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Sample records for medicine history of

  1. Lessons from the history of medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, John

    2008-01-01

    What is the point of teaching the history of medicine? Many historians and clinicians find it regrettable that some medical students today will graduate knowing almost nothing of such "greats" of the past as Hippocrates, Galen, Vesalius, Harvey, Lister, and Pasteur. But does this really matter? After all, traditional history of medicine curricula tended to distort medicine's past, omitting the countless errors, wrong turns, fads, blunders, and abuses, in order to tell the sanitized stories of a few scientific superheroes. Modern scholarship has seriously challenged most of these heroic dramas; few of our heroes were as farsighted, noble, or obviously correct as once thought. Joseph Lister, for example, turns out to have had filthy wards, whereas William Harvey was devoted to the Aristotelianism he was long said to have overthrown [1]. But as the history of medicine has become less romanticized, it has also become much more relevant, for it promises to impart useful lessons in the vital importance of scientific scepticism.

  2. [A study on medical history and historiography of medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen-Rui

    2011-09-01

    Medical history is the objective process of the development of medicine. Medicine historiography is the recording, interpretation and comments of this process. Historiography of medicine is often called medical history. By subject attribute, historiography of medicine belongs to history and could be divided into study on specific medical historiography (the objective ibeing medical history), historical materials on medicine (the objective is to offer reliable materials for specific medical historiography) and study on medical historiography (the objective being mthe historiography of medicine itself).

  3. Lessons of history in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Donald F

    2013-01-01

    The future of veterinary medicine is best understood in the context of history. What began as a profession rooted in urban centers in proximity to horses, physicians, and medical schools, was transformed into a land grant-based agricultural profession with the arrival of the internal combustion engine in the early twentieth century. Most of the United States' current veterinary colleges are still located in towns or small cities in the middle section of the country, outside the largest metropolitan areas where most veterinarians practice companion-animal medicine. Throughout veterinarian history, substantial numbers of US students have been educated in foreign colleges and this continues today, creating an even greater geographic imbalance between the veterinary educational process and US population centers and major medical schools. Three themes deserve special attention as we celebrate the profession's 150th anniversary. We must first move beyond the land-grant culture and develop a more geographically balanced approach to establishing new veterinary colleges that are also in closer association with schools of medicine and public health. We must also facilitate more opportunities for women leadership in organized veterinary medicine, in practice ownership, in academia, and in the corporate structures that educate, hire, and interface with veterinarians. Finally, we need to expand our understanding of One Health to include the concept of zooeyia (the role of animals in promoting human health), as well as continue to emphasize veterinarians' special roles in the control and management of zoonotic diseases and in advancing comparative medicine in the age of the genome.

  4. [Art and medicine, history of an encounter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borde, Frédéric

    2010-01-01

    Art has always been linked to healthcare and medicine: at the beginning of time, art was considered to be therapeutic. Over time, the dominance of religion and then the development of sciences and medicine deprived art of its therapeutic role, before it was reintroduced in the 19th century, with the rapid development of psychiatry. Today, art has found a new place in healthcare.

  5. [History of medicine by prof. Sebastian Girtlera].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryglewski, Ryszard W

    2014-01-01

    Sebastian Girtler (1767-1833), who later became rector of the Jagiellonian University is known primarily as a lecturer and author of several works of forensic medicine, police attention and veterinary medicine. Not so often we hear of him as a historian of medicine, subject of Girtler's interests, which had a lot of his attention and work. This text, to a significant extent based on archival materials, seeks to reconstruct the teaching program and analyses the content and methodology of the two works directly related to past of medical sciences, which had been written by Girtler himself.

  6. Directory of History of Medicine Collections (DHMC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Geographic Data Committee — The collections described in this Directory database provide research and reference services to scholars interested in the history of the health sciences. Some of...

  7. The place of avicenna in the history of medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosavi, Jamal

    2009-04-01

    Avicenna, a Muslim scientist of the tenth and eleventh centuries has an important place in the history of medicine in Iran and the world. Furthermore, the modern medicine is laid upon the infrastructure of his medicine. In this article, the position of Avicenna in the medical history and the scientific influence of his medical works in particular Al-Canon in the development of medical literature and medical educational programs have been studied in a historical approach. In reviewing the position of Avicenna in the history of medicine in the Islamic world and the Europe, it was concluded that during 11th to 17th centuries, the scientific and educational activities of medicine in the world were moving on the pivot of Avicenna medicine or was under its intensive influence.

  8. Medicine, 1450-1620, and the history of science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siraisi, Nancy G

    2012-09-01

    History of science and history of medicine are today largely organized as distinct disciplines, though ones widely recognized as interrelated. Attempts to evaluate the extent and nature of their relation have reached varying conclusions, depending in part on the historical period under consideration. This essay examines some characteristics of European medicine from the fifteenth to the early seventeenth century and considers their relevance for the history of science. Attention is given to the range of interests and activities of individuals trained in or practicing medicine, to the impact of changes in natural philosophy, to the role of observation, description, and accumulation of information, and to the exchange of knowledge among the medical community.

  9. Anesthesia and Pain Relief in the History of Islamic Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Alembizar, Faranak; Hosseinkhani, Ayda; Salehi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Since diseases and surgeries could be very painful, the annihilation of pain has been the most important goal of physicians. The history of Iranian-Islamic medicine includes distinguished physicians that attempted to find different methods of anesthesia. This research aims at reviewing approaches for anesthesia throughout the history of the Iranian-Islamic medicine, in order to identify a variety of drugs used during that period. Methods: In this research, the information was main...

  10. History of Science and Medicine in Turkish History Secondary School Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabag, S. Gulin

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, it is aimed to analyze the acquirements and topics in Turkish secondary school history textbooks that are published by the Ministry of National Education (MEB) and by the private sector to determine to what extend the place given to history of science and history of medicine. In the study, the document and content analysis…

  11. Teaching history of medicine in the perspective of "medical humanities".

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Engelhardt, D

    1999-03-01

    The current interest in philosophical questions and ethical aspects of medicine turns attention towards the past and obtains suggestions and perspectives from previous descriptions and interpretations of sickness, therapy, and the relation between the patient and physician. Culture as therapy and therapy as culture are fundamental challenges for the present; physician, patient, and society, i.e., humans and humane medicine, need this dialogue, which should also be constitutive for teaching history of medicine. Through the separation of the natural sciences and the humanities, modern progress of medicine has produced many benefits but has, at the same time, raised many problems. Negative consequences of this development exist not only for the patient, but also for his personal environment and for the physician. In the course of modern history, there have been several reactions aimed at overcoming these one-sided tendencies: in the Renaissance, in the epoch of Romanticism and Idealism, and at the beginning and the end of the 19th century. This article outlines, with historical examples and contemporary reflections, the concept of teaching history of medicine in the perspective of "medical humanities".

  12. Sketching together the modern histories of science, technology, and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickstone, John V

    2011-03-01

    This essay explores ways to "write together" the awkwardly jointed histories of "science" and "me dicine"--but it also includes other "arts" (in the old sense) and technologies. It draws especially on the historiography of medicine, but I try to use terms that are applicable across all of science, technology, and medicine (STM). I stress the variety of knowledges and practices in play at any time and the ways in which the ensembles change. I focus on the various relations of "science" and "medicine," as they were understood for a succession of periods--from mainly agricultural societies, through industrial societies, to our biomedical present--trying to sketch a history that encompasses daily practices and understandings as well as major conceptual and technical innovations. The model is meant to facilitate inquiry across topics and across times, including those to come.

  13. History and Perspectives of Nuclear Medicine in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Raihan

    2016-01-01

    Bangladesh is one of the smaller states in Asia. But it has a long and rich history of nuclear medicine for over sixty years. The progress in science and technology is always challenging in a developing country. In 1958, work for the first Nuclear Medicine facility was commenced in Dhaka in a tin-shed known as ‘Radioisotope Centre’ and was officially inaugurated in 1962. Since the late 50s of the last century nuclear medicine in Bangladesh has significantly progressed through the years in its course of development, but still the facilities are inadequate. At present there are 20 nuclear medicine establishments with 3 PET-CTs, 42 gamma camera/SPECTs with 95 physicians, 20 physicists, 10 radiochemists and 150 technologists. The Society of Nuclear Medicine, Bangladesh (SNMB) was formed in 1993 and publishing its official journal since 1997. Bangladesh also has close relationships with many international organizations like IAEA, ARCCNM, AOFNMB, ASNM, WFNMB and WARMTH. The history and the present scenario of the status of nuclear medicine in Bangladesh are being described here. PMID:27904875

  14. History and Perspectives of Nuclear Medicine in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Raihan

    2016-01-01

    Bangladesh is one of the smaller states in Asia. But it has a long and rich history of nuclear medicine for over sixty years. The progress in science and technology is always challenging in a developing country. In 1958, work for the first Nuclear Medicine facility was commenced in Dhaka in a tin-shed known as 'Radioisotope Centre' and was officially inaugurated in 1962. Since the late 50s of the last century nuclear medicine in Bangladesh has significantly progressed through the years in its course of development, but still the facilities are inadequate. At present there are 20 nuclear medicine establishments with 3 PET-CTs, 42 gamma camera/SPECTs with 95 physicians, 20 physicists, 10 radiochemists and 150 technologists. The Society of Nuclear Medicine, Bangladesh (SNMB) was formed in 1993 and publishing its official journal since 1997. Bangladesh also has close relationships with many international organizations like IAEA, ARCCNM, AOFNMB, ASNM, WFNMB and WARMTH. The history and the present scenario of the status of nuclear medicine in Bangladesh are being described here.

  15. History of medicine and history of ideas: from Sigerist to Canguilhem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Santos Almeida

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Historians of philosophy and historiography have consistently neglected the relevance of Henry E. Sigerist's works on history of medicine to Canguilhem's conception of the historicization of the sciences. This article aims to shed some light on the intellectual circumstances that connected two of the last century's most important historians of medicine, by following the influence of Sigerist's book Introduction à la Médecine upon Canguilhem's historical technique of the investigation of medical thought.

  16. Origins and canons: medicine and the history of sociology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collyer, Fran

    2010-01-01

    Differing accounts are conventionally given of the origins of medical sociology and its parent discipline sociology. These distinct "histories" are justified on the basis that the sociological founders were uninterested in medicine, mortality and disease. This article challenges these "constructions" of the past, proposing the theorization of health not as a "late development of sociology" but an integral part of its formation. Drawing on a selection of key sociological texts, it is argued that evidence of the founders' sustained interest in the infirmities of the individual, of mortality, and in medicine, have been expunged from the historical record through processes of "canonization" and "medicalization."

  17. Text Mining the History of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Paul; Batista-Navarro, Riza Theresa; Kontonatsios, Georgios; Carter, Jacob; Toon, Elizabeth; McNaught, John; Timmermann, Carsten; Worboys, Michael; Ananiadou, Sophia

    2016-01-01

    Historical text archives constitute a rich and diverse source of information, which is becoming increasingly readily accessible, due to large-scale digitisation efforts. However, it can be difficult for researchers to explore and search such large volumes of data in an efficient manner. Text mining (TM) methods can help, through their ability to recognise various types of semantic information automatically, e.g., instances of concepts (places, medical conditions, drugs, etc.), synonyms/variant forms of concepts, and relationships holding between concepts (which drugs are used to treat which medical conditions, etc.). TM analysis allows search systems to incorporate functionality such as automatic suggestions of synonyms of user-entered query terms, exploration of different concepts mentioned within search results or isolation of documents in which concepts are related in specific ways. However, applying TM methods to historical text can be challenging, according to differences and evolutions in vocabulary, terminology, language structure and style, compared to more modern text. In this article, we present our efforts to overcome the various challenges faced in the semantic analysis of published historical medical text dating back to the mid 19th century. Firstly, we used evidence from diverse historical medical documents from different periods to develop new resources that provide accounts of the multiple, evolving ways in which concepts, their variants and relationships amongst them may be expressed. These resources were employed to support the development of a modular processing pipeline of TM tools for the robust detection of semantic information in historical medical documents with varying characteristics. We applied the pipeline to two large-scale medical document archives covering wide temporal ranges as the basis for the development of a publicly accessible semantically-oriented search system. The novel resources are available for research purposes, while

  18. History of geriatric medicine: from Hippocrates to Marjory Warren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritch, A

    2012-01-01

    It is widely assumed that geriatric medicine was an invention of the twentieth century. However, from the time of Hippocrates, there has been interest in the prolongation of the lifespan, the maintenance of health in old age and agerelated disease patterns. The debate about whether old age was a natural phenomenon or a disease state was not resolved until the nineteenth century. Calls for medicine relating to old age to be recognised as a discrete entity at the time when medical specialisation was developing were disregarded until the second half of the twentieth century. This review discusses the history of the theories of ageing and of disease and the practice of medicine for older people from the classical period up to Marjory Warren's initiative in London in 1935 and the development of geriatrics as a medical specialty.

  19. Medicinal plants of the Russian Pharmacopoeia; their history and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikov, Alexander N; Pozharitskaya, Olga N; Makarov, Valery G; Wagner, Hildebert; Verpoorte, Rob; Heinrich, Michael

    2014-07-03

    Due to the location of Russia between West and East, Russian phytotherapy has accumulated and adopted approaches that originated in European and Asian traditional medicine. Phytotherapy is an official and separate branch of medicine in Russia; thus, herbal medicinal preparations are considered official medicaments. The aim of the present review is to summarize and critically appraise data concerning plants used in Russian medicine. This review describes the history of herbal medicine in Russia, the current situation and the pharmacological effects of specific plants in the Russian Pharmacopoeia that are not included in the European Pharmacopoeia. Based on the State Pharmacopoeia of the USSR (11(th) edition), we selected plant species that have not yet been adopted in Western and Central Europe (e.g., selected for inclusion in the European Pharmacopoeia) and systematically searched the scientific literature for data using library catalogs, the online service E-library.ru, and databases such as Medline/Pubmed, Scopus, and the Web of Science regarding species, effectiveness, pharmacological effects, and safety. The Russian Federation follows the State Pharmacopoeia of the USSR (11(th) edition), which contains 83 individual plant monographs. Fifty-one of these plants are also found in the European Pharmacopoeia and have been well studied, but 32 plants are found only in the Pharmacopoeia of the USSR. Many articles about these medicinal plants were never translated in English, and much of the information collected by Russian scientists has never been made available to the international community. Such knowledge can be applied in future studies aimed at a safe, evidence-based use of traditional Russian medicinal plants in European and global phytopharmacotherapy as well as for the discovery of novel leads for drug development. The review highlights the therapeutic potential of these Russian phytopharmaceuticals but also highlights cases where concern has been raised

  20. [The Theory and Trend of Microhistory: History of Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sul, Heasim

    2015-08-01

    Microhistory, first developed in the 1970s, is the study of the past on a very small scale applying zoom-in methodology. Although microhistory had been introduced to Korea during the late 1990s, there still exists much of misunderstanding and confusions surrounding its nature. Microhistory is to be distinguished from the monographs which deal with petty subject, or from the history of everyday life, and from the case studies. In the field of the history of medicine, there are not many microhistories proper. Several works that claim to utilize microhistorical approach, could not be categorized as microhistory because they carry strong characteristics of macrohistory, specifically those of the disciplinary history or the case studies. The well known work of Harold J. Cook, Trials of an Ordinary Doctor, is not an exception. These studies fail to materialize the critical mind of microhistory that pursues to write a history from below and to restore the agency of obscure people. However, Guido Ruggiero's "The Strange Death of Margarita Marcellini," David Cressy's Travesties and Transgressions in Tudor and Stuart England, and Laurel Thatcher Ulrich's A Midwife's Tale clearly demonstrate the attributes, characteristics, and methodologies of microhistory. These studies well display the emphasis of microhistory, which reveal the complexity of early modern medicine, and the complicated function of individual relationships within each and every social setting. Recently, some scholars begin to suggest that the rigid definition of microhistory should be softened, arguing that there could be various types of microhistory. The history of medicine has many advantage of aptly applying many virtues of microhistory: the de-territoriality of diseases, the peculiar elements of the training and practice in hospitals and medical schools which call for anthropological survey, and the possibility of utilizing doctor's records that contain the confessions of the patients. Also, medical

  1. [The history of medicine in the ancient time].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesarová, Drahomíra

    2012-01-01

    This article deals with the history of medicine in the ancient Greece; from the cult of the God Asklepios, to the founder of the scientific rational medicine, Hippokrates. The humoral theory of Hippokrates is explained (the human body consists from four liquids) and his ideal of a physician's approach to a patient is emphasized. In the Hellenistic period the medical development continued in the Alexandria Medical School (Herofilos and Erasistratos). At first, not much attention was given to medicine and scientific health prevention in ancient Rome. Only 293 AD have physicians from Greece first been invited to Rome--e.g. Asklepiades. During the reign of C. lulius Caesar, foreigners, who engaged in medical practice, were granted Roman citizenship and thanks to a number of benefits the medical condition in Roman Empire blossomed. Medical clinics (iatreia), infirmaries (valetudinaria) and, under the influence of Christianity, hospitals were established. In the 2nd century AD ancient medicine reached its climax with physician Galenos, who created the entire system of medical science and became the most significant, but also last medical figure of ancient Rome.

  2. History, Medicine, and Culture: History for Science Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balog, C. Edward

    1980-01-01

    Describes college level history course entitled "Healers and Persons" for undergraduate medicine students. Topics include Greek medicine and Hippocrates, Galen of Pergamum, Islamic and Roman culture, medieval medicine, the Renaissance, Harvey, Pasteur, Lister, and Mendel. (KC)

  3. Anesthesia and Pain Relief in the History of Islamic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alembizar, Faranak; Hosseinkhani, Ayda; Salehi, Alireza

    2016-05-01

    Since diseases and surgeries could be very painful, the annihilation of pain has been the most important goal of physicians. The history of Iranian-Islamic medicine includes distinguished physicians that attempted to find different methods of anesthesia. This research aims at reviewing approaches for anesthesia throughout the history of the Iranian-Islamic medicine, in order to identify a variety of drugs used during that period. In this research, the information was mainly collected from medical history, traditional literature and various search engines (e.g. Google Scholar, PubMed, Medline, Scopus, SIDS and NoorMags). The search keywords were Anesthetic, Tbnj (sedation), Tnvym (sedative), and Hypnotic. Finally, a detailed analytical study was performed on all notes and the results were presented. Mohammad Ibn-Zakaria Al-Razi (known to the Western world as Razes) in the 10th century was the first physician who used general inhalation for anesthesia in surgeries. Drugs used to relieve pain and anesthesia can be divided into two categories: (i) single drug and (ii) compound drugs. Usually, these are consumed by eating, drinking, inhalation, or as topical. Drugs such as Hemlock, Mandrake, Henbane, Hyocyamus, Mandragora, Loiseuria, Opium Poppy, and Black Nightshade were used. Beyond these herbs, Aghili (18 th century) in his book "Makhzan al-adviyah" also explained the topical application of ice for pain management. The choice for the type of medication and its form of consumption is commensurate to pain and the speed by which the drug has an effect. Anesthesia was usually done in two ways: (i) using a substance called "Mokhader" which was consumed via the mouth or nose, and (ii) "Tnvym" which means putting a patient to sleep to block the sensation of pain. Typically, anesthesia methods and drug recipes were kept as secret to prevent misuse and abuse by unauthorized people. Based on our study, Islamic physicians proposed inspiring methods in using drugs for anesthesia

  4. [Brief history of education of Mongolian medicine 1947-1977].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, H X; Zhen, Y

    2017-03-28

    From 1947 to 1977, the education of Mongolian medicine was developed to a certain degree, in different levels and different forms with attribute of modern education. Through opening training school and class, the traditional Mongolian practitioners and its education are standardized and its levels elevated. In addition, by means of medical colleges and health schools, Mongolian medical talents of different types at different levels were cultivated. All of them were at the forefront of the development of Mongolian medicine later. In 1958, the first undergraduate education, a Department of Sino-Mongolian Medicine was set up in Inner Mongolia Medical College, marking the development of beginning of the higher education of Mongolian medicine. Therefore, Mongolian medicine was the forerunner of higher education of Chinese minority medicine.

  5. [A brief history of traditional Chinese medicinal pills].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X; Lu, X; Zhu, J P

    2016-05-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine pill, an archaic medicinal preparation form, is a kind of spherical or spherical-like preparation form produced by medicinal powders or extracts mixed with appropriate excipient or other accessories. It was originated in the Pre-Qin Dynasty, developed and enriched from the Han Dynasty to the Ming and Qing Dynasties. With the improvement of preparing process, honeyed pill, waxed pill, coating pill and wax-coating pill etc. appeared in succession. In modern times, with the progress of pharmaceutical machine, the medicinal pill is innovated constantly, and at present, it becomes the main form of Chinese patent medicine with batch production.

  6. Dr Ivan Pintar and his contribution to the development of history of medicine in Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupanic Slavec, Z

    1999-03-01

    The Medical School of the Ljubljana University has a long lasting tradition in teaching the history of medicine. Since 1934, all students of medicine and dentistry in Slovenia have attended the courses in history of medicine which were and still are mandatory. The first years of lectures on the history of medicine at the Ljubljana University Medical School coincided with the struggle for the establishment and recognition of a full medical curriculum in Slovenia. Dr Ivan Pintar (1888-1963), the first lecturer of the history of medicine (1934-1963), was a man of great ethical and national values and an ardent advocate for the promotion of Slovene contribution to medical culture in Slovenia, former Yugoslavia, and Europe. Pintar's concept of history of medicine included general historical, sociological, ethical, cultural, psychological, biotechnical, and other aspects. During 30 years of his endeavors, he did a pioneer work in the research on the history of medicine in Slovenia. For many years he was the editor of the Medical Chamber Bulletin, chairman of the Slovene Medical Society, and the founder of the Section for the History of Medicine in 1951. He wrote the first Slovene textbook on the history of medicine and published many articles on prominent physicians from Slovenia. He paved the way for the new generation of medical historians in Slovenia. Owing to him, contemporary Slovene physicians and dentists are aware of the importance of professional tradition. They know how to use the past experiences for new achievements.

  7. Overcoming strategy to strengthen the History of Medicine in Santiago of Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Durán-Fonseca

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A strategy of improvement in the Medical Sciences is proposed, integrated to the performance of every teacher that forms part of the Cuban educational system associated with health. The overcoming of the teachers of Medical Sciences in History of Medicine, takes into account the new conceptions and demands of the training of the doctor at present, for what constitutes a challenge from recognizing that the History of Medicine is not a appendix of Medicine, or History, but with its own legitimacy erected in science synthesis with structural and methodological architecture, deduced by the independent position that Medicine occupies in the set of Natural and Humanistic sciences.

  8. History and Perspectives of Nuclear Medicine in Myanmar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Win Mar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear Medicine was established in Myanmar in 1963 by Dr Soe Myint and International Atomic Energy expert Dr R. Hochel at Yangon General Hospital. Nuclear medicine diagnostic and therapeutic services started with Probe Scintillation Detector Systems and rectilinear scanner. In the early stage, many Nuclear Medicine specialists from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA spent some time in Myanmar and made significant contributions to the development of Nuclear Medicine in our country. The department participated in various IAEA technical cooperation projects and regional cooperation projects. By the late 1990s, new centers were established in Mandalay, Naypyidaw, and North Okkalapa Teaching Hospital of University of Medicine 11, Yangon. The training program related to Nuclear Medicine includes a postgraduate master’s degree (three years at the University of Medicine. Currently, all centers are equipped with SPECT, SPECT-CT, PET-CT, and cyclotron in Yangon General Hospital. Up until now, the International Atomic Energy Agency has been playing a crucial role in the growth and development of Nuclear Medicine in Myanmar. Our vision is to provide a wide spectrum of nuclear medicine services at a level compatible with the international standards to become a Center of Excellence.

  9. History and Perspectives of Nuclear Medicine in Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mar, Win

    2018-01-01

    Nuclear Medicine was established in Myanmar in 1963 by Dr Soe Myint and International Atomic Energy expert Dr R. Hochel at Yangon General Hospital. Nuclear medicine diagnostic and therapeutic services started with Probe Scintillation Detector Systems and rectilinear scanner. In the early stage, many Nuclear Medicine specialists from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) spent some time in Myanmar and made significant contributions to the development of Nuclear Medicine in our country. The department participated in various IAEA technical cooperation projects and regional cooperation projects. By the late 1990s, new centers were established in Mandalay, Naypyidaw, and North Okkalapa Teaching Hospital of University of Medicine 11, Yangon. The training program related to Nuclear Medicine includes a postgraduate master's degree (three years) at the University of Medicine. Currently, all centers are equipped with SPECT, SPECT-CT, PET-CT, and cyclotron in Yangon General Hospital. Up until now, the International Atomic Energy Agency has been playing a crucial role in the growth and development of Nuclear Medicine in Myanmar. Our vision is to provide a wide spectrum of nuclear medicine services at a level compatible with the international standards to become a Center of Excellence.

  10. [The trend and prospect of studies in the modern history of medicine in Korea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yunjae

    2010-06-30

    The Korean Journal of Medical History published in 1992 provides spaces for publication to medical historians who have been growing increasingly since the 1990s, thereby stimulating studies in the modern history of medicine in Korea. Through research published in the Korean Journal of Medical History and other journals, the course through which medicine in Korea in the modern times has been formed and the content of medicine that composed that course are elucidated. This article concludes that the various research tend to posit the view that the modern history of medicine in Korea evolves through a process of accommodation with Western medicine rather than being a complete transplantation of Western medicine, and describes medicine as it is viewed by consumers rather than the operators of medicine. How government power or colonial power utilized medicine in order to stabilize their rule is also a common theme. Now, it is come time to interrogate the viewpoints and analytical methods of medical history studies. Given that medicine is one area that drives changes in Korea in contemporary times, the outcomes obtained through this field can be sufficiently utilized when studying other areas. For instance, agony over the modernity of missionary medicine being studied recently provides meaningful implications in understanding the modernity of Korea. However, the importance of substantiation should not be overlooked as theories not supported by thorough documentary evidence are weak.

  11. The light of emergency medicine: Vietnam-the next chapter in the global history of emergency medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, Robert E

    2011-04-01

    The following is the keynote address to the First Emergency Medicine Conference in Vietnam, held in the historic city of Hue, March 22-26, 2010. This presentation reviewed the global history of emergency medicine (EM) and presented the need for the establishment of EM residency programs in Vietnam in a culturally sensitive manner. Immediately following this presentation, the Deputy Minister of Health for Vietnam announced recognition of EM as a specialty in Vietnam, and the establishment of EM residency programs, with the first starting October 1, 2010, in association with the Hue College of Medicine. © 2011 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  12. History, aims and present structure of psychosomatic medicine in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deter, Hans-Christian; Kruse, Johannes; Zipfel, Stephan

    2018-01-01

    Combining its two traditions of integrated psychosomatics in internal medicine and focusing on psychotherapeutic/psychiatric methods in many clinical fields, German psychosomatic medicine has developed well over the last decades. It benefits from its institutional independence and the progressive changes in health care. Clinically, disorder-oriented psychotherapy is a core method integrated with other modes of therapy. As a conceptual base for empirical research, non-reductionist accounts of the interactions of (sick) persons with their environment are most important. Germany has developed a model of Psychosomatic Medicine that has conceptualized and integrated psychotherapeutic methods into clinical practice and realized one way to practice bio-psycho-social medicine in the health care system of the country.

  13. [The Cheiron emblem and Cheiron medal of the World Association for the History of Veterinary Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochmann, E H

    2001-01-01

    In 1964 the first symposium on history of veterinary medicine was organised in Hanover by the section "History of Veterinary Medicine" of the German Society of Veterinary Medicine. During the 6th symposium in Hanover the World Association for the History of Veterinary Medicine (WAHVM) was created. In the following years further symposiums, called later on congresses took place almost every year. In 2001 the 32nd congress will be held. The Association gave herself in 1973 a distinguishing mark, the Cheiron Emblem. Sixteen years later, the Cheiron Medal was endowed to allow the World Association to express thanks and acknowledgement for special achievements in the field of history of veterinary medicine. The Cheiron Medal was bestowed for the first time on May 26th, 1989.

  14. [Historical studies and medicine. A study in Swedish doctoral thesis concerning history of medicine 1970-2004].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qvarsell, Roger

    2006-01-01

    This article is a study in ninety doctoral thesis published in Sweden between 1970 and 2004 concerning history of the science of medicine and hospital care, patients and practicioners, causes of death and public health, doctors and nurses, health movements and lay medicine and other aspects of the history of medicine. A quantitative part of the study shows that most thesis have been written at departments of history or history of ideas, but sociological and mulitdisciplinary studies are also rather common. Only six of the thesis have been written at departments within the medical faculties. The second half of the 19th and the first half of the 20th centuries has been investigated more often than other historical periods. More than ninety percent of the thesis has been published in Swedish and concerns history of medicine in Sweden. A wide range of methods and theories has been used and history of medicine does not as a field deviate from historical research in general in this respect. A chronological bibliography of the ninety thesis ends the article.

  15. Perspective: Teaching and mentoring the history of medicine: an Oslerian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Charles S; Longo, Lawrence D

    2013-01-01

    Many predict a takeover (seen by some as hostile, and by others as inadvertent) of professional virtues and values by government and capitalism. One source of professional virtues and values consists of lessons from the history of medicine as taught and mentored by Sir William Osler. Some medical schools have required courses in medical history, but proposing a new requirement would probably be a tough sell to most curriculum committees. Osler himself argued against compulsory courses in medical history. The authors propose that exposing medical students to the history of medicine promotes at least two of the seven types of professionalism identified by Hafferty and Castellani. Exposure to the evolution of medical science and to exemplary physicians of bygone eras promotes nostalgic professionalism, which, although in some ways suspect and naïve, fosters a sense of belonging and solidarity as members of a profession, not a trade, whereas exposure to the evolution of medicine as a public service, to the sad history of health care disparities, and to patients' perspectives promotes activist professionalism, fostering a sense of civic responsibility and opposition to excessive commercialism.Steps to promote such exposure include (1) identifying faculty, community physicians, and others interested in the history of medicine, (2) including the history of medicine in faculty development programs, (3) considering a segment in the history of medicine during the introduction to each major course, (4) sponsoring history clubs, and (5) promoting environments favorable for mentor-protégé relationships for faculty and students with further interest.

  16. [Trends in research on the history of medicine in Korea before the modern era].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dongwon

    2010-06-30

    Research on the history of medicine in Korea in the form of modern scholarship began with the publication in 1930 of Yi Neunghwa's "A History of the Development of Medicine in Korea." The purpose of the present study lies in surveying studies on the history of medicine in Korea in the past 80 years since the publication of Yi's paper. In terms of periodization, research on the history of medicine in Korea is bifurcated by the publication of two comprehensive histories-i. e., Miki Sakae's A History of Medicine and Disease in Korea (1963) and Kim Du-jong's The Complete History of Medicine in Korea (1966). Indeed, all earlier studies converged in these two books. Because Miki and Kim both had majored in Western medicine and conducted research based on similar perspectives, data, and methods, the two works overlap considerably, and Kim's book, as the later of the two, unfortunately lost the initiative to the former to a considerable extent. As a result of these two scholars' research, it became possible to trace the overall flow of the history of medicine in Korea. Following the publication of works by Miki and Kim and with the advent of the 1980's, research on the history of medicine in premodern Korea was renovated with the emergence of no fewer than some dozen new doctoral degree holders in the field. In fact, these young scholars went beyond surveying trends in each era to expand the scope of specific discussions and topics per era, to delve into the actual contents, and to elucidate the function of medicine in society. The fruits of studies conducted in the past 80 years on the history of medicine in premodern Korea can be summarized as follows. 1) before the 5th century AD: the existence of a comprehensive medical practice in regions inhabited by those considered to be the ancestors of the Korean people; and information on medication including ginseng. 2) 5th-10th centuries: the existence of professional medical posts; the management of medicine by the royal

  17. Medicinal Use of Cannabis: History and Current Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold Kalant

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To provide an overview of the history and pharmacology of cannabis in relation to current scientific knowledge concerning actual and potential therapeutic uses of cannabis preparations and pure cannabinoids.

  18. Comparison of Patient Health History Questionnaires Used in General Internal and Family Medicine, Integrative Medicine, and Complementary and Alternative Medicine Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laube, Justin G R; Shapiro, Martin F

    2017-05-01

    Health history questionnaires (HHQs) are a set of self-administered questions completed by patients prior to a clinical encounter. Despite widespread use, minimal research has evaluated the content of HHQs used in general internal medicine and family medicine (GIM/FM), integrative medicine, and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM; chiropractic, naturopathic, and Traditional Chinese Medicine [TCM]) clinics. Integrative medicine and CAM claim greater emphasis on well-being than does GIM/FM. This study investigated whether integrative medicine and CAM clinics' HHQs include more well-being content and otherwise differ from GIM/FM HHQs. HHQs were obtained from GIM/FM (n = 9), integrative medicine (n = 11), naturopathic medicine (n = 5), chiropractic (n = 4), and TCM (n = 7) clinics in California. HHQs were coded for presence of medical history (chief complaint, past medical history, social history, family history, surgeries, hospitalizations, medications, allergies, review of systems), health maintenance procedures (immunization, screenings), and well-being components (nutrition, exercise, stress, sleep, spirituality). In HHQs of GIM/FM clinics, the average number of well-being components was 1.4 (standard deviation [SD], 1.4) compared with 4.0 (SD, 1.1) for integrative medicine (p medicine (p = 0.04), 2.0 (SD, 1.4) for chiropractic (p = 0.54), and 2.0 (SD, 1.5) for TCM (p = 0.47). In HHQs of GIM/FM clinics, the average number of medical history components was 6.4 (SD, 1.9) compared with 8.3 (SD, 1.2) for integrative medicine (p = 0.01), 9.0 (SD, 0) for naturopathic medicine (p = 0.01), 7.1 (SD, 2.8) for chiropractic (p = 0.58), and 7.1 (SD, 1.7) for TCM (p = 0.41). Integrative and naturopathic medicine HHQs included significantly more well-being and medical history components than did GIM/FM HHQs. Further investigation is warranted to determine the optimal HHQ content to support the clinical and preventive

  19. The History of "Exercise Is Medicine" in Ancient Civilizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, Charles M.

    2014-01-01

    In 2007, the American College of Sports Medicine, with endorsement from the American Medical Association and the Office of the Surgeon General, launched a global initiative to mobilize physicians, healthcare professionals and providers, and educators to promote exercise in their practice or activities to prevent, reduce, manage, or treat diseases…

  20. A glance at the history of nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, S.

    1995-01-01

    The development of nuclear medicine has resulted in several effective routine methods in diagnosis and therapy. There is an ongoing discussion about the future of the activity based on the fast development of ultrasound, CT and MR. In such discussions, it is often forgotten that nuclear medicine is also a dynamic diagnostic tool under continuous progress. As seen from this historical review, nuclear medicine has grown from quite simple in vitro tests to very advanced methods to image organ function. This is the result of the development of radiopharmaceuticals and instrumentation. Today, development is moving towards what is called receptor scintigraphy, i.e., the use of radiopharmaceuticals which are very specific to certain diseases, for instance, tumours. Even at present there is no other method to determine the regional myocardial blood flow both at stress and at rest, than myocardial scintigraphy. Nuclear medicine will remain an important diagnostic tool as long as it employs people with engagement and interest. Such people will also guarantee that the hospital management will supply the activity with funds for the necessary investments. (orig.)

  1. Hare-lip surgery in the history of traditional Chinese medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, K.

    2000-01-01

    There have been a few articles published in Chinese and English on hare-lip surgery in the history of traditional Chinese medicine. They are brief and some of them are inaccurate, although two recent English articles on this subject have presented an adequate picture on some aspects.' This article offers unreported information and evidence of both congenital and traumatic hare-lip surgery in the history of traditional Chinese medicine and also clarifies and corrects some of the...

  2. The history of "Exercise Is Medicine" in ancient civilizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, Charles M

    2014-06-01

    In 2007, the American College of Sports Medicine, with endorsement from the American Medical Association and the Office of the Surgeon General, launched a global initiative to mobilize physicians, healthcare professionals and providers, and educators to promote exercise in their practice or activities to prevent, reduce, manage, or treat diseases that impact health and the quality of life in humans. Emerging from this initiative, termed Exercise Is Medicine, has been an extensively documented position stand by the American College of Sports Medicine that recommended healthy adults perform 150 min of moderate dynamic exercise per week. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the foundation for this global initiative and its exercise prescription for health and disease prevention has roots that began in antiquity more than two millennia ago. Individuals and concepts to remember are that Susruta of India was the first “recorded” physician to prescribe moderate daily exercise, Hippocrates of Greece was the first “recorded” physician to provide a written exercise prescription for a patient suffering from consumption, and the global influence of Galen from Rome combined with his recommendation on the use of exercise for patients in the management of disease prevailed until the 16th century. Historically intertwined with these concepts was exercise being advocated by select physicians to minimize the health problems associated with obesity, diabetes, and inactivity.

  3. Application of oral history to contemporary history of medicine in Korea: with a focus on medical scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ock-Joo

    2013-08-01

    The oral history helps researchers to fill the gap in historical documents in research on the contemporary history of medicine in Korea. More and more studies in history of contemporary medicine in Korea have come out using oral history of doctors and patients. Based upon the author's research on development of neurosurgery in late 20th century Korea, this paper discusses how to apply oral history to contemporary history of medicine, focusing on oral history of doctors in Korea. In this paper the author describes how to do and use oral history of key doctors and medical scientists in the contemporary history of medicine in Korea. The oral history can be a powerful tool to complement the written documents as following. First, from their interview, doctors and medical scientists often provide valuable information which historians cannot get from documents and written sources. As intelligent interviewees, they not only understand the purpose of research but also help actively the historianresearcher- interviewer. Second, the oral history facilitates further searches and often it leads to more findings of informants, and written and image material. More often than not, doctors and medical scientists do their own research on the topic and provide the historian with valuable historical source material from their laboratories, bedsides, family and friends. Third, interviews with medical scientists and oral material produced by doctors and medical scientists helped the researcher to understand and interpret the papers and written documents. Fourth, the subjective stories told by the medical scientists provide perspectives and historical source as narrative truth. Before a historian attempts to use the oral material as complementary historial evidence, he or she needs to cross-check the validity and of objectivity of the oral material. Oral material is produced through bidirectional intersubjective interaction between the interviewer and interviewee, and critical reflection

  4. Globalizing the history of disease, medicine, and public health in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Mariola

    2013-12-01

    The history of Latin America, the history of disease, medicine, and public health, and global history are deeply intertwined, but the intersection of these three fields has not yet attracted sustained attention from historians. Recent developments in the historiography of disease, medicine, and public health in Latin America suggest, however, that a distinctive, global approach to the topic is beginning to emerge. This essay identifies the distinguishing characteristic of this approach as an attentiveness to transfers of contagions, cures, and medical knowledge from Latin America to the rest of the world and then summarizes a few episodes that demonstrate its promise. While national as well as colonial and neocolonial histories of Latin America have made important contributions to our understanding, works taking the global approach have the potential to contribute more directly to the decentering of the global history of disease, medicine, and public health.

  5. Life atomic a history of radioisotopes in science and medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Creager, Angela N H

    2013-01-01

    After World War II, the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) began mass-producing radioisotopes, sending out nearly 64,000 shipments of radioactive materials to scientists and physicians by 1955. Even as the atomic bomb became the focus of Cold War anxiety, radioisotopes represented the government's efforts to harness the power of the atom for peace-advancing medicine, domestic energy, and foreign relations.             In Life Atomic, Angela N. H. Creager tells the story of how these radioisotopes, which were simultaneously scientific tools and political icons, transformed biomedicine and ecolog

  6. Sleepwalking through history: medicine, arts, and courts of law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umanath, Sharda; Sarezky, Daniel; Finger, Stanley

    2011-10-01

    Somnambulism, or sleepwalking, has always been of interest to theologians, writers, philosophers, physicians, and others fascinated by unusual behaviors. This parasomnia, which was defined less precisely in the past than it is today, has long been featured in medical dissertations and books of medicine. Further, Shakespeare, Bellini, and Brown, among others, incorporated it into their plays, operas, and novels. Because some somnambulists turned violent and committed other acts detrimental to society, sleepwalking also demanded attention from legal systems, and guidelines were set for whether somnambulists could be held responsible for their actions. This historical review focuses on these developments pertaining to somnambulism through the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries.

  7. History of space medicine: the formative years at NASA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Charles A; Hoffler, G Wyckliffe; Jernigan, Clarence A; Kerwin, Joseph P; Mohler, Stanley R

    2009-04-01

    Almost nothing was known about the effects of spaceflight on human physiology when, in May of 1961, President John F. Kennedy committed the United States to land a man on the Moon and return him safely to Earth within the decade. There were more questions than answers regarding the effects of acceleration, vibration, cabin pressure, CO2 concentration, and microgravity. There were known external threats to life, such as solar and ultraviolet radiation, meteorites, and extreme temperatures as well as issues for which the physicians and scientists could not even formulate the questions. And there was no time for controlled experiments with the required numbers of animal or human subjects. Of necessity, risks were evaluated and mitigated or accepted based on minimal data. This article summarizes presentations originally given as a panel at the 79th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Aerospace Medical Association in Boston in 2008. In it, five pioneers in space medicine at NASA looked back on the development of their field. The authors related personal anecdotes, discussed the roles of various people and presented examples of contributions to emerging U.S. initiatives for human spaceflight. Topics included the development of quarantine facilities for returning Apollo astronauts, the struggles between operational medicine and research personnel, and observations from the first U.S. medical officer to experience weightlessness on orbit. Brief biographies of the authors are appended to document their participation in these historic events.

  8. Sin and pleasure: the history of chocolate in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, Donatella

    2015-11-18

    In ancient Mayan texts cocoa is considered a gift of the gods: Pre-Columbian populations used chocolate as medicine, too. After the discovery of America, chocolate was introduced in Europe, but Christian Europe looked to this new exhilarating drink with extreme suspiciousness and criticism. From this reaction, the necessity derived to appeal to the reasons of health, with which doctors and scientists committed themselves to explain that chocolate was good for the body. However, during the Enlightment, the road of therapy separated from that of taste, and chocolate mainly maintained its leading role of excipient, bearing the burden, over time, of a negative valence, being associated with obesity, dental problems, unhealthy lifestyle, and so forth. The rehabilitation of chocolate has arisen only in recent times, re-establishing that value that Linnaeus himself credited to chocolate, calling the generous plant Theobroma cacao, food of the gods.

  9. [History of the split between medicine and surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez S, Hernán; Parada R, Jerónimo; Cortés S, Cristián; Zúñigar, Sergio

    2013-03-01

    This paper summarizes historical and philosophical aspects, from Ancient Greece to the Middle Ages, concerning the split between physicians and surgeons that began to take place in Alexandria. When exploring the changes in classical medical thought and its influence on philosophy, we conclude that this historical moment was marked by a dual distinction between an essential being and a body subjected to becoming. From a unified mind in Hippocrates, in which medicine is based in knowledge of the relations, subjected to laws, of the organism exposed to natural forces Φνσις (physis among the Jonics), a rift amongst body and soul is conceived, specifically in Platonic thought, from which the surgical intervention of the body is considered improper of the medical art.

  10. A tale of Congress, continuing medical education, and the history of medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partin, Clyde; Kushner, Howard I; Horton, Mary E Kollmer

    2014-04-01

    Well-intentioned attempts by the Senate Finance Committee to improve the content and quality of continuing medical education (CME) offerings had the unanticipated consequence of decimating academically oriented history of medicine conferences. New guidelines intended to keep CME courses free of commercial bias from the pharmaceutical industry were worded in a fashion that caused CME officials at academic institutions to be reluctant to offer CME credit for history of medicine gatherings. At the 2013 annual conference of the American Association for the History of Medicine, we offered a novel solution for determining CME credit in line with current guidelines. We asked attendees to provide narrative critiques for each presentation for which they desired CME credit. In this essay, we evaluate the efficacy of this approach.

  11. [The history and perspective of gender-specific medicine in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimokawa, Hiroaki

    2015-04-01

    The history of gender-specific medicine started when Barbara Seaman, a female American journalist, started the women's health movement in 1957. Since then, the National Institutes of Health(NIH) and the Food and Drug Administration(FDA) have promoted gender-specific medicine in USA, including the Women's Health Initiative(WHI) by NIH in 1991 and the Office on Women's Health(OWH) by FDA in 1995. In Japan, being stimulated by the movements in USA, Dr. Chuwa Tei founded Japan' s first women' s clinic in Kagoshima University in 2001, and Dr. Keiko Amano founded the Association for Gender-Specific Medicine in 2004. These activities developed into the establishment of the Japanese Association for Gender-Specific Medicine in 2008, for which Dr.Tei served as the first president for 4 years, followed by Hiroaki Shimokawa since 2012. Furthermore, the importance of gender-specific medicine has been emerging worldwide, resulting in the establishment of International Society of Gender Medicine in 2012. Indeed, the history of gender-specific medicine is 60 years worldwide and is only 15 years in Japan. However, gender-specific medicine will become more and more important not only in medicine but also in the whole society.

  12. The contribution, history, impact and future of physics in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Steve

    2009-01-01

    This is an "Opinion" or "Commentary" text to support the Invited Opening Plenary Lecture of the NACP2008 Conference. It is an outrageously broad title, that I have been given, and I have made selections for the focus of the lecture and for this report. I observe a research methodology in medical physics whereby key developments have come from standing on the shoulders of those who have come before and I illustrate this by the invention of x-ray computed tomography and the development of intensity-modulated radiation therapy. The equally key role of somewhat maligned incremental science is also discussed. Some commentary is made on the enormous range of activities in medicine to which medical physicists have contributed. Conversely, future gazing is a totally unscientific process. Nevertheless I add my thoughts in broad generalities and also in specifics for the field (radiotherapy physics) in which I work and might be expected to be more accurate in my proposals. I conclude with some remarks on the conditions needed to achieve good scientific outcome.

