WorldWideScience

Sample records for medicine formula extracts

  1. Chinese Medicines in the Treatment of Prostate Cancer: From Formulas to Extracts and Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueni; Fang, Gang; Pang, Yuzhou

    2018-02-28

    In order to fully understand the progresses and achievements in Chinese medicines for the treatment of prostate cancer, we summarize all the available reports on formulas, extracts, and compounds of Chinese medicines against prostate cancer. A number of clinical trials verified that traditional Chinese formulas had some unique advantages in the treatment of prostate cancer. Many Chinese medicine extracts could protect against prostate cancer, and many compounds isolated from Chinese traditional medicines showed a clear anti-prostate cancer effect. However, Chinese medicines are facing many problems regarding their multicomponent nature, complicated mechanisms of action, and high doses required for therapy. Herein, we review the functions of Chinese medicines in prostate cancer and focus on their mechanisms. The review will deepen the understanding of Chinese medicines potential in the anti-prostate cancer field. In addition, we put forward a question concerning the current research on Chinese medicines: in order to better illustrate that Chinese medicines can be used in the clinical treatment of prostate cancer, should our research focus on formulas, extracts, or compounds?

  2. A traditional Chinese medicine formula extracts stimulate proliferation and inhibit mineralization of human mesenchymal stem cells in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Muwan; Feng, Wenzhou; Cao, Hui

    2009-01-01

    AIM OF THE STUDY: To investigate the effects of a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) formula extract, named as ZD-I, on the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in vitro. MATERIALS AND METHODS: When hMSCs cultivated in the basal medium with ZD-I, cell...

  3. Compound to Extract to Formulation: a knowledge-transmitting approach for metabolites identification of Gegen-Qinlian Decoction, a traditional Chinese medicine formula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Xue; Wang, Qi; Wang, Shuang; Miao, Wen-juan; Li, Yan-jiao; Xiang, Cheng; Guo, De-an; Ye, Min

    2016-01-01

    Herbal medicines usually contain a large group of chemical components, which may be transformed into more complex metabolites in vivo. In this study, we proposed a knowledge-transmitting strategy for metabolites identification of compound formulas. Gegen-Qinlian Decoction (GQD) is a classical formula in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). It is widely used to treat diarrhea and diabetes in clinical practice. However, only tens of metabolites could be detected using conventional approaches. To comprehensively identify the metabolites of GQD, a “compound to extract to formulation” strategy was established in this study. The metabolic pathways of single representative constituents in GQD were studied, and the metabolic rules were transmitted to chemically similar compounds in herbal extracts. After screening diversified metabolites from herb extracts, the knowledge was summarized to identify the metabolites of GQD. Tandem mass spectrometry (MSn), fragment-based scan (NL, PRE), and selected reaction monitoring (SRM) were employed to identify, screen, and monitor the metabolites, respectively. Using this strategy, we detected 131 GQD metabolites (85 were newly generated) in rats biofluids. Among them, 112 metabolites could be detected when GQD was orally administered at a clinical dosage (12.5 g/kg). This strategy could be used for systematic metabolites identification of complex Chinese medicine formulas. PMID:27996040

  4. [Comparative analysis between origin of cooked traditional Chinese medicine powder and modern formula granules].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Zhai, Hua-Qiang; Tian, Wei-Lan; Hou, Ji-Ru; Jin, Shi-Yuan; Wang, Yong-Yan

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the origin and causes of cooked traditional Chinese medicine powder were reviewed, and a comprehensive analysis was made for the time background of modern traditional Chinese medicine formula granules and the future development trend, in order to provide reference for application and promotion of traditional Chinese medicine formula granules. By reference to ancient medical books of previous dynasties, a system review was conducted for infancy, formation, maturity and transition of cooked traditional Chinese medicine powder, and a comprehensive analysis was made for the six factors of cooked traditional Chinese medicine powder's maturity in the Song Dynasty. Efforts were made to collect domestic and foreign research literatures of modern formula granules, understand the detailed development, and conduct an objective analysis of the current clinical application of modern formula granules. According to the comparative analysis for the application characteristics of cooked traditional Chinese medicine powder and modern formula granules, ①the popularity of cooked traditional Chinese medicine powder in the Song Dynasty has six factors: soaring numbers of medical students and medical practitioners, high medical expenses due to huge army, rapid population growth, frequent epidemics and increasing diseases, and insufficient finances of central and local governments. ②On the basis of clinical application characteristics of traditional Chinese medicine formula granules, traditional Chinese medicine formula granules contain extracted and concentrated effective components, which guarantee the curative effect, meet modern people's demands for "quick, simple and convenience" traditional Chinese medicine decoctions, show a relatively high cost performance; however, formula granules are restricted by their varieties and lack unified quality control standards, and single-extract formula granules have not synergy and attenuation effects of combined traditional

  5. Cardioprotective roles of the Chinese medicinal formula Bao-Xin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Bao-Xin-Tang (BXT) is a traditional Chinese medicinal formula used for the treatment of coronary heart disease and known to have favorable therapeutic benefits. The current study was designed to determine whether BXT has a cardioprotective role for acute myocardial infarction. The underlying mechanisms ...

  6. [Optimize aqueous extract protocol for Yugubao formula by orthogonal experiment design].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Li; Jin, Xiao-Dong; Li, Qing-Nan; Lu, Li

    2017-01-01

    To determine the optimum aqueous extract protocol for Yugubao traditional Chinese medicines formula by using orthogonal experiment design. Through serum pharmacology research, L9(34) orthogonal design with single factor investigation was used to optimize the aqueous extract protocol for Yugubao formula. The effect of water extraction on activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) in osteoblast was referred as the evaluation index for investigating four factors: water consumption (A), heating time (B), soaking time (C), and number of decocting (D), analyzing the optimum extraction conditions, and verifying the effectiveness of this process. The optimum aqueous extract protocol for Yugubao was as follows: adding 8 times water into Chinese medical materials, heating for 60 min, soaking for 30 min, and decocting for 1 time. The drug serum of this aqueous extract of Yugubao could significantly up-regulate the osteogenic genes expression. The optimum aqueous extract protocol for Yugubao formula was established in this experiment, providing evidence for the development and utilization of Yugubao traditional Chinese medicines formula. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  7. Effects of a traditional Chinese medicine formula and its extraction on muscle fiber characteristics in finishing pigs, porcine cell proliferation and isoforms of myosin heavy chain gene expression in myocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Ping Yu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective This study evaluated the effects of a traditional Chinese medicine formula (TCMF on muscle fiber characteristics in finishing pigs and the effects of the formula’s extract (distilled water, ethyl acetate and petroleum ether extraction on porcine cell proliferation and isoforms of myosin heavy chain (MyHC gene expression in myocytes. Methods In a completely randomized design, ninety pigs were assigned to three diets with five replications per treatment and six pigs per pen. The diets included the basal diet (control group, TCMF1 (basal diet+2.5 g/kg TCMF and TCMF2 (basal diet+5 g/kg TCMF. The psoas major muscle was obtained from pigs at the end of the experiment. Muscle fiber characteristics in the psoas major muscle were analyzed using myosin ATPase staining. Cell proliferation was measured using 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT dye and cytometry. Isoforms of MyHC gene expression were detected by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results The final body weight and carcass weight of finishing pigs were increased by TCMF1 (p<0.05, while the psoas major muscle cross-sectional area was increased by TCMF (p<0.05. The cross-sectional area and diameter of psoas major muscle fiber I, IIA, and IIB were increased by TCMF2 (p<0.05. The cross-sectional area and fiber diameter of psoas major muscle fiber IIA and IIB were increased by diet supplementation with TCMF1 (p<0.05. Psoas major muscle fiber IIA and IIB fiber density from the pigs fed the TCMF1 diet and the type IIB fiber density from the pigs fed the TCMF2 diet were lower compared to pigs fed the control diet (p<0.05. Pigs fed TCMF2 had a higher composition of type I fiber and a lower percentage of type IIB fiber in the psoas major muscle (p<0.05. The expression levels of MyHC I, MyHC IIa, and MyHC IIx mRNA increased and the amount of MyHC IIb mRNA decreased in the psoas major muscle from TCMF2, whereas MyHC I and MyHC IIx mRNA increased

  8. Cannabis; extracting the medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazekamp, Arno

    2007-01-01

    The cannabis plant (Cannabis sativa L.) has a long history as a recreational drug, but also as part of traditional medicine in many cultures. Nowadays, it is used by a large number of patients worldwide, to ameliorate the symptoms of diseases varying from cancer and AIDS to multiple sclerosis and

  9. Cannabis; extracting the medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Hazekamp, Arno

    2007-01-01

    The cannabis plant (Cannabis sativa L.) has a long history as a recreational drug, but also as part of traditional medicine in many cultures. Nowadays, it is used by a large number of patients worldwide, to ameliorate the symptoms of diseases varying from cancer and AIDS to multiple sclerosis and migraine. The discovery of cannabinoid-receptors and the endocannabinoid system have opened up a new and exciting field of research. But despite the pharmaceutical potential of cannabis, its classifi...

  10. CONSORT Extension for Chinese Herbal Medicine Formulas 2017: Recommendations, Explanation, and Elaboration (Traditional Chinese Version).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chung-Wah; Wu, Tai-Xiang; Shang, Hong-Cai; Li, You-Ping; Altman, Douglas G; Moher, David; Bian, Zhao-Xiang

    2017-07-18

    Editors' Note: This article is the traditional Chinese version of the CONSORT Extension for Chinese Herbal Medicine Formulas 2017: Recommendations, Explanation, and Elaboration. (Cheng C, Wu T, Shang H, Li, Y, Altman D, Moher D; CONSORT-CHM Formulas 2017 Group. CONSORT Extension for Chinese Herbal Medicine Formulas 2017: Recommendations, Explanation, and Elaboration. Ann Intern Med. 2017;167:112-21. [Epub 27 June 2017]. doi:10.7326/M16-2977).

  11. CONSORT Extension for Chinese Herbal Medicine Formulas 2017: Recommendations, Explanation, and Elaboration (Simplified Chinese Version).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chung-Wah; Wu, Tai-Xiang; Shang, Hong-Cai; Li, You-Ping; Altman, Douglas G; Moher, David; Bian, Zhao-Xiang

    2017-07-18

    Editors' Note: This article is the simplified Chinese version of the CONSORT Extension for Chinese Herbal Medicine Formulas 2017: Recommendations, Explanation, and Elaboration. (Cheng C, Wu T, Shang H, Li, Y, Altman D, Moher D; CONSORT-CHM Formulas 2017 Group. CONSORT Extension for Chinese Herbal Medicine Formulas 2017: Recommendations, Explanation, and Elaboration. Ann Intern Med. 2017;167:112-21. [Epub 27 June 2017]. doi:10.7326/M16-2977).

  12. [Applications of mathematical statistics methods on compatibility researches of traditional Chinese medicines formulae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Lan-Yin; Li, Yi-Xuan; Chen, Yong; Xie, Zhen; Li, Jie; Zhong, Ming-Yu

    2014-05-01

    The compatibility of traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) formulae containing enormous information, is a complex component system. Applications of mathematical statistics methods on the compatibility researches of traditional Chinese medicines formulae have great significance for promoting the modernization of traditional Chinese medicines and improving clinical efficacies and optimizations of formulae. As a tool for quantitative analysis, data inference and exploring inherent rules of substances, the mathematical statistics method can be used to reveal the working mechanisms of the compatibility of traditional Chinese medicines formulae in qualitatively and quantitatively. By reviewing studies based on the applications of mathematical statistics methods, this paper were summarized from perspective of dosages optimization, efficacies and changes of chemical components as well as the rules of incompatibility and contraindication of formulae, will provide the references for further studying and revealing the working mechanisms and the connotations of traditional Chinese medicines.

  13. Chinese medicinal formula Fufang Xueshuantong capsule could inhibit the activity of angiotensin converting enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Shujing; Wang, Yonggang; Long, Chaofeng; Su, Weiwei; Rong, Xia

    2014-01-01

    Fufang Xueshuantong (FXST) capsule, a Chinese medicinal formula composed of four herbals – Panax notoginseng, Radix Astragali, Radix Salvia Miltiorrhizae and Radix Scrophulariaceae, has been used to treat cardiovascular diseases for many years, but the pharmacological mechanisms underlying its effects has not been clarified. This study investigates if a connection between FXST and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) might be an explanation for its pharmacological effects. ACE inhibition assay was performed on FXST capsule, 50% ethanol extracts from the four herbals and three selected saponins most abundant in P. notoginseng (Ginsenoside Rg1, Ginsenoside Rb1 and Notoginsenoside R1) using a biochemical test. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography of liberated hippuric acid from the ACE assay was conducted to determine the inhibitory effect. As a result, FXST and extracts from P. notoginseng showed a significant and dose-dependent inhibition on ACE activity with the IC50 values of 115 μg/ml and 179 μg/ml, respectively. But extracts from the other three herbals and the three selected saponins had no significant effect on ACE inhibition. Compared to other reported plant extracts, FXST could be considered as an effective ACE inhibitor. The inhibition of ACE activity supports the traditional use of FXST on blood circulation and the inhibitory property of FXST is mainly caused by P. notoginseng. PMID:26019516

  14. CONSORT Extension for Chinese Herbal Medicine Formulas 2017: Recommendations, Explanation, and Elaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chung-Wah; Wu, Tai-Xiang; Shang, Hong-Cai; Li, You-Ping; Altman, Douglas G; Moher, David; Bian, Zhao-Xiang

    2017-06-27

    Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) formulas are the major components of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) interventions. The general reporting quality of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of CHM formulas is disappointing, although CONSORT (Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials) Statement extensions for herbal medicinal interventions and acupuncture interventions are available. A group of TCM clinical experts, methodologists, epidemiologists, and editors has developed this CONSORT Extension for CHM Formulas (CONSORT-CHM Formulas 2017) through a comprehensive process, including publication of the draft version, solicitation of comments, revision, and finalization. The CONSORT 2010 Statement was extended by introducing the idea of TCM Pattern and the features of CHM formulas. One new checklist subitem, keywords, was added to facilitate indexing and data searching. Seven of the 25 CONSORT checklist items, namely title and abstract, background and objectives, participants, interventions, outcomes, generalizability, and interpretation, are now elaborated, and the explanation of harms specific to CHM formulas is revised. Illustrative examples and explanations are also provided. The group hopes that CONSORT-CHM Formulas 2017 can improve the reporting quality of RCTs of CHM formulas.

  15. Traditional Chinese medicine formulas for irritable bowel syndrome: from ancient wisdoms to scientific understandings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hai-Tao; Zhong, Linda; Tsang, Siu-Wai; Lin, Ze-Si; Bian, Zhao-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) serves as the most common alternative therapeutic approach for Western medicine and benefits IBS patients globally. Due to the lack of scientific evidence in the past, TCM formulas were not internationally well recognized as promising IBS remedies. In this review, firstly, we present the etiology and therapy of IBS in terms of traditional Chinese medical theory. Secondly, we summarize the clinical randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of TCM formulas for IBS patients that are available in the literature (from 1998 to September 2013), in which 14 RCTs conducted of high quality were discussed in detail. Of the 14 selected trials, 12 of those concluded that TCM formulas provided superior improvement in the global symptoms of IBS patients over the placebo or conventional medicines. As well, all 14 RCTs suggested that TCM formulas have good safety and tolerability. Last but not least, we explore the pharmacological mechanisms of the anti-IBS TCM formulas available in the literature (from 1994 to September, 2013). Collectively, in combating IBS symptoms, most TCM formulas exert multi-targeting actions including the regulation of neurotransmitters and hormones in the enteric nervous system (ENS), modulation of smooth muscle motility in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, modulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, attenuation of intestinal inflammation and restoration of intestinal flora, etc. In conclusion, TCM formulas appear to be promising for IBS treatment. This review provides a useful reference for the public in furthering a better understanding and acceptance of TCM formulas as IBS remedies.

  16. Protective effect of a Chinese Medicine formula He-Ying-Qing-Re Formula on diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Leilei; Wang, Ning; Tan, Hor-yue; Zhang, Yinjian; Feng, Yibin

    2015-07-01

    He-Ying-Qing-Re Formula (HF) is a formula modified from "Si-Miao-Yong-An Decoction", a traditional Chinese medical classic emerged in the Qing dynasty and has been reported for treatment of vascular diseases. HF, containing 8 herbs, has been used in local hospital for decades as a complementary method for diabetic retinopathy (DR) with retinal vascular dysfunction. Clinical reports revealed HF could ameliorate vision defects, microaneurysms, hemorrhages and macular edema. The aim of this study is to investigate the anti-DR action of HF and its underlying mechanism experimentally. Chromatographic fingerprinting of HF and rodent model of DR were established; hypoglycemic effect of HF was measured by fasting, random blood glucose and glucose tolerance test; vascular degeneration was measured by retinal digestion; blood-retina-barrier (BRB) permeability was assessed with Evans Blue leakage assay. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) were measured in vitro and in vivo level; Migration of retinal vascular endothelial cells were determined by wound healing and transwell chamber assays; permeability of endothelial monolayer was monitored with dextran transport. AGEs-related proteins and signaling were measured with immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. Chlorogenic acid, ferulic acid and arctin were identified as major components in HF; HF suppresses retinal vasculature degeneration and BRB permeability damage without significant inhibition on hyperglycemia; HF reduces in vitro and in vivo formation of AGEs and AGEs-induced migration as well as permeability of retinal vascular endothelial cells. Expression of tight junction proteins Zo-1 and Claudin-1 was increased while activation of AGEs receptor and downstream signaling Akt were suppressed upon HF treatment. HF exhibits protective effect against diabetic retinopathy, which may be associated with inhibition on AGEs and recovery on endothelial dysfunction via modulation of tight junction and AGEs downstream signaling

  17. From medical tradition to traditional medicine: A Tibetan formula in the European framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwabl, Herbert; Vennos, Cécile

    2015-06-05

    The increasing prevalence of complex multi-factorial chronic diseases and multimorbidity reveals the need for an enlargement of the therapeutic options. Potent multicompound herbal formulations from traditional medicine systems such as Tibetan Medicine might meet the requirements. With its practice over the centuries Tibetan Medicine is one of the important medical heritages of the world. In the 20th century Tibetan formulas came to Switzerland, where the formula Gabur-25 was then registered as medicine in 1977 (Padma 28, Swissmedic No 35872). The new European directive 2004/24/EC opened the avenue for traditional herbal medicinal products and registrations followed in Austria (HERB-00037) and the UK (39568/0001). The aim of this review was to analyse not only the critical points and hazards but also chances that occur in the endeavour of bringing a ethnopharmacological based preparation to the market within a modern Western medical and regulatory framework and to discuss the necessary transformation steps from a traditional herbal formula towards a modern pharmaceutical product with the example of the Tibetan formula Gabur-25. The historic transformation process from the 19th to the 21st century is analysed, using the registration documents and other material from the library of Padma AG, Hinwil, Switzerland. The transformation of a traditional formula into a modern traditional herbal medicinal product according to the present EU regulations is a multi faceted process. The modern indication represents only a small part of the possible traditional indications. Quality and product labelling has to be adopted to modern standards. The formula, once registered, is a fixed combination of herbal and mineral ingredients. Contrary to this the concept of Asian medical tradition allows a certain flexibility in the composition of an herbal formula. The ingredients are constantly adapted to local conditions, availability of raw material and therapeutic situation. The example

  18. cardioprotective roles of the chinese medicinal formula bao-xin-tang ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Bao-Xin-Tang (BXT) is a traditional Chinese medicinal formula used for the treatment of coronary heart disease and known to have favorable therapeutic benefits. The current study was designed to determine whether BXT has a cardioprotective role for acute myocardial infarction. The underlying mechanisms ...

  19. Zhi-Bai-Di-Huang-Wan, a classic Chinese medicinal formula in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: To explore the effects of Zhi-Bai-Di-Huang-Wan (ZBDHW), a classic formula of Chinese medicinal herbs in relieving menopausal symptoms in British and Chinese women. Methods and Materials: Between May 2011 and May 2013, 224 Chinese and British women were divided into a ZBDHW group with 115 ...

  20. Cytotoxic Effects of Bangladeshi Medicinal Plant Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaikh J. Uddin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the cytotoxic effect of some Bangladeshi medicinal plant extracts, 16 Bangladeshi medicinal plants were successively extracted with n-hexane, dichloromethane, methanol and water. The methanolic and aqueous extracts were screened for cytotoxic activity against healthy mouse fibroblasts (NIH3T3 and three human cancer-cell lines (gastric: AGS; colon: HT-29; and breast: MDA-MB-435S using the MTT assay. Two methanolic extracts (Hygrophila auriculata and Hibiscus tiliaceous and one aqueous extract (Limnophila indica showed no toxicity against healthy mouse fibroblasts, but selective cytotoxicity against breast cancer cells (IC50 1.1–1.6 mg mL−1. Seven methanolic extracts from L. indica, Clerodendron inerme, Cynometra ramiflora, Xylocarpus moluccensis, Argemone mexicana, Ammannia baccifera and Acrostichum aureum and four aqueous extracts from Hygrophila auriculata, Bruguiera gymnorrhiza, X. moluccensis and Aegiceras corniculatum showed low toxicity (IC50 > 2.5 mg mL−1 against mouse fibroblasts but selective cytotoxicity (IC50 0.2–2.3 mg mL−1 against different cancer cell lines. The methanolic extract of Blumea lacera showed the highest cytotoxicity (IC50 0.01–0.08 mg mL−1 against all tested cell lines among all extracts tested in this study. For some of the plants their traditional use as anticancer treatments correlates with the cytotoxic results, whereas for others so far unknown cytotoxic activities were identified.

  1. [Analysis on composition principles of formulae containing Gardeniae Fructus in dictionary of traditional Chinese medicine prescriptions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yan-Zhen; Wei, Jun-Ying; Tang, Shi-Huan; Yang, Hong-Jun

    2016-04-01

    Gardeniae Fructus, which is widely used in health foods and clinical medicines, is a type of edible food and medicine. Dictionary of traditional Chinese medicine prescriptions provides good materials for prescription analysis and the R&D of traditional Chinese medicines. The composition regularity of formulae containing Gardeniae Fructus in dictionary of traditional Chinese medicine prescriptions was analyzed on the basis of the traditional Chinese medicine inheritance support system(TCMISS), in order to provide reference for clinical application and the R&D of new drugs. TCMISS was applied to establish a database of prescriptions containing Gardeniae Fructus. The software's frequency statistics and association rules and other date mining technologies were adopted to analyze commonly used drugs, combination rules and core combined formulae containing Gardeniae Fructus. Totally 3 523 prescriptions were included in this study and involved 1 725 Chinese herbs. With a support degree of 352(10%) and confidence coefficient of 90%, 57 most commonly used drug combinations were screened. Drugs adopted in core combinations were relatively concentrated and selected according to definite composition methods. They were used to mainly treat 18 diseases. Gardeniae Fructus have often been combined with herbs for heat-clearing and detoxification, expelling pathogenic wind, relieving exterior syndrome, invigorating the circulation of blood and gas and promoting blood circulation for removing blood stasis to mainly treat jaundice, typhoid, headache and other syndromes. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  2. A Universal Formula for Extracting the Euler Angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuster, Malcolm D.; Markley, F. Landis

    2004-01-01

    Recently, the authors completed a study of the Davenport angles, which are a generalization of the Euler angles for which the initial and final Euler axes need not be either mutually parallel or mutually perpendicular or even along the coordinate axes. During the conduct of that study, those authors discovered a relationship which can be used to compute straightforwardly the Euler angles characterizing a proper-orthogonal direction-cosine matrix for an arbitrary Euler-axis set satisfying n(sub 1) x n(sub 2) = 0 and n(sub 3) x n(sub 1) = 0, which is also satisfied by the more usual Euler angles we encounter commonly in the practice of Astronautics. Rather than leave that relationship hidden in an article with very different focus from the present Engineering note, we present it and the universal algorithm derived from it for extracting the Euler angles from the direction-cosine matrix here. We also offer literal "code" for performing the operations, numerical examples, and general considerations about the extraction of Euler angles which are not universally known, particularly, the treatment of statistical error.

  3. A New Strategy for Deleting Animal drugs from Traditional Chinese Medicines based on Modified Yimusake Formula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinghui; Li, Yan; Yang, Yinfeng; Chen, Xuetong; Du, Jian; Zheng, Qiusheng; Liang, Zongsuo; Wang, Yonghua

    2017-05-04

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), such as Uyghur Medicine (UM) has been used in clinical treatment for many years. TCM is featured as multiple targets and complex mechanisms of action, which is normally a combination of medicinal herbs and sometimes even contains certain rare animal medicinal ingredients. A question arises as to whether these animal materials can be removed replaced from TCM applications due to their valuable rare resources or animal ethics. Here, we select a classical UM Yimusake formula, which contains 3 animal drugs and other 8 herbs, and has got wealthy experience and remarkable achievements in treating erectile dysfunction (ED) in China. The active components, drug targets and therapeutic mechanisms have been comprehensively analyzed by systems-pharmacology methods. Additionally, to validate the inhibitory effects of all candidate compounds on their related targets, in vitro experiments, computational analysis and molecular dynamics simulations were performed. The results show that the modified, original and three animal materials display very similar mechanisms for an effective treatment of ED, indicating that it is quite possible to remove these three animal drugs from the original formula while still keep its efficiency. This work provides a new attempt for deleting animal materials from TCM, which should be important for optimization of traditional medicines.

  4. Patterns Exploration on Patterns of Empirical Herbal Formula of Chinese Medicine by Association Rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li; Yuan, Jiamin; Yang, Zhimin; Xu, Fuping; Huang, Chunhua

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we use association rules to explore the latent rules and patterns of prescribing and adjusting the ingredients of herbal decoctions based on empirical herbal formula of Chinese Medicine (CM). The consideration and development of CM prescriptions based on the knowledge of CM doctors are analyzed. The study contained three stages. The first stage is to identify the chief symptoms to a specific empirical herbal formula, which can serve as the key indication for herb addition and cancellation. The second stage is to conduct a case study on the empirical CM herbal formula for insomnia. Doctors will add extra ingredients or cancel some of them by CM syndrome diagnosis. The last stage of the study is to divide the observed cases into the effective group and ineffective group based on the assessed clinical effect by doctors. The patterns during the diagnosis and treatment are selected by the applied algorithm and the relations between clinical symptoms or indications and herb choosing principles will be selected by the association rules algorithm. Totally 40 patients were observed in this study: 28 patients were considered effective after treatment and the remaining 12 were ineffective. 206 patterns related to clinical indications of Chinese Medicine were checked and screened with each observed case. In the analysis of the effective group, we used the algorithm of association rules to select combinations between 28 herbal adjustment strategies of the empirical herbal formula and the 190 patterns of individual clinical manifestations. During this stage, 11 common patterns were eliminated and 5 major symptoms for insomnia remained. 12 association rules were identified which included 5 herbal adjustment strategies. The association rules method is an effective algorithm to explore the latent relations between clinical indications and herbal adjustment strategies for the study on empirical herbal formulas.

  5. Patterns Exploration on Patterns of Empirical Herbal Formula of Chinese Medicine by Association Rules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In this study, we use association rules to explore the latent rules and patterns of prescribing and adjusting the ingredients of herbal decoctions based on empirical herbal formula of Chinese Medicine (CM. Materials and Methods. The consideration and development of CM prescriptions based on the knowledge of CM doctors are analyzed. The study contained three stages. The first stage is to identify the chief symptoms to a specific empirical herbal formula, which can serve as the key indication for herb addition and cancellation. The second stage is to conduct a case study on the empirical CM herbal formula for insomnia. Doctors will add extra ingredients or cancel some of them by CM syndrome diagnosis. The last stage of the study is to divide the observed cases into the effective group and ineffective group based on the assessed clinical effect by doctors. The patterns during the diagnosis and treatment are selected by the applied algorithm and the relations between clinical symptoms or indications and herb choosing principles will be selected by the association rules algorithm. Results. Totally 40 patients were observed in this study: 28 patients were considered effective after treatment and the remaining 12 were ineffective. 206 patterns related to clinical indications of Chinese Medicine were checked and screened with each observed case. In the analysis of the effective group, we used the algorithm of association rules to select combinations between 28 herbal adjustment strategies of the empirical herbal formula and the 190 patterns of individual clinical manifestations. During this stage, 11 common patterns were eliminated and 5 major symptoms for insomnia remained. 12 association rules were identified which included 5 herbal adjustment strategies. Conclusion. The association rules method is an effective algorithm to explore the latent relations between clinical indications and herbal adjustment strategies for the study on empirical

  6. Near-infrared for on-line determination of quality parameter of Sophora japonica L. (formula particles): From lab investigation to pilot-scale extraction process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Shi, Xinyuan; Wu, Zhisheng; Guo, Mingye; Xu, Bing; Pan, Xiaoning; Ma, Qun; Qiao, Yanjiang

    2015-01-01

    Extraction process of dried flowers of formula particles should be investigated from lab investigation to pilot-scale because of good water absorbing capacity and obscure active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) dissolution. Reliable analysis of on-line near-infrared (NIR) technique and novel application in fascinating modern, traditional Chinese medicine production (formula particles) was proved. The extraction process of Sophora japonica L. (formula particles) was used as an example, the rutin was regarded as API. On-line NIR technology was used to monitor the variation of rutin in the extraction process. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used as a reference method to determine the content of rutin during the extraction process. The sample set was selected by Kennard-Stone (KS) algorithm. Different pretreatment methods were compared. The synergy interval partial least square (SiPLS) algorithm was applied. Chemometrics indicators and multivariate detection limits method were mutually used to assess the model. According to both errors α (0.05) and β (0.05), rutin content could be detected by on-line NIR, which was more than 0.181 mg/mL. This work demonstrated the feasibility of NIR for on-line determination of rutin in the pilot-scale extraction process of S. japonica. L. It provided technical support for the NIR application in the extraction process of formula particles.

  7. Triazine residues in raw milk and infant formulas from Spanish northwest, by a diphasic dialysis extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, M Ángeles; Santaeufemia, M; Melgar, M Julia

    2012-03-01

    Residue levels of herbicides (triazines) were determined in milk by a new and sensitive analytical method. A total of 312 samples were collected (70 infant formulas and 242 raw milk) biweekly during a 24-month period. A method is reported for the analysis of triazine with extraction by diphasic dialysis and determination by gas chromatography with nitrogen-phosphorus detection (CG/NPD) and by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) to confirm positive results. Detection limits (LODs) were 0.01 mg/l for terbuthylazine, 0.07 mg/l for simazine and 0.04 mg/l for atrazine by CG/NPD. Optimal extraction was obtained with dichloromethane at 34 °C, and stirring at 200 rpm for 4 h. This extraction method improves recovery by up to 89% for terbuthylazine, 75% for simazine and 116% for atrazine. The frequency of total samples containing triazine residues was 12.50%; considering, separately, raw milk and infant formulas, this percentage was 16.11% and 5.71%, respectively. Finally, because one sample contained triazine levels slightly higher than established MRLs and owing to the known effects of these contaminants on infants health and development, urgent actions are needed for monitoring and controlling of the level of contamination in infant formula which not exceeds tolerable limit recommended by European and Spanish legislation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Extraction and Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry Detection of 3-Monochloropropanediol Esters and Glycidyl Esters in Infant Formula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, Jessica K; MacMahon, Shaun

    2016-12-14

    A method was developed for the extraction of fatty acid esters of 3-chloro-1,2-propanediol (3-MCPD) and glycidol from infant formula, followed by quantitative analysis of the extracts using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). These process-induced chemical contaminants are found in refined vegetable oils, and studies have shown that they are potentially carcinogenic and/or genotoxic, making their presence in edible oils (and processed foods containing these oils) a potential health risk. The extraction procedure involves a liquid-liquid extraction, where powdered infant formula is dissolved in water and extracted with ethyl acetate. Following shaking, centrifugation, and drying of the organic phase, the resulting fat extract is cleaned-up using solid-phase extraction and analyzed by LC-MS/MS. Method performance was confirmed by verifying the percent recovery of each 3-MCPD and glycidyl ester in a homemade powdered infant formula reference material. Average ester recoveries in the reference material ranged from 84.9 to 109.0% (0.6-9.5% RSD). The method was also validated by fortifying three varieties of commercial infant formulas with a 3-MCPD and glycidyl ester solution. Average recoveries of the esters across all concentrations and varieties of infant formula ranged from 88.7 to 107.5% (1.0-9.5% RSD). Based on the validation results, this method is suitable for producing 3-MCPD and glycidyl ester occurrence data in all commercially available varieties of infant formula.

  9. A Review on the Traditional Chinese Medicinal Herbs and Formulae with Hypolipidemic Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tung-Ting Sham

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperlipidemia, characterized by the abnormal blood lipid profiles, is one of the dominant factors of many chronic diseases such as diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular diseases (CVD. For the low cost, effectiveness, and fewer side effects, the popularity of using traditional Chinese medicine (TCM to handle hyperlipidemia is increasing and its role in health care has been recognized by the public at large. Despite the importance of TCM herbs and formulations, there is no comprehensive review summarizing their scientific findings on handling hyperlipidemia. This review summarizes the recent experimental and clinical results of nine representative single Chinese herbs and seven classic TCM formulae that could improve lipid profiles so as to help understand and compare their underlying mechanisms. Most of single herbs and formulae demonstrated the improvement of hyperlipidemic conditions with multiple and diverse mechanisms of actions similar to conventional Western drugs in spite of their mild side effects. Due to increasing popularity of TCM, more extensive, well-designed preclinical and clinical trials on the potential synergistic and adverse side effects of herb-drug interactions as well as their mechanisms are warranted. Hyperlipidemic patients should be warned about the potential risks of herb-drug interactions, particularly those taking anticoagulants and antiplatelet drugs.

  10. The Chinese Herbal Medicine Formula mKG Suppresses Pulmonary Fibrosis of Mice Induced by Bleomycin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Gao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary fibrosis (PF is a serious progressive lung disease and it originates from inflammation-induced parenchymal injury with excessive extracellular matrix deposition to result in the destruction of the normal lung architecture. Modified Kushen Gancao Formula (mKG, derived from traditional Chinese herbal medicine, has a prominent anti-inflammatory effect. The present study is to explore the inhibitory effects of mKG on bleomycin (BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice. mKG significantly decreased pulmonary alveolitis, fibrosis scores, and interleukin-6 (IL-6, interleukin-17 (IL-17, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β and hydroxyproline (HYP levels in lung tissue of mice compared with BLM treatment. It markedly alleviated the increase of HYP content in the lung tissues and pathologic changes of pulmonary fibrosis caused by BLM instillation. In conclusion, mKG has an anti-fibrotic effect and might be employed as a therapeutic candidate agent for attenuating pulmonary fibrosis.

  11. Smart Soup, a traditional Chinese medicine formula, ameliorates amyloid pathology and related cognitive deficits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujun Hou

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that causes substantial public health care burdens. Intensive efforts have been made to find effective and safe disease-modifying treatment and symptomatic intervention alternatives against AD. Smart Soup (SS, a Chinese medicine formula composed of Rhizoma Acori Tatarinowii (AT, Poria cum Radix Pini (PRP and Radix Polygalae (RP, is a typical prescription against memory deficits. Here, we assessed the efficacy of SS against AD. Oral administration of SS ameliorated the cognitive impairment of AD transgenic mice, with reduced Aβ levels, retarded Aβ amyloidosis and reduced Aβ-induced gliosis and neuronal loss in the brains of AD mice. Consistently, SS treatment reduced amyloid-related locomotor dysfunctions and premature death of AD transgenic Drosophila. Mechanistic studies showed that RP reduced Aβ generation, whereas AT and PRP exerted neuroprotective effects against Aβ. Taken together, our study indicates that SS could be effective against AD, providing a practical therapeutic strategy against the disease.

  12. In vivo screening for anti-osteoporotic fraction from extract of herbal formula Xianlinggubao in ovariectomized mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinluan Wang

    Full Text Available Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM Fufang or formula Xianlinggubao (XLGB is a prescribed TCM drug in China registered for prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. Fufang in TCM is comprised of a group of herbal compounds contributing in group to the treatment efficacy. The present study aims to identify the bioactive fraction(s in XLGB extract that account(s dominantly for its osteogenic effects.The extract of XLGB formula was separated into three fractions using chromatography, i.e., XLGB-A, XLGB-B and XLGB-C. They were administrated to 4-month old ovariectomized (OVX mice for 6 weeks to determine which bioactive fraction(s were more effective for preventing OVX-induced bone loss evaluated by microCT, biomechanical testing and biochemical markers. The main peaks of the key fraction were identified using reference compounds isolated from the fraction. In addition, the effects of the composite compounds in XLGB-B on osteoblasts' proliferation and mineralization were evaluated in UMR 106 cells.XLGB-B with a yield of 13.0% from herbal Fufang XLGB was identified as the most potential one among the three fractions for prevention of OVX-induced bone loss confirmed with bone mass, bone microarchitecture, bone strength and bone turnover markers. Nine compounds in HPLC fingerprint were identified in the XLGB-B fraction, including phenylpropanoids from Herba Epimedii, terpenes from Radix Dipsaci and coumarins from Fructus Psoraleae. In addition, the identified compounds effectively promoted proliferation and/or mineralization of osteoblast-like UMR 106 cells in vitro.XLGB-B with defined phytochemical structures was screened as the key fraction that demonstrated preventive effects on OVX-induced bone loss in mice. The present study laid down a foundation towards a new generation of herbal Fufang characterized with "less herbal materials for achieving equal treatment efficacy" in development strategy of TCM for prevention of OVX-induced osteoporosis.

