WorldWideScience

Sample records for medicine in art

  1. Contemporary art in medicine: the Cleveland Clinic art collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Fine art is good medicine. It comforts, elevates the spirit, and affirms life and hope. Art in the healthcare setting, combined with outstanding care and service, creates an environment that encourages healing and supports the work of medical professionals. As one of the world’s great medical centers, Cleveland Clinic has always included the arts in its healing environment. The four founders and subsequent leadership encouraged artistic and musical expression by employees. Distinguished artworks have long hung on the walls. In 1983, an Aesthetics Committee was officially formed at Cleveland Clinic to address issues of art and design in Cleveland Clinic facilities. PMID:24282686

  2. [The art of therapy in Islamic medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masić, I

    1997-01-01

    History is a witness of the great importance and influence of islamic science from the period of "Golden Age of Arabic Civilisation". A famous scientist said: "Sciences has no country, it is international; we all share in fruits of investigations of people from different traditions and all ages." Scientists from the early period of islamic era had set fire of a stream of man's thought and progress, observation, experiments and tradition, that have become a weapon of modern science. All of that was based upon Quran and Hadiths, that have been their guidelines when setting free human mind from taboos. Medieval Arabian scientists have followed the words of Holly Prophet Mohammad s.a.v.s., saying that searching for knowledge have had to be the most important task for people, and that ink more saint than blood of the saints. These attitudes of Holly Prophet have awaken desire for studying with muslim scientists. The result of that desire became a key of scientific progress. There are many worldwide famous arabian scientists: El-Kindi, Er-Razi, Ibn Sina, El-Biruni, Ibu Hajsem, Ez-Zahravi, El-Farabi, Ibn Zuhr, Ibn Ruzd etc. These names, among several hundreds of arabian physicians, attribute "Golden Age" of islamic science. That period was characterised by movements, reprocessing of ideas. That reprocessing of ideas has gained the great minds together, and that process is continuous. That is why we have to be grateful to them. Famous Muslim physicians defined medicine as skill that dealt in keeping good health, coped with ills and health recovering. They have also modified many Greek writings and established basic principles of the art of medicine. What is significant is that, regardless of historical past and modern technical and technological presence, these principles are still accurate for understanding of medical science. These principles are what the author is discussing in detail in this paper about.

  3. [The Greek art of medicine in Rome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindekleiv, Haakon

    2005-06-30

    The term "ancient medicine" is often perceived as tantamount to Greek medicine, as most medical writings from the classical period originate in Greece. These texts later became the basis of Western medical thought. Even though the Romans adopted Greek medicine, it continued to be alien to them; they persisted with their practical approach to medicine alongside the Greeks' more theoretical view. This article deals with how Romans reacted to the invasion of Greek doctors, and how this is portrayed by contemporary Roman authors, especially Pliny and Celsus.

  4. Art, Anatomy, and Medicine: Is There a Place for Art in Medical Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Lawrence T. O.; Evans, Darrell J. R.

    2014-01-01

    For many years art, anatomy and medicine have shared a close relationship, as demonstrated by Leonardo da Vinci's anatomical drawings and Andreas Vesalius' groundbreaking illustrated anatomical textbook from the 16th century. However, in the modern day, can art truly play an important role in medical education? Studies have suggested that art can…

  5. Arts and Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Azmeh, Zeina Hazem; Du, Xiangyun

    2018-01-01

    The paper describes the design, delivery and student engagement with a course on Medicine and the Arts offered at a College of Medicine in a Middle Eastern country. The paper shows how the course tries to provide students with the knowledge, skills and attitudes to develop an appreciation...... for the Arts, and an understanding of their connection to medicine. Literature shows that such an understanding contributes to sharpening students’ social skills, highlighting focus on the humane aspects of medical practice, and linking professional and ethical behavior with an understanding of human essence...... to disease, death and dying, pain, empathy, and influence the way in which they practice medicine, manage their own emotions, and communicate with patients. 2) Honed their critical thinking skills, creative aptitudes and emotional intelligence. 3) Helped them appreciate the move beyond the binaries that have...

  6. Art, anatomy, and medicine: Is there a place for art in medical education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Lawrence T O; Evans, Darrell J R

    2014-01-01

    For many years art, anatomy and medicine have shared a close relationship, as demonstrated by Leonardo da Vinci's anatomical drawings and Andreas Vesalius' groundbreaking illustrated anatomical textbook from the 16th century. However, in the modern day, can art truly play an important role in medical education? Studies have suggested that art can be utilized to teach observational skills in medical students, a skill that is integral to patient examination but seldom taught directly within medical curricula. This article is a subjective survey that evaluates a student selected component (SSC) that explored the uses of art in medicine and investigates student perception on the relationship between the two. It also investigates whether these medical students believe that art can play a role in medical education, and more specifically whether analyzing art can play a role in developing observational skills in clinicians. An "Art in Medicine" 8-week course was delivered to first year medical students at Brighton and Sussex Medical School. The use of art to improve observational skills was a core theme throughout. Feedback from the students suggests that they believe a strong association between art and medicine exists. It also showed a strong perception that art could play a role in medical education, and more specifically through analyzing art to positively develop clinical observational skills. The results of this subjective study, together with those from research from elsewhere, suggest that an art-based approach to teaching observational skills may be worth serious consideration for inclusion in medical and other healthcare curricula. © 2014 American Association of Anatomists.

  7. Oropharyngeal leprosy in art, history, and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scollard, D M; Skinsnes, O K

    1999-04-01

    Advanced lesions of the face, nasopharynx, and oropharynx have played an important role in the medical and social history of Hansen's disease. Renaissance artists included detailed portrayals of these lesions in some of their paintings, a testimony not only to their artistic skill and powers of observation but also to the common presence of these patients in European cities and towns of the period. The disease is now understood as a broad immunologic spectrum of host responses to Mycobacterium leprae, with a variety of clinical and pathologic manifestations in nerve, soft tissues, and bone. This review incorporates the findings of 2 extraordinary studies (one from Europe and the other from Japan) of pharyngeal and facial lesions. In the 1950s, studies of skeletal remains from the churchyard of a Danish leprosarium revealed a triad of maxillofacial lesions unique to leprosy and designated facies leprosa. In pre-World War II Japan, before effective treatment had been discovered, a prominent otorhinolaryngologist studying oropharyngeal and nasopharyngeal lesions prepared watercolor illustrations of the natural progression of untreated Hansen's disease. As a result of effective antimicrobial therapy, such advanced lesions are now rarely seen, but the presenting signs and symptoms of leprosy still occasionally arise in the nasal and oral mucosa. The nasopharynx and oropharynx may be important early sites of inoculation and infection by M leprae, and they require additional emphasis in worldwide efforts toward early diagnosis and treatment of Hansen's disease.

  8. Internal medicine, art and science in the third millennium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz C, Félix

    2013-02-01

    Internal medicine, art and science in the third millennium is a statement that Medicine is not only science. It acts on the sick individual to reestablish a natural state as a curative art. Medical art, commissioned by an individual or a society, is service. It requires vocation to obtain satisfaction. However due to the incidence of value changes, market globalization, technological and industrial development, the patient/physician relationship is becoming a user/provider relationship. Physician-related factors such as a higher health care demand, resource shortage and a progressive specialization have also influenced this change of paradigm. This is causing dissatisfaction, loss of self-esteem and a lower ethical commitment among professionals. We need to recover a professional repertoire of ideas in the context of a global ethics. Responsibility and co-responsibility are ethical principles addressed to technological civilizations and their collateral effects on people and environment that lead to a "responsible globalization". We also need a scientific futurology to define risks and avoid errors. In this era of progressive specialization, Internal Medicine, with its holistic vision of mankind, may play a fundamental role in the field of bioethics.

  9. Incorporating the Arts and Humanities in Palliative Medicine Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Lucille R.

    2006-01-01

    The arts and humanities allow the teaching of palliative medicine to come alive by exploring what is often regarded as the most frightening outcome of the illness experience--death and dying. Palliative medicine focuses on the relief of suffering, but how can suffering be understood if the story of the patient is not told through prose, poetry,…

  10. TEACHING VALUES IN MEDICINE VIA AWARENESS CREATED THROUGH ART.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, George H

    2016-01-01

    The design of a new medical education building sought through art to create awareness of important values in physicians. An antique silk embroidery depicting Aesculapius crowning a man charged to protect the medical profession from quackery is placed at the beginning of the space leading into the simulation laboratories to highlight the importance of competency. A charcoal drawing by an important regional artist conveys the message that trust can arise from vulnerability, with optimal mentoring being the outcome. A round table with an authentic French Art Deco lantern and a commissioned table designed as an interpretation of the lantern create the sense of importance that fosters critical thinking and professionalism. An outdoor terrace was designed to challenge residents and medical students to become in touch with their capacity for humanism in medicine. Included among the various elements to nurture this core value are an outdoor classroom, conversation gardens, open spaces under plane trees (which are within the family of trees under which Hippocrates taught), and a reflection cove (reminiscent of those sought by poets who travelled to Ravello, Italy, in an attempt to find the meaning of life). The major focal point on the terrace is a commissioned Dale Chihuly sculpture of red reeds intended to encourage art as a form of healing and as a source of humanism.

  11. [Art and medicine, history of an encounter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borde, Frédéric

    2010-01-01

    Art has always been linked to healthcare and medicine: at the beginning of time, art was considered to be therapeutic. Over time, the dominance of religion and then the development of sciences and medicine deprived art of its therapeutic role, before it was reintroduced in the 19th century, with the rapid development of psychiatry. Today, art has found a new place in healthcare.

  12. The state of the art in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, A.M.

    1999-01-01

    Recent improvements in the understanding of the physiologic and biologic mechanisms of health and disease have led to an expansion of nuclear medicine applications both in clinical studies and research. Advances in radiopharmaceutical development, instrumentation and computer processing have resulted in the implementation of Positron Emission Tomography for clinical studies, and improved treatments with radiopharmaceuticals particularly in cancer patients. There has also been a dramatic increase in the techniques available with nuclear medicine to detect and measure cellular biologic events in-vivo, which have important implications in clinical and basic science research. Nuclear medicine studies provide unique information on human physiology and remain an integral part of clinical medicine practice

  13. The state of the art in diagnostic nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, A.M.; University of Melbourne, VIC

    2001-01-01

    Recent improvements in the understanding of the physiologic and biologic mechanisms of health and disease have led to an expansion of nuclear medicine applications both in clinical studies and research. Advances in radiopharmaceutical development, instrumentation and computer processing have resulted in the implementation of Positron Emission Tomography for clinical studies, and improved treatments with radiopharmaceuticals particularly in cancer patients. There has also been an dramatic increase in the techniques available with nuclear medicine to detect and measure cellular biologic events in-vivo, which have important implications in clinical and basic science research. Nuclear medicine studies provide unique information on human physiology and remain an integral part of clinical medicine practice

  14. Art Portraying Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koski, Kaisu

    2011-01-01

    A number of art projects are currently tackling the medical domain. This activity stems from a perceived need to increase the transparency and democracy of the medical domain, and it often questions the power relations and the one-dimensionality in current medical practices. This article sheds light on how artists process medical themes,…

  15. State of the art: stem cells in equine regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, M J; Jarazo, J

    2015-03-01

    According to Greek mythology, Prometheus' liver grew back nightly after it was removed each day by an eagle as punishment for giving mankind fire. Hence, contrary to popular belief, the concept of tissue and organ regeneration is not new. In the early 20th century, cell culture and ex vivo organ preservation studies by Alexis Carrel, some with famed aviator Charles Lindbergh, established a foundation for much of modern regenerative medicine. While early beliefs and discoveries foreshadowed significant accomplishments in regenerative medicine, advances in knowledge within numerous scientific disciplines, as well as nano- and micromolecular level imaging and detection technologies, have contributed to explosive advances over the last 20 years. Virtually limitless preparations, combinations and applications of the 3 major components of regenerative medicine, namely cells, biomaterials and bioactive molecules, have created a new paradigm of future therapeutic options for most species. It is increasingly clear, however, that despite significant parallels among and within species, there is no 'one-size-fits-all' regenerative therapy. Likewise, a panacea has yet to be discovered that completely reverses the consequences of time, trauma and disease. Nonetheless, there is no question that the promise and potential of regenerative medicine have forever altered medical practices. The horse is a relative newcomer to regenerative medicine applications, yet there is already a large body of work to incorporate novel regenerative therapies into standard care. This review focuses on the current state and potential future of stem cells in equine regenerative medicine. © 2014 EVJ Ltd.

  16. Science and the art of case reporting in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramono, Laurentius A

    2013-10-01

    The case report is one type of article published in medical journals. Not all case reports can be published. Case reports worth publishing are case reports that have good teaching points and good clinical messages. Writing case reports need academic and clinical skills, along with a taste of art to interest readers to read and study about the case we report. Case reports are expected to be a good tool to all clinicians to build their clinical reasoning and sharpen their clinical instincts.

  17. The state of the art of nuclear medicine in 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamat, S.R.

    1982-01-01

    The second congress of World Federation of Nuclear Medicine and Biology proved that nuclear medicine is returning to physiology. Around 1951, when motorized detector was introduced and when GM tube was replaced by scintillation crystal detector, physiologic nuclear medicine moved to anatomic nuclear medicine. Since 1970, when research on cardiology developed, nuclear medicine has been returning to physiology. Since 1963 Kuhl has been doing research on quantitative tomography which develops to emission computerized tomography emphasizing the physiological aspects of medicine. The recent contribution of nuclear medicine to medical science is the concept that human body is a unity of dynamic structure consisting of millions of cubes moving physio-chemically. (RUW)

  18. The art of medicine: arts-based training in observation and mindfulness for fostering the empathic response in medical residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazulak, Joyce; Sanaee, May; Frolic, Andrea; Knibb, Nicole; Tesluk, Eve; Hughes, Edward; Grierson, Lawrence E M

    2017-09-01

    Empathy is an essential attribute for medical professionals. Yet, evidence indicates that medical learners' empathy levels decline dramatically during medical school. Training in evidence-based observation and mindfulness has the potential to bolster the acquisition and demonstration of empathic behaviours for medical learners. In this prospective cohort study, we explore the impact of a course in arts-based visual literacy and mindfulness practice ( Art of Seeing ) on the empathic response of medical residents engaged in obstetrics and gynaecology and family medicine training. Following this multifaceted arts-based programme that integrates the facilitated viewing of art and dance, art-making, and mindfulness-based practices into a practitioner-patient context, 15 resident trainees completed the previously validated Interpersonal Reactivity Index, Compassion, and Mindfulness Scales. Fourteen participants also participated in semistructured interviews that probed their perceived impacts of the programme on their empathic clinical practice. The results indicated that programme participants improved in the Mindfulness Scale domains related to self-confidence and communication relative to a group of control participants following the arts-based programme. However, the majority of the psychometric measures did not reveal differences between groups over the duration of the programme. Importantly, thematic qualitative analysis of the interview data revealed that the programme had a positive impact on the participants' perceived empathy towards colleagues and patients and on the perception of personal and professional well-being. The study concludes that a multifaceted arts-based curriculum focusing on evidence-based observation and mindfulness is a useful tool in bolstering the empathic response, improving communication, and fostering professional well-being among medical residents. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already

  19. [What can art contribute to medicine?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oderwald, Arko; Schrover, Wouter

    2011-01-01

    Art is often used as a medical therapy, or in medical education for the students' all-round development. In this article we discuss whether there is a scientific basis for this use of art. We conclude that though it is true that on a number of points there does seem to be scientific evidence more research is necessary to really be able to speak of an important role for the use of art in medicine.

  20. The effects of arts-in-medicine programming on the medical-surgical work environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonke, Jill; Pesata, Virginia; Arce, Lauren; Carytsas, Ferol P.; Zemina, Kristen; Jokisch, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Background: Arts in medicine programs have significant impacts on patients and staff in long-term care environments, but the literature lacks evidence of effectiveness on hospital units with shorter average lengths of stay. Methods: The qualitative study used individual structured interviews to assess the impacts of arts programming on job satisfaction, stress, unit culture, support, quality of care, and patient outcomes on a short-term medical-surgical unit, and used a qualitative cross comparison grounded theory methodology to analyze data. Results: The study confirmed that arts programming can positively affect unit culture, nursing practice, and quality of care on short-stay medical-surgical units. Significant insights related to nursing practice and the art program were found, including that music can cause negative distraction for staff. Conclusions: While positive impacts of arts programming on the medical-surgical environment are clear, potential negative effects also need to be considered in the development of practice protocols for artists. PMID:25544861

  1. The Art and Science of Learning, Teaching, and Delivering Feedback in Psychosomatic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokko, Hermioni N; Gatchel, Jennifer R; Becker, Madeleine A; Stern, Theodore A

    2016-01-01

    The teaching and learning of psychosomatic medicine has evolved with the better understanding of effective teaching methods and feedback delivery in medicine and psychiatry. We sought to review the variety of teaching methods used in psychosomatic medicine, to present principles of adult learning (and how these theories can be applied to students of psychosomatic medicine), and to discuss the role of effective feedback delivery in the process of teaching and learning psychosomatic medicine. In addition to drawing on the clinical and teaching experiences of the authors of the paper, we reviewed the literature on teaching methods, adult learning theories, and effective feedback delivery methods in medicine to draw parallels for psychosomatic medicine education. We provide a review of teaching methods that have been employed to teach psychosomatic medicine over the past few decades. We outline examples of educational methods using the affective, behavioral, and cognitive domains. We provide examples of learning styles together with the principles of adult learning theory and how they can be applied to psychosomatic medicine learners. We discuss barriers to feedback delivery and offer suggestions as to how to give feedback to trainees on a psychosomatic medicine service. The art of teaching psychosomatic medicine is dynamic and will continue to evolve with advances in the field. Psychosomatic medicine educators must familiarize themselves with learning domains, learning styles, and principles of adult learning in order to be impactful. Effective feedback delivery methods are critical to fostering a robust learning environment for psychosomatic medicine. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The arts and medicine: a challenging relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macneill, Paul Ulhas

    2011-12-01

    This paper discusses various justifications for including medical humanities and art in healthcare education. It expresses concern about portrayals of the humanities and art as benign and servile in relation to medicine and the health professions. An alternative is for the humanities to take a more active role within medical education by challenging the assumptions and myths of the predominant biomedical model. Another is to challenge quiescent notions of the arts by examining examples of recent provocative work and, to this end, the paper considers the work of performance artists Stelarc and Orlan who have subjected their bodies to modifications and extensions. Their work challenges, and potentially undermines, conceptions of the body, medicine, and humanity's relationship with technology. Similarly, other artists, working with biological cultures, have raised controversial issues. Recent work of this kind defies easy understanding and resists being pressed into the service of medicine and other health professions for educational purposes by opening up topics for exploration and discussion without providing unitary explanatory frameworks. The paper goes on to discuss the implications for medical education if this is the approach to the arts and humanities in healthcare education. It suggests that there needs to be a shift in the foundational assumptions of medicine if the arts and humanities are to contribute more fully.

  3. Researching medicine in context: the Arts and Humanities Medical Scholars Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meites, E; Bein, S; Shafer, A

    2003-12-01

    In 2000, the Arts and Humanities Medical Scholars Program at Stanford University School of Medicine issued its first grants to medical students interested in researching an area of the medical arts or humanities in depth. To date, 34 projects have been funded, including renewals. The projects encompass a range of genres and topics, from a website on Asian American health and culture to an ethnographic study of women physicians in training in Spain. Two projects are highlighted here: an online history of medicine course and a poetry project. Students are mentored by faculty from a wide array of university departments and centres and submit completion documents to the committee overseeing the programme. Students are encouraged to present their work at conferences, such as the programme's annual symposium, as well as in publication or other appropriate formats. Future directions include integration with the scholarly concentrations initiative at the medical school.

  4. Nanomedicine applications in orthopedic medicine: state of the art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazaheri, Mozhdeh; Eslahi, Niloofar; Ordikhani, Farideh; Tamjid, Elnaz; Simchi, Abdolreza

    2015-01-01

    The technological and clinical need for orthopedic replacement materials has led to significant advances in the field of nanomedicine, which embraces the breadth of nanotechnology from pharmacological agents and surface modification through to regulation and toxicology. A variety of nanostructures with unique chemical, physical, and biological properties have been engineered to improve the functionality and reliability of implantable medical devices. However, mimicking living bone tissue is still a challenge. The scope of this review is to highlight the most recent accomplishments and trends in designing nanomaterials and their applications in orthopedics with an outline on future directions and challenges. PMID:26451110

  5. The state of the art in therapeutic nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, B.J.

    2001-01-01

    Radionuclide therapy can be curative or palliative in intent, and local or systemic in administration. Current therapy relies of beta emitting radioisotopes and selective carriers for the treatment of advanced tumours. The next generation of therapeutics may be alpha emitting radionuclides for subclinical, micrometastatic disease. Targeted Alpha therapy (TAT) offers the potential to inhibit the growth of micrometastases by selectively killing isolated and preangiogenic clusters of cancer cells. The practicality and efficacy of TAT has been tested by in vitro and in vivo studies many cancers. The first phase 1 clinical trial of TAT for leukaemia with Bi-213 has concluded at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, a phase 1 and 2 trial of intra-lesional TAT is ongoing at Duke University with At-211 labeled Mab against cystic glioma, and a phase 1 and 2 clinical trial for intra-lesional TAT with Bi-213 of subcutaneous secondary melanoma is underway at St George Hospital

  6. [Humor in Medicine - The Art of Leaping Over the Shadows].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Barbara

    2017-12-01

    Humor and laughter are integral parts of human life and communication - and so of course they occur in medical contacts.Humor is defined as a personality based cognitive emotional style of processing situations, characterized by the ability to find positive aspects even in negative situations, and the ability to communicate this point of view to others and to cheer them up. Humor can support healing processes and coping with illness. Humor and jokes reduce anxiety and stress (for patients and doctors). Humorous people have a more realistic, flexible and less fearful behaviour. Humor helps to overcome negative experience. Humor can help the patient to gain new views towards the disease and a healthy distance towards occurring symptoms. Humor improves the relationship between patient and doctor. But beware: jokes can also be used to express fears, aggression or shame. Therefore it is worthwhile to listen carefully to what patients want to express. Humor reduces the risk of burnout. In contact with patients, it is important to give their humor room, to use it and respond to it, more than making jokes. Humor can be trained. Humor training and creation of a humorous atmosphere in health care facilities should also be supported by health insurance funds, institutions' sponsors and public authorities. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Art-making in a family medicine clerkship: how does it affect medical student empathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potash, Jordan S; Chen, Julie Y; Lam, Cindy L K; Chau, Vivian T W

    2014-11-28

    To provide patient-centred holistic care, doctors must possess good interpersonal and empathic skills. Medical schools traditionally adopt a skills-based approach to such training but creative engagement with the arts has also been effective. A novel arts-based approach may help medical students develop empathic understanding of patients and thus contribute to medical students' transformative process into compassionate doctors. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of an arts-making workshop on medical student empathy. This was a mixed-method quantitative-qualitative study. In the 2011-12 academic year, all 161 third year medical students at the University of Hong Kong were randomly allocated into either an arts-making workshop or a problem-solving workshop during the Family Medicine clerkship according to a centrally-set timetable. Students in the arts-making workshop wrote a poem, created artwork and completed a reflective essay while students in the conventional workshop problem-solved clinical cases and wrote a case commentary. All students who agreed to participate in the study completed a measure of empathy for medical students, the Jefferson Scale of Empathy (JSE) (student version), at the start and end of the clerkship. Quantitative data analysis: Paired t-test and repeated measures ANOVA was used to compare the change within and between groups respectively. Qualitative data analysis: Two researchers independently chose representational narratives based on criteria adapted from art therapy. The final 20 works were agreed upon by consensus and thematically analysed using a grounded theory approach. The level of empathy declined in both groups over time, but with no statistically significant differences between groups. For JSE items relating to emotional influence on medical decision making, participants in the arts-making workshop changed more than those in the problem-solving workshop. From the qualitative data, students perceived benefits in arts

  8. Nuclear medicine - the state of the art of nuclear medicine in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, H.A.E.; Schoot, J.B. van der

    1991-01-01

    The present proceedings of the European Nuclear Medicine Congress 1990 contain the opening addresses and the oral presentations of the meeting. The topics were as follows: Methods and basics (52 papers), cardiology (12 papers), neurology (13 papers), pulmonology (2 papers), gastroenterology (9 papers), nephrology (7 papers), osteology (8 papers), endocrinology (7 papers), pediatrics (5 papers), and oncology (12 papers). An author index and a subject index is found as a supplement to these proceedings. (MG) With 182 figs., 92 tabs

  9. Nuclear medicine - the state of the art of nuclear medicine in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, H.A.E. (Evangelisches Krankenhaus Bethesda Gemeinnuetzige GmbH, Duisburg (Germany, F.R.). Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik); Schoot, J.B. van der (Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands). Nuclear Medicine Dept.)

    1991-01-01

    The present proceedings of the European Nuclear Medicine Congress 1990 contain the opening addresses and the oral presentations of the meeting. The topics were as follows: Methods and basics (52 papers), cardiology (12 papers), neurology (13 papers), pulmonology (2 papers), gastroenterology (9 papers), nephrology (7 papers), osteology (8 papers), endocrinology (7 papers), pediatrics (5 papers), and oncology (12 papers). An author index and a subject index is found as a supplement to these proceedings. (MG) With 182 figs., 92 tabs.

  10. On fiction, art and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Sarah

    2014-12-01

    This is a deliberately eclectic and eccentric meditation on some of the connections between writing fiction, academic research in the history of medicine and the practice of medicine. The essay discusses creativity in research and writing, suggesting comparisons with the instincts of experienced clinicians, and explains the author's interest in women's entry to the medical profession. There is the suggestion of parallels between artists' models and surgical patients in late 19th century British culture. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. Capturing the 'art' of emergency medicine: Does film foster reflection in medical students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Gabrielle; Wise, Steve; Siddiqui, Zarrin S; Celenza, Antonio; Fatovich, Daniel M

    2017-08-01

    Integrating arts and humanities-based pedagogy into curricula is of growing interest among medical educators, particularly how it promotes reflection and empathy. Our aim was to explore whether a 2.50 min film titled 'The Art of the ED' stimulated reflective learning processes in a group of first year medical students. The film was shown prior to their first clinical placement in an ED. Student participation was voluntary and not assessable. Using an exploratory qualitative research approach, this study drew on data collected from students' individual written reflections, exploring their perceptions towards clinical experience in an emergency medicine (EM) attachment. A total of 123 (51% of 240) students submitted a reflection. The qualitative data revealed three main themes: the opportunity for students to preview EM ('While watching the film, I felt like I was the patient and the doctor all at once, in that I was living the experience both from within and as an observer …'); exposed the reality of ED; and fostered a growing awareness of the fragility of human life. These findings highlight how visual methodologies (like film) create a safe, non-threatening space to access, experience and process emotion around their perceptions towards EM, and to anticipate and emotionally prepare for their impending clinical experience in the ED. These data support the use of visual methodologies to foster reflective processes that assist medical students to integrate the 'art' of EM, and the development and commitment of core doctoring values of empathy, service and respect for patients. © 2017 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  12. Medicine and art: facial palsy depicted in archaic Greek art on Crete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirsig, W; Helidonis, E; Velegrakis, G

    1995-01-01

    A small earthenware statuette was evacuated from the votive-depot of acropolis of Gortys, an ancient town in South-Crete/Greece. This ex-voto is dated approximately 7th to 6th century BC and very probably represents some symptoms of a stroke, especially the left facial palsy and the contracture of the left arm. Since the Minoan time until today, people of Crete have been offering ex-votos to gods or saints to ask for help in specific diseases.

  13. [The way for carrying medicine and its containers (VII): "Packaging art in the Edo Period (1600-1867)"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, A

    1992-01-01

    A metallic phial with screw cap and an Inro containing 6 glass phials were used as medicine containers for carrying medicines in the Edo period. These samples are exhibited at "Mizutani Inro Collection", which is famous for having a lot of Inro in Hyogo, Japan. On packaging art for medicines, there were two streams in the Edo period. The one is to use tight containers for carrying medicines which were brought from Western Europe and the other is to use well closed containers for crude drugs which were traditionally used in our country and China. These containers are chosen reasonably in accordance with a kind of medicine.

  14. A program to interest medical students in Changhua, Taiwan in the incorporation of visual arts in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, K T; Lin, C C; Chang, L Y

    2011-12-01

    Visual arts have been used to facilitate the teaching of the United States Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competencies used in some countries. Some medical students may not appreciate the usefulness of incorporating arts in medical education. Therefore, arts programs that can interest medical students are necessary. We initiated and evaluated a visual arts program at the Changhua Christian Hospital in Changhua, Taiwan, with an aim to give the students a short review of visual arts and to interest them in the incorporation of arts in medicine. A total of 110 students in clerkship or internship participated in a visual arts program with emphasis on medicine-related visual arts. Content analysis of the data from the notes made by the instructor from direct observation of students; descriptions during discussions and the written feedback from students at the end of the program was used to evaluate the effect of the program. Anonymous questionnaires were also used for self-assessment of students. Qualitative analysis of the data revealed that the course was interesting to students. Themes emerged including its helpfulness to students in interpreting paintings, enhanced empathy, increased cultural awareness, enhanced observational skills, better team work, listening and communication skills and reduced stress. Ratings on the questionnaire showed similar results. Moreover, students had an increase in their confidence and desire to interpret paintings. The structured visual arts program, with emphasis on medicine-related visual arts and other humanities subjects, was able to attract the attention of medical students. It might be helpful to improve the required skills of ACGME competencies, but further studies are needed to support these conclusions.

  15. Visualising the body in art and medicine: a visual art course for medical students at King's College Hospital in 1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Kathy

    2002-11-01

    For many centuries science and art have been studied as completely separate disciplines, and career paths likewise, have diverged. However, in recent years there has been a renewed cultural interest in art/science collaborations, coupled with the perception that a medical education which did not embrace the humanities 'tended to brutalize and dehumanize' (Weatherall, British Medical Journal 309 (1994) 1671-1672) future doctors. It was against this background of the growth of multi-disciplinary collaborative projects and a dissatisfaction with an 'incomplete' medical education, that an opportunity arose for a visual arts course to be set up at a London teaching hospital in 1999. The following dialogue sets out to explore the difficulties, the great joys and the emotions generated by a 'Special Study Module' created by both artists and clinicians.

  16. Performing arts medicine with a focus on Relevé in Dancers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietveld, A.B.M.

    2017-01-01

    -      Het onderwerp van dit proefschrift is Dans- en Muziekgeneeskunde (Performing Arts Medicine). De nadruk ligt op "relevé": het op de tenen (niet op “spitzen”) staan bij dansers. 30% van de dansers heeft symptomatische hyperpronatie (inrollen van de voeten), die goed reageert op

  17. From art to science: a new epistemological status for medicine? On expectations regarding personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesing, Urban

    2017-12-20

    Personalized medicine plays an important role in the development of current medicine. Among the numerous statements regarding the future of personalized medicine, some can be found that accord medicine a new scientific status. Medicine will be transformed from an art to a science due to personalized medicine. This prognosis is supported by references to models of historical developments. The article examines what is meant by this prognosis, what consequences it entails, and how feasible it is. It refers to the long tradition of epistemological thinking in medicine and the use of historical models for the development of medicine. The possible answers to the question "art or science" are systematized with respect to the core question about the relationship between knowledge and action. The prediction for medicine to develop from an 'empirical healing art' to a 'rational, molecular science' is nonsensical from an epistemological point of view. The historical models employed to substantiate the development of personalized medicine are questionable.

  18. State-of-the-art or the art of medicine? Transnational mobility and perceptions of multiple biomedicines among Nigerian physicians in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schühle, Judith

    2018-03-01

    Over the last 40 years, several thousand Nigerian-trained doctors have migrated to the U.S. to practice in what they regard as the state-of-the-art of global biomedicine. Based on interviews with Nigerian physicians, this article shows how their professional mobility, and their transition to the new professional environment of U.S. biomedicine, makes them aware of local differences in practicing medicine. Adapting to local ways of practicing in the U.S. creates a new sense of belonging and professional identity. Yet they also juxtapose highly technologised U.S. biomedicine with what they were trained to excel in within the medical profession in Nigeria - namely the 'art of medicine' - that is, possessing profound clinical skills to diagnose with few investigative technologies. By stressing their competence in the art of medicine, which they see as lacking among their U.S.-trained colleagues, they negotiate their position in a global biomedical landscape and reconnect to a distinctly Nigerian way of practicing medicine. Their narratives thus shed light on perceptions of multiple biomedicines from the point of view of physicians moving from the global South to the global North, and how within a global biomedical landscape both ruptures and connectivities of competence are imagined.

  19. TAI CHI CHUAN: STATE OF THE ART IN INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH: VOL 52 (MEDICINE & SPORT SCIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youlian Hong

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available DESCRIPTION This collection on the latest and practical research data about the characteristics and beneficial effects of Tai Chi Chuan on various physiological and pathological matters is published as the 52nd volume of Medicine and Sport Science Journal. PURPOSE To address the effects of Tai Chi Chuan in the fields of biomechanics and physiology, sensory motor control and fall prevention, psychology and social aspects, as well as various clinical applications. FEATURES The book is organised into four sections, each containing four to seven chapters: the first section focuses on biomechanical and physiological aspects of Tai Chi in seven chapters, the second section addresses the benefits of the sport in terms of sensory motor control and fall prevention in five chapters, the third section highlights the psychological and social aspects in four chapters, and in the last section the application of Tai Chi in clinical intervention such as in Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's diseases, coronary heart disease, chronic heart failure, breast cancer, rheumatoid arthritis and diabetes is demonstrated in six chapters. AUDIENCE This is a thorough reference book for students, researchers, teachers and healthcare professionals in exercise science and medicine. In fact, anyone already practicing Tai Chi Chuan or considering it up would benefit from this book. ASSESSMENT This 52nd volume of Medicine and Sport Science Journal on Tai Chi Chuan is a valuable and essential source of information brought together by recognized researchers around the Globe. The book is for everybody who is interested in understanding the effects and application of this fascinating form of exercise which has been developed as a form of martial arts and used for health exercise for centuries in China.

  20. Martial arts sports medicine: current issues and competition event coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishime, Robert S

    2007-06-01

    More sports medicine professionals are becoming actively involved in the care of the martial arts athlete. Although there are many different forms of martial arts practiced worldwide, certain styles have shown a potential for increased participation in competitive-type events. Further research is needed to better understand the prevalence and profiles of injuries sustained in martial arts full-contact competitive events. Breaking down the martial art techniques into basic concepts of striking, grappling, and submission maneuvers, including choking and joint locking, may facilitate better understanding and management of injuries. This article outlines this approach and reviews the commonly encountered injuries and problems during martial arts full-contact competitions.

  1. Running the "Medicine Line": Images of the Border in Contemporary Native American Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Kate

    2011-01-01

    In this article the author is concerned with the intersection of two congruent phenomena: (1) an increasing number of references to borders in contemporary Native American art; and (2) an increasing occurrence of border-rights conflicts between Native nations and the governments of the United States and Canada. Focusing on the period roughly 1990…

  2. TAI CHI CHUAN: STATE OF THE ART IN INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH: VOL 52 (MEDICINE & SPORT SCIENCE)

    OpenAIRE

    Youlian Hong

    2008-01-01

    DESCRIPTION This collection on the latest and practical research data about the characteristics and beneficial effects of Tai Chi Chuan on various physiological and pathological matters is published as the 52nd volume of Medicine and Sport Science Journal. PURPOSE To address the effects of Tai Chi Chuan in the fields of biomechanics and physiology, sensory motor control and fall prevention, psychology and social aspects, as well as various clinical applications. FEATURES The book is organised...

  3. Gender perspective in occupational medicine and workplace risk assessment: state of the art and research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protano, C; Magrini, A; Vitali, M; Sernia, S

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the current situation and the research agenda in the field of gender differences, both generically in the occupational settings and in the specific activity of risk assessment. Gender is a key determinant of health; the evaluation of documents and scientific literature shows increasing attention to a gender oriented approach, as demonstrated by the development of Gender Medicine, actually cross-oriented in all medical specialties, the publication of books dedicated to this topic and the birth of "ad hoc" new scientific societies and journals. Even today, however, the gender differences are not considered as they should in the context of health disciplines, including occupational medicine. In this respect, in fact, the critical issues to be overcome are numerous, such as the phenomena of "segregation", the exposure to risk factors and their effects, related also to non-professional, socio-cultural features that differentiate male and female workers. All these factors can lead to situations of inequality in health. In fact, the European directives on safety at work repeatedly highlight the attention to gender differences in prevention, assessment and management of risks. In this regard, the European Agency for Safety and Health at Work advocates an approach "more sensitive" to gender in all the processes of assessment and risk management, from the research of all potential sources of risk to the decision-making processes, in order to address the prevention of risks in a holistic manner.

  4. Performing arts medicine: the musical athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarrier, N F

    1993-02-01

    Musicians and dancers in the performing arts place abnormal stresses on their musculoskeletal systems, resulting in overuse injuries. The purpose of this paper is to address the factors contributing to musculoskeletal injuries sustained by musicians. Recommendations for evaluative procedures, treatment, and education in dealing with the needs of this population are discussed.

  5. ECAT ART - a continuously rotating PET camera: performance characteristics, initial clinical studies, and installation considerations in a nuclear medicine department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, D.L.; Young, H.; Bloomfield, P.M.; Meikle, S.R.; Glass, D.; Myers, M.J.; Spinks, T.J.; Watson, C.C.; Luk, P.; Peters, A.M.; Jones, T.

    1997-01-01

    Advances in image reconstruction techniques have permitted the development of a commercial, rotating, partial ring, fully 3D scanner, the ECAT ART. The system has less than one-half the number of bismuth germanate detectors compared with a full ring scanner with the equivalent field of view, resulting in reduced capital cost. The performance characteristics, implications for installation in a nuclear medicine department, and clinical utility of the scanner are presented in this report. The sensitivity (20 cm diameter x 20 cm long cylindrical phantom, no scatter correction) is 11400 cps.kBq -1 .ml -1 . This compares with 5800 and 40500 cps.kBq -1 .ml -1 in 2D and 3D respectively for the equivalent full ring scanner (ECAT EXACT). With an energy window of 350-650 keV the maximum noise equivalent count (NEC) rate was 27 kcps at a radioactivity concentration of ∝15 kBq .ml -1 in the cylinder. Spatial resolution is ∝6 mm full width at half maximum on axis degrading to just under 8 mm at a distance of 20 cm off axis. Installation and use within the nuclear medicine department does not appreciably increase background levels of radiation on gamma cameras in adjacent rooms and the dose rate to an operator in the same room is 2 μSv .h -1 for a typical fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) study with an initial injected activity of 370 MBq. The scanner has been used for clinical imaging with 18 F-FDG for neurological and oncological applications. Its novel use for imaging iron-52 transferrin for localising erythropoietic activity demonstrates its sensitivity and resolution advantages over a conventional dual-headed gamma camera. The ECAT ART provides a viable alternative to conventional full ring PET scanners without compromising the performance required for clinical PET imaging. (orig.). With 9 figs., 3 tabs

  6. COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE AND MEDICAL EDUCATION IN GEORGIA: STATE OF THE ART AND FURTHER PERSPECTIVES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadareishvili, I; Lunze, K; Pkhakadze, G; Japiashvili, N; Tabagari, N

    2017-12-01

    Aim - complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is popular in Georgia, but providers' training not well understood or regulated. The aim of this mixed-methods study was to inform the process of implementing quality CAM curricula in Georgia and strategies for the inclusion of effective CAM curricula into medical education in Georgia. We analyzed existing medical curricula. We conducted a contextual analysis based of qualitative data collected from relevant medical education experts, qualified physicians, CAM practitioners and other stakeholders; and administered a quantitative MD students' survey to MD students. CAM components are currently not represented in medical curricula in Georgia. Physicians largely lack adequate knowledge of CAM and its practice. All stakeholders supported that it would be beneficial to develop CAM educatory courses, both to future practitioners (medical students, initially as an elective subject) and practicing physicians (through CME). We recommend development/integration of an elective subject and/or a curricular component as a first step of CAM integration into the medical curricula in Georgia for MD students and CME courses for physicians. Interdisciplinary and international collaborations may help achieve best outcome, and safe practice of CAM in Georgia, forming a base for physician - CAM practitioner collaborations for quality care for patients in Georgia.

  7. Gender and sex manifestations in hysteria across medicine and the arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmytriw, Adam A

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of hysteria has existed for at least four-thousand years, with roots in the ancient Greek word hysterikos, referring to diseases of the womb. In the sixteenth-century medical discourses, female hysteria was caused by excess pollution of the womb, with fluids that were labelled 'female sperm' as the probable cause. In the work of Shakespeare, there is a reference to hysterica passio, a term used by King Lear to self-diagnose his affliction. Shakespeare shows how a disease associated with women, and the 'wandering womb' phenomenon could have been spoken of in an associative way. At this time, there is a transformation of the nature of hysteria from a neurological consequence of the sick womb, to sexual deviance. Portrayals of the male deviant would evolve by the Victorian era, concurrent with the diagnosis of 'spermatorrhea'. There are very direct correspondences between the hysteria of spermatorrhea and the notion in Western medicine of the direct links between female hysteria and too much or not enough sexual energy release. Hysteria in both sexes was famously diagnosed and catalogued by Jean-Martin Charcot at the end of the nineteenth century. By the twentieth century, hysteria was also depicted as a disorder of gender as well as sexuality.

  8. Liquid xenon in nuclear medicine: state-of-the-art and the PETALO approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrario, P.

    2018-01-01

    Liquid xenon has several attractive features, which make it suitable for applications to nuclear medicine, such as high scintillation yield and fast scintillation decay time, better than currently used crystals. Since the '90s, several attempts have been made to build Positron Emission Tomography scanners based on liquid xenon, which can be divided into two different approaches: on one hand, the detection of the ionization charge in TPCs, and, on the other one, the detection of scintillation light with photomultipliers. PETALO (Positron Emission Tof Apparatus with Liquid xenOn) is a novel concept, which combines liquid xenon scintillating cells and silicon photomultipliers for the readout. A first Monte Carlo investigation has pointed out that this technology would provide an excellent intrinsic time resolution, which makes it possible to measure the Time-Of-Flight with high efficiency. Also, the transparency of liquid xenon to UV and blue wavelengths opens the possibility of exploiting both scintillation and Cherenkov light for a high-sensitivity TOF-PET.

  9. Painters and patients: how art informs medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wear, D

    1991-01-01

    This essay describes three movements in art--impressionism, cubism, and abstract expressionism--and how artists within each movement differed in their portrayal of reality. With this background, the author proposes that inquiry into the motives and methods of artists within each movement may help in our understanding of how a person experiences, interprets, and portrays reality. This, in turn, may translate into a recognition of the multiplicity of perspectives and the uniqueness of each patient's lived experience of his or her illness and that the doctor's vantage point on reality may not mesh with that of the patient.

  10. [Art-chance and art-experience in classical Greece].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Deokjin

    2011-06-30

    In Classical Greece, works defining the nature of art appeared in the various disciplines like medicine, rhetoric, dietetics, architecture and painting. Hippocratic authors tried to show that an art of medicine existed indeed. They contrasted the concept of art with that of chance, not experience that Plato and Aristotle distinguished from art. In fact there are similarities and discrepancies between Hippocratic epistemology and Platoic epistemology. Hippocratic authors maintained that the products of chance were not captured by art. They distinguished the domain of art charactered by explanatory knowledge and prediction from the domain of chance ruled by the unexplained and the unforeseeable. They minimized the role of luck and believed the role of art. Hippocratic authors thought that professional ability contained both knowledge and experience. In Hippocratic corpus, experience is a synonym of competence and usually has a positive meaning. But Plato gave empirical knowledge the disdainful sense and decided a ranking between two types of knowledge. Both Hippocratic authors and Plato held that a genuine art had connection with explanatory knowledge of the nature of its subject matter. A common theme that goes through arguments about art-chance and art-chance is the connection between art and nature. Hippocratic authors and Plato regarded art as a highly systematic process. Art provides us with general and explanatory knowledge of human nature. Art and nature is a mutual relationship. The systematic understanding of nature helps us gain the exactness of art and an exact art helps us understand nature well.