  13. To Place or Not to Place: Toward an Environmental History of Modern Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Christopher

    2018-01-01

    Reviewing recent, overlapping work by historians of medicine and health and of environmental history, this article proposes a further agenda upon which scholars in both fields may converge. Both environmental and medical historians can seek to understand the past two centuries of medical history in terms of a seesaw dialogue over the ways and means by which physicians and other health professionals did, and did not, consider the influence of place-airs and waters included-on disease. Modernizing and professionalizing as well as new styles of science nourished attendant aspirations for a clinical place neutrality, for a medicine in which patients' own places didn't matter to what doctors thought or did. The rise of place neutrality from the late nineteenth century onward also had close and enabling historical ties to the near-simultaneous formation of place-defined specialties-tropical medicine, bacteriological public health, and industrial medicine and hygiene.

  14. Historical thinking in clinical medicine: lessons from R.G. Collingwood's philosophy of history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin-Yee, Benjamin H; Upshur, Ross E G

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this article is to create a space for historical thinking in medical practice. To this end, we draw on the ideas of R.G. Collingwood (1889-1943), the renowned British philosopher of history, and explore the implications of his philosophy for clinical medicine. We show how Collingwood's philosophy provides a compelling argument for the re-centring of medical practice around the patient history as a means of restoring to the clinical encounter the human meaning that is too often lost in modern medicine. Furthermore, we examine how Collingwood's historical thinking offers a patient-centred epistemology and a more pluralistic concept of evidence that includes the qualitative, narrative evidence necessary for human understanding. We suggest that clinical medicine can benefit from Collingwood's historical thinking, and, more generally, illustrates how a philosophy of medicine that draws on diverse sources from the humanities offers a richer, more empathetic clinical practice. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. [History of German-Baltic relations in medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tankler, H; Laschinski, G; Roots, I

    2004-04-30

    Today, the three Baltic countries Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, have well-known medical faculties with international standing. Their individual histories are briefly outlined. However, relations of the German academic world were closest with the university of Dorpat (today: Tartu). It was re-opened in 1802 by tsar Alexander I in order to keep young Baltic people from studying abroad. The medical faculty was its biggest faculty. The university was Russian, but the official language was German. So many a German professor came to Dorpat and many professors from Dorpat were offered a chair at a German university. The scientific imports connected Dorpat with other centres of West-European science, they brought knowledge and ideas and an exchange of information. The standard was high, and among the teaching staff was a handsome number of medical celebrities, e.g. the anatomist August Rauber and the surgeon Ernst von Bergmann. In Dorpat, Rudolf Buchheim brought a new science, experimental pharmacology, into being, which his pupil and successor, Oswald Schmiedeberg, fully established and propagated all over the world.

  16. [A scintillating specialty. Excerpts from the history of nuclear medicine in Denmark].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Søren

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear medicine is among the youngest medical specialties but its history spans more than a century. From the earliest discoveries of radioactivity and the establishment of the novel field of nuclear physics at the turn of the twentieth century and via the developments in radiochemistry set in motion by George de Hevesy from his base in Copenhagen to the specialty of today offering a multitude of diagnostic procedures. The present work is not intended to cover the entire history of nuclear medicine exhaustively but focus on pivotal events in the development of the field with special reference to Denmark.

  17. [Surgical instruments for impossible births in the Museum of History of Medicine in Roma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Claudia; Marinozzi, Silvia

    2006-01-01

    The Museum of History of Medicine of Rome collects gynaecological and obstetrical instruments. Forceps and embriotomy instruments illustrate the evolution of a sort of an "obstetrical speciality", from antiquity to XIX century. The article focuses mainly on the gradual transformation of forceps's use, from abortive to useful instrument for childbirth.

  18. History and Highlights of Cardiothoracic Surgery at Baylor College of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coselli, Joseph S

    2016-01-01

    The history of cardiothoracic surgery at Baylor College of Medicine begins in 1948, when Michael E. DeBakey was recruited as chair of the Department of Surgery. With the addition of Denton A. Cooley, E. Stanley Crawford, and other surgical legends, Baylor College of Medicine quickly rose to the forefront of cardiothoracic surgery. Highlights in its history include treatment of aortic aneurysm and dissection, development of synthetic aortic substitutes, early experience with cardiac replacement valves, the first successful use of coronary artery bypass grafts to revascularize the heart, and the cardiac transplantation and total artificial heart program, which led to the creation of the left ventricular assist device. Baylor's Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery continues to build on its history and legacy to remain a vital contributor to the specialty in the 21st century. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Introduction to the history and current status of evidence-based korean medicine: a unique integrated system of allopathic and holistic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Chang Shik; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Korean medicine, an integrated allopathic and traditional medicine, has developed unique characteristics and has been active in contributing to evidence-based medicine. Recent developments in Korean medicine have not been as well disseminated as traditional Chinese medicine. This introduction to recent developments in Korean medicine will draw attention to, and facilitate, the advancement of evidence-based complementary alternative medicine (CAM). Methods and Results. The history of and recent developments in Korean medicine as evidence-based medicine are explored through discussions on the development of a national standard classification of diseases and study reports, ranging from basic research to newly developed clinical therapies. A national standard classification of diseases has been developed and revised serially into an integrated classification of Western allopathic and traditional holistic medicine disease entities. Standard disease classifications offer a starting point for the reliable gathering of evidence and provide a representative example of the unique status of evidence-based Korean medicine as an integration of Western allopathic medicine and traditional holistic medicine. Conclusions. Recent developments in evidence-based Korean medicine show a unique development in evidence-based medicine, adopting both Western allopathic and holistic traditional medicine. It is expected that Korean medicine will continue to be an important contributor to evidence-based medicine, encompassing conventional and complementary approaches.

  20. Introduction to the History and Current Status of Evidence-Based Korean Medicine: A Unique Integrated System of Allopathic and Holistic Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Shik Yin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Korean medicine, an integrated allopathic and traditional medicine, has developed unique characteristics and has been active in contributing to evidence-based medicine. Recent developments in Korean medicine have not been as well disseminated as traditional Chinese medicine. This introduction to recent developments in Korean medicine will draw attention to, and facilitate, the advancement of evidence-based complementary alternative medicine (CAM. Methods and Results. The history of and recent developments in Korean medicine as evidence-based medicine are explored through discussions on the development of a national standard classification of diseases and study reports, ranging from basic research to newly developed clinical therapies. A national standard classification of diseases has been developed and revised serially into an integrated classification of Western allopathic and traditional holistic medicine disease entities. Standard disease classifications offer a starting point for the reliable gathering of evidence and provide a representative example of the unique status of evidence-based Korean medicine as an integration of Western allopathic medicine and traditional holistic medicine. Conclusions. Recent developments in evidence-based Korean medicine show a unique development in evidence-based medicine, adopting both Western allopathic and holistic traditional medicine. It is expected that Korean medicine will continue to be an important contributor to evidence-based medicine, encompassing conventional and complementary approaches.

  1. [Historical Archives of Italian Nephrology: The role of women in the history of Medicine and Nephrology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timio, M

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the present survey of the history of medicine is to provide a series of succinct assessments of the role of women in the development of nephrology. The inadequate role played by women in some areas of medicine underlines the trend that considers health history as part of external history modulating the branches of science. If "external" or social history considers women's role as marginal in many segments of society, no wonder they play a marginal role in the history of medicine. Nonetheless, when women are offered the opportunity to map out new medical paths or handle new health systems they have always been excellent. Tratula, a doctor from Salerno's medical school, is just an example. Women have been excellent in nursing and popular medicine. Florence Nightingale (1823-1910), an English woman of rare ability and humanitarian enthusiasm, was the first to understand the role of women in organising nursing. In this area she had such a striking success that her method contributed to the founding of the first school of nursing in England and in the world. On the other hand, women doctors have had many difficulties in the medical area. The first modern woman to take her degree in medicine was Elisabeth Blackwell, who graduated from the Geneva Medical School of Western New York in 1849. She managed to open a private dispensary, which within a few years developed into a great hospital and training school for women. In the nephrology area a great Australian woman entered the universal history of medicine, Priscilla Kincaid-Smith. Her outstanding contribution was to improve the diagnosis and treatment of glomerulonephritis. Her positive attitude and the novelty of a woman being on the same scientific level as men, combined to secure her unique reputation in both her own country and the world. We hope that new social trends will develop in which women with scientific ideas will be able to completely express their medical ability and the tendency to eliminate the

  2. [From influence to confluence : positioning the history of pre-modern Korean medicine in East Asia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Soyoung

    2010-12-31

    This article surveys studies focusing on pre-modern Korean medicine, which are both written in English and analyzed primary sources up to 1876. Overall, the history of pre-modern Korean medicine is an unknown filed in Anglophone academia. Yung Sik Kim's, James Palais's, and Carter Ecart's problematization of the nationalist framework of Korean scholarship partially explains the marginality of the field. Addressing these criticisms, this review argues that pre-modern Korean medicine's uneasy task lies in both elaborating Korea's own experience of medicine, while simultaneously avoiding making the "Korean" category itself essential. Korean narratives of premodern medicine need to go beyond the mere territorilalization of Korean medicine against its Chinese, Japanese, or Western counterparts, thereby to tackle the field's own boundary of research objects. The existing scholarship in English responds to this challenge by primarily examining the way in which Korea has shared textual tradition with China. Sirhak scholars' innovation in medicine, visual representation of Tongŭi bogam, Korean management of epidemics in the eleventh century, and Korean indexing of local botanicals, engages not only native achievements, but also the process of modifying medicine across geographical and political boundaries. More to the point, the emerging native narratives, although written in Korean, are implicitly resonant with those currently present in Anglophone academia. Taking "tension," "intertextuality," and "local traits" as a lens, this article assesses a series of current research in Korea. Aiming to go beyond appeals for a "distinctively" Korean experience of medicine, the future study of Korean pre-modern medicine will further elucidate confluences of different flows, such as "Chinese and Korean," "universal and local," "center and periphery," and "native and foreign," which will eventually articulate a range of Korean techniques of creating a bricolage in medicine.

  3. [History and criticism of systematic medicine in the works of Augusto Murri and his school].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scandellari, C

    1994-01-01

    Augusto Murri's last book entitled Nosologia e Psicologia was published in 1924; in the same year his follower Antonio Gnudi delivered a very important commemorative speech for the 100th anniversary of the Società Medica Chirurgica of Bologna. Both works have great value for the understanding of both the history and the theories of so-called systematic medicine as well as the criticisms that led, through Maurizio Bufalini's ideas and the teaching of Augusto Murri and his school, to the birth, at Bologna, of scientific medicine.

  4. [THE FOUNDERS OF FIRST CHAIRS OF HISTORY OF MEDICINE AND SOCIAL HYGIENE IN THE USSR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelova, L E; Kasimovskaia, N A

    2015-01-01

    The USSR academy of medical sciences was organized in 1944. At the same year, the institute of health care organization, medical statistics and social hygiene was included in its structure. Before the institute global tasks in area of research and pedagogic activities were stated. They were implemented in accordance with actual national demands. The institute became a leading research center of studying problems of population health, social hygiene, organization and management of health care and history of medicine. In 2003, the institute was renamed in the The RAMS national research institute of public health, and in 2013 was handed over the Federal agency of research organizations (FANO) of Russia. The directors of the institute were well-known scientists in the field of social hygiene health care organization and history of medicine. They made a significant input into development of medical education, combining scientific, managerial and pedagogic activities. The founders of the first chairs of history of medicine and social hygiene were the directors of the institute I.D. Strashun and N.A. Semashko.

  5. Indigenous narratives of health: (re)placing folk-medicine within Irish health histories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Ronan

    2015-03-01

    With the increased acceptance of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) within society, new research reflects deeper folk health histories beyond formal medical spaces. The contested relationships between formal and informal medicine have deep provenance and as scientific medicine began to professionalise in the 19th century, lay health knowledges were simultaneously absorbed and disempowered (Porter 1997). In particular, the 'medical gaze' and the responses of informal medicine to this gaze were framed around themes of power, regulation, authenticity and narrative reputation. These responses were emplaced and mobile; enacted within multiple settings by multiple agents and structures over time. The work is drawn from secondary material from Ireland, which identify more indigenous narratives of health and act as potential sources for medical humanities. While assumptions have been made as to the place of folk-medicine being essentially rural, evidence will be presented which shows a more complex network of health beliefs and practices. The narratives of informal practice and folk-medicine drawn from evidence from Ireland point to more fluid and hybrid relations with formal medicine and suggest that the complementary nature of the two models reflected wider cultural debates and models of belief (Del Casino Jnr., Health & Place 10:59-73, 2004).

  6. The history of autonomy in medicine from antiquity to principlism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Toni C

    2018-03-01

    Respect for Autonomy (RFA) has been a mainstay of medical ethics since its enshrinement as one of the four principles of biomedical ethics by Beauchamp and Childress' in the late 1970s. This paper traces the development of this modern concept from Antiquity to the present day, paying attention to its Enlightenment origins in Kant and Rousseau. The rapid C20th developments of bioethics and RFA are then considered in the context of the post-war period and American socio-political thought. The validity and utility of the RFA are discussed in light of this philosophical-historical account. It is concluded that it is not necessary to embrace an ethic of autonomy in order to guard patients from coercion or paternalism, and that, on the contrary, the dominance of autonomy threatens to undermine those very things which have helped doctors come to view and respect their patients as persons.

  7. [The tobacco in the light of history and medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Micheli, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Super trajectory is reported of tobacco from his first meeting with the European man October 15, 1492. This plant was known in Europe by the publications of the Sevillan physician Nicolas Monardes (1574), the relations of friar Andrés Thevet (1575) and the famous botanical treatise of Charles de l'Écluse (1605). The Swedish botanist Karl Linnaeus inclused tobacco plant in the family Solanaceae and deleted from this group other plants that were intermixed with it. Its botanical name (Nicotiana tabacum) derived from the surname of the French ambassador to Portugal, Jean Nicot of Villemain, who in 1560 sent it to the Queen Mother of France Cathérine de Medicis. The use of snuff quickly spread throughout Europe, were it became common in the seventeenth century. By the late eighteenth century in New Spain, in addition to cigars, cigarettes and due in packs of different content the tobacco is concocted and price. The preparation of the different presentations of snuff, tobacco made in factories in the capital and several provincial cities, originated in 1796 the creation of the first kindergartens for the children of those working in them. This thanks to the successful initiative of then viceroy Marquis of Branciforte. But contrary to the forecasts of Father F. J. Clavijero and Mrs. F. Calderón de la Barca, wife of the first Spanish diplomatic representative to the government of Mexico, the use of tobacco, with the passage of time, far from waning has been increasing in every social class. And now, more than men, women are smokers. Copyright © 2014 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  8. The history of nuclear medicine instrumentation and clinical procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindeman, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    The clinical assessment of regional organ function became possible with the advent of radionuclide imaging. Although earlier methods of assessing regional function provide useful information and a basic insight into physiologic processes, they have not achieved prominent clinical application because of an inherent invasive, and sometimes destructive, nature. Examples include bronchospirometry, split function studies of the kidneys, and nitrous oxide washout studies to assess organ blood flow. On the other hand, radionuclide techniques provide a simple nondestructive method to observe the net flux of molecular substances in organic regions under physiologic and pathologic conditions. Resolution in these instruments approximates less than 1 cm in 1985

  9. Transnational history of medicine after 1950: framing and interrogation from psychiatric journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, John C

    2011-01-01

    Communication amongst medical specialists helps display the tensions between localism and transnationalisation. Some quantitative sampling of psychiatric journals provides one framework for understanding the history of psychiatry and, to some extent, the history of medicine in general in the twentieth century. After World War II, extreme national isolation of psychiatric communities gave way to substantial transnationalisation, especially in the 1980s, when a remarkable switch to English-language communication became obvious. Various psychiatric communities used the new universal language, not so much as victims of Americanisation, as to gain general professional recognition and to participate in and adapt to modernisation.

  10. A Global Perspective: Reframing the History of Health, Medicine, and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of global history has been one of the more notable features of academic history over the past three decades. Although historians of disease were among the pioneers of one of its earlier incarnations-world history-the recent "global turn" has made relatively little impact on histories of health, disease, and medicine. Most continue to be framed by familiar entities such as the colony or nation-state or are confined to particular medical "traditions." This article aims to show what can be gained from taking a broader perspective. Its purpose is not to replace other ways of seeing or to write a new "grand narrative" but to show how transnational and transimperial approaches are vital to understanding some of the key issues with which historians of health, disease, and medicine are concerned. Moving on from an analysis of earlier periods of integration, the article offers some reflections on our own era of globalization and on the emerging field of global health.

  11. History of “health risk” and its place in the development of preventive medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Е.Е. Shigan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The main stages of the introduction and development of preventive medicine and the term HEALTH RISK are described. The “risk” definition is related to the works by Max Fasmer and Frank Knight. The development of preventive medicine was also influenced by the works of scientists and physicians of the ancient world and the Middle Ages. Particular attention is paid to the appearance, formation and development of the medical school of Salerno, and the impact of its work and the activities of scientists and teachers on further development of prevention and treatment. The relationship of these two concepts and their history is shown. The author dwells on the prevention development in Russia, paying particular attention to domestic researchers, especially after the victory of the Great October Revolution. Works by N.A. Semashko, Z.P. Soloviev, G.V. Khlopin, A.N. Sysin and F.G. Krotkov played a huge role in the development of preventive medicine in Russia and in the world. The article also represents the prevention medicine development facts in the post-war years – the creation of large schools of medicine, aimed at the prevention of diseases and epidemiological studies of the risk incurred. The article also pays attention to the foundation of International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA, some areas of its work, especially in relation to research on the health risks. The itegration at mathematical modeling and forecasting with medicine in general and health in particular, as well as the study of the health concepts of risks at individual nosological examples are written.

  12. The ambivalence of error: "scientific ideology" in the history of the life sciences and psychosomatic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Monica

    2004-02-01

    This paper discusses the concept of "scientific ideology" as it appears in the work of the historian and philosopher of medicine Georges Canguilhem, whose work is becoming increasingly well known and used amongst anglophone social scientists. Whilst addressing the problematic of legitimacy and illegitimacy in the history of science, the concept of "scientific ideology" does something different and more complex than either the opposition between science and false science, or the one between orthodoxy and heresy, allow for. On the one hand, it enables us to preserve a crucial acknowledgment of the specificity of science in general, and of medical science in particular. On the other hand, it also allows us to challenge the sharp contrast between science and non-science by setting that contrast in a diachronic perspective. Drawing also on the work of Isabelle Stengers, the last part of the paper discusses an application of the concept of scientific ideology in relation to the field of psychosomatic medicine and psychoneuroimmunology.

  13. An Australian nationwide survey on medicinal cannabis use for epilepsy: History of antiepileptic drug treatment predicts medicinal cannabis use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suraev, Anastasia S; Todd, Lisa; Bowen, Michael T; Allsop, David J; McGregor, Iain S; Ireland, Carol; Lintzeris, Nicholas

    2017-05-01

    Epilepsy Action Australia conducted an Australian nationwide online survey seeking opinions on and experiences with the use of cannabis-based products for the treatment of epilepsy. The survey was promoted via the Epilepsy Action Australia's main website, on their Facebook page, and by word of mouth. The survey consisted of 39 questions assessing demographics, clinical factors, including diagnosis and seizure types, and experiences with and opinions towards cannabis use in epilepsy. A total of 976 responses met the inclusion criteria. Results show that 15% of adults with epilepsy and 13% of parents/guardians of children with epilepsy were currently using, or had previously used, cannabis products to treat epilepsy. Of those with a history of cannabis product use, 90% of adults and 71% of parents reported success in reducing seizure frequency after commencing cannabis products. The main reasons for medicinal cannabis use were to manage treatment-resistant epilepsy and to obtain a more favorable side-effect profile compared to standard antiepileptic drugs. The number of past antiepileptic drugs tried was a significant predictor of medicinal cannabis use in both adults and children with epilepsy. Fifty-six percent of adults with epilepsy and 62% of parents/guardians of children with epilepsy expressed willingness to participate in clinical trials of cannabinoids. This survey provides insight into the use of cannabis products for epilepsy, in particular some of the likely factors influencing use, as well as novel insights into the experiences of and attitudes towards medicinal cannabis in people with epilepsy in the Australian community. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Cannabinoids and Epilepsy". Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A source for the history of medicine: the scientific library of Bartolo Nigrisoli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Toschi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Bartolo Nigrisoli (1858-1948 was a surgeon and university professor from Ravenna, who spent most of his professional career in Bologna. Throughout his life he built a large medical book collection made up of international works, which is currently held by the Centre of Documentation for the History of Welfare and Health in Florence. The breadth of the collection and its specific chronological and disciplinary focuses make it a valuable source for the investigation of the history of medicine and surgery in Europe from the late XIX century to the 1930s, with particular reference to the areas of intestinal, orthopedic and war surgery. This paper aims to describe the main features of the collection and how they relate to Bartolo Nigrisoli’s personal and professional life.

  15. [The author of Yi du (Medicine Reading) and source and history of its editions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, S M; Lu, X; Wang, X G

    2017-07-28

    Yi du ( Medicine Reading )was a primer of traditional Chinese medicine. The original author was Wang Ji of the Ming Dynasty, and the book was block-printed and published, after the supplement made by Cheng Yingmao of the Qing Dynasty during the reign of Kangxi Emperor of the Qing Dynasty. The editions of the book preserved in Nanjing Library and China Institute for History of Medicine and Medical Literature of China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences was the original version in the reign of Kangxi Emperor. The edition in Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine was the amended version of original version in the reign of Kangxi Emperor. The version of Edo Period in the Cabinet Library of National Archives of Japan was the reprinted edition of the amended version of original version in the reign of Kangxi Emperor. The transcript of Mr . Wang Shishan ' s Medicine Reading of the Qing Dynasty in Nanjing Library and Suzhou Library was the hand-copied version of the original one, with 75 syndromes, including external contraction, internal injuries, woman miscellaneous diseases etc. and all sorts of prescriptions. Cheng Yingmao added his preface, 14 syndromes of children diseases and prescription verse, supplemented general notices, properties of materia medica, pulse manifestations, and revised some texts of pathogenesis to form the 7 volumes. The former 5 volumes of Yi du were in 4-character verses, the 6(th)~7(th) volumes were in 7-character verses, and the pill prescriptions were in prose, which made more convenient for beginners to read, remember, and for recitation.

  16. The lost history of American veterinary medicine: the need for preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, C Trenton

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to survey holdings of ephemeral veterinary literature. World Cat OCLC catalog, the Library of Congress online catalog, the US National Agricultural Library online catalog, and the Dictionary Catalog of the National Agricultural Library, 1862-1965, were used to determine current library holdings of materials published by veterinary schools that are no longer in existence and veterinary associations that are defunct, veterinary supply catalogs, veterinary house organs, patent medicine publications, and veterinary advertisements. Individual library catalogs were also consulted. In addition, the practice of removing advertisements from bound volumes was examined. There are many gaps in the cataloged library holdings of primary source materials relating to the history of the education of veterinarians in the United States. A proactive action plan needs to be designed and activated to locate, catalog, and preserve this primary source material of veterinary medicine for posterity.

  17. The lost history of American veterinary medicine: the need for preservation*†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, C. Trenton

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to survey holdings of ephemeral veterinary literature. Methods: WorldCat OCLC catalog, the Library of Congress online catalog, the US National Agricultural Library online catalog, and the Dictionary Catalog of the National Agricultural Library, 1862–1965, were used to determine current library holdings of materials published by veterinary schools that are no longer in existence and veterinary associations that are defunct, veterinary supply catalogs, veterinary house organs, patent medicine publications, and veterinary advertisements. Individual library catalogs were also consulted. In addition, the practice of removing advertisements from bound volumes was examined. Results: There are many gaps in the cataloged library holdings of primary source materials relating to the history of the education of veterinarians in the United States. Conclusions: A proactive action plan needs to be designed and activated to locate, catalog, and preserve this primary source material of veterinary medicine for posterity. PMID:21243050

  18. Picturing Illness: History, Poetics, and Graphic Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavi Ravi Kasthuri

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Comics have often been treated as a juvenile and sub-literary art form; however, taking cues from the new-found cultural acceptance of comics, particularly with the publication of Art Spiegelman’s Maus (1986, Chris Ware’s Jimmy Corrigan: The Smartest Kid on Earth (2000, and Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home: A Family Tragedy (2006, there have emerged, over the past decade, a new breed of comics dealing with the patient/caregivers’ experiences, perspectives and identities. Christened as graphic medicine, these illness narratives use comics as a medium to address wide ranging disease/illness related issues. The present review examines the following issues: What is graphic medicine? Is there a tangible relationship between underground comics and graphic medicine? If so, can we regard underground comics as historical precedent to graphic medicine? What are the uses of comics in medicine? Broadly put, drawing examples from various graphic medical narratives, the paper seeks to trace the history and poetics of graphic medicine.

  19. History of the Department of Cell Biology at Yale School of Medicine, 1813-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentz, Thomas L.

    2011-01-01

    The Department of Cell Biology at the Yale University School of Medicine was established in 1983. It was preceded by the Section of Cell Biology, which was formed in 1973 when George E. Palade and collaborators came to Yale from the Rockefeller University. Cell Biology at Yale had its origins in the Department of Anatomy that existed from the beginning of classes at the Medical Institution of Yale College in 1813. This article reviews the history of the Department of Anatomy at Yale and its evolution into Cell Biology that began with the introduction of histology into the curriculum in the 1860s. The formation and development of the Section and Department of Cell Biology in the second half of the 20th century to the present time are described. Biographies and research activities of the chairs and key faculty in anatomy and cell biology are provided. PMID:21698037

  20. The history of the Society of Urodynamics, Female Pelvic Medicine, and Urogenital Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissbart, Steven J; Zimmern, Philippe E; Nitti, Victor W; Lemack, Gary E; Kobashi, Kathleen C; Vasavada, Sandip P; Wein, Alan J

    2018-03-25

    To review the history of the Society of Urodynamics, Female Pelvic Medicine and Urogenital Reconstruction (SUFU). We reviewed Society meeting minutes, contacted all living former Society presidents, searched the William P. Didusch Center for Urology History records, and asked Society members to share their important Society experiences in order to gather important historical information about the Society. The Society initially formed as the Urodynamics Society in 1969 in the backdrop of a growing passion for scientific research in the country after World War II ended. Since then, Society meetings have provided a pivotal forum for the advancement of science in lower urinary tract dysfunction. Meetings occurred annually until 2004, when the meeting schedule increased to biannual. The journal, Neurourology and Urodynamics, became the official journal of the Society in 2005. SUFU has authored important guidelines on urodynamics (2012), non-neurogenic overactive bladder (2012), and stress urinary incontinence (2017) and has shared important collaborations with other societies, including the American Urological Association (AUA), the International Continence Society (ICS), and the International Society of Pelvic Neuromodulation (ISPiN). SUFU has also been instrumental in trainee education and helped to establish formal fellowship training in the field in addition to holding a yearly educational meeting for urology residents. The Society has been led by 21 presidents throughout its history. Throughout the Society's near half-century long existence, the Society has fostered research, published guidelines, and educated trainees in order to improve the care of individuals suffering from lower urinary tract dysfunction. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Where is the wisdom? I--a conceptual history of evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyer, Peter C; Silva, Suzana A

    2009-12-01

    Rationale Evidence-based medicine (EBM) has been acclaimed as a major advance in medical science, but criticized as a proposed alternative model for the practice and teaching of medicine. Ambiguity regarding the proper role of the contributions of EBM within the fabric of medicine and health care has contributed to this discrepancy. Aims and objectives We undertook a critical review of the history of the EBM movement, beginning with its origins in the 1970s and continuing through this century. We drew upon the results of an independent project that rationalized the EBM domain from the perspective of educational evaluation and assessment. We considered the content of EBM in relationship to the propositions and promises embodied in advocacy publications. Results EBM emerged in the context of the explosion of biomedical information in the decade preceding public access to the Internet in the mid-1990s and drew upon the independently derived 'information literacy' formula developed by information scientists during the 1980s. The critically important content and achievements of EBM are fully explained within the confines of the information literacy model. The thesis that EBM offers an alternative paradigm for individualized health care, asserted in the advocacy literature, is not supported by published models of evidence-based clinical practice. Conclusion A critical historical review of the origins, content and development of the EBM movement proposes that full integration of the fruits of the movement into routine clinical care remains a conceptual and practical challenge.

  2. The achievements and limitations of researches that make use of interviews for the history of medicine in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sihn, Kyu-Hwan

    2013-08-01

    An interesting aspect of the many recent researches on the history of medicine in Korea is a concentration on oral histories, a trend that is sure to supplement the lack of medical documents and historical materials covering the modern period. This trend will also contribute to the invention of new approaches in the historiography of medicine. Although the fragments of oral testimony cannot be expected to give a perfect representation of historical reality, such "slices of life" help represent history from the viewpoint of ordinary people and members of the medical profession who are less often acknowledged. The recent researches that have taken oral testimony on the history of medicine in Korea have both racked up achievements as well as encountered limitations. First, many disciplines such as history, literature, cultural anthropology, folklore, sociology, and the history of medicine have used the technique of oral histories in the research approaches, and, especially since the start of the 2000s, have produced a variety of materials. The large amounts of raw materials published in these many disciplines are sure to bring even higher research achievements. Second, for the most part, oral history researches in the medical profession have concentrated on second-tier practitioners, such as midwives, apothecaries, and acupuncturists, and the experiences of such untypical sufferers as lepers and victims of germ and atomic warfare. While the oral history of more prominent medical figures tends to underline his or her story of success, the oral histories of minority participants in the medical profession and patients can reveal the truth that has remained veiled until now. It is especially meaningful that these oral histories enable researchers to reconstruct history from below, as it were. Third, the researches that take the oral history approach are intended to complement documentary records. Surprisingly, through being given the opportunity to tell their histories

  3. Diversity in academic medicine no. 2 history of battles lost and won.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strelnick, A Hal; Lee-Rey, Elizabeth; Nivet, Marc; Soto-Greene, Maria L

    2008-12-01

    Spurred by its rapidly changing demographics, the United States is striving to reduce and eliminate racial and ethnic health disparities. To do so, it must overcome the legacy of individual, institutional, and structural racism and resolve conflicts in related political and social ideologies. This has moved the struggle over diversity in the health professions outside the laboratories and ivy-covered walls of academic medicine into the halls of Congress and chambers of the US Supreme Court. Although equal employment opportunity and affirmative action programs began as legal remedies for distinct histories of legally sanctioned racial and gender discrimination, they also became effective means for increasing the representation of underrepresented minorities in higher education and the health professions. Beginning in the 1970s and continuing today, legal challenges to measures for realizing equal opportunity and leveling the playing field have reached the US Supreme Court and state-wide ballot initiatives. These historical challenges and successes are the subject of this article. Although the history is not exhaustive, it aims to provide an important context for the struggles of advocates to improve the representation of underrepresented minorities in medicine and reduce racial and ethnic health disparities.

  4. Regenerative medicine: then and now--an update of recent history into future possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polykandriotis, E; Popescu, L M; Horch, R E

    2010-10-01

    The fields of tissue engineering (TE) and regenerative medicine (RegMed) are yet to bring about the anticipated therapeutic revolution. After two decades of extremely high expectations and often disappointing returns both in the medical as well as in the financial arena, this scientific field reflects the sense of a new era and suggests the feeling of making a fresh start although many scientists are probably seeking reorientation. Much of research was industry driven, so that especially in the aftermath of the recent financial meltdown in the last 2 years we have witnessed a biotech asset yard sale. Despite any monetary shortcomings, from a technological point of view there have been great leaps that are yet to find their way to the patient. RegMed is definitely bound to play a major role in our life because it embodies one of the primordial dreams of mankind, such as: everlasting youth, flying, remote communication and setting foot on the moon. The Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine has been at the frontier of these developments in TE and RegMed from its beginning and reflects recent scientific advances in both fields. Therefore this review tries to look at RegMed through the keyhole of history which might just be like looking 'back to the future'. © 2010 The Authors Journal compilation © 2010 Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. New approaches within the history and theory of medicine and their relevance for homeopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Josef M

    2014-04-01

    Conventional sciences have brought forth a wealth of knowledge and benefits, but they have not always been clear and precise about their legitimate scope and methodological limitations. In contrast, new and critical approaches in modern sciences question and reflect their own presuppositions, dependencies, and constraints. Examples are quantum physics, theory and history of science, as well as theory and history of medicine, sociology, and economics. In this way, deprecative dogmatism and animosity amongst sciences ought to be lessened, while the field opens up for each science to redefine its appropriate place in society. This would appear to be a chance for homeopathy, as new approaches, especially within the social and economic sciences, suggest that being a follower of Samuel Hahnemann (1755-1843) may have advantages and privileges that conventional medicine seems to be lacking and whose relevance was overlooked during the rise of economic thinking in the last two centuries. Copyright © 2013 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The history of dentistry and medicine relationship: could the mouth finally return to the body?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, C L Z; Caramelli, B

    2009-11-01

    The relationship between dentistry and medicine has been acknowledged throughout the history of humanity. This relationship was documented in ancient medicine accounts, and has survived until the present day, accompanied by the evolution of molecular technologies. Although we have had very important researchers' contributions in this interdisciplinary area, mainly after the 18th century, the knowledge on oral infections is still ignored by or unknown to the majority of clinical dentists and physicians. These circumstances could be changed through a broader divulgation of this complex relationship, both in the dentistry and in the medicine areas, which in turn would have a significant impact in systemic health worldwide. This movement has already started, as was observed in a World Health Assembly resolution which called for oral health to be integrated into chronic disease prevention programs in 2007. This was a significant indicator of changing perceptions of oral health over the past several decades. This brief review reports the evolution through time of the knowledge on the association between dental infections and systemic diseases, as well as the paths which we could take to consolidate this historical trend.

  7. [Exploration on an overview of history (from Chunqiu to Ming and Qing Dynasties) and species of Chinese exotic traditional medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Min-Ru; Wang, Tian-Tian; Lu, Xiao-Lin; Ma, Yu-Ying

    2017-05-01

    This paper collected and analyzed literatures about starting of traditional medicine and trading of different medicine from Chunqiu Zhanguo to Ming and Qing Dynasties, in order to preliminarily explore on an overview of specie of chinese exotic traditional medicine and trade of different country in different dynasty(from Chunqiu to Ming and Qing Dynasties), as well as the amount of exotic medicine over two thousand years. (remove repeating and doubtful species), find peculiarity of exotic medicine, sreen species that used to develop the Silk Route and establish quality standards.Finally, We get conclusions are as follows. First, primary,.prosperous and declining stages of development of exotic traditional medicine are Qin and Han, Song-Jin-Yuan, Ming and Qing Dynasties, respectively. Second, according to literature, the stage that has the most species of exotic medicine is song dynasty,approximately have 300. Removing repeating and doubtful species, the believable species are approximate 230 to 250. Meanwhile, the unknown species are approximate 30, which may be different name of one medicine or processed goods, now these medicines are named as "doubtful species". Third, the medicinal parts of exotic medicine are different from Chinese medicine of Han nation. The number of Resin, fruits and seeds kind are more than root and rhizomes kind,mineral medicines are more than animal. Fourth, the major producing area of exotic medicine is some countries and territories related to the Silk Route in the history. Ultimately, this paper preliminarily figure out basic information of exotic medicine of different dynasty in China,that provide reference for learning study and decision of industrial development. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  8. New York-Tidewater Chapters' History of Military Medicine Award. The military odyssey of Norman Bethune.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, C A

    1999-04-01

    While visiting the Peoples Republic of China in 1982, I became aware of the work of the Canadian, Norman Bethune, as a military surgeon. Bethune first served as a stretcher-bearer in an ambulance unit and later as a medical officer with the Allies during the First World War. He also participated in the Spanish Civil War as a military physician. He died in China while serving with Mao Tse-tung's 8th Route Army, fighting the Japanese invaders in Yenan. Bethune pioneered the use of whole blood transfusions in combat areas, first in Spain and then in China. In the annals of Chinese military history, he has been given an honored place as a military surgeon and a martyr. He is also credited in China with improving the practice of battlefield medicine, as an organizer, teacher, and innovator. Bethune's fame in China is now spreading to Canada.

  9. The Development of the Interface between Law, Medicine and Psychiatry: Medico-Legal Perspectives in History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Swanepoel

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Medicine and law were related from early times. This relation resulted as a necessity of protecting communities from the irresponsible acts of impostors. Various legal codes dealing with medical malpractice existed in Egypt, Mesopotamia, China, Islam, Greece, Rome, Persia and India. Over the course of the past 30 years, interest in the history of psychiatry has boomed. Much of this proliferation of interest has taken place under the broad influence of postmodernism and has resulted in multiple and diverse histories that no longer seek to provide a linear narrative of constant evolutionary progress. Rather, these new histories explore and disrupt taken for granted assumptions about the past and provide a starting point for discussion and debate about the some of the very foundations of mental health care in South Africa. As a matter of practical importance knowledge of how knowledge accrues and knowledge of the mistakes of the past is of prime importance in preventing similar mistakes in present and future work. An important reason for specifically understanding historical psychiatry is the fact that many of the uncertainties experienced in the present are a direct result of decisions made in the past. The key issue is that while it is tempting to experience current psychiatric and legal approaches towards the mentally disordered as natural and permanent, an understanding of the past helps mental health and legal practitioners to see things in a different perspective. Psychiatric and legal approaches towards the mentally disordered have changed over time and can undoubtedly also be changed in future. Therefore, the research conducted in this article focuses on the history and development of law and psychiatry including prehistoric times, the Arabian countries, the Nile Valley as well as Greece and Rome.

  10. A history of HbA1c through Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillery, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    HbA(1c) was discovered in the late 1960s and its use as marker of glycemic control has gradually increased over the course of the last four decades. Recognized as the gold standard of diabetic survey, this parameter was successfully implemented in clinical practice in the 1970s and 1980s and internationally standardized in the 1990s and 2000s. The use of standardized and well-controlled methods, with well-defined performance criteria, has recently opened new directions for HbA(1c) use in patient care, e.g., for diabetes diagnosis. Many reports devoted to HbA1c have been published in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM) journal. This review reminds the major steps of HbA(1c) history, with a special emphasis on the contribution of CCLM in this field.

  11. [Mercury--a major agent in the history of medicine and alchemy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norn, Svend; Permin, Henrik; Kruse, Edith; Kruse, Poul R

    2008-01-01

    From ancient time the history of mercury has been connected with that of the medicine and chemistry. Mercury therefore contributes to the history of science throughout times. Knowledge of cinnabar (HgS) is traced back to ancient Assyria and Egypt, but also to China. The Greek philosophers were the initiators of theoretical science. The idea of the four elements, earth, air, water and fire, was introduced mainly by Empedocles and Aristotle in the 5th and 4th century BC. The theory encouraged the hope of transmuting metal to gold. The early development of practical alchemy is obscure, but some hints are given in the encyclopedia compiled by Zosimos about 300 A.D. in Alexandria. It also includes the invention of equipment such as stills, furnaces and heating baths. Medical treatment is described by Pliny and Celsus, e.g. the use of cinnabar in trachoma and venereal diseases. When the Arabs learned Greek alchemy by the Nestorians, they introduced or improved chemical equipments and new chemicals were obtained such as sublimate (HgCl2), different salts, acids, alkaline carbonates and metal oxides. The first recorded account of animal experimentation on the toxicity of mercury comes from Rhazes (al-Razi) in the 9th century and in the 11th century Avicenna (Ibn Sina) had the foresight to recommend the use of mercury only as an external remedy, and quicksilver ointments were used by the Arabs in the treating of skin diseases. In the medieval west scientific experiments were forbidden since the interpretation of the world order should not be changed. Greek and Arabic medicine and alchemy were therefore authoritative and the breakthrough in scientific inventions first appeared after the introduction of the Renaissance. The Renaissance medicine included ancient medicine as well as "modern medicine", based on iatrochemistry, and this chemical approach was introduced by Paracelsus. The medicine included sulphur and salts or oxides of for instance mercury, copper, iron, antimony

  12. Laboratory hematology in the history of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine.

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    Hoffmann, Johannes J M L

    2013-01-01

    For the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the journal Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM), an historic overview of papers that the journal has published in the field of laboratory hematology (LH) is presented. All past volumes of CCLM were screened for papers on LH and these were categorized. Bibliographic data of these papers were also analyzed. CCLM published in total 387 LH papers. The absolute number of LH papers published annually showed a significant increase over the years since 1985. Also the share of LH papers demonstrated a steady increase (overall mean 5%, but mean 8% over the past 4 years). The most frequent category was coagulation and fibrinolysis (23.5%). Authors from Germany contributed the most LH papers to the journal (22.7%), followed by the Netherlands and Italy (16.3 and 13.2%, respectively). Recent citation data indicated that other publications cited LH review papers much more frequently than other types of papers. The history of the journal reflects the emergence and development of laboratory hematology as a separate discipline of laboratory medicine.

  13. Regenerative medicine: then and now – an update of recent history into future possibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polykandriotis, E; Popescu, L M; Horch, R E

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The fields of tissue engineering (TE) and regenerative medicine (RegMed) are yet to bring about the anticipated therapeutic revolution. After two decades of extremely high expectations and often disappointing returns both in the medical as well as in the financial arena, this scientific field reflects the sense of a new era and suggests the feeling of making a fresh start although many scientists are probably seeking reorientation. Much of research was industry driven, so that especially in the aftermath of the recent financial meltdown in the last 2 years we have witnessed a biotech asset yard sale. Despite any monetary shortcomings, from a technological point of view there have been great leaps that are yet to find their way to the patient. RegMed is definitely bound to play a major role in our life because it embodies one of the primordial dreams of mankind, such as: everlasting youth, flying, remote communication and setting foot on the moon. The Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine has been at the frontier of these developments in TE and RegMed from its beginning and reflects recent scientific advances in both fields. Therefore this review tries to look at RegMed through the keyhole of history which might just be like looking ‘back to the future’. PMID:20825521

  14. From Woohwang Cheongsimwon* to Ginseng - The History of Medicine Use in the Joseon Era -**

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    Seong-su KIM

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In Korean traditional medicine, though herbal decoction, acupuncture, and moxibustion are all used to treat diseases, restorative medicines are the most widely preferred treatment method. This paper explores the historical background of restorative herbal medicines and ginseng among the Korean public and Korean traditional medicine practice. It also seeks to clarify how social and cultural perspectives on drug use have changed since restorative medicine became mainstream during the Joseon era. Drug use tendencies were affected by the medical system of the Joseon Dynasty, patients’ desires for reliable treatment, and perceptions of the human body and the causes of disease. In the late Joseon Dynasty, medicine, an industry originally monopolized by the government, began to be manufactured and traded on the free market, and medical personnel began to participate in medical activities on a large scale. As the health preserving theory became more popular and medical personnel became more accessible, medicinal preferences also changed. Specifically, whereas preference was first given to common medicines, such as Cheongsimwon, which are effective for various symptoms, restorative medicines, such as ginseng, gradually became more popular. These restorative medicines were faithful to the basic tenet of East Asian traditional medicine: to avoid disease by making the body healthy before the onset of illness. Patients’ desires for safe treatment and growing competition among commercial doctors who wanted stable profits further increased the popularity of milder medicines. Ultimately, as ginseng cultivation was realized, its use expanded even further in a wave of commercialization.

  15. A focus on Trotula dé Ruggiero: a pioneer in women's and children's health in history of medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bifulco, Maurizio; Ciaglia, Elena; Marasco, Magda; Gangemi, Giuseppina

    2014-01-01

    Trotula dé Ruggiero was the first female physician in history of medicine and her role at Medical School of Salerno. Her reputation in the Middle Ages was so important that her theoretical manuscripts were diffused in all European universities and laid the foundations for modern medicine. Of note, Trotula deepened medicine as an eternal dichotomy between art and science, narrative and evidence. In particular, she spent all her life in treating children's diseases, exhibiting a kind of emotional, cultural and spiritual maternity of inestimable value.

  16. The influence of maternal exposure history to virus and medicine during pregnancy on congenital heart defects of fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Qianhong; Gong, Wei; Zheng, Dongming; Zhong, Risheng; Wen, Yunjie; Wang, Xiaodan

    2017-02-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common birth defect. It is due to dysfunction of the heart and great vessels during embryo development stage, or the channel was not closed after birth. This study focuses on investigating the influence of virus infection and medicine history during pregnancy on the incidence rate of CHD of fetus. We conducted a retrospective birth cohort study of infant born in the maternal and child health hospital of Fanyu district in Guangzhou. Five thousand three hundred eighty one cases with complete medical records, including mothers, fathers, and infants, were enrolled. The exposure history of mothers to virus and medicine from 6 months before pregnancy to prenatal examination was investigated, including mflu, mumps, measles, rubella, chickenpox, and hepatitis and antibiotics, tocolytic agent, anticonvulsants, antipyretic and analgesic, antitumor drug, folic acid supplement, and contraceptive. The relationship between virus infection and medicine history during pregnancy and CHD was analyzed. There was statistical difference between a normal group and a defected group in influenza infection and tocolytic agent and contraceptive pill. The exposure history to influenza and medicines, such as tocolytic agent and contraceptive pill, during pregnancy influenced the incidence rate of CHD of fetus.