  13. Metabonomics Combined with UPLC-MS Chemical Profile for Discovery of Antidepressant Ingredients of a Traditional Chinese Medicines Formula, Chaihu-Shu-Gan-San

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongmei Jia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study proposed a new strategy for uncovering the active chemical constituents of a traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs formula, Chaihu-Shu-Gan-San (CSGS. Metabonomics and chemical profile were integrated in combination with the multivariate statistical analysis (MVA to discover the chemical constituents which contribute to the antidepressant effect of CSGS. Based upon the difference between CSGS and QZ (CSGS without Zhi-Qiao extracts in the chemical profiles and the regulations of metabolic disturbances induced by CUMS, synephrine, naringin, hesperidin, and neohesperidin were recognized as the active constituents of CSGS from Zhi-qiao responsible for those missing regulations of CSGS when Zhi-Qiao was subtracted from the whole formula. They participated in the regulations of the deviated metabolites 2–4, 10–14, and 22–25, involved in metabolic pathways of ketone bodies synthesis, phenylalanine, tyrosine and tryptophan biosynthesis, valine, aspartate, glutamate metabolism, and glycolysis/gluconeogenesis. Furthermore, the assay of MAO-A activity confirmed the potential antidepressant effect of naringin and its active sites on the MAO-A was inferred by molecular docking study. The integration of metabonomics and chemical profile was proved to be a useful strategy for uncovering what the active chemical constituents in TCM formula are and how they make contributions for the efficacy of the formula.

  14. Antiaging and Anxiolytic Effects of Combinatory Formulas Based on Four Medicinal Herbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to search for medicinal-herb combinations based on Radix Bupleurum chinense DC (“B”, Rhizoma Corydalis yanhusuo WT Wang (“Y”, Caulis Polygonum multiflorum Thunb (“P”, and Flos Albizia julibrissin Durazz (“A” for antiaging, anxiolytic, and sedative effects. Application of the D-galactose induced accelerated-aging model employing male ICR mice showed that oral administration of some combinations of B, Y, P, and A significantly improved spatial memory in Y-maze test and reduced brain levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 based on immunoassays and oxidative stress marker malondialdehyde, based on the thiobarbituric acid test, and the loss of whiskers, indicating antiaging and antineurodegeneration effects. In addition, some of the combinatory formulas induced anxiolysis measured using the elevated plus-maze test and/or sedative effects measured using the hole-board test. Over the range of dosages examined, all possible combinations of the four herbs were devoid of any significant side effects in the form of altered locomotor activity, decreased muscle coordination, or anterograde amnesia assessed using the photobeam and rotarod and step-through passive avoidance methods, respectively. The results suggest that various combinations of the B, Y, P, and A herbs could be useful as nonsedative, antiaging and/or antineurodegenerative agents, or anxiolytic agents.

  15. Liuwei Dihuang (LWDH, a traditional Chinese medicinal formula, protects against β-amyloid toxicity in transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jatinder S Sangha

    Full Text Available Liuwei Dihuang (LWDH, a classic Chinese medicinal formula, has been used to improve or restore declined functions related to aging and geriatric diseases, such as impaired mobility, vision, hearing, cognition and memory. Here, we report on the effect and possible mechanisms of LWDH mediated protection of β-amyloid (Aβ induced paralysis in Caenorhabditis elegans using ethanol extract (LWDH-EE and water extract (LWDH-WE. Chemical profiling and quantitative analysis revealed the presence of different levels of bioactive components in these extracts. LWDH-WE was rich in polar components such as monosaccharide dimers and trimers, whereas LWDH-EE was enriched in terms of phenolic compounds such as gallic acid and paeonol. In vitro studies revealed higher DPPH radical scavenging activity for LWDH-EE as compared to that found for LWDH-WE. Neither LWDH-EE nor LWDH-WE were effective in inhibiting aggregation of Aβ in vitro. By contrast, LWDH-EE effectively delayed Aβ induced paralysis in the transgenic C. elegans (CL4176 model which expresses human Aβ1-42. Western blot revealed no treatment induced reduction in Aβ accumulation in CL4176 although a significant reduction was observed at an early stage with respect to β-amyloid deposition in C. elegans strain CL2006 which constitutively expresses human Aβ1-42. In addition, LWDH-EE reduced in vivo reactive oxygen species (ROS in C. elegans (CL4176 that correlated with increased survival of LWDH-EE treated N2 worms under juglone-induced oxidative stress. Analysis with GFP reporter strain TJ375 revealed increased expression of hsp16.2::GFP after thermal stress whereas a minute induction was observed for sod3::GFP. Quantitative gene expression analysis revealed that LWDH-EE repressed the expression of amy1 in CL4176 while up-regulating hsp16.2 induced by elevating temperature. Taken together, these results suggest that LWDH extracts, particularly LWDH-EE, alleviated β-amyloid induced toxicity, in part

  16. Modulatory effects of Thai medicinal plant extract on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-08-02

    )-γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α are able to synergistically induce apoptosis in HaCaT keratinocyte cells. The present study aimed to elucidate modulatory effects of ethanolic extracts derived from Thai traditional medicinal.

  17. Antibacterial activities of the crude ethanol extracts of medicinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Searches for substances with antimicrobial activity are frequent and medicinal plants have been considered interesting by some researchers since they are frequently used in popular medicine as remedies for many infectious diseases. The aim of this study was to verify the antibacterial effect of ethanol extracts of 13 plants ...

  18. Screening of crude extracts of twelve medicinal plants and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antimicrobial activity of extracts of twelve Nigerian medicinal plant species and a “wonder cure” concoction [Epa –Ijebu]; used in traditional medicine for the treatment of tuberculosis and cough were screened for activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from tuberculosis patient sputum and the control strains ...

  19. Cytotoxicity evaluation of sixteen Nigerian medicinal plant extracts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As part of our evaluation of plants from the Nigerian ethnobotany,sixteen extracts from fourteen medicinal plants were evaluated for toxicity and inhibition of tumour cell growth using human rhabdomyosarcoma(RD) cell line. The plant samples were extracted by maceration in methanol at room temperature and were ...

  20. Antimicrobial Activity of some Medicinal Plant Extracts | El Astal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antimicrobial activity of aqueous, ethanolic, methanolic and phenolic compound extracts from three Palestinian folkloric medicinal plants, in addition to their commercial oils, were evaluated against ten pathogenic microorganisms. The plants used were sage, thyme and parsley. Five concentrations of leaf extract of the ...

  1. [Glass transition of Chinese medicine extract powder and its application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiao-Jian; Liu, Hui; Liang, Hong-Bo; Xiong, Lei; Rao, Xiao-Yong; Xie, Yin; He, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Glass transition theory is an important theory in polymer science, which is used to characterize the physical properties. It refers to the transition of amorphous polymer from the glassy state to the rubber state due to heating or the transition from rubber state to glassy state due to cooling. In this paper, the glassy state and glass transition of food and the similar relationship between the composition of Chinese medicine extract powder and food ingredients were described; the determination method for glass transition temperature (Tg) of Chinese medicine extract powder was established and its main influencing factors were analyzed. Meanwhile, the problems in drying process, granulation process and Chinese medicine extract powder and solid preparation storage were analyzed and investigated based on Tg, and then the control strategy was put forward to provide guidance for the research and production of Chinese medicine solid preparation. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  2. Anti-inflammatory activity of mycelial extracts from medicinal mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Yan; Zhu, Shuiling; Lu, Zhenming; Xu, Hongyu; Shi, Jin-Song; Xu, Zheng-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Medicinal mushrooms have been essential components of traditional Chinese herbal medicines for thousands of years, and they protect against diverse health-related conditions. The components responsible for their anti-inflammatory activity have yet to be fully studied. This study investigates the anti-inflammatory activity of n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and methanol extracts of mycelia in submerged culture from 5 commercially available medicinal mushrooms, namely Cephalosporium sinensis, Cordyceps mortierella, Hericium erinaceus, Ganoderma lucidum, and Armillaria mellea. MTT colorimetric assay was applied to measure the cytotoxic effects of different extracts. Their anti-inflammatory activities were evaluated via inhibition against production of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (NO) in murine macrophage-like cell line RAW264.7 cells. Of the 20 extracts, n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and methanol extracts from C. sinensis, C. mortierella, and G. lucidum; chloroform extracts from H. erinaceus and A. mellea; and ethyl acetate extracts from A. mellea at nontoxic concentrations (effective inhibitor, with the lowest half maximal inhibitory concentration (64.09 ± 6.29 μg/mL) of the LPS-induced NO production. These results indicate that extracts from medicinal mushrooms exhibited anti-inflammatory activity that might be attributable to the inhibition of NO generation and can therefore be considered a useful therapeutic and preventive approach to various inflammation-related diseases.

  3. Analysis of medicinal plant extracts by neutron activation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaz, Sandra Muntz

    1995-01-01

    This dissertation has presented the results from analysis of medicinal plant extracts using neutron activation method. Instrumental neutron activation analysis was applied to the determination of the elements Al, Br, Ca, Ce, Cl, Cr, Cs, Fe, K, La, Mg, Mn, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc and Zn in medicinal extracts obtained from Achyrolcline satureoides DC, Casearia sylvestris, Centella asiatica, Citrus aurantium L., Solano lycocarpum, Solidago microglossa, Stryphnondedron barbatiman and Zingiber officinale R. plants. The elements Hg and Se were determined using radiochemical separation by means of retention of Se in HMD inorganic exchanger and solvent extraction of Hg by bismuth diethyl-dithiocarbamate solution. Precision and accuracy of the results have been evaluated by analysing reference materials. The therapeutic action of some elements found in plant extracts analyzed was briefly discussed

  4. Effects of medicinal plant extracts on gluconeogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade-Cetto A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Adolfo Andrade-CettoLaboratorio de Etnofarmacología, Departamento de Biología Celular, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Coyoacán, MéxicoAbstract: On a global level, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is the most common endocrine disorder. T2DM is defined as an elevated blood glucose level associated with the absence of or inadequacy in pancreatic insulin secretion. The liver plays a key role in maintaining blood glucose levels during fasting by synthesizing glucose, mainly from lactate and amino acids through a process called gluconeogenesis. Because hepatic glucose production is increased at least twofold in patients with T2DM, targeting this pathway may lead to a blood glucose reduction in these patients. Botanical agents show promise for the development of new compounds to treat T2DM. Important mechanisms of action function via the inhibition of gluconeogenesis can occur in one of five ways: direct enzyme inhibition; through the downregulation of mRNA levels of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and glucose-6-phosphatase (G-6-P; through the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase, which leads to decreased levels of cAMP response element-binding protein, a key transcription factor for gluconeogenic enzyme phosphorylation; through the expression of the glucokinase gene, which stimulates glucokinase activity and inhibits G-6-P; and through the inhibition of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, which decreases gluconeogenesis and enzymatically inhibits G-6-P and fructose-1,6-diphosphatase.Keywords: type 2 diabetes mellitus, medicinal plants, gluconeogenesis, glucose 6-phosphatase, hepatic glucose production, endocrine disorder, fructose 1,6-diphosphatase

  5. Advancing Drug Discovery and Development from Active Constituents of Yinchenhao Tang, a Famous Traditional Chinese Medicine Formula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aihua Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM formula has been playing a very important role in health protection and disease control for thousands of years. Guided by TCM syndrome theories, formula are designed to contain a combination of various kinds of crude drugs that, when combined, will achieve synergistic efficacy. However, the precise mechanism of synergistic action remains poorly understood. One example is a famous TCM formula Yinchenhao Tang (YCHT, whose efficacy in treating hepatic injury (HI and Jaundice syndrome, has recently been well established as a case study. We also conducted a systematic analysis of synergistic effects of the principal compound using biochemistry, pharmacokinetics and systems biology, to explore the key molecular mechanisms. We had found that the three component (6,7-dimethylesculetin (D, geniposide (G, and rhein (R combination exerts a more robust synergistic effect than any one or two of the three individual compounds by hitting multiple targets. They can regulate molecular networks through activating both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways to synergistically cause intensified therapeutic effects. This paper provides an overview of the recent and potential developments of chemical fingerprinting coupled with systems biology advancing drug discovery towards more agile development of targeted combination therapies for the YCHT.

  6. Extracting relations from traditional Chinese medicine literature via heterogeneous entity networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Huaiyu; Moens, Marie-Francine; Luyten, Walter; Zhou, Xuezhong; Mei, Qiaozhu; Liu, Lu; Tang, Jie

    2016-03-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is a unique and complex medical system that has developed over thousands of years. This article studies the problem of automatically extracting meaningful relations of entities from TCM literature, for the purposes of assisting clinical treatment or poly-pharmacology research and promoting the understanding of TCM in Western countries. Instead of separately extracting each relation from a single sentence or document, we propose to collectively and globally extract multiple types of relations (eg, herb-syndrome, herb-disease, formula-syndrome, formula-disease, and syndrome-disease relations) from the entire corpus of TCM literature, from the perspective of network mining. In our analysis, we first constructed heterogeneous entity networks from the TCM literature, in which each edge is a candidate relation, then used a heterogeneous factor graph model (HFGM) to simultaneously infer the existence of all the edges. We also employed a semi-supervised learning algorithm estimate the model's parameters. We performed our method to extract relations from a large dataset consisting of more than 100,000 TCM article abstracts. Our results show that the performance of the HFGM at extracting all types of relations from TCM literature was significantly better than a traditional support vector machine (SVM) classifier (increasing the average precision by 11.09%, the recall by 13.83%, and the F1-measure by 12.47% for different types of relations, compared with a traditional SVM classifier). This study exploits the power of collective inference and proposes an HFGM based on heterogeneous entity networks, which significantly improved our ability to extract relations from TCM literature. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Pro- and antioxidative properties of medicinal mushroom extracts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, W.; Griensven, van L.J.L.D.

    2008-01-01

    Hot water extracts of 2 groups of medicinal mushrooms have been tested from the genera Agaricus, Antrodia, Auricularia, Coprinus, Cordyceps, Hericium, Grifola, Ganoderma, Lentinus, Phellinus, and Trametes for ROS-generating activity in human cells and for DPPH-TEAC antioxidant activity. Group 1

  8. Antibacterial activity of honey and medicinal plant extracts against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using a broth dilution method, the antibacterial activity extracts of six South African honeys and medicinal plants against six enteric microorganisms viz- Enterobacter cloacae, Escheriachia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Citrobacter freundii isolated from geophagia samples and Aeromonas hydrophila and plesiomonas ...

  9. Evaluation studies of some medicinal plant extracts and fungicides ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation studies of some medicinal plant extracts and fungicides against Alternaria solani. S Phalisteen, S Ishaq, K Amardeep, J Arif, S Sami. Abstract. Alternaria is a polyphagus fungus that occurs frequently on dead and decaying organic material and is responsible for causing leaf spot disease. In Indian subcontinent ...

  10. [Effect of medicinal plant extracts on the growth of microorganisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baronets, N G; Adlova, G P; Mel'nikova, V A

    2001-01-01

    Extracts obtained from sweatweed and licorice roots, flax seeds, milfoil, bur-marigold, plantain, coltsfoot, nettle, Indian corn stigmas, laminaria produced a stimulating effect on the growth of Candida albicans test strain and Streptococcus pyogenes test strain Dick 1. Sweatweed, licorice, Aerva lanata and violet extracts influenced the growth of Corynebacterium xerosis 1911, while sweatweed, violet, horse-tail, bur-marigold, camomile, plantain, and nettle extracts influenced the growth of shigellae. The stimulating effect could be supposedly produced by biologically active substances contained in medicinal plants (organic acids, alkaloids, carotinoids, vitamins, microelements). Further studies aimed at the identification of substances producing the stimulating effect are planned.

  11. The Chinese medicine formula HB01 reduces choroidal neovascularization by regulating the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Ming

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Choroidal neovascularization (CNV remains the leading cause of newly acquired blindness in the developed world. Currently anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF therapies are broadly used to treat neovascular ocular disorders. Here we demonstrate the effect of a traditional Chinese medicine formula, HB01, on CNV. Methods A rat model of laser-induced CNV was used to investigate the effect of HB01 in vivo. The CNV lesions in the eye were evaluated using fundus fluorescein angiography and visualized/quantified using confocal microscopy. Expression of VEGF in the choroidal and retinal tissues was measured using quantitative real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. Results We demonstrated that a traditional Chinese Medicine formula, named HB01, significantly reduced neovascularization in a rat CNV model. The effect of HB01 on CNV was comparable to the intravitreal injection of bevacizumab (Avastin. Our results also suggested that HB01 may reduce CNV partially through inhibiting the expression of VEGF. Conclusions These data support HB01 as an alternative therapy for ocular neovascular disorders.

  12. Choreito, a formula from Japanese traditional medicine (Kampo medicine), for massive hemorrhagic cystitis and clot retention in a pediatric patient with refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Nozomu; Deveaux, Teykia E; Yoshida, Nao; Matsumoto, Kimikazu; Kato, Koji

    2012-09-15

    Hemorrhagic cystitis is critical in patients with hemato-oncological disorders. Unlike adult patients, there are limited modalities and invasive procedures are often not well tolerated in children with poor general conditions. We report a pediatric patient with refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia who developed life-threatening massive gross hematuria. Along with platelet infusion every other day due to suppressed hematopoiesis, his gross hematuria and clot retention in the bladder were successfully treated with choreito, a formula from Japanese traditional medicine (Kampo medicine). He survived free from hematuria for more than four months. Choreito was well tolerated, and no adverse effects were observed throughout the course. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of nanoparticles capped with medicinal plant extracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekulapally, Sujith R.

    In this study, synthesis, characterization and biological application of series nanometal (silver, Ag) and nanometal oxide (titania, TiO2) were carried out. These nanomaterials were prepared using wet-chemistry method and then coated using natural plant extract. Three medicinal plants, namely Zingiber officinale (Ginger), Allium sativum (Garlic) and Capsicum annuum (Chili) were chosen as grafting agent to decrease the side-effects and increase the efficiency of NPs towards living organism. Extraction conditions were controlled under 60-100 °C for 8 hrs. Ag and TiO2 NPs were fabricated using colloidal chemistry and variables were controlled at ambient condition. The band gap of TiO2 NPs used as disinfectant was also modified through coating the medicinal plant extracts. The medicinal plant extracts and coated NPs were measured using spectroscopic methods. Ultraviolet-visible spectra indicated the Ag NPs were formed. The peak at 410 nm resulted from the electrons transferred from their ground to the excited state. The broadened full width at half maximum (FWHM) suggested the ultrafine particles were obtained. The lipid soluble compounds, phenols, tri-terpenoids, flavanoids, capsaicinoids, flavonoids, carotenoids, steroids steroidal glycosides, and vitamins were determined from the high performance liquid chromatographical analyses. X-ray powder diffraction indicated that the face-centered cubic Ag (PDF: 00-004-0783, a = 4.0862A, a = 90°) and anatase TiO2 (PDF: 01-08-1285, a = 3.7845, c = 9.5143A, a = 90°) were obtained using colloidal chemistry. Bactericidal activity indicated that these core-shelled TiO 2 were effective (MBC=0.6 ppm, within 30 mins) at inactivating Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. It is proposed that the medicinal extracts enhanced the potency of NPs against bacteria. From our previous study, the Ag NPs were highly effective at inactivating both bacteria.

  14. Protective Effect against Oxidative Stress in Medicinal Plant Extracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jeong Hee; Lee, Eun Ju; Shin, Dong O; Hong, Sung Eun; Kim, Jin Kyu

    2000-01-01

    Protective effect of medicinal plant extracts against oxidative stress were screened in this study. Methanol extracts from 48 medicinal plants, which were reported to have antioxidative or anti-inflammatory effect were prepared and screened for their protective activity against chemically-induced and radiation-induced oxidative stress by using MTT assay. Thirty three samples showed protective activity against chemically-induced oxidative stress in various extent. Among those samples, extract of Glycyrrhiza uralensis revealed the strongest activity (25.9% at 100 μg/ml) with relatively lower cytotoxicity. Seven other samples showed higher than 20% protection at 100 μg/ml. These samples were tested for protection activity against radiation-induced oxidative stress. Methanol extract of Alpina officinarum showed the highest activity (17.8% at 20 μg/ml). Five fractions were prepared from the each 10 methanol extracts which showed high protective activity against oxidative stress. Among those fraction samples butanol fractions of Areca catechu var. dulcissima and Spirodela polyrrhiza showed the highest protective activities (78.8% and 77.2%, respectively, at 20 μg/ml)

  15. CARDIOPROTECTIVE ROLES OF THE CHINESE MEDICINAL FORMULA BAO-XIN-TANG ON ACUTE MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION IN RATS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Wang, Weihao; Peng, Weijun; Liu, Weiping; Cai, Weijun; Xia, Zian; Zhang, Honggeng; Xing, And Zhihua

    2017-01-01

    Bao-Xin-Tang (BXT) is a traditional Chinese medicinal formula used for the treatment of coronary heart disease and known to have favorable therapeutic benefits. The current study was designed to determine whether BXT has a cardioprotective role for acute myocardial infarction. The underlying mechanisms were also explored. The Sprague-Dawley rat model of acute myocardial infarction was established by occluding the left anterior descending branch of the coronary artery. After a 3-h ischemic period, we determined the myocardial infarction size, inflammatory components, and antioxidant activities. The data showed that BXT could reduce the infarction size and lower the levels of C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, and myeloperoxidase, and increase the activities of superoxide dismutase and the anti-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-10. These results indicate that administration of BXT, following acute myocardial infarction, could reduce infarct size. The effects of BXT may be related to its anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties.

  16. Lysis of Microcystis aeruginosa with Extracts from Chinese Medicinal Herbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Fen Yin

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Boiling water extracts of 66 selected Chinese medicinal herbs were screened for their anticyanobaterial activity against Microcystis aeruginosa by the soft-agar overlayer (SAO method. Results indicated that extracts from 16 materials could inhibit the growth of this bacterial species. Among these anticyanobacterial samples, eight extracts showed low minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC, including four extracts with MICs between 1 and 6 mg/mL, and four extracts with MICs < 1 mg/mL which could be considered useful to prevent the outbreak of cyanobacteria before the appearance of cyanobacterial blooms. Further study showed that three extracts with MIC values < 1 mg/mL induced intensive chlorophyll-a lysis within 7 days at the MIC. The results suggested that highly efficient anticyanobacterial compounds must be involved in the inhibitory activities. The final results indicated these three extracts (from Malaphis chinensis, Cynips gallae-tinctoriae and Fructus mume had the potential to be developed as algicides due to their remarkably anticyanobacterial activities.

  17. Effect of traditional Chinese medicine formula Sinisan on chronic restraint stress-induced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: a rat study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fafeng; Ma, Chongyang; Wang, Xueqian; Zhai, Changming; Wang, Guoli; Xu, Xiaolin; Mu, Jie; Li, Changxiang; Wang, Zisong; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Yue, Wenchao; Du, Xin; Lian, Yajun; Zhu, Wenxiang; Yin, Xiangjun; Wei, Zhen; Song, Wenjie; Wang, Qingguo

    2017-04-07

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents one of the most common forms of liver disease worldwide, and it is always regarded as a consequence of a sedentary, food-abundant lifestyle, sitting for an extended time, and a low physical activity level, which often coincide with chronic and long-lasting psychological stress. A Chinese medicine Sinisan (SNS) may be a potential formula for treating this kind of disease. In this study, a long-term chronic restraint stress protocol was used to investigate the mechanism underlying stress-induced NALFD. To investigate the effect of SNS treatment on stress-induced NAFLD, we measured the liver and serum values of total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), liver free fatty acids (FFA), low-density lipoprotein, superoxide dismutase, tumor necrosis factor-α, malondialdehyde, interleukin (IL)-6, and serum values of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and alkaline phosphatase. Results are shown as a mean ± standard deviation. Significant differences between the groups were evaluated using the Student t-test. For multiple comparisons, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used. If the results of ANOVA indicated significant differences, post hoc analysis was performed with the Tukey test or Dunnett test, and p stress led to steatosis and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Additionally, SNS treatment significantly increased body weight gain (p stress may be a significant risk factor of NAFLD. Furthermore, the traditional Chinese medicine formula SNS may have some beneficial effect in antagonizing psychological stress and stress-related NAFLD.

  18. Fast HPLC-MS/MS Method for Determining Penicillin Antibiotics in Infant Formulas Using Molecularly Imprinted Solid-Phase Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Díaz-Bao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The dairy cattle may suffer from different infections relatively often, but the inflammation of the mammary gland is very important to the farmer. These infections are frequently treated with penicillin antimicrobial drugs. However, their use may result in the presence of residues in animal products, such as milk powder and/or infant formulas, and it represents a potential risk for consumers. To monitor this, the EU has defined safe maximum residue limits (MRLs through Commission Regulation (EU number 37/2010. Although LC-MS is a trustful option for confirmation and quantification of antibiotics, the analysis of real samples with complex matrices frequently implies previous clean-up steps. In this work, precipitation polymerization has been used and different molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP sorbents were tested and optimized for the fast and simultaneous solid-phase extraction (MISPE of eight common penicillins (ampicillin, amoxicillin, oxacillin, penicillin G, penicillin V, cloxacillin, dicloxacillin, and nafcillin. The extracts were analyzed using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS and the applicability of these polymers as sorbents for the extraction of penicillins at MRL levels in milk powder (infant formulas was proved. The limits of detection and quantification were below the legal tolerances, except for LOQ for oxacillin and cloxacillin.

  19. Combination of counterpropagation artificial neural networks and antioxidant activities for comprehensive evaluation of associated-extraction efficiency of various cyclodextrins in the traditional Chinese formula Xue-Zhi-Ning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lili; Yang, Jianwen; Wang, Meng; Zhang, Huijie; Liu, Yanan; Ren, Xiaoliang; Qi, Aidi

    2015-11-10

    Xue-Zhi-Ning (XZN) is a widely used traditional Chinese medicine formula to treat hyperlipidemia. Recently, cyclodextrins (CDs) have been extensively used to minimize problems relative to medicine bioavailability, such as low solubility and poor stability. The objective of this study was to determine the associated-extraction efficiency of various CDs in XZN. Three various type CDs were evaluated, including native CDs (α-CD, β-CD), hydrophilic CD derivatives (HP-β-CD and Me-β-CD), and ionic CD derivatives (SBE-β-CD and CM-β-CD). An ultra high-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) fingerprint was applied to determine the components in CD extracts and original aqueous extract (OAE). A counterpropagation artificial neural network (CP-ANN) was used to analyze the components in different extracts and compare the selective extraction of various CDs. Extraction efficiencies of the various CDs in terms of extracted components follow the ranking, ionic CD derivatives>hydrophilic CD derivatives>native CDs>OAE. Besides, different types of CDs have their own selective extraction and ionic CD derivatives present the strongest associated-extraction efficiency. Antioxidant potentials of various extracts were evaluated by determining the inhibition of spontaneous, H2O2-induced, CCl4-induced and Fe(2+)/ascorbic acid-induced lipid peroxidation (LPO) and analyzing the scavenging capacity for DPPH and hydroxyl radicals. The order of extraction efficiencies of the various CDs relative to antioxidant activities is as follows: SBE-β-CD>CM-β-CD>HP-β-CD>Me-β-CD>β-CD>α-CD. It can be demonstrated that all of the CDs studied increase the extraction efficiency and that ionic CD derivatives (SBE-β-CD and CM-β-CD) present the highest extraction capability in terms of amount extracted and antioxidant activities of extracts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Antibacterial Activity of Medicinal Aqueous Plant Extracts against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muna Mohammed Buzayan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB remains a serious health problem in many regions of the world, and the development of resistance to antibiotics by this microbe created the need for new drugs to replace those which have lost effectiveness. This study assesses the medicinal anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis properties of natural products obtained from plants collected from Eastern Libya. In this study aqueous extracts of nine different plants were assayed for their Mycobacterium tuberculosis inhibitory activity using the BACTEC MGIT960 susceptibility test method. The aqueous extracts of Ceratonia siliqua L, Helichrysum stoechas (L. Moench and Thymus algeriensis did not show any activity against M. tuberculosis in different concentrations. The aqueous extract of Marrubium vulgare L. from Syria showed high activity against M. tuberculosis. Marrubium alysson L., Marrubium vulgare L., Pistacia lentiscus L, Quercus coccifera L, Thymus capitatus (L. Hoffm. & Link, showed varying degrees of activity against M. tuberculosis. The results of this study show that aqueous extracts from six different medicinal plants have different effects against M. tuberculosis in vitro.

  1. [Current development of rapid high-throughout determination technology for total components of traditional Chinese medicines and formula and synthetic immunity chip method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fu-Yuan; Deng, Kai-Wen; Zeng, Jiao-Li; Dai, Ru-Wen; Dai, Ru-Wen; Xia, Zan-Shao; Liu, Weng-Long; Shi, Ji-Lian

    2012-10-01

    The qualitative and quantitative analysis on traditional Chinese medicine and formula components can be made by chemical and instrumental analysis methods. Of both, the instrumental analysis methods play a dominant role, including HPLC, HPLC-MS, HPLC-NMR, GC, GC-MS, biochemical and biological effect. But because traditional Chinese medicines and formula have complicated components, chemical methods are so unspecific that they shall be used less or with caution. While instrumental analysis methods are so specific that they are appropriate for analyzing complicated single component. The analysis techniques for multiple components of traditional Chinese medicines and formula focus on fingerprints, but all of these analysis techniques are limited by the pre-requisite of separation and the lack of general-purpose detectors and therefore being hard to realize the determination of all components of traditional Chinese medicines and formula. In the natural world, however, organisms identify native and alien components through specificity and non-specificity of clusters decided by antigens and antibodies. For example, components of traditional Chinese medicines are directly or indirectly synthesized into antigens and injected into animals, in order to generate specific antibodies and then collect cross reaction information of these components to specific antibodies. As for components without cross reaction, their contents shall be directly read out on the basis of the inhibition rate curve of competitive reaction for specificity of antigens and antibodies. Besides, a cross inhibition rate matrix shall be established first, and them a multiple regression linear equation between cross component concentration or concentration logarithm and inhibition rate by labeling the immunity competitive reaction between antibodies and haptens of traditional Chinese medicine and compound components, and then solved to obtain concentration of each component. The two results are combined to

  2. Ethnopharmacological appraisal of culturally important medicinal plants and polyherbal formulas used against communicable diseases in Rodrigues Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoisy, Anne Kathie; Mahomoodally, Fawzi

    2016-12-24

    The tropical island of Rodrigues is one of three islands that constitute the Mascarene archipelago in the Indian Ocean. Currently considered as a biodiversity hotspot, the island has also a resilient history in the use of traditional medicine. However, there has been no ethnopharmacological study to document quantitatively such traditional practice against communicable diseases (CD), which currently accounts for 6.61% annual death and 30.7% attendances in public hospitals. The aim of the present study was to collect, analyse, and document traditionally used medicinal plants (MP) and polyherbal formulas from key informants and traditional medicine practitioners (TMP) in Rodrigues to treat and/or manage common CD. Data was collected via face-to-face interviews with MP users (n=113) and TMP (n=9) from 17 key sites. Seven quantitative ethnopharmacological indices, namely family use value (FUV), use value (UV), informant agreement ratio (IAR), relative frequency of citation (RFC), fidelity level (FL), relative importance (RI), and ethnobotanicity index (EI) were calculated. Ninety-seven plants belonging to 49 families were recorded to be in common use as monotherapy (80 plants) and/or as part of polyherbal preparation (23 plants) for the treatment and/or management of 16 different CD. Thirteen MPs were found to have a maximum FL of 100% for CD. The highest IAR (0.98) was observed for diseases of the eye and adnexa and skin and subcutaneous tissue. The highest FUV was for Arecaceae. Ayapana triplinervis (Vahl) R.M. king et H.Rob. scored the highest UV (UV=2.72). Seven endemic medicinal plants have been recorded to be employed in cultural rituals for the management of common CDs, whereas 14 polyherbal preparations were used to treat and/or manage 6 different types of CDs. Side effects were also reported following use of some these medicinal plants. Given the dearth of updated information on traditional medicine from Rodrigues, this work has provided an

  3. Systems-Pharmacology Dissection of Traditional Chinese Medicine Compound Saffron Formula Reveals Multi-scale Treatment Strategy for Cardiovascular Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianling; Mu, Jiexin; Zheng, Chunli; Chen, Xuetong; Guo, Zihu; Huang, Chao; Fu, Yingxue; Tian, Guihua; Shang, Hongcai; Wang, Yonghua

    2016-01-27

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) have been regarding as "the world's first killer" of human beings in recent years owing to the striking morbidity and mortality, the involved molecular mechanisms are extremely complex and remain unclear. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) adheres to the aim of combating complex diseases from an integrative and holistic point of view, which has shown effectiveness in CVDs therapy. However, system-level understanding of such a mechanism of multi-scale treatment strategy for CVDs is still difficult. Here, we developed a system pharmacology approach with the purpose of revealing the underlying molecular mechanisms exemplified by a famous compound saffron formula (CSF) in treating CVDs. First, by systems ADME analysis combined with drug targeting process, 103 potential active components and their corresponding 219 direct targets were retrieved and some key interactions were further experimentally validated. Based on this, the network relationships among active components, targets and diseases were further built to uncover the pharmacological actions of the drug. Finally, a "CVDs pathway" consisted of several regulatory modules was incorporated to dissect the therapeutic effects of CSF in different pathological features-relevant biological processes. All this demonstrates CSF has multi-scale curative activity in regulating CVD-related biological processes, which provides a new potential way for modern medicine in the treatment of complex diseases.

  4. Prospective bacterial quorum sensing inhibitors from Indian medicinal plant extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwary, B K; Ghosh, R; Moktan, S; Ranjan, V K; Dey, P; Choudhury, D; Dutta, S; Deb, D; Das, A P; Chakraborty, R

    2017-07-01

    As virulence of many pathogenic bacteria is regulated by the phenomenon of quorum sensing (QS), the present study aimed to find the QS-inhibiting (QS-I) property (if any) in 61 Indian medicinal plants. The presence of QS-I compound in the leaf extract was evaluated by its ability to inhibit production of pigment in Chromobacterium violaceum MTCC 2656 (violacein) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa MTCC 2297 (pyocyanin) or swarming of P. aeruginosa MTCC 2297. Extracts of three plants, Astilbe rivularis, Fragaria nubicola and Osbeckia nepalensis, have shown a dose-dependent inhibition of violacein production with no negative effect on bacterial growth. Inhibition of pyocyanin pigment production and swarming motility in P. aeruginosa MTCC 2297 was also shown. Based on the results obtained by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) and thin-layer chromatography-direct bioautography (TLC-DB), it was concluded that triterpenes and flavonoid compounds found in the three plant extracts could have QS-I activity. A novel alternative prospect to prevent bacterial infections without inhibiting the growth is to apply chemicals that inhibit quorum sensing mechanism of the pathogens. Antiquorum property of 61 medicinal plants was evaluated by the ability of their leaf extract(s) to inhibit production of pigment (violacein in Chromobacterium violaceum MTCC 2656, pyocyanin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa MTCC 2297) or swarming in P. aeruginosa MTCC 2297. The most prospective plants (for the development of quorum sensing inhibitor), showing inhibition of violacein production without affecting bacterial growth, were Astilbe rivularis, Fragaria nubicola and Osbeckia nepalensis. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. Verification of the formulation and efficacy of Danggui Buxue Tang (a decoction of Radix Astragali and Radix Angelicae Sinensis: an exemplifying systematic approach to revealing the complexity of Chinese herbal medicine formulae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Winnie

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This article exemplifies a systematic approach to revealing the complexity of Chinese herbal medicine formulae through three levels of scientific research: standardization of herbs, verification of ancient formulae and mechanism studies. We use Danggui Buxue Tang (DBT as an example for this approach. Among thousands of traditional Chinese medicine herbal formulae, almost all of which consist of multiple herbs, DBT is one of the simplest. Containing only two herbs, namely Radix Astragali (RA and Radix Angelicae Sinensis (RAS, DBT is traditionally used to treat ailments in women. The weight ratio of RA to RAS in DBT was prescribed to be 5:1 as early as in 1247 AD. In addition to advanced chemical analysis of herbal constituents, DNA genotyping techniques have been developed for reliable standardization of RA and RAS. Chemical evaluation shows that main active constituents in DBT, including astragaloside IV, calycosin, formononetin and ferulic acid, were most abundant after extraction at the RA to RAS ratio of 5:1, whereas other tested RA to RAS ratios only gave sub-optimal levels of the active constituents. Biological evaluation indicates that bioactivities of DBT, e.g. immuno-modulatory, oesteotropic and estrogenic effects are also best exerted at the RA to RAS ratio of 5:1. Correlation analysis demonstrates statistically significant relationship between the tested chemical constituents and tested bioactivities. Up- and down-regulation of expression of some genes as potential biomarkers has been detected by using gene chip technology. This systematic approach on the basis of herbal standardization, chemical and biological verification and mechanism studies, as exemplified in this article, will be useful to reveal the complexity of not only DBT but also other Chinese medicine herbal formulae.

  6. Antibacterial activity of medicinal herb extracts against Salmonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mi-Hyang; Kwon, Hyun Ae; Kwon, Dong-Yeul; Park, Hyun; Sohn, Dong-Hwan; Kim, Youn-Chul; Eo, Seong-Kug; Kang, Ho-Young; Kim, Sam-Woong; Lee, John Hwa

    2006-10-01

    The therapeutic potentials of twenty-two medicinal herb species traditionally used in Korea to treat gastrointestinal infections were evaluated for the treatment of salmonellosis. Candidates were primarily screened using the disk-agar method for antibacterial activity against three different Salmonella serotypes. Of the herbs tested, the aqueous and methanolic extracts of Schizandrae Fructus exhibited antibacterial activity against all three Salmonella. The extracts of this herb were further tested against 13 additional Salmonella strains of 6 different serotypes. All of these strains were also affected by these extracts, though the methanolic extract had slightly higher activity. The MIC values of this extract against the 16 Salmonella strains varied from 15.6 to 125 microg/ml. Nine of the 16 strains tested had MIC values of damages were rarely observed in the treated mice, whereas the untreated controls showed clinical signs, e.g., lethargy, and histological damage in the kidney, liver, intestine, and spleen. We conclude that Schizandrae Fructus has the potential to provide an effective treatment for salmonellosis.