  11. The art of observation: impact of a family medicine and art museum partnership on student education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Nancy C; Tobias, Barbara; Lucero-Criswell, Amber; Goldenhar, Linda

    2006-06-01

    Compared to verbal communication, teaching the skill of observation is often shortchanged in medical education. Through a family medicine-art museum collaboration, we developed an elective course for second-year medical students titled the "Art of Observation" (AOO). To evaluate the course's effect on clinical skills, we performed a qualitative evaluation of former students during their clinical rotations. In the spring of 2005, all students who had completed the AOO course in 2003 or 2004 were invited to take part in an online evaluation consisting of eight journaling survey questions. Students were instructed to answer the survey questions with specific examples. Question areas included the most memorable experience, the course's influence on the doctor-patient relationship, usefulness during clinical years of medical school, and skills unique to AOO. The anonymous data were analyzed qualitatively, coding the responses to categories derived from the data, leading to the formation of themes. Of the 19 students eligible, 17 participated. We found three important themes: (1) the AOO positively influenced clinical skills, (2) both art museum exercises and a clinical preceptorship were necessary to achieve those skills, and (3) the AOO led to a sense of personal development as a physician. In addition, students told us that the training in observation and description skills they learned were unique to the AOO. This collaboration between a department of family medicine and an art museum produced a course that facilitated observational skills used in successful doctor-patient relationships.

  12. State-of-The-Art and Applications of 3D Imaging Sensors in Industry, Cultural Heritage, Medicine, and Criminal Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Sansoni

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available 3D imaging sensors for the acquisition of three dimensional (3D shapes have created, in recent years, a considerable degree of interest for a number of applications. The miniaturization and integration of the optical and electronic components used to build them have played a crucial role in the achievement of compactness, robustness and flexibility of the sensors. Today, several 3D sensors are available on the market, even in combination with other sensors in a “sensor fusion” approach. An importance equal to that of physical miniaturization has the portability of the measurements, via suitable interfaces, into software environments designed for their elaboration, e.g., CAD-CAM systems, virtual renders, and rapid prototyping tools. In this paper, following an overview of the state-of-art of 3D imaging sensors, a number of significant examples of their use are presented, with particular reference to industry, heritage, medicine, and criminal investigation applications.

  13. [Basis of art phonetics in biomedical engineering].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Li, Gelin; Ouyang, Kai; Liu, Yongxiang

    2002-01-01

    Art phonetics' medicine, a new branch of traditional medicine, has not been developed perfectly, especially in the aspects of objective and scientific study. In this paper, the acoustical and anatiomical basis of art phonetics in viewpoint of biomedical engineering is explored, and then our work of quantitative measurement and analysis of art phonetic is introduced. The experiment data show further that quantitative measurement and analysis plays an important role in art phonetic medicine.

  14. Emotional Intelligence: one Component in the HeART of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales, Roberto; Cleveland, Tracy

    2015-12-01

    The increasing need for health care providers has contributed to a rise in the number of physician assistant (PA) programs. Unfortunately simply increasing the number of graduates to meet this increased need is not good enough. Not only must PA programs and educators make sure that graduates have the necessary medical knowledge and clinical skills but that graduates also have the ability to understand and manage emotions and behaviors which result from working with others and taking care of patients. How an individual acts and reacts to situations is an aspect of psychology that is rooted in the study of emotion and behaviors which result from emotions. This description serves as the basis for modern analysis of what it means to be emotionally intelligent (EQ). Research suggests that a curriculum which focuses on the development of specific emotional intelligence tenets at certain times in medical and health profession training would help to enhance the development of skill sets associated with EQ. However, before substantial curricular changes are undertaken research specific to PA education is necessary.

  15. The art and science of low-energy applications in medicine: pathology perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Sharon L.

    2011-03-01

    Applications of low energy non-ionizing irradiation result in non-lethal and lethal effects in cells, tissues and intact individuals. The effects of these applications depend on the physical parameters of the applied energies, the mechanisms of interaction of these energies on the target and the biologic status of the target. Recently, cell death has been found not to be a random accident of situation or age but a range of complicated physiological responses to various extrinsic and intrinsic events some of which are genetically programmed and/ or physiologically regulated. Therefore, cell death has been classified into three general groups: 1) Programmed cell death including apoptosis and necroptosis, cornefication and autophagy; 2) Accidental (traumatic) cell death due to the direct, immediate effects of the lethal event and 3) Necrotic cell death which is, by default, all cell death not associated with programmed or accidental cell death. Lethal low energy non-ionizing application biologic effects involve mechanisms of all three groups as compared to high energy applications that predominantly involve the mechanisms of accidental cell death. Currently, the mechanisms of all these modes of cell death are being vigorously investigated. As research and development of new low energy applications continues, the need to understand the mechanisms of cell death that they produce will be critical to the rational creation of safe, yet effective instruments.

  16. [Effective Presentations in Medicine. The Art of Communication and Transmission: Ten Recommendations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Álvaro J Ruiz

    2012-01-01

    To communicate effectively during a lecture or presentation it is necessary to follow simple rules, including the preparation of the conference with the audience in mind and with the definition of a specific message to leave the audience. The public's attention should be quickly captured and all subsequent actions should aim to keep it. The text must be accurate and sizes easily visible, the slides should provide good contrast with solid and simple backgrounds and should avoid excessive animations. At the close of the conference, the conclusions and question session offers the invaluable opportunity to reinforce the desired message. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  17. [Art in undergraduate medical education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjellstad, Kenneth; Isaksen, Tor Olav; Frich, Jan C

    2003-08-28

    During the last decades attempts have been made at integrating art in medical education. What should be the form, content and objectives of such teaching? We address this question on the basis of a review of articles in medical journals from 1990 until May 2001 about art and undergraduate medical education. A common reason for integrating art in undergraduate medical education is that art may act as a balance to the dominance of natural science. One pedagogical approach is to use art as a tool for training skills. Many articles emphasise that teaching art should also contribute to the personal and professional development of medical students. The majority of articles report on courses in literature and medicine. Art is often taught in small or medium-sized groups; courses may last from single lessons to programmes over years. The aim of art courses may be the development of skills, but also one of facilitating personal growth and professional development.

  18. State-of-the-art of the installations, equipments and human resources of nuclear medicine in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiliutti, Claudia A.

    2004-01-01

    The current situation of nuclear medicine in Argentina, taking into account the facilities, their equipment and human resources available is presented in this paper. A review and analysis of the equipment, including technical characteristics and a survey of the professionals and technicians of the area, was carried out . In Argentina, there are 292 centers of nuclear medicine distributed all over the country. The operating licenses are granted by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority. Forty percent of the installed equipment are SPECT of 1 or 2 heads and 40 % are gamma camera. Besides, there are two PET operating in Argentina. There are 402 nuclear medicine physicians with individual permit for diagnostic purposes and 50% of them has also individual permit for treatment purposes. With the purpose of analyzing the regional distribution of the available resources in nuclear medicine, the country was divided into 7 geographical regions: City of Buenos Aires, Province of Buenos Aires, Pampeana, Cuyo, Northeast, Northwest and Patagonia. From the analysis of the gathered information it is possible to conclude that the nuclear medicine equipment as well as the personnel presents an irregular distribution, with a major concentration in the City of Buenos Aires and Province of Buenos Aires. The Northeast region presents the lowest number of Nuclear Medicine centers and the Patagonia region has the lowest number of nuclear medicine physicians with individual permits. The number of SPECT and gamma cameras is 8,65 per million of inhabitants. The information about the available resources in nuclear medicine presented in this paper and its comparison with the international available information provide elements for a better planning of the future activities in the area not only for the operators but also from the regulatory point of view. (author)

  19. Herbal medicinal products versus botanical-food supplements in the European market: state of art and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilia, Anna Rita

    2015-01-01

    Botanical products marketed in Europe are diverse, classified as herbal medicinal products, dietary supplements, cosmetics, foods and beverages depending on the relevant applicable legislation. Many factors are taken into account in the classification of a botanical product (e.g. intended use, labeling, preparations and dosages) according to how it is placed on the market. Herbal medicinal products (HMPs) can only be sold in pharmacies, under the supervision of a pharmacist, and are marketed after full or simplified registration procedures according to their classification, i.e. as over-the-counter drugs (OTC) available without special restrictions and prescription only medicine (POM), which must be prescribed by a licensed medical practitioner. The dietary supplement segment is also sold in the market in dose form (such as capsules, tablets, ampoules of liquids, drops etc) and represents 15-20% of the botanical market at the European level with high variability among each country (i.e. in Italy it reaches up to 80%). In many cases the distinction between medicinal products and food supplements has generated borderline botanical-sourced products, which generally produce confusion and mislead the consumers. As a consequence, there is an urgent need of consumer education and in addition to collect comprehensive data and make this database systematically available to herbalists, nutritionists and medical specialists for a proper classification and harmonization of the use of botanical ingredients, and, as consequence, a correct use of these products.

  20. Cardiovascular nuclear medicine: state of the art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milcinski, M.

    1994-01-01

    Evaluation of myocardial function: first pass studies can be obtained at time of almost every investigation. Assessment of myocardial function is improved using short living isotopes and repeated stress studies as well as gated tomographic imaging and technetium perfusion agents. Nonimaging probes have limited value in continuous monitoring of cardiac function. Stress-echo (transoesophageal) is competitive to nuclear techniques in assessment of contractility. Myocardial perfusion imaging using knowledge from PET and available tomographic or planar imaging modalities gives unique possibilities to detect viable myocardium. Thallium remains the tracer for myocardial viability evaluation on convenient systems when new imaging protocols are applied. New technetium labeled radiopharmaceuticals allow better imaging possibilities for SPECT techniques. Several pharmacological agents are available in addition to traditional physical stress for assessing hemodynamic importance of coronary artery stenoses for diagnosis and in treatment evaluation. Imaging myocardial necrosis is marginal in conformation of majority of acute myocardial infarctions. It is used to assess area at risk after thrombolytic therapy for evolving myocardial infarction using dual-isotope techniques (perfusion agent with infarct-avid tracer in dual isotope technique). Antimyosin antibodies are useful also for confirmation of subacute or remote infarction, myocarditis or rejection after cardiac transplantation. Metabolic and receptor imaging are promising in evaluation of cardiomyopathies and myocardial viability not only on positron emission tomography but also on available imaging systems. In conclusion, new techniques and new radiopharmaceuticals for cardiovascular imaging allow more accurate answers to clinical problems. As the possibilities for research and clinical PET are limited, further transfer of PET-results to convenient imaging modalities is promising. (author)

  1. Genetics, genomics, and cancer risk assessment: State of the Art and Future Directions in the Era of Personalized Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Blazer, Kathleen R; MacDonald, Deborah J; Culver, Julie O; Offit, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Scientific and technologic advances are revolutionizing our approach to genetic cancer risk assessment, cancer screening and prevention, and targeted therapy, fulfilling the promise of personalized medicine. In this monograph, we review the evolution of scientific discovery in cancer genetics and genomics, and describe current approaches, benefits, and barriers to the translation of this information to the practice of preventive medicine. Summaries of known hereditary cancer syndromes and highly penetrant genes are provided and contrasted with recently discovered genomic variants associated with modest increases in cancer risk. We describe the scope of knowledge, tools, and expertise required for the translation of complex genetic and genomic test information into clinical practice. The challenges of genomic counseling include the need for genetics and genomics professional education and multidisciplinary team training, the need for evidence-based information regarding the clinical utility of testing for genomic variants, the potential dangers posed by premature marketing of first-generation genomic profiles, and the need for new clinical models to improve access to and responsible communication of complex disease risk information. We conclude that given the experiences and lessons learned in the genetics era, the multidisciplinary model of genetic cancer risk assessment and management will serve as a solid foundation to support the integration of personalized genomic information into the practice of cancer medicine. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society, Inc.

  2. Knots in Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radmila Sazdanović

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We analyze applications of knots and links in the Ancient art, beginning from Babylonian, Egyptian, Greek, Byzantine and Celtic art. Construction methods used in art are analyzed on the examples of Celtic art and ethnical art of Tchokwe people from Angola or Tamil art, where knots are constructed as mirror-curves. We propose different methods for generating knots and links based on geometric polyhedra, suitable for applications in architecture and sculpture.

  3. Knots in Art

    OpenAIRE

    Jablan, Slavik; Radović, Ljiljana; Sazdanović, Radmila; Zeković, Ana

    2012-01-01

    We analyze applications of knots and links in the Ancient art, beginning from Babylonian, Egyptian, Greek, Byzantine and Celtic art. Construction methods used in art are analyzed on the examples of Celtic art and ethnical art of Tchokwe people from Angola or Tamil art, where knots are constructed as mirror-curves. We propose different methods for generating knots and links based on geometric polyhedra, suitable for applications in architecture and sculpture.

  4. Art History in Remote Aboriginal Art Centres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren Jorgensen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The 2008 Congress of the International Committee of the History of Art in Melbourne suggested in its theme of 'Crossing Cultures' that art history must revise its nationalistic methodologies to construct more international histories of art. This essay addresses the legacy of different eras and methods of writing the art history of remote Aboriginal artists. It argues that colonialism has structured many of the ways in which this art history has been written, and that the globalisation of art history does little to rectify these structures. Instead, art history must turn to institutions that are less implicated in the legacy of colonialism to frame its work. Rather than turning to the museums and art galleries who have provided much of the material for the art histories of the twentieth century, this essay suggests that remote art centres offer dynamic opportunities for doing twenty-first century art history. Founded in an era of political self-determination for remote Aboriginal people, these centres aspire to create an opportunity for the expression of a cultural difference whose origins precede the invasion and colonisation of Australia. Art centres and their archives present an opportunity to work through the legacies of colonialism in the art history of remote Australian Aboriginal artists

  5. Performing arts medicine - instrumentalist musicians part I - general considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dommerholt, Jan

    2009-10-01

    Performing arts medicine is a relatively new specialty addressing the medical needs of dancers, musicians, ice skaters, and gymnasts. This paper focuses on the role of healthcare providers in the diagnosis and therapeutic management of instrumentalist musicians. Musicians are at high risk for developing painful musculoskeletal problems, including pain and overuse injuries, entrapment and peripheral neuropathies, and focal dystonias. Musicians' careers are threatened, when they are no longer able to play their instrument because of pain and dysfunction. To appreciate music-related injuries, it is important that clinicians are familiar with the context of musicians' injuries and disorders. This is the first paper in a series of three. This paper discusses the importance of taking an extended history. The typical history procedures need to be broadened when interviewing musicians, and should include instrument-specific questions, and questions regarding practice habits, education, repertoire, and employment. The second article addresses the physical examination, while the third article provides three case reports of musicians with hand problems, which serve to illustrate the points made in the first two articles. The articles are illustrated with several tables and photographs of musicians to assist the reader in assessing instrumentalist musicians and determining the most appropriate course of action.

  6. Indigenous cosmology, art forms and past medicinal practices: towards an interpretation of ancient Koma Land sites in northern Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankpeyeng, Benjamin W; Nkumbaan, Samuel N; Insoll, Timothy

    2011-08-01

    The ancient cultural tradition in the middle belt region of northern Ghana, with its stone circle and house mounds, contains varied material culture. The unique contextual arrangements of the material culture within the stone circle mounds and the diverse ceramic art forms, as well as their ethnographic analogues in West Africa, indicate the mounds' association with past shrines that have multiple functions, including curative purposes. The archaeology of the mounds and ethnographic associations related to past indigenous medical practices is reviewed and discussed. This paper will also consider how some of the figurines through which the Koma tradition has achieved 'fame' possibly functioned as physical representations of disease, perhaps underpinned by intentions of transference from afflicted to image. The notions of protection and healing are also examined with reference to the resorted and disarticulated human remains sometimes recovered from the sites.

  7. Edible Cyanobacterial Genus Arthrospira: Actual State of the Art in Cultivation Methods, Genetics, and Application in Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda A. Furmaniak

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The cyanobacterial genus Arthrospira appears very conserved and has been divided into five main genetic clusters on the basis of molecular taxonomy markers. Genetic studies of seven Arthrospira strains, including genome sequencing, have enabled a better understanding of those photosynthetic prokaryotes. Even though genetic manipulations have not yet been performed with success, many genomic and proteomic features such as stress adaptation, nitrogen fixation, or biofuel production have been characterized. Many of above-mentioned studies aimed to optimize the cultivation conditions. Factors like the light intensity and quality, the nitrogen source, or different modes of growth (auto-, hetero-, or mixotrophic have been studied in detail. The scaling-up of the biomass production using photobioreactors, either closed or open, was also investigated to increase the production of useful compounds. The richness of nutrients contained in the genus Arthrospira can be used for promising applications in the biomedical domain. Ingredients such as the calcium spirulan, immulina, C-phycocyanin, and γ-linolenic acid (GLA show a strong biological activity. Recently, its use in the fight against cancer cells was documented in many publications. The health-promoting action of “Spirulina” has been demonstrated in the case of cardiovascular diseases and age-related conditions. Some compounds also have potent immunomodulatory properties, promoting the growth of beneficial gut microflora, acting as antimicrobial and antiviral. Products derived from Arthrospira were shown to successfully replace biomaterial scaffolds in regenerative medicine. Supplementation with the cyanobacterium also improves the health of livestock and quality of the products of animal origin. They were also used in cosmetic preparations.

  8. Edible Cyanobacterial GenusArthrospira: Actual State of the Art in Cultivation Methods, Genetics, and Application in Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furmaniak, Magda A; Misztak, Agnieszka E; Franczuk, Martyna D; Wilmotte, Annick; Waleron, Małgorzata; Waleron, Krzysztof F

    2017-01-01

    The cyanobacterial genus Arthrospira appears very conserved and has been divided into five main genetic clusters on the basis of molecular taxonomy markers. Genetic studies of seven Arthrospira strains, including genome sequencing, have enabled a better understanding of those photosynthetic prokaryotes. Even though genetic manipulations have not yet been performed with success, many genomic and proteomic features such as stress adaptation, nitrogen fixation, or biofuel production have been characterized. Many of above-mentioned studies aimed to optimize the cultivation conditions. Factors like the light intensity and quality, the nitrogen source, or different modes of growth (auto-, hetero-, or mixotrophic) have been studied in detail. The scaling-up of the biomass production using photobioreactors, either closed or open, was also investigated to increase the production of useful compounds. The richness of nutrients contained in the genus Arthrospira can be used for promising applications in the biomedical domain. Ingredients such as the calcium spirulan, immulina, C-phycocyanin, and γ-linolenic acid (GLA) show a strong biological activity. Recently, its use in the fight against cancer cells was documented in many publications. The health-promoting action of "Spirulina" has been demonstrated in the case of cardiovascular diseases and age-related conditions. Some compounds also have potent immunomodulatory properties, promoting the growth of beneficial gut microflora, acting as antimicrobial and antiviral. Products derived from Arthrospira were shown to successfully replace biomaterial scaffolds in regenerative medicine. Supplementation with the cyanobacterium also improves the health of livestock and quality of the products of animal origin. They were also used in cosmetic preparations.

  9. Precision Medicine for CRC Patients in the Veteran Population: State-of-the-Art, Challenges and Research Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Shyam S; Batra, Surinder K; Bharadwaj, Srinivas; Bouvet, Michael; Cosman, Bard; Goel, Ajay; Jogunoori, Wilma; Kelley, Michael J; Mishra, Lopa; Mishra, Bibhuti; Mohapatra, Subhra; Patel, Bhaumik; Pisegna, Joseph R; Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Rao, Shuyun; Roy, Hemant; Scheuner, Maren; Singh, Satish; Vidyarthi, Gitanjali; White, Jon

    2018-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) accounts for ~9% of all cancers in the Veteran population, a fact which has focused a great deal of the attention of the VA's research and development efforts. A field-based meeting of CRC experts was convened to discuss both challenges and opportunities in precision medicine for CRC. This group, designated as the VA Colorectal Cancer Cell-genomics Consortium (VA4C), discussed advances in CRC biology, biomarkers, and imaging for early detection and prevention. There was also a discussion of precision treatment involving fluorescence-guided surgery, targeted chemotherapies and immunotherapies, and personalized cancer treatment approaches. The overarching goal was to identify modalities that might ultimately lead to personalized cancer diagnosis and treatment. This review summarizes the findings of this VA field-based meeting, in which much of the current knowledge on CRC prescreening and treatment was discussed. It was concluded that there is a need and an opportunity to identify new targets for both the prevention of CRC and the development of effective therapies for advanced disease. Also, developing methods integrating genomic testing with tumoroid-based clinical drug response might lead to more accurate diagnosis and prognostication and more effective personalized treatment of CRC.

  10. The state of the art in stem cell biology and regenerative medicine: the end of the beginning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Evan Y

    2017-12-13

    With translational stem cell biology and Regenerative Medicine (the field to which the former gave rise) now over a quarter century old, it is time to take stock of where we have been and where we are going. This editorial overview, which serves as an introduction to this special issue of Pediatric Research dedicated to these fields, reinforces the notion that stem cells are ultimately intrinsic parts of developmental biology, for which Pediatrics represents the clinical face. Although stem cells provide the cellular basis for a great deal of only recently recognized plasticity programmed into the developing and postdevelopmental organism, and although there is enormous promise in harnessing this plasticity for therapeutic advantage, their successful use rests on a deep understanding of their developmental imperatives and the developmental programs in which they engage. The potential uses of stems are ranked and discussed in the order of most readily achievable to those requiring extensively more work. Although that order may not be what was contemplated at the field's birth, we nevertheless retain an optimism for the ultimate positive impact of exploiting this fundamental biology for the well-being of children.Pediatric Research advance online publication, 13 December 2017; doi:10.1038/pr.2017.258.

  11. Arts Education Beyond Art : Teaching Art in Times of Change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heusden, Bernard; Gielen, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    People and societies thrive on a versatile and imaginative awareness. Yet the critical debate on arts education is still too often about the qualities of artefacts and technical skills, and tends to neglect issues such as the critical function of the arts in society, artistic cognition and cognitive

  12. Art History in Discipline-Based Art Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinbauer, W. Eugene

    1987-01-01

    Offers a rationale for teaching art history as an integral part of the K-12 curriculum. Maintains that art history instruction should begin in kindergarten. Includes sections on the relationship between art history, art production, art criticism, and aesthetics. (JDH)

  13. From soil in art towards Soil Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, C.; Landa, E. R.; Toland, A.; Wessolek, G.

    2015-02-01

    The range of art forms and genres dealing with soil is wide and diverse, spanning many centuries and artistic traditions, from prehistoric painting and ceramics to early Renaissance works in Western literature, poetry, paintings, and sculpture, to recent developments in cinema, architecture and contemporary art. Case studies focused on painting, installation, and cinema are presented with the view of encouraging further exploration of art about, in, with, or featuring soil or soil conservation issues, created by artists, and occasionally scientists, educators or collaborative efforts thereof.

  14. Art Toys in the contemporary art scene

    OpenAIRE

    Laura Sernissi

    2014-01-01

    The Art Toys phenomenon, better known as Art Toy Movement, was born in China in the mid-nineties and quickly spread out to the rest of the world. The toys are an artistic production of serial sculpture, made by handcrafts or on an industrial scale. There are several types of toys, such as custom toys and canvas toys, synonyms of designer toys, although they are often defined according to the constituent material, such as vinyl toys (plastic) and plush toys (fabric). Art toys are the heirs of ...

  15. Engineering in translational medicine

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book covers a broad area of engineering research in translational medicine. Leaders in academic institutions around the world contributed focused chapters on a broad array of topics such as: cell and tissue engineering (6 chapters), genetic and protein engineering (10 chapters), nanoengineering (10 chapters), biomedical instrumentation (4 chapters), and theranostics and other novel approaches (4 chapters). Each chapter is a stand-alone review that summarizes the state-of-the-art of the specific research area. Engineering in Translational Medicine gives readers a comprehensive and in-depth overview of a broad array of related research areas, making this an excellent reference book for scientists and students both new to engineering/translational medicine and currently working in this area.

  16. Rheumatoid arthritis: Nuclear Medicine state-of-the-art imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado-de-Castro, Paulo Henrique; Lopes de Souza, Sergio Augusto; Alexandre, Dângelo; Barbosa da Fonseca, Lea Mirian; Gutfilen, Bianca

    2014-07-18

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease, which is associated with systemic and chronic inflammation of the joints, resulting in synovitis and pannus formation. For several decades, the assessment of RA has been limited to conventional radiography, assisting in the diagnosis and monitoring of disease. Nevertheless, conventional radiography has poor sensitivity in the detection of the inflammatory process that happens in the initial stages of RA. In the past years, new drugs that significantly decrease the progression of RA have allowed a more efficient treatment. Nuclear Medicine provides functional assessment of physiological processes and therefore has significant potential for timely diagnosis and adequate follow-up of RA. Several single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) radiopharmaceuticals have been developed and applied in this field. The use of hybrid imaging, which permits computed tomography (CT) and nuclear medicine data to be acquired and fused, has increased even more the diagnostic accuracy of Nuclear Medicine by providing anatomical localization in SPECT/CT and PET/CT studies. More recently, fusion of PET with magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) was introduced in some centers and demonstrated great potential. In this article, we will review studies that have been published using Nuclear Medicine for RA and examine key topics in the area.

  17. ICT in the Arts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Anthony Lewis

    2014-01-01

    Increased use of ICT in art projects opens novel opportunities for contemporary artists seeking innovative means to create and express beyond the traditional in new ways and places. This can also be beyond what is conventionally considered art. Thus, wider and transdisciplinary philosophical...... creative industries are important to economic well being in society. This contribution1 presents across these borders through introducing an international conference series titled ArtsIT within a special issue of the International Journal on Arts and Technology, which are vehicles for contemporary artists...

  18. Medicine as a performing art: what we can learn about empathic communication from theater arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Amy; Rosenthal, Susan; Schlussel, Yvette R

    2015-03-01

    The authors describe how they came to the realization that theater arts techniques can be useful and effective tools for teaching interpersonal communication skills (ICS) in medical education. After recognizing the outstanding interpersonal skills demonstrated by two actors-turned-doctors, in 2010 the authors began to develop a technique called Facilitated Simulation Education and Evaluation (FSEE) to teach ICS. In FSEE, actors and residents are coached in empathic, and therefore effective, ICS using a novel technique based on lessons learned from theater arts education. Competence in ICS includes the ability to listen actively, observe acutely, and communicate clearly and compassionately, with the ultimate goal of improving medical outcomes. Resident, actor, and faculty perceptions after two years of experience with FSEE have been positive. After describing the FSEE approach, the authors suggest next steps for studying and expanding the role of theater arts in ICS training.

  19. Arts practices in unreasonable doubt? Reflections on understandings of arts practices in healthcare contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broderick, Sheelagh

    2011-01-01

    This article suggests that the discourse on arts and health encompass contemporary arts practices as an active and engaged analytical activity. Distinctions between arts therapy and arts practice are made to suggest that clinical evidence-based evaluation, while appropriate for arts therapy, is not appropriate for arts practice and in effect cast them in unreasonable doubt. Themes in current discourse on “arts” and “health” are broadly sketched to provide a context for discussion of arts practices. Approaches to knowledge validation in relation to each domain are discussed. These discourses are applied to the Irish healthcare context, offering a reading of three different art projects; it suggests a multiplicity of analyses beyond causal positive health gains. It is suggested that the social turn in medicine and the social turn in arts practices share some similar pre-occupations that warrant further attention. PMID:22675403

  20. Art-Based Learning Strategies in Art Therapy Graduate Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deaver, Sarah P.

    2012-01-01

    This mixed methods research study examined the use of art-based teaching methods in master's level art therapy graduate education in North America. A survey of program directors yielded information regarding in which courses and how frequently art-based methods (individual in-class art making, dyad or group art making, student art projects as…

  1. Parallels in the Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffey, Grace

    1972-01-01

    A mini-course of nine weeks was organized as a laboratory course to survey relationships in literature, music, and art. Three periods in the arts (Romanticism, Impressionism, and Contemporary) were matched with three major activities; the basic areas of study and activity were poetry, short story, and novel. (Author)

  2. Art-in-Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Degn Johansson, Troels

    This article outlines the author's continuous collaboration with the Danish art collective Superflex; an internationally recognised example of how contemporary art has taken interest in design practice in order to realise visions of change and empowerment. Setting off from Frayling's infamous dis...

  3. Art-in-Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Degn Johansson, Troels

    This article outlines the author's continuous collaboration with the Danish art collective Superflex; an internationally recognised example of how contemporary art has taken interest in design practice in order to realise visions of change and empowerment. Setting off from Frayling's infamous...... distinction between research in, for, and through art and design, the author lays out this collaboration as a series of stepping back from an initial action research situation, that is, a case of research through design where the researcher is involved by means of strategic interest. However, by gradually...... distancing himself, by taking steps back from this situation, the author has sought to map out systematically the institutional contexts in which the art collective has been operating. In this way, it has become possible to understand further why art may maintain its original empowering role in design...

  4. Art in Story: Teaching Art History to Elementary School Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccardi, Marianne

    Integrated art history and language arts activities are presented in this curriculum guide. The art history content is chronologically organized by units: (1) "Art of the Ancient World"; (2) "Arts of the East and Africa"; (3) "Art of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance"; (4) "Five European Masters"; (5) "Impressionism and Post-Impressionism"; (6)…

  5. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Classic Art of Healingor the Therapeutic Touch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Touching is often a forgotten part of medicine. The manual medicine or therapeutic touch (TT is much more powerful than many modern, biomedically oriented physicians think. Pain and discomfort can be alleviated just by touching the sick area and in this way help the patient to be in better contact with the tissue and organs of their body. Lack of presence in the body seems to be connected with many symptoms that can be readily reversed simply by sensitive touch. When touch is combined with therapeutic work on mind and feelings, holistic healing seems to be facilitated and many problems can be solved in a direct and easy way in the clinic without drugs. This paper gives examples of the strength of manual medicine or therapeutic touch in its most simple form, and points to the power of physical contact between physician and his patient in the context of the theory and practice of holistic healing. Intimacy seems highly beneficial for the process of healing and it is very important to distinguish clearly between intimacy and sexuality for the physician and his patent to be able to give and receive touch without fear and without holding back emotionally.

  6. Authenticity in Anatomy Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, Jessica

    2017-01-12

    The aim of this paper is to observe the evolution and evaluate the 'realness' and authenticity in Anatomy Art, an art form I define as one which incorporates accurate anatomical representations of the human body with artistic expression. I examine the art of 17th century wax anatomical models, the preservations of Frederik Ruysch, and Gunther von Hagens' Body Worlds plastinates, giving consideration to authenticity of both body and art. I give extra consideration to the works of Body Worlds since the exhibit creator believes he has created anatomical specimens with more educational value and bodily authenticity than ever before. Ultimately, I argue that von Hagens fails to offer Anatomy Art 'real human bodies,' and that the lack of bodily authenticity of his plastinates results in his creations being less pedagogic than he claims.

  7. Art Medium and Art Infrastructure Development in Contemporary Indonesian Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rikrik Kusmara

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This research review Indonesian contemporary artists that used the various media in the presentation in his works over the years since 2000 until now. Survey at Pameran Besar Indonesia "Manifesto" in May 2008, were around 670 Indonesian living artists, 350 are consistently professional artists, 41 artists who utilize a variety of media in each works and 6 of them are artists who used a various of media on their solo exhibition including combining conventional media with new media and installation approaches. 6 artists are analyzed on the structure of the media presentation configuration their used, and generally they used more than 3 types of media in their solo exhibition, first, painting/drawing, second, sculpture/object/installation, and third video/photography. In the study of each exhibition process, generally utilizing the curatorial and sponsored by promotor (gallery. This research shows a rapid development of economic infrastructure in Indonesian the art in 2000-an era with the emergence of many auction hall, a new generation of collectors and galleries, and the Asian art market and global orientation, it became one of the holding in contemporary art of Indonesia, has been shifting art situation from cultural appreciation in the era of 90-to an era to cultural production.

  8. Art Toys in the contemporary art scene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Sernissi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Art Toys phenomenon, better known as Art Toy Movement, was born in China in the mid-nineties and quickly spread out to the rest of the world. The toys are an artistic production of serial sculpture, made by handcrafts or on an industrial scale. There are several types of toys, such as custom toys and canvas toys, synonyms of designer toys, although they are often defined according to the constituent material, such as vinyl toys (plastic and plush toys (fabric. Art toys are the heirs of an already pop-surrealist and neo-pop circuit, which since the eighties of the twentieth century has pervaded the Japanese-American art scene, winking to the playful spirit of the avant-garde of the early century. Some psychoanalytic, pedagogical and anthropological studies about “play theories”, may also help us to understand and identify these heterogeneous products as real works of art and not simply as collectible toys.

  9. Art in Hospitals Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baceviciute, Sarune; Bruni, Luis Emilio; Burelli, Paolo

    The idea of this pilot experiment within the context of the “Art in Hospitals” project was to explore the fruitfulness and future perspectives for integrating psychophysiological methods to the ethnographic approach so far implemented in the project. As a pilot study it serves to open the doors...... to experimental avenues that can support the ethnographic investigation. Therefore in order to form a basis for applications of these methodologies in future studies in the field, this pilot was concentrated in one of the initial premises of the project, which intended to challenge current recommendations for art...... in hospitals. Most of these guidelines favor figurative over abstract art, based on ideas leaning to the emotional congruence theory, which would claim that abstract art leads to ambiguity and therefore it could augment the current emotional base-line of an already stressed patient. The early ethnographic...

  10. Dwarfism in art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limon, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    Throughout the history of mankind the birth of a child with congenital malformation raised anxiety and torment, along with attempts to explain its origins. It is possible to find relics of such events in prehistoric rock drawings and primitive sculptures, in numerous art pieces produced through the centuries up to modern sculptures, paintings and drawings. The aim of the present article is to show how dwarfs were portrayed in a variety of art forms at different moments in the history of our world.

  11. Sleepwalking through history: medicine, arts, and courts of law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umanath, Sharda; Sarezky, Daniel; Finger, Stanley

    2011-10-01

    Somnambulism, or sleepwalking, has always been of interest to theologians, writers, philosophers, physicians, and others fascinated by unusual behaviors. This parasomnia, which was defined less precisely in the past than it is today, has long been featured in medical dissertations and books of medicine. Further, Shakespeare, Bellini, and Brown, among others, incorporated it into their plays, operas, and novels. Because some somnambulists turned violent and committed other acts detrimental to society, sleepwalking also demanded attention from legal systems, and guidelines were set for whether somnambulists could be held responsible for their actions. This historical review focuses on these developments pertaining to somnambulism through the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries.

  12. Art Criticism in Discipline-Based Art Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risatti, Howard

    1987-01-01

    This paper focuses on the cognitive and social functions of art and the role that art plays in communicating social and personal values. It shows how art criticism can play an important part in the education of all students by fostering critical thinking related to art history, art production, and aesthetics. (Author/JDH)

  13. Artfulness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chemi, Tatiana

    2011-01-01

    a collage of previously published materials on Artfulness, in this journal targeted teachers for dysfunctional behaviour children.......a collage of previously published materials on Artfulness, in this journal targeted teachers for dysfunctional behaviour children....

  14. School of the Arts seeks arts organizations and artists for participation in ArtsFusion 2008

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Louise

    2008-01-01

    Virginia Tech School of the Arts announces ArtsFusion 2008, a weeklong celebration of the arts throughout the New River Valley scheduled for April 12 through April 19. ArtsFusion 2008 is seeking participation by arts organizations and artists both on campus and throughout the New River Valley working in music, film, theatre, dance, creative writing, and the visual arts.

  15. Knowledge of Art in Malaysian Contemporary Visual Art

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamad Faizuan Mat

    2017-01-01

    Malaysia has a scarcity in the presentation of art knowledge through visual art. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the importance of art knowledge in the field of visual art. In fact, Malaysian contemporary visual artists appear to have insufficient values of intellectualism and lack shared vision. The intention of this study was to reveal the factors in Malaysian visual arts that led to the crisis in art knowledge development. This project uses a qualitative triangulation method in o...

  16. Grammar in art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segel, Edward; Boroditsky, Lera

    2010-01-01

    Jakobson (1959) reports: "The Russian painter Repin was baffled as to why Sin had been depicted as a woman by German artists: he did not realize that 'sin' is feminine in German (die Sünde), but masculine in Russian (rpex)." Does the grammatical gender of nouns in an artist's native language indeed predict the gender of personifications in art? In this paper we analyzed works in the ARTstor database (a digital art library containing over a million images) to measure this correspondence. This analysis provides a measure of artists' real-world behavior. Our results show a clear correspondence between grammatical gender in language and personified gender in art. Grammatical gender predicted personified gender in 78% of the cases, significantly more often than if the two factors were independent. This analysis offers a new window on an age-old question about the relationship between linguistic structure and patterns in culture and cognition.

  17. "Humanities in medicine".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odenbach, V

    1999-01-01

    Progress in medicine and medical technology along with economic constraints have led to increasing structural change in the hospital sector over the past years. As a result of these changes, the social needs of the patients are in danger of being eclipsed by the requirements of the optimization of hospital processes. Cultural activities can be a meaningful way to offset such changes. They stimulate individuals, promote well-being and prompt discussion. Cultural activities in hospitals are directed at patients, hospital employees and people in the community. In Germany, the 'National Association for Culture and Health MediArt' founded in 1995 has been responsible for the UNESCO project "Art in Hospitals" 1988-1997. This paper provides a snapshot of German hospitals that have integrated cultural activities in an exemplary fashion. The activities include such events as 'international cultural days', 'theatre groups', 'dance workshops', 'clinclowns'. Participants include professionals, employees, patients and visitors from the community. The activities are organized by individuals and/or cultural departments created to act as 'health centres' for musical, theatrical, dance and plastic art events.

  18. COMPETENCE IN MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio Teixeira MD.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical competence is the result of a lifelong evolving process, based on the development of efficiency, experience and ethical principles. Efficiency in medical practice depends on scientific knowledge, technical abilities and communication skills. Experience is a process of personal refinement, breeding knowledge and wisdom. Finally, medical ethics is founded on the quest for justice, compassion and love. Didactically, we can distinguish three phases in the professional evolution of a physician: a Professional infancy, or linear vision: the physician restricts his attention to the morbid process only, often neglecting the patient in his totality. His approach is almost exclusively technical, with limited perception of medicine as an art. b Professional maturity or humanistic vision: it results from the evolution of personality, culture and experience of the physician, who foccuses now on the patient as a whole with his disease(s. c Professional excellence, or holistic vision, the highest stage: when the physician's integrated dimensions and wisdom are projected into the patient, fostering the natural conditions for optimal healing. We conclude that the practice of medicine is best fulfilled when both, art and cience, are considered and exercised together by the doctor.

  19. Grammar in Art

    OpenAIRE

    Segel, Edward; Boroditsky, Lera

    2011-01-01

    Roman Jakobson (1959) reports: The Russian painter Repin was baffled as to why Sin had been depicted as a woman by German artists: he did not realize that sin is feminine in German (die Sünde), but masculine in Russian (грех). Does the grammatical gender of nouns in an artist’s native language indeed predict the gender of personifications in art? In this paper we analyzed works in the ARTstor database (a digital art library containing over a million images) to measure this correspondenc...

  20. Arts-in-Business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darsø, Lotte

    2002-01-01

    Innovative Research in Management. The 2nd European Academy of Management (EURAM) Conference, Stockholm (Sweden). 2002 Short description: This positioning paper proposes a theoretical framework of four categories of Arts-in-Business. The main idea is to examine cases in relation to this model...... forth new learning opportunities. The goal is to map the field, to develop new theory and to share the learning with our partners and networks. This paper proposes a theoretical framework of four categories of Arts-in-Business: "Metaphors", "Capabilities", "Events", and "Products". The main idea...

  1. Indian Arts in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawow, 1974

    1974-01-01

    A recent publication, "Indian Arts in Canada", examines some of the forces, both past and present, which are not only affecting American Indian artists today, but which will also profoundly influence their future. The review presents a few of the illustrations used in the book, along with the Introduction and the Foreword. (KM)

  2. [Personal motif in art].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerevich, József

    2015-01-01

    One of the basic questions of the art psychology is whether a personal motif is to be found behind works of art and if so, how openly or indirectly it appears in the work itself. Analysis of examples and documents from the fine arts and literature allow us to conclude that the personal motif that can be identified by the viewer through symbols, at times easily at others with more difficulty, gives an emotional plus to the artistic product. The personal motif may be found in traumatic experiences, in communication to the model or with other emotionally important persons (mourning, disappointment, revenge, hatred, rivalry, revolt etc.), in self-searching, or self-analysis. The emotions are expressed in artistic activity either directly or indirectly. The intention nourished by the artist's identity (Kunstwollen) may stand in the way of spontaneous self-expression, channelling it into hidden paths. Under the influence of certain circumstances, the artist may arouse in the viewer, consciously or unconsciously, an illusionary, misleading image of himself. An examination of the personal motif is one of the important research areas of art therapy.

  3. Collaboration in Performing Arts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.B.G. Langeveld (Cees); Belme, D.; Koppenberg, T.

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ As a result of declining government support, performing arts organisations (PAOs) face increased challenges and difficulties in the sector. They attempt to develop new ways of generating income and seek new models of organising the production and presentation of

  4. Visual art appreciation in Nigeria: The Zaria art society experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is no doubt that one of the greatest creative impetuses injected into Nigerian art was made possible by, among other things, the activities of the first art institution in Nigeria to award a Diploma certificate in art, Nigerian College of Arts, Science and Technology (NCAST). NCAST started in 1953/54 at their Ibadan branch ...

  5. On art and science: an epistemic framework for integrating social science and clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Jason Adam

    2014-06-01

    Calls for incorporating social science into patient care typically have accounted for neither the logistic constraints of medical training nor the methodological fallacies of utilizing aggregate "social facts" in clinical practice. By elucidating the different epistemic approaches of artistic and scientific practices, this paper illustrates an integrative artistic pedagogy that allows clinical practitioners to generate social scientific insights from actual patient encounters. Although there is no shortage of calls to bring social science into medicine, the more fundamental processes of thinking by which art and science proceed have not been addressed to this end. As such, the art of medical practice is conceptualized as an innate gift, and thus little is done to cultivate it. Yet doing so is more important than ever because uncertainty in diagnosing and treating chronic illnesses, the most significant contemporary mortality risks, suggests a re-expanding role for clinical judgment. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press, on behalf of the Journal of Medicine and Philosophy Inc. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Women's Art in Art Education: Realms, Relevance and Resources, Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandell, Renee

    This document consists of remarks introducing a collaborative panel on women's art and art education. By exploring the realms, relevance, and resources on women's art in art education, the panel hoped to address new and continuing issues, and to clarify continuing misunderstandings. The panelists shared the belief that only through consciousness…

  7. Culinary art in media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radojičić Dragana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject of diet culture is beyond the scope of this paper. Therefore, I concentrated on several examples which best illustrate the presence of culinary art and diet in media. That is, I used 72 articles from the magazine Gloria with the food subject (2006-2009. Diet and culinary arts are omnipresent in media globally. As a rule, many offers recommend recipes and items considered traditional, with a wide range of recipes offered in Serbia alone. Internet also offers many web sites with various diets and recipes. All in all, domestic readers of local journals and magazine can find a variety of fashionable recipes from all over the world, most of the time with limited instructions or groceries not easily obtained at the local market. Bon ton is also lacking while diet and food choices continue to saturate all forms of social behavior as well as recipes serving as communication within a given culture.

  8. Grammar in Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward eSegel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Roman Jakobson (1959 reports: The Russian painter Repin was baffled as to why Sin had been depicted as a woman by German artists: he did not realize that sin is feminine in German (die Sünde, but masculine in Russian (грех. Does the grammatical gender of nouns in an artist’s native language indeed predict the gender of personifications in art? In this paper we analyzed works in the ARTstor database (a digital art library containing over a million images to measure this correspondence. This analysis provides a measure of artists’ real-world behavior. Our results show a clear correspondence between grammatical gender in language and personified gender in art. Grammatical gender predicted personified gender in 78% of the cases, significantly more often than if the two factors were independent. This analysis offers a new window on an age-old question about the relationship between linguistic structure and patterns in culture and cognition.