  17. How Important is Medical Ethics and History of Medicine Teaching in the Medical Curriculum? An Empirical Approach towards Students' Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Stefan; Woestmann, Barbara; Huenges, Bert; Schweikardt, Christoph; Schäfer, Thorsten

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: It was investigated how students judge the teaching of medical ethics and the history of medicine at the start and during their studies, and the influence which subject-specific teaching of the history, theory and ethics of medicine (GTE) - or the lack thereof - has on the judgement of these subjects. Methods: From a total of 533 students who were in their first and 5th semester of the Bochum Model curriculum (GTE teaching from the first semester onwards) or followed the traditional curriculum (GTE teaching in the 5th/6th semester), questionnaires were requested in the winter semester 2005/06 and in the summer semester 2006. They were asked both before and after the 1st and 5th (model curriculum) or 6th semester (traditional curriculum). We asked students to judge the importance of teaching medical ethics and the history of medicine, the significance of these subjects for physicians and about teachability and testability (Likert scale from -2 (do not agree at all) to +2 (agree completely)). Results: 331 questionnaire pairs were included in the study. There were no significant differences between the students of the two curricula at the start of the 1st semester. The views on medical ethics and the history of medicine, in contrast, were significantly different at the start of undergraduate studies: The importance of medical ethics for the individual and the physician was considered very high but their teachability and testability were rated considerably worse. For the history of medicine, the results were exactly opposite. GTE teaching led to a more positive assessment of items previously ranked less favourably in both curricula. A lack of teaching led to a drop in the assessment of both subjects which had previously been rated well. Conclusion: Consistent with the literature, our results support the hypothesis that the teaching of GTE has a positive impact on the views towards the history and ethics of medicine, with a lack of teaching having a negative

  18. The faculty of pain medicine of the Australian and New Zealand college of anaesthetists - history and strategic plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipton, Edward A; Moore, Brendan; Cousins, Michael; Atkinson, Leigh

    2014-12-01

    Since its formation, the Faculty of Pain Medicine (FPM) has grown into an organization with 369 fellows. It has 29 accredited pain medicine training units in Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, and Singapore. This article reviews the history of its birth and subsequent growth. The FPM fellowship is widely recognized as a high-quality qualification, based on a sound curriculum, excellent clinical exposure, and robust continuing professional development. But how does the Faculty position itself for the future? The Faculty's 5-year Strategic Plan (from 2013 to 2017) sets out its vision "to reduce the burden of pain in society through education, advocacy, training and research." Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. State of Digital Education Options in the areas of Medical Terminology and the History, Theory and Ethics of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schochow, Maximilian; Steger, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Institutes of the history of medicine, the theory of medicine, and medical ethics at German institutions of higher learning have created various e-learning options that are based on different learning platforms and tailored to the specific curricular needs of individual teaching. Up to now no valid data has been available about the types of such e-learning options as well as possibilities of future developments thanks to coordinated cooperation among the different institutes. Of 31 German institutes of the history and theory of medicine and medical ethics that were asked to fill out a questionnaire, 30 answered, which equals a return rate of 97 per cent. The questionnaire was completed between July and August 2012 using a telephone survey. Available to students online, digitally interactive teaching tools have boomed in the course of the last few years at German institutes of the history of medicine, the theory of medicine, and medical ethics. This trend is also reflected in a willingness of more than half of the respective departments (67 per cent) to expand their e-learning options on the basis of previous experience. The offered e-learning systems are accepted very well by the students. 57 per cent of the institutes stated, that 90-100 per cent of the students use the offered systems regularly. E-learning courses for terminology are offered particularly often, this is also reflected in the intended extension of these courses by the majority of institutes which plan to expand their e-learning systems. This article discusses the results of a comprehensive empirical survey about e-learning. It illustrates ways in which individual German institutes plan to expand their e-learning options in the future. Finally, specific proposals for cooperation among institutions (not just online) are introduced, the purpose of which is to produce synergy in e-learning.

  20. State of Digital Education Options in the areas of Medical Terminology and the History, Theory and Ethics of Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schochow, Maximilian

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Institutes of the history of medicine, the theory of medicine, and medical ethics at German institutions of higher learning have created various e-learning options that are based on different learning platforms and tailored to the specific curricular needs of individual teaching. Up to now no valid data has been available about the types of such e-learning options as well as possibilities of future developments thanks to coordinated cooperation among the different institutes.Methods: Of 31 German institutes of the history and theory of medicine and medical ethics that were asked to fill out a questionnaire, 30 answered, which equals a return rate of 97 per cent. The questionnaire was completed between July and August 2012 using a telephone survey.Results: Available to students online, digitally interactive teaching tools have boomed in the course of the last few years at German institutes of the history of medicine, the theory of medicine, and medical ethics. This trend is also reflected in a willingness of more than half of the respective departments (67 per cent to expand their e-learning options on the basis of previous experience. The offered e-learning systems are accepted very well by the students. 57 per cent of the institutes stated, that 90-100 per cent of the students use the offered systems regularly. E-learning courses for terminology are offered particularly often, this is also reflected in the intended extension of these courses by the majority of institutes which plan to expand their e-learning systems.Conclusions: This article discusses the results of a comprehensive empirical survey about e-learning. It illustrates ways in which individual German institutes plan to expand their e-learning options in the future. Finally, specific proposals for cooperation among institutions (not just online are introduced, the purpose of which is to produce synergy in e-learning.

  1. THE SPECIALTY OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE IN CHILE: 20 YEARS OF HISTORY

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    WK Mallon

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Chile is uniquely situated to be a leader in South American development of the specialty of Emergency Medicine. Chilean emergency medicine has successfully transitioned from a novelty training idea to a nationally and internationally recognized entity with serious public health goals. There are more residency training programs in Chile than in any other South American or Latin American country, and the specialty is formally recognized by the Ministry of Health. Chilean emergency medicine thought leaders have networked internationally with multiple groups, intelligently used outside resources, and created durable academic relationships. While focusing on locally important issues and patient care they have successfully advanced their agenda. Despite this, the specialty faces many new challenges and remains fragile but sustainable. Policy makers and the Chilean MOH need to be acutely aware of this fragility to preserve the progress achieved so far, and support ongoing maturation of the specialty of Emergency Medicine.

  2. Art and the history of medicine. The dwarf pointed by Mantegna of Montua and the Morgante of Florence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battin, Jacques

    2009-06-01

    This short article concerns two images which relate art and the history of medicine. The first is a fresco by Andrea Mantegna, from the period 1465-1474, when he was at the Gonzaga court of Ludovic III. This painting includes a female dwarf. Modern ideas on dwarfism are briefly discussed and another dwarf, Morgante, from the court of the Medicis in Florence, is described and illustrated.

  3. Pregnancy complication and outcome in women with history of allergy to medicinal agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohel, Iris; Levy, Amalia; Zweig, Aya; Holcberg, Gershon; Sheiner, Eyal

    2010-08-01

    Pregnancy outcome in women with a previous history of drug allergy and the role of drug allergies in adverse pregnancy outcomes is unclear. A retrospective cohort study comparing pregnancies of women with and without history of drug allergy was conducted. Data were collected from the computerized perinatal database. A multiple logistic regression model, with background elimination, was constructed to control for confounders. Of 186,443 deliveries, 4.6% (n = 8647) occurred in patients with a history of drug allergy. The following conditions were significantly associated with a history of drug allergy: advanced maternal age, recurrent abortions, fertility treatments, hypertensive disorders, and diabetes mellitus. Using multivariate analysis, with background elimination, history of drug allergy was significantly associated with intrauterine growth restriction (OR = 1.52, CI = 1.3-0.8, P history of drug allergy is an independent risk factor for intrauterine growth restriction and preterm delivery. Further prospective studies are needed to investigate the nature of this association.

  4. Women in medicine and dermatology: history and advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    França, Katlein; Ledon, Jennifer; Savas, Jessica; Nouri, Keyvan

    2014-01-01

    The history of women in medicine has been marked by many challenges and achievements. Although the role of women in the "art of healing" can be traced back many centuries, only males are traditionally highlighted in history. Across antiquity, access to medical education was denied to females. Dermatology is a medical specialty in which women displayed particular skill and proficiency. Gradually, determination and competence allowed women to lay claim in an essentially male-dominated world. This article presents a brief review of the performance, progress and achievements of women in the history of medicine and dermatology.

  5. Women in medicine and dermatology: history and advances*

    Science.gov (United States)

    França, Katlein; Ledon, Jennifer; Savas, Jessica; Nouri, Keyvan

    2014-01-01

    The history of women in medicine has been marked by many challenges and achievements. Although the role of women in the "art of healing" can be traced back many centuries, only males are traditionally highlighted in history. Across antiquity, access to medical education was denied to females. Dermatology is a medical specialty in which women displayed particular skill and proficiency. Gradually, determination and competence allowed women to lay claim in an essentially male-dominated world. This article presents a brief review of the performance, progress and achievements of women in the history of medicine and dermatology. PMID:24626675

  6. Systems of medicine and nationalist discourse in India: towards "new horizons" in medical anthropology and history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shamshad

    2006-06-01

    While accepting medical "pluralism" as a historical reality, as an intrinsic value inherent in any medical system, and as an ideal or desired goal that any multicultural society ought to achieve, this paper argues the need to go beyond the liberal pluralist tendencies that have dominated the debate so far. It holds that while documenting or dealing with the "co-existence" of varied medical traditions and practices, we must not ignore or underplay issues of power, domination and hegemony and must locate our work in a larger historical, social and political context. With this perspective, and based essentially on Assembly proceedings, private papers, official documents and archival materials from the first half of the 20th-century, this paper identifies three major streams in the nationalist discourse in India: conformity, defiance and the quest for an alternative. It shows that while the elements of conformity to biomedicine and its dominance remained more pronounced and emphatic, those of defiance were conversely weak and at times even apologetic. The quest for alternatives, on the other hand, although powerful and able to build trenchant civilizational and institutional critique of modern science and medicine, could never find adequate space in the national agenda for social change. The paper further holds that although the "cultural authority" and hegemony of biomedicine over indigenous science and knowledge were initiated by the colonial state, they were extended by the mainstream national leaderships and national governments with far more extensive and profound implications and less resistance. In light of the growing global networking of "traditional", "complementary" and "alternative" health systems on the one hand and the hegemonic and homogenizing role and presence of multilateral organizations (such as the World Bank and IMF) in shaping national health policies on the other, such insights from history become extraordinarily important.

  7. [The history of Polish criminalistics and forensic medicine and their links to Austrian science].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widacki, Jan

    2012-01-01

    The institution of the medical expert was already known in the early Polish courts. The first Chair of Forensic Medicine on Polish soil was established in 1805 at the Jagiellonian University in Cracow and has existed until today. Among its most prominent forensic scientists are Prof. Fryderyk Hechell (1795-1851), Prof. Leon Blumenstock (1838-1895), who was the first to give regular lectures on forensic medicine for law students, and Prof. Leon Wachholz (1867-1941), who was a student of both Prof. Blumenstock and Prof. Eduard von Hofmann (1837-1897), under whose supervision he worked in Vienna. Under his guidance and supervision, he started to collect material for his habilitation. At that time, Hofmann was considered the pioneer of experimental research in forensic medicine. In Vienna, Wachholz was a guest scientist not only with Prof. von Hofmann, but also in the Psychiatric Hospital of Prof. Richard von Krafft-Ebing. After his return to Cracow, he was head of the Institute of Forensic Medicine of the Jagiellonian University for several decades. Apart from forensic medicine in the strict sense of the word, he also worked in the fields now known as criminalistics, forensic psychiatry and criminology. In these latter fields, the influence of Krafft-Ebing was still noticeable. Three students of Wachholz became professors of forensic medicine: Jan Olbrycht, Stanislaw Horoszkiewicz and Włodzimierz Sieradzki. Their students founded a whole generation of forensic scientists. Today, all Polish forensic scientists are either directly or indirectly students of Professor Wachholz' successors.

  8. [The invention of animals: a history of Mexican veterinary medicine in the nineteenth century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Blanca Irais Uribe

    2015-12-01

    This article analyzes a phenomenon I call "the invention of animals," that is, the way in which veterinary medicine and the practices of physiology, microbiology and zootechnics produced new and different ways of thinking about, studying, understanding, regulating, legislating, commercializing, exploiting and experiencing "the animal." In particular, the text focuses on the evolution of this phenomenon in Mexico during the nineteenth century, since during this period the impact of these disciplines on animal bodies led to significant changes in the fields of human medicine, public health, and livestock production.

  9. Medical history for the masses: how American comic books celebrated heroes of medicine in the 1940s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Bert

    2004-01-01

    When comic books rose to mass popularity in the early 1940s, one segment of the industry specialized in "true adventures," with stories about real people from the past and the present--in contrast to competing books that offered fantasy, science fiction, superheroes, detectives and crime, funny people, or funny animals. This study examines the figures from both medical history and twentieth-century medicine who were portrayed as heroes and role models in these comic books: first, to call attention to this very popular, if unknown, genre of medical history, and second, to illustrate how medical history was used at that time to popularize scientific and medical ideas, to celebrate the achievements of medical research, to encourage medical science as a career choice, and to show medicine as a humane and noble enterprise. The study explains how these medical history stories were situated in American popular culture more generally, and how the graphic power of comic books successfully conveyed both values and information while also telling a good story. Attention to this colorful genre of popular medical history enriches our picture of the mid-twentieth-century public's enthusiasm for medical progress.

  10. [Medical history in the information age; new impetus for the section 'Historical perspective' in the Dutch Journal of Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolt, Timo C

    2016-01-01

    Over the past half century, medicine has evolved into 'informational medicine'. Physicians today no longer necessarily have to possess specialist knowledge, but have to know how to access this knowledge. This means that it is important that they do not just 'grab' for loose bits of information, but systematically and judiciously search for relevant knowledge. Medical-historical insights could be helpful, alongside critical-appraisal skills. Medical knowledge has a certain structure that has developed historically under the influence of assumptions (some implicit), presuppositions and social forces and interests. By exposing this underlying structure, medical history provides an overview of and insight into relationships within medical knowledge and practice. Now in particular, in the current age of information and disinformation, there is a great need for such 'overviews'. This offers opportunities for the revitalization of the 'Historical perspective' section in the Dutch Journal of Medicine (NTvG), especially if this section evolves into a shared platform for physicians and historians.

  11. [Paleopathology and the history of medicine: the example of influenza pandemics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fangerau, H

    2010-11-01

    The paper examines the history of former influenza pandemics from the perspective of changing nosographic categories. Special emphasis is put on the so-called Spanish flu of 1918. Due to its high mortality rates this pandemic is often highlighted as a warning sign for what may happen during a future pandemic. After a short introduction into the problematic status of the validity of retrospective diagnoses the history of influenza pandemics is discussed. The pandemic of 1918 is analysed from the perspective of the public health system being connected to and relying on medical and scientific debates. The reasons for this pandemic's rank as the long forgotten pandemic are discussed.

  12. A Survey of Headache Medicine Physicians on the Likeability of Headaches and Their Personal Headache History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Randolph W; Ghosh, Kamalika

    2016-03-01

    Two prior studies have shown an increased prevalence of migraine among physicians who are headache medicine specialists (HMS). There have been no studies of the prevalence of other headache disorders among HMS. A prior survey showed that neurologists like to treat some headaches more than others but there has not been a similar survey of HMS. The aim of the survey was to learn more about the prevalence of headaches among HMS and which headache disorders they like to treat. An email survey was sent to 749 physician members of the American Headache Society who were asked to respond to the following statement using a 5-point Likert scale (from 1, strongly disagree to 5, strongly agree): "I like to treat patients with the following types of headaches or syndromes." They were asked, "Have you personally suffered from any of the following at any time during your life: episodic migraine (EM), chronic migraine (CM), refractory migraine (RM), episodic cluster (EC), chronic cluster (CC), new daily persistent headache (NDPH), and postconcussion syndrome (PCS)." The response rate was 15.8% (n = 118) with a mean age of 51.4 years, 64.4% males, and 85.6% neurologists. HMS reported likeability for treating disorders in rank order as follows: EM (mean = 4.69, SD = 0.61); CM (mean = 4.20, SD = 0.94); RM (mean = 3.62, SD = 1.17); EC (mean = 4.37, SD = 0.80); CC (mean = 3.68, SD = 1.10); NDPH (mean = 3.52, SD = 1.21); and PCS (mean = 3.66, SD = 1.18). The lifetime prevalence of disorders was as follows: EM, 69.5% (85.7% in females and 60.5% in males); CM, 13.6% (19% in females and 10.5% in males); RM, .9% (2.4% females and 0% males); EC, 1.7% (0% females and 2.6% males); CC, 0%; NDPH, 0%, and PCS, 4.2% (7.1% females and 2.6% males). HMS with a personal history of EM (mean = 4.73, SD = 0.51) showed a significant preference (t130  = 7.30, P headaches (mean = 3.90, SD = 0.77). HMS preferred to treat some

  13. Odontology and the history of medicine at the Royal Society of Medicine 1907-1960 and the contributions of Lilian Lindsay. Part Two--Lillian Lindsay and the RSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papworth, Julie

    2014-07-01

    This paper examines the foundation and early development of the Royal Society of Medicine and looks in further detail at the Section of Odontology and the Section of the History of Medicine. It then considers the remarkable contributions and achievements of Lilian Lindsay.

  14. The History, present state, and future prospects of the Asian College of Psychosomatic Medicine (ACPM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishizu Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Asian College of Psychosomatic Medicine (ACPM was founded as the Asian Chapter of the International College of Psychosomatic Medicine (ICPM-AC in Tokyo on April 12, 1982. The first president was Hitoshi ISHIKAWA (Japan, the vice-presidents were Mahalingam MAHADEVAN (Malaysia and Burton G.BURTON-BRADLEY (Papua- New Guinea, and the general secretary was Sueharu TSUTSUI (Japan. Five years previously, preparation for creation of the ICPM-AC was started at the 4th World Congress of the International College of Psychosomatic Medicine (ICPM held in Kyoto, Japan, September 5-9, 1977. The First Congress of the ICPM-AC was held by the President Yujiro IKEMI in Tokyo on May 19-20, 1984. The main members in the early stage were Y. IKEMI, H. ISHIKAWA, S. TSUTSUI, Taisaku KATSURA, Tetsuya NAKAGAWA. Hiroyuki SUEMATSU and others from Japan and Hsien RIN (Taiwan, Seock Young KANG (Korea, M. MAHADEVAN. B.G. BURTON-BRADLEY and others from other Asian countries. Thereafter, academic congresses of the ICPM-AC, the 2nd to the 9th, were held approximately every two years, in Japan, India, Malaysia, Taiwan, Korea, and China. The name was changed to the Asian College of Psychosomatic Medicine (ACPM, and the 10th to 14th congresses were held in Taiwan, Okinawa (Japan, Australia, Korea, and China. The current president of the Executive Board of ACPM is Chiharu KUBO, the Director of Kyushu University Hospital. The next academic congress is the 15th ACPM and will be hosted by Tserenkhuugyin LKHAGVASUREN in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia from August 24-26, 2012. Participating countries have expanded to include Asian-Oceanic countries such as Mongolia, Micronesia, Australia and Sri Lanka. The main themes of the congresses have focused on psychosomatic disorders, culture - bound syndromes, oriental medicine, etc... To date,"Health promotion"by raising the level of mental health based on psychoneuroendocrinoimmunomodulation has been very important. Prevention is also

  15. The History, present state, and future prospects of the Asian College of Psychosomatic Medicine (ACPM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizu, Hiroshi

    2012-01-19

    The Asian College of Psychosomatic Medicine (ACPM) was founded as the Asian Chapter of the International College of Psychosomatic Medicine (ICPM-AC) in Tokyo on April 12, 1982.The first president was Hitoshi ISHIKAWA (Japan), the vice-presidents were Mahalingam MAHADEVAN (Malaysia) and Burton G.BURTON-BRADLEY (Papua- New Guinea), and the general secretary was Sueharu TSUTSUI (Japan).Five years previously, preparation for creation of the ICPM-AC was started at the 4th World Congress of the International College of Psychosomatic Medicine (ICPM) held in Kyoto, Japan, September 5-9, 1977.The First Congress of the ICPM-AC was held by the President Yujiro IKEMI in Tokyo on May 19-20, 1984. The main members in the early stage were Y. IKEMI, H. ISHIKAWA, S. TSUTSUI, Taisaku KATSURA, Tetsuya NAKAGAWA. Hiroyuki SUEMATSU and others from Japan and Hsien RIN (Taiwan), Seock Young KANG (Korea), M. MAHADEVAN. B.G. BURTON-BRADLEY and others from other Asian countries.Thereafter, academic congresses of the ICPM-AC, the 2nd to the 9th, were held approximately every two years, in Japan, India, Malaysia, Taiwan, Korea, and China. The name was changed to the Asian College of Psychosomatic Medicine (ACPM), and the 10th to 14th congresses were held in Taiwan, Okinawa (Japan), Australia, Korea, and China.The current president of the Executive Board of ACPM is Chiharu KUBO, the Director of Kyushu University Hospital.The next academic congress is the 15th ACPM and will be hosted by Tserenkhuugyin LKHAGVASUREN in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia from August 24-26, 2012.Participating countries have expanded to include Asian-Oceanic countries such as Mongolia, Micronesia, Australia and Sri Lanka.The main themes of the congresses have focused on psychosomatic disorders, culture - bound syndromes, oriental medicine, etc... To date,"Health promotion"by raising the level of mental health based on psychoneuroendocrinoimmunomodulation has been very important. Prevention is also important in the Asia - Oceana

  16. Andrea Pasta (1706-1782), eclectic scholar of anatomy and clinical medicine, communication and the history of art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerici, Carlo Alfredo; Veneroni, Laura; Patriarca, Carlo

    2014-11-01

    Andrea Pasta was an eclectic visionary light years ahead of his time. He made numerous contributions to the field of medicine, some recognized by his contemporaries and others so visionary that they are being applied only in modern times. His contributions spanned the disciplines of psychology, gynaecology, haematology, infectious diseases and the doctor-patient relationship. Well known among his contemporaries, he combined a passion for clinical medicine and a keen interest in history and art with a strict research methodology and an approach to caring for patients as human beings. By studying his life and works, we can better understand the magnitude and significance of his innovative method and its applicability in modern times and also the significance of his many contributions. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  17. History and Guideline of Emergency Medicine Residency Discipline in Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Iran; Review of 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Shojaee

    2014-09-01

    directly declared to him. Lastly, in ministry time of Dr. Farhadi in 2001 this major was initiated for the first time in Iran University of Medical Sciences. The present report was addressed to the education guideline of emergency medicine at Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences besides evaluating the formation history of emergency medicine discipline in Iran. 

  18. [An outline medical history of Taiwan (I): the period of folklore medicine and witch doctor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C

    1997-01-01

    The paper makes a correlated analysis on the origin of health folklore between Chinese in mainland and Taiwan island. After quoting literatures written by authors living in the Qing dynasty in Taiwan, this paper analyses health condition among aboriginals of Taiwan during the witchcraft age. Along with the increasing immigration from China mainland to Taiwan island, health of folklore and gods from China mainland were introduced into Taiwan, hence the period of witch doctor in Taiwan, featuring the correlation of both. Though modern medicine in Taiwan is so advanced, yet there are still witch doctors elsewhere.

  19. [History Of forensic medicine and the coroner system in the town of Bjelovar].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habek, Dubravko

    2013-09-01

    This review analyses historical sources on the development of forensic medicine and the coroner system in the town of Bjelovar over the past two centuries. The development of these two professional fields in the context of public health was regulated through a number of bylaws, such as Normativum Sanitatum from the time of the Habsburg Monarchy. Coroner examinations were performed by physicians, surgeons, and laymen using special instructions such as the famous booklet by nobleman and county medical officer Vilim Peičić from 1914. Forensic autopsy was performed by surgeons, primary or secondary hospital physicians in case of sudden or suspicious in-hospital deaths, whereas outpatient forensic autopsies were performed by county or town medical officers and district physicians at the request of investigating authorities (police, court, or general attorney's office). This historical review should serve as the basis for further historical research into this field in Croatia so as to obtain deeper insight into the development of forensic medicine and the coroner system, two professions that have always been a vital factor in public health.

  20. [The tension between history and medicine in TCM historiography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-Peng

    2011-11-01

    Before subject classification was introduced from the western world Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) had the background of Chinese traditional culture, and therefore the features of both medicine and historiography. After the introduction of subject classification, TCM was classified into medicine which is a science category and TCM history was classified into the historiography category. From then on, in the context of subject classification, the nature of TCM became more and more medical while less and less historic. As the subject classification of TCM has not been completed, its history needs retrospective study retrospective study needs to be done to its history. Focusing on TCM subject classification and on reality, TCM historiography usually highlights the medical part. In the process of TCM subject classification, the historic mode of academic development did not disappear. In the context of subject classification, TCM is usually classified to TCM historiography for its historic nature, while TCM historiography is somewhat medical because of TCM's medical nature. Considering the particularity of TCM, the tension between history and medicine should be maintained in the TCM historiography research.

  1. Behavioral medicine in China: history, current status, and future development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Bo; Ji, Feng

    2014-08-01

    Behavioral medicine in China has developed quickly in the last three decades. We briefly summarized the history, the main scope and achievements, and the future development of behavioral medicine in China. We did a literature search and discussed with senior scholars in behavioral medicine in China. The concept and main scope of behavioral medicine in China have been developed largely in accordance with the international perspective. Research in behavioral medicine in China significantly contributed to the better understanding of the relationship between various health behavioral factors and psychosomatic disorders and possible mechanisms of this relationship. The following aspects will be the main areas to be further developed in behavioral medicine in China: (1) Basic theories of behavioral medicine and theoretical mechanisms of higher nervous activities in human behavior regulation. (2) Etiology, pathogenesis, and mechanisms of common diseases that are closely related to human lifestyle behaviors. (3) Assessment criteria for unhealthy and disease-related behaviors. (4) Behavioral therapy of psychosomatic disorders, and rehabilitation technologies of disability. (5) Application of major findings from research of behavioral medical science in clinical practice and in health promotion of the whole society. Behavioral medicine in China, as a multidisciplinary subject, plays a relevant role in preventing behavior-related psychosomatic diseases and in promoting health of the public.

  2. A Modern History of 'Imperial Medicine' Surrounding Hansen's Disease: Strategies to Manage Public Opinion in Modern Japanese Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Gijae

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand the reality of imperial medicine by exploring the strategic attitude of the Japanese authority targeting the public who were not patients of Hansen's disease. For this purpose, this study examines the mass media data related to Hansen's disease published in Korea and Japan during the Japanese colonial rule. Research on Hansen's disease can be divided into medical, sociohistorical, social welfare, and human rights approach. There are medical studies and statistics on the dissemination of medical information about Hansen's disease and management measures, the history of the management of the disease, guarantee of the rights of the patients and the welfare environment, and studies on the autobiographical, literary writings and oral statements on the life and psychological conflicts of the patients. Among existing research, the topics of the study on Hansen's disease under the Japanese colonial rule include the history of the Sorokdo Island Sanatorium, investigation on the forced labor of the patients in the island, human rights violations against the patients, oral memoirs of the patients and doctors who practiced at that time. All of these studies are important achievements regarding the research on the patients. An important study of Hansen's disease in modern Japan is the work of Hujino Utaka, which introduces the isolation of and discrimination against the patients of Hansen's disease. Hujino Utaka's study examines the annihilation of people with infectious diseases in Japan and its colonies by the imperial government, which was the consequence of the imperial medical policies, and reports on the isolation of Hansen's disease patients during the war. Although these researches are important achievements in the study of Hansen's disease in modernity, their focus has mainly been on the history of isolation and exploitation in the Sorokdo Island Sanatorium and discrimination against the patients within the sanatorium, which

  3. [Common paths of psychiatry and forensic medicine--history and evolution of insanity defense concept from antiquity to modern times].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolechała, Filip

    2009-01-01

    Forensic psychiatry and psychology were in their beginnings inseparably associated with the forensic medicine, constituting one of its related branches of knowledge. Progress and development of these disciplines, education and the practical application for the purposes of the law were a contribution of a several generations of forensic pathologists in the 19th and 20th centuries. One of the major issues of common interest was opinionating on the sanity of offenders. However, the problem of criminal responsibility of the mentally ill perpetrators dates back to much earlier times and has its roots in the distant beginnings of human civilization. In this paper, the history and evolution of the insanity concept (as a circumstance excluding the guilt of the offender) were presented, from the oldest theories to ideas underlying modern codifications.

  4. [History of the rescue service in Germany--especially in regard to emergency medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefrin, P

    2003-10-01

    Emergency medicine is part of the oldest fields in medicine, however, organized rescue services were at first recognizable in the end of the 19th century or rather in the beginning of the 20th century. In 1908, on the first international congress for rescue services in Frankfurt, the preclinical part was described as a special science, for which a medical instruction would be necessary. In spite of an initially general rejection of an involvement of physicians in the rescue services, it was ascribed to physicians very early to carry out first aid in accidents or sudden illness. In 1958 Kirschner demanded an early medical care at the scene of the accident. After the second world war, the public rescue services were mainly controlled by the occupying powers. The realization of the rescue service was delegated to aid agencies and the fire brigades. In 1956 Bauer was the pioneer of the emergency physician service by dispatching a physician to the scene of the accident with a bus. Out of this resulted the first emergency physician service, which was imitated in many big cities within the Federal Republic of Germany. Since the care for accident casualities stood in the foreground at the beginning, surgeons mainly carried out this service. As the system became more and more established, the characteristics of the patients changed and medical emergency patients increasingly constituted the population of patients. That leaded to a shift in the specialties of the physicians taking part in the emergency physician service. Regarding the qualification specific guidelines were released in 1983 by the federal chamber of physicians in Germany.

  5. Concepts, Diagnosis and the History of Medicine: Historicising Ian Hacking and Munchausen Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, Chris

    2017-08-01

    Concepts used by historians are as historical as the diagnoses or categories that are studied. The example of Munchausen syndrome (deceptive presentation of illness in order to adopt the 'sick role') is used to explore this. Like most psychiatric diagnoses, Munchausen syndrome is not thought applicable across time by social historians of medicine. It is historically specific, drawing upon twentieth-century anthropology and sociology to explain motivation through desire for the 'sick role'. Ian Hacking's concepts of 'making up people' and 'looping effects' are regularly utilised outside of the context in which they are formed. However, this context is precisely the same anthropological and sociological insight used to explain Munchausen syndrome. It remains correct to resist the projection of Munchausen syndrome into the past. However, it seems inconsistent to use Hacking's concepts to describe identity formation before the twentieth century as they are given meaning by an identical context.

  6. Shaping Sexual Knowledge: A Cultural History of Sex Education in Twentieth Century Europe. Routledge Studies in the Social History of Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerteig, Lutz, Ed.; Davidson, Roger, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    The history of sex education enables us to gain valuable insights into the cultural constructions of what different societies have defined as 'normal' sexuality and sexual health. Yet, the history of sex education has only recently attracted the full attention of historians of modern sexuality. "Shaping Sexual Knowledge: A Cultural History of…

  7. LABORATORY OF CLINICAL IMMUNOLOGY N.V. SKLIFOSOVSKY RESEARCH INSTITUTE FOR EMERGENCY MEDICINE (HISTORY AND PRESENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Godkov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Assessment of the immune status of patients with urgent types of pathology in the Institute for Emergency Medicine is performed according to three main objects of research: humoral , phagocytic and lymphocytic components of immune system . This complex allows to fully and adequately evaluate the condition of the immune system of patients at different stages of traumatic disease and after transplantation of organs and tissues , to forecast the probability of septic complications developing, adjust the therapy . During 45 years of work of immunological service formed the algorithm of the adequate immunological screening was formed, number of innovative methods of diagnosis was developed, the ideology of post-test counseling of patients by immunologists was created, mathematical methods of storage, modeling and processing of research results was introduced. Laboratory staff identified a number of medical and social factors in the spread of blood-borne viral infections (HIV, hepatitis B and C. New organizational and economic methods of management team were introduced in the laboratory. The basis of the work is equal integration of scientific and clinical staff of the laboratory. 

  8. [The Salernitan School of Medicine: Its History and Contribution to European Medical Education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Tatsuo

    2015-12-01

    The Salernitan School of Medicine was founded in the late 10th century as a loose association of medical teachers. The period before the middle 13th century was divided into three phases. In the early phase, before the end of 11th century, "practica" books were written, utilizing extant ancient literature, Arabic medical treatises were translated into Latin, and the medical text "Articella" was compiled. In the high phase before the end of the 12th century, the "Articella" was commented upon and new pharmacopeia and practica books were written. In the late phase before the middle of the 13th century, physicians who graduated from Salerno were active in various countries in Europe. After the middle of the 13th century the school developed organizations and rules, became a university at the end of 16th century, and was closed in 1811. The Salernitan school produced "Articella", which pioneered in theoretical medical education, and produced "practica", which dealt with both local diseases from head to foot and systemic fever diseases, and it continued until the end of 18th century. The two major disciplines of medical education before the end of 18th century, theoretica and practica, were derived from Salerno.

  9. From WWII to Kingston, Ontario: The History of Queen's University School of Medicine, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Karen; Wyllie, Kenneth; Davidson, John

    2016-01-01

    To describe the origin and development of the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at the Queen's University School of Medicine (Kingston, Ontario). Resarch ethics board approval and privacy agreements from the Kingston General Hospital (KGH, Kingston, Ontario) medical archives were obtained. Primary and secondary data sources were identified. A systematic examination of newspaper archives, research literature, KGH medical advisory committee meeting minutes, and testimonies from Dr Kenneth Wyllie and Dr John Davidson were obtained. In 1949, Dr Albert Ross Tilley arrived at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario. There, Tilley initiated the Burn Unit at the KGH and began monthly teaching during the academic semester. Ken Wyllie (Meds '55), Lloyd Carlson (Meds '57) and John Emery (Meds '57) were the notable progeny of his early initiatives. In 1963, Kenneth Wyllie founded the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery in Kingston, Ontario, having completed plastic surgery training in Toronto and Edinburgh with experiences in Stockholm (Sweden), Paris (France) and Baltimore (Maryland, USA). He was shortly joined by Pat Shoemaker (Meds '66). John Davidson (Meds '82) arrived in 1989, bringing an interest in microsurgery and critical inquiry to the division. Five notable surgeons, Cartotto (Meds '88), Watkins, Watters, Meathrel (Meds '03) and McKay, further enhanced the Division's clinical and academic mission. The collective activity of the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at Queen's School of Medicine in its 66-year history has encouraged more than 40 others to pursue distinguished careers in the specialty throughout North America, including three past presidents of the Canadian Society of Plastic Surgeons.

  10. National Library of Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Catalog & Services History of Medicine Online Exhibitions & Digital Projects Information for Publishers Visit the Library Health Information in Other Languages Research at NLM Human Genome Resources Biomedical Research & Informatics Environmental Health & Toxicology Health Services Research & Public Health ...

  11. Oropharyngeal leprosy in art, history, and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scollard, D M; Skinsnes, O K

    1999-04-01

    Advanced lesions of the face, nasopharynx, and oropharynx have played an important role in the medical and social history of Hansen's disease. Renaissance artists included detailed portrayals of these lesions in some of their paintings, a testimony not only to their artistic skill and powers of observation but also to the common presence of these patients in European cities and towns of the period. The disease is now understood as a broad immunologic spectrum of host responses to Mycobacterium leprae, with a variety of clinical and pathologic manifestations in nerve, soft tissues, and bone. This review incorporates the findings of 2 extraordinary studies (one from Europe and the other from Japan) of pharyngeal and facial lesions. In the 1950s, studies of skeletal remains from the churchyard of a Danish leprosarium revealed a triad of maxillofacial lesions unique to leprosy and designated facies leprosa. In pre-World War II Japan, before effective treatment had been discovered, a prominent otorhinolaryngologist studying oropharyngeal and nasopharyngeal lesions prepared watercolor illustrations of the natural progression of untreated Hansen's disease. As a result of effective antimicrobial therapy, such advanced lesions are now rarely seen, but the presenting signs and symptoms of leprosy still occasionally arise in the nasal and oral mucosa. The nasopharynx and oropharynx may be important early sites of inoculation and infection by M leprae, and they require additional emphasis in worldwide efforts toward early diagnosis and treatment of Hansen's disease.

  12. The history of Imperial College London 1907-2007 higher education and research in science, technology and medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Gay, Hannah

    2007-01-01

    This is the first major history of Imperial College London. The book tells the story of a new type of institution that came into being in 1907 with the federation of three older colleges. Imperial College was founded by the state for advanced university-level training in science and technology, and for the promotion of research in support of industry throughout the British Empire. True to its name the college built a wide number of Imperial links and was an outward looking institution from the start. Today, in the post-colonial world, it retains its outward-looking stance, both in its many international research connections, and with staff and students from around the world. Connections to industry and the state remain important. The College is one of Britain's premier research and teaching institutions, including now medicine alongside science and engineering. This book is an in-depth study of Imperial College; it covers both governance and academic activity within the larger context of political, economic a...

  13. Various Items from the Museum of the History of Medicine in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1973-01-06

    Jan 6, 1973 ... sense of nostalgia for the days when £400 could still be regarded as a reasonable remuneration, and in others where one reads about outbreaks of hydrophobia, one. "'Date received: 19 June 1972. is thankful for the progress that medical science has made over the years. From the South African News ...

  14. Doctor of medicine profession (MD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Canadian who was one of the greatest professors of medicine in modern history. He worked at ... medicine and later went to Oxford as Regent professor, where he was knighted. He established patient-oriented ...

  15. History of education in medicine and surgery, first hospitals development of urology in danzig/Gdańsk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajączkowski, Tadeusz

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to present the development of hospital services and the teaching of medicine, and the development of urology in Danzig (Gdańisk). Well known Danzig surgeons who were interested in surgery of the genitourinary system are also presented. The beginning of urological surgery and its development within the framework of the department of surgery and as an independent facility at the Medical Academy of Gdafisk in the post-war period is also described. Extensive research was undertaken for the collection of literature and documents in German and Polish archives and libraries in order to prepare this study. The history of hospitals in Danzig goes back to the arrival of the Teutonic Knights in 1308. The earliest institution, according to historical sources, was the Hospital of the Holy Spirit, built in the years 1310-1311. It was run by the Hospitalet Order until 1382, and was intended for the sick, elderly and disabled people, orphans and needy pilgrim, and the poor. Later centuries saw the further development of hospital services in Danzig. In the 19th century, the city's increas ing population, the development of the sciences, and rapid advances in medicine subsequently led to the establishment of three more hospitals in Gdafisk: The Hospital for Obstetrics and Gynaecological Disease (1819), the Holy Virgin Hospital (1852), and the Evangelical Hospital of Deaconess Sisters (1857), in addition to the old Municipal Hospital. In 1911, new modern buildings of Municipal Hospital in Danzig were finished. On the basis of the Municipal Hospi- tal, the Academy of Practical Medicine was established in 1935. It was known under the name Staatliche Akademie fiir Praktische Medizin in the Free City of Danzig. Five years later (in 1940) the Academy was developed and changed to the Medical Academy of Danzig (Medizinische Akad- emie Danzig - MAD). The beginning of medical teaching at the middle level in Danzig (Gdafsk) dates back to the 16th century. It had its

  16. A legislative history of federal assistance for health professions training in primary care medicine and dentistry in the United States, 1963-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, P Preston

    2008-11-01

    This article reviews the legislative history of Title VII of the United States Public Health Service Act. It describes three periods of federal support for health professions training in medicine and dentistry. During the first era, 1963 to 1975, federal support led to an increase in the overall production of physicians and dentists, primarily through grants for construction, renovation, and expansion of schools. The second period, 1976 to 1991, witnessed a shift in federal support to train physicians, dentists, and physician assistants in the fields of primary care defined as family medicine, general internal medicine, and general pediatrics. During this era, divisions of general internal medicine and general pediatrics, and departments of family medicine, were established in nearly every medical and osteopathic medical school. All three disciplines conducted primary care residencies, medical student clerkships, and faculty development programs. The third period, 1992 to present, emphasized the policy goals of caring for vulnerable populations, greater diversity in the health professions, and curricula innovations to prepare trainees for the future practice of medicine and dentistry. Again, Title VII grantees met these policy goals by designing curricula and creating clinical experiences to teach care of the homeless, persons with HIV, the elderly, and other vulnerable populations. Many grantees recruited underrepresented minorities into their programs as trainees and as faculty, and all of them designed and implemented new curricula to address emerging health priorities.This article is part of a theme issue of Academic Medicine on the Title VII health professions training programs.

  17. Occupational injuries in Greece (1938-1955): history of medicine and descriptive epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachiotis, G; Constantinidis, T C; Dounias, G; Drivas, S; Makropoulos, V

    2004-01-01

    To describe the longitudinal trends in the rates of total and fatal occupational accidents in Greece during 1938-1955. Information on occupational injuries have been provided from the yearly reports of the Organization of Social Insurances (1938-1955) and on population data from the tables of National Statistic Agency. Bio-statistical analysis was performed by the use of SPSS software and Stat-Calc of Epi Info. The evolution of the longitudinal trend of occupational accidents has revealed a biphasic character, with a decreasing trend during 1938-1945 and an increasing trend during 1946-1955. The phenomenon was obvious in both sexes and in all age groups. On the contrary fatal occupational injuries increased across the period 1938-1945 and subsequently decreased. These temporal trends can be interpreted on the light of the important reduction in the level of economic activity during the second world war and the subsequent gradual recovery in the post war period. The biphasic characteristics of the occupational accidents longitudinal trend seems to be influenced by historical factors. Important lessons were learnt from the period of war. The decrease of the rate of total occupational accidents does not necessary reflect a satisfactory level of safety at work. The level of the economic activity, the efficiency of the registration and prevention agencies play a role. In addition, the rate of fatal injuries has a critical role in benchmarking national occupational health performance.

  18. Brain death and Islam: the interface of religion, culture, history, law, and modern medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Andrew C; Ziad-Miller, Amna; Elamin, Elamin M

    2014-10-01

    How one defines death may vary. It is important for clinicians to recognize those aspects of a patient's religious beliefs that may directly influence medical care and how such practices may interface with local laws governing the determination of death. Debate continues about the validity and certainty of brain death criteria within Islamic traditions. A search of PubMed, Scopus, EMBASE, Web of Science, PsycNet, Sociological Abstracts, DIALOGUE ProQuest, Lexus Nexus, Google, and applicable religious texts was conducted to address the question of whether brain death is accepted as true death among Islamic scholars and clinicians and to discuss how divergent opinions may affect clinical care. The results of the literature review inform this discussion. Brain death has been acknowledged as representing true death by many Muslim scholars and medical organizations, including the Islamic Fiqh Academies of the Organization of the Islamic Conference and the Muslim World League, the Islamic Medical Association of North America, and other faith-based medical organizations as well as legal rulings by multiple Islamic nations. However, consensus in the Muslim world is not unanimous, and a sizable minority accepts death by cardiopulmonary criteria only.

  19. The History, Mechanism, and Clinical Application of Auricular Therapy in Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pu-Wei Hou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Auricular therapy includes acupuncture, electroacupuncture, acupressure, lasering, cauterization, moxibustion, and bloodletting in the auricle. For 2500 years, people have employed auricular therapy for treating diseases, but the methods have been limited to bloodletting and cauterization. Only after 1957, the international scientific community became aware that the map of the ear resembles an inverted fetus, its introduction has led to auricular acupuncture (AA becoming a more systemic approach, and, following the identification and standardization of more precise points, AA has been employed in clinical applications. The mechanisms of AA are considered to have a close relationship with the autonomic nervous system, the neuroendocrine system, neuroimmunological factors, neuroinflammation, and neural reflex, as well as antioxidation. Auricular therapy has been applied, for example, for pain relief, for the treatment of epilepsy, anxiety, and obesity, and for improving sleep quality. However, the mechanisms and evidence for auricular therapy warrant further study.

  20. The History, Mechanism, and Clinical Application of Auricular Therapy in Traditional Chinese Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Pu-Wei; Hsu, Hsin-Cheng; Lin, Yi-Wen; Tang, Nou-Ying; Cheng, Chin-Yi; Hsieh, Ching-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Auricular therapy includes acupuncture, electroacupuncture, acupressure, lasering, cauterization, moxibustion, and bloodletting in the auricle. For 2500 years, people have employed auricular therapy for treating diseases, but the methods have been limited to bloodletting and cauterization. Only after 1957, the international scientific community became aware that the map of the ear resembles an inverted fetus, its introduction has led to auricular acupuncture (AA) becoming a more systemic approach, and, following the identification and standardization of more precise points, AA has been employed in clinical applications. The mechanisms of AA are considered to have a close relationship with the autonomic nervous system, the neuroendocrine system, neuroimmunological factors, neuroinflammation, and neural reflex, as well as antioxidation. Auricular therapy has been applied, for example, for pain relief, for the treatment of epilepsy, anxiety, and obesity, and for improving sleep quality. However, the mechanisms and evidence for auricular therapy warrant further study.

  1. A Manual of Cherokee Herbal Remedies: History, Information, Identification, Medicinal Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Patricia D.

    This thesis reports on the research of 25 plants, used as herbal remedies since the 1800s by the author's Native American ancestors (the Day family) and the Cherokee tribe. The plants were identified in four state parks in southwestern Indiana. Information sources included the research literature, articles on Cherokee herbal remedies, and…

  2. Odontology and the history of medicine at the Royal Society of Medicine 1907-1960 and the contributions of Lilian Lindsay--Part One. The early years of the Royal Society of Medicine and the Section of Odontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papworth, Julie

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the foundation of the Royal Society of Medicine and the Sections of Odontology. It considers the remarkable achievements of Lilian Lindsay which were made at a time when the medical world was almost entirely dominated by men.

