WorldWideScience

Sample records for medicine research methods

  1. Nuclear Medicine Technology Undergraduate Research Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Cybil J

    2017-12-22

    Introduction: The purpose of this article is to introduce nuclear medicine technology (NMT) educators to a method of incorporating research methodologies into the curriculum. Methods: The research methodology in the NMT program at Indiana University (IU) is taught in five steps (1. Introduction to research articles and statistics 2. Mock project and individual project design 3. Data collection 4. Writing the research paper 5. Presenting the abstract and mentoring new students). These steps could be combined for programs of shorter length or with credit hour restrictions. Results: All IU NMT students (100%) presented their research abstracts as part of a continuing education program for technologists. Seventeen of twenty-five (68%) presented their abstracts at a regional professional meeting. Six of twenty-five (24%) presented their research abstracts at a national professional meeting. Three of those six (50%) received travel grants. Two students submitted their research for publication and one was successful. Conclusion: The goal of incorporating a research methodology program into the nuclear medicine program should be to introduce undergraduates to the research process and instill excitement for new technologists to continue participation in research throughout their career. Copyright © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  2. [Application of Delphi method in traditional Chinese medicine clinical research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Ying-fei; Mao, Jing-yuan

    2012-03-01

    In recent years, Delphi method has been widely applied in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) clinical research. This article analyzed the present application situation of Delphi method in TCM clinical research, and discussed some problems presented in the choice of evaluation method, classification of observation indexes and selection of survey items. On the basis of present application of Delphi method, the author analyzed the method on questionnaire making, selection of experts, evaluation of observation indexes and selection of survey items. Furthermore, the author summarized the steps of application of Delphi method in TCM clinical research.

  3. Microgrants - a method of facilitating research in emergency medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallas, Peter; Brabrand, Mikkel; Folkestad, Lars

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Microgrants is a novel concept where small grants are used to facilitate research. The concept might have a place in developing emergency medicine research, especially in countries where emergency medicine in not established or in new areas of research. Two examples of the beneficial...... effects of microgrants in emergency medicine research are described. Emergency medicine interest groups and foundations should consider setting up microgrant schemes....

  4. Microfinance as a method of facilitating research in emergency medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallas, Peter; Brabrand, Mikkel; Folkestad, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Microgrants are a novel concept where small grants are used to facilitate research. The concept might have a place in developing emergency medicine research, especially in countries where emergency medicine is not established or in new areas of research. Two examples of the beneficial effects...... of microgrants in emergency medicine research are described. Emergency medicine interest groups and foundations should consider setting up microgrant schemes....

  5. Qualitative research methods in renal medicine: an introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristowe, Katherine; Selman, Lucy; Murtagh, Fliss E M

    2015-09-01

    Qualitative methodologies are becoming increasingly widely used in health research. However, within some specialties, including renal medicine, qualitative approaches remain under-represented in the high-impact factor journals. Qualitative research can be undertaken: (i) as a stand-alone research method, addressing specific research questions; (ii) as part of a mixed methods approach alongside quantitative approaches or (iii) embedded in clinical trials, or during the development of complex interventions. The aim of this paper is to introduce qualitative research, including the rationale for choosing qualitative approaches, and guidance for ensuring quality when undertaking and reporting qualitative research. In addition, we introduce types of qualitative data (observation, interviews and focus groups) as well as some of the most commonly encountered methodological approaches (case studies, ethnography, phenomenology, grounded theory, thematic analysis, framework analysis and content analysis). © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  6. Research methods in complementary and alternative medicine: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida Andrade, Fabiana; Schlechta Portella, Caio Fabio

    2018-01-01

    The scientific literature presents a modest amount of evidence in the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). On the other hand, in practice, relevant results are common. The debates among CAM practitioners about the quality and execution of scientific research are important. Therefore, the aim of this review is to gather, synthesize and describe the differentiated methodological models that encompass the complexity of therapeutic interventions. The process of bringing evidence-based medicine into clinical practice in CAM is essential for the growth and strengthening of complementary medicines worldwide. Copyright © 2017 Shanghai Changhai Hospital. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. [Brief introduction of research methods of commodity specification and grade of Chinese medicinal materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hua-ye; Yan, Pei-pei; Yang, Wen-hua; Li, Chao-feng; Qi, Shu-ya; Li, Yan-qi; Cao, Jun-ling

    2015-02-01

    The commodity specification and grade of Chinese medicinal materials is a measure of the quality of traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs), which directly impacts on the safety and effectiveness of clinical medicines. It is an urgent problem to establish a set of standards which can both interpret the scientific connotation of the commodity specification and grade of Chinese medicinal materials and play a significant role on clinical medicines as well as markets. This paper reviews the research methods of the commodity specification and grade of Chinese medicinal materials such as sensory evaluation, chemical assessment, biological evaluation, and cited the applications of various methods for the classification of TCMs. It provides technical support for establishing standards of the commodity specification and grade of Chinese medicinal materials, and also constructs scientific basis for clinical rational drug use.

  8. Research medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    In Section I of this annual report, a brief summary of work is presented by the Research Medicine Group. The major emphasis has been the study of the blood system in man with a special emphasis on the examination of platelet abnormalities in human disease. New programs of major importance include the study of aging or dementia of the Alzheimer's type. A differential diagnosis technique has been perfected using positron emission tomography. Studies on the biochemical basis of schizophrenia have proceeded using radioisotope studies which image physiological and biochemical processes. In the investigation of atherosclerosis, techniques have been developed to measure blood perfusion of the heart muscle by labelling platelets and lipoproteins. Progress is reported in a new program which uses NMR for both imaging and spectroscopic studies in humans. The group has determined through an epidemiological study that bubble chamber and cyclotron workers who have been exposed to high electromagnetic fields for two decades have no significant increases in the prevalence of 21 diseases as compared with controls

  9. [Applications of mathematical statistics methods on compatibility researches of traditional Chinese medicines formulae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Lan-Yin; Li, Yi-Xuan; Chen, Yong; Xie, Zhen; Li, Jie; Zhong, Ming-Yu

    2014-05-01

    The compatibility of traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) formulae containing enormous information, is a complex component system. Applications of mathematical statistics methods on the compatibility researches of traditional Chinese medicines formulae have great significance for promoting the modernization of traditional Chinese medicines and improving clinical efficacies and optimizations of formulae. As a tool for quantitative analysis, data inference and exploring inherent rules of substances, the mathematical statistics method can be used to reveal the working mechanisms of the compatibility of traditional Chinese medicines formulae in qualitatively and quantitatively. By reviewing studies based on the applications of mathematical statistics methods, this paper were summarized from perspective of dosages optimization, efficacies and changes of chemical components as well as the rules of incompatibility and contraindication of formulae, will provide the references for further studying and revealing the working mechanisms and the connotations of traditional Chinese medicines.

  10. Research medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Highlights of the research effort during 1978 and 1979 include the development and use of a 280-crystal position tomograph; use of 11 C-labeled methionine in studies of heart metabolism and brain metabolism in humans; and studies of the megakaryocytic cell system

  11. Research Designs and Statistical Methods Trends in the Annals of Rehabilitation Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinmo; Yoon, Seihee; Kang, Jung Joong; Han, Kyunghwa; Kim, Jong Moon; Kim, Shin Kyoung

    2017-06-01

    To investigate trends of the research designs and statistical methods in the Annals of Rehabilitation Medicine (ARM) published from 2005 to 2015 through a comparison of articles with the Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (APMR). The authors reviewed all articles published in ARM and APMR for the years 2005 and 2015 in order to determine their research designs as well as their statistical methods used in each article. In ARM, randomized controlled trials increased from 4.5% in 2005 to 6.5% in 2015. In APMR, randomized controlled trials increased from 8.1% in 2005 to 14.0% in 2015, meta-analyses increased to 5.3%, and systematic reviews increased to 6%. The number of studies using statistical methods increased in ARM from 1.9 to 2.6 per article and in APMR, from 2.7 to 3.1. Use of advanced methods in ARM also showed an increase from 2005 to 2015. This study concludes that there is a trend of increased awareness and attempts to use varied research approaches in ARM articles. There should also be more in-depth discussions and opportunities for researchers to share their experiences regarding statistical methods in the clinical field.

  12. Translational research in medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakir Mehić

    2011-05-01

    t continue to be regarded as independent disciplines. Integrated training in translational research methods is needed for clinicians, guideline writers, grant awarding bodies, and policy makers, in order to redress current biases in funding and research publications, in order to reflect better the balance of research efforts which are necessary for better assessment of complex evidence-bases, to integrate effective and sensitive interventions with supporting environmental changes, and to encourage continuous improvement of evidence based public policies.[5]There are three major obstacles to effective translational medicine. The first is the challenge of translating basic science discoveries into clinical studies. The second hurdle is the translation of clinical studies into medical practice and health care policy.[6] A third obstacle to effective translational medicine is also philosophical. It is a fact that the available standard therapies for most common diseases are less efficacious than they are believed by the Public to be and significant funds are allocated to maintain this “placebo” effect through standard care. Proportionately, very little is spent to identify truly effective therapies. Finally, it may be a mistake to think that basic science, without observations from the clinic and without epidemiological findings of possible associations between different noxes and disease, will efficiently produce the novel therapies that we are eager to test.To pursue the promotion of translational research, the Editorial Board strongly supports basic scientific work and such that is a combination of basic research and clinical praxis.

  13. [Research on medical speciality of traditional Chinese medicines using dot-immunoblotting method based on polyclonal antibody prepared from traditional Chinese medicines with hot/cold nature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Houwei; Dou, Yanling; Tian, Jingzhen; Li, Feng; Wang, Shijun; Wang, Zhenguo

    2009-02-01

    To research on the substantial foundation of the medical speciality of Chinese traditional medicines from immunogenicity. Control antigen with hot nature was prepared from the mixture of the aqueous extracts of three Chinese traditional medicines with three typical hot nature of Alpinia officinarum, Cinnamomum cassia and Curculigo orchioides, while that with cold nature prepared with Rheum palmatum, Anemarrhena asphodeloides, Coptis chinensis, and polyclonal antibody was prepared by immunizing rabbit with control antigen. Dot blotting was performed between the polyclonal antibody of control antigen and the aqueous extracts of nine Chinese traditional medicines on a piece of PVDF membrane, and the blotting signals were analyzed by the software of Quantity One. Blotting signals with hot control antigen of nine Chinese traditional medicines in descending were Zingiber officinale, Aconitum carmichaeli, Eucommia ulmoides, Fraxinus rhynchophylla, Lonicera japonica, Anemarrhena asphodeloides, Coptis chinensis, Rheum palmatum and Phellodendron chinense, which degree of similarity to control antigen in peak value were 57.33%, 43.56 %, 34.16%, 30.2%, 28.81%, 26.53%, 21.68%, 17.62% and 14.85%, respectively. Blotting signals with cold control antigen were Rheum palmatum, Anemarrhena asphodeloides, Coptis chinensis, Phellodendron chinense, Zingiber officinale, Lonicera japonica, Fraxinus rhynchophylla, Eucommia ulmoides and Aconitum carmichaeli in descending, of which degree of similarity to cold control antigen in peak value were 55.22%, 54.23%, 46.72%, 34.08%, 30.3%, 24.48%, 24.33%, 20.35% and 15.17%, respectively. Results of cluster analysis with Wistar's method showed that nine medicines were classified into two groups, one group included Phellodendron chinense, Anemarrhena asphodeloides, Coptis chinensis, Rheum palmatum, another was Zingiber officinale, Aconitum carmichaeli, Eucommia ulmoides, Fraxinus rhynchophylla, Lonicera japonica. Blotting signals of nine medicines

  14. A method for research programming in the field of evidence-based medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vet, H C; Kroese, M E; Scholten, R J; Bouter, L M

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This paper presents the method we used in programming research on the efficacy of therapeutic interventions for nine chronic benign pain disorders. METHODS: We started with an inventory to identify commonly applied interventions. For these interventions we searched the literature to

  15. A method for research programming in the field of evidence-based medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vet, H.C.W.; Kroese, M.E.A.L.; Scholten, R.J.P.M.; Bouter, L.M.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: This paper presents the method we used in programming research on the efficacy of therapeutic interventions for nine chronic benign pain disorders. Methods: We started with an inventory to identify commonly applied interventions. For these interventions we searched the literature to

  16. A method for research programming in the field of evidence-based medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vet, H. C.; Kroese, M. E.; Scholten, R. J.; Bouter, L. M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the method we used in programming research on the efficacy of therapeutic interventions for nine chronic benign pain disorders. We started with an inventory to identify commonly applied interventions. For these interventions we searched the literature to identify gaps in

  17. [Strengthen researches on translational medicine and regenerative medicine in burns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yue-sheng

    2010-06-01

    Translational medicine and regenerative medicine are presently the hottest areas in medical research. Translational medicine is regarded as a two-way model of medical research, i.e. bench to bedside and bedside to bench. The purpose of translational research is to test novel therapeutic strategies developed through experimentation in human beings, and to facilitate the transformation of findings resulting from basic research to clinical practice. Regenerative medicine is to search for effective biotherapy methods to promote self repair and regeneration; or to construct new tissues and organs to improve or restore the function of the injured tissues and organs. To strengthen researches on translational medicine and regenerative medicine in burns may promote the application of new clinical therapeutic strategies, and supply effective therapeutic measures for treatment of severe burns.

  18. [Research progress on standardization study of NIR spectroscopy based method for quality control of traditional Chinese medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Long; Qu, Hai-Bin

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, the near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy has gained wide acceptance within the quantitative analysis of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). However, the lack of technical standards is the bottleneck problem in this process. To address this issue, standardization study of the NIR spectroscopy based method for the quantitative analysis of TCM is needed, in which the specific characteristics of TCM should be given full considerations. The main research contents include:the scope definition for the application of NIR spectroscopy in the TCM quantitative analysis field, the selection criteria for the sample pretreatment and spectral acquisition conditions, the rules for the model optimization and evaluation, and the regulations for the model update and transfer. In this paper, some foreign studies in the agricultural areas are reviewed for reference. Different chemometrics methods reported in the literature are investigated and compared systematically. This research is important actual significance to the theoretical development of NIR spectroscopy analytical techniques, and will effectively promote the application of the technology in the TCM industry. Furthermore, it is beneficial to improve the technical level of TCM quality control, and can also be used as references to achieve similar purposes for other natural products. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  19. The method of quality marker research and quality evaluation of traditional Chinese medicine based on drug properties and effect characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tiejun; Bai, Gang; Han, Yanqi; Xu, Jun; Gong, Suxiao; Li, Yazhuo; Zhang, Hongbing; Liu, Changxiao

    2018-03-01

    Quality of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) plays a critical role in industry of TCM. Rapid development of TCM pharmaceutical areas is, however, greatly limited, since there are many issues not been resolved, concerning the quality study of TCM. Core concept of TCM quality as well as the characteristics of TCM was discussed, in order to guide the quality research and evaluation of TCM, further improve the level of TCM quality control. In this review, on the basis of systematic analysis of fundamental property and features of TCM in clinical application, the approaches and methods of quality marker (Q-marker) study were proposed through combination of transitivity and traceability of essentials of quality, correlation between chemical ingredients and drug property/efficacy, as well as analysis of endemicity of ingredients sharing similar pharmacophylogenetic and biosynthetic approaches. The approaches and methods of Q-marker study were proposed and the novel integrated pattern for quality assessment and control of TCM was established. The core concept of Q-marker has helped to break through the bottleneck of the current fragmented quality research of TCM and improved the scientificity, integrity and systematicness of quality control. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Nuclear medicine and imaging research. Instrumentation and quantitative methods of evaluation. Progress report, January 15, 1985-January 14, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, R.N.; Cooper, M.D.

    1985-09-01

    This program of research addresses problems involving the basic science and technology of radioactive tracer methods as they relate to nuclear medicine and imaging. The broad goal is to develop new instruments and methods for image formation, processing, quantitation, and display, so as to maximize the diagnostic information per unit of absorbed radiation dose to the patient. These developments are designed to meet the needs imposed by new radiopharmaceuticals developed to solve specific biomedical problems, as well as to meet the instrumentation needs associated with radiopharmaceutical production and quantitative clinical feasibility studies of the brain with PET VI. Project I addresses problems associated with the quantitative imaging of single-photon emitters; Project II addresses similar problems associated with the quantitative imaging of positron emitters; Project III addresses methodological problems associated with the quantitative evaluation of the efficacy of diagnostic imaging procedures. The original proposal covered work to be carried out over the three-year contract period. This report covers progress made during Year Three. 36 refs., 1 tab

  1. Clinical research priorities in emergency medicine: results of a consensus meeting and development of a weighting method for assessment of clinical research priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, Ogilvie; Keijzers, Gerben; Davies, Suzanne; McD Taylor, David; Knott, Jonathan; Middleton, Paul M

    2014-02-01

    There is limited evidence regarding clinical research priorities in emergency medicine outside of some special interest groups. The ACEM Clinical Trials Group undertook a consensus meeting with the aim of developing a reproducible weighting matrix for assessing clinical research priorities. A session at the ACEM annual scientific meeting was dedicated to this meeting. Results from a survey of the ACEM researcher database were presented, along with a proposed weighting matrix. After discussion and adjustment, consensus was achieved on the matrix. It was agreed that the following criteria be used in the matrix: research category and sub-category priority ranking from the ACEM researcher database survey, frequency of presentation of potentially eligible participants, the level of pre-existing evidence regarding the proposed research question and the likely clinical impact of the research. Each criterion was given a weighting, with clinical impact given the heaviest weighting. The weighting matrix was subsequently applied to the list of research questions that resulted from the researcher database survey and a list of research priorities determined. The weighting matrix allows reproducible comparison of research questions. The resultant list of research priorities will act as a guide for the ACEM Clinical Trials Group in determining future projects. © 2014 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  2. Nuclear medicine and imaging research. Instrumentation and quantitative methods of evaluation. Progress report, January 15, 1984-January 14, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, R.N.; Cooper, M.D.

    1984-09-01

    This program addresses problems involving the basic science and technology of radioactive tracer methods as they relate to nuclear medicine and imaging. The broad goal is to develop new instruments and methods for image formation, processing, quantitation and display, so as to maximize the diagnostic information per unit of absorbed radiation dose to the patient. Project I addresses problems associated with the quantitative imaging of single-photon emitters; Project II addresses similar problems associated with the quantitative imaging of positron emitters; Project III addresses methodological problems associated with the quantitative evaluation of the efficacy of diagnostic imaging procedures

  3. Qualitative Research on Emergency Medicine Physicians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paltved, Charlotte; Musaeus, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Aim: This study aims to systematically review the qualitative research studying Emergency Medicine (EM) physicians in Emergency Departments (ED). Background: Qualitative research aims to study complex social phenomena. EM is a highly complex medical and social environment that can be investigated...... with qualitative research. Methods: Electronic databases of English peer-reviewed articles were searched from 1971 to 2012 using Medline through PubMed and PsychINFO. This search was supplemented with hand-searches of Academic Emergency Medicine and Emergency Medicine Journal from 1999 to 2012 and cross references...... and training, communication, professional roles, and organizational factors, and into 12 sub-themes. Conclusion: The strength of qualitative research is its ability to grasp and operationalize complex relations within EM. Although qualitative research methodologies have gained in rigour in recent years and few...

  4. IDENTIFYING CONCERNS OF POSTGRADUATES IN COMMUNITY MEDICINE USING A QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHOD- VISUALISATION IN PARTICIPATORY PROGRAMMES (VIPP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Babu Koganti

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Postgraduation in Community Medicine finds few takers and those who do take it up as a career option have many concerns regarding the course. To understand the issues involved, a qualitative method called VIPP was used, which is a people centered approach to identify issues from the perspectives of those involved. This study is set to identify the problems faced by postgraduate students in Community Medicine regarding their course of study. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study was conducted during a regional postgraduate CME of the NTR University of Health Sciences, Andhra Pradesh. Postgraduates and junior faculty from 5 medical colleges in the region were involved in the exercise after taking their informed consent. Visualisation in Participatory Programmes (VIPP, a qualitative method was used as a means of obtaining information followed by a discussion with visual display of all the mentioned items. RESULTS The themes that emerged are problems faced due to the student’s felt inadequacies, faculty shortcomings, issues regarding the department/college management and lacunae in the course structure and implementation. CONCLUSION In VIPP, sensitive issues are visually displayed for all to see and contemplate. Many of the student’s issues were actually brought on by poor curriculum planning and implementation. This was also undermining students’ self-esteem and causing anxiety about future career prospects.

  5. [Problems in medicinal materials research of new traditional Chinese medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Gang; Wang, Ting; He, Yan-Ping

    2014-08-01

    Medicinal materials research and development of new drug of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) research is the premise and foundation of new drug research and development, it throughout the whole process of new drug research. Medicinal materials research is one of the main content of the pharmaceutical research of new drug of TCM, and it is also the focus of the new medicine pharmaceutical evaluation content. This article through the analysis of the present problems existing in the development of TCM research of new drug of TCM, from medicine research concept, quality stability, quality standard, etc are expounded, including medicine research idea value medicine study should focus on the important role and from the purpose for the top-level design of new drug research problem. Medicinal materials quality stability should pay attention to the original, medicinal part, origin, processing, storage, planting (breeding), and other aspects. Aspect of quality standard of medicinal materials should pay attention to establish the quality standards of conform to the characteristics of new drug of TCM. As the instruction of TCM new drug research and development and the scientific nature of the review, and provide the basis for medicinal material standards.

  6. Research Productivity of Sports Medicine Fellowship Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetanovich, Gregory L.; Saltzman, Bryan M.; Chalmers, Peter N.; Frank, Rachel M.; Cole, Brian J.; Bach, Bernard R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Research productivity is considered an important factor in academic advancement in sports medicine. No study to date has evaluated academic productivity and correlates of academic rank for sports medicine fellowship faculty. Purpose: To describe the academic productivity of American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) fellowship program faculty and to determine the association between academic productivity, fellowship characteristics, and academic rank. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods: Characteristics of orthopaedic sports medicine fellowship programs were obtained from the AOSSM and program websites. Metrics of academic productivity (Hirsch index [h index], I-10 index, publications, citations, and number of publications in several journals) were obtained from Scopus. Statistical analyses were conducted to determine whether academic productivity differs with fellowship attributes and academic rank. Results: A total of 90 AOSSM sports medicine fellowship programs with 610 associated faculty members were identified. Faculty were predominantly male (94%), at academic medical centers (74%), members of AOSSM (71%), and sports medicine–fellowship trained (84%). Faculty had a median of 18 (range, 0-684) publications overall, including a median of 3 (range, 0-161) publications since 2012. All measures of academic productivity were significantly higher among faculty employed at academic medical centers compared with those not employed at academic centers (P Sports Medicine and Arthroscopy per faculty member (P sports medicine fellowship faculty. Research productivity was higher among faculty employed at academic centers in the Northeast and Midwest regions and at programs with a larger number of fellows. PMID:28210650

  7. Introduction of nuclear medicine research in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inubushi, Masayuki [Kawasaki Medical School, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan); Higashi, Tatsuya [National Institutes of Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba, Chiba (Japan); Kuji, Ichiei [Saitama Medical University International Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hidaka-shi, Saitama (Japan); Sakamoto, Setsu [Dokkyo University School of Medicine, PET Center, Mibu, Tochigi (Japan); Tashiro, Manabu [Tohoku University, Division of Cyclotron Nuclear Medicine, Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan); Momose, Mitsuru [Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-12-15

    There were many interesting presentations of unique studies at the Annual Meeting of the Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine, although there were fewer attendees from Europe than expected. These presentations included research on diseases that are more frequent in Japan and Asia than in Europe, synthesis of original radiopharmaceuticals, and development of imaging devices and methods with novel ideas especially by Japanese manufacturers. In this review, we introduce recent nuclear medicine research conducted in Japan in the five categories of Oncology, Neurology, Cardiology, Radiopharmaceuticals and Technology. It is our hope that this article will encourage the participation of researchers from all over the world, in particular from Europe, in scientific meetings on nuclear medicine held in Japan. (orig.)

  8. Introduction of nuclear medicine research in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inubushi, Masayuki; Higashi, Tatsuya; Kuji, Ichiei; Sakamoto, Setsu; Tashiro, Manabu; Momose, Mitsuru

    2016-12-01

    There were many interesting presentations of unique studies at the Annual Meeting of the Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine, although there were fewer attendees from Europe than expected. These presentations included research on diseases that are more frequent in Japan and Asia than in Europe, synthesis of original radiopharmaceuticals, and development of imaging devices and methods with novel ideas especially by Japanese manufacturers. In this review, we introduce recent nuclear medicine research conducted in Japan in the five categories of Oncology, Neurology, Cardiology, Radiopharmaceuticals and Technology. It is our hope that this article will encourage the participation of researchers from all over the world, in particular from Europe, in scientific meetings on nuclear medicine held in Japan.

  9. Researching complementary and alternative medicine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adams, Jon

    2007-01-01

    ... the investigation of CAM. Contributors draw upon their own CAM research work and experience to explain and review a range of methods and research issues pertinent to the contemporary of CAM and its future development, such as: field * * * * * the issues facing practitioners who wish to conduct research; how and why qualitative methods should...

  10. Archives: Journal of Medicine and Biomedical Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 19 of 19 ... Archives: Journal of Medicine and Biomedical Research. Journal Home > Archives: Journal of Medicine and Biomedical Research. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  11. Research Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    WasI* Ion Headquarters Services. Directorate for Information Operations anc: 1fngton, VA 22202-4302, and to the Office of Management and Budget...Post . associate editors. Jeffrey D. Orossman and Jan Walravsn. 0. ca. -- (Defense research series ; v. 31 "Publisheb in cooperat ion with NATO...In S.S. Williamson, M. Hoke, G. Stroink, & M. Kotani (Eds.), Advances in biomagnetism . New York: Plenum. Lewis, G.W., Trejo, L.J., Nunez, P

  12. [Research and analysis to Shui nationality medicine treatment orthopedics & traumatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jian-Shan; Li, Pu; Yang, Yong; Chen, Xin-Chun; Lin, Li

    2013-05-01

    To investigated Shui nationality folk medicine's awareness to orthopedics & traumatology, the history of orthopedics & traumatology treatment, Shui nationality folk doctors' practicing medicine, heritage, diagnosis and treatment methods and tools, etc, through investigated drug resources category and distribution characteristics of Shui nationality medicine to orthopedics & traumatology treatment, explored and finished Shui nationality medicine orthopedics & traumatology treatment theoretical system. After more than 5 years' exploration and finishing, preliminarily formed the theoretical system framework and medicine application characteristics of Shui nationality medicine treating orthopedics & traumatology. Shui nationality medicine treatment orthopedics & traumatology has distinctive national style, and worthy to further exploration and research.

  13. Crowdfunding for Personalized Medicine Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumagalli, Danielle C; Gouw, Arvin M

    2015-12-01

    Given the current funding situation of the National Institutes of Health, getting funding for rare disease research is extremely difficult. In light of the enormous potential for research in the rare diseases and the scarcity of research funding, we provide a case study of a novel successful crowdfunding approach at a non-profit organization called Rare Genomics Institute. We partner with biotechnology companies willing to donate their products, such as mouse models, gene editing software, and sequencing services, for which researchers can apply. First, we find that personal stories can be powerful tools to seek funding from sympathetic donors who do not have the same rational considerations of impact and profit. Second, for foundations facing funding restrictions, company donations can be a valuable tool in addition to crowdfunding. Third, rare disease research is particularly rewarding for scientists as they proceed to be pioneers in the field during their academic careers. Overall, by connecting donors, foundations, researchers, and patients, crowdfunding has become a powerful alternative funding mechanism for personalized medicine.

  14. Nuclear medicine and image research: instrumentation and quantitative methods of evaluation. Comprehensive 3-year progress report, January 15, 1983-January 14, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, R.N.; Cooper, M.D.

    1985-09-01

    This program of research addresses problems involving the basic science and technology of radioactive tracer methods as they relate to nuclear medicine and imaging. The broad goal is to develop new instruments and methods for image formation, processing, quantitation, and display, so as to maximize the diagnostic information per unit of absorbed radiation dose to the patient. Project I addresses problems with the quantitative imaging a single-photon emitters; Project II addresses similar problems associated with the quantitative imaging of positron emitters; Project III addresses methodological problems associated with the quantitative evaluation of the efficacy of diagnostic imaging procedures

  15. Nuclear medicine and imaging research: instrumentation and quantitative methods of evaluation. Comprehensive progress report, January 1, 1980-January 14, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, R.N.; Cooper, M.C.

    1982-07-01

    Progress is reported for the period January 1980 through January 1983 in the following project areas: (1) imaging systems in nuclear medicine and image evaluation; and (2) methodology for quantitative evaluation of diagnostic performance

  16. Concept mapping in palliative medicine research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Carmen Wing Han; Choi, Kai Chow; So, Winnie Kwok Wei; Chan, Helen Yue Lai

    2012-07-01

    Palliative care adopts a share care model that emphasizes the collaboration among patients, families, and health care providers. Different views and different priority of care are often reported. Concept mapping is a research methodology that can best obtain a big picture as well as a clustering of sub-themes that are identified by different parties involved in palliative care. Concept mapping adopts qualitative method to identify themes, and then uses quantitative techniques such as multidimensional scaling to create a map that shows the patterns of relationships between themes. The method draws the shared expertise of a studied group by constructing graphic models of an issue in palliative medicine examined by the group. This paper will introduce the approach of concept mapping and its use in palliative medicine research. Issues such as sample size calculation and validity and reliability will be discussed.

  17. Statistical Methods in Translational Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shein-Chung Chow

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on strategies and statistical considerations for assessment of translation in language (e.g. translation of case report forms in multinational clinical trials, information (e.g. translation of basic discoveries to the clinic and technology (e.g. translation of Chinese diagnostic techniques to well-established clinical study endpoints in pharmaceutical/clinical research and development. However, most of our efforts will be directed to statistical considerations for translation in information. Translational medicine has been defined as bench-to-bedside research, where a basic laboratory discovery becomes applicable to the diagnosis, treatment or prevention of a specific disease, and is brought forth by either a physician—scientist who works at the interface between the research laboratory and patient care, or by a team of basic and clinical science investigators. Statistics plays an important role in translational medicine to ensure that the translational process is accurate and reliable with certain statistical assurance. Statistical inference for the applicability of an animal model to a human model is also discussed. Strategies for selection of clinical study endpoints (e.g. absolute changes, relative changes, or responder-defined, based on either absolute or relative change are reviewed.

  18. [Research on Prevention and Treatment of Cardiovascular Disease by Translational Medicine Based Chinese Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shi-chao; Zhang, Jun-ping

    2015-05-01

    Translational medicine is inevitable in the development of modern medicine, and the uprising concept of translational medicine provides an opportunity for the development of Chinese medicine (CM). Their ideas are well communicated. There are two patterns of researching on CM based on translational medicine: 'literature to bench to bedside' and 'bench to bedside to bench'. CM has her advantages in preventing and treating cardiovascular disease. Effective methods for preventing and treating cardiovascular disease by CM should be further studied based on translational medicine concepts.

  19. Research on constitution of Chinese medicine and implementation of translational medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ji; Wang, Ting; Li, Ying-shuai; Zheng, Yan-fei; Li, Ling-ru; Wang, Qi

    2015-05-01

    Translational medicine is a new concept presented in recent decades, the core of which is to build a bridge between basic medical research and clinical application. From the beginning of constitution of Chinese medicine, clinical application has been given priority. Therefore, the idea of translational medicine is fully demonstrated in the research into the three key scientific problems of "classification of constitution of Chinese medicine", "relationship between constitution and disease" and "adjustment of constitution". Under its guidance, not only was the systematic theory of constitution of Chinese medicine established, but also the Constitution of Chinese Medicine Scale and the Standards of Classification and determination of Constitution of Chinese Medicine were developed, which translates methods of classifying the nine constitutional types into guidance for prevention of disease, management of health and clinical application. The research findings of constitution of Chinese medicine have been applied in clinical practice and public health, establishing the diagnosis and treatment model of constitution-disease-syndrome differentiation. The nationwide application of constitution differentiation has shown good effect. In the future, constitution of Chinese medicine should strengthen the evidence-based research and multi-disciplinary cooperation, and establish a research team on comprehensive constitution of Chinese medicine and translational medicine, to translate the findings into clinical practice and public health more accurately and quickly.

  20. Nuclear medicine. Medical technology research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerch, H.; Jigalin, A.

    2005-01-01

    Aim, method: the scientific publications in the 2003 and 2004 issues of the journal Nuklearmedizin were analyzed retrospectively with regard to the proportion of medical technology research. Results: out of a total of 73 articles examined, 9 (12%) were classified as medical technology research, that is, 8/15 of the original papers (16%) and one of the case reports (5%). Of these 9 articles, 44% (4/9) focused on the combination of molecular and morphological imaging with direct technical appliance or information technology solutions. Conclusion: medical technology research is limited in the journal's catchment area. The reason for this is related to the interdependency between divergent development dynamics in the medical technology industry's locations, the many years that the area of scintigraphic technology has been underrepresented, research policy particularly in discrepancies in the promotion of molecular imaging and a policy in which health is not perceived as a predominantly good and positive economic factor, but more as a curb to economic development. (orig.)

  1. Topics of nuclear medicine research in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inubushi, Masayuki; Kaneta, Tomohiro; Ishimori, Takayoshi; Imabayashi, Etsuko; Okizaki, Atsutaka; Oku, Naohiko

    2017-10-01

    Last year in the European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, we introduced some recent nuclear medicine research conducted in Japan. This was favorably received by European readers in the main. This year we wish to focus on the Annals of Nuclear Medicine on some of the fine nuclear medicine research work executed in Europe recently. In the current review article, we take up five topics: prostate-specific membrane antigen imaging, recent advances in radionuclide therapy, [ 18 F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography (PET) for dementia, quantitative PET assessment of myocardial perfusion, and iodine-124 ( 124 I). Just at the most recent annual meeting of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine 2016, Kyoto was selected as the host city for the 2022 Congress of the World Federation of Nuclear Medicine and Biology. We hope that our continuous efforts to strengthen scientific cooperation between Europe and Japan will bring many European friends and a great success to the Kyoto meeting.

  2. Research Productivity of Sports Medicine Fellowship Faculty

    OpenAIRE

    Cvetanovich, Gregory L.; Saltzman, Bryan M.; Chalmers, Peter N.; Frank, Rachel M.; Cole, Brian J.; Bach, Bernard R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Research productivity is considered an important factor in academic advancement in sports medicine. No study to date has evaluated academic productivity and correlates of academic rank for sports medicine fellowship faculty. Purpose: To describe the academic productivity of American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) fellowship program faculty and to determine the association between academic productivity, fellowship characteristics, and academic rank. Study Design: D...

  3. Systems Biology Methods for Alzheimer's Disease Research Toward Molecular Signatures, Subtypes, and Stages and Precision Medicine: Application in Cohort Studies and Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castrillo, Juan I; Lista, Simone; Hampel, Harald; Ritchie, Craig W

    2018-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a complex multifactorial disease, involving a combination of genomic, interactome, and environmental factors, with essential participation of (a) intrinsic genomic susceptibility and (b) a constant dynamic interplay between impaired pathways and central homeostatic networks of nerve cells. The proper investigation of the complexity of AD requires new holistic systems-level approaches, at both the experimental and computational level. Systems biology methods offer the potential to unveil new fundamental insights, basic mechanisms, and networks and their interplay. These may lead to the characterization of mechanism-based molecular signatures, and AD hallmarks at the earliest molecular and cellular levels (and beyond), for characterization of AD subtypes and stages, toward targeted interventions according to the evolving precision medicine paradigm. In this work, an update on advanced systems biology methods and strategies for holistic studies of multifactorial diseases-particularly AD-is presented. This includes next-generation genomics, neuroimaging and multi-omics methods, experimental and computational approaches, relevant disease models, and latest genome editing and single-cell technologies. Their progressive incorporation into basic research, cohort studies, and trials is beginning to provide novel insights into AD essential mechanisms, molecular signatures, and markers toward mechanism-based classification and staging, and tailored interventions. Selected methods which can be applied in cohort studies and trials, with the European Prevention of Alzheimer's Dementia (EPAD) project as a reference example, are presented and discussed.

  4. Research data services in veterinary medicine libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin E. Kerby, MSI

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Lacking a standard definition of ‘‘research data’’ and a common understanding of precisely what research data services encompass, it is difficult for veterinary medicine librarians and libraries to define and understand their roles in research data services. Nonetheless, they appear to have an interest in learning more about and providing research data services.

  5. Mixed methods research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halcomb, Elizabeth; Hickman, Louise

    2015-04-08

    Mixed methods research involves the use of qualitative and quantitative data in a single research project. It represents an alternative methodological approach, combining qualitative and quantitative research approaches, which enables nurse researchers to explore complex phenomena in detail. This article provides a practical overview of mixed methods research and its application in nursing, to guide the novice researcher considering a mixed methods research project.

  6. Recent trends in medicinal plants research

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shyur, Lie-fen; Lau, Allan S.Y

    2012-01-01

    .... One type of research explores the value of medicinal plants as traditionally used and studies of these plants have the potential to determine which plants are most potent, optimize dosages and dose...

  7. International Journal of Medicine and Biomedical Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    International Journal of Medicine and Biomedical Research. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 5, No 3 (2016) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  8. Research data services in veterinary medicine libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerby, Erin E

    2016-10-01

    The study investigated veterinary medicine librarians' experience with and perceptions of research data services. Many academic libraries have begun to offer research data services in response to researchers' increased need for data management support. To date, such services have typically been generic, rather than discipline-specific, to appeal to a wide variety of researchers. An online survey was deployed to identify trends regarding research data services in veterinary medicine libraries. Participants were identified from a list of contacts from the MLA Veterinary Medical Libraries Section. Although many respondents indicated that they have a professional interest in research data services, the majority of veterinary medicine librarians only rarely or occasionally provide data management support as part of their regular job responsibilities. There was little consensus as to whether research data services should be core to a library's mission despite their perceived importance to the advancement of veterinary research. Furthermore, most respondents stated that research data services are just as or somewhat less important than the other services that they provide and feel only slightly or somewhat prepared to offer such services. Lacking a standard definition of "research data" and a common understanding of precisely what research data services encompass, it is difficult for veterinary medicine librarians and libraries to define and understand their roles in research data services. Nonetheless, they appear to have an interest in learning more about and providing research data services.

  9. Barriers to Herbal Medicine Research in Nigeria; Researcher's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents the barriers to herbal medicine research in Nigeria. This is with a view to formulating appropriate strategies that would be deployed to overcome the identified barriers to herbal medicine research. The paper therefore identified and discussed some of these inherent barriers such as the standardization of ...

  10. Research Productivity of Sports Medicine Fellowship Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetanovich, Gregory L; Saltzman, Bryan M; Chalmers, Peter N; Frank, Rachel M; Cole, Brian J; Bach, Bernard R

    2016-12-01

    Research productivity is considered an important factor in academic advancement in sports medicine. No study to date has evaluated academic productivity and correlates of academic rank for sports medicine fellowship faculty. To describe the academic productivity of American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) fellowship program faculty and to determine the association between academic productivity, fellowship characteristics, and academic rank. Descriptive epidemiology study. Characteristics of orthopaedic sports medicine fellowship programs were obtained from the AOSSM and program websites. Metrics of academic productivity (Hirsch index [ h index], I-10 index, publications, citations, and number of publications in several journals) were obtained from Scopus. Statistical analyses were conducted to determine whether academic productivity differs with fellowship attributes and academic rank. A total of 90 AOSSM sports medicine fellowship programs with 610 associated faculty members were identified. Faculty were predominantly male (94%), at academic medical centers (74%), members of AOSSM (71%), and sports medicine-fellowship trained (84%). Faculty had a median of 18 (range, 0-684) publications overall, including a median of 3 (range, 0-161) publications since 2012. All measures of academic productivity were significantly higher among faculty employed at academic medical centers compared with those not employed at academic centers ( P Sports Medicine and Arthroscopy per faculty member ( P sports medicine fellowship faculty. Research productivity was higher among faculty employed at academic centers in the Northeast and Midwest regions and at programs with a larger number of fellows.

  11. Journal of Medicine and Biomedical Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Journal of Medicine and Biomedical Research is published by the College of Medical Sciences, University of Benin to encourage research into primary health care. The journal will publish original research articles, reviews, editorials, commentaries, case reports and letters to the editor. Articles are welcome in all ...

  12. Clinical research priorities in emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keijzers, Gerben; Thom, Ogilvie; Taylor, David; Knott, Jonathan; Taylor, David McD

    2014-02-01

    To determine the clinical research priorities of Fellows of the Australasian College for Emergency Medicine (ACEM) in order to inform the strategic research agenda specific to multicentre clinical research. An anonymous survey of all ACEM Fellows (FACEMs) listed on the ACEM researcher database was conducted between January and March 2013. Of 108 FACEMs invited to participate, 54 (50%) responded. Over half of respondents (61%) had a higher research degree but only a minority (24%) had funded research positions. The top research categories identified as priorities were resuscitation, trauma, cardiology, ED ultrasound, acute behavioural disturbance and geriatrics. The most common specific sub-categories included anterior chest pain, fluid resuscitation in trauma, and drug therapy for both atrial fibrillation and acute behavioural disturbance. Several specific research questions related to chest pain, resuscitation/sepsis, stroke, paediatrics and pulmonary embolus. The findings provide guidance and support for research areas amenable to collaborative multicentre clinical research within emergency medicine. Discussion rounds are planned to translate these perceived research priorities to actual priorities. © 2013 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  13. The Ethics of Sports Medicine Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Robert J; Reider, Bruce

    2016-04-01

    This article explores the background and foundations of ethics in research. Some important documents and codes are mentioned, such as The Belmont Report and the International Conference of Harmonisation. Some influential historical events involving research ethics are recounted. The article provides a detailed discussion of the Declaration of Helsinki, which is considered the international standard for guidelines in medical research ethics. The most salient features of the Declaration are described and related to orthopaedic surgery and sports medicine. Some of the most controversial aspects of the Declaration are discussed, which helps examine contentious areas of research in sports medicine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. International Journal of Medicine and Biomedical Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The International Journal of Medicine and Biomedical Research (IJMBR) is a peer-reviewed scholarly journal by Michael Joanna Publications. It publishes data and information, useful to researchers in all aspects of Clinical and Basic Medical Sciences including Anatomical Sciences, Biochemistry, Dentistry, Genetics, ...

  15. Nuclear medicine. Nuclear medicine in research and practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, H.A.E. (Evangelisches Krankenhaus Bethesda, Duisburg (Germany). Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik); Hoefer, R. (Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Vienna (Austria). 2. Abt. fuer Innere Medizin) (eds.)

    1992-01-01

    The present book contains the papers presented at the 4th Congress of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine. The main headings were as follows: Methods and basics including instrumentation, computers and data analysis, RIA, radiopharmaceuticals, hermatology, and inflammation (76 papers), cardiology (21 papers), neurology (20 papers), pulmonology (6 papers), gastroenterology (10 papers), nephrology (17 papers), osteology (5 papers), endocrinology (6 papers), pediatrics (8 papers), oncology (16 papers) as well as therapy (10 papers). (MG) With 224 figs., 150 tabs.

  16. Consumer Behavior Research Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chrysochou, Polymeros

    2017-01-01

    This chapter starts by distinguishing consumer behavior research methods based on the type of data used, being either secondary or primary. Most consumer behavior research studies phenomena that require researchers to enter the field and collect data on their own, and therefore the chapter...... of the methods and how to improve quality in consumer behavior research methods....

  17. Information for nuclear medicine researchers and practitioners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlett, W.

    1987-01-01

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) has a major research program in nuclear medicine; this article describes the information support given to the program by the Lucas Heights Research Laboratories (LHRL) Library. The INIS database is a prime indicator of the information held at LHRL Library, however, other databases also cover nuclear medicine. As part of the Australian library system the ANSTO Library's resources are accessed by subscription. The ANSTO Library staff can also search INIS for a fee for external enquiries but the other databases can presently only be searched for LHRL staff and affiliates. Even so, most major library and information services can provide access to these databases

  18. Nuclear methods in environmental and energy research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogt, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    A total of 75 papers were presented on nuclear methods for analysis of environmental and biological samples. Sessions were devoted to software and mathematical methods; nuclear methods in atmospheric and water research; nuclear and atomic methodology; nuclear methods in biology and medicine; and nuclear methods in energy research

  19. Nuclear methods in environmental and energy research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, J R [ed.

    1980-01-01

    A total of 75 papers were presented on nuclear methods for analysis of environmental and biological samples. Sessions were devoted to software and mathematical methods; nuclear methods in atmospheric and water research; nuclear and atomic methodology; nuclear methods in biology and medicine; and nuclear methods in energy research.

  20. Survey of Chinese Medicine Students to Determine Research and Evidence Based Medicine Perspectives at Pacific College of Oriental Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Belinda J.; Kligler, Benjamin; Cohen, Hillel W.; Marantz, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    Context Research literacy and the practice of evidence based medicine (EBM) are important initiatives in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), which requires cultural change within educational institutions for successful implementation. Objective To determine the self-assessed research and EBM perspectives of Chinese medicine Masters degree students at Pacific College of Oriental Medicine, New York campus (PCOM-NY). Design and Methods A survey with seventeen close-ended questions and one open-ended question was administered through Survey Monkey to students at PCOM-NY. Results The survey was sent to 420 Masters students and 176 (41.9%) responded. Students in all 4 years of the Masters degree indicated a generally high degree interest in, and support for the value of research. However increasing years (1 – 4) in the program was associated with lower interest post-graduation in research participation and entering the doctoral program, and 4th year students reported low levels of interest in having greater research content and training in their Masters degree programs. Students who responded to the open-ended question (23% of respondents) expressed enthusiasm for research and concerns about the relevance of research to Chinese medicine. Conclusions Consistent with findings in similar studies at CAM colleges, interest in research and EBM of the PCOM-NY Masters students appeared to decline with increasing years in the program. Concerns around paradigm and epistemological issues associated with research and EBM among Chinese medicine students and practitioners warrants further investigation, and may be an important challenge for integrative medicine. PMID:27473310

  1. Molecular methods in nuclear medicine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyung Han

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear medicine has traditionally contributed to molecular oncology by allowing noninvasive monitoring of tumor metabolism, growth and genetic changes, thereby providing a basis for appropriate biology-based treatment planning. However, NM techniques are now being applied as an active therapeutic tool in novel molecular approaches for cancer treatment. Such areas include research on cancer therapy with radiolabeled ligands or oligonucleotides, and utilization of synergism between NM radiotherapy and gene transfer techniques. Here we will focus on novel aspects of nuclear medicine therapy

  2. RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT INTO HERBAL MEDICINES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recent advances in the Research and development of Herbal Medicines are highlighted and a scheme for R & D work is presented. The need for adequate information (chemical, biological, botanical and so on) on local plants is highlighted. There is also the need to standardize the herbal product, prepare it in an ...

  3. Chinese herbal medicine research in eczema treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leung Ping

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Eczema is a chronic relapsing atopic dermatitis (AD associated with pruritus, sleep disturbance and poor quality of life of the patient. Treatment of eczema includes use of emollient, topical and systemic antimicrobial agents, corticosteroid or immunomodulating agents. Many patients also seek alternative treatments such as dietary avoidance, supplementation or both. This article reviews the basic pathophysiology of eczema and clinical trials involving Chinese medicine in the treatment of eczema. Research reports on Chinese herbal medicine for eczema were retrieved from PubMed and the Cochrane Database for Systematic Reviews for this review. Only a few RCTs demonstrated the efficacy (or lack of efficacy of Chinese medicinal herbs in treating atopic eczema. Further larger scale trials are warranted.

  4. The application of nuclear-medicine methods in veterinary medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpraga, M.; Kraljevic, P.; Dodig, D.

    1996-01-01

    X-radiography and ultrasound imaging are well established and widely used in veterinary practice, but it is not the same situation with radioisotope imaging. In veterinary practice the above mentioned methods of nuclear medicine are developed only in two countries in Europe. That is not doubt due, so bar, to the difficulties in obtaining satisfactory supply of radioisotopes and to the relatively high cost of scanning equipment. However, in collaboration with the Department of Radiation Protection and Nuclear Medicine of the Medical Faculty in Zagreb, Croatia, we have chance to develop the use of those methods in clinical veterinary practice in Zagreb. That is way in this paper an overview of the application of radioisotopes imaging in veterinary medicine is given. In small animals skeletal changes, lung perusions, brain lesions, space occupying lesions in the liver and its function and hearth function can be usefully searched by a gamma camera and its associated computer. In equine practice scintigraphy of bones, liver, hearth, pulmonary circulation and ventilation is described. The largest amount of radioactive material is used during gamma camera scanning of the skeletons of horses. In this cases the radiation dose 1-2 m from the animal is approximately 3 μSv/h. That is why the protection of personal involved in radioisotope scanning in veterinary medicine must be also regulated by low of radiation protection. Also, the animals should be confined to a controlled area for 2-3 days after scanning before being returned to their owners. After this period the area must be cleaned. (author)

  5. Research Methods in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Check, Joseph; Schutt, Russell K.

    2011-01-01

    "Research Methods in Education" introduces research methods as an integrated set of techniques for investigating questions about the educational world. This lively, innovative text helps students connect technique and substance, appreciate the value of both qualitative and quantitative methodologies, and make ethical research decisions.…

  6. [Research progress on identification and quality evaluation of glues medicines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui-Hu; Ren, Gang; Chen, Li-Min; Zhong, Guo-Yue

    2018-01-01

    Glues medicines is a special kind of traditional Chinese medicine.As the market demand is large, the raw materials are in short supply and lacks proper quality evaluation technology, which causes inconsistent quality of products on the market. Its authentic identification and evaluation stay a problem to be solved. In this paper, the research progress of the methods and techniques of the evaluation of the identification and quality of glues medicines were reviewed. The researches of medicinal glue type identification and quality evaluation mainly concentrated in four aspects of medicinal materials of physical and chemical properties, trace elements, organic chemicals and biological genetic methods and techniques. The methods of physicochemical properties include thermal analysis, gel electrophoresis, isoelectric focusing electrophoresis, infrared spectroscopy, gel exclusion chromatography, and circular dichroism. The methods including atomic absorption spectrometry, X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, plasma emission spectrometry and visible spectrophotometry were used for the study of the trace elements of glues medicines. The organic chemical composition was studied by methods of composition of amino acids, content detection, odor detection, lipid soluble component, organic acid detection. Methods based on the characteristics of biogenetics include DNA, polypeptide and amino acid sequence difference analysis. Overall, because of relative components similarity of the glues medicines (such as amino acids, proteins and peptides), its authenticity and quality evaluation index is difficult to judge objectively, all sorts of identification evaluation methods have different characteristics, but also their limitations. It indicates that further study should focus on identification of evaluation index and various technology integrated application combining with the characteristics of the production process. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  7. An Overview of Herbal Medicine Research and Development in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The research pattern in medicinal plants and traditional medicine practices in Nigeria is largely unknown. Hence this paper examined such research patterns with a view to determining how the country fared in herbal medicine research and development. The study also identified the number of herbal medicine scientific ...

  8. [Strengthen Chinese translational medicine research in ocular surface].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zuguo; Hong, Jiaxu

    2014-09-01

    Translational medicine emphasizes the application of the results of basic research to clinical practice and the solution of clinical issues through basic research. It is very important for the development direction of the medical field. Over the past decade, the translational medicine research in ocular surface disease has drawn international attention and developed rapidly. This field in China has made great progress, but overall there are still some gaps with the international advanced level. We need to establish the concept and the platform of translational research, explore scientific and effective methods, and create a whole chain to enhance our ocular research. It also requires research institutions and government departments to give full support. Finally, we need to explore a suitable way for the development of Chinese translational medical research.

  9. Traditional, complementary, and alternative medicine: Focusing on research into traditional Tibetan medicine in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Peipei; Xia, Jufeng; Rezeng, Caidan; Tong, Li; Tang, Wei

    2016-07-19

    As a form of traditional, complementary, and alternative medicine (TCAM), traditional Tibetan medicine has developed into a mainstay of medical care in Tibet and has spread from there to China and then to the rest of the world. Thus far, research on traditional Tibetan medicine has focused on the study of the plant and animal sources of traditional medicines, study of the histology of those plants and animals, chemical analysis of traditional medicines, pharmacological study of those medicines, and evaluation of the clinical efficacy of those medicines. A number of papers on traditional Tibetan medicines have been published, providing some evidence of the efficacy of traditional Tibetan medicine. However, many traditional Tibetan medicines have unknown active ingredients, hampering the establishment of drug quality standards, the development of new medicines, commercial production of medicines, and market availability of those medicines. Traditional Tibetan medicine must take several steps to modernize and spread to the rest of the world: the pharmacodynamics of traditional Tibetan medicines need to be determined, the clinical efficacy of those medicines needs to be verified, criteria to evaluate the efficacy of those medicines need to be established in order to guide their clinical use, and efficacious medicines need to be acknowledged by the pharmaceutical market. The components of traditional Tibetan medicine should be studied, traditional Tibetan medicines should be screened for their active ingredients, and techniques should be devised to prepare and manufacture those medicines.

  10. THE ACTION RESEARCH METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petre GEORGIEVSKI

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available The effort in this work to elaborate an action research method as a central research problem considering the recent contemporary sociological and educa­tional literature. The author begins with the statement that the method is a complex notion, composed of three main components: approach to the research problem, data gathering procedures and data analysis procedures. This point of view is further applied and elaborated in the author's text, emphasizing the action research characteristics: interruption with the positive tradition in social research and the divided of the objective and subjective, application of the qualitative data. The sub­stantial difference between the action research in regard with the other kinds of research, is not only in getting to new knowledge's, but also in problem solving or a change in the situation in a concrete social context.

  11. Archives: International Journal of Medicine and Biomedical Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 15 of 15 ... Archives: International Journal of Medicine and Biomedical Research. Journal Home > Archives: International Journal of Medicine and Biomedical Research. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  12. [Teaching transfusion medicine research in the francophone world].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefrère, J-J; Shiboski, C; Fontanet, A; Murphy, E L

    2009-01-01

    A two-week, French language, clinical research course in transfusion medicine has recently been created at the Pasteur Institute in Paris under the joint leadership of faculty members from the University of California San Francisco (UCSF), the Blood Systems Research Institute (BSRI) and the National Institute of Transfusion of Paris. The goal is to train transfusion professionals from the developing world to conduct clinical research that will contribute to improving the quality of care and safety in transfusion practices in their respective countries. The course provides training on clinical and epidemiological research methods and their potential applications in transfusion medicine. As part of the course, each student develops a study protocol that can be implemented in his/her blood center of hospital.

  13. Research methods in information

    CERN Document Server

    Pickard, Alison Jane

    2013-01-01

    The long-awaited 2nd edition of this best-selling research methods handbook is fully updated and includes brand new coverage of online research methods and techniques, mixed methodology and qualitative analysis. There is an entire chapter contributed by Professor Julie McLeod, Sue Childs and Elizabeth Lomas focusing on research data management, applying evidence from the recent JISC funded 'DATUM' project. The first to focus entirely on the needs of the information and communications community, it guides the would-be researcher through the variety of possibilities open to them under the heading "research" and provides students with the confidence to embark on their dissertations. The focus here is on the 'doing' and although the philosophy and theory of research is explored to provide context, this is essentially a practical exploration of the whole research process with each chapter fully supported by examples and exercises tried and tested over a whole teaching career. The book will take readers through eac...

  14. [Development of social hygienic research in industrial medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izmerov, N F; Tikhonova, G I; Churanova, A N

    2013-01-01

    The article covers history of establishment and development of social hygienic research in Industrial Medicine Research Institute with RAMSc over last 90 years. The materials deal with founders and leaders of Social Hygienic research laboratory in various periods, with history of occupational morbidity studies, with development and results of social hygienic studies, organization of occupational therapy service in Russia, studies concerning remote effects of occupational hazards through analytic epidemiology methods, with considerably restricted possibilities in studies of relationships (especially remote) between work conditions and workers' health nowadays due to implemented law on personal data and new approaches to evaluation of industrial hazards effects on health.

  15. Ergonomics research methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uspenskiy, S. I.; Yermakova, S. V.; Chaynova, L. D.; Mitkin, A. A.; Gushcheva, T. M.; Strelkov, Y. K.; Tsvetkova, N. F.

    1973-01-01

    Various factors used in ergonomic research are given. They are: (1) anthrometric measurement, (2) polyeffector method of assessing the functional state of man, (3) galvanic skin reaction, (4) pneumography, (5) electromyography, (6) electrooculography, and (7) tachestoscopy. A brief summary is given of each factor and includes instrumentation and results.

  16. [Translational medicine and its application in research & development of integrative medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yue-Rong; Chen, Ke-Ji

    2010-10-01

    The background, concept and status quo of translational medicine at home and abroad were introduced systematically in this review, and the application mode of translational medicine in the research and development of Chinese medicine (CM) was analyzed. Targeting the characteristics of CM and the changes in the spectrum of diseases in China, some suggestions were made to strengthen the translational research in CM and integrative medicine.

  17. Mathematical methods in medicine: neuroscience, cardiology and pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amigó, José M; Small, Michael

    2017-06-28

    The application of mathematics, natural sciences and engineering to medicine is gaining momentum as the mutual benefits of this collaboration become increasingly obvious. This theme issue is intended to highlight the trend in the case of mathematics. Specifically, the scope of this theme issue is to give a general view of the current research in the application of mathematical methods to medicine, as well as to show how mathematics can help in such important aspects as understanding, prediction, treatment and data processing. To this end, three representative specialties have been selected: neuroscience, cardiology and pathology. Concerning the topics, the 12 research papers and one review included in this issue cover biofluids, cardiac and virus dynamics, computational neuroscience, functional magnetic resonance imaging data processing, neural networks, optimization of treatment strategies, time-series analysis and tumour growth. In conclusion, this theme issue contains a collection of fine contributions at the intersection of mathematics and medicine, not as an exercise in applied mathematics but as a multidisciplinary research effort that interests both communities and our society in general.This article is part of the themed issue 'Mathematical methods in medicine: neuroscience, cardiology and pathology'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  18. Marketing research on intranasal medicines of domestic market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. S. Burlaka

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Modern development of biopharmaceutical research in world science and practice promotes the use of new dosage forms or administration routes of active substances in the human body. Recently, researchers drew attention to the use of non-invasive route of administration that can be used for new drug substances and for existing ones. Non-invasive routes of drugs’ administration have some advantages over invasive one, namely: do not damage the skin, do not require special training and conditions of use, provide the appropriate level of therapeutic efficacy of medicinal products. One of these administration routes of active substances in the human body is the intranasal one. Intranasal formulations have been known for a long time, most of them are widely used for topical treatment of various diseases of the nasal cavity. In recent decades, scientists have positive results on the use of intranasal route for regular use. Nasal medicines for systemic use are also easy to use; they do not cause irritation of the gastrointestinal tract. While intranasal route of administration the active ingredients fall directly into the general circulation and unlike enteral route they escape the first-pass elimination, which prevents the premature destruction of the drug. Objective: marketing research on registered intranasal drugs for local and systemic applications of the domestic market. Materials and Methods: Official data from the Ukrainian State Register of medicines, with details to release forms of the drug, dosage, manufacturer, country of origin and pharmacotherapeutic group has been used as a research material. Results. According to the State Register of medicinal products 226 intranasal drugs of the domestic market are recorded. Conclusions. Marketing research on intranasal drugs for local and systemic applications of the domestic market has been performed. It has been found that vast majority – 94.7% among registered intranasal drugs are the medicines

  19. [Application of molecular pharmacognosy in research of Mongolian medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qianquan; Zhou, Lishe; Guo, Lanping; Li, Minhui; Zhang, Na; Yuan, Qingjun; Yuan, Yuan

    2011-10-01

    Molecular pharmacognosy has developed as a new borderline discipline. Using the method and technology of molecular pharmacognosy, a wide range of challenging problems were resolved, such as the identification of Mongolian medicinal raw materials, etiology of endangerment and protection of endangered Mongolian medicinal plants and animals, biosynthesis and bioregulation of active components in Mongolian medicinal plants, and characteristics and the molecular bases of Dao-di Herbs. So molecular pharmacognosy will provide the new methods and insights for modernization of Mongolian medicine.