  9. Physics technologies in medicine

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva. Audiovisual Unit; Kreis, Roland; Wildermuth, Simon; Buck, Alfred; Von Schulthess, Gustav K

    2002-01-01

    Modern medicine is a large consumer of physics technologies. The series of lectures covers medical imaging starting with an overview and the history of medical imaging. Then follows four lectures covering x-ray imaging positron emission tomography imaging blood flow by ultrasound magnetic resonance 10 June 2002 100 Years of Medical Imaging Pr. Gustav K. von Schulthess MD, PhD, University of Zurich History and overview of Medical Imaging 11 June 2002 X-rays: still going strong Dr. Simon Wildermuth, MD, University Hospital Zurich Multidetector computed tomography: New developments and applications Since its introduction in 1992, spiral computed tomography (CT) scanners constructed with a single row of detectors have revolutionized imaging of thoracic and abdominal diseases. Current state-of-the-art models use up to 16 detectors and are capable of acquiring 16 contiguous slices of data with each gantry rotation; systems with 32 data acquisition units (and more) are currently in development. The principal advan...

  10. Frontiers in the Arts: Careers in Creative Arts Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naitove, Connie E.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the knowledge, skills, and training required of an art therapist and suggests how career education for art therapy may begin in the elementary/ secondary grades, before the formal university program. This article is part of a theme issue on career education in art. (SJL)

  11. Interactive displays in medical art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcconathy, Deirdre Alla; Doyle, Michael

    1989-01-01

    Medical illustration is a field of visual communication with a long history. Traditional medical illustrations are static, 2-D, printed images; highly realistic depictions of the gross morphology of anatomical structures. Today medicine requires the visualization of structures and processes that have never before been seen. Complex 3-D spatial relationships require interpretation from 2-D diagnostic imagery. Pictures that move in real time have become clinical and research tools for physicians. Medical illustrators are involved with the development of interactive visual displays for three different, but not discrete, functions: as educational materials, as clinical and research tools, and as data bases of standard imagery used to produce visuals. The production of interactive displays in the medical arts is examined.

  12. Art History in 3-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Students often have a hard time equating time spent on art history as time well spent in the art room. Likewise, art teachers struggle with how to keep interest in their classrooms high when the subject turns to history. Some teachers show endless videos, with the students nodding sleepily along to the narrator. Others try to incorporate small…

  13. [Interdisciplinary consensus statement on alternative airway management with supraglottic airway devices in pediatric emergency medicine: Laryngeal mask is state of the art].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, J; Jung, P; Schiele, A; Urban, B; Parsch, A; Matsche, B; Eich, C; Becke, K; Landsleitner, B; Russo, S G; Bernhard, M; Nicolai, T; Hoffmann, F

    2016-01-01

    Airway management with supraglottic airway devices (SGA) in life-threatening emergencies involving children is becoming increasingly more important. The laryngeal mask (LM) and the laryngeal tube (LT) are devices commonly used for this purpose. This article presents a literature review and consensus statement by various societies on the use of SGA in pediatric emergency medicine. Literature search in the database PubMed and classification of studies according to the criteria of the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine levels of evidence. The evidence for successful application of the various types of LM is significantly higher than for LT application. Reports of smaller series of successful applications of LT are currently limited to selected research groups and centers. Insufficient evidence currently exists for the successful application of the LT especially for children below 10 kg body weight and, therefore, its routine use cannot currently be recommended. SGAs used for emergencies should have a possibility for gastric drainage. Considering the scientific data and the large clinical experience with the LM in medical routine and emergency situations in children, currently only the LM can be recommended for alternative (i.e. non-intubation) airway management in children. If alternative airway management is part of a local emergency strategy, the LM should be provided in all pediatric sizes (1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, 4 and 5) for prehospital and in-hospital emergency use and all users should be regularly trained in its application.

  14. Place based teaching in the visual arts and art education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kirsten Bak

    Contemporary Art and three orientations in visual culture pedagogy: Perception, Relational and Reflexive practice.......Contemporary Art and three orientations in visual culture pedagogy: Perception, Relational and Reflexive practice....

  15. Integrative Medicine in Preventive Medicine Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jani, Asim A.; Trask, Jennifer; Ali, Ather

    2016-01-01

    During 2012, the USDHHS’s Health Resources and Services Administration funded 12 accredited preventive medicine residencies to incorporate an evidence-based integrative medicine curriculum into their training programs. It also funded a national coordinating center at the American College of Preventive Medicine, known as the Integrative Medicine in Preventive Medicine Education (IMPriME) Center, to provide technical assistance to the 12 grantees. To help with this task, the IMPriME Center established a multidisciplinary steering committee, versed in integrative medicine, whose primary aim was to develop integrative medicine core competencies for incorporation into preventive medicine graduate medical education training. The competency development process was informed by central integrative medicine definitions and principles, preventive medicine’s dual role in clinical and population-based prevention, and the burgeoning evidence base of integrative medicine. The steering committee considered an interdisciplinary integrative medicine contextual framework guided by several themes related to workforce development and population health. A list of nine competencies, mapped to the six general domains of competence approved by the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education, was operationalized through an iterative exercise with the 12 grantees in a process that included mapping each site’s competency and curriculum products to the core competencies. The competencies, along with central curricular components informed by grantees’ work presented elsewhere in this supplement, are outlined as a roadmap for residency programs aiming to incorporate integrative medicine content into their curricula. This set of competencies adds to the larger efforts of the IMPriME initiative to facilitate and enhance further curriculum development and implementation by not only the current grantees but other stakeholders in graduate medical education around integrative medicine

  16. THE SPECIFICS OF ART INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION IN ART CLASSES

    OpenAIRE

    Maja Hrvanović

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the author puts forward the hypothesis that the representation of information of artistic type in art classes affects the formation of judgement of taste as one of the most important factors for intensifying and memorising the experience of artistic content. The function of art education is to enable an individual to „read“ the work of art, to supply him with skills and knowledge necessary to recognise formally significant determinants in art. Creation of new concep...

  17. A arte de curar dos profissionais de saúde popular em tempo de cólera: Grão-Pará do século XIX The curative art of specialists in folk medicine in times of cholera: 19th century Grão-Pará

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Felipe Beltrão

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Durante a epidemia de cólera que assolou o Grão-Pará, em 1855, pouco mais de uma dezena de anônimos profissionais de saúde popular inscreveram suas artes de curar nos anais da história. As terapias não eram muitas, mas foram disseminadas nos jornais provinciais ou pela forte tradição oral presente na Amazônia. Uma dessas terapias - o uso do sumo de limão - chegou a ser avalizada pelos médicos da província como cientificamente correta. Os homens que "não eram médicos, nem cirurgiões" usavam ervas e frutos medicinais preparados em sumos, infusões, banhos, emplastos e supositórios, rompendo as fronteiras estabelecidas pela arte oficial de curar, a medicina alopática, que tentava estabelecer-se hegemonicamente. Descrevo a trilha da cólera até o Grão-Pará e analiso o contexto social da epidemia; os conhecimentos sobre a cólera: as possibilidades de socorro oferecidas à população e as práticas curativas então adotadas.During the cholera epidemics that affected the Grão-Pará Province in 1855, not more than ten anonymous public health professionals registered in history their curing powers as they relieved cholera victims. There were not too many therapies, but they were publicized in letters printed in local newspapers. The therapeutical powers of alternative medicine was disseminated throughout the Amazon thanks to the strong oral history tradition. One of such therapies - the usage of lemon juice - was adopted by medical doctors in the Province and later on scientifically accredited. Citizens who "were not doctors, nor surgeons" used medicinal herbs and fruits to prepare juices, infusions, baths, plasters and suppositories. They went over the limits established by the official medicine, allopathy, which acted hegemonically. The article describes the path that cholera traveled to reach Grão-Pará and the ensuing scourge of Belém. Data are presented on mortality, the social context of the event, health-care knowledge

  18. VISUAL ART APPRECIATION IN NIGERIA: THE ZARIA ART ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ndubuisi

    2017-02-02

    Feb 2, 2017 ... award a Diploma certificate in art, Nigerian College of Arts, Science and Technology. (NCAST). NCAST ... their permanent site at Zaria, in northern Nigeria, with 16 students. This paper focuses on ... Onabolu was the first Nigeria artist to receive a formal education in art, thus he single- handedly brought ...

  19. Statistical Image Properties in Large Subsets of Traditional Art,Bad Art, and Abstract Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redies, Christoph; Brachmann, Anselm

    2017-01-01

    Several statistical image properties have been associated with large subsets of traditional visual artworks. Here, we investigate some of these properties in three categories of art that differ in artistic claim and prestige: (1) Traditional art of different cultural origin from established museums and art collections (oil paintings and graphic art of Western provenance, Islamic book illustration and Chinese paintings), (2) Bad Art from two museums that collect contemporary artworks of lesser importance (© Museum Of Bad Art [MOBA], Somerville, and Official Bad Art Museum of Art [OBAMA], Seattle), and (3) twentieth century abstract art of Western provenance from two prestigious museums (Tate Gallery and Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen). We measured the following four statistical image properties: the fractal dimension (a measure relating to subjective complexity); self-similarity (a measure of how much the sections of an image resemble the image as a whole), 1st-order entropy of edge orientations (a measure of how uniformly different orientations are represented in an image); and 2nd-order entropy of edge orientations (a measure of how independent edge orientations are across an image). As shown previously, traditional artworks of different styles share similar values for these measures. The values for Bad Art and twentieth century abstract art show a considerable overlap with those of traditional art, but we also identified numerous examples of Bad Art and abstract art that deviate from traditional art. By measuring statistical image properties, we quantify such differences in image composition for the first time.

  20. Counseling as an Art: The Creative Arts in Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladding, Samuel T.

    In this book counseling approaches with a variety of populations are examined using these creative arts: music; dance/movement; imagery; visual arts; literature; drama; and play and humor. It is noted that all of these arts are process-oriented, emotionally sensitive, socially directed, and awareness-focused. Chapter 1 discusses the history,…

  1. ArtsIN: Arts Integration and Infusion Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartle, Lynn C.; Pinciotti, Patricia; Gorton, Rebecca L.

    2015-01-01

    Teaching to meet the diverse learning needs of twenty-first century, global learners can be challenging, yet a growing body of research points to the proved successes of arts-infused and integrated curricula, especially for building capacity for learning and motivation. This article presents the ArtsIN: Arts Integration and Infusion framework, a…

  2. [Characteristics of art therapists in rehabilitative therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oster, Jörg

    2017-09-01

    Characteristics of art therapists in rehabilitative therapy Objectives: This study examines the sociodemographic, qualification- and activity-related characteristics of art therapists working in the field of rehabilitation. In 2013, an analysis of occupational groups was carried out in Germany, with the objective of describing the art therapists working there.A total of 2,303 complete datasets were submitted. From this group, those therapists mainly working in the field of rehabilitation/follow-up care/participation of disabled persons (according to Social Security Code VI and IX, n = 302) were selected and described. Most art therapists are female (average age 45 years) and largelywork part-time. Music and art therapy are the most common venues.More than 80% have a graduate degree. Methods of quality management are used.More than half of the therapists working in rehabilitation hospitals are employed in the field of psychosomatic medicine. Both individual and group therapy (each patient attending 1-2 times a week) are common. The results provide an overview of art therapy in the field of rehabilitation and show the spread in rehabilitation. Further research is indicated.

  3. ARTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahadevan, Shankar; Virk, Kashif M.; Madsen, Jan

    2007-01-01

    . We present an abstract system-level modelling and simulation framework (ARTS) which allows for cross-layer modelling and analysis covering the application layer, middleware layer, and hardware layer. ARTS allows MPSoC designers to explore and analyze the network performance under different traffic...... and load conditions, consequences of different task mappings to processors (software or hardware) including memory and power usage, and effects of RTOS selection, including scheduling, synchronization and resource allocation policies. We present the application and platform models of ARTS as well...... as their implementation in SystemC. We present the usage of the ARTS framework as seen from platform developers’ point of view, where new components may be created and integrated into the framework, and from application designers’ point of view, where existing components are used to explore possible implementations...

  4. Art and the history of medicine. The dwarf pointed by Mantegna of Montua and the Morgante of Florence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battin, Jacques

    2009-06-01

    This short article concerns two images which relate art and the history of medicine. The first is a fresco by Andrea Mantegna, from the period 1465-1474, when he was at the Gonzaga court of Ludovic III. This painting includes a female dwarf. Modern ideas on dwarfism are briefly discussed and another dwarf, Morgante, from the court of the Medicis in Florence, is described and illustrated.

  5. Minimalism in Art, Medical Science and Neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okten, Ali Ihsan

    2018-01-01

    The word "minimalism" is a word derived from French the word "minimum". Whereas the lexical meaning of minimum is "the least or the smallest quantity necessary for something", its expression in mathematics can be described as "the lowest step a variable number can descend, least, minimal". Minimalism, which advocates an extreme simplicity of the artistic form, is a current in modern art and music whose origins go to 1960s and which features simplicity and objectivity. Although art, science and philosophy are different disciplines, they support each other from time to time, sometimes they intertwine and sometimes they copy each other. A periodic schools or teaching in one of them can take the others into itself, so, they proceed on their ways empowering each other. It is also true for the minimalism in art and the minimal invasive surgical approaches in science. Concepts like doing with less, avoiding unnecessary materials and reducing the number of the elements in order to increase the effect in the expression which are the main elements of the minimalism in art found their equivalents in medicine and neurosurgery. Their equivalents in medicine or neurosurgery have been to protect the physical integrity of the patient with less iatrogenic injury, minimum damage and the same therapeutic effect in the most effective way and to enable the patient to regain his health in the shortest span of time. As an anticipation, we can consider that the minimal approaches started by Richard Wollheim and Barbara Rose in art and Lars Leksell, Gazi Yaşargil and other neurosurgeons in neurosurgery in the 1960s are the present day equivalents of the minimalist approaches perhaps unconsciously started by Kazimir Malevich in art and Victor Darwin L"Espinasse in neurosurgery in the early 1900s. We can also consider that they have developed interacting with each other, not by chance.

  6. Arts-based learning in medical education: the students' perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de la Croix, Anne; Rose, Catharine; Wildig, Emma; Willson, Suzy

    2011-01-01

    CONTEXT Arts subjects are often included in medical school curricula to facilitate the exploration of non-scientific elements of medicine, such as communication, social, political, emotional and spiritual issues. However, little research has reported on students' experience of arts teaching.

  7. Teaching Art History in Interdisciplinary Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheney, Leana

    This paper discusses how to teach art history in college level interdisciplinary courses. Today, art historians find themselves involved in teaching art history not only in art history curricula, but also in interdisciplinary studies, such as Ancient Greek Culture, Renaissance in France, and Women in Art. When teaching art history in…

  8. Rheumatoid arthritis: Nuclear Medicine state-of-the-art imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Rosado-de-Castro, Paulo Henrique; Lopes de Souza, Sergio Augusto; Alexandre, Dângelo; Barbosa da Fonseca, Lea Mirian; Gutfilen, Bianca

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease, which is associated with systemic and chronic inflammation of the joints, resulting in synovitis and pannus formation. For several decades, the assessment of RA has been limited to conventional radiography, assisting in the diagnosis and monitoring of disease. Nevertheless, conventional radiography has poor sensitivity in the detection of the inflammatory process that happens in the initial stages of RA. In the past years, new drugs that sig...

  9. Taking a long look at Art: Reflections on the context of production and consumption of art in Art Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Gilroy, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    This paper draws on experiences of looking at art to consider the influence of social context on the production and consumption of art in art therapy. I draw on art historical discourses to explore the experience and relate this to looking at art in art therapy. I suggest that professional socialisation profoundly influences how art therapists look and think about what they see. I propose that attention to our tacit knowledge about art, extending art therapy’s practices of looking to include ...

  10. How Standards will Degrade the Art of Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Botin, Lars

    2013-01-01

    everyday language from our communication in the system we lose major part of meaning-construction concerning health and life of the patient/citizen. It is the normative and ethical aim of the discussion to frame how human factors are terminated as standards and bodies as machines replaces everyday language...

  11. Neuroimaging in sleep medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang-Vu, Thien Thanh; Desseilles, Martin; Petit, Dominique; Mazza, Stéphanie; Montplaisir, Jacques; Maquet, Pierre

    2007-06-01

    The development of neuroimaging techniques has made possible the characterization of cerebral function throughout the sleep-wake cycle in normal human subjects. Indeed, human brain activity during sleep is segregated within specific cortical and subcortical areas in relation to the sleep stage, sleep physiological events and previous waking activity. This approach has allowed sleep physiological theories developed from animal data to be confirmed, but has also introduced original concepts about the neurobiological mechanisms of sleep, dreams and memory in humans. In contrast, at present, few neuroimaging studies have been dedicated to human sleep disorders. The available work has brought interesting data that describe some aspects of the pathophysiology and neural consequences of disorders such as insomnia, sleep apnea and narcolepsy. However, the interpretation of many of these results is restricted by limited sample size and spatial/temporal resolution of the employed technique. The use of neuroimaging in sleep medicine is actually restrained by concerns resulting from the technical experimental settings and the characteristics of the diseases. Nevertheless, we predict that future studies, conducted with state of the art techniques on larger numbers of patients, will be able to address these issues and contribute significantly to the understanding of the neural basis of sleep pathologies. This may finally offer the opportunity to use neuroimaging, in addition to the clinical and electrophysiological assessments, as a helpful tool in the diagnosis, classification, treatment and monitoring of sleep disorders in humans.

  12. THE SPECIFICS OF ART INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION IN ART CLASSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Hrvanović

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the author puts forward the hypothesis that the representation of information of artistic type in art classes affects the formation of judgement of taste as one of the most important factors for intensifying and memorising the experience of artistic content. The function of art education is to enable an individual to „read“ the work of art, to supply him with skills and knowledge necessary to recognise formally significant determinants in art. Creation of new conceptual design, functional usage of visual information in communication process, individuality in shaping their own criteria, are just some of the determinants of artistic development. Art education accorded with development of technology and visual communication is necessary for human development of young individuals and improvement of their general level of culture. Conceptually – concrete art can uncritically be understood as direct and „comprehensible“. The observer with basic artistic education has no difficulties in expressing judgement about realistic work of art, because all mental functions, by analogy, occur with the experience. Art formed in the area of symbolic self-expression, areal structure, requires special knowledge and skills to overcome sensed and decorative levels when experiencing a work of art. The classes of art education should teach the students the methods of judging the artistic quality, to significantly influence their ability of critical analysis, interpretation and formation of judgement of taste

  13. THE SPECIFICS OF ART INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION IN ART CLASSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Hrvanović

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the author puts forward the hypothesis that the representation of information of artistic type in art classes affects the formation of judgement of taste as one of the most important factors for intensifying and memorising the experience of artistic content. The function of art education is to enable an individual to „read“ the work of art, to supply him with skills and knowledge necessary to recognise formally significant determinants in art. Creation of new conceptual design, functional usage of visual information in communication process, individuality in shaping their own criteria, are just some of the determinants of artistic development. Art education accorded with development of technology and visual communication is necessary for human development of young individuals and improvement of their general level of culture. Conceptually – concrete art can uncritically be understood as direct and „comprehensible“. The observer with basic artistic education has no difficulties in expressing judgement about realistic work of art, because all mental functions, by analogy, occur with the experience. Art formed in the area of symbolic self-expression, areal structure, requires special knowledge and skills to overcome sensed and decorative levels when experiencing a work of art. The classes of art education should teach the students the methods of judging the artistic quality, to significantly influence their ability of critical analysis, interpretation and formation of judgement of taste.

  14. [Sports medicine in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickhuth, H-H

    2005-08-01

    Sports medicine covers many different aspects, ranging from clinical specialties, such as internal medicine, orthopedics or pediatrics to physiology and sports sciences. The requirements for sports medicine evolve mainly from exercise physiology (elite, leisure and health oriented physical activity), orthopedics and traumatology as well as from preventive and rehabilitative issues. In the new German curriculum, sports medicine is defined as a subspecialty. Historically, sports medicine in Germany has a federal structure with a governing body (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Sportmedizin und Prävention). Due to these facts, University Departments of Sports Medicine (which vary greatly in size and performance) are either attached to Medical or non-Medical Faculties, such as Sports Sciences. In medical schools, sports medicine can be selected as an elective subject. However, the main part of teaching sports medicine is covered by Sports Science Faculties. In an international context, the strength of German sports medicine is its clinical orientation and close cooperation with the sport itself, especially high-performance sports. In the future, like in the Anglo- American countries, sports medicine in Germany will play a major role in health prevention and rehabilitation.

  15. Material interaction in art therapy assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pénzes, I.J.N.J.; Hooren, S. van; Dokter, D.; Smeijsters, H.; Hutschemaekers, G.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Diverse approaches to art therapy assessment agree that art materials should play a central role. However, relatively little research is done on the role of different art materials. This article describes the results of a qualitative study on the use of art materials by art therapists in art therapy

  16. Figurative Language Represented in Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallach, Michele

    2009-01-01

    In the test-driven society in which teachers teach, many art teachers are encouraged to create interdisciplinary units that fuse art with reading and writing. In this article, the author presents a unit which fosters appreciation of Sandra Cisneros' writing and encourages students to portray her words in their own three-dimensional designs.…

  17. Rock Art in Kurdistan Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal Lahafian

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Kurdistan, with great potential and prehistoric resources, has numerous petroglyphs in different areas of the province. During the last 14 years of extensive field study, more than 30 sites of rock art have been identified and introduced by the author. In this article, we summarize these rock art areas in Iranian Kurdistan.

  18. Authenticity in art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, S.J.

    1975-01-01

    After a general introductory chapter, the subject is treated under three headings: paintings, ceramics and metals. The scientific tests for authenticity are described in their application to one or more of these branches of art. The traditional method of visual stylistic judgement is compared with and supplemented by scientific methods which (as well as 'wet' chemical analysis, optical microscopy, ultraviolet, infrared, electron and X-ray microscopy, X-ray crystallography and X-ray fluorescence, and direct age determination) include the following or more direct 'nuclear' interest: neutron (or proton, deuteron and high-energy photon) activation analysis for determining impurity and trace element content, gamma radiography for bronzes, neutron autoradiography or examining paintings, radiocarbon dating, other isotope dating (e.g. with lead isotopes and the radium-lead ratio), high temperature thermoluminescence for ceramics, and mass spectroscopy to determine isotope ratios indicative of particular sources of materials. As well as the reference in each chapter there is an additional bibliography. (U.K.)

  19. From body art to anticancer activities: perspectives on medicinal properties of henna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Rohan; Dandawate, Prasad; Vyas, Alok; Padhye, Subhash; Biersack, Bernhard; Schobert, Rainer; Ahmad, Aamir; Sarkar, Fazlul H

    2012-12-01

    Nature has been a rich source of therapeutic agents for thousands of years and an impressive number of modern drugs have been isolated from natural sources based on the uses of these plants in traditional medicine. Henna is one such plant commonly known as Persian Henna or Lawsonia inermis, a bushy, flowering tree, commonly found in Australia, Asia and along the Mediterranean coasts of Africa. Paste made from the leaves of Henna plant has been used since the Bronze Age to dye skin, hairs and fingernails especially at the times of festivals. In recent times henna paste has been used for body art paintings and designs in western countries. Despite such widespread use in dyeing and body art painting, Henna extracts and constituents possess numerous biological activities including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial and anticancer activities. The active coloring and biologically active principle of Henna is found to be Lawsone (2- hydroxy-1, 4-naphthoquinone) which can serve as a starting building block for synthesizing large number of therapeutically useful compounds including Atovaquone, Lapachol and Dichloroallyl lawsone which have been shown to possess potent anticancer activities. Some other analogs of Lawsone have been found to exhibit other beneficial biological properties such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antitubercular and antimalarial. The ability of Lawsone to undergo the redox cycling and chelation of trace metal ions has been thought to be partially responsible for some of its biological activities. Despite such diverse biological properties and potent anticancer activities the compound has remained largely unexplored and hence in the present review we have summarized the chemistry and biological activities of Lawsone along with its analogs and metal complexes.

  20. Art in the Service of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmus, J. F.

    In fields such as studio art, art conservation, archaeology, anthropology, music, and architecture it is often understood that many of the advances emerge from the introduction of new developments from science and technology. Scientific research is often justified on the basis of its past as well as potential future fallout into other endeavors as diverse as medicine, manufacturing, and the humanities. The diffusion of scientific innovation into the practice of art conservation has been punctuated by the introduction of a series of diverse technologies. Trace element and isotopic analyses, infrared imaging, ultraviolet fluorescence inspection, advanced coatings and adhesives, scanning electron microscopy, and photon/electron microprobes are notable examples. For the past thirty years various laser technologies have demonstrated utility in the practice of art conservation, as well. These include photon cleaning and divestment, holographic display and nondestructive analysis, surface characterization through laser fluorescence, radiation scattering and absorption, as well as laser-induced ultrasound. At the dawn of laser technology's introduction into the art conservation field (1972-74) the Center for Art/Science Studies (CASS) was established at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) with the hope of accelerating and broadening the diffusion of scientific developments into art conservation practice. Surprisingly, one of the first events in the CASS/UCSD transpired when a Visual Arts Department student employed a primitive laser statue cleaner to "correct" a silk-screen print. In the course of maintaining her laser this art student discovered a dramatically improved method for aligning the complex optical beam train by utilizing her artistic training. A few months later another CASS/UCSD student in the Photographic Arts Program (while modifying a ruby laser to experiment with theater-lighting special effects) discovered an improved laser beam

  1. Art therapy in cancer fight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érica Rodrigues D'Alencar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Art therapy is the therapeutic use of artistic activity in the context of the professional relationship with people affected by disease, injury or by seeking personal development. This study aims to report the experience of art therapy activities with a group of patients and their caregivers in a university hospital. This is an experience report, in Fortaleza - CE, during September 2010 to February 2011. In the meetings, participated 49 people, who performed activities, using the methods of art therapy, like painting, cutting, drawing, collage, creative visualization and color therapy. In the assessments, after the groups, the participants demonstrated the effects of art therapy, which described that the intervention allowed speak from the process of facing life to cancer fight. It is concluded that the techniques of art therapy provided self-knowledge, self-esteem and redemption sense of well-being with relaxation, and promote happiness and reduce stress.

  2. Personalized medicine in psychiatry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wium-Andersen, Ida Kim; Vinberg, Maj; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2017-01-01

    Background: Personalized medicine is a model in which a patient’s unique clinical, genetic, and environmental characteristics are the basis for treatment and prevention.  Aim, method, and results: This review aims to describe the current tools, phenomenological features, clinical risk factors......, and biomarkers used to provide personalized medicine. Furthermore, this study describes the target areas in which they can be applied including diagnostics, treatment selection and response, assessment of risk of side-effects, and prevention.  Discussion and conclusion: Personalized medicine in psychiatry....... The discussion proposes possible solutions to narrow this gap and to move psychiatric research forward towards personalized medicine....

  3. Ethics in sports medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Warren R; George, Michael S; Churchill, Larry; Spindler, Kurt P

    2007-05-01

    Physicians have struggled with the medical ramifications of athletic competition since ancient Greece, where rational medicine and organized athletics originated. Historically, the relationship between sport and medicine was adversarial because of conflicts between health and sport. However, modern sports medicine has emerged with the goal of improving performance and preventing injury, and the concept of the "team physician" has become an integral part of athletic culture. With this distinction come unique ethical challenges because the customary ethical norms for most forms of clinical practice, such as confidentiality and patient autonomy, cannot be translated easily into sports medicine. The particular areas of medical ethics that present unique challenges in sports medicine are informed consent, third parties, advertising, confidentiality, drug use, and innovative technology. Unfortunately, there is no widely accepted code of sports medicine ethics that adequately addresses these issues.

  4. Mind-Body Medicine Practices in Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fact Sheets Home > Mind-Body Medicine Practices in Complementary and Alternative Medicine Small Text Medium Text Large Text Mind-Body Medicine Practices in Complementary and Alternative Medicine YESTERDAY The concept that the mind is important ...

  5. Nuclear Medicine in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durak, H.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear Medicine is a medical specialty that uses radionuclides for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases and it is one of the most important peaceful applications of nuclear sciences. Nuclear Medicine has a short history both in Turkey and in the world. The first use of I-131 for the treatment of thyrotoxicosis in Turkey was in 1958 at the Istanbul University Cerrahpasa Medical School. In 1962, Radiobiological Institute in Ankara University Medical School was established equipped with well-type counters, radiometers, scalers, external counters and a rectilinear scanner. In 1965, multi-probe external detection systems, color dot scanners and in 1967, anger scintillation camera had arrived. In 1962, wet lab procedures and organ scanning, in 1965 color dot scanning, dynamic studies (blood flow - renograms) and in 1967 analogue scintillation camera and dynamic camera studies have started. In 1974, nuclear medicine was established as independent medical specialty. Nuclear medicine departments have started to get established in 1978. In 1974, The Turkish Society of Nuclear Medicine (TSNM) was established with 10 members. The first president of TSNM was Prof. Dr. Yavuz Renda. Now, in the year 2000, TSNM has 349 members. Turkish Society of Nuclear Medicine is a member of European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM), World Federation of Nuclear Medicine and Biology (WFNMB) and WFNMB Asia-Oceania. Since 1974, TSNM has organized 13 national Nuclear Medicine congresses, 4 international Nuclear Oncology congresses and 13 nuclear medicine symposiums. In 1-5 October 2000, 'The VII th Asia and Oceania Congress of Nuclear Medicine and Biology' was held in Istanbul, Turkey. Since 1992, Turkish Journal of Nuclear Medicine is published quarterly and it is the official publication of TSNM. There are a total of 112 Nuclear Medicine centers in Turkey. There are 146 gamma cameras. (52 Siemens, 35 GE, 16 Elscint, 14 Toshiba, 10 Sopha, 12 MIE, 8 Philips, 9 Others) Two cyclotrons are

  6. Art in the Digital Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The genre of “computer art” began in the 1950s, when long exposure photography was used to capture images created by an oscilloscope manipulating electronic waves on a small fluorescent screen. Through the 1960s, most works of computer art were created using plotters and impact printers by the scientists and engineers who had access to emerging computing technology. By the 1970s, artists were learning to program, and some universities began to integrate computers into the fine arts curriculum. The widespread adoption of computers and the availability of off-the-shelf paint programs in the 1980s brought computer art to the masses. At the same time, computer graphics and special effects were beginning their takeover of the entertainment industry through Hollywood films, TV shows, and video games. By the 1990s, the term computer art was fading, and computers were becoming a mainstream part of arts and entertainment.

  7. [Surgical laboratory in pregraduate medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia-Jurado, Jesús

    2011-01-01

    Surgical laboratory in pregraduate students in medicine is beneficial and improves learning processes in cognitive aspects and skills acquisition. It is also an early initiation into scientific research. The laboratory is the introductory pathway into basic concepts of medical science (meaningful learning). It is also where students gain knowledge in procedures and abilities to obtain professional skills, an interactive teacher-student process. Medicine works rapidly to change from an art to a science. This fact compromises all schools and medical faculties to analyze their actual lesson plans. Simulators give students confidence and ability and save time, money and resources, eliminating at the same time the ethical factor of using live animals and the fear of patient safety. Multimedia programs may give a cognitive context evolving logically with an explanation based on written and visual animation followed by a clinical problem and its demonstration in a simulator, all before applying knowledge to the patient.

  8. Radioisotopes in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuel, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: A number of advances in diverse fields of science and technology and the fruitful synchronization of many a new development to address the issues related to health care in terms of prognosis and diagnosis resulted in the availability of host of modern diagnostic tools in medicine. Nuclear medicine, a unique discipline in medicine is one such development, which during the last four decades has seen exponential growth. The unique contribution of this specialty is the ability to examine the dynamic state of every organ of the body with the help of radioactive tracers. This tracer application in nuclear medicine to monitor the biological molecules that participate in the dynamic state of body constituents has led to a whole new approach to biology and medicine. No other technique has the same level of sensitivity and specificity as obtained in radiotracer technique in the study of in-situ chemistry of body organs. As modem medicine becomes oriented towards molecules rather than organs, nuclear medicine will be in the forefront and will become an integral part of a curative process for regular and routine application. Advances in nuclear medicine will proceed along two principal lines: (i) the development of improved sensitive detectors of radiation, powerful and interpretable data processing, image analysis and display techniques, and (ii) the production of exotic and new but useful radiopharmaceuticals. All these aspects are dealt with in detail in this talk

  9. Immoral behaviour in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmon, P; Tabak, N

    1997-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to emphasize a social phenomenon that exists in Israel: immoral medicine. In recent years, nurses have been exposed to many instances of immoral medicine in hospitals. We want to protest about the demands for money from patients who are waiting for surgical intervention, arouse the medical community's conscience concerning these immoral activities, and improve professional and moral behaviour.

  10. [Complementary medicine in Israel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenkel, Moshe; Gamus, Dorit

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades there has been an increase in the use and popularity of complementary medicine in Israel. Currently, there are over 100 complementary medicine clinics in the public health sector supported by the four health funds and most hospitals in Israel. The number of visits to those clinics reaches close to 3 million visits annually. This reflects an extensive system of care that Israelis utilize in addition to the conventional heaLthcare system. However, the communication between the two systems is still Limited and the education of complementary medicine providers is not regulated by the Ministry of Health. Concurrently, there are a growing number of physicians who expand the knowledge on these therapies and actually integrate them in patients' care. This issue describes experiences and knowledge related to the integration of complementary medicine in the Israeli healthcare system and provides additional research data in support of further integration of complementary medicine within conventional healthcare.

  11. Diversity in Medicinal Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, David

    2018-01-08

    The wide world of medicinal chemistry: We look back at our activities in 2017, particularly the expansion of the journal's scope to nanomedicine and why we need a more inclusive medicinal chemistry journal. Additionally, we look at upcoming special issues and developments for ChemPubSoc Europe in 2018. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. MEANING, VALUE, IMPORTANCE IN ARTS AND THE ART OF MUSIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Bingol

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the journey of reaching beauty, which has possibly been a basic motivation of art, there has been attempts to define beauty, In this respect, several questions have been addressed such as What is beauty? Are there any criteria for generalizing the concept of beauty? Is beauty a feature that beings bear? Or, is it us to find them beautiful? Meaning, importance and value have been some of the basic issues in the philosophy of art. Accordingly, there has been some explanations made from various philosophical views. In this paper, the issues of meaning, importance and value in art, from general definitions toward the art of music, are presented from formalist, referentialist and expressionist views. The purpose of this paper is to present some phiolophical views with regard to the issues of meaning, importance and value in the art of music.

  13. PACS in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Keon Wook

    2000-01-01

    PACS (Picture Archiving and Communication System) is being rapidly spread and installed in many hospitals, but most of the system do not include nuclear medicine field. Although additional costs of hardware for nuclear medicine PACS is low, the complexity in developing viewing software and little market have made the nuclear medicine PACS not popular. Most PACS utilize DICOM 3.0 as standard format, but standard format in nuclear medicine has been Interfile. Interfile should be converted into DICOM format if nuclear images are to be stored and visualized in most PACS. Nowadays, many vendors supply the DICOM option in gamma camera and PET. Several hospitals in Korea have already installed nucler PACS with DICOM, but only the screen captured images are supplied. Software for visualizing pseudo-color with color lookup tables and expressing with volume view should be developed to fulfill the demand of referring physicians and nuclear medicine physicians. PACS is going to integrate not only radiologic images but also endoscopic and pathologic images. Web and PC based PACS is now a trend and is much compatible with nuclear medicine PACS. Most important barrier for nuclear medicine PACS that we encounter is not a technical problem, but indifference of investor such as administrator of hospital or PACS. Now it is time to support and invest for the development of nuclear medicine PACS

  14. Imagery in visual arts: Managing the temperament of art criticism ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Works of art can be described as narratives in shorthand where tangled mass of meaning and relationships are woven 'seemingly' inseparably by the instrumentality of a medium. The interpretation of this shorthand and the undoing of the 'tangled mass of meaning, constitute the great area known as 'art criticism'.

  15. Technology in respiratory medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Repro

    Respiratory medicine is the subspecialty in medicine which requires the most regu- lar and precise evaluation of physiological function for complete assessment of the patient. The very nature of respiratory physiology requires the availability of a range of technological devices. Physiological measurements that may be.

  16. Arte, só na aula de arte? = Art, only in the art class?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins, Mirian Celeste

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A pergunta que dá título ao artigo é o mote da conversa que o texto deseja compartilhar. O convite é para percorrer trajetos em encontros com a arte, com a palavra “estética”, com a potencialidade da arte contemporânea, com o “olhar de missão francesa” que teima em considerar a arte como expressão da beleza. No percurso, a proposição da leitura de uma imagem incompleta, tenta provocar idas e voltas conceituais na percepção do próprio ato de leitura oferecida como curadoria educativa na processualidade da mediação cultural. Declanchar, tirar a tranca. Não será esta a tarefa maior da mediação cultural: abrir o que estava travado, libertar o olhar amarrado ao já conhecido para ver além? Não será este o sentido da educação estética? Os territórios de arte de arte & cultura, instigando o pensamento rizomático, não seriam nutrição estética para ir além das obras de arte conhecidas e das biografias dos artistas? Na ampliação de horizontes, cabe ao leitor a resposta: Afinal, arte, só na aula de arte?

  17. Demystifying Experiential Learning in the Performing Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindelan, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    The pedagogy of performing arts courses in theatre, film, music, and dance programs found in most liberal arts curricula is clearly experiential insofar as the making of art involves active engagement in classroom activities or events that are staged or filmed. But because many educators outside the arts perceive performing arts programs as solely…

  18. Nuclear Medicine in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, S.

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear Medicine in China was established in 1956, when the first course, Biomedical Applications of Isotopes, was offered in our country by the Peking Union Medical College (PUMC). In 1958, several courses in Clinical Nuclear Medicine brought up the first generation of Nuclear Medicine physicians in China. 99m Tc and 113m In generators were supplied in 1972. The first gamma camera was imported in 1972 and the first homemade gamma camera was installed in 1977. The Chinese Journal of Nuclear Medicine commenced publication in 1981. The first single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) camera was imported in 1983. At present, there are 800 Nuclear Medicine departments in China with a total of 6,000 staff. Beijing and Shanghai each have a cyclotron of 30 MeV, imported from Belgium, consequently gallium-68, thallium-201, indium-111, iodine-123 are all available for production. There is currently one operating PET camera facility in China, in the Shandong province. A second PET/cyclotron facility is currently being developed in the Nuclear Medicine Department, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai Medical University. The most common clinical Nuclear Medicine applications are in oncological, cardiovascular, cerebrovascular and neuropsychiatric disorders

  19. The Colour Treatment: A Convergence of Art and Medicine at the Red Cross Russell Lea Nerve Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, Jim

    2016-01-01

    When the Red Cross opened its new convalescent home at Russell Lea in Sydney in 1919, it contained a coloured room designed for treating ‘nerve cases’. This room was painted by Roy de Maistre, a young artist, and was modelled on the Kemp Prossor colour scheme trialled at the McCaul Convalescent Hospital in London for the treatment of shell shock. Dubbed the ‘colour cure’ by the popular press, this unconventional treatment was ignored by the Australian medical profession. The story of de Maistre's colour experiment is not widely known outside the specialist field of Australian art history. Focusing on the colour room as a point of convergence between art and medicine in the context of the First World War, this article investigates Red Cross activities and the care of soldiers suffering from nervous conditions.

  20. Art in virtual reality 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ben

    2010-01-01

    For decades, virtual reality artwork has existed in a small but highly influential niche in the world of electronic and new media art. Since the early 1990's, virtual reality installations have come to define an extreme boundary point of both aesthetic experience and technological sophistication. Classic virtual reality artworks have an almost mythological stature - powerful, exotic, and often rarely exhibited. Today, art in virtual environments continues to evolve and mature, encompassing everything from fully immersive CAVE experiences to performance art in Second Life to the use of augmented and mixed reality in public space. Art in Virtual Reality 2010 is a public exhibition of new artwork that showcases the diverse ways that contemporary artists use virtual environments to explore new aesthetic ground and investigate the continually evolving relationship between our selves and our virtual worlds.

  1. Distinctions in Disclosure: Mandated Informed Consent in Abortion and ART.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daar, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Enactment of mandated pre-procedure disclosures in abortion and assisted reproductive technology (ART) services has swelled in recent years. Calls to equally regard these mandates as neutral tools in furtherance of patient protection fail to acknowledge key substantive and structural differences in these reproduction-affecting mandates. While ART mandates permit physicians to use their medical judgment to protect presumptively vulnerable egg donors and gestational carriers, abortion disclosures impart scientifically suspect messaging aimed at dissuading women from pursuing pregnancy termination. These and other distinctions counsel in favor of regarding and analyzing abortion and ART mandated disclosures as separate and distinguishable informed consent tools. © 2015 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  2. Studio in Art: A Comprehensive Foundation Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    This secondary level art curriculum guide helps students to individualize visual and plastic arts experience. It is divided into sections on the nature of art, elements of art, and movements and trends in the world of art. Materials direct the teacher toward important events and concepts, useful exercises, and pertinent points for student…

  3. [Oocyte vitrification in an ART laboratory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, P; Montjean, D; Tourame, P; Gervoise-Boyer, M

    2013-09-01

    Oocyte vitrification has been authorized in France after the modification of French bioethics law in July 2011. This evolution will bring a dramatic change in patients' management since, from 2011, infertile couples, oocyte donation and fertility preservation programs will benefit this technique in France. We have introduced oocyte vitrification in our ART laboratory through a validation of the method using Evidence-Based Medicine model: open system Cryotop, Ethylène-glycol 15% and DMSO 15%. Based on our 1-year experience, oocyte vitrification upgrades our daily practice while also minimizing embryo cryoconservation as recommended by the law. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Imaging and visual documentation in medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wamsteker, K.; Jonas, U.; Veen, G. van der; Waes, P.F.G.M. van

    1987-01-01

    DOCUMED EUROPE '87 was organized to provide information to the physician on the constantly progressing developments in medical imaging technology. Leading specialists lectured on the state-of-the-art of imaging technology and visual documentation in medicine. This book presents a collection of the papers presented at the conference. refs.; figs.; tabs

  5. Art and emotion in psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurist, Elliot L

    2006-10-01

    Freud's view that art satisfies psychic needs has been taken to mean that art has its source in the unconscious and that it unifies pleasure and reality. The author argues that there is a third point that Freud repeatedly emphasizes, which should not be overlooked, that art influences our emotions. The author examines what Freud means by this claim, in particular, his reading of Michelangelo's Moses. Freud's focus here on emotions as fundamental to subjective experience, as subject to regulation and as potentially healthy forms of communication serves to supplement and even challenge what he says in his theory of affect. The author concludes by making inferences about a contemporary psychoanalytic theory of affects: that it ought to be inclusive of science (more receptive to neurobiology and less bound to Freud) as well as art (preserving the focus on subjective experience, especially the processing of complex emotions), which is illustrated with the concept of mentalized affectivity.

  6. Andrea Pasta (1706-1782), eclectic scholar of anatomy and clinical medicine, communication and the history of art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerici, Carlo Alfredo; Veneroni, Laura; Patriarca, Carlo

    2014-11-01

    Andrea Pasta was an eclectic visionary light years ahead of his time. He made numerous contributions to the field of medicine, some recognized by his contemporaries and others so visionary that they are being applied only in modern times. His contributions spanned the disciplines of psychology, gynaecology, haematology, infectious diseases and the doctor-patient relationship. Well known among his contemporaries, he combined a passion for clinical medicine and a keen interest in history and art with a strict research methodology and an approach to caring for patients as human beings. By studying his life and works, we can better understand the magnitude and significance of his innovative method and its applicability in modern times and also the significance of his many contributions. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  7. The Influence of Art on children´s art expression in school practice

    OpenAIRE

    VÁŇOVÁ, Jana

    2010-01-01

    Diploma Thesis ?The Influence of Art on Children´s Art Expression in School Practice? Deals with Evaluation of Possibilities Arttherapeutic Elements of Roznov Art Therapy and the Ways of Use Receptive Art Therapy in Art Lessons at Secondary School. There is Described Children´s Art Expression in the Age between 12 and 15 and Possible Impact of Art Form on Shaping Children´s Art Expression. It Evaluates the Importance of Methodical Intervention of Roznov Art Therapy Elements.