  3. Twenty years history and the future of Asian-Pacific Association of Laser Medicine and Surgery (APLMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atsumi, Kazuhiko

    2005-07-01

    In 1986, APLMS was established to promote the various activities of Laser Medicine Surgery in the Asia-pacific regions. The purpose of APLMS is not only to deliver academic information but also technological, industrial and social ones. Until now, the 9 congresses had been taken place in the different countries in Asia-Pacific regions. As the results of the 18years" efforts, the organizations of each country on laser medicine and surgery have been established, and the network of researchers and clinicians has been completed. The next challenges are proposed such as education, training, and standardization of methods. To establish guidelines and regulation for laser medicine and surgery, and to transfer technology are also important issues.

  4. Evolutionary history and leaf succulence as explanations for medicinal use in aloes and the global popularity of Aloe vera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Olwen M; Buerki, Sven; Symonds, Matthew R E; Forest, Félix; van Wyk, Abraham E; Smith, Gideon F; Klopper, Ronell R; Bjorå, Charlotte S; Neale, Sophie; Demissew, Sebsebe; Simmonds, Monique S J; Rønsted, Nina

    2015-02-26

    Aloe vera supports a substantial global trade yet its wild origins, and explanations for its popularity over 500 related Aloe species in one of the world's largest succulent groups, have remained uncertain. We developed an explicit phylogenetic framework to explore links between the rich traditions of medicinal use and leaf succulence in aloes. The phylogenetic hypothesis clarifies the origins of Aloe vera to the Arabian Peninsula at the northernmost limits of the range for aloes. The genus Aloe originated in southern Africa ~16 million years ago and underwent two major radiations driven by different speciation processes, giving rise to the extraordinary diversity known today. Large, succulent leaves typical of medicinal aloes arose during the most recent diversification ~10 million years ago and are strongly correlated to the phylogeny and to the likelihood of a species being used for medicine. A significant, albeit weak, phylogenetic signal is evident in the medicinal uses of aloes, suggesting that the properties for which they are valued do not occur randomly across the branches of the phylogenetic tree. Phylogenetic investigation of plant use and leaf succulence among aloes has yielded new explanations for the extraordinary market dominance of Aloe vera. The industry preference for Aloe vera appears to be due to its proximity to important historic trade routes, and early introduction to trade and cultivation. Well-developed succulent leaf mesophyll tissue, an adaptive feature that likely contributed to the ecological success of the genus Aloe, is the main predictor for medicinal use among Aloe species, whereas evolutionary loss of succulence tends to be associated with losses of medicinal use. Phylogenetic analyses of plant use offer potential to understand patterns in the value of global plant diversity.

  5. Chocolate in History: Food, Medicine, Medi-Food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatella Lippi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Throughout history, chocolate has been used to treat a wide variety of ailments, and in recent years, multiple studies have found that chocolate can have positive health effects, providing evidence to a centuries-long established use; this acknowledgement, however, did not have a straight course, having been involved in religious, medical and cultural controversies. Christian Europe, in fact, feared the exhilarating effects of new drinks, such as chocolate, coffee and tea. Therefore, these beverages would have been banished, had not doctors and scientists explained that they were good for the body. The scientific debate, which reached its peak in Florence in the 18th century, regarded the therapeutic effectiveness of the various chocolate components: it was necessary to know their properties first, in order to prepare the best cacao concoction for every patient. When Dietetics separated from Medicine, however, chocolate acquired the role of vehicle for easing the administration of bitter medicines, being associated to different health problems. The recent rediscovery of the beneficial use of cacao and chocolate focuses upon its value as supplemental nutrition. Building a bridge to the past may be helpful to detect the areas where the potential health benefits of chocolate are likely to be further explored.

  6. Chocolate in history: food, medicine, medi-food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, Donatella

    2013-05-14

    Throughout history, chocolate has been used to treat a wide variety of ailments, and in recent years, multiple studies have found that chocolate can have positive health effects, providing evidence to a centuries-long established use; this acknowledgement, however, did not have a straight course, having been involved in religious, medical and cultural controversies. Christian Europe, in fact, feared the exhilarating effects of new drinks, such as chocolate, coffee and tea. Therefore, these beverages would have been banished, had not doctors and scientists explained that they were good for the body. The scientific debate, which reached its peak in Florence in the 18th century, regarded the therapeutic effectiveness of the various chocolate components: it was necessary to know their properties first, in order to prepare the best cacao concoction for every patient. When Dietetics separated from Medicine, however, chocolate acquired the role of vehicle for easing the administration of bitter medicines, being associated to different health problems. The recent rediscovery of the beneficial use of cacao and chocolate focuses upon its value as supplemental nutrition. Building a bridge to the past may be helpful to detect the areas where the potential health benefits of chocolate are likely to be further explored.

  7. Chocolate in History: Food, Medicine, Medi-Food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, Donatella

    2013-01-01

    Throughout history, chocolate has been used to treat a wide variety of ailments, and in recent years, multiple studies have found that chocolate can have positive health effects, providing evidence to a centuries-long established use; this acknowledgement, however, did not have a straight course, having been involved in religious, medical and cultural controversies. Christian Europe, in fact, feared the exhilarating effects of new drinks, such as chocolate, coffee and tea. Therefore, these beverages would have been banished, had not doctors and scientists explained that they were good for the body. The scientific debate, which reached its peak in Florence in the 18th century, regarded the therapeutic effectiveness of the various chocolate components: it was necessary to know their properties first, in order to prepare the best cacao concoction for every patient. When Dietetics separated from Medicine, however, chocolate acquired the role of vehicle for easing the administration of bitter medicines, being associated to different health problems. The recent rediscovery of the beneficial use of cacao and chocolate focuses upon its value as supplemental nutrition. Building a bridge to the past may be helpful to detect the areas where the potential health benefits of chocolate are likely to be further explored. PMID:23673608

  8. [Nazism and medicine. Learning from history].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-López, E

    2011-04-01

    Between 1933-1945 in Nazi Germany, physicians and other professional care providers participated in forced sterilization of patients who were carriers of genetic origin diseases and psychiatric disorders, extermination of children and adults with congenital and mental diseases, "scientific and pseudoscientific" medical experiments without consent and mass extermination of people based on their religion, political, cultural or sexual identity (Jews, gypsies, homosexuals). At present, the same ethical issues present during Nazi Period (research limits, end-life decisions, role of the physician as state or health system servant, and genetic research) continue to be present in routine medical care. Having knowledge of the past and the role played by Nazi doctors reinforces the necessary emphasis on bioethics and professionalism within the training of professional health providers. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  9. [From the History of the German Society of Internal Medicine (DGIM) - Part 1: The DGIM in the Nazi era].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsbach, Ralf; Hofer, Hans-Georg

    2017-12-01

    51 years after its founding in 1882, the "Congress for Internal Medicine", 1920 renamed "German Society for Internal Medicine (DGIM)", fell into heavy water. While during the Kaiserreich and the Weimar Republic the medical care for the individual patient had never been seriously questioned, the proclaimed "Third Reich" brought fundamental changes. The 1164 male and 13 female physicians, who had been organized in the DGIM 1933, had to position themselves in the Nazi dictatorship. The same applied for the society as a whole.The behavior of the German Society of Internal Medicine during the Nazi period is disenchanting. The society completely subordinated to the Nazi regime. The scientific program of the meetings was oriented to the ideological interests of the regime. Solidarity with nazi-persecuted people is only apparent in rare cases. On the contrary, even DGIM chairmen were involved in expulsions and NS-medical crimes. Cautious criticism was limited to a few areas, such as the "Neue Deutsche Heilkunde" ("New German Healing") and the study conditions at the universities. Only individual DGIM members developed oppositional behavior on the basis of personal conviction.In accordance with the more recent research on the Nazi era, these results both clarify and broaden the picture of scientific organizations in general and medical societies in particular. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Why the history of nephrology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eknoyan, Garabed

    2016-01-01

    Nephrology is a relatively new discipline that emerged at a time when the writing of the history of medicine was changing drastically. While the merits of medical history were valued since antiquity, it was only in the 18th century that the actual historiography of medicine began. It was nurtured, matured and appreciated enough that by the late 19th and early 20th centuries, medical history was incorporated into the medical curriculum and presented at national meetings. Unfortunately, the merits of medical history and its inclusion in medical education have come under increasing scrutiny over the past few decades. Ironically, the erosion began at about the same time that scholarly work on the history of medicine was flourishing whilst that of scientific discovery and innovation in medicine was accelerating. The demands of rigorous research into the history of medicine gradually led to the emergence of medical history as an independent discipline within academic departments of history. Simultaneously, the exponential growth of new information generated by medical research led to an overflow of medical knowledge in which the inclusion of medical history was contested and dismissed. That is just about the time that nephrology emerged in the 1960s. Whereas initially the quest for origins led renal journals to publish historical articles, the more recent quest to increase impact factors has led to the exclusion of historical articles from consideration for publication. This manuscript examines the reasons that brought about the separation of nephrology from its history and proposes potential solutions to their rapprochement.

  11. Evolutionary history and leaf succulence as explanations for medicinal use in aloes and the global popularity of Aloe vera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grace, Olwen Megan; Buerki, Sven; Symonds, Matthew RE

    2015-01-01

    Background: Aloe vera supports a substantial global trade yet its wild origins, and explanations for its popularity over 500 related Aloe species in one of the world’s largest succulent groups, have remained uncertain. We developed an explicit phylogenetic framework to explore links between...... the rich traditions of medicinal use and leaf succulence in aloes. Results: The phylogenetic hypothesis clarifies the origins of Aloe vera to the Arabian Peninsula at the northernmost limits of the range for aloes. The genus Aloe originated in southern Africa ~16 million years ago and underwent two major...... radiations driven by different speciation processes, giving rise to the extraordinary diversity known today. Large, succulent leaves typical of medicinal aloes arose during the most recent diversification ~10 million years ago and are strongly correlated to the phylogeny and to the likelihood of a species...

  12. Use of Rorschach tests at the Nuremberg war crimes trial: A forgotten chapter in history of medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimsdale, Joel E

    2015-06-01

    Seventy years ago, psychiatrists and psychologists had unusual access to the Nazi leaders awaiting trial by the International Military Tribunal in Nuremberg. Early leaders in the field of psychosomatic medicine were instrumental in facilitating these interviews as well as arranging for the administration of psychological testing with the Rorschach inkblot test. These observations were kept under wraps for decades and there remains controversy even now about what these Rorschachs revealed-demonic psychopaths or just morally corrupt individuals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The concept of normality through history: a didactic review of features related to philosophy, statistics and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, A A; Conti, A; Gensini, G F

    2006-09-01

    Normality characterises in medicine any possible qualitative or quantitative situation whose absence implies an illness or a state of abnormality. The illness concept was first a philosophical one. But the use of mathematics in the study of biological events, which began with Galton (1822-1911) and with Pearson (1857-1936), changed the frame of reference. In the second part of the 19th century mathematics was used to study the distribution of some biological characteristics in the evolution of the species. Around 1900, statistics became the basis for the study of the diffusion of the illnesses. Half a century later statistics made possible the transition from the description of single cases to groups of cases. Even more important is the concept of "normality" in laboratory medicine. In this field the search for the "perfect norm" was, and possibly still is, under way. The widespread use of statistics in the laboratory has allowed the definition, in a certain sense, of a new normality. This is the reason why the term "reference value" has been introduced. However, even the introduction of this new term has merely shifted the problem, and not resolved it.

  14. What's the Original Concept of Meridian and Acupuncture Point in Oriental Medicine? - A Perspective of Medical History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YIN Chang- Shik

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Meridian and acupuncture point(MAP is a core theory of acupuncture and essential building blocks of oriental medicine. There still continue theoretic or experimental arguments and controversies on the origination or original concept of MAP, without any definite approval or disapproval of a hypothesis. The theory of MAP is an historic product and has never been outside of historic influences. This study discusses the original concept of meridian and acupuncture point theory and its historical evolution, based on the review of classic literatures on meridian including the mawangdui medical texts of Han dynasty. The concept of MAP served as a empirical reference system in clinical settings irrespective of the anatomical entity of MAP.

  15. On the history of medicine in the United States, theory, health insurance, and psychiatry: an interview with Charles Rosenberg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Charles; Mantovani, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    An interview with Charles Rosenberg conducted by Rafael Mantovani in November 2013 that addressed four topics. It first focused on the way in which Rosenberg perceived trends and directions in historical research on medicine in the United States during the second half of the twentieth century. The second focus was on his experience with other important historians who wrote about public health. Thirdly, he discussed his impressions about the current debate on health policy in his country. Finally, the last part explores some themes related to psychiatry and behavior control that have appeared in a number of his articles.

  16. ["Lingue di seripi", "serpents' tongues" and "glossopetrae". Highlights from the history of popular "cult" medicine in early modern times].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freller, T

    1997-01-01

    In the 16th, 17th and 18th century "Glossopetrae", popularly known as "Lingue di Serpi", found on the Mediterranean island of Malta, were extensively used for medical purposes as antidotes. These fossil teeth, including specimens of the "Carcharodon Megalodon" (an extinct variant of the great white shark), were ground to powder or used as amulet pendants and "credence" and exported to pharmacies and shops in various cities of Europe. In antiquity, authors like Plinius or Solinus, excluding any religious connotations, had regarded "Glossopetrae" as objects "fallen from heaven on dark moonless nights". However, from the beginning of the 16th century the miraculous antidotic power of the specimens found at Malta was very strongly connected with the Pauline cult there. This cult owed ist origin to the excerpt of the shipwreck of the Apostle of the Gentiles on this island, as recorded in the New Testament. As in so many cases found in medieval and early modern medicine and pharmacy, the renown, collection, distribution and use of the antidote "Glossopetrae" or "Lingue di Serpi" was never limited to its real chemical and pharmaceutical properties. In the period of enlightenment and secular thinking mythic medicine as "Glossopetrae" had lost ist "magical" power. Consequently, with beginning of the late 18th century also the Maltese "Glossopetrae" featured in literature merely as exotic objects of curiosity or symbols of an age bound to medical superstition.

  17. A systematic overview of the first pasteurised VWF/FVIII medicinal product, Haemate P/ Humate -P: history and clinical performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berntorp, E.; Archey, W.; Auerswald, G.

    2008-01-01

    , plasma-derived VWF/FVIII medicinal product, which was first licensed in Germany in 1981 for the treatment of HA-associated bleeding. It has since then come to be accepted as the gold standard for both the treatment and prophylaxis of bleeding in VWD, especially in cases where desmopressin [1-deamino-8-D......-arginine vasopressin (DDAVP)] has been ineffective. Haemate P was the first effectively virus-inactivated (pasteurisation: 60 degrees C for 10 h in aqueous solution) FVIII product, whereby the risk of potentially threatening infective complications of plasma-derived products was reduced. Haemate P was also shown...... including surgical interventions. By virtue of its plasma-derived combination of VWF and FVIII, in addition to its high VWF:FVIII content ratio (2.4:1), Haemate P is also associated with successful immune tolerance induction in those patients developing inhibitor antibodies. Although the theoretical risk...

  18. "History, Theory and Ethics of Medicine": The Last Ten Years. A Survey of Course Content, Methods and Structural Preconditions at Twenty-nine German Medical Faculties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schildmann, Jan; Bruns, Florian; Hess, Volker; Vollmann, Jochen

    2017-01-01

    Objective: "History, Theory, Ethics of Medicine" (German: "Geschichte, Theorie, Ethik der Medizin", abbreviation: GTE) forms part of the obligatory curriculum for medical students in Germany since the winter semester 2003/2004. This paper presents the results of a national survey on the contents, methods and framework of GTE teaching. Methods: Semi-structured questionnaire dispatched in July 2014 to 38 institutions responsible for GTE teaching. Descriptive analysis of quantitative data and content analysis of free-text answers. Results: It was possible to collect data from 29 institutes responsible for GTE teaching (response: 76%). There is at least one professorial chair for GTE in 19 faculties; two professorial chairs or professorships remained vacant at the time of the survey. The number of students taught per academic year ranges from 350. Teaching in GTE comprises an average of 2.18 hours per week per semester (min: 1, max: 6). Teaching in GTE is proportionally distributed according to an arithmetic average as follows: history: 35.4%, theory 14.7% and ethics 49.9%. Written learning objectives were formulated for GTE in 24 faculties. The preferred themes of teaching in history, theory or ethics which according to respondents should be taught comprise a broad spectrum and vary. Teaching in ethics (79 from a max. of 81 possible points) is, when compared to history (61/81) and theory (53/81), attributed the most significance for the training of medical doctors. Conclusion: 10 years after the introduction of GTE the number of students and the personnel resources available at the institutions vary considerably. In light of the differences regarding the content elicited in this study the pros and cons of heterogeneity in GTE should be discussed.

  19. [Henri Beckquerel's discovery of radioactivity, and history of nuclear medicine. 100 years in the shadow or on the shoulder of Röntgen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rootwelt, K

    1996-12-10

    In 1896 Henri Becquerel discovered that uranium emitted penetrating rays similar to X-rays. His finding started a series of discoveries that were rewarded with numerous Nobel prizes. Marie and Pierre Curie found that thorium was radioactive too, and discovered and described two new elements, polonium and radium. They also found that radioactive radiation could be separated into alpha, beta and gamma rays. In 1993 their daughter Irene Joliot-Curie and her husband Frederic Joliot managed to produce radioactivity artificially by bombarding atomic nuclei with alpha particles. Enrico Fermi did likewise, but bombarded the nuclei with neutrons. In the cyclotron invented by Ernest Lawrence, radioactive isotopes were produced by proton bombardment. The ability to produce radioisotopes of different elements initiated a variety of tracer studies in biology and medicine. The number of studies increased exponentially when the nuclear reactor in Oak Ridge, US, was opened for radionuclide production in 1946. This article summarises the history of the application of radionuclides in science and medicine internationally and in Norway until now.

  20. [History of incompability among medicinals of "Glycyrrhiza antagonistic to Sargassum, Euphorbia Pekinensis, Kansui, and Genkwa" and its modern recognition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chenxue; Bian, Yali; Fan, Xinsheng

    2015-05-01

    The allegation of "Glycyrrhiza antagonistic to Sargassum, Euphorbia Pekinensis, Kansui, and Genkwa", being one of the hypotheses of "18 antagonisms" in TCM pharmacology, is referring to the antagonistic action among the Radix et Rhizoma Glycyrrhiza and Radix Euphorbiae Kansui, Radix Euphorbiae Pekinensis, Flos Genkwa, and Sargassum when compounded together in a single recipe. By reviewing its history concerted with modern knowledge, it can be found that the theory of "seven emotions" was originated from Shennong's Classic of Materia Medica; while the Variorum of the Classic of Materia Medica firstly and definitely records that Radix et Rhizoma Glycyrrhizae is forbidden to be used with Radix Kansui, Flos Genkwa, Radix Euphorbiae Pekinensis, Sargassum together in a single formula. It was summarized into a Chinese poetic sentence as above-mentioned later. In the works of later ages, including Chinese Pharmacopoeia, A Great Dictionary of Chinese Materia Medica, and China's Herbology, etc., all enhance the understanding of the prohibited combination of Radix et Rhizoma Glycyrrhizae and its incompatible herbs. Nevertheless, there are discrepancies between the results of modern experimental and clinical studies on this problem, which, needless to say, should be resolved by further investigations.

  1. Tibetan medicine: a unique heritage of person-centered medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberti di Sarsina, Paolo; Ottaviani, Luigi; Mella, Joey

    2011-12-01

    With a history going back approximately 2,500 years, the Tibetan medicine, known as Sowa Rigpa in the Tibetan language, is one of the world's oldest known traditional medicine. It originally developed during the pre-Buddhist era in the kingdom known as Shang Shung. As a traditional medicine, the future development of Tibetan medicine in Western countries is linked to being recognized as a popular and viable healthcare option providing an alternative clinical reality. Its inherent ability to incorparate predictive diagnostics, targeted prevention, and the creation of individualized medical treatment give Tibetan medicine great potential for assessing and treating patients.

  2. [What is the link between the sister of the "Titanic" and the history of medicine in Palestine?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Zalman

    2006-06-01

    On 21st November 1916, the Royal Navy Hospital ship 'Britannic' (the sister ship of the 'Titanic') was torpedoed near the island of Kea in the Aegean Sea. Captain Dr. John Cropper, aged 52, was one of 30 people who drowned of the 1100 on board. Dr. Cropper was born in 1864, at Guisborough, England. He obtained his medical degree from Cambridge University in 1891. After his marriage to Anne Ellen Walker in 1895, the Church Missionary Society sent him on a medical mission to Palestine. Dr. Cropper stayed in Palestine for about 10 years working in Acre, Nablus, Ramallah and Jerusalem. He published his experiences in 35 articles and letters in English medical periodicals, more than anyone else did in Palestine at that time. In those publications, he described various operations that he carried out and observations on infectious diseases, most of which were the first descriptions from that remote and unhealthy country. His prominent research was in the field of malaria - the most common and important disease in Palestine during that period. It was less than two years after Grassi's discovery of the role of Anopheles mosquitoes as the vector of human malaria that Dr. Cropper carried out surveys of larval and adult mosquitoes in correlation with malarial distribution in Palestine. Dr. Cropper was the first who routinely examined slides microscopically in Palestine and correctly diagnosed the type of malaria. Dr. Cropper was also the first in Palestine to suggest antimalarial measures aimed directly at the mosquito vector and paid attention to ecological aspects such as breeding places and the daily behavior of adult mosquitoes. Dr. Cropper noted the common antimalarial measurements of that time, such as covering of wells, planting of Eucalyptus trees to drain swamps and the routine use of quinine as a preventive medicine, but he wrote that those measures were not effective under the local conditions. He suggested that the only effective measures must be aimed against the

  3. [Thomas Bartholin, theological anatomy in the 17th century --religion and science in Danish history of medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mønster-Kjaer, Inge

    2009-01-01

    It is commonly accepted, that the Reformation heavily influenced scientific thinking in Europe. But in many historical accounts, this effect is presented as a fundamental break at the beginning of the 16th century with previous ideas and methods. In this view, scientists turned their back on explanations based on religion and began deliberately and determinedly to pull society away from the church. After studying Bartholin's writings, particularly some of the less well known texts such as his treatises on biblical medicine, I have come to the conclusion, that he in fact saw himself primarily as a theologian. For him anatomy was merely a tool, and so it had been for scientist all over Europe from its gradual evolvement as a field of study from Antiquity to the Renaissance. It had been a tool to illustrate the greatness and perfection of God's Creation in artistic ways, a tool to prove sanctity, a tool to establish causes of death in both judicial and medical contexts etc.

  4. Narrative and Cultural History in the Hippocratic Treatise On Ancient Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Romani Mistretta

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the ‘history of medicine’ outlined by the author of the Hippocratic treatise On Ancient Medicine, in order to reflect on the relationship between medicine and narrative in Classical Greece. At the outset of the work, the author provides an account of the beginnings of his discipline, conceiving of medicine’s history as a continuum of research and findings that unravel the nature of the human body and the cause of diseases. As this paper shows, the physician-narrator assigns to his craft a crucial role in fostering the birth and progress of human civilization. The rhetorical goals of the historical account are, as I argue, attained through a subtle narrative strategy. In fact, the narrator locates the origins of medicine within a teleological framework, marked by strong emphasis on the heuristic method that characterizes the past, the present, and the future of medical knowledge at once.

  5. Family medicine training and practice in Malawi: History, progress ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article analyses the development and implementation of family medicine training and practice in Malawi, with special attention given to its current status and the projected role the trained family physician will be expected to play in the future. The general aim of the paper is to briefly review the role of family physicians in ...

  6. [The relations between music and medicine in history and present].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasenzer, E R; Neugebauer, E A M

    2011-12-01

    Since the ancient world relations exist between music and medicine. In the prehistoric music, dance, rhythm and religious practice were important parts of shamanism and early medical procedures. Important philosophers of the classic period already began with the scientific research of musical and medical questions. During the middle age convents conserved ancient knowledge. They offered medical care and taught the ancient knowledge of medicine, arts and music. The Gregorian choral was created. Traditions of popular believe expressed the relations between music and medicine. The Renaissance became the great époque of art, music and science. Leonardo da Vinci and Andreas Vesalius presented a new style of artistic working and scientific knowledge. Also the basics of western music, like tonality was developed. With the separation of scientific subjects in natural sciences and humanities, the relationships between music and medicine fall into oblivion. During the classic and romantic era music and art were important parts of cultural live of the well educated society. With the development of neurology, psychiatry and psychoanalysis more physicians and scientists were interested in musical questions. Questions about the role of music in human behavior and the ancient method to use music in medical treatment became popular. In the early 20th century the music therapy was developed. Today the effects of music to the human brain are investigated with radionuclear methods. A lot of investigations showed the effect of music and music performance to humans. Music plays an important part in psychotherapy, therapeutic pedagogy and medical care, the importance of music and music therapy increases. In the 80ies of the 20th century the performing arts medicine was developed, which asks for the medical problems of performing musicians. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. A History of Medicine and the Establishment of Medical Institutions in Middlesex County, New Jersey that Transformed Doctor and Patient Relationships during the Early Twentieth Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield-Spinner, Linda

    2011-01-01

    The early twentieth century was a period of tremendous advancements in medicine and technology and as a result experienced a revolutionary change in the delivery of healthcare in America. Modern medicine which encompassed specialized knowledge, technical procedures, and rules of behavior, changed the way medical care was provided in the United…

  8. Silent Bias: Challenges, Obstacles, and Strategies for Leadership Development in Academic Medicine-Lessons From Oral Histories of Women Professors at the University of Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingleton, Susan K; Jones, Emily V M; Rosolowski, Tacey A; Zimmerman, Mary K

    2016-08-01

    Despite dramatic increases in female learners and junior faculty, a significant gap remains in female leadership in academic medicine. To assess challenges and obstacles encountered, strategies for academic success, and lessons learned for leadership development, the authors conducted an in-depth study of women full professors. The authors used a qualitative oral history approach, interviewing 87% of the cohort of female full professors at one Midwestern medical school in 2013 using a pretested, open-ended, semistructured interview guide. Interviews were videotaped and the audio recordings transcribed. Content was sorted into categories and key themes identified within each category. Participants described significant challenges: being treated with "silent bias," "being ignored," and being seen as an "other." Coping strategies included downplaying, keeping a distance, employing humor, and using symbols (e.g., white coat) to carefully present themselves. Explanations for success included intelligence, meritocracy, being even-tempered, and carefully constructing femininity. The participants recommended individual skills and actions to prepare for leadership development. Virtually all women could describe an individual mentor (sponsor), usually male, who provided essential assistance for their career success. At the same time, they stressed the importance of institutional support for diversity, especially with child care. Attaining "full professor" status is the pinnacle of academic success. Women who successfully navigated this academic ladder describe significant external and internal challenges that require multiple strategies to overcome. Leadership development entails a combination of individual support through mentors and sponsors, self-education and reflection, and organizational structural support to promote diversity.

  9. Ethnoveterinary Medicine: The prospects of integrating medicinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Medicinal plants products are part of the natural products that have been in use in traditional medicine and also a source of novel drugs. Therefore, the use of medicinal plant products would be a rational alternative to synthetic drugs. Ethnobotanical surveys carried out in many parts of Kenya have revealed a lot of plants ...

  10. Medicinal plants used as excipients in the history in Ghanaian herbal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freiesleben, Sara Holm; Soelberg, Jens; Jäger, Anna K

    2015-11-04

    The present study was carried out to investigate the traditional use, pharmacology and active compounds of four plants commonly used as excipients in herbal medicine in Ghana. A comprehensive literature search was conducted to gain knowledge about the traditional use, pharmacology and active compounds of the four plant excipients. The broth dilution antibacterial assay and the DPPH radical scavenging antioxidant assay were used to evaluate the antibacterial and antioxidant activity of the plants, respectively. Ethanol, warm water and cold water extracts were prepared from the dried seeds/fruits of Aframomum melegueta, Piper guineense, Xylopia aethiopica and Monodora myristica, and tested in the assays. A. melegueta and P. guineense seemed to act as pharmacoenhancers, since they have been shown to inhibit specific CYP-enzymes. A. melegueta could act as an antioxidant to preserve herbal preparations. None of the plant excipients had antibacterial activity against the bacteria tested in this study. Compounds with an aromatic or pungent smell had been identified in all the plant excipients. An explanation for the use of the plants as excipients could rely on their taste properties. The present study suggests that there may be more than one simple explanation for the use of these four plants as excipients. Plausible explanations have been proven to be: (1) a way to increase the effect of the medicine, (2) a way to make the medicine more palatable or (3) a way to preserve the activity of the medicinal preparation over time. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Disturbance history of the Medicine Bow Range, Wyoming, using historical documents, contemporary forest inventory, and lake sediment cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    V. Carter; A. Brunelle; J. Shaw

    2014-01-01

    In the late 1860s, Euro-American settlement and related activities, including logging, began affecting the composition and structure of forests of the western United States. These impacts were likely to be most substantial along the corridor of the trans-continental railroad. Construction and maintenance of the railroad created a high dependence for wood, especially...

  12. Credentialing of practitioners of botanical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarnell, Eric; Abascal, Kathy; Greenfield, Russell Howard; Romm, Aviva; Sudberg, Sidney

    2002-01-01

    This article discusses how practitioners, regardless of other professional licenses they may hold, could be credentialed in botanical medicine. The article reviews the field of clinical botanical medicine and the history and modern status of botanical medicine, as well as organizations currently involved in botanical medicine credentialing. Many different types of professionals prescribe botanical medicines, and the potential for collaboration among them is great. The current trend treats botanical medicine as a narrow subdivision of allopathic medicine and does not acknowledge the breadth, depth, and diversity of botanical medicine and ultimately will not provide maximum benefits for patients. An alternative approach that instead credentials practitioners skilled in the use of a wide variety of botanical medicines in a responsible, scientific fashion is presented.

  13. Analysis of the influence of recent reforms in China: cardiovascular and cerebrovascular medicines as a case history to provide future direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wenjie; Zhen, Junjie; Feng, Mengying; Campbell, Stephen M; Finlayson, Alexander E; Godman, Brian

    2014-07-01

    Pharmaceutical expenditure has grown by 16% per annum in China, enhanced by incentives for physicians and hospitals. Hospital pharmacies dispense 80% of medicines in China, accounting for 46% of total hospital expenditure. Principal measures to moderate drug expenditure growth include pricing initiatives as limited demand-side measures. Assess current utilization and expenditure including traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) between 2006 and 2012. Uncontrolled retrospective study of medicines to treat cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases in one of the largest hospitals in southwest China. Utilization increased 3.3-fold for cerebrovascular medicines, greatest for TCMs, with expenditure increasing 4.85-fold. Low prices for generics were seen, similar to Europe. However, there was variable utilization of generics at 29-31% of total product volumes in recent years. There continued to be irrationality in prescribing with high use of TCMs, and the utilization of different medicines dropping significantly once they achieved low prices. Prices still have an appreciable impact on utilization in China. Potential measures similar to those implemented among western European countries could improve prescribing rationality and conserve resources.

  14. Medicinal plants used as excipients in the history in Ghanaian herbal medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freiesleben, Sara Holm; Soelberg, Jens; Jäger, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance The present study was carried out to investigate the traditional use, pharmacology and active compounds of four plants commonly used as excipients in herbal medicine in Ghana. Materials and methods A comprehensive literature search was conducted to gain knowledge....... melegueta could act as an antioxidant to preserve herbal preparations. None of the plant excipients had antibacterial activity against the bacteria tested in this study. Compounds with an aromatic or pungent smell had been identified in all the plant excipients. An explanation for the use of the plants...... as excipients could rely on their taste properties. Conclusion The present study suggests that there may be more than one simple explanation for the use of these four plants as excipients. Plausible explanations have been proven to be: (1) a way to increase the effect of the medicine, (2) a way to make...

  15. History of rheumatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrikant Deshpande

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the history and various milestones of rheumatology from ancient to modern times. The origin of rheumatology can be traced to ancient times. Diseases such as gout and osteoarthritis were prevalent in ancient people. Many ancient skeletons show signs of gout and osteoarthritis. The ancient book on Indian Medicine, Charaka Samhita, gives a vivid description of many variants of arthritis. Charaka, an eminent Ayurvedic physician, described rheumatoid arthritis (RA in Charaka Samhitha as "Vishkantha," meaning painful joints. The word rheumatology has its origin in the word "rheuma," which means flowing, and is mentioned in Hippocratic corpus. Hippocrates made several observations about gout, popularly known as "aphorisms of gout." Many famous paintings in the medieval era depict joint diseases. Hand lesions resembling those of RA are found in paintings of the Flemish school. "The virgin with canon van der paele," a painting by Jan Van Eyck (1436, shows thickened arteries in the temple, suggestive of temporal arthritis. The famous portrait of Federigo de Montefeltre, thought to have been painted by Joos (Justus van Gent, shows arthritis of the proximal interphalangeal joint of the left index finger. Rheumatology developed as a well-recognized specialty of medicine in the 20th century. American Physicians Bernard Comroe and Joseph Lee Hollander coined the term rheumatologist in 1940. Rheumatology has rapidly advanced during the last 50 years due to improved diagnosis as a result of progress in immunology, molecular biology, genetics and imaging.

  16. Entangled Histories: German Veterinary Medicine, c.1770-1900.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuda, Tatsuya

    2017-01-01

    Medical historians have recently become interested in the veterinary past, investigating the development of animal health in countries such as France, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and the United States. An appreciation of the German context, however, is still lacking - a gap in the knowledge that the present article seeks to fill. Providing a critical interpretation of the evolution of the veterinary profession, this investigation explains why veterinary and medical spheres intersected, drifted apart, then came back together; it also accounts for the stark differences in the position of veterinarians in Germany and Britain. Emphasis is placed on how diverse traditions, interests and conceptualisations of animal health shaped the German veterinary profession, conditioned its field of operation, influenced its choice of animals and diseases, and dictated the speed of reform. Due to a state-oriented model of professionalisation, veterinarians became more enthusiastic about public service than private practice, perceiving themselves to be alongside doctors and scientists in status, rather than next to animal healers or manual labourers. Building on their expertise in epizootics, veterinarians became involved in zoonoses, following outbreaks of trichinosis. They achieved a dominant position in meat hygiene by refashioning abattoirs into sites for the construction of veterinary knowledge. Later, bovine tuberculosis helped veterinarians cement this position, successfully showcasing their expertise and contribution to society by saving as much meat as possible from diseased livestock. Ultimately, this article shows how veterinarians were heavily 'entangled' with the fields of medicine, food, agriculture and the military.

  17. A prescription survey about combined use of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and anticholinergic medicines in the dementia outpatient using electronic medication history data from community pharmacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurata K

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Kaori Kurata,1 Eitarou Taniai,2 Kanae Nishimura,3 Kenji Fujita,3 Akira Dobashi1 1Education and Research Institute of Information Science, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, Hachioji, Tokyo, Japan; 2Informational Headquarters, Yakuju Corporation, Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan; 3General Incorporated Foundation Social University, Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan Purpose: We investigated prescriptions regarding the combined use of donepezil hydrochloride (DPZ and anticholinergics for elderly outpatients in Japan to determine the impact that combination therapy has on decreasing their cognitive functions. Methods: Using electronic medication records from 142 community pharmacies, outpatients older than 40 years of age taking DPZ, with or without other prescription medicines, were assessed over 6 years, beginning in 2007. We estimated the number of medicines administered along with DPZ, the number of anticholinergics administered along with DPZ, and the medicines' anticholinergic cognitive burden (ACB scale cumulative score based on data from the top four pharmacies that filled the highest number of prescriptions for DPZ for outpatients with dementia in 2010. Data were gathered from records of 431 patients; only three patients were younger than 60 years. Results: There was a 1.94-fold increase in the number of prescriptions including DPZ over 6 years. The proportion of patients to whom other medicines were administered along with DPZ was 65.6% (n=283 and the proportion of those taking at least one anticholinergic agent was 24.1% (n=104. The mean number of medicines among subjects taking at least one anticholinergic was 5.7, and the mean cumulative ACB score for anticholinergics contained in these medicines was 2.6. Among 104 patients to whom the anticholinergics were administered along with DPZ, two outpatients taking urologic medicines such as oxybutynin hydrochloride or tolterodine tartrate were found. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that it is

  18. A history of salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirillo, M; Capasso, G; Di Leo, V A; De Santo, N G

    1994-01-01

    The medical history of salt begins in ancient times and is closely related to different aspects of human history. Salt may be extracted from sea water, mineral deposits, surface encrustations, saline lakes and brine springs. In many inland areas, wood was used as a fuel source for evaporation of brine and this practice led to major deafforestation in central Europe. Salt played a central role in the economies of many regions, and is often reflected in place names. Salt was also used as a basis for population censuses and taxation, and salt monopolies were practised in many states. Salt was sometimes implicated in the outbreak of conflict, e.g. the French Revolution and the Indian War of Independence. Salt has also been invested with many cultural and religious meanings, from the ancient Egyptians to the Middle Ages. Man's innate appetite for salt may be related to his evolution from predominantly vegetarian anthropoids, and it is noteworthy that those people who live mainly on protein and milk or who drink salty water do not generally salt their food, whereas those who live mainly on vegetables, rice and cereals use much more salt. Medicinal use tended to emphasize the positive aspects of salt, e.g. prevention of putrefaction, reduction of tissue swelling, treatment of diarrhea. Evidence was also available to ancient peoples of its relationship to fertility, particularly in domestic animals. The history of salt thus represents a unique example for studying the impact of a widely used dietary substance on different important aspects of man's life, including medical philosophy.

  19. História e medicina: a herança arcaica de um paradigma History and medicine: the inheritance of an age-old paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Helena Cabral de Almeida Cardoso

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available A proposta de estudar a interconexão entre história e medicina a partir da herança comum de um modelo de conhecimento implica resgatar o passado como vetor para a reflexão sobre a posição de ambas no estágio atual da produção científica. É nesse sentido que, neste artigo, busca-se discutir não só a historicidade e os fundamentos comuns a esses dois campos do conhecimento, as articulações possíveis de serem estabelecidas entre eles, como também os elementos a serem considerados na pesquisa sobre a imbricação entre os dois campos. Propõe-se uma abordagem em rede capaz de mostrar, por um lado, que tanto os discursos epistemológicos da medicina quanto os da história estruturam-se narrativamente como meio de abarcar conhecimentos específicos acerca de seus objetos e, por outro, que figuras de linguagem, especialmente a metáfora, têm um papel importante na construção e divulgação desses dois campos do saber.Based on inheritance of a common model of knowledge, drawing links between history and medicine represents a proposal to not abandon the contribution the past has to make when reflecting upon the current stage of scientific production in both fields. With this in mind, the present study endeavors to discuss history’s and medicine’s common ground and their historicity, the articulations possible between the two fields, and, lastly, the elements that should be taken into account when researching relations between them. The article proposes a network approach that will demonstrate (1 that both medical and historical studies display a narrative epistemology, used as a means of addressing specific knowledge about their objects of study and (2 that figures of language - the metaphor above all - have an important role to play in the construction and dissemination of both fields.

  20. Conceptual history and History of Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conrad VILANOU I TORRANO

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available After noting the importance of linguistic turn in the field of historiography, the two leading currents in the field of conceptual history are identi- fied, the Cambridge school and Reinhart Koselleck’s Begriffsgeschichte. The paper focuses on the analysis of the latter trend in conceptual history, linked to the phi- losophical (Heidegger, Gadamer, political (Schmitt and historical (Dilthey tradi- tion within the German academic community. The paper then reviews the origin and nature of the History of Pedagogy, which arose as part of the classic History of Ideas and later gave rise, after the Second World War, to a Social History of Education. Finally, a conceptual History of Education is proposed that, in addi- tion to addressing the various conceptual strata included in the different terms, also takes into account the intellectual and cultural aspects through a return to discourses and pedadogic narratives.

  1. Annals of African Medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Annals of African Medicine is published by the Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto, Nigeria and the Annals of African Medicine Society. The Journal is intended to serve as a medium for the publication of research findings in the broad field of Medicine in Africa and other developing countries, and ...

  2. Armenian medicine and diseases of the kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eknoyan, Garabed

    2009-01-01

    The history of Armenian medicine is that of the common practice of medicine in caring for the sick through the ages, using mainly local medicinal herbs and natural products. Over the years, its practitioners persistently collected and recorded an expanding body of information on therapeutics and put it to use for the daily medical care of ordinary folks. Armenian medicine developed around the church and monasteries, which flourished during episodic periods of peace in an otherwise tumultuous and warring region. However, unlike the monastic medicine that developed in Europe, Armenian medicine maintained the rationality it had acquired from Greek medicine, and never resorted to magic, myth or amulets. Nor did it acquire or import saints. Armenian medicine is a classic example of the evolving art of therapeutics, whose record is preserved in extant manuscripts, saved over the centuries in monasteries, and now preserved in accessible collections.

  3. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is Doing Blog: Public Health Matters Video: "The History of Bioterrorism" Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... as bioterrorist weapons. Watch the Complete Program "The History of Bioterroism" (26 min 38 sec) Watch Specific ...

  4. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is Doing Blog: Public Health Matters Video: "The History of Bioterrorism" Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... as bioterrorist weapons. Watch the Complete Program "The History of Bioterroism" (26 min 38 sec) Watch Specific ...

  5. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CDC is Doing Blog: Public Health Matters Video: "The History of Bioterrorism" Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... or can be used as bioterrorist weapons. Watch the Complete Program "The History of Bioterroism" (26 min ...

  6. History of Science and History of Philologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daston, Lorraine; Most, Glenn W

    2015-06-01

    While both the sciences and the humanities, as currently defined, may be too heterogeneous to be encompassed within a unified historical framework, there is good reason to believe that the history of science and the history of philologies both have much to gain by joining forces. This collaboration has already yielded striking results in the case of the history of science and humanist learning in early modern Europe. This essay argues that first, philology and at least some of the sciences (e.g., astronomy) remained intertwined in consequential ways well into the modern period in Western cultures; and second, widening the scope of inquiry to include other philological traditions in non-Western cultures offers rich possibilities for a comparative history of learned practices. The focus on practices is key; by shifting the emphasis from what is studied to how it is studied, deep commonalities emerge among disciplines--and intellectual traditions--now classified as disparate.

  7. History of mathematics and history of science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Tony

    2011-09-01

    This essay argues that the diversity of the history of mathematics community in the United Kingdom has influenced the development of the subject and is a significant factor behind the different concerns often evident in work on the history of mathematics when compared with that of historians of science. The heterogeneous nature of the community, which includes many who are not specialist historians, and the limited opportunities for academic careers open to practitioners have had a profound effect on the discipline, leading to a focus on elite mathematics and great mathematicians. More recently, reflecting earlier developments in the history of science, an increased interest in the context and culture of the practice of mathematics has become evident.

  8. BOOK APPRAISAL: HISTORY OF DENTISTRY IN NIGERIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, O S

    2016-06-01

    The book appraised in this edition of Chronicles of Medical History, History of Dentistry in Nigeria, is a product of many years of painstaking research. The Author, Professor Eyitope Ogunbodede, has put together an excellent book that is a great work of art. Dentistry is one of the first specialties in medicine with a very long history; evidence of periodontal disease has been traced back to at least 100, 000 years in human remains. However, the book by Professor Ogunbodede is the first comprehensive record of the History of dentistry in Nigeria. It is a must-read for every medical professional practicing in Nigeria and a worthy addition to every library.

  9. Personal history and quality of life in chronic myeloid leukemia patients: a cross-sectional study using narrative medicine and quantitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breccia, Massimo; Graffigna, Guendalina; Galimberti, Sara; Iurlo, Alessandra; Pungolino, Ester; Pizzuti, Michele; Maggi, Alessandro; Falzetti, Franca; Capalbo, Silvana Franca; Intermesoli, Tamara; Maffioli, Margherita; Elena, Chiara; Melosi, Alessandro; Simonetti, Federico; Capochiani, Enrico; Seta, Roberta Della; Pacilli, Matteo; Luppi, Mario; Di Renzo, Nicola; Mastrullo, Lucia; Trabacchi, Elena; Vallisa, Daniele; Rapezzi, Davide; Orlandi, Ester Maria; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Efficace, Fabio; Alimena, Giuliana

    2016-11-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) drastically changed the outcome of patients diagnosed with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Several reports indicated the advantage of continue long-term adherence associated with positive outcome. Therefore, it is important to better understand from the patient's standpoint the experience of living with the disease and the related treatment. In this study, quantitative analysis and narrative medicine were combined to get insights on this issue in a population of 257 patients with CML in chronic phase treated with TKIs (43 % men, with a median age of 58 years, 27 % aged 31-50 years), followed for a median time of 5 years. Sixty-one percent of patients enrolled were treated in first line, whereas 37 % were treated in second line. The results showed more positive perceptions and acceptance in males compared to females, without impact of disease on relationships. Level of positive acceptance was more evident in elderly compared to younger patients, with a close connection with median time from diagnosis. Overall, female patients reported negative perceptions and an impact of disease on family daily living. The majority of patients understood the importance of continue adherence to treatment, with 27 % resulting less adherent (60 % for forgetfulness), even if well informed and supported by his/her physician. Narrative medicine, in association to quantitative analysis, can help physicians to understand needs of their patients in order to improve communication.

  10. [Military medicine and medicine of accidents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizh, I M

    2010-09-01

    The article presents an observe of such parts of military medicine as intensive aid and operative treatment on the place of case, contestation against infectious diseases, preservation of psychic health, medical and social rehabilitation. Were lighted successful activity of military physicians during liquidation of Chernobyl accident (1986), earthquakes in Armenia (1988), railway accident in Bashkiria (1989) and other accidents. Experience of military medicine (particularly using medical units of special purposes) was used in proving of conception of medicine of accidents, and in organization of medical supply of troops in armed conflicts of restricted scale--in effectuating of antiterrorist operations in Northern Caucasus (1994-1996, 1999-2002), in effectuating of peacemaking operation in Kosovo (1999-2003), natural disasters.