  7. Elucidation of Compatibility Interactions of Traditional Chinese Medicines: In Vitro Absorptions Across Caco-2 Monolayer of Coptidis Rhizoma and Euodiae Fructus in Zuojin and Fanzuojin Formulas as A Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yan-Fang; Zhou, Qi-Le; Yang, Xiu-Wei

    2017-08-01

    Traditional Chinese medicines are often combined as formulae and interact with each other. As for Coptidis Rhizoma (CR) and Euodiae Fructus (EF), the most classical compatibilities were Zuojin (ZJF) and Fanzuojin formulas (FZJF) with reverse mixture ratios and opposite effects. To compare in vitro absorption interactions between CR and EF, bidirectional transports across Caco-2 cell monolayer of extracts of two formulas and equivalent single herbs were studied. Eighteen alkaloids from CR and EF were determined by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. Parameter apparent permeability coefficient (P app ) and efflux rate (ER) values showed that most alkaloids were well or moderately absorbed and six quaternary protoberberine alkaloids from CR had obvious efflux. ZJF compatibilities reduced both P app BL→AP and ER values of three indole alkaloids, and increased ER values of two quinolone alkaloids from EF. FZJF compatibilities obviously affected the bidirectional P app values of CR alkaloids, weakened ERs of five protoberberines from CR and enlarged ERs of two quinolones from EF. Conclusions were drawn that different compatibility ratios of CR and EF led to different interactions on the in vitro absorption of alkaloids. The results may provide a good reference for interaction studies on the compatibilities of traditional Chinese medicines. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Clinical Strategy for Optimal Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) Herbal Dose Selection in Disease Therapeutics: Expert Consensus on Classic TCM Herbal Formula Dose Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Lin-Hua; He, Li-Sha; Lian, Feng-Mei; Zhen, Zhong; Ji, Hang-Yu; Xu, Li-Peng; Tong, Xiao-Lin

    2015-01-01

    The clinical therapeutics of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) constitutes a complicated process which involves theory, diagnosis, and formula prescription with specific herbal dosage. Zhang Zhong-Jing's classic work, Treatise on Febrile and Miscellaneous Diseases, has been influencing TCM practice for almost 2000 years. However, during this extended period of time in Chinese history, the Chinese weight measurement system experienced noticeable changes. This change in the weight measurement system inevitably, and perhaps even negatively, affected TCM herbal dosage determination and treatment outcome. Thus, in modern society, a full understanding of the accuracy of herbal dose selection has a critical importance in the TCM daily practice of delivering the best treatment to the patients suffering from different illnesses. In the 973 Project of the Chinese National Basic Research Program, expert consensus on classic TCM formula dose conversion has been reached based on extensive literature review and discussion on the dose-effect relationship of classic TCM formulas. One "liang" in classic TCM formulas is equivalent to 13.8 g. However, based on many TCM basic and clinical studies of variable herbal formula prescriptions and herbal drug preparations, the rule of one liang equals 13.8 g should be adjusted according to different disease conditions. Recommended by the committee on TCM formula dose-effect relationship of the China Association of Chinese Medicine and the World Federation of Chinese Medicine Societies, the following expert consensus has been reached: (i) One liang converts to 6-9 g for the severely and critically ill patients. (ii) One liang converts to 3-6 g for the patients suffering from chronic diseases. (iii) One liang converts to 1-3 g in preventive medicine. The above conversions should be used as a future TCM practice guideline. Using this recommended guideline should enhance the effectiveness of daily TCM practice.

  9. Safety, clinical, and immunologic efficacy of a Chinese herbal medicine (Food Allergy Herbal Formula-2) for food allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Julie; Jones, Stacie M; Pongracic, Jacqueline A; Song, Ying; Yang, Nan; Sicherer, Scott H; Makhija, Melanie M; Robison, Rachel G; Moshier, Erin; Godbold, James; Sampson, Hugh A; Li, Xiu-Min

    2015-10-01

    Food Allergy Herbal Formula-2 (FAHF-2) is a 9-herb formula based on traditional Chinese medicine that blocks peanut-induced anaphylaxis in a murine model. In phase I studies FAHF-2 was found to be safe and well tolerated. We sought to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of FAHF-2 as a treatment for food allergy. In this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study 68 subjects aged 12 to 45 years with allergies to peanut, tree nut, sesame, fish, and/or shellfish, which were confirmed by baseline double-blind, placebo-controlled oral food challenges (DBPCFCs), received FAHF-2 (n = 46) or placebo (n = 22). After 6 months of therapy, subjects underwent DBPCFCs. For those who demonstrated increases in the eliciting dose, a repeat DBPCFC was performed 3 months after stopping therapy. Treatment was well tolerated, with no serious adverse events. By using intent-to-treat analysis, the placebo group had a higher eliciting dose and cumulative dose (P = .05) at the end-of-treatment DBPCFC. There was no difference in the requirement for epinephrine to treat reactions (P = .55). There were no significant differences in allergen-specific IgE and IgG4 levels, cytokine production by PBMCs, or basophil activation between the active and placebo groups. In vitro immunologic studies performed on subjects' baseline PBMCs incubated with FAHF-2 and food allergen produced significantly less IL-5, greater IL-10 levels, and increased numbers of regulatory T cells than untreated cells. Notably, 44% of subjects had poor drug adherence for at least one third of the study period. FAHF-2 is a safe herbal medication for subjects with food allergy and shows favorable in vitro immunomodulatory effects; however, efficacy for improving tolerance to food allergens is not demonstrated at the dose and duration used. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Inhibition of release of inflammatory mediators in primary and cultured cells by a Chinese herbal medicine formula for allergic rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McPhee Sarah

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We demonstrated that a Chinese herbal formula, which we refer to as RCM-101, developed from a traditional Chinese medicine formula, reduced nasal and non-nasal symptoms of seasonal allergic rhinitis (SAR. The present study in primary and cultured cells was undertaken to investigate the effects of RCM-101 on the production/release of inflammatory mediators known to be involved in SAR. Methods Compound 48/80-induced histamine release was studied in rat peritoneal mast cells. Production of leukotriene B4 induced by the calcium ionophore A23187 was studied in porcine neutrophils using an HPLC assay and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated prostaglandin E2 production was studied in murine macrophage (Raw 264.7 cells by immune-enzyme assay. Expression of cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1 and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 was determined in Raw 264.7 cells, using western blotting techniques. Results RCM-101 (1–100 μg/mL produced concentration-dependent inhibition of compound 48/80-induced histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells and of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated prostaglandin E2 release from Raw 264.7 cells. Over the range 1 – 10 μg/mL, it inhibited A23187-induced leukotriene B4 production in porcine neutrophils. In addition, RCM-101 (100 μg/mL inhibited the expression of COX-2 protein but did not affect that of COX-1. Conclusion The findings indicate that RCM-101 inhibits the release and/or synthesis of histamine, leukotriene B4 and prostaglandin E2 in cultured cells. These interactions of RCM-101 with multiple inflammatory mediators are likely to be related to its ability to reduce symptoms of allergic rhinitis.

  11. Optimization of ion source extraction and transport with symbolic manipulation programs: electrostatic lenses formulas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavenago, M.

    1996-01-01

    The partly built line of the ECR ion source Alice, mainly based on electrostatic elements, needs several optimizations for different ion beam (A/q ranges from 2 to 9). Numerical codes easy to maintain and fast to execute were in demand. Beam optics codes are usually implemented as a kind of object oriented programs followed by a purposely written high level interpreter. This level was here replaced by general programs, combining symbolic and numerical capability, which therefore support different programming styles and a much finer physical description. Highly efficient linear tracking of electrostatic elements was obtained combining piecewise analytical solutions for quadratic and linear elements; some basic formulas and a sample result for Alice line are shown. Extension of elements to nonlinear case is given here, with detail for the anode lens. (author)

  12. Extract from IAEA's Resources Manual in Nuclear Medicine - Part 2. - Human Resources Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The Nuclear Medicine Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency is now engaged in finalizing a reference manual in nuclear medicine, entitled, 'Resources Manual in Nuclear Medicine'. Several renowned professionals from all over the world, from virtually all fields of nuclear medicine have contributed to this manual. The World Journal of Nuclear Medicine will publish a series of extracts from this manual as previews. This is the second extract from the Resources Manual, Part-2 of the chapter on Human Resources Development. (author)

  13. An Integrated Strategy for Global Qualitative and Quantitative Profiling of Traditional Chinese Medicine Formulas: Baoyuan Decoction as a Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaoli; Guo, Xiaoyu; Song, Yuelin; Qiao, Lirui; Wang, Wenguang; Zhao, Mingbo; Tu, Pengfei; Jiang, Yong

    2016-12-01

    Clarification of the chemical composition of traditional Chinese medicine formulas (TCMFs) is a challenge due to the variety of structures and the complexity of plant matrices. Herein, an integrated strategy was developed by hyphenating ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC), quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-TOF), hybrid triple quadrupole-linear ion trap mass spectrometry (Qtrap-MS), and the novel post-acquisition data processing software UNIFI to achieve automatic, rapid, accurate, and comprehensive qualitative and quantitative analysis of the chemical components in TCMFs. As a proof-of-concept, the chemical profiling of Baoyuan decoction (BYD), which is an ancient TCMF that is clinically used for the treatment of coronary heart disease that consists of Ginseng Radix et Rhizoma, Astragali Radix, Glycyrrhizae Radix et Rhizoma Praeparata Cum Melle, and Cinnamomi Cortex, was performed. As many as 236 compounds were plausibly or unambiguously identified, and 175 compounds were quantified or relatively quantified by the scheduled multiple reaction monitoring (sMRM) method. The findings demonstrate that the strategy integrating the rapidity of UNIFI software, the efficiency of UPLC, the accuracy of Q-TOF-MS, and the sensitivity and quantitation ability of Qtrap-MS provides a method for the efficient and comprehensive chemome characterization and quality control of complex TCMFs.

  14. Chinese Medicinal Formula (MHGWT for Relieving Diabetic Neuropathic Pain: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-I Tsai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the effects of modified Hungqi Guizhi Wuwu Tang (MHGWT, a formula that comprises Chinese medicinal herbs, in relieving neuropathic pain in diabetics. Method. Between March 2008 and April 2009, 112 participants were randomly assigned to either the MHGWT group, whose members received MHGWT (n=56, or the control group, whose members received a placebo (n=56. Diabetic neuropathic pain (DNP was rated using the 15-item Short-Form Brief Pain Inventory (SF-BPI, the 17-item Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ, the 13-item Modified Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument (MMNSI, and the 36-item “SF-36.” Nerve conduction studies (NCSs were performed before and after treatment. Results. After 12 weeks of treatment, the SF-MPQ and SF-BPI scores of the MHGWT group were significantly (P0.05 reduced, and no significant difference in NCS level was observed between the groups (P>0.05. Conclusions. MHGWT shows promise in relieving DNP and deserves further investigation.

  15. Extracts of medicinal plants as functional beer additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević Sofija

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is based on determining the level of the antioxidant activity of beer, to which sensory acceptable amounts of selected extracts of medicinal plants were added, with the aim of obtaining a beer with increased functional and new sensory features. For purposes of this study a commercial lager beer type Pils and extracts of herbal drugs: Melissae folium, Thymi herba, Juniperi fructus, Urticae radix and Lupuli strobuli, were used. Total phenols were analyzed by the method of Folin-Ciocalteu, and the antioxidant activity of samples using FRAP and DPPH test. Sensory evaluation of beer was conducted on 80 subjects, using a nine levels hedonic scale. The results showed that the content of total phenols was the highest in the beer which thyme, juniper and lemon balm were added to (384.22, 365.38 and 363.08 mg GAE/L, respectively, representing the increase of 37.09, 30.36 and 29.55% (respectively compared to the commercial lager beer. Values of antioxidant activity were correlated with the content of total phenols. The extract of lemon balm blended in the best manner with the baseline, commercial lager beer in terms of sensory acceptability. New beer, enriched with lemon balm, had a pleasant, appealing and harmonious flavor and aroma.

  16. Extraction of conformal data in critical quantum spin chains using the Koo-Saleur formula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milsted, Ashley; Vidal, Guifre

    2017-12-01

    We study the emergence of two-dimensional conformal symmetry in critical quantum spin chains on the finite circle. Our goal is to characterize the conformal field theory (CFT) describing the universality class of the corresponding quantum phase transition. As a means to this end, we propose and demonstrate automated procedures which, using only the lattice Hamiltonian H =∑jhj as an input, systematically identify the low-energy eigenstates corresponding to Virasoro primary and quasiprimary operators, and assign the remaining low-energy eigenstates to conformal towers. The energies and momenta of the primary operator states are needed to determine the primary operator scaling dimensions and conformal spins, an essential part of the conformal data that specifies the CFT. Our techniques use the action, on the low-energy eigenstates of H , of the Fourier modes Hn of the Hamiltonian density hj. The Hn were introduced as lattice representations of the Virasoro generators by Koo and Saleur [Nucl. Phys. B 426, 459 (1994), 10.1016/0550-3213(94)90018-3]. In this paper, we demonstrate that these operators can be used to extract conformal data in a nonintegrable quantum spin chain.

  17. Inorganic constituents determination in medicinal plants and their extracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francisconi, Lucilaine Silva

    2014-01-01

    Different types of therapies have been introduced as an alternative treatment to combat different types of human disorders. Among them, the use of herbal teas has been highlighted by the cost/benefit, easiness of acquisition and administration. The aim of this study was to determine the inorganic constituents, and evaluate the element concentrations of As, Ba, Br, Ca, Co, Cr, Cs, Fe, Hf, K, Mg. Mn, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, Ta, Th, Ti, U, V, Zn and Zr by neutron activation analysis; and Cd, Cu, Ni and Pb, by atomic emission spectrometry, with inductively coupled plasma source and Hg, by atomic absorption spectrometry, with cold vapor generation in medicinal plants and their extracts, whose marketing was recently regulated by National Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA). The relevance of these analyses is justified by the need of contributing to the recommendation of such plants as sources of minerals in the diet and, also, to verify if their concentrations cam pose some harm to the organism. The techniques showed adequate sensitivity in determining the concentration for most of the elements. Toxic elements were found in concentration not harmful to the human body. The results, also, allowed possible to correlate the elemental concentration in the analyzed species, by the determination the correlation coefficients and applications of cluster analysis. From these results it was confirmers in the groups of elements, regarding the variation of the concentrations observed in some plants and their extracts. The elements that play important roles in the human metabolism were determined in concentrations that can help both, to avoid the lack of these elements in the organisms, from the diet, and in treatment of disease. (author)

  18. Effects of gamma irradiation on microbial contamination and extraction yields of Korean medicinal herbs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi-Jung; Yook, Hong-Sun; Byun, Myung-Woo

    2000-01-01

    Effects of gamma irradiation on hygienic quality and extraction yields in twenty-one kinds of Korean medicinal herbs were investigated. Gamma irradiation at 5-10 kGy inactivated contaminating microorganisms. The total extraction yield in fifteen kinds of the investigated medicinal herbs increased by 5-25% by a dose of 10 kGy. (author)

  19. The Discovery of a Potential Antimicrobial Agent: the Novel Compound Natural Medicinal Plant Fermentation Extracts against Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Mingzhu; Wang, Xirui; Mao, Canquan; Yao, Wei

    2018-01-01

    Natural medicinal plants and their extracts are important sources of antimicrobial drug development. In this study, we reported an ancient formula of Chinese folk medicine, the compound natural medicinal plant fermentation extracts (CNMPFE) for its antimicrobial effects. The effects and mechanisms of CNMPFE on C. albicans were studied by cell damage experiments including antimicrobial kinetics, fungal growth curve, alkaline phosphatase (AKP) activity, ultraviolet absorption, electric conductivity and the evaluation of cellular ultra microstructure. The results showed that the minimal inhibitory concentration and minimum fungicidal concentration of CNMPFE against C. albicans were 75% (vol/vol) and 80% (vol/vol) respectively. The inhibition of CNMPFE for C. albicans was dose and time dependent, based on increasing of the AKP activities and the ultraviolet absorptions and the electric conductivities of the fungal solutions, it may exert its antifungal properties by disrupting the structure of cell wall and the cell membrane integrity and their permeability, subsequently resulting in cell death. Taken together, these findings suggest that CNMPFE may be a promising drug candidate for the treatment of fungal infections skin diseases.

  20. Using association rules mining to explore pattern of Chinese medicinal formulae (prescription) in treating and preventing breast cancer recurrence and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yanhua; Zheng, Xiao; Sit, Cindy; Loo, Wings T Y; Wang, ZhiYu; Xie, Ting; Jia, Bo; Ye, Qiaobo; Tsui, Kamchuen; Chow, Louis W C; Chen, Jianping

    2012-09-19

    Chinese herbal medicine is increasingly widely used as a complementary approach for control of breast cancer recurrence and metastasis. In this paper, we examined the implicit prescription patterns behind the Chinese medicinal formulae, so as to explore the Chinese medicinal compatibility patterns or rules in the treatment or control of breast cancer recurrence and metastasis. This study was based on the herbs recorded in Pharmacopoeia of the People's Republic of China, and the literature sources from Chinese Journal Net and China Master Dissertations Full-text Database (1990 - 2010) to analyze the compatibility rule of the prescription. Each Chinese herb was listed according to the selected medicinal formulae and the added information was organized to establish a database. The frequency and the association rules of the prescription patterns were analyzed using the SPSS Clenmentine Data Mining System. An initial statistical analysis was carried out to categorize the herbs according to their medicinal types and dosage, natures, flavors, channel tropism, and functions. Based on the categorization, the frequencies of occurrence were computed. The main prescriptive features from the selected formulae of the mining data are: (1) warm or cold herbs in the Five Properties category; sweet or bitter herbs in the Five Flavors category and with affinity to the liver meridian are the most frequently prescribed in the 96 medicinal formulae; (2) herbs with tonifying and replenishing, blood-activating and stasis-resolving, spleen-strengthening and dampness-resolving or heat-clearing and detoxicating functions that are frequently prescribed; (3) herbs with blood-tonifying, yin-tonifying, spleen-strengthening and dampness-resolving, heat-clearing and detoxicating, and blood-activating with stasis-resolving functions that are interrelated and prescribed in combination with qi-tonifying herbs. The results indicate that there is a close relationship between recurrence and metastasis

  1. Identification of the effective constituents for anti-inflammatory activity of Ju-Zhi-Jiang-Tang, an ancient traditional Chinese medicine formula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shufang; Chen, Pinghong; Jiang, Wei; Wu, Leihong; Chen, Lulin; Fan, Xiaohui; Wang, Yi; Cheng, Yiyu

    2014-06-27

    The anti-inflammatory constituents of Ju-Zhi-Jiang-Tang (JZJT), a formula used for thousands of years in China, were identified by LC-MS and pharmacological activity evaluation. In this study, the whole extract of formula was separated into multiple components to facilitate the analytical process. To characterize their contributions to pharmacological activity of formula, activity indexes of constituents were proposed and calculated for the first time, which integrated the chemical and pharmacological information of multiple components. Among the 151 constituents detected in JZJT by LC-Q-TOF-MS and LC-IT-MS, a total number of 108 constituents were identified unambiguously or tentatively, including eighteen potential novel compounds. And, the structures of some constituents were confirmed by NMR. According to their activity indexes, polymethoxy flavones were indicated as the major active constituents responsible for the anti-inflammatory activity of JZJT. To verify the feasibility of activity indexes in predicting the active constituents, nine compounds with positive and negative index values were selected to validate their anti-inflammatory activity in vitro. The results showed that two polymethoxy flavones with higher positive index values, i.e., nobiletin and tangeretin can significantly exert anti-inflammatory effects, while other compounds with negative values did not show any activity. In conclusion, our results indicated the proposed approach might be an efficient and rapid way to identify active constituents of TCM formulae. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Extraction of GBH Film Medicine and Influence on Quality Evaluation of The Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Y. B.; Lu, L.; Ru, X.; Guo, S. Z.; Qiao, A. N.; Wang, S. W.

    2017-12-01

    To know the extraction effects of GBH film medicine and the influence on film quality evaluation. Ultrasonic extraction and reflux extraction were used to extract the two methods with the traditional water decocting method to contrast. They were used to determining the content of total flavonoids. The same method was used to separate the root of the main medicinal herbs and the decoction of the water decoction of the other drug powder. They were used to determine the content of total flavonoids. The effect of extraction method on the preparation of membrane was investigated. The membrane preparation, evaluation and flexibility, respectively, film-forming property, smoothness and disintegration time are used to evaluating separately the effect of extraction method. The results showed that the extraction effect of 70% ethanol concentration of total flavonoids. The best extraction method had no effect on the film quality initial evaluation. This experiment provides a method for membrane extraction agent, has a certain practical significance.

  3. Clinical Evaluation of a New-Formula Shampoo for Scalp Seborrheic Dermatitis Containing Extract of Rosa centifolia Petals and Epigallocatechin Gallate: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yu Ri; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Shin, Hong-Ju; Choe, Yong Beom; Ahn, Kyu Joong; Lee, Yang Won

    2014-12-01

    Scalp seborrheic dermatitis is a chronic type of inflammatory dermatosis that is associated with sebum secretion and proliferation of Malassezia species. Ketoconazole or zinc-pyrithione shampoos are common treatments for scalp seborrheic dermatitis. However, shampoos comprising different compounds are required to provide patients with a wider range of treatment options. This study was designed to evaluate a new-formula shampoo that contains natural ingredients-including extract of Rosa centifolia petals and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG)-that exert antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and sebum secretion inhibitory effects, and antifungal agents for the treatment of scalp seborrheic dermatitis. Seventy-five patients were randomized into three treatment groups; new-formula shampoo, 2% ketoconazole shampoo, and 1% zinc- pyrithione shampoo. The clinical severity scores and sebum levels were assessed by the same dermatologists at baseline (week 0), and at 2 and 4 weeks after using the shampoo. User satisfaction and irritation were also assessed with the aid of a questionnaire. The efficacy of the new-formula shampoo was comparable to that of both the 1% zinc-pyrithione shampoo and the 2% ketoconazole shampoo. Furthermore, it was found to provide a more rapid response than the 1% zinc-pyrithione shampoo for mild erythema lesions and was associated with greater user satisfaction compared with the 2% ketoconazole shampoo. However, the new-formula shampoo did not exhibit the previously reported sebum inhibitory effect. Extract of R. centifolia petals or EGCG could be useful ingredients in the treatment of scalp seborrheic dermatitis.

  4. Effect of insulin in combined with Chinese medicine formulae on the serum Mg2+ and visfatin levels, maternal and infant outcome in pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Xia Liu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the effect of insulin in combined with Chinese medicine formulae on the serum Mg2+ and visfatin levels, maternal and infant outcome in pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM. Methods: A total of 108 pregnant women with GDM who were admitted in our hospital were included in the study and randomized into the observation group (n=55 and the control group (n=53. The patients in the two groups were given diet control, exercise therapy, and subcutaneous injection of insulin. On this basis, the patients in the observation group were given self-made Chinese medicine formulae, continuously for 2 weeks. The blood sugar level, and serum Mg2+ and visfatin (VF levels before treatment and before delivery in the two groups were detected. The maternal and infant outcome in the two groups was evaluated. Results: The serum HbA1c, FPG, 1 h PBG, 2 h PBG, and VF levels before delivery in the two groups were significantly reduced when compared with before treatment (P<0.05, while the serum Mg2+ level was significantly elevated when compared with before treatment (P<0.05. The improvement of the above indicators before delivery in the observation group was more significant when compared with the control group (P<0.05. The occurrence rate of cesarean section, premature delivery, gestational hypertension, fetal distress, and macrosomia in the observation group was significantly lower than that in the control group (P<0.05. Conclusions: Insulin in combined with self-made Chinese medicine formulae can effectively control the blood sugar level in pregnant women with GDM, and improve the maternal and infant outcome.

  5. Antibacterial activities of the crude ethanol extracts of medicinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-07-05

    Jul 5, 2010 ... Searches for substances with antimicrobial activity are frequent and medicinal plants have been considered interesting by some researchers since they are frequently used in popular medicine as remedies for many infectious diseases. The aim of this study was to verify the antibacterial effect of ethanol ...

  6. An in vivo analysis of the therapeutic and synergistic properties of Chinese medicinal formula Yin-Chen-Hao-Tang based on its active constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Aihua; Sun, Hui; Yuan, Ye; Sun, Wenjun; Jiao, Guozheng; Wang, Xijun

    2011-12-01

    6,7-Dimethylesculetin (D), geniposide (G) and rhein (R) are the three major active ingredients of Yin-Chen-Hao-Tang (YCHT), a famous Chinese herbal formula, which has been shown to be clinically effective for treating hepatic injury (HI) syndrome. The present study was conducted to investigate the therapeutic and synergistic effects of COC (combination of D, G and R) on HI rats by combining pharmacokinetic with biochemical analysis strategy. Plasma was analyzed by using reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) models were built to evaluate the therapeutic and synergistic effects of COC at the biochemical level. Here, we report that the COC combination could increase the plasma level, slow elimination rate, exert a more robust therapeutic effect than any one or two of the three individual compounds by hitting multiple targets in a rat model of HI. Overall, this beneficially accounts for the popular view that traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) formula usually takes multi-component to exert their therapeutic effects. We suggest that dissecting the mode of action of clinically effective formula to be capable of producing a sufficient effect at low doses. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations of the interactions of medicinal plant extracts and drugs with lipid bilayer membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopec, Wojciech; Telenius, Jelena; Khandelia, Himanshu

    2013-01-01

    Several small drugs and medicinal plant extracts, such as the Indian spice extract curcumin, have a wide range of useful pharmacological properties that cannot be ascribed to binding to a single protein target alone. The lipid bilayer membrane is thought to mediate the effects of many such molecu......Several small drugs and medicinal plant extracts, such as the Indian spice extract curcumin, have a wide range of useful pharmacological properties that cannot be ascribed to binding to a single protein target alone. The lipid bilayer membrane is thought to mediate the effects of many...

  8. Antitumor and Antiviral Activity of Colombian Medicinal Plant Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betancur-Galvis LA

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracts of nine species of plants traditionally used in Colombia for the treatment of a variety of diseases were tested in vitro for their potential antitumor (cytotoxicity and antiherpetic activity. MTT (Tetrazolium blue and Neutral Red colorimetric assays were used to evaluate the reduction of viability of cell cultures in presence and absence of the extracts. MTT was also used to evaluate the effects of the extracts on the lytic activity of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2. The 50% cytotoxic concentration (CC50 and the 50% inhibitory concentration of the viral effect (EC50 for each extract were calculated by linear regression analysis. Extracts from Annona muricata, A. cherimolia and Rollinia membranacea, known for their cytotoxicity were used as positive controls. Likewise, acyclovir and heparin were used as positive controls of antiherpetic activity. Methanolic extract from Annona sp. on HEp-2 cells presented a CC50 value at 72 hr of 49.6x103mg/ml. Neither of the other extracts examined showed a significant cytotoxicity. The aqueous extract from Beta vulgaris, the ethanol extract from Callisia grasilis and the methanol extract Annona sp. showed some antiherpetic activity with acceptable therapeutic indexes (the ratio of CC50 to EC50. These species are good candidates for further activity-monitored fractionation to identify active principles.

  9. Effect of certain medicinal plants extracts on some pathogenic microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attia, S.H.

    2002-01-01

    A queous, alcoholic and active ingredients extracts of karkatde, tamarind and licorice showed different inhibitory effects on the growth of some pathogenic srains. Active ingredients wwere the most effective on bacterial strains than alcoholic and aqueous extracts. Extracts of karkade and tamarind were more effective on diplococcus sp. and pseudomonas aeruginosa, respectively than other bacterial strains under investigation and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) were 2 mu1/6 mm diameter disc. The extracts of karkade, tamarind and licorice increased the mycelial dry weight of aspergillus flavus by increasing the concentration of extracts in the media. Effect of extracted substances of tested plants on the ultra-structure of diplococcus sp. and p. aeruginosa and the changes in the morphological changes of A. flovus aflatoxin producer strain were studied by using electron and light microscopes, respectively. The treatment of p. aeruginosa with MIC (2 mu 1 ) of tamarined extract induced rupture of cell wall lysis of cytoplasmic ocntent. However, treatment of diplococcus sp. with 2 mu 1 of karkade extract caused patial rupture of cell wall while cell content still keeping its normal pattern. On the other hand, licorice extract stimulated germination of spores of A. Flavus.Total protein and carbohydrate contents of diplococcus sp., and p. aeruginosa decreased as a result of inhibition effect of active substance on bacterial cells. While, in A. flavus, it increased as a result of the stimulation effect of licorice extract on fungal spores

  10. Screening of radical scavenging activity of some medicinal and aromatic plant extracts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miliauskas, G.; Venskutonis, R.P.; Beek, van T.A.

    2004-01-01

    Extracts of 12 medicinal and aromatic plants were investigated for their radical scavenging activity using DPPH and ABTS assays: Salvia sclarea, Salvia glutinosa, Salvia pratensis, Lavandula angustifolia, Calendula officinalis, Matricaria recutita, Echinacea purpurea, Rhaponticum carthamoides,

  11. Simultaneous molecular formula determinations of natural compounds in a plant extract using 15 T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyu Hwan; Kim, Min Sun; Baek, Sun Jong; Bae, Ik Hyun; Seo, Sang-Wan; Kim, Jongjin; Shin, Yong Kook; Lee, Yong-Moon; Kim, Hyun Sik

    2013-01-01

    Plant extracts are a reservoir of pharmacologically active substances; however, conventional analytical methods can analyze only a small portion of an extract. Here, we report a high-throughput analytical method capable of determining most phytochemicals in a plant extract and of providing their molecular formulae from a single experiment using ultra-high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (UHR ESI MS). UHR mass profiling was used to analyze natural compounds in a 70% ethanol ginseng extract, which was directly infused into a 15 T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer for less than 10 min without a separation process. The UHR FT-ICR MS yielded a mass accuracy of 0.5 ppm and a mass resolving power (m/Δm) of 1,000,000-270,000 for the range m/z 290-1,100. The mass resolution was sufficient to resolve the isotopic fine structure (IFS) of many compounds in the extract. After noise removal from 1,552 peaks, 405 compounds were detected. The molecular formulae of 123 compounds, including 33 ginsenosides, were determined using the observed IFS, exact monoisotopic mass, and exact mass difference. Liquid chromatography (LC)/FT-ICR MS of the extract was performed to compare the high-throughput performance of UHR ESI FT-ICR MS. The LC/FT-ICR MS detected only 129 compounds, including 19 ginsenosides. The result showed that UHR ESI FT-ICR MS identified three times more compounds than LC/FT-ICR MS and in a relatively shorter time. The molecular formula determination by UHR FT-ICR MS was validated by LC and tandem MS analyses of three known ginsenosides. UHR mass profiling of a plant extract by 15 T FT-ICR MS showed that multiple compounds were simultaneously detected and their molecular formulae were decisively determined by a single experiment with ultra-high mass resolution and mass accuracy. Simultaneous molecular determination of multiple natural products by UHR ESI FT-ICR MS would be a powerful method to profile a wide

  12. Antimicrobial activity of medicinal plant leaf extracts against pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atikya Farjana

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine antibacterial activity of water, oil and methanol extracts of guava (Psidium guajava, green tea (Camellia sinensis, neem (Azadirachta indica and marigold (Calendula officinalis against different species of bacteria, Pseudomonas spp., Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus (V. parahaemolyticus, Klebsiella spp., Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp. and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus. Methods: Antibacterial activity of plant extracts was measured by agar well diffusion method. Results: Boiled water extracts of guava leaf showed the largest zone of inhibition (22 mm against V. parahaemolyticus. Water extracts of green tea leaf at boiling and room temperature showed 17.5 mm and 19 mm zone of inhibitions against V. parahaemolyticus and S. aureus, respectively. Boiled water extract of neem leaf showed moderate zone of inhibition against Escherichia coli (10 mm and Klebsiella spp. (11 mm. Water and oil extracts of marigold leaf at both boiling and room temperature did not show any zone of inhibition against any of the tested microorganisms. Methanol extracts of both guava and green tea leaves showed same zone of inhibition against Pseudomonus spp. (18 mm. Methanol extract of neem leaf showed antibacterial acitivity against Klebsiella spp. (16 mm and Vibrio cholerae (14 mm and that of marigold leaf showed antimicrobial activity against S. aureus (18 mm and Klebsiella spp. (12 mm. Conclusions: The results from the study suggest that the leaves of guava, green tea, neem and marigold show anibacterial activity against different bacterial species. They could be used as alternatives to common antimicrobial agents for treatment of bacterial infections.

  13. Infant Formula

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... iron-fortified formula.Some formulas are made from soy milk instead of cow’s milk. If your baby seems ... cow’s milk, your doctor may suggest using a soy-milk formula.If you’re not breastfeeding, use infant ...

  14. Makeham's Formula

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup Jensen, Bjarne

    Makeham's formula is an actuarial formula expressing the present value of a payment stream in terms of its repayments instead of the payments themselves. The formula is largely neglected in the finance literature, but -- as this paper shows -- it has a number of useful applications in fixed income...

  15. Synthesis of silver nanoparticles using medicinal Zizyphus xylopyrus bark extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumi Maria, Babu; Devadiga, Aishwarya; Shetty Kodialbail, Vidya; Saidutta, M. B.

    2015-08-01

    In the present paper, biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using Zizyphus xylopyrus bark extract is reported. Z. xylopyrus bark extract is efficiently used for the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles. UV-Visible spectroscopy showed surface plasmon resonance peaks in the range 413-420 nm confirming the formation of silver nanoparticles. Different factors affecting the synthesis of silver nanoparticles like methodology for the preparation of extract, concentration of silver nitrate solution used for biosynthesis and initial pH of the reaction mixture were studied. The extract prepared with 10 mM AgNO3 solution by reflux extraction method at optimum initial pH of 11, resulted in higher conversion of silver ions to silver nanoparticles as compared with those prepared by open heating or ultrasonication. SEM analysis showed that the biosynthesized nanoparticles are spherical in nature and ranged from 60 to 70 nm in size. EDX suggested that the silver nanoparticles must be capped by the organic components present in the plant extract. This simple process for the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using aqueous extract of Z. xylopyrus is a green technology without the usage of hazardous and toxic solvents and chemicals and hence is environment friendly. The process has several advantages with reference to cost, compatibility for its application in medical and drug delivery, as well as for large-scale commercial production.

  16. Natural Antioxidants in Foods and Medicinal Plants: Extraction, Assessment and Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dong-Ping; Li, Ya; Meng, Xiao; Zhou, Tong; Zhou, Yue; Zheng, Jie; Zhang, Jiao-Jiao; Li, Hua-Bin

    2017-01-05

    Natural antioxidants are widely distributed in food and medicinal plants. These natural antioxidants, especially polyphenols and carotenoids, exhibit a wide range of biological effects, including anti-inflammatory, anti-aging, anti-atherosclerosis and anticancer. The effective extraction and proper assessment of antioxidants from food and medicinal plants are crucial to explore the potential antioxidant sources and promote the application in functional foods, pharmaceuticals and food additives. The present paper provides comprehensive information on the green extraction technologies of natural antioxidants, assessment of antioxidant activity at chemical and cellular based levels and their main resources from food and medicinal plants.

  17. Application of ionic liquids in the microwave-assisted extraction of polyphenolic compounds from medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Fu-You; Xiao, Xiao-Hua; Luo, Xue-Jun; Li, Gong-Ke

    2009-05-15

    Ionic liquids (ILs) solutions as solvents were successfully applied in the microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) of polyphenolic compounds from medicinal plants. ILs, its concentration and MAE conditions were investigated in order to extract polyphenolic compounds effectively from Psidium guajava Linn. (P. guajava) leaves and Smilax china (S. china) tubers. The results obtained indicated that the anions and cations of ILs had influences on the extraction of polyphenolic compounds as well as the ILs with electron-rich aromatic pi-system enhanced extraction ability. Under the optimized conditions, the extraction yields of the polyphenolic compounds were in the range of 79.5-93.8% with one-step extraction, and meanwhile the recoveries were in the range of 85.2-103% with relative standard deviations (R.S.D.s) lower than 5.6%. Compared to conventional extraction procedures, the results suggested that the proposed method was effective and alternative for the extraction of polyphenolic compounds from medicinal plants. In addition, the extraction mechanisms and the structures of samples before and after extraction were also investigated. ILs solutions as green solvents in the MAE of polyphenolic compounds from medicinal plant samples showed a great promising prospect.

  18. Antiproliferative activity of Thai medicinal plant extracts on human breast adenocarcinoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moongkarndi, Primchanien; Kosem, Nuttavut; Luanratana, Omboon; Jongsomboonkusol, Suna; Pongpan, Narongchai

    2004-06-01

    Ethanolic extracts of selected nine Thai medicinal plants were tested for antiproliferative activity against SKBR3 human breast adenocarcinoma cell line using MTT assay. Garcinia mangostana showed the most potent activity. However, all plant extracts showed activity in potential range for further investigation on cancer cells. Copyright 2004 Elsevier B.V.

  19. Spasmolytic activity of several extracts obtained from some Mexican medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-López, V; Salazar, L; Estrada, S

    2003-12-01

    A total of ten extracts from different parts of eight medicinal plants that are used in the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders, were evaluated to determine their spasmolytic action on in vitro isolated rat ileum. All extracts were less potent than papaverine, which was used as a positive control.

  20. Effects of different enzyme treatments in extraction of total folate from infant formula, baby foods and other food products prior to microbiological assay and radioassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Souza, S.C.