  8. Is laboratory medicine ready for the era of personalized medicine? A survey addressed to laboratory directors of hospitals/academic schools of medicine in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malentacchi, F.; Mancini, I.; Brandslund, I.

    2015-01-01

    in the integration of personalized medicine in routine health care and set the state-of-the-art -knowledge about personalized medicine and laboratory medicine in Europe, a questionnaire was constructed under the auspices of the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM) and the European......Developments in "-omics" are creating a paradigm shift in laboratory medicine leading to personalized medicine. This allows the increase in diagnostics and therapeutics focused on individuals rather than populations. In order to investigate whether laboratory medicine is ready to play a key role...... Society of Pharmacogenomics and Personalised Therapy (ESPT). The answers of the participating laboratory medicine professionals indicate that they are aware that personalized medicine can represent a new and promising health model, and that laboratory medicine should play a key role in supporting...

  9. Women in medicine through the ages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuskin, Eugenija; Pucarin-Cvetkovic, Jasna; Schachter, E N; Mustajbegovic, Jadranka; Vitale, Ksenija; Deckovic-Vukres, Vlasta; Milosevic, M; Jelinic, Jagoda Doko

    2008-01-01

    Female practitioners of the medical arts have been active since the ancient world The role of women in science, and particularly in medicine, has changed significantly over time. We provide a chronological review of the growing knowledge in medicine related to women's activities through the ages with particular attention to occupational medicine. Throughout history hazards have been shaped by the forces that shape work itself social evolution, shifting economic powers and demographic changes. Mythical Greece, Egypt and ancient Rome were the cradle of ancient medicine. In the past century, women were allowed to enter the medical profession with increasing acceptance. Some of the most important women in ancient and modern medicine are recalled, such as Mother Peseshet in ancient Egypt, Artemisia of Caria and Phanostrate and Philista in the Greek period, Hildegard of Bingen, Marie Marguerite Biheron in England, Elisabeth Blackwell, Emily Jennings, Maude E. Abbott and others. Women in occupational medicine are described separately, such as Alice Hamilton, Harriet L. Hardy, Molly Newhouse and Olga Macek. Certainly, the first few women who iluminated the way for the generations that followed them into medicine, the women who made outstanding contributions to medicine, and the women who are currently finding success in medicine deserve our respect and admiration.

  10. Fluorine in medicinal chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swallow, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Since its first use in the steroid field in the late 1950s, the use of fluorine in medicinal chemistry has become commonplace, with the small electronegative fluorine atom being a key part of the medicinal chemist's repertoire of substitutions used to modulate all aspects of molecular properties including potency, physical chemistry and pharmacokinetics. This review will highlight the special nature of fluorine, drawing from a survey of marketed fluorinated pharmaceuticals and the medicinal chemistry literature, to illustrate key concepts exploited by medicinal chemists in their attempts to optimize drug molecules. Some of the potential pitfalls in the use of fluorine will also be highlighted. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. [Medicine in sports or sport medicine?] ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimer, S; Tonković-Lojović, M

    2001-01-01

    Sports medicine is a profession pertaining to primary health care of sport population (competitors, coaches, referees, participants in sports recreation). It embraces the physical and mental health protection and promotion of participants in relation to a particular sport activity and sport environment, directing athletes to a sport and adapting them to sport and the sport to them. Sports medicine takes part in selection procedure, training process planning and programming, and cares for epidemiological, hygienic, nutritional and other problems in sport. The Republic of Croatia belongs to those world states in which the field of sports medicine is regulated neither by a law or by profession. A consequence is that wide circle of physicians and paramedics work in clubs and various medical units without any legal or/and professional control not being adequately educated nor having licence for it. This review is an appeal to the Croatian Medical Chamber and the Ministry of Health to make efforts to promote the education and medical profession in sports medicine.

  12. Emergency medicine in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Lowan H; Trunkey, Donald; Rebagliati, G Steve

    2007-01-01

    Recent events, including the development of space tourism and commercial spaceflight, have increased the need for specialists in space medicine. With increased duration of missions and distance from Earth, medical and surgical events will become inevitable. Ground-based medical support will no longer be adequate when return to Earth is not an option. Pending the inclusion of sub-specialists, clinical skills and medical expertise will be required that go beyond those of current physician-astronauts, yet are well within the scope of Emergency Medicine. Emergency physicians have the necessary broad knowledge base as well as proficiency in basic surgical skills and management of the critically ill and injured. Space medicine shares many attributes with extreme conditions and environments that many emergency physicians already specialize in. This article is an introduction to space medicine, and a review of current issues in the emergent management of medical and surgical disease during spaceflight.

  13. Challenges in sexual medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cellek, Selim; Giraldi, Annamaria

    2012-01-01

    The sexual medicine field has been in mode of revolution until recently. Like all other fields of biomedical research, the economic situation around the world has had a negative impact on the field's momentum-research funding bodies, regulatory bodies and pharmaceutical companies seem to have...... placed sexual medicine in their low-priority list. But this is not the only challenge the field is facing. The successful development of phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors for treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED) means that research in this area seems to have slowed. However, there remain...... several unmet medical needs within sexual medicine such as premature ejaculation, severe ED and hypoactive sexual desire disorder, which await novel therapeutic approaches. Despite these challenges, research into finding and developing such therapies is likely to continue in the sexual medicine field...

  14. Acupuncture in Military Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Soldiers and family members, and to reduce excessive use, or supplement judicious use of pain medications. The Acupuncture in Modern Medicine336 Army ... acupuncture . Acupuncture in Military Medicine http://dx.doi.org/10.5772/55146 331 3. A Holistic approach to pain Complementary and integrative (CI...medical care. More than other CI therapies, acupuncture has undergone a significant integration particularly as a complement to traditional pain manage

  15. Robotics in medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, D. N.; Syryamkin, V. I.

    2015-11-01

    Modern technologies play a very important role in our lives. It is hard to imagine how people can get along without personal computers, and companies - without powerful computer centers. Nowadays, many devices make modern medicine more effective. Medicine is developing constantly, so introduction of robots in this sector is a very promising activity. Advances in technology have influenced medicine greatly. Robotic surgery is now actively developing worldwide. Scientists have been carrying out research and practical attempts to create robotic surgeons for more than 20 years, since the mid-80s of the last century. Robotic assistants play an important role in modern medicine. This industry is new enough and is at the early stage of development; despite this, some developments already have worldwide application; they function successfully and bring invaluable help to employees of medical institutions. Today, doctors can perform operations that seemed impossible a few years ago. Such progress in medicine is due to many factors. First, modern operating rooms are equipped with up-to-date equipment, allowing doctors to make operations more accurately and with less risk to the patient. Second, technology has enabled to improve the quality of doctors' training. Various types of robots exist now: assistants, military robots, space, household and medical, of course. Further, we should make a detailed analysis of existing types of robots and their application. The purpose of the article is to illustrate the most popular types of robots used in medicine.

  16. Biomarkers in Veterinary Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Michael J; Smith, Emily R; Turfle, Phillip G

    2017-02-08

    This article summarizes the relevant definitions related to biomarkers; reviews the general processes related to biomarker discovery and ultimate acceptance and use; and finally summarizes and reviews, to the extent possible, examples of the types of biomarkers used in animal species within veterinary clinical practice and human and veterinary drug development. We highlight opportunities for collaboration and coordination of research within the veterinary community and leveraging of resources from human medicine to support biomarker discovery and validation efforts for veterinary medicine.

  17. Biostereometrics In Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferenc, Kovats

    1986-07-01

    'un artiste doue. Liais nous retournerons encore a cet argument. Avec un objet d'art l'artiste registe un seul moment dune serie de mouvements de son sujet, spit en deux dimensions, s'il est peintre on graveur , dessinateur etc., spit en trois dimensions s'il est sculpteur.i:algre cela , il y a beaucoup d'oeuvresd'art dyna-miques, qui donnent l'impression de mouvement.On pent produire cet effetavec la ROMDOSi-tion des mouvements non simultanees , comme par exemple sur les tableaux de XIX 'si8cle representant des concours hyppiques, on les extremit-ees des chevaux sort distandue an maximum en avant et en arriere; c'est un mode de galop inexistant, mais malgr6, qu'il est faux, it suggere la vitesse.

  18. "Medicine show." Alice in Doctorland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    This is an excerpt from the script of a 1939 play provided to the Institute of Social Medicine and Community Health by the Library of Congress Federal Theater Project Collection at George Mason University Library, Fairfax, Virginia, pages 2-1-8 thru 2-1-14. The Federal Theatre Project (FTP) was part of the New Deal program for the arts 1935-1939. Funded by the Works Progress Administration (WPA) its goal was to employ theater professionals from the relief rolls. A number of FTP plays deal with aspects of medicine and public health. Pageants, puppet shows and documentary plays celebrated progress in medical science while examining social controversies in medical services and the public health movement. "Medicine Show" sharply contrasts technological wonders with social backwardness. The play was rehearsed by the FTP but never opened because funding ended. A revised version ran on Broadway in 1940. The preceding comments are adapted from an excellent, well-illustrated review of five of these plays by Barabara Melosh: "The New Deal's Federal Theatre Project," Medical Heritage, Vol. 2, No. 1 (Jan/Feb 1986), pp. 36-47.

  19. Physics in the Art Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Daniel A.; Bailey, Brenae L.

    2003-02-01

    Parisian artist Paul Signac met the impressionists Claude Monet and Georges Seurat in 1884. Their influence spurred his work in pointillism (or, where the juxtaposition of small dots of color in conjunction with the limited resolving power of the human eye lead to the impression of color coalescence).1-4 To stimulate a cross-disciplinary appreciation of science and art, we used the University of Wyoming Art Museum's Signac painting "Barques de Pêche à Marseilles" (see Fig. 1) to explore diffraction theory and the anatomical limitations to our vision during an optics exercise done in the museum.

  20. Whistleblowing in academic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, R; Strain, J J

    2004-02-01

    Although medical centres have established boards, special committees, and offices for the review and redress of breaches in ethical behaviour, these mechanisms repeatedly prove themselves ineffective in addressing research misconduct within the institutions of academic medicine. As the authors see it, institutional design: (1) systematically ignores serious ethical problems, (2) makes whistleblowers into institutional enemies and punishes them, and (3) thereby fails to provide an ethical environment. The authors present and discuss cases of academic medicine failing to address unethical behaviour in academic science and, thereby, illustrate the scope and seriousness of the problem. The Olivieri/Apotex affair is just another instance of academic medicine's dereliction in a case of scientific fraud and misconduct. Instead of vigorously supporting their faculty member in her efforts to honestly communicate her findings and to protect patients from the risks associated with the use of the study drug, the University of Toronto collaborated with the Apotex company's "stalling tactics," closed down Dr Olivieri's laboratory, harassed her, and ultimately dismissed her. The authors argue that the incentives for addressing problematic behaviour have to be revised in order to effect a change in the current pattern of response that occurs in academic medicine. An externally imposed realignment of incentives could convert the perception of the whistleblower, from their present caste as the enemy within, into a new position, as valued friend of the institution. The authors explain how such a correction could encourage appropriate reactions to scientific misconduct from academic medicine.

  1. The role of biotechnology in art preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, José Luis; Santana, María A; Galindo-Castro, Iván; Gonzalez, Alvaro

    2005-12-01

    Biotechnology has played a key role in medicine, agriculture and industry for over 30 years and has advanced our understanding of the biological sciences. Furthermore, the tools of biotechnology have a great and largely untapped potential for the preservation and restoration of our cultural heritage. It is possible that these tools are not often applied in this context because of the inherent separation of the worlds of art and science; however, it is encouraging to see that during the past six years important biotechnological applications to artwork preservation have emerged and advances in biotechnology predict further innovation. In this article we describe and reflect upon a unique example of a group of scientists and art restoration technicians working together to study and treat of a piece of colonial art, and review some of the new applications in biotechnology for the preservation of mankind's cultural heritage. We predict an expansion in this field and the further development of biotechnological techniques, which will open up new opportunities to both biologists and artwork preservers.

  2. Artfulness in Young Children's Spoken Narratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn-Applegate, Katherine; Breit-Smith, Allison; Justice, Laura M.; Piasta, Shayne B.

    2010-01-01

    Research Findings: Artfulness is rarely considered as an indicator of quality in young children's spoken narratives. Although some studies have examined artfulness in the narratives of children 5 and older, no studies to date have focused on the artfulness of preschoolers' oral narratives. This study examined the artfulness of fictional spoken…

  3. PERFORMANCE IN ART NATURE AND MEANING

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2012-04-25

    Apr 25, 2012 ... Visual Arts often contracted and referred to as Art or Fine Arts is offered in most institutions of Higher learning. It is widely taught at all levels of our education system in Nigeria .The following definitions of art have been noted for this study. National Educational Research Council (NERC) and the. Universal ...

  4. Investments in art: opportunities and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Pashkus, M.

    2013-01-01

    Art as an investment avenue has been considered an interesting and profitable alternative, but it is also extremely risky. These alternative investments' performance is alluring. Indices tracking the performance of high-class art have held up well in the recent economic slowdown, while art-auction houses report record prices. This article discusses the basic problems of investment in works of Art.

  5. A Future in Fashion: Designing Wearable Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brew, Charl Anne

    2009-01-01

    Art instructors are ever mindful of the need to introduce and encourage the possibilities of careers in the art field. The longer the author has been teaching art, the more aware she has become of the many wonderful art-related jobs and careers that exist. Fashion design, marketing and retail are three areas in which many students--male and…

  6. Sustainability in Modern Art Museums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campolmi, Irene

    2013-01-01

    common good of the community. On the other hand, it is considered from the so called “three bottom” approach as also corporations and business companies have approached it. In a so called “three bottom” approach, museums’ pursuit for environmental, economic and social sustainability is related...... curatorial and managerial perspectives. A long-term sustainable museum model steps beyond Foucault’s notion that art museums are “heterotopy”, i.e. spaces that present art as an alternative phenomenon outside reality. On the contrary, a sustainable model for museums acts as “archètopy”, i.e. a space (tòpos...

  7. Essentials of periodontal medicine in preventive medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minkle Gulati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Influence of systemic disorders on periodontal diseases is well established. However, of growing interest is the effect of periodontal diseases on numerous systemic diseases or conditions like cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, diabetes, pre-term low birth weight babies, preeclampsia, respiratory infections and others including osteoporosis, cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, erectile dysfunction, Alzheimer′s disease, gastrointestinal disease, prostatitis, renal diseases, which has also been scientifically validated. This side of the oral-systemic link has been termed Periodontal Medicine and is potentially of great public health significance, as periodontal disease is largely preventable and in many instances readily treatable, hence, providing many new opportunities for preventing and improving prognosis of several systemic pathologic conditions. This review article highlights the importance of prevention and treatment of periodontal diseases as an essential part of preventive medicine to circumvent its deleterious effects on general health.

  8. Radiology in veterinary medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrusovsky, J.; Benes, J.

    1985-01-01

    A textbook is presented for pregraduate and postgraduate students of veterinary medicine, offering an extensive review of all aspects of radiology as applied in veterinary sciences. Based on findings published in the literature and the authors' own research, the textbook familiarizes the reader with the problems of nuclear physics, biological effects of ionizing radiation on animals, the principles of biological cycles of radionuclides in the atmosphere, the fundamentals of radiochemistry, dosimetry, radiometry and nuclear medicine. Radiation protection of animals, raw materials, feeds, foodstuff and water, and the questions of the aplications of ionizing radiation and of radionuclides in veterinary medicine are discussed in great detail. The publication is complemented with numerous photographs, figures and graphs. (L.O.)

  9. Polypharmacy in Zoological Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert P. Hunter

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Polypharmacy is a term that describes the inappropriate, concurrent use of multiple drugs in an individual patient. Zoological medicine practitioners must take approved agents (veterinary or human and extrapolate their use to non-approved species often with little species-specific pharmacological evidence to support their decisions. When considering polypharmacy, even less information exists concerning multi-drug pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, or potential drug-drug interactions in non-domestic species. Unfortunately, captive, zoological species are susceptible, just like their domestic counterparts, to chronic diseases and co-morbidities that may lead to the usage of multiple drugs. Polypharmacy is a recognized and important issue in human medicine, as well as an emerging issue for veterinarians; thus, this paper will discuss the novel, potential risks of polypharmacy in zoological medicine. Hopefully, this discussion will help bring the attention of veterinarians to this issue and serve as an interesting discussion topic for pharmacologists in general.

  10. Making Meaningful: Intention in Children's Art Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, Heather

    2013-01-01

    Children's art work has often been the subject of study by researchers seeking to gain insight into the role of art making in children's learning and development. However, rarely are children's own explanations of their art making used to inform these studies. Children's perceptions of their own art making are important for research and practice…

  11. Art Education in Action on the Street

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sheng Kuan; Ortiz, Christy

    2011-01-01

    Showcasing the many forms and functions of art helps to articulate the fundamental importance of art education, whether it is to enhance the child or to support society. In illuminating the importance of art education, educators can eloquently argue about its value and contributions through an institutional tunnel, or they can take art education…

  12. PERFORMANCE IN ART NATURE AND MEANING

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2012-04-25

    Apr 25, 2012 ... Meaning between Fine/Applied Arts and Theatre Arts undergraduates in the. University of Benin. The study was ... Universal Free Primary Education (UPE) document (1977) portrayed art as the visual expression of man's ... Art is not mathematics where there is one correct answer to a set of problems‖ ...

  13. The Potential for Meaning in Student Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnezda, Nicole M.

    2009-01-01

    At the end of the 20th century, dialogue in art education shifted the goals of art teaching from a primary focus on studio production to an aesthetics and culture driven curriculum. Discipline-Based Art Education and, more recently, Visual Culture Art Education (VCAE) have provided students with a rich background for intellectualizing about art…

  14. The marriage of art and science in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham-Pole, J R

    2001-01-01

    This paper invites the reader to consider the marriage of art and science as antidote to much epidemic disease, for our greater personal and societal health. The history of arts medicine is reviewed, identifying its persisting although often tenuous link with health care from pre-history to the present. The author describes his personal encounter with art at the bedside, and how it led to his establishing a comprehensive artist-in-residence program at his university hospital. The scientific evidence underscoring the efficacy of art-making for physical and psychological health are outlined, together with the physiological and biochemical data. The author describes his own program, and offers examples of healing art in action.

  15. Heroes and Villains in Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needelman, Bert; Weiner, Norman L.

    1976-01-01

    Argues that artistic viewpoints significantly influence our perceptions of everyday life; the arts have been a major force in the construction of the deviant role and physical appearance has been a prime artistic device in concretizing this image. As populations continue to become more educated and sophisticated the great mass of people will…

  16. Symbolism and violence in art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Salmerón

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigate the issues related to the symbolism and violence in psychoanalytic theories begining with Freudian and Kleinian hypothesis, and also explores how they relate to creative activity. The emphasis is on Kleinian hypothesis regarding aggression toward the mother’s body as engine for repair activity (art.

  17. Physics in nuclear medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Cherry, Simon R; Phelps, Michael E

    2012-01-01

    Physics in Nuclear Medicine - by Drs. Simon R. Cherry, James A. Sorenson, and Michael E. Phelps - provides current, comprehensive guidance on the physics underlying modern nuclear medicine and imaging using radioactively labeled tracers. This revised and updated fourth edition features a new full-color layout, as well as the latest information on instrumentation and technology. Stay current on crucial developments in hybrid imaging (PET/CT and SPECT/CT), and small animal imaging, and benefit from the new section on tracer kinetic modeling in neuroreceptor imaging.

  18. Antibiotics in laboratory medicine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lorian, Victor

    2005-01-01

    ... in critical articles and reviews. Materials appearing in this book prepared by individuals as part of their official duties as U.S. government employees are not covered by the above-mentioned copyright. Printed in the USA Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Antibiotics in laboratory medicine / [edited by] Victor Lorian. - 5th ed...

  19. Cytomics in predictive medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnok, Attila; Valet, Guenther K.

    2004-07-01

    Predictive Medicine aims at the detection of changes in patient's disease state prior to the manifestation of deterioration or improvement of the current status. Patient-specific, disease-course predictions with >95% or >99% accuracy during therapy would be highly valuable for everyday medicine. If these predictors were available, disease aggravation or progression, frequently accompanied by irreversible tissue damage or therapeutic side effects, could then potentially be avoided by early preventive therapy. The molecular analysis of heterogeneous cellular systems (Cytomics) by cytometry in conjunction with pattern-oriented bioinformatic analysis of the multiparametric cytometric and other data provides a promising approach to individualized or personalized medical treatment or disease management. Predictive medicine is best implemented by cell oriented measurements e.g. by flow or image cytometry. Cell oriented gene or protein arrays as well as bead arrays for the capture of solute molecules form serum, plasma, urine or liquor are equally of high value. Clinical applications of predictive medicine by Cytomics will include multi organ failure in sepsis or non infectious posttraumatic shock in intensive care, or the pretherapeutic identification of high risk patients in cancer cytostatic. Early individualized therapy may provide better survival chances for individual patient at concomitant cost containment. Predictive medicine guided early reduction or stop of therapy may lower or abrogate potential therapeutic side effects. Further important aspects of predictive medicine concern the preoperative identification of patients with a tendency for postoperative complications or coronary artery disease patients with an increased tendency for restenosis. As a consequence, better patient care and new forms of inductive scientific hypothesis development based on the interpretation of predictive data patterns are at reach.

  20. Art as Alterity in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guoping

    2014-01-01

    In education, art has often been perceived as entertainment and decoration and is the first subject to go when there are budget cuts or test-score pressures. Drawing on Emmanuel Lévinas's idea of the primacy of radical alterity that breaks the totality of our being, enables self-transformation and ethics, and ensures community as a totality…

  1. Artistic Activism in Nigeria Art

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR Nneka

    2015-04-14

    Apr 14, 2015 ... Department of Fine and Applied Arts. Federal College of Education, Zaria. Kaduna .... Figure 4: Edosa Oguigo, Friends, Oil on Canvas, 81 x 119cm, 2011. Source: Nothing but the truth ... in relation of the title that calls for friendship has not shown any reason why both men will not easily be friend each other.

  2. [Integrative medicine development in China: enlightenment from Kampo medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Peng-fei

    2011-10-01

    Japanese Kampo medicine has made huge progress in the 300-year development, especially in Kampo education, research and development of Kampo medicinal drugs, and industrialization and internationalization of Kampo medicine in recent 30 years. Based on the study of Japanese Kampo medicine, this article discussed some characteristics of Kampo medicine. For example, the emphasis of Kampo medicine research is the effectiveness and scientificalness; classical prescriptions are the main application in Kampo medicine while it also values correspondence between prescription and syndrome as well as abdomen examination; Kampo medicine emphasized the continuity of education after graduation; international development is accelerating in the research of Kampo medicinal drugs. Such a development strategy of Kampo medicine may benefit the development of integrative medicine in China.

  3. Developments in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elias, H.

    1977-01-01

    The article reports on the first international meeting about radiopharmaceutical chemistry in the Brookhaven National Laboratory, Long Island/USA, from 21st to 24th September, 1976. The meeting report is preceded by the explanation of the terms 'radiopharmaceutical chemistry' and 'nuclear medicine' and a brief survey of the history. The interdisciplinary connection of the spheres of nuclear physics, nuclear chemistry, biochemistry, nuclear medicine, and data processing is also briefly shown. This is necessary before radiodiagnosis can be made for a patient. (RB) [de

  4. Nuclear medicine in sports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Anshu Rajnish

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear medicine can synergistically contribute to the sports medicine field, in the management of sports-related stress injures. Bone scintigraphy is commonly requested for evaluation of athletes with pain. Three-Phase 99m Tc MDP Bone Scan has emerged as the imaging reference standard for diagnosing such injuries. The inherently high-contrast resolution of the bone scan allows early detection of bone trauma and becomes positive within six to seventy-two hours after the onset of symptoms. The bone scan is able to demonstrate stress injuries days to weeks before the radiograph

  5. Nuclear medicine in obstetrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaral, L.B.D.; Pinto, J.C.M.; Linhares, E.

    1981-01-01

    The possible deleterious effects from the exposition to radiation in the field of obstetrics are studied. The radiological protection since the first week of development until a mature fetus is discussed. The use of nuclear medicine in the diagnostic and treatment in obstetrics is studied. (M.A.C.) [pt

  6. Medicine in Ancient Assur

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arbøll, Troels Pank

    This dissertation is a microhistorical study of a single individual named Kiṣir-Aššur who practiced medicine in the ancient city of Assur (modern northern Iraq) in the 7th century BCE. The study provides the first detailed analysis of one healer’s education and practice in ancient Mesopotamia...

  7. Risk and safety management in infertility and assisted reproductive technology (ART): from the doctor's office to the ART procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ziegler, Dominique; Gambone, Joseph C; Meldrum, David R; Chapron, Charles

    2013-12-01

    Risk and safety management (RSM) is receiving increasing attention in medicine, with the goals of reducing medical error and increasing quality of care. The principles and tools of RSM can and should be applied to assisted reproductive technology (ART), a field that has already made significant progress in reducing the undesirable and sometimes dangerous consequences of treatment. ART is a prime area of medicine to contribute and help to lead the application of RSM and patient safety because it has been ahead of many other fields of medicine in standardizing treatment, certifying and auditing practitioners, and reporting standardized outcomes, and because treatments are applied to otherwise healthy individuals where exposure to risk may be less acceptable. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Nuclear medicine in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Shihchen; Liu, Xiujie

    1986-01-01

    Since China first applied isotopes to medical research in 1956, over 800 hospitals and research institutions with 4000 staff have taken up nuclear technology. So far, over 120 important biologically active materials have been measured by radioimmunoassay in China, and 44 types of RIA kit have been supplied commercially. More than 50,000 cases of hyperthyroidism have been treated satisfactorily with 131 I. Radionuclide imaging of practically all organs and systems of the human body has been performed, and adrenal imaging and nuclear cardiology have become routine clinical practice in several large hospitals. The thyroid iodine uptake test, renogram tracing and cardiac function studies with a cardiac probe are also commonly used in most Chinese hospitals. The active principles of more than 60 medicinal herbs have been labelled with isotopes in order to study the drug metabolism and mechanism of action. Through the use of labelled neurotransmitters or deoxyglucose, RIA, radioreceptor assay and autoradiography, Chinese researchers have made remarkable achievements in the study of the scientific basis of acupuncture analgesia. In 1980 the Chinese Society of Nuclear Medicine was founded, and since 1981 the Chinese Journal of Nuclear Medicine has been published. Although nuclear medicine in China has already made some progress, when compared with advanced countries, much progress is still to be made. It is hoped that international scientific exchange will be strengthened in the future. (author)

  9. Sports Medicine in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomquist, Lorraine E.

    This report on a visit to the People's Republic of China in April 1985 to explore methodology of sports science research, treatment of injuries, and role of sports in everyday life discusses the following topics: (1) introduction to China; (2) sports and physical culture; (3) sports medicine and rehabilitation; (4) health factors; (5) cost of…

  10. Preventive medicine in 2030.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudenberg, Nicholas

    2012-12-01

    This invited commentary imagines two futures for preventive medicine and public health in the Year 2030. Using satire, the commentary describes one future in which large corporations control public health and another where a robust public sector plays the leading role. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Nuclear medicine in pediatrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gumplova, H.

    1982-01-01

    The methods of nuclear medicine are outlined used for examining children. The problems are discussed of children's exposure in isotope methods, diagnostic localization methods, in central nervous system examinations, skeleton, hematopoietic organs, gastrointestinal tract, respiratory organs, blood circulation system, and thyroid examinations. (J.B.)

  12. Images in medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-07-30

    Jul 30, 2015 ... Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Image in medicine. A male patient aged 20 years, visited us for routine oral examination. Incidentally, a well-demarcated ...

  13. Medicinal Mushrooms in Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerkamp, Yvonne; Paz, Ana Margarita; Guzmán, Gastón

    2016-01-01

    Guatemala, located in Central America, has a long and rich history in the traditional use of edible, medicinal, and hallucinogenic mushrooms. This article describes the use of these mushrooms and presents studies on the scientific validation of native and foreign species.

  14. ISSUES IN MEDICINE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MEI1994. ISSUES IN MEDICINE. The crisis in outh African family practice. Athe veil of apartheid, academic boycotts and sanc- tions is slowly lifted off South Africa, the damage that has been done is gradually being assessed. Perhaps the worst hit medical discipline has been South. African family practice and primary care.

  15. Whistleblowing in academic medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, R; Strain, J

    2004-01-01

    The authors present and discuss cases of academic medicine failing to address unethical behaviour in academic science and, thereby, illustrate the scope and seriousness of the problem. The Olivieri/Apotex affair is just another instance of academic medicine's dereliction in a case of scientific fraud and misconduct. Instead of vigorously supporting their faculty member in her efforts to honestly communicate her findings and to protect patients from the risks associated with the use of the study drug, the University of Toronto collaborated with the Apotex company's "stalling tactics," closed down Dr Olivieri's laboratory, harassed her, and ultimately dismissed her. The authors argue that the incentives for addressing problematic behaviour have to be revised in order to effect a change in the current pattern of response that occurs in academic medicine. An externally imposed realignment of incentives could convert the perception of the whistleblower, from their present caste as the enemy within, into a new position, as valued friend of the institution. The authors explain how such a correction could encourage appropriate reactions to scientific misconduct from academic medicine. PMID:14872069

  16. Nuclear medicine in Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Affram, R.K.; Kyere, K.; Amuasi, J.

    1991-01-01

    The background to the introduction and application of radioisotopes in medicine culminating in the establishment of the nuclear Medicine Unit at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, Ghana, has been examined. The Unit has been involved in important clinical researches since early 1970s but routine application in patient management has not always been possible because of cost per test and lack of continuous availability of convertible currency for the purchase of radioisotopes which are not presently produced by the National Nuclear Research Institute at Kwabenya. The capabilities and potentials of the Unit are highlighted and a comparison of Nuclear Medicine techniques to other medical diagnostic and imaging methods have been made. There is no organised instruction in the principles of medical imaging and diagnostic methods at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels in Korle Bu Teaching Hospital which has not promoted the use of Nuclear Medicine techniques. The development of a comprehensive medical diagnostic and imaging services is urgently needed. (author). 18 refs., 3 tabs

  17. Images in medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2016-01-22

    Jan 22, 2016 ... 1Department of Nuclear Medicine, Mohammed V Military Teaching Hospital, Mohammed V University of Rabat, Morocco ... Pan African Medical Journal – ISSN: 1937- 8688 (www.panafrican-med-journal.com). Published in ... F18-FDG PET-CT coronal fusion image: pathological lymph nodes are identified ...

  18. Images in medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-12-04

    Dec 4, 2015 ... Oral lesions in Tuberculosis. Sandhya Gokavarapu1, Prashanth Panta2,&. 1Basavatarakam Indo Americal Cancer Hospital and Research Institute, Banjara Hills, Hyderabad, India, 2Department of Oral Medicine and. Radiology, MNR Dental College and Hospital, Narsapur road, Sangareddy (502294), ...

  19. Images in medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    21 oct. 2015 ... Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Image en medicine. Le canal de Wharton draine les secrétions de la glande sous- maxillaire. Les étiologies de la ...

  20. Expressive Arts Therapy: Creative Process in Art and Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Sally; Adams, Marianne; McKinney, Cathy; McKinney, Harold; Rose, Liz; Wentworth, Jay; Woodworth, Joan

    This book is written for therapists and for students who are becoming therapists. It offers insights to artists, teachers, and others interested in exploring the power of expressive arts for growth and healing. It provides theoretical grounding and practical applications from the collective experience of the authors who share their own immersion…

  1. Psychopathological Art and the Use of Art in Psychiatric Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latife UTAŞ AKHAN

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The human being has to socialize once he is born as an individual and is under the influence of the environment, and the ethical, esthetic and moral values since his childhood. The thoughts, wants and wishes of the individual that conflict with the environmental order and values are repressed outside the consciousness. The repressed feelings and thoughts are converted into symbols in the form of visual images outside the consciousness. Unformed symbols provide the purest hint regarding the internal conflicts causing mental disorders. There is regression in verbal expression in some psychiatric disorders and especially in psychosis. Symptoms specific for the abstract thoughts and verbal language pathology appear. Visual language as graphic language may become the single way of communication in such instances. This constitutes the rationale and main principle of “Diagnosis and Treatment by Art'' in the psychiatric field. The three-function method of spontaneous psychopathological art enables the use of art in individuals with a psychiatric disorder. This is the projection of the complexes and conflicts that are subconscious or outside consciousness with spontaneous images as graphic and plastic expressions and enables making a diagnosis. The second function of psychopathological art is to monitor the disease progress. A series of artistic work enable the step by step monitoring of the disorder's progress. Pathological changes can be reflected in the works of art even before the clinical symptoms of the disorder appear. The third function is enabling treatment. The individual who has severed connections with the environment is in a chaotic word. During the time the psychopathological art method is used, the patients start to see the artistic work as a mirror where they find and watch themselves and their behaviors. When the artistic endeavor of patients with a mental disorder does not take place under suitable control, it becomes a tool that

  2. HIV/AIDS in the visual arts: applying discipline-based art education (DBAE) to medical humanities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapajos, Ricardo

    2003-06-01

    Health professions educators have been systematically attempting to insert the humanities into health professions curricula for over 4 decades, with various degrees of success. Among the several medical humanities, the visual arts seem particularly adequate for the teaching/learning of crucial aspects of medicine. Educational efforts in the arts require, however, a sound pedagogical philosophy of art education. Health professions educators need therefore to be aware of educational frameworks in the arts. Discipline-based art education (DBAE) is a recognised contemporary educational framework for the teaching/learning of the arts, which may be adapted to medical humanities. It is the ultimate objective of this essay to share the experience of applying this educational framework to a course in a medical curriculum. The author describes a course on the representations of HIV/AIDS in the visual arts, with explicit reference to its objectives, content, instructional features and student assessment in the light of DBAE, whose principles and characteristics are described in detail. Discipline-based art education may be applied to medical humanities courses in a medical curriculum. This essay throws light on how this structure may be particularly useful for designing other pedagogically sound art courses in health professions curricula.

  3. THE CHANGING FACE OF MEDICINE IN THE 21ST CENTURY – THE EXAMPLE OF INFERTILE CLOMID FAILED INSULIN RESISTANT POLYCYSTIC OVARIAN PATIENTS SUBMITTED TO ASSISTED REPRODUCTIVE THERAPY (ART I N PAKISTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarwat Jehan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The outcome of metformin administration in insulin resistant infertile polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS patients who had failed clomid. The research was conducted at the University Assisted Reproductive Techniques (ART Institute in Pakistan – a developing country with a high prevalence of diabetes. 166 PCOS patients submitted to ART out of 277 referrals (59.9%. Of these 78 (47% achieved pregnancies with 75.6% take home babies and 24.4% reproductive failure prior to ART, Intra Cytoplasmic Sperm Injection (ICSI and In Vitro Fertilization (IVF. The total healthy take home baby rate was 47% of the 166 patients. These seventy eight (78 patients became pregnant prior to ART after starting metformin for insulin resistance. 88 required ART and 19 of these delivered a healthy baby. Metformin (500 to 2500 mg daily was started prior to pregnancy and continued throughout pregnancy. Metformin 1500 mg daily for 3 months resulted in 59 live and well neonates averaging 3.1kg. Metformin <1500 mg daily and / or administration for less than 3 months prior to Pregnancy resulted in 18 abortions and 1 intrauterine death at 30 weeks gestation with no live neonate. Almost 50% became pregnant without ART. When ART was needed 19 out of 88 patients delivered a live baby. Almost 50% of patients with failed ART elsewhere became pregnant on this regime with take home healthy babies and 6 did not require ART. Metformin 1500mg daily administrated for at least 3 months prior to pregnancy and continued throughout pregnancy had an uncomplicated neonatal outcome in 59 patients compared to lower doses or shorter duration of administration in 19 patients who had a uniformly poor pregnancy outcome. The European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE and American Society for Reproductive Society (ASRM guidelines are biologically and statistically flawed. In South Asia infertile PCOS patients require a long term life cycle approach. Early insulin resistance should be

  4. Traditional Medicine in Developing Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Rikke Stamp

    People use traditional medicine to meet their health care needs in developing countries and medical pluralism persists worldwide despite increased access to allopathic medicine. Traditional medicine includes a variety of treatment opportunities, among others, consultation with a traditional healer...... or spiritual healer and self-treatment with herbal medicine or medicinal plants. Reliance on traditional medicine varies between countries and rural and urban areas, but is reported to be as high as 80% in some developing countries. Increased realization of the continued importance of traditional medicine has...... led to the formulation of policies on the integration of traditional medicine into public health care. Local level integration is already taking place as people use multiple treatments when experiencing illness. Research on local level use of traditional medicine for health care, in particular the use...

  5. Radiation protection in medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vano, E.; Holmberg, O.; Perez, M. R.; Ortiz, P.

    2016-08-01

    Diagnostic, interventional and therapeutic used of ionizing radiation are beneficial for hundreds of millions of people each year by improving health care and saving lives. In March 2001, the first International Conference on the Radiological Protection of Patients was held in Malaga, Spain, which led to an international action plan for the radiation protection of patients. Ten years after establishing the international action plan, the International Conference on Radiation Protection in Medicine: Setting the Scene for the Next Decade was held in Bonn, Germany, in December 2012. the main outcome of this conference was the so called Bonn Call for Action that identifies then priority actions to enhance radiation protection in medicine for the next decade. The IAEA and WHO are currently working in close cooperation to foster and support the implementation of these ten priority actions in Member States, but their implementation requires collaboration of national governments, international agencies, researchers, educators, institutions and professional associations. (Author)

  6. Prospects in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pink, V.; Johannsen, B.; Muenze, R.

    1990-01-01

    In nuclear medicine, a sequence of revolutioning research up to the simple and efficient application in routine has always then taken place when in an interdisciplinary teamwork new radiochemical tracers and/or new instrumentation had become available. At present we are at the beginning of a phase that means to be in-vivo-biochemistry, the targets of which are molecular interactions in the form of enzymatic reactions, ligand-receptor interactions or immunological reactions. The possibility to use positron-emitting radionuclides of bioelements in biomolecules or drugs to measure their distribution in the living organism by positron-emission tomography (PET) is gaining admittance into the pretentious themes of main directions of medical research. Diagnostic routine application of biochemically oriented nuclear medicine methods are predominantly expected from the transmission of knowledge in PET research to the larger appliable emission tomography with gamma-emitting tracers (SPECT). (author)

  7. Improvement for equipment in the practices of basic veterinary medicine

    OpenAIRE

    市原, 伸恒

    2009-01-01

    The practices (veterinary anatomy laboratory, veterinarian physiology laboratory I, veterinarian physiology laboratory II, and veterinarian physiology chemistry laboratory) in the area of basic veterinary medicine are important subjects for acquiring knowledge and the technique by the process of shifting from the liberal arts subject to a specialized subjects for the area of applied veterinary medicine and clinical veterinary medicine. The number of equipment is insufficient to practice effec...

  8. Artful creation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darsø, Lotte

    2013-01-01

    An introduction to the field of Arts-in-Business outlining 4 different approaches: 1) Art as decoration, 2) Art as intertainment, 3) Arts as instrumental, 4) Art as strategic......An introduction to the field of Arts-in-Business outlining 4 different approaches: 1) Art as decoration, 2) Art as intertainment, 3) Arts as instrumental, 4) Art as strategic...

  9. Teleophthalmology in preventive medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Michelson, Georg

    2014-01-01

    This book provides an up-to-date overview of the clinical applications, methods, and technologies of teleophthalmology within the field of preventive medicine. The ability of novel methods to detect the initial signs of neurodegenerative diseases on the basis of alterations in the retina is reviewed, and detailed attention is paid to the role of teleophthalmology in screening for vision-threatening diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and age-related macular degeneration. A major part of the book is devoted to novel imaging methods and the latest information technologies, including advanced mobile communication and Web 2.0 applications in teleophthalmology. In addition, the initial projects of an interdisciplinary cooperation in preventive medicine are described. All of the authors are experienced in the scientific and practical aspects of teleophthalmology, including e-learning, and have produced a book that will meet the needs of all medical care providers interested in using teleophthalmology.

  10. Implications for Art Education in the Third Millennium: Art Technology Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Sherry

    2007-01-01

    Most would agree that today's art education is far more complex than art activities such as making pumpkin paintings in October. For one, art education continually evolves in response to arts technology integration. What exactly are the implications for art education in the new millennium? In this article, the author presents and shows some of the…

  11. Imaging in nuclear medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Hoeschen, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    This volume addresses a wide range of issues in the field of nuclear medicine imaging, with an emphasis on the latest research findings. Initial chapters set the scene by considering the role of imaging in nuclear medicine from the medical perspective and discussing the implications of novel agents and applications for imaging. The physics at the basis of the most modern imaging systems is described, and the reader is introduced to the latest advances in image reconstruction and noise correction. Various novel concepts are then discussed, including those developed within the framework of the EURATOM FP7 MADEIRA research project on the optimization of imaging procedures in order to permit a reduction in the radiation dose to healthy tissues. Advances in quality control and quality assurance are covered, and the book concludes by listing rules of thumb for imaging that will be of use to both beginners and experienced researchers.

  12. Hypnosis in contemporary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, James H

    2005-04-01

    Hypnosis became popular as a treatment for medical conditions in the late 1700s when effective pharmaceutical and surgical treatment options were limited. To determine whether hypnosis has a role in contemporary medicine, relevant trials and a few case reports are reviewed. Despite substantial variation in techniques among the numerous reports, patients treated with hypnosis experienced substantial benefits for many different medical conditions. An expanded role for hypnosis and a larger study of techniques appear to be indicated.

  13. Laser In Veterinary Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Carlton; Jaggar, David H.

    1982-12-01

    Lasers have been used for some time now on animals for experimental purposes prior to their use in human medical and surgical fields. However the use of lasers in veterinary medicine and surgery per se is a recent development. We describe the application of high and low intensity laser technology in a general overview of the current uses, some limitations to its use and future needs for future inquiry and development.

  14. Dreams in ancient Greek Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laios, K; Moschos, M M; Koukaki, E; Vasilopoulos, E; Karamanou, M; Kontaxaki, M-I; Androutsos, G

    2016-01-01

    Dreams preoccupied the Greek and Roman world in antiquity, therefore they had a prominent role in social, philosophical, religious, historical and political life of those times. They were considered as omens and prophetic signs of future events in private and public life, and that was particularly accentuated when elements of actions which took place in the plot of dreams were associated directly or indirectly with real events. This is why it was important to use them in divination, and helped the growth of superstition and folklore believes. Medicine as a science and an anthropocentric art, could not ignore the importance of dreams, having in mind their popularity in antiquity. In ancient Greek medicine dreams can be divided into two basic categories. In the first one -which is related to religious medicine-dreams experienced by religionists are classified, when resorted to great religious sanctuaries such as those of Asclepius (Asclepieia) and Amphiaraos (Amfiaraeia). These dreams were the essential element for healing in this form of religious medicine, because after pilgrims underwent purifications they went to sleep in a special dwelling of the sanctuaries called "enkoimeterion" (Greek: the place to sleep) so that the healing god would come to their dreams either to cure them or to suggest treatment. In ancient Greek literature there are many reports of these experiences, but if there may be phenomena of self-suggestion, or they could be characterized as propaganda messages from the priesthood of each sanctuary for advertising purposes. The other category concerns the references about dreams found in ancient Greek medical literature, where one can find the attempts of ancient Greek physicians to interpret these dreams in a rational way as sings either of a corporal disease or of psychological distress. This second category will be the object of our study. Despite the different ways followed by each ancient Greek physician in order to explain dreams, their

  15. Art therapist's perceptions of the role of the art medium in the treatment of bereaved clients in art therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bat-Or, Michal; Garti, Dana

    2018-03-02

    The exploratory study's aim was to examine how art therapists perceive the role of the art medium in the treatment of bereaved clients. Eight Israeli art therapists reflected on this topic through drawings and interviews. Qualitative analysis identified three major roles, specifically art as: 1) a space for the client's grief work; 2) a communication channel that impacts the art therapist's experience and therapeutic relationship; and 3) a shared space where client and therapist create a new narrative. The discussion deals with the findings and their clinical implications, identifying the central therapeutic processes involved in art therapy with bereaved clients.