  11. Physical and rehabilitation medicine section and board of the European Union of Medical Specialists. Community context; history of European medical organizations; actions under way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Korvin, G; Delarque, A

    2009-01-01

    The European Community is based on a series of treaties and legal decisions, which result from preliminary documents prepared long before by different organizations and lobbies. The European union of medical specialists (Union européenne des médecins specialists [UEMS]) came into being in order to address the questions raised by European directives (e.g., free circulation of people and services, reciprocal recognition of diplomas, medical training, quality improvements). The specialty sections of the UEMS contribute actively to this work. The physical and rehabilitation medicine (PRM) section is composed of three committees: the PRM board is devoted to initial and continuing education and has published a harmonized teaching programme and organized a certification procedure, which can be considered as a European seal of quality; the Clinical Affairs Committee is concerned with the quality of PRM care, and it has set up a European accreditation system for PRM programs of care, which will help to describe PRM clinical activity more concretely; and the Professional Practice Committee works on the fields of competence in our specialty. This third committee has already published a White Book, and further documents are being prepared, based on both the International classification of functioning, disability and health (ICF) and reference texts developed by the French Federation of PRM.

  12. A history of the histories of econometrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boumans, M.; Dupont-Kieffer, A.

    2011-01-01

    Econometricians have from the start considered historical knowledge of their own discipline as reflexive knowledge useful for delineating their discipline, that is, for setting its disciplinary boundaries with respect to its aims, its methods, and its scientific values. As such, the histories

  13. The teaching of history through histories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Gabriela Calvas-Ojeda

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The comic strips have been introduced into the world of history as a didactic resource for their learning; However, there are still shortcomings in their use by teachers, motivated on many occasions due to lack of knowledge and insufficient methodological preparation; The purpose of this work is to socialize knowledge related to these didactic resources to contribute to the didactic-methodological enrichment of the teacher, in order to change this attitude. The methodological strategy responds to the quantitative-qualitative paradigm; in the collection of the information a participant observation guide was used to the history classes and interview to a sample of 9 teachers of Third Degree of the schools of the city of Machala randomly selected. We recorded the observations of the knowledge acquired by the 98 students who received the classes mediated by comic strips, which allowed us to conclude that comics for the teaching and learning of History constitute a powerful didactic resource.

  14. History of Mathematics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Vagn Lundsgaard; Gray, Jeremy

    Volume 1 in Theme on "History of Mathematics", in "Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems (EOLSS), developed under the auspices of the UNESCO.......Volume 1 in Theme on "History of Mathematics", in "Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems (EOLSS), developed under the auspices of the UNESCO....

  15. HISTORY OF LEPROSY

    OpenAIRE

    Hanumanthayya; Manjunath; Anisha; Nida; Minakshi

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy is one of the oldest and most dreaded diseases, which has tormented humans throughout history, leaving lasting impressions on religion, literature and art. If history is traced, evidence of leprosy is found in all the four Yugas of Hindu religion, quotes of Jesus in Bible of Christianity and verses of Prophet in Muslim religion.

  16. HISTORY OF LEPROSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanumanthayya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy is one of the oldest and most dreaded diseases, which has tormented humans throughout history, leaving lasting impressions on religion, literature and art. If history is traced, evidence of leprosy is found in all the four Yugas of Hindu religion, quotes of Jesus in Bible of Christianity and verses of Prophet in Muslim religion.

  17. History of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oversby, John

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses why the history of science should be included in the science curriculum in schools. He also presents some opportunities that can come out of using historical contexts, and findings from a study assessing the place of history of science in readily available textbooks.

  18. The Truth about Truth-Telling in American Medicine: A Brief History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisk, Bryan; Frankel, Richard; Kodish, Eric; Harry Isaacson, J

    2016-01-01

    Transparency has become an ethical cornerstone of American medicine. Today, patients have the right to know their health information, and physicians are obliged to provide it. It is expected that patients will be informed of their medical condition regardless of the severity or prognosis. This ethos of transparency is ingrained in modern trainees from the first day of medical school onward. However, for most of American history, the intentional withholding of information was the accepted norm in medical practice. It was not until 1979 that a majority of physicians reported disclosing cancer diagnoses to their patients. To appreciate the current state of the physician-patient relationship, it is important to understand how physician-patient communication has developed over time and the forces that led to these changes. In this article, we trace the ethics and associated practices of truth-telling during the past two centuries, and outline the many pressures that influenced physician behavior during that time period. We conclude that the history of disclosure is not yet finished, as physicians still struggle to find the best way to share difficult information without causing undue harm to their patients.

  19. School of History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Ukolova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The current international processes and events, world politics at the beginning of the 21 century have once again clearly demonstrated that their meaning often emerges through the historical context without which the understanding of what is happening is hardly possible. Rector of MGIMO A.V. Torkunov in his talk on International relations as an educational discipline remarked that "as for sciences the basis of professionalism is mathematical skills and competencies, for international relations such a basis is history". Historical disciplines are taught at MGIMO from the very start of education process. MGIMO is one of the leading centers of research in the fields of history, political sciences and humanities. Here, in different years academics E.V. Tarle, L.N. Ivanov, V.G. Trukhanovskiy, A.L. Narochnitskiy and other prominent scholars and historians taught. Historical School of MGIMO has united important areas of historical science: the history of political processes in the twentieth century, modern history, the history of international relations and diplomacy, historical regional studies and cultural studies, oriental, philosophy and theory of history. The best traditions of the MGIMO historical school incorporated by its founders, make the foundation of its development at present. In 1992, the Department of MGIMO world and national history was established. The principle innovation was the combination of two components - historical education and historical science. This made it possible to present the story of Russia as an important part of the world history, opened up prospects for the implementation of comparative history, the synthesis of specific historical approaches and generalized global vision of civilization and human development. The historical school has realised a number of research projects, including "Alexander Nevsky" and the multi-volume "Great Victory", the work continues on a research project "Russia in the Modern World", and

  20. The history of parathyroid endocrinology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kalra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The parathyroid glands are now recognized as being essential for life. Their structure and function is well delineated, and their disease and dysfunction, well characterized. Diagnosis and management of parathyroid disease has improved in the past few decades. The path of parathyroid science, however, has been far from smooth. This paper describes the early history of parathyroid endocrinology. In doing so, it focuses on major events and discoveries, which improved the understanding and practice of our specialty. Contribution in anatomy, physiology, pathology, medicine, surgery and biochemistry are reviewed.

  1. The podiatrist as a member of the sports medicine team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, David W

    2015-04-01

    This article reviews the history of sports medicine highlighting the "jogging boom" of the 1970s and the advocacy of Dr George Sheehan, which boosted the position of podiatry in sports medicine. Significant events in mainstream sports medicine that promoted the rise of podiatric medicine are discussed. Reasons as to why podiatric medicine should be a member of the sports medicine team are outlined, and lastly, examples that highlight podiatric medicine as participants alongside other specialties in the evaluation and care of athletes are given. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [How to do Things with Metaphors: Reflections on the Role of Metaphors and Metaphor Theory for the History of Science Using the Example of Shock Metaphors in Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Ulrich

    2015-12-01

    In recent decades, metaphors have attracted a great deal of interest within the history, philosophy, and sociology of science. The article takes the growing interest in epistemic metaphors as the starting point of a discussion of two conflicting motives prevalent in theories of metaphor and metaphoricity: On the one hand, metaphors are associated with the indeterminacy of scientific discovery and the emergence of new epistemic objects; and on the other hand, metaphors are said to provide a filter of possible meanings and vantage-points. It is argued that an approach, which aims to do justice to both tendencies, cannot exclusively rely on linguistic models but must expand its scope of inquiry to include the practical trajectories of a metaphor’s usage as well as the problematizations to which they respond, since both engender metaphorical meaning, albeit at the cost of semantic precision. The exemplary case discussed in the article, the psychologization of nervous shock in nineteenth century medical discourse, demonstrates that the incremental process of shock’s shifting semantics would be inadequately characterized as a metaphorical transfer. Instead, it is shown how the actualization of earlier meanings, in particular of shock as a state of altered consciousness, in novel professional and cultural contexts acted as a catalyst for the psychologization of shock and related nascent concepts such as psychic trauma. As a possible, and methodologically fruitful way of overcoming the one-sidedness of linguistic notions of metaphor, a combination of Jìrgen Link’s concept of inter-discourse with a philosophical metaphorology (Blumenberg) is discussed in the final section of the paper.

  3. American Academy of Pain Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 7. GET STARTED AAPM... the Voice of Pain Medicine Become part of the distinguished multimodal, interdisciplinary community of pain medicine clinicians. Join Today! Welcome The American Academy of ...

  4. American Academy of Oral Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Statements Newsletters AAOM: Representing the Discipline of Oral Medicine Oral Medicine is the discipline of dentistry concerned with the ... offers credentialing, resources and professional community for oral medicine practitioners. Our membership provides care to thousands. We ...

  5. History of the World Federation of Societies for Laser Medicine and Surgery (WFSLMS) and its Non-Profit Organization (NPO-WFSLMS): Part 1: Origins to Inaugural Meeting, 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshiro, Toshio

    2014-07-01

    The first society formed to represent the "new" field of laser applications in medicine and surgery was the late Professor Kaplan's International Society for Laser Surgery and Medicine, held in Israel in 1975. Following the ISLSM lead, a large number of national and international societies were very swiftly formed. As the number grew, it became obvious that some sort of linking forum would help all these separate societies to pool the knowledge of their members for the good of the clinicians and their patients. The World Federation of Societies for Laser Medicine and Surgery was formed to attempt to fill this role. The History: At the 1996 meeting of the Greek Medical Laser Association, the first international forum of representatives from 17 international and national laser societies was convened by Professor Nick Nicolopoulos, and the seed of an idea for a centralized forum to help separate laser societies coordinate efforts and knowledge was planted. This seed was nurtured by the ISLSM as the first medical laser society, and forums were called together at each meeting of the ISLSM and the other related societies from 1997 to 2003. At the 2004 Chinese Medical Laser Society meeting, the idea of worldwide federation of laser societies crystallized into a more tangible form The Inaugural WFSLMS Congress: The convening of the first WFSLMS congress took place in Tokyo in 2005, under the leadership of Professor Kazuhiko Atsumi. At this meeting, Professor Kaplan proposed that a Medical Laser Foundation should be established and donated the first seed money for its formation. Because of the Japanese legal requirements, a foundation was impossible and so a Non-profit Organization (NPO-WFSLMS) was started, based in Japan, to oversee the work and fund the tasks of promoting laser surgery and medicine worldwide, for the good of mankind: the financing, running and holding WFSLMS congresses became one of the tasks of NPO-WFSLMS. Both the WFSLMS and NPO-WFSLMS were therefore on

  6. History of cannabis as a medicine: a review História da cannabis como medicamento: uma revisão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Waldo Zuardi

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Cannabis as a medicine was used before the Christian era in Asia, mainly in India. The introduction of cannabis in the Western medicine occurred in the midst of the 19th century, reaching the climax in the last decade of that century, with the availability and usage of cannabis extracts or tinctures. In the first decades of the 20th century, the Western medical use of cannabis significantly decreased largely due to difficulties to obtain consistent results from batches of plant material of different potencies. The identification of the chemical structure of cannabis components and the possibility of obtaining its pure constituents were related to a significant increase in scientific interest in such plant, since 1965. This interest was renewed in the 1990's with the description of cannabinoid receptors and the identification of an endogenous cannabinoid system in the brain. A new and more consistent cycle of the use of cannabis derivatives as medication begins, since treatment effectiveness and safety started to be scientifically proven.Antes da Era Cristã, a cannabis foi utilizada na Ásia como medicamento, com grande importância na Índia. A introdução da cannabis na Medicina Ocidental ocorreu em meados do século XIX, atingindo o clímax na última década deste século, com a disponibilidade e o uso de extratos e tinturas da cannabis. Nas primeiras décadas do século XX, o uso médico da cannabis no Ocidente diminuiu significativamente, em grande parte pela dificuldade na obtenção de resultados consistentes de amostras da planta com diferentes potências. A identificação da estrutura química de componentes da cannabis e a possibilidade de se obter seus constituintes puros foram relacionadas a um aumento significativo no interesse científico pela planta, desde 1965. Este interesse foi renovado nos anos 90, com a descrição dos receptores de canabinóides e a identificação de um sistema canabinóide endógeno no cérebro. Usos

  7. The University of Vermont College of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Martin

    This study of the origin and history of the University of Vermont College of Medicine begins with the appointment of John Pomeroy to the faculty in 1804, and traces the years that followed. Chiefly concerned with the individuals who were involved, it is a case study of the responses of one small medical school to reform movements, and its ability…

  8. Estrogenicity of Medicinal Botanicals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eagon, Patricia

    1998-01-01

    Medicinal botanicals PLANT EXTRACTS have been used for centuries to relieve various gynecological symptoms, and are of increasing interest to those seeking alternative health care and self-treatment...

  9. History of quantum theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hund, F.

    1980-01-01

    History of quantum theory from quantum representations (1900) to the formation of quantum mechanics is systematically stated in the monograph. A special attention is paid to the development of ideas of quantum physics, given are schemes of this development. Quantum theory is abstractly presented as the teaching about a role, which value h characterizing elementary quantum of action, plays in the nature: in statistics - as a unit for calculating the number of possible states; in corpuscular-wave dualism for light - as a value determining the interaction of light and substance and as a component of atom dynamics; in corpuscular-wave dualism for substance. Accordingly, history of the quantum theory development is considered in the following sequence: h discovery; history of quantum statistics, history of light quanta and initial atom dynamics; crysis of this dynamics and its settlement; substance waves and in conclusion - the completion of quantum mechanics including applications and its further development

  10. [History and psychoanalysis: the stakes of history].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chertok, L; Stengers, I

    1993-01-01

    Freud's definition of the relationship between hypnosis and psychoanalysis is a political one that even then pointed to the paradigmatical sciences as defined by Kuhn. Nevertheless, the historian who applies to psychoanalysis the technique of symetry elaborated for such sciences, runs up against a set of singularities that risk bringing him to a position of denouncer of a "fake science". We emphasize that, if the historian does not limit himself to the positivist position or to the history of ideas, he will inevitably find himself engaged in the history that he is analyzing, but with the responsibility of his mode of engagement. We propose to define hypnosis and psychoanalysis as fields inhabited by the question of science in the modern sense of the term, and raising the issue of pertinence, as far as they are concerned, of the theoretical experimental model that guided them.

  11. Essentials of periodontal medicine in preventive medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minkle Gulati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Influence of systemic disorders on periodontal diseases is well established. However, of growing interest is the effect of periodontal diseases on numerous systemic diseases or conditions like cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, diabetes, pre-term low birth weight babies, preeclampsia, respiratory infections and others including osteoporosis, cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, erectile dysfunction, Alzheimer′s disease, gastrointestinal disease, prostatitis, renal diseases, which has also been scientifically validated. This side of the oral-systemic link has been termed Periodontal Medicine and is potentially of great public health significance, as periodontal disease is largely preventable and in many instances readily treatable, hence, providing many new opportunities for preventing and improving prognosis of several systemic pathologic conditions. This review article highlights the importance of prevention and treatment of periodontal diseases as an essential part of preventive medicine to circumvent its deleterious effects on general health.

  12. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be used as bioterrorist weapons. Watch the Complete Program "The History of Bioterroism" (26 min 38 sec) Watch Specific Segments of the Program Overview Anthrax Plague Smallpox Botulism Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers ...

  13. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have been or can be used as bioterrorist weapons. Watch the Complete Program "The History of Bioterroism" ( ... Drug Administration (FDA), and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 1999. Are You Prepared? Coping ...

  14. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Planning More on Preparedness What CDC is Doing Blog: Public Health Matters Video: "The History of Bioterrorism" ... Planning More on Preparedness What CDC is Doing Blog: Public Health Matters File Formats Help: How do ...

  15. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is Doing Blog: Public Health Matters Video: "The History of Bioterrorism" Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir This video describes the Category A diseases: smallpox, anthrax, botulism, plague, tularemia, and viral hemorrhagic fevers. If these germs ...

  16. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What CDC is Doing Blog: Public Health Matters Video: "The History of Bioterrorism" Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir This video describes the Category A diseases: smallpox, anthrax, botulism, ...

  17. BOOK APPRAISAL: HISTORY OF DENTISTRY IN NIGERIA

    OpenAIRE

    Michael, O.S.

    2016-01-01

    The book appraised in this edition of Chronicles of Medical History, History of Dentistry in Nigeria, is a product of many years of painstaking research. The Author, Professor Eyitope Ogunbodede, has put together an excellent book that is a great work of art. Dentistry is one of the first specialties in medicine with a very long history; evidence of periodontal disease has been traced back to at least 100, 000 years in human remains. However, the book by Professor Ogunbodede is the first comp...

  18. The historiography of medical history: from great men to archaeology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, C. R.

    1991-01-01

    The history of medicine is always written from the basis of the historian. Contemporary historiography provides an understanding of the major methods of historical analysis and their influences on the writing of medical history. Medical history in the 20th century has emphasized the historiographic methods of the history of great men, historicism, social history, and intellectual history. Each methodology has inherent biases that influence the historian's analysis of the past. Understanding the historian's biases provides the reader important tools for the interpretation of medical history. PMID:1933068

  19. History of Medical Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, John S.

    1983-01-01

    Traces the development of basic radiation physics that underlies much of today's medical physics and looks separately at the historical development of two major subfields of medical physics: radiation therapy and nuclear medicine. Indicates that radiation physics has made important contributions to solving biomedical problems in medical…

  20. Valeriu Bologa's studies on the history of science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bârsu, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    History of science is a vast and complex domain, comprising many sub-domains, such as: the history of medicine, history of chemistry, history of physics etc. Different specialists in these sub-domains, trying to reach the general and integrative understanding of the history of science, succeeded only after they acquired a rich scientific experience in their fields of activity. One of the scientists who had interesting papers on the history of science was Valeriu Bologa (1892-1971). He was the first Romanian professor of history of medicine. Our paper presents some milestones regarding his preoccupations on the history of science. The aim of our study is to prove that, although he was primarily a historian of medicine, he surpassed this framework, proving to be a skillful historian of science. The topics of his works on the history of science included: the value of the unity of science, the ethical aspects of science during centuries, the interferences between the history of science and the history of medicine etc.

  1. Valeriu Bologa’s studies on the history of science

    Science.gov (United States)

    BÂRSU, CRISTIAN

    2016-01-01

    History of science is a vast and complex domain, comprising many sub-domains, such as: the history of medicine, history of chemistry, history of physics etc. Different specialists in these sub-domains, trying to reach the general and integrative understanding of the history of science, succeeded only after they acquired a rich scientific experience in their fields of activity. One of the scientists who had interesting papers on the history of science was Valeriu Bologa (1892–1971). He was the first Romanian professor of history of medicine. Our paper presents some milestones regarding his preoccupations on the history of science. The aim of our study is to prove that, although he was primarily a historian of medicine, he surpassed this framework, proving to be a skillful historian of science. The topics of his works on the history of science included: the value of the unity of science, the ethical aspects of science during centuries, the interferences between the history of science and the history of medicine etc. PMID:27547069

  2. [History of viral hepatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, José Carlos Ferraz da

    2010-01-01

    The history of viral hepatitis goes back thousands of years and is a fascinating one. When humans were first infected by such agents, a natural repetitive cycle began, with the capacity to infect billions of humans, thus decimating the population and causing sequelae in thousands of lives. This article reviews the available scientific information on the history of viral hepatitis. All the information was obtained through extensive bibliographic review, including original and review articles and consultations on the internet. There are reports on outbreaks of jaundice epidemics in China 5,000 years ago and in Babylon more than 2,500 years ago. The catastrophic history of great jaundice epidemics and pandemics is well known and generally associated with major wars. In the American Civil War, 40,000 cases occurred among Union troops. In 1885, an outbreak of catarrhal jaundice affected 191 workers at the Bremen shipyard (Germany) after vaccination against smallpox. In 1942, 28,585 soldiers became infected with hepatitis after inoculation with the yellow fever vaccine. The number of cases of hepatitis during the Second World War was estimated to be 16 million. Only in the twentieth century were the main agents causing viral hepatitis identified. The hepatitis B virus was the first to be discovered. In this paper, through reviewing the history of major epidemics caused by hepatitis viruses and the history of discovery of these agents, singular peculiarities were revealed. Examples of this include the accidental or chance discovery of the hepatitis B and D viruses.

  3. Popular Medicine and Empirics in Greece, 1900-1950: An Oral History Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hionidou, Violetta

    2016-10-01

    Western literature has focused on medical plurality but also on the pervasive existence of quacks who managed to survive from at least the eighteenth to the twentieth century. Focal points of their practices have been their efforts at enrichment and their extensive advertising. In Greece, empirical, untrained healers in the first half of the twentieth century do not fit in with this picture. They did not ask for payment, although they did accept 'gifts'; they did not advertise their practice; and they had fixed places of residence. Licensed physicians did not undertake a concerted attack against them, as happened in the West against the quacks, and neither did the state. In this paper, it is argued that both the protection offered by their localities to resident popular healers and the healers' lack of demand for monetary payment were jointly responsible for the lack of prosecutions of popular healers. Moreover, the linking of popular medicine with ancient traditions, as put forward by influential folklore studies, also reduced the likelihood of an aggressive discourse against the popular healers. Although the Greek situation in the early twentieth century contrasts with the historiography on quacks, it is much more in line with that on wise women and cunning-folk. It is thus the identification of these groups of healers in Greece and elsewhere, mostly through the use of oral histories but also through folklore studies, that reveals a different story from that of the aggressive discourse of medical men against quacks.

  4. Imaging and development of medicines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syrota, A.

    2000-01-01

    The last developments in medical imaging allow visualization of medicines in organism. Today, these techniques: positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) play an essential role in the production and the development of new medicines. The medicinal substances labelled with radioisotopes permit to improve the understanding of medicines' action mode. The spectacular advances were observed in the field of medicines acting on the brain (F.M.)

  5. History of psychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorter, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review The present review examines recent contributions to the evolving field of historical writing in psychiatry. Recent findings Interest in the history of psychiatry continues to grow, with an increasing emphasis on topics of current interest such as the history of psychopharmacology, electroconvulsive therapy, and the interplay between psychiatry and society. The scope of historical writing in psychiatry as of 2007 is as broad and varied as the discipline itself. Summary More than in other medical specialties such as cardiology or nephrology, treatment and diagnosis in psychiatry are affected by trends in the surrounding culture and society. Studying the history of the discipline provides insights into possible alternatives to the current crop of patent-protected remedies and trend-driven diagnoses. PMID:18852567

  6. Constructing history in biography: a symposium on William Osler: a life in medicine. Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lella, J W

    2001-01-01

    William Osler's medical career spanned two centuries and three nations: Canada, the United States, and Great Britain. Though not an especially noted scientist, he was an innovative teacher, a professional organizer, and mentor and colleague to many grateful--indeed, sometimes adoring--students and colleagues, some of whom became influential in the Anglo-Saxon medical world. Since his death, Osler has been the subject of an enormous body of literature, fed by numerous Osler societies throughout the world. Among these is the American Osler Society, upon whose recent review panel this symposium is based. In it, three Oslerians--Philip Teigen, Earl Nation, and Joseph Lella--use Michael Bliss's book as the starting point for reading historical themes in Osler's life from their own standpoints. Bliss responds to these views by stressing the factual underpinnings of his book and by interpreting it, the first major biography of Osler since Cushing, in the context of his other works in the history of medicine as another study of the emergence of "health care as a secular replacement for traditional religious faith in the supernatural."

  7. History of echinostomes (Trematoda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Rafael; Radev, Valentin; Kanev, Ivan; Gardner, Scott L; Fried, Bernard

    2014-10-01

    Echinostomatidae (Trematoda) is the largest family within the class Trematoda. Members of this family have been studied for many years in relation to their utility as basic research models in biodiversity and systematics and also as experimental models in parasitology since they offer many advantages. Echinostomes have contributed significantly to numerous developments in many areas studied by parasitologists and experimental biologists. In this review, we examine the history of the echinostomebased studies from the beginnings to the present. For this purpose, we have divided the history of echinostomes into four periods (i.e. 18(th) and 19(th) centuries, first half of the 20(th) century, second half of the 20(th) century and the late 20(th) and 21(th) century) according to the types of studies performed in each of them. Moreover, we also briefly review the history of echinostome infections in humans.

  8. Jos Journal of Medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jos Journal of Medicine is a peer-reviewed journal and editorially independent publication of the Association of Resident Doctors of Jos University Teaching Hospital. It seeks to provide a forum for the dissemination of research, review articles and information in all aspects of medical sciences among medical professionals ...

  9. History of psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidman, Nadine

    2016-02-01

    The editor of History of Psychology discusses her plan to vary the journal's content and expand its scope in specific ways. The first is to introduce a "Spotlight" feature, a relatively brief, provocative thought piece that might take one of several forms. Along with this new feature, she hopes further to broaden the journal's coverage and its range of contributors. She encourages submissions on the history of the psy-sciences off the beaten path. Finally, she plans to continue the journal's tradition of special issues, special sections, and essay reviews of two or more important recently published books in the field. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Annals of Nigerian Medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Annals of Nigerian Medicine is an editorially independent publication by the Association of Resident Doctors of the Ahmadu Bello University Teaching hospital Zaria, Nigeria. the journal is multidisciplinary and provides a forum for the dissemination of research finding, reviews, theories and information on all aspects of ...

  11. Is laboratory medicine ready for the era of personalized medicine?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malentacchi, Francesca; Mancini, Irene; Brandslund, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    in the integration of personalized medicine in routine health care and set the state-of-the-art knowledge about personalized medicine and laboratory medicine in Europe, a questionnaire was constructed under the auspices of the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM) and the European......Developments in "-omics" are creating a paradigm shift in laboratory medicine leading to personalized medicine. This allows the increase in diagnostics and therapeutics focused on individuals rather than populations. In order to investigate whether laboratory medicine is ready to play a key role...... Society of Pharmacogenomics and Personalised Therapy (ESPT). The answers of the participating laboratory medicine professionals indicate that they are aware that personalized medicine can represent a new and promising health model, and that laboratory medicine should play a key role in supporting...

  12. Archives of Ibadan Medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Archives of Ibadan Medicine is a broad-based medical publication which focuses on topics with a tropical slant that would be of interest to a worldwide readership. As such, suitable articles (original articles, case reports, points of technique, editorials or leader articles) on issues which would be of interest to this ...

  13. Quality of generic medicines in South Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patel, Aarti; Gauld, Robin; Norris, Pauline

    2012-01-01

    Generic Medicines are an important policy option allowing for access to affordable, essential medicines. Quality of generic medicines must be guaranteed through the activities of national medicines regulatory authorities. Existing negative perceptions surrounding the quality of generic medicines ...

  14. Alexandria Journal of Medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Alexandria Journal of Medicine is concerned with providing a venue for publication of research, with a particular focus on diseases of high prevalence in MENA (Middle East and North Africa) and its comparison to their profile worldwide. Manuscripts from the international scientific community are also welcome to cater ...

  15. Libyan Journal of Medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the journal is to publish high quality medical data in the different discipline of medicine. It also aims at rapid publication via the advanced online publication. The journal is directed to clinicians and researcher around the globe. The scope of the journal covers all medical research and related subjects.

  16. Summer of history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burman, Jeremy Trevelyan

    2017-01-01

    This summer, the University of Groningen will host three events—yes, three—that will be of special interest to the historically- and theoretically-inclined. The meeting of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science (HOPOS) will be held on July 9-12, a workshop exploring the

  17. History of modern physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biezunski, M.

    1993-01-01

    This book presents an history of the principal concepts of contemporary physics and their genesis from the great cleavages of the beginning of the century with some incursions in a more far-away past. The essential concepts are replaced in their creation context, especially relativity, quantum mechanics and particles physics. (A.B.)

  18. A history of pediatric immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiehm, E Richard; Johnston, Richard B

    2005-03-01

    Immunology has played a prominent role in the history of medicine. Pediatric immunologists have focused on immune aberrations in pediatric disorders, particularly those involving host defense mechanisms. These efforts have paid rich dividends in terms of fundamental knowledge of the immune system and major therapeutic advances, including 1) i.v. immunoglobulin therapy, 2) hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and 3) gene therapy. Pediatric immunology as an organized discipline emerged in the early 1950s, when pediatricians and their basic scientist colleagues began to focus on clinical and basic research related to immunodeficiency. Since then, key organizations and infrastructure have been developed to support this research and the clinical care of immunodeficient patients. We review here the evolution of contemporary pediatric immunology, particularly in North America, from its roots in 19th-century Europe to its current expression as one of the fundamental scientific and clinical disciplines of pediatrics.

  19. Neurolinguistics, History of

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eling, P.A.T.M.

    2015-01-01

    The history of neurolinguistics is described, starting with the modern period, beginning in the 1960s. Subsequently, an overview of studies and theories on the effects of brain lesions on language behavior is presented. Up to the nineteenth century, mainly single case descriptions have been

  20. History of wood machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter Koch

    1967-01-01

    The history of wood machining is closely tied to advanced in metallurgy and power sources. It has been strongly and continuously shaped by prevailing economic forces and the rise and decline of other contemporary industries. This paper sketches a few of the highlights, with emphasis on developments in North America.

  1. The history of Kevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez, Sergio G.

    2001-01-01

    During the Annual meeting of the Asociacion Fisica Argentina, hold between September 20 and 22, 1963, Dr. Wolfgang Meckbach made a communication officially introducing to the argentine scientific community the Kevatron accelerator, build in the Bariloche Atomic Center: a ions accelerator of the Cockcroft-Walton type. The history of its construction and installation is related. (author)

  2. Natural history of COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestbo, Jørgen; Lange, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The natural history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is usually described with a focus on change in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1 ) over time as this allows for exploration of risk factors for an accelerated decline-and thus of developing COPD. From epidemiological studies we...

  3. A History of Reading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalçın Yalçınkaya

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The meaning of reading according to Alberto Manguel is to have the art of giving life to a message which comes from past to today. Reading is the objective/ intellectual context of starting up and shutting the time. Reading is an open ended tool that makes it possible to know the words/thoughts which spoke to humanity from long time ago. The books/libraries offer a way to look at the nature, understand history, live and interpret the life. In other words, the books/libraries are natural spaces of the freedom of opinion. The reading action is a great need to redefine the Universe, realize  miracles, oppose injustice. In essence, the life is focused on the  reader from the beginning of transferring the words by writing. The history of reading started when the first writer drew and gave voice to the first letters. In brief, the history of reading is considered as the  reading action within a wide context. Now, we know there is a history of the reading…

  4. Taking of history

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langebæk, Rikke

    2007-01-01

    Learning how to take a history is an extremely important discipline in the education of veterinary students. In our opinion the fact that this discipline is often neglected in traditional teaching is a big mistake. The mere thought of facing a real client can be almost paralysing to even the smar......Learning how to take a history is an extremely important discipline in the education of veterinary students. In our opinion the fact that this discipline is often neglected in traditional teaching is a big mistake. The mere thought of facing a real client can be almost paralysing to even...... the smartest student. So the more familiar a student can become with these situations the better. Since september 2006, veterinary students at Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, have received training in the discipline of history taking, using innovative educational methods: Online...... The students prepare themselves for the course by going online at home the day before class. Here they find a narrated PowerPoint presentation containing : 1) The principles of history taking 2) Client diversities – and the obstacles one might have to face with these different types of clients Video In class...

  5. Didactics of History

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haue, Harry

    The book consits of five chapters about  formation and education in Denmark over the last two centuries. The developement of history teaching is especially stressed. The guiding concept for the upper secondary education has since 1850 been 'general character formation'. The book is an edited...

  6. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Specific Groups Resources for Emergency Health Professionals Training & Education Social Media What’s New Preparation & Planning More on Preparedness What CDC is Doing Blog: Public Health Matters Video: "The History of Bioterrorism" Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ...

  7. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Groups Resources for Emergency Health Professionals Training & Education Social Media What’s New Preparation & Planning More on Preparedness What CDC is Doing Blog: Public Health Matters Video: "The History of Bioterrorism" Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir This video describes the Category ...

  8. A Church History of Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lausten, Martin Schwarz

    A Church History of Denmark from the Missionary periode, through the Middle Ages, the Lutheran Reformation, the Ortodoxy, Pietisme, Enlightenment and det History of the 19. and 20. century......A Church History of Denmark from the Missionary periode, through the Middle Ages, the Lutheran Reformation, the Ortodoxy, Pietisme, Enlightenment and det History of the 19. and 20. century...

  9. The collective nature of personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGonigle, Ian Vincent

    2016-01-21

    Precision medicine, incorporating personalized medicine, is an emerging medical model that holds great promise for improving the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of many diseases. The future success of precision medicine, however, depends on the establishment of large databases that collate diverse data, including family genealogies, disease histories, drug sensitivities and genomic data. Herein I raise some of the social and ethical challenges that such a system faces, specifically: the enrolment of volunteers into large genetic databases; the need for a change in mindset of clinicians, patients and the wider public; and the need for interdisciplinary ethics considering the emerging issues. Finally I argue that the future potential of 'personalized' medicine crucially depends on 'collective' participation of informed citizens.

  10. Book appraisal: history of dentistry in Nigeria | Michael | Annals of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The book appraised in this edition of Chronicles of Medical History, History of Dentistry in Nigeria, is a product of many years of painstaking research. The Author, Professor Eyitope Ogunbodede, has put together an excellent book that is a great work of art. Dentistry is one of the first specialties in medicine with a very long ...

  11. [Nanotechnology future of medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terlega, Katarzyna; Latocha, Małgorzata

    2012-10-01

    Nanotechnology enables to produce products with new, exactly specified, unique properties. Those products are finding application in various branches of electronic, chemical, food and textile industry as well as in medicine, pharmacy, agriculture, architectural engineering, aviation and in defense. In this paper structures used in nanomedicine were characterized. Possibilities and first effort of application of nanotechnology in diagnostics and therapy were also described. Nanotechnology provides tools which allow to identifying changes and taking repair operations on cellular and molecular level and applying therapy oriented for specific structures in cell. Great hope are being associated with entering nanotechnology into the regenerative medicine. It requires astute recognition bases of tissue regeneration biology--initiating signals as well as the intricate control system of the progress of this process. However application of nanotechnology in tissue engineering allows to avoiding problems associated with loss properties of implants what is frequent cause of performing another surgical procedure at present.

  12. [History of electric defibrillation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qing; Wan, Zhi

    2007-07-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is one of the most effective methods in rescuing those in critical situations. In recent decades, electric cardiac defibrillation has made the biggest advance in the field of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. It has been found that the rate of successful resuscitation with electric defibrillation is much higher than by bare-handed or drug resuscitations by which more lives have been saved, has become the most essential and most important means of first aid. The history of the development of electric defibrillation is a successful modality of multidisciplinary cooperation of physicians, biologists, physiologists, and engineers. Although "early defibrillation" has been recognized as an idea of standard therapy and a basic measure of life support by international organizations as American Heart Association, it is far from being perfect and has a long way to go. A review of the history may help to bring the technique of electric defibrillation into perfection, and to save more lives in the future.

  13. History of microeconomics

    OpenAIRE

    Tubaro, Paola

    2015-01-01

    This article provides a brief overview of the history of microeconomics, starting from the late eighteenth century when its key foundations were laid. Without intending to be comprehensive, the article outlines landmarks and milestones in the building of the basic principles of today’s knowledge, highlighting challenges faced and open questions. Focus is on the contribution of each historical phase to the understanding of two foundational issues in microeconomics – the theory of individual ec...

  14. The future of medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Russ

    2012-03-01

    The recent innovation of prediction markets is examined, and their significant applications to the science of medicine are demonstrated. According to one comprehensive study, these markets make "uncannily accurate" predictions of every type of event. In the medical field, being able to predict cures, epidemics, medical discoveries, and myriad other medical variables can greatly further the advances of medical science and its clinical applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. History and National Development | Oyeranmi | Journal of History ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Volumes of works have been written on the subject of the relevance of history to national development in Nigeria. To „.non historians.. history teaches no particular skill “since the primary focus of history is the past... Does history still serve any purpose especially in the 21st century? What are those values embedded in ...

  16. History of Cardiology in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrinal Kanti Das

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available History as a science revolves around memories, travellers' tales, fables and chroniclers' stories, gossip and trans-telephonic conversations. Medicine itself as per the puritan's definition is a non-exact science because of the probability-predictability-sensitivity-specificity factors. Howsoever, the chronicles of Cardiology in India is quite interesting and intriguing. Heart and circulation was known to humankind from pre-Vedic era. Various therapeutics measures including the role of Yoga and transcendental meditation in curing cardiovascular diseases were known in India. Only recently there has been resurgence of the same globally. There have been very few innovations in Cardiology in India. The cause of this paucity possibly lie in the limited resources. This has a vicious effect on the research mentality of the population who are busy in meeting their daily requirements. This socio-scientific aspect needs a thorough study and is beyond the scope of the present documentation. Present is the future of past and so one must not forget the history which is essentially past that give the present generation the necessary fulcrum to stand in good stead. The present article essentially aims to pay tribute to all the workers and pioneers in the field of Cardiology in India, who in spite of limited resources ventured in an unchartered arena.

  17. History of Cardiology in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Mrinal Kanti; Kumar, Soumitra; Deb, Pradip Kumar; Mishra, Sundeep

    2015-01-01

    History as a science revolves around memories, travellers' tales, fables and chroniclers' stories, gossip and trans-telephonic conversations. Medicine itself as per the puritan's definition is a non-exact science because of the probability-predictability-sensitivity-specificity factors. Howsoever, the chronicles of Cardiology in India is quite interesting and intriguing. Heart and circulation was known to humankind from pre-Vedic era. Various therapeutics measures including the role of Yoga and transcendental meditation in curing cardiovascular diseases were known in India. Only recently there has been resurgence of the same globally. There have been very few innovations in Cardiology in India. The cause of this paucity possibly lie in the limited resources. This has a vicious effect on the research mentality of the population who are busy in meeting their daily requirements. This socio-scientific aspect needs a thorough study and is beyond the scope of the present documentation. Present is the future of past and so one must not forget the history which is essentially past that give the present generation the necessary fulcrum to stand in good stead. The present article essentially aims to pay tribute to all the workers and pioneers in the field of Cardiology in India, who in spite of limited resources ventured in an unchartered arena. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. BRST Quantisation of Histories Electrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Noltingk, D.

    2001-01-01

    This paper is a continuation of earlier work where a classical history theory of pure electrodynamics was developed in which the the history fields have \\emph{five} components. The extra component is associated with an extra constraint, thus enlarging the gauge group of histories electrodynamics. In this paper we quantise the classical theory developed previously by two methods. Firstly we quantise the reduced classical history space, to obtain a reduced quantum history theory. Secondly we qu...

  19. Future of palliative medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushma Bhatnagar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A ′need-supply′ and ′requirement-distribution mismatch′ along with a continuingneed explosion are the biggest hurdles faced by palliative medicine today. It is the need of the hour to provide an unbiased, equitable and evidence-based palliative care to those in need irrespective of the diagnosis, prognosis, social and economic status or geographical location. Palliative care as a fundamental human right, ensuring provision throughout the illness spectrum, global as well as region-specific capacity building, uniform availability of essential drugs at an affordable price, a multidisciplinary team approachand caregiver-support are some of the achievable goals for the future. This supplanted with a strong political commitment, professional dedication and ′public-private partnerships′ are necessaryto tackle the existing hurdles and the exponentially increasing future need. For effectively going ahead it is of utmost importance to integrate palliative medicine into medical education, healthcare system and societal framework.

  20. The history of tropical medicine in Brazil: the discovery of Trypanosoma cruzi by Carlos Chagas and the German School of Protozoology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, M Romero

    2005-12-01

    The discovery of trypanosomes in a Brazilian monkey by the Brazilian physician Carlos Chagas in 1908, led to the finding of a new microorganism pathogenic to man, Trypanosoma cruzi, and a new human trypanosomiasis. The present work discusses the context in which the discovery happened, and stresses the influence of German protozoologists in the work of the Brazilian scientist.

  1. History of Korean Neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sung-nam

    2015-08-01

    The year 2012 was the 50th anniversary of the Korean Neurosurgical Society, and in 2013, the 15th World Congress of Neurosurgery took place in Seoul, Korea. Thus, it is an appropriate occasion to introduce the world to the history of the Korean Neurosurgical Society and the foundation, development, and growth of Korean neurosurgery. Historical materials and pictures were collected and reviewed from the history book and photo albums of the Korean Neurosurgical Society. During the last 50 years, the Korean Neurosurgical Society and Korean neurosurgery have developed and grown enormously not only in quantity but also in quality. In every aspect, the turning point from the old to the new era of the Korean Neurosurgical Society and Korean neurosurgery was the year 1980. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. [The tribute of the pioneer of hypnotherapy--Franz Anton Mesmer, MD, PhD in the history of psychotherapy and medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radovancević, Ljubomir

    2009-01-01

    Modern hypnosis started with the Austrian physician Franz Anton Mesmer (1734-1815), who believed that the phenomenon known as mesmerism, or animal magnetism, or fluidum was related to an invisible substance--a fluid that runs within the subject or between the subject and the therapist, that is, the hypnotist, or the "magnetizer". The term hypnosis was introduced in the 1840s by a Scottish surgeon James Braid (1795-1860), who believed the subject to be in a particular state of sleep--a trance. In the late 19th century, a French neurologist Jean Martin Charcot (1825-1893) thought hypnotism to be a special physiological state, and his contemporary Hyppotite-Marie Bernheim (1840-1919) believed it to be a psychological state of heightened suggestibility. Sigmund Freud, who studied with Charcot, used hypnosis early in his career to help patients recover repressed memories. He noted that patients would relive traumatic events while under hypnosis, a process know as abreaction. Freud later replaced hypnosis with the technique of free associations. Today, hypnosis is used as a form of therapy (hypnotherapy), a method of investigation to recover lost memories, and research tool. According to Caplan & Sadock, F.A. Mesmer is generally thought of as the fons et origo of modern psychotherapy; and from the early techniques of mesmerism, it is said, have evolved the more elaborate and sophisticated therapeutic measures of the analyst and his colleagues. Although Mesmer was certainly dealing with individuals suffering from a variety of neurotic disorders, and though the clinical successes he achieved were the result of psychological processes that his procedures induced in his patients, Mesmer's theoretical formulations, his understanding of the nature of the treatment he developed, and his specific procedures were all totally different from those of the 20th century analyst. He was one of the corne stones in the development of psychoanalysis through hypnosis mainly of hysterical

  3. Practice of defensive medicine | Buowari | Jos Journal of Medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Defensive medicine is prescribing of unnecessary investigation and procedure and taking measures in order to prevent medical litigations. Litigation in medicine is generally high against doctors in the surgical specialities. Methodology: Literature search on articles on defensive medicine was done. Conclusion: ...

  4. [History of vaccine refusal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazin, Hervé

    2010-01-01

    The human fight against infectious diseases is ancient and ongoing. It started with variolation, probably in China in the 17th century and in the West at the beginning of the 18th century. Like most innovations it aroused a good deal of opposition. Improvements in this form of preventive medicine, first by Edward Jenner and then by Louis Pasteur, did not put a stop to these objections, some founded on reasonable arguments, others on simple opinion or religious or moral convictions. To these were added systematic resistance, pseudoscientific arguments, personal attacks, fallacious statements, claims of victimization of vaccine opponents, and simple slander.

  5. The history of infant nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilho, Silvia Diez; Barros Filho, Antônio Azevedo

    2010-01-01

    To retrace the history of infant nutrition with the objective of better understanding breastfeeding. Bibliographic searches were run on MEDLINE, LILACS, SciELO, and the Internet. Encyclopedias, scientific textbooks and books for the general public, in addition to literature, art and history, were also used. Texts on child care from several different periods were consulted, in addition to the history of medicine and recent scientific articles on infant nutrition. During the preindustrial period, customs varied little and the likelihood of survival was linked to breastfeeding or its substitution by a wetnurse's milk. Where this was not possible, infants were given animal milk, pre-chewed foods or paps that were poor in nutrients and contaminated, which caused high mortality rates. There was nothing that could successfully substitute breastfeeding and the survival of the species was dependent on breastfeeding. Once the industrial revolution had started, women who had been accustomed to breastfeeding went to work in factories, stimulating the search for alternative infant nutrition. Consumption of animal milk and formulae (diluted, flour-based, powdered milk) and premature introduction of complementary foods compromised children's health. The feminist movement and the contraceptive pill caused a fall in birth rates. Manufacturers in search of profits developed modified formulae and invested in advertising. Society reacted with breastfeeding support movements. Nowadays, the advantages of breastmilk are recognized and exclusive breastfeeding is recommended up to 6 months, to be supplemented with other foods from this age on and continued until at least 2 years of age. Infant nutrition, whether natural or artificial, has always been determined and conditioned by the social value attributed to breastfeeding.