    1988-01-01

    Four different enzyme treatments-conjugase alone, conjugase and alpha-amylase, conjugase and Pronase reg-sign and a triple enzyme combination of conjugase, Pronase reg-sign and alpha-amylase were applied in the extraction of total folate from infant formula, baby foods and various other foods by microbiological and radioassay methods. Significant increases (P < 0.05) in measurable folate were obtained using the triple enzyme system in spinach, Camembert cheese, soy-based infant formula and cereal-based, meat-based and fruit-based infant foods over the use of conjugase alone by the microbiological method. Increases were also observed in many of the same foods using Pronase reg-sign or alpha-amylase in addition to conjugase alone. Increases obtained by microbiological assay were confirmed by radioassay in a number of foods studied

  1. Rationale for using Peltophorum africanum (Fabaceae extracts in veterinary medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.E. Bizimenyera

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Peltophorum africanum (Fabaceae is a deciduous tree widespread in southern Africa. The plant has many ethnomedical and ethnoveterinary uses. Root and bark decoctions are used to treat diarrhoea, dysentery, sore throat, wounds, back and joint pains, HIV-AIDS, venereal diseases and infertility. Pastoralists and rural farmers use the root and bark extracts to treat diarrhoea, dysentery, infertility, and to promote well-being and resistance to diseases in cattle. To evaluate these ethnobotanical leads, dried leaves, stem bark and root bark were extracted with ethanol, acetone, dichloromethane and hexane. Polyphenols in the extract were determined by the Folin-Ciocalteu method with gallic acid as standard. Qualitative antioxidant activity was screened by spraying thin layer chromatograms (TLC of the extracts with 0.2 % 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH, and quantified with Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC assay. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and total antibacterial activity (TAA were determined by serial microplate dilution for Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterococcus faecalis, with gentamicin as standard and tetrazolium violet as growth indicator. Acetone and ethanol extracted the largest quantity of material. Polyphenols concentration was 49.2% in acetone extract of the root and 3.8 % in dichloromethane extract of the leaf. Antioxidant activity of at least 5 antioxidant compounds as measured by TEAC ranged from 1.34 (ethanol extract of the root to 0.01 (hexane extract of the leaf. The total antibacterial activity (volume to which active compounds present in 1 g plant material can be diluted and still inhibit bacterial growth was 1263 mℓ/g for ethanol extract of the root against S. aureus, and 800 mℓ/g for acetone extract of the root against P. aeruginosa. There was substantial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, with MIC values of 0.08 mg/mℓ for S

  2. Evaluation studies of some medicinal plant extracts and fungicides ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alternaria is a polyphagus fungus that occurs frequently on dead and decaying organic material and is responsible for causing leaf spot disease. In Indian subcontinent, there are different varieties of plants showing antimicrobial and other medicinal properties which can be employed in plant disease management to reduce ...

  3. Antibacterial activity of medicinal plant extracts against periodontopathic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iauk, L; Lo Bue, A M; Milazzo, I; Rapisarda, A; Blandino, G

    2003-06-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the antibacterial activity of Althaea officinalis L. roots, Arnica montana L. flowers, Calendula officinalis L. flowers, Hamamelis virginiana L. leaves, Illicium verum Hook. fruits and Melissa officinalis L. leaves, against anaerobic and facultative aerobic periodontal bacteria: Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella spp., Fusobacterium nucleatum, Capnocytophaga gingivalis, Veilonella parvula, Eikenella corrodens, Peptostreptococcus micros and Actinomyces odontolyticus. The methanol extracts of H. virginiana and A. montana and, to a lesser extent, A. officinalis were shown to possess an inhibiting activity (MIC or = 2048 mg/L) against all the tested species with the exception of Prevotella sp. Illicium verum methanol extract was not very active though it had a particular good activity against E. corrodens. The results suggest the use of the alcohol extracts of H. virginiana, A. montana and A. officinalis for topical medications in periodontal prophylactics. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Activity of some Mexican medicinal plant extracts on carrageenan-induced rat paw edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meckes, M; David-Rivera, A D; Nava-Aguilar, V; Jimenez, A

    2004-07-01

    The extracts obtained from 14 plants of the Mexican medicinal flora were assessed for anti-inflammatory activity by carrageenan-induced rat paw edema model. The i.p. administration of the extracts at a dose of 400 mg/kg produced a high reduction of edema with 70% of the plant extracts. Oenothera rosea methanol extract, Sphaeralcea angustifolia chloroform extract, Acaciafarnesiana, Larrea tridentata and Rubus coriifolius methanol extracts as well as the aqueous extract of Chamaedora tepejilote were demonstrated to be particularly active against the induced hind-paw edema. Moderate inhibition of edema formation was also demonstrated with the methanol extracts of Astianthus viminalis, Brickellia paniculata, C. tepejilote and Justicia spicigera.

  5. Biosynthesis of Silver Nanoparticles Using Extracts of Mexican Medicinal Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, J. L.; Baltazar, C.; Torres, M.; Ruız, A.; Esparza, R.; Rosas, G.

    The biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using an aqueous extract of Agastache mexicana and Tecoma stans was carried out. The AgNO3 concentration and extract concentration was varied to evaluate their influence on the nanoparticles characteristics such as size and shape. Several characterization techniques were employed. UV-Vis spectroscopy revealed the surface plasmon resonance in the range of 400-500 nm. The X-Ray diffraction results showed that the nanoparticles have a face-centered cubic structure. SEM results confirmed the formation of silver nanoparticles with spherical morphologies. Finally, the antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles was evaluated against Escherichia coli bacteria.

  6. Preliminary study on the effect of medicinal mushroom extract and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mushrooms are like mannas and their water heal eye diseases. To determine if aqueous mushroom extract has an effect on ocular hypertension, 8 cats with baseline intra ocular pressure (IOP) of 14.94 ± 0.153mmHg were used in the first phase of this study. The second phase consisted of 2 groups, the experimental and ...

  7. Antimycobacterial activity of selected medicinal plants extracts from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    New drugs are highly needed to control mycobacterial infections. This study aimed at screening ethnobotanically selected plants extracted using organic solvents for their antimycobacterial activity. In vitro assays were performed on Mycobacterium smegmatis, Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette ...

  8. Modulatory effects of Thai medicinal plant extract on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lindau (1 and 100 μg/ml), significantly inhibited the IFN-y/TNF-a- induced HaCaT apoptosis, while members of the Zingiberaceae family, Curcuma longa L. and Alpinia galanga (L.) Willd, significantly enhanced apoptosis when a concentration of 100 μg/ml was used. Furthermore, the ethanolic plant extracts were found to ...

  9. Insecticidal activity of four medicinal plant powders and extracts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Powders and extracts prepared from Capsicum frutescens, Cymbopogon citratus, Moringa oleifera, Anacardium occidentale were tested for their insecticidal potential against Angoumois grain moth, Sitotroga cerealella. The powder of C. frutescens had the highest mortality rate of 100% after 2 days of application at all tested ...

  10. Chinese herbal medicine TangBi Formula treatment of patients with type 2 diabetic distal symmetric polyneuropathy disease: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, De; Huang, Wen-Jing; Meng, Xiang; Yang, Fan; Zheng, Yu-Jiao; Bao, Qi; Zhang, Mei-Zhen; Yang, Ya-Nan; Ni, Qing; Lian, Feng-Mei; Tong, Xiao-Lin

    2017-12-29

    Diabetic distal symmetric polyneuropathy (DSPN) is one of the most common microvascular complications of diabetes mellitus, and it has become a major public health problem worldwide because of its high and increasing prevalence, morbidity, and disability rate. The current medications for DSPN are not entirely satisfactory. Preliminary studies indicated that the Chinese herbal TangBi Formula may alleviate signs and symptoms and improve the velocity of nerve conduction in patients with DSPN. This study was designed to determine if Chinese herbal medicine used in combination with conventional treatment is more effective than conventional treatment alone. We are conducting a multicenter, placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trial as a means of assessing the therapeutic effects of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) treatment. A total of 188 patients will be randomized in a 1:1 ratio to a treatment group (TangBi Formula plus mecobalamin) and a control group (placebo plus mecobalamin). The test period lasts 6 months, during which all of the patients will be given standard medical care as recommended by established guidelines. The primary outcome will be development of differences in changes in clinical symptoms and signs in patients and changes in Michigan Diabetic Neuropathy Score (MDNS) between the two groups before and after treatment. The secondary outcome will be changes in nerve conduction velocity and in single clinical signs and symptoms. Safety assessments and adverse events will also be evaluated. We postulate that patients with DSPN will benefit from therapy that includes TCM. If successful, this work will provide an evidence-based complementary therapeutic approach for treatment of DSPN. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT03010241 . Registered on 2 January 2017.

  11. A CTAB Procedure Of Total Genomic DNA Extraction For Medicinal Mushrooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azhar Mohamad; Muhammad Hussaini Mohd Mustafa; Muhammad Hanif Azhari Noor; Rosnani Abdul Rashid; Hasan Hamdani Hasan Mutaat; Meswan Meskom; Mat Rasol Awang

    2014-01-01

    Medicinal mushroom is defined as mushrooms used in medicine or medical research. Isolation of intact, high-molecular-mass genomic DNA is essential for many molecular biology applications including Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), endonuclease restriction digestion, Southern blot analysis, and genomic library construction. The most important and prerequisite towards reliable molecular biology work is the total genomic DNA of a sample must be in good quality. Five freshly samples of medicinal mushroom were used in this work known as Auriculariapolytricha, Lentinus edode, Pleurotus sayorcaju, Sczhizopyllum commune and Ganodermalucidum. 5 mg of each sample were used to extraction the DNA, prepared in 3 replications and repeated twice. PCR based technique by using ISSR markers were used in checking the amplification ability of the total genomic extraction. A standard Doyle and Doyle protocol for genomic DNA extraction was modified in optimizing the total genomic DNA from the medicinal mushroom.The modification parameters were percentage of CTAB, incubation period and temperature. The results reveal that each sample required a certain combinations of time and period of incubation. Besides, percentage of CTAB in the buffer was found significant in giving a high yielding of extracted total genomic DNA. The extracted total genomic DNA from the medicinal mushroom yielded from 39.7 ng/ μl to 919.1 ng/ μl. The different yield among the samples found to be corresponded to polysaccharide content in the medicinal mushrooms. The objective of this works is to optimize total genomic DNA extraction of medicinal mushrooms towards a high quality intact genomic DNA for molecular activities. (author)

  12. Systems-Pharmacology Dissection of Traditional Chinese Medicine Compound Saffron Formula Reveals Multi-scale Treatment Strategy for Cardiovascular Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jianling; Mu, Jiexin; Zheng, Chunli; Chen, Xuetong; Guo, Zihu; Huang, Chao; Fu, Yingxue; Tian, Guihua; Shang, Hongcai; Wang, Yonghua

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) have been regarding as ?the world?s first killer? of human beings in recent years owing to the striking morbidity and mortality, the involved molecular mechanisms are extremely complex and remain unclear. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) adheres to the aim of combating complex diseases from an integrative and holistic point of view, which has shown effectiveness in CVDs therapy. However, system-level understanding of such a mechanism of multi-scale treatment s...

  13. A Single Medicine for a Disease: Simple Formula of Treasured Mirror of Eastern Medicine, It's Compilation and Succession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Imkyung; Kim, Hoyeon

    2013-08-01

    In this article, we will examine the theory and practice of encounters between oral history and narrative medicine in view of storytelling. Man is a storytelling animal. Our experience is understood, reconstructed and transmitted as a story and we can find the meaning of life through a story. Oral history is a specific practice and method of research. It refers to the process of recording interviews with people who have something to say, transcribing the record and interpretating the written text to conduct the study of the past. Therefore story is a basic tool of oral history. There has been also growing interest regarding the narrative features of medicine. Especially the illness narrative is one of the most powerful tools in this context. An illness narrative is a patient's story about his illness, including the meaning of the illness in his life. Illness as a specific event of life can only be understood through a story of patient. How can we combine oral history and narrative medicine altogether? We propose two subjects, one is 'healing' and the other is 'the social'. The goal of medicine is healing of suffered people. It is well known that storytelling has a healing effect. Conducting oral history is not only 'recovery history' but also is helping people to have a well organized memory and integrate that into his whole life story. The use of oral history as a means of empowerment should be extended referring the healing effect of medicine. On the other hand, modern medicine has a tendency to reduce the problem of health and illness as an individual one. However story of illness can reveal the dominance of modern biomedicine in the contemporary and have political implications. Oral history deals with memory. Personal memory can only be understood in the context of social and cultural backgrounds. Collective memory is necessary in building community history. Medicine should learn from oral history's social dimensions. In this context, life of KIM Hyeongyul who

  14. Antioxidant activity of medicinal plant extracts in cookies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mišan, Aleksandra; Mimica-Dukić, Neda; Sakač, Marijana; Mandić, Anamarija; Sedej, Ivana; Simurina, Olivera; Tumbas, Vesna

    2011-01-01

    The antioxidant activity of ethanolic extracts of parsley, buckthorn, mint, caraway, and their mixture "Vitalplant" was evaluated, and the potential of "Vitalplant" mixture extract to retard the process of lipid oxidation in cookies was tested. The antioxidant activity was estimated by 2 direct (ESR) and 4 indirect (spectrophotometric) tests and correlated with the total phenolic and flavonoid content. The potential of "Vitalplant" mixture extract to retard the process of lipid oxidation in cookies was measured by thiobarbituric acid (TBA)-reactive-substances assay (TBARS) and DPPH˙ (1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl) test. Significantly different (P buckthorn > "Vitalplant" > parsley > caraway. Total flavonoid content varied from 0.510% (parsley) to 2.05% ("Vitalplant"). A statistically significant correlation was found between IC(50) values on DPPH˙ and total flavonoid content of the samples (r=- 0.94, P cookies in dose-dependent manner. Supplementation of cookies with a mixture of Petroselini fructus, Frangulae cortex, Mentha piperitae folium, Carvi fructus can retard the process of lipid oxidation and elevate antioxidant activity of the final product. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  15. Extracts from IAEA's Resources Manual in Nuclear Medicine. Part-3: Establishing Nuclear Medicine Services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    In the past, consideration was given to the categories of nuclear medicine ranging from simple imaging or in-vitro laboratories, to more complex departments performing a full range of in-vitro and in-vivo procedures that are also involved in advanced clinical services, training programmes, research and development. In developing countries, nuclear medicine historically has often been an offshoot of pathology, radiology or radiotherapy services. These origins are currently changing as less radioimmunoassay is performed and fully-fledged, independent departments of nuclear medicine are being set up. The trend appears to be that all assays (radioassay or ELISA) are done in a biochemistry laboratory whereas nuclear medicine departments are involved largely in diagnostic procedures, radionuclide therapy and non-imaging in-vitro tests. The level of nuclear medicine services is categorized according to three levels of need: Level 1: Only one gamma camera is needed for imaging purposes. The radiopharmaceutical supply, physics and radiation protection services are contracted outside the centre. Other requirements include a receptionist and general secretarial assistance. A single imaging room connected to a shared reporting room should be sufficient, with a staff of one nuclear medicine physician and one technologist, with back-up. This level is appropriate for a small private practice. Level 2: This is suitable for a general hospital where there are multiple imaging rooms where in-vitro and other non-imaging studies would generally be performed as well as radionuclide therapy. Level 3: his is appropriate for an academic institution where there is a need for a comprehensive clinical nuclear medicine service, human resource development and research programmes. Radionuclide therapy for in-patients and outpatients is provided

  16. In vitro evaluation of novel antiviral activities of 60 medicinal plants extracts against hepatitis B virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbab, Ahmed Hassan; Parvez, Mohammad Khalid; Al-Dosari, Mohammed Salem; Al-Rehaily, Adnan Jathlan

    2017-07-01

    Currently, >35 Saudi Arabian medicinal plants are traditionally used for various liver disorders without a scientific rationale. This is the first experimental evaluation of the anti-hepatitis B virus (HBV) potential of the total ethanolic and sequential organic extracts of 60 candidate medicinal plants. The extracts were tested for toxicity on HepG2.2.15 cells and cytotoxicity concentration (CC 50 ) values were determined. The extracts were further investigated on HepG2.2.15 cells for anti-HBV activities by analyzing the inhibition of HBsAg and HBeAg production in the culture supernatants, and their half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC 50 ) and therapeutic index (TI) values were determined. Of the screened plants, Guiera senegalensis (dichloromethane extract, IC 50 =10.65), Pulicaria crispa (ethyl acetate extract, IC 50 =14.45), Coccinea grandis (total ethanol extract, IC 50 =31.57), Fumaria parviflora (hexane extract, IC 50 =35.44), Capparis decidua (aqueous extract, IC 50 =66.82), Corallocarpus epigeus (total ethanol extract, IC 50 =71.9), Indigofera caerulea (methanol extract, IC 50 =73.21), Abutilon figarianum (dichloromethane extract, IC 50 =99.76) and Acacia oerfota (total ethanol extract, IC 50 =101.46) demonstrated novel anti-HBV activities in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Further qualitative phytochemical analysis of the active extracts revealed the presence of alkaloids, tannins, flavonoids and saponins, which are attributed to antiviral efficacies. In conclusion, P. crispa, G. senegalensis and F. parviflora had the most promising anti-HBV potentials, including those of C. decidua , C. epigeus, A. figarianum , A. oerfota and I. caerulea with marked activities. However, a detailed phytochemical study of these extracts is essential to isolate the active principle(s) responsible for their novel anti-HBV potential.

  17. Natural Antioxidants in Foods and Medicinal Plants: Extraction, Assessment and Resources

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Dong-Ping; Li, Ya; Meng, Xiao; Zhou, Tong; Zhou, Yue; Zheng, Jie; Zhang, Jiao-Jiao; Li, Hua-Bin

    2017-01-01

    Natural antioxidants are widely distributed in food and medicinal plants. These natural antioxidants, especially polyphenols and carotenoids, exhibit a wide range of biological effects, including anti-inflammatory, anti-aging, anti-atherosclerosis and anticancer. The effective extraction and proper assessment of antioxidants from food and medicinal plants are crucial to explore the potential antioxidant sources and promote the application in functional foods, pharmaceuticals and food additive...

  18. In vitro biological evaluation of 100 selected methanol extracts from the traditional medicinal plants of Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunmei; Wang, Myeong-Hyeon

    2014-04-01

    In Asia, various medicinal plants have been used as the primary sources in the health care regimen for thousands of years. In recent decades, various studies have investigated the biological activity and potential medicinal value of the medicinal plants. In this study, 100 methanol extracts from 98 plant species were evaluated for their biological activities. The research properties, including 1,1-diphenyl-2-pic-rylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity, α-glucosidase and α-tyrosinase inhibitory effects, anti-inflammatory activity, and anticancer activity were evaluated for the selected extracts. Fifteen of the extracts scavenged more than 90% of the DPPH radical. Among the extracts, approximately 20 extracts showed a strong inhibitory effect on α-glucosidase, while most had no effect on α-tyrosinase. In addition, 52% of the extracts showed low toxicity to normal cells, and parts of the extracts exhibited high anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities on the murine macrophage cell (RAW 264.7) and human colon cancer cell (HT-29) lines, respectively. Our findings may contribute to further nutrition and pharmacological studies. Detailed investigations of the outstanding samples are currently underway.

  19. The correlation of metal content in medicinal plants and their water extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranđelović Saša S.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The quality of some medicinal plants and their water extracts from South East Serbia is determined on the basis of metal content using atomic absorption spectrometry. The two methods were used for the preparation of water extracts, to examine the impact of the preparation on the content of metals in them. Content of investigated metals in both water extracts is markedly lower then in medicinal plants, but were higher in water extract prepared by method (I, with exception of lead content. The coefficients of extraction for the observed metal can be represented in the following order: Zn > Mn > Pb > Cu > Fe. Correlation coefficients between the metal concentration in the extract and total metal content in plant material vary in the range from 0.6369 to 0.9956. This indicates need the plants to be collected and grown in the unpolluted area and to examine the metal content. The content of heavy metals in the investigated medicinal plants and their water extracts is below the maximum allowable values, so they are safe to use.

  20. Effects of a traditional Chinese medicine, Longdanxiegan formula granule, on Toll-like receptor pathway in female guinea pigs with recurrent genital herpes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Lin; Deng, Yihui; Liu, Xiaodan; Zou, Zhixiang; Mi, Lan

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of Longdanxiegan formula granule (LDXGFG), a Chinese traditional medicine on Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway in recurrent genital herpes. An experimental recurrent genital herpes model was constructed using herpes guinea pig model. The effect of LDXGFG on expression levels of TLR pathway genes were detected using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Furthermore, the dendritic cells and Langerhans cells were isolated and the TLR pathway genes of these cells were assayed after LDXGFG treatment. The result suggested two different expression patterns of TLR pathway genes in genital herpes and recurrent genital herpes, including upregulated genes and downregulated genes. TLR1, TLR4, TLR6, TLR7, TLR8, TLR9, and TLR10 showed a significant decrease while, TLR2, TLR3, and TLR5 increased in genital herpes and recurrent genital herpes guinea pigs. Meanwhile, the downregulated genes in genital herpes and recurrent genital herpes were stimulated by LDXGFG. By contrast, the upregulated genes decreased significantly after LDXGFG treatment. In both dendritic cells and Langerhans cells, the TLR pathway genes exhibited same pattern: the LDXGFG corrected the abnormal expression of TLR pathway genes. The present results suggest that LDXGFG is an alternative, inexpensive, and lasting-effect medicine for herpes simplex virus 2 infection. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Comparison of Artemisia annua bioactivities between traditional medicine and chemical extracts

    KAUST Repository

    Nageeb, Ahmed

    2014-04-04

    The present work investigates the efficacy of using Artemisia annua in traditional medicine in comparison with chemical extracts of its bioactive molecules. In addition, the effects of location (Egypt and Jericho) on the bioactivities of the plant were investigated. The results showed that water extracts of Artemisia annua from Jericho have stronger antibacterial activities than organic solvent extracts. In contrast, water and organic solvent extracts of the Artemisia annua from Egypt do not have anti-bacterial activity. Furthermore, while the methanol extract of EA displayed high anticancer affects, the water extract of Egypt and the extracts of Jericho did not show significant anticancer activity. Finally, the results showed that the methanol and water extracts of Jericho had the highest antioxidant activity, while the extracts of Egypt had none. The current results validate the scientific bases for the use of Artemisia annua in traditional medicine. In addition, our results suggest that the collection location of the Artemisia annua has an effect on its chemical composition and bioactivities. - See more at: http://www.eurekaselect.com/121416/article#sthash.2c2j9AoL.dpuf

  2. Evaluation of medicinal plant extracts against blood-sucking parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaraj, Chinnaperumal; Rahuman, Abdul Abdul; Bagavan, Asokan; Elango, Gandhi; Rajakumar, Govindasamy; Zahir, Abdul Abduz; Marimuthu, Sampath; Santhoshkumar, Thirunavukkarasu; Jayaseelan, Chidambaram

    2010-05-01

    The present study was based on assessments of the antiparasitic activities to determine the efficacies of acetone, chloroform, ethyl acetate, hexane, and methanol dried leaf, flower, and seed extracts of Cassia auriculata L., Rhinacanthus nasutus KURZ., Solanum torvum Swartz, Terminalia chebula Retz., and Vitex negundo Linn. were tested against larvae of cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus Canestrini, 1887 (Acari: Ixodidae), adult of Haemaphysalis bispinosa Neumann, 1897 (Acarina: Ixodidae), hematophagous fly Hippobosca maculata Leach (Diptera: Hippoboscidae), nymph of goat-lice Damalinia caprae Gurlt (Trichodectidae), and adult sheep parasite Paramphistomum cervi Zeder, 1790 (Digenea: Paramphistomatidae). All plant extracts showed moderate parasitic effects after 24 h of exposure at 3,000 ppm; however, the highest parasite mortality was found in leaf ethyl acetate, flower methanol of C. auriculata, leaf and seed methanol of S. torvum, seed acetone of T. chebula, and leaf hexane extracts of V. negundo against the larvae of R. microplus (LC(50) = 335.48, 309.21, 297.43, 414.99, 167.20, and 611.67 ppm; LC(90) = 1571.58, 1111.82, 950.98, 1243.64, 595.31, and 1875.50 ppm), the leaf and flower methanol of R. nasutus, leaf and seed methanol of S. torvum, and seed methanol extracts of T. chebula against the nymph of D. caprae (LC(50) = 119.26,143.10,164.93,140.47, and 155.98 ppm; LC(90) = 356.77, 224.08, 546.20, 479.72, and 496.06 ppm), the leaf methanol of R. nasutus, leaf and seed methanol of S.torvum, and seed acetone of T. chebula against the adult of H. bispinosa (LC(50) = 333.15, 328.98, 312.28, and 186.46 ppm; LC(90) = 1056.07, 955.39, 946.63, and 590.76 ppm), the leaf methanol of C. auriculata, the leaf and flower methanol of R. nasutus, the leaf ethyl acetate of S. torvum against the H. maculata (LC(50) = 303.36, 177.21, 204.58, and 211.41 ppm; LC(90) = 939.90, 539.39, 599.43, and 651.90 ppm), and the leaf acetone of C. auriculata, the flower methanol

  3. Inhibitory effects of sudanese medicinal plant extracts on hepatitis C virus (HCV) protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, G; Miyashiro, H; Nakamura, N; Hattori, M; Kakiuchi, N; Shimotohno, K

    2000-11-01

    One hundred fifty-two methanol and water extracts of different parts of 71 plants commonly used in Sudanese traditional medicine were screened for their inhibitory effects on hepatitis C virus (HCV) protease (PR) using in vitro assay methods. Thirty-four extracts showed significant inhibitory activity (>/=60% inhibition at 100 microg/mL). Of these, eight extracts, methanol extracts of Acacia nilotica, Boswellia carterii, Embelia schimperi, Quercus infectoria, Trachyspermum ammi and water extracts of Piper cubeba, Q. infectoria and Syzygium aromaticum, were the most active (>/=90% inhibition at 100 microg/mL). From the E. schimperi extract, two benzoquinones, embelin (I) and 5-O-methylembelin (II), were isolated and found as potent HCV-PR inhibitors with IC(50) values of 21 and 46 microM, respectively. Inhibitory activities of derivatives of I against HCV-PR as well as their effects on other serine proteases were also investigated. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Effect on cell surface hydrophobicity and susceptibility of Helicobacter pylori to medicinal plant extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annuk, H; Hirmo, S; Türi, E; Mikelsaar, M; Arak, E; Wadström, T

    1999-03-01

    Effects on aqueous extracts of medicinal plants on ten Helicobacter pylori strains were studied by the salt aggregation test to determine the possibility to modulate their cell surface hydrophobicity and by an agar diffusion assay for detection of antimicrobial activity. It was established that aqueous extracts of bearberry and cowberry leaves enhance cell aggregation of all H. pylori strains tested by the salt aggregation test, and the extract of bearberry possessed a remarkable bacteriostatic activity. Pure tannic acid showed a result similar to that of bearberry and cowberry extracts which contained a large amount of tannins. In contrast, extracts of wild camomile and pineapple-weed, which blocked aggregation of H. pylori, contained small amounts of tannins and did not reveal any antimicrobial activity. Tannic acid seems to be the component of bearberry and cowberry aqueous extracts with the highest activity to decrease cell surface hydrophobicity as well as in antibacterial activity against H. pylori.

  5. Studies on detection and analysis of proteases in leaf extract of medicinally important plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnadurai, Gandhi Shree; Krishnan, Sivakumar; Perumal, Palani

    2018-02-01

    The whole plant or the extracts obtained from them have long been used as medicine to treat various human diseases and disorders. Notably, those plants endowed with protease activity have been traditionally used as the agents for treating tumors, digestion disorders, swelling, blood coagulation, fibrinolysis and also for immune-modulation. Proteases occupy a pivotal position in enzyme based industries. Plant proteases have been increasingly exploited for pharmaceutical, food, leather and textile processing industries. Earlier investigations have focused on the occurrence of proteases in medicinally unimportant plants. Therefore it has been aimed to study the occurrence of proteolytic enzymes from medicinally important plants establish any correlation exists between protease activity and medicinal use of individual plants. Crude extract were obtained from the leaves of 80 different medicinal plants. Tris-HCl buffer was used as the extraction buffer and the supernatants obtained were used for determination of total protein and protease activity using spectrophotometric methods. Qualitative screening for the presence of protease was carried out with agar diffusion method by incorporating the substrate. SDS-PAGE was used to analyse the isoforms of protease and for determination of relative molecular mass. Relatively higher protease activities were observed in the extracts of leaves of Pongamia pinnata (Fabaceae), Wrightia tinctoria (Apocyanaceae) Acalypha indica (Euphorbiaceae), Adhatoda vasica (Acanthaceae) and Curcuma longa (Zingiberaceae). No correlation was found between the total protein content and protease activity in individual plant species. SDS-PAGE analysis indicated the presence of multiple forms of protease of higher molecular weight range in several plant species. We found a strong correlation between the protease activity and medicinal application of the plant CONCLUSION: The present study has unequivocally revealed that the leaves of medicinal plants

  6. Possibility of fighting food borne bacteria by egyptian folk medicinal herbs and spices extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayel, Ahmed A; El-Tras, Wael F

    2009-01-01

    Phytotherapy (herbal medicine) have a long-standing history in Egypt. Current study investigated the antimicrobial potentialities of twenty five herbs and spices which are widely used in folk medicine by Egyptian housewives to treat gastrointestinal disorders against seven bacterial strains, mostly food borne including pathogens. They were tested by using paper disc diffusion technique as qualitative assay and agar dilution method for determining the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of herbs extracts. Among screened plants, basil, cardamom, cinnamon, clove, lemon grass, mustard, oregano, rosemary, sage and thyme extracts exhibited notable antimicrobial activities against most of the tested strains. Cinnamon extract was the most inhibitor followed by clove, whereas extracts of chamomile, rose of Jericho, safflower and turmeric showed weak antibacterial activities against most of the tested strains. The most sensitive strain to plant extracts was B. subtilis and the most resistant strain was Ps. fluorescens. herbs and spices extracts -used in Egyptian folk medicine for treating many gastrointestinal disorders - could be successfully applied as natural antimicrobials for elimination of food borne bacteria and pathogens growth.

  7. Induction of seed germination in Orobanche spp. by extracts of traditional Chinese medicinal herbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, YongQing; Zhang, Wei; Dong, ShuQi; Ren, XiangXiang; An, Yu; Lang, Ming

    2012-03-01

    The co-evolution of Orobanche spp. and their hosts within the same environment has resulted in a high degree of adaptation and effective parasitism whereby the host releases parasite germination stimulants, which are likely to be unstable in the soil. Our objective was to investigate whether extracts from non-host plants, specifically, Chinese medicinal plants, could stimulate germination of Orobanche spp. Samples of 606 Chinese medicinal herb species were extracted with deionized water and methanol. The extracts were used to induce germination of three Orobanche species; Orobanche minor, Orobanche cumana, and Orobanche aegyptiaca. O. minor exhibited a wide range of germination responses to the various herbal extracts. O. cumana and O. aegyptiaca exhibited an intermediate germination response to the herbal extracts. O. minor, which has a narrow host spectrum, showed higher germination rates in response to different herbal extracts compared with those of O. cumana and O. aegyptiaca, which have a broader host spectrum. Methanolic extracts of many Chinese herbal species effectively stimulated seed germination among the Orobanche spp., even though they were not the typical hosts. The effective herbs represent interesting examples of potential trap crops. Different countries can also screen extracts from indigenous herbaceous plants for their ability to induce germination of Orobanche spp. seeds. The use of such species as trap plants could diminish the global soil seed bank of Orobanche.

  8. Extracts of Edible and Medicinal Plants Damage Membranes of Vibrio cholerae▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Eduardo; García, Santos; Heredia, Norma

    2010-01-01

    The use of natural compounds from plants can provide an alternative approach against food-borne pathogens. The mechanisms of action of most plant extracts with antimicrobial activity have been poorly studied. In this work, changes in membrane integrity, membrane potential, internal pH (pHin), and ATP synthesis were measured in Vibrio cholerae cells after exposure to extracts of edible and medicinal plants. A preliminary screen of methanolic, ethanolic, and aqueous extracts of medicinal and edible plants was performed. Minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) were measured for extracts showing high antimicrobial activity. Our results indicate that methanolic extracts of basil (Ocimum basilicum L.), nopal cactus (Opuntia ficus-indica var. Villanueva L.), sweet acacia (Acacia farnesiana L.), and white sagebrush (Artemisia ludoviciana Nutt.) are the most active against V. cholera, with MBCs ranging from 0.5 to 3.0 mg/ml. Using four fluorogenic techniques, we studied the membrane integrity of V. cholerae cells after exposure to these four extracts. Extracts from these plants were able to disrupt the cell membranes of V. cholerae cells, causing increased membrane permeability, a clear decrease in cytoplasmic pH, cell membrane hyperpolarization, and a decrease in cellular ATP concentration in all strains tested. These four plant extracts could be studied as future alternatives to control V. cholerae contamination in foods and the diseases associated with this microorganism. PMID:20802077

  9. Extracts of edible and medicinal plants damage membranes of Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Eduardo; García, Santos; Heredia, Norma

    2010-10-01

    The use of natural compounds from plants can provide an alternative approach against food-borne pathogens. The mechanisms of action of most plant extracts with antimicrobial activity have been poorly studied. In this work, changes in membrane integrity, membrane potential, internal pH (pH(in)), and ATP synthesis were measured in Vibrio cholerae cells after exposure to extracts of edible and medicinal plants. A preliminary screen of methanolic, ethanolic, and aqueous extracts of medicinal and edible plants was performed. Minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) were measured for extracts showing high antimicrobial activity. Our results indicate that methanolic extracts of basil (Ocimum basilicum L.), nopal cactus (Opuntia ficus-indica var. Villanueva L.), sweet acacia (Acacia farnesiana L.), and white sagebrush (Artemisia ludoviciana Nutt.) are the most active against V. cholera, with MBCs ranging from 0.5 to 3.0 mg/ml. Using four fluorogenic techniques, we studied the membrane integrity of V. cholerae cells after exposure to these four extracts. Extracts from these plants were able to disrupt the cell membranes of V. cholerae cells, causing increased membrane permeability, a clear decrease in cytoplasmic pH, cell membrane hyperpolarization, and a decrease in cellular ATP concentration in all strains tested. These four plant extracts could be studied as future alternatives to control V. cholerae contamination in foods and the diseases associated with this microorganism.

  10. Chemical profiles and pharmacological activities of Chang-Kang-Fang, a multi-herb Chinese medicinal formula, for treating irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Qian; Shi, Lei; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Luo, Yu-Hui; Wang, Yin-Yu; Li, Xue; Lu, Min; Ju, Jian-Min; Xu, Jin-Di; Kong, Ming; Zhou, Shan-Shan; Shen, Min-Qin; Li, Song-Lin

    2017-04-06

    Chang-Kang-Fang formula (CKF), a multi-herb traditional Chinese medicinal formula, has been clinically used for treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The mechanisms of CKF for treating IBS and the components that are responsible for the activities were still unknown. To investigate the chemical profiles and effects of CKF on IBS model. The chemical profiles of CKF were investigated by ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-Q/TOF-MS/MS). On colon irritation induced rat neonates IBS model, the influence of CKF on neuropeptides, including substance P (SP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), were measured by ELISA, and the effect on intestinal sensitivity was assessed based on the abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) scores. In addition, the activities of CKF against acetic acid-induced nociceptive responses and prostigmin methylsulfate triggered intestinal propulsion in mice were also evaluated. 80 components were identified or tentatively assigned from CKF, including 11 alkaloids, 20 flavanoids, 4 monoterpenoids, 9 iridoid glycoside, 9 phenylethanoid glycosides, 10 chromones, 7 organic acid, 3 coumarins, 2 triterpene and 5 other compounds. On IBS rat model, CKF was observed to reduce AWR scores and levels of SP, CGRP, VIP and 5-HT. Moreover, CKF reduced the acetic acid-induced writhing scores at all dosages and reduced the intestinal propulsion ration at dosage of 7.5 and 15.0g/kg/d. CKF could alleviate the symptoms of IBS by modulating the brain-gut axis through increasing the production of neuropeptides such as CGRP, VIP, 5-HT and SP, releasing pain and reversing disorders of intestinal propulsion. Berberine, paeoniflorin, acteoside, flavonoids and chromones may be responsible for the multi-bioactivities of CKF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Pharmaceutical analysis and clinical efficacy of Kampo medicine, maoto, extract suppository against pediatric febrile symptoms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Nobuhiro; Doi, Norio; Uemura, Tomochika; Taketani, Takeshi; Hayashi, George; Kasai, Takeshi; Kanai, Rie; Yamaguchi, Seiji; Iwamoto, Kikuo; Naora, Kohji

    2009-06-01

    A traditional Chinese herbal medicine, Kampo medicine, maoto, has been widely used in the treatment of febrile symptoms caused by viral infection. This herbal extract granule for oral use, however, is not well accepted by infants or young children due to its unpleasant taste and odor. Therefore, we prepared Kampo medicine, maoto, suppository and investigated the pharmaceutical and clinical efficacy of the suppository. Kampo medicine, maoto, granules were micro-pulverized and homogeneously dispersed into Hosco-H15 to prepare suppositories containing 0.25 to 1.0 g herbal extract by the conventional fusion method. Content of l-ephedrine, an index compound of Kampo medicine, maoto, in the extract granules and suppositories was determined by using a high performance liquid chromatographic method. Physicochemical experiments revealed that the suppository containing 0.5 g herbal extract had the most suitable melting point of 34 degrees C. Contents of l-ephedrine in the suppository were constant, 93-96% of those in the same amount of the extract granules in different three lots. Upper and lower portions of the suppository had the same content of l-ephedrine. The suppository maintained more than 95% of l-ephedrine content through 6 months at 4 degrees C, room temperature and 40 degrees C, although maldistribution of the extract constituent was observed after storage at 40 degrees C. The suppository was administered to 21 pediatric febrile patients at a dose of 1/3 to 2 full pieces depending on their body weight and physical status. Significant reduction (pchildren with viral febrile symptoms without any adverse effects.