  16. Unseen dimensions dialogues in art and science

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    The interface of art and science was explored by expert speakers and artists including Michael Hoch, founder of the CERN outreach programme, Art@CMS, in a week-long programme at the City of London Boys School in October

  17. Imaging in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giussani, Augusto [BfS - Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Protection and Health; Hoeschen, Christoph (eds.) [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen - German Research Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg (Germany). Research Unit Medical Raditation Physics and Diagnostics

    2013-08-01

    Presents the most recent developments in nuclear medicine imaging, with emphasis on the latest research findings. Considers the latest advances in imaging systems, image reconstruction, noise correction, and quality assurance. Discusses novel concepts, including those developed within the framework of the EURATOM FP7 MADEIRA project. Lists rules of thumb for imaging of use to both beginners and experienced researchers. This volume addresses a wide range of issues in the field of nuclear medicine imaging, with an emphasis on the latest research findings. Initial chapters set the scene by considering the role of imaging in nuclear medicine from the medical perspective and discussing the implications of novel agents and applications for imaging. The physics at the basis of the most modern imaging systems is described, and the reader is introduced to the latest advances in image reconstruction and noise correction. Various novel concepts are then discussed, including those developed within the framework of the EURATOM FP7 MADEIRA research project on the optimization of imaging procedures in order to permit a reduction in the radiation dose to healthy tissues. Advances in quality control and quality assurance are covered, and the book concludes by listing rules of thumb for imaging that will be of use to both beginners and experienced researchers.

  18. Imaging in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giussani, Augusto; Hoeschen, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Presents the most recent developments in nuclear medicine imaging, with emphasis on the latest research findings. Considers the latest advances in imaging systems, image reconstruction, noise correction, and quality assurance. Discusses novel concepts, including those developed within the framework of the EURATOM FP7 MADEIRA project. Lists rules of thumb for imaging of use to both beginners and experienced researchers. This volume addresses a wide range of issues in the field of nuclear medicine imaging, with an emphasis on the latest research findings. Initial chapters set the scene by considering the role of imaging in nuclear medicine from the medical perspective and discussing the implications of novel agents and applications for imaging. The physics at the basis of the most modern imaging systems is described, and the reader is introduced to the latest advances in image reconstruction and noise correction. Various novel concepts are then discussed, including those developed within the framework of the EURATOM FP7 MADEIRA research project on the optimization of imaging procedures in order to permit a reduction in the radiation dose to healthy tissues. Advances in quality control and quality assurance are covered, and the book concludes by listing rules of thumb for imaging that will be of use to both beginners and experienced researchers.

  19. Traditional medicine and HIV/AIDS in Ethiopia: Herbal medicine and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    The accessibility and cultural acceptability of both herbal medicines and faith healing and the scarcity of antiretroviral treatment (ART) in many ... increasingly used in the international literature to distinguish between different uses of ... disinfectants and other chemicals, oxygen therapy, electric shock therapy and immune.

  20. Performing Art-Based Research: Innovation in Graduate Art Therapy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Bruce L.; Hoffman, Nadia

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an innovation in art therapy research and education in which art-based performance is used to generate, embody, and creatively synthesize knowledge. An art therapy graduate student's art-based process of inquiry serves to demonstrate how art and performance may be used to identify the research question, to conduct a process…

  1. [Italy's Slow Medicine: a new paradigm in medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaldi, Antonio; Vernero, Sandra

    2015-02-01

    , anthropology, psychology, ethics, art, etc. Operationally, Slow Medicine has launched the "Doing more does not mean doing better" campaign similar to "Choosing Wisely" in the United States, which aims to improve clinical appropriateness through the reduction of unnecessary tests and treatments: as first step, the specialty societies involved (30 by now) should indicate five tests or treatments commonly used in Italy's clinical practice that do not provide any benefit to most patients but may cause harm.

  2. [Ethics in contemporary medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero-Serrano, Octavio; Durante-Montiel, Irene

    2008-01-01

    Medical practice has been traditionally ruled by the principles of medical ethics and the scientific aspects that define it. However, today's medical practice is largely influenced by other aspects such as: economic interests, abuse of therapeutics, defensive medicine, unnecessary surgeries and conflicts of interests without excluding alterations in the application of the informed consent, the relation with the pharmaceutical industry, respect of confidentiality, organizational ethics, and the ethical practice that escapes the will of the medical professional.

  3. Hirudotherapy in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobczak, Natalia; Kantyka, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    The saliva of medicinal leeches, e.g., Hirudo medicinalis and Hirudo verbana commonly used in hirudotherapy, contains more than 100 bioactive substances with various therapeutic effects, including anticoagulant, vasodilator, thrombolytic, anti-inflammatory and anaesthetic properties. Recently, leeches have been used very successfully in veterinary medicine to treat many diseases of animals, especially dogs, cats and horses. The most common indications for the use of leeches are hip and elbow dysplasia, acute and chronic arthritis, diseases associated with inflammation of tendons, ligaments, and fascia, diseases of the vertebrae and the treatment of scars. Leech therapy is a painless procedure which takes an average of 30 to 120 minutes, the time being dependent on the size of the animal. All leeches used in medical procedures should originate only from certified biofarms. The maintenance of sterile conditions for the culture, transport and storage of medical leeches is very important to protect animals from microbial infections. Hirudotherapy is successfully used in veterinary medicine, especially when traditional treatment is not effective, the effects of treatment are too slow, or after surgery, when the tissues may be threatened by venous congestion.

  4. Thermal imaging in medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaka Ogorevc

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIntroduction: Body temperature monitoring is one of the oldest and still one of the most basic diagnostic methods in medicine. In recent years thermal imaging has been increasingly used in measurements of body temperature for diagnostic purposes. Thermal imaging is non-invasive, non-contact method for measuring surface body temperature. Method is quick, painless and patient is not exposed to ionizing radiation or any other body burden.Application of thermal imaging in medicine: Pathological conditions can be indicated as hyper- or hypothermic patterns in many cases. Thermal imaging is presented as a diagnostic method, which can detect such thermal anomalies. This article provides an overview of the thermal imaging applications in various fields of medicine. Thermal imaging has proven to be a suitable method for human febrile temperature screening, for the detection of sites of fractures and infections, a reliable diagnostic tool in the detection of breast cancer and determining the type of skin cancer tumour. It is useful in monitoring the course of a therapy after spinal cord injury, in the detection of food allergies and detecting complications at hemodialysis and is also very effective at the course of treatment of breast reconstruction after mastectomy. With thermal imaging is possible to determine the degrees of burns and early detection of osteomyelitis in diabetic foot phenomenon. The most common and the oldest application of thermal imaging in medicine is the field of rheumatology.Recommendations for use and standards: Essential performance of a thermal imaging camera, measurement method, preparation of a patient and environmental conditions are very important for proper interpretation of measurement results in medical applications of thermal imaging. Standard for screening thermographs was formed for the human febrile temperature screening application.Conclusion: Based on presented examples it is shown that thermal imaging can

  5. Arts Achieve, Impacting Student Success in the Arts: Preliminary Findings after One Year of Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastrorilli, Tara M.; Harnett, Susanne; Zhu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    The "Arts Achieve: Impacting Student Success in the Arts" project involves a partnership between the New York City Department of Education (NYCDOE) and five of the city's premier arts organizations. "Arts Achieve" provides intensive and targeted professional development to arts teachers over a three-year period. The goal of the…

  6. The visual arts in Northern Ireland hospitals.

    OpenAIRE

    Cromie, H.

    1995-01-01

    Since 1989 there has been a burgeoning of the visual arts in Northern Ireland hospitals. This paper compares the three organisational models for hospital arts currently operating within the Province and in an overview discusses ways to coordinate working practice for future development of the visual arts in local hospitals. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3

  7. Advocating for Arts in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauerlein, Mark

    2010-01-01

    This article contends that every chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts must advocate for arts education. The arts need a voice in power, say people in the field, someone in the corridors of influence to argue the benefits of teaching the nation's students about classical and jazz music, ballet, and sculpture. With No Child Left Behind…

  8. The visual arts in Northern Ireland hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromie, H

    1995-10-01

    Since 1989 there has been a burgeoning of the visual arts in Northern Ireland hospitals. This paper compares the three organisational models for hospital arts currently operating within the Province and in an overview discusses ways to coordinate working practice for future development of the visual arts in local hospitals.

  9. The visual arts in Northern Ireland hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromie, H.

    1995-01-01

    Since 1989 there has been a burgeoning of the visual arts in Northern Ireland hospitals. This paper compares the three organisational models for hospital arts currently operating within the Province and in an overview discusses ways to coordinate working practice for future development of the visual arts in local hospitals. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 PMID:8533183

  10. The Arts in School Reform: Other Conversations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Judith M.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses why art is important in students' lives, features of artistry that captivate the mind, and reasons why arts should be fully integrated into school curricula. Change in art education should be grounded in substantive insights about artistic content, child development, teaching methods, and curriculum as a meeting ground. (SM)

  11. Nanoscience in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, N R

    2007-08-01

    Nanotechnology, as an enabling technology, has the potential to revolutionize veterinary medicine. Examples of potential applications in animal agriculture and veterinary medicine include disease diagnosis and treatment delivery systems, new tools for molecular and cellular breeding, identity preservation of animal history from birth to a consumer's table, the security of animal food products, major impact on animal nutrition scenarios ranging from the diet to nutrient uptake and utilization, modification of animal waste as expelled from the animal, pathogen detection, and many more. Existing research has demonstrated the feasibility of introducing nanoshells and nanotubes into animals to seek and destroy targeted cells. Thus, building blocks do exist and are expected to be integrated into systems over the next couple of decades on a commercial basis. While it is reasonable to presume that nanobiotechnology industries and unique developments will revolutionize veterinary medicine in the future, there is a huge concern, among some persons and organizations, about food safety and health as well as social and ethical issues which can delay or derail technological advancements.

  12. Precision Medicine in Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Precision medicine helps doctors select cancer treatments that are most likely to help patients based on a genetic understanding of their disease. Learn about the promise of precision medicine and the role it plays in cancer treatment.

  13. Quality control in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leme, P.R.

    1983-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: objectives of the quality control in nuclear medicine; the necessity of the quality control in nuclear medicine; guidelines and recommendations. An appendix is given concerning the guidelines for the quality control and instrumentation in nuclear medicine. (M.A.) [pt

  14. African Women in the Visual Arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, Lisa

    1991-01-01

    Explores recent studies in anthropology, art history, and archeology on African women's art from a feminist theoretical perspective. Relates women's arts to several sociological and economic factors and suggests new avenues of exploration, especially in the face of urbanization and modernization. (CJS)

  15. A Place for Beauty in Art Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Robert

    2018-01-01

    For the past 100 years beauty has been marginalised in Western art and regarded as a problematic notion in a range of cultural contexts. Art educators tend to associate experiences of beauty with passive appreciation rather than active engagement, while researchers of children's understanding of art characterise references to beauty as evidence of…

  16. The Framework of Teacherhood in Art Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Määttä, Kaarina; Uusiautti, Satu

    2013-01-01

    In Finland, art teachers are currently trained at the Aalto University, Helsinki, and at the University of Lapland, Rovaniemi. This review is based on research on and other literature discussing art education. In addition, experiences of art teacher education program provided at the University of Lapland provided the basis of our analysis of the…

  17. Expanding Arts Education in a Digital Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Haeryun; Piro, Joseph M.

    2009-01-01

    This article proposes a way to expand the study of arts education within new contexts of technology and globalization. Drawing upon theories that have informed arts and aesthetic education in the past, the authors suggest new applications for these ideas to ensure that arts education sustains its significance in twenty-first-century society. The…

  18. Positioning Community Art Practices in Urban Cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschelden, Griet; Van Eeghem, Elly; Steel, Riet; De Visscher, Sven; Dekeyrel, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    This article addresses the position of community art practices and the role of practitioners in urban cracks. Community art practices raise possibilities for a reconceptualisation of the concept of community and an extension of the concept of art in public space. Urban cracks are conceptualised as spatial, temporal and relational manifestations of…

  19. Avicenna on Education in Philosophy and Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azadpur, Mohammad; Silvers, Anita

    2005-01-01

    This article, the tenth in an occasional series on past treatments of major issues in arts education policy from antiquity through the twentieth century, discusses philosopher Avicenna's view that art's aesthetic value bestows intrinsic public benefits sufficient to command community support of the arts. By exploring Avicenna's comparison of the…

  20. Arts-Based Methods in Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chemi, Tatiana; Du, Xiangyun

    2017-01-01

    This chapter introduces the field of arts-based methods in education with a general theoretical perspective, reviewing the journey of learning in connection to the arts, and the contribution of the arts to societies from an educational perspective. Also presented is the rationale and structure...

  1. [Ethical medicine in Paracelsus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, D V

    1997-01-01

    The last decades have been an increasing interest in medical ethics. Paracelsus occupies an important place in the development of ethics in medicine in the crucial cultural passage between Middle Ages and Renaissance. Paracelsus' biography is in itself connected with ethical choices and theories. In his medical doctrines ethics is rooted in the belief in a strict correspondence between micro- and macrocosmos. Love is the basis on which a correct doctor-patient relationship can be built. Ilnesses are but episodes in the human life, and care for both spiritual and bodily health should dominate the entire life, and not ony the crucial moments of birth, sickness and death.

  2. Systems medicine advances in interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiffo, Flavia R; Eickelberg, Oliver; Fernandez, Isis E

    2017-09-30

    Fibrotic lung diseases involve subject-environment interactions, together with dysregulated homeostatic processes, impaired DNA repair and distorted immune functions. Systems medicine-based approaches are used to analyse diseases in a holistic manner, by integrating systems biology platforms along with clinical parameters, for the purpose of understanding disease origin, progression, exacerbation and remission.Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) refer to a heterogeneous group of complex fibrotic diseases. The increase of systems medicine-based approaches in the understanding of ILDs provides exceptional advantages by improving diagnostics, unravelling phenotypical differences, and stratifying patient populations by predictable outcomes and personalised treatments. This review discusses the state-of-the-art contributions of systems medicine-based approaches in ILDs over the past 5 years. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  3. Handbooks in radiology: Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datz, F.L.

    1988-01-01

    This series of handbooks covers the basic facts, major concepts and highlights in seven radiological subspecialties. ''Nuclear Medicine'' is a review of the principles, procedures and clinical applications that every radiology resident and practicing general radiologist should know about nuclear medicine. Presented in an outline format it covers all of the organ systems that are imaged by nuclear medicine

  4. Arts Teachers' Perceptions and Attitudes on Arts Integration While Participating in a Statewide Arts Integration Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Brittany Nixon; Robinson, Nicole R.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions and attitudes of the Beverley Taylor Sorenson Arts Learning Program (BTSALP) arts specialists on arts integration. BTSALP arts specialists (N = 50) throughout the state of Utah responded to a 20-item survey. Results indicated that a majority of BTSALP arts specialists believe that arts…

  5. Peace Education in Art: Focus on Gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppinen, Heta

    Art education can be used as a focal point in studying peace education and gender issues. One aspect of peace education is the field of human relations and that can include issues of gender. Basic concepts of patriarchy, sexism, feminism, and women's liberation can be studied through art. Finnish art education curriculum provides three areas for…

  6. Indigenous Australian art in intercultural contact zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonore Wildburger

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This article comments on Indigenous Australian art from an intercultural perspective. The painting Bush Tomato Dreaming (1998, by the Anmatyerre artist Lucy Ngwarai Kunoth serves as model case for my argument that art expresses existential social knowledge. In consequence, I will argue that social theory and art theory together provide tools for intercultural understanding and competence.

  7. Creativity in Digital Art Education Teaching Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Joanna; Browning, Kathy

    2011-01-01

    Since the introduction of personal computers, art educators increasingly have adopted new digital technologies into their pedagogy, yet overall that adoption has been a slow process. Many teachers remain still infrequent users of technology or avoid using new learning technologies in art classrooms. It is important for art education to embrace an…

  8. Arts-based learning in medical education: the students' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Croix, Anne; Rose, Catharine; Wildig, Emma; Willson, Suzy

    2011-11-01

    Arts subjects are often included in medical school curricula to facilitate the exploration of non-scientific elements of medicine, such as communication, social, political, emotional and spiritual issues. However, little research has reported on students' experience of arts teaching. Performing Medicine is a programme created by the Clod Ensemble theatre company in collaboration with Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, and the Department of Drama at Queen Mary University, London. Professional artists run a range of workshops exploring issues relating to health care and work to develop students' professional skills in self-presentation, observation, communication, self-care and their understanding of difference. This article presents an analysis of student-written material about Performing Medicine. A dataset of written student materials (reflections and feedback), drawn from three academic years (2006-2009), was analysed using the qualitative methods of thematic analysis and word frequency analysis. Five prevalent themes were identified: (i) Acting like a doctor; (ii) Developing broader awareness of others; (iii) The self in focus; (iv) The art of communication, and (v) A place for arts-based teaching within the medical curriculum. The corpus linguistic analysis confirmed and elaborated on the five themes found in the thematic analysis. Students generally felt that arts teaching made a valuable contribution to the medical curriculum. Many felt the training would reduce 'performance anxiety' in situations such as examinations, presentations and new placements. Group work developed camaraderie and students enjoyed the opportunity to learn new skills through creative writing, theatre and movement sessions. Some sessions developed students' ability to engage with and relate to people from very different backgrounds than their own. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2011.

  9. [Technical medicine in ancient comedy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Alfageme, I

    1995-01-01

    The texts of Greek comedy offer a panoramic vision of the evolution of medicine between the fifth and the third centuries. They provide an excellent way to understand the prejudices and the bases of technical medicine and its relationship with popular medicine. Comedy also shows us a vivid portrait of the physician and his position in Greek society.

  10. VLSI in medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Einspruch, Norman G

    1989-01-01

    VLSI Electronics Microstructure Science, Volume 17: VLSI in Medicine deals with the more important applications of VLSI in medical devices and instruments.This volume is comprised of 11 chapters. It begins with an article about medical electronics. The following three chapters cover diagnostic imaging, focusing on such medical devices as magnetic resonance imaging, neurometric analyzer, and ultrasound. Chapters 5, 6, and 7 present the impact of VLSI in cardiology. The electrocardiograph, implantable cardiac pacemaker, and the use of VLSI in Holter monitoring are detailed in these chapters. The

  11. Book received: Towards a Science of Art History: J. J. Tikkanen and Art Historical Scholarship in Europe and The shaping of Art History in Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Publications of the Society of Art History in Finland

    2010-01-01

    Publications of the Society of Art History in Finland: Towards a Science of Art History: J. J. Tikkanen and Art Historical Scholarship in Europe and The shaping of Art History in Finland, Helsinki 2007 with tables of contents.

  12. Mobile learning in medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serkan Güllüoüǧlu, Sabri

    2013-03-01

    This paper outlines the main infrastructure for implicating mobile learning in medicine and present a sample mobile learning application for medical learning within the framework of mobile learning systems. Mobile technology is developing nowadays. In this case it will be useful to develop different learning environments using these innovations in internet based distance education. M-learning makes the most of being on location, providing immediate access, being connected, and acknowledges learning that occurs beyond formal learning settings, in places such as the workplace, home, and outdoors. Central to m-learning is the principle that it is the learner who is mobile rather than the device used to deliver m learning. The integration of mobile technologies into training has made learning more accessible and portable. Mobile technologies make it possible for a learner to have access to a computer and subsequently learning material and activities; at any time and in any place. Mobile devices can include: mobile phone, personal digital assistants (PDAs), personal digital media players (eg iPods, MP3 players), portable digital media players, portable digital multimedia players. Mobile learning (m-learning) is particularly important in medical education, and the major users of mobile devices are in the field of medicine. The contexts and environment in which learning occurs necessitates m-learning. Medical students are placed in hospital/clinical settings very early in training and require access to course information and to record and reflect on their experiences while on the move. As a result of this paper, this paper strives to compare and contrast mobile learning with normal learning in medicine from various perspectives and give insights and advises into the essential characteristics of both for sustaining medical education.

  13. Material interaction and art product in art therapy assessment in adult mental health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pénzes, I.J.N.J.; Hooren, S. van; Dokter, D.; Smeijsters, H.; Hutschemaekers, G.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Art materials have a central role in art therapy. The way a client interacts with art materials - material interaction - is an important source of information in art therapy assessment in adult mental health. The aim of this study was to develop the categories of material interaction and

  14. Translational research in medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakir Mehić

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Translational medicine is a medical practice based on interventional epidemiology. It is regarded by its proponents as a natural progression from Evidence-Based Medicine. It integrates research from the basic sciences, social sciences and political sciences with the aim of optimizing patient care and preventive measures which may extend beyond healthcare services. In short, it is the process of turning appropriate biological discoveries into drugs and medical devices that can be used in the treatment of patients.[1]Scientific research and the development of modern powerful techniques are crucial for improving patient care in a society that is increasingly demanding the highest quality health services.[2] Indeed, effective patient care requires the continuous improvement of knowledge on the pathophysiology of the diseases, diagnostic procedures and therapeutic tools available. To this end, development of both clinical and basic research in health sciences is required. However, what is most effective in improving medical knowledge, and hence patient care, is the cross-fertilization between basic and clinical science. This has been specifically highlighted in recent years with the coining of the term “translational research”.[3] Translational research is of great importance in all medical specialties.Translational Research is the basis for Translational Medicine. It is the process which leads from evidence based medicine to sustainable solutions for public health problems.[4] It aims to improve the health and longevity of the world’s populations and depends on developing broad-based teams of scientists and scholars who are able to focus their efforts to link basic scientific discoveries with the arena of clinical investigation, and translating the results of clinical trials into changes in clinical practice, informed by evidence from the social and political sciences. Clinical science and ecological support from effective policies can

  15. Encouraging the Arts through Higher Education Institutions: Arts Policy Implementation in Virginia

    OpenAIRE

    Keeney, Katherine Preston

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation investigates the role of public higher education institutions in state-level arts policy in the state of Virginia. The strength of public support for the arts historically has been measured by per capita arts spending, as determined by appropriations to state arts agencies. However, this is a very thin measure that misses an increasingly important contributor to the arts policy landscape - higher education institutions. As direct sources of funding for the arts decline, univ...

  16. Join the Art Club: Exploring Social Empowerment in Art Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Frances Johanna; Willis-Rauch, Mallori

    2014-01-01

    Social Empowerment Art Therapy (SEAT) aims to address the stigma of mental illness through the artistic empowerment of participants. The model was developed within an inpatient psychiatric setting from observations of a shared governance structure that empowered residents. Incorporating an open art studio approach and social action art therapy,…

  17. Lessons about Art in History and History in Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Mary, Ed.; Clark, Gilbert, Ed.

    Written by teachers from the United States and Canada, these lesson plans focus on integrating the teaching of history and art history. Seventeen lesson plans cover the topics of (1) Slavery, Henry Ossawa Tanner, and His Family--Grades: Elementary; (2) Chinese Landscape Painting--Grades: Elementary; (3) Regionalism: American Art of the Great…

  18. Determinants of monozygotic twinning in ART

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Kathrine Vauvert R; Malchau, Sara Sofia; Pinborg, Anja

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The incidence of monozygotic twins (MZT) after ART appears to be higher than the incidence after spontaneous conceptions contradicting the aim of ART to avoid multiple pregnancies because of the associated risks. OBJECTIVE AND RATIONALE: The aim was to study the frequency of MZT after...... only on case studies. All of the articles were categorized according to the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine's 'Levels of Evidence', and quality and risk of bias assessment was performed with 'The Cochrane Collaboration's Risk of Bias Tools'. A meta-analysis was performed to study the impact...

  19. Organic bioelectronics in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löffler, S; Melican, K; Nilsson, K P R; Richter-Dahlfors, A

    2017-07-01

    A major challenge in the growing field of bioelectronic medicine is the development of tissue interface technologies promoting device integration with biological tissues. Materials based on organic bioelectronics show great promise due to a unique combination of electronic and ionic conductivity properties. In this review, we outline exciting developments in the field of organic bioelectronics and demonstrate the medical importance of these active, electronically controllable materials. Importantly, organic bioelectronics offer a means to control cell-surface attachment as required for many device-tissue applications. Experiments have shown that cells readily attach and proliferate on reduced but not oxidized organic bioelectronic materials. In another application, the active properties of organic bioelectronics were used to develop electronically triggered systems for drug release. After incorporating drugs by advanced loading strategies, small compound drugs were released upon electrochemical trigger, independent of charge. Another type of delivery device was used to achieve well-controlled, spatiotemporal delivery of cationic drugs. Via electrophoretic transport within a polymer, cations were delivered with single-cell precision. Finally, organic bioelectronic materials are commonly used as electrode coatings improving the electrical properties of recording and stimulation electrodes. Because such coatings drastically reduce the electrode impedance, smaller electrodes with improved signal-to-noise ratio can be fabricated. Thus, rapid technological advancement combined with the creation of tiny electronic devices reacting to changes in the tissue environment helps to promote the transition from standard pharmaceutical therapy to treatment based on 'electroceuticals'. Moreover, the widening repertoire of organic bioelectronics will expand the options for true biological interfaces, providing the basis for personalized bioelectronic medicine. © 2017 The

  20. Nanomedicine, nanotechnology in medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisseau, Patrick; Loubaton, Bertrand

    2011-09-01

    Nanomedicine is a relatively new field of science and technology. It looks sometimes ill defined and interpretations of that term may vary, especially between Europe and the United States. By interacting with biological molecules, therefore at nanoscale, nanotechnology opens up a vast field of research and application. Interactions between artificial molecular assemblies or nanodevices and biomolecules can be understood both in the extracellular medium and inside the human cells. Operating at nanoscale allows to exploit physical properties different from those observed at microscale such as the volume/surface ratio. The investigated diagnostic applications can be considered for in vitro as well as for in vivo diagnosis. In vitro, the synthesised particles and manipulation or detection devices allow for the recognition, capture, and concentration of biomolecules. In vivo, the synthetic molecular assemblies are mainly designed as a contrast agent for imaging. A second area exhibiting a strong development is "nanodrugs" where nanoparticles are designed for targeted drug delivery. The use of such carriers improves the drug biodistribution, targeting active molecules to diseased tissues while protecting healthy tissue. A third area of application is regenerative medicine where nanotechnology allows developing biocompatible materials which support growth of cells used in cell therapy. The application of nanotechnology to medicine raises new issues because of new uses they allow, for instance: Is the power of these new diagnostics manageable by the medical profession? What means treating a patient without any clinical signs? Nanomedicine can contribute to the development of a personalised medicine both for diagnosis and therapy. There exists in many countries existing regulatory frameworks addressing the basic rules of safety and effectiveness of nanotechnology based medicine, whether molecular assemblies or medical devices. However, there is a need to clarify or to

  1. Graphical User Interface in Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwilt, Ian

    This essay discusses the use of the Graphical User Interface (GUI) as a site of creative practice. By creatively repositioning the GUI as a work of art it is possible to challenge our understanding and expectations of the conventional computer interface wherein the icons and navigational architecture of the GUI no longer function as a technological tool. These artistic recontextualizations are often used to question our engagement with technology and to highlight the pivotal place that the domestic computer has taken in our everyday social, cultural and (increasingly), creative domains. Through these works the media specificity of the screen-based GUI can broken by dramatic changes in scale, form and configuration. This can be seen through the work of new media artists who have re-imagined the GUI in a number of creative forms both, within the digital, as image, animation, net and interactive art, and in the analogue, as print, painting, sculpture, installation and performative event. Furthermore as a creative work, the GUI can also be utilized as a visual way-finder to explore the relationship between the dynamic potentials of the digital and the concretized qualities of the material artifact.

  2. Participatory art in public space

    OpenAIRE

    Crespo-Martín, Bibiana

    2016-01-01

    At the hand of three artistic projects —Suzanne Lacy’s Between the Door and the Street (2013), Lee Mingwei’s The Moving Garden (2009/2015) and Rirkrit Tiravanija’s The Land Foundation— this paper reflects on the methodological precepts underlying theoretical and conceptual foundations of participatory art at the public space. Taken as case studies about participatory art, each propositions allow to explore relational art / relational aesthetics concepts proposed by the French curator artifice...

  3. Artificial intelligence in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, A N; Kambhampati, C; Monson, J R T; Drew, P J

    2004-09-01

    Artificial intelligence is a branch of computer science capable of analysing complex medical data. Their potential to exploit meaningful relationship with in a data set can be used in the diagnosis, treatment and predicting outcome in many clinical scenarios. Medline and internet searches were carried out using the keywords 'artificial intelligence' and 'neural networks (computer)'. Further references were obtained by cross-referencing from key articles. An overview of different artificial intelligent techniques is presented in this paper along with the review of important clinical applications. The proficiency of artificial intelligent techniques has been explored in almost every field of medicine. Artificial neural network was the most commonly used analytical tool whilst other artificial intelligent techniques such as fuzzy expert systems, evolutionary computation and hybrid intelligent systems have all been used in different clinical settings. Artificial intelligence techniques have the potential to be applied in almost every field of medicine. There is need for further clinical trials which are appropriately designed before these emergent techniques find application in the real clinical setting.

  4. Artificial intelligence in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, A. N.; Kambhampati, C.; Monson, J. R. T.; Drew, P. J.

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Artificial intelligence is a branch of computer science capable of analysing complex medical data. Their potential to exploit meaningful relationship with in a data set can be used in the diagnosis, treatment and predicting outcome in many clinical scenarios. METHODS: Medline and internet searches were carried out using the keywords 'artificial intelligence' and 'neural networks (computer)'. Further references were obtained by cross-referencing from key articles. An overview of different artificial intelligent techniques is presented in this paper along with the review of important clinical applications. RESULTS: The proficiency of artificial intelligent techniques has been explored in almost every field of medicine. Artificial neural network was the most commonly used analytical tool whilst other artificial intelligent techniques such as fuzzy expert systems, evolutionary computation and hybrid intelligent systems have all been used in different clinical settings. DISCUSSION: Artificial intelligence techniques have the potential to be applied in almost every field of medicine. There is need for further clinical trials which are appropriately designed before these emergent techniques find application in the real clinical setting. PMID:15333167

  5. Playware Explorations in Robot Art

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik Hautop; Pagliarini, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    We describe the upcoming art field termed robot art. Describing our group contribution to the world of robot art, a brief excursion on the importance of the underlying principles, of the context, of the message and its semiotic is also provided, case by case, together with few hints on the recent...... history of such a discipline, under the light of an artistic perspective. Therefore, the aim of the paper is to try to summarize the main characteristics that might classify ro-bot art as a unique and innovative discipline, and to track down some of the principles by which a robotic artifact can...

  6. Clinical holistic medicine: classic art of healing or the therapeutic touch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventegodt, Søren; Morad, Mohammed; Merrick, Joav

    2004-03-04

    Touching is often a forgotten part of medicine. The manual medicine or therapeutic touch (TT) is much more powerful than many modern, biomedically oriented physicians think. Pain and discomfort can be alleviated just by touching the sick area and in this way help the patient to be in better contact with the tissue and organs of their body. Lack of presence in the body seems to be connected with many symptoms that can be readily reversed simply by sensitive touch. When touch is combined with therapeutic work on mind and feelings, holistic healing seems to be facilitated and many problems can be solved in a direct and easy way in the clinic without drugs. This paper gives examples of the strength of manual medicine or therapeutic touch in its most simple form, and points to the power of physical contact between physician and his patient in the context of the theory and practice of holistic healing. Intimacy seems highly beneficial for the process of healing and it is very important to distinguish clearly between intimacy and sexuality for the physician and his patent to be able to give and receive touch without fear and without holding back emotionally.

  7. Machine Learning in Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deo, Rahul C.

    2015-01-01

    Spurred by advances in processing power, memory, storage, and an unprecedented wealth of data, computers are being asked to tackle increasingly complex learning tasks, often with astonishing success. Computers have now mastered a popular variant of poker, learned the laws of physics from experimental data, and become experts in video games – tasks which would have been deemed impossible not too long ago. In parallel, the number of companies centered on applying complex data analysis to varying industries has exploded, and it is thus unsurprising that some analytic companies are turning attention to problems in healthcare. The purpose of this review is to explore what problems in medicine might benefit from such learning approaches and use examples from the literature to introduce basic concepts in machine learning. It is important to note that seemingly large enough medical data sets and adequate learning algorithms have been available for many decades – and yet, although there are thousands of papers applying machine learning algorithms to medical data, very few have contributed meaningfully to clinical care. This lack of impact stands in stark contrast to the enormous relevance of machine learning to many other industries. Thus part of my effort will be to identify what obstacles there may be to changing the practice of medicine through statistical learning approaches, and discuss how these might be overcome. PMID:26572668

  8. Nuclear medicine in psychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lass, P.; Slawek, P.

    2007-01-01

    In the same way that the symptoms between different diseases in psychiatry overlap, functional brain research frequently shows the same pattern of changes across diagnostic borders; on the other hand, many the other tests, e.g. psychological tests, present the same problem as mentioned above; therefore: The psychiatrist seldom applies to an NM specialist to obtain a diagnosis; instead, a nuclear medicine report will rather confirm, or less frequently exclude, the psychiatrist's diagnosis. Ideally, psychiatric patients should be rescanned after the treatment, and changes in perfusion and/or metabolism discussed between psychiatrist and NM specialist. As shown above, there are few practical applications of nuclear medicine due to low specificity and low spatial resolution, although in the aspect of functional imaging it is still superior to CT/MRI, even in their functional modalities. On the other hand, its investigational potential is still growing, as there is no imaging technique in sight which could replace metabolic and receptor studies, and also because the scope of functional imaging in psychiatric diseases is spreading from its traditional applications, like dementia or depression, towards many poorly investigated fields e.g. hypnosis, suicidal behaviour or sleep disorders. (author)

  9. Machine Learning in Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deo, Rahul C

    2015-11-17

    Spurred by advances in processing power, memory, storage, and an unprecedented wealth of data, computers are being asked to tackle increasingly complex learning tasks, often with astonishing success. Computers have now mastered a popular variant of poker, learned the laws of physics from experimental data, and become experts in video games - tasks that would have been deemed impossible not too long ago. In parallel, the number of companies centered on applying complex data analysis to varying industries has exploded, and it is thus unsurprising that some analytic companies are turning attention to problems in health care. The purpose of this review is to explore what problems in medicine might benefit from such learning approaches and use examples from the literature to introduce basic concepts in machine learning. It is important to note that seemingly large enough medical data sets and adequate learning algorithms have been available for many decades, and yet, although there are thousands of papers applying machine learning algorithms to medical data, very few have contributed meaningfully to clinical care. This lack of impact stands in stark contrast to the enormous relevance of machine learning to many other industries. Thus, part of my effort will be to identify what obstacles there may be to changing the practice of medicine through statistical learning approaches, and discuss how these might be overcome. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Artificial intelligence in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamet, Pavel; Tremblay, Johanne

    2017-04-01

    Artificial Intelligence (AI) is a general term that implies the use of a computer to model intelligent behavior with minimal human intervention. AI is generally accepted as having started with the invention of robots. The term derives from the Czech word robota, meaning biosynthetic machines used as forced labor. In this field, Leonardo Da Vinci's lasting heritage is today's burgeoning use of robotic-assisted surgery, named after him, for complex urologic and gynecologic procedures. Da Vinci's sketchbooks of robots helped set the stage for this innovation. AI, described as the science and engineering of making intelligent machines, was officially born in 1956. The term is applicable to a broad range of items in medicine such as robotics, medical diagnosis, medical statistics, and human biology-up to and including today's "omics". AI in medicine, which is the focus of this review, has two main branches: virtual and physical. The virtual branch includes informatics approaches from deep learning information management to control of health management systems, including electronic health records, and active guidance of physicians in their treatment decisions. The physical branch is best represented by robots used to assist the elderly patient or the attending surgeon. Also embodied in this branch are targeted nanorobots, a unique new drug delivery system. The societal and ethical complexities of these applications require further reflection, proof of their medical utility, economic value, and development of interdisciplinary strategies for their wider application. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Medicines in ancient period

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Netravalkar, M.G.S.

    stream_size 7 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name New_Trend_Indian_Art_Archaeol_1992_387.pdf.txt stream_source_info New_Trend_Indian_Art_Archaeol_1992_387.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset...

  12. VERBAL IN FINE ARTS: USE OF QUOTES, WORDS AND EXPRESSIONS IN MODERN ART MEMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapanzha, O.S.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to the analysis of verbal art memes as a phenomenon of modern network communication. Based on the typology of art memes (visual, animation, verbal and synthetic we provide the characteristics of the tools used in the construction of verbal art memes. The main method of creating art memes is the method of appropriation. The main device that creates new meanings of artistic images in verbal art memes is the inclusion of speech elements in the work of art. Unlike visual art memes, using professional art of the XX century, a verbal art meme is mass scale by its origin and understandable to a wide audience of network users and consumers of mass art content.

  13. Nanotechnology in respiratory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omlor, Albert Joachim; Nguyen, Juliane; Bals, Robert; Dinh, Quoc Thai

    2015-05-29

    Like two sides of the same coin, nanotechnology can be both boon and bane for respiratory medicine. Nanomaterials open new ways in diagnostics and treatment of lung diseases. Nanoparticle based drug delivery systems can help against diseases such as lung cancer, tuberculosis, and pulmonary fibrosis. Moreover, nanoparticles can be loaded with DNA and act as vectors for gene therapy in diseases like cystic fibrosis. Even lung diagnostics with computer tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) profits from new nanoparticle based contrast agents. However, the risks of nanotechnology also have to be taken into consideration as engineered nanomaterials resemble natural fine dusts and fibers, which are known to be harmful for the respiratory system in many cases. Recent studies have shown that nanoparticles in the respiratory tract can influence the immune system, can create oxidative stress and even cause genotoxicity. Another important aspect to assess the safety of nanotechnology based products is the absorption of nanoparticles. It was demonstrated that the amount of pulmonary nanoparticle uptake not only depends on physical and chemical nanoparticle characteristics but also on the health status of the organism. The huge diversity in nanotechnology could revolutionize medicine but makes safety assessment a challenging task.

  14. Nuclear Medicine and Application of Nuclear Techniques in Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiharto, Kunto

    1996-01-01

    The use of nuclear techniques medicine covers not only nuclear medicine and radiology in strict sense but also determination of body mineral content by neutron activation analysis and x-ray fluorescence technique either in vitro or in vivo, application of radioisotopes as tracers in pharmacology and biochemistry, etc. This paper describes the ideal tracer in nuclear medicine, functional and morphological imaging, clinical aspect and radiation protection in nuclear medicine. Nuclear technique offers facilities and chances related to research activities and services in medicine. The development of diagnostic as well as therapeutic methods using monoclonal antibodies labeled with radioisotope will undoubtedly play an important role in the disease control

  15. [Medicine in the notaphily].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babić, Rade R; Stanković-Babić, Gordana

    2010-01-01

    Apart from literature, painting and philately, some of the greatest names of medicine found their place in the field of numismatics. They popularised their people and nations, as well as the medical science worldwide. The paper exhibits banknotes with the portraits of famous and world-wide recognised people in world and national history. Among these are the poet and pediatrician, Jovan Jovanović Zmaj; the doctor and botanist, Josif Pancić; the academic painter, Nadezda Petrović, as well as the motifs from our national history. The banknotes from China with the image of the surgeon, Dr. Sun Yat Sen, from Spain with the portrait of the histologist Dr. Santiago Ramón y Cajal, from Austria with the face of the Nobel Prize winner and psychiatrist, Dr. Julius Wagner Jauregg and from France with the portrait of the great scientist, Louis Pasteur are also presented. These are some of the examples of great names of medicine, who brought world fame to their nations and medical science, and who were, apart from literature, painting, philately, interested in numismatics.

  16. Index of international publications in aerospace medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    The 5th edition of the Index of International Publications in Aerospace Medicine is a comprehensive : listing of international publications in clinical aerospace medicine, operational aerospace medicine, : aerospace physiology, environmental medicine...

  17. Index of international publications in aerospace medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-08-01

    The Index of International Publications in Aerospace Medicine is a comprehensive listing of international publications in clinical aerospace medicine, operational aerospace medicine, aerospace physiology, environmental medicine/physiology, diving med...

  18. A singular art : a theoretical and artistic survey on miniature and hybrid possibilities of traditional arts in contemporary art

    OpenAIRE

    Şener, Seval

    2007-01-01

    Ankara : The Department of Graphic Design and the Institute of Fine Arts of Bilkent University, 2007. Thesis (Master's) -- Bilkent University, 2007. Includes bibliographical references leaves 81-83 The aim of this study is to point out the problems which are stemmed from the use of traditional arts, particularly miniature, in contemporary art. A theoretical survey on seeing and representation of traditional arts and miniature was made. The result of the survey is that tradit...

  19. Performative, Arts-Based, or Arts-Informed? Reflections on the Development of Arts-Based Research in Music Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledger, Alison; McCaffrey, Tríona

    2015-01-01

    Arts-based research (ABR) has emerged in music therapy in diverse ways, employing a range of interpretive paradigms and artistic media. It is notable that no consensus exists as to when and where the arts are included in the research process, or which music therapy topics are most suited to arts-based study. This diversity may pose challenges for music therapists who are developing, reading, and evaluating arts-based research. This paper provides an updated review of arts-based research literature in music therapy, along with four questions for researchers who are developing arts-based research. These questions are 1) When should the arts be introduced? 2) Which artistic medium is appropriate? 3) How should the art be understood? and 4) What is the role of the audience? We argue that these questions are key to understanding arts-based research, justifying methods, and evaluating claims arising from arts-based research. Rather than defining arts-based research in music therapy, we suggest that arts-based research should be understood as a flexible research strategy appropriate for exploring the complexities of music therapy practice. © the American Music Therapy Association 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Performance in Art Nature and Meaning among Fine/Applied Arts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... influence on the students‟ performance. The study was delimited to undergraduates in Fine/Applied Arts and Theatre Arts who registered for Art, Nature and Meaning in the University of Benin. As a result, two Research Questions were raised. It was discovered that there is no significant difference in performance in Art, ...

  1. Personalized medicine in rheumatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kłak, Anna; Paradowska-Gorycka, Agnieszka; Kwiatkowska, Brygida; Raciborski, Filip

    2016-01-01

    In the era of the 21 st century, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is still poorly characterized. Rheumatoid arthritis is a common but heterogeneous disease, not only in the course and clinical symptoms, but also in the clinical response to treatment. Now it is known that early, correct diagnosis and starting treatment with disease-modifying drugs (DMARDs), of which methotrexate (MTX) remains the gold standard in the treatment of RA, is crucial in order to prevent joint destruction, functional disability and an unfavourable disease outcome. Early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis is significant in so much as the primary treatment can be started better. Pharmacogenetic and pharmacogenomic studies, which help determine the genetic profile of individual patients, may bring us closer to personalized medicine. Further studies on RA should allow for the identification of disease-specific genes at the stage when their tolerance by the organism is still preserved (before auto-aggression develops).

  2. OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE APPLICATIONS IN ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taner AYDIN

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Osteopathic medicine is among the fastest-growing sectors of health care. From its beginning, it has undertaken an active role in promoting athletic participation at all levels, as a means of healthy lifestyle. Its role in athletes may be of particular importance for performance improvement, prevention of and recovery from injury, and ultimately for successful competition outcomes. It is projected that by 2020, approximately 100,000 physicians of osteopathic medicine will be practicing in the United States. Despite its growing popularity, osteopathic medicine is not as widely understood as traditional medicine, also known as allopathic medicine. Manipulation, a component of osteopathic medicine, is often a subject of debate, especially concerning evidence-based medicine. Questions as such are raised: What is the purpose of osteopathic manipulation? Who would benefit from it? What harm may cause the practice? This article attempts to answer these questions by discussing the philosophy of osteopathic medicine, to delineate the differences between osteopathic physicians and other performers of manual medicine, by reviewing some of the current literature. The article particularly focuses on the use of manipulation in the athletic setting. Implementation of osteopathic principles and practices, which may include manual medicine, can then be applied to aid in the prevention of or recovery from illnesses or sports injuries.