  6. The past and the present status of nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, C.S.

    1979-01-01

    Various aspects of nuclear medicine in Korea such as a short history, personnels and medical establishments of using radioisotopes, the trend and pattern of radioisotopes usage, amount of medically applying radioisotopes, and the amount of home production of primary radioisotopes and labelled compounds in Korea are summarized as well as an introduction of research activities of the Korean Society of Nuclear Medicine. (Author)

  7. Is evidence-based medicine so evident in veterinary research and practice? History, obstacles and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandeweerd, Jean-Michel; Kirschvink, Nathalie; Clegg, Peter; Vandenput, Sandrine; Gustin, Pascal; Saegerman, Claude

    2012-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) refers to the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of current best evidence from research for the care of an individual patient. The concept of EBM was first described in human medicine in the early 1990s and was introduced to veterinary medicine 10 years later. However, it is not clear that the EBM approach promulgated in human medicine can be applied to the same extent to veterinary medicine. EBM has the potential to help veterinarians to make more informed decisions, but obstacles to the implementation of EBM include a lack of high quality patient-centred research, the need for basic understanding of clinical epidemiology by veterinarians, the absence of adequate searching techniques and accessibility to scientific data bases and the inadequacy of EBM tools that can be applied to the busy daily practise of veterinarians. This review describes the development of EBM in the veterinary profession, identifies its advantages and disadvantages and discusses whether and how veterinary surgeons should further adopt the EBM approach of human medicine. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Annals of African Medicine: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. The Annals of African Medicine subscribes to the “Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts submitted to Biomedical Journals” as published in New England Journal of Medicine 1997:336:309-315. The journal will publish articles in all fields and aspects of medicine in Africa and also from elsewhere, which ...

  9. The History of Secondary Education in History of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulloch, Gary

    2012-01-01

    "History of Education" has published a steady stream of papers on the history of secondary education over the first 40 years of its existence. This corpus of research has been generated in the context of renewed interest in the history of secondary education that has been stimulated by developments in social and historical inquiry as…

  10. Comparison of Leiomyoma of Modern Medicine and Traditional Persian Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansaz, Mojgan; Tajadini, Haleh

    2016-04-01

    Leiomyoma is the most common benign tumor of the pelvic that is associated with reproductive problems such as infertility, frequent abortions, and undesirable prenatal outcomes. High prevalence of leiomyoma and its relation with important gynecological complications, especially during reproductive ages, on the one hand, and high medical expenses and significant complications of common treatments, on the other, made us search traditional Persian medicine texts for a similar disease. In traditional Persian medicine, a condition has been introduced similar to leiomyoma (Oram-e-rahem). In this article, by collecting materials from traditional medicine texts on leiomyoma, we aim to provide theories for further studies on this topic, as there is an obvious difference between traditional Persian medicine and modern medicine with regard to leiomyoma. When modern medicine has not found a suitable response to treatment, reviewing of traditional Persian medicine for finding better treatment strategies is wise. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. [History of hip arthroplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płomiński, Janusz; Kwiatkowski, Krzysztof

    2007-02-01

    The authors present the history of hip prosthesis in treatment of coxarthrosis. Despite eighty years of experience the problem of gaining good and long-term results still exist and is difficult to solve. Even changing the way on cementless stabilization of prosthesis doesn't has result in solving the problem of aseptic loosening of hip arthroplasty. Problems of wear derbies made the producers find new to reduce particulate debris. The future of hip arthroplasty is connected with hip resurfacing. Moreover, the higher number of primary hip plasty the more prosthesis are loosening. The treatment is far more difficult and more expensive.

  12. Trends and Challenges of Traditional Medicine in Africa | Abdullahi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prior to the introduction of cosmopolitan medicine, traditional medicine used to be the dominant medical system available to millions of people in Africa in both rural and urban communities. However, the arrival of the Europeans marked a significant turning point in the history of this age-long tradition and culture. This paper ...

  13. [An aspect of Buddhistic medicine in ancient Korea: Wonhyo and medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, I S; Park, H W

    1995-01-01

    Lack of historical records causes some difficulties in the historical studies of ancient Korea. It is the same case as that of the history of medicine. We imagine what the situation of medicine was like in ancient Korea with a bit of historical records. In ancient times, medicine had very close relation with religions. In ancient Korea, it had very close relation with Buddhism. According to Sam Kuk Sa Ki and Sam Kuk Yu Sa buddhist monks treated patients with the religious rituals. In this article, the authors would like to present a record which had been unnoticed until now. It is the commentary of Wonhyo on a certain Buddhistic cannon called Kum Kwang Myung Kyung. A chapter (Je Byung Poom) of this cannon is on the theory of medicine, causes of diseases and treatments. We can presume Wonhyo's knowledge of medicine at that time through his commentary on this chapter.

  14. History of Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Tomisaku; Naoe, Shiro

    2014-04-01

    We describe a short history of Kawasaki disease. In 1967, we published a paper entitled 'Infantile acute febrile mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome with specific desquamation of the fingers and toes. Clinical observation of 50 cases'; this was the first report on what is now called Kawasaki disease. Since then, many reports on cardiology, treatment, epidemiology, pathology and etiology of Kawasaki disease have been published. Furthermore, a recent Chapel Hill Consensus Statement on Kawasaki disease in the classification of vasculitis is given, along with a figure on the relationship and classification of childhood vasculitis by autopsy material.

  15. The other branch of medicine: an historiography of veterinary medicine from a Canadian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukes, T W

    2000-11-01

    Animal (veterinary) medicine, that other branch of medical healing, forms a part of medical history and there are themes in common between human and veterinary medical historiography. Some of these themes include "great docs, great diseases," struggles with professionalization, institutional stories, general chronological overviews, development of medical disciplines, and the role of women. The "patient's view" in veterinary historiography is somewhat different. Veterinary history includes the theme of "great animals" but this is not, in the medical historical sense, a "patient's" view. Much work in this area of Canadian history remains to be accomplished.

  16. [Contribution to the history of pharmacology (the early Roman empire)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesařová, Drahomíra

    2014-01-01

    This article is a contribution to the history of pharmacology in the early Roman empire. It contains texts mainly written in Latin: the works of Aulus Cornelius Celsus, Scribonius Largus and Plinius Maior (Pliny the Elder). It describes their structure and contributions to the history of medicine and gives examples of some prescriptions and drugs in the original language and in Czech.

  17. Spirits and liqueurs in European traditional medicine: Their history and ethnobotany in Tuscany and Bologna (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea, Teresa; Signorini, Maria Adele; Bruschi, Piero; Rivera, Diego; Obón, Concepción; Alcaraz, Francisco; Palazón, José Antonio

    2015-12-04

    Fermented drinks, often alcoholic, are relevant in many nutritional, medicinal, social, ritual and religious aspects of numerous traditional societies. The use of alcoholic drinks of herbal extracts is documented in classical pharmacy since the 1st century CE and it is often recorded in ethnobotanical studies in Europe, particularly in Italy, where are used for a wide range of medicinal purposes. Formulations and uses represent a singular tradition which responds to a wide range of environmental and cultural factors. This research has two overarching aims To determine how long ancient uses, recipes and formulas for medicinal liqueurs from the pharmacopoeias and herbals of the 18th century persisted in later periods and their role in present ethnobotanical knowledge in areas of Tuscany and Emilia-Romagna (Italy). To trace other possible relationships among ancient and recent recipes of alcoholic beverages, from both popular and 'classic' (learned) sources in N-C Italy and neighboring areas. The review of herbals and classical pharmacopoeias, and ethnobotanical field work in Alta Valle del Reno (Tuscany and Emilia Romagna, Italy) were followed of a systematic study of ingredients and medicinal uses with multivariate analysis techniques. The multivariate analysis clearly shows six different styles of preparing medicinal alcoholic beverages: 1. The medicinal wine formulae by Dioscorides (1st century CE). 2. The pharmacopoeias of Florence and Bologna in the 18th century CE. 3. The formularies of Santa Maria Novella and Castiglione (19th and early 20th centuries CE). 4. The ethnobotanical data from Appennino Tosco-Emiliano; home-made formulations based almost exclusively on the use of local resources. 5. Traditional recipes from NE Italy and Austria. 6. Traditional recipes from NW Italy, Emilia, and Provence (France). A total of 54 ingredients (29 fruits) from 48 species are used in different combinations and proportions in Alta Valle del Reno (Italy) to produce

  18. [Problems in medicinal materials research of new traditional Chinese medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Gang; Wang, Ting; He, Yan-Ping

    2014-08-01

    Medicinal materials research and development of new drug of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) research is the premise and foundation of new drug research and development, it throughout the whole process of new drug research. Medicinal materials research is one of the main content of the pharmaceutical research of new drug of TCM, and it is also the focus of the new medicine pharmaceutical evaluation content. This article through the analysis of the present problems existing in the development of TCM research of new drug of TCM, from medicine research concept, quality stability, quality standard, etc are expounded, including medicine research idea value medicine study should focus on the important role and from the purpose for the top-level design of new drug research problem. Medicinal materials quality stability should pay attention to the original, medicinal part, origin, processing, storage, planting (breeding), and other aspects. Aspect of quality standard of medicinal materials should pay attention to establish the quality standards of conform to the characteristics of new drug of TCM. As the instruction of TCM new drug research and development and the scientific nature of the review, and provide the basis for medicinal material standards.

  19. Past and present of measuring apparatus for nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murayama, Hideo

    2013-01-01

    The history of advancement of measuring apparatus for nuclear medicine is looked back. It is presented that Japanese contribution to these advancement has been in no small quantities. The future view carrying the measuring apparatus for nuclear medicine is also described. (M.H.)

  20. Tele-nuclear medicine | Sabbah | SA Journal of Radiology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article presents a description of tele-nuclear medicine and, after outlining its history, a wide, representative range of its applications. Tele-nuclear medicine has benefited greatly from technological progress, which for several decades has provided greater data transfer rates and storage capacity at steadily decreasing ...

  1. Impact History of the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, B. A.; Bottke, W. F.; Norman, M. V.; van der Bogert, C. H.; Fassett, C. I.; Hiesinger, H.; Joy, K. H.; Mazrouei, S. A.; Nemchin, A.; Neumann, G. A.; Zellner, N. E. B.

    2018-04-01

    Establishing an absolute planetary chronology has important ramifications for understanding the early structure of the solar system and the geologic history of the planets. The Moon is the cornerstone for understanding this impact history.

  2. Nuclear Medicine and Application of Nuclear Techniques in Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiharto, Kunto

    1996-01-01

    The use of nuclear techniques medicine covers not only nuclear medicine and radiology in strict sense but also determination of body mineral content by neutron activation analysis and x-ray fluorescence technique either in vitro or in vivo, application of radioisotopes as tracers in pharmacology and biochemistry, etc. This paper describes the ideal tracer in nuclear medicine, functional and morphological imaging, clinical aspect and radiation protection in nuclear medicine. Nuclear technique offers facilities and chances related to research activities and services in medicine. The development of diagnostic as well as therapeutic methods using monoclonal antibodies labeled with radioisotope will undoubtedly play an important role in the disease control

  3. A history of mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Boyer, Carl B

    1989-01-01

    "Boyer and Merzbach distill thousands of years of mathematics into this fascinating chronicle. From the Greeks to Godel, the mathematics is brilliant; the cast of characters is distinguished; the ebb and flow of ideas is everywhere evident. And, while tracing the development of European mathematics, the authors do not overlook the contributions of Chinese, Indian, and Arabic civilizations. Without doubt, this is--and will long remain--a classic one-volume history of mathematics and mathematicians who create it." --William Dunham Author, Journey Through Genius, The Great Theorems of Mathematics "When we read a book like A History of Mathematics, we get the picture of a mounting structure, ever taller and broader and more beautiful and magnificent--and with a foundation, moreover, that is as untainted and as functional now as it was when Thales worked out the first geometrical theorems nearly 26 centuries ago." --From the Foreword by Isaac Asimov "One of the most useful and comprehensive general introductions t...

  4. Index of international publications in aerospace medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    The 5th edition of the Index of International Publications in Aerospace Medicine is a comprehensive : listing of international publications in clinical aerospace medicine, operational aerospace medicine, : aerospace physiology, environmental medicine...

  5. Exploring global history through the lens of history of Chemistry: Materials, identities and governance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Lissa

    2016-12-01

    As global history continues to take shape as an important field of research, its interactive relationships with the history of science, technology, and medicine are recognized and being investigated as significant areas of concern. Strangely, despite the fact that it is key to understanding so many of the subjects that are central to global history and would itself benefit from a broader geographical perspective, the history of chemistry has largely been left out of this process - particularly for the modern historical period. This article argues for the value of integrating the history of chemistry with global history, not only for understanding the past, but also for thinking about our shared present and future. Toward this end, it (1) explores the various ways in which 'chemistry' has and can be defined, with special attention to discussions of 'indigenous knowledge systems'; (2) examines the benefits of organizing historical inquiry around the evolving sociomaterial identities of substances; (3) considers ways in which the concepts of 'chemical governance' and 'chemical expertise' can be expanded to match the complexities of global history, especially in relation to environmental issues, climate change, and pollution; and (4) seeks to sketch the various geographies entailed in bringing the history of chemistry together with global histories.

  6. History of autostereoscopic cinema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Walter

    2012-03-01

    This paper covers the history of autostereoscopic cinema, from the beginnings of autostereoscopy in the 1800s, the development of motion capability and it's subsequent evolution to present techniques. Public viewings of autostereoscopic movies have occurred on a semi-ongoing basis since the early 1940s. In Moscow and other cities, theaters were constructed called stereokinos, for showing autostereoscopic films, with specially positioned seating for proper viewing. The Cyclostéréoscope was an autostereoscopic cinema system invented by François Savoye in France. It was based around a drum made of metal bars that revolve around a screen. For several years in the 1940s and 1950s, it was open to the public in Paris. Any film made in a dual film format could be shown. Besides dedicated theaters in Russia and France, exhibits of content have occurred outside devoted theaters. The paper focuses on the history of autostereoscopic technology developed for entertainment, public viewing of content, the individuals involved and the content itself.

  7. Index of international publications in aerospace medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-08-01

    The Index of International Publications in Aerospace Medicine is a comprehensive listing of international publications in clinical aerospace medicine, operational aerospace medicine, aerospace physiology, environmental medicine/physiology, diving med...

  8. Charles E. Rosenberg and the multifaceted promise of medical history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Rosemary A

    2008-10-01

    Charles E. Rosenberg has had a major influence in defining the history of medicine as a field. However, critics who focus on his leadership or "school" in terms of defined scholarly perspectives, including those of social history and the framing of disease, offer inadequate descriptions of the messages, breadth, and scope of his scholarly work as a whole. Shoehorning the history of medicine into prescribed patterns in order to build a more unitary discipline would weaken rather than strengthen the field and is not in the Rosenberg tradition.

  9. History of acupuncture research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Yi; Xing, Jing-jing; Li, Juan; Zeng, Bai-Yun; Liang, Fan-rong

    2013-01-01

    The acupuncture has been practiced in China for more than 3000 years and was spread to Europe and American from the sixteenth to the nineteenth century. The history of acupuncture research was initiated in the eighteenth century and developed rapidly since then. In the past, physicians tried hard to apply acupuncture into clinical practice, while scientists were focused on the possible characteristics of acupoints and meridians. In the modern time, scientists have strived hard to evaluate the real effectiveness of acupuncture and the underlying physiological and biological mechanisms of acupuncture. Reviewing research history from past to present, we are delighted to witness this wonderful development. Accumulated evidences that acupuncture is beneficial in various conditions significantly enhanced our understanding the mechanisms of acupuncture treatment. However, there is still no conclusive evidence in acupuncture clinical studies. The clinical research still needs great improving, while the basic research results need to be appropriately transformed into clinical outcomes. Based on current achievements, we believe that although the challenges and difficulties exist, a more collaborative, innovative, and integrated approach will help us to achieve further progress in future acupuncture research. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Antibiotic Resistance and the Biology of History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landecker, Hannah

    2016-12-01

    Beginning in the 1940s, mass production of antibiotics involved the industrial-scale growth of microorganisms to harvest their metabolic products. Unfortunately, the use of antibiotics selects for resistance at answering scale. The turn to the study of antibiotic resistance in microbiology and medicine is examined, focusing on the realization that individual therapies targeted at single pathogens in individual bodies are environmental events affecting bacterial evolution far beyond bodies. In turning to biological manifestations of antibiotic use, sciences fathom material outcomes of their own previous concepts. Archival work with stored soil and clinical samples produces a record described here as 'the biology of history': the physical registration of human history in bacterial life. This account thus foregrounds the importance of understanding both the materiality of history and the historicity of matter in theories and concepts of life today.

  11. History of health informatics: a global perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesnik, Branko; Kidd, Michael R

    2010-01-01

    In considering a 'history' of Health Informatics it is important to be aware that the discipline encompasses a wide array of activities, products, research and theories. Health Informatics is as much a result of evolution as planned philosophy, having its roots in the histories of information technology and medicine. The process of its growth continues so that today's work is tomorrow's history. A 'historical' discussion of the area is its history to date, a report rather than a summation. As well as its successes, the history of Health Informatics is populated with visionary promises that have failed to materialise despite the best intentions. For those studying the subject or working in the field, the experiences of others' use of Information Technologies for the betterment of health care can provide a necessary perspective. This chapter starts by noting some of the major events and people that form a technological backdrop to Health Informatics and ends with some thoughts on the future. This chapter gives an educational overview of: * The history of computing * The beginnings of the health informatics discipline.

  12. The History of Melancholia Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghfard, Abbas; Bozorgi, Ali Reza; Ahmadi, Shaghayegh; Shojaei, Masoumeh

    2016-05-01

    Melancholia is a kind of depression with the most common symptoms of evident mental disorder, slimness, lack of enjoyment, feeling guilty and having no appetite. In modern medicine, the word "melancholia" only refers to mental and affective symptoms of depression. However, historically, it could have physical symptoms as well as mental symptoms and the atrabilious situations were categorized according to their common reasons rather than their specific characteristics. This study aimed to enlighten the history of this disease. This is a review article concerned with cerebral diseases by collecting data from medical electronic databases including PUBMED and SID, historical psychiatry books and traditional medicine manuscripts. The first known physician to have scientifically looked at the mental diseases was Hippocrates (370-460 B.C), who should be accredited as the father of medicine. While physicians in the time of Hippocrates seriously believed in the metaphysics power in health and diseases, Hippocrates believed in natural laws. Plato (348-428 B.C) believed that human behavior is affected by his physical needs and instincts. In the course of Hippocrates's theory about bodily humors, Aristotle considered a range of mental characteristics for each. Finally, Galen believed that cerebral disease causes mental diseases or disorders based on his own theories of anatomy. Persian physicians involved in this area were Rabban al-Tabari (838-870 A.D), Razes (865-925 A.D), Ali-Ibn Abbas Ahvazi (944-982 A.D), Al-ikhwan al bukhari the physician of the ninth century, Ibn Sina (980-1037 A.D), Gorgani (1040-1136 A.D) and Khaje Nasireddin Tousi (1201-1274 A.D). They considered cerebral diseases and health as a part of equality process; different organs accommodate a physical system and mutual dependence with the society and environment. Mental health has been reviewed from various aspects in view of ancient physicians. Feeble mindedness and behavioral disorder complications had

  13. Functions of History Education: History Teacher Trainees' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinoglu, Orhan

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate history teacher trainees' views and perceptions of the functions of history education. 36 teacher trainees participated in the study. All of the participants were registered to the History Education masters degree (without dissertation), within the Secondary Education Social Sciences discipline at…

  14. Troubling Histories and Theories: Gender and the History of Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Joyce

    2003-01-01

    Discusses gender influences and ways that history and theory have interacted in influencing women's contribution and recognition in educational history. Focuses on several historians' views and how some have eventually written women back into the historical picture of education. (KDR)

  15. Histories of Hating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Shepherd

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This roundtable discussion presents a dialogue between digital culture scholars on the seemingly increased presence of hating and hate speech online. Revolving primarily around the recent #GamerGate campaign of intensely misogynistic discourse aimed at women in video games, the discussion suggests that the current moment for hate online needs to be situated historically. From the perspective of intersecting cultural histories of hate speech, discrimination, and networked communication, we interrogate the ontological specificity of online hating before going on to explore potential responses to the harmful consequences of hateful speech. Finally, a research agenda for furthering the historical understandings of contemporary online hating is suggested in order to address the urgent need for scholarly interventions into the exclusionary cultures of networked media.

  16. Introducing considerations in the Translation of Chinese Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritzker, Sonya E; Hui, Ka-Kit

    2014-07-01

    This article introduces the document, Considerations in the Translation of Chinese Medicine, published in PDF form online in both Chinese and English. This 20-page document includes several sections describing why the Considerations is necessary, the specificity of texts in Chinese medicine; the history of translation in Chinese medicine; who constitutes an ideal translator of Chinese medicine; what types of language exist in Chinese medicine; and specific issues in the translation of Chinese medicine, such as domestication versus foreignization, technical terminology, period-specific language, style, polysemy, and etymological translation. The final section offers a brief advisory for consumers, and concludes with a call to further discussion, and action, specifically in the development of international collaborative efforts towards the creation of more rigorous guidelines for the translation of Chinese medicine. The current article provides an overview of several of these sections, and includes links to the original document.

  17. Who teaches History? Possibility of the history research in education in history

    OpenAIRE

    山田, 智

    2013-01-01

    Who teaches History? - Possibility of the history research in education in history Recent days, education has been actively. Above all, discussion on historical education has been deepened. Ryuichi Narita's "KINGENDAI-NIHONSHI TO REKISHIGAKU" is one of the most thought-provoking work in this field. In this paper, I re-consider his study and state my own view about this problem. Narita divides Japan's modern history research into three periods and points out that the Japanese history textbook ...

  18. [Holistic integrative medicine: the road to the future of the development of burn medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, D M

    2017-01-20

    Holistic integrative medicine is the road to the future of the development of burn medicine. Not only burn medicine, but also human medicine gradually enters the era of holistic integrative medicine. Holistic integrative medicine is different from translational medicine, evidence-based medicine or precision medicine, which integrates the most advanced knowledge and theories in medicine fields with the most effective practices and experiences in clinical specialties to form a new medical system.

  19. White paper of nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-10-01

    This document aims at proposing a synthetic presentation of nuclear medicine in France (definition, strengths and weaknesses, key figures about practices and the profession, stakes for years to come), a description of the corresponding education (speciality definition, abilities and responsibilities, diploma content, proposition by the European Society of Radiology and by the CNIPI, demography of the profession), and an overview of characteristics of nuclear medicine (radio-pharmacy, medical physics, paramedical personnel in nuclear medicine, hybrid imagery, therapy, relationships with industries of nuclear medicine, relationships with health authorities)

  20. The European Network on Psychosomatic Medicine (ENPM) - history and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deter, Hans-Christian; Orth-Gomér, Kristina; Wasilewski, Bohdan; Verissimo, Ramiro

    2017-01-01

    Within national and international societies of psychosomatic medicine the idea has emerged of bringing together and coordinating psychosomatic, behavioural, psychological and medical actions with common interests throughout Europe as a way to increase their scientific and political influence. It was felt that there was a strong need and opportunity of a common and unifying forum for scientific exchange. It was considered desirable to exchange scientific thoughts and experiences in an open minded and boundless way, among individuals and societies, between disciplines and across borders. The course of ideas and discussions within the group of European psychosomatic scientists over 12 years is presented as an effort to combine strengths and actions supporting clinical psychosomatic research and medical practice in Europe. The fields of psycho-cardiology, quality in primary care, psycho-oncology, gastrointestinal psychosomatics, C/L Psychiatry, and Psychosomatics are examples of such positive developments. Several historic ideas are mentioned and the aims and advantages of the newly founded European Association of Psychosomatic Medicine are discussed. The advantages and virtues of a more powerful common European organisation of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychiatric Consultation-Liaison are compared to continuing our work within the present Psychosomatic/Psychiatric and Behavioural fields. Psychosomatic and Behavioural Medicine have reached a strong position in Europe. There are studies in which the medical speciality is on equal terms with psychosomatic medicine representatives. There is a continuous need for scientific conferences, for teaching, and for better practice with patients. This could be coordinated by a network. Much energy and time is lost in isolated societies and countries. We want to focus our resources in scientific projects within the boundaries of a scientific network with the primary aim of developing psychosomatic scientific exchange.

  1. History of Antibiotics Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Kathrin I

    2016-01-01

    For thousands of years people were delivered helplessly to various kinds of infections, which often reached epidemic proportions and have cost the lives of millions of people. This is precisely the age since mankind has been thinking of infectious diseases and the question of their causes. However, due to a lack of knowledge, the search for strategies to fight, heal, and prevent the spread of communicable diseases was unsuccessful for a long time. It was not until the discovery of the healing effects of (antibiotic producing) molds, the first microscopic observations of microorganisms in the seventeenth century, the refutation of the abiogenesis theory, and the dissolution of the question "What is the nature of infectious diseases?" that the first milestones within the history of antibiotics research were set. Then new discoveries accelerated rapidly: Bacteria could be isolated and cultured and were identified as possible agents of diseases as well as producers of bioactive metabolites. At the same time the first synthetic antibiotics were developed and shortly thereafter, thousands of synthetic substances as well as millions of soil borne bacteria and fungi were screened for bioactivity within numerous microbial laboratories of pharmaceutical companies. New antibiotic classes with different targets were discovered as on assembly line production. With the beginning of the twentieth century, many of the diseases which reached epidemic proportions at the time-e.g., cholera, syphilis, plague, tuberculosis, or typhoid fever, just to name a few, could be combatted with new discovered antibiotics. It should be considered that hundred years ago the market launch of new antibiotics was significantly faster and less complicated than today (where it takes 10-12 years in average between the discovery of a new antibiotic until the launch). After the first euphoria it was quickly realized that bacteria are able to develop, acquire, and spread numerous resistance mechanisms

  2. History of gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Thomas; Parker, Nigel; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2013-08-10

    Two decades after the initial gene therapy trials and more than 1700 approved clinical trials worldwide we not only have gained much new information and knowledge regarding gene therapy in general, but also learned to understand the concern that has persisted in society. Despite the setbacks gene therapy has faced, success stories have increasingly emerged. Examples for these are the positive recommendation for a gene therapy product (Glybera) by the EMA for approval in the European Union and the positive trials for the treatment of ADA deficiency, SCID-X1 and adrenoleukodystrophy. Nevertheless, our knowledge continues to grow and during the course of time more safety data has become available that helps us to develop better gene therapy approaches. Also, with the increased understanding of molecular medicine, we have been able to develop more specific and efficient gene transfer vectors which are now producing clinical results. In this review, we will take a historical view and highlight some of the milestones that had an important impact on the development of gene therapy. We will also discuss briefly the safety and ethical aspects of gene therapy and address some concerns that have been connected with gene therapy as an important therapeutic modality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Herman Boerhaave, the Dutch Hippocrates, a Forgotten Father of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholer, Anthony J; Khan, Munim Ali; Tandon, Aastha; Swan, Kenneth; Chokshi, Ravi J

    2018-03-01

    In today's medical community, when people say the name Herman Boerhaave, most assimilate it to Boerhaave syndrome. His influence on medicine is seen every day in hospitals around the world. His methodologies revolutionized medical education and the way physicians approach the examination of patients. It has been said that during the Age of Reason, he was the "Bearer of the Enlightenment of Medicine." He is a forgotten father of medicine. To preserve medical history, educators should give students a brief summary of the contributors to medicine to remind us how much of their lives they gave to further medical knowledge.

  4. Comparison of Sasang Constitutional Medicine, Traditional Chinese Medicine and Ayurveda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Yeol Kim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sasang constitutional medicine (SCM, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM and Ayurveda are three different forms of Asian traditional medicine. Although these traditions share a lot in common as holistic medicines, the different philosophical foundations found in each confer distinguishing attributes and unique qualities. SCM is based on a constitution-based approach, and is in this way relatively more similar to the Ayurvedic tradition than to the TCM, although many of the basic SCM theories were originally derived from TCM, a syndrome-based medicine. SCM and TCM use the same botanical materials that are distributed mainly in the East Asian region, but the basic principles of usage and the underlying rationale are completely different from each other. Meanwhile, the principles of the Ayurvedic use of botanical resources are very similar to those seen in SCM, but the medicinal herbs used in Ayurveda generally originate from the West Asian region which displays a different spectrum of flora.

  5. Personalized medicine: a confluence of traditional and contemporary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Samineh; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Saeidnia, Soodabeh

    2014-01-01

    Traditional systems of medicine have attained great popularity among patients in recent years. Success of this system in the treatment of disease warrants consideration, particularly in cases for which conventional medicine has been insufficient. This study investigates the similarities in principles and approaches of 3 traditional systems and explores whether conventional medicine is able to exploit the advantages of traditional systems. This study first identifies and explores the advantages of 3 well-known systems-traditional Iranian medicine (TIM), ayurveda, and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM)-that are similar in their basic principles and methods. Second, it clarifies whether and how conventional medicine could exploit the advantages of traditional systems as it modernizes, to become more personalized. Finally, this study investigates the possibility that conventional medicine could benefit from traditional typology to improve its personalization. The acknowledgment of the unity of humans and nature, applying rational methods, and personalized approaches is fundamentally similar in the 3 systems. Additionally, they all promote the holistic view that health is harmony and disease is disharmony of the body. Other similarities include their recognition of the unique nature of every person and their categorization of people into different body types. Although conventional medicine has mostly failed to incorporate the advantages of traditional medicine, its integration with traditional medicine is achievable. For instance, exploiting traditional typologies in genomic and other studies may facilitate personalization of conventional medicine. From its review, the research team concludes that prospects are bright for the integration of traditional and conventional medicines and, consequently, for a dramatic improvement in health systems.

  6. [Kant and medicine of enlightenment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Model, A

    1990-01-01

    Immanuel Kants "Critique of Judgment" (1970) reflects the medicine of the second part of the eighteenth century. Both parts of the "Critique of Judgment" (as well the "Critique of Aesthetic Judgment" as the "Critique of Teleological Judgment") refer to problems of medicine.

  7. Traditional use and safety of herbal medicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davyson de L. Moreira

    Full Text Available In the European Union, traditional herbal medicines that are regarded as "acceptably safe, albeit not having a recognized level of efficacy" fit into a special category of drugs ("traditional herbal medicine products" for which requirements of non-clinical and clinical studies are less rigorous. A regulation proposal published by the Brazilian National Health Surveillance (Anvisa defines a similar drug category ("traditional phytotherapeutic products" for registration purposes. Regarding herbal medicines, both agencies seem to be lenient regarding proof of efficacy, and consider long-standing folk use as evidence of safety and a waiver of a thorough toxicological evaluation. Nonetheless, several herbal products and constituents with a long history of folk usage are suspected carcinogenic and/or hepatotoxic. Herbal products have also been shown to inhibit and/or induce drug-metabolizing enzymes. Since herbal medicines are often used in conjunction with conventional drugs, kinetic and clinical interactions are a cause for concern. A demonstration of the safety of herbal medicines for registration purposes should include at least in vitroand in vivogenotoxicity assays, long-term rodent carcinogenicity tests (for drugs intended to be continuously used for > 3 months or intermittently for > 6 months, reproductive and developmental toxicity studies (for drugs used by women of childbearing age, and investigation of the effects on drug-metabolizing enzymes.

  8. Transformation of History textbooks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haue, Harry

    2013-01-01

    Artiklen omhandler danske og tyske lærebøger i historie over de seneste to århundreder med hensyn til deres vægtning af det nationale og det globale stof.......Artiklen omhandler danske og tyske lærebøger i historie over de seneste to århundreder med hensyn til deres vægtning af det nationale og det globale stof....

  9. HISTORY OF NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL REHABILITATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Varako

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. The article reviews the history of neuropsychological rehabilitation. It begins with the description of first rehabilitation programs developed by Paul Broca and Shepherd Franz. Franz’s experimental work for motor recovery in monkeys and correlation between active movement or affected limb immobilization and rehabilitation outcomes are described in further details. Special focus is given on ideas of famous German neurologist and psychiatrist Kurt Goldstein, who laid the foundation for modern approach in rehabilitation. Goldstein developed the idea of connection between rehabilitation and patient’s daily life. He also pointed out the necessity of psychological care of patients with brain damage.Russian neuropsychological approach is presented by its founders L.S. Vygotskiy and A.R. Luriya. Aspects of higher mental processes structure and options of its correction such as “cognitive prosthesis” are described in the sense of the approach.Y. Ben-Yishay, G. Prigatano, B. Wilson represent neuropsychological rehabilitation of the second half of the 20th century. The idea of a holistic approach for rehabilitation consists of such important principles as patient’s active involvement in a process of rehabilitation, work of a special team of rehabilitation professionals, inclusion of patient’s family members. The short review of a new rehabilitation approach for patients in coma, vegetative states and critical patients under resuscitation is given. 

  10. History of animal bioacoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popper, Arthur N.; Dooling, Robert J.

    2002-11-01

    The earliest studies on animal bioacoustics dealt largely with descriptions of sounds. Only later did they address issues of detection, discrimination, and categorization of complex communication sounds. This literature grew substantially over the last century. Using the Journal of the Acoustical Society of America as an example, the number of papers that fall broadly within the realm of animal sound production, communication, and hearing rose from two in the partial first decade of the journal in the 1930's, to 20 in the 1970's, to 92 in the first 2 years of this millennium. During this time there has been a great increase in the diversity of species studied, the sophistication of the methods used, and the complexity of the questions addressed. As an example, the first papers in JASA focused on a guinea pig and a bird. In contrast, since the year 2000 studies are often highly comparative and include fish, birds, dolphins, dogs, ants, crickets, and snapping shrimp. This paper on the history of animal bioacoustics will consider trends in work over the decades and discuss the formative work of a number of investigators who have spurred the field by making critical theoretical and experimental observations.

  11. Early History of Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Rogez, J. C.; Matson, D. L.; Johnson, T. V.; Atreya, S.; Lunine, J. I.

    2007-05-01

    We revisit models for the early history of Titan. Our models start a few My after the production of calcium- aluminum inclusions (CAIs), consistent with the dates required by our thermophysical-dynamical modeling of Saturn's medium-sized satellites. Depending on the time of formation with respect to CAIs, the accretion time scale, and the available accretional energy, models of Titan's interior after accretion are partially to fully differentiated. At one extreme of the models, Titan accretes incorporating a minimal amount of heat. This results in a relatively cold core that, over the long term, heats up and overturns, consistent with previous models of Titan. At the other extreme, accretional heat and heat fom the decay of short-lived radiogenic isotopes results in quick and complete differentiation. In this model there is no core overturn, and conditions soon develop for silicate serpentinization, and hydrothermal activity starts. We identify the periods during which conditions are suitable for hydrothermal geochemistry leading to the production of molecular nitrogen from ammonia decomposition and methane from the Fischer-Tropsch reaction. Key questions include the availability of suitable metal catalysts and/or clay minerals, storage of the reactants and products in the interior of Titan, and mechanisms by which they are released to the atmosphere. Acknowledgements: This work was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory-California Institute of Technology, under contract to NASA.

  12. The history of leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steverding, Dietmar

    2017-02-15

    In this review article the history of leishmaniasis is discussed regarding the origin of the genus Leishmania in the Mesozoic era and its subsequent geographical distribution, initial evidence of the disease in ancient times, first accounts of the infection in the Middle Ages, and the discovery of Leishmania parasites as causative agents of leishmaniasis in modern times. With respect to the origin and dispersal of Leishmania parasites, the three currently debated hypotheses (Palaearctic, Neotropical and supercontinental origin, respectively) are presented. Ancient documents and paleoparasitological data indicate that leishmaniasis was already widespread in antiquity. Identification of Leishmania parasites as etiological agents and sand flies as the transmission vectors of leishmaniasis started at the beginning of the 20 th century and the discovery of new Leishmania and sand fly species continued well into the 21 st century. Lately, the Syrian civil war and refugee crises have shown that leishmaniasis epidemics can happen any time in conflict areas and neighbouring regions where the disease was previously endemic.

  13. History of social psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, Kathleen; Kumbier, Ekkehardt

    2012-11-01

    The overview focuses on publications relating to the history of social psychiatry and the mental health movement, respectively. The selected works show fundamental developments within psychiatry, which can be conceived in the broadest sense as sociomedical in nature. Main emphases are the criticism of large institutions, reform movements and antipsychiatric movements, the search for alternative therapeutic methods, and the question of the resocialization of the mentally ill. Furthermore, it is important to demonstrate the influences of other scientific disciplines. Although social psychiatric approaches can be discerned as early as in the 19th century, the focus of the works lies on the development of social psychiatry in the 20th century. Only from the 1950s onwards did social psychiatry establish itself as an integral part of psychiatric practice and later of research. Accordingly, the main focus of the studies is on the development after the Second World War, not least because processes that began at that time have not yet been concluded. Happily, a trend is apparent in this respect: the one-sided view of physicians and their actions is being increasingly complemented by further professional groups and is consequently broadened by important dimensions.

  14. a History of Emats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alers, George

    2008-02-01

    This paper was prepared for a Special Session in the 34th Annual Review of Quantitative NDE devoted to "Applications of EMATs". As such, it reviews the past history of electromagnetic induction of vibrations in metals with special attention to the application to nondestructive testing. The first patent describing the use of Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducers (EMATs) to replace the commonly used piezoelectric transducer was in 1969 but their first appearance in the scientific literature was in 1939 when the principles were applied to exciting and detecting the longitudinal resonance modes of bars of brass. The first true application to nondestructive testing was an R&D program sponsored by the American Gas Association to develop a device for inspecting buried gas pipelines for stress corrosion cracks in the early 1970's. During this same time period, theoretical models to describe the transduction mechanism appeared and led to the engineering of solutions to NDT and NDE problems that could not be accomplished with piezoelectric devices. The papers in the session to follow this historical summary show how the field has developed over the past 30 years and expose an impressive array of applications to quantitative nondestructive evaluation (QNDE) practices.

  15. Histories of terrestrial planets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benes, K.

    1981-01-01

    The uneven historical development of terrestrial planets - Mercury, Venus, Earth, Moon and Mars - is probably due to the differences in their size, weight and rotational dynamics in association with the internal planet structure, their distance from the Sun, etc. A systematic study of extraterrestrial planets showed that the time span of internal activity was not the same for all bodies. It is assumed that the initial history of all terrestrial planets was marked with catastrophic events connected with the overall dynamic development of the solar system. In view of the fact that the cores of small terrestrial bodies cooled quicker, their geological development almost stagnated after two or three thousand million years. This is what probably happened to the Mercury and the Moon as well as the Mars. Therefore, traces of previous catastrophic events were preserved on the surface of the planets. On the other hand, the Earth is the most metamorphosed terrestrial planet and compared to the other planets appears to be atypical. Its biosphere is significantly developed as well as the other shell components, its hydrosphere and atmosphere, and its crust is considerably differentiated. (J.P.)

  16. Archives: Annals of African Medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 34 of 34 ... Archives: Annals of African Medicine. Journal Home > Archives: Annals of African Medicine. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 34 of 34 Items ...

  17. Applications of electrochemistry in medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Schlesinger, Mordechay

    2013-01-01

    Medical Applications of Electrochemistry, a volume of the series Modern Aspects of Electrochemistry, illustrates the interdisciplinary nature of modern science by indicating the many current issues in medicine that are susceptible to solution by electrochemical methods. This book also suggests how personalized medicine can develop.

  18. Archives: Orient Journal of Medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 26 of 26 ... Archives: Orient Journal of Medicine. Journal Home > Archives: Orient Journal of Medicine. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 26 of 26 Items ...

  19. Archives: Alexandria Journal of Medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 31 of 31 ... Archives: Alexandria Journal of Medicine. Journal Home > Archives: Alexandria Journal of Medicine. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 31 of 31 ...

  20. Archives: Libyan Journal of Medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 23 of 23 ... Archives: Libyan Journal of Medicine. Journal Home > Archives: Libyan Journal of Medicine. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 23 of 23 Items ...

  1. Archives: Jos Journal of Medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 18 of 18 ... Archives: Jos Journal of Medicine. Journal Home > Archives: Jos Journal of Medicine. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 18 of 18 Items. 2017 ...

  2. [The nature of internal medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federspil, G; Scandellari, C

    1994-01-01

    We investigate here the problem of the nature of Internal Medicine in the context of the different medical disciplines. After reviewing the origins of Internal Medicine and the changes it has undergone since the early 19th century, we deal with the present crisis of this medical branch and the reasons for it. In Italy, the crisis of Internal Medicine began at the dawn of this century when Neurology became a distinct discipline, isolated from the rest of Clinical Medicine. The present-day crisis is determined by the fact that the different constituent parts of Special Medical Pathology have become autonomous specialist disciplines: this situation has convinced some specialists that Internal Medicine, as a single branch, no longer exists. We thus examine the "justification" for the existence of Internal Medicine. Specialist disciplines were originally created to permit deeper analysis of pathological phenomena; however, the great emphasis on detailed and precise analysis of the different phenomena has paved the way for immense progress in pathophysiology and diagnosis, while the synthetic approach fundamental to Clinical Medicine has been neglected. After referring to Claude Bernard's idea that an organism is greater than the sum of its parts, we note that nowadays considerable importance is given to the "whole", that is, to the global study of very complex systems. We thus examine the thesis of Internal Medicine (which views the organism as a whole) as the specific clinical tool enabling the physician to evaluate each single pathophysiological phenomenon.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Nigerian Journal of Medicine: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. At the Nigerian Journal of Medicine, we welcome any contribution that advances/illuminates medical science or practice extending to all aspects of medicine. Contributions may be in the form of review articles, original articles, case report, clinical practice materials, letters to the editor, short communication ...

  4. An overview of space medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodkinson, P D; Anderton, R A; Posselt, B N; Fong, K J

    2017-12-01

    Space medicine is fundamental to the human exploration of space. It supports survival, function and performance in this challenging and potentially lethal environment. It is international, intercultural and interdisciplinary, operating at the boundaries of exploration, science, technology and medicine. Space medicine is also the latest UK specialty to be recognized by the Royal College of Physicians in the UK and the General Medical Council. This review introduces the field of space medicine and describes the different types of spaceflight, environmental challenges, associated medical and physiological effects, and operational medical considerations. It will describe the varied roles of the space medicine doctor, including the conduct of surgery and anaesthesia, and concludes with a vision of the future for space medicine in the UK.Space medicine doctors have a responsibility to space workers and spaceflight participants. These 'flight surgeons' are key in developing mitigation strategies to ensure the safety, health and performance of space travellers in what is an extreme and hazardous environment. This includes all phases from selection, training and spaceflight itself to post-flight rehabilitation and long-term health. The recent recognition of the speciality provides a pathway to train in this fascinating field of medicine and is a key enabler for the UK Government's commercial spaceflight ambition. © Crown copyright 2017.

  5. The German emergency and disaster medicine and management system—history and present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman Hecker

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available As well for optimized emergency management in individual cases as for optimized mass medicine in disaster management, the principle of the medical doctors approaching the patient directly and timely, even close to the site of the incident, is a long-standing marker for quality of care and patient survival in Germany. Professional rescue and emergency forces, including medical services, are the “Golden Standard” of emergency management systems. Regulative laws, proper organization of resources, equipment, training and adequate delivery of medical measures are key factors in systematic approaches to manage emergencies and disasters alike and thus save lives. During disasters command, communication, coordination and cooperation are essential to cope with extreme situations, even more so in a globalized world. In this article, we describe the major historical milestones, the current state of the German system in emergency and disaster management and its integration into the broader European approach. Keywords: Emergency medical systems, Disaster medicine, Public health, Germany

  6. Young women's use of medicines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dana Lee; Hansen, Ebba Holme; Holstein, Bjørn Evald

    2009-01-01

    , a unifying concept involving growing autonomy in medicine use emerged. This concept consisted of three parts: the great influence of family norms when autonomy was limited, growing autonomy under changing influences and assertion of autonomy and positioning of own behaviour relative to the norm. This study...... taking practices and ideas about appropriate medicine use within their family and peer group. Young women possessed a keen awareness of medicine-related norms, although medicine use was a topic only rarely discussed with others. At the interface of these themes pertaining to family and peer norms...... of the influential role that perceived norms in peer and family contexts can play in young women's use of medicine....

  7. The Development of Sports Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddington, Ivan

    1996-01-01

    The development of sports medicine was influenced by medicalization and increasing competitiveness in modern sport, with sports physicians helping to develop performance enhancing drugs and techniques. This paper discusses sports medicine and drug use in Eastern European countries, early development of anabolic steroids in the United States, and…

  8. Central African Journal of Medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Central African Journal of Medicine is a quarterly refereed general medical journal which seeks to promote the practice and science of medicine in Africa. Emphasis is placed on general medical topics, reflecting common and important conditions in the region. The journal also covers related medical fields. Submissions ...

  9. Antioxidant Potential of Different Medicinal Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Vasanthi P; Parameswari CS

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal plants are the resource of new drug. Most of the modern medicines are produced indirectly from medicinal plants. Plants are directly used as medicines by a majority of cultures around the world. Studying medicinal plants helps to understand plant toxicity and protect human and animals from natural poisons. Medicinal plants are the important sources for pharmaceutical manufacturing. In developing countries, herbal medicines are considered to be readily available, accessible, affordab...