  12. Study of aqueous extract of three medicinal plants on cell membrane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of aqueous extract of three medicinal plants, Artemisia dracunculus L, Cuminum cyminum L and Heracleum persicum Desf, which contain saponins on biological membrane. Also in this study, some of their physicochemical properties were studied. At the first step, the aqueous ...

  13. Screening of crude extracts of twelve medicinal plants and “wonder ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-09-17

    Sep 17, 2008 ... 1Department of Botany and Microbiology, Faculty of Science, University of Lagos, Akoka Lagos, Nigeria. 2Nigerian Institute of Medical Research (NIMR), Yaba, Lagos, Nigeria. Accepted 30 July, 2008. The antimicrobial activity of extracts of twelve Nigerian medicinal plant species and a “wonder cure”.

  14. Common Mechanism of Pathogenesis in Gastrointestinal Diseases Implied by Consistent Efficacy of Single Chinese Medicine Formula: A PRISMA-Compliant Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Wei; Li, Yang; Jiang, Wei; Sui, Yi; Zhao, Hai-Lu

    2015-07-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) disorders often manifest similar symptoms with overlapping clinical diagnosis and unmet medical needs. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has history-proven benefits for GI diseases; albeit language barrier prevents Western readers from accessing the original reports in Chinese. The TCM formula Si-Ni-San (SNS) consists of 4 herbs targeting on homeostatic disturbances characterized by "reflux" and "irritable" problems. Here we used SNS as a therapeutic tool to explore the common mechanisms of pathogenesis in non-neoplastic GI diseases.Data sources from PUBMED, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Wanfang databases were searched for clinical trials. Comparisons were SNS as intervention and Western conventional medicine as control, which treat patients with upper GI disorders (gastroesophageal reflux disease, peptic ulcer, chronic gastritis, duodenogastric reflux), lower GI diseases (irritable bowel syndrome, ulcerative colitis), and functional dyspepsia. Participants and studies in accordance with the Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) Statement were eligible. We used the Jadad scale to assess methodological qualities, the fixed or random-effect model to evaluate therapeutic efficacy, and the funnel plots to explore publication bias. Outcome was clinical efficacy defined by symptom relief with normal GI endoscopy, radiology, and pathology.We included 83 studies involving 7762 participants: 1708 versus 1397 of the upper GI disorders in 34 studies, 901 versus 768 of the lower GI diseases in 19 studies, 1641 versus 1348 of functional dyspepsia in 30 studies, and 328 versus 287 of relapse rate in 8 studies. Six studies had a Jadad score >2 points and the rest were <2 points. Pooled data showed significant efficacy of SNS for the upper GI disorders (odds ratio [OR] = 3.9, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.09-4.92), lower GI diseases (OR = 4.91, 95% CI = 3.71-6.51), and functional dyspepsia (N

  15. Potential Medicinal Application and Toxicity Evaluation of Extracts from Bamboo Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panee, Jun

    2015-06-01

    Bamboo plants play a significant role in traditional Asian medicine, especially in China and Japan. Biomedical investigations on the health-benefiting effects as well as toxicity of different parts and species of bamboo have been carried out worldwide since the 1960s, and documented a wide range of protective effects of bamboo-derived products, such as protection against oxidative stress, inflammation, lipotoxicity, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. Some of these products may interfere with male and female reproductive function, thyroid hormone metabolism, and hepatic xenobiotransformation enzymes. The diversity of bamboo species, parts of the plants available for medicinal use, and different extraction methods suggest that bamboo has great potential for producing a range of extracts with functional utility in medicine.

  16. [Effectiveness of aqueous extracts of aromatic and medicinal plants against tomato grey mould in Morocco].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasmi, Manal; Aourach, Mohammed; El Boukari, Mohammed; Barrijal, Said; Essalmani, Haiat

    2017-08-01

    Grey mould is a major disease threatening the Moroccan tomato; this disease is often controlled by fungicides. However, the latter are a real danger to human health and environment. Thus, this study is part of the research of harmless alternatives such extracts of aromatic and medicinal plants (Lavandula officinalis, Thymus vulgaris, Cymbopogon citratus, and Melissa officinalis). In this study, the extracts of four medicinal and aromatic plants were tested for their antifungal potency in vitro and in vivo in order to select the most effective. The results show that, in vitro, the Lavandula officinalis, Thymus vulgaris and Cymbopogon citratus aqueous extracts all possess significant antifungal activity, whereas Melissa officinalis shows the least effective. Also in vivo only the aqueous extract of Cymbopogon citratus proves most effective against B. cinerea on tomato fruit. The test of the plants confirms that aqueous extracts of Cymbopogon citratus and Thymus vulgaris are most effective, while the aqueous extracts of Melissa officinalis and Lavandula officinalis always seem to be the least effective. Therefore, the aqueous extracts of Cymbopogon citratus and Thymus vulgaris are the most envisaged for the biological control of grey mould. Copyright © 2017 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Medicinal plant extracts with efflux inhibitory activity against Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Mark I; Rahman, M Mukhlesur; Gibbons, Simon; Piddock, Laura J V

    2011-02-01

    It was hypothesised that extracts from plants that are used as herbal medicinal products contain inhibitors of efflux in Gram-negative bacteria. Extracts from 21 plants were screened by bioassay for synergy with ciprofloxacin against Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium, including mutants in which acrB and tolC had been inactivated. The most active extracts, fractions and purified compounds were further examined by minimum inhibitory concentration testing with five antibiotics for activity against Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Efflux activity was determined using the fluorescent dye Hoechst 33342. Eighty-four extracts from 21 plants, 12 fractions thereof and 2 purified molecules were analysed. Of these, 12 plant extracts showed synergy with ciprofloxacin, 2 of which had activity suggesting efflux inhibition. The most active extract, from Levisticum officinale, was fractionated and the two fractions displaying the greatest synergy with the five antibiotics were further analysed. From these two fractions, falcarindiol and the fatty acids oleic acid and linoleic acid were isolated. The fractions and compounds possessed antibacterial activity especially for mutants lacking a component of AcrAB-TolC. However, no synergism was seen with the fractions or purified molecules, suggesting that a combination of compounds is required for efflux inhibition. These data indicate that medicinal plant extracts may provide suitable lead compounds for future development and possible clinical utility as inhibitors of efflux for various Gram-negative bacteria. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  18. Identification of traditional medicinal plant extracts with novel anti-influenza activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhivya Rajasekaran

    Full Text Available The emergence of drug resistant variants of the influenza virus has led to a need to identify novel and effective antiviral agents. As an alternative to synthetic drugs, the consolidation of empirical knowledge with ethnopharmacological evidence of medicinal plants offers a novel platform for the development of antiviral drugs. The aim of this study was to identify plant extracts with proven activity against the influenza virus. Extracts of fifty medicinal plants, originating from the tropical rainforests of Borneo used as herbal medicines by traditional healers to treat flu-like symptoms, were tested against the H1N1 and H3N1 subtypes of the virus. In the initial phase, in vitro micro-inhibition assays along with cytotoxicity screening were performed on MDCK cells. Most plant extracts were found to be minimally cytotoxic, indicating that the compounds linked to an ethnomedical framework were relatively innocuous, and eleven crude extracts exhibited viral inhibition against both the strains. All extracts inhibited the enzymatic activity of viral neuraminidase and four extracts were also shown to act through the hemagglutination inhibition (HI pathway. Moreover, the samples that acted through both HI and neuraminidase inhibition (NI evidenced more than 90% reduction in virus adsorption and penetration, thereby indicating potent action in the early stages of viral replication. Concurrent studies involving Receptor Destroying Enzyme treatments of HI extracts indicated the presence of sialic acid-like component(s that could be responsible for hemagglutination inhibition. The manifestation of both modes of viral inhibition in a single extract suggests that there may be a synergistic effect implicating more than one active component. Overall, our results provide substantive support for the use of Borneo traditional plants as promising sources of novel anti-influenza drug candidates. Furthermore, the pathways involving inhibition of hemagglutination

  19. The in vitro antibacterial activity of dietary spice and medicinal herb extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Bin; Cai, Yi-Zhong; Brooks, John D; Corke, Harold

    2007-06-10

    The in vitro antibacterial activities of a total of 46 extracts from dietary spices and medicinal herbs were investigated by agar-well diffusion method against five foodborne bacteria (Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella anatum). Their total phenolic contents were also evaluated. Many herb and spice extracts contained high levels of phenolics and exhibited antibacterial activity against foodborne pathogens. Gram-positive bacteria were generally more sensitive to the tested extracts than Gram-negative ones. S. aureus was the most sensitive, while E. coli was the most resistant. There were highly positive relationships (R(2)=0.73-0.93) between antibacterial activities and phenolic content of the tested extracts against each bacterium. This suggested that the antibacterial activity of the tested extracts was closely associated with their phenolic constituents.

  20. A New Application for the Optimal Foraging Theory: The Extraction of Medicinal Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Taboada Soldati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Optimal Foraging Theory was used to identify possible patterns in bark extraction and the selective cutting of Anadenanthera colubrina (Angico, a medicinal plant. The hypotheses were built on two approaches: selection of collection place and bark exploitation occurrence in only one of these resource areas. The results suggest that the distance that must be traveled to reach each gathering site determines the extent of the extraction process, showing that people minimize the time and energy spent in A. colubrina collection. The availability of each site appears not to influence the operation. The resource amount was the optimized variable for bark extraction, which was analyzed in only one collection zone. In contrast to the phenomenon of collection place selection, the distance between angico individuals, the management period, and the tannin content did not affect bark extraction. This study also discusses how certain cultural aspects influence the extraction of angico.

  1. Total phenolics, antioxidant, antitumor, and enzyme inhibitory activity of Indian medicinal and aromatic plants extracted with different extraction methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nile, Shivraj Hariram; Nile, Arti Shivraj; Keum, Young-Soo

    2017-05-01

    The phenolic content, antioxidant, antitumor, and enzyme inhibitory activities of commonly used medicinal herbs from a Unani system of medicine were investigated using four different extraction methods. Among the plants studied, the Hyssopus officinalis L, Origanum vulgare L, and Portulaca oleracea L. extracts showed the highest amount of total phenolics (64.40, 60.35, and 58.81 mg GAE/g) and revealed significant antioxidant activities. The plants also showed a maximum cytotoxic activity as indicated by H. officinalis (82%), O. vulgare (75%), and P. oleracea (72%) showed more than 70% cytotoxicity for breast cancer cells, 82% of the cells were dead at the concentration of 500 mg/mL. The plants H. officinalis, P. oleracea, O. vulgare, and Rubia cordifolia L. revealed more than 80% inhibition towards xanthine oxidase and comprising maximum 70% of inhibition for superoxide dismutase. From results we conclude that there is a strong correlation between phenolic content, antioxidant, and enzyme inhibitory activity among these plants, indicating phenolics are the major compounds for these biological activities. Furthermore, this study provides the basis for the therapeutic importance of studied plants as latent inhibitors of oxidative stress and antitumor cell proliferation which correlate with the ethnobotanical data contained in the Unani system of medicine.

  2. Quantitative evaluation of translational medicine based on scientometric analysis and information extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yin; Diao, Tianxi; Wang, Lei

    2014-12-01

    Designed to advance the two-way translational process between basic research and clinical practice, translational medicine has become one of the most important areas in biomedicine. The quantitative evaluation of translational medicine is valuable for the decision making of global translational medical research and funding. Using the scientometric analysis and information extraction techniques, this study quantitatively analyzed the scientific articles on translational medicine. The results showed that translational medicine had significant scientific output and impact, specific core field and institute, and outstanding academic status and benefit. While it is not considered in this study, the patent data are another important indicators that should be integrated in the relevant research in the future. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Effects of Medicinal Plant Extracts and Photosensitization on Aflatoxin Producing Aspergillus flavus (Raper and Fennell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loise M. Njoki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken with an aim of exploring the effectiveness of medicinal plant extracts in the control of aflatoxin production. Antifungal properties, photosensitization, and phytochemical composition of aqueous and organic extracts of fruits from Solanum aculeastrum, bark from Syzygium cordatum, and leaves from Prunus africana, Ocimum lamiifolium, Lippia kituiensis, and Spinacia oleracea were tested. Spores from four-day-old cultures of previously identified toxigenic fungi, UONV017 and UONV003, were used. Disc diffusion and broth dilution methods were used to test the antifungal activity. The spores were suspended in 2 ml of each extract separately and treated with visible light (420 nm for varying periods. Organic extracts displayed species and concentration dependent antifungal activity. Solanum aculeastrum had the highest zones of inhibition diameters in both strains: UONV017 (mean = 18.50±0.71 mm and UONV003 (mean = 11.92±0.94 mm at 600 mg/ml. Aqueous extracts had no antifungal activity because all diameters were below 8 mm. Solanum aculeastrum had the lowest minimum inhibitory concentration at 25 mg/ml against A. flavus UONV017. All the plant extracts in combination with light reduced the viability of fungal conidia compared with the controls without light, without extracts, and without both extracts and light. Six bioactive compounds were analyzed in the plant extracts. Medicinal plant extracts in this study can control conidia viability and hence with further development can control toxigenic fungal spread.

  4. Online identification of the antioxidant constituents of traditional Chinese medicine formula Chaihu-Shu-Gan-San by LC-LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometry and microplate spectrophotometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhi-Heng; Zou, Guo-An; Preiss, Alfred; Zhang, Hong-Wu; Zou, Zhong-Mei

    2010-11-02

    Chaihu-Shu-Gan-San (CSGS), a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) formula containing seven herbal medicines, has been used in treatment of gastritis, peptic ulcer, irritable bowel syndrome and depression clinically. However, the chemical constituents in CSGS had not been studied so far. To quickly identify the chemical constituents of CSGS and to understand the chemical profiles related to antioxidant activity of CSGS, liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization hybrid linear trap quadrupole orbitrap (LC-LTQ-Orbitrap) mass spectrometry has been applied for online identification of chemical constituents in complex system, meanwhile, antioxidant profile of CSGS was investigated by the fraction collecting and microplate reading system. As a result, 33 chemical constituents in CSGS were identified. Among them, 13 components could be detected both in positive and in negative ion modes, 20 constituents were determined only in positive ion mode and 2 components were only detected in negative ion mode. Meanwhile, the potential antioxidant profile of CSGS was also characterized by combination of 96-well plate collection of elutes from HPLC analysis and microplate spectrophotometer, in which the scavenging activities of free radical produced by DPPH of each fraction could be directly investigated by the analysis of microplate reader. This study quickly screened the contribution of CSGS fractions to the antioxidant activity and online identified the corresponding active constituents. The results indicated that the combination of LC-MS(n) and 96-well plate assay system established in this paper would be a useful strategy for correlating the chemical profile of TCMs with their bioactivities without isolation and purification. Crown Copyright (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. An evaluation of the RNase H inhibitory effects of Vietnamese medicinal plant extracts and natural compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Bui Huu; Nhut, Nguyen Duy; Nhiem, Nguyen Xuan; Quang, Tran Hong; Thanh Ngan, Nguyen Thi; Thuy Luyen, Bui Thi; Huong, Tran Thu; Wilson, Jennifer; Beutler, John A; Ban, Ninh Khac; Cuong, Nguyen Manh; Kim, Young Ho

    2011-10-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a severe pandemic disease especially prevalent in poor and developing countries. Thus, developing specific, potent antiviral drugs that restrain infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), a major cause of AIDS, remains an urgent priority. This study evaluated 32 extracts and 23 compounds from Vietnamese medicinal plants for their inhibitory effects against HIV-1 ribonuclease H (RNase H) and their role in reversing the cytopathic effects of HIV. The plants were air-dried and extracted in different solvent systems to produce plant extracts. Natural compounds were obtained as previously published. Samples were screened for RNase H inhibition followed by a cytopathic assay. Data were analyzed using the Microsoft Excel. At 50 μg/mL, 11 plant extracts and five compounds inhibited over 90% of RNase H enzymatic activity. Methanol extracts from Phyllanthus reticulatus and Aglaia aphanamixis leaves inhibited RNase H activity by 99 and 98%, respectively, whereas four extracts showed modest protection against the cytopathic effects of HIV. The screening results demonstrated that the butanol (BuOH) extract of Celastrus orbiculata leaves, methanol (MeOH) extracts of Glycosmis stenocarpa stems, Eurya ciliata leaves, and especially P. reticulatus leaves showed potential RNase H inhibition and protection against the viral cytopathic effects of HIV-1. Further chemical investigations should be carried out to find the active components of these extracts and compounds as potential anti-HIV drug candidates.

  6. Antibacterial effects of medicinal plant extracts against Lactococcus garvieae, the etiological agent of rainbow trout lactococcosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Saeid Fereidouni

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Eight medicinal plants were assessed for antimicrobial activity against Lactococcus garvieae isolate obtained from diseased Oncorhynchus mykiss collected from rainbow trout fish farms in Iran. Lactococcus garvieae is among the major pathogens of a large number of fish species cultured in fresh and marine recirculating and net pen production systems. The antibacterial activity of the medicinal plants against L. garvieae was evaluated using disc diffusion, well diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration. Results showed that the extracts and essential oils had a relatively high antibacterial activity against L. garvieae. Of the plants studied, the most active extracts were those from the methanol extract of Peganum harmala, the essential oil of Satureja bachtiarica, the ethanol extract of Juglans regia and Trachyspermum copticum with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of 105, 126, 510 and 453 μg/ml, respectively. Conversly, some of the extracts such as Quercus branti Lindley and Glycyrrhiza glabra L. had lower activity against L. garvieae with MIC values of 978 and 920 μg/ml respectively. Plant extracts as natural and environment- friendly compounds can be an important source of antibacterial agents against L. garvieae. They may be used for disinfection of instruments and rainbow trout raceways or treatment of the fish.

  7. Water Extract of Juglans Regia L. And Diabetes Mellitus in Iranian Traditional Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarahroodi S.

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground and Objectives: There are many reports about the glucose lowering effects of medicinal plants in animal models. There are a some reports in Iranian traditional medicine about glucose lowering effect of septum water extract of Juglans Regia L. In the present study, effect of aqueous extract of the septum of Juglans Regia L. on plasma glucose is assessed. Methods: After preparing the water extract of Juglans Regia L. and concentrating of it the lyophilized extract, was tested in diabetic (ip injection of streptozocin and normal rats. Comparison between groups was made by analysis of variance (ANOVA and the differences between the means assessed using student’s t test. Results: In an oral glucose tolerance test (OGGT, a single oral administration of the water extract at doses of 50, 250 and 750 mg/kg body weight didn’t lowered the plasma glucose level in the normal rats. Although that insulin administration (5IU/kg caused a reduction of serum glucose(P0.005. Conclusion: These results demonstrated that the water extract of the septum of Juglans regia's fruit didn’t have a significant hypoglycemic effect in rats.Keywords: Diabetes Mellitus; Juglans Regia L.; Rat.

  8. In vitro and in vivo protocols of antimicrobial bioassay of medicinal herbal extracts: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najeeb Ullah

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial susceptibility testing against pathogenic microorganisms is the most significant task of clinical microbiology laboratory. The present study was therefore designed to review the in vitro and in vivo protocols of antimicrobial bioassays of various medicinal herbal extracts against a diversity of pathogenic microorganisms. Plants have a broad variety of antimicrobial agents which are extensively used as herbal drugs against different microbes. The review covers the antimicrobial techniques and antimicrobial bioassays of medicinal herbal extracts against different bacterial and fungal strains from 2000 onward. Plants have diverse concentrations of bioactive constituents such as alkaloids, saponins, tannins, terpenoids, steroids, carbohydrates, proteins and lipids. These phytochemicals are used against an extensive range of bacteria (Escherichia coli, Mycobacterium, Corynebacterium pervum, Bordetella pertusis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella typhi, viruses (simian-virus, retrovirus and fungi (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus flavus, Fusarium solani. A variety of antibiotics (tetracycline, terramycin, ampicillin has also been isolated from different medicinal plants. This review was therefore intended to explore the techniques used for antimicrobial activities of herbal medicinal extracts.

  9. Antibacterial activity of native California medicinal plant extracts isolated from Rhamnus californica and Umbellularia californica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Maria G; Sevigny, Mary B; Banerjee, Debashree; Fox-Cubley, Lacie

    2015-05-23

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a major threat to global public health. Medicinal plants have long been used as remedies for infectious diseases by native cultures around the world and have the potential for providing effective treatments for antibiotic-resistant infections. Rhamnus californica (Rhamnaceae) and Umbellularia californica (Lauraceae) are two indigenous California plant species historically used by Native Americans to treat skin, respiratory and gastrointestinal infections. This study aimed to assess the in vitro antimicrobial activity of methanolic extracts of leaves and bark of R. and U. californica against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and other Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Methanolic extracts of leaves and bark of R. and U. californica were prepared by soxhlet extraction and evaluated for their antimicrobial activity against Bacillus cereus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Mycobacterium smegmatis, Staphylococcus aureus, MRSA, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa using disc diffusion and minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) assays. Chemical profiling of the extracts was performed using standard methods. All extracts inhibited the growth of MRSA and other Gram-positive bacteria with MICs of 3.3-6.0 mg/ml. Gram-negative organisms were unaffected by these extracts. U. californica extracts (leaves and bark) had the lowest MIC values. Chemical profiling detected the presence of quinones, alkaloids, flavonoids, cardenolides, tannins and saponins in these extracts. Our study is the first to report the antimicrobial properties of R. and U. californica and illustrates their promising anti-MRSA potential. Our results give scientific credence to the traditional medicinal uses of these plants by the indigenous peoples of California. Further investigation of the secondary metabolites responsible for the antimicrobial activity of these extracts against MRSA is warranted.

  10. Interactions of Papua New Guinea medicinal plant extracts with antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Erica C; Hathaway, Laura B; Lamb, John G; Pond, Chris D; Rai, Prem P; Matainaho, Teatulohi K; Piskaut, Pius; Barrows, Louis R; Franklin, Michael R

    2014-09-29

    A substantial proportion of the population in Papua New Guinea (PNG) lives with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Treatment requires lifelong use of antiretroviral therapy (ART). The majority of people in PNG use traditional medicines (TM) derived from plants for all types of health promotions. Consequently, there is a concern that herb-drug interactions may impact the efficacy of ART. Herb-drug, or drug-drug, interactions occur at the level of metabolism through two major mechanisms: enzyme induction or enzyme inhibition. In this study, extracts of commonly-used medicinal plants from PNG were screened for herb-drug interactions related to cytochrome P450s (CYPs). Sixty nine methanol extracts of TM plants were screened for their ability to induce CYPs by human aryl hydrocarbon receptor- (hAhR-) and human pregnane X receptor- (hPXR-) dependent mechanisms, utilizing a commercially available cell-based luciferase reporter system. Inhibition of three major CYPs, CYP1A2, CYP3A4, and CYP2D6, was determined using human liver microsomes and enzyme-selective model substrates. Almost one third of the TM plant extracts induced the hAhR-dependent expression of CYP1A2, the hPXR-dependent expression of CYP3A4, or both. Almost two thirds inhibited CYP1A2, CYP3A4, or CYP2D6, or combinations thereof. Many plant extracts exhibited both induction and inhibition properties. We demonstrated that the potent and selective ability of extracts from PNG medicinal plants to affect drug metabolizing enzymes through induction and/or inhibition is a common phenomenon. Use of traditional medicines concomitantly with ART could dramatically alter the concentrations of antiretroviral drugs in the body; and their efficacy. PNG healthcare providers should counsel HIV patients because of this consequence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Preliminary phytochemical screening, Antibacterial potential and GC-MS analysis of two medicinal plant extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayaram, Seerangaraj; Kannan, Suruli; Saravanan, Konda Mani; Vasantharaj, Seerangaraj; Sathiyavimal, Selvam; P, Palanisamy Senthilkumar

    2016-05-01

    The presence study was aimed to catalyze the primary metabolites and their confirmation by using GC-MS analysis and antibacterial potential of leaf extract of two important medicinal plant viz., Eucalyptus and Azadirachta indica. The antibacterial potential of the methanol leaf extract of the studied species was tested against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiellap neumoniae, Streptococcus pyogens, Staphylococcus aureus using by agar well diffusion method. The higher zone of inhibition (16mm) was observed against the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa at 100μl concentration of methanol leaf extract. Preliminary phytochemical analysis of studied species shows that presence of phytochemical compounds like steroids, phenolic compounds and flavonoids. GC-MS analysis confirms the occurrence of 20 different compounds in the methanol leaf extract of the both studied species.

  12. Use of Moroccan medicinal plant extracts as botanical fungicide against citrus blue mould.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askarne, L; Talibi, I; Boubaker, H; Boudyach, E H; Msanda, F; Saadi, B; Ait Ben Aoumar, A

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to find an alternative to chemical fungicides currently used in the control of postharvest citrus fruit diseases. In this study, we screened eight Moroccan medicinal and aromatic plants extracted with petroleum ether, chloroform, ethyl acetate and methanol for their anti-fungal activity against Penicillium italicum, the causal agent of citrus blue mould. The anti-fungal activity of these extracts was tested based on the disc diffusion method. Petroleum ether extracts of Inula viscosa, Asteriscus graveolens, Bubonium odorum and Thymus leptobotrys and chloroformic extract of Anvillea radiata revealed the highest significant anti-fungal activity with inhibition zones that ranged between 25·83 and 28·33 mm in diameter. In the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) study, we observed that petroleum ether extract of I. viscosa was the most effective extract with both the significantly largest halo (27·50 mm) and the lowest MIC (1 mg ml(-1)). The most active plant extracts in in vitro studies were tested in vivo, and results indicated that solvent extracts of the selected plant species significantly decreased the incidence and severity of blue mould, after 7 and 10 days of storage at 20°C. In addition, Halimium umbellatum methanol extract and T. leptobotrys petroleum ether extract completely inhibited the development of P. italicum under both storage periods, and no phytotoxic effects were recorded on citrus fruit. This study demonstrates that plant extracts have a high potential to control blue mould of citrus and will provide a starting point for discovering new compounds with better activity than chemical fungicides currently available. Such natural products therefore represent a sustainable alternative to the use of chemical fungicides. © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. Antibacterial activity of medicinal plant extracts Atividade antibacteriana de extratos de plantas medicinais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Ikeda Ushimaru

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed at evaluating the in vitro antimicrobial activity of methanolic extracts of some medicinal plants against Escherichia coli, Salmonella Typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus sp. The methanolic extract of Caryophyllus aromaticus presented the highest anti-S. aureus activity and was effective against all bacterial strains tested.Avaliou-se a atividade antimicrobiana in vitro de extratos metanólicos de algumas plantas medicinais frente a Escherichia coli, Salmonella Typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus e Enterococcus sp. O extrato metanólico de Caryophyllus aromaticus foi o mais eficaz para todas as bactérias testadas e apresentou a melhor atividade anti-S. aureus.

  14. From classical taxonomy to genome and metabolome: towards comprehensive quality standards for medicinal herb raw materials and extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindaraghavan, Suresh; Hennell, James R; Sucher, Nikolaus J

    2012-09-01

    Fundamental to herbal medicine quality is the use of 'authentic' medicinal herb species. Species, however, 'represent more or less arbitrary and subjective man-made units'. Against this background, we discuss, with illustrative examples, the importance of defining species boundaries by accommodating both the fixed (shared) diagnostic and varying (within-species) traits in medicinal herb populations. We emphasize the role of taxonomy, floristic information and genomic profiling in authenticating medicinal herb species, in addition to the need to include within species phytochemical profile variations while developing herbal extract identification protocols. We outline the application of species-specific genomic and phytochemical markers, chemoprofiling and chemometrics as additional tools to develop qualifying herbal extract references. We list the diagnostic traits available subsequent to each step during the medicinal herb extract manufacturing process and delineate limits to qualification of extract references. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Changes in Microbial Diversity, Methanogenesis and Fermentation Characteristics in the Rumen in Response to Medicinal Plant Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Tae Kim

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the in vitro effect of medicinal plant extracts on ruminal methanogenesis, four different groups of methanogens and ruminal fermentation characteristics. A fistulated Holstein cow was used as a donor of rumen fluid. Licorice and mugwort extracts (Glycyrrhiza uralensis and Artemisia capillaris, 0.5% and 1% of total substrate DM, respectively, previously used as folk remedies, were added to an in vitro fermentation incubated with buffered-rumen fluid. Total gas production in Glycyrrhiza uralensis extract treatment was not significantly different between treatments (p<0.05 while total gas production in the Artemisia capillaris extract treatment was lower than that of the control. Artemisia capillaris extract and Glycyrrhiza uralensis extract reduced CH4 emission by 14% (p<0.05 and 8% (p<0.05, respectively. Ciliate-associated methanogens population decreased by 18% in the medicinal plant extracts treatments. Medicinal plant extracts also affected the order Methanobacteriales community. Methanobacteriales diversity decreased by 35% in the Glycyrrhiza uralensis extract treatment and 30% in the Artemisia capillaris extract treatment. The order Methanomicrobiales population decreased by 50% in the 0.5% of Glycyrrhiza uralensis extract treatment. These findings demonstrate that medicinal plant extracts have the potential to inhibit in vitro ruminal methanogenesis.

  16. Medicinal potential of Passiflora foetida L. plant extracts: biological and pharmacological activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadujjaman, Md; Mishuk, Ahmed Ullah; Hossain, Md Aslam; Karmakar, Utpal Kumar

    2014-03-01

    To investigate analgesic, antidiarrhoeal and cytotoxic activities of the ethanol extract of Passiflora foetida L. (Passifloraceae) by three experimental methods. Analgesic activity of the ethanol extract of Passiflora foetida L. (EEPF) acetic acid-induced writhing inhibition in mice. The method of castor oil-induced diarrhoea in mice was utilized to evaluate antidiarrhoeal activity. The cytotoxic activity of EEPF was explored with a brine shrimp lethality bioassay. The extract showed 68.75% and 30.00% inhibition of writhe at the doses of 500 and 250 mg/kg body weight, respectively. The extract increased the mean latent period prior to diarrhoeal onset to about 1.55 h and 1.17 h, and decreased the mean number of stools to 4.4 and 5.6 at the doses of 500 and 250 mg/kg body weight. The extract also demonstrated cytotoxic activity in the brine shrimp lethality assay, and the median lethal concentration for brine shrimp nauplii was 80 μg/mL. The results suggest that the plant extract has analgesic and antidiarrhoeal activities, supporting its uses in traditional medicine. The results also demonstrate that the plant extract possesses cytotoxic activities.

  17. Analysis of Flavonoid in Medicinal Plant Extract Using Infrared Spectroscopy and Chemometrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lestyo Wulandari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Infrared (IR spectroscopy combined with chemometrics has been developed for simple analysis of flavonoid in the medicinal plant extract. Flavonoid was extracted from medicinal plant leaves by ultrasonication and maceration. IR spectra of selected medicinal plant extract were correlated with flavonoid content using chemometrics. The chemometric method used for calibration analysis was Partial Last Square (PLS and the methods used for classification analysis were Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA, Soft Independent Modelling of Class Analogies (SIMCA, and Support Vector Machines (SVM. In this study, the calibration of NIR model that showed best calibration with R2 and RMSEC value was 0.9916499 and 2.1521897, respectively, while the accuracy of all classification models (LDA, SIMCA, and SVM was 100%. R2 and RMSEC of calibration of FTIR model were 0.8653689 and 8.8958149, respectively, while the accuracy of LDA, SIMCA, and SVM was 86.0%, 91.2%, and 77.3%, respectively. PLS and LDA of NIR models were further used to predict unknown flavonoid content in commercial samples. Using these models, the significance of flavonoid content that has been measured by NIR and UV-Vis spectrophotometry was evaluated with paired samples t-test. The flavonoid content that has been measured with both methods gave no significant difference.

  18. Screening of immunomodulatory activity of total and protein extracts of some Moroccan medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daoudi, Abdeljlil; Aarab, Lotfi; Abdel-Sattar, Essam

    2013-04-01

    Herbal and traditional medicines are being widely used in practice in many countries for their benefits of treating different ailments. A large number of plants in Morocco were used in folk medicine to treat immune-related disorders. The objective of this study is to evaluate the immunomodulatory activity of protein extracts (PEs) of 14 Moroccan medicinal plants. This activity was tested on the proliferation of immune cells. The prepared total and PEs of the plant samples were tested using MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay on the splenocytes with or without stimulation by concanavalin-A (Con-A), a mitogenic agent used as positive control. The results of this study indicated different activity spectra. Three groups of activities were observed. The first group represented by Citrullus colocynthis, Urtica dioica, Elettaria cardamomum, Capparis spinosa and Piper cubeba showed a significant immunosuppressive activity. The second group that showed a significant immunostimulatory activity was represented by Aristolochia longa, Datura stramonium, Marrubium vulgare, Sinapis nigra, Delphynium staphysagria, Lepidium sativum, Ammi visnaga and Tetraclinis articulata. The rest of the plant extracts did not alter the proliferation induced by Con-A. This result was more important for the PE than for the total extract. In conclusion, this study revealed an interesting immunomodulating action of certain PEs, which could explain their traditional use. The results of this study may also have implications in therapeutic treatment of infections, such as prophylactic and adjuvant with cancer chemotherapy.

  19. Effect of extraction solvents on polyphenols and antioxidant activity of medicinal halophytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qasim, M.; Aziz, I.; Gul, B.

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the most effective solvent for extraction of polyphenols and antioxidant activity of medicinally important coastal halophytes (Thespesia populneoides, Salvadora persica, Ipomoea pes-caprae, Suaeda fruticosa and Pluchea lanceolata) known for high antioxidant potential. Five different solvents (water, 80% methanol, 80% ethanol, acetone and chloroform) were used to quantify polyphenols including total phenolic (TPC), total flavonoid (TFC) and proanthocyanidin contents (PC) and antioxidant capacity using DPPH radical scavenging and Ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) activities. Among solvents of different polarities 80% methanol appeared most effective for polyphenol extraction. Thespesia populneoides had the highest polyphenols (TPC, TFC and PC) followed by Salvadora persica. Highest antioxidant activity was also found in T. populneoides and S. persica using the same solvent (80% methanol) which appeared better than synthetic antioxidants (BHA and BHT). The correlation analyses of each solvent showed strong to weak relationships among all studied parameters with maximum values (r and R2) in methanol followed by ethanol and water. Weaker correlation of acetone and chloroform indicates low capacity of these solvents both for polyphenol extraction and antioxidant activity. Our results reveal that aqueous methanol extracts of coastal halophytes had comparatively higher antioxidant activity than commercial antioxidants which indicate both their prospective efficacy and potential to replace synthetic derivatives from edible and medicinal products. (abstract)

  20. Lipid Oxidation Inhibitory Effects and Phenolic Composition of Aqueous Extracts from Medicinal Plants of Colombian Amazonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ignacio Ruiz-Sanz

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Diverse plants of ethnobotanic interest in Amazonia are commonly used in traditional medicine. We determined the antioxidant potential against lipid peroxidation, the antimicrobial activity, and the polyphenol composition of several Amazonian plants (Brownea rosademonte, Piper glandulosissimum, Piper krukoffii, Piper putumayoense, Solanum grandiflorum, and Vismia baccifera. Extracts from the plant leaf, bark, and stem were prepared as aqueous infusions, as used in folk medicine, and added to rat liver microsomes exposed to iron. The polyphenolic composition was detected by reverse-phase HPLC coupled to diode-array detector and MS/MS analysis. The antimicrobial activity was tested by the spot-on-a-lawn method against several indicator microorganisms. All the extracts inhibited lipid oxidation, except the P. glandulosissimum stem. The plant extracts exhibiting high antioxidant potential (V. baccifera and B. rosademonte contained high levels of flavanols (particularly, catechin and epicatechin. By contrast, S. grandiflorum leaf, which exhibited very low antioxidant activity, was rich in hydroxycinnamic acids. None of the extracts showed antimicrobial activity. This study demonstrates for the first time the presence of bioactive polyphenolic compounds in several Amazonian plants, and highlights the importance of flavanols as major phenolic contributors to antioxidant activity.

  1. The antibacterial and antifungal activity of essential oils extracted from Guatemalan medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Andrew B; Cates, Rex G; Lawrence, Michael; Soria, J Alfonso Fuentes; Espinoza, Luis V; Martinez, Jose Vicente; Arbizú, Dany A

    2015-04-01

    Essential oils are prevalent in many medicinal plants used for oral hygiene and treatment of diseases. Medicinal plant species were extracted to determine the essential oil content. Those producing sufficient oil were screened for activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus acidophilus, and Candida albicans. Plant samples were collected, frozen, and essential oils were extracted by steam distillation. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were determined using a tube dilution assay for those species yielding sufficient oil. Fifty-nine of the 141 plant species produced sufficient oil for collection and 12 species not previously reported to produce essential oils were identified. Essential oil extracts from 32 species exhibited activity against one or more microbes. Oils from eight species were highly inhibitory to S. mutans, four species were highly inhibitory to C. albicans, and 19 species yielded MIC values less than the reference drugs. RESULTS suggest that 11 species were highly inhibitory to the microbes tested and merit further investigation. Oils from Cinnamomum zeylanicum Blume (Lauraceae), Citrus aurantiifolia (Christm.) Swingle (Rutaceae), Lippia graveolens Kunth (Verbenaceae), and Origanum vulgare L. (Lamiaceae) yielded highly significant or moderate activity against all microbes and have potential as antimicrobial agents. Teas prepared by decoction or infusion are known methods for extracting essential oils. Oils from 11 species were highly active against the microbes tested and merit investigation as to their potential for addressing health-related issues and in oral hygiene.