  20. Translational research: precision medicine, personalized medicine, targeted therapies: marketing or science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquet, Pierre; Longeray, Pierre-Henry; Barlesi, Fabrice; Ameye, Véronique; Augé, Pascale; Cazeneuve, Béatrice; Chatelut, Etienne; Diaz, Isabelle; Diviné, Marine; Froguel, Philippe; Goni, Sylvia; Gueyffier, François; Hoog-Labouret, Natalie; Mourah, Samia; Morin-Surroca, Michèle; Perche, Olivier; Perin-Dureau, Florent; Pigeon, Martine; Tisseau, Anne; Verstuyft, Céline

    2015-01-01

    Personalized medicine is based on: 1) improved clinical or non-clinical methods (including biomarkers) for a more discriminating and precise diagnosis of diseases; 2) targeted therapies of the choice or the best drug for each patient among those available; 3) dose adjustment methods to optimize the benefit-risk ratio of the drugs chosen; 4) biomarkers of efficacy, toxicity, treatment discontinuation, relapse, etc. Unfortunately, it is still too often a theoretical concept because of the lack of convenient diagnostic methods or treatments, particularly of drugs corresponding to each subtype of pathology, hence to each patient. Stratified medicine is a component of personalized medicine employing biomarkers and companion diagnostics to target the patients likely to present the best benefit-risk balance for a given active compound. The concept of targeted therapy, mostly used in cancer treatment, relies on the existence of a defined molecular target, involved or not in the pathological process, and/or on the existence of a biomarker able to identify the target population, which should logically be small as compared to the population presenting the disease considered. Targeted therapies and biomarkers represent important stakes for the pharmaceutical industry, in terms of market access, of return on investment and of image among the prescribers. At the same time, they probably represent only the first generation of products resulting from the combination of clinical, pathophysiological and molecular research, i.e. of translational research. © 2015 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  1. An overview of epigenetics in Chinese medicine researches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xue-Qing; Su, Shi-Bing

    2017-09-01

    Chinese medicine (CM) has contributed to human health care for several thousand years and is still popular in Asian countries. But the mechanisms underlying CM remain obscure, and need to be clarifified by modern biological subjects and methods. Recently, CM researches on epigenetics have gained obvious improvement following rapidly developed molecular technologies. In this review, we revealed mutual characteristics of epigenetics and CM, such as holism, yin-yang dynamic nature, reversibility and balance, and visceral manifestation. Moreover, epigenetic modifications, including DNA methylation, histone post-transcriptional modifications, micro RNA interference, etc. may help explore the molecular basis of CM syndrome classifification, and mechanisms of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM), CHM compounds and Chinese herbal formulae activities. Meanwhile, CM and epigenetics might promote each other and jointly develop following the continuous progress of epigenetics in CM researches.

  2. [Some reflections on evidenced-based medicine, precision medicine, and big data-based research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, J L; Li, L M

    2018-01-10

    Evidence-based medicine remains the best paradigm for medical practice. However, evidence alone is not decisions; decisions must also consider resources available and the values of people. Evidence shows that most of those treated with blood pressure-lowering, cholesterol-lowering, glucose-lowering and anti-cancer drugs do not benefit from preventing severe complications such as cardiovascular events and deaths. This implies that diagnosis and treatment in modern medicine in many circumstances is imprecise. It has become a dream to identify and treat only those few who can respond to the treatment. Precision medicine has thus come into being. Precision medicine is however not a new idea and cannot rely solely on gene sequencing as it was initially proposed. Neither is the large cohort and multi-factorial approach a new idea; in fact it has been used widely since 1950s. Since its very beginning, medicine has never stopped in searching for more precise diagnostic and therapeutic methods and already made achievements at various levels of our understanding and knowledge, such as vaccine, blood transfusion, imaging, and cataract surgery. Genetic biotechnology is not the only path to precision but merely a new method. Most genes are found only weakly associated with disease and are thus unlikely to lead to great improvement in diagnostic and therapeutic precision. The traditional multi-factorial approach by embracing big data and incorporating genetic factors is probably the most realistic way ahead for precision medicine. Big data boasts of possession of the total population and large sample size and claims correlation can displace causation. They are serious misleading concepts. Science has never had to observe the totality in order to draw a valid conclusion; a large sample size is required only when the anticipated effect is small and clinically less meaningful; emphasis on correlation over causation is equivalent to rejection of the scientific principles and methods

  3. Nanotechnology and nuclear medicine; research and preclinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assadi, Majid; Afrasiabi, Kolsoom; Nabipour, Iraj; Seyedabadi, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    The birth of nanotechnology in human society was around 2000 years ago and soon found applications in various fields. In this article, we highlight the current status of research and preclinical applications and also future prospects of nanotechnology in medicine and in nuclear medicine. The most important field is cancer. A regular nanotechnology training program for nuclear medicine physicians may be welcome.

  4. International Journal of Medicine and Biomedical Research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It also publishes valuable studies in areas of Biological Sciences related to health issues, Allied Medicine, Alternative and Complementary Medicine, Nursing, Physiotherapy, and Medical Ethics and Medical Education. Authorship criteria. Authorship should be based on considerable intellectual contributions to the following ...

  5. Researching the life stages of medicines: Introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geest, S.; Chamberlain, K.

    2011-01-01

    This introduction presents the concept of ‘biography’ or ‘life stages’ of medicines as an ordering principle and analytical tool for the study of medicines as social, commercial and symbolic objects. The first stages, production and marketing, which have been largely neglected by social scientists,

  6. [Complementary medicine and scientific pluralism--from governmental research funding to the dialogue forum of pluralism in medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthiessen, Peter F

    2013-01-01

    Medicine is based on a pluralism of different ways of thinking and practical approaches. Given this assumption, the history and experiences of the 2 German governmental research funding programs 'Unconventional Methods of Cancer' (UMK) and 'Unconventional Medicine Directions' (UMR) are described from the perspective of the project supporter of 2 working groups that were based at the University of Witten/Herdecke, Germany, on behalf of the federal government. The results of a nationwide inventory analysis conducted under my direction in the years 1989–1992 showed a distinct lack of human and infrastructural resources for competitive research for complementary medicine at that time. The field of complementary medicine was found to be very heterogeneous and was divided into procedures without any visible research interest, but also contained approaches nourishing mainstream medicine by its different paradigm. The representatives of complementary medicine were and still are recognizably interested in evaluative, empirical research. The following contains our funding recommendations made for the relevant ministries, the advertised funding issues, and the research activities carried out. Although this governmental research funding was limited, a signal function can be awarded, retrospectively. For the subsequent period, there has been a significant improvement in infrastructural, staff, and research conditions. This development led to a significant increase in the level of quality and the acceptability of research results. As a result of an increased willingness for cooperations, the foundations, concerns, and activities of the 'dialogue forum pluralism in medicine' set up in 2000 are presented and compared with the situation at the time of research funding by government. 'Integrative Medicine' is currently being favored and welcomed as a sign of better mutual acceptance. Nevertheless, complementary medicine is still seen as being creative, enriching medical and health

  7. Training physician investigators in medicine and public health research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourevitch, Marc N; Jay, Melanie R; Goldfrank, Lewis R; Mendelsohn, Alan L; Dreyer, Benard P; Foltin, George L; Lipkin, Mack; Schwartz, Mark D

    2012-07-01

    We have described and evaluated the impact of a unique fellowship program designed to train postdoctoral, physician fellows in research at the interface of medicine and public health. We developed a rigorous curriculum in public health content and research methods and fostered linkages with research mentors and local public health agencies. Didactic training provided the foundation for fellows' mentored research initiatives, which addressed real-world challenges in advancing the health status of vulnerable urban populations. Two multidisciplinary cohorts (6 per cohort) completed this 2-year degree-granting program and engaged in diverse public health research initiatives on topics such as improving pediatric care outcomes through health literacy interventions, reducing hospital readmission rates among urban poor with multiple comorbidities, increasing cancer screening uptake, and broadening the reach of addiction screening and intervention. The majority of fellows (10/12) published their fellowship work and currently have a career focused in public health-related research or practice (9/12). A fellowship training program can prepare physician investigators for research careers that bridge the divide between medicine and public health.

  8. Nuclear medicine and imaging research. Progress report, January 1, 1981-December 31, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, R.N.; Cooper, M.C.

    1981-09-01

    The Progress Report for the period January 1, 1981-December 31, 1981 of the Franklin Memorial Research Institute discusses instrumentation and quantitative methods of evaluation in nuclear medicine and imaging research. Imaging systems and image evaluation are discussed in four projects: Radiation Detector Studies, Dual Purpose Scanner for Thyroid Imaging, Instrumentation for Image Processing and Enhancement, and Energy-Coded Processing in Nuclear Medicine

  9. Original Research. Photoacoustic Microscopy in Dental Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stan Adrian Tudor

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Photoacoustic microscopy, also known as optoacoustic imaging, is a comparatively new method of investigation in dental medicine, which uses a laser-generated ultrasound (short laser pulses to achieve images for interpretation. Photoacoustic microscopy can be used in a broad spectrum, from detecting tooth decay at its earliest stages to dental anatomy analysis. Material and methods: The energy emitted by the photoacoustic pulse is moderately absorbed by the target and exchanged into heat, leading to a local transitory temperature upsurge. The tension propagates and grows as ultrasonic waves, distinguished by the ultrasonic transducers which are planted apart from the tissue. The photoacoustic microscope has a tunable dye laser which passes through a condensing lens, an objective and ultimately an ultrasonic transducer attached to an acoustic lens to capture and receive information about the scanned probe from a sample moved on the X, Y dimensions. Results: The precise anatomy of layered concentric structures can be clearly observed in photoacoustic microscopy. The image value of the inner layer can be higher, indicating strong optical absorption, while the image value of the outer layer is lower, indicating weaker optical absorption. Meanwhile, the inner layer has the exact same size as the dentin structure and the outer layer has the exact same size as the enamel structure in this cross-section. Conclusions: The photoacoustic microscope (all-optical comes out to be a future and promising tool for detecting early-stage caries and lesions on the surface of the teeth, where micro-leakage occurs at the interface of tooth restoration, and also the anatomy of dental tissues.

  10. Sparse QSAR modelling methods for therapeutic and regenerative medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, David A.

    2018-02-01

    The quantitative structure-activity relationships method was popularized by Hansch and Fujita over 50 years ago. The usefulness of the method for drug design and development has been shown in the intervening years. As it was developed initially to elucidate which molecular properties modulated the relative potency of putative agrochemicals, and at a time when computing resources were scarce, there is much scope for applying modern mathematical methods to improve the QSAR method and to extending the general concept to the discovery and optimization of bioactive molecules and materials more broadly. I describe research over the past two decades where we have rebuilt the unit operations of the QSAR method using improved mathematical techniques, and have applied this valuable platform technology to new important areas of research and industry such as nanoscience, omics technologies, advanced materials, and regenerative medicine. This paper was presented as the 2017 ACS Herman Skolnik lecture.

  11. Sparse QSAR modelling methods for therapeutic and regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, David A

    2018-04-01

    The quantitative structure-activity relationships method was popularized by Hansch and Fujita over 50 years ago. The usefulness of the method for drug design and development has been shown in the intervening years. As it was developed initially to elucidate which molecular properties modulated the relative potency of putative agrochemicals, and at a time when computing resources were scarce, there is much scope for applying modern mathematical methods to improve the QSAR method and to extending the general concept to the discovery and optimization of bioactive molecules and materials more broadly. I describe research over the past two decades where we have rebuilt the unit operations of the QSAR method using improved mathematical techniques, and have applied this valuable platform technology to new important areas of research and industry such as nanoscience, omics technologies, advanced materials, and regenerative medicine. This paper was presented as the 2017 ACS Herman Skolnik lecture.

  12. Genetics in psychosomatic medicine : research designs and statistical approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCaffery, Jeanne M.; Snieder, Harold; Dong, Yanbin; de Geus, Eco

    2007-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear that genetic factors influence many of the behaviors and disease endpoints of interest to psychosomatic medicine researchers. There has been increasing interest in incorporating genetic variation markers into psychosomatic research. In this Statistical Corner

  13. Genetics in psychosomatic medicine: Research designs and statistical approaches.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCaffery, J.M.; Snieder, H.; Dong, Y.; de Geus, E.J.C.

    2007-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear that genetic factors influence many of the behaviors and disease endpoints of interest to psychosomatic medicine researchers. There has been increasing interest in incorporating genetic variation markers into psychosomatic research. In this Statistical Corner

  14. Research Methods Tutorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, Frank J.

    2015-01-01

    A guiding principle for conducting research in technology, science, and engineering, leading to innovation is based on our use of research methodology (both qualitative and qualitative). A brief review of research methodology will be presented with an overview of NASA process in developing aeronautics technologies and other things to consider in research including what is innovation.

  15. Mixed methods research in music therapy research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradt, Joke; Burns, Debra S; Creswell, John W

    2013-01-01

    Music therapists have an ethical and professional responsibility to provide the highest quality care possible to their patients. Much of the time, high quality care is guided by evidence-based practice standards that integrate the most current, available research in making decisions. Accordingly, music therapists need research that integrates multiple ways of knowing and forms of evidence. Mixed methods research holds great promise for facilitating such integration. At this time, there have not been any methodological articles published on mixed methods research in music therapy. The purpose of this article is to introduce mixed methods research as an approach to address research questions relevant to music therapy practice. This article describes the core characteristics of mixed methods research, considers paradigmatic issues related to this research approach, articulates major challenges in conducting mixed methods research, illustrates four basic designs, and provides criteria for evaluating the quality of mixed methods articles using examples of mixed methods research from the music therapy literature. Mixed methods research offers unique opportunities for strengthening the evidence base in music therapy. Recommendations are provided to ensure rigorous implementation of this research approach.

  16. Mixed methods research for the novice researcher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giddings, Lynne S; Grant, Barbara M

    2006-10-01

    Mixed methods research is becoming increasingly popular in the health and social science disciplines. The aim of this article is to give an overview of the varieties of mixed methods designs. We begin by situating mixed methods research in the context of a paradigmatic framework which assists a researcher in making decisions concerning the design of their study. Although the most commonly used mixed methods designs are underpinned by positivist/postpositivist assumptions, the combination of qualitative and quantitative methods can be used within any research paradigm.

  17. Mixed methods research for TESOL

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, James; Farr, Fiona

    2014-01-01

    Defining and discussing the relevance of theoretical and practical issues involved in mixed methods research. Covering the basics of research methodology, this textbook shows you how to choose and combine quantitative and qualitative research methods to b

  18. International Journal of Medicine and Biomedical Research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. IJMBR publishes editorial, original and review papers, case reports, reports and commentaries, letters to editor and conference proceedings in areas of Clinical and Basic Medical Sciences. It also publishes valuable studies in Allied Medicine, Pharmaceutical Chemistry, and Alternative and ...

  19. Regenerative medicine: advances in new methods and technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dong-Hyuk; Eve, David J

    2009-11-01

    The articles published in the journal Cell Transplantation - The Regenerative Medicine Journal over the last two years reveal the recent and future cutting-edge research in the fields of regenerative and transplantation medicine. 437 articles were published from 2007 to 2008, a 17% increase compared to the 373 articles in 2006-2007. Neuroscience was still the most common section in both the number of articles and the percentage of all manuscripts published. The increasing interest and rapid advance in bioengineering technology is highlighted by tissue engineering and bioartificial organs being ranked second again. For a similar reason, the methods and new technologies section increased significantly compared to the last period. Articles focusing on the transplantation of stem cell lineages encompassed almost 20% of all articles published. By contrast, the non-stem cell transplantation group which is made up primarily of islet cells, followed by biomaterials and fetal neural tissue, etc. comprised less than 15%. Transplantation of cells pre-treated with medicine or gene transfection to prolong graft survival or promote differentiation into the needed phenotype, was prevalent in the transplantation articles regardless of the kind of cells used. Meanwhile, the majority of non-transplantation-based articles were related to new devices for various purposes, characterization of unknown cells, medicines, cell preparation and/or optimization for transplantation (e.g. isolation and culture), and disease pathology.

  20. Filling a gap in transfusion medicine education and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibinga, Cees Th Smit

    2009-10-01

    After the outbreak of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, attention was focused on the restructuring and reorganization of nationally supported safe and sustainable blood supply systems. Networking and human capacity building in transfusion medicine were developed through World Health Organization initiatives. Educational materials were created for the core elements of the blood transfusion chain. However, the management aspects of transfusion medicine as well as applied health science research in transfusion medicine were not addressed. In 2000, the World Health Organization initiated the creation of the Academic Institute for International Development of Transfusion Medicine (IDTM). This would focus on the development of a postgraduate master's course in management of transfusion medicine (MMTM) and the development of research programs for transfusion medicine-related health sciences. The Academic Institute IDTM was created at the University of Groningen Faculty of Medical Sciences, The Netherlands. The MMTM course was thus established, and since September 2007 fourteen fellows from economically restricted countries have entered the course.

  1. Radioactive isotopes in clinical medicine and research. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The contribution displays 44 abstracts and 35 posters from the 27th International Symposium on ''radioactive isotopes in clinical medicine and research'', organized by the Austrian society of nuclear medicine and the department of nuclear medicine and the center for biomedical engineering and physics of the Vienna medical university. The abstracts are sorted according to lecture headers: radiopharmaceutical sciences, endocrinology, clinical PET, neurology, oncology, physics and instrumentation, cardiology, inflammation, therapy and varia. (uke)

  2. Trends in clinical reproductive medicine research: 10 years of growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleixandre-Benavent, Rafael; Simon, Carlos; Fauser, Bart C J M

    2015-07-01

    To study the most important metrics of publication in the field of reproductive medicine over the decade 2003-2012 to aid in discerning the clinical, social, and epidemiologic implications of this relatively new but rapidly emerging area in medical sciences. Bibliometric analysis of most-cited publications from Web of Science databases. Not applicable. None. None. Most productive and frequently cited investigators, institutions, and countries and specific areas of research, scientific collaborations, and comparison of the growth of reproductive medicine research compared with other areas of medical investigation such as obstetrics and gynecology and related science categories. We found that 90 investigators with more than 1,000 citations had jointly published 4,010 articles. A continued rise in the impact factor of reproductive medicine journals was seen. The number of publications in reproductive medicine grew more rapidly compared with other science categories. Presently 22% of highly cited articles in reproductive medicine research are published in journals belonging to science categories outside reproductive medicine. The most-cited study groups are situated in the Netherlands, Belgium, Spain, the United States, and the United Kingdom, and collaborative studies have been increasing. Reproductive medicine research and subsequent clinical development have attained scientific growth and maturity. High-quality research is increasingly being published in high-impact journals. The increase in (inter)national collaborations seems to be key to the field's success. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Assessment of the State of Herbal Medicines Research and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (28.1 %), improvement in R&D infrastructure (18.6 %) and fostering public-private partnership (17 %). Conclusion: Herbal medicines R&D is not fully developed in Nigeria due to a myriad of fundamental challenges facing the key players. Keywords: Research and development, Herbal medicine, Innovation, Pharmaceutical ...

  4. Medicinal Plant Research Group, School of Pharmacy, College of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Medicinal Plant Research Group, School of Pharmacy, College of Health Sciences, University of Nairobi,. P.O. Box 19676-00202, Nairobi, Kenya. The use of traditional and herbal medicines ... may be used alone or in combination with others. The extraction of the plant material may involve soakage, percolation, decoction ...

  5. Emerging translational research on magnetic nanoparticles for regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yu; Lim, Jing; Teoh, Swee-Hin; Xu, Chenjie

    2015-10-07

    Regenerative medicine, which replaces or regenerates human cells, tissues or organs, to restore or establish normal function, is one of the fastest-evolving interdisciplinary fields in healthcare. Over 200 regenerative medicine products, including cell-based therapies, tissue-engineered biomaterials, scaffolds and implantable devices, have been used in clinical development for diseases such as diabetes and inflammatory and immune diseases. To facilitate the translation of regenerative medicine from research to clinic, nanotechnology, especially magnetic nanoparticles have attracted extensive attention due to their unique optical, electrical, and magnetic properties and specific dimensions. In this review paper, we intend to summarize current advances, challenges, and future opportunities of magnetic nanoparticles for regenerative medicine.

  6. Survey of Chinese Medicine Students to Determine Research and Evidence-Based Medicine Perspectives at Pacific College of Oriental Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Belinda J; Kligler, Benjamin; Cohen, Hillel W; Marantz, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    Research literacy and the practice of evidence-based medicine (EBM) are important initiatives in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), which requires cultural change within educational institutions for successful implementation. To determine the self-assessed research and EBM perspectives of Chinese medicine Masters degree students at Pacific College of Oriental Medicine, New York campus (PCOM-NY). A survey with 17 close-ended questions and one open-ended question was administered through Survey Monkey to students at PCOM-NY. The survey was sent to 420 Masters students and 176 (41.9%) responded. Students in all four years of the Masters degree indicated a generally high degree of interest in, and support for the value of research. However, increasing years (one to four years) in the program was associated with lower interest in post-graduation research participation and entering the doctoral program, and the fourth year students reported low levels of interest in having greater research content and training in their Masters degree programs. Students who responded to the open-ended question (23% of respondents) expressed enthusiasm for research and concerns about the relevance of research in Chinese medicine. Consistent with findings in similar studies at CAM colleges, interest in research, and EBM of the PCOM-NY Masters students appeared to decline with increasing years in the program. Concerns around paradigm and epistemological issues associated with research and EBM among Chinese medicine students and practitioners warrants further investigation, and may be an important challenge for integrative medicine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Methods in mummy research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynnerup, Niels

    2009-01-01

    Mummies are human remains with preservation of non-bony tissue. Many mummy studies focus on the development and application of non-destructive methods for examining mummies, including radiography, CT-scanning with advanced 3-dimensional visualisations, and endoscopic techniques, as well as minima......Mummies are human remains with preservation of non-bony tissue. Many mummy studies focus on the development and application of non-destructive methods for examining mummies, including radiography, CT-scanning with advanced 3-dimensional visualisations, and endoscopic techniques, as well...... as minimally-destructive chemical, physical and biological methods for, e.g., stable isotopes, trace metals and DNA....

  8. Research Methods in Sociolinguistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Campoy, Juan Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The development of Sociolinguistics has been qualitatively and quantitatively outstanding within Linguistic Science since its beginning in the 1950s, with a steady growth in both theoretical and methodological developments as well as in its interdisciplinary directions within the spectrum of language and society. Field methods in sociolinguistic…

  9. Assessing research impact in academic clinical medicine: a study using Research Excellence Framework pilot impact indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovseiko Pavel V

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Funders of medical research the world over are increasingly seeking, in research assessment, to complement traditional output measures of scientific publications with more outcome-based indicators of societal and economic impact. In the United Kingdom, the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE developed proposals for the Research Excellence Framework (REF to allocate public research funding to higher education institutions, inter alia, on the basis of the social and economic impact of their research. In 2010, it conducted a pilot exercise to test these proposals and refine impact indicators and criteria. Methods The impact indicators proposed in the 2010 REF impact pilot exercise are critically reviewed and appraised using insights from the relevant literature and empirical data collected for the University of Oxford’s REF pilot submission in clinical medicine. The empirical data were gathered from existing administrative sources and an online administrative survey carried out by the university’s Medical Sciences Division among 289 clinical medicine faculty members (48.1% response rate. Results The feasibility and scope of measuring research impact in clinical medicine in a given university are assessed. Twenty impact indicators from seven categories proposed by HEFCE are presented; their strengths and limitations are discussed using insights from the relevant biomedical and research policy literature. Conclusions While the 2010 pilot exercise has confirmed that the majority of the proposed indicators have some validity, there are significant challenges in operationalising and measuring these indicators reliably, as well as in comparing evidence of research impact across different cases in a standardised manner. It is suggested that the public funding agencies, medical research charities, universities, and the wider medical research community work together to develop more robust methodologies for capturing

  10. Laboratory research at the clinical trials of Veterinary medicinal Products

    OpenAIRE

    ZHYLA M.I.

    2011-01-01

    The article analyses the importance of laboratory test methods, namely pathomorfological at conduct of clinical trials. The article focuses on complex laboratory diagnostics at determination of clinical condition of animals, safety and efficacy of tested medicinal product.

  11. [Trends in research on the history of medicine in Korea before the modern era].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dongwon

    2010-06-30

    Research on the history of medicine in Korea in the form of modern scholarship began with the publication in 1930 of Yi Neunghwa's "A History of the Development of Medicine in Korea." The purpose of the present study lies in surveying studies on the history of medicine in Korea in the past 80 years since the publication of Yi's paper. In terms of periodization, research on the history of medicine in Korea is bifurcated by the publication of two comprehensive histories-i. e., Miki Sakae's A History of Medicine and Disease in Korea (1963) and Kim Du-jong's The Complete History of Medicine in Korea (1966). Indeed, all earlier studies converged in these two books. Because Miki and Kim both had majored in Western medicine and conducted research based on similar perspectives, data, and methods, the two works overlap considerably, and Kim's book, as the later of the two, unfortunately lost the initiative to the former to a considerable extent. As a result of these two scholars' research, it became possible to trace the overall flow of the history of medicine in Korea. Following the publication of works by Miki and Kim and with the advent of the 1980's, research on the history of medicine in premodern Korea was renovated with the emergence of no fewer than some dozen new doctoral degree holders in the field. In fact, these young scholars went beyond surveying trends in each era to expand the scope of specific discussions and topics per era, to delve into the actual contents, and to elucidate the function of medicine in society. The fruits of studies conducted in the past 80 years on the history of medicine in premodern Korea can be summarized as follows. 1) before the 5th century AD: the existence of a comprehensive medical practice in regions inhabited by those considered to be the ancestors of the Korean people; and information on medication including ginseng. 2) 5th-10th centuries: the existence of professional medical posts; the management of medicine by the royal

  12. Research studies on patients' illness experience using the Narrative Medicine approach: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fioretti, Chiara; Mazzocco, Ketti; Riva, Silvia; Oliveri, Serena; Masiero, Marianna; Pravettoni, Gabriella

    2016-07-14

    Since its birth about 30 years ago, Narrative Medicine approach has increased in popularity in the medical context as well as in other disciplines. This paper aims to review Narrative Medicine research studies on patients' and their caregivers' illness experience. MEDLINE, Psycinfo, EBSCO Psychological and Behavioural Science, The Cochrane Library and CINAHL databases were searched to identify all the research studies which focused on the Narrative Medicine approach reported in the title, in the abstract and in the keywords the words 'Narrative Medicine' or 'Narrative-based Medicine'. number of participants, type of disease, race and age of participants, type of study, dependent variables, intervention methods, assessment. Of the 325 titles screened, we identified 10 research articles fitting the inclusion criteria. Our systematic review showed that research on Narrative Medicine has no common specific methodology: narrative in Medicine is used as an intervention protocol as well as an assessment tool. Patients' characteristics, types of disease and data analysis procedures differ among the screened studies. Narrative Medicine research in medical practice needs to find clear and specific protocols to deepen the impact of narrative on medical practice and on patients' lives. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. Research projects in family medicine funded by the European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavličević, Ivančica; Barać, Lana

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed at synthesizing funding opportunities in the field of family medicine by determining the number of family medicine projects, as well as number of project leaderships and/ or participations by each country. This was done in order to encourage inclusion of physicians in countries with underdeveloped research networks in successful research networks or to encourage them to form new ones. We searched the Community Research and Development Information Service project database in February 2013. Study covered the period from years 1992 - 2012, selecting the projects within the field of general/family medicine. The search was conducted in February 2013. First search conducted in the CORDIS database came up with a total of 466 projects. After excluding 241 projects with insufficient data, we analysed 225 remaining projects; out of those, 22 (9.8%) were in the field of family medicine and 203 (90.2%) were from other fields of medicine. Sorted by the number of projects per country, Dutch institutions had the highest involvement in family medicine projects and were partners or coordinators in 18 out of 22 selected projects (81.8%), followed by British institutions with 15 (68.8%), and Spanish with 10 projects (45.5%). Croatia was a partner in a single FP7 Health project. Research projects in family medicine funded by the European Union show significant differences between countries. Constant and high-quality international cooperation in family medicine is the prerequisite for improvement and development of scientific research and the profession. Copyright © 2014 by Academy of Sciences and Arts of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  14. International Journal of Medicine and Biomedical Research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Search tips: Search terms are case-insensitive; Common words are ignored; By default only articles containing all terms in the query are returned (i.e., AND is implied); Combine multiple words with OR to find articles containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., ...

  15. [Research progression of translational medicine in gastric cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Maoran; Zhao, Gang; Zhu, Chunchao

    2014-02-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors which is a great threat to human health. In recent years, the reform of surgical mordalities and the optimization of radiation and chemotherapy is still far from reducing morbidity and mortality of gastric cancer. As a new research pattern, translational medicine has emerged in various clinical subjects, which leads to remarkable effects. In this paper, the definition and development of translational medicine, molecular markers and drug treatment of gastric cancer will be discussed and the feasibility of translational medicine in the treatment of gastric cancer will be explained. In our opinion, the intervention of translational medicine could change the current situation that scientific researches is severely disconnected with clinical practice and increase the detection rate of gastric cancer and the effective rate of adjuvant therapy after surgery to improve the prognosis of patients with gastric cancer.

  16. Insights and limits of translational research in critical care medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pène, Frédéric; Ait-Oufella, Hafid; Taccone, Fabio Silvio; Monneret, Guillaume; Sharshar, Tarek; Tamion, Fabienne; Mira, Jean-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Experimental research has always been the cornerstone of pathophysiological and therapeutic advances in critical care medicine, where clinical observations and basic research mutually fed each other in a so-called translational approach. The objective of this review is to address the different aspects of translational research in the field of critical care medicine. We herein highlighted some demonstrative examples including the animal-to-human approach to study host-pathogen interactions, the human-to-animal approach for sepsis-induced immunosuppression, the still restrictive human approach to study critical illness-related neuromyopathy, and the technological developments to assess the microcirculatory changes in critically ill patients. These examples not only emphasize how translational research resulted in major improvements in the comprehension of the pathophysiology of severe clinical conditions and offered promising perspectives in critical care medicine but also point out the obstacles to translate such achievements into clinical practice.

  17. Regression methods for medical research

    CERN Document Server

    Tai, Bee Choo

    2013-01-01

    Regression Methods for Medical Research provides medical researchers with the skills they need to critically read and interpret research using more advanced statistical methods. The statistical requirements of interpreting and publishing in medical journals, together with rapid changes in science and technology, increasingly demands an understanding of more complex and sophisticated analytic procedures.The text explains the application of statistical models to a wide variety of practical medical investigative studies and clinical trials. Regression methods are used to appropriately answer the

  18. Tourism research and audio methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin Trandberg

    2016-01-01

    • Audio methods enriches sensuous tourism ethnographies. • The note suggests five research avenues for future auditory scholarship. • Sensuous tourism research has neglected the role of sounds in embodied tourism experiences.......• Audio methods enriches sensuous tourism ethnographies. • The note suggests five research avenues for future auditory scholarship. • Sensuous tourism research has neglected the role of sounds in embodied tourism experiences....

  19. Nanotechnology in medicine: European research and its implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann-Amtenbrink, Margarethe; Hofmann, Heinrich; Hool, Alessandra; Roubert, François

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we explore and discuss nanoparticles and nanoscale materials and their use in medicine (nanomedicine) and pharmaceutics (nanopharmaceutics). The study is aimed at shedding light on this highly multidisciplinary research field and at examining the influence of research funding, industrial applications, and legal and regulatory frameworks on the research in this field, a clear understanding of which is essential to efficiently support the translation of research findings into industrial and clinical applications and to enable access to a larger society.

  20. Common strategic research agenda for radiation protection in medicine

    OpenAIRE

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Reflecting the change in funding strategies for European research projects, and the goal to jointly improve medical radiation protection through sustainable research efforts, five medical societies involved in the application of ionising radiation (European Association of Nuclear Medicine, EANM; European Federation of Organizations for Medical Physics. EFOMP; European Federation of Radiographer Societies, EFRS; European Society of Radiology, ESR; European Society for Radiotherapy and...

  1. Library Utilization among College Of Medicine Research Year ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigates the prevalence of library utilization by the college of medicine research year undergraduates of Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma, Edo State, Nigeria. It is a descriptive cross sectional survey that involved the use of a pre-tested questionnaire. The results revealed that though the research year ...

  2. The research rotation: competency-based structured and novel approach to research training of internal medicine residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrov Vihren

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the United States, the Accreditation Council of graduate medical education (ACGME requires all accredited Internal medicine residency training programs to facilitate resident scholarly activities. However, clinical experience and medical education still remain the main focus of graduate medical education in many Internal Medicine (IM residency-training programs. Left to design the structure, process and outcome evaluation of the ACGME research requirement, residency-training programs are faced with numerous barriers. Many residency programs report having been cited by the ACGME residency review committee in IM for lack of scholarly activity by residents. Methods We would like to share our experience at Lincoln Hospital, an affiliate of Weill Medical College Cornell University New York, in designing and implementing a successful structured research curriculum based on ACGME competencies taught during a dedicated "research rotation". Results Since the inception of the research rotation in 2004, participation of our residents among scholarly activities has substantially increased. Our residents increasingly believe and appreciate that research is an integral component of residency training and essential for practice of medicine. Conclusion Internal medicine residents' outlook in research can be significantly improved using a research curriculum offered through a structured and dedicated research rotation. This is exemplified by the improvement noted in resident satisfaction, their participation in scholarly activities and resident research outcomes since the inception of the research rotation in our internal medicine training program.

  3. [Discussion on appraisal methods and key technologies of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and medicinal plant symbiosis system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meilan; Guo, Lanping; Yang, Guang; Chen, Min; Yang, Li; Huang, Luqi

    2011-11-01

    Applications of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in research of medicinal plant cultivation are increased in recent years. Medicinal plants habitat is complicated and many inclusions are in root, however crop habitat is simple and few inclusions in root. So appraisal methods and key technologies about the symbiotic system of crop and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi can't completely suitable for the symbiotic system of medicinal plants and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. This article discuss the appraisal methods and key technologies about the symbiotic system of medicinal plant and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi from the isolation and identification of arbuscular mycorrhiza, and the appraisal of colonization intensity. This article provides guidance for application research of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in cultivation of medicinal plants.

  4. Research progress of Tunisian medicinal plants used for acute diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wissem Aidi Wannes

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of the medicinal plants in treating diabetes is frequent in Africa, especially in Tunisia, and it is ritually transmitted from generation to generation within cultures. Many of Tunisian medicinal plants have been experimentally validated. A comprehensive review was conducted to pile up information from scientific journal articles, including indigenous knowledge researches, about Tunisian medicinal plants used for the treatment of diabetes. The aim of this review article is to provide the reader with information concerning the importance of Tunisian medicinal plants in the treatment of diabetes and to draw attention of the health professionals and scientists working in the field of pharmacology and therapeutics to develop new drug formulations to cure different kinds of diabetes.

  5. Promises and challenges of stem cell research for regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Carl; Rasko, John E J

    2011-11-15

    In recent years, stem cells have generated increasing excitement, with frequent claims that they are revolutionizing medicine. For those not directly involved in stem cell research, however, it can be difficult to separate fact from fiction or realistic expectation from wishful thinking. This article aims to provide internists with a clear and concise introduction to the field. While recounting some scientific and medical milestones, the authors discuss the 3 main varieties of stem cells-adult, embryonic, and induced pluripotent-comparing their advantages and disadvantages for clinical medicine. The authors have sought to avoid the moral and political debates surrounding stem cell research, focusing instead on scientific and medical issues.

  6. Access to essential medicines in Pakistan: policy and health systems research concerns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shehla Zaidi

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Inadequate access to essential medicines is a common issue within developing countries. Policy response is constrained, amongst other factors, by a dearth of in-depth country level evidence. We share here i gaps related to access to essential medicine in Pakistan; and ii prioritization of emerging policy and research concerns. METHODS: An exploratory research was carried out using a health systems perspective and applying the WHO Framework for Equitable Access to Essential Medicine. Methods involved key informant interviews with policy makers, providers, industry, NGOs, experts and development partners, review of published and grey literature, and consultative prioritization in stakeholder's Roundtable. FINDINGS: A synthesis of evidence found major gaps in essential medicine access in Pakistan driven by weaknesses in the health care system as well as weak pharmaceutical regulation. 7 major policy concerns and 11 emerging research concerns were identified through consultative Roundtable. These related to weaknesses in medicine registration and quality assurance systems, unclear and counterproductive pricing policies, irrational prescribing and sub-optimal drug availability. Available research, both locally and globally, fails to target most of the identified policy concerns, tending to concentrate on irrational prescriptions. It overlooks trans-disciplinary areas of policy effectiveness surveillance, consumer behavior, operational pilots and pricing interventions review. CONCLUSION: Experience from Pakistan shows that policy concerns related to essential medicine access need integrated responses across various components of the health systems, are poorly addressed by existing evidence, and require an expanded health systems research agenda.

  7. [Genomic research of traditional Chinese medicines in vivo metabolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shui-Ming; Bai, Rui; Zhang, Xiao-Yan

    2016-11-01

    Gene is the base of in vivo metabolism and effectiveness for traditional Chinese medicines (TCM), and the gene expression, regulation and modification are used as the research directions to perform the TCM multi-component, multi-link and multi-target in vivo metabolism studies, which will improve the research on TCM metabolic proecess, effect target and molecular mechanism. Humans are superorganisms with 1% genes inherited from parents and 99% genes from various parts of the human body, mainly coming from the microorganisms in intestinal flora. These indicate that genetically inherited human genome and "second genome" could affect the TCM in vivo metabolism from inheritance and "environmental" aspects respectively. In the present paper, typical case study was used to discuss related TCM in vivo metabolic genomics research, mainly including TCM genomics research and gut metagenomics research, as well as the personalized medicine evoked from the individual difference of above genomics (metagenomics). Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  8. Marketing research on the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors antihypertensive medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    BOBOIA, ANAMARIA; GRIGORESCU, MARIUS RAREŞ; TURCU - ŞTIOLICĂ, ADINA

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims The research aimed at investigating sales trends of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors antihypertensive medicines, both in terms of quantity and value, in ten community pharmacies, for a period of three years. The research on the antihypertensive medicines consumption is important for highlighting the ever increasing impact of hypertension among the population. Methods The methods used in this research were the following: marketing research, method of sampling, descriptive methods, retrospective analysis, method of comparison. Results The results showed that the drugs containing the active substances of the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors class had had significant increases in quantitative and value sales, bringing substantial revenues to pharmacies. From the quantitative perspective, the best-selling products were those containing Enalaprilum, while in terms of value, the best-selling medicines were those containing Perindoprilum. We evidenced that spectacular sales were also achieved for products that have Lisinoprilum, respectively Captoprilum, as active substances. The largest quantities were marketed for the Captopril Terapia® product and the highest earnings were recorded for the Prestarium® medicine. Conclusion This paper approaches an interesting and topical issue, which can be helpful to professionals (pharmacists, doctors) and other categories, such as economists, statisticians, representatives of companies manufacturing medicines, as well as to hypertensive patients, as it could be used to warn population regarding the incidence of cardiovascular diseases, and, at the same time, trace sales trends in order to accomplish profitable business plans. PMID:28246502

  9. Two birds with one stone: experiences of combining clinical and research training in addiction medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Klimas, J.; McNeil, R.; Ahamad, K.; Mead, A.; Rieb, L.; Cullen, W.; Wood, E.; Small, W.

    2017-01-01

    Background Despite a large evidence-base upon which to base clinical practice, most health systems have not combined the training of healthcare providers in addiction medicine and research. As such, addiction care is often lacking, or not based on evidence or best practices. We undertook a qualitative study to assess the experiences of physicians who completed a clinician-scientist training programme in addiction medicine within a hospital setting. Methods We interviewed physicians from the S...

  10. Harnessing the crowd to accelerate molecular medicine research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert J; Merchant, Raina M

    2015-07-01

    Crowdsourcing presents a novel approach to solving complex problems within molecular medicine. By leveraging the expertise of fellow scientists across the globe, broadcasting to and engaging the public for idea generation, harnessing a scalable workforce for quick data management, and fundraising for research endeavors, crowdsourcing creates novel opportunities for accelerating scientific progress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Future methods in pharmacy practice research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almarsdottir, A B; Babar, Z U D

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the current and future practice of pharmacy scenario underpinning and guiding this research and then suggests future directions and strategies for such research. First, it sets the scene by discussing the key drivers which could influence the change in pharmacy practice...... research. These are demographics, technology and professional standards. Second, deriving from this, it seeks to predict and forecast the future shifts in use of methodologies. Third, new research areas and availability of data impacting on future methods are discussed. These include the impact of aging...... information technology users on healthcare, understanding and responding to cultural and social disparities, implementing multidisciplinary initiatives to improve health care, medicines optimization and predictive risk analysis, and pharmacy as business and health care institution. Finally, implications...

  12. [Application of chemometrics in composition-activity relationship research of traditional Chinese medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sheng-Nan

    2014-07-01

    Chemometrics is a new branch of chemistry which is widely applied to various fields of analytical chemistry. Chemometrics can use theories and methods of mathematics, statistics, computer science and other related disciplines to optimize the chemical measurement process and maximize access to acquire chemical information and other information on material systems by analyzing chemical measurement data. In recent years, traditional Chinese medicine has attracted widespread attention. In the research of traditional Chinese medicine, it has been a key problem that how to interpret the relationship between various chemical components and its efficacy, which seriously restricts the modernization of Chinese medicine. As chemometrics brings the multivariate analysis methods into the chemical research, it has been applied as an effective research tool in the composition-activity relationship research of Chinese medicine. This article reviews the applications of chemometrics methods in the composition-activity relationship research in recent years. The applications of multivariate statistical analysis methods (such as regression analysis, correlation analysis, principal component analysis, etc. ) and artificial neural network (such as back propagation artificial neural network, radical basis function neural network, support vector machine, etc. ) are summarized, including the brief fundamental principles, the research contents and the advantages and disadvantages. Finally, the existing main problems and prospects of its future researches are proposed.

  13. [German medicine of the age of romanticism (1797-1848) as research problem].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płonka-Syroka, B

    1997-01-01

    In the period between 1797 and 1848, German medicine was considerably influenced by philosophy. It absorbed ideas deriving from neo-Platonism and vitalism, as well as the modern philosophy of nature (Naturphilosophie), especially the ideas of Schelling. The article presents the main tendencies in the German medicine of that period: the distinct character of German medical thought as compared to the rest of Europe, the deductive character of medical theories, the grounding of medical thought in non-materialist philosophy and its close ties with the Protestant religion. The author's aim is investigate how German medicine of the period evolved away from European standards set by the model of medicine as an empirical science, based on the inductive method of research. The article presents the state of German medicine of the first half of the nineteenth century against the background of socio-cultural factors and relates German medical theory of the period to the social awareness of that time.

  14. A Research Roadmap for Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, F.; Lewith, G.; Witt, C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The CAMbrella coordination action was funded within the Framework Programme 7. Its aim is to provide a research roadmap for clinical and epidemiological research for complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) that is appropriate for the health needs of European citizens and acceptable...... evaluation of the overall effectiveness of CAM as an additional or alternative treatment strategy in real-world settings. Research into effects of context and meaning: The impact of effects of context and meaning on the outcome of CAM treatments must be investigated; it is likely that they are significant....... Research into different models of CAM health care integration: There are different models of CAM being integrated into conventional medicine throughout Europe, each with their respective strengths and limitations. These models should be described and concurrently evaluated; innovative models of CAM...

  15. [Current research situation of nephrotoxicity of Chinese herbal medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xue; Fang, Sai-Nan; Gao, Yu-Xin; Liu, Jian-Ping; Chen, Wei

    2018-02-01

    To provide the basis for the future research on the nephrotoxicity of Chinese herbal medicine through systematic and comprehensive summary of all the Chinese herbal medicines which may lead to nephrotoxicity. Foreign resources included PubMed and Cochrane library, and domestic research resources was China Food and Drug Administration(CDFA) Adverse Drug Reaction Monitoring Center database. The databases were searched from establishment to January 1, 2017. There was no limitation on research type. 28 English studies were found, including 97 Chinese herbs or prescriptions with the risk of nephrotoxicity. The following six Chinese herbal medicines with the risk of nephrotoxicity had a large number of studies: aristolochic acid(5 studies), Tripterygium wilfordii(4 studies), Erycibe obtusifolia(2 studies), Rheum palmatum(2 studies), Ephedra sinica(2 studies), and Atractylodes lances(2 studies). The remaining 91 Chinese medicines were reported with risk of nephrotoxicity in only 1 study respectively. CDFA reported 16 Chinese herbal medicines with the risk of nephrotoxicity, including Ganmaoqing Pian(capsule), Zhenju Jiangya Pian, T. wilfordii preparation, Vc-Yinqiao Pian, Chuanhuning injection, Shuanghuanglian injection, Qingkailing injection, Lianbizhi injection, herbal decoction containing Aristolochiae Radix, Guanxin Suhe Wan, Shugan Liqi Wan, Ershiwuwei Songshi Wan, herbal decoction containing Aristolochia Fangchi, herbal granules containing root of Kaempfer Dutchmanspipe, Ganmaotong(tablets), and Longdan Xiegan Wan. Currently, in addition to aristolochic acids, the most reported Chinese herbal medicine with the risk of nephrotoxicity is T. wilfordii preparation. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  16. Marketing research on the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors antihypertensive medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boboia, Anamaria; Grigorescu, Marius Rareş; Turcu-Ştiolică, Adina

    2017-01-01

    The research aimed at investigating sales trends of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors antihypertensive medicines, both in terms of quantity and value, in ten community pharmacies, for a period of three years. The research on the antihypertensive medicines consumption is important for highlighting the ever increasing impact of hypertension among the population. The methods used in this research were the following: marketing research, method of sampling, descriptive methods, retrospective analysis, method of comparison. The results showed that the drugs containing the active substances of the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors class had had significant increases in quantitative and value sales, bringing substantial revenues to pharmacies. From the quantitative perspective, the best-selling products were those containing Enalaprilum, while in terms of value, the best-selling medicines were those containing Perindoprilum. We evidenced that spectacular sales were also achieved for products that have Lisinoprilum, respectively Captoprilum, as active substances. The largest quantities were marketed for the Captopril Terapia® product and the highest earnings were recorded for the Prestarium® medicine. This paper approaches an interesting and topical issue, which can be helpful to professionals (pharmacists, doctors) and other categories, such as economists, statisticians, representatives of companies manufacturing medicines, as well as to hypertensive patients, as it could be used to warn population regarding the incidence of cardiovascular diseases, and, at the same time, trace sales trends in order to accomplish profitable business plans.

  17. The Situation of Complementary and Alternative Medicine / Integrative Medicine in Finland: Genuine Research Is Needed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Peter Josef; Aarva, Pauliina; Sorsa, Minna

    The official acceptance of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) or integrative medicine in the academic discussion and in health policies in Finland is still poor. This is in contradiction to the fact that modern Finnish citizens use CAM as much as any people elsewhere in the European Union, with rates of 28-46% of the general population, or even more. This was one of the reasons for the foundation of the Finnish Forum for Research in Integrative Medicine and Healthcare (SILF) in November 2014. A first challenge for the SILF was to facilitate a research seminar to address the issue of CAM research as a part of the Finnish academic research. The seminar was organized by the Department of Health Sciences of the University of Tampere on November 13, 2015. Almost one third of the more than 400 participants were health professionals, and again one-third out of this group were physicians. As a result of the seminar, a research network was inaugurated. Obviously there is an increasing interest of health professionals in CAM and maybe even a change of attitude towards CAM also in Finland. However, genuine Finnish CAM research is essential in order to open up the academic discussion. © 2017 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  18. Research on Clinical Decisions Made Daily in Family Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Marjorie A; Neale, Anne Victoria; Seehusen, Dean A

    2017-01-01

    This issue presents research on the types of decisions that are required daily in family medicine. Patients often make these health decisions, and family physicians help patients with these decisions daily. Patients and their family physicians discuss when to quit screening for colon cancer, which treatment to choose for localized prostate cancer, when to test for pertussis when a cough is present, whether to take prescribed medications, how to complete more preventive services, and how to understand the "new genetics", and family physician use of telehealth. © Copyright 2017 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  19. [Qualitative methods in psychiatric research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorski, Claudia; Glaesmer, Heide

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses the usage of qualitative methods in psychiatric research and presents the qualitative approach in more detail. Recent original empirical work of a German psychiatric journal was systematically reviewed. Methods used to collect and analyse the information are detailed. One third of the articles used a solely qualitative research design. One further article applied a combination of quantitative and qualitative approaches. Three kinds of the qualitative interviews were used (in depth, narrative and problem-focussed interview). Additionally, focus groups (group discussions) and qualitative content analysis were applied by studies. Qualitative approaches are an integral part of psychiatric research. Further work should assure to use adequate sampling strategies.

  20. Qualitative research as methodical hermeneutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennie, David L

    2012-09-01

    The proportion of publications of qualitative research in mainstream psychology journals is small. Thus, in terms of this important criterion, despite its recent rapid growth, qualitative research is marginalized in psychology. The author suggests that contributing to this situation is the lack of a coherent and unifying methodology of qualitative research methods that elucidates their credibility. He groups the many qualitative research methods into 3 main kinds, then applies to them 4 propositions offered as such a methodology: (1) Qualitative research is hermeneutical, entailing application of the method of the hermeneutic circle to text about experience and/or action. (2) Implicit in the use of the hermeneutic circle method is the activity of educing and articulating the meaning of text, an activity that modifies and interacts with C. S. Peirce's (1965, 1966) logical operations of abduction, theorematic deduction, and induction. (3) The cycling of these 4 moments enables demonstration, achieved rhetorically, of the validity of the understandings resulting from the exegesis of the text under study. (4) This demonstrative rhetoric is enhanced when researchers disclose reflexively those aspects of their perspectives they judge to have most relevant bearing on their understandings. The author compares abduction as formulated here with other recent uptakes of it. As an installment on the generality of the methodology, he explores its fit with the descriptive phenomenological psychological method, conversation analysis, and thematic analysis.

  1. Can emergency medicine research benefit from adaptive design clinical trials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flight, Laura; Julious, Steven A; Goodacre, Steve

    2017-04-01

    Adaptive design clinical trials use preplanned interim analyses to determine whether studies should be stopped or modified before recruitment is complete. Emergency medicine trials are well suited to these designs as many have a short time to primary outcome relative to the length of recruitment. We hypothesised that the majority of published emergency medicine trials have the potential to use a simple adaptive trial design. We reviewed clinical trials published in three emergency medicine journals between January 2003 and December 2013. We determined the proportion that used an adaptive design as well as the proportion that could have used a simple adaptive design based on the time to primary outcome and length of recruitment. Only 19 of 188 trials included in the review were considered to have used an adaptive trial design. A total of 154/165 trials that were fixed in design had the potential to use an adaptive design. Currently, there seems to be limited uptake in the use of adaptive trial designs in emergency medicine despite their potential benefits to save time and resources. Failing to take advantage of adaptive designs could be costly to patients and research. It is recommended that where practical and logistical considerations allow, adaptive designs should be used for all emergency medicine clinical trials. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  2. Translational research of optical molecular imaging for personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, C; Ma, X; Tian, J

    2013-12-01

    In the medical imaging field, molecular imaging is a rapidly developing discipline and forms many imaging modalities, providing us effective tools to visualize, characterize, and measure molecular and cellular mechanisms in complex biological processes of living organisms, which can deepen our understanding of biology and accelerate preclinical research including cancer study and medicine discovery. Among many molecular imaging modalities, although the penetration depth of optical imaging and the approved optical probes used for clinics are limited, it has evolved considerably and has seen spectacular advances in basic biomedical research and new drug development. With the completion of human genome sequencing and the emergence of personalized medicine, the specific drug should be matched to not only the right disease but also to the right person, and optical molecular imaging should serve as a strong adjunct to develop personalized medicine by finding the optimal drug based on an individual's proteome and genome. In this process, the computational methodology and imaging system as well as the biomedical application regarding optical molecular imaging will play a crucial role. This review will focus on recent typical translational studies of optical molecular imaging for personalized medicine followed by a concise introduction. Finally, the current challenges and the future development of optical molecular imaging are given according to the understanding of the authors, and the review is then concluded.

  3. An Emerging Complimentary Medicine-Yolk Oil Made from Heating Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung-Ming Hu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Yolk oil is common in Asia. According to the Flora Sinensis, yolk oil is a multipurpose medicine, with specific dermatological and fever indications. Nowadays, it is generally used as a complimentary medicine for heart diseases. Yolk oil can be made from heating or chemical extraction method. It is generally believed that yolk oil made from heating (YOheat method is more effective as a medicine than that from extraction (YOext. The technical details of the heating method remain an issue of argument, including the degree of char and the threat of carcinogens formed during the heating process. Most yolk oil related studies used YOext as research material. Nevertheless, animal studies have showed that YOheat reduced triglycerides and total cholesterol in rodent liver. It is expected an easy-to-make complimentary medicine like YOheat may become even more common and thus evidence based studies should be conducted to verify its pharmacological effects and safety.

  4. An emerging complimentary medicine-yolk oil made from heating method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Tsung-Ming; Lan, Tsuo-Hung; Loh, El-Wui

    2012-07-01

    Yolk oil is common in Asia. According to the Flora Sinensis, yolk oil is a multipurpose medicine, with specific dermatological and fever indications. Nowadays, it is generally used as a complimentary medicine for heart diseases. Yolk oil can be made from heating or chemical extraction method. It is generally believed that yolk oil made from heating (YOheat) method is more effective as a medicine than that from extraction (YOext). The technical details of the heating method remain an issue of argument, including the degree of char and the threat of carcinogens formed during the heating process. Most yolk oil related studies used YOext as research material. Nevertheless, animal studies have showed that YOheat reduced triglycerides and total cholesterol in rodent liver. It is expected an easy-to-make complimentary medicine like YOheat may become even more common and thus evidence based studies should be conducted to verify its pharmacological effects and safety.

  5. Radioisotope method researches of pharmaceutical preparates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khujaev, S.; Sultanov, A.; Aliev, Kh.; Nazarov, E.A.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: The development of modern stage of nuclear medicine is characterized by the increasing role of methods using radionuclides. Radioactive nuclides used in nuclear medicine may be divided into 2 groups. Radionuclides used for diagnostic researches and radionuclides used for therapeutic purposes. These two directions are considered to be the main ones in usage of radionuclides in medicine. However there is one more direction in the research of new medical products where it is possible to use radionuclides to study their pharmacological kinetics. In these researches radionuclide is applied as a radioactive label at the stage of studying pharmacological kinetics of a new medical product. In Institute of Nuclear Physics AS RU the works are being carried out in the recent years focused on studying pharmacology of some new medical preparations, which are synthesized in Tashkent Pharmaceutical Institute. Syntheses these preparations are based on use microelements. Its compounds are possessed expressed biological activity and be of great importance in the pharmaceutical science of Uzbekistan. Introducing a radioisotope at the stage of synthesis carried out reception of labeled connections of all preparations. The output of the final product reached the yield of no less than 80 percent in all cases of synthesis. This work presents the results of research on synthesis and study of pharmacology of radioactively labeled preparations - Piracin, labeled by radioisotope Zn 6 9I; Cobavit, labeled by radioisotope Co 57; NI 101, labeled by radioisotope Co 57. Received radioisotope - labeled compounds of medical preparations were used in the study of their pharmacological kinetics. In all cases, preliminary irradiation of corresponding nuclear targets in the nuclear reactor and cyclotron, radiochemical procedures on separation, purification and concentration of radioactive isotopes, and reception of its radioactive solution for synthesis of labeled compounds of preparations

  6. Assessment of the State of Herbal Medicines Research and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    R&D) outputs in universities, research institutes and pharmaceutical manufacturing firms in Nigeria. Methods: Questionnaires were administered to core researchers in the above-mentioned research organizations using purposive and ...

  7. Methods and quality assurance in environmental medicine. Formation of a RKI-Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eis, D.

    2000-01-01

    An almost bewildering number of widely differing methods and techniques, often not validated, are being applied often inappropriately in the field of environmental medicine to answer questions regarding exposure assessment, diagnosis, treatment, counselling and prevention. Therefore, quality control within the field of environmental medicine is quite problematic. A primary goal of the newly formed RKI-Commission 'Methods and Quality Assurance in Environmental Medicine' is to form a panel of experts in the field, who evaluate the situation and generate consensus documents containing respective recommendations. By this the commission will contribute to standardization and agreement on appropriate methods, procedures and their correct application in the practice of environmental medicine. Hopefully it will also achieve a stronger, more consistent use of evidence-based-medicine and improve the quality of the structure, processes and results of research and practice in this field. The committee will initially deal with the issue of clinical environmental medicine, because here the largest problems in quality assurance are seen. In this context the commission will look at the problem areas of environmental-medical outpatient units and environmental clinics. The work of the commission will be supported by the newly formed Documentation and Evaluation Center for Methods in Environmental Medicine (Zentrale Erfassungs- und Bewertungsstelle fuer umweltmedizinische Methoden, ZEBUM) at the Robert Koch Institute. (orig.) [de

  8. Get SMARTS] (Sports Medicine Research Team System): A Computerized Outpatient Data Collection System for Epidemiologic Research

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brodine, S

    1997-01-01

    .... This report describes features of the Sports Medicine Research Team System (SMARTS) and reviews results of a SMARTS supported prospective study of male Marine Corps recruits undergoing basic training...

  9. Golden Helix Institute of Biomedical Research: Interdisciplinary research and educational activities in pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitropoulos, Konstantinos; Innocenti, Federico; van Schaik, Ron H.; Lezhava, Alexander; Tzimas, Giannis; Kollia, Panagoula; Macek, Milan; Fortina, Paolo; Patrinos, George P.