  10. [Exploration of microcosmic Chinese medicine used by western medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhi-jing

    2015-02-01

    "Microcosmic syndrome", "treatment based on syndrome differentiation", and "combination of disease identification and syndrome differentiation" generally refer to a mode: following the syndrome if with no disease identified, following the disease if with no syndrome type differentiated. For example, Chinese medical treatment of hypertension, high blood lipids, increased transaminase, and so on candirectly use Chinese recipes, but no longer with syndrome differentiation. Clinical application of Chinese patent medicine can also obtain favorable clinical. Western doctors need not follow syndrome differentiation. The invention of artemisinin was screened from more than 40 000 kinds of compounds and herbs, but with no reference of any traditional Chinese medical theory. A lot of folk remedy and empirical recipes have obtained effective efficacy but unnecessarily with profound Chinese medical theories. Various evidences showed that disease can also be cured without syndrome differentiation. I held that it might be associated with the same mechanism of Chinese medicine and Western medicine. Any disease can be cured or alleviated by Chinese medicine is a result from its modern pharmacological effect, which is achieved by improving etiologies, and pathogeneses. I was inspired by whether we can directly use traditional Chinese medicine with modern pharmacological effects to treat symptomatic disease. So I raised an idea of microcosmic Chinese medicine used by Western medicine, i.e., we find and use Chinese herbs with relatively effective modern pharmacological effect to treat diseases targeting at patients' clinical symptoms and signs, as well as various positive laboratory results (collectively called as microscopic dialectical indicators). More Western doctors would use it to treat disease due to omission of complicated and mysterious syndrome differentiation. This will promote extensive application and expansion of Chi- nese medicine and pharmacy, enlarge the team of

  11. Future of nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganatra, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    When it comes to setting up nuclear medicine in a developing country, there is a group of people, who feel that such high technology has no place in a developing country. RIA is likely to remain the method of choice for the research laboratory. The use of radioisotopic label has many advantages compared to the use of an enzyme marker. Generally, iodination is simpler than the preparation of an enzyme labelled substance, especially since there has been no agreement as to which enzyme is best for substances as small as steroids or a large as viruses. In addition, there may be some change in the configuration of the enzyme or the substance to be labelled during the conjugation procedure. Monoclonal antibodies can provide virtually unlimited amounts of homogenous antibodies against a specific antigenic site. The heterogeneous antibodies are more likely to provide more sensitive assays than the monoclonal antibodies, although assays employing the latter are likely to be more specific. The optimal choice of the antiserum may depend on whether sensitivity or specificity is required for the assays

  12. History of biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Parduman; Batra, H S; Naithani, Manisha

    2004-01-01

    Biochemistry in broad terms is the study of the chemical composition of the living matter and the biochemical processes that underlie life activities during growth and maintenance. This article is an attempt to explore the metamorphosis of biochemistry from a pupa entwined in its own cocoon to a vibrantly colored phenomenon. Studies pertaining to this discipline of science began with Biochemistry interfaces with biology and chemistry even before nineteenth century with studies concerned with the chemical processes that take place within living cells. Modern biochemistry developed out of and largely came to replace what in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries was called physiological chemistry, which dealt more with extra cellular chemistry, such as the chemistry of digestion and of body fluids. The name Biochemistry was coined in 1903 by a German chemist named Carl Neuber. However, work in this very living, aspect of chemistry had started much earlier. Claude Bernard is accredited with the Sirehood of Biochemistry. During the later part of the nineteenth century eminent scientists contributed a great deal to the elucidation of the chemistry of fats, proteins and carbohydrates. At this period some very fundamental aspects of enzymology were under close scrutiny. Study of nucleic acid is central to the knowledge of life but its fusion with biochemistry started with works of Fredrick Sanger and Har Gobind Khurana. Their experiments involved a subtle bland of enzymology and chemistry that few would have thought possible to combine. The scientists were busy removing the mist that was mitigating the light of knowledge but they still lacked an insight into the cell. In 1990's research turned to finding the structural details of cell. The field of molecular biochemistry was also progressing at an almost unstoppable speed having expanded its horizons beyond human imagination with the introduction of PCR, creating waves of appreciation from every field of medicine

  13. First principles of Hamiltonian medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi, Bernard; Foster, Kevin; Úbeda, Francisco

    2014-05-19

    We introduce the field of Hamiltonian medicine, which centres on the roles of genetic relatedness in human health and disease. Hamiltonian medicine represents the application of basic social-evolution theory, for interactions involving kinship, to core issues in medicine such as pathogens, cancer, optimal growth and mental illness. It encompasses three domains, which involve conflict and cooperation between: (i) microbes or cancer cells, within humans, (ii) genes expressed in humans, (iii) human individuals. A set of six core principles, based on these domains and their interfaces, serves to conceptually organize the field, and contextualize illustrative examples. The primary usefulness of Hamiltonian medicine is that, like Darwinian medicine more generally, it provides novel insights into what data will be productive to collect, to address important clinical and public health problems. Our synthesis of this nascent field is intended predominantly for evolutionary and behavioural biologists who aspire to address questions directly relevant to human health and disease.

  14. American College of Sports Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2017 » More News Upcoming Events 7th Annual Comprehensive Sports Medicine Update and Board Review Minneapolis | Dates: 19 – 23 Jun, 2018 ACSM's 65th Annual Meeting, 9th World Congress on Exercise is Medicine® and World Congress on the Basic Science of Muscle Hypertrophy and Atrophy Minneapolis | Dates: 29 ...

  15. History of infrared detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogalski, A.

    2012-09-01

    This paper overviews the history of infrared detector materials starting with Herschel's experiment with thermometer on February 11th, 1800. Infrared detectors are in general used to detect, image, and measure patterns of the thermal heat radiation which all objects emit. At the beginning, their development was connected with thermal detectors, such as thermocouples and bolometers, which are still used today and which are generally sensitive to all infrared wavelengths and operate at room temperature. The second kind of detectors, called the photon detectors, was mainly developed during the 20th Century to improve sensitivity and response time. These detectors have been extensively developed since the 1940's. Lead sulphide (PbS) was the first practical IR detector with sensitivity to infrared wavelengths up to ˜3 μm. After World War II infrared detector technology development was and continues to be primarily driven by military applications. Discovery of variable band gap HgCdTe ternary alloy by Lawson and co-workers in 1959 opened a new area in IR detector technology and has provided an unprecedented degree of freedom in infrared detector design. Many of these advances were transferred to IR astronomy from Departments of Defence research. Later on civilian applications of infrared technology are frequently called "dual-use technology applications." One should point out the growing utilisation of IR technologies in the civilian sphere based on the use of new materials and technologies, as well as the noticeable price decrease in these high cost technologies. In the last four decades different types of detectors are combined with electronic readouts to make detector focal plane arrays (FPAs). Development in FPA technology has revolutionized infrared imaging. Progress in integrated circuit design and fabrication techniques has resulted in continued rapid growth in the size and performance of these solid state arrays.

  16. Case Report-The 46 year old man with a 5 month history of vomiting

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    history of vomiting. Dalitso Segula1,2 Victoria Mwandiambira3, Will. Howson1, Theresa J Allain1. 1. Department of Medicine, University of Malawi College of Medicine,. Blantyre ... He had a history of moderate alcohol consumption (< 20 units per .... accident, stress and Parkinson's disease1,2and rheumatologic disorders ...

  17. Precision medicine and traditional chinese medicine of dialogue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lou Xin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The precision medicine is more precise individualized medicine, based on the patient’s genes or physiological to formulate the specific treatment plan, for the realization of individualized treatment of various diseases to provide valuable information.But with the progress of modern science and technology, modern medicine dependence on medical instruments are too serious, traditional ways are gradually forgotten.If the machine depends on the instrument test results too serious which don’t combined with the actual diagnosis, the cause of misdiagnosis, so we should pay attention to the overall analysis of diseases and systematic diagnosis and examination, use of the overall treatment concept traced back to find the cause of Traditional Chinese Medicine, finally decide to select a best treatment plan.We should use the dialectical attitude to look at the precise medical. Not blindly requirements according to the road of precision medicine of Traditional Chinese Medicine to go, to shine in himself field, form of self characteristic of Traditional Chinese Medicine.Can learn some of the advantages of accurate concept, the good and rejecting the bad, hope the Traditional Chinese Medicine in the modern environment more walk more far.

  18. [Medical history impressions of Karl Marx 1983].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, W

    1983-12-15

    Excerpts of his London era first published on the occasion of the Karl Marx testimonials of 1983 gave rise to extend the memory of the fundamental achievements of Karl Marx to medico-historical aspects. In this case Karl Marx paid special attention to the working and living conditions of the working class and an analysis of his adequate statements and records shows multifarious details which give a research basis also for the history of medicine. Marx and Engels had friendly contacts with several physicians who shared the opinions of the two classics: their way of life is shown in the most important points.

  19. History or histories of socio-economic rights?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Christian O.

    2016-01-01

    (telos) – be it towards progress or decline – was inadequate for the multi-faceted geographies, rhythms and dynamics of life. In these reflections on a two-days research workshop in Paris, I argue that Koselleck’s point also applies to the field of the history of socio-economic rights. Instead of writing...... the history of socio-economic rights, I would propose thinking about the histories of socio-economic rights. There are three main reasons for this: the non-teleological histories of socioeconomic rights; the distinctiveness between different socio-economic rights; and the complexity (multiple variables...

  20. At the Interface: Academic History, School History and the Philosophy of History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retz, Tyson

    2016-01-01

    How history is learnt and taught must to some extent be shaped by conceptions of what history is. Historians tend to conceptualize what something is by investigating what it has been and what it has meant in different contexts. This article explains how a debate in the philosophy of history between positivism and intentionalism provided the…

  1. Physical Sources of Biblical History

    OpenAIRE

    Touber, Jetze

    2017-01-01

    The Reformation and the consequent divergence of religious cultures in Europe had profound consequences for intellectual regimes across the continent. Learned medicine was no exception in that respect. One area where we may gauge the effects of this development was in the field of medicina sacra: the application of medical knowledge to the interpretation of biblical passages touching upon the workings of the human body. The engagement of learned medicine with Scripture may be expected to have...

  2. Asian School of Nuclear Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundram, F.X.

    2007-01-01

    A number of organisations are involved in the field of nuclear medicine education. These include International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), World Federation of Nuclear Medicine and Biology (WFNMB), Asia-Oceania Federation of Nuclear Medicine and Biology (AOFNMB), Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM in USA), European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM). Some Universities also have M.Sc courses in Nuclear Medicine. In the Asian Region, an Asian Regional Cooperative Council for Nuclear Medicine (ARCCNM) was formed in 2000, initiated by China, Japan and Korea, with the main aim of fostering the spread of Nuclear Medicine in Asia. The Asian School of Nuclear Medicine (ASNM) was formed in February 2003, with the ARCCNM as the parent body. The Aims of ASNM are: to foster Education in Nuclear Medicine among the Asian countries, particularly the less developed regions; to promote training of Nuclear Medicine Physicians in cooperation with government agencies, IAEA and universities and societies; to assist in national and regional training courses, award continuing medical education (CME) points and provide regional experts for advanced educational programmes; and to work towards awarding of diplomas or degrees in association with recognised universities by distance learning and practical attachments, with examinations. There are 10 to 12 teaching faculty members from each country comprising of physicists, radio pharmacists as well as nuclear medicine physicians. From this list of potential teaching experts, the Vice-Deans and Dean of ASNM would then decide on the 2 appropriate teaching faculty member for a given assignment or a course in a specific country. The educational scheme could be in conjunction with the ARCCNM or with the local participating countries and their nuclear medicine organisations, or it could be a one-off training course in a given country. This teaching faculty is purely voluntary with no major expenses paid by the ASNM; a token contribution could be

  3. Nigerian Journal of Economic History

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Nigerian Journal of Economic History (NJEH) seeks to promote the scholarly study of Africa's and the developing world's past economic issues and events from a diversity of perspectives notably those of History, Economics, and other relevant disciplines. The Journal, which encourages careful formulation of issues and ...

  4. The History of World Cinema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, David

    This survey of the history of world cinema begins with the "Pre-history" of film making and covers developments, by major periods, through 1972. The film making of all major countries, except Australia, receives attention, and the appendixes contain a note on animated films, a selected filmographies list, and a bibliography. Aspects of…

  5. Out of the shadow of medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Helge

    2008-01-01

    Modern chemistry, so alarming, so necessary, so ubiquitous, became a mature science in nineteenth-century Europe. As it developed, often from a lowly position in medicine or in industry, so chemists established themselves as professional men; but differently in different countries. In 1820...... chemistry was an autonomous science of great prestige but chemists had no corporate identity. It was 1840 before national chemical societies were first formed; and many countries lagged fifty years behind. Chemists are the largest of scientific groups; and in this book we observe the social history...... of chemistry in fifteen countries, ranging from the British Isles to Lithuania and Greece. There are regularities and similarities; and by describing how national chemical professions emerged under particular economic and social circumstances, the book contributes significantly to European history of science....

  6. History of food allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüthrich, Brunello

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter we will first consider whether there is real evidence on the basis of literature for early descriptions in antiquity of pathogenic reactions after food intake that could be comparable to allergy, for instance in the scriptures of Hippocrates or Lucretius. On this topic we are skeptical, which is in agreement with the medical historian Hans Schadewaldt. We also assert that it is unlikely that King Richard III was the first food-allergic individual in medical literature. Most probably it was not a well-planned poisoning ('allergy') with strawberries, but rather a birth defect ('… his harm was ever such since his birth') that allowed the Lord Protector to bring Mylord of Ely to the scaffold in the Tower, as we can read in The History of King Richard III by Thomas More (1478-1535; published by his son-in-law, Rastell, in 1557). In 1912, the American pediatrician Oscar Menderson Schloss (1882-1952) was probably the first to describe scratch tests in the diagnosis of food allergy. Milestones in the practical diagnosis of food allergy are further discussed, including scratch tests, intradermal tests, modified prick tests and prick-to-prick tests. False-negative results can be attributed to the phenomenon of a 'catamnestic reaction' according to Max Werner (1911-1987), or to the fermentative degradation of food products. Prior to the discovery of immunoglobulin E, which marked a turning point in allergy diagnosis, and the introduction of the radioallergosorbent test in 1967, several more or less reliable techniques were used in the diagnosis of food allergy, such as pulse rate increase after food intake according to Coca, the leukopenic index, drop in basophils or drastic platelet decrease. The 'leukocytotoxic test' (Bryan's test), today called the 'ALCAT' test, shows no scientific evidence. The double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge test remains the gold standard in the diagnosis of food allergy. For the future, component-resolved diagnostics

  7. The history of African trypanosomiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steverding Dietmar

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The prehistory of African trypanosomiasis indicates that the disease may have been an important selective factor in the evolution of hominids. Ancient history and medieval history reveal that African trypanosomiasis affected the lives of people living in sub-Saharan African at all times. Modern history of African trypanosomiasis revolves around the identification of the causative agents and the mode of transmission of the infection, and the development of drugs for treatment and methods for control of the disease. From the recent history of sleeping sickness we can learn that the disease can be controlled but probably not be eradicated. Current history of human African trypanosomiasis has shown that the production of anti-sleeping sickness drugs is not always guaranteed, and therefore, new, better and cheaper drugs are urgently required.

  8. The Challenge of World History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldana, Cristobal T.

    2012-01-01

    The author started teaching world history during his first year of teaching at Harlingen High School. To be given such an assignment, because of the breadth of the course, in one's first year might be considered a great misfortune. However, looking back, the author would not have preferred it any other way. World history quickly became his…

  9. History of American Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Margaret Cain

    2011-01-01

    "History of American Higher Education" documents the fascinating evolution of American colleges and universities, touching on the historical events that shaped them, from the colonial era through the early twenty-first century. Throughout history, higher education has played an important role in the transmission of cultural identity from…

  10. [Racism of "Blood" and colonial medicine - Blood group anthropology studies at Keijo Imperial University Department of Forensic Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Joon Young

    2012-12-01

    This paper attempts to explore implications of Colonial medicine's Blood Type Studies, concerning the characteristics and tasks of racism in the Japanese Colonial Empire. Especially, it focuses on the Blood Group Anthropology Studies at Keijo Imperial University Department of Forensic Medicine. In Colonial Korea, the main stream of Blood Type Studies were Blood Group Anthropology Studies, which place Korean people who was inferior to Japanese people in the geography of the race on the one hand, but on the other, put Koreans as a missing link between the Mongolian and the Japanese for fulfillment of the Japanese colonialism, that is, assimilationist ideology. Then, Compared to the Western medicine and Metropole medicine of Japan, How differentiated was this tendency of Colonial Medicine from them? In this paper, main issues of Blood Group Anthropology Studies and its colonial implications are examined. The Korean Society for the History of Medicine.

  11. The history of the

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.Ruocco

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to discuss the present understanding of the high frequency dynamics in liquid water, with particular attention to a specific phenomenon - the so-called fast sound - since its first appearance in the literature up to its most recent explanation. A particular role in this history is played by the inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS technique, which - with its introduction in the middle '90- allowed to face a large class of problems related to the high frequency dynamics in disordered materials, such as glass and liquids. The results concerning the fast sound in water obtained using the IXS technique are here compared with the inelastic neutron scattering (INS and molecular dynamics simulation works. The IXS work has allowed us to demonstrate experimentally the existence of two branches of collective modes in liquid water: one linearly dispersing with the momentum (apparent sound velocity of ≈3200 m/s, the "fast sound" and the other at almost constant energy (5..7 meV. It has been possible to show that the dispersing branch originates from the viscoelastic bend up of the ordinary sound branch. The study of this sound velocity dispersion, marking a transition from the ordinary sound, co to the "fast sound", c∞, as a function of temperature, has made it possible to relate the origin of this phenomenon to a structural relaxation process, which presents many analogies to those observed in glass-forming systems. The possibility to estimate from the IXS data the value of the relaxation time, τ, as a function of temperature leads to relating the relaxation process to the structural re-arrangements induced by the making and breaking of hydrogen bonds. In this framework, it is then possible to recognize an hydrodynamical "normal" regime, i. e. when one considers density fluctuations whose period of oscillation is on a timescale long with respect to τ, and a solid-like regime in the opposite limit. In the latter regime, the density

  12. Core principles of evolutionary medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunspan, Daniel Z; Nesse, Randolph M; Barnes, M Elizabeth; Brownell, Sara E

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background and objectives Evolutionary medicine is a rapidly growing field that uses the principles of evolutionary biology to better understand, prevent and treat disease, and that uses studies of disease to advance basic knowledge in evolutionary biology. Over-arching principles of evolutionary medicine have been described in publications, but our study is the first to systematically elicit core principles from a diverse panel of experts in evolutionary medicine. These principles should be useful to advance recent recommendations made by The Association of American Medical Colleges and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute to make evolutionary thinking a core competency for pre-medical education. Methodology The Delphi method was used to elicit and validate a list of core principles for evolutionary medicine. The study included four surveys administered in sequence to 56 expert panelists. The initial open-ended survey created a list of possible core principles; the three subsequent surveys winnowed the list and assessed the accuracy and importance of each principle. Results Fourteen core principles elicited at least 80% of the panelists to agree or strongly agree that they were important core principles for evolutionary medicine. These principles over-lapped with concepts discussed in other articles discussing key concepts in evolutionary medicine. Conclusions and implications This set of core principles will be helpful for researchers and instructors in evolutionary medicine. We recommend that evolutionary medicine instructors use the list of core principles to construct learning goals. Evolutionary medicine is a young field, so this list of core principles will likely change as the field develops further. PMID:29493660

  13. Egyptian Journal of Natural History

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Egyptian Journal of Natural History publishes taxonomic and faunistic studies, or field-based research involving the natural history of the Egyptian fauna and flora. Both short and long papers are welcomed. We particularly encourage studies on Sinai.View the Instructions for authors All papers are reviewed by at least ...

  14. Role of honey in modern medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan Ayoub Meo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Use of honey has a very long history. Honey has been used since ancient time due to its nutritional and therapeutic values. There had been varied ways of consumption honey including its use as a sweetener and flavoring agent. Honey is produced all over the world. The most important nutriment of honey is carbohydrates present in the form of monosaccharides, fructose and glucose. Honey plays an important role as an antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial agent and augments the adherence of skin grafts and wound healing process. The role of honey has been acknowledged in the scientific literature and there is convincing evidence in support of its antioxidant and antibacterial nature, cough prevention, fertility and wound healing properties. However, its use has been controversially discussed and has not been well accepted in the modern medicine. The aim of this review was explore and highlight the role of honey in modern medicine.

  15. Medicinal plants of the Mapuche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, P J; Manby, J

    1985-03-01

    A list of 136 plants used for medicinal purposes by the Mapuche Amerindians of Chile has been compiled. This is the first such list in English and is important due to the disappearance of Mapuche culture with increasing urbanisation. Some introduced plants have been incorporated into the traditional medicine of the Mapuche since the advent of European settlers but there is also a wealth of information about the uses of many indigenous species.

  16. [The function of philosophy of science in the teaching of medical history].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaming

    2014-05-01

    The philosophy of science yields 3 important functions in the teaching of medical history. Firstly, by analyzing the development of medicine from the perspective of philosophy, we can integrate medical history into the history of human thought and clearly show the close connection between the development of humanity and the development of medical science. Secondly, philosophical analysis on the general rules of scientific discoveries involved in medical history can help medical students to understand the methodology in the research of sciences in history. Thirdly, philosophy of science offers new dimensions for understanding the relationship between medicine and the society. By making use of the relevant theory in scientific philosophy to explore the relationship between medicine and the society, the nature of medicine and the social nature and function of science can be further understood by medical students so as to exert an active role in the research and clinical work in the future.

  17. An Aspect of the History of Medicine in Ancient Korea as Examined through Silla Buddhist Monks'Annotations on the "Chapter on Eliminating Disease"in the Sutra of Golden Light (Suvarnabhāsa-sūtra).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Chaekun; Jeon, Jongwook; Shin, Dongwon

    2016-12-01

    Nearly nothing is known of medicine in ancient Korea due to insufficient materials. With several extant prescriptions and esoteric methods of treating diseases alone, it is impossible to gauge in depth the management of medicine during this period. If one exception were to be cited, that would be the fact that the annotations for understanding the contents on Indian medicine in the "Chapter on Eliminating Disease" in the Sutra of Golden Light, a Buddhist sutra originating from India, reflected the medical knowledge of Buddhist monks from Silla (57 BC-935 AD) who were active immediately after the nation's unification of the two other kingdoms on the Korean Peninsula (668 AD) such as Wonhyo (617-686 AD), Gyeongheung (620?-700? AD), and Seungjang (684-? AD). Along with those by other monks, these annotations are collected in the Mysterious Pivot of the Sutra of Golden Light, which was compiled by Gangyō(835-871 AD), a Japanese monk from the Heian era (794-1185 AD). Representative versions of the "Chapter on Eliminating Disease" in the Sutra of Golden Light include: a classical Chinese translation by the Indian monk Dharmakṣema (385-433 AD); the eight-volume edition by Chinese monk Baogui, which differs little from the preceding work in terms of the contents of the "Chapter on Eliminating Disease"; and the ten-volume edition by Yijing (635-713 AD), who had full-fledged knowledge of Indian medicine. When the contents of the annotations thus collected are examined, it seems that Wonhyo had not been aware of the existence of the ten-volume edition, and Gyeongheung and Seungjang most certainly used the ten-volume edition in their annotations as well. Especially noteworthy are Wonhyo's annotations on the Indian medical knowledge found in the "Chapter on Eliminating Disease" in the Sutra of Golden Light. Here, he made a bold attempt to link and understand consistently even discussions on Indian and Buddhist medicine on the basis of the traditional East Asian medical

  18. An Aspect of the History of Medicine in Ancient Korea as Examined through Silla Buddhist Monks’Annotations on the “Chapter on Eliminating Disease” in the Sutra of Golden Light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaekun OH

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nearly nothing is known of medicine in ancient Korea due to insufficient materials. With several extant prescriptions and esoteric methods of treating diseases alone, it is impossible to gauge in depth the management of medicine during this period. If one exception were to be cited, that would be the fact that the annotations for understanding the contents on Indian medicine in the “Chapter on Eliminating Disease” in the Sutra of Golden Light, a Buddhist sutra originating from India, reflected the medical knowledge of Buddhist monks from Silla (57 BC-935 AD who were active immediately after the nation’s unification of the two other kingdoms on the Korean Peninsula (668 AD such as Wonhyo (617-686 AD, Gyeongheung (620?-700? AD, and Seungjang (684-? AD. Along with those by other monks, these annotations are collected in the Mysterious Pivot of the Sutra of Golden Light, which was compiled by Gangyō(835-871 AD, a Japanese monk from the Heian era (平安, 794-1185 AD. Representative versions of the “Chapter on Eliminating Disease” in the Sutra of Golden Light include: a classical Chinese translation by the Indian monk Dharmakṣema (385-433 AD; the eight-volume edition by Chinese monk Baogui, which differs little from the preceding work in terms of the contents of the “Chapter on Eliminating Disease”; and the ten-volume edition by Yijing (635-713 AD, who had full-fledged knowledge of Indian medicine. When the contents of the annotations thus collected are examined, it seems that Wonhyo had not been aware of the existence of the ten-volume edition, and Gyeongheung and Seungjang most certainly used the ten-volume edition in their annotations as well. Especially noteworthy are Wonhyo’s annotations on the Indian medical knowledge found in the “Chapter on Eliminating Disease” in the Sutra of Golden Light. Here, he made a bold attempt to link and understand consistently even discussions on Indian and Buddhist medicine on the basis of

  19. Longing for the Present in the History of History Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wils, Kaat; Verschaffel, Tom

    2012-01-01

    The public debates on history education that occurred in many countries over the past decades have given rise to the idea that people live in an age of "history wars". While these wars are primarily fought on a national level, they are increasingly looked at as a global phenomenon. In most cases, they are the expression of tensions between the…

  20. The Brazilian medicinal chemistry from 1998 to 2008 in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry, Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry Letters and European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry [A química medicinal brasileira de 1998 a 2008 nos periódicos Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry, Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry Letters e European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Bárbara Vasconcellos da Silva; Renato Saldanha Bastos; Angelo da Cunha Pinto

    2009-01-01

    In this article we present the Brazilian publications, the research groups involved, the contributions per states and the main diseases studied from 1998 to 2008 in the following periodicals: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry, Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry Letters and European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry.

  1. History of Dermatology In the Sudan | Ahmed | Sudanese Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The history of medicine in the Sudan has yet to be recorded. Sources available for such a task are the records of the Ministry of Health and perhaps those of the medical school University of Khartoum. We only found a single book that utilized those sources to write on the medical services in the Sudan,. This was the book ...

  2. [JUBILEE OF "MEDYCYNA NOWOŻYTNA" ["MODERN MEDICINE MAGAZINE"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryglewski, Ryszard W

    2015-01-01

    In 1922 appeared the first, proof copy of a magazine which two years later was titled "Modern Medicine. Studies on the history of medicine". The idea to create a new periodical was born among the historians of science, who focused their scientific interest on the topics of medicine's past. The major purpose was to make a thorough revision of methodological views that usually did not go beyond the positivist or Marxist model. They aspired to some kind of "opening up" to the content present in philosophy and the history of science, including in particular epistemological theories of Ludwik Fleck, Thomas Kuhn or Michael Foucault. Consistent references were made to the experiences and findings of cultural anthropology, psychology, sociology and history of arts, highlighting the problems which in national medical historiography had been previously rarely, if ever, present. "Classical" form and content of works published in the magazine was not excluded, though, since the purpose of the editorial staff was not so much to fight against the traditional model of the history of medicine as its enrichment and gradual transformation in the spirit of contemporary needs. The aim of this article is to present as completely as possible--both the content of "Modern Medicine" and the achievements of people contributing to the magazine for the past twenty years of its existence. It is also an attempt to evaluate to what extent the guidelines set two decades ago have been realized in practice.

  3. The Use of Herbal Medicine in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Suryawati, Suryawati; Suardi, Hijra Novia

    2015-01-01

    The herbal medicine has been widely used in children for the treatment of several symptoms and the prevention of diseases before accessing the hospital for professionals help. There are 3 kinds of marketed herbal medicine including empirical based herbal medicine (jamu), standardized herbal medicine (obat herbal terstandar) and clininically tested herbal medicine (fitofarmaka). This study aimed to investigate the utilization of the marketed herbal medicine along with non marketed ones which w...

  4. The commercialization of traditional medicine in modern Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, Bandeth; Lê, Gillian; McPake, Barbara; Fustukian, Suzanne

    2018-01-01

    Globally, traditional medicine has long been used to address relatively common illness, mental ill health and during childbirth and post-natal care. However, traditional medicine is primarily provided by the private sector and it is unclear how far expenditures on traditional medicine contribute to household impoverishment. A life history method was used to understand the health seeking experience of 24 households over the last 60 years in Cambodia, a country with high out-of-pocket expenditures for health. The life histories suggest that traditional medicine in Cambodia has been undergoing a process of commercialization, with significant impacts on poor households. In the earlier lives of respondents, payments for traditional medicine were reported to have been flexible, voluntary or appropriate to patients' financial means. In contrast, contemporary practitioners appear to seek immediate cash payments that have frequently led to considerable debt and asset sales by traditional medicine users. Given traditional medicine's popularity as a source of treatment in Cambodia and its potential to contribute to household impoverishment, we suggest that it needs to be included in a national conversation about achieving Universal Health Coverage in the country. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press in association with The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

  5. Drawing medicine out of a vial

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000530.htm Drawing medicine out of a vial To use the sharing ... a clean area. Wash your hands. Check Your Medicine Carefully check your medicine: Check the label. Make ...

  6. WEST AFRICAN JOURNAL OF MEDICINE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    the urine or past history of urethritis or trauma to the urethra. He had history of childhood terminal haematuria. He had felt a hard mass alone the urethra associated with pain. A diagnosis of acute urinary retention secondary to urethral calculus was made to rule out urethral stricture. He had suprapubic cystostomy done then ...

  7. WEST AFRICAN JOURNAL OF MEDICINE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urgence, Services d'Ambulances,. Traumatisme, Lagos, Nigeria. WEST AFRICAN JOURNAL OF MEDICINE. ORIGINAL ARTICLE. ABSTRACT. BACKGROUND: Emergency medical care is designed to overcome the factors most commonly implicated ...

  8. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The area of nuclear medicine, the development of artificially produced radioactive isotopes for medical applications, is relatively recent. Among the subjects covered in a lengthy discussion are the following: history of development; impact of nuclear medicine; understanding the most effective use of radioisotopes; most significant uses of nuclear medicine radioimmunoassays; description of equipment designed for use in the field of nuclear medicine (counters, scanning system, display systems, gamma camera); description of radioisotopes used and their purposes; quality control. Numerous historical photographs are included. 52 refs

  9. Essentials of nuclear medicine imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Mettler, Fred A. Jr

    2012-01-01

    Essentials of Nuclear Medicine Imaging, by Drs. Fred A Mettler and Milton J Guiberteau, provides the practical and comprehensive guidance you need to master key nuclear imaging techniques. From physics, instrumentation, quality control, and legal requirements to hot topics such as sodium fluoride, radiopharmaceuticals, and recommended pediatric administered doses and guidelines, this sixth edition covers the fundamentals and recent developments in the practice of nuclear medicine.

  10. Medicinal Plants in Neurodegenerative Diseases: Perspective of Traditional Persian Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzaei, Mohammad Hosein; Shahpiri, Zahra; Mehri, Mohammad Reza; Bahramsoltani, Roodabeh; Rezaei, Mahdi; Raeesdana, Azade; Rahimi, Roja

    2018-03-05

    Neurodegenerative diseases are a progressive loss of structure and/or function of neurons. Weak therapeutic response and progressive nature of the diseases, as well as wide range of side effects caused by conventional therapeutic approaches, make patients seek for complementary and alternative medicine. The aim of present paper is to discuss the neuropharmacological basis of medicinal plants and their principle phytochemicals which have been used in traditional Persian medicine for different types of neurodegenerative diseases. Medicinal plants introduced in traditional Persian medicine perform beneficial effects in neurodegenerative diseases via various cellular and molecular mechanisms including suppression of apoptosis mediated by the increase in expression of anti-apoptotic agents (e.g. Bcl-2) as well as the decrease in the expression and activity of pro-apoptotic proteins (e.g. Bax, caspase 3 and 9). Alleviating inflammatory responses and suppressing the expression and function of pro-inflammatory cytokines like Tumor necrosis factor α and interleukins, as well as improvement in antioxidative performance mediated by superoxide dismutase and catalase, are among other neuroprotective mechanisms of traditional medicinal plants. Modulation of transcription, transduction, intracellular signaling pathways including ERK, p38, and MAPK, with upstream regulatory activity on inflammatory cascades, apoptosis and oxidative stress associated pathways, play an essential role in preventive and therapeutic potential of the plants in neurodegenerative diseases. Medicinal plants used in traditional Persian medicine along with their related phytochemicals by affecting various neuropharmacological pathways can be considered as future drugs or adjuvant therapies with conventional pharmacotherapeutics; though, further clinical studies are necessary for confirmation of their safety and efficacy. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. Medicinal electrochemistry: integration of electrochemistry, medicinal chemistry and computational chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, M O; Maltarollo, V G; de Toledo, R A; Shim, H; Santos, M C; Honorio, K M

    2014-01-01

    Over the last centuries, there were many important discoveries in medicine that were crucial for gaining a better understanding of several physiological processes. Molecular modelling techniques are powerful tools that have been successfully used to analyse and interface medicinal chemistry studies with electrochemical experimental results. This special combination can help to comprehend medicinal chemistry problems, such as predicting biological activity and understanding drug action mechanisms. Electrochemistry has provided better comprehension of biological reactions and, as a result of many technological improvements, the combination of electrochemical techniques and biosensors has become an appealing choice for pharmaceutical and biomedical analyses. Therefore, this review will briefly outline the present scope and future advances related to the integration of electrochemical and medicinal chemistry approaches based on various applications from recent studies.

  12. Efficacy of traditional Chinese herbal medicine in the treatment of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    powder/decoction. CASE PRESENTATION. A 44-year-old man presented at the Chengdu. University of Traditional Chinese Medicine. Teaching Hospital on the 3rd of April, 2013 with a one year, history of weakness and associated loss of weight. There was an exacerbation of symptoms two weeks prior to presentation. He.

  13. History of psychiatry in Bengal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Gautam Kumar; Ghoshal, Malay; Saha, Gautam; Singh, Om Prakash

    2018-02-01

    The history of psychiatry in Bengal mirrors the history of psychiatry in India. With Bengal being an important location for the East India Company, it became the locus for much infrastructure development, including the setting up of lunatic asylums. This article traces the development of psychiatric care in Bengal, from the early time of private asylums exclusively for Europeans, to psychiatric care in the present time.

  14. [Ethics and medicine in Michel Foucault: the humanistic dimension of medicine derived from a genealogy of morality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Benjamim

    2005-01-01

    The article presents the results of a doctoral dissertation defended at the Universidad de Salamanca, based on Foucault's final decade of writings. If Foucault's goal in writing The History of Sexuality was to fashion a genealogy of ethics, my goal in analyzing this book, along with his other writings, is to demonstrate his last contribution to the history of medicine. He moves from a conception of power over others towards a conception of power over oneself, an exclusive terrain of ancient Greek morality. As a thinker who tries to understand today's problems by going to their roots, Foucault develops less a history than a philosophy of history. Considered an anti-humanist, he leaves us with a portrait of a wholly ethical-humanistic medicine.

  15. Trends and challenges of traditional medicine in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullahi, Ali Arazeem

    2011-01-01

    Prior to the introduction of cosmopolitan medicine, traditional medicine used to be the dominant medical system available to millions of people in Africa in both rural and urban communities. However, the arrival of the Europeans marked a significant turning point in the history of this age-long tradition and culture. This paper examines the trends and challenges of traditional medicine in Africa. The impact of colonialism on African traditional medicine is also examined. Although the paper is on Africa, references are drawn around the world to buttress the growing demand for traditional medicine. The paper concludes that to minimise the current distrust between modern and traditional doctors and to achieve the objective of regulation, standardisation and cooperation, both traditional and modern doctors must acknowledge their areas of strengths and weaknesses from which they operate and be genuinely concerned about the difficult but necessary task of being human.

  16. Unique aspect of Tibetan medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakpa, Tenzing

    2014-01-01

    Tibetan medicine is known as the knowledge of healing in the Four Tantras, the main medical text studied by Tibetan doctors. In the 8th century, King Trisong Deutsen (718-785 CE) invited eminent physicians from India, China, Persia, East Turkestan, Mongolia, and Nepal for the First International Medical Symposium in Samye, Tibet and ordered his personal physician Elder Yuthog Yonten Gonpo (708-833 CE), who lived 125 years, and participated in this conference to summarize. By combining all the information available and presented during this symposium, he compiled the Four Tantras. He established the Tanadug medical school at Menlung in Kongpo, Southern Tibet in 763 CE, and worked for the propagation of Tibetan medicine. He is considered an emanation of Medicine Buddha, who is a symbol of mental and physical well being. In his left hand, the Medicine Buddha clasps a begging bowl with long-life nectar, signifying immortality, and in his right, the Chebulic myrobalan (Haritaki), a symbol of good health. Chebulic myrobalan, Belleric myrobalan, and Emblic myrobalan are together called the "3 Fruits" and are common ingredients in Tibetan medicines. Prof. Omura, Y of NY Medical College evaluated these "3 Fruits" and found that one of them available as a "Haritaki," had the highest normal cell telomere increasing effect by optimal dose, with improvement of circulation all over the body, which in turn inhibits cancer activity. He considered Tibetan medicine to be the most advanced medicine in the world before the 19th Century with its well-organized systematic method as described by colorful Tibetan medical paintings by Sangye Gyamtso (1653-1705 CE). During a typical diagnosis, the physician examines the patients' tongue, radial arteries for pulse beats by the index, middle, and ring fingers of both hands and the urine for features like color, vapor, and bubbles, etc.

  17. Network pharmacology of medicinal attributes and functions of Chinese herbal medicines: (I Basic statistics of medicinal attributes and functions for more than 1100 Chinese herbal medicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WenJun Zhang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on the Pharmacopoeia of the People's Republic of China, Chinese Materia Medica, and other resources, I collected a total of 1127 Chinese herbal medicines mainly with recorded chemical composition. Of which 210 families and approximately 2000 species of medicinal plants and fungi were involved. According to the comparison, in total of 69 medicinal attributes (Shu Xing and 78 medicinal functions (Gon Xiao, including 22 medicinal organs or tissues, 7 taste attributes, 5 medicinal properties, 1 toxicity attribute, 22 chemical composition categories, 12 meridians and collaterals (Gui Jing, and 78 medicinal functions were determined. All of the Chinese herbal medicines were numerically coded according to drug name, species, family, 69 medicinal attributes and 78 medicinal functions. Finally, an interactive coding database, CHM-DATA, which contains 8 tables, was obtained. Statistics, e.g., totals, frequencies or probabilities, percentages, etc., were calculated on the basis of total population of medicines and families.

  18. History of mathematics and history of science reunited?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Jeremy

    2011-09-01

    For some years now, the history of modern mathematics and the history of modern science have developed independently. A step toward a reunification that would benefit both disciplines could come about through a revived appreciation of mathematical practice. Detailed studies of what mathematicians actually do, whether local or broadly based, have often led in recent work to examinations of the social, cultural, and national contexts, and more can be done. Another recent approach toward a historical understanding of the abstractness of modern mathematics has been to see it as a species of modernism, and this thesis will be tested by the raft of works on the history of modern applied mathematics currently under way.

  19. History of physical culture as a reflection of social history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tymoshenko Y.

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The basic of the article consists of the letters of the USSR citizens, which are dedicated to some aspects of physical culture development in the years after the World War II. In particular, the situation concerning renewing air sports, airclubs and in general the situation in sport field is described. The author, within the framework of historical hermeneutics, analyses letters and describes the social history of soviet Ukraine through the view of physical culture. In this context physical culture shows as a part of every day history.

  20. Antifertility activity of medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniyal, Muhammad; Akram, Muhammad

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this review was to provide a comprehensive summary of medicinal plants used as antifertility agents in females throughout the world by various tribes and ethnic groups. We undertook an extensive bibliographic review by analyzing classical text books and peer reviewed papers, and further consulting well accepted worldwide scientific databases. We performed CENTRAL, Embase, and PubMed searches using terms such as "antifertility", "anti-implantation", "antiovulation", and "antispermatogenic" activity of plants. Plants, including their parts and extracts, that have traditionally been used to facilitate antifertility have been considered as antifertility agents. In this paper, various medicinal plants have been reviewed for thorough studies such as Polygonum hydropiper Linn, Citrus limonum, Piper nigrum Linn, Juniperis communis, Achyanthes aspera, Azadirachta indica, Tinospora cordifolia, and Barleria prionitis. Many of these medicinal plants appear to act through an antizygotic mechanism. This review clearly demonstrates that it is time to expand upon experimental studies to source new potential chemical constituents from medicinal plants; plant extracts and their active constituents should be further investigated for their mechanisms. This review creates a solid foundation upon which to further study the efficacy of plants that are both currently used by women as traditional antifertility medicines, but also could be efficacious as an antifertility agent with additional research and study. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  1. Antifertility activity of medicinal plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Daniyal

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review was to provide a comprehensive summary of medicinal plants used as antifertility agents in females throughout the world by various tribes and ethnic groups. We undertook an extensive bibliographic review by analyzing classical text books and peer reviewed papers, and further consulting well accepted worldwide scientific databases. We performed CENTRAL, Embase, and PubMed searches using terms such as “antifertility”, “anti-implantation”, “antiovulation”, and “antispermatogenic” activity of plants. Plants, including their parts and extracts, that have traditionally been used to facilitate antifertility have been considered as antifertility agents. In this paper, various medicinal plants have been reviewed for thorough studies such as Polygonum hydropiper Linn, Citrus limonum, Piper nigrum Linn, Juniperis communis, Achyanthes aspera, Azadirachta indica, Tinospora cordifolia, and Barleria prionitis. Many of these medicinal plants appear to act through an antizygotic mechanism. This review clearly demonstrates that it is time to expand upon experimental studies to source new potential chemical constituents from medicinal plants; plant extracts and their active constituents should be further investigated for their mechanisms. This review creates a solid foundation upon which to further study the efficacy of plants that are both currently used by women as traditional antifertility medicines, but also could be efficacious as an antifertility agent with additional research and study.

  2. An introductory course in philosophy of medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnick, A

    2004-06-01

    Philosophy of medicine, narrowly defined as ontology and epistemology of medicine, is a well developed research field, yet education in this field is less well developed. The aim of this paper is to present an educational development in philosophy of medicine-an introductory course in philosophy of medicine. Central features of the course are described. Participants (medical undergraduate students) scored high on average. The conclusion is that further such educational ventures in philosophy of medicine should be developed and implemented.

  3. [Eponyms and epilepsy (history of Eastern civilizations)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janković, S M; Sokić, D V; Lević, Z M; Susić, V; Drulović, J; Stojsavljević, N; Veskov, R; Ivanus, J

    1996-01-01

    considered as life threatening events. Persian history of epilepsy, except from the 6th century Zoroastrian "Avesta" document, lacks the written or spoken medical heritage untill the 7th century A.D. and the Arabic conquest of the entire Moslem world. On the other hand, Islamic medicine should be freed from the simple prejudice that the Moslem authors were only the translators of Greek medicine; contrary to such a view, their work contains a high degree of individuality. Although Mohammed introduced a lot of novelty into medicine, Khoran and the Sayings do not explicitly refer to epilepsy. Of importance is to notice that Moslem medicine did not have demons in the "repertoire" of direct causes of epilepsy. The causes and the cures of epilepsy were more magic-mystical and occult in nature, which is reminiscent of the European, as well as Serbian Middle age attitudes. Avicenna recognized difference between children and adult epilepsy. He considered insomnia and afternoon siesta as well as intensive sounds and light to be a provocative factors, whereby we see that at least empirically he knew of sleep (deprivation), startle and reflex epilepsy. The XIII century invasion of Mongols brought about the recession in Moslem Medicine; it recovered only in the XVIII century under the strong influence of European medicine handed over to us through Jewish doctors of various nationalities. The story of the China history of epilepsy has its debut approximately in the 8th century B. C. Medical texts from this period name epilepsy "Dian" and "Xian" which meant "the falling sickness" and "convulsions", respectively. Chinese medical terminology often interchangeably used the words "mania", "madness" and "psychosis" for "epilepsy" which, aside from a prominent language barrier, brings additional confusion. Although Chinese documents gave the first description of the grand mal epileptic attack already in the 8th century B. C. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED)

  4. The natural history of HIV infection | Venter | Southern African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Southern African Journal of HIV Medicine. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 3, No 2 (2002) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. The natural history of HIV infection. WDF Venter ...

  5. The History of the Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Simon; Scott, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Calculus is a mathematical concept that is fundamental to how we understand the world around us. Whether it is in the world of technology, finance, astronomy, sociology, medicine, calculus in one form or another can be found. This brief article describes the origins of calculus in Greece, further developments by Newton and Leibniz, and the…

  6. The future of general medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firth, John

    2014-08-01

    It is a truth universally acknowledged that there is a problem with general medicine. Physicians have become increasingly specialised over the past 30 years or so, and specialist care has produced increasingly better outcomes for some patients. The patients left behind are looked after by general medicine, where demand is increasing, operational priority within hospitals is low, there is little professional kudos and recruitment is suffering. Three recent reports - Hospitals on the Edge?, the Future Hospital Commission report, and the Shape of Training report - have described the problems, but not articulated compelling solutions. Here, I discuss what is good about general medicine, what is bad and make suggestions for improvement. These involve getting specialities to take responsibility for care of appropriate admissions automatically and without delay, giving general physicians control over the service that they provide, and using well-chosen financial drivers to support movement in the right direction. © 2014 Royal College of Physicians.

  7. Introductory physics of nuclear medicine. Third edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandra, R.

    1987-01-01

    The new third edition includes essential details and many examples and problems taken from the routine practice of nuclear medicine. Basic principles and underlying concepts are explained, although it is assumed that the reader has some current use as a bone densitometer. For resident physicians in nuclear medicine, residents in pathology, radiology, and internal medicine, and students of nuclear medicine technology, the third edition offers a simplified and reliable approach to the physics and basic sciences of nuclear medicine

  8. The history of a lesson

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mikkel Vedby

    2003-01-01

    and emphasises the need to study the history of lessons rather than the lessons of history. This approach shows that Munich is the end point of a constitutive history that begins in the failure of the Versailles treaty to create a durable European order following the First World War. The Munich lesson is thus...... one element of the lesson of Versailles, which is a praxeology that defines how the West is to make peace, and against whom peace must be defended. The lesson of Versailles has been, at least in part, constitutive of the outbreak of the Cold War, and it continues to define the Western conception...... of what defines peace and security even in the 'war against terrorism'....