  2. Medicinal Mushroom Extracts Possess Differential Antioxidant Activity and Cytotoxicity to Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbatrawy, Eman Nasr; Ghonimy, Eglal AbdAllah; Alassar, Mahomud Mohammed; Wu, Fang-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Many species of edible mushrooms are known to contain a wide array of compounds with high nutritional and medicinal values. However, these values vary widely among mushroom species because of the wide diversity of compounds with different solubilities to solvents used in extraction. We report here the comparison of antioxidant activity and cytotoxicity against cancer cells in extracts of Pleurotus ostreatus, P. sajor-caju, Agaricus campestris, and A. bisporus from 7 different solvents, including water, ethanol, ethyl acetate, acetone, chloroform, hexane, and petroleum ether. The extracts were analyzed for their antioxidant activities using the % DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazylhydrate) scavenging activity method. Our results revealed that the water extracts exhibited the highest % DPPH scavenging activity in comparison to all other solvent extracts. The highest value was obtained from the water extract of P. sajor-caju (78.1%), and the lowest one was from the hexane extract of A. bisporus (0.8%). In general, extracts from nonpolar solvents exhibited much lower antioxidant activities than those from polar solvents. The cytotoxic effects of these extracts were evaluated using 2 cancer cell lines of larynx carcinoma (HEp-2) and breast carcinoma (MCF-7). When added into Hep-2 cells, the hexane extracts from P. ostreatus, P. sajor-caju, A. bisporus, and A. campestris yielded the highest IC50 values of 1.7 ± 1.56, 2.1 ± 2.82, 4.4 ± 1.71, and 2.2 ± 1.34 μg/mL, respectively, in comparison to all other solvent extracts. Similar IC50 values were obtained when the MCF-2 cancer cells were tested, suggesting that hexane is the preferred solvent to extract the anticancer compounds from these mushrooms. Our results also indicated that extracts from solvents with nonpolar or intermediate polarity were more potent than those with high polarity in their cytotoxicity against cancer cells, and extracts from different mushrooms by the same solvent possessed varied degrees of

  3. Exploring optimal supplement strategy of medicinal herbs and tea extracts for bioelectricity generation in microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bor-Yann; Liao, Jia-Hui; Hsu, An-Wei; Tsai, Po-Wei; Hsueh, Chung-Chuan

    2018-05-01

    This first-attempt study used extracts of appropriate antioxidant abundant Camellia and non-Camellia tea and medicinal herbs as model ESs to stably intensify bioelectricity generation performance in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). As electron shuttles (ESs) could stimulate electron transport phenomena by significant reduction of electron transfer resistance, the efficiency of power generation for energy extraction in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) could be appreciably augmented. Using environmentally friendly natural bioresource as green bioresource of ESs is the most promising to sustainable practicability. As comparison of power-density profiles indicated, supplement of Camellia tea extracts would be the most appropriate, then followed non-Camellia Chrysanthemum tea and medicinal herbs. Antioxidant activities, total phenolic contents and power stimulating activities were all electrochemically associated. In particular, the extract of unfermented Camellia tea (i.e., green tea) was the most promising ESs to augment bioenergy extraction compared to other refreshing medicinal herb extracts. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Quantification of total and water extractable essential elements in medicinal plants used for stomach problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahito, S.R.; Kazi, T.G.; Shar, G.Q.; Mangrio, A.M; Shaikh, M.S.

    2004-01-01

    The role of elements particularly trace elements in health and disease is well known. Present study has been undertaken in our laboratories to quantify the commonly occurring elements in three medicinal plans. Peganum harmala Linn, Phyllanthus emblica Linn, Tamarix dioca used for stomach problems using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Wet digestion method has been used to extract the acid extractable metals. Samples were boiled in water to obtain water extractable metals. The validation of the method was checked with the NBS-1570 (Spinach) as Standard Reference Material. Levels of essential elements were found high as compared to concentration of toxic elements. The considerable amounts of essential such as calcium, magnesium, potassium, zinc and iron were found in all these plant samples. (author)

  5. Medicinal plant extracts modulate respiratory burst and proliferation activity of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulfon, Chiara; Galeotti, Marco; Volpatti, Donatella

    2018-02-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the immunomodulatory effects of Aloe vera, Curcuma longa, Echinacea purpurea, Lavandula officinalis, Origanum vulgare, Panax ginseng, and Rheum officinale extracts on leukocytes purified from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) head kidney. The cells were cultured in a medium containing increasing doses of extracts; afterwards, they were tested for reactive oxygen species production after stimulation with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and proliferation in the presence or absence of phytohemagglutinin from Phaseolus vulgaris (PHA-P). After a 2-h exposure, the extracts of L. officinalis, O. vulgare, and R. officinale strongly reduced the oxidative burst activity of PMA-stimulated leukocytes, in a dose-dependent manner (P ≤ 0.05). A. vera, C. longa, E. purpurea, and P. ginseng extracts reduced this response with lower efficacy and especially at lower concentrations. On the contrary, the highest concentration of ginseng extract stimulated the respiratory burst of leukocytes compared to untreated control cells. After a 72-h exposure, the extracts of L. officinalis, R. officinale, C. longa, E. purpurea, and P. ginseng had a clear dose-dependent stimulatory effect on leukocyte proliferation (P ≤ 0.05). The results suggest that these medicinal plants can be considered as reliable sources of new antioxidants or immunostimulants to be used in aquaculture.

  6. Anti-Toxoplasma activity of vegetal extracts used in West African traditional medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit-Vical F.

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Both Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium are Apicomplexan protozoa that share common metabolic pathways and potential drug targets. The objective of this study was to examine the anti- Toxoplasma activity of nine West African plants with known activity against P. falciparum. The extracts were obtained from parts of plant commonly used, by most traditional healers, in the form of infusion or as water decoction. The in vitro activity of plant extracts on T. gondii was assessed on MRC5 tissue cultures and was quantified by enzyme-linked immunoassay. Aqueous extracts from Vernonia colorata were found to be inhibitory for Toxoplasma growth at concentrations > 10 mg/L, with an IC50 of 16.3 mg/L. A ten-fold gain in activity was obtained when organic solvents such as dichloromethane, acetone or ethanol were used to extract V. colorata's active principles. These extracts were inhibitory at concentrations as low as 1 mg/L, with IC50 of 1.7, 2.6 and 2.9 mg/L for dichloromethane, acetone and ethanol extracts respectively. These results indicate a promising source of new anti-Toxoplasma drugs from V. colorata and African medicinal plants.

  7. Antibacterial activity of ethanolic extracts of some Vietnamese medicinal plants against Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngan, Luong Thi My; Dung, Pham Phuong; Nhi, Nguyen Vang Thi Yen; Hoang, Nguyen van Minh; Hieu, Tran Trung

    2017-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori is one of the most common human infectious bacteria. The infection is highly associated with a number of the most important disease of the upper gastrointestinal tract, including gastritis, duodenitis, peptic ulceration, and gastric cancer. In addition, widespread use of antimicrobial agents has resulted in the development of antibiotic resistance. Metabolites of plants, particularly higher plants, have been suggested as alternative potential sources for antibacterial products due to their safe. This study aimed to evaluate antibacterial activities of crude ethanolic extracts of seventeen Vietnamese medicinal plants toward one reference strain and three clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori using broth micro-dilution bioassay. The antibacterial activities of these extracts were also compared with those of seven antibiotics, amoxicillin, clarithromycin, erythromycin, levofloxacin, azithromycin, tetracycline, and metronidazole. The extracts of Ampelopsis cantoniensis and Cleistocalyx operculatus showed highest antibacterial activity with MIC (MBC) values of 0.31 - 0.97 (2.5 - 5) mg/mL, followed by the extracts of Hedyotis diffusa and Ardisia silvestris with MIC (MBC) values of 1.04 - 1.94 (7.5 - 10) mg/mL. The remaining plant extracts exhibited moderate, low and very low or no active to the H. pylori strains. Further studies are needed to determine the active compounds from the extracts that showed high antibacterial activity against H. pylori.

  8. In Vitro effect of some medicinal plant extracts on stimulating theimmune system in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shawar, Said M.; Al-Aqtum, Musa T.; Al-Kayed, Sameer A.

    2008-01-01

    The difficulty to treat cancer without side effects by surgery,chemotherapy, radiotherapy and immunotherapy, has led investigators to lookfor phytotherapy as a new strategy in cancer medicine. The immune systemplays an important role in anti-tumor defenses, thus, we evaluated theproliferation potential of aqueous extracts from five medicinal plants onperipheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) from 118 properly consented volunteers.We examined the aqueous extract of Thyme, Sage, Clove, Calament and BlackSeed in vitro on PBLs from 100 cancer patients seeking treatment atAl-Basheer Hospital in Amman and 18 apparently healthy volunteers. PBLs wereisolated from blood samples collected in heparin tubes. Then,Ficoll-Hypaquedensity gradient configuration was employed to enrich forlymphocytes. Cells were collected in RPMI containing 10% human serum at106/mL before culturing them at an appropriate density. Three concentrationsof the aqueous extract from each plant were assayed in duplicates on culturedPBLs for 72 hours. Cell proliferation was quantified using 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) standardmethod. Phytohemagglutinin (PHA) was used as a positive proliferation controland sterile RPMI medium was used as a negative control. Among the fivedifferent aqueous extracts used in this study, only sage aqueous extractdemonstrated promising results. Sage extract was effective in proliferatingPBLs of all normal controls and cancer patients tested. Proliferation of themajority of PBLs from cancer patients was highly effective. However, somesamples showed a weaker index of proliferation. PBLs proliferation exhibiteda dose-dependent effect. The effectiveness among cancer patients was age,sex, cancer-type and cancer-stage independent. Our data suggest that theaqueous extract of sage contains a polyclonal mitogen(s) that enhances theimmune system in a non-specific fashion. (author)

  9. HPLC-UV Analysis Coupled with Chemometry to Identify Phenolic Biomarkers from Medicinal Plants, used as Ingredients in Two Food Supplement Formulas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raluca Maria Pop

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available . High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC with UV detection is nowadays the reference method to identify and quantify the biomarkers of quality and authenticity of plants and food supplements. Seven medicinal plants were collected from wild flora: Taraxacum officinalis (1, Cynara scolimus (2, Silybum marianum (3, Hypericum perforatum (4,  Chelidonium majus (5, Lycopodium clavatum (6 and  Hippophae rhamnoides (7  leaves and fruits.  Two products (A and B were obtained by mixing individual plant powders. Therefore product A was obtained by mixing dandelion, artichoke and milk thistle, 1:1:1 while product B by mixing St John’s wort, Celandine and Wolf’s claw, 1:1:1. The methanolic extracts of individual plants as well as three different extracts of products A and B (using acidulated water, neutral water and acidulated methanol were analyzed using HPLC-UV for their phenolics’ fingerprint and composition. The qualitative (untargeted analysis and quantitative (targeted analysis results were further compared using Principal Component Analysis (PCA in order to identify their specific biomarkers. Thus, quantitative evaluation of individual phenolics in case of individual plants and products A and B extracts, showed specific and significant differences of composition. Both products A and B contained elagic acid as major compound. For product A, good biomarkers were trans-cinnamic, chlorogenic, caffeic and p-coumaric acids, as well silymarin and silibine originating from milk thistle. For product B, good biomarkers were quercetin and kaempherol, gallic and protocatecuic acids, this product being rich in flavonoids. In conclusion, HPLC-UV coupled with PCA analysis proved to be a rapid and useful way to identify the main biomarkers of plants’ authentication, as well of final products’ quality and safety.

  10. Inhibition of HIV-1 entry by extracts derived from traditional Chinese medicinal herbal plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Xinming

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART is the current HIV/AIDS treatment modality. Despite the fact that HAART is very effective in suppressing HIV-1 replication and reducing the mortality of HIV/AIDS patients, it has become increasingly clear that HAART does not offer an ultimate cure to HIV/AIDS. The high cost of the HAART regimen has impeded its delivery to over 90% of the HIV/AIDS population in the world. This reality has urgently called for the need to develop inexpensive alternative anti-HIV/AIDS therapy. This need has further manifested by recent clinical trial failures in anti-HIV-1 vaccines and microbicides. In the current study, we characterized a panel of extracts of traditional Chinese medicinal herbal plants for their activities against HIV-1 replication. Methods Crude and fractionated extracts were prepared from various parts of nine traditional Chinese medicinal herbal plants in Hainan Island, China. These extracts were first screened for their anti-HIV activity and cytotoxicity in human CD4+ Jurkat cells. Then, a single-round pseudotyped HIV-luciferase reporter virus system (HIV-Luc was used to identify potential anti-HIV mechanisms of these extracts. Results Two extracts, one from Euphorbiaceae, Trigonostema xyphophylloides (TXE and one from Dipterocarpaceae, Vatica astrotricha (VAD inhibited HIV-1 replication and syncytia formation in CD4+ Jurkat cells, and had little adverse effects on host cell proliferation and survival. TXE and VAD did not show any direct inhibitory effects on the HIV-1 RT enzymatic activity. Treatment of these two extracts during the infection significantly blocked infection of the reporter virus. However, pre-treatment of the reporter virus with the extracts and treatment of the extracts post-infection had little effects on the infectivity or gene expression of the reporter virus. Conclusion These results demonstrate that TXE and VAD inhibit HIV-1 replication likely by blocking

  11. In vitro antimicrobial activity of Brazilian medicinal plant extracts against pathogenic microorganisms of interest to dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Elizete Maria; Gomes, Rafael Tomaz; Freire, Natália Ribeiro; Aguiar, Evandro Guimarães; Brandão, Maria das Graças Lins; Santos, Vagner Rodrigues

    2011-03-01

    This study evaluated the susceptibility of oral pathogenic microorganisms Candida albicans, Streptococcus mutans, Staphylococcus aureus, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans to Brazilian medicinal plant extracts of Schinus terebinthifolius (aroeira), Croton campestris (velame), Lafoensia pacari (pacari), Centaurium erythraea (centáurea), Stryphnodendron adstringens (barbatimão), and Anacardium humile (cajuzinho-docerrado), as compared to standardized antimicrobial agents (nystatin, chloramphenicol and tetracycline hydrochloride). Ethanol, hexane and butane fractions from stem barks, rinds, leaves, and/or roots were extracted and tested. Antimicrobial diffusion agar test and MIC were performed according to CLSI. After 24 h of incubation at 37 °C, the diameter of inhibition zones and spectrophotometer readings were measured and compared. The results were reported as means ± standard deviation (M ± SD). With the exception of five extracts that showed no antimicrobial activity, all the extracts tested showed antimicrobial activity, in different levels. This study suggests that extracts from the plants tested could be an alternative therapeutic option for infectious conditions of the oral cavity, such as denture stomatitis, dental caries, and periodontitis. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Catalytic Therapy of Cancer with Ascorbate and Extracts of Medicinal Herbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadejda Rozanova (Torshina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic therapy (CT is a cancer treatment modality based on the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS using a combination of substrate molecules and a catalyst. The most frequently used substrate/catalyst pair is ascorbate/Co phthalocyanine (PcCo. In the present work, herb extracts containing pigments have been studied as a catalyst in place of PcCo. Extracts from herbs are expected to have efficiency comparable with that of phthalocyanines but as natural products, to exhibit fewer side effects. The present studies demonstrate that a combined use of ascorbate and herbal extracts results in ROS production and a significant decrease in the number of cancer cells after a single in vitro treatment. Treatment with ascorbate in conjunction with extracts prepared from several medicinal herbs stimulated apoptosis and disrupted the cell cycle. The number of cells accumulating in the sub-G0/G1 stage of the cell cycle was increased 2- to 7-fold, and cells in G2/M increased 1.5- to 20-fold, indicating that the treatment protocol was highly effective in suppressing DNA synthesis and potentially reflecting DNA damage in the tumor cells. In addition, 20–40% of the cells underwent apoptosis within 24 h of completing treatment. Our results suggest that herbal extracts can function as CT catalysts in the treatment of cancer.

  13. Process optimization for extraction of carotenoids from medicinal caterpillar fungus, Cordyceps militaris (Ascomycetes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tao; Sun, Junde; Lian, Tiantian; Wang, Wenzhao; Dong, Cai-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Natural carotenoids have attracted great attention for their important beneficial effects on human health and food coloring function. Cordyceps militaris, a well-known edible and medicinal fungus, is a potential source of natural carotenoids. The present study aimed to optimize the process parameters for carotenoid extraction from this mushroom. The effects of different methods of breaking the fungal cell wall and organic solvents were studied by the one-factor-at-a-time method. Subsequently, the process parameters including the duration of the extraction time, the number of extractions, and the solvent to solid ratio were optimized by using the Box-Behnken design. The optimal extraction conditions included using an acid-heating method to break the cell wall and later extracting three times, each for a 1 h duration, with a 4:1 mixture of acetone: petroleum ether and a solvent: solid ratio of 24:1. The carotenoid content varied from 2122.50 to 3847.50 µg/g dry weights in different commercially obtained fruit bodies of C. militaris. The results demonstrated that the C. militaris contained more carotenoid content in its fruit bodies than other known mushrooms. Stability monitoring by HPLC demonstrated that the carotenoids could be stored at 4°C for 40 d. It is suggested that the carotenoid content should be considered as the quality standard of commercial products of this valued mushroom. These findings will facilitate the exploration of carotenoids from C. militaris.

  14. Antifungal properties of crude extracts of five Egyptian medicinal plants against dermatophytes and emerging fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashem, Mohamed

    2011-07-01

    Antifungal properties of the crude extracts of five medicinal plants (Artemisia judaica, Ballota undulate, Cleome amblyocarpa, Peganum harmala, and Teucrium polium) were tested against dermatophytes and emerging fungi. Ethanol extract of Ballota undulate was the most effective against all tested fungi. Paecilomyces lilacinus, P. variotii, and Candida albicans were the most sensitive organisms. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of Ballota undulate ethanol extract against C. albicans, P. lilacinus, and P. variotii was 25 mg/ml. GC-MS analysis revealed that Ballota undulate ethanol extract contains 35 aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, sesquiterpene hydrocarbon along with some other essential oils, which could be involved in antifungal activity. Light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have proved that Ballota undulate ethanol extract exhibits fungicidal effect on P. lilacinus through alterations in hyphal structures including budding of hyphal tip, anomalous structure, such as swelling, decrease in cytoplasmic content, with clear separation of cytoplasm from cell wall in hyphae. SEM clearly showed distorted mycelium, squashed and flattened conidiophores bearing damaged metullae. Eventually, the mycelia became papillated, flattened, and empty. Puncturing and squashing of hyphae as well as complete cell wall disruption were clear signs of complete death of hyphae.

  15. Prioritizing West African medicinal plants for conservation and sustainable extraction studies based on market surveys and species distribution models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Andel, T.R.; Croft, S.; van Loon, E.E.; Quiroz, D.; Towns, A.M.; Raes, N.

    2015-01-01

    Sub-Saharan African human populations rely heavily on wild-harvested medicinal plants for their health. The trade in herbal medicine provides an income for many West African people, but little is known about the effects of commercial extraction on wild plant populations. Detailed distribution maps

  16. Prioritizing West African medicinal plants for conservation and sustainable extraction studies based on market surveys and species distribution models.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andel, van T.R.; Croft, S.; Loon, van E.E.; Quiroz Villarreal, D.K.; Towns, A.M.; Raes, N.

    2015-01-01

    Sub-Saharan African human populations rely heavily on wild-harvested medicinal plants for their health. The trade in herbal medicine provides an income for many West African people, but little is known about the effects of commercial extraction on wild plant populations. Detailed distribution maps

  17. Anti-UV/HIV activity of Kampo medicines and constituent plant extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Takao; Horie, Norio; Matsuta, Tomohiko; Naoki, Umemura; Shimoyama, Tetsuo; Kaneko, Tadayoshi; Kanamoto, Taisei; Terakubo, Shigemi; Nakashima, Hideki; Kusama, Kaoru; Sakagami, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    In order to search for new biological activities of Kampo medicines and their constituent plant extracts, we investigated whether they protect the cells from the cytotoxicity induced by UV irradiation and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Anti-UV/HIV activity (SI value) was evaluated as the ratio of the CC(50) (concentration that reduced the viable cell number by 50%) to the EC(50) (the concentration that increased the viability of UV-irradiated or HIV-infected cells to 50%): SI=CC(50)/EC(50). The content of glycyrrhizin in each sample was determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Caspase-3/-7 activity was assayed by cleavage of poly ADP ribose polymerase using western blot analysis. Among 25 plant extracts, Gardenia fruit had the highest anti-UV activity (SI≥8.0), followed by Glycyrrhiza (SI=4.3), Coptis rhizoma (SI=1.5), Cimicifuga rhizoma (SI>1.4), Saposhnikovia root (SI>1.3) and Japanese Gentian (SI>1.1). Among ten Kampo medicines, Unseiin and Hangesyashinto (SI>4.9) had the highest anti-UV activity, followed by Shosaikoto (SI>4.3), Saireito (SI>3.4), Rikkosan (SI>1.2) and Kikyoto (SI=1.1). Glycyrrhiza inhibited UV-induced caspase-3/-7 activation. Only Polyporus sclerotium (SI>4.4), Gardenia fruit (SI>2.7), Atractylodes lancea rhizoma (SI>1.9), Cnidium rhizoma (SI>1.5) and Japanese Angelica root (SI>1.1) exhibited some anti-HIV activity. There was no apparent correlation of their anti-UV/HIV activity and content of glycyrrhizin, a major component of Glycyrrhiza, which exhibited much higher anti-UV activity (SI=20.6) and some anti-HIV activity (SI>2.0). The present study suggests the involvement of substances other than glycyrrhizin in the anti-UV/HIV activity of Kampo medicines and their constituent plant extracts.

  18. Combination of acupuncture and Chinese medicinal herbs in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The concentration of serum salvianolic acid Group C was significantly higher than Group B, indicating that acupuncture might improve the absorption of salvianolic acid B from the extracts of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge in the Chinese medicine formula. Combination of acupuncture and Chinese medicinal herbs significantly ...

  19. Antibacterial activity of crude extracts from Mexican medicinal plants and purified coumarins and xanthones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunaka, Kakuko; Abe, Fumiko; Nagayama, Ariaki; Okabe, Hikaru; Lozada-Pérez, Lucio; López-Villafranco, Edith; Muñiz, Elizabeth Estrada; Aguilar, Abigail; Reyes-Chilpa, Ricardo

    2005-02-28

    Thirty-two extracts from 22 Mexican medicinal plants of 15 different families were assayed to determine their antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Seventeen plants showed antibacterial activity, while five plants showed no activity against both bacteria. All of the extracts showed higher activity against Staphylococcus aureus (methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant) than against Escherichia coli, except one. Among the plants examined, Bursera simaruba (L.) Sarg. (Burseraceae), Haematoxylum brasiletto H. Karst. (Fabaceae), Calophyllum brasiliense Cambess. (Clusiaceae), and Mammea americana L. (Clusiaceae) were highly active against Staphylococcus aureus. Coumarins (mammea A/BA and mammea A/AA) and xanthones, namely jacareubin and 1,3,5,6-tetrahydroxy-2-(3,3-dimethylallyl) xanthone, were isolated as the principle compounds from the last two plants.

  20. Polysaccharides from Traditional Chinese Medicines: Extraction, Purification, Modification, and Biological Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yun; Yao, Fangke; Ming, Ke; Wang, Deyun; Hu, Yuanliang; Liu, Jiaguo

    2016-12-13

    Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) has been used to treat diseases in China for thousands of years. TCM compositions are complex, using as their various sources plants, animals, fungi, and minerals. Polysaccharides are one of the active and important ingredients of TCMs. Polysaccharides from TCMs exhibit a wide range of biological activities in terms of immunity- modifying, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, and anti-tumor properties. With their widespread biological activities, polysaccharides consistently attract scientist's interests, and the studies often concentrate on the extraction, purification, and biological activity of TCM polysaccharides. Currently, numerous studies have shown that the modification of polysaccharides can heighten or change the biological activities, which is a new angle of polysaccharide research. This review highlights the current knowledge of TCM polysaccharides, including their extraction, purification, modification, and biological activity, which will hopefully provide profound insights facilitating further research and development.

  1. Antiplasmodial activity of ethanolic extracts of some selected medicinal plants from the northwest of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangian, Hadi; Faramarzi, Hossein; Yazdinezhad, Alireza; Mousavi, Seyed Javad; Zamani, Zahra; Noubarani, Maryam; Ramazani, Ali

    2013-11-01

    The effectiveness of antimalarial drugs is declining at an ever accelerating rate, with consequent increase in malaria-related morbidity and mortality. The newest antiplasmodial drug from plants is needed to overcome this problem. The aim of this study was to assess antimalarial activity of the ethanolic extracts of 10 different medicinal plants from eight families against Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine-sensitive 3D7 strain. The selection of the hereby studied plants was based on the existing information on their local ethnobotanic history. Plants were dried, powdered, and macerated in a hydroalcoholic solution. Resulting extracts have been assessed for in vitro and in vivo antimalarial and brine shrimp toxicity activities. Of 10 plant species tested, four plants: Althea officinalis L. (Malvaceae), Myrtus communis Linn (Myrtaceae), Plantago major (Plantaginaceae), and Glycyrrhiza glabra L. (Papilionaceae) displayed promising antimalarial activity in vitro (50% inhibitory concentration values of 62.77, 42.18, 40.00, and 13.56 μg/mL, respectively) with no toxicity against brine shrimp larvae. The crude extracts of three active plants, G. glabra, M. communis, and A. officinalis, also significantly reduced parasitemia in vivo in female Swiss albino mice at a dose of 400 mg/kg compared to no treatment. Antiplasmodial activities of extracts of A. officinalis and M. communis are reported for the first time.

  2. Contact and fumigant toxicity of oriental medicinal plant extracts against Dermanyssus gallinae (Acari: Dermanyssidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soon-Il; Na, Young-Eun; Yi, Ji-Hwan; Kim, Byung-Seok; Ahn, Young-Joon

    2007-04-30

    The acaricidal activity of methanolic extracts from 40 oriental medicinal plant species and a steam distillate of Cinnamomum camphora towards poultry house-collected adult Dermanyssus gallinae De Geer was examined using direct contact and vapour phase toxicity bioassays. Results were compared with those of 15 acaricides currently used. In filter paper contact toxicity bioassays using adult D. gallinae, C. camphora steam distillate (0.0051 mgcm(-2)) was the most toxic material, followed by extracts from Asarum sieboldii var. seoulens whole plant, Eugenia caryophyllata flower bud and Mentha arvensis var. piperascens whole plant (0.0063-0.0072 mgcm(-2)), based upon 24h LD(50) values. The acaricidal activity of these four plant preparations was almost comparable to that of profenofos (LD(50), 0.003 mgcm(-2)) but less effective than dichlorvos (LD(50), 0.0004 mgcm(-2)). The toxicity of Illicium verum fruit and Lysimachia davurica leaf extracts (0.09 mgcm(-2)) was almost comparable to that of benfuracarb, prothiofos, propoxur and fenthion (0.053-0.070mgcm(-2)). In vapour phase toxicity tests, these plant preparations were more effective in closed containers than in open ones, indicating that the mode of delivery of these plant extracts was largely a result of action in the vapour phase. Plants described herein merit further study as potential D. gallinae control agents.

  3. In vitro thrombolytic potential of root extracts of four medicinal plants available in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Fahad; Islam, Ariful; Bulbul, Latifa; Moghal, Mizanur Rahman; Hossain, Mohammad Salim

    2014-01-01

    Thrombus formation inside the blood vessels obstructs blood flow through the circulatory system leading hypertension, stroke to the heart, anoxia, and so on. Thrombolytic drugs are widely used for the management of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis patients, but they have certain limitations. Medicinal plants and their components possessing antithrombotic activity have been reported before. However, plants that could be used for thrombolysis has not been reported so far. This study's aim was to evaluate the thrombolytic potential of selected plants' root extracts. Plants were collected, dried, powdered and extracted by methanol and then fractionated by n-hexane for getting the sample root extracts. Venous blood samples were drawn from 10 healthy volunteers for the purposes of investigation. An in vitro thrombolytic model was used to check the clot lysis potential of four n-hexane soluble roots extracts viz., Acacia nilotica, Justicia adhatoda, Azadirachta indica, and Lagerstroemia speciosa along with streptokinase as a positive control and saline water as a negative control. Dunnett t-test analysis was performed using SPSS is a statistical analysis program developed by IBM Corporation, USA. on Windows. Using an in vitro thrombolytic model, A. nilotica, L. speciosa, A. indica, and J. adhatoda at 5 mg extract/ml NaCl solution concentration showed 15.1%, 15.49%, 21.26%, and 19.63% clot lysis activity respectively. The reference streptokinase showed 47.21%, and 24.73% clot lysis for 30,000 IU and 15,000 IU concentrations, respectively whereas 0.9% normal saline showed 5.35% clot lysis. The selected extracts of the plant roots possess marked thrombolytic properties that could lyse blood clots in vitro; however, in vivo clot dissolving properties and active components responsible for clot lysis are yet to be discovered.