    2013-01-01

    The Golden Helix Institute of Biomedical Research is an international non-profit scientific organization with interdisciplinary research and educational activities in the field of genome medicine in Europe, Asia and Latin America. These activities are supervised by an international scientific advisory council, consisting of world leaders in the field of genomics and translational medicine. Research activities include the regional coordination of the Pharmacogenomics for Every Nation Initiative in Europe, in an effort to integrate pharmacogenomics in developing countries, the development of several National/Ethnic Genetic databases and related web services and the critical assessment of the impact of genetics and genomic medicine to society in various countries. Also, educational activities include the organization of the Golden Helix Symposia®, which are high profile scientific research symposia in the field of personalized medicine, and the Golden Helix Pharmacogenomics Days, an international educational activity focused on pharmacogenomics, as part of its international pharmacogenomics education and outreach efforts. PMID:22379996

  10. Recent Research Trends in Korean Medicine Treatment of Diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Han-sung

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective : The purpose of this study was to analyze the directions of Korean Medicine treatment of diabetes mellitus. Methods : We reviewed the 52 studies about diabetes mellitus which had been published from 2000 to 2007. We selected those studies from the search engine of the web site of five journals. Those were the Journal of Korean Oriental Medical Society, Korean Journal of Oriental Physiology & Pathology, the Journal of Korean Acupuncture & Moxibustion Society, Korean Journal of Oriental Internal Medicine and the Journal of Korean Pharmacopuncture Institute. Results : 1. The types of diabetes mellitus model in studies were the model used Alloxan(2cases, the model used Streptozotocin(41cases, NOD mice(1case, ob/ob mice(1case, db/db mice(5cases and rats fed highfat diet(2cases. 2. The types of method in studies were pharmacopuncture(8cases, herbal medcine(47case and both pharmacopuncture and herbal medcine(3cases. the types of materials in studies were single herb(24cases, multiple herbs(32cases and both single and multiple herbs(4cases. 3. The types of evaluation criteria in studies were glucose, pancreas, liver, kidney, serum lipid, oxidative stress, nervous system, vascular system and immunity. Conclusions : There have been reported many studies of diabetes mellitus in Korean Medicine. It requires to study further types of diabetes mellitus, kinds of herbs and complications of diabetes mellitus for Korean Medicine treatment of diabetes mellitus was covered the ground.

  11. Detection and characterization of translational research in cancer and cardiovascular medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, David S; Cambrosio, Alberto; Mogoutov, Andrei

    2011-05-11

    Scientists and experts in science policy have become increasingly interested in strengthening translational research. Efforts to understand the nature of translational research and monitor policy interventions face an obstacle: how can translational research be defined in order to facilitate analysis of it? We describe methods of scientometric analysis that can do this. We downloaded bibliographic and citation data from all articles published in 2009 in the 75 leading journals in cancer and in cardiovascular medicine (roughly 15,000 articles for each field). We calculated citation relationships between journals and between articles and we extracted the most prevalent natural language concepts. Network analysis and mapping revealed polarization between basic and clinical research, but with translational links between these poles. The structure of the translational research in cancer and cardiac medicine is, however, quite different. In the cancer literature the translational interface is composed of different techniques (e.g., gene expression analysis) that are used across the various subspecialties (e.g., specific tumor types) within cancer research and medicine. In the cardiac literature, the clinical problems are more disparate (i.e., from congenital anomalies to coronary artery disease); although no distinctive translational interface links these fields, translational research does occur in certain subdomains, especially in research on atherosclerosis and hypertension. These techniques can be used to monitor the continuing evolution of translational research in medicine and the impact of interventions designed to enhance it.

  12. Summary results of an assessment of research projects in the Nuclear Medicine Research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    In May 1987, OHER management requested the Office of Program Analysis (OPA) to conduct a peer review of the projects of the DOE Nuclear Medicine Research program. This was done using procedures and a quantitative methodology OPA developed for assessing DOE research programs. Sixty-three individual nuclear medicine projects were reviewed by seven panels; one panel on isotopes and radioisotopes, three on radiopharmacology, two on clinical feasibility, and one on instrumentation. Each panel consisted of five to ten knowledgeable reviewers. 5 figs

  13. Space Exploration: Challenges in Medicine, Research, and Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jeffrey R.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the challenges that space exploration faces in terms of medicine, research and ethics. The topics include: 1) Effects of Microgravity on Human Physiology; 2) Radiation; 3) Bone; 4) Behavior and Performance; 5) Muscle; 6) Cardiovascular; 7) Neurovestibular; 8) Food and Nutrition; 9) Immunology and Hematology; 10) Environment; 11) Exploration; 12) Building Block Approach; 13) Exploration Issues; 14) Life Sciences Contributions; 15) Health Care; and 17) Habitability.

  14. [Research advance in ecotoxicology and environmental impact of veterinary medicines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Xiaoping; Sun, Zhenjun; Shen, Jianzhong

    2004-02-01

    Veterinary medicines or their metabolites could be discharged to the environment through different exposure routes, and had potential impacts to ecosystem in different levels, including individual, population, community and ecosystem. Their fate and potential impact have been widely researched in the world. This paper reviewed their exposure routes, fate in the environment, and impact on organisms in soils and waters and on soil processes. The significance of their environmental risk assessment was also analyzed.

  15. Booklet of the Research Institute of Clinical Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todua, F.; Jgamadze, N.; Todua, N.; Beriashvili, Z.; Chelishvili, M.; Todua, I.; Chovelidze, Sh. et al.

    2012-01-01

    Research Institute of Clinical Medicine is one of the biggest university diagnostic and treatment centre in Georgia with unique modern diagnostic and treatment apparatus. The institute is acknowledged as a leader in various trends of radiology and surgery. The Research Institute of Clinical Medicine was founded in 1991. It is the leading scientific establishment in the field of medicine. The scientific-research work of the Institute is coordinated by the National Academy of Sciences of Georgia. The main scientific trend of the Institute is the Early Complex Diagnostics and Treatment. The scientific activity of the Institute is led by the Scientific Council. Institute achieved remarkable success since its foundation: It has been defended 56 theses for Candidate of Medical Sciences and 16 for Doctor of Medical Sciences; About 30 post-graduate students and more than 200 radiologists have taken training courses in radiology. Nowadays they work in different regions of Georgia, 21 inventions took out patents. It has been published 2000 scientific works and 9 monographs. (authors)

  16. Hierarchical Linear Modeling for Analysis of Ecological Momentary Assessment Data in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terhorst, Lauren; Beck, Kelly Battle; McKeon, Ashlee B; Graham, Kristin M; Ye, Feifei; Shiffman, Saul

    2017-08-01

    Ecological momentary assessment (EMA) methods collect real-time data in real-world environments, which allow physical medicine and rehabilitation researchers to examine objective outcome data and reduces bias from retrospective recall. The statistical analysis of EMA data is directly related to the research question and the temporal design of the study. Hierarchical linear modeling, which accounts for multiple observations from the same participant, is a particularly useful approach to analyzing EMA data. The objective of this paper was to introduce the process of conducting hierarchical linear modeling analyses with EMA data. This is accomplished using exemplars from recent physical medicine and rehabilitation literature.

  17. Nuclear medicine methods in the assessment of acupuncture effects: a short review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Deise Elisabete; Rebello, Bernardo Machado; Agostinho, Raquel Terra; Silva Filho, Reginaldo de Carvalho; Bernardo-Filho, Mario

    2007-01-01

    The mechanisms of acupuncture are poorly understood. In consequence, numerous investigators have conducted clinical trials to test the efficacy of acupuncture in various conditions. We have used PubMed database system to evaluate the number of publications in acupuncture and nuclear medicine procedures in the period from 1964 to 2007, using the keywords: 'nuclear medicine and acupuncture', 'SPECT and acupuncture, 'PET and acupuncture', 'scintigraphy and acupuncture, 'radionuclide and acupuncture', 'radiopharmaceutical and acupuncture', 'radioisotope and acupuncture' and 99m Tc and acupuncture'. Some papers published in English language were selected and a short review is presented The analysis of the number of publications shows that when a method is well accepted by the scientific community, as the methods used in nuclear medicine, the interest in the development of research increases. Moreover, important findings are presented when the nuclear medicine image is used to evaluate the effect of the acupuncture. (author)

  18. [Advances in diabetic animal models and its application in the traditional Chinese medicine research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Long; Shen, Zhu-fang; Sun, Gui-bo; Sun, Xiao-bo

    2015-08-01

    The high and continuing soaring incidence of diabetes may become a huge obstacle to China's development. The antidiabetic drug development is one way to solve the problem. Animal model is a powerful tool for drug development. This paper compares and analyzes the three kinds of animal models for antidiabetic drug development in replicating principle, methods and characteristic, then summarized the application in the research of traditional Chinese medicine. At the same time, the analysis of the market, application and clinical advantages of hypoglycemic medicine from traditional Chinese medicine, is given in this paper, based on the literature analysis. From the point of the clinic advantage embodiment and new drug development, this paper will provide advisory and assistance support for the anti-diabetic fighting with traditional Chinese medicine.

  19. Using mixed methods in music therapy health care research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    2015-01-01

    »Mixed methods« (or »multiple methods») is a fairly new concept in music therapy research. It is inspired by recent methodological developments in social science, covering the interaction of quantitative and qualitative methods in one and the same research study. Mixed methods are not the same...... as the diversity or pluralism of methods advocated by many scholars who are critical towards the principles of evidence-based medicine. This article presents a concrete example of mixed methods in music therapy research: a psycho-social study of music therapy with female cancer survivors. Problems related...

  20. Mental health and emergency medicine: a research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Gregory Luke; Beautrais, Annette L; Spirito, Anthony; Kirrane, Barbara M; Lippmann, Melanie J; Milzman, David P

    2009-11-01

    The burden of mental illness is profound and growing. Coupled with large gaps in extant psychiatric services, this mental health burden has often forced emergency departments (EDs) to become the de facto primary and acute care provider of mental health care in the United States. An expanded emergency medical and mental health research agenda is required to meet the need for improved education, screening, surveillance, and ED-initiated interventions for mental health problems. As an increasing fraction of undiagnosed and untreated psychiatric patients passes through the revolving doors of U.S. EDs, the opportunities for improving the art and science of acute mental health care have never been greater. These opportunities span macroepidemiologic surveillance research to intervention studies with individual patients. Feasible screening, intervention, and referral programs for mental health patients presenting to general EDs are needed. Additional research is needed to improve the quality of care, including the attitudes, abilities, interests, and virtues of ED providers. Research that optimizes provider education and training can help academic settings validate psychosocial issues as core components and responsibilities of emergency medicine. Transdisciplinary research with federal partners and investigators in neuropsychiatry and related fields can improve the mechanistic understanding of acute mental health problems. To have lasting impact, however, advances in ED mental health care must be translated into real-world policies and sustainable program enhancements to assure the uptake of best practices for ED screening, treatment, and management of mental disorders and psychosocial problems. (c) 2009 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  1. [Challenges in the progress of sleep research and sleep medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillar, Giora

    2009-05-01

    Interest in sleep and dreams has existed since the dawn of history. Despite intensive steep research in recent years, the exact function of sleep is yet to be determined. Nevertheless, several breakthrough discoveries have led to substantial improvement in the quality of sleep medicine. This issue of "Harefuah" is dedicated to the current knowledge in steep research and sleep medicine, to novel discoveries in this field, and to some challenges for the future. One paper discusses the concept of tolerance to hypnotics, while another article provides a review, summarizing the development and cLinicaL potential usage of stow release meLatonin in the treatment of insomnia. The issue provides novel data regarding the effect of steep posture on the severity of apnea in children and adults, as well as data regarding obstructive sleep disorders in children younger than two years old. Encouraging data are presented regarding the potential treatment of obstructive sleep apnea utilizing eLectricaL stimulation of the genioglossus muscle to prevent its' collapse during sleep. SeveraL additional articLes in the issue shed further light on recent discoveries in the field of steep medicine.

  2. Common strategic research agenda for radiation protection in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Reflecting the change in funding strategies for European research projects, and the goal to jointly improve medical radiation protection through sustainable research efforts, five medical societies involved in the application of ionising radiation (European Association of Nuclear Medicine, EANM; European Federation of Organizations for Medical Physics. EFOMP; European Federation of Radiographer Societies, EFRS; European Society of Radiology, ESR; European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology, ESTRO) have identified research areas of common interest and developed this first edition of the Common Strategic Research Agenda (SRA) for medical radiation protection. The research topics considered necessary and most urgent for effective medical care and efficient in terms of radiation protection are summarised in five main themes: 1. Measurement and quantification in the field of medical applications of ionising radiation 2. Normal tissue reactions, radiation-induced morbidity and long-term health problems 3. Optimisation of radiation exposure and harmonisation of practices 4. Justification of the use of ionising radiation in medical practice 5. Infrastructures for quality assurance The SRA is a living document; thus comments and suggestions by all stakeholders in medical radiation protection are welcome and will be dealt with by the European Alliance for Medical Radiation Protection Research (EURAMED) established by the above-mentioned societies. • Overcome the fragmentation of medical radiation protection research in Europe • Identify research areas of joint interest in the field of medical radiation protection • Improve the use of ionising radiation in medicine • Collect stakeholder feedback and seek consensus • Emphasise importance of clinical translation and evaluation of research results.

  3. [Research progress on enlargement of medicinal resources of Paridis Rhizome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Li; Zhen, Yan; Chen, Min; Huang, Lu-qi

    2015-08-01

    Currently, as an important raw material of Chinese traditional patent medicines, Paridis Rhizome is in great demand, which led to its price increases. In order to protect the wild resources and satisfy market demand of Paridis rhizome, the researches in various directions were conducted, involved its chemical composition, pharmacological action, clinical application, resource investigation, artificial cultivation, etc. Herein, the chemical studies of genus Paridis Rhizome, aerial parts of Paridis Rhizome gummy and starchy Paridis Rhizome, and the studies of endophyte in Paridis Rhizome were reviewed and analyzed in order to explore the substitutes of Paridis Rhizome, and provide the reference for the enlargement of medicinal resources of Paridis Rhizome. It manifests that the steroidal saponins, the important chemical compositions in Paridis Rhizome were tested in genus Paridis Rhizome, aerial parts of Paridis Rhizome, gummy Paridis Rhizome and the endophyte in Paridis Rhizome. However, the further experimental studies and clinical verification works should be carried out to confirm the final substitute.

  4. International development of traditional medicine / complementary and alternative medicine research--what can Europe learn?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hök, Johanna; Lewith, George; Weidenhammer, Wolfgang; Santos-Rey, Koldo; Fønnebø, Vinjar; Wiesener, Solveig; Falkenberg, Torkel

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse global research and development (R&D) strategies for traditional medicine (TM) and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) across the world to learn from previous and on-going activities. 52 representatives within CAMbrella nominated 43 key international stakeholders (individuals and organisations) and 15 of these were prioritised. Information from policy documents including mission statements, R&D strategies and R&D activities were collected in combination with personal interviews. Data were analysed using the principles of content analysis. Key stakeholders vary greatly in terms of capacity, mission and funding source (private/public). They ranged from only providing research funding to having a comprehensive R&D and communication agenda. A common shift in R&D strategy was noted; whereas 10 years ago research focused mainly on exploring efficacy and mechanisms, today the majority of stakeholders emphasise the importance of a broad spectrum of research, including methodologies exploring context, safety and comparative effectiveness. The scarce public investment in this field in Europe stands in stark contrast to the large investments found in Australia, Asia and North America. There is an emerging global trend supporting a broad research repertoire, including qualitative and comparative effectiveness research. This trend should be considered by the EU given the experience and the substantial research funding committed by the included stakeholders. To facilitate international collaborative efforts and minimise the risk of investment failure, we recommend the formation of a centralised EU CAM research centre fostering a broad CAM R&D agenda with the responsibility for implementing the relevant findings of CAMbrella.

  5. [Research progress in phytoestrogens of traditional Chinese medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuan; Zheng, Hong-Xia; Xu, Ying; Lin, Na

    2017-09-01

    Phytoestrogens are plant-derived compounds, which have a similarity in structure with human endogenous estrogen 17-β-estradiol. Structural likeness enables phytoestrogens to interact with estrogen receptors, not simply mimicking the effects of human steroidal estrogen but also exhibiting similar and divergent actions. The global literature relating to phytoestrogen in recent years was systematically summarized in this paper. Chemical compositions of phytoestrogens were mainly flavonoids, coumarins, lignans, terpenoids, steroids, etc., with a character of prevention and treatment of perimenopausal syndrome, osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease, metabolic diseases, cancer, regulation of brain function and other pharmacological effects. The mechanisms of action mainly included classical estrogen receptor pathway, epigenetic effect, activation of 5'-adenosyl-phospho-activated protein kinase, inhibition of kinase, activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, regulation of apoptosis-related proteins, inhibition of nuclear factor κB signaling pathway and so on. According to their efficacy classification, phytoestrogens were mainly distributed in the tonifying medicines, blood-activating and stasis-resolving medicines and heat-clearing medicines. The classical prescriptions with estrogen activity included tonifying formula, Qi-regulating formula and harmonizing formula, etc. This review was aimed at providing a certain reference for the further study of phytoestrogens by researchers and clinicians. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  6. Phytochemical and biological research of Fritillaria medicine resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Da-Cheng; Gu, Xiao-Jie; Xiao, Pei-Gen; Peng, Yong

    2013-07-01

    The genus Fritillaria is a botanical source for various pharmaceutically active components, which have been commonly used in traditional Chinese medicine for thousands of years. Increasing interest in Fritillaria medicinal resources has led to additional discoveries of steroidal alkaloids, saponins, terpenoids, glycosides and many other compounds in various Fritillaria species, and to investigations on their chemotaxonomy, molecular phylogeny and pharmacology. In continuation of studies on Fritillaria pharmacophylogeny, the phytochemistry, chemotaxonomy, molecular biology and phylogeny of Fritillaria and their relevance to drug efficacy is reviewed. Literature searching is used to characterize the global scientific effort in the flexible technologies being applied. The interrelationship within Chinese Bei Mu species and between Chinese species, and species distributed outside of China, is clarified by the molecular phylogenetic inferences based on nuclear and chloroplast DNA sequences. The incongruence between chemotaxonomy and molecular phylogeny is revealed and discussed. It is essential to study more species for both the sustainable utilization of Fritillaria medicinal resources and for finding novel compounds with potential clinical utility. Systems biology and omics technologies will play an increasingly important role in future pharmaceutical research involving the bioactive compounds of Fritillaria. Copyright © 2013 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Complementary and alternative medicine whole systems research: beyond identification of inadequacies of the RCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoef, Marja J; Lewith, George; Ritenbaugh, Cheryl; Boon, Heather; Fleishman, Susan; Leis, Anne

    2005-09-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) often consists of whole systems of care (such as naturopathic medicine or traditional Chinese medicine (TCM)) that combine a wide range of modalities to provide individualised treatment. The complexity of these interventions and their potential synergistic effect requires innovative evaluative approaches. Model validity, which encompasses the need for research to adequately address the unique healing theory and therapeutic context of the intervention, is central to whole systems research (WSR). Classical randomised controlled trials (RCTs) are limited in their ability to address this need. Therefore, we propose a mixed methods approach that includes a range of relevant and holistic outcome measures. As the individual components of most whole systems are inseparable, complementary and synergistic, WSR must not focus only on the "active" ingredients of a system. An emerging WSR framework must be non-hierarchical, cyclical, flexible and adaptive, as knowledge creation is continuous, evolutionary and necessitates a continuous interplay between research methods and "phases" of knowledge. Finally, WSR must hold qualitative and quantitative research methods in equal esteem to realize their unique research contribution. Whole systems are complex and therefore no one method can adequately capture the meaning, process and outcomes of these interventions.

  8. Research evaluation and competition for academic positions in occupational medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Giuliano

    2013-01-01

    Citation analysis is widely used to evaluate the performance of individual researchers, journals, and universities. Its outcome plays a crucial role in the decision-making process of ranking applicants for an academic position. A number of indicators, including the h-index reflecting both scientific productivity and its relevance in medical fields, are available through the Web of Knowledge( sm ) and Scopus®. In the field of occupational medicine, the adoption of the h-index in assessing the value of core journals shows some advantages compared with traditional bibliometrics and may encourage researchers to submit their papers. Although evaluation of the overall individual performance for academic positions should assess several aspects, scientific performance is usually based on citation analysis indicators. Younger researchers should be aware of the new approach based on transparent threshold rules for career promotion and need to understand the new evaluation systems based on metrics.

  9. Clinical research of traditional Chinese medicine in big data era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junhua; Zhang, Boli

    2014-09-01

    With the advent of big data era, our thinking, technology and methodology are being transformed. Data-intensive scientific discovery based on big data, named "The Fourth Paradigm," has become a new paradigm of scientific research. Along with the development and application of the Internet information technology in the field of healthcare, individual health records, clinical data of diagnosis and treatment, and genomic data have been accumulated dramatically, which generates big data in medical field for clinical research and assessment. With the support of big data, the defects and weakness may be overcome in the methodology of the conventional clinical evaluation based on sampling. Our research target shifts from the "causality inference" to "correlativity analysis." This not only facilitates the evaluation of individualized treatment, disease prediction, prevention and prognosis, but also is suitable for the practice of preventive healthcare and symptom pattern differentiation for treatment in terms of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), and for the post-marketing evaluation of Chinese patent medicines. To conduct clinical studies involved in big data in TCM domain, top level design is needed and should be performed orderly. The fundamental construction and innovation studies should be strengthened in the sections of data platform creation, data analysis technology and big-data professionals fostering and training.

  10. [Procedures and methods of benefit assessments for medicines in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekkering, G E; Kleijnen, J

    2008-12-01

    implement a scoping process to support the development of the research question. 2. To separate the work of the external experts performing the evidence assessment from that of the institute formulating recommendations. Therefore, the preliminary report as produced by external experts needs to be public, and published separately from any subsequent amendments or (draft-)reports made by the institute, which includes the institute's recommendations. 3. To implement open peer review by publishing both the comments of the reviewers and their names. Based on the legal framework, the institute must provide for adequate participation of relevant parties. These include organisations representing the interests of patients; experts of medical, pharmaceutical and health economic science and practice; the professional organisations of pharmacists and pharmaceutical companies; and experts on alternative therapies. Patients and health care professionals bring in new insights with respect to research priorities, treatment and outcomes. The relevant parties should be identified and contacted whenever the global scope of the assessment has been drafted. Subsequently, the relevant parties should be involved in defining the research question, developing the protocol and commenting on the preliminary report. To implement the involvement of relevant parties in defining the research question a scoping process is suggested. For the other phases, written comments followed by an oral discussion should be used. Finally, the relevant parties should have the right to appeal the final decision on judicial grounds. None of these steps mean that the institute would lose any part of its scientific independence. From the relevant sections of the legal framework with respect to the assessment methods, it can be concluded that: 1. The institute must ensure that the assessment is made in accordance with internationally recognised standards of evidence-based medicine (EBM). 2. The assessment is conducted in

  11. Procedures and methods of benefit assessments for medicines in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekkering, Geertruida E; Kleijnen, Jos

    2008-11-01

    process to support the development of the research question. 2. To separate the work of the external experts performing the evidence assessment from that of the institute formulating recommendations. Therefore, the preliminary report as produced by external experts needs to be public, and published separately from any subsequent amendments or (draft-)reports made by the institute, which includes the institute's recommendations. 3. To implement open peer review by publishing both the comments of the reviewers and their names. Based on the legal framework, the institute must provide for adequate participation of relevant parties. These include organisations representing the interests of patients; experts of medical, pharmaceutical and health economic science and practice; the professional organisations of pharmacists and pharmaceutical companies; and experts on alternative therapies. Patients and health care professionals bring in new insights with respect to research priorities, treatment and outcomes.The relevant parties should be identified and contacted whenever the global scope of the assessment has been drafted. Subsequently, the relevant parties should be involved in defining the research question, developing the protocol and commenting on the preliminary report. To implement the involvement of relevant parties in defining the research question a scoping process is suggested. For the other phases, written comments followed by an oral discussion should be used. Finally, the relevant parties should have the right to appeal the final decision on judicial grounds. None of these steps mean that the institute would lose any part of its scientific independence.From the relevant sections of the legal framework with respect to the assessment methods, it can be concluded that: 1. The institute must ensure that the assessment is made in accordance with internationally recognised standards of evidence-based medicine (EBM). 2. The assessment is conducted in comparison with other

  12. Contributions of Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) in the area of Medicinal plants/Traditional medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Neeraj; Yadav, Satyapal Singh

    2017-02-02

    Medicinal plants belong to the oldest known health care products that have been used by human beings all over the world and are major components of the formulations used in indigenous system of medicine practiced in many countries. Besides, finding place as health supplements, nutraceuticals, cosmetics, herbal tea etc. there has been a global insurgence of interest, including India, leading to enormous research/activities in the area of medicinal plants. The article is aimed to provide the effort and initiatives of ICMR towards research on medicinal plants and its contributions on consolidation of Indian research on medicinal plants that are very relevant and important in the national context. The various initiatives undertaken by ICMR on research on traditional medicines/medicinal plants in the past are reviewed and documented in this article. The multi-disciplinary, multicentric research initiatives of ICMR have resulted in validation of traditional treatment Kshaarasootra (medicated Ayurvedic thread) for anal fistula, Vijayasar (heart wood of Pterocarpus marsupium Roxb.) for diabetes mellitus, encouraging micro- and macrofilaricidal activity of Shakotak (stem bark of Streblus asper Lour.) in experimental studies an iridoid glycosides fraction isolated from root/rhizomes of Picrorhiza kurroa Royle ex Benth. (designated as Picroliv) for viral hepatitis. Other developmental and compilation of research works on Indian medicinal plants have resulted in publications of the thirteen volumes of quality standards, comprising of 449 Indian medicinal plants; three volumes of 90 phytochemical reference standards; fifteen volumes of review monographs on 4167 medicinal plant species; and one publication each on perspectives of Indian medicinal plants for management of liver disorders, lymphatic filariasis and diabetes mellitus (details available at http://www.icmr.nic.in/mpsite). The ICMR efforts assume special significance in the light of multifaceted use of medicinal plants

  13. Between clinical medicine and the laboratory: medical research funding in France from 1945 to the present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esterle, Laurence; Picard, Jean-François

    2011-10-01

    By focusing on funding methods, this paper considers the way in which medical research eventually led to the science-based medicine that is prevalent in France today. This process seems to have taken place in three stages during the second half of the twentieth century. In the 1940s and 1950s, two major events occurred. The first was the creation of a national health insurance fund in France, which opened up new reasons for, and ways of, funding medical research. The second was the development of antibiotics, which triggered a revival of clinical medicine. In the 1960s and 1970s, a proactive government science policy allowed the life sciences and medical research to come together in the wake of a burgeoning new science: molecular biology. Thus, in 1964, the creation of the National Health and Medical Research Institute (Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale or INSERM), destined to "molecularize" medical research, was seen as the fulfillment of the government's ambitious research policy. Today, with medicine irreversibly embedded in scientific and technical rationality, health has become a major issue in modern societies. This paper therefore touches on some of the key features of biomedical research, including the revival of funding systems for clinical research and the development of a system of research grants that was made possible by patient organizations and the creation of new funding agencies.

  14. [Research about re-evaluation of screening of traditonal Chinese medicine symptoms item of post-marketing medicine Xuezhikang].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Xie, Yanming; Wang, Yongyan

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of post-marketing Chinese medicine re-evaluation is to identify Chinese medicine clinical indications, while designing scientific and rational of Chinese medicine symptoms items are important to the result of symptoms re-evaluation. This study give screening of traditional Chinese medicine(TCM) symptoms item of post-marketing medicine Xuezhikang re-evaluation as example that reference to principle dyslipidemia clinical research, academic dissertations, Xuezhikang directions, clinical expert practice experience etc. while standardization those symptom names and screening 41 dyslipidemia common symptoms. Furthermore, this paper discuss about the accoerdance and announcements when screening symptoms item, so as to providing a research thread to manufacture PRO chart for post-marketing medicine re-evaluation.

  15. Personalized medicine and the role of health economics and outcomes research: issues, applications, emerging trends, and future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, John C

    2013-01-01

    The decade since the completion of the sequencing of the human genome has witnessed significant advances in the incorporation of genomic information in diagnostic, treatment, and reimbursement practices. Indeed, as case in point, there are now several dozen commercially available genomic tests routinely applied across a wide range of disease states in predictive or prognostic applications. Moreover, many involved in the advancement of personalized medicine would view emerging approaches to stratify patients in meaningful ways beyond genomic information as a signal of the progress made. Yet despite these advances, there remains a general sense of dissatisfaction about the progress of personalized medicine in terms of its contribution to the drug development process, to the efficiency and effectiveness of health care delivery, and ultimately to the provision of the right treatment to the right patient at the right time. Academicians, payers, and manufacturers alike are struggling not only with how to embed the new insights that personalized medicine promises but also with the fundamental issues of application in early drug development, implications for health technology assessment, new demands on traditional health economic and outcomes research methods, and implications for reimbursement and access. In fact, seemingly prosaic issues such as the definition and composition of the term "personalized medicine" are still unresolved. Regardless of these issues, practitioners are increasingly compelled to find practical solutions to the challenges and opportunities presented by the evolving face of personalized medicine today. Accordingly, the articles comprising this Special Issue offer applied perspectives geared toward professionals and policymakers in the field grappling with developing, assessing, implementing, and reimbursing personalized medicine approaches. Starting with a framework with which to characterize personalized medicine, this Special Issue proceeds to

  16. The National Library of Medicine's Disaster Information Management Research Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Steven J

    2013-12-16

    The Disaster Information Management Research Center (DIMRC) develops and provides access to health information resources and technology for disaster preparedness, response, and recovery. DIMRC focuses on maintaining access to health information at all phases of disasters, developing innovative products and services for emergency personnel, conducting research to support disaster health information management, and collaborating with other agencies and communities. Several tools are available to help emergency responders in hazardous materials or chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear incidents. Access to the literature is made available through PubMed and the Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health, with links to online documents and resources from numerous organizations and government agencies. In addition, DIMRC supports the Disaster Information Specialist Program, a collaborative effort to explore and promote the role of librarians and information specialists in the provision of disaster-related information resources to the workforce and communities.

  17. [Progress in research of traditional Chinese medicine Citrus aurantium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-xiao; Li, Zheng-yong; Ma, Yu-ling; Ma, Shuang-cheng

    2015-01-01

    Citrus aurantium is one of the most common traditional Chinese medicines. In this paper, the chemical components, content determination and pharmacological actions of C. aurantium were summarized for the comprehensive utilization of its resources. Because of the complicated resources of C. aurantium, only one single component as index couldn't reflect the quality and effects and comprehensive evaluation which concluding multiple components should be established in the future quality control. In recent years, the pharmacological effects research of C. aurantium has made tremendous progress, and it is important to explore new drugs from the development and utilization of the active ingredient of C. aurantium. In recent years, the pharmacological effects research of C. aurantium has made tremendous progress, and it is important to explore new drugs from the development and utilization of the active ingredient of C. aurantium.

  18. [Industrial medicine in theory and research for practice (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruhmann, G

    1979-03-16

    The university teacher in industrial medicine is guided by an autonomous self-responsibility to public interests protected by the fundamental law of the German Federal Republic. For the medical student about 8 hours practical work and an examination in the second clinical professional examination is prescribed. The teaching of the mutual relationships between industrial work and health is divided into: prevention and clinical aspects of industrial diseases, industrial hygiene, toxicology, industrial physiology (ergonomics), industrial psychology, rehabilitation and knowledge of giving expert opinion. The following are discussed as examples of research related to practice: the constant revision of the list of maximal concentration of work places, studies on the synergism of inhaled poisons, research into the causes of chronic bronchitis, pneumoconioses due to organic dusts and the discovery of aggresive antigens in work places previously considered safe.

  19. Methods and Methods' Debates within Consumption Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halkier, Bente

    2017-01-01

    ethnography, as we have experienced and visualized them being practices in our native fields of anthropology, marketing and consumer research, and as it has touched upon industry market researchers and their workings. We do not rehash classic treatments easily available to interested scholars (e.g. Arnould...

  20. Research publications in medical journals (1992-2013 by family medicine authors - Suez Canal University-Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulmajeed A Abdulmajeed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Research in family medicine (FM provides an important contribution to its discipline. Family medicine research can contribute to many areas of primary care, ranging from the early diagnosis to equitable health care. Publication productivity is important in academic settings as a marker for career advancement. Objective: To describe the publications by family medicine researcher authors between 1992 and 2013. Materials and Methods: All full text, original articles published by family medicine researcher; author with affiliation to the Suez Canal University were collected using the internet and hand search. The journals that published for family medicine researcher authors were identified. Author characteristics were described. The trend of publications was described. All articles were analyzed for their characteristics, including the themes and study designs according to predefined criteria. Results: Along 22 years, 149 research articles were published by 48 family medicine authors in 39 medical journals. The largest category in publications was related to Family physician/Health service (FP-HS, n = 52 articles, followed by ′Patient′ category (n = 42. All the studies were quantitative; the largest group was represented by cross-sectional studies (76.5%. Conclusions: The publication productivity by family medicine researchers are going to be increased. FP-HS and patient topics were mostly addressed in publications. Cross-sectional studies exceeded any other designs. There is need to put more emphasis on intervention studies. Continuous assessment and improvement of FM research production and publication is recommended.

  1. Developing a strategic research framework for sport and exercise medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzhausen, Louis J; van Zyl, Gert J; Nel, Marietjie M

    2014-07-01

    Sport and exercise medicine (SEM) is a young, fast growing discipline. The need to broaden its evidence base has been established. The aim of the study was to compile a research-based strategic framework for the development of a sustainable research programme in SEM at a South African university. A literature review, internal document analysis, semistructured interviews with role players within the university and a Delphi process utilising a panel of international and national experts in research and SEM, were applied. Results were analysed and categorised regarding foundational aspects and operational components to create a sustainable research programme in SEM. The foundational level of the framework consists of points of departure, premises and resources. Points of departure regarding SEM, the university, management, research and sustainability were identified. The premises for the research programme are relevance, currency, flexibility, implementability and a scientific base. Internal, institutional and external resources required by the programme were identified. The operational level was developed according to the W.K. Kellogg programme logic model. It consists of academic and management inputs; a central hub of activities which drives the programme; desired financial, human and academic outputs, and long-term qualitative and quantitative outcomes. The third level represents a sustainable research programme which is constantly monitored and reviewed. The strategic framework provides guidelines for the development and sustainable management of an SEM research programme. It will make a substantial contribution to the research, further development, and ultimately the status of SEM in South Africa. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  2. Analysis of medicinal plant extracts by neutron activation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaz, Sandra Muntz

    1995-01-01

    This dissertation has presented the results from analysis of medicinal plant extracts using neutron activation method. Instrumental neutron activation analysis was applied to the determination of the elements Al, Br, Ca, Ce, Cl, Cr, Cs, Fe, K, La, Mg, Mn, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc and Zn in medicinal extracts obtained from Achyrolcline satureoides DC, Casearia sylvestris, Centella asiatica, Citrus aurantium L., Solano lycocarpum, Solidago microglossa, Stryphnondedron barbatiman and Zingiber officinale R. plants. The elements Hg and Se were determined using radiochemical separation by means of retention of Se in HMD inorganic exchanger and solvent extraction of Hg by bismuth diethyl-dithiocarbamate solution. Precision and accuracy of the results have been evaluated by analysing reference materials. The therapeutic action of some elements found in plant extracts analyzed was briefly discussed

  3. Synergistic effects of Chinese herbal medicine: a comprehensive review of methodology and current research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian Zhou

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Traditional Chinese medicine is an important part of primary health care in Asian countries that has utilised complex herbal formulations (consisting 2 or more medicinal herbs for treating diseases over thousands of years. There seems to be a general assumption that the synergistic therapeutic effects of Chinese herbal medicine derive from the complex interactions between the multiple bioactive components within the herbs and/or herbal formulations. However, evidence to support these synergistic effects remains weak and controversial due to several reasons, including the very complex nature of Chinese herbal medicine, misconceptions about synergy, methodological challenges to study design. In this review, we clarify the definition of synergy, identify common errors in synergy research and describe current methodological approaches to test for synergistic interaction. We discuss the strengthen and weakness of these models in the context of Chinese herbal medicine and summarise the current status of synergy research in CHM. Despite the availability of some scientific data to support the synergistic effects of multi-herbal and/or herb-drug combinations, the level of evidence remains low and the clinical relevancy of most of these findings is undetermined. There remain significant challenges in the development of suitable methods for synergistic studies of complex herbal combinations.

  4. Roles of contract research organizations in translational medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Shu Shih

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Transitional medicine/science is shifting the medical research paradigm from compound-based to evidence-based drug/device discovery. It is increasing interdisciplinary collaborations, enhancing usage of advanced technologies, and facilitating therapeutics reaching patients faster. The fundamental theme of evidence-based discovery is to apply what is revealed in preclinical experimentation and to bring the resulting safety and efficacy to clinics. In the medical fields, a contract research organization (CRO works like a hired agent who has corresponding knowledge and experience to conduct and complete tasks for a sponsor. The relationship is business, and the contract is for deliverables. The increasingly high volume of sponsored outsourcing work has made this for-profit business boom in the past decade. Location boundaries are being blurred under globalization in the sciences and cross-border regulatory reviews. Getting from bench to bedside is a winding road with many obstacles and high hurdles. Efficient teamwork becomes essential to materialize ideas and bring them to the market. The professionals within team communities include drug/device makers and CROs. It has become increasingly obvious that CROs play pivotal roles in the chain of discovery/design, developing product to market through in vitro, in vivo, and ex vivo testing during preclinical experimentations and clinical trials. Project management teams are responsible for nurturing the materialization in a collaborative manner and enhancing the productivity of the pipelines. CROs have many functional aspects and specialties, and no one organization is fully capable of serving, i.e., integrated services, with expertise in each step of the chain to the needs of a variety of sponsors. Instead of competition among the CROs themselves, the continuously expanding market demands can be shared by Expertise-Based Integrated Services among allied CROs, in contrast to the few large CROs

  5. Study on color difference estimation method of medicine biochemical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunhong; Zhou, Yue; Zhao, Hongxia; Sun, Jiashi; Zhou, Fengkun

    2006-01-01

    The biochemical analysis in medicine is an important inspection and diagnosis method in hospital clinic. The biochemical analysis of urine is one important item. The Urine test paper shows corresponding color with different detection project or different illness degree. The color difference between the standard threshold and the test paper color of urine can be used to judge the illness degree, so that further analysis and diagnosis to urine is gotten. The color is a three-dimensional physical variable concerning psychology, while reflectance is one-dimensional variable; therefore, the estimation method of color difference in urine test can have better precision and facility than the conventional test method with one-dimensional reflectance, it can make an accurate diagnose. The digital camera is easy to take an image of urine test paper and is used to carry out the urine biochemical analysis conveniently. On the experiment, the color image of urine test paper is taken by popular color digital camera and saved in the computer which installs a simple color space conversion (RGB -> XYZ -> L *a *b *)and the calculation software. Test sample is graded according to intelligent detection of quantitative color. The images taken every time were saved in computer, and the whole illness process will be monitored. This method can also use in other medicine biochemical analyses that have relation with color. Experiment result shows that this test method is quick and accurate; it can be used in hospital, calibrating organization and family, so its application prospect is extensive.

  6. [Research progress of genetic engineering on medicinal plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Zhong-qiu; Shen, Ye

    2015-02-01

    The application of genetic engineering technology in modern agriculture shows its outstanding role in dealing with food shortage. Traditional medicinal plant cultivation and collection have also faced with challenges, such as lack of resources, deterioration of environment, germplasm of recession and a series of problems. Genetic engineering can be used to improve the disease resistance, insect resistance, herbicides resistant ability of medicinal plant, also can improve the medicinal plant yield and increase the content of active substances in medicinal plants. Thus, the potent biotechnology can play an important role in protection and large area planting of medicinal plants. In the development of medicinal plant genetic engineering, the safety of transgenic medicinal plants should also be paid attention to. A set of scientific safety evaluation and judgment standard which is suitable for transgenic medicinal plants should be established based on the recognition of the particularity of medicinal plants.

  7. [Translational Medicine and its application in stem cell research for periodontal regeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Xiang-ying; Yang, Wen

    2013-02-18

    Translational Medicine is an evolutional concept that encompasses the rapid translation of basic research for use in clinical disease diagnosis, prevention, treatment and finally in public health promotion. It follows the idea "from bench to bedside and back", and hence relies on cooperation between laboratory research and clinical care. Translation process is a complex process that requires both research and non-research activities. During the past ten years, there has been intense interest in the development of new clinical procedures, therapeutic molecules, and prototypes based on translational medicine concept including dentistry. Periodontitis is a globally prevalent inflammatory disease that causes the destruction of the tooth supporting apparatus. Current methods to reconstitute lost periodontal structures have been shown to have limited and variable outcomes. Stem cell therapy can be used for periodontal regeneration and it is also one of the hot topics in translational regenerative medicine. In this article, recent advances and current status of translational medicine in stem cell therapy in periodontal regeneration field were reviewed. However, a number of biological, technical and clinical hurdles must be overcome before stem cell therapy could be used in clinics.

  8. Advancing translational research and precision medicine with targeted proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzozie, Anuli Christiana; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2018-02-22

    Remarkable advances in quantitative mass spectrometry have shifted the focus of proteomics from the characterization of protein expression profiles to detailed investigations on the spatial and temporal organization of the proteome. Demands for precision therapy and personalized medicine are challenged by heterogeneity in the larger population, which have led to drawbacks in biomarker performance and therapeutic efficacy. The consistent adaptation of the cellular proteome in response to distinctive signals defines a phenotype. Acquisition of quantitative multi-layered omics data on multiple individuals over defined time scales has made it possible to establish means to probe the extent to which the genome, transcriptome and environment influence the variability of the proteome in given conditions, over time. Comprehensive, reproducible datasets generated with contemporary quantitative, massively parallel, targeted proteomic approaches offer as yet untapped benefits for biomarker discovery, development, and validation. The objective of this review is to recapitulate on advances in targeted proteomics approaches for quantifying the cellular proteome and to address ways to incorporate these data towards improving present day methodologies for biomarker evaluation and precision medicine. Advances in quantitative mass spectrometry have shifted the focus of proteomics from the characterization of protein expression profiles to detailed investigations on the spatial and temporal organization of the proteome. This review expounds on avenues through which targeted proteomic methodologies can be constructively implemented in translational research and precision medicine to overcome existing challenges that hinder the success of protein biomarkers in clinics, and to develop precise therapeutics for future applications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Monogenic diabetes: Implementation of translational genomic research towards precision medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaxillaire, Martine; Froguel, Philippe

    2016-11-01

    Various forms of early onset non-autoimmune diabetes are recognized as monogenic diseases, each subtype being caused by a single highly penetrant gene defect at the individual level. Monogenic diabetes (MD) is clinically and genetically heterogeneous, including maturity onset diabetes of the young and infancy-onset and neonatal diabetes mellitus, which are characterized by functional defects of insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells and hyperglycemia early in life. Depending on the genetic cause, MD differs in the age at diabetes onset, the severity of hyperglycemia, long-term diabetic complications, and extrapancreatic manifestations. In this review we discuss the many challenges of molecular genetic diagnosis of MD in the face of a substantial genetic heterogeneity, as well as the clinical benefit and cost-effectiveness of an early genetic diagnosis, as demonstrated by simulation models based on lifetime complications and treatment costs. We also discuss striking examples of proof-of-concept of genomic medicine, which have enabled marked improvement in patient care and long-term clinical management. Recent advances in genome editing and pluripotent stem cell reprogramming technologies provide new opportunities for in vitro diabetes modeling and the discovery of novel drug targets and cell-based diabetes therapies. A review of these future directions makes the case for exciting translational research to further our understanding of the pathophysiology of early onset diabetes. © 2016 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  10. Alternative medicine research in clinical practice: a US national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilburt, Jon C; Curlin, Farr A; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Clarridge, Brian; Bolcic-Jankovic, Dragana; Emanuel, Ezekiel J; Miller, Franklin G

    2009-04-13

    Little is known about whether federally funded complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) research is translating into clinical practice. We sought to describe the awareness of CAM clinical trials, the ability to interpret research results, the acceptance of research evidence, and the predictors of trial awareness among US clinicians. We conducted a cross-sectional mailed survey of 2400 practicing US acupuncturists, naturopaths, internists, and rheumatologists. A total of 1561 clinicians (65%) responded. Of the respondents, 59% were aware of at least 1 major CAM clinical trial; only 23% were aware of both trials. A minority of acupuncturists (20%), naturopaths (25%), internists (17%), and rheumatologists (33%) were "very confident" in interpreting research results (P research experience (OR, 1.45 [95% CI, 1.13-1.86]), institutional or academic practice setting (ORs, 1.98 [95% CI, 1.01-3.91], and 1.23 [95% CI, 0.73-2.09], respectively), and rating randomized trials as "very useful" (OR, 1.46 [95% CI, 1.12-1.91]) (P clinical decision making were positively associated with CAM trial awareness. Acupuncturists, naturopaths, and internists (ORs, 0.15 [95% CI, 0.10-0.23], 0.15 [95% CI, 0.09-0.24], and 0.18 [95% CI, 0.12-0.28], respectively) were all similarly less aware of CAM trial results compared with rheumatologists. For clinical research in CAM to achieve its social value, concerted efforts must be undertaken to train clinicians and improve the dissemination of research results.

  11. Research advances in traditional Chinese medicine syndromes in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Qing; Luo, Yun-quan; Wang, Wen-hai; Liu, Xuan; Li, Qi; Su, Shi-bing

    2016-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) syndrome, also known as TCM ZHENG or TCM pattern, is an integral and essential part of TCM theory that helps to guide the design of individualized treatments. A TCM syndrome, in essence, is a characteristic profile of all clinical manifestations in one patient that can be readily identified by a TCM practitioner. In this article, the authors reviewed the presentations of TCM syndromes in seven common malignancies (liver, lung, gastric, breast, colorectal, pancreatic and esophageal cancers), the objectivity and the standardization of TCM syndrome differentiation, the evaluation of TCM syndrome modeling in cancer research, and syndrome differentiation-guided TCM treatment of cancers. A better understanding of TCM syndrome theory, as well as its potential biological basis, may contribute greatly to the clinical TCM diagnosis and the treatment of cancer.

  12. Pain Research in Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Australia: A Critical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Charlie C.L.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Sixty percent (60%) to 80% of patients who visit chiropractic, osteopathic, or Chinese medicine practitioners are seeking pain relief. Objectives This article aimed to identify the amount, quality, and type of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) pain research in Australia by systematically and critically reviewing the literature. Methods PubMed, Scopus, Australasian Medical Index, and Cochrane library were searched from their inception to July 2009. Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trial Registration and National Health and Medical Research Council databases were searched for human studies yet to be completed. Predefined search terms and selection criteria were used for data identification. Results Of 204 studies selected, 54% were on chiropractic, 27% on Chinese medicine, 15% about multitherapy, and 4% on osteopathy. Chronic spinal pain was the most studied condition, with visceral pain being the least studied. Half of the articles in Chinese medicine or multitherapy were systematic reviews or randomized control trials. In comparison, only 5% of chiropractic and none of osteopathy studies were in these categories. Government funding was rare, and most studies were self-funded or internally funded. All chiropractic, osteopathic, and Chinese herbal medicine studies were conducted by the researchers of the professions. In contrast, half of the acupuncture studies and all t'ai chi studies were conducted by medical doctors or physiotherapists. Multidisciplinary collaboration was uncommon. Conclusions The quantity and the quality of CAM pain research in Australia are inconsistent with the high utilization of the relevant CAM therapies by Australians. A substantial increase in government funding is required. Collaborative research examining the multimodality or multidisciplinary approach is needed. PMID:22891634

  13. Assessing the Needs of Students in Veterinary Medicine for Preferred Delivery Methods: Focus Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena-Mirela Samfira

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the paper is to presents the results of a focus group with students in veterinary medicine, asked about their preferred delivery methods. The research is a preliminary one in a longer series of studies dedicated to the design and implementation of a problem-based learning methodology for the students. The materials used consisted in a series of questions that were submitted for debate during a focus group organised with 12 students in veterinary medicine. The method used was the focus group. The degree of novelty of the paper is high. Results show that students in veterinary medicine have already used problem-based learning without even knowing it. The research limitations consist in the fact that the authors organised the focus group on a small sample of students. The usefulness of the paper consists in the fact that it will help other academics see better through the eyes of their students and try to meet their expectations. The originality of the paper is real: there has been no such research in Romanian higher education in veterinary medicine. The importance of the paper resides in its disclosure of facts and feelings unknown to both the authors of the paper and readers.

  14. Current application of chemometrics in traditional Chinese herbal medicine research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yipeng; Wu, Zhenwei; Su, Rihui; Ruan, Guihua; Du, Fuyou; Li, Gongke

    2016-07-15

    Traditional Chinese herbal medicines (TCHMs) are promising approach for the treatment of various diseases which have attracted increasing attention all over the world. Chemometrics in quality control of TCHMs are great useful tools that harnessing mathematics, statistics and other methods to acquire information maximally from the data obtained from various analytical approaches. This feature article focuses on the recent studies which evaluating the pharmacological efficacy and quality of TCHMs by determining, identifying and discriminating the bioactive or marker components in different samples with the help of chemometric techniques. In this work, the application of chemometric techniques in the classification of TCHMs based on their efficacy and usage was introduced. The recent advances of chemometrics applied in the chemical analysis of TCHMs were reviewed in detail. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Methods in Chronic Renal Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Erdogan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite its long history, use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM methods has increased dramatically only after 1990s. Up to 57% of patients with chronic renal use CAM methods.These patienys use CAM methods to overcome hypertension, fatigue, constipation, leg edema, pain, cramps, anxiety, depression, sleep disorders, to cope with symptoms such as itching, to stop the progression of kidney disease and to improve their quality of life. Methods used are herbal products and food supplements, acupressure, acupuncture, homeopathy, exercise, aromatherapy, yoga and reflexology. Nephrotoxic effect of several CAM therapies used in patients with renal impairment could disturb hemodynamics by reducing the glomerular filtration rate. For this reason, health care providers should question patients about used of CAM, methods. Communication with patients should be clear and should not act judgmental. Health care personnel should learn more about CAM methods in order to avoid unwanted situations that could develop after the application of CAM methods. Patients should be informed correctly and scientifically about these methods to avoid harmful and unnecessary uses. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2014; 23(4.000: 770-786

  16. Behavioral methods in cannabinoid research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fride, Ester; Perchuk, Alex; Hall, F Scott; Uhl, George R; Onaivi, Emmanuel S

    2006-01-01

    In the absence of any specific behavioral assay for cannabinoids or endocannabinoids, a cannabinoid-induced profile in a series of four in vivo assays in mice is most commonly used to assess a specific cannabinoid activity at the behavioral level. Thus, when a given compound produces motor depression in an open field, catalepsy on an elevated ring, analgesia on a hot plate, as well as hypothermia, cannabinoid CB1 receptor activation is assumed, although exceptions are possible. The full cannabinoid profile, however, includes for example ataxia in dogs and discrimination learning in rats. In view of (1) the addictive/reward potential of cannabis and the cannabinoids and (2) the multiple roles of the endocannabinoid physiological control system (EPCS) in behavioral functions, including memory, emotionality, and feeding, a number of behavioral techniques have been used to assess the effects of cannabinoids in these functions. In this chapter we will describe the tetrad of cannabinoid-induced effects as well as a series of behavioral assays used in the behavioral pharmacology of marijuana-cannabinoid research. Since the EPCS plays an important role in the developing organism, methods used in the assessment of physical and behavioral development will also be discussed. The techniques include the tetrad, drug discrimination, self-stimulation and self-administration, conditioned place preference/aversion, the plus-maze, chronic mild stress (CMS), ultrasonic vocalizations, cognitive behaviors, and developmental assessment in mouse (and rat) pups.

  17. Nuclear methods in environmental and energy research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, J. R. [ed.

    1977-01-01

    The topics considered in the seven sessions were nuclear methods in atmospheric research; nuclear and atomic methodology; nuclear methods in tracer applications; energy exploration, production, and utilization; nuclear methods in environmental monitoring; nuclear methods in water research; and nuclear methods in biological research. Individual abstracts were prepared for each paper. (JSR)

  18. Zebrafish: an animal model for research in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowik, N; Podlasz, P; Jakimiuk, A; Kasica, N; Sienkiewicz, W; Kaleczyc, J

    2015-01-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) has become known as an excellent model organism for studies of vertebrate biology, vertebrate genetics, embryonal development, diseases and drug screening. Nevertheless, there is still lack of detailed reports about usage of the zebrafish as a model in veterinary medicine. Comparing to other vertebrates, they can lay hundreds of eggs at weekly intervals, externally fertilized zebrafish embryos are accessible to observation and manipulation at all stages of their development, which makes possible to simplify the research techniques such as fate mapping, fluorescent tracer time-lapse lineage analysis and single cell transplantation. Although zebrafish are only 2.5 cm long, they are easy to maintain. Intraperitoneal and intracerebroventricular injections, blood sampling and measurement of food intake are possible to be carry out in adult zebrafish. Danio rerio is a useful animal model for neurobiology, developmental biology, drug research, virology, microbiology and genetics. A lot of diseases, for which the zebrafish is a perfect model organism, affect aquatic animals. For a part of them, like those caused by Mycobacterium marinum or Pseudoloma neutrophila, Danio rerio is a natural host, but the zebrafish is also susceptible to the most of fish diseases including Itch, Spring viraemia of carp and Infectious spleen and kidney necrosis. The zebrafish is commonly used in research of bacterial virulence. The zebrafish embryo allows for rapid, non-invasive and real time analysis of bacterial infections in a vertebrate host. Plenty of common pathogens can be examined using zebrafish model: Streptococcus iniae, Vibrio anguillarum or Listeria monocytogenes. The steps are taken to use the zebrafish also in fungal research, especially that dealing with Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans. Although, the zebrafish is used commonly as an animal model to study diseases caused by external agents, it is also useful in studies of metabolic

  19. STRUCTURAL BIOLOGY AND MOLECULAR MEDICINE RESEARCH PROGRAM (LSBMM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenberg, David S.

    2008-01-01

    The UCLA-DOE Institute of Genomics and Proteomics is an organized research unit of the University of California, sponsored by the Department of Energy through the mechanism of a Cooperative Agreement. Today the Institute consists of 10 Principal Investigators and 7 Associate Members, developing and applying technologies to promote the biological and environmental missions of the Department of Energy, and 5 Core Technology Centers to sustain this work. The focus is on understanding genomes, pathways and molecular machines in organisms of interest to DOE, with special emphasis on developing enabling technologies. Since it was founded in 1947, the UCLA-DOE Institute has adapted its mission to the research needs of DOE and its progenitor agencies as these research needs have changed. The Institute started as the AEC Laboratory of Nuclear Medicine, directed by Stafford Warren, who later became the founding Dean of the UCLA School of Medicine. In this sense, the entire UCLA medical center grew out of the precursor of our Institute. In 1963, the mission of the Institute was expanded into environmental studies by Director Ray Lunt. I became the third director in 1993, and in close consultation with David Galas and John Wooley of DOE, shifted the mission of the Institute towards genomics and proteomics. Since 1993, the Principal Investigators and Core Technology Centers are entirely new, and the Institute has separated from its former division concerned with PET imaging. The UCLA-DOE Institute shares the space of Boyer Hall with the Molecular Biology Institute, and assumes responsibility for the operation of the main core facilities. Fig. 1 gives the organizational chart of the Institute. Some of the benefits to the public of research carried out at the UCLA-DOE Institute include the following: The development of publicly accessible, web-based databases, including the Database of Protein Interactions, and the ProLinks database of genomicly inferred protein function linkages

  20. [Research progress in mechanism of traditional Chinese medicine treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xian-Ying; Zhou, Li; Sun, Zu-Yue

    2016-10-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous endocrine disorder, which is characterized by hyperandrogenism, insulin resistance and chronic anovulation, and has become a serious threat to the health of adolescents and women of childbearing age.At present,lowering androgen, improving insulin resistance and inducing ovulation are the main methods adopted by doctors to treat the disease, but the adverse reactions of the western medicine and the long-term treatment are hard to be accepted by the patients. PCOS treated by traditional Chinese medicine has achieved a certain effect in recent years.Traditional Chinese medicine is relatively safe and has more effect in many links and targets in improving the symptom of endocrine and metabolic disorder in patients with PCOS. This paper expounds the traditional Chinese medicine pathogenesis of PCOS through clinical and experimental aspects of the literature research:correcting endocrine hormone disorder,the effects of the expression of gene and regulatory factors,improving insulin resistance,correcting lipid metabolic disorder,improving the pregnancy outcome and improving ovarian morphology to summarize the treatment of traditional Chinese medicine in PCOS research results in recent years. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  1. Assessing research impact in academic clinical medicine: a study using Research Excellence Framework pilot impact indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovseiko, Pavel V; Oancea, Alis; Buchan, Alastair M

    2012-12-23

    Funders of medical research the world over are increasingly seeking, in research assessment, to complement traditional output measures of scientific publications with more outcome-based indicators of societal and economic impact. In the United Kingdom, the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) developed proposals for the Research Excellence Framework (REF) to allocate public research funding to higher education institutions, inter alia, on the basis of the social and economic impact of their research. In 2010, it conducted a pilot exercise to test these proposals and refine impact indicators and criteria. The impact indicators proposed in the 2010 REF impact pilot exercise are critically reviewed and appraised using insights from the relevant literature and empirical data collected for the University of Oxford's REF pilot submission in clinical medicine. The empirical data were gathered from existing administrative sources and an online administrative survey carried out by the university's Medical Sciences Division among 289 clinical medicine faculty members (48.1% response rate). The feasibility and scope of measuring research impact in clinical medicine in a given university are assessed. Twenty impact indicators from seven categories proposed by HEFCE are presented; their strengths and limitations are discussed using insights from the relevant biomedical and research policy literature. While the 2010 pilot exercise has confirmed that the majority of the proposed indicators have some validity, there are significant challenges in operationalising and measuring these indicators reliably, as well as in comparing evidence of research impact across different cases in a standardised manner. It is suggested that the public funding agencies, medical research charities, universities, and the wider medical research community work together to develop more robust methodologies for capturing and describing impact, including more valid and reliable impact

  2. Research methods for economic psychology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ranyard, Rob; Antonides, Gerrit

    2017-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of possible avenues for research in relation to various key economic-psychological problems. Theoretical research mainly comprises (mathematical) modelling of economic psychological processes. The starting point for theoretical research often is literature search

  3. High prevalence but limited evidence in complementary and alternative medicine: guidelines for future research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Helle

    2014-01-01

    The use of complementary and alternative Medicine (CAM) has increased over the past two decades in Europe. Nonetheless, research investigating the evidence to support its use remains limited. The CAMbrella project funded by the European Commission aimed to develop a strategic research agenda...... care challenges. Keywords: Complementary and alternative medicine, Research strategy, Randomized clinical trials, Safety, Qualitative studies, Comparative effectiveness research...