  9. The evolution of sports medicine in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Benedict

    2013-10-01

    Sports medicine is a relatively new subspecialty in Singapore. This commentary chronicles its evolution in Singapore from 1969, through various milestones, to the present day. The first sports medicine clinic in Singapore was established in 1971 at Farrer Park. Notable institutions that followed include the Sports Medicine and Research Centre (1973), Soldier Performance Centre, Changi Sports Medicine Centre (2003), Singapore Sports Medicine Centre (2006), and other multidisciplinary centres of restructured hospitals. Formal groundwork to establish sports medicine as a subspecialty began in 2005, with its first trainee commencing traineeship at the Changi Sports Medicine Centre in 2007, and culminated in the subspecialty register at the beginning of 2011. Also captured in this discussion are the broader scopes of sports medicine, including military sports medicine, the sports sciences, exercise medicine, and event medical coverage.

  10. Medicinal aspects of opium as described in Avicenna's Canon of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydari, Mojtaba; Hashempur, Mohammad Hashem; Zargaran, Arman

    2013-01-01

    Throughout history, opium has been used as a base for the opioid class of drugs used to suppress the central nervous system. Opium is a substance extracted from the opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L.). Its consumption and medicinal application date back to antiquity. In the medieval period, Avicenna, a famous Persian scholar (980-1037 AD) described poppy under the entry Afion of his medical encyclopedia Canon of Medicine. Various effects of opium consumption, both wanted and unwanted are discussed in the encyclopedia. The text mentions the effects of opioids such as analgesic, hypnotic, antitussive, gastrointestinal, cognitive, respiratory depression, neuromuscular disturbance, and sexual dysfunction. It also refers to its potential as a poison. Avicenna describes several methods of delivery and recommendations for doses of the drug. Most of opioid effects described by Avicenna have subsequently been confirmed by modern research, and other references to opium use in medieval texts call for further investigation. This article highlights an important aspect of the medieval history of medicine.

  11. Two books History of Cartography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Husak

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Two valuable books were published under the title History of Cartography in the group Lecture Notes and the subgroup Publications of the International Cartographic Association. The books were published as a result of collaboration between International Cartographic Association (ICA and the Springer-Verlag publishing company and contain most papers from the following symposia:3rd International Symposium of the ICA Commission on the History of Cartography at University of Texas in Arlington, October 11–12, (URL 1 with the theme Charting the Cartography of Chartered Companies and4th International Symposium of the ICA Commission on the History of Cartography, at Eötvös Loránd University in Budapest, Hungary, June 28–29, 2012 (URL 2 with the theme Exploration – Discovery – Cartography.

  12. A history of modern librarianship

    CERN Document Server

    Wiegand, Wayne; Richards, Pamela; Richards, Pamela; Wiegand, Wayne; Dalbello, Marija

    2015-01-01

    Previous histories of libraries in the Western world-the last of which was published nearly 20 years ago-concentrate on libraries and librarians. This book takes a different approach. It focuses on the practice of librarianship, showing you how that practice has contributed to constructing the heritage of cultures. To do so, this groundbreaking collection of essays presents the history of modern librarianship in the context of recent developments of the library institution, professionalization of librarianship, and innovation through information technology. Organized by region, the book a

  13. Practice of defensive medicine | Buowari | Jos Journal of Medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jos Journal of Medicine. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 7, No 2 (2013) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should load here ...

  14. West African Journal of Medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The West African Journal of Medicine is owned by the West African College of Physicians and the West African College of Surgeons. Aims: The aims of the Journal are: To provide a medium for international dissemination of information about medical science in West Africa and elsewhere. To furnish a means whereby ...

  15. Conservation Medicine, Ecology of Diseases and Veterinary Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa María Viviana Gómez Carrillo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Conservation Medicine, Ecology of Diseases and Veterinary Medicine are intertwined in investigative processes and provide solutions to problems affecting both human and animal health. On this issue, it is known that infectious diseases affect the welfare of humans and animals; in this regard, it has been found that 75 %  of zoonotic diseases have origins in wild animals and 60 % of infectious diseases in humans are zoonotic. The foregoing puts at risk human populations because of emerging and reemerging diseases; also it affects livestock production by reducing the quality and quantity of products and manages to disrupt wildlife populations by decimating the species, which can sometimes reach extinction.

  16. Thermoluminescence dosimetry and its applications in medicine. Part 2: history and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kron, T.

    1995-01-01

    Thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) has been available for dosimetry of ionising radiation for nearly 100 years. The variety of materials and their different physical forms allow the determination of different radiation qualities over a wide range of absorbed dose. This makes TL dosimeters useful in radiation protection where dose levels of μ Gy are monitored as well as in radiotherapy where doses up to several Gray are to be measured. The major advantages of TL detectors are their small physical size and that no cables or auxiliary equipment is required during the dose assessment. TLD is considered to be a good method for point dose measurements in phantoms as well as for in vivo dosimetry on patients during radiotherapy treatment. As an integrative dosimetric technique, it can be applied to personal dosimetry and it lends itself to the determination of dose distributions due to multiple or moving radiation sources (e.g. conformal and dynamic radiotherapy, computed tomography). In addition, TL dosimeters are easy to transport, and they can be mailed. This makes them well suited for intercomparison of doses delivered in different institutions. The present article aims at describing the various applications TLD has found in medicine by taking into consideration the physics and practice of TLD measurements which have been discussed in the first part of this review. 198 refs., 4 tabs., 2 figs

  17. THE STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF DEPARTMENTS OF MEDICINE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landefeld, C Seth

    2016-01-01

    The structure and function of departments of medicine are important for several reasons. First, departments of medicine are the biggest departments in virtually every medical school and in most universities with a medical school, and they are the largest professional units in most academic medical centers. In fact, Petersdorf described them as "the linchpins of medical schools" (1). Departments of medicine account for one-fourth or more of the academic medical enterprise: they include about one-fourth of the faculty of medical school, account for roughly one-fourth of the patient care and clinical revenue of academic medical centers, and their faculty perform a disproportionate share of teaching and research, accounting for up to 45% of National Institutes of Health (NIH) - funded research in some medical schools. Second, the department's ability to fulfill its role and advance its mission depends on its structure and function. Finally, lessons learned from examining the structure and function of departments of medicine may guide other departments and schools of medicine themselves in improving their structure and function. This paper describes the issues that face departments of medicine in 2016. I begin by providing the context for these issues with a definition of a department of medicine, describing briefly the history of departments, and stating their mission.

  18. History and science of knots

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, J C

    1996-01-01

    This book brings together twenty essays on diverse topics in the history and science of knots. It is divided into five parts, which deal respectively with knots in prehistory and antiquity, non-European traditions, working knots, the developing science of knots, and decorative and other aspects of knots.Its authors include archaeologists who write on knots found in digs of ancient sites (one describes the knots used by the recently discovered Ice Man); practical knotters who have studied the history and uses of knots at sea, for fishing and for various life support activities; a historian of l

  19. West African Journal of Medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the use of manual vacuum aspiration for uterine evacuation9. Uterine evacuation is one of the most commonly performed procedures in our center and procured abortion With its numerous complications. West African Journal of Medicine Vol. 26, N o. 4. Treatment Outcome of Asherman's Syndrome is a particular problem in ...

  20. Nigerian Journal of Clinical Medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Nigerian Journal of Medicine (NJCM) is a biannual journal of the Association of Resident Doctors of the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital, which hopes to provide a platform for medical researchers to make contributions that advances/illuminates medical science or practice in all its spheres.

  1. Global Journal of Community Medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Global Journal of Community Medicine is aimed at promoting research in all areas of community or public health. It addresses issues of primary and tertiary health care. It deals with problems and solutions of health problems at the grassroots and daily livings. Visit the Global Journal Series website here: ...

  2. A brief history of videogames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Belli

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The following text contains a brief journey through a short and yet intense adventure, the history of videogames. Since its beginnings in the 1950's decade to the present time, videogames have progressively changed from a hobby for ingeneering studens to the most powerfull leisure industry. In order to gain a better understanding of this phenomenon it is necessary to look over the path of its transformation from a retrospecive point of view. Such a look has necessarily to focus on those devices and games that had made a landmark in the history of videogames, taking them to their current position. Besides, it is crucial to address their implications in contemporary visual culture, along with current prejudices against them. This is a short account about a great history.

  3. A historical overview of traditional medicine practices and policy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Although traditional medicine plays an important role in Ethiopian society, knowledge about the extent and characteristics of traditional healing practices and practitioners is limited and has frequently been ignored in the national health system. Objective: To review history of practices and policies on traditional ...

  4. XXIVth days of nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Abstracts are presented of papers submitted to the 24th Days of Nuclear Medicine held in Opava, Czechoslovakia between Oct 9 and 11, 1985. The conference proceeded in three sessions, namely nuclear pediatrics, miscellaneous and technicians' session. The publication also contains abstracts of posters. (L.O.)

  5. The pharmacology of regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christ, George J; Saul, Justin M; Furth, Mark E; Andersson, Karl-Erik

    2013-07-01

    Regenerative medicine is a rapidly evolving multidisciplinary, translational research enterprise whose explicit purpose is to advance technologies for the repair and replacement of damaged cells, tissues, and organs. Scientific progress in the field has been steady and expectations for its robust clinical application continue to rise. The major thesis of this review is that the pharmacological sciences will contribute critically to the accelerated translational progress and clinical utility of regenerative medicine technologies. In 2007, we coined the phrase "regenerative pharmacology" to describe the enormous possibilities that could occur at the interface between pharmacology, regenerative medicine, and tissue engineering. The operational definition of regenerative pharmacology is "the application of pharmacological sciences to accelerate, optimize, and characterize (either in vitro or in vivo) the development, maturation, and function of bioengineered and regenerating tissues." As such, regenerative pharmacology seeks to cure disease through restoration of tissue/organ function. This strategy is distinct from standard pharmacotherapy, which is often limited to the amelioration of symptoms. Our goal here is to get pharmacologists more involved in this field of research by exposing them to the tools, opportunities, challenges, and interdisciplinary expertise that will be required to ensure awareness and galvanize involvement. To this end, we illustrate ways in which the pharmacological sciences can drive future innovations in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering and thus help to revolutionize the discovery of curative therapeutics. Hopefully, the broad foundational knowledge provided herein will spark sustained conversations among experts in diverse fields of scientific research to the benefit of all.

  6. WEST AFRICAN JOURNAL OF MEDICINE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user1

    West African Journal of Medicine Vol. 30, No. 2 March–April, 2011. INTRODUCTION. Alternating hemiplegia of childhood. (AHC) is a rare neurological disorder that goes undiagnosed in many cases. It has a prevalence of about one case per million.1 It was first described by Vernot and Steele in 1971.2 Within this diagnosis.

  7. Epigenetic Mechanisms of Integrative Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riya R. Kanherkar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Since time immemorial humans have utilized natural products and therapies for their healing properties. Even now, in the age of genomics and on the cusp of regenerative medicine, the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM approaches represents a popular branch of health care. Furthermore, there is a trend towards a unified medical philosophy referred to as Integrative Medicine (IM that represents the convergence of CAM and conventional medicine. The IM model not only considers the holistic perspective of the physiological components of the individual, but also includes psychological and mind-body aspects. Justification for and validation of such a whole-systems approach is in part dependent upon identification of the functional pathways governing healing, and new data is revealing relationships between therapies and biochemical effects that have long defied explanation. We review this data and propose a unifying theme: IM’s ability to affect healing is due at least in part to epigenetic mechanisms. This hypothesis is based on a mounting body of evidence that demonstrates a correlation between the physical and mental effects of IM and modulation of gene expression and epigenetic state. Emphasis on mapping, deciphering, and optimizing these effects will facilitate therapeutic delivery and create further benefits.

  8. Annals of Ibadan Postgraduate Medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Annals of Ibadan Postgraduate Medicine is a peer-reviewed, international, medical journal published bi-annually by the Association of Resident Doctors, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria. The journal has a vision to regularly publish first-class and widely cited articles in different specialities of medical ...

  9. Therapeutic potential of cannabinoid medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, P J

    2014-01-01

    Cannabis was extensively used as a medicine throughout the developed world in the nineteenth century but went into decline early in the twentieth century ahead of its emergence as the most widely used illicit recreational drug later that century. Recent advances in cannabinoid pharmacology alongside the discovery of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) have re-ignited interest in cannabis-based medicines. The ECS has emerged as an important physiological system and plausible target for new medicines. Its receptors and endogenous ligands play a vital modulatory role in diverse functions including immune response, food intake, cognition, emotion, perception, behavioural reinforcement, motor co-ordination, body temperature, wake/sleep cycle, bone formation and resorption, and various aspects of hormonal control. In disease it may act as part of the physiological response or as a component of the underlying pathology. In the forefront of clinical research are the cannabinoids delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol, and their contrasting pharmacology will be briefly outlined. The therapeutic potential and possible risks of drugs that inhibit the ECS will also be considered. This paper will then go on to review clinical research exploring the potential of cannabinoid medicines in the following indications: symptomatic relief in multiple sclerosis, chronic neuropathic pain, intractable nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite and weight in the context of cancer or AIDS, psychosis, epilepsy, addiction, and metabolic disorders. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. The future of space medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicogossian, A; Pober, D

    2001-01-01

    In November 2000, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and its partners in the International Space Station (ISS) ushered in a new era of space flight: permanent human presence in low-Earth orbit. As the culmination of the last four decades of human space flight activities. the ISS focuses our attention on what we have learned to date. and what still must be learned before we can embark on future exploration endeavors. Space medicine has been a primary part of our past success in human space flight, and will continue to play a critical role in future ventures. To prepare for the day when crews may leave low-Earth orbit for long-duration exploratory missions, space medicine practitioners must develop a thorough understanding of the effects of microgravity on the human body, as well as ways to limit or prevent them. In order to gain a complete understanding and create the tools and technologies needed to enable successful exploration. space medicine will become even more of a highly collaborative discipline. Future missions will require the partnership of physicians, biomedical scientists, engineers, and mission planners. This paper will examine the future of space medicine as it relates to human space exploration: what is necessary to keep a crew alive in space, how we do it today, how we will accomplish this in the future, and how the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) plans to achieve future goals.

  11. The World of Sports Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emeagwali, N. Susan

    2008-01-01

    Soon, the best athletes in the world will face each other at the Summer Olympics in Beijing. Many of them will sustain injuries, or seek to prevent them, and will be thankful that among their entourages are some of the best sports medicine professionals in the world. When an athlete collapses from fatigue, or something else, there will be a group…

  12. West African Journal of Medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    _ WEST AFRICAN JOURNAL OF MEDICINE. CLINI CAL PRA CTI CE. Pain Management inAdult Acute Sickle Cell Pain Crisis: A Viewpoint. Chagriner la direction dans la crise de douleur de cellule de faucille adulte: un point de Vue . E. Udezue*, E. HerreraT. ABSTRACT. BACKGROUND: The acute pain crisis of sickle cell ...

  13. Biomarkers of diseases in medicine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Biomarkers have gained immense scientific and clinical value and interest in the practise of medicine. .... extent and characteristics of the disease detected ..... marker for cancer. In colon cancer, the tumour suppressor genes CDKN2A, MGMT and MLH1, as well as other genes (e.g., TIMP-3, p14ARF,. APC, MINT31, MINT2 ...

  14. Nigerian Journal of Postgraduate Medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We are interested in contributions that illuminates or advance medical science or practices extending all aspects of medicine. Contributions may be in the form of review articles, case reports, clinical practice materials, letter to the Editor, short communication commentaries, and viewpoints. Articles on socio-economic, ...

  15. Mary Slessor Journal of Medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Mary Slessor Journal of Medicine (MJSM) publishes original research papers, review articles, case reports and short communications on any aspect of health and tropical diseases. All papers are refereed by independent assessors. Vol 9, No 1 (2009). DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ...

  16. How and when to get rid of unused medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disposal of unused medicines; Expired medicines; Unused medicines ... You should get rid of a medicine when: Your health care provider changes your prescription but you still have some medicine left You feel better and your provider says ...

  17. History of radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minder, W.

    1981-01-01

    The author describes the historical development of the physics of atoms and nuclei. After a consideration of the ancient Greek philosophy concerning atoms the behaviour of gases is discussed with regards to statistical mechanics. Then the developement of chemistry from alchemy is described. Thereafter the early studies of gas discharges are described with regards to the electronic structure of atoms. In this connection the periodic system of elements is considered. Then the detection of the α-radiation of Uranium by Becquerel and the detections of M. and P. Curie are described. Thereafter the radiactive decay of nuclei is discussed. Then a popular introduction into nuclear structure is given with special regards to artificial radioactivity and nuclear fission. Finally nuclear reactors, the atomic bombs, applications of radionuclides, and problems of radiation protection are described. (HSI) [de

  18. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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  19. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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  1. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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  2. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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  3. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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  4. Brief history of numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Corry, Leo

    2015-01-01

    The world around us is saturated with numbers. They are a fundamental pillar of our modern society, and accepted and used with hardly a second thought. But how did this state of affairs come to be? In this book, Leo Corry tells the story behind the idea of number from the early days of the Pythagoreans, up until the turn of the twentieth century. He presents an overview of how numbers were handled and conceived in classical Greek mathematics, in the mathematics of Islam, in European mathematics of the middle ages and the Renaissance, during the scientific revolution, all the way through to the

  5. The history of the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: From the civil engineering, to the manufacturing of the various magnet types, each building block of this extraordinary machine required ambitious leaps in innovation. This lecture will review the history of the LHC project, focusing on the many challenges -- scientific, technological, managerial -- that had to be met during the various phases of R&D, industrialization, construction, installation and commissioning.

  6. WEST AFRICAN JOURNAL OF MEDICINE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user1

    West African Journal of Medicine Vol. 30, No. 2 March–April, 2011. A. E. Fawibe and Associates. Unilateral Tuberculous Lung Destruction. INTRODUCTION. Unilateral lung destruction is a .... occasional low grade fever associated with weight loss despite good .... right ventricular diastolic dysfunction and moderate tricuspid ...

  7. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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  11. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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  14. Taking of history

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langebæk, Rikke

    2007-01-01

    with the different types of clients, and we discuss any mistakes done by the veterinarian. Subjects such as ethical values, bad conscience, euthanasia, new family members, value of life, economy, maltreatment, etc. are often discussed. Live Role Playing We end up with a session of Live Role Play - the teacher...

  15. History of analytic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Boyer, Carl B

    2012-01-01

    Designed as an integrated survey of the development of analytic geometry, this study presents the concepts and contributions from before the Alexandrian Age through the eras of the great French mathematicians Fermat and Descartes, and on through Newton and Euler to the "Golden Age," from 1789 to 1850.

  16. Indian Astronomy: History of

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, R.; Murdin, P.

    2002-01-01

    From the time of A macronryabhat under dota (ca AD 500) there appeared in India a series of Sanskrit treatises on astronomy. Written always in verse, and normally accompanied by prose commentaries, these served to create an Indian tradition of mathematical astronomy which continued into the 18th century. There are as well texts from earlier centuries, grouped under the name Jyotishaveda macronn d...

  17. Human Rights, History of

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Baets, Antoon; Wright, James

    2015-01-01

    In this article, six basic debates about human rights are clarified from a historical perspective: the origin of human rights as moral rights connected to the natural law doctrine and opposed to positive rights; the wave of criticism of their abstract and absolute character by nineteenth-century

  18. History of Economic Rationalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    takes place in the meeting with other regimes of thought, values, and moral discourses. The book offers new and refreshing insights, ranging from the development of early economic thinking to economic aspects and concepts in the works of classical thinkers such as Thomas Hobbes, John Locke and Karl Marx...

  19. [The history of heroin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosztafi, S

    2001-08-01

    The discovery of heroin and the development of heroin abuse are introduced. Heroin, the hydrochloride of diacetylmorphine, was discovered by acetylation of morphine. Heroin, in pharmacological studies, proved to be more effective than morphine or codeine. The Bayer Company started the production of heroin in 1898 on a commercial scale. The first clinical results were so promising that heroin was considered a wonder drug. Indeed, heroin was more effective than codeine in respiratory diseases. It has turned out, however, that repeated administration of heroin results in the development of tolerance and the patients become heroin-addicts soon. In the early 1910s morphine addicts "discovered" the euphorising properties of heroin and this effect was enhanced by intravenous administration. Heroin became a narcotic drug and its abuse began to spread quickly. Restrictions on its production, use and distribution were regulated by international treties. The total ban on heroin production was also proposed. As a result of the strict regulations the production and cosumption of heroin showed a significant decrease after 1931. At the same time the underworld recognized the shortage of heroin and started the illicit production and trafficking. The quantity of heroin seized by law enforcement agencies in the past decades rose gradually. As an indicator of the worldwide heroin market, the quantity of confiscated heroin underwent a tenfold increase since 1970. The paper surveys the most important heroin-producing and trafficking countries. Heroin, prepared in clandestine ("kitchen" or "jungle") laboratories, is diluted ("cut") by every member of the illegal heroin distributing chain, i.e. smugglers, traffickers, dealers and vendors.

  20. History of NAMES Conferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, Lev

    2013-03-01

    Franco-Russian NAMES Seminars are held for the purpose of reviewing and discussing actual developments in the field of materials science by researchers from Russia and from the Lorraine Region of France. In more precise terms, as set down by the organizers of the seminar (the Moscow Institute of Steel and Alloys and the Institut National Polytechnique de Lorraine), the mission of the seminars is as follows: the development of scientific and academic contacts, giving a new impulse to joint fundamental research and technology transfer the development and consolidation of scientific, technical and business collaboration between the regions of Russia and Lorraine through direct contact between the universities, institutes and companies involved The first Seminar took place on 27-29 October 2004, at the Institut National Polytechnique de Lorraine (on the premises of the Ecole Européenne d'Ingénieurs en Génie des Matériaux, Nancy, France). The number, variety and quality of the oral presentations given and posters exhibited at the first Seminar were of high international standard. 30 oral presentations were given and 72 posters were presented by 19 participants from five universities and three institutes of the Russian Academy of Sciences participants from 11 laboratories of three universities from the Lorraine region three industrial companies, including the European Aeronautic Defence and Space Company—EADS, and ANVAR (Agence Nationale de Valorisation de la Recherche) From 2005 onwards, it was decided to organize the Seminar every other year. The second Seminar convened on the occasion of the 75th Anniversary of the Moscow Institute of Steel and Alloys on 10-12 November 2005 in Moscow, Russia. The seminar demonstrated the efficiency of the scientific partnership founded between the research groups of Russia and France during the first Seminar. High productivity of the Franco-Russian scientific cooperation on the basis of the Research-Educational Franco

  1. [History of the craniotomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Darder, José Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Craniotomy can be defined as the neurosurgical procedure aimed at achieving a wide cranial opening with the final purpose of performing a surgical therapeutic manoeuvre within the intracranial space. The current surgical technique for craniotomy is the final result of the development of the procedure since its introduction at the end of the 19th century. The very first wide cranial approach was introduced in 1889 by Wagner, and described as a 'temporary cranial resection'. This procedure could be named today as 'osteoplastic craniotomy with pedicle bone flap'. The final result of the procedural development of the craniotomy is the 'osteoplastic craniotomy with free bone flap', used widely around the world. In this paper, we review the historic evolution of craniotomy from a technical perspective. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Natural history of impetigo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dajani, Adnan S.; Ferrieri, Patricia; Wannamaker, Lewis W.

    1972-01-01

    Intensive observations on 37 children in a population with endemic skin infections provided an opportunity to study the interrelationships between and the significance of the bacterial genera commonly associated with impetigo. Cultures of the respiratory tract, three normal skin sites, and lesions, when present, were taken three times weekly from July to October 1969. Impetigo developed in all 37 children. Group A streptococci alone were recovered from 21% of 361 lesions, Staphylococcus aureus alone from 8%, Staphylococcus epidermidis alone from 5% and mixtures of streptococci and staphylococci from 61%. Vesicular or pustular lesions were more often pure streptococcal than pure staphylococcal. Streptococci alone were more often recovered from early stage lesions rather than from later ones. The pure staphylococcal lesions characteristically occurred early in the season whereas streptococcal or mixed lesions had later peaks. Serial observations on 74 lesions revealed longer persistence of streptococci than staphylococci in mixed lesions. In 85% of the instances the same streptococcal serotype was recovered repeatedly from an individual lesion, whereas staphylococcal types changed in 57% of instances. Phage type 75 accounted for the majority of staphylococcal isolates from all sites, whereas phage type 54 was recovered only from skin lesions. In contrast to streptococci, the site sequence of staphylococcal spread was from the nose to normal skin to skin lesions. These studies reveal important differences in the migration of staphylococci (as compared with streptococci) to various body sites and suggest a subsidiary role for staphylococci in nonbullous impetiginous lesions yielding both organisms. Images PMID:4263498

  3. History of grating images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Fujio

    2001-06-01

    Toppan Printing Co., Ltd. originated the name of 'grating image'. It means an image that consists of diffraction grating dots that look similar to the halftone dots of conventional printing. We proposed this new display method using simple gratings in order to enhance the visual effects when illumination is made by a fluorescent lamp. We considered the use of simple gratings as elemental dots, and used a number of elemental dots to display a 2D image. This method produces an effect something like the halftone dots of printing. The grating image technology grows from its starting to become able to produce 3D images and a 3D-video system using an electron beam grating-writing system.

  4. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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  5. History of reconstructive rhinoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzola, Isabella C; Mazzola, Riccardo F

    2014-06-01

    Amputation of the nose was practiced as a sign of humiliation to adulterers, thieves, and prisoners of war by certain ancient populations. To erase this disfigurement, numerous techniques were invented over the centuries. In India, where this injury was common, advancement cheek flaps were performed (around 600 BC). The forehead flap was introduced much later, probably around the 16th century. The Venetian adventurer Manuzzi, in writing a report about the Mughal Empire in the second half of the 17th century gave the description of the forehead rhinoplasty. Detailed information concerning the Indian forehead flap reached the Western world in 1794, thanks to a letter to the editor that appeared in the Gentleman's Magazine. From this episode, one can date the beginning of a widespread interest in rhinoplasty and in plastic surgery in general. In Europe, nasal reconstruction started in the 15th century in Sicily with the Brancas, initially with cheek flaps and then with arm flaps. At the beginning of the 16th century, rhinoplasty developed in Calabria (Southern Italy) with the Vianeos. In 1597, Gaspare Tagliacozzi, Professor of Surgery at Bologna, improved the arm flap technique and published a book entirely devoted to this art. He is considered the founder of plastic surgery. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  6. An abridged photographic history of organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Ignazio R; Cirillo, Claudia

    2014-03-01

    Organ transplantation is one of the most remarkable therapeutic advances in modern medicine; it started as an experiment and has become a life-saving practice. We briefly describe the major milestones of this multidisciplinary clinical science, the challenges that it still faces, and we consider the crucial contribution that its example could set for other medical fields. A review of the literature was conducted and a selection of images was made to complete a brief history of organ transplantation, with a particular focus on liver transplantation. The largest problem affecting organ transplantation today is the shortage of organs. Attention should be given to preserving the peculiar high ethical value that characterizes the very nature of organ transplantation. Methods successfully adopted by organ transplantation during the past 60 years can inspire promising fields, such as stem cell research, and provide useful tools to face the ethical challenges posed by scientific discoveries.

  7. A History of College Football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokosz, Francis M.

    The history of football is traced as it evolved from the English game of rugby. The game as it is known today was conceived only after a long series of changes. Three prominent reasons for the change were: to make football more interesting to the spectator; to balance the competition between offense and defense; and to modify the dangerous…

  8. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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  9. History of Economic Rationalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book concentrates upon how economic rationalities have been embedded into particular historical practices, cultures, and moral systems. Through multiple case-studies, situated in different historical contexts of the modern West, the book shows that the development of economic rationalities t...

  10. Monsoons, history of

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Niitsuma, N.; Naidu, P.D.

    The evolution of the Asian monsoon started at around 9.5 Ma, in response to the uplift of the Himalayas. The monsoonal intensity reached its maximum at around 5 Ma, and from that time the associated easterly trade winds caused intense upwelling...

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  12. History of the Night

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The definition of the night, as the period between sunset and sunrise, is consistent and unalterable, regardless of culture and time. However the perception of the night and its economic, social, and cultural roles are subject to change. Which parameters determine these changes? What can we learn by studying them about the specific character of a culture? Why do people experience the night in different ways in different historical periods and how did this affect their lives? How do references to nocturnal activities in historical sources (works of art, narratives) reveal what the artists/authors wish to communicate to their audiences? Can the night be a meaningful subject of historical and archaeological enquiry? A study of the source material in the Greek world (ca. 400 BC-ca. AD 400) shows a continuous effort to colonize the night with activities of the day, to make the night safer, more productive, more rational, more efficient. The main motors for this change were social developments and religion, no...

  13. History of Weak Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T. D.

    1970-07-01

    While the phenomenon of beta-decay was discovered near the end of the last century, the notion that the weak interaction forms a separate field of physical forces evolved rather gradually. This became clear only after the experimental discoveries of other weak reactions such as muon-decay, muon-capture, etc., and the theoretical observation that all these reactions can be described by approximately the same coupling constant, thus giving rise to the notion of a universal weak interaction. Only then did one slowly recognize that the weak interaction force forms an independent field, perhaps on the same footing as the gravitational force, the electromagnetic force, and the strong nuclear and sub-nuclear forces.

  14. The history of echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edler, Inge; Lindström, Kjell

    2004-12-01

    Following a brief review of the development of medical ultrasonics from the mid-1930s to the mid-1950s, the collaboration between Edler and Hertz that began in Lund in 1953 is described. Using an industrial ultrasonic flaw detector, they obtained time-varying echoes transcutaneously from within the heart. The first clinical applications of M-mode echocardiography were concerned with the assessment of the mitral valve from the shapes of the corresponding waveforms. Subsequently, the various M-mode recordings were related to their anatomical origins. The method then became established as a diagnostic tool and was taken up by investigators outside Lund, initially in China, Germany, Japan and the USA and, subsequently, world-wide. The diffusion of echocardiography into clinical practice depended on the timely commercial availability of suitable equipment. The discovery of contrast echocardiography in the late 1960s further validated the technique and extended the range of applications. Two-dimensional echocardiography was first demonstrated in the late 1950s, with real-time mechanical systems and, in the early 1960s, with intracardiac probes. Transesophageal echocardiography followed, in the late 1960s. Stop-action two-dimensional echocardiography enjoyed a brief vogue in the early 1970s. It was, however, the demonstration by Bom in Rotterdam of real-time two-dimensional echocardiography using a linear transducer array that revolutionized and popularized the subject. Then, the phased array sector scanner, which had been demonstrated in the late 1960s by Somer in Utrecht, was applied to cardiac studies from the mid-1970s onwards. Satomura had demonstrated the use of the ultrasonic Doppler effect to detect tissue motion in Osaka in the mid-1950s and the technique was soon afterwards applied in the heart, often in combination with M-mode recording. The development of the pulsed Doppler method in the late 1960s opened up new opportunities for clinical innovation. The

  15. National Museum of Military History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Nicolaides

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Attractions such as military history museums which exhibit a wide range of important historical artefacts are fundamental sub-elements in any tourism systems, and yet their study suffers from lack of theoretical depth. Military history is an integral element of the history of any nation and countless varieties of tourists both local and international, visit military museums whenever the opportunity presents itself because museums are generally stimulating places of interest. This article focuses predominantly on international tourists visiting the Ditsong National Museum of Military History. In addition to the interest that such museums generate, they play a key role as the organizational foundation stones of modernity. It is via their many interesting exhibits that museums enlighten us about the past that intrinsically highlights its distance from the present era. Museums also selectively reconstitute aspects of history and in so doing alienate many artefacts from their original context and yet manage to impart deep understanding of events that shaped the modern world. Museums of all types thus impart knowledge and have a wide range of tales to tell concerning the many and diverse assortments of objects they hold. National pride is an obvious reason for having a military museum where the comprehensive display of military equipment is exceptionally unique while exhibition halls also offer an educational narrative of a nation’s history. What is also of interest to many visitors is the type of research that is carried out in a multiplicity of ways. The huge global growth in tourism in recent years has contributed to many museums radically altering their exhibits in both content and manner of exhibition. This is significant given the reciprocal impact that museums and tourism have on one another. The attractions in museums are regarded by many to be central to the tourism process and these are very often the main reason for many tourists visiting

  16. History of Diabetes Insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenti, Giovanna; Tamma, Grazia

    2016-02-01

    Under physiological conditions, fluid and electrolyte homoeostasis is maintained by the kidney adjusting urine volume and composition according to body needs. Diabetes Insipidus is a complex and heterogeneous clinical syndrome affecting water balance and characterized by constant diuresis, resulting in large volumes of dilute urine. With respect to the similarly named Diabetes Mellitus, a disease already known in ancient Egypt, Greece and Asia, Diabetes Insipidus has been described several thousand years later. In 1670s Thomas Willis, noted the difference in taste of urine from polyuric subjects compared with healthy individuals and started the differentiation of Diabetes Mellitus from the more rare entity of Diabetes Insipidus. In 1794, Johann Peter Frank described polyuric patients excreting nonsaccharine urine and introduced the term of Diabetes Insipidus. An hystorical milestone was the in 1913, when Farini successfully used posterior pituitary extracts to treat Diabetes Insipidus. Until 1920s the available evidence indicated Diabetes Insipidus as a disorder of the pituitary gland. In the early 1928, De Lange first observed that some patients with Diabetes Insipidus did not respond to posterior pituitary extracts and subsequently Forssman and Waring in 1945 established that the kidney had a critical role for these forms of Diabetes Insipidus resistant to this treatment. In 1947 Williams and Henry introduced the term Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus for the congenital syndrome characterized by polyuria and renal concentrating defect resistant to vasopressin. In 1955, du Vigneaud received the 1955 Nobel Prize in chemistry for the first synthesis of the hormone vasopressin representing a milestone for the treatment of Central Diabetes Insipidus.

  17. History of Historical Archaeology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L. Schuyler

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available On Sunday April 19, 1998 Jean Carl Harrington (known to the profession as J.C. or "Pinky" Harrington passed away at his home in Richmond, Virginia. At 96 Harrington's life almost spanned the 20th century and did encompass the rise and establishment of professional Historical Archaeology in North America. Many consider Harrington to be the founder or "father" of Americanist Historical Archaeology. In 1936 he took over the newly created NPS-CCC project at Jamestown, Virginia and that event is arguably the inception of Historical Archaeology as an organized, scholarly discipline.

  18. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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  1. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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  7. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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  9. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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    Full Text Available ... illness and death. Watch this video to learn how some of these agents have been or can ... Doing Blog: Public Health Matters File Formats Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, ...

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  16. A Miscarriage of History

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warner, Cameron David

    2011-01-01

    political, cultural, and hereditary independence from China is at least analogous and possibly influenced by historiographic traditions found in texts such as the Tang Annals and post-imperial Tibetan Buddhist works like the Vase-shaped Pillar Testament. However, as Central Tibetan and Chinese historians...... used Wencheng to index the complex relationship between Tibet and China, Eastern Tibetan historians preserved lesser-known, potentially subversive narratives of Wencheng's travels, especially regarding her possible love-affair with the Tibetan minister Gar Tongtsen and their illegitimate child. After....... My investigation into Wencheng-narratives from Eastern Tibet demonstrates that her journey from China to Tibet should not be thought of a mere liminal period of her life, but rather central to debates among Tibetans and Chinese regarding the politics of national unity (minzu tuanjie...

  17. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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  19. History of Norwegian psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kringlen, Einar

    2012-03-01

    Psychiatry as a professional and scientific enterprise developed in Norway in the middle of the 19th century. During the last part of this century, four state asylums were erected, followed by several county asylums during the first part of the 20th century. From the 1870 s, institutions for private care were established, usually in the vicinity of the asylums. During the middle of the 19th century, psychiatry in Norway was influenced by "moral treatment", but during the end of the century somatic ideas prevailed. After the Second World War, Norwegian psychiatry was influenced by Dutch and British social psychiatry, followed by American psychoanalytic-oriented psychiatry during the 1960-70s. Since the 1980s, the climate changed, with more emphasis on classification and drug therapy. The new American DSM-III also influenced Norwegian psychiatry, and cognitive-behavioral therapies became more prevalent. Norwegian psychiatric research has during the last few decades been characterized by epidemiological studies, clinical follow-ups and twin research.

  20. Evolution of nuclear medicine: a historical perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, A.; Kamal, S.

    1996-01-01

    The field Nuclear Medicine has Completed its 100 yeas in 1996. Nuclear medicine began with physics, expanded into chemistry and instrumentation, and then greatly influenced various fields of medicine. The chronology of the events that formulated the present status of nuclear medicine involves some of the great pioneers of yesterday like Becquerel, Curie, Joliot, Hevesy, Anger, Berson and Yallow. The field of nuclear medicine has been regarded as the bridge builder between various aspects of health care and within next 20 years, nuclear medicine enters a new age of certainty, in which surgery, radiation and chemotherapy will only be used when a benefit in certain to result from the treatment. (author)

  1. Philosophy of medicine 2017: reviewing the situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Patrick

    2017-12-01

    In this introduction to a special subsection of Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics comprising separate reviews of the Springer Handbook of the Philosophy of Medicine, The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Medicine, and The Bloomsbury Companion to Contemporary Philosophy of Medicine, I compare the three texts with respect to their overall organization and their approach to the relation between the science and the art of medicine. I then indicate two areas that merit more explicit attention in developing a comprehensive philosophy of medicine going forward: health economics and systematic relations within the field as a whole. The reviews that follow speak for themselves.

  2. Geological history of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niini, Heikki

    1989-01-01

    Uranium is widely distributed in continental geological environments. The order of magnitude of uranium abundance in felsitic igneous rocks is 2-15 ppm, whereas it is less than 1 ppm in mafic rocks. Sedimentary rocks show a large range: from less than 0.1 ppm U in certain evaporites to over 100 ppm in phosphate rocks and organogenic matter. The content of U in seawater varies from 0.0005 to 0.005 ppm. The isotopic ratio U-238/U-235 is presently 137.5+-0.5, having gradually increased during geological time. The third natural isotope is U-234. On the basis of three fundamental economic criteria for ore reserves assessment (geological assurance, technical feasibility, and the grade and quantity of the deposits), the author finally comes to the following conclusions: Although the global uranium ores are not geologically renewable but continuously mined, they still, due to exploration and technical development, will tend to progressively increase for centuries to come

  3. Milestones of dental history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Mahant

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Since ages, human beings suffer from the dental problems. With the journey as time elapsed the person treating the teeth changed (i.e., from barbers and monks to present dentists, equipment changed (i.e., from bow drills to airotor and laser handpieces, materials changed (i.e., from ground mastic alum/honey to tooth colored composite and ceramics. There has been drastic change in treatment planning from extraction to the conservation of teeth and from manual restoration to computerized restorations computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing. Thus, this review is an attempt to have an insight into major milestones of the dental timeline.

  4. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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  5. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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  11. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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  12. History of Bioterrorism: Botulism

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    Full Text Available ... Word file Microsoft Excel file Audio/Video file Apple Quicktime file RealPlayer file Text file Zip Archive file SAS file ePub file RIS file Page last reviewed: June 6, 2007 Page last updated: October 7, 2014 Content source: Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response ( ...

  13. The Structure of Big History

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spier, Fred

    1996-01-01

    The social and natural sciences have more in common than most of us may suspect. This thought-provoking study presents a single straightforward structure which unites the latest scientific views on the history of the universe, the solar system, the planet, life and humankind. The focus on the

  14. History of American Education Primer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boers, David

    2007-01-01

    This book depicts the evolution of American educational history from 1630 to the present. The book highlights how ideological managers have shaped society and, because schools mirror society, have thus had a profound impact on education and schooling. Five common areas of study - philosophy, politics, economics, social sciences, and religion -…

  15. [The history of commensalism: a contemporary history of microbiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poreau, Brice

    2014-01-01

    Commensalism is a biological association between two species, with one species, the commensal, getting an advantage, whereas the other one, the host, gets no advantage neither disadvantage. This concept is theorized in the 1860's by Pierre-Joseph Van Beneden. Van Beneden is a physician in the 1850's, nevertheless, he is well known as a zoologist. The concept of commensalism developed by Van Beneden is employed in many scientific fields, not only in zoology, but also, in microbiology. Although the use of a possible play of the commensal bacterial microflora is exposed at the end of the 19th century, it is only during the second part of the 20th century that this way is studied. Commensalism in animal microbiology is studied first and then it is studied in human. The aim of this article is to present the history of commensalism as a main part of the history of microbiology.

  16. A Brief Review of Therapeutic and Diagnostic Applications of Enema in Iranian Traditional Medicine and Other Complementary Medicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamideh khorrampazouh

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Enema or ‘hoqne’ is a therapeutic approach used for a wide range of diseases in the Iranian traditional medicine. The use of this method dates back to thousands of years to Hippocrates and Galen. The aim of this study was to review the history of enema and its methods and indices in the Iranian medicine and other complementary medicine.Methods: This review study was conducted on the Iranian medicine textbooks and articles published in the international databases, including Google Scholar, PubMed, Embase, and Scopus, as well as the Iranian databases, such as SID and Magiran. The searching process was performed using the following keywords: ‘Hoqne’, ‘Enema’, ‘Vasta’, ‘Basta’, and ‘Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM’. There was no limitation regarding the publication data of the included studies.Result: In the Iranian medicine, the term “hoqne” is equivalent to enema. Enema is used in various diseases of the brain, respiratory system, digestive system, urogenital system, and musculoskeletal system, as well as systemic diseases. Enema is one of the five main therapies in the Indian medicine or Ayurveda. In other types of complementary medicine, including Chinese medicine, this procedure has therapeutic applications. Although enema has been recognized as a diagnostic method in modern medicine, it has been considered as a therapeutic approach in the recent years.Conclusion: According to the findings of the reviewed studies, enema is a major therapeutic focus in complementary medicine, part of which has been confirmed in the recent studies. Given the low side effects and high success rate of this treatment, it can be used as a supplemental therapy for the management of poisoning, febrile seizures, prolonged functional constipation, and chronic kidney disease, as well as the prevention of swelling. However, this theory requires further investigation and targeted clinical trials. This method has been

  17. A review of neuroendoscopy and potential applications in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginbotham, Michael; Levesque, Donald

    2011-01-01

    The endoscope was first developed over 200 yr ago. Endoscopy has since been applied to many disciplines of medicine. Its application to the nervous system was initially slow and not widely accepted and mainly involved the biopsy of tumors and the treatment of hydrocephalus. Several reasons for neuroendoscopy's limited use include inadequate endoscope technology, high skill level required, the advent of the surgical microscope, and the development of other treatments such as ventricular shunting. Over the past 50 yr, improvements in optical glass lenses, fiber optics, and electrical circuitry has led to better equipment and a revival of neuroendoscopy. Neuroendoscopy is now used in many diseases in human medicine including hydrocephalus, neoplasia, and intracranial cysts. This review presents the history of neuroendoscopy, the equipment and technology used, and the possible translation of techniques currently used in human medicine to veterinary medicine.

  18. A Virtual History of Mauritius

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nafiisah

    based game. A pure strategy based environment would favour interactivity over exploration but a mixture of those two would be ideal for Virtual Heritage and this would be an invaluable tool for teaching students about our local history and it would also allow historians to simulate what would have happened had the French ...

  19. For a history of the histories of Portuguese cinema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Cunha

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available For decades, the history of Portuguese cinema was made without historians or academics in the social sciences and humanities, but made by curious, enthusiasts and writers who were committed to the object itself. It was therefore that these early writings, although an essential role in collecting and inventariações sources, promoted the creation of myths, more implicitly or explicitly manipulated the past of Portuguese cinema and conditioned its historic narrative.This thematic dossier brings together four essays that analyze and reflect on different ideas and conceptions of Portuguese Cinema which have been outlined in stocks, texts and films over the decades. The purpose of this dossier is not to answer questions, but take advantage of them to review preconceived ideas and to launch reading hypotheses to classic and current issues in the history of Portuguese cinema.

  20. History of endonasal skull base surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Amy J; Zaidi, Hasan A; Laws, Edward D

    2016-12-01

    While the endonasal approach to the skull base continues to advance, this paper invokes its long history. The centuries of medieval neuroanatomy and early neurosurgery enabled the conception of the first transfacial approaches in the late 1800s; Henry Schloffer performed the first transsphenoidal surgery in 1907. Although the procedure was initially met with much interest, Harvey Cushing eventually led the field of neurosurgery to abandon the transsphenoidal approach in the 1920s. The following three generations of neurosurgeons contained several key figures including Norman Dott, Gerard Guiot, and Jules Hardy who were steadfast in preserving the technique as well as in addressing its shortcomings. The endoscopic approach developed simultaneously, and advances in magnifying and fiberoptics further resolved limitations previously inherent to the transsphenoidal approach. At last, in the 1960s, the transsphenoidal approach entered its renaissance. Today, the momentum of its development persists in the endoscopic endonasal approach, which has recently expanded the indications for transsphenoidal surgery across the skull base, far beyond its original jurisdiction of the sella. Continued progress must not take for granted the rich history of the transsphenoidal approach, which was developed over centuries by surgeons around the world. The authors present the evolution of modern endonasal surgery as a dynamic interplay between technology, medicine, and surgery over the past 100 years. Progress can be attributed to courageous surgeons who affirmed their contemporary practices despite gaps in technology or medicine, and to visionary individuals who produced and incorporated new elements into transsphenoidal surgery. And so while the new endoscopic technique brings forth new challenges, its development reaffirms the principles laid down by the pioneers of transsphenoidal surgery.