  3. [Geriatric medicine in future].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameyama, M

    1989-01-01

    Geriatrics in future will be most concerned with persons aged 80 years or more (very elderly) in Japan. Clinical and pathological features of very elderly patients were reported with comparison to the 65-79 age group. Many very elderly do not show clear-cut clinical signs and symptoms, but have serious underlying diseases. We propose here a concept of "clinical threshold". On evaluating the laboratory data, we must consider the grades of "activity of daily living (ADL)" of the aged patients, because ADL may significantly modify the test results. Furthermore in clinical practice, we should pay attention to both the psychosocial states and physical findings of the patients. "The old age syndrome" proposed by Parker is useful in geriatric medicine. Extensive studies on dementia, especially of Alzheimer's type are required urgently. Molecular biology approaches to this disease have shown great advances in geriatrics. To prevent geriatric disease, well-controlled exercise and diet are important as well as reasonable psychosocial integrity.

  4. See Art History in a New Light: Have an Art Auction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benter, Doris J.

    2008-01-01

    At Portledge School in Locust Valley, New York, ninth graders in their upper school study art history for one semester. The visual arts department has created a vigorous new syllabus culminating in an hour-long mock art auction. The department selects several art movements (e.g., Post-Impressionism, Cubism, Abstract Expressionism, Social Realism,…

  5. Role of ART in imprinting disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eroglu, Ali; Layman, Lawrence C

    2012-04-01

    Assisted reproductive technologies (ART) offer revolutionary infertility treatments for millions of childless couples around the world. Currently, ART accounts for 1 to 3% of annual births in industrialized countries and continues to expand rapidly. Except for an increased incidence of premature births, these technologies are considered safe. However, new evidence published during the past decade has suggested an increased incidence of imprinting disorders in children conceived by ART. Specifically, an increased risk was reported for Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS), Angelman syndrome (AS), Silver-Russell syndrome, and retinoblastoma. In contrast, some studies have found no association between ART and BWS, AS, Prader-Willi syndrome, transient neonatal diabetes mellitus, and retinoblastoma. The variability in ART protocols and the rarity of imprinting disorders complicate determining the causative relationship between ART and an increased incidence of imprinting disorders. Nevertheless, compelling experimental data from animal studies also suggest a link between increased imprinting disorders and ART. Further comprehensive, appropriately powered studies are needed to better address the magnitude of the risk for ART-associated imprinting disorders. Large longitudinal studies are particularly critical to evaluate long-term effects of ART not only during the perinatal period but also into adulthood. An important consideration is to determine if the implicated association between ART and imprinting disorders is actually related to the procedures or to infertility itself. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  6. Computational Mathematics in Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Garrido

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available AI requires Logic. But its Classical version shows too many insufficiencies. So, it is very necessary to introduce more sophisticated tools, as may be Fuzzy Logic, Modal Logic, Non-
    Monotonic Logic, and so on [2]. Among the things that AI needs to represent are Categories, Objects, Properties, Relations between objects, Situations, States, Time, Events, Causes and effects, Knowledge about knowledge, and so on. The problems in AI can be classified in two general types
    [3, 4], Search Problems and Representation Problem. There exist different ways to reach this objective. So, we have [3] Logics, Rules, Frames, Associative Nets, Scripts, and so on, many times interconnect. Also it will be very useful, in the treatment of the problems of uncertainty and causality, the introduction of Bayesian Networks and particularly, a principal tool as the Essential Graph. We attempt here to show the scope of application of such versatile methods, currently fundamental in Medicine.

  7. Advanced polymers in medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Puoci, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The book provides an up-to-date overview of the diverse medical applications of advanced polymers. The book opens by presenting important background information on polymer chemistry and physicochemical characterization of polymers. This serves as essential scientific support for the subsequent chapters, each of which is devoted to the applications of polymers in a particular medical specialty. The coverage is broad, encompassing orthopedics, ophthalmology, tissue engineering, surgery, dentistry, oncology, drug delivery, nephrology, wound dressing and healing, and cardiology. The development of polymers that enhance the biocompatibility of blood-contacting medical devices and the incorporation of polymers within biosensors are also addressed. This book is an excellent guide to the recent advances in polymeric biomaterials and bridges the gap between the research literature and standard textbooks on the applications of polymers in medicine.

  8. The Morehouse Human Values in Medicine Program, 1978-80: Reinforcing a Commitment to Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Kathryn; Axelsen, Diana

    1982-01-01

    A program in human values in medicine begun in 1978 at Morehouse College's School of Medicine is discussed. The Human Values in Medicine Program draws on the Humanities--particularly philosophy, literature, and art--and secondarily on the social sciences. (MLW)

  9. Images in medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    16 févr. 2015 ... L'echodoppler (A) et l'angioscanner (B) des troncs supra-aortiques objectivaient un épaississement étendu et fusiforme de l'artère carotide primitive gauche avec une sténose estimée à 60% de l'artère carotide interne droite. L'enquête infectieuse, le bilan immunologique et de thrombophilie étaient ...

  10. Educating the public, defending the art: language use and medical education in Hippocrates' The Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rademaker, Adriaan

    2010-01-01

    The Hippocratic treatise The Art is an epideictic speech in defence of medicine against certain unnamed detractors. The author of The Art is fully aware of the fact that for him, language (as opposed to, say, a live demonstration) is the medium of education. Accordingly, the author shows full command of the main issues of the late fifth century 'sophistic' debate on the nature and the correct and effective use of language. In his views on language, the author seems to adopt a quite positivistic stance. For him, words reflect our perception and interpretation of the visual appearances or eidea of the things that are, and these appearances prove the existence of things in nature. To this extent, language reflects reality, provided that we language users have the expertise to form correct interpretations of what we observe. At the same time, language remains a secondary phenomenon: it is not a 'growth' of nature, but a set of conventional signs that have a basis in reality only if they are applied correctly. There is always the possibility of incorrect interpretation of our perceptions, which will lead to an incorrect use of language that does not reflect real phenomena. Words remain conventional expressions, and not all words can be expected to reflect the truth. In fact, the unnamed detractors of the art are victim to many such incorrect interpretations. Consistent with his view of language as secondary to visual phenomena, the author claims in his peroration that as a medium for the defence of medicine, the spoken word is generally considered less effective than live demonstrations. This modesty, while undoubtedly effective as a means to catch the sympathy of his public, still seems slightly overstated. Our author is fully aware of the powers and limitations of his medium, and shows great sophistication in its use.

  11. Discrimination And Intolerance in the Art

    OpenAIRE

    Vitor Correia

    2014-01-01

    When the people speak about discrimination and intolerance, it is usually in reference to the racial, religious, political, sexual, age, problems, etc., and does not refer, or refers less, the discrimination and the intolerance determined by artistic reasons, or with these related : the age differences in art, the sexism in art, and the rejection of works of art. In this text we intend to show the existence of these forms of discrimination and intolerance, explain what they mean, its causes, ...

  12. Temporality and permanence in Romanian public art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria-Judit Balko

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the relationship between permanent monuments and temporary art projects, as temporality is one of the strategies employed by Romanian artists to counterbalance the support that the Romanian state has shown only towards monuments and memorials dedicated to affirming its value. The complex nature of public art requires a careful consideration of the different dimensions this practice employs, and for that the Western debate on this matter can be a reference point in understanding Romanian public art. We will be looking at possible aspects of the functions of these two main directions in Romanian public art, as they stand methodically one in opposition to the other, in connection with the texts of Piotr Piotrowski (Art and Democracy in Post-communist Europe, 2012 and Boris Groys (Art Power, 2008.

  13. Coordination compounds in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurisson, S.; Berning, D.; Wei Jia; Dangshe Ma

    1993-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals, drugs containing a radionuclide, are used routinely in nuclear medicine departments for the diagnosis of disease and are under investigation for use in the treatment of disease. Nuclear medicine takes advantage of both the nuclear properties of the radionuclide and the pharmacological properties of the radiopharmaceutical. Herein lies the real strength of nuclear medicine, the ability to monitor biochemical and physiological functions in vivo. This review discusses the coordination chemistry that forms the basis for nuclear medicine applications of the FDA-approved radiopharmaceuticals that are in clinical use, and of the most promising diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals that are in various stages of development. 232 refs

  14. Performing Beauty in Participatory Art and Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinrich, Falk

    , Plato, Alison, Hume, Kant, Gadamer and Santayana through to McMahon and Sartwell, Heinrich argues that the experience of beauty in participatory art demands a revised notion of beauty; a conception that accounts for the performative and ludic turn within various art forms and which is, in a broader...... sense, a notion of beauty suited to a participatory and technology-saturated culture. Through case studies of participatory art, he provides an art-theoretical approach to the concept of performative beauty; an approach that is then applied to the wider context of media and design artefacts.......This book investigates the notion of beauty in participatory art, an interdisciplinary form that necessitates the audience’s agential participation and that is often seen in interactive art and technology-driven media installations. After considering established theories of beauty, for example...

  15. Formative Evaluation Research of Art-Based Supervision in Art Therapy Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, Barbara J.

    2008-01-01

    Image making is a common component of art therapy supervision but its use has not yet been formally evaluated. This article describes formative evaluation research used to investigate student responses to art-based supervision in which response art was used as a primary method to contain, explore, or express clinical work. Art-based supervision,…

  16. Exploring what works in art therapy with children with autism : Tacit knowledge of art therapists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schweizer, Celine; Spreen, Marinus; Knorth, Erik J.

    2017-01-01

    Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) are often referred to art therapy. To investigate what works in art therapy with these children 'tacit knowledge' of eight well experienced art therapists was explored. Promising components were arranged into the Context and Outcomes of Art Therapy

  17. Exploring What Works in Art Therapy with Children with Autism: Tacit Knowledge of Art Therapists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Celine; Spreen, Marinus; Knorth, Erik J.

    2017-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are often referred to art therapy. To investigate what works in art therapy with children with ASD, the tacit knowledge of 8 experienced art therapists was explored through interviews. Promising components were arranged into the Context and Outcomes of Art Therapy (COAT) model. According to the…

  18. Advanced Placement in Studio Art and Secondary Art Education Policy: Countering the Null Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Mark A.; Sims-Gunzenhauser, Alice

    2009-01-01

    Because of education reform policy and misconceptions about artistry and artistic assessment, visual art education remains in the margins of high school education. One response to the lack of supportive arts education policy is the Advanced Placement (AP) Studio Art Program, a visual arts assessment at the high school level that engages large…

  19. The Principles of Ornament in Islamic Art and Effects of These Principles on the Turkish Carpet Art

    OpenAIRE

    Sema Etikan

    2011-01-01

    Islamic art reflects art work which is formed by combining earlier art perception in muslims living areas with Islamic prensiples. Islamic art can be understood as a synthesis however, it has also its own originality. The main characteristic to reflect the originality of this art is ornament style. This ornament art is applied similarly in every Islamic art work. In this study, it is aimed to tell the reflections of Islamic ornament art into Turkish carpet art. The elements of ornamaent in Is...

  20. Nuclear Medicine week in Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padhy, A.K.

    2003-01-01

    During the week of 6-12 October 2003 the IAEA organized a Research Coordination Meeting on 'Relationship between lower Respiratory Tract Infection, Gastroesophageal reflux and bronchial Asthma in children' at Hospital San Ignacio in Bogota. Besides there were four workshops in Bogota; workshops on Bone infection and Bone scan in Pediatric ortopaedics at Hospital Militar and Fundacion CardioInfantil, a workshop for Nuclear Medicine Technologists and a workshop on Sentinel Lymph Node mapping and Surgical Gamma Probe Application at Institute of Oncology. A nuclear cardiology workshop was organized in Medellin, and finally crowning them all was the 9th Congress of the Colombian Association of Nuclear Medicine at Cali from 10-12 October, 2003; probably the largest and best Colombian nuclear medicine congress every held in the country. A workshop was also organized in Cali for nuclear medicine technologists in conjunction with the Annual Convention. It was a mix of IAEA's Technical Cooperation and Regular Budget activities along with the activities of Colombian Association of Nuclear Medicine, bringing in absolute synergy to galvanize the entire nuclear medicine community of the country. The week saw nuclear medicine scientists from more than 20 IAEA Member States converging on Colombia to spread the message of nuclear medicine, share knowledge and to foster International understanding and friendship among the nuclear medicine people of the world

  1. Combining Art and Science in "Arts and Sciences" Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needle, Andrew; Corbo, Christopher; Wong, Denise; Greenfeder, Gary; Raths, Linda; Fulop, Zoltan

    2007-01-01

    Two of this article's authors--an art professor and a biology professor--shared a project for advanced biology, art, nursing, and computer science majors involving scientific research that used digital imaging of the brain of the zebrafish, a newly favored laboratory animal. These contemporary and innovative teaching and learning practices were a…

  2. [Problems in medicinal materials research of new traditional Chinese medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Gang; Wang, Ting; He, Yan-Ping

    2014-08-01

    Medicinal materials research and development of new drug of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) research is the premise and foundation of new drug research and development, it throughout the whole process of new drug research. Medicinal materials research is one of the main content of the pharmaceutical research of new drug of TCM, and it is also the focus of the new medicine pharmaceutical evaluation content. This article through the analysis of the present problems existing in the development of TCM research of new drug of TCM, from medicine research concept, quality stability, quality standard, etc are expounded, including medicine research idea value medicine study should focus on the important role and from the purpose for the top-level design of new drug research problem. Medicinal materials quality stability should pay attention to the original, medicinal part, origin, processing, storage, planting (breeding), and other aspects. Aspect of quality standard of medicinal materials should pay attention to establish the quality standards of conform to the characteristics of new drug of TCM. As the instruction of TCM new drug research and development and the scientific nature of the review, and provide the basis for medicinal material standards.

  3. Mental Toughness in the Classical Martial Arts

    OpenAIRE

    Minnix, Douglas Wayne

    2010-01-01

    Mental Toughness in the Classical Martial Arts Douglas Wayne Minnix ABSTRACT The construct of mental toughness is in a state of evolution and refinement. The current study proposed to investigate; (1) the importance of mental toughness attributes from a Classical Martial Arts context, (2) the trainability of the mental toughness attributes from a Classical Martial Arts context, (3) and the extent to which classical martial artists perceive that attributes converge under broader...

  4. COMMUNICATION AND INTERACTION IN ART CLASSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Hrvanović

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Numerous indicators affect communication and interaction in art classes. For every teacher, as pedagogue, his successful educational activity is very important as some indicators influence the two-way exchange of information in art classes. Teaching art is very specific way of teaching process, because it is mostly based on exchange of visual information of artistic type which represents a special form of communication. The specificity of artistic information, way of acting on the viewer and intense emotional charge in the process of communication should be used as visual stimulus. The richness of imagery, stimulation of reality, abstraction and other cognitive processes in art classes experientially and visually improve students’ awareness and should be represented and diversified by origin and multiplied by quantity. The research paper aims to demonstrate the importance of connectivity between judgment of taste and ability to evaluate the quality of the work of art in art and non-art schools. Teaching and education in art classes is being realized precisely inside communicative relations and appropriate socio-emotional climate. In this research, visual communication in art classes is defined over the structure of the inventory that will examine the differences between abilities to evaluate the quality of artistic information and the judgment of taste.

  5. Hunting Motifs in Situla Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Preložnik

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Situla art developed as an echo of the toreutic style which had spread from the Near East through the Phoenicians, Greeks and Etruscans as far as the Veneti, Raeti, Histri, and their eastern neighbours in the region of Dolenjska (Lower Carniola. An Early Iron Age phenomenon (c. 600—300 BC, it rep- resents the major and most arresting form of the contemporary visual arts in an area stretching from the foot of the Apennines in the south to the Drava and Sava rivers in the east. Indeed, individual pieces have found their way across the Alpine passes and all the way north to the Danube. In the world and art of the situlae, a prominent role is accorded to ani- mals. They are displayed in numerous representations of human activities on artefacts crafted in the classic situla style – that is, between the late 6th  and early 5th centuries BC – as passive participants (e.g. in pageants or in harness or as an active element of the situla narrative. The most typical example of the latter is the hunting scene. Today we know at least four objects decorat- ed exclusively with hunting themes, and a number of situlae and other larger vessels where hunting scenes are embedded in composite narratives. All this suggests a popularity unparallelled by any other genre. Clearly recognisable are various hunting techniques and weapons, each associated with a particu- lar type of game (Fig. 1. The chase of a stag with javelin, horse and hound is depicted on the long- familiar and repeatedly published fibula of Zagorje (Fig. 2. It displays a hound mauling the stag’s back and a hunter on horseback pursuing a hind, her neck already pierced by the javelin. To judge by the (so far unnoticed shaft end un- der the stag’s muzzle, the hunter would have been brandishing a second jave- lin as well, like the warrior of the Vače fibula or the rider of the Nesactium situla, presumably himself a hunter. Many parallels to his motif are known from Greece, Etruria, and

  6. Applying Operational Art in the Space Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    applicable in the space domain. The conclusion reviews the specific application of each attribute of operational art within the space domain and draws ...that are traceable throughout the history of land warfare. Within the last few decades, the concept of operational art has spread outside its...service doctrine manuals all contain definitions of the operational level of war and operational art . These definitions have underlying histories and

  7. Natural language processing: state of the art and prospects for significant progress, a workshop sponsored by the National Library of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Carol; Rindflesch, Thomas C; Corn, Milton

    2013-10-01

    Natural language processing (NLP) is crucial for advancing healthcare because it is needed to transform relevant information locked in text into structured data that can be used by computer processes aimed at improving patient care and advancing medicine. In light of the importance of NLP to health, the National Library of Medicine (NLM) recently sponsored a workshop to review the state of the art in NLP focusing on text in English, both in biomedicine and in the general language domain. Specific goals of the NLM-sponsored workshop were to identify the current state of the art, grand challenges and specific roadblocks, and to identify effective use and best practices. This paper reports on the main outcomes of the workshop, including an overview of the state of the art, strategies for advancing the field, and obstacles that need to be addressed, resulting in recommendations for a research agenda intended to advance the field. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The visual arts influence in Nazi Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bie Yanan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article will discuss the influence of visual art in Nazi Germany from two parts of visual arts, which are political photography and poster propaganda, analyzing the unique social and historical stage of Nazi Germany. And it emphasizes the ideology of the Nazis, which in Nazi Germany inflamed the political sentiment of the masses and took the visual art as their important instrument of political propaganda, while Nazi party used visual art on anti-society and war which is worth warning and criticizing for later generation.

  9. Precision Medicine in Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Liu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Since President Obama announced the Precision Medicine Initiative in the United States, more and more attention has been paid to precision medicine. However, clinicians have already used it to treat conditions such as cancer. Many cardiovascular diseases have a familial presentation, and genetic variants are associated with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of cardiovascular diseases, which are the basis for providing precise care to patients with cardiovascular diseases. Large-scale cohorts and multiomics are critical components of precision medicine. Here we summarize the application of precision medicine to cardiovascular diseases based on cohort and omic studies, and hope to elicit discussion about future health care.

  10. Infection imaging in nuclear medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Regardless of advances in medicine, infection continues to play a major role in patients' morbidity and mortality. Nuclear medicine techniques have an important role in the evaluation of patients suspected of harbouring infection. Many different agents may be used in an attempt to image infection. ere are ...

  11. Women's Achievements in Art: An Issues Approach for the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Georgia C.; Sandell, Renee

    1987-01-01

    Reviews gender-related issues that might arise as students are introduced to women's art achievements. Divides women's art into mainstream art and "hiddenstream" art, or art represented by work in textiles, ceramics, and miscellaneous art forms. Includes a chart which shows the name and nationality of over 90 female artists working between 1390…

  12. An Artistic Approach to Fine Arts Interpretation in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selan, Jurij

    2013-01-01

    Art criticism was introduced into art education to help students understand works of art. However, art interpretation methods differ according to the educational goals specified for various types of art students. The fine arts interpretation procedures established in education are usually purely theoretical and exclusively verbal, and are thus…

  13. Nuclear medicine in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, J.F.

    1999-01-01

    Cancer is increasingly prevalent in our society. There is a life-time risk that 1 in 3 Australian men and 1 in 4 Australian women will get cancer before the age of 75 years. Overall, 27% of the deaths in NSW are currently related to cancer. The common cancers for men are prostate, lung, melanoma, colon, rectum and bladder. For women the common cancers are breast, colon, melanoma, lung and unknown primary. However, overall lung cancer remains the major cause of cancer deaths (20%) followed by colorectal (13%), unknown site (8%), breast and prostate. Breast and lung cancer are the major causes of death in women. Recent information on 5 year survivals reveal good 5 year survival rates for breast (78.6%), prostate (72.4%) and melanoma (92%), while some tumours such as lung cancer (10.7%) have poor survival. Colon cancer has intermediate survival (57.1%). Projections for cancer incidence suggests rates of cancer will increase for colorectal cancer, melanoma, lung cancer in females but decrease for breast, lung in males and prostate cancer. Major strategic directions in cancer research are understanding carcinogenesis, identification of high risk groups, screening and early detection, chemo-prevention, new cancer therapies, combined modality therapy and quality of life issues. Nuclear medicine will play an important part in many of these areas

  14. Radiation in art and archeometry

    CERN Document Server

    Creagh, D C

    2000-01-01

    /inca/publications/misc/creaghcov.htmAbout the cover This book contains twenty chapters covering a wide range of research in the fields of scientific conservation of art and archaeometry. The common thread is the use of radiation in these analyses. The term "radiation" is used in the widest possible sense. The book encompasses the use of electromagnetic radiation in its microwave, infrared, visible, ultraviolet, x ray and &ggr; ray forms and the use of particulate forms such as electrons, neutrons and charged particles for which the Planck's Law relation applies. In many cases there is an interplay between the two forms: for example, proton induced x ray emission (PIXE), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). As far as possible the chapters have been arranged in order of ascending particle energy. Thus it commences with the use of microwaves and finishes with the use of &ggr; rays. The authors were chosen on the basis of their expertise as practitioners of their particular field of study. This means ...

  15. Maladministrations in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smart, R.C.

    2002-01-01

    Maladministration has been defined as the mistaken administration of a radiopharmaceutical to a patient. Examples include the administration of the wrong radiopharmaceutical or the wrong activity to the correct patient or the administration of the correct radiopharmaceutical to the wrong patient. Although maladministrations are rare, lessons can be learnt from the incidents that do occur. Medical maladministrations and other radiation incidents are discussed by members of the NSW Hospital and University Radiation Safety Officers Group (HURSOG) at their bi-monthly meetings. During the three years of 1997-1999 fourteen incidents of maladministrations in nuclear medicine were reported. Analysis of these reports indicated that eight (57 %) were due to the wrong radiopharmaceutical having been administered. This usually occurred because the technologist had selected the wrong lyophilised agent when the radiopharmaceutical was being prepared, or selected the wrong vial of the reconstituted agent. For example, in one instance a vial of MAG3 was reconstituted instead of a vial of HMPAO. These mistakes occurred even though the vials were clearly labelled and sometimes had different coloured labels. Of the remaining 6 cases, two involved the wrong activity being administered due to a mis-read dose calibrator, two involved the wrong procedure being performed following a breakdown in communication and the final two incidents resulted in the wrong patient being administered the radiopharmaceutical. In order to minimise the possibility of recurrence of these incidents the NSW Radiation Advisory Council asked the NSW Branch of the Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine and HURSOG to jointly convene a Working Party to prepare Guidelines for the administration of radiopharmaceuticals. The Guidelines specify: 1. the procedure for the validation of the requested investigation on the request form 2. who should reconstitute, dispense and administer radiopharmaceuticals

  16. Medicine in South India

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHenry, Malcolm M.

    1978-01-01

    A three-month sabbatical allowed a superficial overview of Indian medical history and practice. As in Western nations, cost is a major determinant of health care delivery in India; poverty and fiscal shortages, however, deny care to many. The education of Indian physicians is similar to that in Western nations and a high level of clinical competence is seen. However, physician compensation is woefully low by Western standards. India possesses its own indigenous medical systems, purported to be the oldest in the world and predating Hippocrates by several millenia. Most Indians are cared for by native practitioners whose medical techniques are intricately related to the Hindu and Islamic religions. Many of their herbal medicines have been assimilated into contemporary Western practice. Diseases unknown to us except by textbooks are commonly seen and effectively treated. On the other hand, Western diseases such as coronary arteriosclerosis are not uncommon in a land of massive overpopulation and malnutrition. The humbling aspect of this experience is the realization that medical practice dating back several millenia can be made more modern and carried out competently by contemporary physicians. A Western physician working in India finds an unparalleled variety of disease in a totally different medical-religious environment allowing him to reorganize his priorities and to rediscover himself in the world within which he lives. PMID:716392

  17. Integrative holistic medicine in Minnesota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torkelson, Carolyn J; Manahan, Bill

    2009-05-01

    Minnesota has played a leading role in the integrative holistic medicine movement in the United States for more than 2 decades. This article defines integrative holistic medicine and describes how it is practiced. It also discusses the reasons why institutions and providers here and elsewhere in the country have embraced this approach to patient care.

  18. Surgical Lasers In Veterinary Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, H. C.

    1987-03-01

    Veterinary medicine is a latecomer in benefiting from the advent of surgical lasers. It is ironic that although most of the basic work in lasers is carried out in animal species with which we are most conversant, veterinary medicine as a profession has not been very extensively involved.

  19. Radiation protection in medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frischauf, H.; Kletter, H.; Dudczak, R.

    1983-01-01

    Radiation burden of medical personnel is low in trained medical staff. Higher doses can occur with therapeutic application of unsealed or sealed sources, if adequate shielding is not possible or not cared for or if radiation protection measures are not observed in work with higher activities of radionuclides. More important than immoderate structural alterations for shielding purposes is individual inspection with advice on the working place and optimisation of working methods, also in regard to the radiation protection. This is possible only by cooperation and by discussing risks and problems between the radiation protection officer and the working personnel in an overt manner, assuring the mutual understanding. Radiation protection concerning medical uses of radiation in the whole population and in patients especially is determined by the necessity of indication for the medical application of radiation, by quality control and lastly by the correct interpretation of results or consequences. The latter necessitates a good collaboration between nuclear medicine specialists and clinicians because of the individual particularity of the patient which must be considered in the evaluation of results. (Author)

  20. Humanities and Arts in Management Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Statler, Matt; Monthoux, Pierre Guillet de

    2015-01-01

    An introduction is presented in which the editors discuss various reports within the issue on topics including business management education in Great Britain, liberal arts education, and business studios.......An introduction is presented in which the editors discuss various reports within the issue on topics including business management education in Great Britain, liberal arts education, and business studios....

  1. Closer, intimacies in art 1730-1930

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogh, Mikkel

    In this book the author relates the story of how art became modern, homing in on the private, personal body and the objects of everyday life......In this book the author relates the story of how art became modern, homing in on the private, personal body and the objects of everyday life...

  2. Commedia dell'arte in northern Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Bent

    2015-01-01

    a contextulized introduction to commedia dell'arte in Northern European countries in the 17. to 19. centuries: from charlatans to satirical comedians and pantomimes......a contextulized introduction to commedia dell'arte in Northern European countries in the 17. to 19. centuries: from charlatans to satirical comedians and pantomimes...

  3. Nuclear medicine in emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansi, L.; Rambaldi, P.F.; Cuccurullo, V.; Varetto, T.

    2005-01-01

    The role of a procedure depends not only on its own capabilities but also on a cost/effective comparison with alternative technique giving similar information. Starting from the definition of emergency as a sudden unexpected occurrence demanding immediate action, the role of nuclear medicine (NM) is difficult to identify if it is not possible to respond 24h a day, 365 days a year, to clinical demands. To justify a 24 h NM service it is necessary to reaffirm the role in diagnosis of pulmonary embolism in the spiral CT era, to spread knowledge of the capabilities of nuclear cardiology in reliability diagnosis myocardial infraction (better defining admission and discharge to/from the emergency department), to increase the number of indications. Radionuclide technique could be used as first line, alternative, complementary procedures in a diagnostic tree taking into account not only the diagnosis but also the connections with prognosis and therapy in evaluating cerebral pathologies, acute inflammation/infection, transplants, bleeding, trauma, skeletal, hepatobiliary, renal and endocrine emergencies, acute scrotal pain

  4. Multifractal structure in nonrepresentational art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mureika, J. R.; Dyer, C. C.; Cupchik, G. C.

    2005-10-01

    Multifractal analysis techniques are applied to patterns in several abstract expressionist artworks, painted by various artists. The analysis is carried out on two distinct types of structures: the physical patterns formed by a specific color (“blobs”) and patterns formed by the luminance gradient between adjacent colors (“edges”). It is found that the multifractal analysis method applied to “blobs” cannot distinguish between artists of the same movement, yielding a multifractal spectrum of dimensions between about 1.5 and 1.8. The method can distinguish between different types of images, however, as demonstrated by studying a radically different type of art. The data suggest that the “edge” method can distinguish between artists in the same movement and is proposed to represent a toy model of visual discrimination. A “fractal reconstruction” analysis technique is also applied to the images in order to determine whether or not a specific signature can be extracted which might serve as a type of fingerprint for the movement.

  5. Examining Practice in Secondary Visual Arts Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Donna Mathewson

    2015-01-01

    Teaching in secondary visual arts classrooms is complex and challenging work. While it is implicated in much research, the complexity of the lived experience of secondary visual arts teaching has rarely been the subject of sustained and synthesized research. In this paper, the potential of practice as a concept to examine and represent secondary…

  6. [Strengthen researches on translational medicine and regenerative medicine in burns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yue-sheng

    2010-06-01

    Translational medicine and regenerative medicine are presently the hottest areas in medical research. Translational medicine is regarded as a two-way model of medical research, i.e. bench to bedside and bedside to bench. The purpose of translational research is to test novel therapeutic strategies developed through experimentation in human beings, and to facilitate the transformation of findings resulting from basic research to clinical practice. Regenerative medicine is to search for effective biotherapy methods to promote self repair and regeneration; or to construct new tissues and organs to improve or restore the function of the injured tissues and organs. To strengthen researches on translational medicine and regenerative medicine in burns may promote the application of new clinical therapeutic strategies, and supply effective therapeutic measures for treatment of severe burns.

  7. Nuclear Medicine Practice in Kenya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ndirangu, T.D.

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty that relies on the use of nuclear technology in the diagnosis and treatment (therapy) of diseases. Nuclear medicine uses the principle that a certain radiopharmaceutical (tracer) will at a certain point in time have a preferential uptake by a particular body, tissue or cell. This uptake is then imaged by the use of detectors mounted in gamma cameras or PET (positron emission tomography) devices.. Unlike other radiation applications for medical use, nuclear medicine uses open (unsealed) sources of radiation. In a country with an estimated population of 48 million in 2017, Kenya has only two (2) nuclear medicine facilities (units). Being a relatively new medical discipline in Kenya, several measures have been taken by the clinical nuclear medicine team to create awareness at various levels

  8. Art Practice as Research in the Classroom: A New Paradigm in Art Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Julia; D'Adamo, Kimberley

    2011-01-01

    The artmaking process is increasingly accepted in experimental forms of qualitative ethnographic, narrative, and phenomenological research in the social sciences, psychology, and education. Some artists and art educators are taking idea of using art practice in research a step further and claiming that art practice is research. That is to say,…

  9. Living Sculptures: Performance Art in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pembleton, Matthew; LaJevic, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    What does an introduction to and engagement in performance art offer K-12 students? In this article, we respond to this question by proposing a lesson inspired by the artmaking practices of the contemporary artist Erwin Wurm. Performance art can be defined as any form of work that combines the artist's body and a live-action event with or…

  10. Computer Science in a Liberal Arts Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenenberg, Josh; McCartney, Robert

    2007-01-01

    This issue is devoted to the curriculum guidelines from the Liberal Arts Computer Science Consortium. These guidelines provide a coherent and important model for computing education within a liberal arts context, giving primacy to critical reason, rigorous methods, and student engagement in the research process. In this regard, they are at the…

  11. An Unselfish Act: Graffiti in Art Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Laurie A.

    2013-01-01

    Graffiti artist Sentrock sees his graffiti as a selfless act, a way of giving back to the community--when done legally--and inspires a group of middle school students. This is a case study of an artist and educator who teaches about graffiti art in public schools. He is unique in that he delineates between graffiti art and vandalism, and teaches…

  12. Sustaining Arts Programs in Public Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunstan, David

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative research case study was to investigate leadership and funding decisions that determine key factors responsible for sustaining arts programs in public schools. While the educational climate, financial constraints, and standardized testing continue to impact arts programs in public education, Eastland High School, the…

  13. Applications of electrochemistry in medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Schlesinger, Mordechay

    2013-01-01

    Medical Applications of Electrochemistry, a volume of the series Modern Aspects of Electrochemistry, illustrates the interdisciplinary nature of modern science by indicating the many current issues in medicine that are susceptible to solution by electrochemical methods. This book also suggests how personalized medicine can develop.

  14. Peptide radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blok, D.; Vermeij, P.; Feitsma, R.I.J.; Pauwels, E.J.K.

    1999-01-01

    This article reviews the labelling of peptides that are recognised to be of interest for nuclear medicine or are the subject of ongoing nuclear medicine research. Applications and approaches to the labelling of peptide radiopharmaceuticals are discussed, and drawbacks in their development considered. (orig.)

  15. SOME MEDICINAL PLANTS USED IN

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    VHADA

    complete refusal to willing to work with all aspects. The major uses of the medicinal plants ranged from pain killer to malaria and cancer treatment. CONCLUSION: This study signals the information and identification of varieties and usage of medicinal plants in the study area. The scientific validity of these remedies, however ...

  16. Medicinal plants with hepatoprotective activity in Iranian folk medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Asadi-Samani

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available There are a number of medicinal combinations in the Iranian traditional medicine which are commonly used as tonic for liver. In this review, we have introduced some medicinal plants that are used mainly for the treatment of liver disorders in Iranian folk medicine, with focus on their hepatoprotective effects particularly against CC14 agent. In this study, online databases including Web of Science, PubMed, Scopus, and Science Direct were searched for papers published from January 1970 to December 2013. Search terms consisted of medicinal plants, traditional medicine, folk medicine, hepatoprotective, Iran, liver, therapeutic uses, compounds, antioxidant, CC14, anti-inflammatory, and antihepatotoxic, hepatitis, alone or in combination. Allium hirtifolium Boiss., Apium graveolens L., Cynara scolymus, Berberis vulgaris L., Calendula officinalis, Nigella sativa L., Taraxacum officinale, Tragopogon porrifolius, Prangos ferulacea L., Allium sativum, Marrubium vulgare, Ammi majus L., Citrullus lanatus Thunb, Agrimonia eupatoria L. and Prunus armeniaca L. are some of the medicinal plants that have been used for the treatment of liver disorders in Iranian folk medicine. Out of several leads obtained from plants containing potential hepatoprotective agents, silymarin, β-sitosterol, betalain, neoandrographolide, phyllanthin, andrographolide, curcumin, picroside, hypophyllanthin, kutkoside, and glycyrrhizin have been demonstrated to have potent hepatoprotective properties. Despite encouraging data on possibility of new discoveries in the near future, the evidence on treating viral hepatitis or other chronic liver diseases by herbal medications is not adequate.

  17. Where are we with nuclear medicine in pediatrics?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadel, H.R.

    1995-01-01

    The practice of nuclear medicine in children is different from that in adults. Technical considerations including immobilization, dosing of radiopharmaceuticals, and instrumentation are of major importance. Image mangnification and the capability to perform single-photon emission tomography are essential to performing state of the art pediatric nuclear medicine. New advances in instrumentation with multiple detector imaging, the possibility of clinical positron emission tomography imaging in children, and new radiopharmaceuticals will further enhance pediatric scintigraphic imaging. This review highlights advances in pediatric nuclear medicine and discusses selected clinical problems. (orig.)

  18. Technology in Art Therapy: Ethical Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alders, Amanda; Beck, Liz; Allen, Pat B.; Mosinski, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    As technology advances, art therapy practices are adapting to the demands of a new cultural climate. Art therapists face a number of ethical challenges as they interact with increasingly diverse populations and employ new media. This article addresses some of the ethical and professional issues related to the use of technology in clinical…

  19. Behavioral Contracts in the Martial Arts Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corder, Gregory W.

    This paper discusses the use of behavior contracts for students with behavior problems in martial arts classrooms. Highlighted is the experience of one marital arts teacher with a preteen student who constantly disrupts the class. The behavior contract let the student continue participating while outlining specific expectations for him, his…

  20. The Iconic Boom in Modern Russian Art

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renneboog, L.D.R.; Spaenjers, C.

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the prices and the returns in the market for modern Russian art, a prime example of an ‘emerging art market’, over the last four decades. After applying a hedonic regression model on an extensive dataset containing 52,154 sales by 410 Russian artists, we show that the

  1. Navigating the Arts in an Electronic Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouch, Virginia

    1994-01-01

    The 1990s will usher in increasingly sophisticated interactive multimedia technologies leading to widespread employment of virtual reality. The arts (visual, music, drama, dance, and creative writing) are intimately involved with instructional technology's future. The arts provide both adult (commercial) creators and contributors to the programs…

  2. Art history in the art school: the critical historians of Camberwell

    OpenAIRE

    Beth Williamson

    2011-01-01

    Within the context of a wider study of British art education between 1960 and 2010, this paper takes as its starting point the introduction in 1960 of the Diploma in Art and Design or DipAD in art schools with its attendant requirements for art historical instruction and intellectual enrichment. Beginning with a survey of the Coldstream and Summerson developments in the 1960s, and with specific reference to the teaching of art history, it will consider Camberwell School of Arts and Crafts as ...

  3. Music education and performing arts medicine: the state of the alliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palac, Judith A; Grimshaw, David N

    2006-11-01

    As a group, musicians tend to be somewhat disembodied; their awareness of their whole selves extends almost exclusively to the parts involved directly with musical technique. Even though many consider musicians to be small muscle athletes, it is unusual to see a group of beginning musicians working out or warming up on their practice field, or having a trainer present to supervise their movements or their mental performance orientation, as one would in sports. Several questions come to mind. How has this state of things come about? What do musicians know about the mental, spiritual, and physical attributes they bring to music making? What do music teachers teach students about wellness? How can a collaboration of the fields of music education and rehabilitation medicine approach these issues? This article addresses these questions.

  4. Territorial Factors in a Globalised Art World? : The visibility of countries in international contemporary art events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.J.J. van Hest (Femke)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractIn comparison to other disciplines of high culture, the visual arts seem to be the most suitable to internationalise (cf. Crane, 1992; Janssen, Kuipers & Verboord, 2008). The global diffusion of visual art works, for example, is far less complex than that of the performing arts, which

  5. Images in medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2016-01-08

    Jan 8, 2016 ... TSH secreting adenoma: a rare cause of severe headache. Serdar Olt1,&, Mehmet Şirik2. 1Adıyaman University Medical Faculty Department of Internal Medicine, Adıyaman, Turkey, 2Adıyaman University Medical Faculty Department of. Radiology, Adıyaman, Turkey. &Corresponding author: Serdar Olt, ...

  6. Images in medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    Pearled papules over tattoo: Molluscum cotagiosum. Ricardo Ruiz-Villaverde1,&, Daniel Sánchez-Cano2. 1Dermatology Unit. Complejo Hospitalario de Jaen, Jaen, Spain, 2Internal Medicine. Hospital Santa Ana, Motril, Granada, Spain. &Corresponding author: Ricardo Ruiz-Villaverde, Dermatology Unit. Complejo ...

  7. Dendrimers in Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Linping; Ficker, Mario; Christensen, Jørn Bolstad

    2015-01-01

    Dendrimers are three-dimensional macromolecular structures originating from a central core molecule and surrounded by successive addition of branching layers (generation). These structures exhibit a high degree of molecular uniformity, narrow molecular weight distribution, tunable size and shape ...... as challenging issues surrounding the future development of dendrimer-based medicines....

  8. Arts-based interventions in healthcare education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Magda; Eacott, Bella; Willson, Suzy

    2018-03-01

    Healthcare education institutions are increasingly including arts-based interventions in their programmes. We analysed 62 studies of arts-based interventions to understand how these interventions may be beneficial, and why providing evidence continues to be a challenge for the field.Our analysis highlighted two issues. We found that 79% of the included studies reported that their interventions were successful, but without always defining this success or how it was measured. This lack of clarity was apparent in descriptions of both what arts-based interventions aimed to do, and in descriptions of how they might do this. We also found that only 34% of studies involved a collaboration with artists or arts educators, raising questions over who had the necessary experience and specialism in the arts to design and deliver such interventions.Our analysis revealed that arts-based interventions are failing to acknowledge, and subsequently capture through assessment, the process of learning in the moment. This is particularly important because arts-based pedagogies typically use embodied, practical, physical methods, in which what is being learnt cannot be separated from the process of learning. Involving artists and arts educators throughout the process of designing and delivering these interventions may help to bring clarity over what arts-based interventions are aiming to do and how they may do this, and ensure that appropriate evaluation methods are used. We suggest that close observation with feedback, and the use of reflective portfolios are two ways of assessing the process of learning in arts-based interventions. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. Images in medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    6 nov. 2013 ... La maladie de Léo-Buerger est une artérite du sujet jeune généralement de sexe masculin et classiquement associée au tabac. Sa pathogénie exacte demeure inconnue mais parait-il que le tabac n'est pas le seul facteur toujours incriminé dans sa genèse. Le cannabis est une drogue cultivée en zone ...

  10. Images in medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    9 févr. 2016 ... &Corresponding author: Rachid Ammor, Neurosurgery, Military Hospital My Ismail, Meknes, Morocco. Key words: Hémorragie méningée, artériographie cérébrale, anévrismes multiples ... céphalées d'installation brutale. L'examen clinique trouve une patiente consciente, TA=13/7, avec présence d'un ...

  11. Practical occupational medicine in "practice"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingemann Larsen, Anders; Schmidt, Jan; Jepsen, Jørgen Riis

    2016-01-01

    In Denmark, the practice of occupational medicine tends to be carried out by specialists in occupational medicine and less so by family physicians. The provision of health service to workers is therefore limited. This constraint may also apply in other developed countries and even more in countries...... with few occupational health resources. This Editorial argues that family physicians are indeed in a position where they can make a major positive difference for their working patients and for the enterprises where they work. Without specialist knowledge in occupational medicine, the family physician...... exposed workers. Such involvement would expand the coverage of occupational health service to patients/workers on a global scale....

  12. Therapy in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eftekhari, M.; Sadeghi, R.; Takavar, A.; Fard, A.; Saghari, M.