  4. Karma, reincarnation, and medicine: Hindu perspectives on biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Janis Faye; Sharp, Richard

    2008-12-01

    Prior to the completion of the Human Genome Project, bioethicists and other academics debated the impact of this new genetic information on medicine, health care, group identification, and peoples' lives. A major issue is the potential for unintended and intended adverse consequences to groups and individuals. When conducting research in, for instance, American Indian and Alaskan native (AI/AN) populations, political, cultural, religious and historical issues must be considered. Among African Americans, the Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment is a reminder of racism and discrimination in this country. The goal of the current study is to understand reasons for participating, or not, in genetic research such as the HapMap project and other genetic/medical research from the perspective of the Indian American community in Houston, Texas. In this article, we report on a topic central to this discussion among Indian Americans: karma and reincarnation. Both concepts are important beliefs when considering the body and what should happen to it. Karma and reincarnation are also important considerations in participation in medical and genetic research because, according to karma, what is done to the body can affect future existences and the health of future descendants. Such views of genetic and medical research are culturally mediated. Spiritual beliefs about the body, tissue, and fluids and what happens to them when separated from the body can influence ideas about the utility and acceptability of genetic research and thereby affect the recruitment process. Within this community it is understood that genetic and environmental factors contribute to complex diseases such as diabetes, hypertension, and cancer; and acknowledgment of the significance of environmental stressors in the production of disease. A commitment to service, i.e. "betterment of humanity," karmic beliefs, and targeting environmental stressors could be prominent avenues for public health campaigns in this

  5. The application of biotechnology in medicinal plants breeding research in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, He-Ping; Li, Jin-Cai; Huang, Lu-Qi; Wang, Dian-Lei; Huang, Peng; Nie, Jiu-Sheng

    2015-07-01

    Breeding is not only an important area of medicinal plants research but also the foundation for the superior varieties acquirement of medicinal plants. The rise of modern biotechnology provides good opportunities and new means for medicinal plants breeding research in China. Biotechnology shows its technical advantages and new development prospects in breeding of new medicinal plants varieties with high and stable yield, good quality, as well as stress-resistance. In this paper, we describe recent advances, problems, and development prospects about the application of modern biotechnology in medicinal plants breeding research in China.

  6. Equilibrium Decision Method for Earthquake First-Aid Medicine Allocation Based on Demand Information Updating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Ye

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The allocation of rescue resources after an earthquake has become a popular research topic in the field of emergency management. The allocation of first-aid medicine for earthquake rescue has stronger time sensitivity than that of general rescue materials. This study focuses on the problem of first-aid medicine allocation in earthquake response. First, we consider the incompleteness and renewal of decision information in an emergency environment, as well as the balance between the risk of decision error and delay. Second, we propose an equilibrium decision method for the allocation of first-aid medicine in earthquake rescue based on information update. This method attempts to realize a fair allocation to all disaster places and minimize total transport time loss. Third, a simulation analysis is performed in which the proposed method is applied to the first-aid medicine allocation problem in the Wenchuan earthquake response. Results show that the method can be used to create a good allocation plan in an earthquake rescue situation.

  7. The intellectual contribution of laboratory medicine professionals to research papers on laboratory medicine topics published in high-impact general medicine journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Pedro Medina; Nydegger, Urs; Risch, Martin; Risch, Lorenz

    2012-03-01

    An author is generally regarded as an individual "who has made substantial intellectual academic contributions to a published study". However, the extent of the contribution that laboratory medicine professionals have made as authors of research papers in high-impact medical journals remains unclear. From 1 January 2004 to 31 March 2009, 4837 original research articles appeared in the: New England Journal of Medicine, Lancet, Annals of Internal Medicine, JAMA and BMJ. Using authorship as an indicator of intellectual contribution, we analyzed articles that included laboratory medicine parameters in their titles in an observational cross-sectional study. We also extracted data regarding radiological topics that were published during the same time within the same journals. Out of 481 articles concerning laboratory medicine topics, 380 provided information on the affiliations of the authors. At least one author from an institution within the field of laboratory medicine was listed in 212 articles (55.8%). Out of 3943 co-authors, only 756 (19.2%) were affiliated with laboratory medicine institutions. Authors from laboratory medicine institutions were listed as the first, last or corresponding authors in 99 articles (26.1%). The comparative proportions for author affiliation from 55 radiology articles were significantly higher, as 72.7% (p=0.026) of articles and 24.8% (p=0.001) of authors indicated an affiliation with a radiology institution. Radiology professionals from 72.7% of the articles were listed as either the first, last or corresponding authors (pmedicine professionals from North America were significantly less frequently involved as co-authors than were their colleagues from Europe (p=0.04). Laboratory medicine professionals are underrepresented as co-authors in laboratory medicine studies appearing in high-impact general medicine journals.

  8. How often do patients in primary care use the methods of traditional medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrov-Kiurski Miloranka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Traditional medicine is a comprehensive system of theory and practice, implemented in the prevention, diagnostics and treatment of diseases, which utilizes preparations of vegetable, animal and mineral origin, as well as methods of spiritual therapy Objective: 1. To estimate how many patients in primary care use traditional medicine for diagnostics, treatment and prevention of diseases, and to establish possible differences regarding gender, age and urban or rural location. 2. What methods of traditional medicine are the most often used, and for which diseases and conditions? 3. Why did the subjects opted for this type of treatment, and what was the effect of the therapy? Method: Multicentric research based on interviewing patients in five outpatient health centers in Serbia. As a survey instrument was used a questionnaire with 10 questions. Results: The study included 1157 subjects, 683 women and 474 men, mean age 60.22±14.54, The traditional medicine was used by 83.66% (79.96% males and 86.245% females. Information about the methods of traditional medicine subjects usually received from their friends and acquaintances (54.9% and the media (39.3%. There is no significant difference in the way of obtaining information in relation to gender. Information on the internet was obtained more often in subjects younger than 65 (p=0.000 and in urban population (p=0.000. The same is true for information obtained from doctor or pharmacist (p=0.003. They opted for this method because in their opinion it is less harmful and have less adverse effects (72.8%. This type of treatment patients used for treatment of muscles, bone and joint diseases - 28.5%, diseases of the heart and blood vessels -21,1 %, and for the treatment of pain 19.7%. Patients from rural areas more often used traditional medicine for treatment of cardiovascular diseases (p=0.000. Outcome of treatment was good or satisfactory in 45.3%, moderate in 32%, and in 15.8% effect was

  9. Online research article discussion board to increase knowledge translation during emergency medicine residency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoneking LR

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lisa R Stoneking, Kristi H Grall, Alice A Min, Ashish R PanchalDepartment of Emergency Medicine, University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, AZ, USABackground: Many clinicians have difficulties reading current best practice journal articles on a regular basis. Discussion boards are one method of online asynchronous learning that facilitates active learning and participation. We hypothesized that an online repository of best practice articles with a discussion board would increase journal article reading by emergency medicine residents.Methods: Participants answered three questions weekly on a discussion board: What question does this study address? What does this study add to our knowledge? How might this change clinical practice? A survey regarding perceived barriers to participating was then distributed.Results: Most participants completed an article summary once or twice in total (23/32, 71.9%. Only three were involved most weeks (3/32, 9.4% whereas 5/32 (15.6% participated monthly. The most common barriers were lack of time (20/32, 62.5%, difficulty logging on (7/32, 21.9%, and forgetting (6/32, 18.8%.Conclusion: Although subjects were provided weekly with an article link, email, and feedback, journal article reading frequency did not increase.Keywords: online research, discussion board, knowledge translation, emergency medicine residency

  10. Participatory Methods in Arctic Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Louise

    2018-01-01

    This book is a collection of articles written by researchers at Aalborg University, affiliated with AAU Arctic. The articles are about how the researchers in their respective projects work with stakeholders and citizens in different ways, for example in connection with problem formulation, data c...

  11. Researches on Transcriptome Sequencing in the Study of Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Jie; Zhang, Rong-chao; Wang, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Due to its incomparable advantages, the application of transcriptome sequencing in the study of traditional Chinese medicine attracts more and more attention of researchers, which greatly promote the development of traditional Chinese medicine. In this paper, the applications of transcriptome sequencing in traditional Chinese medicine were summarized by reviewing recent related papers. PMID:28900463

  12. [Investigation, collation and research of traditional Dai medicine of China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-Xia; Zhang, Zhong-Lian; Li, Hai-Tao; Niu, Ying-Fen; Guan, Yan-Hong; Ma, Xiao-Jun

    2016-08-01

    In order to find out the composition, characteristics and traditional utilization characteristics of Dai medicine and promote the rational protection, inheritance and utilization of the resources and traditional knowledge of Dai medicine in China, the resources of traditional Dai medicine have been investigated systematically and the traditional knowledge of Dai medicine have been analyzed in the article. We found out that there were altogether 1 077 kinds of traditional Dai medicine in China and among which 272 were the first time recorded in the condition of Dai folk medical uses. There were 1 053 plant medicines which belong to 169 family and 694 genus. These plant medicines mainly distributed in the southern, west southern and east southern area of Yunnan province, the southern area of Guangxi, Guangdong, Guizhou, Sichuan, Fujian province and tropical, subtropical district as Taiwan, and more than 94.49% plant medicines could be found in Yunnan province. From the point of plant life form, they were major herbaceous or shrubby plants; When it is used as medicinal part, root and rhizome of plants account for the highest proportion, the next were whole plant and leaves. From nature, flavor and channel tropism points of view, the largest proportion of Dai medicines were cool, bitter-tasted and possesses water element. In terms of treatment of disease types, most of the drugs can treat gastrointestinal diseases, next were drugs that could be used to treat upper respiratory infection, traumatological and rheumatic diseases, urinary infection, gynecological diseases, hepatopathy, puerperium fever and diseases caused by poisonous insects and beast of prey bite. The study revealed that the resources of traditional Dai medicine and traditional knowledge of application were abundant in China, but the resources of traditional Dai medicine and traditional knowledge of application were faced with the risk of gradually reduce and loss. The article suggested that we should

  13. Research and career opportunities for chemists in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    Two recent publications [Training Requirements for Chemists in Nuclear Medicine, Nuclear Industry, and Related Areas: Report of a Workshop National Academy Press, Washington, D.C., 1988, and Report of the Society of Nuclear Medicine Manpower Committee, Journal of Nuclear Medicine, January, 1989] have emphasized the opportunities for Chemists in Nuclear Medicine. These opportunities exist in Medical Centers, the Radiopharmaceutical Drug Industry as well as the Ethical Drug Industry of particular importance of the need for organic and inorganic chemists with knowledge and experience in radiochemistry to develop and prepare the radiopharmaceuticals needed for the Nuclear Medicine community. The number of positions available at present and anticipated in the future will be compared and the number of training programs listed. Examples of the types of opportunities in this area will be given

  14. [Research in tropical medicine and primary health care in Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, H; Falconí, E; Llanos-Cuentas, A; Chang, J

    1993-01-01

    Tropical medicine's fundamental task is to improve health in the tropics. By adopting primary health care strategies, it satisfies the real needs of the population while doing research, improving its effectiveness and social impact. We illustrate this with some examples drawn from our experience, where this potentiation is evident. A sanitary dermatology study, based on health auxiliaries and promoters, encompassed a whole jungle province, with 68,977 km2 and 103,681 inhabitants. It resulted in an excellent relationship with the populations, and findings of significance for early diagnosis and control of hanseniasis and other diseases. It also facilitated an extension of activities to include the entire Amazonian Region, with specific concentration on training of the health personnel. Clinico-epidemiological studies on leishmaniasis in Andean valleys incorporated activities of sanitary education, health care, aspects of community development, etc., and extended into other geographic areas. Migrant workers from high-altitude communities in Cusco who have been to the jungle and acquired cutaneous or mucocutaneous leishmaniasis formed Patient Associations. The latter now receive support for their health and development needs from health authorities and many institutions; our Institute contributes with improved therapeutic procedures and further epidemiologic studies to orient preventive and control measures.

  15. Training Methods to Improve Evidence-Based Medicine Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiz Ozyigit

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Evidence based medicine (EBM is the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients. It is estimated that only 15% of medical interventions is evidence-based. Increasing demand, new technological developments, malpractice legislations, a very speed increase in knowledge and knowledge sources push the physicians forward for EBM, but at the same time increase load of physicians by giving them the responsibility to improve their skills. Clinical maneuvers are needed more, as the number of clinical trials and observational studies increase. However, many of the physicians, who are in front row of patient care do not use this increasing evidence. There are several examples related to different training methods in order to improve skills of physicians for evidence based practice. There are many training methods to improve EBM skills and these trainings might be given during medical school, during residency or as continuous trainings to the actual practitioners in the field. It is important to discuss these different training methods in our country as well and encourage dissemination of feasible and effective methods. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(3.000: 245-254

  16. Flexible nuclear medicine camera and method of using

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilmanian, F. Avraham; Packer, Samuel; Slatkin, Daniel N.

    1996-12-10

    A nuclear medicine camera 10 and method of use photographically record radioactive decay particles emitted from a source, for example a small, previously undetectable breast cancer, inside a patient. The camera 10 includes a flexible frame 20 containing a window 22, a photographic film 24, and a scintillation screen 26, with or without a gamma-ray collimator 34. The frame 20 flexes for following the contour of the examination site on the patient, with the window 22 being disposed in substantially abutting contact with the skin of the patient for reducing the distance between the film 24 and the radiation source inside the patient. The frame 20 is removably affixed to the patient at the examination site for allowing the patient mobility to wear the frame 20 for a predetermined exposure time period. The exposure time may be several days for obtaining early qualitative detection of small malignant neoplasms.

  17. Cancer Research Center Indiana University School of Medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to authorize the Indiana School of Medicine to proceed with the detailed design, construction and equipping of the proposed Cancer Research Center (CRC). A grant was executed with the University on April 21, 1992. A four-story building with basement would be constructed on the proposed site over a 24-month period. The proposed project would bring together, in one building, three existing hematology/oncology basic research programs, with improved cost-effectiveness through the sharing of common resources. The proposed site is currently covered with asphaltic pavement and is used as a campus parking lot. The surrounding area is developed campus, characterized by buildings, walkways, with minimal lawns and plantings. The proposed site has no history of prior structures and no evidence of potential sources of prior contamination of the soil. Environmental impacts of construction would be limited to minor increases in traffic, and the typical noises associated with standard building construction. The proposed CRC project operation would involve the use radionuclides and various hazardous materials in conducting clinical studies. Storage, removal and disposal of hazardous wastes would be managed under existing University programs that comply with federal and state requirements. Radiological safety programs would be governed by Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license and applicable Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations. There are no other NEPA reviews currently active which are in relationship to this proposed site. The proposed project is part of a Medical Campus master plan and is consistent with applicable local zoning and land use requirements.

  18. Cancer Research Center Indiana University School of Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to authorize the Indiana School of Medicine to proceed with the detailed design, construction and equipping of the proposed Cancer Research Center (CRC). A grant was executed with the University on April 21, 1992. A four-story building with basement would be constructed on the proposed site over a 24-month period. The proposed project would bring together, in one building, three existing hematology/oncology basic research programs, with improved cost-effectiveness through the sharing of common resources. The proposed site is currently covered with asphaltic pavement and is used as a campus parking lot. The surrounding area is developed campus, characterized by buildings, walkways, with minimal lawns and plantings. The proposed site has no history of prior structures and no evidence of potential sources of prior contamination of the soil. Environmental impacts of construction would be limited to minor increases in traffic, and the typical noises associated with standard building construction. The proposed CRC project operation would involve the use radionuclides and various hazardous materials in conducting clinical studies. Storage, removal and disposal of hazardous wastes would be managed under existing University programs that comply with federal and state requirements. Radiological safety programs would be governed by Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license and applicable Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations. There are no other NEPA reviews currently active which are in relationship to this proposed site. The proposed project is part of a Medical Campus master plan and is consistent with applicable local zoning and land use requirements

  19. Family Medicine Research in the United States From the late 1960s Into the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Marjorie A; Lucan, Sean C; Rosenthal, Thomas C; Mainous, Arch G; James, Paul A

    2017-04-01

    When the new field of family medicine research began a half century ago, multiple individuals and organizations emphasized that research was a key mission. Since the field's inception, there have been notable research successes for which family medicine organizations, researchers, and leaders-assisted by federal and state governments and private foundations-can take credit. Research is a requirement for family medicine residency programs but not individual residents, and multiple family medicine departments offer research training in various forms for learners at all levels, including research fellowships. Family physicians have developed practice-based research networks (PBRNs) to conduct investigations and generate new knowledge. The field of family medicine has seen the creation of new journals to support the publication of research relevant to practicing family physicians. Nonetheless, in spite of much growth and many successes, family physicians and their research have been underrepresented in research funding. Clinical presentations in family medicine are often complex, poorly-differentiated, and exist as one of several patient complaints and diagnoses, and are not well-covered by the narrow basic-science and specialty research that defines most of the biomedical research enterprise. Overall health in the United States would benefit from a more robust research participation and greater support for family medicine research.

  20. Methods of marketing research in banking

    OpenAIRE

    Kraevskiy, B.; Makukhina, Ya.

    2017-01-01

    The paper considers the nature of marketing research in banking activities, the main directions of marketing research in the banking sector, identified tasks that can be solved based on the methods of marketing research.

  1. Narrative medicine in the framework of empirical social research: the Russian context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaly Lekhtsier

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This article contains the results of the empirical analysis carried out in 2012-2016 which sought to examine whether patients’ narratives of their illness were present in doctor-patient communication and whether this subjective story was significant to both sides of the medical communication in Russian somatic disease medicine. The research was carried out in four stages and combined qualitative and quantitative methods, analyzing the perspectives of patients, doctors and medical students through surveys and interviews as well as looking at online doctor-patient communication in health forums. In all four stages, the results of the research showed that little value was placed on the subjective experience of disease in doctor-patient interactions. The topic of narrative medicine is new to Russian social studies, making the results of this research an important contribution to the establishment of narrative medicine as a global idea advocating the universal therapeutic and ethical value of patients’ stories of illness in the “remission society,” in which chronic pathologies dominate.

  2. Action Research Methods: Plain and Simple

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Sheri R., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Among the plethora of action research books on the market, there is no one text exclusively devoted to understanding how to acquire and interpret research data. Action Research Methods provides a balanced overview of the quantitative and qualitative methodologies and methods for conducting action research within a variety of educational…

  3. Teaching Qualitative Research Methods Using "Undercover Boss"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, LaKresha; Schuwerk, Tara J.

    2017-01-01

    Course(s): Research Methods, Qualitative Research Methods, Organizational Communication, Business Communication. Objectives: After completing this class exercise, students should be able to identify the major components of a qualitative research study, along with the ethical dilemmas that come with doing qualitative research.

  4. Dynamic Studies with Radioisotopes in Medicine. Proceedings of the Symposium on Dynamics Studies with Radioisotopes in Clinical Medicine and Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1971-01-01

    Observations on the temporal patterns of uptake, metabolism, clearance or excretion of administered radioactive materials form the basis of many important applications of radioisotopes in clinical medicine and research. Such applications include studies of organ function, of regional blood flow and of the turnover of various substances in the human body. Newly available radioisotopes, new instruments such as gamma came ras, new techniques and new methods of data analysis based on the use of analogue and digital computers are continually enlarging the scope of the applications. Progress in these matters was discussed at the Symposium on Dynamic Studies with Radioisotopes in Clinical Medicine and Research, organized by the lnternational Atomic Energy Agency and held in Rotterdam, The Netherlands, from 31 August to 4 September 1970. A total of 315 participants nominated by 39 countries and 4 international organizations attended, and the 70 papers presented cove r the theoretical aspects of dynamic studies, the development of techniques and instruments for such studies, and specific applications in studies of thyroid, renal, hepatic and splenic function, mineral metabolism, regional blood flow, and cardiac and pulmonary function. The proceedings include the full texts of all the papers presented together with the edited discussions. Invited review papers deal with the general aspects of the various main groups of applications covered. Many of the applications described have already reached the stage of routine use; others are still in the developmental stage. Of particular note in the latter connection are applications based on the quantitative analysis of scintillation camera data. The many papers presented on these topics and the ensuing discussions indicate the great interest now shown in this promising area of development. It is hoped that the proceedings will provide a valuable guide to the present status of the subject

  5. [Scientific research and academic promotion in occupational medicine: what are the rules of the game?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, G

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the National University Council (CUN) recognized the importance of bibliometric indicators in assessing scientific output and the Ministry of Education, University and Research established that the selection committees' decision must be guided by internationally recognized metrics including the impact factor (IF). To analyse methods and tools of metrics to assess scientific performance in Occupational Medicine by examining some critical aspects for entry-level positions and academic promotion in the Universities. By means of different databases (Web of Knowledge, Scopus, SCImago), the h-index was studied to assess the scientific output in the field of Occupational Medicine. The h-index was used as an index of both output and quality of overall output of researchers, disciplines, journals, and countries. Italian scientific output in the Public, Environmental & Occupational Health subject category (h-index = 62) was lower than almost the total of other medical disciplines and, at an international level, is ranked at 12th place (other disciplines ranked 3rd to 9th). Output was 32% compared to that of the USA (other disciplines ranged from 42% and 61%). However, it should be noted that most scientific papers of Occupational Medicine researchers are published mainly in journals of different disciplines (with a higher IF) rather than in journals of Public, Environmental & Occupational Health (with a lower IF). Assuming that selection committees' decisions will be guided by metrics and will respect the minimum standard proposed by CUN, Occupational Medicine researchers aiming at academic promotion will have good reason to ask themselves not only which journals are most useful but also which journals have the greatest impact. This fact could have profound implications for the future of the discipline.

  6. Development of a productive research culture in emergency medicine: Report of the outcomes of a research forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, David McD; Cohen, Donna R; Epstein, Joseph; Freeman, Peter; Gosbell, Andrew D; Judkins, Simon; Mowatt, Elizabeth J M; O'Reilly, Gerard M; Vinen, John

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, the Australasian College for Emergency Medicine (ACEM) has increasingly focused on the need for high-quality research in emergency medicine (EM). One important initiative was the establishment of the ACEM Foundation, which among other responsibilities, is required to support clinical research through the provision of research funding and other measures. In February 2015, the Foundation held a Research Forum that was attended by the leading EM researchers from Australasia. The Forum aimed to determine how a productive research culture could be developed within the ACEM. Nine key objectives were determined including that research should be a core business of the ACEM and a core activity of the EM workforce, and that EM research should be sustainable and adequately supported. This report describes the background and conduct of the Forum, its recommendations and the way in which they could be implemented. © 2015 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  7. Nuclear medicine methods in the assessment of acupuncture effects: a short review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Deise Elisabete; Rebello, Bernardo Machado; Agostinho, Raquel Terra [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes. Lab. de Radiofarmacia Experimental; Academia Brasileira de Arte e Ciencia Oriental, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); E-mail: deise_desouza@yahoo.com.br; Silva Filho, Reginaldo de Carvalho [Escola Brasileira de Medicina Chinesa, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro Avancado de Pesquisas em Ciencias Orientais; Bastos, Sohaku R.C. [Academia Brasileira de Arte e Ciencia Oriental, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Bernardo-Filho, Mario [Instituto Nacional de Cancer (INCa), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisa Basica

    2007-09-15

    The mechanisms of acupuncture are poorly understood. In consequence, numerous investigators have conducted clinical trials to test the efficacy of acupuncture in various conditions. We have used PubMed database system to evaluate the number of publications in acupuncture and nuclear medicine procedures in the period from 1964 to 2007, using the keywords: 'nuclear medicine and acupuncture', 'SPECT and acupuncture, 'PET and acupuncture', 'scintigraphy and acupuncture, 'radionuclide and acupuncture', 'radiopharmaceutical and acupuncture', 'radioisotope and acupuncture' and {sup 99m}Tc and acupuncture'. Some papers published in English language were selected and a short review is presented The analysis of the number of publications shows that when a method is well accepted by the scientific community, as the methods used in nuclear medicine, the interest in the development of research increases. Moreover, important findings are presented when the nuclear medicine image is used to evaluate the effect of the acupuncture. (author)

  8. Thirty years of artificial intelligence in medicine (AIME) conferences: A review of research themes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peek, Niels; Combi, Carlo; Marin, Roque; Bellazzi, Riccardo

    2015-09-01

    Over the past 30 years, the international conference on Artificial Intelligence in MEdicine (AIME) has been organized at different venues across Europe every 2 years, establishing a forum for scientific exchange and creating an active research community. The Artificial Intelligence in Medicine journal has published theme issues with extended versions of selected AIME papers since 1998. To review the history of AIME conferences, investigate its impact on the wider research field, and identify challenges for its future. We analyzed a total of 122 session titles to create a taxonomy of research themes and topics. We classified all 734 AIME conference papers published between 1985 and 2013 with this taxonomy. We also analyzed the citations to these conference papers and to 55 special issue papers. We identified 30 research topics across 12 themes. AIME was dominated by knowledge engineering research in its first decade, while machine learning and data mining prevailed thereafter. Together these two themes have contributed about 51% of all papers. There have been eight AIME papers that were cited at least 10 times per year since their publication. There has been a major shift from knowledge-based to data-driven methods while the interest for other research themes such as uncertainty management, image and signal processing, and natural language processing has been stable since the early 1990s. AIME papers relating to guidelines and protocols are among the most highly cited. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. [Compatibility regularity of compound traditional Chinese medicine patents based on association principle and entropy method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xiang-jun; He, Qing-yong

    2015-02-01

    To analyze the compatibility regularity of compound traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) patents for treating dyslipidemia, and provide basis for the clinical development and research of new TCM for treating dyslipidemia. Totally 243 compound traditional Chinese medicine patents for treating dyslipidemia were collected from the national patent database from September 1985 to March 2014 and analyzed by using drug frequency, association rules, complex network and entropy method of Traditional Chinese Medicine Inheritance System (V1.1). The commonest single medicine in the treatment of dyslipidemia is Crataegi Fructus 109 (44.86%). The commonest pair medicine is Crataegi Fructus-Salviae Miltiorrhizae Radix et Rhizoma 53 (21.81%). The commonest corner drug is Crataegi Fructus-Cassiae Semen-Polygoni Multiflori Radix 25 (10.29%). The common prescriptions on basis of association rules are Prunellae Spica-->Salviae Miltiorrhizae Radix et Rhizoma (0.833), Rhei Radix et Rhizoma, Alismatis Rhizoma-->Polygoni Multiflori Radix (1.00), Salviae Miltiorrhizae Radix et Rhizoma, Cassiae Semen, Alismatis Rhizoma-->Polygoni Multiflori Radix (0.929). The core drugs based on complex networks are Salviae Miltiorrhizae Radix et Rhizoma and Crataegi Fructus. The new prescriptions extracted by entropy method are Atractylodis Macrocephalae Rhizoma-Glycyrrhizae Radix et Rhizoma-Platycladi Semen-Stephaniae Tetrandrae Radix; Citri Reticulatae Pericarpium-Poria-Coicis Semen-Pinelliae Rhizoma. This study shows the regularity in the compatibility of compound TCM patents treating dyslipidemia, suggesting that future studies on new traditional Chinese medicines treating dyslipidemia should focus on the following six aspects: (1) Single medicine should be preferred: e. g. Crataegi Fructus; (2) Pair medicines should be preferred: e. g. Crataegi Fructus-Salviae Miltiorrhizae Radix et Rhizoma; (3) Corner drugs should be preferred: e. g. Crataegi Fructus, Cassiae Semen, Polygoni Multiflori Radix; (4) The

  10. Reliability studies of diagnostic methods in Indian traditional Ayurveda medicine: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurande, Vrinda Hitendra; Waagepetersen, Rasmus; Toft, Egon; Prasad, Ramjee

    2013-01-01

    Recently, a need to develop supportive new scientific evidence for contemporary Ayurveda has emerged. One of the research objectives is an assessment of the reliability of diagnoses and treatment. Reliability is a quantitative measure of consistency. It is a crucial issue in classification (such as prakriti classification), method development (pulse diagnosis), quality assurance for diagnosis and treatment and in the conduct of clinical studies. Several reliability studies are conducted in western medicine. The investigation of the reliability of traditional Chinese, Japanese and Sasang medicine diagnoses is in the formative stage. However, reliability studies in Ayurveda are in the preliminary stage. In this paper, examples are provided to illustrate relevant concepts of reliability studies of diagnostic methods and their implication in practice, education, and training. An introduction to reliability estimates and different study designs and statistical analysis is given for future studies in Ayurveda. PMID:23930037

  11. Research concerning Yersinia pestis and its significance in military medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Rui-fu YANG

    2012-01-01

    As the military medicine progresses, the scope of protective medicine against biological threats should be extended to any facets that can cause biological threats, including biowarfare, bioterrorisms, invasion of alien organisms, loss of biological resources, genetically modified organisms, and emerging infectious diseases. Yersinia pestis is the pathogen for a typical zoonotic disease, plague, and it is also one of important biowarfare or bioterrorism agents. In history, this pathogen once ...

  12. Executive summary: Education research in emergency medicine-opportunities, challenges, and strategies for success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMantia, Joseph; Deiorio, Nicole M; Yarris, Lalena M

    2012-12-01

    The 2012 Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) consensus conference "Education Research In Emergency Medicine: Opportunities, Challenges, and Strategies for Success" convened a diverse group of stakeholders in medical education to target gaps in emergency medicine (EM) education research and identify priorities for future study. A total of 175 registrants collaborated in preparatory and conference-day activities to explore subtopics in educational interventions, learner assessment, faculty development, and research funding and infrastructure. The conference was punctuated by didactic sessions led by key international medical education experts and ended with consensus formation in many domains. This issue of AEM presents the exciting results of this process. © 2012 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  13. Research methods for subgrouping low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kent, Peter; Keating, Jennifer L; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    important distinctions in their treatment needs or prognoses. Due to a proliferation of research methods and variability in how subgrouping results are interpreted, it is timely to open discussion regarding a conceptual framework for the research designs and statistical methods available for subgrouping...... studies (a method framework). The aims of this debate article are: (1) to present a method framework to inform the design and evaluation of subgrouping research in low back pain, (2) to describe method options when investigating prognostic effects or subgroup treatment effects, and (3) to discuss...... the strengths and limitations of research methods suitable for the hypothesis-setting phase of subgroup studies....

  14. Establishment of research-oriented hospital: an important way for translational medicine development in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MEINA LI

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Globally, one of the major trends is the development of translational medicine. The traditional hospital structure could not meet the demands of translational medicine development any longer and to explore a novel hospital structure is imperative. Following the times, China proposed and implemented a development strategy for a first-class modern research-oriented hospital. To establish a research-oriented hospital has become an important strategy to guide the scientific development of high-quality medical institutions and to advance translational medicine development. To facilitate translational medicine by developing research-oriented hospital, the Chinese Research Hospital Association (CRHA has been established, which provides service of medicine, talents cultivation, scientific research and clinical teaching and covers areas of theoretical research, academic exchange, translational medicine, talents training and practice guiding. On the whole, research-oriented hospital facilitated translational medicine by developing interdisciplinary platform, training core competencies in clinical and translational research, providing financial support of translational research, and hosting journals on translational medicine, etc.

  15. Establishment of research-oriented hospital: an important way for translational medicine development in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meina; Zhang, Lulu

    2015-01-01

    Globally, one of the major trends is the development of translational medicine. The traditional hospital structure could not meet the demands of translational medicine development any longer and to explore a novel hospital structure is imperative. Following the times, China proposed and implemented a development strategy for a first-class modern research-oriented hospital. To establish a research-oriented hospital has become an important strategy to guide the scientific development of high-quality medical institutions and to advance translational medicine development. To facilitate translational medicine by developing research-oriented hospital, the Chinese Research Hospital Association (CRHA) has been established, which provides service of medicine, talents cultivation, scientific research and clinical teaching and covers areas of theoretical research, academic exchange, translational medicine, talents training and practice guiding. On the whole, research-oriented hospital facilitated translational medicine by developing interdisciplinary platform, training core competencies in clinical and translational research, providing financial support of translational research, and hosting journals on translational medicine, etc.

  16. Insurance systems and reimbursement concerning research and development of regenerative medicine in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Kiyoshi; Miyata, Toshio; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2017-03-01

    In Japan, the Act on the Safety of Regenerative Medicine and the Pharmaceuticals, Medical Devices and Other Therapeutic Products Act were enacted in November 2014, creating a new framework for clinical research and products related to regenerative medicine. Together with these regulatory frameworks, new insurance procedures were created for handling regenerative medicine in Japan. For developing regenerative medicine in Japan, understanding medical insurance greatly influences funding and venture success, particularly in the stages between clinical research and market launch. The study aimed to identify the issues and examples surrounding Japan's present medical insurance system, especially for regenerative medicine. We believe that building stronger insurance systems for regenerative medicine is essential for internationally aligning and harmonizing the progress of regenerative medicine.

  17. Research Progress in the Application of Chinese Herbal Medicines in Aquaculture: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu Pu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to increasing safety concerns regarding human consumption of fish products, an increasing number of medicinal chemicals are prohibited from use in aquaculture. As a result, Chinese herbal medicines are being increasingly used, coining the use of the term “green medicine.” Research shows that Chinese herbal medicines have many beneficial effects on fish, including growth promotion, enhancement of disease resistance, and improvement in meat quality. Many effective ingredients have been discovered in Chinese herbal medicines, which function to promote feed intake, improve meat flavor, and increase digestive enzyme activity. They also regulate and participate in processes that improve the specific and non-specific immunity of fish; however, the composition of Chinese herbal medicines is very complex and it is often difficult to identify the effective ingredients. This article reviews the latest research and application progress in Chinese herbal medicines regarding growth and feed utilization, immunity and disease resistance, and the meat quality of cultured fish. It also discusses research on the chemical constituents of classical Chinese medicinal herbs and problems with the application of Chinese herbal medicines in fish culture. This article concludes by proposing that future studies on Chinese herbal medicines should focus on how to cheaply refine and extract the effective ingredients in classical Chinese medicinal herbs, as well as how to use them efficiently in aquaculture.

  18. [Problems in quality standard research of new traditional Chinese medicine compound].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Gang; He, Yan-Ping

    2014-09-01

    The new traditional Chinese medicine compound is the main part of the research of new drug of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), and the new Chinese herbal compound reflects the characteristics of TCM theory. The new traditional Chinese medicine compound quality standard research is one of the main content of pharmaceutical research, and is also the focus of the new medicine pharmaceutical evaluation content. Although in recent years the research level of new traditional Chinese medicine compound has been greatly improved, but the author during the review found still some common problems existing in new traditional Chinese medicine compound quality standard research data, this paper analyzed the current quality standards for new traditional Chinese medicine compound and the problems existing in the research data, respectively from measurement of the content of index selection, determine the scope of the content, and the quality standard design concept, the paper expounds developers need to concern. The quality of new traditional Chinese medicine compound quality standard is not only itself can be solved, but quality standards is to ensure the key and important content of product quality, improving the quality of products cannot do without quality standards. With the development of science and technology, on the basis of quality by design under the guidance of the concept, new traditional Chinese medicine compound quality standard system will be more scientific, systematic and perfect.

  19. Education and training for medicines development, regulation and clinical research in emerging countries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandor - Kerpel-Fronius

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this satellite workshop held at the 17th World Congress of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology (WCP2014 was to discuss the needs, optimal methods and practical approaches for extending education teaching of medicines development, regulation and clinical research to Low and Middle Income Countries (LMIC’s. It was generally agreed that, for efficiently treating the rapidly growing number of patients suffering from non-communicable diseases, modern drug therapy has to become available more widely and with a shorter time lag in these countries. To achieve this goal many additional experts working in medicines development, regulation and clinical research have to be trained in parallel. The competence-oriented educational programs designed within the framework of the European Innovative Medicine Initiative-PharmaTrain (IMI-PhT project were developed with the purpose to cover these interconnected fields. In addition, the programs can be easily adapted to the various local needs, primarily due to their modular architecture and well defined learning outcomes. Furthermore, the program is accompanied by stringent quality assurance standards which are essential for providing internationally accepted certificates. Effective cooperation between international and local experts and organizations, the involvement of the industry, health care centers and governments is essential for successful education. The initiative should also support the development of professional networks able to manage complex health care strategies. In addition it should help establish cooperation between neighboring countries for jointly managing clinical trials, as well as complex regulatory and ethical issues.

  20. From method to hermeneutics: which epistemological framework for narrative medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abettan, Camille

    2017-06-01

    The past 10 years have seen considerable developments in the use of narrative in medicine, primarily through the emergence of the so-called narrative medicine. In this article, I question narrative medicine's self-understanding and contend that one of the most prominent issues is its lack of a clear epistemological framework. Drawing from Gadamer's work on hermeneutics, I first show that narrative medicine is deeply linked with the hermeneutical field of knowledge. Then I try to identify which claims can be legitimately expected from narrative medicine, and which ones cannot be. I scrutinize in particular whether narrative medicine can legitimately grasp the patient's lived experience of his or her illness. In the last section of this article, I begin to explore the potential usefulness of this epistemological clarification. This analysis allows for a further understanding of what is really at stake with narrative medicine, and thus to identify when it may be convenient, and when it may not. Furthermore, this clarification opens up promising new possibilities of dialogue with critics of the field. I conclude that narrative medicine finds its proper place as a possible tool available to mediate dialogue, which is at the heart of the clinical encounter in medical practice.

  1. Research Methods in European Union Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Research methods and designs from the social sciences and beyond can, and should, be applied in research directed at EU affairs. The purpose of this edited collection is twofold: (1) to provide a state-of-the-art examination of social science research methods in EU studies and (2) to provide inno...

  2. Mixed Methods Approaches in Family Science Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plano Clark, Vicki L.; Huddleston-Casas, Catherine A.; Churchill, Susan L.; Green, Denise O'Neil; Garrett, Amanda L.

    2008-01-01

    The complex phenomena of interest to family scientists require the use of quantitative and qualitative approaches. Researchers across the social sciences are now turning to mixed methods designs that combine these two approaches. Mixed methods research has great promise for addressing family science topics, but only if researchers understand the…

  3. Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Parents/Teachers Resource Links for Students Glossary Nuclear Medicine What is nuclear medicine? What are radioactive tracers? ... funded researchers advancing nuclear medicine? What is nuclear medicine? Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty that uses ...

  4. Methods in Lexicography and Dictionary Research | Schierholz ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods are used in every stage of dictionary-making and in every scientific analysis which is carried out in the field of dictionary research. This article presents some general considerations on methods in philosophy of science, gives an overview of many methods used in linguistics, in lexicography, dictionary research as ...

  5. [Research progress on potential liver toxic components in traditional Chinese medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao; Zhong, Rong-Ling; Xia, Zhi; Huang, Hou-Cai; Zhong, Qing-Xiang; Feng, Liang; Song, Jie; Jia, Xiao-Bin

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, the proportion of traditional Chinese medicine in scientific research and its clinical use increased gradually. The research result also becomes more and more valuable, but in the process of using traditional Chinese medicine, it also needs to pay more attention. With the gradual deepening of the toxicity of traditional Chinese medicine, some traditional Chinese medicines have also been found to have the potential toxicity, with the exception of some traditional toxicity Chinese medicine. Traditional Chinese medicine in the growth, processing, processing, transportation and other aspects of pollution or deterioration will also cause the side effects to the body. Clinical practice should be based on the theory of traditional Chinese medicine to guide rational drug use and follow the symptomatic medication, the principle of proper compatibility. The constitution of the patients are different, except for a few varieties of traditional Chinese medicines are natural herbs with hepatotoxicity, liver toxicity of most of the traditional Chinese medicine has idiosyncratic features. The liver plays an important role in drug metabolism. It is easy to be damaged by drugs. Therefore, the study of traditional Chinese medicine potential liver toxicity and its toxic components has become one of the basic areas of traditional Chinese medicine research. Based on the review of the literatures, this paper summarizes the clinical classification of liver toxicity, the pathogenesis of target cell injury, and systematically summarizes the mechanism of liver toxicity and toxic mechanism of traditional Chinese medicine. This paper provided ideas for the study of potential liver toxicity of traditional Chinese medicine and protection for clinical safety of traditional Chinese medicine. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  6. Research advancements and applications of carboranes in nuclear medicinal chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Wen; Wei Hongyuan; Luo Shunzhong

    2011-01-01

    Because of their uniquely high thermal and chemical stabilities, carboranes have become a subject of study with high interest in the chemistry of supra molecules, catalysts and radiopharmaceuticals. In recent years, the role of carboranes in nuclear medicinal chemistry has been diversified, from the traditional use in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), to the clinical applications in molecular radio imaging and therapy. This paper provides an overview of the synthesis and characterization of carboranes and their applications in nuclear medicinal chemistry, with highlights of recent key advancements in the re- search areas of BNCT and radio imaging. (authors)

  7. [Research progress of Chinese herbal medicine raw materials in cosmetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yan-jun; Kong, Wei-jun; Yang, Mei-hua; Yang, Shi-hai

    2015-10-01

    Advocating green, nature, environmental protection, safety and the pursuit of efficacy are the trends of cosmetics in the world. In recent years, more and more Chinese herbal extracts with mild, high safety and small irritation are applied to cosmetics as the natural additives. This has become a new hot spot. The recent application advances of Chinese medicine raw materials in cosmetics are overviewed according to their main functions. This review will provide useful references for the future development and application of Chinese medicinal herbs cosmetics.

  8. Clinical research should be a priority in the NHS - but what do genito-urinary medicine clinic staff think?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Rosa; Perry, Nicky; Phillips, Alan; Richardson, Daniel; Soni, Suneeta

    2015-02-01

    Clinical research improves patient care and is a government priority. We sought the opinions of genito-urinary medicine clinic staff regarding undertaking research, any barriers they perceived, and methods to optimise study recruitment. Questionnaires were offered to everyone working in the genito-urinary medicine clinic over a one-week period. In addition, four focus groups were held with genito-urinary medicine clinic staff. Forty-three questionnaires were completed. All respondents stated that research was important; however, 14.0% worried that it affected patient care and 16.3% would rather see patients without having to consider research. Doctors were more likely to enjoy discussing studies than other healthcare staff (p = 0.029) and were less likely to think that too many studies were being conducted at one time (p = 0.027). Forty staff attended the focus groups. Time, knowledge of studies, difficulty in broaching the topic of research and patient factors were cited as barriers to recruitment. Suggestions to improve recruitment included: greater multi-disciplinary team involvement; improving staff research knowledge; streamlining the research process; and patient education. Reasons for different attitudes between staff disciplines towards research included different training pathways and incentives to conduct research. The recommendations staff have made to help drive recruitment should be implemented in the genito-urinary medicine clinic. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  9. Navigating the research-clinical interface in genomic medicine: analysis from the CSER Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Susan M; Amendola, Laura M; Berg, Jonathan S; Chung, Wendy K; Clayton, Ellen Wright; Green, Robert C; Harris-Wai, Julie; Henderson, Gail E; Jarvik, Gail P; Koenig, Barbara A; Lehmann, Lisa Soleymani; McGuire, Amy L; O'Rourke, Pearl; Somkin, Carol; Wilfond, Benjamin S; Burke, Wylie

    2017-08-31

    PurposeThe Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research (CSER) Consortium encompasses nine National Institutes of Health-funded U-award projects investigating translation of genomic sequencing into clinical care. Previous literature has distinguished norms and rules governing research versus clinical care. This is the first study to explore how genomics investigators describe and navigate the research-clinical interface.MethodsA CSER working group developed a 22-item survey. All nine U-award projects participated. Descriptive data were tabulated and qualitative analysis of text responses identified themes and characterizations of the research-clinical interface.ResultsSurvey responses described how studies approached the research-clinical interface, including in consent practices, recording results, and using a research versus clinical laboratory. Responses revealed four characterizations of the interface: clear separation between research and clinical care, interdigitation of the two with steps to maintain separation, a dynamic interface, and merging of the two. All survey respondents utilized at least two different characterizations. Although research has traditionally been differentiated from clinical care, respondents pointed to factors blurring the distinction and strategies to differentiate the domains.ConclusionThese results illustrate the difficulty in applying the traditional bifurcation of research versus clinical care to translational models of clinical research, including in genomics. Our results suggest new directions for ethics and oversight.Genetics in Medicine advance online publication, 31 August 2017; doi:10.1038/gim.2017.137.

  10. New Zealand Emergency Medicine Network: a collaboration for acute care research in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    The specialty of emergency medicine in Australasia is coming of age. As part of this maturation there is a need for high-quality evidence to inform practice. This article describes the development of the New Zealand Emergency Medicine Network, a collaboration of committed emergency care researchers who share the vision that New Zealand/Aotearoa will have a world-leading, patient-centred emergency care research network, which will improve emergency care for all, so that people coming to any ED in the country will have access to the same world-class emergency care. © 2015 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  11. A simple electrochemical method for the rapid estimation of antioxidant potentials of some selected medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amidi, Salimeh; Mojab, Faraz; Bayandori Moghaddam, Abdolmajid; Tabib, Kimia; Kobarfard, Farzad

    2012-01-01

    Clinical and Epidemiological studies have shown that a diet rich in fruits and vegetables is associated with a decreased risk of cardiovascular diseases, cancers and other related disorders. These beneficial health effects have been attributed in part to the presence of antioxidants in dietary plants. Therefore screening for antioxidant properties of plant extracts has been one of the interests of scientists in this field. Different screening methods have been reported for the evaluation of antioxidant properties of plant extracts in the literature. In the present research a rapid screening method has been introduced based on cyclic voltammetry for antioxidant screening of some selected medicinal plant extracts. CYCLIC VOLTAMMETRY OF METHANOLIC EXTRACTS OF SEVEN MEDICINAL PLANTS: Buxus hyrcana, Rumex crispus, Achillea millefolium, Zataria multiflora, Ginkgo biloba, Lippia citriodora and Heptaptera anisoptera was carried out at different scan rates. Based on the interpretation of voltammograms, Rumex crispus, Achillea millefolium and Ginkgo biloba showed higher antioxidant capability than the others while Lippia citriodora contained the highest amount of antioxidants. Cyclic voltammetry is expected to be a simple method for screening antioxidants and estimating the antioxidant activity of foods and medicinal plants.

  12. Application of eye tracking in medicine: A survey, research issues and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harezlak, Katarzyna; Kasprowski, Pawel

    2017-05-30

    The performance and quality of medical procedures and treatments are inextricably linked to technological development. The application of more advanced techniques provides the opportunity to gain wider knowledge and deeper understanding of the human body and mind functioning. The eye tracking methods used to register eye movement to find the direction and targets of a person's gaze are well in line with the nature of the topic. By providing methods for capturing and processing images of the eye it has become possible not only to reveal abnormalities in eye functioning but also to conduct cognitive studies focused on learning about peoples' emotions and intentions. The usefulness of the application of eye tracking technology in medicine was proved in many research studies. The aim of this paper is to give an insight into those studies and the way they utilize eye imaging in medical applications. These studies were differentiated taking their purpose and experimental paradigms into account. Additionally, methods for eye movement visualization and metrics for its quantifying were presented. Apart from presenting the state of the art, the aim of the paper was also to point out possible applications of eye tracking in medicine that have not been exhaustively investigated yet, and are going to be a perspective long-term direction of research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Training needs for chemists in nuclear medicine research and production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    The field Nuclear Medicine has expanded rapidly over the last two decades. Individuals with training in radiochemistry are needed in industry, medical centers and hospitals. Although basic training in organic chemistry, inorganic chemistry, biochemistry or pharmacy are required, radiochemistry knowledge is essential for all these individuals. Opportunities and training requirements in these areas will be discussed. (author) 7 refs.; 5 tabs

  14. Traditional Medicine: Past, present and future research and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The high cost of drugs and increase in drug resistance to common diseases like malaria, bacteria infections and other sexually transmitted diseases has caused the therapeutic approach to alternative traditional medicine as an option for concerted search for new chemical entities (NCE). The World Health Organisation ...

  15. Trends in clinical reproductive medicine research : 10 years of growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aleixandre-Benavent, Rafael; Simon, Carlos; Fauser, Bart C J M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071281932

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the most important metrics of publication in the field of reproductive medicine over the decade 2003-2012 to aid in discerning the clinical, social, and epidemiologic implications of this relatively new but rapidly emerging area in medical sciences. Design Bibliometric analysis of

  16. Methods of approach in market research

    OpenAIRE

    Szabo Laszlo

    2003-01-01

    The author of this article, an eminent Hungarian research worker, director of Hungarian Institute for Market Research in Budapest, appeared several times as the author of interesting articles in this periodical. In this contribution Dr. Szabo reviews the possibility of research of marketing phenomena, especially the possibility of previsions of future events. In his opinion one or two methods are not sufficient; a complex application of several different methods and research of determined phe...

  17. How core competencies are taught during clinical supervision: participatory action research in family medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saucier, Danielle; Paré, Line; Côté, Luc; Baillargeon, Lucie

    2012-12-01

    The development of professional competence is the main goal of residency training. Clinical supervision is the most commonly used teaching and learning method for the development of core competencies (CCs). The literature provides little information on how to encourage the learning of CCs through supervision. We undertook an exploratory study to describe if and how CCs were addressed during supervision in a family medicine residency programme. We selected a participatory action research design to engage participants in exploring their precepting practices. Eleven volunteer faculty staff and six residents from a large family medicine residency programme took part in a 9-month process which included three focus group encounters alternating with data gathering during supervision. We used mostly qualitative methods for data collection and analysis, with thematic content analysis, triangulation of sources and of researchers, and member checking. Participants realised that they addressed all CCs listed as programme outcomes during clinical supervision, albeit implicitly and intuitively, and often unconsciously and superficially. We identified a series of factors that influenced the discussion of CCs: (i) CCs must be both known and valued; (ii) discussion of CCs occurs in a constant adaptation to numerous contextual factors, such as residents' characteristics; (iii) the teaching and learning of CCs is influenced by six challenges in the preceptor-resident interaction, such as residents' active engagement, and (iv) coherence with other curricular elements contributes to learning about CCs. Differences between residents' and preceptors' perspectives are discussed. This is the first descriptive study focusing on the teaching of CCs during clinical supervision, as experienced in a family medicine residency programme. Content and process issues were equally influential on the discussion of CCs. Our findings led to a representation of factors determining the teaching and

  18. Integrating Research Skills Training into Non--Research Methods Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Jules

    2014-01-01

    Research skills are a valued commodity by industry and university administrators. Despite the importance placed on these skills students typically dislike taking research method courses where these skills are learned. However, training in research skills does not necessarily have to be confined to these courses. In this study participants at a…

  19. Promoting integrative medicine by computerization of traditional Chinese medicine for scientific research and clinical practice: The SuiteTCM Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Arthur de Sá

    2013-03-01

    Chinese and contemporary Western medical practices evolved on different cultures and historical contexts and, therefore, their medical knowledge represents this cultural divergence. Computerization of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is being used to promote the integrative medicine to manage, process and integrate the knowledge related to TCM anatomy, physiology, semiology, pathophysiology, and therapy. We proposed the development of the SuiteTCM software, a collection of integrated computational models mainly derived from epidemiology and statistical sciences for computerization of Chinese medicine scientific research and clinical practice in all levels of prevention. The software includes components for data management (DataTCM), simulation of cases (SimTCM), analyses and validation of datasets (SciTCM), clinical examination and pattern differentiation (DiagTCM, TongueTCM, and PulseTCM), intervention selection (AcuTCM, HerbsTCM, and DietTCM), management of medical records (ProntTCM), epidemiologic investigation of sampled data (ResearchTCM), and medical education, training, and assessment (StudentTCM). The SuiteTCM project is expected to contribute to the ongoing development of integrative medicine and the applicability of TCM in worldwide scientific research and health care. The SuiteTCM 1.0 runs on Windows XP or later and is freely available for download as an executable application.

  20. Advances in structure research by diffraction methods

    CERN Document Server

    Hoppe, W

    1974-01-01

    Advances in Structure Research by Diffraction Methods: Volume 5 presents discussions on application of diffraction methods in structure research. The book provides the aspects of structure research using various diffraction methods. The text contains 2 chapters. Chapter 1 reviews the general theory and experimental methods used in the study of all types of amorphous solid, by both X-ray and neutron diffraction, and the detailed bibliography of work on inorganic glasses. The second chapter discusses electron diffraction, one of the major methods of determining the structures of molecules in the

  1. Information Systems Development as a Research Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Hasan

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper takes the stance that some cases of information systems development can be considered knowledge creating activities, and, in those cases, information systems development can be a legitimate research method. In these cases not only is knowledge created about the development process itself but also a deeper understanding emerges about the organisational problem that the system is designed to solve. The paper begins with a brief overview of research in the design sciences and a comparison of research methods that are concerned with the design, and use, of information systems. This is followed by an assessment of the way systems development as a research method deals with the scientific research processes of data collection, analysis, synthesis and display. A case study, where the systems development research method was use, is described to illustrate the method and give the reader a better understanding of the approach.

  2. Measuring access to medicines: a review of quantitative methods used in household surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domingues Marlos R

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medicine access is an important goal of medicine policy; however the evaluation of medicine access is a subject under conceptual and methodological development. The aim of this study was to describe quantitative methodologies to measure medicine access on household level, access expressed as paid or unpaid medicine acquisition. Methods Searches were carried out in electronic databases and health institutional sites; within references from retrieved papers and by contacting authors. Results Nine papers were located. The methodologies of the studies presented differences in the recall period, recruitment of subjects and medicine access characterization. Conclusions The standardization of medicine access indicators and the definition of appropriate recall periods are required to evaluate different medicines and access dimensions, improving studies comparison. Besides, specific keywords must be established to allow future literature reviews about this topic.

  3. The progress on researching method and metabolism of positron radiopharmaceutical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gan Hongmei; Qiao Jinping; Kong Aiying; Zhu Lin

    2010-01-01

    Positron radiopharmaceuticals are mainly used for PET studies, which are used in the field of nuclear medicine as tracers in the diagnosis and treatment of many diseases. They have important position and function in the clinical diagnosis and treatment. Metabolism or biotransformation will happen when PET radio-pharmaceuticals enter into the body. Understanding the metabolic fate of radiopharmaceutical probes is essential for an accurate analysis and interpretation of positron emission tomography imaging. The recent research progress on PET radiopharmaceuticals metabolism was reviewed in this paper, including the metabolism characteristics, research methods, analytical techniques and so on. (authors)

  4. [Research advance in metabolism of effective ingredients from traditional Chinese medicines by probiotics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Cheng-En; Li, Hai-Long; He, Xiao-Ping; Zheng, Fen-Fen; Zhu, Hua-Liu; Liu, Liang-Feng; Du, Wei

    2018-01-01

    The pharmacological activity of active ingredients from Chinese medicine depends greatly on the microecological environment of probiotics in the human body. After effective ingredients from traditional Chinese medicines are metabolized or biotransformed by probiotics, their metabolites can increase pharmacological activity, and can be absorbed more easily to improve the bioavailability. Therefore, the combination of Chinese medicines with probiotics is the innovation point in R&D of functional food and Chinese medicines, and also a new thinking for the modernization of Chinese medicine.This review summarizes and analyses the research progress on metabolism effects of gut microbiota on Chinese medicines components, the regulating effect of effective ingredients from Chinese medicine on intestinal probiotics, the application status of probiotics in traditional Chinese medicines, and the main problems and prospects in the research and development of Chinese medicines products with probiotic, aiming to provide theoretical guidance and practical value for the fermentation engineering of Chinese herbal medicine. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  5. Reflections on a Quarter-Century of Research in Sports Medicine Psychology

    OpenAIRE

    Wiese-Bjornstal, Diane M.

    2014-01-01

    The three purposes of this paper are to provide reflections on (a) defining a new field of sports medicine psychology, (b) our research examining the genesis and testing of the integrated model of psychological response to the sport injury and rehabilitation process (Wiese-Bjornstal and Smith, 1993), and, (c) future directions for evaluating the model and advancing the field of sports medicine psychology. Illustrations visually summarize components of sports medicine psychology and show the i...

  6. Two birds with one stone: experiences of combining clinical and research training in addiction medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimas, J; McNeil, R; Ahamad, K; Mead, A; Rieb, L; Cullen, W; Wood, E; Small, W

    2017-01-23

    Despite a large evidence-base upon which to base clinical practice, most health systems have not combined the training of healthcare providers in addiction medicine and research. As such, addiction care is often lacking, or not based on evidence or best practices. We undertook a qualitative study to assess the experiences of physicians who completed a clinician-scientist training programme in addiction medicine within a hospital setting. We interviewed physicians from the St. Paul's Hospital Goldcorp Addiction Medicine Fellowship and learners from the hospital's academic Addiction Medicine Consult Team in Vancouver, Canada (N = 26). They included psychiatrists, internal medicine and family medicine physicians, faculty, mentors, medical students and residents. All received both addiction medicine and research training. Drawing on Kirkpatrick's model of evaluating training programmes, we analysed the interviews thematically using qualitative data analysis software (Nvivo 10). We identified five themes relating to learning experience that were influential: (i) attitude, (ii) knowledge, (iii) skill, (iv) behaviour and (v) patient outcome. The presence of a supportive learning environment, flexibility in time lines, highly structured rotations, and clear guidance regarding development of research products facilitated clinician-scientist training. Competing priorities, including clinical and family responsibilities, hindered training. Combined training in addiction medicine and research is feasible and acceptable for current doctors and physicians in training. However, there are important barriers to overcome and improved understanding of the experience of addiction physicians in the clinician-scientist track is required to improve curricula and research productivity.

  7. Ecological Research on Endangered Medicinal Plants in Bromo Tengger Semeru National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SYAMSUL HIDAYAT

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available An ecological research on some endangered medicinal plants in Ranu Pani, Senduro and Pronojiwo Resort, Bromo Tengger Semeru National Park, East Java was conducted on July 2006. Nine study areas were chosen inside the forest of national park and one site at the enclave area (non-forest area, covering a wide range of plant association, abundances, forest and habitat types, and altitudes. A systematic parallel line sampling method using quadrat technique was employed and total area sampled were 1 ha. The total of 13 medicinal plant species were found in quadrats and there were three species i.e. Euchresta horsfieldii (Lesch. Benn., Cinnamomum sintoc Bl., and Alyxia reinwardtii Bl. known as endangered species which seemed to have a tendency for cluster distribution. Instead of being discovered inside the conservation area, an endangered species, Pimpinella pruatjan Molkenb., was found at an agriculture land in the adjacent area. The Shannon-Weaver diversity index was 1.10 with Evenness value of 0.99. Based on contingency table constructed from the sampling result, we found no single association between the endangered medicinal plant species. Habitat, conservation status and potential threats of the four endangered species are also briefly described.

  8. Stem Cell, Regenerative Medicine and Cancer | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Of the estimated trillion cells that build up our bodies, only a little number can self-renew and give rise to many different cell types. These unspecialized cells are called stem cells. Stem cell division and differentiation is fundamental to the development of the mature organism. Stem cells have recently attracted significant attention largely due to their potential medical benefits in the fields of therapeutic cloning and regenerative medicine.