  4. Measurement of the jet mass in highly boosted [Formula: see text] events from pp collisions at [Formula: see text][Formula: see text].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Asilar, E; Bergauer, T; Brandstetter, J; Brondolin, E; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Flechl, M; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hartl, C; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; König, A; Krätschmer, I; Liko, D; Matsushita, T; Mikulec, I; Rabady, D; Rad, N; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, H; Schieck, J; Strauss, J; Waltenberger, W; Wulz, C-E; Dvornikov, O; Makarenko, V; Mossolov, V; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Zykunov, V; Shumeiko, N; Alderweireldt, S; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Lauwers, J; Van De Klundert, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Van Spilbeeck, A; Abu Zeid, S; Blekman, F; D'Hondt, J; Daci, N; De Bruyn, I; Deroover, K; Lowette, S; Moortgat, S; Moreels, L; Olbrechts, A; Python, Q; Skovpen, K; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Parijs, I; Brun, H; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Delannoy, H; Fasanella, G; Favart, L; Goldouzian, R; Grebenyuk, A; Karapostoli, G; Lenzi, T; Léonard, A; Luetic, J; Maerschalk, T; Marinov, A; Randle-Conde, A; Seva, T; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Vannerom, D; Yonamine, R; Zenoni, F; Zhang, F; Cimmino, A; Cornelis, T; Dobur, D; Fagot, A; Gul, M; Khvastunov, I; Poyraz, D; Salva, S; Schöfbeck, R; Tytgat, M; Van Driessche, W; Yazgan, E; Zaganidis, N; Bakhshiansohi, H; Beluffi, C; Bondu, O; Brochet, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, A; De Visscher, S; Delaere, C; Delcourt, M; Francois, B; Giammanco, A; Jafari, A; Komm, M; Krintiras, G; Lemaitre, V; Magitteri, A; Mertens, A; Musich, M; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Selvaggi, M; Vidal Marono, M; Wertz, S; Beliy, N; Aldá Júnior, W L; Alves, F L; Alves, G A; Brito, L; Hensel, C; Moraes, A; Pol, M E; Rebello Teles, P; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E; Carvalho, W; Chinellato, J; Custódio, A; Da Costa, E M; Da Silveira, G G; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Huertas Guativa, L M; Malbouisson, H; Matos Figueiredo, D; Mora Herrera, C; Mundim, L; Nogima, H; Prado Da Silva, W L; Santoro, A; Sznajder, A; Tonelli Manganote, E J; Torres Da Silva De Araujo, F; Vilela Pereira, A; Ahuja, S; Bernardes, C A; Dogra, S; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Gregores, E M; Mercadante, P G; Moon, C S; Novaes, S F; Padula, Sandra S; Romero Abad, D; Ruiz Vargas, J C; Aleksandrov, A; Hadjiiska, R; Iaydjiev, P; Rodozov, M; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Vutova, M; Dimitrov, A; Glushkov, I; Litov, L; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Fang, W; Ahmad, M; Bian, J G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Chen, M; Chen, Y; Cheng, T; Jiang, C H; Leggat, D; Liu, Z; Romeo, F; Ruan, M; Shaheen, S M; Spiezia, A; Tao, J; Wang, C; Wang, Z; Zhang, H; Zhao, J; Ban, Y; Chen, G; Li, Q; Liu, S; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Wang, D; Xu, Z; Avila, C; Cabrera, A; Chaparro Sierra, L F; Florez, C; Gomez, J P; González Hernández, C F; Ruiz Alvarez, J D; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, D; Puljak, I; Ribeiro Cipriano, P M; Sculac, T; Antunovic, Z; Kovac, M; Brigljevic, V; Ferencek, D; Kadija, K; Mesic, B; Susa, T; Attikis, A; Mavromanolakis, G; Mousa, J; Nicolaou, C; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Rykaczewski, H; Tsiakkouri, D; Finger, M; Finger, M; Carrera Jarrin, E; Abdelalim, A A; Mohammed, Y; Salama, E; Kadastik, M; Perrini, L; Raidal, M; Tiko, A; Veelken, C; Eerola, P; Pekkanen, J; Voutilainen, M; Härkönen, J; Järvinen, T; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Tuominiemi, J; Tuovinen, E; Wendland, L; Talvitie, J; Tuuva, T; Besancon, M; Couderc, F; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Favaro, C; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Ghosh, S; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Kucher, I; Locci, E; Machet, M; Malcles, J; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Titov, M; Abdulsalam, A; Antropov, I; Baffioni, S; Beaudette, F; Busson, P; Cadamuro, L; Chapon, E; Charlot, C; Davignon, O; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Jo, M; Lisniak, S; Miné, P; Nguyen, M; Ochando, C; Ortona, G; Paganini, P; Pigard, P; Regnard, S; Salerno, R; Sirois, Y; Stahl Leiton, A G; Strebler, T; Yilmaz, Y; Zabi, A; Zghiche, A; Agram, J-L; Andrea, J; Aubin, A; Bloch, D; Brom, J-M; Buttignol, M; Chabert, E C; Chanon, N; Collard, C; Conte, E; Coubez, X; Fontaine, J-C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Le Bihan, A-C; Van Hove, P; Gadrat, S; Beauceron, S; Bernet, C; Boudoul, G; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Courbon, B; Depasse, P; El Mamouni, H; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Gouzevitch, M; Grenier, G; Ille, B; Lagarde, F; Laktineh, I B; Lethuillier, M; Mirabito, L; Pequegnot, A L; Perries, S; Popov, A; Sabes, D; Sordini, V; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Viret, S; Khvedelidze, A; Tsamalaidze, Z; Autermann, C; Beranek, S; Feld, L; Kiesel, M K; Klein, K; Lipinski, M; Preuten, M; Schomakers, C; Schulz, J; Verlage, T; Albert, A; Brodski, M; Dietz-Laursonn, E; Duchardt, D; Endres, M; Erdmann, M; Erdweg, S; Esch, T; Fischer, R; Güth, A; Hamer, M; Hebbeker, T; Heidemann, C; Hoepfner, K; Knutzen, S; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Millet, P; Mukherjee, S; Olschewski, M; Padeken, K; Pook, T; Radziej, M; Reithler, H; Rieger, M; Scheuch, F; Sonnenschein, L; Teyssier, D; Thüer, S; Cherepanov, V; Flügge, G; Kargoll, B; Kress, T; Künsken, A; Lingemann, J; Müller, T; Nehrkorn, A; Nowack, A; Pistone, C; Pooth, O; Stahl, A; Aldaya Martin, M; Arndt, T; Asawatangtrakuldee, C; Beernaert, K; Behnke, O; Behrens, U; Bin Anuar, A A; Borras, K; Campbell, A; Connor, P; Contreras-Campana, C; Costanza, F; Diez Pardos, C; Dolinska, G; Eckerlin, G; Eckstein, D; Eichhorn, T; Eren, E; Gallo, E; Garay Garcia, J; Geiser, A; Gizhko, A; Grados Luyando, J M; Grohsjean, A; Gunnellini, P; Harb, A; Hauk, J; Hempel, M; Jung, H; Kalogeropoulos, A; Karacheban, O; Kasemann, M; Keaveney, J; Kleinwort, C; Korol, I; Krücker, D; Lange, W; Lelek, A; Lenz, T; Leonard, J; Lipka, K; Lobanov, A; Lohmann, W; Mankel, R; Melzer-Pellmann, I-A; Meyer, A B; Mittag, G; Mnich, J; Mussgiller, A; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Raspereza, A; Roland, B; Sahin, M Ö; Saxena, P; Schoerner-Sadenius, T; Spannagel, S; Stefaniuk, N; Van Onsem, G P; Walsh, R; Wissing, C; Blobel, V; Centis Vignali, M; Draeger, A R; Dreyer, T; Garutti, E; Gonzalez, D; Haller, J; Hoffmann, M; Junkes, A; Klanner, R; Kogler, R; Kovalchuk, N; Lapsien, T; Marchesini, I; Marconi, D; Meyer, M; Niedziela, M; Nowatschin, D; Pantaleo, F; Peiffer, T; Perieanu, A; Scharf, C; Schleper, P; Schmidt, A; Schumann, S; Schwandt, J; Stadie, H; Steinbrück, G; Stober, F M; Stöver, M; Tholen, H; Troendle, D; Usai, E; Vanelderen, L; Vanhoefer, A; Vormwald, B; Akbiyik, M; Barth, C; Baur, S; Baus, C; Berger, J; Butz, E; Caspart, R; Chwalek, T; Colombo, F; De Boer, W; Dierlamm, A; Fink, S; Freund, B; Friese, R; Giffels, M; Gilbert, A; Goldenzweig, P; Haitz, D; Hartmann, F; Heindl, S M; Husemann, U; Katkov, I; Kudella, S; Mildner, H; Mozer, M U; Müller, Th; Plagge, M; Quast, G; Rabbertz, K; Röcker, S; Roscher, F; Schröder, M; Shvetsov, I; Sieber, G; Simonis, H J; Ulrich, R; Wayand, S; Weber, M; Weiler, T; Williamson, S; Wöhrmann, C; Wolf, R; Anagnostou, G; Daskalakis, G; Geralis, T; Giakoumopoulou, V A; Kyriakis, A; Loukas, D; Topsis-Giotis, I; Kesisoglou, S; Panagiotou, A; Saoulidou, N; Tziaferi, E; Evangelou, I; Flouris, G; Foudas, C; Kokkas, P; Loukas, N; Manthos, N; Papadopoulos, I; Paradas, E; Filipovic, N; Pasztor, G; Bencze, G; Hajdu, C; Horvath, D; Sikler, F; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Zsigmond, A J; Beni, N; Czellar, S; Karancsi, J; Makovec, A; Molnar, J; Szillasi, Z; Bartók, M; Raics, P; Trocsanyi, Z L; Ujvari, B; Komaragiri, J R; Bahinipati, S; Bhowmik, S; Choudhury, S; Mal, P; Mandal, K; Nayak, A; Sahoo, D K; Sahoo, N; Swain, S K; Bansal, S; Beri, S B; Bhatnagar, V; Chawla, R; Bhawandeep, U; Kalsi, A K; Kaur, A; Kaur, M; Kumar, R; Kumari, P; Mehta, A; Mittal, M; Singh, J B; Walia, G; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, A; Choudhary, B C; Garg, R B; Keshri, S; Malhotra, S; Naimuddin, M; Ranjan, K; Sharma, R; Sharma, V; Bhattacharya, R; Bhattacharya, S; Chatterjee, K; Dey, S; Dutt, S; Dutta, S; Ghosh, S; Majumdar, N; Modak, A; Mondal, K; Mukhopadhyay, S; Nandan, S; Purohit, A; Roy, A; Roy, D; Roy Chowdhury, S; Sarkar, S; Sharan, M; Thakur, S; Behera, P K; Chudasama, R; Dutta, D; Jha, V; Kumar, V; Mohanty, A K; Netrakanti, P K; Pant, L M; Shukla, P; Topkar, A; Aziz, T; Dugad, S; Kole, G; Mahakud, B; Mitra, S; Mohanty, G B; Parida, B; Sur, N; Sutar, B; Banerjee, S; Dewanjee, R K; Ganguly, S; Guchait, M; Jain, Sa; Kumar, S; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Mazumdar, K; Sarkar, T; Wickramage, N; Chauhan, S; Dube, S; Hegde, V; Kapoor, A; Kothekar, K; Pandey, S; Rane, A; Sharma, S; Chenarani, S; Eskandari Tadavani, E; Etesami, S M; Khakzad, M; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M; Naseri, M; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F; Safarzadeh, B; Zeinali, M; Felcini, M; Grunewald, M; Abbrescia, M; Calabria, C; Caputo, C; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; Cristella, L; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; Fiore, L; Iaselli, G; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Miniello, G; My, S; Nuzzo, S; Pompili, A; Pugliese, G; Radogna, R; Ranieri, A; Selvaggi, G; Sharma, A; Silvestris, L; Venditti, R; Verwilligen, P; Abbiendi, G; Battilana, C; Bonacorsi, D; Braibant-Giacomelli, S; Brigliadori, L; Campanini, R; Capiluppi, P; Castro, A; Cavallo, F R; Chhibra, S S; Codispoti, G; Cuffiani, M; Dallavalle, G M; Fabbri, F; Fanfani, A; Fasanella, D; Giacomelli, P; Grandi, C; Guiducci, L; Marcellini, S; Masetti, G; Montanari, A; Navarria, F L; Perrotta, A; Rossi, A M; Rovelli, T; Siroli, G P; Tosi, N; Albergo, S; Costa, S; Di Mattia, A; Giordano, F; Potenza, R; Tricomi, A; Tuve, C; Barbagli, G; Ciulli, V; Civinini, C; D'Alessandro, R; Focardi, E; Lenzi, P; Meschini, M; Paoletti, S; Russo, L; Sguazzoni, G; Strom, D; Viliani, L; Benussi, L; Bianco, S; Fabbri, F; Piccolo, D; Primavera, F; Calvelli, V; Ferro, F; Monge, M R; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Brianza, L; Brivio, F; Ciriolo, V; Dinardo, M E; Fiorendi, S; Gennai, S; Ghezzi, A; Govoni, P; Malberti, M; Malvezzi, S; Manzoni, R A; Menasce, D; Moroni, L; Paganoni, M; Pedrini, D; Pigazzini, S; Ragazzi, S; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Buontempo, S; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Di Guida, S; Esposito, M; Fabozzi, F; Fienga, F; Iorio, A O M; Lanza, G; Lista, L; Meola, S; Paolucci, P; Sciacca, C; Thyssen, F; Azzi, P; Bacchetta, N; Benato, L; Bisello, D; Boletti, A; Carlin, R; Carvalho Antunes de Oliveira, A; Checchia, P; Dall'Osso, M; De Castro Manzano, P; Dorigo, T; Dosselli, U; Gasparini, F; Gasparini, U; Gozzelino, A; Lacaprara, S; Margoni, M; Meneguzzo, A T; Pazzini, J; Pozzobon, N; Ronchese, P; Simonetto, F; Torassa, E; Zanetti, M; Zotto, P; Zumerle, G; Braghieri, A; Fallavollita, F; Magnani, A; Montagna, P; Ratti, S P; Re, V; Riccardi, C; Salvini, P; Vai, I; Vitulo, P; Alunni Solestizi, L; Bilei, G M; Ciangottini, D; Fanò, L; Lariccia, P; Leonardi, R; Mantovani, G; Menichelli, M; Saha, A; Santocchia, A; Androsov, K; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bernardini, J; Boccali, T; Castaldi, R; Ciocci, M A; Dell'Orso, R; Donato, S; Fedi, G; Giassi, A; Grippo, M T; Ligabue, F; Lomtadze, T; Martini, L; Messineo, A; Palla, F; Rizzi, A; Savoy-Navarro, A; Spagnolo, P; Tenchini, R; Tonelli, G; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Barone, L; Cavallari, F; Cipriani, M; Del Re, D; Diemoz, M; Gelli, S; Longo, E; Margaroli, F; Marzocchi, B; Meridiani, P; Organtini, G; Paramatti, R; Preiato, F; Rahatlou, S; Rovelli, C; Santanastasio, F; Amapane, N; Arcidiacono, R; Argiro, S; Arneodo, M; Bartosik, N; Bellan, R; Biino, C; Cartiglia, N; Cenna, F; Costa, M; Covarelli, R; Degano, A; Demaria, N; Finco, L; Kiani, B; Mariotti, C; Maselli, S; Migliore, E; Monaco, V; Monteil, E; Monteno, M; Obertino, M M; Pacher, L; Pastrone, N; Pelliccioni, M; Pinna Angioni, G L; Ravera, F; Romero, A; Ruspa, M; Sacchi, R; Shchelina, K; Sola, V; Solano, A; Staiano, A; Traczyk, P; Belforte, S; Casarsa, M; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Zanetti, A; Kim, D H; Kim, G N; Kim, M S; Lee, S; Lee, S W; Oh, Y D; Sekmen, S; Son, D C; Yang, Y C; Lee, A; Kim, H; Brochero Cifuentes, J A; Kim, T J; Cho, S; Choi, S; Go, Y; Gyun, D; Ha, S; Hong, B; Jo, Y; Kim, Y; Lee, K; Lee, K S; Lee, S; Lim, J; Park, S K; Roh, Y; Almond, J; Kim, J; Lee, H; Oh, S B; Radburn-Smith, B C; Seo, S H; Yang, U K; Yoo, H D; Yu, G B; Choi, M; Kim, H; Kim, J H; Lee, J S H; Park, I C; Ryu, G; Ryu, M S; Choi, Y; Goh, J; Hwang, C; Lee, J; Yu, I; Dudenas, V; Juodagalvis, A; Vaitkus, J; Ahmed, I; Ibrahim, Z A; Md Ali, M A B; Mohamad Idris, F; Wan Abdullah, W A T; Yusli, M N; Zolkapli, Z; Castilla-Valdez, H; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Hernandez-Almada, A; Lopez-Fernandez, R; Magaña Villalba, R; Mejia Guisao, J; Sanchez-Hernandez, A; Carrillo Moreno, S; Oropeza Barrera, C; Vazquez Valencia, F; Carpinteyro, S; Pedraza, I; Salazar Ibarguen, H A; Uribe Estrada, C; Morelos Pineda, A; Krofcheck, D; Butler, P H; Ahmad, A; Ahmad, M; Hassan, Q; Hoorani, H R; Khan, W A; Saddique, A; Shah, M A; Shoaib, M; Waqas, M; Bialkowska, H; Bluj, M; Boimska, B; Frueboes, T; Górski, M; Kazana, M; Nawrocki, K; Romanowska-Rybinska, K; Szleper, M; Zalewski, P; Bunkowski, K; Byszuk, A; Doroba, K; Kalinowski, A; Konecki, M; Krolikowski, J; Misiura, M; Olszewski, M; Walczak, M; Bargassa, P; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C; Calpas, B; Di Francesco, A; Faccioli, P; Ferreira Parracho, P G; Gallinaro, M; Hollar, J; Leonardo, N; Lloret Iglesias, L; Nemallapudi, M V; Rodrigues Antunes, J; Seixas, J; Toldaiev, O; Vadruccio, D; Varela, J; Afanasiev, S; Bunin, P; Gavrilenko, M; Golutvin, I; Gorbunov, I; Kamenev, A; Karjavin, V; Lanev, A; Malakhov, A; Matveev, V; Palichik, V; Perelygin, V; Shmatov, S; Shulha, S; Skatchkov, N; Smirnov, V; Voytishin, N; Zarubin, A; Chtchipounov, L; Golovtsov, V; Ivanov, Y; Kim, V; Kuznetsova, E; Murzin, V; Oreshkin, V; Sulimov, V; Vorobyev, A; Andreev, Yu; Dermenev, A; Gninenko, S; Golubev, N; Karneyeu, A; Kirsanov, M; Krasnikov, N; Pashenkov, A; Tlisov, D; Toropin, A; Epshteyn, V; Gavrilov, V; Lychkovskaya, N; Popov, V; Pozdnyakov, I; Safronov, G; Spiridonov, A; Toms, M; Vlasov, E; Zhokin, A; Aushev, T; Bylinkin, A; Chistov, R; Polikarpov, S; Zhemchugov, E; Andreev, V; Azarkin, M; Dremin, I; Kirakosyan, M; Leonidov, A; Terkulov, A; Baskakov, A; Belyaev, A; Boos, E; Bunichev, V; Dubinin, M; Dudko, L; Ershov, A; Klyukhin, V; Korneeva, N; Lokhtin, I; Miagkov, I; Obraztsov, S; Perfilov, M; Savrin, V; Volkov, P; Blinov, V; Skovpen, Y; Shtol, D; Azhgirey, I; Bayshev, I; Bitioukov, S; Elumakhov, D; Kachanov, V; Kalinin, A; Konstantinov, D; Krychkine, V; Petrov, V; Ryutin, R; Sobol, A; Troshin, S; Tyurin, N; Uzunian, A; Volkov, A; Adzic, P; Cirkovic, P; Devetak, D; Dordevic, M; Milosevic, J; Rekovic, V; Alcaraz Maestre, J; Barrio Luna, M; Calvo, E; Cerrada, M; Chamizo Llatas, M; Colino, N; De La Cruz, B; Delgado Peris, A; Escalante Del Valle, A; Fernandez, C; Fernández Ramos, J P; Flix, J; Fouz, M C; Garcia-Abia, P; Gonzalez Lopez, O; Goy Lopez, S; Hernandez, J M; Josa, M I; Navarro De Martino, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Puerta Pelayo, J; Quintario Olmeda, A; Redondo, I; Romero, L; Soares, M S; de Trocóniz, J F; Missiroli, M; Moran, D; Cuevas, J; Fernandez Menendez, J; Gonzalez Caballero, I; González Fernández, J R; Palencia Cortezon, E; Sanchez Cruz, S; Suárez Andrés, I; Vischia, P; Vizan Garcia, J M; Cabrillo, I J; Calderon, A; Curras, E; Fernandez, M; Garcia-Ferrero, J; Gomez, G; Lopez Virto, A; Marco, J; Martinez Rivero, C; Matorras, F; Piedra Gomez, J; Rodrigo, T; Ruiz-Jimeno, A; Scodellaro, L; Trevisani, N; Vila, I; Vilar Cortabitarte, R; Abbaneo, D; Auffray, E; Auzinger, G; Baillon, P; Ball, A H; Barney, D; Bloch, P; Bocci, A; Botta, C; Camporesi, T; Castello, R; Cepeda, M; Cerminara, G; Chen, Y; d'Enterria, D; Dabrowski, A; Daponte, V; David, A; De Gruttola, M; De Roeck, A; Di Marco, E; Dobson, M; Dorney, B; du Pree, T; Duggan, D; Dünser, M; Dupont, N; Elliott-Peisert, A; Everaerts, P; Fartoukh, S; Franzoni, G; Fulcher, J; Funk, W; Gigi, D; Gill, K; Girone, M; Glege, F; Gulhan, D; Gundacker, S; Guthoff, M; Harris, P; Hegeman, J; Innocente, V; Janot, P; Kieseler, J; Kirschenmann, H; Knünz, V; Kornmayer, A; Kortelainen, M J; Kousouris, K; Krammer, M; Lange, C; Lecoq, P; Lourenço, C; Lucchini, M T; Malgeri, L; Mannelli, M; Martelli, A; Meijers, F; Merlin, J A; Mersi, S; Meschi, E; Milenovic, P; Moortgat, F; Morovic, S; Mulders, M; Neugebauer, H; Orfanelli, S; Orsini, L; Pape, L; Perez, E; Peruzzi, M; Petrilli, A; Petrucciani, G; Pfeiffer, A; Pierini, M; Racz, A; Reis, T; Rolandi, G; Rovere, M; Sakulin, H; Sauvan, J B; Schäfer, C; Schwick, C; Seidel, M; Sharma, A; Silva, P; Sphicas, P; Steggemann, J; Stoye, M; Takahashi, Y; Tosi, M; Treille, D; Triossi, A; Tsirou, A; Veckalns, V; Veres, G I; Verweij, M; Wardle, N; Wöhri, H K; Zagozdzinska, A; Zeuner, W D; Bertl, W; Deiters, K; Erdmann, W; Horisberger, R; Ingram, Q; Kaestli, H C; Kotlinski, D; Langenegger, U; Rohe, T; Wiederkehr, S A; Bachmair, F; Bäni, L; Bianchini, L; Casal, B; Dissertori, G; Dittmar, M; Donegà, M; Grab, C; Heidegger, C; Hits, D; Hoss, J; Kasieczka, G; Lustermann, W; Mangano, B; Marionneau, M; Martinez Ruiz Del Arbol, P; Masciovecchio, M; Meinhard, M T; Meister, D; Micheli, F; Musella, P; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Pandolfi, F; Pata, J; Pauss, F; Perrin, G; Perrozzi, L; Quittnat, M; Rossini, M; Schönenberger, M; Starodumov, A; Tavolaro, V R; Theofilatos, K; Wallny, R; Aarrestad, T K; Amsler, C; Caminada, L; Canelli, M F; De Cosa, A; Galloni, C; Hinzmann, A; Hreus, T; Kilminster, B; Ngadiuba, J; Pinna, D; Rauco, G; Robmann, P; Salerno, D; Seitz, C; Yang, Y; Zucchetta, A; Candelise, V; Doan, T H; Jain, Sh; Khurana, R; Konyushikhin, M; Kuo, C M; Lin, W; Pozdnyakov, A; Yu, S S; Kumar, Arun; Chang, P; Chang, Y H; Chao, Y; Chen, K F; Chen, P H; Fiori, F; Hou, W-S; Hsiung, Y; Liu, Y F; Lu, R-S; Miñano Moya, M; Paganis, E; Psallidas, A; Tsai, J F; Asavapibhop, B; Singh, G; Sri Manobhas, N; Suwonjandee, N; Adiguzel, A; Bakirci, M N; Damarseckin, S; Demiroglu, Z S; Dozen, C; Eskut, E; Girgis, S; Gokbulut, G; Guler, Y; Hos, I; Kangal, E E; Kara, O; Kiminsu, U; Oglakci, M; Onengut, G; Ozdemir, K; Ozturk, S; Polatoz, A; Sunar Cerci, D; Turkcapar, S; Zorbakir, I S; Zorbilmez, C; Bilin, B; Bilmis, S; Isildak, B; Karapinar, G; Yalvac, M; Zeyrek, M; Gülmez, E; Kaya, M; Kaya, O; Yetkin, E A; Yetkin, T; Cakir, A; Cankocak, K; Sen, S; Grynyov, B; Levchuk, L; Sorokin, P; Aggleton, R; Ball, F; Beck, L; Brooke, J J; Burns, D; Clement, E; Cussans, D; Flacher, H; Goldstein, J; Grimes, M; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Jacob, J; Kreczko, L; Lucas, C; Newbold, D M; Paramesvaran, S; Poll, A; Sakuma, T; Seif El Nasr-Storey, S; Smith, D; Smith, V J; Bell, K W; Belyaev, A; Brew, C; Brown, R M; Calligaris, L; Cieri, D; Cockerill, D J A; Coughlan, J A; Harder, K; Harper, S; Olaiya, E; Petyt, D; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Thea, A; Tomalin, I R; Williams, T; Baber, M; Bainbridge, R; Buchmuller, O; Bundock, A; Burton, D; Casasso, S; Citron, M; Colling, D; Corpe, L; Dauncey, P; Davies, G; De Wit, A; Della Negra, M; Di Maria, R; Dunne, P; Elwood, A; Futyan, D; Haddad, Y; Hall, G; Iles, G; James, T; Lane, R; Laner, C; Lucas, R; Lyons, L; Magnan, A-M; Malik, S; Mastrolorenzo, L; Nash, J; Nikitenko, A; Pela, J; Penning, B; Pesaresi, M; Raymond, D M; Richards, A; Rose, A; Scott, E; Seez, C; Summers, S; Tapper, A; Uchida, K; Vazquez Acosta, M; Virdee, T; Wright, J; Zenz, S C; Cole, J E; Hobson, P R; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Reid, I D; Symonds, P; Teodorescu, L; Turner, M; Borzou, A; Call, K; Dittmann, J; Hatakeyama, K; Liu, H; Pastika, N; Bartek, R; Dominguez, A; Buccilli, A; Cooper, S I; Henderson, C; Rumerio, P; West, C; Arcaro, D; Avetisyan, A; Bose, T; Gastler, D; Rankin, D; Richardson, C; Rohlf, J; Sulak, L; Zou, D; Benelli, G; Cutts, D; Garabedian, A; Hakala, J; Heintz, U; Hogan, J M; Jesus, O; Kwok, K H M; Laird, E; Landsberg, G; Mao, Z; Narain, M; Piperov, S; Sagir, S; Spencer, E; Syarif, R; Breedon, R; Burns, D; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M; Chauhan, S; Chertok, M; Conway, J; Conway, R; Cox, P T; Erbacher, R; Flores, C; Funk, G; Gardner, M; Ko, W; Lander, R; Mclean, C; Mulhearn, M; Pellett, D; Pilot, J; Shalhout, S; Shi, M; Smith, J; Squires, M; Stolp, D; Tos, K; Tripathi, M; Bachtis, M; Bravo, C; Cousins, R; Dasgupta, A; Florent, A; Hauser, J; Ignatenko, M; Mccoll, N; Saltzberg, D; Schnaible, C; Valuev, V; Weber, M; Bouvier, E; Burt, K; Clare, R; Ellison, J; Gary, J W; Ghiasi Shirazi, S M A; Hanson, G; Heilman, J; Jandir, P; Kennedy, E; Lacroix, F; Long, O R; Negrete, M Olmedo; Paneva, M I; Shrinivas, A; Si, W; Wei, H; Wimpenny, S; Yates, B R; Branson, J G; Cerati, G B; Cittolin, S; Derdzinski, M; Gerosa, R; Holzner, A; Klein, D; Krutelyov, V; Letts, J; Macneill, I; Olivito, D; Padhi, S; Pieri, M; Sani, M; Sharma, V; Simon, S; Tadel, M; Vartak, A; Wasserbaech, S; Welke, C; Wood, J; Würthwein, F; Yagil, A; Della Porta, G Zevi; Amin, N; Bhandari, R; Bradmiller-Feld, J; Campagnari, C; Dishaw, A; Dutta, V; Franco Sevilla, M; George, C; Golf, F; Gouskos, L; Gran, J; Heller, R; Incandela, J; Mullin, S D; Ovcharova, A; Qu, H; Richman, J; Stuart, D; Suarez, I; Yoo, J; Anderson, D; Bendavid, J; Bornheim, A; Bunn, J; Duarte, J; Lawhorn, J M; Mott, A; Newman, H B; Pena, C; Spiropulu, M; Vlimant, J R; Xie, S; Zhu, R Y; Andrews, M B; Ferguson, T; Paulini, M; Russ, J; Sun, M; Vogel, H; Vorobiev, I; Weinberg, M; Cumalat, J P; Ford, W T; Jensen, F; Johnson, A; Krohn, M; Leontsinis, S; Mulholland, T; Stenson, K; Wagner, S R; Alexander, J; Chaves, J; Chu, J; Dittmer, S; Mcdermott, K; Mirman, N; Nicolas Kaufman, G; Patterson, J R; Rinkevicius, A; Ryd, A; Skinnari, L; Soffi, L; Tan, S M; Tao, Z; Thom, J; Tucker, J; Wittich, P; Zientek, M; Winn, D; Abdullin, S; Albrow, M; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Banerjee, S; Bauerdick, L A T; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhat, P C; Bolla, G; Burkett, K; Butler, J N; Cheung, H W K; Chlebana, F; Cihangir, S; Cremonesi, M; Elvira, V D; Fisk, I; Freeman, J; Gottschalk, E; Gray, L; Green, D; Grünendahl, S; Gutsche, O; Hare, D; Harris, R M; Hasegawa, S; Hirschauer, J; Hu, Z; Jayatilaka, B; Jindariani, S; Johnson, M; Joshi, U; Klima, B; Kreis, B; Lammel, S; Linacre, J; Lincoln, D; Lipton, R; Liu, M; Liu, T; Lopes De Sá, R; Lykken, J; Maeshima, K; Magini, N; Marraffino, J M; Maruyama, S; Mason, D; McBride, P; Merkel, P; Mrenna, S; Nahn, S; O'Dell, V; Pedro, K; Prokofyev, O; Rakness, G; Ristori, L; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Soha, A; Spalding, W J; Spiegel, L; Stoynev, S; Strait, J; Strobbe, N; Taylor, L; Tkaczyk, S; Tran, N V; Uplegger, L; Vaandering, E W; Vernieri, C; Verzocchi, M; Vidal, R; Wang, M; Weber, H A; Whitbeck, A; Wu, Y; Acosta, D; Avery, P; Bortignon, P; Bourilkov, D; Brinkerhoff, A; Carnes, A; Carver, M; Curry, D; Das, S; Field, R D; Furic, I K; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Low, J F; Ma, P; Matchev, K; Mei, H; Mitselmakher, G; Rank, D; Shchutska, L; Sperka, D; Thomas, L; Wang, J; Wang, S; Yelton, J; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Martinez, G; Rodriguez, J L; Ackert, A; Adams, T; Askew, A; Bein, S; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Johnson, K F; Kolberg, T; Prosper, H; Santra, A; Yohay, R; Baarmand, M M; Bhopatkar, V; Colafranceschi, S; Hohlmann, M; Noonan, D; Roy, T; Yumiceva, F; Adams, M R; Apanasevich, L; Berry, D; Betts, R R; Bucinskaite, I; Cavanaugh, R; Evdokimov, O; Gauthier, L; Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; Jung, K; Sandoval Gonzalez, I D; Varelas, N; Wang, H; Wu, Z; Zakaria, M; Zhang, J; Bilki, B; Clarida, W; Dilsiz, K; Durgut, S; Gandrajula, R P; Haytmyradov, M; Khristenko, V; Merlo, J-P; Mermerkaya, H; Mestvirishvili, A; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Ogul, H; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Penzo, A; Snyder, C; Tiras, E; Wetzel, J; Yi, K; Blumenfeld, B; Cocoros, A; Eminizer, N; Fehling, D; Feng, L; Gritsan, A V; Maksimovic, P; Roskes, J; Sarica, U; Swartz, M; Xiao, M; You, C; Al-Bataineh, A; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Boren, S; Bowen, J; Castle, J; Forthomme, L; Kenny Iii, R P; Khalil, S; Kropivnitskaya, A; Majumder, D; Mcbrayer, W; Murray, M; Sanders, S; Stringer, R; Tapia Takaki, J D; Wang, Q; Ivanov, A; Kaadze, K; Maravin, Y; Mohammadi, A; Saini, L K; Skhirtladze, N; Toda, S; Rebassoo, F; Wright, D; Anelli, C; Baden, A; Baron, O; Belloni, A; Calvert, B; Eno, S C; Ferraioli, C; Gomez, J A; Hadley, N J; Jabeen, S; Jeng, G Y; Kellogg, R G; Kunkle, J; Mignerey, A C; Ricci-Tam, F; Shin, Y H; Skuja, A; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Abercrombie, D; Allen, B; Apyan, A; Azzolini, V; Barbieri, R; Baty, A; Bi, R; Bierwagen, K; Brandt, S; Busza, W; Cali, I A; D'Alfonso, M; Demiragli, Z; Gomez Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; Hsu, D; Iiyama, Y; Innocenti, G M; Klute, M; Kovalskyi, D; Krajczar, K; Lai, Y S; Lee, Y-J; Levin, A; Luckey, P D; Maier, B; Marini, A C; Mcginn, C; Mironov, C; Narayanan, S; Niu, X; Paus, C; Roland, C; Roland, G; Salfeld-Nebgen, J; Stephans, G S F; Tatar, K; Velicanu, D; Wang, J; Wang, T W; Wyslouch, B; Benvenuti, A C; Chatterjee, R M; Evans, A; Hansen, P; Kalafut, S; Kao, S C; Kubota, Y; Lesko, Z; Mans, J; Nourbakhsh, S; Ruckstuhl, N; Rusack, R; Tambe, N; Turkewitz, J; Acosta, J G; Oliveros, S; Avdeeva, E; Bloom, K; Claes, D R; Fangmeier, C; Suarez, R Gonzalez; Kamalieddin, R; Kravchenko, I; Rodrigues, A Malta; Monroy, J; Siado, J E; Snow, G R; Stieger, B; Alyari, M; Dolen, J; Godshalk, A; Harrington, C; Iashvili, I; Kaisen, J; Nguyen, D; Parker, A; Rappoccio, S; Roozbahani, B; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Hortiangtham, A; Massironi, A; Morse, D M; Nash, D; Orimoto, T; Teixeira De Lima, R; Trocino, D; Wang, R-J; Wood, D; Bhattacharya, S; Charaf, O; Hahn, K A; Kumar, A; Mucia, N; Odell, N; Pollack, B; Schmitt, M H; Sung, K; Trovato, M; Velasco, M; Dev, N; Hildreth, M; Hurtado Anampa, K; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kellams, N; Lannon, K; Marinelli, N; Meng, F; Mueller, C; Musienko, Y; Planer, M; Reinsvold, A; Ruchti, R; Rupprecht, N; Smith, G; Taroni, S; Wayne, M; Wolf, M; Woodard, A; Alimena, J; Antonelli, L; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Flowers, S; Francis, B; Hart, A; Hill, C; Hughes, R; Ji, W; Liu, B; Luo, W; Puigh, D; Winer, B L; Wulsin, H W; Cooperstein, S; Driga, O; Elmer, P; Hardenbrook, J; Hebda, P; Lange, D; Luo, J; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mei, K; Ojalvo, I; Olsen, J; Palmer, C; Piroué, P; Stickland, D; Svyatkovskiy, A; Tully, C; Malik, S; Barker, A; Barnes, V E; Folgueras, S; Gutay, L; Jha, M K; Jones, M; Jung, A W; Khatiwada, A; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Schulte, J F; Shi, X; Sun, J; Wang, F; Xie, W; Parashar, N; Stupak, J; Adair, A; Akgun, B; Chen, Z; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Guilbaud, M; Li, W; Michlin, B; Northup, M; Padley, B P; Roberts, J; Rorie, J; Tu, Z; Zabel, J; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Duh, Y T; Ferbel, T; Galanti, M; Garcia-Bellido, A; Han, J; Hindrichs, O; Khukhunaishvili, A; Lo, K H; Tan, P; Verzetti, M; Agapitos, A; Chou, J P; Gershtein, Y; Gómez Espinosa, T A; Halkiadakis, E; Heindl, M; Hughes, E; Kaplan, S; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R; Kyriacou, S; Lath, A; Nash, K; Osherson, M; Saka, H; Salur, S; Schnetzer, S; Sheffield, D; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Thomassen, P; Walker, M; Delannoy, A G; Foerster, M; Heideman, J; Riley, G; Rose, K; Spanier, S; Thapa, K; Bouhali, O; Celik, A; Dalchenko, M; De Mattia, M; Delgado, A; Dildick, S; Eusebi, R; Gilmore, J; Huang, T; Juska, E; Kamon, T; Mueller, R; Pakhotin, Y; Patel, R; Perloff, A; Perniè, L; Rathjens, D; Safonov, A; Tatarinov, A; Ulmer, K A; Akchurin, N; Cowden, C; Damgov, J; De Guio, F; Dragoiu, C; Dudero, P R; Faulkner, J; Gurpinar, E; Kunori, S; Lamichhane, K; Lee, S W; Libeiro, T; Peltola, T; Undleeb, S; Volobouev, I; Wang, Z; Greene, S; Gurrola, A; Janjam, R; Johns, W; Maguire, C; Melo, A; Ni, H; Sheldon, P; Tuo, S; Velkovska, J; Xu, Q; Arenton, M W; Barria, P; Cox, B; Goodell, J; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Li, H; Neu, C; Sinthuprasith, T; Sun, X; Wang, Y; Wolfe, E; Xia, F; Clarke, C; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Sturdy, J; Belknap, D A; Buchanan, J; Caillol, C; Dasu, S; Dodd, L; Duric, S; Gomber, B; Grothe, M; Herndon, M; Hervé, A; Klabbers, P; Lanaro, A; Levine, A; Long, K; Loveless, R; Perry, T; Pierro, G A; Polese, G; Ruggles, T; Savin, A; Smith, N; Smith, W H; Taylor, D; Woods, N

    2017-01-01

    The first measurement of the jet mass [Formula: see text] of top quark jets produced in [Formula: see text] events from pp collisions at [Formula: see text] [Formula: see text] is reported for the jet with the largest transverse momentum [Formula: see text] in highly boosted hadronic top quark decays. The data sample, collected with the CMS detector, corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 19.7[Formula: see text]. The measurement is performed in the lepton+jets channel in which the products of the semileptonic decay [Formula: see text] with [Formula: see text] where [Formula: see text] is an electron or muon, are used to select [Formula: see text] events with large Lorentz boosts. The products of the fully hadronic decay [Formula: see text] with [Formula: see text] are reconstructed using a single Cambridge-Aachen jet with distance parameter [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text] [Formula: see text]. The [Formula: see text] cross section as a function of [Formula: see text] is unfolded at the particle level and is used to test the modelling of highly boosted top quark production. The peak position of the [Formula: see text] distribution is sensitive to the top quark mass [Formula: see text], and the data are used to extract a value of [Formula: see text] to assess this sensitivity.

  5. Anti-aging activities of extracts from Tunisian medicinal halophytes and their aromatic constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jdey, A.; Falleh, H.; Ben Jannet, S.; Mkadmini Hammi, K.; Dauvergne, X.; Magné, C.; Ksouri, R.

    2017-01-01

    Six medicinal halophytes widely represented in North Africa and commonly used in traditional medicine were screened for pharmacological properties to set out new promising sources of natural ingredients for cosmetic or nutraceutical applications. Thus, Citrullus colocynthis, Cleome arabica, Daemia cordata, Haloxylon articulatum, Pituranthos scoparius and Scorzonera undulata were examined for their in vitro antioxidant (DPPH scavenging and superoxide anion-scavenging, β-carotene bleaching inhibition and iron-reducing tests), antibacterial (microdilution method, against four human pathogenic bacteria) and anti-tyrosinase activities. Besides, their aromatic composition was determined by RP-HPLC. H. articulatum shoot extracts exhibited the strongest antioxidant activity and inhibited efficiently the growth of Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli. P. scoparius and C. arabica inhibited slightly monophenolase, whereas H. articulatum was the most efficient inhibitor of diphenolase activity. Furthermore, H. articulatum exhibited the highest aromatic content (3.4 % DW), with dopamine as the major compound. These observations suggest that shoot extract of H. articulatum, and to a lesser extent of C. arabica, could be used as antioxidant, antibiotic as well as new natural skin lightening agents. Also, possible implication of aromatic compounds in anti-tyrosinase activity is discussed. PMID:28827992

  6. Screening of anti-dengue activity in methanolic extracts of medicinal plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Leon IC

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dengue fever regardless of its serotypes has been the most prevalent arthropod-borne viral diseases among the world population. The development of a dengue vaccine is complicated by the antibody-dependent enhancement effect. Thus, the development of a plant-based antiviral preparation promises a more potential alternative in combating dengue disease. Methods Present studies investigated the antiviral effects of standardised methanolic extracts of Andrographis paniculata, Citrus limon, Cymbopogon citratus, Momordica charantia, Ocimum sanctum and Pelargonium citrosum on dengue virus serotype 1 (DENV-1. Results O. sanctum contained 88.6% of total flavonoids content, an amount that was the highest among all the six plants tested while the least was detected in M. charantia. In this study, the maximum non-toxic dose (MNTD of the six medicinal plants was determined by testing the methanolic extracts against Vero E6 cells in vitro. Studies also determined that the MNTD of methanolic extract was in the decreasing order of M. charantia >C. limon >P. citrosum, O. sanctum >A. paniculata >C. citratus. Antiviral assay based on cytopathic effects (CPE denoted by degree of inhibition upon treating DENV1-infected Vero E6 cells with MNTD of six medicinal plants showed that A. paniculata has the most antiviral inhibitory effects followed by M. charantia. These results were further verified with an in vitro inhibition assay using MTT, in which 113.0% and 98.0% of cell viability were recorded as opposed to 44.6% in DENV-1 infected cells. Although methanolic extracts of O. sanctum and C. citratus showed slight inhibition effect based on CPE, a significant inhibition was not reflected in MTT assay. Methanolic extracts of C. limon and P. citrosum did not prevent cytopathic effects or cell death from DENV-1. Conclusions The methanol extracts of A. paniculata and M. charantia possess the ability of inhibiting the activity of DENV-1 in in vitro assays

  7. Automated Tongue Feature Extraction for ZHENG Classification in Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratchadaporn Kanawong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available ZHENG, Traditional Chinese Medicine syndrome, is an integral and essential part of Traditional Chinese Medicine theory. It defines the theoretical abstraction of the symptom profiles of individual patients and thus, used as a guideline in disease classification in Chinese medicine. For example, patients suffering from gastritis may be classified as Cold or Hot ZHENG, whereas patients with different diseases may be classified under the same ZHENG. Tongue appearance is a valuable diagnostic tool for determining ZHENG in patients. In this paper, we explore new modalities for the clinical characterization of ZHENG using various supervised machine learning algorithms. We propose a novel-color-space-based feature set, which can be extracted from tongue images of clinical patients to build an automated ZHENG classification system. Given that Chinese medical practitioners usually observe the tongue color and coating to determine a ZHENG type and to diagnose different stomach disorders including gastritis, we propose using machine-learning techniques to establish the relationship between the tongue image features and ZHENG by learning through examples. The experimental results obtained over a set of 263 gastritis patients, most of whom suffering Cold Zheng or Hot ZHENG, and a control group of 48 healthy volunteers demonstrate an excellent performance of our proposed system.

  8. Employing Solid Phase Microextraction as Extraction Tool for Pesticide Residues in Traditional Medicinal Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thamani T. Gondo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available HS-SPME was optimised using blank plant sample for analysis of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs of varying polarities in selected medicinal plants obtained from northern part of Botswana, where OCPs such as DDT and endosulfan have been historically applied to control disease carrying vectors (mosquitos and tsetse fly. The optimised SPME parameters were used to isolate analytes from root samples of five medicinal plants obtained from Maun and Kasane, Botswana. The final analytes determination was done with a gas chromatograph equipped with GC-ECD and analyte was confirmed using electron ionisation mass spectrometer (GC-MS. Dieldrin was the only pesticide detected and confirmed with MS in the Terminalia sericea sample obtained from Kasane. The method was validated and the analyte recoveries ranged from 69.58±7.20 to 113±15.44%, with RSDs ranging from 1.19 to 17.97%. The method indicated good linearity (R2>0.9900 in the range of 2 to 100 ng g−1. The method also proved to be sensitive with low limits of detection (LODs ranging from 0.48±0.16 to 1.50±0.50 ng g−1. It can be concluded that SPME was successfully utilized as a sampling and extraction tool for pesticides of diverse polarities in root samples of medicinal plants.