    2002-01-01

    Although there have been very significant development in the field of radionuclide therapy within the past 10 years, radionuclide therapy in the form of 131 I, 33 P,.... have been in use for over 46 years. Palliation of bone pain is a good example for radionuclide therapy. It has an especial role in advanced metastatic cancer. 32 P, 89 Sr-Cl, 186 Re-HEDP, 133 Sm-EDTMP, and 117 mSn-DTPA are used in these patients. They are usually effective and help to maintain a painless life for patients with advanced cancer. Although this kind of therapy is not as rapid as radiotherapy, its effect lasts longer. In addition re-treatment with these agents is safe and effective. Radioimmunotherapy is a new exciting technique in the radionuclide therapy. In this technique monoclonal antibodies or their fragments are labeled with a suitable radionuclide, these antibodies can irradiate tumor cells over a distance of some fraction of a millimeter. Bulky tumors are obviously unsuitable targets for Rit. Several antibodies specific for Cd 20 (B1 and 1 F 5) and CD 37 (Mb-1) labeled with 131 I have been used for hematologic malignancies with good response. Several antigens associated with carcinomas of various histologic types have been targeted for therapeutic purposes by antibodies labeled with different radionuclides. Other routes of administration like intraperitoneal, intrathecal, and intravesical have been used with different rates of success. Pre targeting techniques can be used to reduce unwanted radioactive concentration in normal tissues. The avidin-biotin system is an example, which exploits the high-affinity binding between avidin and biotin, and was first used with anti-Cea antibody. Radiation synovectomy is another aspect of radionuclide therapy 198 Au colloid, 90 Y resin colloid, and 165 Dy-FHMA are some of the radionuclides used in the field of hematology. There has been significant advances in the field of therapy in nuclear medicine in recent years, which are briefly

  13. Updates in Psychosomatic Medicine: 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudenreich, Oliver; Huffman, Jeff C; Sharpe, Michael; Beach, Scott R; Celano, Christopher M; Chwastiak, Lydia A; Cohen, Mary Ann; Dickerman, Anne; Fitz-Gerald, Mary Joe; Kontos, Nicholas; Mittal, Leena; Nejad, Shamim H; Niazi, Shehzad; Novak, Marta; Philbrick, Kemuel; Rasimas, Joseph J; Shim, Jewel; Simpson, Scott A; Walker, Audrey; Walker, Jane; Wichman, Christina L; Zimbrean, Paula; Söllner, Wolfgang; Stern, Theodore A

    2015-01-01

    The amount of literature published annually related to psychosomatic medicine is vast; this poses a challenge for practitioners to keep up-to-date in all but a small area of expertise. To introduce how a group process using volunteer experts can be harnessed to provide clinicians with a manageable selection of important publications in psychosomatic medicine, organized by specialty area, for 2014. We used quarterly annotated abstracts selected by experts from the Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine and the European Association of Psychosomatic Medicine in 15 subspecialties to create a list of important articles. In 2014, subspecialty experts selected 88 articles of interest for practitioners of psychosomatic medicine. For this review, 14 articles were chosen. A group process can be used to whittle down the vast literature in psychosomatic medicine and compile a list of important articles for individual practitioners. Such an approach is consistent with the idea of physicians as lifelong learners and educators. Copyright © 2015 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Essential Medicines in National Constitutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toebes, Brigit; Hogerzeil, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A constitutional guarantee of access to essential medicines has been identified as an important indicator of government commitment to the progressive realization of the right to the highest attainable standard of health. The objective of this study was to evaluate provisions on access to essential medicines in national constitutions, to identify comprehensive examples of constitutional text on medicines that can be used as a model for other countries, and to evaluate the evolution of constitutional medicines-related rights since 2008. Relevant articles were selected from an inventory of constitutional texts from WHO member states. References to states’ legal obligations under international human rights law were evaluated. Twenty-two constitutions worldwide now oblige governments to protect and/or to fulfill accessibility of, availability of, and/or quality of medicines. Since 2008, state responsibilities to fulfill access to essential medicines have expanded in five constitutions, been maintained in four constitutions, and have regressed in one constitution. Government commitments to essential medicines are an important foundation of health system equity and are included increasingly in state constitutions. PMID:27781006

  15. Fine-art gifted pupils in art classes

    OpenAIRE

    Vogrin, Oto

    2011-01-01

    Fine arts gift is an inborn quality yet the potential can easily be wasted if not developed. The development of a child’s gift is affected by his/her surroundings and conditions, adapted to an individual’s needs. Among the individual capabilities of fine arts gifted student our special attention goes to the ones which an individual uses to assimilate his/her experience and reactions to it, to visual memory, manual skills and aesthetic intelligence. They all enable us to determine aesthetic va...

  16. [Falsified medicines in parallel trade].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muckenfuß, Heide

    2017-11-01

    The number of falsified medicines on the German market has distinctly increased over the past few years. In particular, stolen pharmaceutical products, a form of falsified medicines, have increasingly been introduced into the legal supply chain via parallel trading. The reasons why parallel trading serves as a gateway for falsified medicines are most likely the complex supply chains and routes of transport. It is hardly possible for national authorities to trace the history of a medicinal product that was bought and sold by several intermediaries in different EU member states. In addition, the heterogeneous outward appearance of imported and relabelled pharmaceutical products facilitates the introduction of illegal products onto the market. Official batch release at the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut offers the possibility of checking some aspects that might provide an indication of a falsified medicine. In some circumstances, this may allow the identification of falsified medicines before they come onto the German market. However, this control is only possible for biomedicinal products that have not received a waiver regarding official batch release. For improved control of parallel trade, better networking among the EU member states would be beneficial. European-wide regulations, e. g., for disclosure of the complete supply chain, would help to minimise the risks of parallel trading and hinder the marketing of falsified medicines.

  17. Transferring ART research into education in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Maria Fidela de Lima; Modena, Karin Cristina da Silva; Freitas, Maria Cristina Carvalho de Almendra; Fagundes, Ticiane Cestari

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the teaching of the Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) approach in Brazilian dental schools. A questionnaire on this subject was sent to Pediatric Dentistry, Operative Dentistry and Public Health Dentistry professors. The questions approached the following subjects: the method used to teach ART, the time spent on its teaching, under which discipline it is taught, for how many years ART has been taught and its effect on the DMFT index. A total of 70 out of 202 dental schools returned the questionnaire. The ART approach is taught in the majority of the Brazilian dental schools (96.3%), and in most of these schools it is taught both in theory and in clinical practice (62.9%). The majority (35.3%) of professors teach ART for 8 hours, and most often as part of the Pediatric Dentistry discipline (67.6%). It has been taught for the last 7 to 10 years in 34.3% of dental schools. Most professors did not observe a change in the DMFT index with this approach. There is a diversity in the teaching of ART in Brazil in terms of the number of hours spent, the teaching method (theory and practice), and the disciplines involved in its teaching. It is necessary to address the training of professors in the ART approach for the whole country. An educational model is proposed whereby a standard ART module features as part of other preventive and restorative caries care educational modules. This will facilitate and standardize the introduction and adoption of the ART approach in undergraduate education in Brazil.

  18. Art Images in Holistic Nursing Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl V. Elhammoumi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nursing research has concentrated on empirical knowing with little focus on aesthetic knowing. Evidence from the literature suggests that using visual art in nursing education enhances both clinical observation skills and interpersonal skills. The purpose of this review was to explore how visual art has been used in baccalaureate nursing education. Methods: Of 712 records, 13 studies met the criteria of art, nursing and education among baccalaureate nursing students published in English. Results: Three quantitative studies demonstrated statistical significance between nursing students who participated in arts-based learning compared to nursing students who received traditional learning. Findings included improved recall, increased critical thinking and enhanced emotional investment. Themes identified in 10 qualitative studies included spirituality as role enhancement, empathy, and creativity. Conclusion: Visual arts-based learning in pre-licensure curriculum complements traditional content. It supports spirituality as role enhancement in nurse training. Visual art has been successfully used to enhance both critical thinking and interpersonal relations. Nursing students may experience a greater intra-connectedness that results in better inter-connectedness with patients and colleagues. Incorporating visual arts into pre-licensure curriculums is necessary to nurture holistic nursing practice.

  19. Nuclear medicine in developing nations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nofal, M.M.

    1985-01-01

    Agency activities in nuclear medicine are directed towards effectively applying techniques to the diagnosis and management of patients attending nuclear medicine units in about 60 developing countries. A corollary purpose is to use these techniques in investigations related to control of parasitic diseases distinctive to some of these countries. Through such efforts, the aim is to improve health standards through better diagnosis, and to achieve a better understanding of disease processes as well as their prevention and management. Among general trends observed for the region: Clinical nuclear medicine; Radiopharmaceuticals; Monoclonal antibodies; Radioimmunoassay (RIA); Nuclear imaging

  20. Discrimination And Intolerance in the Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Correia

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available When the people speak about discrimination and intolerance, it is usually in reference to the racial, religious, political, sexual, age, problems, etc., and does not refer, or refers less, the discrimination and the intolerance determined by artistic reasons, or with these related : the age differences in art, the sexism in art, and the rejection of works of art. In this text we intend to show the existence of these forms of discrimination and intolerance, explain what they mean, its causes, and its aftermath. We analyze the specificity of each of the discrimination and intolerance in the artistic field,  and the social weight they have in the world today.

  1. Discrimination And Intolerance in the Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Correia

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available When the people speak about discrimination and intolerance, it is usually in reference to the racial, religious, political, sexual, age, problems, etc., and does not refer, or refers less, the discrimination and the intolerance determined by artistic reasons, or with these related : the age differences in art, the sexism in art, and the rejection of works of art. In this text we intend to show the existence of these forms of discrimination and intolerance, explain what they mean, its causes, and its aftermath. We analyze the specificity of each of the discrimination and intolerance in the artistic field,  and the social weight they have in the world today.

  2. Humility in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Jennifer L

    2013-01-01

    Becoming a physician comes with privilege and exciting opportunities. The rigor of academic medicine can be challenging. The ability to have humility as a physician is not only a sign of a good doctor, but it can be one of the most challenging attributes to maintain. My surgeon, Dr. Steven Kopits, embodied what it means to be a humble, yet accomplished physician. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A survey on saffron in major islamic traditional medicine books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi, Behjat; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Emami, Seyed Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Islamic Traditional Medicine (ITM) is a holistic system of medicine. Saffron (Crocus sativus) is one of the most famous plants cultivated in Iran and has a wide range of activities such as oxytocic, anti-carcinogenic, exhilarant, anti-depressant, and anti-asthma effects. In addition, saffron can increase the bioavailability and enhance absorption of other drugs. This study comprises a bibliographical survey of 13 major ITM books regarding different medical aspects of this species. Ferdows al-Hekmah fi'l-Tibb (The Paradise of Wisdom in Medicine), Al-Hawi fi'l-Tibb (Comprehensive Book of Medicine), Kamel al-Sanaat al-Tibbyyah (Complete Book of the Medical Art), Al-Qanun fi'l-Tibb (Canon of Medicine), Zakhireh Kharazmshahi (Treasure of Kharazmshahi), and Makhzan al-Adwiah (Drug Treasure) are some of the most important ITM books used in this survey.

  4. Frontiers in nuclear medicine symposium: Nuclear medicine & molecular biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    This document contains the abstracts from the American College of Nuclear Physicians 1993 Fall Meeting entitled, `Frontiers in Nuclear Medicine Symposium: Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Biology`. This meeting was sponsored by the US DOE, Office of Health and Environmental Research, Office of Energy Research. The program chairman was Richard C. Reba, M.D.

  5. [Advances in the application of smart phones in modern medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Hu, Jie; Li, Fei; Wei, Huilin; Li, Ying; Lu, Tianjian; Wang, Shuqi; Xu, Feng

    2014-02-01

    Since smart phones have been developed, significant advances in the function of mobile phone due to the development of software, hardware and accessories have been reached. Till now, smart phones have been engaged in daily life with an increasing impact. As a new medical model, mobile phone medicine is emerging and has found wide spread applications in medicine, especially in diagnosing, monitoring and screening various diseases. In addition, mo bile phone medical application shows great potential trend to improve healthcare in resource-limited regions due to its advantageous features of portability and information communication capability. Nowadays, the scientific and technological issues related to mobile phone medicine have attracted worldwide attention. In this review, we summarize state-of-the-art advances of mobile phone medicine with focus on its diagnostics applications in order to expand the fields of their applications and promote healthcare informatization.

  6. Computed Tomography in Forensic Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Peter Mygind

    2015-01-01

    Modern diagnostic imagining techniques are gaining popularity in forensic medicine. Denmark has been involved in the development of this use of imaging techniques from the beginning. The Institute of Forensic Medicine at the University of Southern Denmark acquired a helical computed tomography (CT...... AND METHODS: This thesis investigated 900 forensic cases that were CT-scanned and autopsied at the Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Southern Denmark, from 2006-2011. The scanner was a Siemens Somatom Spirit dual-slice CT-scanner with a Siemens Syngo MultiModality workstation. Contrast enhancement...

  7. VISUAL ARTS AS THE FIELD OF KNOWLEDGE IN ARTE NA ESCOLA - DAC / UFSC PROJECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Perassi Luiz de Sousa

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents and justifies the content worked in the extension course "The Visual Arts as a field of knowledge," which was sponsored by the Departamento Artístico Cultural – DAC/ UFSC, within the project "Arte na Escola". The course was directed at teachers of Art and also received other stakeholders in the study of Visual Arts, focusing on contemporary art. Art is justified as a field of knowledge in that, throughout its history, many have been developed knowledge, technologies and expertise applied to the development of artistic activities. In addition, each work of art represents a unique and innovative testimony of their time and offers a new set of knowledge, which broadens the cultural heritage of humanity. Finally, knowledge and artistic products are also applied in developing other areas of knowledge.

  8. Creating a Children's Art World: Negotiating Participation, Identity, and Meaning in the Elementary School Art Room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Art making has been theorized as a way for children to develop the capacity to participate in social and cultural transformation. Yet, little research has been done to examine the role of art making in children's development as participants in society. This study used ethnographic methods to investigate children's art making in elementary school.…

  9. The Performing Arts in a New Era

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McCarthy, Kevin

    2001-01-01

    The Pew Charitable Trust commissioned The Performing Arts in a New Era from RAND in 1999 as part of a broad initiative aimed at increasing policy and financial support for nonprofit culture in the United States...

  10. "Being" a Critical Multicultural Pedagogue in the Art Education Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuff, Joni Boyd

    2018-01-01

    Art educators continuously struggle to understand what multiculturalism "looks like" in the art classroom. This has resulted in multicultural art education becoming superficial, in which art teachers guide students through art projects like creating African masks, Native American dream catchers, Aboriginal totems, and sand paintings, all…

  11. Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Educational - Medicine Prize Related The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine has been awarded to people and ... this page MLA style: "The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine – Educational". Nobelprize.org. Nobel Media ...

  12. Regulatory problems in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandergrift, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    Governmental involvement in the practice of medicine has increased sharply within the past few years. The impact on health care has, for the most part, been in terms of financial interactions between health care facilities and federally funded health services programs. One might say that this type of governmental involvement has indirect impact on the medical and/or technical decisions in the practice of nuclear medicine. In other areas, however, governmental policies and regulations have had a more direct and fundamental impact on nuclear medicine than on any other medical specialty. Without an understanding and acceptance of this situation, the practice of nuclear medicine can be very frustrating. This chapter is thus written in the hope that potential frustration can be reduced or eliminated

  13. Art in the making. The evolutionary origins of visual art as a communication signal

    OpenAIRE

    Mendoza Straffon, Larissa

    2014-01-01

    The corpus of art from the Pleistocene has grown substantially in recent decades, and with it, the earliest evidence of visual art has become much older than previously anticipated, going back over 100,000 years. This new information has rendered some traditional ideas about the recent origins of visual art obsolete. Existing archaeological and evolutionary models that aim to explain the emergence of visual art should now be reassessed in light of current data. That is the aim of this book. F...

  14. Patterns of peripheral neuropathy in ART-naïve patients initiating modern ART regimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Anthony J; Bosch, Ronald J; Evans, Scott R; Wu, Kunling; Harrison, Taylor; Grant, Philip; Clifford, David B

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate associations of pre-ART CD4 with peripheral neuropathy (PN) and estimate the prevalence of PN in HIV-positive patients starting modern combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) regimens. ART-naïve subjects initiating cART were followed longitudinally and screened for signs/symptoms of PN. Lower pre-ART CD4 count was associated with post-ART PN. After 7 years (n = 117), the prevalence (95% CI) of PN and SPN were 31% (23, 40%) and 5% (2, 11%) with pre-ART CD4 count >250 copies/μL. PN continues to be identified in HIV-infected individuals on modern cART by targeted assessment but is generally without symptoms.

  15. Digital filtering in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, T.R.; Sampathkumaran, S.

    1982-01-01

    Digital filtering is a powerful mathematical technique in computer analysis of nuclear medicine studies. The basic concepts of object-domain and frequency-domain filtering are presented in simple, largely nonmathemaical terms. Computational methods are described using both the Fourier transform and convolution techniques. The frequency response is described and used to represent the behavior of several classes of filters. These concepts are illustrated with examples drawn from a variety of important applications in nuclear medicine

  16. Key Topics in Sports Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Key Topics in Sports Medicine is a single quick reference source for sports and exercise medicine. It presents the essential information from across relevant topic areas, and includes both the core and emerging issues in this rapidly developing field. It covers: 1) Sports injuries, rehabilitation and injury prevention, 2) Exercise physiology, fitness testing and training, 3) Drugs in sport, 4) Exercise and health promotion, 5) Sport and exercise for special and clinical populations, 6) The ps...

  17. Antibacterial activities of medicinal plants used in Mexican traditional medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ashutosh; Flores-Vallejo, Rosario Del Carmen; Cardoso-Taketa, Alexandre; Villarreal, María Luisa

    2017-08-17

    ,836 worldwide antibacterial patents prepared from different sources were recorded; only 36 antibacterial patents from plants were registered over the same time period. We offered some insights on the most important findings regarding the antibacterial effects, current state of the art, and research perspectives of top plant species with antibacterial activities in vitro. Studies of the antibacterial in vitro activity of medicinal plants popularly used in Mexico to treat infections indicate that both the selection of plant material and the investigation methodologies vary. Standardized experimental procedures as well as in vivo pharmacokinetic studies to document the effectiveness of plant extracts and compounds are necessary. This review presents extensive information about the medicinal plants possessing antibacterial activity that has been scientifically studied and are popularly used in Mexico. We anticipate that this review will be of use for future studies because it constitutes a valuable information tool for selecting the most significant plants and their potential antibacterial properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Official art organizations in the emerging art markets of China and Russia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kharchenkova, S.; Komarova, N.; Velthuis, O.; Velthuis, O.; Baia Curioni, S.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter explores why official art organizations—artists associations and art academies—which regulated artistic production in Soviet Russia and Maoist China, continue to survive despite changing environments and the development of art markets in these countries. This chapter observes

  19. Restoring Wisconsin Art Therapy Association in Art Therapy History: Implications for Professional Definition and Inclusivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potash, Jordan; Burnie, Michele; Pearson, Rosemary; Ramirez, Wayne

    2016-01-01

    The Wisconsin Art Therapy Association (WATA), formally established in 1969, was the first incorporated organization of art therapists in the United States. Under the leadership of Wayne Ramirez, WATA lobbied the national association for an inclusive definition of art therapy that aimed to foster respect for psychiatric, educational, and community…

  20. Knowledge Management in Nuclear Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abaza, A.

    2017-01-01

    The last two decades have seen a significant increase in the demand for medical radiation services following the introduction of new techniques and technologies that has led to major improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of human diseases. The diagnostic and therapeutic applications of nuclear medicine techniques play a pivotal role in the management of these diseases, improving the quality of life of patients by means of an early diagnosis allowing opportune and proper therapy. On the other hand, inappropriate or unskilled use of these technologies can result in potential health hazards for patients and staff. So, there is a need to control and minimize these health risks and to maximize the benefits of radiation in medicine. The present study aims to discuss the role of nuclear medicine technology knowledge and scales in improving the management of patients, and raising the awareness and knowledge of nuclear medicine staff regarding the use of nuclear medicine facilities. The practical experience knowledge of nuclear medicine staff in 50 medical centers was reviewed through normal visiting and compared with the IAEA Published documents information. This review shows that the nuclear medicine staff has good technology knowledge and scales during managing patients as compared to IAEA Published information regarding the radiation protection measures and regulation. The outcome of the study reveals that competent authority can improve radiation safety in medical settings by developing and facilitating the implementation of scientific evidence-based policies and recommendations covering nuclear medicine technology focusing in the public health aspects and considering the risks and benefits of the use of radiation in health care. It could be concluded that concerted and coordinated efforts are required to improve radiation safety, quality and sustain ability of health systems

  1. Art: Discipline Analysis. Women in the Curriculum Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Linnea; Hurd, Diane Smith

    This essay examines the ways in which art and art history, as disciplines, have been influenced by feminist scholarship and research into the areas of gender, sexuality, and race. It explains that before the interventions of feminist art historians and theorists of art, beginning in the 1970s, the history of art was conceived of and taught as a…

  2. What Is Art in Education? New Narratives of Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    In this paper I address some questions pertinent to the development of school art education. I begin by considering how we relate to art and how we might understand the notion of this relation in terms of human subjectivity and the art object. To do this I describe particular art practices that have broadened social conceptions of art, which in…

  3. Shifting the Role of the Arts in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Merryl; Bossenmeyer, Melinda

    1998-01-01

    SUAVE (Socios Unidos para Artes Via Educacion--United Community for Arts in Education) is an arts-integrated approach to teaching in multicultural and multilingual settings. A unique professional development project for San Diego-area teachers, SUAVE helps teachers develop ways to integrate the arts into mathematics, science, language arts, and…

  4. Evaluative Models for the Arts in Secondary Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Charles M.

    1982-01-01

    Art programs suffer from public misunderstanding and a general undervaluing of their content. This article presents new approaches to evaluating student art, particularly that afforded by the College Board's Advanced Placement Program in Studio Art, the Presidential Scholars in the Arts Program, and the National Arts Awards Program. (WD)

  5. Nanotechnologies in regenerative medicine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubinová, Šárka; Syková, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 19, 3-4 (2010), s. 144-156 ISSN 1364-5706 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500390902; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA AV ČR KAN201110651 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) 1M0538; GA ČR(CZ) GA203/09/1242; GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN200520804; EC FP6 project ENIMET(XE) LSHM-CT-2005-019063 Program:1M; GA; KA Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : Nanotechnology * regenerative medicine * nanofibers Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.051, year: 2010

  6. Nuclear Medicine in Surgical Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ndirangu, D.T.

    2009-01-01

    Defines nuclear medicine as a branch that utilizes nuclear technology for diagnosis and treatment of diseases.The principles of nuclear medicine are; it uses the principle that a certain radiopharmaceutical (tracer) will at a certain point in time have a preferential uptake by a particular body or tissue. it is imaged by use the use of detectors mounted in gamma cameras or PET (Position emission tomography) devices

  7. Representations of Lancet or Phlebotome in Serbian Medieval Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajić, Sanja; Jurišić, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    The topic of this study are representations of lancet or phlebotome in frescoes and icons of Serbian medieval art. The very presence of this medical instrument in Serbian medieval art indicates its usage in Serbian medical practices of the time. Phlebotomy is one of the oldest forms of therapy, widely spread in medieval times. It is also mentioned in Serbian medical texts, such as Chilandar Medical CodexNo. 517 and Hodoch code, i.e. translations from Latin texts originating from Salerno-Montpellier school. Lancet or phlebotome is identified based on archaeological finds from the Roman period, while finds from the Middle Ages and especially from Byzantium have been scarce. Analyses of preserved frescoes and icons has shown that, in comparison to other medical instruments, lancet is indeed predominant in Serbian medieval art, and that it makes for over 80% of all the representations, while other instruments have been depicted to a far lesser degree. Examination of written records and art points to the conclusion that Serbian medieval medicine, both in theory and in practice, belonged entirely to European traditions of the period.

  8. Medicine poisoning in suicidal pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljušic Dragan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Investigations shows that on every realized suicide comes 8 to 25 non realized attempts. Individuals which tried suicide with medicine poisoning mostly quote that they have been overwhelmed with feelings and thoughts which was unbearable in that moment. They wished to escape from that unbearable situation or they lost self control. Between individuals whom tried suicide with medicine poisoning, desire to really die, to disappear was very rare. Mostly it was wish 'just to sleep a little, to take a rest, make pause'. Aim of work: to identified most frequently method for suicidal attempt in both sex and resources which was used in these purposes. Results: most frequently method for suicidal attempt for both sex in our investigation was medicine poisoning - 91,1%, veins cutting - 5,4% and jump from height - 3,6%. Mostly used medicines were anxiolytics - 55,4%, combination of different drugs - 25,0%, antidepressants - 8,9%, neuroleptics - 7,1%, drugs and alcohol - 3,6%. Most frequent method for suicidal attempt in both sex was medicine poisoning. From drugs most frequently used drugs were anxiolytics and in minimum percent combination of drugs and alcohol. After suicidal attempt 90% of individuals experienced relief because their suicidal attempt was unsuccessful. In 3% individuals there was new suicidal attempt on same way, medicine poisoning.

  9. Case studies of soil in art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, C.; Landa, E. R.; Toland, A.; Wessolek, G.

    2015-08-01

    The material and symbolic appropriations of soil in artworks are numerous and diverse, spanning many centuries and artistic traditions, from prehistoric painting and ceramics to early Renaissance works in Western literature, poetry, paintings, and sculpture, to recent developments in film, architecture, and contemporary art. Case studies focused on painting, installation, and film are presented with the view of encouraging further exploration of art about, in, and with soil as a contribution to raising soil awareness.

  10. Challenges Associated with the Content of the Art History Component in the General Knowledge in Art Subject: Implications for Art History Education in West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adom, Dickson; Kquofi, Steve; Agyem, Joe Adu

    2016-01-01

    The content of the Art History component in the General Knowledge in Art subject studied by various Senior High Schools in West Africa is largely of foreign art histories at the expense of the histories of African indigenous arts which are shallowly presented in the teaching syllabus to be taught students. This makes the students appreciate more…

  11. New Technologies, New Possibilities for the Arts and Multimodality in English Language Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Wendy R.

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses the arts, multimodality, and new technologies in English language arts. It then turns to the example of the illuminated text--a multimodal book report consisting of animated text, music, and images--to consider how art, multimodality, and technology can work together to support students' reading of literature and inspire…

  12. Art as Peace Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Laurie

    2014-01-01

    Art educators can "critique" senseless violence--mistreatment, exclusion, intimidation, bullying, violation, abuse, corruption, murder, and war--by unleashing the power of students' creativity. In this article, the author, sharing her philosophical context, discusses how art is preventative medicine with the power to transform the cycle…

  13. Art experience in research with children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Maj

    In art and drawing children can visually articulate pre-reflexive phenomena such as feelings, emotions, experiences, intentions and engagement. Research can include children’s art and drawings to study such phenomena and how they can be articulated and thematized in non-verbal/visual articulation....... The researcher’s pre-reflexive sensory and aesthetic experiences often contribute to the immediate interpretations of such data. It is a challenge to make the ways in which art and drawings in specific ways contribute to interpretation and knowledge transparent in research. The aim of this paper is to describe...... and discuss how the construct ‘aesthetic object’ may offer researchers an approach to non-verbal/visual articulation that can explicitly include the researcher’s sensory and aesthetic experiences as knowledge. Examples from studies including children’s art and drawings are part of the presentation. The paper...

  14. Occupations and Professionalism in Art and Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lennart G. Svensson

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The article introduces the topic of this special issue on artists and professionalism from the perspective of the sociology of the arts and culture, in order to demonstrate how the contributions significantly develop studies of professions in general. Some theoretical concepts are defined and discussed: culture, arts, occupations, professions, status, field, symbolic and social capital, emotional labour, and reversed economy. An illustration is used to demonstrate pricing in arts and what may explain it. There is a focus on the field of art with a brief comparison to the academic field. In this issue we find studies on artists, authors, and theatre actors, which provide significant contributions to these themes in theories and studies of professions.Keywords: creative industries, creative occupations, professions, status, field, symbolic and social capital 

  15. Art in Early Childhood Education Classrooms: An Invitation to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Art is more or less a conceptual representation of inner thoughts and feelings. It is in recognition of this that art educators have emphasized creativity as the primary aim of art. Through art activities the child makes real, his ideas. Essentially, the child's concept of creativity can be best described as 'the art of combining things ...

  16. Art in Early Childhood Education Classrooms: An Invitation to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST LADY

    story – telling, music, dramatic play, dance and visual arts. The focus in this article is visual arts. Art is one of many ... emotion as fully engaged. This also confirms Crosser's (2008) assertion that ... would usually celebrate art as the domain of emotions, they are also quick to argue that art is usually “profoundly cognitive”.

  17. Sleep Medicine in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeneessier, Aljohara S; BaHammam, Ahmed S

    2017-04-15

    The practice of sleep medicine in Saudi Arabia began in the mid to late 1990s. Since its establishment, this specialty has grown, and the number of specialists has increased. Based on the available data, sleep disorders are prevalent among the Saudi population, and the demand for sleep medicine services is expected to increase significantly. Currently, two training programs are providing structured training and certification in sleep medicine in this country. Recently, clear guidelines for accrediting sleep medicine specialists and technologists were approved. Nevertheless, numerous obstacles hamper the progress of this specialty, including the lack of trained technicians, specialists, and funding. Increasing the awareness of sleep disorders and their serious consequences among health care workers, health care authorities, and insurance companies is another challenge. Future plans should address the medical educational system at all levels to demonstrate the importance of early detection and the treatment of sleep disorders. This review discusses the current position of and barriers to sleep medicine practice and education in Saudi Arabia. © 2017 American Academy of Sleep Medicine

  18. Development of nuclear medicine in Mongolia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onkhuudai, P.; Erdenechimeg, S.

    2002-01-01

    , equipment, space and work load. The department replaced its old Siemens gamma camera with a GE gamma camera in the year 1996, and upgraded its RIA laboratory in the year 1999. In tandem with developments in the field of nuclear medicine, the department acquired its first SPECT Elscint camera in 2000, a single detector device with 40-cm field of view. That year, we introduced for the first time Nuclear Cardiology procedures in Mongolia including Myocardial Perfusion Imaging. To-day, the nuclear medicine department of The First State Central Clinic Hospital is a vibrant set-up offering a spectrum of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures to the people of Mongolia. The current staff strength consists of 4 medical doctors, 1 medical physicist, 1 radiopharmacist, 5 technologists and 2 laboratory assistants. During the past 25 years the department has conducted Radionuclide investigations on more than 80,000 patients. The number of nuclear medicine procedures and investigations have been increasing every year. During 2000 the department had conducted more than 4000 diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures. With regard to Radionuclide therapy, the department has been engaged in the radioiodine treatment of thyrotoxicosis since 1982. The departmental activities in the field of therapeutic nuclear medicine took a big leap forward this year, when it introduced the Radionuclide treatment of Liver Cancer using Re-188 Lipiodol in March, 2002. IAEA's contribution to the growth and development of nuclear medicine in Mongolia has been of immense value. The country in general and the department in particular has benefited significantly from IAEA support through its several technical cooperation and coordinated research projects. Such support has provided opportunities to Mongolia in enhancing its human resources in the field of nuclear medicine, upgrading equipment, introducing new technologies and providing the state of the art medical care to its people using nuclear medicine technology

  19. Precision Medicine in Cardiovascular Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Yan Liu; Jie Du

    2017-01-01

    Since President Obama announced the Precision Medicine Initiative in the United States, more and more attention has been paid to precision medicine. However, clinicians have already used it to treat conditions such as cancer. Many cardiovascular diseases have a familial presentation, and genetic variants are associated with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of cardiovascular diseases, which are the basis for providing precise care to patients with cardiovascular diseases. Large-scale c...

  20. Arts-based inquiry in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Briege

    2009-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the methods, processes, and experiences of using arts-based inquiry within the context of an undergraduate nursing curriculum. Exploration of these phenomena was achieved through an ethnographic study that involved participatory research among twenty second year students as they engaged in a Nursing Humanities option module. The capacity of arts-based approaches in the nursing curriculum to foster inquiry and critical thinking; essential attributes in contemporary nursing, is explored through re-presentation and analysis of student artwork/art-making processes, contextual discussions and researcher field notes. The challenges encountered in using arts-informed pedagogical approaches within current nursing curricula are made visible and possibilities for integrating aesthetic inquiry into nurse education programmes are discussed.

  1. Medicinal plants contain mucilage used in traditional Persian medicine (TPM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameri, Ahmad; Heydarirad, Ghazaleh; Mahdavi Jafari, Jamileh; Ghobadi, Ali; Rezaeizadeh, Hossein; Choopani, Rasool

    2015-04-01

    Conventional therapies using mucilage plants greatly used by practitioners in Iran. The usage of mucilages is rooted in traditional knowledge with a history of more than 4000 years. Scientific assessment of these historical documents could be valuable for finding new potential usage in the current medicine. This study assembled an inventory of mucilage plants considered important therapeutic aids for alleviating the ailments in ancient Persian medicine and compared therapeutic applications of ancient times with current findings of medicinal mucilages in the same plant species. A literature search compiled some main traditional manuscripts of Persian medicine, including the book of AlHavi, Canon of Medicine, Zakhireh-iKharazmshahi, Qarabadine-kabir, Tohfat ol Moemenin, and Makhzan-ol-advieh, and select mucilage plants used in treating the mouth and respiratory system disorders. Also, current investigations on related subjects were considered through a search of the Pub Med and Google Scholar databases. In Iran, the application of medicinal plants contains mucilage date back to ancient times. In mentioned medieval Persian books, 20 medicinal plants containing mucilage were identified. Mucilages have been traditionally used via oral or topical routes for a variety of disorders. According to this study, most of the cited medicinal plant species were used for their mucilaginous, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidant effects. A scientific evaluation of these historical documents can give an insight into the ideas of the past and be valuable in finding new data on clinical use of the mucilages that should lead to future opportunities to investigate their potential medicinal use.

  2. Towards gloss control in fine art reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baar, Teun; Brettel, Hans; Ortiz Segovia, Maria V.

    2015-03-01

    The studies regarding fine art reproduction mainly focus on the accuracy of colour and the recreation of surface texture properties. Since reflection properties other than colour are neglected, important details of the artwork are lost. For instance, gloss properties, often characteristic to painters and particular movements in the history of art, are not well reproduced. The inadequate reproduction of the different gloss levels of a piece of fine art leads to a specular reflection mismatch in printed copies with respect to the original works that affects the perceptual quality of the printout. We used different print parameters of a 3D high resolution printing setup to control the gloss level on a printout locally. Our method can be used to control gloss automatically and in crucial applications such as fine art reproduction.

  3. The pinch of Expressionism in art history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Pop

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Review of Kimberly A. Smith, ed., The Expressionist Turn in Art History: A useful if strangely hybrid collection of writings in translation by allegedly expressionist art historians, together with introductory historical essays by young as well as established (Hans Aurenhammer, Charles Haxthausen art historiographers. The translated texts vary in quality, familiarity, and interest, and while on the whole they are judiciously chosen, the same cannot be said of the list of protagonists, which leans unfortunately toward a German-nationalist, tendentiously political expressionism unfair both to artists like Beckmann or Klee and to the more interesting art historians who engaged with expressionism. Interestingly, the contingency of these choices, and the imperfect match between even the chosen historians and expressionism as an artistic movement, are clearly seen and duly noted by editor Kimberly Smith and several of the contemporary authors. Some suggestions are thus made about how such an attention to expressionist historiography could be extended.

  4. Decoupling, situated cognition and immersion in art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reboul, Anne

    2015-09-01

    Situated cognition seems incompatible with strong decoupling, where representations are deployed in the absence of their targets and are not oriented toward physical action. Yet, in art consumption, the epitome of a strongly decoupled cognitive process, the artwork is a physical part of the environment and partly controls the perception of its target by the audience, leading to immersion. Hence, art consumption combines strong decoupling with situated cognition.

  5. The Use of Herbal Medicine in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Suryawati, Suryawati; Suardi, Hijra Novia

    2015-01-01

    The herbal medicine has been widely used in children for the treatment of several symptoms and the prevention of diseases before accessing the hospital for professionals help. There are 3 kinds of marketed herbal medicine including empirical based herbal medicine (jamu), standardized herbal medicine (obat herbal terstandar) and clininically tested herbal medicine (fitofarmaka). This study aimed to investigate the utilization of the marketed herbal medicine along with non marketed ones which w...

  6. Art and mental health in Samoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Brigid; Goding, Margaret; Fenner, Patricia; Percival, Steven; Percival, Wendy; Latai, Leua; Petaia, Lisi; Pulotu-Endemann, Fuimaono Karl; Parkin, Ian; Tuitama, George; Ng, Chee

    2015-12-01

    To pilot an art and mental health project with Samoan and Australian stakeholders. The aim of this project was to provide a voice through the medium of art for people experiencing mental illness, and to improve the public understanding in Samoa of mental illness and trauma. Over 12 months, a series of innovative workshops were held with Samoan and Australian stakeholders, followed by an art exhibition. These workshops developed strategies to support the promotion and understanding of mental health in Samoa. Key stakeholders from both art making and mental health services were engaged in activities to explore the possibility of collaboration in the Apia community. The project was able to identify the existing resources and community support for the arts and mental health projects, to design a series of activities aimed to promote and maintain health in the community, and to pilot these programs with five key organizations. This project demonstrates the potential for art and mental health projects to contribute to both improving mental health and to lowering the personal and social costs of mental ill health for communities in Samoa. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  7. Cultural Diversity in AP Art History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolte, Frances R.

    2006-01-01

    Teaching AP Art History is like running on a treadmill that is moving faster than a teacher can run. Many teachers are out of breath before the end of the term and wonder how in the world they can cover every chapter. Because time is short and art from pre-history through to the present, including the non-European traditions, must be covered, this…

  8. REMATERIALIZED TENDENCIES IN MEDIA ART?FROM SILICON TO CARBON-BASED ART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DANIEL LÓPEZ DEL RINCÓN

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of digitality in Media Art theories consolidated the aesthetic of dematerialization, as it shifted the value of materiality in this field. However, the advent of new forms of technological art, such as Bio Art, which uses laboratory technologies in an aesthetic way to manipulate life, demonstrates the crisis of this paradigm and the trend of rematerialization. This paper investigates the role of materiality, even in the more dematerialized realms of Media Art: the digital technologies. We focus on two art forms that combine new technologies and life sciences: Artificial life, which involves the intangible features of Media Art, and Bio Art, which interprets materiality in a radical manner, by choosing life as the raw material for artistic creation.

  9. REMATERIALIZED TENDENCIES IN MEDIA ART? FROM SILICON TO CARBON-BASED ART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel López del Rincón

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of digitality in Media Art theories consolidated the aesthetic of dematerialization, as it shifted the value of materiality in this field. However, the advent of new forms of technological art, such as Bio Art, which uses laboratory technologies in an aesthetic way to manipulate life, demonstrates the crisis of this paradigm and the trend of rematerialization. This paper investigates the role of materiality, even in the more dematerialized realms of Media Art: the digital technologies. We focus on two art forms that combine new technologies and life sciences: Artificial life, which involves the intangible features of Media Art, and Bio Art, which interprets materiality in a radical manner, by choosing life as the raw material for artistic creation.

  10. Nuclear Medicine Practice in Kenya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ndrirangu, T.T.

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty that relies on the use of nuclear technology in the diagnosis and treatment (therapy) of diseases. Nuclear medicine uses the principle that a certain radiopharmaceutical (tracer) will at a certain point in time have a preferential uptake by a particular body, tissue or cell. Unlike other radiation applications for medical use, nuclear medicine uses open (unsealed) sources of radiation. The tracer is introduced into the body of the patient through several routes (oral, intravenous, percutaneous, intradermally, inhalation, intracapsular etc) and s/he becomes the source of radiation. Early diagnosis of diseases coupled with associated timely therapeutic intervention will lead to better prognosis. In a country with an estimated population of 42 million in 2017, Kenya has only two (2) nuclear medicine facilities (units) that is Kenyatta National Hospital - Public facility and Aga Khan University Hospital which is a Private facility. Being a relatively new medical discipline in Kenya, several measures have been taken by the clinical nuclear medicine team to create awareness at various levels. Kenya does not manufacture radiopharmaceuticals. We therefore have to import them from abroad and this makes them quite expensive, and the process demanding. There is no local training in nuclear medicine and staff have to be sent abroad for training, making this quite expensive and cumbersome and the IAEA has been complimenting in this area. With concerted effort by all stakeholders at the individual, national and international level, it is possible for Kenya to effectively sustain clinical nuclear medicine service not only as a diagnostic tool in many disease entities, but also play an increasingly important role in therapy

  11. Found in Translation: Interdisciplinary Arts Integration in Project AIM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, Lara; Ingram, Debra; Weiss, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    This paper will share the arts-integration methodology used in Project AIM and address the question; "How is translation evident in interdisciplinary arts instruction, and how does it affect students?" Methods: The staff and researchers from Project AIM, (an arts-integration program of the Center for Community Arts Partnerships at…

  12. Art investment in South Africa: Portfolio diversification and art market efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdi Botha

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Art has been suggested as a good way to diversify investment portfolios during times of financial uncertainty. The argument is that art exhibits different risk and return characteristics to conventional investments in other asset classes. The new Citadel art price index offered the opportunity to test this theory in the South African context. Moreover, this paper tests whether art prices are efficient. The Citadel index uses the hedonic regression method with observations drawn from the top 100, 50 and 20 artists by sales volume, giving approximately 29 503 total auction observations. The Index consists of quarterly data from the period 2000Q1 to 2013Q3. A vector autoregression of the art price index, Johannesburg stock exchange all-share index, house price index, and South African government bond index were used. Results show that, when there are increased returns on the stock market in a preceding period and wealth increases, there is a change in the Citadel art price index in the same direction. No significant difference was found between the house price index and the art price index, or between the art and government bond price indices. The art market is also found to be inefficient, thereby exacerbating the risk of investing in art. Overall, the South African art market does not offer the opportunity to diversify portfolios dominated by either property, bonds, or shares.

  13. Barriers to ART adherence & follow ups among patients attending ART centres in Maharashtra, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joglekar, N; Paranjape, R; Jain, R; Rahane, G; Potdar, R; Reddy, K S; Sahay, S

    2011-12-01

    Adherence to ART is a patient specific issue influenced by a variety of situations that a patient may encounter, especially in resource-limited settings. A study was conducted to understand factors and influencers of adherence to ART and their follow ups among patients attending ART centres in Maharashtra, India. Between January and March 2009, barriers to ART adherence among 32 patients at three selected ART centres functioning under national ART roll-out programme in Maharashtra, India, were studied using qualitative methods. Consenting patients were interviewed to assess barriers to ART adherence. Constant comparison method was used to identify grounded codes. Patients reported multiple barriers to ART adherence and follow up as (i) Financial barriers where the contributing factors were unemployment, economic dependency, and debt, (ii) social norm of attending family rituals, and fulfilling social obligations emerged as socio-cultural barriers, (iii) patients' belief, attitude and behaviour towards medication and self-perceived stigma were the reasons for sub-optimal adherence, and (iv) long waiting period, doctor-patient relationship and less time devoted in counselling at the center contributed to missed visits. Mainstreaming ART can facilitate access and address 'missed doses' due to travel and migration. A 'morning' and 'evening' ART centre/s hours may reduce work absenteeism and help in time management. Proactive 'adherence probing' and probing on internalized stigma might optimize adherence. Adherence probing to prevent transitioning to suboptimal adherence among patients stable on ART is recommended.

  14. ArtsBridge to the Yavapi Children: A Desert Ecology Unit in Visual Art

    OpenAIRE

    Stokrocki, Mary L.

    2003-01-01

    Dr. Mary Stokrocki, Professor at Arizona State University and faculty mentor, worked with art scholar-teacher Laura Hales who was one of her graduate students, to offer an art class to Yavapi third graders at the Hmañ 'Shawa Elementary School, Fort McDowell Yavapai Nation, Fountain Hills, Arizona. The 10-week program was based on the theme “Our Place in the World”(www.artsednet.getty.edu) and included exploratory art criticism, art history, and creating art components. The program began with...

  15. Application of art therapy practice in educational and psychological counseling

    OpenAIRE

    Mazehóová, Yvona

    2008-01-01

    The dissertation thesis deals with art therapy applied in educational and psychological counseling. Theoretical part of the thesis defines the term "art therapy", theoretical and historical fundaments of the art therapy and touches upon possible applications in treatment. The art therapy process is described from the projective art therapy point of view; specificities of this particular approach in work with children are explained. The developmental view on the art therapy is esp. accented (a...

  16. Pattern Classification in Kampo Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yakubo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pattern classification is very unique in traditional medicine. Kampo medical patterns have transformed over time during Japan’s history. In the 17th to 18th centuries, Japanese doctors advocated elimination of the Ming medical theory and followed the basic concepts put forth by Shang Han Lun and Jin Gui Yao Lue in the later Han dynasty (25–220 AD. The physician Todo Yoshimasu (1702–1773 emphasized that an appropriate treatment could be administered if a set of patterns could be identified. This principle is still referred to as “matching of pattern and formula” and is the basic concept underlying Kampo medicine today. In 1868, the Meiji restoration occurred, and the new government changed its policies to follow that of the European countries, adopting only Western medicine. Physicians trained in Western medicine played an important role in the revival of Kampo medicine, modernizing Kampo patterns to avoid confusion with Western biomedical terminology. In order to understand the Japanese version of traditional disorders and patterns, background information on the history of Kampo and its role in the current health care system in Japan is important. In this paper we overviewed the formation of Kampo patterns.