  9. Person-centred medicines optimisation policy in England: an agenda for research on polypharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, Janet; Britten, Nicky; Krska, Janet; Reeve, Joanne

    2017-01-01

    Aim To examine how patient perspectives and person-centred care values have been represented in documents on medicines optimisation policy in England. There has been growing support in England for a policy of medicines optimisation as a response to the rise of problematic polypharmacy. Conceptually, medicines optimisation differs from the medicines management model of prescribing in being based around the patient rather than processes and systems. This critical examination of current official and independent policy documents questions how central the patient is in them and whether relevant evidence has been utilised in their development. A documentary analysis of reports on medicines optimisation published by the Royal Pharmaceutical Society (RPS), The King's Fund and National Institute for Health and Social Care Excellence since 2013. The analysis draws on a non-systematic review of research on patient experiences of using medicines. Findings The reports varied in their inclusion of patient perspectives and person-centred care values, and in the extent to which they drew on evidence from research on patients' experiences of polypharmacy and medicines use. In the RPS report, medicines optimisation is represented as being a 'step change' from medicines management, in contrast to the other documents which suggest that it is facilitated by the systems and processes that comprise the latter model. Only The King's Fund report considered evidence from qualitative studies of people's use of medicines. However, these studies are not without their limitations. We suggest five ways in which researchers could improve this evidence base and so inform the development of future policy: by facilitating reviews of existing research; conducting studies of patient experiences of polypharmacy and multimorbidity; evaluating medicines optimisation interventions; making better use of relevant theories, concepts and tools; and improving patient and public involvement in research and in

  10. Implementation and Impact of a Translational Research Training Program in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnapp, Lynn M.; Vaught, Meridale; Park, David R.; Rubenfeld, Gordon; Goodman, Richard B.; Hudson, Leonard D.

    2012-01-01

    Background The translation of basic research advances to the clinical arena has been slow and inefficient. With the goal of improving interactions and collaboration between basic science and clinical investigators, we instituted a Translational Research Training Program (TRTP) in acute lung injury to complement our basic science and clinical research training programs in pulmonary and critical care medicine. Methods We developed a TRTP in which trainees select a primary research discipline for rigorous development of skills in either basic science research or clinical research. This primary foundation is complemented by cross-training in the other discipline through a specifically designed program of study. To measure the impact of the program, we analyzed publication rates, coauthorship to reflect collaboration between research disciplines, and publication of papers with a translational focus by members of our division before and after the institution of the TRTP. Results We describe our new training program, including modifications to our preexisting program and development of new components. We found significant increases in multidisciplinary authorship and translational articles following institution of TRTP. Conclusions An explicit TRTP appears to increase collaboration between basic and clinical investigators. Our goal is to share our experiences and provide a template for other pulmonary and critical care programs interested in developing similar curricula. We speculate that this training will improve the translation of basic research findings into clinical advances, thus increasing the probability that successful treatments will be developed for patients with lung diseases. PMID:19017887

  11. Optimizing How We Teach Research Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvancara, Kristen E.

    2017-01-01

    Courses: Research Methods (undergraduate or graduate level). Objective: The aim of this exercise is to optimize the ability for students to integrate an understanding of various methodologies across research paradigms within a 15-week semester, including a review of procedural steps and experiential learning activities to practice each method, a…

  12. e-Learning Business Research Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    This paper outlines the development of a generic Business Research Methods course from a simple name in a box to a full e-Learning web based module. It highlights particular issues surrounding the nature of the discipline and the integration of a large number of cross faculty subject specific research methods courses into a single generic module.…

  13. Cleveland Clinic's summer research program in reproductive medicine: an inside look at the class of 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damayanthi Durairajanayagam

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The American Center for Reproductive Medicine's summer internship course in reproductive medicine and research at Cleveland Clinic is a rigorous, results-oriented annual program that began in 2008 to train both local and international students in the fundamentals of scientific research and writing. The foremost goal of the program is to encourage premedical and medical students to aspire toward a career as a physician–scientist. The internship provides participants with an opportunity to engage in original bench research and scientific writing while developing theoretical knowledge and soft skills. This study describes selected survey responses from interns who participated in the 2014 internship program. The objective of these surveys was to elicit the interns' perspective on the internship program, its strengths and weaknesses, and to obtain insight into potential areas for improvement. Methods: Questionnaires were structured around the five fundamental aspects of the program: 1 theoretical knowledge, 2 bench research, 3 scientific writing, 4 mentorship, and 5 soft skills. In addition, an exit survey gathered information on factors that attracted the interns to the program, communication with mentors, and overall impression of the research program. Results: The opportunity to experience hands-on bench research and scientific writing, personalized mentorship, and the reputation of the institution were appreciated and ranked highly among the interns. Nearly 90% of the interns responded that the program was beneficial and well worth the time and effort invested by both interns and faculty. Conclusion: The outcomes portrayed in this study will be useful in the implementation of new programs or refinement of existing medical research training programs.

  14. Exploring methods in information literacy research

    CERN Document Server

    Lipu, Suzanne; Lloyd, Annemaree

    2007-01-01

    This book provides an overview of approaches to assist researchers and practitioners to explore ways of undertaking research in the information literacy field. The first chapter provides an introductory overview of research by Dr Kirsty Williamson (author of Research Methods for Students, Academics and Professionals: Information Management and Systems) and this sets the scene for the rest of the chapters where each author explores the key aspects of a specific method and explains how it may be applied in practice. The methods covered include those representing qualitative, quantitative and mix

  15. Qualitative versus quantitative methods in psychiatric research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razafsha, Mahdi; Behforuzi, Hura; Azari, Hassan; Zhang, Zhiqun; Wang, Kevin K; Kobeissy, Firas H; Gold, Mark S

    2012-01-01

    Qualitative studies are gaining their credibility after a period of being misinterpreted as "not being quantitative." Qualitative method is a broad umbrella term for research methodologies that describe and explain individuals' experiences, behaviors, interactions, and social contexts. In-depth interview, focus groups, and participant observation are among the qualitative methods of inquiry commonly used in psychiatry. Researchers measure the frequency of occurring events using quantitative methods; however, qualitative methods provide a broader understanding and a more thorough reasoning behind the event. Hence, it is considered to be of special importance in psychiatry. Besides hypothesis generation in earlier phases of the research, qualitative methods can be employed in questionnaire design, diagnostic criteria establishment, feasibility studies, as well as studies of attitude and beliefs. Animal models are another area that qualitative methods can be employed, especially when naturalistic observation of animal behavior is important. However, since qualitative results can be researcher's own view, they need to be statistically confirmed, quantitative methods. The tendency to combine both qualitative and quantitative methods as complementary methods has emerged over recent years. By applying both methods of research, scientists can take advantage of interpretative characteristics of qualitative methods as well as experimental dimensions of quantitative methods.

  16. Feasibility study of structured diagnosis methods for functional dyspepsia in Korean medicine clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Hwan Park

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Functional dyspepsia (FD is the seventh most common disease encountered in Korean medicine (KM clinics. Despite the large number of FD patients visiting KM clinics, the accumulated medical records have no utility in evidence development, due to being unstructured. This study aimed to construct a standard operating procedure (SOP with appropriate structured diagnostic methods for FD, and assess the feasibility for use in KM clinics. Methods: Two rounds of professional surveys were conducted by 10 Korean internal medicine professors to select the representative diagnostic methods. A feasibility study was conducted to evaluate compliance and time required for using the structured diagnostic methods by three specialists in two hospitals. Results: As per the results of the professional survey, five questionnaires and one basic diagnostic method were selected. An SOP was constructed based on the survey results, and a feasibility study showed that the SOP compliance score (out of 5 was 3.45 among the subjects, and 3.25 among the practitioners. The SOP was acceptable and was not deemed difficult to execute. The total execution time was 136.5 minutes, out of which the gastric emptying test time was 129 minutes. Conclusion: This feasibility study of the SOP with structured diagnostic methods for FD confirmed it was adequate for use in KM clinics. It is expected that these study findings will be helpful to clinicians who wish to conduct observational studies as well as to generate quantitative medical records to facilitate Big Data research. Keywords: Big Data, Dyspepsia, Korean medicine, Feasibility studies, Observational study

  17. Innovative Interpretive Qualitative Case Study Research Method ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    lc2o

    SUMMARY. The aim of this paper is to review the methodology for interpretive qualitative case study research method using ... encourages a quantitative approach to research (Darling and. 40. AJPARS ... Interpretive Qualitative Case Study Aligned with Systems Theory for Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation Research. Scott ...

  18. Survey Research: Methods, Issues and the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Ernest W.; Torrisi-Steele, Geraldine; Wang, Victor C. X.

    2015-01-01

    Survey research is prevalent among many professional fields. Both cost effective and time efficient, this method of research is commonly used for the purposes of gaining insight into the attitudes, thoughts, and opinions of populations. Additionally, because there are several types of survey research designs and data collection instruments, the…

  19. Innovative Interpretive Qualitative Case Study Research Method ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this paper is to review the methodology for interpretive qualitative case study research method using systems theory. The paper also addresses the underlying assumptions of this research methodology and how these affect the way research questions are answered. In reviewing this methodology, an example is ...

  20. Training Internal Medicine Residents in Social Medicine and Research-Based Health Advocacy: A Novel, In-Depth Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Gaurab; Pels, Richard J; Stark, Rachel L; Jain, Priyank; Bor, David H; McCormick, Danny

    2017-04-01

    Health disparities are pervasive worldwide. Physicians have a unique vantage point from which they can observe the ways social, economic, and political factors impact health outcomes and can be effective advocates for enhanced health outcomes and health equity. However, social medicine and health advocacy curricula are uncommon in postgraduate medical education. In academic year (AY) 2012, the Cambridge Health Alliance internal medicine residency program transformed an elective into a required social medicine and research-based health advocacy curriculum. The course has three major innovations: it has a yearlong longitudinal curriculum, it is required for all residents, and all residents complete a group research-based health advocacy project within the curricular year. The authors describe the structure, content, and goals of this curriculum. Over the last four years (AYs 2012-2015), residents (17/32; 53%) have rated the overall quality of the course highly (mean = 5.2, where 6 = outstanding; standard deviation = 0.64). In each year since the new course has been implemented, all scholarly work from the course has been presented at conferences by 31 resident presenters and/or coauthors. The course seems to enhance the residency program's capacity to recruit high-caliber residents and faculty members. The authors are collecting qualitative and quantitative data on the impact of the course. They will use their findings to advocate for a national health advocacy competency framework. Recommendations about how to initiate or further develop social medicine and health advocacy curricula are offered.

  1. Autoethnography as an Accessible Method of Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrycja Polczyk

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Reflecting on my own experiences as a researcher with a disability who lives and works in Poland, I examine methodological issues critical to conducting qualitative research. I argue that autoethnography is a viable method for researchers who must overcome physical and/or cultural obstacles associated with a disability. I also maintain that autoethnography as well as its usefulness as a research method is inherently situated within the sociocultural conditions in which research is being conducted. Concluding, I imply that further studies are necessary for people with disabilities to re-gain voice and articulate their experiences.

  2. Using observational methods in nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Jenny

    2015-07-08

    Observation is a research data-collection method used generally to capture the activities of participants as well as when and where things are happening in a given setting. It checks description of the phenomena against what the researcher perceives to be fact in a rich experiential context. The method's main strength is that it provides direct access to the social phenomena under consideration. It can be used quantitatively or qualitatively, depending on the research question. Challenges in using observation relate to adopting the role of participant or non-participant researcher as observer. This article discusses some of the complexities involved when nurse researchers seek to collect observational data on social processes in naturalistic settings using unstructured or structured observational methods in qualitative research methodology. A glossary of research terms is provided.

  3. Research methods for English language teachers

    CERN Document Server

    McDonough, Jo

    2014-01-01

    This book offers a lively introduction to the research methods and techniques available to English language teachers who wish to investigate aspects of their own practice. It covers qualitative and quantitative methodology and includes sections on observation, introspection, diary studies, experiments, interviews, questionnaires, numerical techniques and case study research. Each method is illustrated with examples in language teaching contexts, and techniques of data collection and analysis are introduced. The authors focus particularly on research in the classroom, on tests, materials, the

  4. The medical eye: Conclusions from eye tracking research on expertise development in medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jarodzka, Halszka; Jaarsma, Thomas; Dewhurst, Richard; Boshuizen, Els

    2013-01-01

    Jarodzka, H., Jaarsma, T., Dewhurst, R., & Boshuizen, H. P. A. (2012, October). The medical eye: Conclusions from eye tracking research on expertise development in medicine. Paper presented at the New tools and practices for seeing and learning in medicine ’12, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.

  5. Reliability studies of diagnostic methods in Indian traditional Ayurveda medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurande, Vrinda Hitendra; Waagepetersen, Rasmus; Toft, Egon

    2013-01-01

    Recently, a need to develop supportive new scientific evidence for contemporary Ayurveda has emerged. One of the research objectives is an assessment of the reliability of diagnoses and treatment. Reliability is a quantitative measure of consistency. It is a crucial issue in classification (such...... diagnoses is in the formative stage. However, reliability studies in Ayurveda are in the preliminary stage. In this paper, examples are provided to illustrate relevant concepts of reliability studies of diagnostic methods and their implication in practice, education, and training. An introduction...... to reliability estimates and different study designs and statistical analysis is given for future studies in Ayurveda....

  6. [Research on problem of exogenous pollution of Chinese medicine resources from perspective of circular economy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Tian, Kan; Tian, Hong

    2016-08-01

    Based on the in-depth analysis of the current situation of the exogenous pollution of Chinese medicine resources, this research mainly discusses the intrinsic link and practical significance between the development of circular economy in Chinese medicine resources and the control of the problem of the exogenous pollution from the perspective of circular economy, and proposes some suggestions to develop the recycling economy of Chinese medicine resources from the establishment of legal system, mechanism of development, production norms, industry standards and regulatory system of the recycling of Chinese medicine resources. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  7. Sport and exercise medicine research activity in the Arab world: a 15-year bibliometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fares, Mohamad Y; Fares, Jawad; Baydoun, Hasan; Fares, Youssef

    2017-01-01

    The role of sports in decreasing the prevalence of many diseases has led to a growing interest in the field of sport and exercise medicine. But sport and exercise medicine still remains new to the Arab world, waiting to be explored. The aim of this study is to describe and characterise sport and exercise medicine research activity in the Arab world between 2002 and 2016. The PubMed database was used to search for publications related to sport and exercise medicine. Publications were classified according to the country of origin and filtered to include publications between 2002 and 2016. Research output was analysed with respect to gross domestic product (GDP) and population of each country. A total of 1148 papers related to sport and exercise medicine were found to be published in the Arab countries between 2002 and 2016. Sport-and-exercise-medicine-related publications constituted 0.86% of the total biomedical research papers published in the Arab world and 0.49% of the world's sport and exercise medicine literature. The number of sport-and-exercise-medicine-related publications per country ranged from zero to 352, with Qatar occupying the top spot. Tunisia ranked first with respect to publications per average GDP, while Qatar ranked first with respect to publications per average population. Comoros, Mauritania, Somalia, Sudan and Yemen were found to have no publications related to sport and exercise medicine. Sport and exercise medicine is a novel field in the Arab world. Recognising the barriers facing sport and exercise medicine research and exploring them meticulously remains an essential part of the plan to improve the Arab world's output and contribution in this field.

  8. The Value of Mixed Methods Research: A Mixed Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKim, Courtney A.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this explanatory mixed methods study was to examine the perceived value of mixed methods research for graduate students. The quantitative phase was an experiment examining the effect of a passage's methodology on students' perceived value. Results indicated students scored the mixed methods passage as more valuable than those who…

  9. Qualitative and quantitative methods in health research

    OpenAIRE

    V?zquez Navarrete, M. Luisa

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Research in the area of health has been traditionally dominated by quantitative research. However, the complexity of ill-health, which is socially constructed by individuals, health personnel and health authorities have motivated the search for other forms to approach knowledge. Aim To discuss the complementarities of qualitative and quantitative research methods in the generation of knowledge. Contents The purpose of quantitative research is to measure the magnitude of an event,...

  10. Regulatory agencies' recommendations for medicine information leaflets: Are they in line with research findings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Amber; Tordoff, June; Smith, Alesha

    2018-02-01

    The design of medicine information leaflets can determine whether a leaflet will be read or discarded by patients. It may also influence patients' ability to understand the information about their medicines within the leaflet. Researchers compared regulatory agencies' recommendations for medicine information leaflet design from New Zealand, the United Kingdom, the European Union, and the United States against recommended good design principles to determine the appropriateness, comprehensiveness, and consistency of their recommendations. Recommendations for medicine information leaflets varied between the regulatory agencies. There were some inconsistencies between the recommendations and some gaps were identified. There was little regulatory guidance given to creators of medicine information leaflets in New Zealand compared to other countries, and this could lead to manufacturer-produced information leaflets of a poorer quality. Up-to-date and enforceable guidance for creators of medicine information leaflets should be provided in all countries to ensure they are of an appropriate standard. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Proteomic Contributions to Medicinal Plant Research: From Plant Metabolism to Pharmacological Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiko Hashiguchi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Herbal medicine is a clinical practice of utilizing medicinal plant derivatives for therapeutic purposes. It has an enduring history worldwide and plays a significant role in the fight against various diseases. Herbal drug combinations often exhibit synergistic therapeutic action compared with single-constituent dosage, and can also enhance the cytotoxicity induced by chemotherapeutic drugs. To explore the mechanism underlying the pharmacological action of herbs, proteomic approaches have been applied to the physiology of medicinal plants and its effects on animals. This review article focuses on the existing proteomics-based medicinal plant research and discusses the following topics: (i plant metabolic pathways that synthesize an array of bioactive compounds; (ii pharmacological action of plants tested using in vivo and in vitro studies; and (iii the application of proteomic approaches to indigenous plants with scarce sequence information. The accumulation of proteomic information in a biological or medicinal context may help in formulating the effective use of medicinal plants.

  12. Trends in study design and the statistical methods employed in a leading general medicine journal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosho, M; Sato, Y; Nagashima, K; Takahashi, S

    2018-02-01

    Study design and statistical methods have become core components of medical research, and the methodology has become more multifaceted and complicated over time. The study of the comprehensive details and current trends of study design and statistical methods is required to support the future implementation of well-planned clinical studies providing information about evidence-based medicine. Our purpose was to illustrate study design and statistical methods employed in recent medical literature. This was an extension study of Sato et al. (N Engl J Med 2017; 376: 1086-1087), which reviewed 238 articles published in 2015 in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) and briefly summarized the statistical methods employed in NEJM. Using the same database, we performed a new investigation of the detailed trends in study design and individual statistical methods that were not reported in the Sato study. Due to the CONSORT statement, prespecification and justification of sample size are obligatory in planning intervention studies. Although standard survival methods (eg Kaplan-Meier estimator and Cox regression model) were most frequently applied, the Gray test and Fine-Gray proportional hazard model for considering competing risks were sometimes used for a more valid statistical inference. With respect to handling missing data, model-based methods, which are valid for missing-at-random data, were more frequently used than single imputation methods. These methods are not recommended as a primary analysis, but they have been applied in many clinical trials. Group sequential design with interim analyses was one of the standard designs, and novel design, such as adaptive dose selection and sample size re-estimation, was sometimes employed in NEJM. Model-based approaches for handling missing data should replace single imputation methods for primary analysis in the light of the information found in some publications. Use of adaptive design with interim analyses is increasing

  13. Applying systems biology to biomedical research and health care: a précising definition of systems medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Schleidgen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systems medicine has become a key word in biomedical research. Although it is often referred to as P4-(predictive, preventive, personalized and participatory-medicine, it still lacks a clear definition and is open to interpretation. This conceptual lack of clarity complicates the scientific and public discourse on chances, risks and limits of Systems Medicine and may lead to unfounded hopes. Against this background, our goal was to develop a sufficiently precise and widely acceptable definition of Systems Medicine. Methods In a first step, PubMed was searched using the keyword “systems medicine”. A data extraction tabloid was developed putting forward a means/ends-division. Full-texts of articles containing Systems Medicine in title or abstract were screened for definitions. Definitions were extracted; their semantic elements were assigned as either means or ends. To reduce complexity of the resulting list, summary categories were developed inductively. In a second step, we applied six criteria for adequate definitions (necessity, non-circularity, non-redundancy, consistency, non-vagueness, and coherence to these categories to derive a so-called précising definition of Systems Medicine. Results We identified 185 articles containing the term Systems Medicine in title or abstract. 67 contained at least one definition of Systems Medicine. In 98 definitions, we found 114 means and 132 ends. From these we derived the précising definition: Systems Medicine is an approach seeking to improve medical research (i.e. the understanding of complex processes occurring in diseases, pathologies and health states as well as innovative approaches to drug discovery and health care (i.e. prevention, prediction, diagnosis and treatment through stratification by means of Systems Biology (i.e. data integration, modeling, experimentation and bioinformatics. Our study also revealed the visionary character of Systems Medicine. Conclusions Our

  14. Research reactors: a tool for science and medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordonez, Juan

    2001-01-01

    The types and uses of research reactors are reviewed. After an analysis of the world situation, the demand of new research reactors of about 20 MW is foreseen. The experience and competitiveness of INVAP S.E. as designer and constructor of research reactors is outlined and the general specifications of the reactors designed by INVAP for Egypt and Australia are given

  15. A Review of Current Methods for Analysis of Mycotoxins in Herbal Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Dou, Xiao-Wen; Zhang, Cheng; Logrieco, Antonio F.; Yang, Mei-Hua

    2018-01-01

    The presence of mycotoxins in herbal medicines is an established problem throughout the entire world. The sensitive and accurate analysis of mycotoxin in complicated matrices (e.g., herbs) typically involves challenging sample pretreatment procedures and an efficient detection instrument. However, although numerous reviews have been published regarding the occurrence of mycotoxins in herbal medicines, few of them provided a detailed summary of related analytical methods for mycotoxin determination. This review focuses on analytical techniques including sampling, extraction, cleanup, and detection for mycotoxin determination in herbal medicines established within the past ten years. Dedicated sections of this article address the significant developments in sample preparation, and highlight the importance of this procedure in the analytical technology. This review also summarizes conventional chromatographic techniques for mycotoxin qualification or quantitation, as well as recent studies regarding the development and application of screening assays such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, lateral flow immunoassays, aptamer-based lateral flow assays, and cytometric bead arrays. The present work provides a good insight regarding the advanced research that has been done and closes with an indication of future demand for the emerging technologies. PMID:29393905

  16. Gut Microbiota: From Fundamental Research to Translational Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujing Bi

    2015-12-01

    aroused strong interest in recent years, is reported to be a highly successful therapy for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection. These studies support novel research ideas that are no longer focused solely on the host, but rather on the intimacy of the host-microbiota relationship. Considering the relative ease of regulating the gut microbiota[1], targeting these organisms through diet, prebiotics, probiotics, or other methods may become a useful strategy for curing diseases. To date, a large number of studies have been devoted to uncovering the relationship between microbial metabolites and human diseases, and it is highly likely that more bacterial or related pathways involved in human disease will be identified. In the future, targeting the microbiome may represent an effective and complementary strategy to current approaches for preventing and treating diseases.

  17. Work-life balance in academic medicine: narratives of physician-researchers and their mentors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Erin A; De Castro, Rochelle; Sambuco, Dana; Stewart, Abigail; Ubel, Peter A; Griffith, Kent A; Jagsi, Reshma

    2013-12-01

    Leaders in academic medicine are often selected from the ranks of physician-researchers, whose demanding careers involve multiple professional commitments that must also be balanced with demands at home. To gain a more nuanced understanding of work-life balance issues from the perspective of a large and diverse group of faculty clinician-researchers and their mentors. A qualitative study with semi-structured, in-depth interviews conducted from 2010 to 2011, using inductive analysis and purposive sampling. One hundred former recipients of U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) K08 or K23 career development awards and 28 of their mentors. Three researchers with graduate training in qualitative methods conducted the interviews and thematically coded verbatim transcripts. Five themes emerged related to work-life balance: (1) the challenge and importance of work-life balance for contemporary physician-researchers, (2) how gender roles and spousal dynamics make these issues more challenging for women, (3) the role of mentoring in this area, (4) the impact of institutional policies and practices intended to improve work-life balance, and (5) perceptions of stereotype and stigma associated with utilization of these programs. In academic medicine, in contrast to other fields in which a lack of affordable childcare may be the principal challenge, barriers to work-life balance appear to be deeply rooted within professional culture. A combination of mentorship, interventions that target institutional and professional culture, and efforts to destigmatize reliance on flexibility (with regard to timing and location of work) are most likely to promote the satisfaction and success of the new generation of clinician-researchers who desire work-life balance.

  18. Changing the Face of Veterinary Medicine: Research and Clinical Developments at AAVMC Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Donald F; Hagstrom, Melena R

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a 50-year overview of research and clinical advances in AAVMC member colleges in four representative fields of veterinary medicine: oncology, vaccine development, production medicine, and public health. Though emphasis is on the progress since the mid-1960s, the salient background and associated personnel in each field are also identified to the extent that their description informs more recent events. Advances in board certification and post-graduate clinical and research educational opportunities are also described.

  19. Building a Strategic Framework for Comparative Effectiveness Research in Complementary and Integrative Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia M. Witt

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing burden of chronic diseases presents not only challenges to the knowledge and expertise of the professional medical community, but also highlights the need to improve the quality and relevance of clinical research in this domain. Many patients now turn to complementary and integrative medicine (CIM to treat their chronic illnesses; however, there is very little evidence to guide their decision-making in usual care. The following research recommendations were derived from a CIM Stakeholder Symposium on Comparative Effectiveness Research (CER: (1 CER studies should be made a priority in this field; (2 stakeholders should be engaged at every stage of the research; (3 CER study designs should highlight effectiveness over efficacy; (4 research questions should be well defined to enable the selection of an appropriate CER study design; (5 the CIM community should cultivate widely shared understandings, discourse, tools, and technologies to support the use and validity of CER methods; (6 Effectiveness Guidance Documents on methodological standards should be developed to shape future CER studies. CER is an emerging field and its development and impact must be reflected in future research strategies within CIM. This stakeholder symposium was a first step in providing systematic guidance for future CER in this field.

  20. An agenda for increasing grant funding of emergency medicine education research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Esther K; Fernandez, Rosemarie; Hayden, Emily M; Schneider, Jeffrey I; Clyne, Brian; Ginsburg, Shiphra; Gruppen, Larry D

    2012-12-01

    Funding is a perennial challenge for medical education researchers. Through a consensus process, the authors developed a multifaceted agenda for increasing funding of education research in emergency medicine (EM). Priority agenda items include developing resources to increase the competitiveness of medical education research faculty in grant applications, identifying means by which departments may bolster their faculty's grant writing success, taking long-term steps to increase the number of grants available to education researchers in the field, and encouraging a shift in cultural attitudes toward education research. © 2012 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  1. Respiratory medicines for children: current evidence, unlicensed use and research priorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smyth, A R; Barbato, A; Beydon, N

    2010-01-01

    deficiency. We hope that this summary of the evidence for respiratory medicines in children, highlighting gaps and research priorities, will be useful for the pharmaceutical industry, the paediatric committee of the European Medicines Agency, academic investigators and the lay public.......This European Respiratory Society task force has reviewed the evidence for paediatric medicines in respiratory disease occurring in adults and children. We describe off-licence use, research priorities and ongoing studies. Off-licence and off-label prescribing in children is widespread...

  2. Determination of impurities and degradation products from veterinary medicinal products by HPLC method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Gabriela Oltean

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The organic or inorganic impurities in the veterinary medicinal product can derive from starting materials, manufacturing process, incomplete purification, inappropriate storage. The acceptable levels of impurities in pharmaceuticals are estimated by comparison with standard solutions, according to the appropriate monographs. Forced degradation studies determine the stability of the method of dosage for the active compounds and for the entire finished product under excessive accelerated degradation conditions. They also provide information on degradation pathways and selectivity of analytical methods applied. The information provided by the degradation studies on the active compound and finished pharmaceutical product should demonstrate the specificity of the analytical method regarding impurities. Forced degradation studies should demonstrate that the impurities and degradation products generated do not interfere with the active compound. The current forced degradation methods consist of acid hydrolysis, basic hydrolysis, oxidation, exposure of the medicinal product to temperature and light. HPLC methods are an integral analytical instrument for the analysis of the medicinal product. The HPLC method should be able to separate, detect and quantify various specific degradation products that can appear after manufacture or storage of the medicinal product, as well as new elements appearing after synthesis. FDA and ICH guidelines recommend the enclosure of the results, including the chromatograms specific to the forced degradation-subjected medicinal product, in the documentation for marketing authorization. Using HPLC methods in forced degradation studies on medicinal products provides relevant information on the method of determination for the formulation of the medicinal product, synthesis product, packaging methods and storage.

  3. Food studies: an introduction to research methods

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Miller, Jeff; Deutsch, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    .... Designed for the classroom as well as for the independent scholar, the book details the predominant research methods in the field, provides a series of interactive questions and templates to help...

  4. Research Methods in European Union Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynggaard, Kennet; Manners, Ian; Löfgren, Karl

    Research on the European Union over the past few years has been strongly implicated in the crises that currently grip Europe with a failure to ask the pertinent questions as well as a perceived weakness in the methods and evidence used by researchers providing the basis for these allegations...... of the importance of research strategies, designs and methods. The 20 chapters in this collection range from micro-level analyses of identities, single policy studies and European discourse, through meso-level analysis of agenda setting, bargaining, implementation and Europeanisation, to macro-level analyses....... This volume moves the study of EU research strategies beyond the dichotomies of the past towards a new agenda for research on Europe through a rich diversity of problem-solving based research. This new agenda acknowledges the weaknesses of the past and moves beyond them towards greater openness and awareness...

  5. Tobacco Research and Its Relevance to Science, Medicine and Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tso TC

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is a historical review and a vision for the future of tobacco plant research. This is the perspective of an experienced tobacco scientist who devoted his total professional career to tobacco research. From the very beginning, pioneering tobacco research was the foundation of plant science at the dawn of modern development, in such areas as light, nutrition, genetics, growth control, disorders and metabolism. Tobacco research led to current advancements in plant biotechnology. In addition, tobacco plant research contributed significantly to public health research in radioactive elements, mycotoxins, and air pollutants. However, public support for tobacco research has today greatly declined to almost total elimination because of a sense of political correctness. This author points out that tobacco is one of the most valuable research tools, and is a most abundant source of scientific information. Research with tobacco plants will contribute far beyond the frontiers of agricultural science: tobacco can be a source of food supply with nutrition value similar to that of milk; tobacco can be a source of health supplies including medical chemicals and various vaccines; tobacco can be a source of biofuel. All we need is to treat tobacco with respect; the use of tobacco is only in its initial stages.

  6. Closing the gap in travel medicine: reframing research questions for a new era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin H; Leder, Karin; Wilson, Mary E

    2017-07-01

    Travel medicine needs are changing. New patterns of travel, including greater travel by individuals from emerging economies with different values in costs, risks and benefits, must be considered. This review aims to (1) highlight selected studies that have been published that address previously identified gaps in knowledge; (2) propose possible ways to consider questions regarding travel medicine practice for travelers from emerging economies, underscoring priorities for research focusing on these important populations; (3) highlight potential deficiencies in relevance of current international guidelines as they pertain to travelers from emerging economies; (4) frame research questions for travelers from emerging economies and (5) consider roles for ISTM in closing the gap. We reviewed past travel medicine research priorities published in 2010 to identify publications that responded to some research questions posed. We also reviewed CDC and WHO recommendations and assessed their applicability to travelers from emerging economies. Recent publications have responded to some research questions, but gaps remain and new questions have emerged. Re-framing of several key research questions is needed for travelers from emerging economies. A new challenge looms for traditional travel medicine fields to identify and attend to knowledge and guideline gaps, particularly to rethink questions regarding travel medicine to make them relevant for travelers from emerging economies. The International Society of Travel Medicine is well positioned to assist emerging economies assess their resources and needs, formulate research priorities and tailor the development of travel medicine into a framework aligned to their requirements. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  7. Mixed Methods Research Designs in Counseling Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, William E.; Creswell, John W.; Clark, Vicki L. Plano; Petska, Kelly S.; Creswell, David J.

    2005-01-01

    With the increased popularity of qualitative research, researchers in counseling psychology are expanding their methodologies to include mixed methods designs. These designs involve the collection, analysis, and integration of quantitative and qualitative data in a single or multiphase study. This article presents an overview of mixed methods…

  8. Postgraduate and research programmes in Medicine and Public ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... 3 Master programmes in the pipeline (Global Health, Health Financing, and Supply Chain Management); partnerships with research institutions of great renown, which contributed to the reinforcement of the institutional research capacity and visibility towards excellence in leadership, accountability, and self sustainability.

  9. Qualitative research methods for medical educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Janice L; Balmer, Dorene F; Giardino, Angelo P

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides a primer for qualitative research in medical education. Our aim is to equip readers with a basic understanding of qualitative research and prepare them to judge the goodness of fit between qualitative research and their own research questions. We provide an overview of the reasons for choosing a qualitative research approach and potential benefits of using these methods for systematic investigation. We discuss developing qualitative research questions, grounding research in a philosophical framework, and applying rigorous methods of data collection, sampling, and analysis. We also address methods to establish the trustworthiness of a qualitative study and introduce the reader to ethical concerns that warrant special attention when planning qualitative research. We conclude with a worksheet that readers may use for designing a qualitative study. Medical educators ask many questions that carefully designed qualitative research would address effectively. Careful attention to the design of qualitative studies will help to ensure credible answers that will illuminate many of the issues, challenges, and quandaries that arise while doing the work of medical education. Copyright © 2011 Academic Pediatric Association. All rights reserved.

  10. Mapping Mixed Methods Research: Methods, Measures, and Meaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeldon, J.

    2010-01-01

    This article explores how concept maps and mind maps can be used as data collection tools in mixed methods research to combine the clarity of quantitative counts with the nuance of qualitative reflections. Based on more traditional mixed methods approaches, this article details how the use of pre/post concept maps can be used to design qualitative…

  11. Students' perspectives of undergraduate research methods ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: in this study we used a model of adult learning to explore undergraduate students' views on how to improve the teaching of research methods and biostatistics. Methods: this was a secondary analysis of survey data of 600 undergraduate students from three medical schools in Uganda. The analysis looked at ...

  12. Using Replication Projects in Teaching Research Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standing, Lionel G.; Grenier, Manuel; Lane, Erica A.; Roberts, Meigan S.; Sykes, Sarah J.

    2014-01-01

    It is suggested that replication projects may be valuable in teaching research methods, and also address the current need in psychology for more independent verification of published studies. Their use in an undergraduate methods course is described, involving student teams who performed direct replications of four well-known experiments, yielding…

  13. Phenomenological Research Methods for Counseling Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertz, Frederick J.

    2005-01-01

    This article familiarizes counseling psychologists with qualitative research methods in psychology developed in the tradition of European phenomenology. A brief history includes some of Edmund Husserl's basic methods and concepts, the adoption of existential-phenomenology among psychologists, and the development and formalization of qualitative…

  14. How to locate and appraise qualitative research in complementary and alternative medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this publication is to present a case study of how to locate and appraise qualitative studies for the conduct of a meta-ethnography in the field of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). CAM is commonly associated with individualized medicine. However, one established scientific approach to the individual, qualitative research, thus far has been explicitly used very rarely. This article demonstrates a case example of how qualitative research in the field of CAM studies was identified and critically appraised. Methods Several search terms and techniques were tested for the identification and appraisal of qualitative CAM research in the conduct of a meta-ethnography. Sixty-seven electronic databases were searched for the identification of qualitative CAM trials, including CAM databases, nursing, nutrition, psychological, social, medical databases, the Cochrane Library and DIMDI. Results 9578 citations were screened, 223 articles met the pre-specified inclusion criteria, 63 full text publications were reviewed, 38 articles were appraised qualitatively and 30 articles were included. The search began with PubMed, yielding 87% of the included publications of all databases with few additional relevant findings in the specific databases. CINHAL and DIMDI also revealed a high number of precise hits. Although CAMbase and CAM-QUEST® focus on CAM research only, almost no hits of qualitative trials were found there. Searching with broad text terms was the most effective search strategy in all databases. Conclusions This publication presents a case study on how to locate and appraise qualitative studies in the field of CAM. The example shows that the literature search for qualitative studies in the field of CAM is most effective when the search is begun in PubMed followed by CINHAL or DIMDI using broad text terms. Exclusive CAM databases delivered no additional findings to locate qualitative CAM studies. PMID:23731997

  15. Clinical research activity in periodontal medicine: a systematic mapping of trial registers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsarrat, Paul; Blaizot, Alessandra; Kémoun, Philippe; Ravaud, Philippe; Nabet, Cathy; Sixou, Michel; Vergnes, Jean-Noel

    2016-05-01

    The primary aim of the study was to systematically map registration records on periodontal medicine in clinical trial registers. The secondary aim was to assess the evolution of periodontal medicine in clinical periodontal research as a whole. We searched all registration records related to periodontology in the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform. For registration records classified in the field of periodontal medicine, we assigned the 2015 MeSH(®) term for the most precisely corresponding systemic condition. Fifty-seven systemic conditions have been hypothesized to be linked with periodontal diseases, covering nearly 2% of the diseases indexed in MeSH. In addition to diabetes, cardiovascular disease or preterm birth, other systemic conditions have been the subject of registration records, such as anaemia, liver diseases, dyspepsia or ankylosing spondylitis. A trend towards increasing diversification of systemic conditions has appeared over time. About a third of registration records in clinical periodontal research deals with periodontal medicine. Periodontal medicine now constitutes an important part of clinical periodontal research. Research activity in periodontal medicine has grown continuously since the early 2000s, and exploration of registers gives a useful up-to-date snapshot of this constantly evolving field of research. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Clinical Research Informatics for Big Data and Precision Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, C; Kahn, M G

    2016-11-10

    To reflect on the notable events and significant developments in Clinical Research Informatics (CRI) in the year of 2015 and discuss near-term trends impacting CRI. We selected key publications that highlight not only important recent advances in CRI but also notable events likely to have significant impact on CRI activities over the next few years or longer, and consulted the discussions in relevant scientific communities and an online living textbook for modern clinical trials. We also related the new concepts with old problems to improve the continuity of CRI research. The highlights in CRI in 2015 include the growing adoption of electronic health records (EHR), the rapid development of regional, national, and global clinical data research networks for using EHR data to integrate scalable clinical research with clinical care and generate robust medical evidence. Data quality, integration, and fusion, data access by researchers, study transparency, results reproducibility, and infrastructure sustainability are persistent challenges. The advances in Big Data Analytics and Internet technologies together with the engagement of citizens in sciences are shaping the global clinical research enterprise, which is getting more open and increasingly stakeholder-centered, where stakeholders include patients, clinicians, researchers, and sponsors.

  17. Social Experiments and Participatory Research as Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirckinck-Holmfeld, Lone

    2007-01-01

    Interdisciplinary research with stakeholders and users challenge the research methodologies to be used. These have to provide a shared language for all the participants, to build up trust, and to offer insights into the diverse perspectives of the participants. Further more it challenge ways to d...... practice-based methods where "social experiments with technology" and "dialogue research" are the key-words. ......Interdisciplinary research with stakeholders and users challenge the research methodologies to be used. These have to provide a shared language for all the participants, to build up trust, and to offer insights into the diverse perspectives of the participants. Further more it challenge ways...... to discuss and validate contributions from each others - across different criteria for each discipline, and crosswise different agendas for stakeholders, politicians, practitioners and researchers. Participatory research and social experiments are methodologies which have been developed to cope...

  18. Promoting interdisciplinary research in departments of medicine: results from two models at Boston University School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, David L; Spira, Avrum; Ravid, Katya

    2013-01-01

    We have sought to broaden our department's research capacity using two different interdisciplinary approaches. First, we created the Evans Center for Interdisciplinary Biomedical Research (ECIBR) - a virtual center that promotes and funds Affinity Research Collaboratives (ARCs) initiated by faculty from within and outside Boston University (BU). Of the 11 funded ARCs, the 4 ARCs in existence for a minimum of 3 years have a total of 37 participants, 93 co-authored publications, and 33 new grants. Second, the Department of Medicine (DOM) created a Section of Computational Biomedicine in 2009 to enhance analytical and computational expertise in the DOM. After 3 years, the section is comprised of 10 faculty members and 21 trainees. The faculty members have collaborated with 20 faculty members in other sections or departments and secured 12 extramural grants (totaling ∼$20 million in direct costs). The ECIBR and the Section of Computational Biomedicine represent new organizational approaches to stimulating innovation in research in a DOM.

  19. Scaling Up Scientific Discovery in Sleep Medicine: The National Sleep Research Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Dennis A.; Goldberger, Ary L.; Mueller, Remo; Kim, Matthew; Rueschman, Michael; Mobley, Daniel; Sahoo, Satya S.; Jayapandian, Catherine P.; Cui, Licong; Morrical, Michael G.; Surovec, Susan; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Redline, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Professional sleep societies have identified a need for strategic research in multiple areas that may benefit from access to and aggregation of large, multidimensional datasets. Technological advances provide opportunities to extract and analyze physiological signals and other biomedical information from datasets of unprecedented size, heterogeneity, and complexity. The National Institutes of Health has implemented a Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) initiative that aims to develop and disseminate state of the art big data access tools and analytical methods. The National Sleep Research Resource (NSRR) is a new National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute resource designed to provide big data resources to the sleep research community. The NSRR is a web-based data portal that aggregates, harmonizes, and organizes sleep and clinical data from thousands of individuals studied as part of cohort studies or clinical trials and provides the user a suite of tools to facilitate data exploration and data visualization. Each deidentified study record minimally includes the summary results of an overnight sleep study; annotation files with scored events; the raw physiological signals from the sleep record; and available clinical and physiological data. NSRR is designed to be interoperable with other public data resources such as the Biologic Specimen and Data Repository Information Coordinating Center Demographics (BioLINCC) data and analyzed with methods provided by the Research Resource for Complex Physiological Signals (PhysioNet). This article reviews the key objectives, challenges and operational solutions to addressing big data opportunities for sleep research in the context of the national sleep research agenda. It provides information to facilitate further interactions of the user community with NSRR, a community resource. Citation: Dean DA, Goldberger AL, Mueller R, Kim M, Rueschman M, Mobley D, Sahoo SS, Jayapandian CP, Cui L, Morrical MG, Surovec S, Zhang GQ, Redline S

  20. The importance of radiopharmaceuticals and radionuclides in medicine and research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.W.

    2003-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals and medical radionuclides are used by physicians and biomedical researchers each day throughout the world. Radiopharmaceuticals provide physicians with a means of diagnosing a variety of diseases including cancer, AIDS, pulmonary emboli, coronary artery disease, and many others. Radiopharmaceuticals can also be used for therapeutic treatment of many types of cancer as well as other diseases. Medical radionuclides are used by biomedical researchers for the study of human disease, drug development, AIDS research, and many other areas. Transport of these radionuclides is critically important. Their unencumbered movement ensures availability of these products to all physicians and researchers. Uniform international standards for transport provide the framework for the free movement of these materials across member state borders. (author)

  1. The intensive care medicine research agenda on septic shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, Anders; Gordon, Anthony C; Angus, Derek C

    2017-01-01

    Septic shock remains a global health challenge with millions of cases every year, high rates of mortality and morbidity, impaired quality of life among survivors and relatives, and high resource use both in developed and developing nations. Care and outcomes are improving through organisational i...... and translational work. In this review, international experts summarize the current position of clinical research in septic shock and propose a research agenda to advance this field....

  2. Assessing alternative medicine: methodological and research policy concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Stephen H

    2003-01-01

    Setting funding priorities among research projects for complementary and alternative therapies is especially vulnerable to arbitrary, partisan criteria and opportunistic readings of controversial evidence. This study develops a procedural approach to characterizing, in a transparent and even-handed way, the available evidence on these treatments and demonstrates a simple analytical scheme for prioritizing competing, but typically incommensurable, research projects for public support. A simple five-step scheme for categorizing therapies is developed and justified, based on a taxonomy of the study designs used to generate research evidence. Once identified, candidate therapies are assigned to ordered categories along these design criteria and effectively grouped into equivalence classes by type of evidence. Finally, a partial ordering on the therapies is formed within each class by means of secondary screening criteria. Twenty-five candidate therapies are assigned to equivalence classes. The intent, in effect, is to restrict comparisons to those therapies that fall within a particular class of similar study designs. Within-class orderings avoid the problem of having better-known or better-supported therapies crowd out lesser known ones when it comes to allocating dollars for more research. A set of criteria and procedure for prioritizing spending for further research is demonstrated. Relying on an open, formal procedure for comparing unconventional therapies offers protection against prejudgment in setting funding priorities, especially when weak clinical evidence relates more to a low investment in research than lack of efficacy.

  3. Ethno-Medicinal Plants And Methods Used By Gwandara Tribe Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    From our survey, various methods were found to be used by the traditional medicine practitioners to treat mental illness and associated disorders. These include music, incantations and medicinal plants in various formulations – decoction, powder, infusion – which are administered in various ways like fumigation, inhalation, ...

  4. [h Index and scientific output of researchers in medicine from the University of Guadalajara, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panduro, Arturo; Ojeda-Granados, Claudia; Rivera, Horacio; Roman, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate by the h index the scientific output of researchers from the University of Guadalajara who belong to the Sistema Nacional de Investigadores in the field of Medicine and Health Sciences. Researchers from the University of Guadalajara were selected from the Active SNI Researchers 2013 file. The scientific output of researchers in the fields of Medicine/Health Sciences and Biology/Chemistry was evaluated using the h index estimated by the Scopus website. A sample of capital researchers and Emeritus scientists was taken to perform the same procedure and compare data. The total number of researchers in the University of Guadalajara who are members of the SNI was 711, of which 67.2 % were level I and in less proportion were level II and III. Only 24.2 % of them were classified in the fields of Medicine/Health Sciences and Biology/Chemistry. The average h index value of researchers level I, II and III in Medicine/Health Sciences field was 5.4, 10.5 and 14.5, respectively. Capital and Emeritus scientists had an average h index of 23.4 and 19.8, respectively. The h index measures the quantity and quality of the scientific output and it also avoids bias in the evaluation process. It should be useful for future evaluations of the SNI members and for medical doctors who sign up for the National Academy of Medicine.

  5. A novel classification method for aid decision of traditional Chinese patent medicines for stroke treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yufeng; Liu, Bo; He, Liyun; Bai, Wenjing; Yu, Xueyun; Cao, Xinyu; Luo, Lin; Rong, Peijing; Zhao, Yuxue; Li, Guozheng; Liu, Baoyan

    2017-09-01

    Traditional Chinese patent medicines are widely used to treat stroke because it has good efficacy in the clinical environment. However, because of the lack of knowledge on traditional Chinese patent medicines, many Western physicians, who are accountable for the majority of clinical prescriptions for such medicine, are confused with the use of traditional Chinese patent medicines. Therefore, the aid-decision method is critical and necessary to help Western physicians rationally use traditional Chinese patent medicines. In this paper, Manifold Ranking is employed to develop the aid-decision model of traditional Chinese patent medicines for stroke treatment. First, 115 stroke patients from three hospitals are recruited in the cross-sectional survey. Simultaneously, traditional Chinese physicians determine the traditional Chinese patent medicines appropriate for each patient. Second, particular indicators are explored to characterize the population feature of traditional Chinese patent medicines for stroke treatment. Moreover, these particular indicators can be easily obtained byWestern physicians and are feasible for widespread clinical application in the future. Third, the aid-decision model of traditional Chinese patent medicines for stroke treatment is constructed based on Manifold Ranking. Experimental results reveal that traditional Chinese patent medicines can be differentiated. Moreover, the proposed model can obtain high accuracy of aid decision.

  6. [New Royal Decree on clinical trials: main implications for emergency medicine physicians who do research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Arenillas, Mar; Haj-Ali Saflo, Okba; Sáenz de Tejada, Marta

    2017-06-01

    The new European Union directives affecting clinical trials of medicines introduced important changes for Spain, leading to the publication of a Royal Decree regulating the conduct of clinical trials that went into effect in January 2016. The decree sets out the principles for complying with the EU directives, regulates the work of institutional review boards (IRBs) or ethics committees that review research proposals, introduces means to facilitate clinical research, and clarifies the role of the Spanish register of clinical trials, among other topics. This paper discusses the main changes that have been introduced, especially those intended to facilitate research, such as the new concepts of low intervention trial and noncommercial clinical research. These concepts may be particularly useful for clinical trials designed by emergency medicine physicians. We also comment on changes affecting vulnerable populations and the documents that must be presented to both the researchers' IRB and the Spanish Agency for Medicines and Health Care Products.

  7. Theoretical basis, application, reliability, and sample size estimates of a Meridian Energy Analysis Device for Traditional Chinese Medicine Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Yen Tsai

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The Meridian Energy Analysis Device is currently a popular tool in the scientific research of meridian electrophysiology. In this field, it is generally believed that measuring the electrical conductivity of meridians provides information about the balance of bioenergy or Qi-blood in the body. METHODS AND RESULTS: PubMed database based on some original articles from 1956 to 2014 and the authoŕs clinical experience. In this short communication, we provide clinical examples of Meridian Energy Analysis Device application, especially in the field of traditional Chinese medicine, discuss the reliability of the measurements, and put the values obtained into context by considering items of considerable variability and by estimating sample size. CONCLUSION: The Meridian Energy Analysis Device is making a valuable contribution to the diagnosis of Qi-blood dysfunction. It can be assessed from short-term and long-term meridian bioenergy recordings. It is one of the few methods that allow outpatient traditional Chinese medicine diagnosis, monitoring the progress, therapeutic effect and evaluation of patient prognosis. The holistic approaches underlying the practice of traditional Chinese medicine and new trends in modern medicine toward the use of objective instruments require in-depth knowledge of the mechanisms of meridian energy, and the Meridian Energy Analysis Device can feasibly be used for understanding and interpreting traditional Chinese medicine theory, especially in view of its expansion in Western countries.

  8. Implementation strategies of Systems Medicine in clinical research and home care for cardiovascular disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montecucco, Fabrizio; Carbone, Federico; Dini, Frank Lloyd; Fiuza, Manuela; Pinto, Fausto J; Martelli, Antonietta; Palombo, Domenico; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Mach, François; De Caterina, Raffaele

    2014-11-01

    Insights from the "-omics" science have recently emphasized the need to implement an overall strategy in medical research. Here, the development of Systems Medicine has been indicated as a potential tool for clinical translation of basic research discoveries. Systems Medicine also gives the opportunity of improving different steps in medical practice, from diagnosis to healthcare management, including clinical research. The development of Systems Medicine is still hampered however by several challenges, the main one being the development of computational tools adequate to record, analyze and share a large amount of disparate data. In addition, available informatics tools appear not yet fully suitable for the challenge because they are not standardized, not universally available, or with ethical/legal concerns. Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are a very promising area for translating Systems Medicine into clinical practice. By developing clinically applied technologies, the collection and analysis of data may improve CV risk stratification and prediction. Standardized models for data recording and analysis can also greatly broaden data exchange, thus promoting a uniform management of CVD patients also useful for clinical research. This advance however requires a great organizational effort by both physicians and health institutions, as well as the overcoming of ethical problems. This narrative review aims at providing an update on the state-of-art knowledge in the area of Systems Medicine as applied to CVD, focusing on current critical issues, providing a road map for its practical implementation. Copyright © 2014 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Using ethnographic methods in software engineering research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharp, Helen, C.; Dittrich, Yvonne; De Souza, Cleidson

    2010-01-01

    This tutorial provides an overview of the role of ethnography in Software Engineering research. It describes the use of ethnographic methods as a means to provide an in-depth understanding of the socio-technological realities surrounding everyday software development practice. The knowledge gained...... can be used to improve processes, methods and tools as well as develop observed industrial practices. The tutorial begins with a brief historical account of ethnography in the fields of Software Engineering, CSCW, Information Systems and other related areas. This sets the stage for a more in......-depth discussion of methods for data collection and analysis used in ethnographic studies. It then describes how these methods can be and have been used by software engineering researchers to understand developers' work practices, to inform the development of processes, methods and tools and to evaluate...

  10. A Comprehensive Infrastructure for Big Data in Cancer Research: Accelerating Cancer Research and Precision Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izumi V. Hinkson

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Advancements in next-generation sequencing and other -omics technologies are accelerating the detailed molecular characterization of individual patient tumors, and driving the evolution of precision medicine. Cancer is no longer considered a single disease, but rather, a diverse array of diseases wherein each patient has a unique collection of germline variants and somatic mutations. Molecular profiling of patient-derived samples has led to a data explosion that could help us understand the contributions of environment and germline to risk, therapeutic response, and outcome. To maximize the value of these data, an interdisciplinary approach is paramount. The National Cancer Institute (NCI has initiated multiple projects to characterize tumor samples using multi-omic approaches. These projects harness the expertise of clinicians, biologists, computer scientists, and software engineers to investigate cancer biology and therapeutic response in multidisciplinary teams. Petabytes of cancer genomic, transcriptomic, epigenomic, proteomic, and imaging data have been generated by these projects. To address the data analysis challenges associated with these large datasets, the NCI has sponsored the development of the Genomic Data Commons (GDC and three Cloud Resources. The GDC ensures data and metadata quality, ingests and harmonizes genomic data, and securely redistributes the data. During its pilot phase, the Cloud Resources tested multiple cloud-based approaches for enhancing data access, collaboration, computational scalability, resource democratization, and reproducibility. These NCI-led efforts are continuously being refined to better support open data practices and precision oncology, and to serve as building blocks of the NCI Cancer Research Data Commons.

  11. LABORATORY OF CLINICAL IMMUNOLOGY N.V. SKLIFOSOVSKY RESEARCH INSTITUTE FOR EMERGENCY MEDICINE (HISTORY AND PRESENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Godkov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Assessment of the immune status of patients with urgent types of pathology in the Institute for Emergency Medicine is performed according to three main objects of research: humoral , phagocytic and lymphocytic components of immune system . This complex allows to fully and adequately evaluate the condition of the immune system of patients at different stages of traumatic disease and after transplantation of organs and tissues , to forecast the probability of septic complications developing, adjust the therapy . During 45 years of work of immunological service formed the algorithm of the adequate immunological screening was formed, number of innovative methods of diagnosis was developed, the ideology of post-test counseling of patients by immunologists was created, mathematical methods of storage, modeling and processing of research results was introduced. Laboratory staff identified a number of medical and social factors in the spread of blood-borne viral infections (HIV, hepatitis B and C. New organizational and economic methods of management team were introduced in the laboratory. The basis of the work is equal integration of scientific and clinical staff of the laboratory. 

  12. Journal of Medicine and Biomedical Research: Advanced Search

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Search tips: Search terms are case-insensitive; Common words are ignored; By default only articles containing all terms in the query are returned (i.e., AND is implied); Combine multiple words with OR to find articles containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., ...

  13. [A review of research on sustainable use of medicinal plants cropland in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei-Wei; Zhao, Yang-Jing; Wang, Yu-Ping; Chen, Shi-Lin

    2006-10-01

    In China, about 40% of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) comes from cultivation in agrarian systems. The cropland is fundamental to the productions of medicinal plants, and the sustainable soil management is essential for sustainable using of the TCM resources, furthermore it affects the local economies of the medicinal plant production regions and the sustainable development of TCM agriculture. In this paper, the concept of the sustainable use of TCM cropland was discussed and the problems on sustainable soil management in China were analyzed from the aspects of resources and quality. The research advances in sustainable use of the medicinal plants cropland were reviewed from the aspects of continuous cropping obstacles, faming systems and degraded soil remediation. The strengthening research fields in the further were suggested.

  14. Research Methods in Healthcare Epidemiology: Survey and Qualitative Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safdar, Nasia; Abbo, Lilian M; Knobloch, Mary Jo; Seo, Susan K

    2016-11-01

    Surveys are one of the most frequently employed study designs in healthcare epidemiology research. Generally easier to undertake and less costly than many other study designs, surveys can be invaluable to gain insights into opinions and practices in large samples and may be descriptive and/or be used to test associations. In this context, qualitative research methods may complement this study design either at the survey development phase and/or at the interpretation/extension of results stage. This methods article focuses on key considerations for designing and deploying surveys in healthcare epidemiology and antibiotic stewardship, including identification of whether or not de novo survey development is necessary, ways to optimally lay out and display a survey, denominator measurement, discussion of biases to keep in mind particularly in research using surveys, and the role of qualitative research methods to complement surveys. We review examples of surveys in healthcare epidemiology and antimicrobial stewardship and review the pros and cons of methods used. A checklist is provided to help aid design and deployment of surveys in healthcare epidemiology and antimicrobial stewardship. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;1-6.

  15. [Research progress of cell co-culture method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yanqin; Chen, Yulong; Li, Jiansheng

    2016-08-01

    Cell culture technology is the most commonly used method in the in vitro experiments at present. However, monolayer cell culture technology has been unable to meet the demand of the researchers. This is because that monolayer cell culture cannot mimic the cellular environment in which multiple cells interact with each other in the body. We cannot discuss the relationship of many cells, because we do not know the relationship between cells through a single kind of cell. So cell co-culture medicine arises at the historic moment for the demand. With the development of research method in recent years, cell co-culture method also has been improved in practice: from direct contact co-cultures to indirect contact co-cultures, from two-dimensional co-cultures to three-dimensional co-cultures. Cell co-culture method is closer to the human body. It is also more advantageous to study the interaction among cells. Nowadays, there are more researchers tend to select this method to study the physiological and pathological in vitro model, tissue engineering, and cell differentiation research. At the same time, it has become the focus of drug research and development, drug analysis, mechanism of drug action, and drug targets. This article will review the studies of cell co-culture method, summarize advantages and disadvantages of various methods, so as to promote improvement of cell culture methods, to build cells co-culture system that more close to human body, and build the in vitro model that simulate internal circulation of human body further.

  16. Barriers to conducting research: A survey of trainees in emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaussen, Alexander; Jennings, Paul A; O'Reilly, Gerard; Mitra, Biswadev; Cameron, Peter A

    2017-04-01

    Research underpins evidence-based practice, but there are significant barriers to conducting research relevant to each clinical discipline. Understanding these barriers could allow strategies to reduce their impact. The present study was undertaken to understand specific barriers to research for emergency medicine (EM) trainees. EM trainees attending research short courses were surveyed. Free-text responses were classified into themes and a list of pre-specified potential barriers was used for ranking purposes. The responders (n = 61/90; 67.8%) were young, mostly male with low confidence in leading a research project and limited previous research experience. There were 155 unique barriers identified from 55 respondents, which fitted into nine categories. The most frequently perceived barrier was time (29%), followed by skills (22.6%) and cultural factors (19.4%). Most trainees (n = 54/56, 96.4%) believed that the barriers could be overcome. Strategies suggested included protection of time, mentoring and education, as well as top-down improved research culture. Barriers to research in EM are similar to other specialities and were perceived to be manageable. Reorganisation and refocus of the Australasian College for Emergency Medicine training curriculum may be an option to foster an environment to promote research. © 2017 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  17. Qualitative Methods in Mental Health Services Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palinkas, Lawrence A.

    2014-01-01

    Qualitative and mixed methods play a prominent role in mental health services research. However, the standards for their use are not always evident, especially for those not trained in such methods. This paper reviews the rationale and common approaches to using qualitative and mixed methods in mental health services and implementation research based on a review of the papers included in this special series along with representative examples from the literature. Qualitative methods are used to provide a “thick description” or depth of understanding to complement breadth of understanding afforded by quantitative methods, elicit the perspective of those being studied, explore issues that have not been well studied, develop conceptual theories or test hypotheses, or evaluate the process of a phenomenon or intervention. Qualitative methods adhere to many of the same principles of scientific rigor as quantitative methods, but often differ with respect to study design, data collection and data analysis strategies. For instance, participants for qualitative studies are usually sampled purposefully rather than at random and the design usually reflects an iterative process alternating between data collection and analysis. The most common techniques for data collection are individual semi-structured interviews, focus groups, document reviews, and participant observation. Strategies for analysis are usually inductive, based on principles of grounded theory or phenomenology. Qualitative methods are also used in combination with quantitative methods in mixed method designs for convergence, complementarity, expansion, development, and sampling. Rigorously applied qualitative methods offer great potential in contributing to the scientific foundation of mental health services research. PMID:25350675

  18. Research with radioisotopes in clinical and laboratory medicine: a bibliographic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metz, J.; Van der Walt, L.A.; Malan, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    This bibliography is restricted mainly to AEC-supported projects which are considered to amply reflect the widespread use of radioisotopes in clinical and laboratory medicine in South Africa and which describe research with radioisotopes of some direct relevance to diagnostic-clinical or laboratory medicine, or both, but excluding therapy with isotopes. General information is given in this review on oncology, endocrinology, metabolism and nutrition, haematology, neurology, angiocardiology, pulmonology, gastroenterology, gynaecology and obstetrics, nephrology, immunology and transplantation, microbiology and parasitology

  19. Qualitative and Mixed Methods Social Media Research

    OpenAIRE

    Chareen L. Snelson

    2016-01-01

    Social media technologies have attracted substantial attention among many types of users including researchers who have published studies for several years. This article presents an overview of trends in qualitative and mixed methods social media research literature published from 2007 through 2013. A collection of 229 qualitative studies were identified through a systematic literature review process. A subset of 55 of these articles report studies involving a combination of qualitative and q...

  20. Qualitative and Mixed Methods Social Media Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chareen L. Snelson

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Social media technologies have attracted substantial attention among many types of users including researchers who have published studies for several years. This article presents an overview of trends in qualitative and mixed methods social media research literature published from 2007 through 2013. A collection of 229 qualitative studies were identified through a systematic literature review process. A subset of 55 of these articles report studies involving a combination of qualitative and quantitative methods. Articles were reviewed, analyzed, and coded through a qualitative content analysis approach. Overall trends are presented with respect to the entire collection of articles followed by an analysis of mixed methods research approaches identified in the subset of 55 studies. The most commonly used research approaches involved collecting data from people through interview, focus group, and survey methodologies. Content analysis was the second most commonly used approach whereby researchers use Facebook posts, Tweets (Twitter posts, YouTube videos, or other social media content as a data source. Many of the studies involving combinations of quantitative and qualitative data followed a design resembling Creswell and Plano Clark’s basic mixed methods typology (e.g., convergent parallel, explanatory sequential, and exploratory sequential.

  1. Advances in structure research by diffraction methods

    CERN Document Server

    Brill, R

    1970-01-01

    Advances in Structure Research by Diffraction Methods reviews advances in the use of diffraction methods in structure research. Topics covered include the dynamical theory of X-ray diffraction, with emphasis on Ewald waves in theory and experiment; dynamical theory of electron diffraction; small angle scattering; and molecular packing. This book is comprised of four chapters and begins with an overview of the dynamical theory of X-ray diffraction, especially in terms of how it explains all the absorption and propagation properties of X-rays at the Bragg setting in a perfect crystal. The next

  2. Evaluation of an internal research funding program in a school of veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, David G; Kearney, Michael T

    2012-01-01

    The present article describes a paradigm for evaluating the internal research funding program of a college or school of veterinary medicine, using as an example a similar exercise recently conducted at the Louisiana State University School of Veterinary Medicine (LSU SVM). The purpose of the exercise was to quantify and evaluate the effectiveness of the LSU SVM internal research funding mechanism known as the Competitive Organized Research Program (CORP). The evaluation resulted in several important observations that will allow us to further improve the effectiveness of our internal research funding program investment. Among the most important of these was the greater return on investment for CORP projects funded with smaller awards (approximately $10,000 US) compared to projects funded with larger awards (approximately $52,000 US). Other colleges and schools of veterinary medicine may find such an exercise similarly informative and beneficial.

  3. Anatomy in cardiovascular medicine: modern technologies in research and education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М. В. Диденко

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Methods of 'clinical plastination' and their integration into practical postgraduate education of cardiovascular specialists (interventional cardiologists, electrophysiologists, radiologists are presented. Implementing this project enables to move anatomy into a hospital, thus not just saving the time for specialists involved in clinical work but improving the efficacy of their education.

  4. Research Article ( New England Journal of Medicine ) Severe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: We conducted a case–control study of 381 preschool children with severe anemia (hemoglobin concentration, <5.0 g per deciliter) and 757 preschool children without severe anemia in urban and rural settings in Malawi. Causal factors previously associated with severe anemia were studied. The data were ...

  5. Research Article ( New England Journal of Medicine ) Antibiotics as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we randomly assigned Malawian children, 6 to 59 months of age, with severe acute malnutrition to receive amoxicillin, cefdinir, or placebo for 7 days in addition to ready-to-use therapeutic food for the outpatient treatment of uncomplicated severe acute ...

  6. [Construction of Research-Oriented State Key Clinical Department by Highlighting the Characteris- tics and Advantages of Chinese Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shi-yu; Guo, Li-heng; Han, Yun; Li, Jian; Zhang, Min-zhou

    2016-04-01

    As the largest research-oriented specialty department in national traditional Chinese medicine hospitals, the Department of Critical Care Medicine in Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine insists on the development mode combined with clinical medicine and scientific research. By taking clinical and basic researches for integrative medicine preventing and treating acute myocardial in-farction and sepsis as a breakthrough, authors explored key problems of Chinese medicine in improving the prognosis related diseases and patients' quality of life. In recent 3 years our department has successively become the principal unit of the national key specialties cooperative group of critical care medicine (awarded by State Administration of Traditional Chinese Medicine), the key clinical specialties (awarded by National Health and Family Planning Commission), and Guangzhou key laboratory construction unit, and achieved overall lap in clinical medical treatment, personnel training, scientific research, and social service.

  7. Effects and treatment methods of acupuncture and herbal medicine for premenstrual syndrome/premenstrual dysphoric disorder: systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background During their reproductive years about 10% of women experience some kind of symptoms before menstruation (PMS) in a degree that affects their quality of life (QOL). Acupuncture and herbal medicine has been a recent favorable therapeutic approach. Thus we aimed to review the effects of acupuncture and herbal medicine in the past decade as a preceding research in order to further investigate the most effective Korean Medicine treatment for PMS/PMDD. Methods A systematic literature search was conducted using electronic databases on studies published between 2002 and 2012. Our review included randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) of acupuncture and herbal medicine for PMS/PMDD. Interventions include acupuncture or herbal medicine. Clinical information including statistical tests was extracted from the articles and summarized in tabular form or in the text. Study outcomes were presented as the rate of improvement (%) and/or end-of-treatment scores. Results The search yielded 19 studies. In screening the RCTs, 8 studies in acupuncture and 11 studies in herbal medicine that matched the criteria were identified. Different acupuncture techniques including traditional acupuncture, hand acupuncture and moxibustion, and traditional acupuncture technique with auricular points, have been selected for analysis. In herbal medicine, studies on Vitex Agnus castus, Hypericum perforatum, Xiao yao san, Elsholtzia splendens, Cirsium japonicum, and Gingko biloba L. were identified. Experimental groups with Acupuncture and herbal medicine treatment (all herbal medicine except Cirsium japonicum) had significantly improved results regarding PMS/PMDD. Conclusions Limited evidence supports the efficacy of alternative medicinal interventions such as acupuncture and herbal medicine in controlling premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder. Acupuncture and herbal medicine treatments for premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder showed a 50% or

  8. Application of four-dimension criteria to assess rigour of qualitative research in emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forero, Roberto; Nahidi, Shizar; De Costa, Josephine; Mohsin, Mohammed; Fitzgerald, Gerry; Gibson, Nick; McCarthy, Sally; Aboagye-Sarfo, Patrick

    2018-02-17

    The main objective of this methodological manuscript was to illustrate the role of using qualitative research in emergency settings. We outline rigorous criteria applied to a qualitative study assessing perceptions and experiences of staff working in Australian emergency departments. We used an integrated mixed-methodology framework to identify different perspectives and experiences of emergency department staff during the implementation of a time target government policy. The qualitative study comprised interviews from 119 participants across 16 hospitals. The interviews were conducted in 2015-2016 and the data were managed using NVivo version 11. We conducted the analysis in three stages, namely: conceptual framework, comparison and contrast and hypothesis development. We concluded with the implementation of the four-dimension criteria (credibility, dependability, confirmability and transferability) to assess the robustness of the study, RESULTS: We adapted four-dimension criteria to assess the rigour of a large-scale qualitative research in the emergency department context. The criteria comprised strategies such as building the research team; preparing data collection guidelines; defining and obtaining adequate participation; reaching data saturation and ensuring high levels of consistency and inter-coder agreement. Based on the findings, the proposed framework satisfied the four-dimension criteria and generated potential qualitative research applications to emergency medicine research. We have added a methodological contribution to the ongoing debate about rigour in qualitative research which we hope will guide future studies in this topic in emergency care research. It also provided recommendations for conducting future mixed-methods studies. Future papers on this series will use the results from qualitative data and the empirical findings from longitudinal data linkage to further identify factors associated with ED performance; they will be reported

  9. A bibliographic review of medicine and science research in dancesport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Teri R; Wyon, Matthew; Ambegaonkar, Jatin P; Redding, Emma

    2013-06-01

    DanceSport is the competitive form of ballroom dancing, and even though it has more participants worldwide than ballet and modern dance, there is less peer-reviewed research. A review was conducted to identify all relevant literature to help researchers and clinicians gain an enhanced understanding of dancesport. Eight databases were searched, with 34 articles found in topics including participation motives, psychology, exercise physiology, fitness training, injuries and injury prevention, biomechanics, menstrual dysfunction, and substance use. Our results indicate that researchers have been inconsistently recording and reporting anthropometric and dancesport data; for example, 31 studies separated participants by gender, 21 included the competition classification of dancers, 19 reported which style of dancesport participants competed in, and 13 described the participants as a dance couple. Common injuries affected the neck, shoulder, spine, knee, lower leg, and foot. Dancesport is in the very heavy to extremely heavy category in energy expenditure (mean heart rate: male 175.2 ± 10.7, female 178.6 ± 8.6 bpm) and utilizes both aerobic and anaerobic energy systems. Alpha-beta and heart rate variability intervention techniques are reported to successfully enhance performance in dancers. Dancesport participants also appear less likely to smoke cigarettes, but have little knowledge about anti-doping rules. During events, professionals danced farther (30 m) and faster (0.3 m/sec) than junior dancers. Female competitors were more likely to be eumenorrheic. Dancesport is a physically and mentally demanding competitive sport, but there is a need to standardize measurements in future studies to allow comparison.

  10. The Ethics of Traditional Chinese and Western Herbal Medicine Research: Views of Researchers and Human Ethics Committees in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline A. Smith

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the growth of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM and western herbal medicine (WHM research in Australia, little is known about how ethics committees (HRECs assess the ethics of TCM or WHM research. The objectives of this study were to examine the experiences of TCM and WHM researchers and HRECs with the evaluation of ethics applications. Two cross-sectional surveys were undertaken of HRECs and TCM and WHM researchers in Australia. Anonymous self-completion questionnaires were administered to 224 HRECs and 117 researchers. A response confirming involvement in TCM or WHM research applications was received from 20 HRECs and 42 researchers. The most frequent ethical issues identified by HRECs related to herbal products including information gaps relating to mode of action of herbal medicines and safety when combining herbal ingredients. Researchers concurred that they were frequently requested to provide additional information on multiple aspects including safety relating to the side effects of herbs and herb-drug interactions. Overall adherence with the principles of ethical conduct was high among TCM and WHM researchers although our study did identify the need for additional information regarding assessment of risk and risk management.

  11. Genetically engineered mouse models in oncology research and cancer medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersten, Kelly; de Visser, Karin E; van Miltenburg, Martine H; Jonkers, Jos

    2017-02-01

    Genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) have contributed significantly to the field of cancer research. In contrast to cancer cell inoculation models, GEMMs develop de novo tumors in a natural immune-proficient microenvironment. Tumors arising in advanced GEMMs closely mimic the histopathological and molecular features of their human counterparts, display genetic heterogeneity, and are able to spontaneously progress toward metastatic disease. As such, GEMMs are generally superior to cancer cell inoculation models, which show no or limited heterogeneity and are often metastatic from the start. Given that GEMMs capture both tumor cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic factors that drive de novo tumor initiation and progression toward metastatic disease, these models are indispensable for preclinical research. GEMMs have successfully been used to validate candidate cancer genes and drug targets, assess therapy efficacy, dissect the impact of the tumor microenvironment, and evaluate mechanisms of drug resistance. In vivo validation of candidate cancer genes and therapeutic targets is further accelerated by recent advances in genetic engineering that enable fast-track generation and fine-tuning of GEMMs to more closely resemble human patients. In addition, aligning preclinical tumor intervention studies in advanced GEMMs with clinical studies in patients is expected to accelerate the development of novel therapeutic strategies and their translation into the clinic. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  12. Phenomenography: A Missed Method in Medical Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assarroudi Abdolghader

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Research is an approach with which human beings can attempt to answer questions and discover the unknowns. Research methodology is something that is determined by the researcher’s attitude toward the universe as well as by the question he is trying to answer. Some essential questions regarding the research process are: “What is the nature of reality?”, “What is the nature of the relationship between the scholar and the subject of interest?”, and “How can one understand the subject, and what are the methods?”. Research approaches can be categorized as quantitative and qualitative. In the former, measurement, prediction, and control are the bases, while in the latter, exploring, describing, and explaining the phenomena are fundamental. Among qualitative research methods, phenomenography is one of the newest methods. However, in spite of proving to be useful in various disciplines, it has yet to become popular, and many scholars mistake it for phenomenology. The focus of phenomenography is on what is known as the second-order perspective and the different ways that people can experience the same phenomenon, while phenomenology primarily emphasizes the first-order perspective and the similar essences that are derived from various experiences. This article aims to provide a better understanding of phenomenography through explaining it and comparing it with phenomenology in order to facilitate its proper and timely application in medical studies.

  13. Sprint methods for web archive research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.C. Huurdeman; A. Ben David; T. Samar (Thaer)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractWeb archives provide access to snapshots of the Web of the past, and could be valuable for research purposes. However, access to these archives is often limited, both in terms of data availability, and interfaces to this data. This paper explores new methods to overcome these

  14. Which research is needed to support clinical decision-making on integrative medicine?- Can comparative effectiveness research close the gap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Claudia M; Huang, Wen-jing; Lao, Lixing; Bm, Berman

    2012-10-01

    In clinical research on complementary and integrative medicine, experts and scientists have often pursued a research agenda in spite of an incomplete understanding of the needs of end users. Consequently, the majority of previous clinical trials have mainly assessed the efficacy of interventions. Scant data is available on their effectiveness. Comparative effectiveness research (CER) promises to support decision makers by generating evidence that compares the benefits and harms of the best care options. This evidence, more generalizable than the evidence generated by traditional randomized controlled trials (RCTs), is better suited to inform real-world care decisions. An emphasis on CER supports the development of the evidence base for clinical and policy decision-making. Whereas in most areas of complementary and integrative medicine data on comparative effectiveness is scarce, available acupuncture research already contributes to CER evidence. This paper will introduce CER and make suggestions for future research.

  15. [Which research is needed to support clinical decision-making on integrative medicine? Can comparative effectiveness research close the gap?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Claudia M; Huang, Wen-jing; Lao, Lixing; Berman, Brian M

    2013-08-01

    In clinical research on complementary and integrative medicine, experts and scientists have often pursued a research agenda in spite of an incomplete understanding of the needs of end users. Consequently, the majority of previous clinical trials have mainly assessed the efficacy of interventions. Scant data is available on their effectiveness. Comparative effectiveness research (CER) promises to support decision makers by generating evidence that compares the benefits and harms of best care options. This evidence, more generalizable than evidence generated by traditional randomized clinical trials (RCTs), is better suited to inform real-world care decisions. An emphasis on CER supports the development of the evidence base for clinical and policy decision-making. Whereas in most areas of complementary and integrative medicine data on CER is scarce, available acupuncture research already contributes to CER evidence. This paper will introduce CER and make suggestions for future research.

  16. The Bad Taste of Medicines: Overview of Basic Research on Bitter Taste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennella, Julie A.; Spector, Alan C.; Reed, Danielle R.; Coldwell, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    consume some medicines, they often are not effective in suppressing bitter tastes. Further development of psychophysical tools for children will help us better understand their sensory worlds. Multiple testing strategies will help us refine methods to assess acceptance and compliance/adherence by various pediatric populations. Research involving animal models, in which the gustatory system can be more invasively manipulated, can elucidate mechanisms, ultimately providing potential targets. These approaches, combined with new technologies and guided by findings from clinical studies, will potentially lead to effective ways to enhance drug acceptance and compliance in pediatric populations. PMID:23886820

  17. Reliability and risk analysis methods research plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-10-01

    This document presents a plan for reliability and risk analysis methods research to be performed mainly by the Reactor Risk Branch (RRB), Division of Risk Analysis and Operations (DRAO), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. It includes those activities of other DRAO branches which are very closely related to those of the RRB. Related or interfacing programs of other divisions, offices and organizations are merely indicated. The primary use of this document is envisioned as an NRC working document, covering about a 3-year period, to foster better coordination in reliability and risk analysis methods development between the offices of Nuclear Regulatory Research and Nuclear Reactor Regulation. It will also serve as an information source for contractors and others to more clearly understand the objectives, needs, programmatic activities and interfaces together with the overall logical structure of the program

  18. Implementing genomics and pharmacogenomics in the clinic: The National Human Genome Research Institute's genomic medicine portfolio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolio, Teri A

    2016-10-01

    Increasing knowledge about the influence of genetic variation on human health and growing availability of reliable, cost-effective genetic testing have spurred the implementation of genomic medicine in the clinic. As defined by the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), genomic medicine uses an individual's genetic information in his or her clinical care, and has begun to be applied effectively in areas such as cancer genomics, pharmacogenomics, and rare and undiagnosed diseases. In 2011 NHGRI published its strategic vision for the future of genomic research, including an ambitious research agenda to facilitate and promote the implementation of genomic medicine. To realize this agenda, NHGRI is consulting and facilitating collaborations with the external research community through a series of "Genomic Medicine Meetings," under the guidance and leadership of the National Advisory Council on Human Genome Research. These meetings have identified and begun to address significant obstacles to implementation, such as lack of evidence of efficacy, limited availability of genomics expertise and testing, lack of standards, and difficulties in integrating genomic results into electronic medical records. The six research and dissemination initiatives comprising NHGRI's genomic research portfolio are designed to speed the evaluation and incorporation, where appropriate, of genomic technologies and findings into routine clinical care. Actual adoption of successful approaches in clinical care will depend upon the willingness, interest, and energy of professional societies, practitioners, patients, and payers to promote their responsible use and share their experiences in doing so. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  19. [Current Research Activities on Person-Centered Medicine in Academic Institutes of General Practice in Germany and Austria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Annemarie; Schelling, Jörg; Kohls, Niko; van Dyck, Marcus; Poggenburg, Stephanie; Vajda, Christian; Hirsch, Jameson; Sirois, Fuschia; Toussaint, Loren; Offenbächer, Martin

    2017-10-11

    Aim of study Person-centered medicine (PCM) with its focus on humanistic-biographical-oriented medicine and integrated, positive-salutogenic health is a central aspect in the patient-physician relationship in general practice. The objective of this analysis is to assess the prevalence and type of research project in academic institutions of general practice in Germany (Ger) and Austria (At) and the thematic priorities of the projects in the areas PCM, health promotion (HP), prevention (PRE) and conventional medicine (CM). Methods A search was conducted (September-December 2015) on the websites of 30 institutes and divisions of general medicine for their current research projects. The retrieved projects were assigned to five categories: PCM, HP, PRE, CM and others. Subsequently, we identified the targeted patient groups of the projects as well as the thematic focus in the categories PCM, HP, PRE and CM with focus on PCM and HP. Results 541 research projects were identified, 452 in Germany and 89 in Austria. Research projects were only included if they were explicitly indicated as research-oriented. Seventy projects addressed PCM aspects, 15 projects HP aspects, 32 projects PRE aspects and 396 projects CM aspects. The most frequently target groups in the categories PCM (24 of 70) and HP (7 of 15) were chronically ill patients. The most common thematic focus in PCM was communication (13 of 70) and in HP, physical activity (6 of 15). Conclusion The vast majority of research projects investigated conventional medical topics. The percentage of research activities in the field of PCM (13%) or PCM including HP (16%) in Ger and At is below the European average of 20%. From our point of view, PCM and HP need to be implemented to a greater extent in general practice. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Health policy and systems research in access to medicines: a prioritized agenda for low- and middle-income countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To identify priority policy issues in access to medicines (ATM) relevant for low- and middle-income countries, to identify research questions that would help address these policy issues, and to prioritize these research questions in a health policy and systems research (HPSR) agenda. Methods The study involved i) country- and regional-level priority-setting exercises performed in 17 countries across five regions, with a desk review of relevant grey and published literature combined with mapping and interviews of national and regional stakeholders; ii) interviews with global-level stakeholders; iii) a scoping of published literature; and iv) a consensus building exercise with global stakeholders which resulted in the formulation and ranking of HPSR questions in the field of ATM. Results A list of 18 priority policy issues was established following analysis of country-, regional-, and global-level exercises. Eighteen research questions were formulated during the global stakeholders’ meeting and ranked according to four ranking criteria (innovation, impact on health and health systems, equity, and lack of research). The top three research questions were: i) In risk protection schemes, which innovations and policies improve equitable access to and appropriate use of medicines, sustainability of the insurance system, and financial impact on the insured? ii) How can stakeholders use the information available in the system, e.g., price, availability, quality, utilization, registration, procurement, in a transparent way towards improving access and use of medicines? and iii) How do policies and other interventions into private markets, such as information, subsidies, price controls, donation, regulatory mechanisms, promotion practices, etc., impact on access to and appropriate use of medicines? Conclusions Our HPSR agenda adopts a health systems perspective and will guide relevant, innovative research, likely to bear an impact on health, health systems and

  1. Ethics and policy issues for stem cell research and pulmonary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenthal, Justin; Sugarman, Jeremy

    2015-03-01

    Stem cell research and related initiatives in regenerative medicine, cell-based therapy, and tissue engineering have generated considerable scientific and public interest. Researchers are applying stem cell technologies to chest medicine in a variety of ways: using stem cells as models for drug discovery, testing stem cell-based therapies for conditions as diverse as COPD and cystic fibrosis, and producing functional lung and tracheal tissue for physiologic modeling and potential transplantation. Although significant scientific obstacles remain, it is likely that stem cell-based regenerative medicine will have a significant clinical impact in chest medicine. However, stem cell research has also generated substantial controversy, posing a variety of ethical and regulatory challenges for research and clinical practice. Some of the most prominent ethical questions related to the use of stem cell technologies in chest medicine include (1) implications for donors, (2) scientific prerequisites for clinical testing and use, (3) stem cell tourism, (4) innovation and clinical use of emerging stem cell-based interventions, (5) responsible translation of stem cell-based therapies to clinical use, and (6) appropriate and equitable access to emerging therapies. Having a sense of these issues should help to put emerging scientific advances into appropriate context and to ensure the responsible clinical translation of promising therapeutics.

  2. One size will never fit all: the future of research in pediatric transfusion medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephson, Cassandra D; Mondoro, Traci Heath; Ambruso, Daniel R; Sanchez, Rosa; Sloan, Steven R; Luban, Naomi L C; Widness, John A

    2014-11-01

    There is concern at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) and among transfusion medicine specialists regarding the small number of investigators and studies in the field of pediatric transfusion medicine (PTM). Accordingly, the objective of this article is to provide a snapshot of the clinical and translational PTM research considered to be of high priority by pediatricians, neonatologists, and transfusion medicine specialists. Included is a targeted review of three research areas of importance: (i) transfusion strategies, (ii) short- and long-term clinical consequences, and (iii) transfusion-transmitted infectious diseases. The recommendations by PTM and transfusion medicine specialists represent opportunities and innovative strategies to execute translational research, observational studies, and clinical trials of high relevance to PTM. With the explosion of new biomedical knowledge and increasingly sophisticated methodologies over the past decade, this is an exciting time to consider transfusion medicine as a paradigm for addressing questions related to fields such as cell biology, immunology, neurodevelopment, outcomes research, and many others. Increased awareness of PTM as an important, fertile field and the promotion of accompanying opportunities will help establish PTM as a viable career option and advance basic and clinical investigation to improve the health and wellbeing of children.

  3. Review: Public perspectives on the utilization of human placentas in scientific research and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, R S

    2013-01-01

    Placental tissues are frequently utilized by scientists studying pregnancy and reproduction and in diverse fields including immunology, stem cell research, genetics, cancer research, and tissue engineering, as well as by clinicians in many therapies. Though the utilization of the human placenta in science and medicine has benefitted many people, little is known about public perspectives of this phenomenon. This review addresses placental donation, collection, and utilization in science and medicine, focusing on public perspectives. Cultural values and traditions, ethical paradigms and concerns, public understandings of science and medicine, and political considerations may impact perceptions of the utilization of the placenta in science and medicine, but systematic study is lacking. It is argued that knowledge of public views gained from empirical investigation may underpin the development of collection protocols and research projects that are more responsive to public will, spur more extensive utilization in science and medicine of this unique organ, and/or aid in the realization of the mobilization of knowledge about the placenta for clinical and educational ends. New avenues for research on public perspectives of the placenta are proposed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [Overview of application and research of Echinops genus in Chinese medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parhat, Rozi; Makabel, Bolat; Nurhabek, Ugulhan; Tohonrbek, Amangul; Hayni; Song, Fei-Fan; Baysanbek, Asiya; Yang, Hai-Yan; Ding, Gang; Zou, Zhong-Mei

    2014-10-01

    Asteraceae Echionopos (Echinops genus) is one of the world's plants commonly used in traditional Chinese medicine herbs. In this paper, a lot of literature on the basis of domestic and foreign, and modern research on the application of medicinal plants in different ethnic groups in our country Echionopos made a brief presentation and evaluation, and its in Chinese Han, Mongolian, Uygur, Kazak, Korean and other ethnic groups in the application of traditional medicine and related research conducted profiles. To further comprehensive and accurate use of the abundant plant resources and research, in order to find biologically active natural products, provide reference basis for the clinical application of new drugs developed and expanded drug source.

  5. Development of a Student Mentored Research Program between a Complementary and Alternative Medicine University and a Traditional, Research Intensive University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Barbara M.; Furner, Sylvia E.; Cramer, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    The global need to develop clinician-scientists capable of using research in clinical practice, translating research knowledge into practice, and carrying out research that affects the quality, efficacy, and efficiency of health care is well-documented. The complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) professions embrace the call to develop physician-researchers to carry out translational and applied research for CAM modalities. CAM universities face unique challenges when implementing research training compared to traditional, research intensive (TRI) universities and medical centers where the majority of medical research is carried out. The authors present the development and outcomes of a mentored research program (MRP) between a CAM and a TRI institution, the National University of Health Sciences and the University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health, between 2006 and 2012. CAM pre-doctoral students engaged in a full-immersion semester at the TRI, including didactic courses and active research with a TRI faculty research mentor. Half of the participating doctor of chiropractic (DC) students continued on to PhD programs and half established integrative medicine, primary care clinical careers. Establishing rigorous criteria for mentors and mentees, communicating expectations, developing solid relationships between the mentor, mentee, and home school advisor, responding quickly to impediments, and providing adequate support from CAM and TRI investigators were key to the MRP success. To sustain research opportunities, coordinated degree programs for the DC and master of public health (DC/MPH) and master of clinical and translational research (DC/MS CTS) were established. PMID:24988423

  6. Clinical Research on Traditional Chinese Medicine compounds and their preparations for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiayi; Shen, Lan; Lin, Xiao; Hong, Yanlong; Feng, Yi

    2017-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a chronic, fatal neurodegenerative disease which leads to progressive muscle atrophy and paralysis. In order to summarize the characteristics of Traditional Chinese Medicine compounds and their preparations in the prevention and treatment of ALS through analyzing the mechanism, action site, and symptoms according to effective clinical research. We searched ALS, motor neuron disease, chemical drugs, herbal medicine, Chinese medicine, Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), and various combinations of these terms in databases including the PudMed, Springer, Ovid, Google, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Wanfang databases. It was found that the chemical drugs almost had not sufficient evidence to show their effectiveness in the treatment of ALS, except RILUZOLE. According to the characteristics of clinical symptoms of ALS, Chinese medicine practitioners believe that this disease belongs to the category of "atrophic disease". In clinical research, many Chinese herbal formulas had good clinical efficacies in the treatment of ALS with multiple targets, multiple links, and few side effects. And four kinds of dialectical treatment had been developed based on Clinical data analysis and the use of dialectical therapy: Benefiting the kidney; Declaring the lungs; Enhancing the Qi; and Dredging the meridian. In this review, we provide an overview of chemical drugs and Traditional Chinese Medicine compound and its preparations in therapy of ALS as well as how they may contribute to the ALS pathogenesis, thereby offering some clues for further studies. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  7. Is evidence-based medicine so evident in veterinary research and practice? History, obstacles and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandeweerd, Jean-Michel; Kirschvink, Nathalie; Clegg, Peter; Vandenput, Sandrine; Gustin, Pascal; Saegerman, Claude

    2012-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) refers to the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of current best evidence from research for the care of an individual patient. The concept of EBM was first described in human medicine in the early 1990s and was introduced to veterinary medicine 10 years later. However, it is not clear that the EBM approach promulgated in human medicine can be applied to the same extent to veterinary medicine. EBM has the potential to help veterinarians to make more informed decisions, but obstacles to the implementation of EBM include a lack of high quality patient-centred research, the need for basic understanding of clinical epidemiology by veterinarians, the absence of adequate searching techniques and accessibility to scientific data bases and the inadequacy of EBM tools that can be applied to the busy daily practise of veterinarians. This review describes the development of EBM in the veterinary profession, identifies its advantages and disadvantages and discusses whether and how veterinary surgeons should further adopt the EBM approach of human medicine. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Nuclear medicine methods in the assessment of acupuncture effects: a short review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deise Elisabete Souza

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of acupuncture are poorly understood. In consequence, numerous investigators have conducted clinical trials to test the efficacy of acupuncture in various conditions. We have used PubMed database system to evaluate the number of publications in acupuncture and nuclear medicine procedures in the period from 1964 to 2007, using the keywords: "nuclear medicine and acupuncture", "SPECT and acupuncture", "PET and acupuncture", "scintigraphy and acupuncture", "radionuclide and acupuncture", "radiopharmaceutical and acupuncture", "radioisotope and acupuncture" and "99mTc and acupuncture". Some papers published in English language were selected and a short review is presented The analysis of the number of publications shows that when a method is well accepted by the scientific community, as the methods used in nuclear medicine, the interest in the development of research increases. Moreover, important findings are presented when the nuclear medicine image is used to evaluate the effect of the acupuncture.Os mecanismos de ação da acupuntura ainda não são completamente esclarecidos. Em conseqüência, diversos pesquisadores têm conduzido testes clínicos para verificar a eficiência da acupuntura em condições diversas. Nós utilizamos o sistema de base de dados PubMed para avaliar o número de publicações em acupuntura e procedimentos em medicina nuclear no período de 1964 até 2007, usando as palavras-chaves: "medicina nuclear e acupuntura", "SPECT e acupuntura", "PET e acupuntura", "cintilografia e acupuntura", "radionuclídeo e acupuntura", "radiofármaco e acupuntura", "radioisótopo e acupuntura" e "99mTc e acupuntura". Alguns artigos publicados em inglês foram selecionados e uma pequena revisão é apresentada. A análise do número de publicações mostra que quando um método é bem aceito pela comunidade científica, como os métodos utilizados em medicina nuclear, o interesse em desenvolver novos estudos aumenta. Al

  9. Barriers to Research Utilization among Registered Nurses in Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospitals: A Cross-Sectional Survey in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fen Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. As there might be relevant differences with regard to research utilization in the general hospitals, we aimed to study research utilization among registered nurses working in traditional Chinese medicine hospitals. Methods. A total of 648 registered nurses from 4 tertiary-level hospitals in China were recruited for participation. A modified BARRIERS Scale and self-designed questionnaires were used for data collection. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics, t-tests, and one-way ANOVAs and Spearman correlation analysis. Results. Overall, items which belong to the subscale “Research” were identified as the most important barriers. Among the individual items, the lack of time on the job was ranked as the top barrier, followed by the lack of knowledgeable colleagues and by overwhelming research publications. Clinical experience, working pressure, job satisfaction, and research experience could be identified as associated factors for barriers to research utilization. Conclusions. Registered nurses in traditional Chinese medicine hospitals felt high barriers to research utilization. Reducing registered nurses’ working pressure, promoting their positive attitude to nursing, and improving research training might be helpful for increasing research utilization. Close cooperation between clinical and nursing schools or academic research centres might facilitate the necessary change in nursing education and routine.

  10. IDENTIFICATION OF SOME COMPOSITE MEDICINAL DRUGS CONTAINING PARACETAMOL, WITH IR-SPECTROMETRY METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Saushkina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A serious threat to the health of the population is falsified medicines. In a number of cases, they are identified in the process of incoming quality control for compliancewith the requirements of regulatory documents for indicators “Description”, “Packaging”, “Marking”. However, in order to identify sophisticated counterfeits, only a visual assessment of the drug is not enough. Purpose screening evaluation of potentiallycounterfeited or poor-quality drugs using the IR spectrometry along the total spectrum.Materials and methods. The objects of research were available in freely availablecommercially available tablets produced by domestic and foreign manufacturers“Paracetamol Extratab”, “Solpadein fast”, “Citrapac”, “Citramon P”, “Ascofen-P”,  corresponding to the requirements of the current regulatory documents. The studies were carried out on a Fourier-Spectrophotometer infrared “FSM 1201”. Results and discussion. On the example of the tablets “Citramon P”, “Ascophen-P”, “Citrapac”, “Paracetamol Extratab”, “Solpadein Fast” the possibility of using the total IR spectra as a primary screening index of authenticity is shown. It was established that the total IR spectra of medicines of similar composition reflect the similarity of serial samples of the products ofone manufacturer and the difference in serial samples of products of different manufacturers.

  11. Improving health care globally: a critical review of the necessity of family medicine research and recommendations to build research capacity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weel, C. van; Rosser, W.W.

    2004-01-01

    An invitational conference led by the World Organization of Family Doctors (Wonca) involving selected delegates from 34 countries was held in Kingston, Ontario, Canada, March 8 to12, 2003. The conference theme was "Improving Health Globally: The Necessity of Family Medicine Research." Guiding

  12. Ethnopharmacology—A Bibliometric Analysis of a Field of Research Meandering Between Medicine and Food Science?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy Wai Kan Yeung

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The research into bioactive natural products of medicinal plants has a long tradition, but ethnopharmacology as a well-defined field of research has a relatively short history, only dating back 50 years.Aims: With the fast development of this field and its global importance especially in the fast developing economies of Asia it is timely to assess the most influential articles (as measured by citations and to identify important drivers and research trends in this field.Methods: Scopus was searched to identify relevant articles which were assessed by all three authors. The 100 most cited articles were identified and analyzed. Bibliometric software (VOSviewer was utilized to supplement the analysis and to generate a term map that visualized the citation patterns of the 100 articles containing different terms.Results: Forty-four of the 100 articles are reviews. On average, each of the 100 articles had 632 citations and since publication was cited 43 times annually. The four core journals were Journal of Ethnopharmacology (n = 17, Food Chemistry (n = 7, Life Sciences (n = 5, and Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry (n = 4. Anti-oxidant effects appeared to be a recurring and highly cited topic, whereas the links into drug discovery and neuropharmacology seemed to be less strong. Numerous medicinal plants and functional foods were the foci of research, and the foci shifted when comparing pre-2000 and post-2000 publications (with the later involving a broader spectrum of plants and foods and a wider range of biological effects. Contributions largely came from Asia, and also from the Americas, Africa, and Oceania, besides Europe.Conclusion: We have identified and analyzed the 100 most-cited articles in ethnopharmacology. Within 50 years the field has gained a profile and while conventionally often linked to “traditional knowledge,” drug discovery and some areas of pharmacology, this analysis highlights its emerging importance in

  13. Ethnopharmacology—A Bibliometric Analysis of a Field of Research Meandering Between Medicine and Food Science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Andy Wai Kan; Heinrich, Michael; Atanasov, Atanas G.

    2018-01-01

    Background: The research into bioactive natural products of medicinal plants has a long tradition, but ethnopharmacology as a well-defined field of research has a relatively short history, only dating back 50 years. Aims: With the fast development of this field and its global importance especially in the fast developing economies of Asia it is timely to assess the most influential articles (as measured by citations) and to identify important drivers and research trends in this field. Methods: Scopus was searched to identify relevant articles which were assessed by all three authors. The 100 most cited articles were identified and analyzed. Bibliometric software (VOSviewer) was utilized to supplement the analysis and to generate a term map that visualized the citation patterns of the 100 articles containing different terms. Results: Forty-four of the 100 articles are reviews. On average, each of the 100 articles had 632 citations and since publication was cited 43 times annually. The four core journals were Journal of Ethnopharmacology (n = 17), Food Chemistry (n = 7), Life Sciences (n = 5), and Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry (n = 4). Anti-oxidant effects appeared to be a recurring and highly cited topic, whereas the links into drug discovery and neuropharmacology seemed to be less strong. Numerous medicinal plants and functional foods were the foci of research, and the foci shifted when comparing pre-2000 and post-2000 publications (with the later involving a broader spectrum of plants and foods and a wider range of biological effects). Contributions largely came from Asia, and also from the Americas, Africa, and Oceania, besides Europe. Conclusion: We have identified and analyzed the 100 most-cited articles in ethnopharmacology. Within 50 years the field has gained a profile and while conventionally often linked to “traditional knowledge,” drug discovery and some areas of pharmacology, this analysis highlights its emerging importance in the context

  14. Research scholars program: a faculty development initiative at the Oregon College of Oriental Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerschlag, Richard; Lasater, Kathie; Salanti, Sonya; Fleishman, Susan

    2008-05-01

    The Research Scholars Program (RSP) was created at the Oregon College of Oriental Medicine (OCOM) to provide faculty development in research literacy, research-informed clinical practice, and research participation skills. The RSP is part of a broad effort, funded by a National Institutes of Health/National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine R25 education grant, to infuse an evidence-based perspective into the curriculum at schools of complementary and alternative medicine. The RSP arose from the realization that this curriculum reform would first necessitate faculty training in both research appreciation and pedagogy. OCOM's grant, Acupuncture Practitioner Research Education Enhancement, is a partnership with the Oregon Health & Science University School of Nursing (OHSU SON). The RSP was developed initially as a collaborative effort among the OCOM Dean of Research (R.H.), OCOM Director of Research Education (S.F.), and an OHSU SON education specialist (K.L.). The 9-month, 8 hours per month seminar-style RSP provides the opportunity for a cohort of OCOM faculty and staff to explore research-related concepts and content as well as pedagogical practices that emphasize interactive, learner-centered teaching. The RSP adheres to a competency-based approach as developed by the Education Committee of the grant. As a tangible outcome, each Research Scholar designs a sustainable learning activity that infuses a research perspective into their courses, clinic supervision, or other sphere of influence at the college. In this paper, we describe the creative process and the lessons learned during the planning and initial implementation of the RSP. We view the early successes of the RSP as encouraging signs that research literacy and an evidence-based perspective are becoming increasingly accepted as needed skill sets for present-day practitioners of acupuncture and Oriental medicine.

  15. Participatory design methods in telemedicine research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danbjørg, Dorthe Boe; Clemensen, Jane; Rothmann, Mette Juel

    together with the patients. Participatory design is a research design and methodology that encourages the participation of users in the design process of technological solutions. Therefore, it has a potential for designing technologies that actually reflect the needs of the users, why it is relevant within...... telemedicine. The aim of this presentation is to explain the process and theoretical framework of a PD project; give an example of a project including the applied methods, and to determine its application to telemedicine with focus on the rationale for genuine participation. Theory: Participation implies....... Methods: Key activities of a Participatory Design project comprise methods such as fieldwork; literature reviewing; development and testing, and user activities as workshops. Methods that support telling, making, enacting. For instance telling activities as drivers for participation, where practitioners...

  16. Methods of 15N tracer research in biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirschberg, K.; Faust, H.

    1985-01-01

    The application of the stable isotope 15 N is of increasing importance in different scientific disciplines, especially in medicine, agriculture, and the biosciences. The close correlation between the growing interest and improvements of analytical procedures resulted in remarkable advances in the 15 N tracer technique. On the basis of the latest results of 15 N tracer research in life sciences and agriculture methods of 15 N tracer research in biological systems are compiled. The 15 N methodology is considered under three headings: Chemical analysis with a description of methods of sample preparation (including different separation and isolation methods for N-containing substances of biological and agricultural origin) and special procedures converting ammonia to molecular nitrogen. Isotopic analysis with a review on the most important methods of isotopic analysis of nitrogen: mass spectrometry (including the GC-MS technique), emission spectrometry, NMR spectroscopy, and other analytical procedures. 15 N-tracer techniques with a consideration of the role of the isotope dilution analysis as well as different labelling techniques and the mathematical interpretation of tracer data (modelling, N turnover experiments). In these chapters also sources of errors in chemical and isotopic analysis, the accuracy of the different methods and its importance on tracer experiments are discussed. Procedures for micro scale 15 N analysis and aspects of 15 N analysis on the level of natural abundance are considered. Furthermore some remarks on isotope effects in 15 N tracer experiments are made. (author)

  17. Research on application information system integration platform in medicine manufacturing enterprise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wu; Zhao, Huimin; Zou, Li; Li, Yuanyuan; Li, Zhengguang

    2012-08-01

    Computer and information technology popularizes in the medicine manufacturing enterprise for its potentials in working efficiency and service quality. In allusion to the explosive data and information of application system in current medicine manufacturing enterprise, we desire to propose a novel application information system integration platform in medicine manufacturing enterprise, which based on a combination of RFID technology and SOA, to implement information sharing and alternation. This method exploits the application integration platform across service interface layer to invoke the RFID middleware. The loose coupling in integration solution is realized by Web services. The key techniques in RFID event components and expanded role-based security access mechanism are studied in detail. Finally, a case study is implemented and tested to evidence our understanding on application system integration platform in medicine manufacturing enterprise.

  18. New Infrared spectroscopic methods for tumor diagnosis and medicinal plants analytics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pezzei, C.

    2012-01-01

    This work was done to verify the feasibility of infrared spectroscopy as a method for tumor diagnosis and medicinal plants analysis. The method of IR imaging has been successfully used for the diagnosis of prostate-, bladder- and oral squamous cell carcinoma as well as for localization of different ingredients of plant roots. All measurements have been done with a resolution down to 1,2 µm. As a non-invasive method, IR imaging can be used for qualitative analysis of 2-dimensional chemical structures and distribution of these substances in plant roots. It was found that IR imaging can be used for detecting cancer-affected areas in tissue-samples. For more profound results, IR-imaging has to be combined with chemometric evaluation methods like multi- and univariate data analysis. Measurements applying that combination of methods allow the identification of cancer-affected areas of tissue-samples of prostate-, bladder- and oral squamous cell carcinoma as well as an illustration of the local distribution of components like carbon-hydrates, proteins, lipids, amides and nucleic acids in samples from Urtica dioica, Phytolacca americana, Levisticum officinale, Primula veris, Cimicifuga racemosa and Gentiana lutea. All research was done by using state of the art technology for IR-imaging and image processing. It was found that IR-imaging can be used for localizing dissolved substances in roots of medical plants with a high resolution down to 1,2 µm. This work shows that different species of Polygala can be identified using FT-NIR and FT-IR spectroscopy. Future developments of more sophisticated and powerful detectors will help to establish IR-imaging as an objective technology for diagnostics of cancer as well as a method in the field of research on medical plants and botany in general. (author) [de

  19. Experimental methods of shock wave research

    CERN Document Server

    Seiler, Friedrich

    2016-01-01

    This comprehensive and carefully edited volume presents a variety of experimental methods used in Shock Waves research. In 14 self contained chapters this 9th volume of the “Shock Wave Science and Technology Reference Library” presents the experimental methods used in Shock Tubes, Shock Tunnels and Expansion Tubes facilities. Also described is their set-up and operation. The uses of an arc heated wind tunnel and a gun tunnel are also contained in this volume. Whenever possible, in addition to the technical description some typical scientific results obtained using such facilities are described. Additionally, this authoritative book includes techniques for measuring physical properties of blast waves and laser generated shock waves. Information about active shock wave laboratories at different locations around the world that are not described in the chapters herein is given in the Appendix, making this book useful for every researcher involved in shock/blast wave phenomena.

  20. The relevance of pharmacognosy in pharmacological research on herbal medicinal products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pferschy-Wenzig, Eva-Maria; Bauer, Rudolf

    2015-11-01

    As all medicines, herbal medicinal products are expected to be safe, effective, and of appropriate quality. However, regulations on herbal medicinal products vary from country to country, and herbal preparations do occur not only in the form of medicinal products but also as less strictly regulated product groups like dietary supplements. Therefore, it is not always easy for the consumers to discriminate high-quality products from low-quality products. On the other hand, herbal medicines have many special features that distinguish them from conventional medicinal products. Plants are complex multicomponent mixtures; in addition, their phytochemical composition is not constant because of inherent variability and a plethora of external influences. Therefore, the production process of an herbal medicinal product needs to be strictly monitored. First of all, the starting materials need to be correctly authenticated and free of adulterants and contaminants. During plant growth, many factors like harvest season and time, developmental stage, temperature, and humidity have a strong impact on plant metabolite production. Also, postharvest processing steps like drying and storage can significantly alter the phytochemical composition of herbal material. As the production of many phytopharmaceuticals includes an extraction step, the extraction solvent and conditions need to be optimized in order to enrich the bioactive constituents in the extract. The quality of finished preparations needs to be determined either on the basis of marker constituents or on the basis of analytical fingerprints. Thus, all production stages should be accompanied by appropriate quality assessment measures. Depending on the particular task, different methods need to be applied, ranging from macroscopic, microscopic, and DNA-based authentication methods to spectroscopic methods like vibrational spectroscopy and chromatographic and hyphenated methods like HPLC, GC-MS and LC-MS. Also, when performing

  1. Recent progress of research on medicinal mushrooms, foods, and other herbal products used in traditional Chinese medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Hsiung Lee

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This article will review selected herbal products used in traditional Chinese medicine, including medicinal mushrooms (巴西蘑菇 bā xī mó gū; Agaricus blazei, 雲芝 yún zhī; Coriolus versicolor, 靈芝 líng zhī; Ganoderma lucidum, 香蕈 xiāng xùn; shiitake, Lentinus edodes, 牛樟芝 niú zhāng zhī; Taiwanofungus camphoratus, Cordyceps (冬蟲夏草 dōng chóng xià cǎo, pomegranate (石榴 shí liú; Granati Fructus, green tea (綠茶 lǜ chá; Theae Folium Non Fermentatum, garlic (大蒜 dà suàn; Allii Sativi Bulbus, turmeric (薑黃 jiāng huáng; Curcumae Longae Rhizoma, and Artemisiae Annuae Herba (青蒿 qīng hāo; sweet wormwood. Many of the discussed herbal products have gained popularity in their uses as dietary supplements for health benefits. The review will focus on the active constituents of the herbs and their bioactivities, with emphasis on the most recent progress in research for the period of 2003 to 2011.

  2. Ethical considerations in clinical research on herbal medicine for prevention of cardiovascular disease in the ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koonrungsesomboon, Nut; Karbwang, Juntra

    2016-10-15

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the ageing is a major public health problem worldwide. The nature of most CVD is subclinical with pathological processes that can span over years. Use of preventive measures could be an appropriate approach to prevailing over CVD in the ageing, and herbal medicine is one of the promising preventive approaches and is currently of interest among medical societies. In the evidence-based era, herbal medicine is, however, often underestimated and approached with skepticism, mainly due to the paucity of scientific evidence. Properly designed clinical trials on herbal medicine for prevention of CVD in a geriatric population are thus of importance and of clinical value. To review ethical issues and discuss considerations when such research is proposed. Four ethical issues, including the scientific validity of research, risk-benefit assessments, subject selection and vulnerability, and informed consent, are structured and extensively discussed in this article. Ethical core considerations of prevention research of CVD on herbal medicine involve particular attention on the scientific validity of research, risk-benefit assessments, subject selection and vulnerability, and informed consent. These issues and considerations are keys, although they must be adapted to an individual research setting in which a clinical study is proposed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Proteomics in pulmonary research: selected methodical aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Petrek

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent years witness rapid expansion of applications of proteomics to clinical research including non-malignant lung disorders. These developments bring along the need for standardisation of proteomic experiments. This paper briefly reviews basic methodical aspects of appliedproteomic studies using SELDI-TOF mass spectrometry platform as example but also emphasizes general aspects of quality assurance in proteomics. Key-words: lung proteome, quality assurance, SELDI-TOF MS

  4. One method for objective adherence measurement in mind-body medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahbeh, Helané; Zwickey, Heather; Oken, Barry

    2011-02-01

    Home practice is frequently prescribed as part of mind-body medicine interventions, although rarely objectively measured. This brief methods report describes one method for objectively measuring home practice adherence using a custom monitoring software program. Methods for objectively measuring adherence were developed as part of a randomized controlled trial on the mechanisms of mindfulness meditation. The study was conducted at Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon. The subjects comprised 11 combat veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder. The method used was mindfulness meditation. There were subjective and objective adherence measurements of mindfulness meditation home practice. The first iteration of objective adherence monitoring used an iPod device and had limitations in participant usage and correctly capturing data. In the second iteration, objective data were easily collected, uploaded, and viewed using the custom software application, iMINDr. Participants reported that iMINDr was straightforward to use, and they returned the monitoring units as directed. The iMINDr is an example of a simple objective adherence measurement system that may help mind-body researchers examine how home practice adherence may affect outcomes in future clinical trials.

  5. Research into real-option evaluation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiba, Tsuyoshi; Wakamatsu, Hitoshi

    2002-03-01

    As an evaluational method for valuation of a corporation, an investment project, a research and development, or the evaluation technique of an enterprise strategy, a real option analysis attracts attention instead of conventional Discount Cash Flow method. The reason is that it can divert the technique for the option valuation in financial engineering to the decision-making process performed according to change in investment environment. Related references, the analysis tools, the application examples, etc. were investigated about the decision-making technique using real option analysis, and this investigation considered the application method to decision-making of the research and development at Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute. Consequently, since the feature is in real option analysis being the evaluation technique on condition of that business conditions and business itself also change, the real option analysis fits for evaluation of a research and development that business conditions were opaque and it turns out that the businesses are highly flexible. Moreover, it turns out that it fits also for evaluation of a capital concentration type investment issue like power plants. (author)

  6. Human iPSC-derived neurons and lymphoblastoid cells for personalized medicine research in neuropsychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurwitz, David

    2016-09-01

    The development and clinical implementation of personalized medicine crucially depends on the availability of high-quality human biosamples; animal models, although capable of modeling complex human diseases, cannot reflect the large variation in the human genome, epigenome, transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome. Although the biosamples available from public biobanks that store human tissues and cells may represent the large human diversity for most diseases, these samples are not always sufficient for developing biomarkers for patient-tailored therapies for neuropsychiatric disorders. Postmortem human tissues are available from many biobanks; nevertheless, collections of neuronal human cells from large patient cohorts representing the human diversity remain scarce. Two tools are gaining popularity for personalized medicine research on neuropsychiatric disorders: human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons and human lymphoblastoid cell lines. This review examines and contrasts the advantages and limitations of each tool for personalized medicine research.

  7. [Training and research in forensic medicine: present situation and future challenges for medical schools in Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Leonardo; Inzunza, José Antonio; Bustos, Luis; Vallejos, Carlos; Gutiérrez, René

    2005-07-01

    Lawyers need some medical knowledge and physicians must know about forensics. To explore training and research programs in forensic medicine in Chilean universities. Deans of all Medicine Faculties in Chile were contacted by e-mail and invited to answer a questionnaire containing 21 questions. A survey of Chilean publications on forensic medicine was performed in Medline, Lilacs and SciELO databases. Fourteen deans answered the questionnaire. In all the responding faculties, forensic medicine is an obligatory course, generally during the fifth year and mostly combining theory with practice. In seven faculties, forensic medicine concepts are included in other courses. Forensics is taught in only two of 10 dental schools, two of 17 nursing schools, one of nine midwives schools and one of nine medical technology schools. It is not taught in phonoaudiology, kinesiology and nutrition schools. There are 74 physicians that teach the specialty but only 10 are certified by the National Board of Medical Specialty Certification (CONACEM). Treatment of most topics on forensics is insufficient. Thanatology is the strongest topic and forensic dentistry is the weakest. There are 52 publications in the area, mostly on "medical law". Forensic medicine is taught in medical schools mostly as thanatology. The knowledge of forensics among medical students is limited and must be improved.

  8. THE ROLE OF THE N.V. SKLIFOSOVSKY RESEARCH INSTITUTE FOR EMERGENCY MEDICINE IN THE CREATION OF DISASTER MEDICINE IN THE COUNTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Khubutiya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence  of large-scale emergencies with great  human  losses  and the  absence of a unified authority  of the country health  system which would manage  its medical and sanitary consequences required  the  creation  of special  units to provide emergency  health  services (EHS in mass injuries. The disaster  medicine  became  attractive for the N.V. Sklifosovsky Research  Institute  for Emergency Medicine in the 70s of the last century. Originally, the Department for Disaster Medicine was established at the  Institute  in 1987. At the  Department, the  extensive  work was performed  to shorten  a time gap between the delivery of medical care and the beginning  of a disaster  as much as possible. It was based  on a created  concept  for organization of medical  assistance and evacuation,  methods of its expertise and the  development of technical  means  for phased  medical  and evacuatiol  support of victims. The organizational and medical-diagnostic specificity of EHS in emergencies and its delivery were analyzed  in order to reduce  the severity of consequences. The health  care experience in emergencies has been  enriched  by the staff of the Institute  (who were not employees  of the Department  actively involved in the management of mass injuries and poisonings via air ambulance at the accident site and in the treatment of victims admitted to the Institute  from sites of emergencies. Consequently, the N.V. Sklifosovsky Research Institute  for Emergency Medicine developed and offered the  scientific and organizational basis  for EHS in emergencies which made  a significant  practical contribution to the creation  of public services for disaster  medicine in the country.

  9. Implementation of Electronic Consent at a Biobank: An Opportunity for Precision Medicine Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie T. Boutin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to characterize the potential benefits and challenges of electronic informed consent (eIC as a strategy for rapidly expanding the reach of large biobanks while reducing costs and potentially enhancing participant engagement. The Partners HealthCare Biobank (Partners Biobank implemented eIC tools and processes to complement traditional recruitment strategies in June 2014. Since then, the Partners Biobank has rigorously collected and tracked a variety of metrics relating to this novel recruitment method. From June 2014 through January 2016, the Partners Biobank sent email invitations to 184,387 patients at Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women’s Hospital. During the same time period, 7078 patients provided their consent via eIC. The rate of consent of emailed patients was 3.5%, and the rate of consent of patients who log into the eIC website at Partners Biobank was 30%. Banking of biospecimens linked to electronic health records has become a critical element of genomic research and a foundation for the NIH’s Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI. eIC is a feasible and potentially game-changing strategy for these large research studies that depend on patient recruitment.

  10. Implementation of Electronic Consent at a Biobank: An Opportunity for Precision Medicine Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutin, Natalie T; Mathieu, Kathleen; Hoffnagle, Alison G; Allen, Nicole L; Castro, Victor M; Morash, Megan; O'Rourke, P Pearl; Hohmann, Elizabeth L; Herring, Neil; Bry, Lynn; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A; Karlson, Elizabeth W; Weiss, Scott T; Smoller, Jordan W

    2016-06-09

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the potential benefits and challenges of electronic informed consent (eIC) as a strategy for rapidly expanding the reach of large biobanks while reducing costs and potentially enhancing participant engagement. The Partners HealthCare Biobank (Partners Biobank) implemented eIC tools and processes to complement traditional recruitment strategies in June 2014. Since then, the Partners Biobank has rigorously collected and tracked a variety of metrics relating to this novel recruitment method. From June 2014 through January 2016, the Partners Biobank sent email invitations to 184,387 patients at Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women's Hospital. During the same time period, 7078 patients provided their consent via eIC. The rate of consent of emailed patients was 3.5%, and the rate of consent of patients who log into the eIC website at Partners Biobank was 30%. Banking of biospecimens linked to electronic health records has become a critical element of genomic research and a foundation for the NIH's Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI). eIC is a feasible and potentially game-changing strategy for these large research studies that depend on patient recruitment.

  11. China's research status in emergency medicine: a 15-year survey of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiwei; Jiang, Ting; Li, Chunyu; Chen, Jun; Cao, Kejiang; Qi, Lian-wen; Li, Ping; Zhu, Wei; Zhu, Baoli; Chen, Yan

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the research status of emergency medicine in China through literature search of international emergency medicine journals and retrospectively compare the outputs of emergency medicine articles of the 3 major regions of China-Mainland (ML), Taiwan (TW), and Hong Kong (HK). Emergency medicine journals were selected category from Science Citation Index Expand. Articles from the ML, TW, and HK were retrieved from PubMed database. The total number of articles, publication types, research contents, impact factors (IF), and articles published in each journal were conducted for quantity and quality comparisons. A total of 1760 articles from 19 emergency medicine journals were searched, of which 395 were from ML, 1210 from TW, and 155 from HK. Accumulated IF of articles from TW (2451.109) was much higher than that of ML (851.832) and HK (328.579), whereas the average IF of articles from TW (2.02) was the lowest. The number of case reports was the highest, which was, 69 from ML, 637 from TW, and 25 from HK, respectively. Although emergency medicine was involved with multiple organs and multiple systems, the reports of trauma accounted for 25% of the research contents. The total number of articles from both China and the rest of the world increased significantly from 2000 to 2014, especially ML. The total number of articles from TW was still much more than that of ML and HK, whereas the quality of articles from TW was not as good as ML and HK. Case report had the highest share of publication types, whereas the proportions of meta-analysis and observational study were the lowest. As for research contents, the proportion of trauma was still the highest. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingelfinger, Franz J.