  17. Understanding How College Students Describe Art: An Analysis on Art Education in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Wang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to explore how Chinese college students appreciate art as reflected in their descriptions of an artwork. Students’ descriptions were defined by a content analysis with respect to opinions and facts, art elements and principles. A questionnaire was also used to investigate students’ attitudes toward art education. 85 students who were divided into four groups participated in the study. The results showed: (1 participants were more familiar with art appreciation than art elements and principles; (2 there was a slight but no significant difference between students’ describing facts and opinions; (3 participants had significantly higher scores on describing art elements than describing art principles; (4 among all participants with regard to all elements and principles, there was a significant difference of describing space between students of art education and students of music education, and also, there was a significant difference of describing value between Chinese language students and other students. The results suggested that participants, including those of art education, had poor knowledge and strategies of understanding art, implying art education in China may have ended up with failure.

  18. Medicines in My Home: Information for Adults on Using Over-the-Counter Medicines Safely

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medicines In My Home More about using medicines safely Medicines in My Home: www.fda.gov/medsinmyhome FDA Consumer Medicine Education: www.fda.gov/usemedicinesafely National Council on Patient Information and ...

  19. Medicinal Plants in Neurodegenerative Diseases: Perspective of Traditional Persian Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzaei, Mohammad Hosein; Shahpiri, Zahra; Mehri, Mohammad Reza; Bahramsoltani, Roodabeh; Rezaei, Mahdi; Raeesdana, Azade; Rahimi, Roja

    2018-03-05

    Neurodegenerative diseases are a progressive loss of structure and/or function of neurons. Weak therapeutic response and progressive nature of the diseases, as well as wide range of side effects caused by conventional therapeutic approaches, make patients seek for complementary and alternative medicine. The aim of present paper is to discuss the neuropharmacological basis of medicinal plants and their principle phytochemicals which have been used in traditional Persian medicine for different types of neurodegenerative diseases. Medicinal plants introduced in traditional Persian medicine perform beneficial effects in neurodegenerative diseases via various cellular and molecular mechanisms including suppression of apoptosis mediated by the increase in expression of anti-apoptotic agents (e.g. Bcl-2) as well as the decrease in the expression and activity of pro-apoptotic proteins (e.g. Bax, caspase 3 and 9). Alleviating inflammatory responses and suppressing the expression and function of pro-inflammatory cytokines like Tumor necrosis factor α and interleukins, as well as improvement in antioxidative performance mediated by superoxide dismutase and catalase, are among other neuroprotective mechanisms of traditional medicinal plants. Modulation of transcription, transduction, intracellular signaling pathways including ERK, p38, and MAPK, with upstream regulatory activity on inflammatory cascades, apoptosis and oxidative stress associated pathways, play an essential role in preventive and therapeutic potential of the plants in neurodegenerative diseases. Medicinal plants used in traditional Persian medicine along with their related phytochemicals by affecting various neuropharmacological pathways can be considered as future drugs or adjuvant therapies with conventional pharmacotherapeutics; though, further clinical studies are necessary for confirmation of their safety and efficacy. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Mechanical Reproduction in an Age of High Art

    OpenAIRE

    Chris Barker

    2014-01-01

    This paper reopens the question of the place of high art in the period identified by Walter Benjamin as the age of mechanical reproduction. Walter Benjamin, Bruno Latour, and Adam Lowe are wrong to think that mechanical reproduction has transformed the concept of art, destroying the aura of art or transmitting that aura from original to copy. The concept of art cannot be redefined by the modern change in the capacity to reproduce art unless art was initially defined primarily by its uniquen...

  1. Contribution of astrology in medicine -- a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Bhuvnesh Kumar; Prasad, P V V; Narayana, A

    2007-01-01

    Astrology is the art of predicting or determining the influence of the planets and stars on human affairs. The origin of this word is from Greek word astron, star + logos (discourse). Both Ayurveda and Astrology have established a way of life in India since time immemorial. Highly advanced knowledge related to Astrology on medicine is preserved in Indian Holy scriptures and transmitted from generation to generation. Although both Astrology and medicine were developed as a part of religion in ancient India, astrological principles related to prevention, health care and relief from illness were applied as rituals (religious ceremonies). An astrologer gives guidance for taking medicines at suitable time for the best remedy of ailments. Even the medicinal herbs were collected and used at appropriate times for their efficacy. Astrology and Ayurveda are inseparable in human life. Role of the Astrology in healthy life and pathogenesis of the disease is well known to Indians. When a physician knows etiology of the disease, he attempts to treat the disease with specific medication, diet and life style and also avoiding causative factors. In a case where a physician is unable to understand the pathogenesis of the disease and to treat, the patient depends upon Astrology. Account of good and bad deeds during this life and previous lives, their consequences of health or ill health during this life which orderly, when, what and how will be clearly known through Astrology. It gives guidelines about welfare not only to human being but also to whole creation and also indicates about calamities and their solutions as possible extent. Hence a concise astrological evaluation related to prevention, health care, diagnosis and treatment of diseases is being presented in this article.

  2. Publication productivity in nuclear medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKellar, Cheryl; Currie, Geoff

    2015-06-01

    Publications form the knowledge base of any profession. Patterns in professional publications provide insight into the profession's maturity and global status. To our knowledge, publication productivity in nuclear medicine technology has not been reported. A recent study on publication productivity in radiography and radiation therapy provided interesting insight; however, a sampling bias resulted in study flaws. The most productive medical radiation technologists were determined by collecting data from 7 key, international peer-reviewed journals for the medical radiation sciences over a 5-y period. A full list of the technologists' publications, for the 5-y period, was obtained using a PubMed and ResearchGate search, and the authors were analyzed. In total, 165 medical radiation technologists were identified who had published 3 or more articles between 2009 and 2013. Of these authors, 55.2% (91/165) were radiographers, 35.2% (58/165) were radiation therapists, and 9.6% (16/165) were nuclear medicine technologists. Overall, the majority of the most prolific authors were academics (104/165; 63.0%). After we applied a correction factor (the productivity per member of the registered workforce), radiography had the fewest authors publishing, compared with the relative workflow sizes. Nuclear medicine technologists demonstrated a high degree of productivity both absolutely and relatively. Consequently, nuclear medicine technologists have a productive research culture and command a large footprint within and outside the key medical radiation science journals. © 2015 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  3. Comparative intrauterine development and placental function of ART concepti: implications for human reproductive medicine and animal breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloise, Enrrico; Feuer, Sky K; Rinaudo, Paolo F

    2014-01-01

    The number of children conceived using assisted reproductive technologies (ART) has reached >5 million worldwide and continues to increase. Although the great majority of ART children are healthy, many reports suggest a forthcoming risk of metabolic complications, which is further supported by the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease hypothesis of suboptimal embryo/fetal conditions predisposing adult cardiometabolic pathologies. Accumulating evidence suggests that fetal and placental growth kinetics are important features predicting post-natal health, but the relationship between ART and intrauterine growth has not been systematically reviewed. Relevant studies describing fetoplacental intrauterine phenotypes of concepti generated by in vitro fertilization (IVF), intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) in the mouse, bovine and human were comprehensively researched using PubMed and Google Scholar. Intrauterine growth plots were created from tabular formatted data available in selected reports. ART pregnancies display minor but noticeable alterations in fetal and placental growth curves across mammalian species. In all species, there is evidence of fetal growth restriction in the earlier stages of pregnancy, followed by significant increases in placental size and accelerated fetal growth toward the end of gestation. However, there is a species-specific effect of ART on birthweights, that additionally vary in a culture condition-, strain-, and/or stage at transfer-specific manner. We discuss the potential mechanisms that underlie these changes, and how they are affected by specific components of ART procedures. ART may promote measurable alterations to intrauterine growth trajectory and placental function. Key findings include evidence that birthweight is not a reliable marker of fetal stress, and that increases in embryo manipulation result in more deviant fetal growth curves. Because growth kinetics in early life are

  4. Historic images in nuclear medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hess, Søren; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming; Alavi, Abass

    2014-01-01

    In 1976, 2 major molecular imaging events coincidentally took place: Clinical Nuclear Medicine was first published in June, and in August researchers at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania created the first images in humans with F-FDG. FDG was initially developed as part of an evolution...... set in motion by fundamental research studies with positron-emitting tracers in the 1950s by Michel Ter-Pegossian and coworkers at the Washington University. Today, Clinical Nuclear Medicine is a valued scientific contributor to the molecular imaging community, and FDG PET is considered the backbone...

  5. Theranostics in nuclear medicine practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yordanova, Anna; Eppard, Elisabeth; Kürpig, Stefan; Bundschuh, Ralph A; Schönberger, Stefan; Gonzalez-Carmona, Maria; Feldmann, Georg; Ahmadzadehfar, Hojjat; Essler, Markus

    2017-01-01

    The importance of personalized medicine has been growing, mainly due to a more urgent need to avoid unnecessary and expensive treatments. In nuclear medicine, the theranostic approach is an established tool for specific molecular targeting, both for diagnostics and therapy. The visualization of potential targets can help predict if a patient will benefit from a particular treatment. Thanks to the quick development of radiopharmaceuticals and diagnostic techniques, the use of theranostic agents has been continually increasing. In this article, important milestones of nuclear therapies and diagnostics in the context of theranostics are highlighted. It begins with a well-known radioiodine therapy in patients with thyroid cancer and then progresses through various approaches for the treatment of advanced cancer with targeted therapies. The aim of this review was to provide a summary of background knowledge and current applications, and to identify the advantages of targeted therapies and imaging in nuclear medicine practices. PMID:29042793

  6. Renal scintigraphy in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, Reid; Daniel, Gregory B

    2014-01-01

    Renal scintigraphy is performed commonly in dogs and cats and has been used in a variety of other species. In a 2012 survey of the members of the Society of Veterinary Nuclear Medicine, 95% of the respondents indicated they perform renal scintigraphy in their practice. Renal scintigraphy is primarily used to assess renal function and to evaluate postrenal obstruction. This article reviews how renal scintigraphy is used in veterinary medicine and describes the methods of analysis. Species variation is also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [CFC gases in medicinal sprays].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, P H; Svendsen, U G

    1989-03-20

    In 1987, approximately 1.18 million aerosol dispensers for medicinal use were sold in Denmark. These contained approximately 29 tons of completely halogenized CFC gases ("Freon") and the preparations were employed for the treatment of bronchial asthma and rhinitis. The possibilities of substitutes are discussed in this article. Preparations are already available which do not contain CFC. Producers of CFC are also attempting to develop new aerosol gases which do not damage the environment. Perhaps these will be found in medicinal preparations in the future.

  8. The Theme of Displacement in Contemporary Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John POTTS

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Cet article examine les images et idées de dislocation dans des œuvres d'art récentes. Le thème du déplacement ou de la dislocation est traité dans le contexte de l'aspect globalisant de l'art contemporain, considéré lui-même comme un reflet de la mondialisation. Les principaux textes théoriques qui influencent et informent les pratiques en matière de conservation sont abordés, entre autres les écrits de Giorgio Agamben, Nicolas Bourriaud et Rex Butler. Le thème de la dislocation dans l'art contemporain est analysé au travers des œuvres de nombreux artistes, tels que Francis Alÿs, Bill Fontana, Allan Sekula, Chen Chieh-jen, Ai Wei Wei, Rosemary Laing, Mike Parr, Santiago Sierra, Rebecca Belmore et Tracey Moffatt.This essay considers images and ideas of displacement in recent works of art. The theme of displacement is examined in the context of the globalist aspect of contemporary art, itself a reflection of globalisation. Influential theoretical texts informing curatorial practice and the discourse of contemporary art theory are discussed, including the writings of Girogio Agamben, Nicolas Bourriaud and Rex Butler. The theme of displacement in contemporary art is analysed with regard to the work of many artists, including Francis Alÿs, Bill Fontana, Allan Sekula, Chen Chieh-jen, Ai Wei Wei, Rosemary Laing, Mike Parr, Santiago Sierra, Rebecca Belmore and Tracey Moffatt.

  9. [The relations between music and medicine in history and present].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasenzer, E R; Neugebauer, E A M

    2011-12-01

    Since the ancient world relations exist between music and medicine. In the prehistoric music, dance, rhythm and religious practice were important parts of shamanism and early medical procedures. Important philosophers of the classic period already began with the scientific research of musical and medical questions. During the middle age convents conserved ancient knowledge. They offered medical care and taught the ancient knowledge of medicine, arts and music. The Gregorian choral was created. Traditions of popular believe expressed the relations between music and medicine. The Renaissance became the great époque of art, music and science. Leonardo da Vinci and Andreas Vesalius presented a new style of artistic working and scientific knowledge. Also the basics of western music, like tonality was developed. With the separation of scientific subjects in natural sciences and humanities, the relationships between music and medicine fall into oblivion. During the classic and romantic era music and art were important parts of cultural live of the well educated society. With the development of neurology, psychiatry and psychoanalysis more physicians and scientists were interested in musical questions. Questions about the role of music in human behavior and the ancient method to use music in medical treatment became popular. In the early 20th century the music therapy was developed. Today the effects of music to the human brain are investigated with radionuclear methods. A lot of investigations showed the effect of music and music performance to humans. Music plays an important part in psychotherapy, therapeutic pedagogy and medical care, the importance of music and music therapy increases. In the 80ies of the 20th century the performing arts medicine was developed, which asks for the medical problems of performing musicians. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Fallacies in astronomy and medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salpeter, Edwin E

    2005-01-01

    Both in astronomy and in medicine research, fallacies occur occasionally. Sometimes these fallacies are due to 'subconscious cheating' or the 'file drawer effect' (filing away unfavourable results instead of publishing), but it is difficult to know whether a fallacy has occurred and, if so, why. I give two examples from the past where, in my opinion, fallacies have occurred: a quadratic distance-redshift law and a periodicity in galaxy pair redshift differences. I then discuss the current quasi steady state cosmology, which is very unorthodox but it is not yet clear if fallacies have occurred. I finish with examples from medicine research, where fallacies are particularly troublesome and some countermeasures are attempted

  11. Challenges in aerospace medicine education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenon, S Marlene; Saary, Joan

    2011-11-01

    Aerospace medicine training and research represents a dream for many and a challenge for most. In Canada, although some opportunities exist for the pursuit of education and research in the aerospace medicine field, they are limited despite the importance of this field for enabling safe human space exploration. In this commentary, we aim to identify some of the challenges facing individuals wishing to get involved in the field as well as the causal factors for these challenges. We also explore strategies to mitigate against these.

  12. The evolution of sports medicine in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Benedict

    2013-10-01

    Sports medicine is a relatively new subspecialty in Singapore. This commentary chronicles its evolution in Singapore from 1969, through various milestones, to the present day. The first sports medicine clinic in Singapore was established in 1971 at Farrer Park. Notable institutions that followed include the Sports Medicine and Research Centre (1973), Soldier Performance Centre, Changi Sports Medicine Centre (2003), Singapore Sports Medicine Centre (2006), and other multidisciplinary centres of restructured hospitals. Formal groundwork to establish sports medicine as a subspecialty began in 2005, with its first trainee commencing traineeship at the Changi Sports Medicine Centre in 2007, and culminated in the subspecialty register at the beginning of 2011. Also captured in this discussion are the broader scopes of sports medicine, including military sports medicine, the sports sciences, exercise medicine, and event medical coverage.

  13. Medicinal Herbs Affecting Gray Hair in Iranian Traditional Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rameshk, Maryam; Khandani, Shahram Kalantari; Raeiszadeh, Mahboobeh

    2016-05-01

    The presence of hair plays an important role in people's overall physical appearance and self-perception. As a result of increased life expectancy, the desire to look youthful plays a bigger role than ever.The use of medicinal plants is as old as mankind and the market will face many new products containing natural oils and herbs in coming years. In traditional Iranian medicine, many plants and herbal formulations are reported for hair growth as well as the improvement in hair quality. The aim of this article is to introduce effective medicinal plants in traditional Iranian medicine to prevent gray hair and advocate them as the new products. The present investigation is an overview study and has been codified by library search in the main sources of traditional Iranian medicine. In traditional Iranian medicine, three types of formulations are proposed to prevent gray hair, namely (i) treatment compounds, (ii) preventive compounds, and (iii) hair dyes to color gray hairs. Our search showed that the main parts of a plant that is used in the treatment and preventive compounds are seeds and fruits. These are primarily in the form of topical oil or oral compound (electuary). The majority of plant parts used in hair dyes is from the fruit and/or leaves. Natural products are highly popular and the use of plant extracts in formulations is on the rise. This is because synthetic based product may cause health hazards with several side effects. Considering the increased popularity of herbal drugs in hair care, it is worthwhile to conduct systemic investigation on the production and efficacy of these drugs. We trust that our investigation would encourage the use of traditional Iranian medicine in future hair care products.

  14. Genomic applications in forensic medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børsting, Claus; Morling, Niels

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1980s, advances in DNA technology have revolutionized the scope and practice of forensic medicine. From the days of restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) to short tandem repeats (STRs), the current focus is on the next generation genome sequencing. It has been almost a decade...... sequence information may aid mixture interpretation and will increase the statistical weight of the evidence. In this chapter, we provide an overview on conventional DNA diagnostics and the possible applications of single cell sequencing and NGS in forensic medicine....

  15. Quality assurance in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paras, P.

    1978-01-01

    Quality assurance practices must be followed throughout the entire nuclear medicine process, from the initial decision to perform a particular procedure, through the interpretation and reporting of the results. The various parameters that can be defined and measured in each area must be monitored by quality control tests to assure the excellence of the total nuclear medicine process. The presentation will discuss each of the major areas of nuclear medicine quality control and their interaction as a part of the entire system. Quality control testing results and recommendations for measurements of radioactivity distribution will be described with emphasis on imaging equipment and dose calibrating instrumentation. The role of the health physicist in a quality assurance program will be stressed. (author)

  16. Radiation protection in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeburrun, V.

    2013-04-01

    Radiation protection in nuclear medicine in this project is concerned with the reduction of doses to workers, patients and members of the public. Protection of workers is achieved by adopting good personal habits, good housekeeping, proper use of personal protective devices and equipment, attend training and have continuous education. Exposure to radiation of workers and the members of the public are minimised by proper management of radioactive waste and safe transport of radioactive material. The design and shielding of a nuclear medicine department shall further provide for the protection of the worker, the patient and the general public. Protection of patient is achieved by justifying the procedure, delivering the minimum radiation dose possible to the patient while obtaining the best image quality and applying guidance levels. Special considerations shall be given to pregnant and breast-feeding patients. Quality assurance programme through image quality, radiopharmaceutical quality and patient records on nuclear medicine procedures shall provide assurance to the patient. (au)

  17. Arts Entrepreneurship Education in the UK and Germany: An Empirical Survey among Lecturers in Fine Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on the current state of arts entrepreneurship education at higher educational institutions (HEIs) in the UK and Germany. It is based on findings from questionnaire surveys among 210 lecturers in fine art at 89 HEIs in the UK and Germany. Design/methodology/approach: This paper explores issues related…

  18. Some Medicinal Plants Used in Traditional Medicine in Swaziland ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An ethnomedical survey of the Manzini region of Swaziland was carried out. Traditional medical practitioners (TMPs) were interviewed in their homesteads where they practiced traditional medicine. Ethnomedical uses of plants used were collected from the wild with the assistance of the TMPs who gave information on them.

  19. An introductory course in philosophy of medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnick, A

    2004-06-01

    Philosophy of medicine, narrowly defined as ontology and epistemology of medicine, is a well developed research field, yet education in this field is less well developed. The aim of this paper is to present an educational development in philosophy of medicine-an introductory course in philosophy of medicine. Central features of the course are described. Participants (medical undergraduate students) scored high on average. The conclusion is that further such educational ventures in philosophy of medicine should be developed and implemented.

  20. Mitochondria in biology and medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Claus Desler; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2012-01-01

    pathologies (Luft, 1994). Since 1959, the understanding of mitochondrial cytopathies has evolved immensely and mitochondrial cytopathies are now known to be the largest group of metabolic diseases and to be resulting in a wide variety of pathologies. "Mitochondria in Biology and Medicine" was the title...... of the first annual conference of Society of Mitochondrial Research and Medicine - India. The conference was organized by A. S. Sreedhar, Keshav Singh and Kumarasamy Thangaraj, and was held at The Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology (CCMB) Hyderabad, India, during 9-10 December 2011. The conference...

  1. Complementary medicines: When regulation results in revolution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The regulatory practices include all the steps from the development and manufacture of the active ingredients until the medicines reach the consumer. The Medicines Control Council (MCC) is mandated to regulate medicines in South Africa. Complementary medicines were previously perceived to be unregulated, although ...

  2. Women in medicine and dermatology: history and advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    França, Katlein; Ledon, Jennifer; Savas, Jessica; Nouri, Keyvan

    2014-01-01

    The history of women in medicine has been marked by many challenges and achievements. Although the role of women in the "art of healing" can be traced back many centuries, only males are traditionally highlighted in history. Across antiquity, access to medical education was denied to females. Dermatology is a medical specialty in which women displayed particular skill and proficiency. Gradually, determination and competence allowed women to lay claim in an essentially male-dominated world. This article presents a brief review of the performance, progress and achievements of women in the history of medicine and dermatology.

  3. Women in medicine and dermatology: history and advances*

    Science.gov (United States)

    França, Katlein; Ledon, Jennifer; Savas, Jessica; Nouri, Keyvan

    2014-01-01

    The history of women in medicine has been marked by many challenges and achievements. Although the role of women in the "art of healing" can be traced back many centuries, only males are traditionally highlighted in history. Across antiquity, access to medical education was denied to females. Dermatology is a medical specialty in which women displayed particular skill and proficiency. Gradually, determination and competence allowed women to lay claim in an essentially male-dominated world. This article presents a brief review of the performance, progress and achievements of women in the history of medicine and dermatology. PMID:24626675

  4. The Art Self-Concept Inventory: Development and Validation of a Scale to Measure Self-Concept in Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Alison

    The Art Self-Concept Inventory (ASCI) was developed as a situation specific self-concept instrument to measure the students' ideas and feelings about themselves in the art context. Art self-concept was defined as students' perceptions of themselves as makers, as judges, and as enjoyers of art. To top these dimensions of art self-concept, items…

  5. Fractals and dynamics in art and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guastello, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Many styles of visual art that build on fractal imagery and chaotic dynamics in the creative process have been examined in NDPLS in recent years. This article presents a gallery of artwork turned into design that appeared in the promotional products of the Society for Chaos Theory in Psychology & Life Sciences. The gallery showcases a variety of new imaging styles, including photography, that reflect a deepening perspective on nonlinear dynamics and art. The contributing artworks in design formats combine to render the verve that transcends the boundaries between the artistic and scientific communities.

  6. Making art matter-ings: Engaging (with art in early childhood education, in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craw Janita

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the special nature of Te Whāriki, Aotearoa New Zealand’s early childhood national curriculum, as a dynamic social, cultural document through an exploration of two art-inspired imaginary case studies. Thinking with Te Whāriki retains the potential to ignite thinking post-developmentally about art, pedagogy and practice in teacher education, and in the field. It offers examples of how creating spaces for engaging (with art as pedagogy acts as a catalyst for change, art offers a dynamic way of knowing, and being-with the different life-worlds we inhabit. While new paradigms for thinking and practicing art in education continue to push the boundaries of developmentally and individually responsive child-centred pedagogies, an emphasis on multiple literacies often gets in the way. This prohibits opportunities for engaging in other more complex approaches to pedagogy and art as subject-content knowledge, something essential for developing a rich curriculum framework. The article draws on research that emphasises the importance of teacher education in opening up spaces for thinking about (the history of art in/and of education as more than a communication/language tool. It considers an inclusive and broad knowledge-building-communities approach that values the contribution that art, artists, and others offer the 21st early learning environments we find ourselves in.

  7. Virtue Ethics in Monetized Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Arthur W

    2016-01-01

    This review essay situates Abraham Nussbaum's The Finest Traditions of Our Calling (2016) within the contemporary genre of physician memoirs that shade into critiques of institutional medicine. Nussbaum's primary concern is the demoralization of medicine as it becomes increasingly monetized; patients are reduced to body parts and reimbursement schedules. He argues that physicians continue to have considerable choice in how they practice, despite institutional constraints. For bioethics, Nussbaum's advocacy of virtue ethics is notable. His book is a moving testimonial to contemporary problems, but also a manifesto for possibilities of change at the individual level.

  8. Artful leadership in healthcare: encouraging the possible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Lloyd; Burke, George

    2007-01-01

    A dramatic trend has developed in leadership preparation: the use of Arts Based Training (ABT). Recent literature has reported that the corporate world and graduate business degree programs have discovered the significant value that the arts can play in educating and developing management talent. The MFA (Master of Fine Arts) is the new MBA! The reasoning behind this shift is the increased need for "right brain" thinkers. This trend may very well extend to healthcare leadership. This paper provides a comprehensive literature review, a section on possibilities for ABT in healthcare organizations, a section on possibilities for ABT in Graduate Education of Healthcare Leaders, a summary rationale for using ABT for developing healthcare leaders, and conclusions and recommendations.

  9. Interactive Technologies in Musical and Arts Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Y. Glazyrina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper substantiates the introduction of interactive techniques in music and arts education, and analyzes the definitions of interactivity – a key term of the modern educational paradigm. Various interpretationsof interactivity and its components – interaction, communication, dia logue, polylogue, interpretation, reinterpretation, intonation, feelings, comprehension, generalization (reflection, and experience – are given. In the methodology context, the author traces out the similarity of interactive concepts in general didactics and the humanities knowledge (M. M. Bakhtin, V. S. Bibler, and maintains that the main components of interactive teaching include the basic categories of culture, art, music, and psychology of artistic perception and creativity. Therefore, similarity of the content and approach to interpreting the conceptual terminological apparatus of interactive education makes it possible to implement the interactive techniques in teaching the cycle of music and arts disciplines.

  10. 77 FR 5243 - Proposed Priority, Requirements, Definitions, and Selection Criteria-Arts in Education National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-02

    ..., and visual arts, including folk arts. We are proposing these requirements to ensure that funded... resources, in music, dance, theater, media arts, and visual arts, including folk arts, for arts educators. (iii) Arts-based educational programming in music, dance, theater, media arts, and visual arts...

  11. Neutron use in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guidez, J.; May, R.; Moss, R. [HFR-Unit, European Commission, IAM, Petten (Netherlands); Askienazy, S. [Departement Central de Medicine Nucleaire et Biophysique, Saint Antoine Hospital, Paris (France); Hildebrand, J. [Neurology Department, Erasmus Hospital, Brussels (Belgium)

    1999-07-01

    Neutrons produced by research reactors are being used in nuclear medicine and other medical applications in several ways. The High Flux Reactor (HFR) based in Petten (The Netherlands), owned by the European Commission, has been working increasingly in this field of health care for the European citizen. On the basis of this experience, a survey has been carried out on the main possibilities of neutrons used in nuclear medicine. The most important and most well known is the production of radioisotopes for diagnosis and therapy. Ten million patients receive nuclear medicine in Europe each year, with more than 8 million made with the products issued from research reactors. The survey of the market and the techniques (cyclotron, PET) shows that this market will continue to increase in the future. The direct use of reactors in medicine is actually made by the Boron Neutron capture Therapy (BNCT) for the treatment of glioblastoma, which kills about 15.000 people in Europe each year. For this promising technique, HFR is the most advanced for experimental possibilities and treatment studies. Medical research is also made in other promising fields: the use beam tubes for characterizing of prostheses and bio-medical materials, alpha-immuno therapy products, new types of radioisotopes, new types of illness to be treated by BNCT, etc. (author)

  12. Neutron use in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidez, J.; May, R.; Moss, R.; Askienazy, S.; Hildebrand, J.

    1999-01-01

    Neutrons produced by research reactors are being used in nuclear medicine and other medical applications in several ways. The High Flux Reactor (HFR) based in Petten (The Netherlands), owned by the European Commission, has been working increasingly in this field of health care for the European citizen. On the basis of this experience, a survey has been carried out on the main possibilities of neutrons used in nuclear medicine. The most important and most well known is the production of radioisotopes for diagnosis and therapy. Ten million patients receive nuclear medicine in Europe each year, with more than 8 million made with the products issued from research reactors. The survey of the market and the techniques (cyclotron, PET) shows that this market will continue to increase in the future. The direct use of reactors in medicine is actually made by the Boron Neutron capture Therapy (BNCT) for the treatment of glioblastoma, which kills about 15.000 people in Europe each year. For this promising technique, HFR is the most advanced for experimental possibilities and treatment studies. Medical research is also made in other promising fields: the use beam tubes for characterizing of prostheses and bio-medical materials, alpha-immuno therapy products, new types of radioisotopes, new types of illness to be treated by BNCT, etc. (author)

  13. Drawing Myth and History in visual art

    OpenAIRE

    Córdoba Benedicto, Jaime de

    2009-01-01

    After the famous exhibition “Copier créer” curated by Jean Pierre Cuzin in the “Musée du Louvre” in 1993, the practice of drawing art has acquired a renovated interest. This exhibition revised the theoretical concepts introduced by Bober and others in the second half of the XXth century and increased the value of the contribution of drawing in the study of art history instead of the idea of copying. An important catalog and essay by Haverkamp, Begemann and Login, titled “Creative copies”, app...

  14. The Brazilian medicinal chemistry from 1998 to 2008 in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry, Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry Letters and European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry [A química medicinal brasileira de 1998 a 2008 nos periódicos Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry, Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry Letters e European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Bárbara Vasconcellos da Silva; Renato Saldanha Bastos; Angelo da Cunha Pinto

    2009-01-01

    In this article we present the Brazilian publications, the research groups involved, the contributions per states and the main diseases studied from 1998 to 2008 in the following periodicals: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry, Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry Letters and European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry.

  15. The Challenges of Art Education in Designer Capitalism: Collaborative Practices in the (New Media) Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    jagodzinski, jan

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the challenges to art education in the twenty-first century as art curricula around the world begin to change so as to meet the new emergent technological realities. It is argued that within a "control" society like ours, where the economic system of capitalism dictates the direction of education along with its…

  16. Milestones in Health and Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Anne S.

    This book includes more than 500 entries describing advances in the treatment of disease and the understanding of human health. The emphasis is on significant advances in diseases, treatments, and health issues. Topics included are: alternative or nonwestern medicine; anesthesia and analgesia; antibiotics; cancer; cell biology and physiology;…

  17. Nuclear medicine in the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villadolid, Leland.

    1978-01-01

    This article traces the history of nuclear medicine in the country from the time the first radioisotope laboratory was set up by the Philippine General Hospital about 1955, to the not too satisfactory present facilities acquired by hospitals for diagnosis, treatment and investigation of diseases. It is in research, the investigation of disease that is nuclear medicine's most important area. The Philippine Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC) has pioneered in the conducting of courses in the medical uses of radioisotopes. The local training of nuclear manpower has been continued and updated and foreign fellowships are availed of through the cooperation of IAEA. Quite a number are already trained also in the allied fields that support the practice of nuclear medicine. However the brain drain has seriously affected the number of trained staff of medical units. Discussed and presented is the growth of the medical use of radioisotopes which are locally produced by PAEC. In order to benefit from the full advantage that nuclear medicine can do to a majority of Filipinos, the government should extend its financial support in acquiring such facilities to equip strategic hospitals in the country and support training programs. The Philippine has the expertise to start the expansion but only with adequate provision of funds will our capacity turn into reality. (RTD)

  18. Shock wave treatment in medicine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Urology has long been the only medical field for shock waves in medicine. Meanwhile shock waves have been used in orthopedics and traumatology to treat insertion tendinitis, avascular necrosis of the head of femur and other necrotic bone alterations. Another field of shock wave application is the treatment of tendons, ...

  19. Dietary advice in family medicine.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weel, C. van

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses the conceptual basis of dietary advice in family medicine. Given the large number of illnesses and diseases encountered in family practice for which diet and nutrition are relevant interventions, food-related advice is an important part of daily practice. To enhance the

  20. Biomarkers of diseases in medicine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Biomarkers have gained immense scientific and clinical value and interest in the practise of medicine. .... extent and characteristics of the disease detected ..... marker for cancer. In colon cancer, the tumour suppressor genes CDKN2A, MGMT and MLH1, as well as other genes (e.g., TIMP-3, p14ARF,. APC, MINT31, MINT2 ...

  1. Political issues in contemporary art of Ukraine

    OpenAIRE

    Natalia Usenko

    2014-01-01

    At the beginning of the XXI century Ukrainian art observed activization of the artist’s interest for the political life of the country. The starting point was 2004, marked by protests against unfair elections in the country, the birth of the first “Maidan” and “Orange revolution”. In a number of artistic actions organized by art groups we can see the reflection of the revolution events and, later, the frustrations of its ideals. The most striking manifestation of political issues in contempor...

  2. Art Museums in Australia: A Personal Retrospect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Thomas

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A survey of, and reflections on, the growth of art museums in Australia based on personal experience and involvement. It starts with the early art collections and state galleries and their organisation. It looks at changing patterns of leadership and governance. It considers the roles of inter-state competition, the varying patters of organisation and support and the impact of federal institutions. It reflects on factors of race, gender and ethnicity and also the situation of Australian exhibitions and collections in the Global Village. It considers the effects of popularisation, commercialisation and celebrity culture on exhibition practices. It concludes that Australia’s art museums, more perhaps than any others, have become unusually well-suited to a post-European or post-North Atlantic age.

  3. Opportunities for Innovation Adoption in Art Galleries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ieva VITKAUSKAITĖ

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces the opportunities for innovation adoption in art galleries. It provides systematised information on innovation processes and innovations used in business models of art galleries. The empirical research conducted has revealed the attitude of art galleries towards innovations, as well as the benefits and opportunities to realise them. The first part of the article distinguishes the stages of innovation process and management. The following part describes the factors that influence the management of innovation process. The final part of the article analyses the application of innovations for the improvement of a business model, with Business Model Canvas by Alexander Osterwalder and Yves Pigneur selected as the starting point for analysis and, finally, the outcomes of empirical research are provided.

  4. An Interactionist Perspective on Understanding Gender Identity in Art Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gussak, David

    2008-01-01

    This paper applies social interactionism to gender identity issues as addressed in the art therapy literature and within interview data collected from art therapists working in the field. The findings revealed that perceptions from practicing art therapists differed from ideas put forth in the art therapy literature about gender traits that…

  5. Instituting reality in martial arts practice

    OpenAIRE

    Bowman, Paul

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the relations between the desire for reality in martial arts training and the inevitable emergence of institutional styles. It argues that since at least the time of Bruce Lee’s influential 1971 article ‘Liberate Yourself From Classical Karate’, there has been a growing effort in Western martial arts circles to escape from the constraints and strictures of ‘artificial styles’ and to achieve a kind of emancipation that would reflect a direct engagement with the ‘truth’ an...

  6. Profession Dilemmas in the art educational field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Lutnæs

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The anthology Kunstner eller lærer? Profesjonsdilemmaer i musikk- og kunst­­pedagogisk utdanning (Artist or teacher? Profession Dilemmas in the music and art educational fields is edited by Elin Angelo and Signe Kalsnes. The reviewer concludes there is a label identity construction through the use of terms, including how you choose to position yourself and how you are categorised by others, which makes the book a very valuable contribution to the discussion of the professional dilemma and professional identity of students, teachers and researchers in the art educational fields.

  7. Quality control in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostadinova, I.

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear medicine comprises diagnosis and therapy of the diseases with radiopharmaceuticals. The ambition of all specialists in our country is their activity to reach European standards. In this connection, a Commission for external audit was formed to evaluate the quality of work in the centers of nuclear medicine. This Commission create a long-lasting programme based on the objective European criteria and the national standard of nuclear medicine, having in mind to increase quality of the work and the expert evaluation of activity in every center. The program comprises measures for quality control of instrumentation, radiopharmaceuticals, performed investigations, obtained results and the whole organization from the receiving of the isotopes to the results of the patients. The ambition is most of the centers to fulfill the requirements. As a conclusion it could be said that not only the quality of everyday nuclear medicine work is enough to increase the prestige of the specialty. It is also necessary we to have understanding expert and financial support from corresponding institutions, incl. Ministry of health for a delivery of a new, contemporary instrumentation with new possibilities. Thus it would be possible Bulgarian patients to reach the high technology apparatuses for an early functional diagnosis of the diseases and optimal treatment, which possibility have the patients from the developed countries. (author)

  8. Pop Life, Art in a Material World.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clémence Bonnet

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available « I don’t think myself as evil – just realistic », Andy Warhol« Good business is the best art », légendaire citation d’Andy Warhol, résonne entre les murs de la Tate Modern, digne fil conducteur de l’exposition « Pop Life, Art in a Material World  ». Le Business Art et l’artiste intégrant le commercial à son travail (ne se contentant plus de seulement le commenter réunissent vingt-deux artistes autour de la figure centrale de Warhol, présenté comme le père fondateur de toute cette mouvance p...

  9. Pulmonary explorations in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, C.

    1987-01-01

    Ten years ago specialists in Nuclear Medicine from the South of France formed an Association called ACOMEN. The objectives were to create a permanent exchange of ideas between members and a close collaboration with physicians. The group objectives have led to a combination of efforts on the behalf of each one to clarify our techniques for physicians having recourse to this speciality as well as the various categories of students passing through the Nuclear Medicine Departments. Different groups within the ACOMEN were assigned to specific subjects. Each group was in charge of building the framework of a certain topic, which was then illustrated by selected documents contributed by all members. A slide collection, complete with an explanatory booklet is the final result of this collaboration. Thus anyone concerned in any way, with nuclear medicine, is able to quickly become familiar with the techniques of the speciality, to be aware of its possibilities and its limitations and to update his hnowledge. One realizes that the first theme selected was not the easiest; pulmonary radionuclide explorations are, as everyone knows, variable and even personalized. However, the choice was deliberate. The difficulty should stimulate those responsible for the other themes as well as the people working with them. There is already a slide collection available to anyone who wishes to learn about the use of nuclear medicine in the diagnosis of respiratory diseases [fr

  10. The Crisis in Osteopathic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Christopher T.; Price, Albert

    1992-01-01

    In three decades, the osteopathic profession has moved from primarily manipulative therapy to full-service health care, replacing primary care emphasis with specialization. The profession should return to its original mission of primary care, establish links with allopathic medicine, and support new national policy for primary health care.…

  11. Computer networks in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noelpp, U.B.

    1986-01-01

    For multi-camera and multi-computer departements it is advantageous to connect the computers into a network. Care should be taken to choose an open and reliable solution. For long term, Ethernet is probably a good choice. Several manufactureres already offer networks with big differences. Own Experience shows that networks in nuclear medicine are manageable. (Author)

  12. Work shifts in Emergency Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Recupero

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Emergency Medicine is known as a high stress specialty. The adverse effect of constantly rotating shifts is the single most important reason given for premature attrition from the field. In this work problems tied with night shift work will be taken into account and some solutions to reduce the impact of night work on the emergency physicians will be proposed.

  13. Images compression in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebelo, M.S.; Furuie, S.S.; Moura, L.

    1992-01-01

    The performance of two methods for images compression in nuclear medicine was evaluated. The LZW precise, and Cosine Transformed, approximate, methods were analyzed. The results were obtained, showing that the utilization of approximated method produced images with an agreeable quality for visual analysis and compression rates, considerably high than precise method. (C.G.C.)

  14. Shock wave treatment in medicine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    compared to urology where shock waves are used for disintegration. [Shrivastava S K and Kailash 2005 Shock wave treatment in medicine; J. Biosci. 30 269–275]. 1. Introduction. Extracorporeal generated shock waves have been intro- duced for medical therapy approximately 20 years back to disintegrate kidney stones.

  15. Beyond Tradition: Culture, Symbolism, and Practicality in American Indian Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Barbara Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Indigenous people have always created what colonial language labels art. Yet there is no Native word for "art" as defined in a Euro-American sense. Art, as the dominant culture envisions, is mostly ornamental. This is in sharp juxtaposition to a Native perspective, which sees art as integrative, inclusive, practical, and constantly…

  16. Autobiographical Snapshots: Constructing Self in Letras y Arte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armon, Joan; Ortega, Tony

    2008-01-01

    Letras y Arte: Literacy and Art, is a summer course that pairs college students and children from a Latino neighborhood for literacy and art learning. Started five years ago, Letras y Arte provides opportunities in four areas: (1) literacy opportunities that foster distinctive identities and voice; (2) immersion in a broad view of literacy that…

  17. Working With Arts in Danish Nurse Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Julie Borup

    2011-01-01

    The article outlines ideas and a number of results of a design-for-learning experiment, involving nurse students working with arts in the nurse education in Denmark. The findings show that learning in practice in nurse education can involve creativity as a dimension of building personal knowledge...

  18. What makes an art expert? Emotion and evaluation in art appreciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leder, Helmut; Gerger, Gernot; Brieber, David; Schwarz, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Why do some people like negative, or even disgusting and provocative artworks? Art expertise, believed to influence the interplay among cognitive and emotional processing underlying aesthetic experience, could be the answer. We studied how art expertise modulates the effect of positive-and negative-valenced artworks on aesthetic and emotional responses, measured with self-reports and facial electromyography (EMG). Unsurprisingly, emotionally-valenced art evoked coherent valence as well as corrugator supercilii and zygamoticus major activations. However, compared to non-experts, experts showed attenuated reactions, with less extreme valence ratings and corrugator supercilii activations and they liked negative art more. This pattern was also observed for a control set of International Affective Picture System (IAPS) pictures suggesting that art experts show general processing differences for visual stimuli. Thus, much in line with the Kantian notion that an aesthetic stance is emotionally distanced, art experts exhibited a distinct pattern of attenuated emotional responses.

  19. Mentorship in Medicine and Other Health Professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry-Noel, Nayanee; Bishop, Maria; Gwede, Clement K; Petkova, Ekaterina; Szumacher, Ewa

    2018-04-24

    Mentoring skills are valuable assets for academic medicine and allied health faculty, who influence and help shape the careers of the next generation of healthcare providers. Mentors are role models who also act as guides for students' personal and professional development over time. Mentors can be instrumental in conveying explicit academic knowledge required to master curriculum content. Importantly, they can enhance implicit knowledge about the "hidden curriculum" of professionalism, ethics, values, and the art of medicine not learned from texts. In many cases, mentors also provide emotional support and encouragement. It must be noted that to be an effective mentor, one must engage in ongoing learning in order to strengthen and further mentoring skills. Thus, learning communities can provide support, education, and personal development for the mentor. The relationship benefits mentors as well through greater productivity, career satisfaction, and personal gratification. Maximizing the satisfaction and productivity of such relationships entails self-awareness, focus, mutual respect, and explicit communication about the relationship. In this article, the authors describe the development of optimal mentoring relationships, emphasizing the importance of different approaches to mentorship, roles of the mentors and mentees, mentor and mentee benefits, interprofessional mentorships for teams, gender and mentorship, and culture and mentorship.

  20. Disability Art, Aesthetics, and Access: Creating Exhibitions in a Liberal Arts Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Cooley

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this essay we discuss the strategies and concepts behind two separate disability arts exhibitions we co-curated at Davidson College in 2009: RE/FORMATIONS: DISABILITY, WOMEN, AND SCULPTURE and STARING.  First, as curators who have mounted two disability arts exhibitions in the context of a small liberal arts college, we offer insights from our practical experience related to conceptualizing and producing a show focused around disability and art: its shape, funding, and display.  It is our hope these will be useful to curators, but also to those who have little or no curatorial experience.  Our comments will emphasize the context of the liberal arts college, but many of the central issues we confronted would be relevant to mounting such exhibitions in other settings.  Second, in discussing the dialogues about disability that emerged within and from our two exhibitions (RE/FORMATIONS: Disability, Women, and Sculpture and STARING, we want to provide some answers from our own experience to the question: what compelling issues and ideas emerge at the intersection of access, disability aesthetics, and art when creating such exhibitions?   Keywords: art, disability art, curator, curating disability, liberal arts college, exhibitions, disability aesthetics, RE/FORMATIONS, STARING, staring, Harriet Sanderson, Laura Splan, Nancy Fried, Judith Scott, Rebecca Horn, Doug Auld, Chris Rush, access, exhibition access, sculpture, breast cancer, intellectual disability, polio, burn survivors