    1980-01-01

    Selected for discussion are certain advances in basic research and technologic innovation which shape the past, present, and future of medical care. Included are infectious diseases, especially hepatitis, immunology, clinical disorders of the immune system and the histocompatability system. (Author/SA)

  13. Application of metabonomic analytical techniques in the modernization and toxicology research of traditional Chinese medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Yong-Min; Jiang, Jian-Guo; Yan, Lu

    2009-08-01

    In the recent years, a wide range of metabonomic analytical techniques are widely used in the modern research of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). At the same time, the international community has attached increasing importance to TCM toxicity problems. Thus, many studies have been implemented to investigate the toxicity mechanisms of TCM. Among these studies, many metabonomic-based methods have been implemented to facilitate TCM toxicity investigation. At present, the most prevailing methods for TCM toxicity research are mainly single analysis techniques using only one analytical means. These techniques include nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), etc.; with these techniques, some favourable outcomes have been gained in the toxic reaction studies of TCM, such as the action target organs assay, the establishment of action pattern, the elucidation of action mechanism and the exploration of action material foundation. However, every analytical technique has its advantages and drawbacks, no existing analytical technique can be versatile. Multi-analysed techniques can partially overcome the shortcomings of single-analysed techniques. Combination of GC-MS and LC-MS metabolic profiling approaches has unravelled the pathological outcomes of aristolochic acid-induced nephrotoxicity, which can not be achieved by single-analysed techniques. It is believed that with the further development of metabonomic analytical techniques, especially multi-analysed techniques, metabonomics will greatly promote TCM toxicity research and be beneficial to the modernization of TCM in terms of extending the application of modern means in the TCM safety assessment, assisting the formulation of TCM safety norms and establishing the international standards indicators.

  14. The IGNITE network: a model for genomic medicine implementation and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzel, Kristin Wiisanen; Alexander, Madeline; Bernhardt, Barbara A; Calman, Neil; Carey, David J; Cavallari, Larisa H; Field, Julie R; Hauser, Diane; Junkins, Heather A; Levin, Phillip A; Levy, Kenneth; Madden, Ebony B; Manolio, Teri A; Odgis, Jacqueline; Orlando, Lori A; Pyeritz, Reed; Wu, R Ryanne; Shuldiner, Alan R; Bottinger, Erwin P; Denny, Joshua C; Dexter, Paul R; Flockhart, David A; Horowitz, Carol R; Johnson, Julie A; Kimmel, Stephen E; Levy, Mia A; Pollin, Toni I; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S

    2016-01-05

    Patients, clinicians, researchers and payers are seeking to understand the value of using genomic information (as reflected by genotyping, sequencing, family history or other data) to inform clinical decision-making. However, challenges exist to widespread clinical implementation of genomic medicine, a prerequisite for developing evidence of its real-world utility. To address these challenges, the National Institutes of Health-funded IGNITE (Implementing GeNomics In pracTicE; www.ignite-genomics.org ) Network, comprised of six projects and a coordinating center, was established in 2013 to support the development, investigation and dissemination of genomic medicine practice models that seamlessly integrate genomic data into the electronic health record and that deploy tools for point of care decision making. IGNITE site projects are aligned in their purpose of testing these models, but individual projects vary in scope and design, including exploring genetic markers for disease risk prediction and prevention, developing tools for using family history data, incorporating pharmacogenomic data into clinical care, refining disease diagnosis using sequence-based mutation discovery, and creating novel educational approaches. This paper describes the IGNITE Network and member projects, including network structure, collaborative initiatives, clinical decision support strategies, methods for return of genomic test results, and educational initiatives for patients and providers. Clinical and outcomes data from individual sites and network-wide projects are anticipated to begin being published over the next few years. The IGNITE Network is an innovative series of projects and pilot demonstrations aiming to enhance translation of validated actionable genomic information into clinical settings and develop and use measures of outcome in response to genome-based clinical interventions using a pragmatic framework to provide early data and proofs of concept on the utility of these

  15. Qualitative Descriptive Methods in Health Science Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colorafi, Karen Jiggins; Evans, Bronwynne

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this methodology paper is to describe an approach to qualitative design known as qualitative descriptive that is well suited to junior health sciences researchers because it can be used with a variety of theoretical approaches, sampling techniques, and data collection strategies. It is often difficult for junior qualitative researchers to pull together the tools and resources they need to embark on a high-quality qualitative research study and to manage the volumes of data they collect during qualitative studies. This paper seeks to pull together much needed resources and provide an overview of methods. A step-by-step guide to planning a qualitative descriptive study and analyzing the data is provided, utilizing exemplars from the authors' research. This paper presents steps to conducting a qualitative descriptive study under the following headings: describing the qualitative descriptive approach, designing a qualitative descriptive study, steps to data analysis, and ensuring rigor of findings. The qualitative descriptive approach results in a summary in everyday, factual language that facilitates understanding of a selected phenomenon across disciplines of health science researchers. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. Seeking to understand: using generic qualitative research to explore access to medicines and pharmacy services among resettled refugees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellamy, Kim; Ostini, Remo; Martini, Nataly; Kairuz, Therese

    2016-06-01

    Introduction There are challenges associated with selecting a qualitative research approach. In a field abundant with terminology and theories, it may be difficult for a pharmacist to know where and how to begin a qualitative research journey. The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into generic qualitative research and to describe the journey of data collection of a novice qualitative researcher in the quest to answer her research question: 'What are the barriers to accessing medicines and pharmacy services for resettled refugees in Queensland, Australia?' Methodology Generic qualitative research draws on the strengths of one or more qualitative approaches. The aim is to draw out participants' ideas about things that are 'outside themselves'; rather than focussing on their inner feelings the research seeks to understand a phenomenon, a process, or the perspectives of participants. Sampling is designed to obtain a broad range of opinions about events and experiences and data collection includes interviews, questionnaires or surveys; thematic analysis is often used to analyse data. When to use Generic qualitative research provides an opportunity to develop research designs that fit researchers' epistemological stance and discipline, with research choices, including methodology and methods, being informed by the research question. Limitations Generic qualitative research is one of many methodologies that may be used to answer a research question and there is a paucity of literature about how to do it well. There is also debate about its validity as a qualitative methodology.

  17. Trends in research productivity of residents applying for orthopedic sports medicine fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFroda, Steven F; Shah, Kalpit N; Safdar, Omar; Mulcahey, Mary K

    2018-02-01

    Though there are no research requirements to match into an orthopaedic sports medicine fellowship, many applicants are productive in research endeavors during residency. We hypothesize that the number of publications by Orthopaedic sports medicine applicants are increasing. A list of current and recent sports medicine fellows was compiled from publicly accessible information on sports medicine fellowship websites. Articles published while the fellow was a resident were identified via publicly available search engines. The following information was collected: year of fellowship and years of residency, fellowship program, geographic location of fellowship program, total number of publications (noting specifically first and last author publications), number of publications in high impact orthopaedic journals (AJSM, JBJS Am, JSES, or Arthroscopy). Overall, 189 fellowship-matched surgeons from 2010 - 2017 were identified. There were 746 publications (average of 3.95 per fellow), with 218 (29.2%) in high impact orthopaedic journals. Surgeons who completed their fellowship during the 2016-17 academic year, published on average 5.42 publications per fellow. Fellowship applicants in the Northeast region had the highest number of total publications (359 publications, 48.1% of all publications; 6.41 publications per fellow). Applicants were listed most often as middle authors (462 publications, 61.9%). There has been an overall increase in the number of publications among sports medicine fellowship applicants in the last several academic years. Fellowship programs in the northeast United States tended to match applicants with a higher number of publications.

  18. Analysis of the Maternal Filicide in Terms of Forensic Medicine in Turkey: A Clinical Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    EKE, Salih Murat; BAŞOĞLU, Saba; TAKTAK, Şafak; ORAL, Gökhan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In the literature, 15% of the victims of homicide consists of children under 16 years of age; children under the age has been proved that they have the maximum risk. The vast majority of the victims were killed by their mothers. Thus, if mothers are the perpetrators of crime child murders are discussed in different ways, so it is conceptualized under the name of maternal filicide in the literature. This study has been performed for, in Turkey, women who killed their own children between 0–6 years old, victims of crimes, and to determine features of crime regarding on forensic medicine, eventually in order to provide a basis for taking necessary precautions and measures. Methods This research includes 74 reports of maternal filicide cases came to IV. Board of Specialization at the Council of Forensic Medicine in Istanbul, Ministry of Justice of Republic of Turkey between 1996–2006 years. In the light of data came from these reports, the socio-demographic characteristics of mothers who attempted filicide and children who were killed, and crime occurrence methods and mothers’ criminal legal responsibility were examined. Results Mothers, suspected of the filicide crime, are often at a young age, and did not desire pregnancy, 73 of mother’s do not have criminal history, and 48 of mothers confessed the crime. Found that 71 of child victims are biological kids, 38 of them were killed around age, and 20 of them were girls, 35 of them were boys. The study group, seven of defendants killed or attempted to kill more than one child at the same time. The majority of mothers committed the crime during the daylight. When filicide methods were examined strangling or throwing up the child from higher were seen the most. The majority of mothers committed crime wiıthout weapon or other objects, just by their hands. Based on decisions of IV. Board of Specialization, no significant difference was observed between the the mothers with criminal liability and mothers

  19. Developing an Organizational Understanding of Faculty Mentoring Programs in Academic Medicine in Major American Research Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer Zellers, Darlene

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the organizational and contextual factors associated with faculty mentoring programs in academic medicine within major research institutions in the United States, and explores the usefulness of organizational behavior theory in understanding these relationships. To date, many formal faculty mentoring programs are in operation…

  20. Research Article ( New England Journal of Medicine ) A trial of a 7 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research Article (New England Journal of Medicine) A trial of a 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in HIV-infected adults. Neil French, Stephen B. Gordon, Thandie Mwalukomo, Sarah A. White, Gershom Mwafulirwa, Herbert Longwe, Martin Mwaiponya, Eduard E. Zijlstra, Malcolm E. Molyneux, Charles F. Gilks ...

  1. Moral Duties of Genomics Researchers : Why Personalized Medicine Requires a Collective Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Shoko; van Delden, Johannes J M; van Diest, Paul J; Bredenoord, Annelien L

    Advances in genome sequencing together with the introduction of personalized medicine offer promising new avenues for research and precision treatment, particularly in the field of oncology. At the same time, the convergence of genomics, bioinformatics, and the collection of human tissues and

  2. Radiation methods in research of ancient monuments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cechak, T.; Gerndt, J.; Kubelik, M.; Musilek, L.; Pavlik, Milan

    2000-01-01

    A 'Laboratory of Quantitative Methods in Monument Research' is being built at the CTU Prague. Its primary orientation is the investigation of historic architecture, although other objects of art can also be investigated. In the first phase, two radiation methods are being established, but it is set up in such a way, that various other methods can readily be added in its future development. The radiation methods chosen for the initial development of the laboratory are: thermoluminescence dating and X-ray fluorescence analysis. The design of the automated TL-reader, built in our laboratories, is adjusted for the purpose of dating of historic brick architecture (which, of course, does not exclude applications for ceramics and other materials). The investigation of renaissance architecture in southern Bohemia and Moravia is under preparation as the first large campaign of this kind in the Czech Republic. Radionuclide X-ray fluorescence analysis has been chosen as the basic analytical method in the laboratory. The possibility of analyses of paintings and fired building materials (bricks, roof tiles) have been investigated. The first results in both the areas are very promising

  3. Experience inheritance from famous specialists based on real-world clinical research paradigm of traditional Chinese medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Guanli; Wang, Yinghui; Zhang, Runshun; Liu, Baoyan; Zhou, Xuezhong; Zhou, Xiaji; Zhang, Hong; Guo, Yufeng; Xue, Yanxing; Xu, Lili

    2014-09-01

    The current modes of experience inheritance from famous specialists in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) include master and disciple, literature review, clinical-epidemiology-based clinical research observation, and analysis and data mining via computer and database technologies. Each mode has its advantages and disadvantages. However, a scientific and instructive experience inheritance mode has not been developed. The advent of the big data era as well as the formation and practice accumulation of the TCM clinical research paradigm in the real world have provided new perspectives, techniques, and methods for inheriting experience from famous TCM specialists. Through continuous exploration and practice, the research group proposes the innovation research mode based on the real-world TCM clinical research paradigm, which involves the inheritance and innovation of the existing modes. This mode is formulated in line with its own development regularity of TCM and is expected to become the main mode of experience inheritance in the clinical field.

  4. Statistical method use in public health research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karran, James C; Moodie, Erica E M; Wallace, Michael P

    2015-11-01

    The content of public health research is often statistically complex. This review seeks to assess the breadth of statistical literacy required to understand this material, with a view to informing practitioners' statistical training. We review the statistical content of original research articles published in 2011 in four major public health journals. Categories of statistical methodologies are identified and their frequency of use recorded. Methods' "usefulness" in terms of the extent to which their understanding increases accessibility to the literature is assessed. A total of 482 articles were reviewed and 30 categories of methods identified. Along with descriptive statistics (467 articles), regression analyses were also common, with logistic regression (206 articles) more than twice as prevalent as linear regression (95 articles). More complex regression models for use with clustered data were also commonly encountered, appearing in 96 articles. The public health literature features a wide variety of statistical methods, some of which are advanced. To ensure the literature remains accessible, training for public health practitioners should include statistical training that maximizes breadth as well as depth of understanding. © 2015 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  5. Pain research in complementary and alternative medicine in Australia: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhen; Xue, Charlie C L

    2013-02-01

    Sixty percent (60%) to 80% of patients who visit chiropractic, osteopathic, or Chinese medicine practitioners are seeking pain relief. This article aimed to identify the amount, quality, and type of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) pain research in Australia by systematically and critically reviewing the literature. PubMed, Scopus, Australasian Medical Index, and Cochrane library were searched from their inception to July 2009. Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trial Registration and National Health and Medical Research Council databases were searched for human studies yet to be completed. Predefined search terms and selection criteria were used for data identification. Of 204 studies selected, 54% were on chiropractic, 27% on Chinese medicine, 15% about multitherapy, and 4% on osteopathy. Chronic spinal pain was the most studied condition, with visceral pain being the least studied. Half of the articles in Chinese medicine or multitherapy were systematic reviews or randomized control trials. In comparison, only 5% of chiropractic and none of osteopathy studies were in these categories. Government funding was rare, and most studies were self-funded or internally funded. All chiropractic, osteopathic, and Chinese herbal medicine studies were conducted by the researchers of the professions. In contrast, half of the acupuncture studies and all t'ai chi studies were conducted by medical doctors or physiotherapists. Multidisciplinary collaboration was uncommon. The quantity and the quality of CAM pain research in Australia are inconsistent with the high utilization of the relevant CAM therapies by Australians. A substantial increase in government funding is required. Collaborative research examining the multimodality or multidisciplinary approach is needed.

  6. Building a Strategic Framework for Comparative Effectiveness Research in Complementary and Integrative Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Claudia M. Witt; Margaret Chesney; Richard Gliklich; Lawrence Green; George Lewith; Bryan Luce; Anne McCaffrey; Shelly Rafferty Withers; Harold C. Sox; Sean Tunis; Brian M. Berman

    2012-01-01

    The increasing burden of chronic diseases presents not only challenges to the knowledge and expertise of the professional medical community, but also highlights the need to improve the quality and relevance of clinical research in this domain. Many patients now turn to complementary and integrative medicine (CIM) to treat their chronic illnesses; however, there is very little evidence to guide their decision-making in usual care. The following research recommendations were derived from a CIM ...

  7. Research trends in evidence-based medicine: a joinpoint regression analysis of more than 50 years of publication data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bui The Hung

    Full Text Available Evidence-based medicine (EBM has developed as the dominant paradigm of assessment of evidence that is used in clinical practice. Since its development, EBM has been applied to integrate the best available research into diagnosis and treatment with the purpose of improving patient care. In the EBM era, a hierarchy of evidence has been proposed, including various types of research methods, such as meta-analysis (MA, systematic review (SRV, randomized controlled trial (RCT, case report (CR, practice guideline (PGL, and so on. Although there are numerous studies examining the impact and importance of specific cases of EBM in clinical practice, there is a lack of research quantitatively measuring publication trends in the growth and development of EBM. Therefore, a bibliometric analysis was constructed to determine the scientific productivity of EBM research over decades.NCBI PubMed database was used to search, retrieve and classify publications according to research method and year of publication. Joinpoint regression analysis was undertaken to analyze trends in research productivity and the prevalence of individual research methods.Analysis indicates that MA and SRV, which are classified as the highest ranking of evidence in the EBM, accounted for a relatively small but auspicious number of publications. For most research methods, the annual percent change (APC indicates a consistent increase in publication frequency. MA, SRV and RCT show the highest rate of publication growth in the past twenty years. Only controlled clinical trials (CCT shows a non-significant reduction in publications over the past ten years.Higher quality research methods, such as MA, SRV and RCT, are showing continuous publication growth, which suggests an acknowledgement of the value of these methods. This study provides the first quantitative assessment of research method publication trends in EBM.

  8. Research trends in evidence-based medicine: a joinpoint regression analysis of more than 50 years of publication data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Bui The; Long, Nguyen Phuoc; Hung, Le Phi; Luan, Nguyen Thien; Anh, Nguyen Hoang; Nghi, Tran Diem; Hieu, Mai Van; Trang, Nguyen Thi Huyen; Rafidinarivo, Herizo Fabien; Anh, Nguyen Ky; Hawkes, David; Huy, Nguyen Tien; Hirayama, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) has developed as the dominant paradigm of assessment of evidence that is used in clinical practice. Since its development, EBM has been applied to integrate the best available research into diagnosis and treatment with the purpose of improving patient care. In the EBM era, a hierarchy of evidence has been proposed, including various types of research methods, such as meta-analysis (MA), systematic review (SRV), randomized controlled trial (RCT), case report (CR), practice guideline (PGL), and so on. Although there are numerous studies examining the impact and importance of specific cases of EBM in clinical practice, there is a lack of research quantitatively measuring publication trends in the growth and development of EBM. Therefore, a bibliometric analysis was constructed to determine the scientific productivity of EBM research over decades. NCBI PubMed database was used to search, retrieve and classify publications according to research method and year of publication. Joinpoint regression analysis was undertaken to analyze trends in research productivity and the prevalence of individual research methods. Analysis indicates that MA and SRV, which are classified as the highest ranking of evidence in the EBM, accounted for a relatively small but auspicious number of publications. For most research methods, the annual percent change (APC) indicates a consistent increase in publication frequency. MA, SRV and RCT show the highest rate of publication growth in the past twenty years. Only controlled clinical trials (CCT) shows a non-significant reduction in publications over the past ten years. Higher quality research methods, such as MA, SRV and RCT, are showing continuous publication growth, which suggests an acknowledgement of the value of these methods. This study provides the first quantitative assessment of research method publication trends in EBM.

  9. Educational research methods for researching innovations in teaching, learning and assessment: The nursing lecturer as researcher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks-Maran, Diane

    2015-11-01

    The author, who has had previous experience as a nurse researcher, has been engaged in helping nurse lecturers to undertake evaluation research studies into innovations in their teaching, learning and assessment methods. In order to undertake this work successfully, it was important to move from thinking like a nurse researcher to thinking like an educational researcher and developing the role of the nursing lecturer as researcher of their teaching. This article explores the difference between evaluation and evaluation research and argues for the need to use educational research methods when undertaking evaluation research into innovations in teaching, learning and assessment. A new model for educational evaluation research is presented together with two case examples of the model in use. The model has been tested on over 30 research studies into innovations in teaching, learning and assessment over the past 8 years. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. To establish a body of evidence on safety for postmarketing Chinese medicine: A new research paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xing; Xie, Yan-Ming; Robinson, Nicola; Wang, Yong-Yan

    2017-03-01

    The issue of safety evaluation on postmarketing Chinese medicines has become a hot topic in mainland China recently. Researchers and decision-makers can obtain a variety of evidence resources about safety in order to evaluate the safety profile for postmarketing Chinese medicines. A registry study on ten Chinese medicine injections for postmarketing surveillance has come to the end. From such a study observing more than 300,000 patients for more than 4 years, a theoretical research question emerges, that is, how to identify and evaluate safety evidence systematically. We put forward a brand new research paradigm on the theory level, which is to establish a body of evidence on safety evaluation for postmarketing Chinese medicine. Therefore, multiple information sources were explored and extracted from preclinical experiments for toxicity, postmarketing clinical trials for effificacy and safety evaluation, registry study for surveillance, retrospective data analysis from hospital information system and spontaneous response system, and case reports and systematic review from literature. Greater efforts for this idea and cooperation with experts in this fifield both in China and abroad are urgently needed.

  11. The impact of computer science in molecular medicine: enabling high-throughput research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Iglesia, Diana; García-Remesal, Miguel; de la Calle, Guillermo; Kulikowski, Casimir; Sanz, Ferran; Maojo, Víctor

    2013-01-01

    The Human Genome Project and the explosion of high-throughput data have transformed the areas of molecular and personalized medicine, which are producing a wide range of studies and experimental results and providing new insights for developing medical applications. Research in many interdisciplinary fields is resulting in data repositories and computational tools that support a wide diversity of tasks: genome sequencing, genome-wide association studies, analysis of genotype-phenotype interactions, drug toxicity and side effects assessment, prediction of protein interactions and diseases, development of computational models, biomarker discovery, and many others. The authors of the present paper have developed several inventories covering tools, initiatives and studies in different computational fields related to molecular medicine: medical informatics, bioinformatics, clinical informatics and nanoinformatics. With these inventories, created by mining the scientific literature, we have carried out several reviews of these fields, providing researchers with a useful framework to locate, discover, search and integrate resources. In this paper we present an analysis of the state-of-the-art as it relates to computational resources for molecular medicine, based on results compiled in our inventories, as well as results extracted from a systematic review of the literature and other scientific media. The present review is based on the impact of their related publications and the available data and software resources for molecular medicine. It aims to provide information that can be useful to support ongoing research and work to improve diagnostics and therapeutics based on molecular-level insights.

  12. CURRENT METHODS OF ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION ASSESSMENT AND THEIR POSSIBLE USE IN THE PRACTICAL MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Shabrov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A review contains a description of the most common methods of evaluation and monitoring of "endothelial dysfunction" that are assessed in terms of their information content and applicability in the practice of medicine. The term "endothelial function" is interpreted primarily as a function of the regulation of capillary blood flow, carried out by the expense of the dynamic change of the phase of vasoconstriction and vasodilatation in vessels of resistive type (in accordance with the changing needs of cellular metabolism. Assessment of endothelial dysfunction is understood as a generalized indicator of the extent and nature of violations of the regulation of peripheral circulation. It includes an assessment of imbalances between endotheliumdependent vasoconstrictor and vasodilating factors or mismatch of the local and central regulation of capillary blood flow in response to various functional tests or other effects (eg, cold test, or test with local ischemia. All methods of endothelial dysfunction assessment in the survey are divided into invasive and non-invasive. The main feature of invasive methods lies in the direct effect on the endothelium of the coronary or other vessels by introducing into these vessels vasoactive substances such as acetylcholine. Response to the test (vasoconstriction or vasodilation is evaluated by coronary angiography or by ultrasound. Non-invasive methods of the assessment of endothelial dysfunction or functions of regulation of the peripheral circulation are regarded as the most promising for widespread use. There are two basic methods that underlie functional tests: methods PAT (peripheral arterial tone and PHG (polyhepatography. Assessment of endothelial dysfunction in many modern scientific researches is important. They are regarded as the causative factors of many different diseases. Such assessments can be useful in everyday medical practice. Assessment of endothelial function provides the clinician with

  13. Nuclear medicine in research and practice. Nuklearmedizin in Forschung und Praxis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, H.A.E.; Vauramo, E.

    1984-01-01

    The present proceedings are containing the compacts of 208 papers presented at the 22nd International Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine. They are dealing with the following themes: Methods and basics, cardiology, pulmonology, gastroenterology, nephrology, neurology, hematology, osteology, oncology and immunoscintigraphy, endocrinology, pediatrics, radioimmunoassay, and therapy.

  14. The difficulty of making psychology research and clinical practice relevant to medicine: experiences and observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Rodger

    2008-03-01

    Psychology and medicine research and practice have demonstrated substantial and unique bodies of knowledge designed to both improve patient care and respond to contemporary health care needs for use of evidence and cost consciousness. At their full potential they represent a significant paradigm shift in healthcare. Despite impressive successes, it is clear that we are just on the cusp of such a change. These findings have had limited impact and penetration into medical practice, particularly outside of academic medicine and large, organized systems of health care, and there are multiple examples of such limitations in various arenas of health care. There also appear to be common themes to such examples which provide us opportunities to consider how psychologists might move things ahead. They also suggest how our unique position in academic medicine can both limit our impact and provide ways of creating continued shifts in the healthcare paradigm.

  15. World Workshop on Oral Medicine VI: Utilization of Oral Medicine-specific software for support of clinical care, research, and education: current status and strategy for broader implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brailo, Vlaho; Firriolo, Francis John; Tanaka, Takako Imai; Varoni, Elena; Sykes, Rosemary; McCullough, Michael; Hua, Hong; Sklavounou, Alexandra; Jensen, Siri Beier; Lockhart, Peter B; Mattsson, Ulf; Jontell, Mats

    2015-08-01

    To assess the current scope and status of Oral Medicine-specific software (OMSS) utilized to support clinical care, research, and education in Oral Medicine and to propose a strategy for broader implementation of OMSS within the global Oral Medicine community. An invitation letter explaining the objectives was sent to the global Oral Medicine community. Respondents were interviewed to obtain information about different aspects of OMSS functionality. Ten OMSS tools were identified. Four were being used for clinical care, one was being used for research, two were being used for education, and three were multipurpose. Clinical software was being utilized as databases developed to integrate of different type of clinical information. Research software was designed to facilitate multicenter research. Educational software represented interactive, case-orientated technology designed for clinical training in Oral Medicine. Easy access to patient data was the most commonly reported advantage. Difficulty of use and poor integration with other software was the most commonly reported disadvantage. The OMSS presented in this paper demonstrate how information technology (IT) can have an impact on the quality of patient care, research, and education in the field of Oral Medicine. A strategy for broader implementation of OMSS is proposed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Implementation of comparative effectiveness research in personalized medicine applications in oncology: current and future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IJzerman MJ

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Maarten J IJzerman,1,3 Andrea Manca,2,3 Julia Keizer,1 Scott D Ramsey4 1Department of Health Technology and Services Research, University of Twente, Enschede, the Netherlands; 2Centre for Health Economics, University of York, York, UK; 3Department of Population Health, Luxembourg Institute of Health, Strassen, Luxembourg, 4Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USAAbstract: Personalized medicine (PM or precision medicine has been defined as an innovative approach that takes into account individual differences in people's genes, environments, and lifestyles in prevention and treatment of disease. In PM, genomic information may contribute to the molecular understanding of disease, to optimize preventive health care strategies, and to fit the best drug therapies to the patient's individual characteristics. Evidence development in the era of genomic medicine is extremely challenging due to a number of factors. These include the rapid technological innovation in molecular diagnostics and targeted drug discoveries, and hence the large number of mutations and multiple ways these may influence treatment decisions. Although the evidence base for PM is evolving rapidly, the main question to be explored in this article is whether existing evidence is also fit for comparative effectiveness research (CER. As a starting point, this paper therefore reflects on the evidence required for CER and the evidence gaps preventing decisions on market access and coverage. The paper then discusses challenges and potential barriers for applying a CER paradigm to PM, identifies common methodologies for designing clinical trials in PM, discusses various approaches for analyzing clinical trials to infer from population to individual level, and presents an example of a clinical trial in PM (The RxPONDER TRIAL demonstrating good practice. The paper concludes with a future perspective, including modeling approaches for evidence synthesis.Keywords: personalized

  17. Quality Assessment of Research Articles in Nuclear Medicine Using STARD and QUADAS-2 Tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roysri, Krisana; Chotipanich, Chanisa; Laopaiboon, Vallop; Khiewyoo, Jiraporn

    2014-01-01

    Diagnostic nuclear medicine is being increasingly employed in clinical practice with the advent of new technologies and radiopharmaceuticals. The report of the prevalence of a certain disease is important for assessing the quality of that article. Therefore, this study was performed to evaluate the quality of published nuclear medicine articles and determine the frequency of reporting the prevalence of studied diseases. We used Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy (STARD) and Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS-2) checklists for evaluating the quality of articles published in five nuclear medicine journals with the highest impact factors in 2012. The articles were retrieved from Scopus database and were selected and assessed independently by two nuclear medicine physicians. Decision concerning equivocal data was made by consensus between the reviewers. The average STARD score was approximately 17 points, and the highest score was 17.19±2.38 obtained by the European Journal of Nuclear Medicine. QUADAS-2 tool showed that all journals had low bias regarding study population. The Journal of Nuclear Medicine had the highest score in terms of index test, reference standard, and time interval. Lack of clarity regarding the index test, reference standard, and time interval was frequently observed in all journals including Clinical Nuclear Medicine, in which 64% of the studies were unclear regarding the index test. Journal of Nuclear Cardiology had the highest number of articles with appropriate reference standard (83.3%), though it had the lowest frequency of reporting disease prevalence (zero reports). All five journals had the same STARD score, while index test, reference standard, and time interval were very unclear according to QUADAS-2 tool. Unfortunately, data were too limited to determine which journal had the lowest risk of bias. In fact, it is the author's responsibility to provide details of research methodology so that the

  18. Quality Assessment of Research Articles in Nuclear Medicine Using STARD and QUADAS-2 Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roysri, Krisana; Chotipanich, Chanisa; Laopaiboon, Vallop; Khiewyoo, Jiraporn

    2014-01-01

    Diagnostic nuclear medicine is being increasingly employed in clinical practice with the advent of new technologies and radiopharmaceuticals. The report of the prevalence of a certain disease is important for assessing the quality of that article. Therefore, this study was performed to evaluate the quality of published nuclear medicine articles and determine the frequency of reporting the prevalence of studied diseases. We used Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy (STARD) and Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS-2) checklists for evaluating the quality of articles published in five nuclear medicine journals with the highest impact factors in 2012. The articles were retrieved from Scopus database and were selected and assessed independently by two nuclear medicine physicians. Decision concerning equivocal data was made by consensus between the reviewers. The average STARD score was approximately 17 points, and the highest score was 17.19±2.38 obtained by the European Journal of Nuclear Medicine. QUADAS-2 tool showed that all journals had low bias regarding study population. The Journal of Nuclear Medicine had the highest score in terms of index test, reference standard, and time interval. Lack of clarity regarding the index test, reference standard, and time interval was frequently observed in all journals including Clinical Nuclear Medicine, in which 64% of the studies were unclear regarding the index test. Journal of Nuclear Cardiology had the highest number of articles with appropriate reference standard (83.3%), though it had the lowest frequency of reporting disease prevalence (zero reports). All five journals had the same STARD score, while index test, reference standard, and time interval were very unclear according to QUADAS-2 tool. Unfortunately, data were too limited to determine which journal had the lowest risk of bias. In fact, it is the author's responsibility to provide details of research methodology so that the reader

  19. Research of primary hyperhidrosis in students of medicine of the State of Sergipe, Brazil*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Sônia Oliveira; Aragão, João Fernandes Britto; Machado Neto, José; de Almeida, Kaio Bernardes Santos; Menezes, Layla Melize Santos; Santana, Vanessa Rocha

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hyperhidrosis or excessive sweat production occurs at 2.9-9% of the population. OBJECTIVE To estimate the prevalence and disorders due to primary hyperhidrosis (HP) in medicine students in the state of Sergipe. METHODS Cross-sectional study using individual interviews. RESULTS Hyperhidrosis was found in 14.76% of subjects, the most affected regions were palmar, plantar and axillary, causing prejudice in daily activities. Family history occurred in 45% and 22.72% was diagnosed by a physician. CONCLUSION The prevalence of hyperhidrosis in medicine students of Sergipe was high, with strong family and a small portion of diagnoses made by medical professionals. PMID:26560211

  20. [Research on promotory effect of traditional Chinese medicine on fracture healing in cell and molecular level].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kun; Niu, Liang-Chen; Yuan, Fu-Jie; Liu, Shen-Peng

    2017-08-25

    Traditional Chinese medicine is widely used in the treatment of fractures, osteoporosis, other bone related diseases for thousands of years. There are many animal experiments and clinical trials demonstrating that the traditional Chinese medicine such as epimedium, Drynaria and other traditional Chinese medicine can stimulate bone regeneration and inhibit bone resorption, accelerating the fracture healing. In recent years many cell experiments have shown that these herbal ingredients up-regulated the expression of intracellular osteogenic transcription factors and osteogenic related genes, and then induced osteoblastic differentiation and stimulated the proliferation of osteoblasts, bone nodule formation and matrix mineralization. Meanwhile these herbal ingredients up-regulated the expression of intracellular osteoclastic transcription factors and osteoclast related genes, inhibited osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption of osteoclasts. In addition, intracellular signaling pathways regulated these herbal ingredients by might be involved in the above effects. We can have a conclusion that the genes expression regulated by transcription factors in pre-osteoblast and pre-osteoclast and these signaling pathways are the major molecular mechanisms and research hotspots of traditional Chinese medicine in promoting fracture healing. Based on these molecular mechanisms to review, this review provides not only the foundation for the study of traditional Chinese medicine in promoting fracture healing, but also the basis for clinical treatment of fracture. Copyright© 2017 by the China Journal of Orthopaedics and Traumatology Press.

  1. A Quantitative Assessment of the Reporting Quality of Herbal Medicine Research: The Road to Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, Ken

    2018-02-01

    To quantify different aspects of the quality of reporting of herbal medicine clinical trials, to determine how that quality is affecting the conclusions of meta-analyses, and to target areas for improvement in future herbal medicine research reporting. The Electronic databases PubMed, Academic Search Premier, ScienceDirect, and Alt HealthWatch were searched for meta-analyses of herbal medicines in refereed journals and Cochrane Reviews in the years 2000-2004 and 2010-2014. The search was limited to meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials involving humans and published in English. Judgments and descriptions within the meta-analyses were used to report on risks of bias in the included clinical trials and the meta-analyses themselves. Out of 3264 citations, 9 journal-published meta-analyses were selected from 2000 to 2004, 116 from 2010 to 2014, and 44 Cochrane Reviews from 2010 to 2014. Across both time frames and categories of publication, herbal medicines include a significant number of clinical trials that do not meet the recommended standards for clinical trial reporting. This quantitative assessment identified significant publication bias and other bias risks that may be due to inadequate trial design or incomplete reporting of outcomes. Suggested improvements to herbal medicine clinical trial reporting are discussed.

  2. Research and Development for Botanical Products in Medicinals and Food Supplements Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Miroddi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Botanical products sold in the health area are generally intended as drugs, medicinal products, food supplements or substances for therapeutic use. Use of botanicals for improving or to care human health has evolved independently in different countries worldwide. Regulatory issues regarding botanical products designed for the food supplements or medicinal market and their influence on research and development are discussed. European Union (EU and United States (US policies regulating these products are focused with comments on the legislations delivered during the last ten years and differences existing in rules between these countries are emphasized. Research and development on botanical products nowdays strongly influenced by the product destination in the market. Addressed and differentiated research for either food supplements or medicinal markets is necessary to purchase data really useful for assessment of safe and effective use for both the categories. The main objective is to catalyze interest of academic and companies' researchers on crucial aspects to be taken into account in the research for the development of botanical products.

  3. Research and development for botanical products in medicinals and food supplements market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miroddi, Marco; Mannucci, Carmen; Mancari, Ferdinando; Navarra, Michele; Calapai, Gioacchino

    2013-01-01

    Botanical products sold in the health area are generally intended as drugs, medicinal products, food supplements or substances for therapeutic use. Use of botanicals for improving or to care human health has evolved independently in different countries worldwide. Regulatory issues regarding botanical products designed for the food supplements or medicinal market and their influence on research and development are discussed. European Union (EU) and United States (US) policies regulating these products are focused with comments on the legislations delivered during the last ten years and differences existing in rules between these countries are emphasized. Research and development on botanical products nowdays strongly influenced by the product destination in the market. Addressed and differentiated research for either food supplements or medicinal markets is necessary to purchase data really useful for assessment of safe and effective use for both the categories. The main objective is to catalyze interest of academic and companies' researchers on crucial aspects to be taken into account in the research for the development of botanical products.

  4. Teaching methods in Hawler College of Medicine in Iraq: A qualitative assessment from teachers' perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh Abubakir M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medical education in Iraq is poorly assessed and there is a general lack of documented knowledge about the challenges facing this field and the needs for its development. This study aimed to assess the existing teaching methods in the Hawler College of Medicine, Iraq from teaching staff perspectives and assess the knowledge of the teaching staff about student-centred learning. Methods A qualitative study based on a self-administered questionnaire survey of a purposive sample of 83 teaching staff in Hawler Medical University was conducted. The questionnaire addressed the participants’ view on the positive aspects and problems of the current teaching methods and priorities to change it. The qualitative data analysis comprised thematic analysis. Results The study revealed significant problems facing the existing teaching methods including having large number of students in the lecture hall (45.0 %, having focus on teacher-centred teaching (45.0 % and lack of infrastructures and facilities suitable for proper teaching (26.7 %. The priorities for improving the quality of teaching methods included adoption of small group teaching strategy in all study years (34.6 %, improving the infrastructure and facilities for teaching in the college (34.6 % and provision of continuous academic development programs for the teaching staff (24.3 %. Conclusions The existing medical education system face significant problems and it needs important and comprehensive improvements in different areas. There is a need for further research in this field to explore the identified problems in a more in-depth manner in order to better understand of the problems and needs of this important area of education.

  5. A Mixed-Methods Analysis of Changing Student Confidence in an Online Shelter Medicine Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeTar, Lena G; Alber, Julia M; Behar-Horenstein, Linda S; Spencer, Terry G

    Maddie's Shelter Medicine Program at the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine offers comprehensive training in shelter medicine to veterinary students based on a set of core job skills identified by the Association of Shelter Veterinarians. In 2012, this program began teaching online distance education courses to students and practicing veterinarians worldwide who sought additional training in this newly recognized specialty area. Distance learning is a novel educational strategy in veterinary medicine; most instruction at veterinary medical schools is classroom based. No previous studies have shown whether online courses can prepare veterinarians to practice shelter medicine. In this study, we investigated how an online, graduate-level course titled "Shelter Animal Physical Health" changed student self-reported confidence. First, we compared pre-course confidence regarding eight specific shelter medical practice scenarios to post-course confidence through statistical analysis. Quantitative analysis showed a significant (pconfidence for all eight scenarios. Next, we used open coding to identify themes within reflection papers that students were asked to write during the course and used those findings to corroborate or refute the quantitative results. Qualitative analysis of students' reflection papers identified six themes: confidence, communication, population management, outbreak management, medical care, and application. The results of this study show that distance education can be an effective method of preparing veterinarians and veterinary students to practice shelter medicine.

  6. Integrating clinical medicine into biomedical graduate education to promote translational research: strategies from two new PhD programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Carolyn L; Jarrett, Marcia; Bierer, S Beth

    2013-01-01

    For several decades, a barrier has existed between research and clinical medicine, making it difficult for aspiring scientists to gain exposure to human pathophysiology and access to clinical/translational research mentors during their graduate training. In 2005, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute announced the Med Into Grad initiative to support graduate programs that integrate clinical knowledge into PhD biomedical training, with the goal of preparing a new cadre of translational researchers to work at the interface of the basic sciences and clinical medicine. Two institutions, Baylor College of Medicine and the Cleveland Clinic/Case Western Reserve University, developed new PhD programs in translational biology and/or molecular medicine. These programs teach the topics and skills that today's translational researchers must learn and expose students to clinical medicine. In this article, the authors compare and contrast the history, implementation, and evaluation of the Translational Biology and Molecular Medicine program at Baylor College of Medicine and the Molecular Medicine program at the Cleveland Clinic/Case Western Reserve University. The authors also demonstrate the feasibility of creating a multidisciplinary graduate program in molecular medicine that integrates pathophysiology and clinical medicine without extending training time. They conclude with a discussion of the similarities in training approaches that exist despite the fact that each program was independently developed and offer observations that emerged during their collaboration that may benefit others who are considering developing similar programs.

  7. Adopting a blended learning approach to teaching evidence based medicine: a mixed methods study

    OpenAIRE

    Ilic, Dragan; Hart, William; Fiddes, Patrick; Misso, Marie; Villanueva, Elmer

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) is a core unit delivered across many medical schools. Few studies have investigated the most effective method of teaching a course in EBM to medical students. The objective of this study was to identify whether a blended-learning approach to teaching EBM is more effective a didactic-based approach at increasing medical student competency in EBM. Methods A mixed-methods study was conducted consisting of a controlled trial and focus groups with second ye...

  8. Human Microbiome and Learning Healthcare Systems: Integrating Research and Precision Medicine for Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuong, Kim H; Mack, David R; Stintzi, Alain; O'Doherty, Kieran C

    2018-02-01

    Healthcare institutions face widespread challenges of delivering high-quality and cost-effective care, while keeping up with rapid advances in biomedical knowledge and technologies. Moreover, there is increased emphasis on developing personalized or precision medicine targeted to individuals or groups of patients who share a certain biomarker signature. Learning healthcare systems (LHS) have been proposed for integration of research and clinical practice to fill major knowledge gaps, improve care, reduce healthcare costs, and provide precision care. To date, much discussion in this context has focused on the potential of human genomic data, and not yet on human microbiome data. Rapid advances in human microbiome research suggest that profiling of, and interventions on, the human microbiome can provide substantial opportunity for improved diagnosis, therapeutics, risk management, and risk stratification. In this study, we discuss a potential role for microbiome science in LHSs. We first review the key elements of LHSs, and discuss possibilities of Big Data and patient engagement. We then consider potentials and challenges of integrating human microbiome research into clinical practice as part of an LHS. With rapid growth in human microbiome research, patient-specific microbial data will begin to contribute in important ways to precision medicine. Hence, we discuss how patient-specific microbial data can help guide therapeutic decisions and identify novel effective approaches for precision care of inflammatory bowel disease. To the best of our knowledge, this expert analysis makes an original contribution with new insights poised at the emerging intersection of LHSs, microbiome science, and postgenomics medicine.

  9. Current Researches on the Methods of Diagnosing Sasang Constitution: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Woo Lee

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Sasang constitution diagnosis has traditionally been conducted by a Sasang constitutional medicine (SCM doctor who examines the external appearance, temperament and various symptoms of an individual and then collectively analyzes this information to determine their own constitutions. However, because this process is subjective and not quantitative, many researchers have been attempting to develop objective and reasonable methods of determining constitutions. In Korea, even though a wide range of research regarding SCM has been conducted, most of the work has not been revealed internationally. So in this review, the authors have searched the Journal of Sasang Constitutional Medicine, as well as other Korean domestic journal databases and Pubmed for research regarding modernized constitution diagnosis methods so to provide the understanding of current research state and outlook for future research.

  10. The Documentary Method in Intercultural Research Scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrike Evers

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The documentary method appears to be especially suitable for preventing possible ethnocentrisms in the interpretation of data in reconstructive research, as well as for precluding concessions with a statistic and normative cultural concept. As an illustration of this thesis, this article presents a study—undertaken at the Bremen University of Applied Sciences—in which the effects of an intercultural contact programme between international students and German families are analysed. Special emphasis is placed on the question of the students' emotional and cognitive changes, called educational processes ("Bildung" in the educational science. The theoretical and methodological background of the study and exemplary results are presented. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0901478

  11. The laddering method in service innovation research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grünbaum, Niels Nolsøe

    2017-01-01

    map of what is actually going on in the consumer’s mind when the consumer is buying and consuming specific goods. It is argued, in this chapter, that this understanding is indeed both interesting and relevant in service innovation. More specifically, realizations of consumers’ values will help...... to guide marketers to understand what to innovate, how to innovate, how to plan and efficiently communicate changes, how to sell the innovations in the market place and how to implement organizational changes that innovations might cause. Furthermore, the laddering methodology has been applied across many...... fields with good success and the premises for using the method and for analyzing obtained data, is rather well described. The latter (i.e. premises and data analysis) is often raised as central and critical points of qualitative research methodology when arguing for problems with validity and reliability...

  12. Miscellaneous standard methods for Apis mellifera research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Human, Hannelie; Brodschneider, Robert; Dietemann, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    and storing as well as determining individual weight of bees. The precise timing of developmental stages is also an important aspect of sampling individuals for experiments. In order to investigate and manipulate functional processes in honey bees, e. g. memory formation and retrieval and gene expression......, microinjection is often used. A method that is used by both researchers and beekeepers is the marking of queens that serves not only to help to locate her during her life, but also enables the dating of queens. Creating multiple queen colonies allows the beekeeper to maintain spare queens, increase brood...... production or ask questions related to reproduction. On colony level, very useful techniques are the measurement of intra hive mortality using dead bee traps, weighing of full hives, collecting pollen and nectar, and digital monitoring of brood development via location recognition. At the population level...

  13. [AVIATION MEDICINE: THEORETICAL CONCEPTS AND FOCAL FUNDAMENTAL AND PRACTICAL ISSUES (for the 80th anniversary of the Research Test Center of Aerospace Medicine and Military Ergonomics)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanko, I M; Pisarev, A A; Vorona, A A; Lapa, V V; Khomenko, M N

    2015-01-01

    The article discloses postulates of theoretical concepts that make the methodological basis for addressing the real-world aviation medicine challenges of humanizing aviator's environment, labor content and means, and health and performance maintenance. Under consideration are focal fundamental and practical issues arising with the technological progress in aviation and dealt with at the AF CRI Research Test Center of Aerospace Medicine and Military Ergonomics.

  14. Teaching methods in Hawler College of Medicine in Iraq: a qualitative assessment from teachers' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Abubakir M; Al-Tawil, Namir G; Al-Hadithi, Tariq S

    2012-07-27

    Medical education in Iraq is poorly assessed and there is a general lack of documented knowledge about the challenges facing this field and the needs for its development. This study aimed to assess the existing teaching methods in the Hawler College of Medicine, Iraq from teaching staff perspectives and assess the knowledge of the teaching staff about student-centred learning. A qualitative study based on a self-administered questionnaire survey of a purposive sample of 83 teaching staff in Hawler Medical University was conducted. The questionnaire addressed the participants' view on the positive aspects and problems of the current teaching methods and priorities to change it. The qualitative data analysis comprised thematic analysis. The study revealed significant problems facing the existing teaching methods including having large number of students in the lecture hall (45.0 %), having focus on teacher-centred teaching (45.0 %) and lack of infrastructures and facilities suitable for proper teaching (26.7 %). The priorities for improving the quality of teaching methods included adoption of small group teaching strategy in all study years (34.6 %), improving the infrastructure and facilities for teaching in the college (34.6 %) and provision of continuous academic development programs for the teaching staff (24.3 %). The existing medical education system face significant problems and it needs important and comprehensive improvements in different areas. There is a need for further research in this field to explore the identified problems in a more in-depth manner in order to better understand of the problems and needs of this important area of education.

  15. Qualitative methods: a research approach worth considering

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Qualitative research forms part of the classical cycle of research. A researcher notices a phenomenon that he/she has no explanation for. He/she observes the phenomenon and collects data about it to describe it-this is qualitative research. With enough information about the phenomenon the researcher can now formulate a ...

  16. Recommendations for the safe use and regulation of radiation sources in industry, medicine, research and teaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The use of radiation sources of various types and activities is widespread in industry, medicine, research and teaching, and is increasing yearly. The safety record has been admirable, although incidents have occurred where loss of control of radiation sources has given rise to unplanned exposures to workers, medical patients and members of the public, sometimes with fatal results, while in other situations exposure may not have been as low as reasonably achievable. This publication is intended as a practical aid for all concerned with operational radiation protection connected with the use of radiation sources in industry, medicine, research and teaching, from the point of view of both the user of such sources and the regulatory bodies. Refs, figs

  17. Advancing medicine one research note at a time: the educational value in clinical case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabán-Martinez Alberto J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A case report—a brief written note that describes unique aspects of a clinical case—provides a significant function in medicine given its rapid, succinct, and educational contributions to scientific literature and clinical practice. Despite the growth of, and emphasis on, randomized clinical trials and evidenced-based medicine, case reports continue to provide novel and exceptional knowledge in medical education. The journal BMC Research Notes introduces a new “case reports” section to provide the busy clinician with a forum in which to document any authentic clinical case that provide educational value to current clinical practice. The aim is for this article type to be reviewed, wherever possible, by specialized Associate Editors for the journal, in order to provide rapid but thorough decision making. New ideas often garnered by and documented in case reports will support the advancement of medical science — one research note at a time.

  18. Advancing medicine one research note at a time: the educational value in clinical case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabán-Martinez, Alberto J; Beltrán, Wilfredo F García

    2012-07-06

    A case report--a brief written note that describes unique aspects of a clinical case--provides a significant function in medicine given its rapid, succinct, and educational contributions to scientific literature and clinical practice. Despite the growth of, and emphasis on, randomized clinical trials and evidenced-based medicine, case reports continue to provide novel and exceptional knowledge in medical education. The journal BMC Research Notes introduces a new "case reports" section to provide the busy clinician with a forum in which to document any authentic clinical case that provide educational value to current clinical practice. The aim is for this article type to be reviewed, wherever possible, by specialized Associate Editors for the journal, in order to provide rapid but thorough decision making. New ideas often garnered by and documented in case reports will support the advancement of medical science--one research note at a time.

  19. TAI CHI CHUAN: STATE OF THE ART IN INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH: VOL 52 (MEDICINE & SPORT SCIENCE)

    OpenAIRE

    Youlian Hong

    2008-01-01

    DESCRIPTION This collection on the latest and practical research data about the characteristics and beneficial effects of Tai Chi Chuan on various physiological and pathological matters is published as the 52nd volume of Medicine and Sport Science Journal. PURPOSE To address the effects of Tai Chi Chuan in the fields of biomechanics and physiology, sensory motor control and fall prevention, psychology and social aspects, as well as various clinical applications. FEATURES The book is organised...

  20. Publication bias in animal research presented at the 2008 Society of Critical Care Medicine Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conradi, Una; Joffe, Ari R

    2017-07-07

    To determine a direct measure of publication bias by determining subsequent full-paper publication (P) of studies reported in animal research abstracts presented at an international conference (A). We selected 100 random (using a random-number generator) A from the 2008 Society of Critical Care Medicine Conference. Using a data collection form and study manual, we recorded methodology and result variables from A. We searched PubMed and EMBASE to June 2015, and DOAJ and Google Scholar to May 2017 to screen for subsequent P. Methodology and result variables were recorded from P to determine changes in reporting from A. Predictors of P were examined using Fisher's Exact Test. 62% (95% CI 52-71%) of studies described in A were subsequently P after a median 19 [IQR 9-33.3] months from conference presentation. Reporting of studies in A was of low quality: randomized 27% (the method of randomization and allocation concealment not described), blinded 0%, sample-size calculation stated 0%, specifying the primary outcome 26%, numbers given with denominators 6%, and stating number of animals used 47%. Only being an orally presented (vs. poster presented) A (14/16 vs. 48/84, p = 0.025) predicted P. Reporting of studies in P was of poor quality: randomized 39% (the method of randomization and allocation concealment not described), likely blinded 6%, primary outcome specified 5%, sample size calculation stated 0%, numbers given with denominators 34%, and number of animals used stated 56%. Changes in reporting from A to P occurred: from non-randomized to randomized 19%, from non-blinded to blinded 6%, from negative to positive outcomes 8%, from having to not having a stated primary outcome 16%, and from non-statistically to statistically significant findings 37%. Post-hoc, using publication data, P was predicted by having positive outcomes (published 62/62, unpublished 33/38; p = 0.003), or statistically significant results (published 58/62, unpublished 20/38; p < 0

  1. Preclinical imaging methods for assessing the safety and efficacy of regenerative medicine therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarfe, Lauren; Brillant, Nathalie; Kumar, J. Dinesh; Ali, Noura; Alrumayh, Ahmed; Amali, Mohammed; Barbellion, Stephane; Jones, Vendula; Niemeijer, Marije; Potdevin, Sophie; Roussignol, Gautier; Vaganov, Anatoly; Barbaric, Ivana; Barrow, Michael; Burton, Neal C.; Connell, John; Dazzi, Francesco; Edsbagge, Josefina; French, Neil S.; Holder, Julie; Hutchinson, Claire; Jones, David R.; Kalber, Tammy; Lovatt, Cerys; Lythgoe, Mark F.; Patel, Sara; Patrick, P. Stephen; Piner, Jacqueline; Reinhardt, Jens; Ricci, Emanuelle; Sidaway, James; Stacey, Glyn N.; Starkey Lewis, Philip J.; Sullivan, Gareth; Taylor, Arthur; Wilm, Bettina; Poptani, Harish; Murray, Patricia; Goldring, Chris E. P.; Park, B. Kevin

    2017-10-01

    Regenerative medicine therapies hold enormous potential for a variety of currently incurable conditions with high unmet clinical need. Most progress in this field to date has been achieved with cell-based regenerative medicine therapies, with over a thousand clinical trials performed up to 2015. However, lack of adequate safety and efficacy data is currently limiting wider uptake of these therapies. To facilitate clinical translation, non-invasive in vivo imaging technologies that enable careful evaluation and characterisation of the administered cells and their effects on host tissues are critically required to evaluate their safety and efficacy in relevant preclinical models. This article reviews the most common imaging technologies available and how they can be applied to regenerative medicine research. We cover details of how each technology works, which cell labels are most appropriate for different applications, and the value of multi-modal imaging approaches to gain a comprehensive understanding of the responses to cell therapy in vivo.

  2. Research enrichment: evaluation of structured research in the curriculum for dental medicine students as part of the vertical and horizontal integration of biomedical training and discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart Tanis

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research programs within medical and dental schools are important vehicles for biomedical and clinical discovery, serving as effective teaching and learning tools by providing situations in which predoctoral students develop problem-solving and critical-thinking skills. Although research programs at many medical and dental schools are well-established, they may not be well integrated into the predoctoral curriculum to effectively support the learning objectives for their students. Methods A series of structured seminars, incorporating faculty research, was designed for first-year dental students at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, School of Dental Medicine to reinforce and support the concepts and skills taught in concurrent courses. A structured research enrichment period was also created to facilitate student engagement in active research using faculty and student curricular release time. Course evaluations and surveys were administered to gauge student perceptions of the curricular integration of research, the impact of these seminars on recruitment to the research program, and overall levels of student satisfaction with research enrichment. Results The analysis of course surveys revealed that students perceived the research-containing seminars effectively illustrated concepts, were logically sequenced, and were well-integrated into their curriculum. In addition, analysis of surveys revealed that the Integration Seminar courses motivated students to engage in research enrichment. Finally, this analysis provided evidence that students were very satisfied with their overall learning experience during research enrichment. Conclusion Curricular integration is one method of improving the teaching and learning of complicated and inter-related concepts, providing an opportunity to incorporate research training and objectives into traditionally separate didactic courses. Despite the benefits of curricular integration, finding

  3. [Summary of research works on viruses in the Vietnam Research Station, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashiro, Tetsu

    2013-01-01

    Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University (NEKKEN) and National Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, Vietnam (NIHE) jointly conducted a project from 2006 on Emerging and Re-emerging Infectious Diseases (ERID) granted by the Ministry of Education, Science, Culture and Technology (MEXT) of Japan. Fifteen independent researches have been carried out by 7 scientists who stationed in the Vietnam Research Station (VRS), and by approximately 60 visiting scientists. A wide variety of viruses have been studied in the research activities in the VRS, of those, topics of'' Nipah virus infection in bats in Vietnam'', ''Nam Dinh virus, a newly discovered insect nidovirus'', and'' Risk factors of dengue fever in southern Vietnam'' were summarized. It is important to develop a mechanism to facilitate young scientists to use the VRS in their research works, and then a scope to establish the VRS as a gateway to a successful career path for young scientists in the field of the infectious diseases would be realized.

  4. Clinical research skills development program in cell-based regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, Ivonne Hernandez; Suncion, Viky; Karantalis, Vasileios; Balkan, Wayne; Hare, Joshua M

    2015-02-01

    Cell-based therapy aimed at restoring organ function is one of the most exciting and promising areas of medical research. However, a novel intervention like cell-based therapy requires physician education and training. An increasing number of physicians untrained in regenerative medicine are using cell-based therapy to treat patients for a wide variety of chronic illnesses. The current lack of training for physicians in this area combined with the sharply increasing practice of regenerative medicine is concerning for a number of reasons, namely potential harm to patients and avoidable conflicts between governmental regulatory agencies and physicians. Academic medical fellowship training programs are needed that specifically prepare physicians for treating patients with cell-based therapies for various organ systems and chronic diseases. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute established the Cardiovascular Cell Therapy Network to design and conduct clinical trials that advance the field of cell-based therapy for patients with cardiovascular disease. As part of the network, a two-year Clinical Research Skills Development Program was supported at two centers with the goal of training early career investigators in cell-based clinical and translational research. In this review, we describe the implementation of this training program at our institution with the purpose of promoting the further development of academic fellowship programs in cell-based regenerative medicine. ©AlphaMed Press.

  5. The economics of medicines optimization: policy developments, remaining challenges and research priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Rita; Barbieri, Marco; Light, Kate; Elliott, Rachel A.; Sculpher, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Background This review scopes the evidence on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of interventions to improve suboptimal use of medicines in order to determine the evidence gaps and help inform research priorities. Sources of data Systematic searches of the National Health Service (NHS) Economic Evaluation Database, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects. Areas of agreement The majority of the studies evaluated interventions to improve adherence, inappropriate prescribing and prescribing errors. Areas of controversy Interventions tend to be specific to a particular stage of the pathway and/or to a particular disease and have mostly been evaluated for their effect on intermediate or process outcomes. Growing points Medicines optimization offers an opportunity to improve health outcomes and efficiency of healthcare. Areas timely for developing research The available evidence is insufficient to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of interventions to address suboptimal medicine use in the UK NHS. Decision modelling, evidence synthesis and elicitation have the potential to address the evidence gaps and help prioritize research. PMID:25190760

  6. Qualitative methods: a research approach worth considering

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    has no explanation for. He/she observes the phenomenon and collects data about it to describe it-this is qualitative research. With enough information about the phenomenon the researcher can now formulate a hypothesis or hypotheses that can be tested through quantitative research. Qualitative research developed in the ...

  7. Sampling Methods in Clinical Research; an Educational Review

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Elfil; Ahmed Negida

    2017-01-01

    Clinical research usually involves patients with a certain disease or a condition. The generalizability of clinical research findings is based on multiple factors related to the internal and external validity of the research methods. The main methodological issue that influences the generalizability of clinical research findings is the sampling method. In this educational article, we are explaining the different sampling methods in clinical research.

  8. Statistical modeling methods to analyze the impacts of multiunit process variability on critical quality attributes of Chinese herbal medicine tablets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun F

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Fei Sun,1 Bing Xu,1,2 Yi Zhang,1 Shengyun Dai,1 Chan Yang,1 Xianglong Cui,1 Xinyuan Shi,1,2 Yanjiang Qiao1,2 1Research Center of Traditional Chinese Medicine Information Engineering, School of Chinese Materia Medica, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, 2Key Laboratory of Manufacture Process Control and Quality Evaluation of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The quality of Chinese herbal medicine tablets suffers from batch-to-batch variability due to a lack of manufacturing process understanding. In this paper, the Panax notoginseng saponins (PNS immediate release tablet was taken as the research subject. By defining the dissolution of five active pharmaceutical ingredients and the tablet tensile strength as critical quality attributes (CQAs, influences of both the manipulated process parameters introduced by an orthogonal experiment design and the intermediate granules’ properties on the CQAs were fully investigated by different chemometric methods, such as the partial least squares, the orthogonal projection to latent structures, and the multiblock partial least squares (MBPLS. By analyzing the loadings plots and variable importance in the projection indexes, the granule particle sizes and the minimal punch tip separation distance in tableting were identified as critical process parameters. Additionally, the MBPLS model suggested that the lubrication time in the final blending was also important in predicting tablet quality attributes. From the calculated block importance in the projection indexes, the tableting unit was confirmed to be the critical process unit of the manufacturing line. The results demonstrated that the combinatorial use of different multivariate modeling methods could help in understanding the complex process relationships as a whole. The output of this study can then be used to define a control strategy to improve the quality of the PNS immediate release tablet. Keywords: Panax

  9. Multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary, or dysfunctional? Team working in mixed-methods research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Cathain, Alicia; Murphy, Elizabeth; Nicholl, Jon

    2008-11-01

    Combining qualitative and quantitative methods in a single study-otherwise known as mixed-methods research-is common. In health research these projects can be delivered by research teams. A typical scenario, for example, involves medical sociologists delivering qualitative components and researchers from medicine or health economics delivering quantitative components. We undertook semistructured interviews with 20 researchers who had worked on mixed-methods studies in health services research to explore the facilitators of and barriers to exploiting the potential of this approach. Team working emerged as a key issue, with three models of team working apparent: multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary, and dysfunctional. Interdisciplinary research was associated with integration of data or findings from the qualitative and quantitative components in both the final reports and the peer-reviewed publications. Methodological respect between team members and a principal investigator who valued integration emerged as essential to achieving integrated research outcomes.

  10. A narrative method for consciousness research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, José-Luis

    2013-01-01

    Some types of first-person narrations of mental processes that constitute phenomenological accounts and texts, such as internal monolog statements, epitomize the best expressions and representations of human consciousness available and therefore may be used to model phenomenological streams of consciousness. The type of autonomous monolog in which an author or narrator declares actual mental processes in a think aloud manner seems particularly suitable for modeling streams of consciousness. A narrative method to extract and depict conscious processes, operations, contents, and states from an acceptable phenomenological text would require three subsequent steps: operational criteria for producing and/or selecting a phenomenological text, a system for detecting text items that are indicative of conscious contents and processes, and a procedure for representing such items in formal dynamic system devices such as Petri nets. The requirements and restrictions of each of these steps are presented, analyzed, and applied to phenomenological texts in the following manner: (1) the relevance of introspective language and narrative analyses to consciousness research and the idea that specific narratives are of paramount interest for such investigation is justified; (2) some of the obstacles and constraints to attain plausible consciousness inferences from narrative texts and the methodological requirements to extract and depict items relevant to consciousness contents and operations from a suitable phenomenological text are examined; (3) a preliminary exercise of the proposed method is used to analyze and chart a classical interior monolog excerpted from James Joyce’s Ulysses, a masterpiece of the stream-of-consciousness literary technique and, finally, (4) an inter-subjective evaluation for inter-observer agreement of mental attributions of another phenomenological text (an excerpt from the Intimate Journal of Miguel de Unamuno) is presented using some mathematical tools

  11. Methods for the study of endophytic microorganisms from traditional Chinese medicine plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li-Xing; Xu, Li-Hua; Jiang, Cheng-Lin

    2012-01-01

    Plant endophytes are very numerous and widely distributed in nature, their relationships being described as a balanced symbiotic continuum ranging from mutualism through commensalism to parasitism during a long period of coevolution. Traditional Chinese medicines have played a very important role in disease treatment in China and other Asian countries. Investigations show that these medicinal plants harbor endophytes with different kinds of ecological functions, and some of them have potential to produce bioactive small-molecule compounds. This chapter will focus on the selective isolation methods, the diversity of some endophytes (actinobacteria and fungi) isolated from Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) plants, and the bioactive compounds from selected endophytic actinobacteria reported in the past 3 years. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Calibration and intercomparison methods of dose calibrators used in nuclear medicine facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Alessandro Martins da

    1999-01-01

    Dose calibrators are used in most of the nuclear medicine facilities to determine the amount of radioactivity administered to a patient in a particular investigation or therapeutic procedure. It is therefore of vital importance that the equipment used presents good performance and is regular;y calibrated at a authorized laboratory. This occurs of adequate quality assurance procedures are carried out. Such quality control tests should be performed daily, other biannually or yearly, testing, for example, its accuracy and precision, the reproducibility and response linearity. In this work a commercial dose calibrator was calibrated with solution of radionuclides used in nuclear medicine. Simple instrument tests, such as response linearity and the response variation of the source volume increase at a constant source activity concentration, were performed. This instrument can now be used as a working standard for calibration of other dose calibrators/ An intercomparison procedure was proposed as a method of quality control of dose calibrators used in nuclear medicine facilities. (author)

  13. Application of photonuclear methods of analysis in biology, medicine, ecological studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burmistenko, Yu.N.

    1986-01-01

    Examples of application of photonuclear methods of analysis (PhMA) of the substance composition in biology, medicine, ecology are considered. The methods for determining the element composition of soft and bone tissues, blood, urine are developed. The results of studying the limits of determination of different elements are presented. In ecological investigations PhMA is applied for studying the composition of atmospheric aerosols, industrial sewage, canalization wastes, pollution of soil, plants, animals with toxic elements

  14. Directions and dilemmas in massage therapy research: a workshop report from the 2009 north american research conference on complementary and integrative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, Christopher A; Dryden, Trish; Shipwright, Stacey

    2009-06-29

    Massage therapy (MT) is widely used and expanding rapidly, but systematic research on its mechanisms and effects has, in contrast with many other therapeutic fields, a short history. To take stock of the current state of MT research and to explore approaches, directions, and strategies with the potential to make the next two decades of MT research optimally productive. The 2009 North American Research Conference on Complementary and Integrative Medicine held in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Using a modified Delphi method, the study authors led an interactive workshop that aimed to identify established MT research findings, needed MT research, weaknesses and limitations in currently available MT research, and directions to pursue in the next two decades of MT research. The thirty-seven conference attendees-including MT researchers, educators, and practitioners, and other health care practitioners who already work interprofessionally with MT-actively participated in the workshop and ensured that a diversity of perspectives were represented. The MT field has made rapid and laudable progress in its short history, but at the same time this short history is probably the main reason for most of the current shortcomings in MT research. Drawing on a diversity of backgrounds, workshop participants identified many opportunities and strategies for future research. Though lost time can never be recovered, the field's late start in research should not be allowed to be a demoralizing handicap to progress. Modern scientific methods and technologies, applied to the range of directions and dilemmas highlighted in this report, can lead to impressive progress in the next twenty years of MT research.

  15. Geographic trends in research output and citations in veterinary medicine: insight into global research capacity, species specialization, and interdisciplinary relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Mary M; Marusic, Ana

    2013-06-12

    Bibliographic data can be used to map the research quality and productivity of a discipline. We hypothesized that bibliographic data would identify geographic differences in research capacity, species specialization, and interdisciplinary relationships within the veterinary profession that corresponded with demographic and economic indices. Using the SCImago portal, we retrieved veterinary journal, article, and citation data in the Scopus database by year (1996-2011), region, country, and publication in species-specific journals (food animal, small animal, equine, miscellaneous), as designated by Scopus. In 2011, Scopus indexed 165 journals in the veterinary subject area, an increase from 111 in 1996. As a percentage of veterinary research output between 1996 and 2010, Western Europe and North America (US and Canada) together accounted for 60.9% of articles and 73.0% of citations. The number of veterinary articles increased from 8815 in 1996 to 19,077 in 2010 (net increase 66.6%). During this time, publications increased by 21.0% in Asia, 17.2% in Western Europe, and 17.0% in Latin America, led by Brazil, China, India, and Turkey. The United States had the highest number of articles in species-specific journals. As a percentage of regional output, the proportion of articles in small animal and equine journals was highest in North America and the proportion of articles in food animal journals was highest in Africa. Based on principal component analysis, total articles were highly correlated with gross domestic product (based on World Bank data). The proportion of articles in small animal and equine journals was associated with gross national income, research and development, and % urban population, as opposed to the proportion of food animal articles, agricultural output, and % rural population. Co-citations linked veterinary medicine with medicine in the United States, with basic sciences in Eastern Europe and the Far East, and with agriculture in most other

  16. Geographic trends in research output and citations in veterinary medicine: insight into global research capacity, species specialization, and interdisciplinary relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Bibliographic data can be used to map the research quality and productivity of a discipline. We hypothesized that bibliographic data would identify geographic differences in research capacity, species specialization, and interdisciplinary relationships within the veterinary profession that corresponded with demographic and economic indices. Results Using the SCImago portal, we retrieved veterinary journal, article, and citation data in the Scopus database by year (1996–2011), region, country, and publication in species-specific journals (food animal, small animal, equine, miscellaneous), as designated by Scopus. In 2011, Scopus indexed 165 journals in the veterinary subject area, an increase from 111 in 1996. As a percentage of veterinary research output between 1996 and 2010, Western Europe and North America (US and Canada) together accounted for 60.9% of articles and 73.0% of citations. The number of veterinary articles increased from 8815 in 1996 to 19,077 in 2010 (net increase 66.6%). During this time, publications increased by 21.0% in Asia, 17.2% in Western Europe, and 17.0% in Latin America, led by Brazil, China, India, and Turkey. The United States had the highest number of articles in species-specific journals. As a percentage of regional output, the proportion of articles in small animal and equine journals was highest in North America and the proportion of articles in food animal journals was highest in Africa. Based on principal component analysis, total articles were highly correlated with gross domestic product (based on World Bank data). The proportion of articles in small animal and equine journals was associated with gross national income, research and development, and % urban population, as opposed to the proportion of food animal articles, agricultural output, and % rural population. Co-citations linked veterinary medicine with medicine in the United States, with basic sciences in Eastern Europe and the Far East, and with agriculture

  17. Sex as a Biological Variable in Emergency Medicine Research and Clinical Practice: A Brief Narrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Alyson J; Beauchamp, Gillian A; Wira, Charles R; Perman, Sarah M; Safdar, Basmah

    2017-10-01

    The National Institutes of Health recently highlighted the significant role of sex as a biological variable (SABV) in research design, outcome and reproducibility, mandating that this variable be accounted for in all its funded research studies. This move has resulted in a rapidly increasing body of literature on SABV with important implications for changing the clinical practice of emergency medicine (EM). Translation of this new knowledge to the bedside requires an understanding of how sex-based research will ultimately impact patient care. We use three case-based scenarios in acute myocardial infarction, acute ischemic stroke and important considerations in pharmacologic therapy administration to highlight available data on SABV in evidence-based research to provide the EM community with an important foundation for future integration of patient sex in the delivery of emergency care as gaps in research are filled.

  18. [Research on collaborative innovation in traditional Chinese medicine of China based on patent cooperation network].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bei; Chen, Xiang-dong

    2015-03-01

    In the situation of global completion, collaborative innovation is becoming increasingly important because its advantage in risk avoiding and innovation efficiency. In order to explore the model of collaborative innovation and its evolution in traditional Chinese medicine of China, the cooperation in traditional Chinese medicine patents of China from 1985 to 2013 has been analyzed by using the method of scientometrics and social network analysis. It is proved that, though the number of grated cooperative patents has increased sharply during the last thirty years, the degree of cooperation innovation in traditional Chinese medicine of China is still not high. Moreover, in spite of the individual subject' s leading role in the past domestic collaborative innovation in traditional Chinese medicine of China, the institutions have been more and more powerful and achieved great improvement. At last, core institutions, represented by universities have played an important role in the collaborative innovation of domestic institutions, because they are key links between many institutions and promote the transferring and diffusion of knowledge.

  19. Spectroscopic methods in gas hydrate research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauh, Florian; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2012-01-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline structures comprising a guest molecule surrounded by a water cage, and are particularly relevant due to their natural occurrence in the deep sea and in permafrost areas. Low molecular weight molecules such as methane and carbon dioxide can be sequestered into that cage at suitable temperatures and pressures, facilitating the transition to the solid phase. While the composition and structure of gas hydrates appear to be well understood, their formation and dissociation mechanisms, along with the dynamics and kinetics associated with those processes, remain ambiguous. In order to take advantage of gas hydrates as an energy resource (e.g., methane hydrate), as a sequestration matrix in (for example) CO(2) storage, or for chemical energy conservation/storage, a more detailed molecular level understanding of their formation and dissociation processes, as well as the chemical, physical, and biological parameters that affect these processes, is required. Spectroscopic techniques appear to be most suitable for analyzing the structures of gas hydrates (sometimes in situ), thus providing access to such information across the electromagnetic spectrum. A variety of spectroscopic methods are currently used in gas hydrate research to determine the composition, structure, cage occupancy, guest molecule position, and binding/formation/dissociation mechanisms of the hydrate. To date, the most commonly applied techniques are Raman spectroscopy and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Diffraction methods such as neutron and X-ray diffraction are used to determine gas hydrate structures, and to study lattice expansions. Furthermore, UV-vis spectroscopic techniques and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have assisted in structural studies of gas hydrates. Most recently, waveguide-coupled mid-infrared spectroscopy in the 3-20 μm spectral range has demonstrated its value for in situ studies on the formation and dissociation of gas

  20. EU FP7 project 'CAMbrella' to build European research network for complementary and alternative medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weidenhammer, Wolfgang; Lewith, George; Falkenberg, Torkel

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The status of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) within the EU needs clarification. The definition and terminology of CAM is heterogeneous. The therapies, legal status, regulations and approaches used vary from country to country but there is widespread use by EU citizens...... governing CAM provision, and to explore the needs and attitudes of EU citizens with respect to CAM. Based on this information a roadmap will be created that will enable sustainable and prioritised future European research in CAM. CAMbrella encompasses 16 academic research groups from 12 European countries...... review open access publications and a final conference, with emphasis on current and future EU policies, addressing different target audiences....

  1. The determinants of traditional medicine use in Northern Tanzania: a mixed-methods study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W Stanifer

    Full Text Available Traditional medicines are an important part of healthcare in sub-Saharan Africa, and building successful disease treatment programs that are sensitive to traditional medicine practices will require an understanding of their current use and roles, including from a biomedical perspective. Therefore, we conducted a mixed-method study in Northern Tanzania in order to characterize the extent of and reasons for the use of traditional medicines among the general population so that we can better inform public health efforts in the region.Between December 2013 and June 2014 in Kilimanjaro, Tanzania, we conducted 5 focus group discussions and 27 in-depth interviews of key informants. The data from these sessions were analyzed using an inductive framework method with cultural insider-outsider coding. From these results, we developed a structured survey designed to test different aspects of traditional medicine use and administered it to a random sample of 655 adults from the community. The results were triangulated to explore converging and diverging themes.Most structured survey participants (68% reported knowing someone who frequently used traditional medicines, and the majority (56% reported using them themselves in the previous year. The most common uses were for symptomatic ailments (42%, chronic diseases (15%, reproductive problems (11%, and malaria/febrile illnesses (11%. We identified five major determinants for traditional medicine use in Northern Tanzania: biomedical healthcare delivery, credibility of traditional practices, strong cultural identities, individual health status, and disease understanding.In order to better formulate effective local disease management programs that are sensitive to TM practices, we described the determinants of TM use. Additionally, we found TM use to be high in Northern Tanzania and that its use is not limited to lower-income areas or rural settings. After symptomatic ailments, chronic diseases were reported as

  2. ASPECTS REGARDING NEUROMARKETING SPECIFIC RESEARCH METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIRELA-CRISTINA VOICU

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Information is one of the most important resources that a company must posses. Some informations are hidden deep in the black box - the mind of the consumer. Neuromarketing helps us find what is inside of the black box without troubling the consumer with questions that he doesn’t want to answer or that he can’t answer. Today because of an extensive research in mapping cortical and subcortical activity in association with behaviors and thoughts, the confidence in neurological data is growing. Thanks to discoveries in perceptual sciences we can identify the parts of the brain that are responsible for the phenomena that we experience daily. For all those interested in information obtained through neuromarketing techniques it becomes evident that there are corresponding neural substrates of consumer decision making process and these substrates can be observed, measured, and possibly manipulated. The following paper reveals some important aspects of the use of neuromarketing in studying consumer behavior by presenting the concepts, methods and techniques used under this sophisticated name, the limitations and advantages of using neuromarketing techniques and the importance of this type of information in decision making process at a company level.

  3. Writing Competitions as a New Research Method

    OpenAIRE

    Raija Warkentin

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this article is to introduce the international audience to writing competitions as a data collection method. Although commonly used in Finland this method is less known elsewhere. The article will use a Canada-wide writing competition on the Finnish-Canadian sauna as an example of this method. It compares and contrasts the method to two other more commonly used methods, interviewing and auto-ethnography. The advantages, disadvantages and challenges of this method are described and...

  4. Exploring Reticence in Research Methods: The Experience of Studying Psychological Research Methods in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsley, Barbara E.; Robertson, Julia M.

    2017-01-01

    As a fundamental element of any psychology degree, the teaching and learning of research methods is repeatedly brought into sharp focus, and it is often regarded as a real challenge by undergraduate students. The reasons for this are complex, but frequently attributed to an aversion of maths. To gain a more detailed understanding of students'…

  5. Quality assessment of clinical research on liver cancer treated by intra-arterial infusion of Chinese medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Xiao-Feng; Qiao, Cui-Xia; Liu, Qun; Chen, Zhe; Ling, Chang-Quan

    2014-11-01

    To assess the methodological quality of clinical research on Chinese medicine (CM) applied by intra-arterial infusion in treating primary liver cancer (PLC). Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PubMed, and three Chinese databases, including Chinese BioMedical Database (CBM), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) and China Academic Journal (VIP) were searched. Chinese articles were also searched manually in 16 journals. Two reviewers independently selected studies, the quality of literatures were assessed according to the Cochrane Collaboration method of quality assessment. A total of 14 articles met the inclusion criteria for this review. Only three of these articles described the randomization method used. None of the studies was blinded. All of the articles didn't report the calculation of the sample size. Only six studies mentioned adverse reactions. All of the studies were of grade C according to the Cochrane Collaboration method. Six studies reported results of survival, and only two of these reported better efficacy in the treatment groups. The quality of studies concerned intra-arterial infusion of CM in treating with PLC was poor and the exact effect of these medicines still need evaluation. Well designed RCTs with large sample sizes, adequate follow-up data and reliable methods of assessment are needed to better appraise the real effect of CMs in the treatment of PLC patients.

  6. Demystifying Mixed Methods Research Design: A Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Gail D. Caruth

    2013-01-01

    Mixed methods research evolved in response to the observed limitations of both quantitative and qualitative designs and is a more complex method. The purpose of this paper was to examine mixed methods research in an attempt to demystify the design thereby allowing those less familiar with its design an opportunity to utilize it in future research. A review of the literature revealed that it has been gaining acceptance among researchers, researchers have begun using mixed methods research, it ...

  7. Systematic review of emergency medicine clinical practice guidelines: Implications for research and policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, Arjun K; Savage, Dan; Sandefur, Benjamin; Bernard, Kenneth R; Rothenberg, Craig; Schuur, Jeremiah D

    2017-01-01

    Over 25 years, emergency medicine in the United States has amassed a large evidence base that has been systematically assessed and interpreted through ACEP Clinical Policies. While not previously studied in emergency medicine, prior work has shown that nearly half of all recommendations in medical specialty practice guidelines may be based on limited or inconclusive evidence. We sought to describe the proportion of clinical practice guideline recommendations in Emergency Medicine that are based upon expert opinion and low level evidence. Systematic review of clinical practice guidelines (Clinical Policies) published by the American College of Emergency Physicians from January 1990 to January 2016. Standardized data were abstracted from each Clinical Policy including the number and level of recommendations as well as the reported class of evidence. Primary outcomes were the proportion of Level C equivalent recommendations and Class III equivalent evidence. The primary analysis was limited to current Clinical Policies, while secondary analysis included all Clinical Policies. A total of 54 Clinical Policies including 421 recommendations and 2801 cited references, with an average of 7.8 recommendations and 52 references per guideline were included. Of 19 current Clinical Policies, 13 of 141 (9.2%) recommendations were Level A, 57 (40.4%) Level B, and 71 (50.4%) Level C. Of 845 references in current Clinical Policies, 67 (7.9%) were Class I, 272 (32.3%) Class II, and 506 (59.9%) Class III equivalent. Among all Clinical Policies, 200 (47.5%) recommendations were Level C equivalent, and 1371 (48.9%) of references were Class III equivalent. Emergency medicine clinical practice guidelines are largely based on lower classes of evidence and a majority of recommendations are expert opinion based. Emergency medicine appears to suffer from an evidence gap that should be prioritized in the national research agenda and considered by policymakers prior to developing future quality

  8. Comparative Effectiveness Research, Genomics-Enabled Personalized Medicine, and Rapid Learning Health Care: A Common Bond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsburg, Geoffrey S.; Kuderer, Nicole M.

    2012-01-01

    Despite stunning advances in our understanding of the genetics and the molecular basis for cancer, many patients with cancer are not yet receiving therapy tailored specifically to their tumor biology. The translation of these advances into clinical practice has been hindered, in part, by the lack of evidence for biomarkers supporting the personalized medicine approach. Most stakeholders agree that the translation of biomarkers into clinical care requires evidence of clinical utility. The highest level of evidence comes from randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs). However, in many instances, there may be no RCTs that are feasible for assessing the clinical utility of potentially valuable genomic biomarkers. In the absence of RCTs, evidence generation will require well-designed cohort studies for comparative effectiveness research (CER) that link detailed clinical information to tumor biology and genomic data. CER also uses systematic reviews, evidence-quality appraisal, and health outcomes research to provide a methodologic framework for assessing biologic patient subgroups. Rapid learning health care (RLHC) is a model in which diverse data are made available, ideally in a robust and real-time fashion, potentially facilitating CER and personalized medicine. Nonetheless, to realize the full potential of personalized care using RLHC requires advances in CER and biostatistics methodology and the development of interoperable informatics systems, which has been recognized by the National Cancer Institute's program for CER and personalized medicine. The integration of CER methodology and genomics linked to RLHC should enhance, expedite, and expand the evidence generation required for fully realizing personalized cancer care. PMID:23071236

  9. [Very high frequency ultrasound: New therapeutic method in aesthetic medicine and dermatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruglikov, I

    2015-11-01

    Very high frequency ultrasound (VHF-US) is new therapy method with a broad application spectrum in dermatology and aesthetic medicine. In this method, ultrasound waves with frequencies over 10 MHz, which were for a long time only used in ultrasound diagnostics, are applied for therapeutic purposes. Such US waves demonstrate specific biophysical efficiencies which warrant their application for the treatment of the skin efflorescences, chronic wounds and hypertrophic scars as well as in anti-aging and skin improvement procedures in aesthetic medicine. VHF-US can be applied not only for stand-alone treatments, but also as a supportive pre- and posttreatment method in combination with laser, radiofrequency currents, injection lipolysis, etc. as well as in aesthetic plastic surgery.

  10. Mexican medicinal plants with anxiolytic or antidepressant activity: Focus on preclinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Rubalcava, Carolina; Estrada-Camarena, Erika

    2016-06-20

    Anxiety and depression are considered the most prevalent psychiatric disorders worldwide. In Mexico, the use of medicinal plants to alleviate the symptoms associated with these psychiatric disorders is increasing. However, there is little scientific evidence that validates the efficacy of these plants. This evidence needs to be critically revised, and further studied to provided scientific support for their use. To identify the plants that are used in Mexico for the treatment of disorders related to anxiety and depression, and to review the current preclinical and when available, clinical information of these plants. We searched in scientific databases (Pubmed, Web of Science, Scopus and other web sources such as "Biblioteca digital de la medicina tradicional Mexicana" ) for Mexican plants used for the treatment of anxiety and depression that have been analyzed in preclinical studies. Additional information was obtained from published books. For this review, we also consider those plants used in Mexican traditional medicine for the treatment of "nervios," "susto" or "espanto;" common terms that describe symptoms related to anxiety and depression disorders. The bibliographic search identified 49 plants used in Mexican traditional medicine for the treatment of disorders related to anxiety and depression. From all these plants, 59% were analyzed in preclinical research, and only 8% were tested in clinical studies; only a few of these studies tried to elucidate their mechanism of action. In general, it is proposed that the plant extracts interact with the GABAergic system. However, only part of these studies attempted to analyze other neurotransmitter systems. Finally, in some cases, drug-herbal interactions were reported. There is a large number of Mexican medicinal plants used as a treatment for anxiety and depression disorders. Although some of these plants have been studied in preclinical research, in most cases these studies are preliminary, and the understanding

  11. Barred from better medicine? Reexamining regulatory barriers to the inclusion of prisoners in research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Elaine; Cauley, Jacqueline

    2017-01-01

    Abstract In 2015, President Obama announced plans for the Precision Medicine Initiative® (PMI), an ambitious longitudinal project aimed at revolutionizing medicine. Integral to this Initiative is the recruitment of over one million Americans into a volunteer research cohort, the All of UsSM Research Program. The announcement has generated much excitement but absent is a discussion of how the All of Us Research Program—to be implemented within the context of social realities of mass incarcerations and racial disparities in criminal justice and healthcare—might excaberate health disparities. We examine how attainment of Initiative's stated goals of reflecting the diversity of the American population and including all who are interested in participating might be impeded by regulatory and administrative barriers to the involvement of participants who become incarcerated during longitudinal studies. Changes have been proposed to the federal policy for human subjects research protections, but current regulations and administrative policies—developed under a protectionist paradigm in response to scandalous research practices with confined populations—dramatically limit research involving prisoners. Our review provides rationale for the development of Initiative policies that anticipate recruitment and retention obstacles that might frustrate inclusivity and exacerbate health disparities. Furthermore, we question the effective ban on biomedical and behavioral research involving prisoners and advocate for regulatory reforms that restore participatory research rights of prisoners. Disparities in health and justice are intertwined, and without regulatory reforms to facilitate participatory research rights of prisoners and careful planning of viable and responsible recruitment, engagement, and retention strategies, Initiative could miss discovery opportunities, exacerbate health disparities, and increase levels of distrust in science. PMID:28852561

  12. A Strategy To Advance the Evidence Base in Palliative Medicine: Formation of a Palliative Care Research Cooperative Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Noreen M.; Basch, Ethan; Bull, Janet; Cleeland, Charles S.; Currow, David C.; Fairclough, Diane; Hanson, Laura; Hauser, Joshua; Ko, Danielle; Lloyd, Linda; Morrison, R. Sean; Otis-Green, Shirley; Pantilat, Steve; Portenoy, Russell K.; Ritchie, Christine; Rocker, Graeme; Wheeler, Jane L.; Zafar, S. Yousuf; Kutner, Jean S.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Palliative medicine has made rapid progress in establishing its scientific and clinical legitimacy, yet the evidence base to support clinical practice remains deficient in both the quantity and quality of published studies. Historically, the conduct of research in palliative care populations has been impeded by multiple barriers including health care system fragmentation, small number and size of potential sites for recruitment, vulnerability of the population, perceptions of inappropriateness, ethical concerns, and gate-keeping. Methods A group of experienced investigators with backgrounds in palliative care research convened to consider developing a research cooperative group as a mechanism for generating high-quality evidence on prioritized, clinically relevant topics in palliative care. Results : The resulting Palliative Care Research Cooperative (PCRC) agreed on a set of core principles: active, interdisciplinary membership; commitment to shared research purposes; heterogeneity of participating sites; development of research capacity in participating sites; standardization of methodologies, such as consenting and data collection/management; agile response to research requests from government, industry, and investigators; focus on translation; education and training of future palliative care researchers; actionable results that can inform clinical practice and policy. Consensus was achieved on a first collaborative study, a randomized clinical trial of statin discontinuation versus continuation in patients with a prognosis of less than 6 months who are taking statins for primary or secondary prevention. This article describes the formation of the PCRC, highlighting processes and decisions taken to optimize the cooperative group's success. PMID:21105763

  13. Researching medicine in context: the Arts and Humanities Medical Scholars Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meites, E; Bein, S; Shafer, A

    2003-12-01

    In 2000, the Arts and Humanities Medical Scholars Program at Stanford University School of Medicine issued its first grants to medical students interested in researching an area of the medical arts or humanities in depth. To date, 34 projects have been funded, including renewals. The projects encompass a range of genres and topics, from a website on Asian American health and culture to an ethnographic study of women physicians in training in Spain. Two projects are highlighted here: an online history of medicine course and a poetry project. Students are mentored by faculty from a wide array of university departments and centres and submit completion documents to the committee overseeing the programme. Students are encouraged to present their work at conferences, such as the programme's annual symposium, as well as in publication or other appropriate formats. Future directions include integration with the scholarly concentrations initiative at the medical school.

  14. A new criterion of photostimulated luminescence (PSL) method to detect irradiated traditional Chinese medicinal herbs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Liwen; Lin, Tong; Jiang, Yingqiao; Bi, Fujun

    2013-01-01

    This work used a new criterion to analyze 162 varieties (222 batches) of traditional Chinese medicinal herbs based on the European Standard EN 13751 (2009. Foodstuffs—Detection of Irradiated Food Using Photostimulated Luminescence. European Committee for Standardization, Brussels, Belgium). The characteristics of PSL signals are described, and a new criterion is established. Compared to EN 13751, the new criterion uses clearer definition to evaluate instead of the ambiguous descriptions in EN Standard, such as “much greater than” and “within the same order of magnitude”. Moreover, the accuracy of the new criterion is as good as or better than EN Standard in regard to classifying irradiated and non-irradiated traditional Chinese medicinal herbs. It can help to avoid false positive result when a non-irradiated herb got a screening PSL measurement above 5000 counts/60 s. This new criterion of photostimulated luminescence method can be applied to identify the irradiation status of traditional Chinese medicinal herbs, even if the medicinal herbs were irradiated at a low dose (0.3 kGy) or stored in the dark at room temperature for 24 months after the irradiation treatment. - Highlights: • Clearer evaluation criterion instead of the ambiguous descriptions in EN 13751. • Accuracy satisfied. • Large sample size provides outstanding representativeness. • Systematical evaluation on PSL method

  15. Electronic strategies for information and research: cyberNephrology/cyberMedicine in the emerging world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solez, Kim; Hales, Michele; Katz, Sheila Moriber

    2005-09-01

    Communication and medicine have evolved together. Internet resources now provide an unprecedented opportunity to provide health assistance to the developing world. The International Society of Nephrology Informatics Commission and National Kidney Foundation cyberNephrology initiative (http://www.cybernephrology.org) have created e-mail discussion groups (e.g., NEPHROL, NEPHKIDS, and so forth) and online texts and web resources (e.g., the Schrier Atlas: http://www.kidneyatlas.org) that are, in many respects, ahead of other areas of medicine. On the other hand, nephrology is quite behind in its embrace of some specific communications initiatives that could benefit emerging nations: the Health InterNetwork Access to Research Initiative program, which provides free full-text access to medical journals and books in poorer countries; the Global Health Network Supercourse, which provides specially designed online lectures for the developing world; and Internet2/Abilene and similar research networks around the world, which provide reliable, guaranteed bandwidth for high-quality Internet videoconferencing as an alternative to face-to-face lectures and meetings. The intent of many educational ventures in nephrology, particularly in the clinical practice guideline realm (National Kidney Foundation Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative, Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes, and so forth), is not just to disseminate information but to change human behavior: physician practice and referral patterns, patient compliance, and so forth. Concepts from the worlds of marketing and entertainment, where the science of changing human behavior is highly evolved, can be used to create high-impact, educational offerings to promote health. They can also be highly beneficial to share Internet educational innovations and future vision across boundaries of medical specialties, which is part of the intent of the cyberMedicine joint venture (http://www.cyber-medicine.org).

  16. Writing Competitions as a New Research Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raija Warkentin

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this article is to introduce the international audience to writing competitions as a data collection method. Although commonly used in Finland this method is less known elsewhere. The article will use a Canada-wide writing competition on the Finnish-Canadian sauna as an example of this method. It compares and contrasts the method to two other more commonly used methods, interviewing and auto-ethnography. The advantages, disadvantages and challenges of this method are described and discussed. According to the author, a writing competition is a fast way of gathering a large amount of data from a wide geographical area.

  17. A Benchmark for Comparing Precision Medicine Methods in Thyroid Cancer Diagnosis using Tissue Microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ching-Wei; Lee, Yu-Ching; Calista, Evelyne; Zhou, Fan; Zhu, Hongtu; Suzuki, Ryohei; Komura, Daisuke; Ishikawa, Shumpei; Cheng, Shih-Ping

    2017-12-23

    The aim of precision medicine is to harness new knowledge and technology to optimize the timing and targeting of interventions for maximal therapeutic benefit. This study explores the possibility of building AI models without precise pixel-level annotation in prediction of the tumor size, extrathyroidal extension, Lymph node metastasis, cancer stage and BRAF mutation in thyroid cancer diagnosis, providing the patients' background information, histopathological and immunohistochemical tissue images. A novel framework for objective evaluation of automatic patient diagnosis algorithms has been established under the auspices of the IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging 2017 - A Grand Challenge for Tissue Microarray Analysis in Thyroid Cancer Diagnosis. Here, we present the datasets, methods and results of the challenge and lay down the principles for future uses of this benchmark. The main contributions of the challenge include the creation of the data repository of tissue microarrays, the creation of the clinical diagnosis classification data repository of thyroid cancer, and the definition of objective quantitative evaluation for comparison and ranking of the algorithms. With this benchmark, three automatic methods for predictions of the five clinical outcomes have been compared, and detailed quantitative evaluation results are presented in this paper. Based on the quantitative evaluation results, we believe automatic patient diagnosis is still a challenging and unsolved problem. The datasets and the evaluation software will be made available to the research community, further encouraging future developments in this field. (http://www-o.ntust.edu.tw/˜cvmi/ISBI2017/). cweiwang@mail.ntust.edu.tw. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  18. Sports medicine clinical trial research publications in academic medical journals between 1996 and 2005: an audit of the PubMed MEDLINE database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, A W

    2008-11-01

    To identify sports medicine-related clinical trial research articles in the PubMed MEDLINE database published between 1996 and 2005 and conduct a review and analysis of topics of research, experimental designs, journals of publication and the internationality of authorships. Sports medicine research is international in scope with improving study methodology and an evolution of topics. Structured review of articles identified in a search of a large electronic medical database. PubMed MEDLINE database. Sports medicine-related clinical research trials published between 1996 and 2005. Review and analysis of articles that meet inclusion criteria. Articles were examined for study topics, research methods, experimental subject characteristics, journal of publication, lead authors and journal countries of origin and language of publication. The search retrieved 414 articles, of which 379 (345 English language and 34 non-English language) met the inclusion criteria. The number of publications increased steadily during the study period. Randomised clinical trials were the most common study type and the "diagnosis, management and treatment of sports-related injuries and conditions" was the most popular study topic. The knee, ankle/foot and shoulder were the most frequent anatomical sites of study. Soccer players and runners were the favourite study subjects. The American Journal of Sports Medicine had the highest number of publications and shared the greatest international diversity of authorships with the British Journal of Sports Medicine. The USA, Australia, Germany and the UK produced a good number of the lead authorships. In all, 91% of articles and 88% of journals were published in English. Sports medicine-related research is internationally diverse, clinical trial publications are increasing and the sophistication of research design may be improving.

  19. Technical efficiency of Shiraz school of medicine in research and education domains: a data envelopment analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delavari, Somayeh; Rezaee, Rita; Hatam, Nahid; Delavari, Sajad

    2016-01-01

    Efficiency evaluation of universities and faculties is one of the tools that help managers to identify the departments' strengths and weakness. The main objective of the present research was to measure and compare the technical efficiency of Shiraz school of medicine departments using Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) technique. This cross-sectional and retrospective study was performed on clinical and non-clinical departments in research and education domains over the period of 2006 to 2011. Different inputs and outputs were considered for research and educational domain separately. Efficiency was measured based on the observed optimal performance. Findings showed that pathology and anatomy departments achieved the score of 100 in technical efficiency in education during 2006 to 2011. During this period, parasitology, psychiatric and pediatrics department's achieved the score of 100 for technical efficiency in research domain. The lowest mean of relative educational efficiency belonged to orthopedic department; as to relative research efficiency, the lowest mean was shown in orthopedics and genetics departments. The mean technical efficiency of non-medical departments in education and research domain was 91.93 and 76.08, respectively, while the mean technical efficiency of the clinical department in educational and research fields was 91.02 and 82.23, respectively. Using multiple input and output in DEA technique provided a comprehensive evaluation of efficiency in Shiraz school of medicine departments. The DEA could successfully estimate the technical efficiency of the departments in research and educational fields. Moreover, the deficiency in each department was found; this could help them to plan for improvement.

  20. Mixed-methods research in pharmacy practice: basics and beyond (part 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, Muhammad Abdul; Alldred, David Phillip; Closs, S José; Briggs, Michelle

    2013-10-01

    This is the first of two papers which explore the use of mixed-methods research in pharmacy practice. In an era of evidence-based medicine and policy, high-quality research evidence is essential for the development of effective pharmacist-led services. Over the past decade, the use of mixed-methods research has become increasingly common in healthcare, although to date its use has been relatively limited in pharmacy practice research. In this article, the basic concepts of mixed-methods research including its definition, typologies and advantages in relation to pharmacy practice research are discussed. Mixed-methods research brings together qualitative and quantitative methodologies within a single study to answer or understand a research problem. There are a number of mixed-methods designs available, but the selection of an appropriate design must always be dictated by the research question. Importantly, mixed-methods research should not be seen as a 'tool' to collect qualitative and quantitative data, rather there should be some degree of 'integration' between the two data sets. If conducted appropriately, mixed-methods research has the potential to generate quality research evidence by combining strengths and overcoming the respective limitations of qualitative and quantitative methodologies. © 2012 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  1. Handbook of Research Methods in Social and Personality Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Harry T.; Judd, Charles M.

    2000-03-01

    This volume provides an overview of research methods in contemporary social psychology. Coverage includes conceptual issues in research design, methods of research, and statistical approaches. Because the range of research methods available for social psychology have expanded extensively in the past decade, both traditional and innovative methods are presented. The goal is to introduce new and established researchers alike to new methodological developments in the field.

  2. [Ideas and methods on efficient screening of traditional medicines for anti-osteoporosis activity based on M-Act/Tox integrated evaluation using zebrafish].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mo; Ling, Jie; Chen, Ying; Song, Jie; Sun, E; Shi, Zi-Qi; Feng, Liang; Jia, Xiao-Bin; Wei, Ying-Jie

    2017-11-01

    The increasingly apparent liver injury problems of bone strengthening Chinese medicines have brought challenges for clinical application, and it is necessary to consider both effectiveness and safety in screening anti-osteoporosis Chinese medicines. Metabolic transformation is closely related to drug efficacy and toxicity, so it is significant to comprehensively consider metabolism-action/toxicity(M-Act/Tox) for screening anti-osteoporosis Chinese medicines. The current evaluation models and the number of compounds(including metabolites) severely restrict efficient screening in vivo. By referring to previous relevant research and domestic and abroad literature, zebrafish M-Act/Tox integrative method was put forward for efficiently screening anti-osteoporosis herb medicines, which has organically integrated zebrafish metabolism model, osteoporosis model and toxicity evaluation method. This method can break through the bottleneck and blind spots that trace compositions can't achieve efficient and integrated in vivo evaluation, and realize both efficient and comprehensive screening on anti-osteoporosis traditional medicines based on in vivo process taking both safety and effectiveness into account, which is significant to accelerate discovery of effective and safe innovative traditional Chinese medicines for osteoporosis. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  3. United States Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine: Warfighter Research Focusing on the Past 25 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    and pyridostigmine bromide were examined for their impact on thermoregulation and physical performance in hot and cold environments. Wearing CB-PC... thermoregulation and the ability to perform in hot or cold environments. Military nutrition research focused on evaluating the nutri- tional adequacy of...Army published official medical/performance doctrines for operations in the heat and cold and at high altitude. The current Global War on Terrorism

  4. Performance Data Report: Space Medicine Division, Human Research Program, Behavioural Health and Performance Research Element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Camille; Keeton, Kathryn E.; Schmidt, Lacey L.; Slack, Kelley J.; Patterson, Holly N.; Leveton, Lauren B.; Holland, Albert W.

    2012-01-01

    This report is the result of a collaborative effort between NASA?s Behavioral Health & Performance (BHP) Research and Operations Group to investigate and determine the availability of data pertaining to behavioral performance (and other pertinent variables) that have been collected by the laboratories at NASA?s Johnson Space Center. BHP?s Operations and Research groups collaborated to systematically identify what types of performance data are needed in relevant BHP performance domains and also to conduct structured interviews with NASA personnel to identify which data do or do not exist currently (and for instances where such data exist, to evaluate the type, quality, accessibility, and confidentiality of those data). The authors defined outcome categories of performance that encapsulate BHP performance domains, mapped BHP Research Risks and Gaps onto those performance outcome categories, and identified and prioritized indicators for each outcome category. The team identified key points of contact (subject matter experts [SMEs]) as potential interviewees, created a template for structured interview questions about sources and accessibility of performance data, and coordinated and conducted structured interviews with the SMEs. The methodology, results, and implications of this effort, as well as forward work needed, are discussed in this report.

  5. Discriminating Between Legitimate and Predatory Open Access Journals: Report from the International Federation for Emergency Medicine Research Committee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhakti Hansoti

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Open access (OA medical publishing is growing rapidly. While subscription-based publishing does not charge the author, OA does. This opens the door for “predatory” publishers who take authors’ money but provide no substantial peer review or indexing to truly disseminate research findings. Discriminating between predatory and legitimate OA publishers is difficult. Methods: We searched a number of library indexing databases that were available to us through the University of California, Irvine Libraries for journals in the field of emergency medicine (EM. Using criteria from Jeffrey Beall, University of Colorado librarian and an expert on predatory publishing, and the Research Committee of the International Federation for EM, we categorized EM journals as legitimate or likely predatory. Results: We identified 150 journal titles related to EM from all sources, 55 of which met our criteria for OA (37%, the rest subscription based. Of these 55, 25 (45% were likely to be predatory. We present lists of clearly legitimate OA journals, and, conversely, likely predatory ones. We present criteria a researcher can use to discriminate between the two. We present the indexing profiles of legitimate EM OA journals, to inform the researcher about degree of dissemination of research findings by journal. Conclusion: OA journals are proliferating rapidly. About half in EM are legitimate. The rest take substantial money from unsuspecting, usually junior, researchers and provide no value for true dissemination of findings. Researchers should be educated and aware of scam journals.

  6. Basic Research Methods for Librarians, Fifth Edition

    CERN Document Server

    Connaway, Lynn Silipigni

    2010-01-01

    Fifty-nine percent of the respondents to a 2000 survey reported that their master's programs had not adequately prepared them to conduct research, something that has not changed much in the ensuing decade. Yet, many library and information services (LIS) practitioners are routinely called upon to conducted job-related research. Where can they turn for the guidance they need?

  7. Debriefing Research Games : Context, Substance and Method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hoogen, J.; Lo, J.C.; Meijer, S.A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Debriefing is an intrinsic part of games for learning and proper
    debriefing can also be beneficial to research games. However, the literature
    on how to debrief research games is sparse and only provides the professional
    with an abstract topic guide.
    Aim. The purpose of

  8. Variation and Commonality in Phenomenographic Research Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerlind, Gerlese S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on the data analysis stage of phenomenographic research, elucidating what is involved in terms of both commonality and variation in accepted practice. The analysis stage of phenomenographic research is often not well understood. This paper helps to clarify the process, initially by collecting together in one location the more…

  9. A Method for Political Communication Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, George A.; And Others

    This paper suggests the applicability of metric multidimensional scaling for research within the political arena. Multidimensional scaling allows the researcher to simultaneously observe change and rates of change within the policy's attitudes toward the candidates and issues in election campaigns. Multidimensional scaling also reveals which…

  10. Cleveland Clinic's summer research program in reproductive medicine: an inside look at the class of 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durairajanayagam, Damayanthi; Kashou, Anthony H; Tatagari, Sindhuja; Vitale, Joseph; Cirenza, Caroline; Agarwal, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    The American Center for Reproductive Medicine's summer internship course in reproductive medicine and research at Cleveland Clinic is a rigorous, results-oriented annual program that began in 2008 to train both local and international students in the fundamentals of scientific research and writing. The foremost goal of the program is to encourage premedical and medical students to aspire toward a career as a physician-scientist. The internship provides participants with an opportunity to engage in original bench research and scientific writing while developing theoretical knowledge and soft skills. This study describes selected survey responses from interns who participated in the 2014 internship program. The objective of these surveys was to elicit the interns' perspective on the internship program, its strengths and weaknesses, and to obtain insight into potential areas for improvement. Questionnaires were structured around the five fundamental aspects of the program: 1) theoretical knowledge, 2) bench research, 3) scientific writing, 4) mentorship, and 5) soft skills. In addition, an exit survey gathered information on factors that attracted the interns to the program, communication with mentors, and overall impression of the research program. The opportunity to experience hands-on bench research and scientific writing, personalized mentorship, and the reputation of the institution were appreciated and ranked highly among the interns. Nearly 90% of the interns responded that the program was beneficial and well worth the time and effort invested by both interns and faculty. The outcomes portrayed in this study will be useful in the implementation of new programs or refinement of existing medical research training programs.

  11. Ethnoveterinary medicinal plants: Preparation and application methods by traditional healers in selected districts of southern Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gebremedhin Romha Eshetu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to document the ethnoveterinary medicinal plants, their preparation, and application methods used by traditional healers in treating different animal diseases, in four districts with different culture and languages in southern Ethiopia. Materials and Methods: Information of ethnoveterinary medicinal plants was obtained through in-depth direct interview with the local healers and field observations. A descriptive statistics was used to analyze the reported ethnoveterinary medicinal plants and associated indigenous knowledge. The informant consensus factor (ICF was calculated for each category of diseases to identify the agreements of the informants on the reported cures. Preference ranking was used to assess the degree of effectiveness of certain medicinal plants against most prevalent animal diseases in the area. Results: The healers had a very high intention to keep their traditional knowledge secrete and none of them was ready to transfer their knowledge either freely or on incentive bases to other people; they need to convey their knowledge only to their selected scions after getting very old. A total of 49 plant species used to treat 26 animal ailments were botanically classified and distributed into 34 families. The most commonly used plant parts for remedy preparations were leaves (38.8%, followed by whole roots (20.4%. Calpurnia aurea (Ait. Benth was the most preferred effective treatment against external parasite and skin problem, which is the most prevalent disease with the highest ICF (0.68. Conclusion: The study suggests that the community of the study districts depend largely on ethnoveterinary medicinal plants for the treatment of different animal ailments though the healers have a very high intention to keep their traditional knowledge secrete. Commonly reported plant species need to be tested for their antimicrobial activities in vitro and validated their active ingredients in order to recommend effective

  12. [Herbal textual research on Chinese medicine "Huangjing" (Polygonati Rhizoma)and some enlightenments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing-Jing; Si, Jin-Ping

    2018-02-01

    To clarify the change and development of the original plants, medicinal organs, traditional functions, resource distribution of "Huangjing"(Polygonati Rhizome), a traditional Chinese medicine, we investigated Polygonatum species on the ancient Chinese herbal texts. The name of "Nüwei" was first carried out in the book of Sheng Nong's Herbal Classic. Its effects included two aspects: one was similar to "Weirui"(Polygonati Odorati Rhizome, "Yuzhu"), that was tonifying, nourishing one's vitality, removing wind and dampness, settling five organs, making body lightness, keeping longevity and not being hungry; the second was alike to "Huangjing" recorded in the book of Ming Yi Bie Lu(Appendant Records of Famous Physicians). Specifically, "Weirui" possesses the therapeutic effect of "Nüwei", while "Huangjing" possesses the tonic effect of " Nüwei". Thereafter, the following ancient Chinese herbal texts kept those two names and function records. Accordingly, we hold the point of view that "Huangjing" was first carried out in the book of Sheng Nong's Herbal Classic in the synonym of "Nüwei". "Yuzhu" included the "Huangjing" in ancient herbal text before Qing Dynasty, that was further confirmed by the research on change and development of the original plants. The identification between "Yuzhu" and "Huangjing" was based on the shape of rhizome and size before early Tang Dynasty. The shape was a key character and used up to now, but size was not reasonable. The opposite phyllotaxy was an important character of authentic "Huangjing" from Tang to Qing Dynasty. The seedling of Polygonatum sibiricum and P. kingianum, the adult plant of P. cyrtonema with alternate leaves were misused as "Yuzhu"("Nüwei" and "Weirui") at that time. Therefore, both "Yuzhu" and "Huangjing" should be used as key words during the search of ancient prescriptions and development of new drugs and health foods. The leaves, flowers, fruits and seedlings could

  13. Participation in college laboratory research apprenticeships among students considering careers in medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothy A. Andriole

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We sought to determine the prevalence of college laboratory research apprenticeship (CLRA participation among students considering medical careers and to examine the relationship between CLRA participation and medical-school acceptance among students who applied to medical school. Methods: We used multivariate logistic regression to identify predictors of: 1 CLRA participation in a national cohort of 2001–2006 Pre-Medical College Admission Test (MCAT Questionnaire (PMQ respondents and 2 among those PMQ respondents who subsequently applied to medical school, medical-school acceptance by June 2013, reporting adjusted odds ratios (aOR and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI. Results: Of 213,497 PMQ respondents in the study sample (81.2% of all 262,813 PMQ respondents in 2001–2006, 72,797 (34.1% reported CLRA participation. Each of under-represented minorities in medicine (URM race/ethnicity (vs. white, aOR: 1.04; 95% CI: 1.01–1.06, Asian/Pacific Islander race/ethnicity (vs. white, aOR: 1.20; 95% CI: 1.17–1.22, and high school summer laboratory research apprenticeship (HSLRA participation (aOR: 3.95; 95% CI: 3.84–4.07 predicted a greater likelihood of CLRA participation. Of the 213,497 PMQ respondents in the study sample, 144,473 (67.7% had applied to medical school and 87,368 (60.5% of 144,473 medical-school applicants had been accepted to medical school. Each of female gender (vs. male, aOR: 1.19; 95% CI: 1.16–1.22, URM race/ethnicity (vs. white, aOR: 3.91; 95% CI: 3.75–4.08, HSLRA participation (aOR: 1.11; 95% CI: 1.03–1.19, CLRA participation (aOR: 1.12; 95% CI: 1.09–1.15, college summer academic enrichment program participation (aOR: 1.26; 95% CI: 1.21–1.31, and higher MCAT score (per point increase, aOR: 1.31; 95% CI: 1.30–1.31 predicted a greater likelihood of medical-school acceptance. Conclusions: About one-third of all PMQ respondents had participated in CLRAs prior to taking the MCAT, and such participation

  14. Radioactive isotopes in clinical medicine and research. Final Programme and Abstracts Book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergmann, H.; Dudczak, R.; Markt, B.

    2002-01-01

    The 25 th symposium offers again a representative cross-section through the current topics of nuclear medicine of scientific interest. The general theme of research in nuclear medicine has shifted from the spectacular new developments which were so often reported in the first symposia to a less spectacular, nevertheless equally fruitful, consolidation period. The topics of the symposium reflect the major trends in nuclear medicine, witnessing the firm place which PET procedures have occupied in clinical practice. Standardization and validation is another area which has remained as a major task for the development of our specialty and which in spite of the enormous progress that has been made during the past two years still is far from a general solution. Networking, even between heterogeneous systems, has become less of a problem than it used to be a few years ago. However, new and more complex acquisition technology such as needed for quantitation in scintigraphy and for multi-modality imaging, is still a challenge for integration and for PACS systems. (author)

  15. Translating cell-based regenerative medicines from research to successful products: challenges and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayon, Yves; Vertès, Alain A; Ronfard, Vincent; Egloff, Matthieu; Snykers, Sarah; Salinas, Gabriella Franco; Thomas, Robert; Girling, Alan; Lilford, Richard; Clermont, Gaelle; Kemp, Paul

    2014-08-01

    The Tissue Engineering & Regenerative Medicine International Society-Europe (TERMIS-EU) Industry Committee as well as its TERMIS-Americas (AM) counterpart intend to address the specific challenges and needs facing the industry in translating academic research into commercial products. Over the last 3 years, the TERMIS-EU Industry Committee has worked with commercial bodies to deliver programs that encourage academics to liaise with industry in proactive collaborations. The TERMIS-EU 2013 Industry Symposium aimed to build on this commercial agenda by focusing on two topics: Operations Management (How to move a process into the good manufacturing practice [GMP] environment) and Clinical Translation (Moving a GMP process into robust trials). These topics were introduced by providing the synergistic business perspective of partnering between the multiple regenerative medicine stakeholders, throughout the life cycle of product development. Seven industry leaders were invited to share their experience, expertise, and strategies. Due to the complex nature of regenerative medicine products, partnering for their successful commercial development seems inevitable to overcome all obstacles by sharing experiences and expertise of all stakeholders. When ideally implemented, the "innovation quotient" of a virtual team resulting from the combination of internal and external project teams can be maximized through maximizing the three main dimensions: core competences, technology portfolio, and alliance management.

  16. Mapping the Iranian Research Literature in the Field of Traditional Medicine in Scopus Database 2010-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    GhaedAmini, Hossein; Okhovati, Maryam; Zare, Morteza; Saghafi, Zahra; Bazrafshan, Azam; GhaedAmini, Alireza; GhaedAmini, Mohammadreza

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to provide research and collaboration overview of Iranian research efforts in the field of traditional medicine during 2010-2014. This is a bibliometric study using the Scopus database as data source, using search affiliation address relevant to traditional medicine and Iran as the search strategy. Subject and geographical overlay maps were also applied to visualize the network activities of the Iranian authors. Highly cited articles (citations >10) were further explored to highlight the impact of research domains more specifically. About 3,683 articles were published by Iranian authors in Scopus database. The compound annual growth rate of Iranian publications was 0.14% during 2010-2014. Tehran University of Medical Sciences (932 articles), Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (404 articles) and Tabriz Islamic Medical University (391 articles), were the leading institutions in the field of traditional medicine. Medicinal plants (72%), digestive system's disease (21%), basics of traditional medicine (13%), mental disorders (8%) were the major research topics. United States (7%), Netherlands (3%), and Canada (2.6%) were the most important collaborators of Iranian authors. Iranian research efforts in the field of traditional medicine have been increased slightly over the last years. Yet, joint multi-disciplinary collaborations are needed to cover inadequately described areas of traditional medicine in the country.

  17. TAI CHI CHUAN: STATE OF THE ART IN INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH: VOL 52 (MEDICINE & SPORT SCIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youlian Hong

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available DESCRIPTION This collection on the latest and practical research data about the characteristics and beneficial effects of Tai Chi Chuan on various physiological and pathological matters is published as the 52nd volume of Medicine and Sport Science Journal. PURPOSE To address the effects of Tai Chi Chuan in the fields of biomechanics and physiology, sensory motor control and fall prevention, psychology and social aspects, as well as various clinical applications. FEATURES The book is organised into four sections, each containing four to seven chapters: the first section focuses on biomechanical and physiological aspects of Tai Chi in seven chapters, the second section addresses the benefits of the sport in terms of sensory motor control and fall prevention in five chapters, the third section highlights the psychological and social aspects in four chapters, and in the last section the application of Tai Chi in clinical intervention such as in Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's diseases, coronary heart disease, chronic heart failure, breast cancer, rheumatoid arthritis and diabetes is demonstrated in six chapters. AUDIENCE This is a thorough reference book for students, researchers, teachers and healthcare professionals in exercise science and medicine. In fact, anyone already practicing Tai Chi Chuan or considering it up would benefit from this book. ASSESSMENT This 52nd volume of Medicine and Sport Science Journal on Tai Chi Chuan is a valuable and essential source of information brought together by recognized researchers around the Globe. The book is for everybody who is interested in understanding the effects and application of this fascinating form of exercise which has been developed as a form of martial arts and used for health exercise for centuries in China.

  18. Methodology in diagnostic laboratory test research in clinical chemistry and clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumbreras-Lacarra, Blanca; Ramos-Rincón, José Manuel; Hernández-Aguado, Ildefonso

    2004-03-01

    The application of epidemiologic principles to clinical diagnosis has been less developed than in other clinical areas. Knowledge of the main flaws affecting diagnostic laboratory test research is the first step for improving its quality. We assessed the methodologic aspects of articles on laboratory tests. We included articles that estimated indexes of diagnostic accuracy (sensitivity and specificity) and were published in Clinical Chemistry or Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine in 1996, 2001, and 2002. Clinical Chemistry has paid special attention to this field of research since 1996 by publishing recommendations, checklists, and reviews. Articles were identified through electronic searches in Medline. The strategy combined the Mesh term "sensitivity and specificity" (exploded) with the text words "specificity", "false negative", and "accuracy". We examined adherence to seven methodologic criteria used in the study by Reid et al. (JAMA1995;274:645-51) of papers published in general medical journals. Three observers evaluated each article independently. Seventy-nine articles fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The percentage of studies that satisfied each criterion improved from 1996 to 2002. Substantial improvement was observed in reporting of the statistical uncertainty of indices of diagnostic accuracy, in criteria based on clinical information from the study population (spectrum composition), and in avoidance of workup bias. Analytical reproducibility was reported frequently (68%), whereas information about indeterminate results was rarely provided. The mean number of methodologic criteria satisfied showed a statistically significant increase over the 3 years in Clinical Chemistry but not in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine. The methodologic quality of the articles on diagnostic test research published in Clinical Chemistry and Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine is comparable to the quality observed in the best general medical journals

  19. Electrocardiography interpretation training in emergency medicine: methods, resources, competency assessment, and national standardization

    OpenAIRE

    Özel, Betül Akbuğa; Demircan, Ahmet; Keleş, Ayfer; Bildik, Fikret; Özel, Deniz; Ergin, Mehmet; Günaydin, Gül Pamukçu

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s). The aim of this study was to evaluate the status of electrocardiography (ECG) training in emergency medicine residency programs in Turkey, and the attitude of the program representatives towards standardization of such training. Methods. This investigation was planned as a cross-sectional study. An 18-item questionnaire was distributed to directors of residency programs. Responses were evaluated using SPSS (v.16.0), and analyzed using the chi-square test. Results. Thirty...

  20. A review on reporting guidelines of clinical research in evidence based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xing; Wang, Gui-qian; Xie, Yan-ming

    2015-07-01

    Good clinical practice should be based on evidence. Evidence quality should be based on critical appraisal in evidence based medicine (EBM). Evaluation of evidence quality plays an important role in evidence level clarifying, which is the core of EBM. Different recommendations for clinical practice often derive from evidence levels. Thus evidence quality evaluation is the first and most important step in EBM. There are lots of standards to evaluate evidence quality in the world. However there are two aspects of the evaluation, one is methodological evaluation and the other is reporting evaluation. This article collected a series of standards for clinical trials quality evaluation according to different research designs. It is hoped that the resource and introduction about the quality evaluation of clinical trials be helpful for medical researchers in China. Only being familiar with all kinds of standards of methodology and reporting, researchers could publish high quality scientific papers.