  9. Anticancer and antioxidant activities of methanol extracts and fractions of some Cameroonian medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagne, Richard Simo; Telefo, Bruno Phelix; Nyemb, Jean Noel; Yemele, Didiane Mefokou; Njina, Sylvain Nguedia; Goka, Stéphanie Marie Chekem; Lienou, Landry Lienou; Nwabo Kamdje, Armel Hervé; Moundipa, Paul Fewou; Farooq, Ahsana Dar

    2014-09-01

    To obtain a scientific basis of the use of plant-derived preparations by many rural people in Cameroon, for their primary health care needs in the treatment of diseases such as cancer. The antiproliferative effect of 11 plants methanol crude extracts on four cancer cells using sulforhodamine-B assay and their antioxidant activities using 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical and nitric oxide radical scavenging ability were investigated. The Ekebergia senegalensis (E. senegalensis) and Protea elliotii (P. elliotii) extracts were selected based on their antioxidant and anticancer activities, and partition in hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, butanol and methanol was done. Each fraction was submitted to antioxidant and anticancer activities, and the effect of the dichloromethane fraction (the most antiproliferative fraction) on NCI-H460 cell cycle was determined by flow cytometry. The most antiproliferative substances were found for the extracts from E. senegalensis, P. elliotii, Terminalia macroptera and Vitellaria paradoxa. Whereas the most antioxidant substances were found for the extracts from Cissus populnea, E. senegalensis, P. elliotii, Terminalia macroptera, Vitellaria paradoxa, and Gardenia aqualla. Dichloromethane fraction of P. elliotii was found to be highly antiproliferative to NCI-H460 cancer cells and showed S phase arrest cell cycle progression. Ethyl acetate n-butanol and methanol fractions showed quite strong antioxidant activity for both E. senegalensis and P. elliotii, as compared to that of gallic acid. Overall, the antiproliferative and antioxidant activities of some of the extracts lend some support to their use in the traditional medicine of Adamawa Region, Cameroon to treat cancer. Copyright © 2014 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Collection and Identification of a Medicinal Mushroom, Phellinus Conchatus in Iran and Investigation of the Antibacterial Activity of Total Methanol Extract and Fractional Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Hokmollahi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Macromycetes are considered as new resources for medicine with various biological properties. One of the most important medicinal fungi in Iran is Phellinus conchatus. This genus contains 359 species around the world of which 12 species are reported from the north regions of Iran. Phellinus species have anticancer, antioxidant and antibacterial effects. Moreover, they have been used in traditional medicines for treatment of several diseases. Due to the increasing bacterial resistance to existing antibiotics, it seems that research for new sources of antibiotics is necessary. Methods: The purpose of this research was to collect and identify the species with respect to hosts, dispersal, macromorphological and micromorphological characters of the species, and their biological effect against Gram-negative bacteria and Gram-positive bacteria was evaluated using total methanol extract and it’s fractional extracts(chloroform, butanol and water extracts using disk diffusion method, minimum inhibitory concentrations(MICs and minimal bactericidal concentrations(MBCs. Results: The results of disk diffusion tests showed that all extracts except aqueous extract had growth inhibitory effects on three bacteria; Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The butanolic extract showed the best result in growth inhibition against the bacteria, especially on Pseudomonas aeruginosa . The MICs and MBCs of the butanol extract of these bacteria were(1, 2mg.disk, (2, 4 mg.disk and(8, 16mg.disk, respectively. Conclusion: The results show that different extracts, especially butanol extract have high antibacterial activities which indicate the presence of active components in this fraction. More fractionation studies are under way to isolate the antibacterial components in the butanolic extract.

  11. Evaluation of antibacterial effect of some Sinai medicinal plant extracts on bacteria isolated from bovine mastitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamil S. G. Zeedan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Bovine mastitis is the most economically important disease affecting dairy cattle worldwide from an economic, diagnostic and public-health point of view. The present study aimed to isolate and identify of bacteria causes mastitis in dairy cows and to evaluate the antibacterial activities of some selected medicinal plants extracts comparing antibiotics used in the treatment of mastitis in Egypt. Materials and Methods: A total of 203 milk samples of dairy cows were collected during the period from February to June 2013 at different Governorates in Egypt. The use clinical inspection and California mastitis test examination were provided efficient diagnostic tool for detection of clinical, subclinical mastitis and apparently normal health cattle. The collected milk samples were cultured on Nutrient, Blood agar, Mannitol salt, Edward’s and MacConkey agar plates supporting the growth of various types of bacteria for their biochemical studies and isolation. The antimicrobial activity of plants extracts (Jasonia montana and Artemisia herb albawith different solvent (ethanol, petroleum ether, chloroform and acetonewere studied in vitro against isolated bacteria from mastitis by paper desk diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration method (MIC. Results: The prevalence of clinical, subclinical mastitis and normal healthy animals were 34.50%, 24.7% and 40.8% respectively. The major pathogens isolated from collected milk samples were Escherichia coli (22.16%, Staphylococcus aureus (20.19%, Streptococcus spp. (13.3%, Streptococcus agalactiae (12.8%, Streptococcus dysgalactia (0.5%, Pasteurella spp. (2.45%, Klebsiella spp. (1.47%and Pseudomonas spp. (0.45%. The highest antibacterial activity of J. montana plant extracted with acetone solvent against S. agalactiae, E. coli, S. aureus, Klebsiella spp and coagulase-negative Staphylococci with zone of inhibition values ± standard deviation (SD, ranging from 4.33±0.57 to 25.6±0.60 mm. The MIC values

  12. Chemical composition of hydroethanolic extracts from Siparuna guianensis, medicinal plant used as anxiolytics in Amazon region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Negri

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Siparuna guianensis Aubl., Siparunaceae, is used as anxiolytic plants in folk medicine by South-American indians, "caboclos" and river-dwellers. This work focused the evaluation of phenolic composition of hydroethanolic extract of S. guianensis through HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS/MS. The constituents exhibited protonated, deprotonated and sodiated molecules and the MS/MS fragmentation of protonated, deprotonated and sodiated molecules provided product ions with rich structural information. Vicenin-2 (apigenin-6,8-di-C-glucoside was the main constituent found in S. guianensis together quercetin-3,7-di-O-rhamnoside and kaempferol-3,7di-O-rhamnoside. A commercial extract of Passiflora incarnata (Phytomedicine was used as surrogate standard and also was analyzed through HPLC-DAD-ESI/ MS/MS, showing flavones C-glycosides as constituents, among them, vicenin-2 and vitexin. The main constituent was vitexin. Flavonols triglycosides was also found in low content in S. guianensis and were tentatively characterized as quercetin-3O-rutinoside-7-O-rhamnoside, quercetin-3-O-pentosyl-pentoside-7-O-rhamnoside and kaempferol-3-O-pentosyl-pentoside-7-O-rhamnoside. Apigenin and kaempferol derivatives had been reported as anxiolytic agents. Flavonoids present in this extract were correlated with flavonoids reported as anxiolytics.

  13. Chemical composition of hydroethanolic extracts from Siparuna guianensis, medicinal plant used as anxiolytics in Amazon region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Negri

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Siparuna guianensis Aubl., Siparunaceae, is used as anxiolytic plants in folk medicine by South-American indians, "caboclos" and river-dwellers. This work focused the evaluation of phenolic composition of hydroethanolic extract of S. guianensis through HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS/MS. The constituents exhibited protonated, deprotonated and sodiated molecules and the MS/MS fragmentation of protonated, deprotonated and sodiated molecules provided product ions with rich structural information. Vicenin-2 (apigenin-6,8-di-C-glucoside was the main constituent found in S. guianensis together quercetin-3,7-di-O-rhamnoside and kaempferol-3,7di-O-rhamnoside. A commercial extract of Passiflora incarnata (Phytomedicine was used as surrogate standard and also was analyzed through HPLC-DAD-ESI/ MS/MS, showing flavones C-glycosides as constituents, among them, vicenin-2 and vitexin. The main constituent was vitexin. Flavonols triglycosides was also found in low content in S. guianensis and were tentatively characterized as quercetin-3O-rutinoside-7-O-rhamnoside, quercetin-3-O-pentosyl-pentoside-7-O-rhamnoside and kaempferol-3-O-pentosyl-pentoside-7-O-rhamnoside. Apigenin and kaempferol derivatives had been reported as anxiolytic agents. Flavonoids present in this extract were correlated with flavonoids reported as anxiolytics.

  14. Screening of Venezuelan medicinal plant extracts for cytostatic and cytotoxic activity against tumor cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Peter; Arsenak, Miriam; Abad, María Jesús; Fernández, Angel; Milano, Balentina; Gonto, Reina; Ruiz, Marie-Christine; Fraile, Silvia; Taylor, Sofía; Estrada, Omar; Michelangeli, Fabian

    2013-04-01

    There are estimated to be more than 20,000 species of plants in Venezuela, of which more than 1500 are used for medicinal purposes by indigenous and local communities. Only a relatively small proportion of these have been evaluated in terms of their potential as antitumor agents. In this study, we screened 308 extracts from 102 species for cytostatic and cytotoxic activity against a panel of six tumor cell lines using a 24-h sulphorhodamine B assay. Extracts from Clavija lancifolia, Hamelia patens, Piper san-vicentense, Physalis cordata, Jacaranda copaia, Heliotropium indicum, and Annona squamosa were the most cytotoxic, whereas other extracts from Calotropis gigantea, Hyptis dilatata, Chromolaena odorata, Siparuna guianensis, Jacaranda obtusifolia, Tapirira guianensis, Xylopia aromatica, Protium heptaphyllum, and Piper arboreum showed the greatest cytostatic activity. These results confirm previous reports on the cytotoxic activities of the above-mentioned plants as well as prompting further studies on others such as C. lancifolia and H. dilatata that have not been so extensively studied. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Cytotoxic and Antibacterial Activity of an Extract from a Saudi Traditional Medicinal Plant Equisetum Arvense

    KAUST Repository

    Aldaas, Salsabil

    2011-05-01

    Background:Many ancient civilizations have used plants for medicinal purposes and indeed research has suggested that plant-derived compounds can be useful for treating many ailments, including cancer and infectious diseases. One such plant, Equisetum arvense, commonly known as horsetail, is a herbal plant that grows in Saudi Arabia and is traditionally used as a diuretic. Objective (s): We sought to determine whether horsetail extract exhibits 1) cytotoxic activity on cell lines and 2) antibacterial activity on the bacterial strain Escherichia coli. Materials and Methods: Using dried aerial part of the horsetail plant, a methanolic extract was prepared for screening. This extract was examined for its cytotoxic effect on the following cell lines: cervical adenocarcinoma and breast adenocarcinoma as a cancer cell model; lung fibroblast as a normal cell model; and human embryonic kidney. After 72 hours of treatment, the cells were assayed to determine the relative percentages of dead and live cells. Microscopical examination was used to give approximate percentages and a general overview of the effect on cell morphology. The LIVE⁄DEAD® Viability⁄Cytotoxicity kit was used to determine viability of cells in the population by using two dyes: the green-fluorescent calcein-AM which stains living cells, and the red-fluorescent ethidium homodimer-1 which stains dead cells. The alamarBlue® assay, based on a fluorometric/colorimetric growth indicator that detects metabolic activity, was used to establish a relative percentage of the living cells in a population treated with the plant extract compared to untreated cells (control). To determine antibacterial activity, the disc diffusion method was used. Results: Preliminary screening suggests that the horsetail extract induces death on the four tested cell lines with the greatest effect on human embryonic kidney cells followed by breast adenocarcinoma. The extract also displayed antibacterial activity at the highest

  16. Chinese herbal medicine Tangshen Formula treatment of patients with type 2 diabetic kidney disease with macroalbuminuria: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Meihua; Wen, Yumin; Yang, Liping; Wu, Xi'ai; Lu, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Bingxuan; Huang, Weiping; Li, Ping

    2016-05-23

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is one of the most common microvascular complications of diabetes mellitus and the main cause of end-stage renal disease. Present medications for DKD are not entirely satisfactory. Preliminary studies indicate that the Chinese herbal formula Tangshen Formula (TSF) appears to decrease the proteinuria and improve the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in DKD patients. This trial is a five-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. DKD patients with a 24-h urinary protein (24 h UP) level between 0.5 and 3.5 g and serum creatinine patients with macroalbuminuria. Chinese Clinical Trials Registry, ChiCTR-TRC-13003566 . Registered 9 August 2013.

  17. Extraction and isolation of new compounds from traditional herbal medicine; Clerodendrum phlomidis Linn.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Jameel

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Clerodendrum phlomidis L., (Lamiaceae, is a shrub, generally found in south-east Asia. This genus has great ethno-medicinal importance in various indigenous systems of medicine like Indian, Chinese, Thai, Korean, Siddha, Unani and Japanese for the treatment of numerous diseases like syphilis, typhoid, cancer, jaundice, hypertension, constipation, gonorrhea, piles, urinary diseases, nervous disorders, inflammation and measles. Isolation of three new compounds from methanolic extracts of roots of plant namely 3′-stigmast-5-enyl-4′-octadecanyl protocatechuic acid (2, n-tetratriacont-24-enoic acid (3, n-tetradecanyl- glucopyranosyl–(2′→1″ glucopyranoside (5 along with known β-sitosteryl n-octadec-9′,12′-dienoate (1, n-octadec-9-enoyl- β-D-arabinopyranoside (4 and α-D-glucopyranosyl-(6→1′-α-D-glucopyranosyl-(6′→1″-α-D-glucopyranoside (6 have been done on the basis of spectral data analysis and chemical means.

  18. Radioactivity of natural medicinal preparations contained extracts from peat mud available in retail trade used externally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpińska, Maria; Kapała, Jacek; Raciborska, Agnieszka; Kulesza, Grzegorz; Milewska, Anna; Mnich, Stanisław

    2017-08-01

    In this work were identified and measured the activity of radioactive isotopes present in medicinal preparations from peat mud and estimated the doses obtained from them during therapy. Radioactivity of 22 preparations from peat mud and 20 water samples from water of the North-East region of Poland was studied. The median of the total activity was 24.8 Bq kg -1 . Total maximal isotope activity was observed in the Iwonicka Cube 146 Bq kg -1 while considerable amounts of isotopes were found in the Kolobrzeska Peat Mud Paste 112 Bq kg -1 . The doses obtained during therapy were within the range of 11 nSv-13 μSv depending on extracts of medicinal preparations from peat mud. The probability that such a small dose would stimulate biological effects is low. However, some clinicians believe that one of the possible therapeutic mechanisms in the treatment of rheumatoid disorders is the induction of immune response by ionising radiation.

  19. Coordinate regulatory osteogenesis effects of icariin, timosaponin B II and ferulic acid from traditional Chinese medicine formulas on UMR-106 osteoblastic cells and osteoblasts in neonatal rat calvaria cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mei; Zhang, Nai-Dan; Wang, Yin; Han, Ting; Jiang, Yi-Ping; Rahman, Khalid; Qin, Lu-Ping; Xin, Hai-Liang; Zhang, Qiao-Yan

    2016-06-05

    Icariin (I), ferulic acid (F) and timosaponin B II (T) derived respectively from the leaf of Epimedium brevicornu Maxim (EBM, Berberidaceae), rhizome of Anemarrhena asphodeloides Bunge (AAB, Liliaceae) and root of Angelica sinensis (Oliv.) Diels (ASD, Umbelliferae) are included in several traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) formulas for the treatment of osteoporosis. In addition, the medicinal materials and chemical constituents in many traditional Chinese formulas have been shown to have potential synergistic, additive and antagonistic effects. To explore the action mechanism and interactions between I, T and F as bone anabolic ingredients on osteoblasts, and fully understand their action mechanism and rationality of the formula design. An osteoporotic model was established in bilaterally ovariectomized mice. Bone mineral density (BMD), bone mineral content (BMC) and serum biochemical parameters including alkaline phosphatase (ALP), tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), osteoprotegerin (OPG) and deoxypyridinoline cross-links (DPD) were measured to evaluate the effects of I, T or F alone and their combinations on osteoporotic mice. UMR-106 osteoblastic cells and primary osteoblasts in neonatal rat calvarias were used to evaluate the osteogenesis effect. The immunohistochemical method and Western-blot analysis were used to detect the expression of critical proteins in the process of proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts. IFT combinations enhanced the therapeutic effect without increasing the adverse effects on osteoporotic mice, synergistically increased the osteoblast proliferation, ALP activity and mineralized nodule formation, and promoted the expression of bone matrix by regulating BMP and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways in osteoblasts. IFT combinations reinforced the therapeutic effect on osteoporosis by modulating multi-signaling pathways and action targets. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Chemical and Biological Aspects of Extracts from Medicinal Plants with Antidiabetic Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gushiken, Lucas F; Beserra, Fernando P; Rozza, Ariane L; Bérgamo, Patrícia L; Bérgamo, Danilo A; Pellizzon, Cláudia H

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease and a leading cause of death in western countries. Despite advancements in the clinical management of the disease, it is not possible to control the late complications of diabetes. The main characteristic feature of diabetes is hyperglycemia, which reflects the deterioration in the use of glucose due to a faulty or poor response to insulin secretion. Alloxan and streptozotocin (STZ) are the chemical tools that are most commonly used to study the disease in rodents. Many plant species have been used in ethnopharmacology or to treat experimentally symptoms of this disease. When evaluated pharmacologically, most of the plants employed as antidiabetic substances have been shown to exhibit hypoglycemic and antihyperglycemic activities, and to contain chemical constituents that may be used as new antidiabetic agents. There are many substances extracted from plants that offer antidiabetic potential, whereas others may result in hypoglycemia as a side effect due to their toxicity, particularly their hepatotoxicity. In this article we present an updated overview of the studies on extracts from medicinal plants, relating the mechanisms of action by which these substances act and the natural principles of antidiabetic activity.

  1. Induction of murine embryonic stem cell differentiation by medicinal plant extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynertson, Kurt A. [Center for Complementary and Integrative Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Department of Pharmacology, Weill Cornell Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Charlson, Mary E. [Center for Complementary and Integrative Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Gudas, Lorraine J., E-mail: ljgudas@med.cornell.edu [Center for Complementary and Integrative Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Department of Pharmacology, Weill Cornell Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicates that diets high in fruits and vegetables provide a measure of cancer chemoprevention due to phytochemical constituents. Natural products are a rich source of cancer chemotherapy drugs, and primarily target rapidly cycling tumor cells. Increasing evidence indicates that many cancers contain small populations of resistant, stem-like cells that have the capacity to regenerate tumors following chemotherapy and radiation, and have been linked to the initiation of metastases. Our goal is to discover natural product-based clinical or dietary interventions that selectively target cancer stem cells, inducing differentiation. We adapted an alkaline phosphatase (AP) stain to assay plant extracts for the capacity to induce differentiation in embryonic stem (ES) cells. AP is a characteristic marker of undifferentiated ES cells, and this represents a novel approach to screening medicinal plant extracts. Following a survey of approximately 100 fractions obtained from 12 species of ethnomedically utilized plants, we found fractions from 3 species that induced differentiation, decreasing AP and transcript levels of pluripotency markers (Nanog, Oct-4, Rex-1). These fractions affected proliferation of murine ES, and human embryonal, prostate, and breast carcinoma cells in a dose-dependent manner. Several phytochemical constituents were isolated; the antioxidant phytochemicals ellagic acid and gallic acid were shown to affect viability of cultured breast carcinoma cells.

  2. Extraction of an hyperglycaemic principle from the annatto (Bixa orellana), a medicinal plant in the West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, E Y; Thompson, H; Pascoe, K; West, M; Fletcher, C

    1991-01-01

    The red powdery extract from the seeds of the annatto, Bixa orellana, is a well known food colouring. In an oil suspension it is used as a folk remedy (bush tea) in the West Indies, for diabetes mellitus. Detailed investigations on this extract, yielded a methyl ester, trans-bixin, molecular weight 394 and molecular formula C24H30O4. This purified substance was demonstrated, in anaesthetised mongrel dogs, to cause hyperglycaemia. Concomitant electron microscopy of tissue biopsies, revealed damage to mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum mainly in liver and pancreas. When dogs were fed on a diet fortified with riboflavin, there was neither demonstrable tissue damage nor associated hyperglycaemia. These findings point to: (i) the potential dangers of informal medications such as 'bush teas'; (ii) the possible role of plant extracts/food additives in the development of diabetes mellitus especially in the undernourished state.

  3. Phytotherapy of calcium urolithiasis with extracts of medicinal plants: Changes of diuresis, urine pH and crystalluria

    OpenAIRE

    Asilbek Gaybullaev; Saidakhror Kariev

    2012-01-01

    At present the phyto-preparations is still widely used in the clinical practice. The simple extracts (infusions) from medicinal plants which have diuretic effect seem to be the most available for preparation and usage. Unfortunately, both physicians and patients consider that the extracts may be prescribed for a long time without limitation. Most of them are used only with purpose to increase diuresis. Meanwhile they have ability to change other urine parameters. We performed study of effect ...

  4. Assessment of effect of hydroalcoholic and decoction methods on extraction of antioxidants from selected Indian medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneria, Mital; Kanani, Bhavana; Chanda, Sumitra

    2012-03-01

    To assess the effects of extraction methods on antioxidant activities of selected Indian medicinal flora. Different parts of plants were extracted by hydroalcoholic and decoction methods using water and various concentrations of methanol (ME) viz. 75%, 50% and 25% ME. The antioxidant activity of all the different extracts was evaluated using two different antioxidant assays viz. 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging assay and superoxide anion radical scavenging assay. Total phenol and flavonoid content was also estimated. The results showed that the extracting solvent significantly altered the antioxidant property estimations of screened plants. High correlations between phenolic compositions and antioxidant activities of extracts were observed. High levels of antioxidant activities were detected in Manilkara zapota (M. zapota) as compared with other screened plants. The results obtained appear to confirm the effect of different methods on extraction of antioxidants and antioxidant property of M. zapota.

  5. Identification of potent anticancer activity in Ximenia americana aqueous extracts used by African traditional medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Cristina; Eyol, Ergül; Berger, Martin R

    2006-03-15

    The antineoplastic activity of a plant powder used in African traditional medicine for treating cancer was investigated by analyzing the activity of various extracts in vitro. The most active, aqueous extract was subsequently subjected to a detailed investigation in a panel of 17 tumor cell lines, showing an average IC50 of 49 mg raw powder/ml medium. The sensitivity of the cell lines varied by two orders of magnitude, from 1.7 mg/ml in MCF7 breast cancer cells to 170 mg/ml in AR230 chronic-myeloid leukemia cells. Immortalized, non-tumorigenic cell lines showed a marginal sensitivity. In addition, kinetic and recovery experiments performed in MCF7 and U87-MG cells and a comparison with the antineoplastic activity of miltefosine, gemcitabine, and cisplatinum in MCF7, U87-MG, HEp2, and SAOS2 cells revealed no obvious similarity between the sensitivity profiles of the extract and the three standard agents, suggesting a different mechanism of cytotoxicity. The in vivo antitumor activity was determined in the CC531 colorectal cancer rat model. Significant anticancer activity was found following administration of equitoxic doses of 100 (perorally) and 5 (intraperitoneally) mg raw powder/kg, indicating a 95% reduced activity following intestinal absorption. By sequencing the mitochondrial gene for the large subunit of the ribulose bis-phosphate carboxylase (rbcL) in DNA from the plant material, the source plant was identified as Ximenia americana. A physicochemical characterization showed that the active antineoplastic component(s) of the plant material are proteins with galactose affinity. Moreover, by mass spectrometry, one of these proteins was shown to contain a stretch of 11 amino acids identical to a tryptic peptide from the ribosome-inactivating protein ricin.

  6. Phytochemical attributes of four conventionally extracted medicinal plants and cytotoxic evaluation of their extracts on human laryngeal carcinoma (HEp2) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belščak-Cvitanović, Ana; Durgo, Ksenija; Bušić, Arijana; Franekić, Jasna; Komes, Draženka

    2014-02-01

    The bioactive composition and cytotoxic and antioxidative/prooxidative effects of four medicinal plants: yarrow (Achillea millefolium L.), hawthorn (Crataegus oxyacantha L.), ground ivy (Glechoma hederacea L.), and olive (Olea europea L.) on human laryngeal carcinoma cell line (HEp2) were investigated. Water extracts of these plants obtained by infusion, maceration, and decoction were characterized for their polyphenol content and antioxidant capacity. Based on the extraction efficiency of polyphenols, the final extracts were obtained whose polyphenolic profile, polysaccharides, mineral content, and cytoprotective activities were determined. The overall highest content of polyphenols and antioxidant capacity was determined in hawthorn, followed by yarrow and ground ivy, and the lowest in olive leaves extract. Phytochemical screening revealed the presence of phenolic acids, as the most abundant bioactive compounds, followed by flavonoids, flavons, and flavonols. All examined medicinal plants reduced the cell viability and reactive oxygen species formation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Ground ivy and yarrow containing a high content of phenolic acids and polysaccharides were more efficient to decrease the cell survival when compared to olive leaf and hawthorn. Experiments confirmed the importance of polyphenolic composition rather than content of investigated plants and revealed a relationship between the polyphenolic and polysaccharide contents and antioxidant/prooxidant characters of medicinal plants.

  7. Antioxidative and immunomodulating activities of polysaccharide extracts of the medicinal mushrooms Agaricus bisporus, Agaricus brasiliensis, Ganoderma lucidum and Phellinus linteus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kozarski, M.; Klaus, A.; Niksic, M.; Jakovljevic, D.; Helsper, J.P.F.G.; Griensven, van L.J.L.D.

    2011-01-01

    Partially purified polysaccharides were obtained from four medicinal mushroom species, Agaricus bisporus, Agaricus brasiliensis, Phellinus linteus and Ganoderma lucidum by hot water extraction, followed by ethanol precipitation. The four samples contained varying amounts of both a- and ß-glucans as

  8. Quantitative analysis of the major constituents in Chinese medicinal preparation SuoQuan formulae by ultra fast high performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng; Li, Hai-Long; Li, Yong-Hui; Tan, Yin-Feng; Zhang, Jun-Qing

    2013-07-30

    The SuoQuan formulae containing Fructus Alpiniae Oxyphyllae has been used to combat the urinary incontinence symptoms including frequency, urgency and nocturia for hundreds of years in China. However, the chemical information was not well characterized. The quality control marker constituent only focused on one single compound in the current Chinese Pharmacopeia. Hence it is prudent to identify and quantify the main constituents in this herbal product. This study aimed to analyze the main constituents using ultra-fast performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (UFLC-MS/MS). Fourteen phytochemicals originated from five chemical classes constituents were identified by comparing the molecular mass, fragmentation pattern and retention time with those of the reference standards. A newly developed UFLC-MS/MS was validated demonstrating that the new assay was valid, reproducible and reliable. This method was successfully applied to simultaneously quantify the fourteen phytochemicals. Notably, the content of these constituents showed significant differences in three pharmaceutical preparations. The major constituent originated from each of chemical class was isolinderalactone, norisoboldine, nootkatone, yakuchinone A and apigenin-4',7-dimethylther, respectively. The variation among these compounds was more than 1000 times. Furthermore, the significant content variation between the two different Suoquan pills was also observed. The proposed method is sensitive and reliable; hence it can be used to analyze a variety of SuoQuan formulae products produced by different pharmaceutical manufacturers.

  9. Evaluation of the medicinal properties of Cyrtocarpa procera Kunth fruit extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Elizalde, Karla Stephanie; Jimenez-Estrada, Manuel; Flores, Cesar Mateo; Hernandez, Luis Barbo; Rosas-Lopez, Rocio; Duran-Diaz, Angel; Nieto-Yañez, Oscar J; Barbosa, Elizabeth; Rodriguez-Monroy, Marco Aurelio; Canales-Martinez, Margarita

    2015-03-21

    The fruit of Cyrtocarpa procera is used to treat stomach diseases by people living in San Rafael, Coxcatlan, Puebla. This work investigated the antibacterial, antioxidant, cytotoxic and anti-inflammatory activities of the fruit produced by this species. Methanol extract was obtained by maceration. After obtaining the methanol extract (MeOH1), methanol subextract (MeOH2) and hexane (H) were obtained. The antibacterial activities of MeOH1, MeOH2 and H were evaluated through disc-diffusion. The quenching of free radicals was evaluated by decolorizing a methanolic DPPH solution. The cytotoxic activity of MeOH2 was evaluated by in vitro assay system of growth inhibition of human cervical carcinoma cell line (CasKi). The IL-1β and TNF-α were determined through ELISA in the supernatants of the macrophage cell line (RAW 264.7). The MeOH2 subextract was separated by column chromatography, seventy-three fractions were collected. The Gram-positive and -negative bacteria examined were sensitive to MeOH1 and MeOH2; the MeOH2 was bactericidal toward Staphyloccocus aureus (MIC = 4 mg/mL) and Vibrio cholera (MIC = 4 mg/mL). The MeOH2 inhibited the DPPH radical (SC50 = 69.7 μg/mL), but a cytotoxicity assay revealed that the extract is not toxic according to the National Cancer Institute (LD50 = 22.03 μg/mL). The production of proinflammatory cytokines (IL- 1β and TNF- α) by LPS- stimulated macrophages was reduced after the treatments. The methanol extract contained various organic acids, such as citric acid, palmitic acid and α- linoleic acid. The fruits of Cyrtocarpa procera are employed to treat ailments such as diarrhea, in this study were demonstrated some biological activities involved in a bacterial infection. This is the first research about of the medicinal properties of C. procera fruit.

  10. Phenolic composition and antioxidant properties of some traditionally used medicinal plants affected by the extraction time and hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komes, Draženka; Belščak-Cvitanović, Ana; Horžić, Dunja; Rusak, Gordana; Likić, Saša; Berendika, Marija

    2011-01-01

    Polyphenolic phytochemicals in traditionally used medicinal plants act as powerful antioxidants, which aroused an increasing interest in their application in functional food development. The effect of extraction time (5 and 15 min) and hydrolysis on the qualitative and quantitative content of phenolic compounds and antioxidant capacity of six traditionally used medicinal plants (Melissa officinalis L., Thymus serpyllum L., Lavandula officinalis Miller, Rubus fruticosus L., Urtica dioica L., and Olea europea L.) were investigated. The content of total phenols, flavonoids, flavan-3-ols and tannins was determined using UV/Vis spectrophotometric methods, while individual phenolic acids, flavones and flavonols were separated and detected using HPLC analysis. Also, to obtain relevant data on the antioxidant capacity, two different assays, (2,2-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) radical scavenging and ferric reducing/antioxidant power (FRAP) assays were used. The extraction efficiency of phenolics, as well as the antioxidant capacity of plant extracts, was affected by both prolonged extraction and hydrolysis. The overall highest content of phenolic compounds was determined in hydrolyzed extract of blackberry leaves (2160 mg GAE/L), followed by the non-hydrolyzed extract of lemon balm obtained after 15 min of extraction (929.33 mg GAE/L). The above extracts also exhibited the highest antioxidant capacity, while extracts of olive leaves were characterized with the lowest content of phenolic compounds, as well as the lowest antioxidant capacity. The highest content of rosmarinic acid, as the most abundant phenolic compound, was determined in non-hydrolyzed extract of lemon balm, obtained after 15 min of extraction. Although the hydrolysis provided the highest content of polyphenolic compounds, longer extraction time (15 min) was more efficient to extract these bioactives than shorter extraction duration (5 min). The distribution of

  11. Bioactivity-guided fractionation identifies amygdalin as a potent neurotrophic agent from herbal medicine Semen Persicae extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chuanbin; Zhao, Jia; Cheng, Yuanyuan; Li, Xuechen; Rong, Jianhui

    2014-01-01

    Herbal medicine Semen Persicae is widely used to treat blood stasis in Chinese medicine and other oriental folk medicines. Although little is known about the effects of Semen Persicae and its active compounds on neuron differentiation, our pilot study showed that Semen Persicae extract promoted neurite outgrowth in rat dopaminergic PC12 cells. In the present study, we developed a bioactivity-guided fractionation procedure for the characterization of the neurotrophic activity of Semen Persicae extract. The resultant fractions were assayed for neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells based on microscopic assessment. Through liquid-liquid extraction and reverse phase HPLC separation, a botanical glycoside amygdalin was isolated as the active compound responsible for the neurotrophic activity of Semen Persicae extract. Moreover, we found that amygdalin rapidly induced the activation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2). A specific ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059 attenuated the stimulatory effect of amygdalin on neurite outgrowth. Taken together, amygdalin was identified as a potent neurotrophic agent from Semen Persicae extract through a bioactivity-guided fractional procedure. The neurotrophic activity of amygdalin may be mediated by the activation of ERK1/2 pathway.

  12. Bioactivity-Guided Fractionation Identifies Amygdalin as a Potent Neurotrophic Agent from Herbal Medicine Semen Persicae Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanbin Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Herbal medicine Semen Persicae is widely used to treat blood stasis in Chinese medicine and other oriental folk medicines. Although little is known about the effects of Semen Persicae and its active compounds on neuron differentiation, our pilot study showed that Semen Persicae extract promoted neurite outgrowth in rat dopaminergic PC12 cells. In the present study, we developed a bioactivity-guided fractionation procedure for the characterization of the neurotrophic activity of Semen Persicae extract. The resultant fractions were assayed for neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells based on microscopic assessment. Through liquid-liquid extraction and reverse phase HPLC separation, a botanical glycoside amygdalin was isolated as the active compound responsible for the neurotrophic activity of Semen Persicae extract. Moreover, we found that amygdalin rapidly induced the activation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2. A specific ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059 attenuated the stimulatory effect of amygdalin on neurite outgrowth. Taken together, amygdalin was identified as a potent neurotrophic agent from Semen Persicae extract through a bioactivity-guided fractional procedure. The neurotrophic activity of amygdalin may be mediated by the activation of ERK1/2 pathway.

  13. Effect of medicinal plants extracts on the incidence of mosaic disease caused by cucumber mosaic virus and growth of chili

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidson, H.; Damiri, N.; Angraini, E.

    2018-01-01

    This research was conducted to study the effect of the application of several extracts of medicinal plants on the incidence of mosaic disease caused by Cucumber Mosaic Virus infection on the chili (Capsicum annuum L.) plantation. A Randomized Block Design with eight treatments including control was used throughout the experiment. Treatments consisted of Azadiracta indica (A), Piper bitle (B), Cymbopogon citrates (C), Curcuma domestica (D), Averroa bilimbi (E), Datura stramonium (F), Annona Muricata (G) and control (H). Each treatment consist of three replications. The parameters observed were the incidence of mosaic attack due to CMV, disease severity, plant height, wet and dry weight and production (number of fruits and the weight of total fruits) each plant. Results showed that the application of medicinal plant extracts reduced the disease severity due to CMV. Extracts of Annona muricata and Datura stramonium were most effective in suppressing disease severity caused by the virus as they significantly different from control and from a number of treatment. The plants medicinal extracts were found to have increased the plant height and total weight of the plant, fruit amount and fruit weight. Extracts of Curcuma domestica, Piper bitle and Cymbopogon citrates were the third highest in fruit amount and weight and significantly different from the control.

  14. Comprehensive and Holistic Analysis of HT-29 Colorectal Cancer Cells and Tumor-Bearing Nude Mouse Model: Interactions Among Fractions Derived From the Chinese Medicine Formula Tian Xian Liquid in Effects on Human Colorectal Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, Annballaw Bridget; Cheung, Ho Pan; Lin, Li-Zhu; Ng, Tzi Bun; Lao, Lixing; Zhang, Yanbo; Zhang, Zhang-Jin; Tong, Yao; Sze, Stephen Cho Wing

    2017-09-01

    The Chinese medicine formula Tian Xian Liquid (TXL) has been used clinically for cancer therapy in China for more than 25 years. However, the comprehensive and holistic effects of its bioactive fractions for various antitumor therapeutic effects have not been unraveled. This is the first study to scientifically elucidate the holistic effect of Chinese medicine formula for treating colon cancer, hence allowing a better understanding of the essence of Chinese medicine formula, through the comparison of the actions of TXL and its functional constituent fractions, including ethyl acetate (EA), butanol (BU), and aqueous (WA) fractions. Tissue-specific proliferative/antiproliferative effects of these fractions on human colorectal carcinoma HT-29 cells and splenocytes were studied by using the MTT assay. Their modulations on the expression of markers of antiproliferation, antimetastasis, reversion of multidrug resistance in treated HT-29 cells were examined with real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis, and their modulations in a xenografted nude mouse model were examined by Western blot analysis. Results revealed that EA fraction slightly inhibited the proliferation of HT-29 cells, but tissue-specifically exerted the most potent antiproliferative effect on splenocytes. On the contrary, only TXL and BU fraction tissue-specifically contributed to the proliferation of splenocytes, but inhibited the proliferation of HT-29 cells. WA fraction exerted the most potent antiproliferative effect on HT-29 cells and also the strongest inhibitory action on tumor size in the nude mouse model in our previous study. In the HT-29 model, TXL and WA fraction exerted the most pronounced effect on upregulation of p21 mRNA and protein; TXL, and EA and WA fractions exerted the effect on downregulation of G1 phase cell cycle protein, cyclin D1 mRNA and protein; EA and BU fractions exerted the most prominent anti-invasive effect on anti-invasion via downregulation of MMP-1 m

  15. Wound healing activity of an aqueous extract of the Lingzhi or Reishi medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lucidum (higher Basidiomycetes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Asheesh; Kirar, Vandana; Keshri, Gaurav Kr; Gola, Shefali; Yadav, Anju; Negi, Prem Singh; Misra, Kshipra

    2014-01-01

    The Lingzhi or Reishi medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lucidum (higher Basidiomycetes) is popular because of its health-promoting properties. The effects of G. lucidum extract on cancer, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and hepatitis have been reported by many researchers. This investigation was undertaken to evaluate the healing efficacy of an aqueous lyophilized extract of G. lucidum from the Indian Himalayan region on dermal excision wound in experimental rats. The extract used in the study was found to be rich in total polyphenol and flavonoid contents. The healing efficacy was comparatively assessed with a reference povidone-iodine ointment. The G. lucidum extract showed significant enhanced healing activity, evidenced by an increase in wound contraction, collagen accumulation (hydroxyproline), hexosamine, and total protein contents. Histopathological findings further supported the biochemical indices. The results suggest that aqueous lyophilized extract of G. lucidum possesses significant wound-healing activity.

  16. Medicinal plants from the Yanesha (Peru): evaluation of the leishmanicidal and antimalarial activity of selected extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valadeau, Céline; Pabon, Adriana; Deharo, Eric; Albán-Castillo, Joaquina; Estevez, Yannick; Lores, Fransis Augusto; Rojas, Rosario; Gamboa, Dionicia; Sauvain, Michel; Castillo, Denis; Bourdy, Geneviève

    2009-06-25

    Ninety-four ethanolic extracts of plants used medicinally by the Yanesha, an Amazonian Peruvian ethnic group, for affections related to leishmaniasis and malaria were screened in vitro against Leishmania amazonensis amastigotes and against a Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistant strain. The viability of Leishmania amazonensis amastigote stages was assessed by the reduction of tetrazolium salt (MTT) while the impact on Plasmodium falciparum was determined by measuring the incorporation of radio-labelled hypoxanthine. Six plant species displayed good activity against Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistant strain (IC(50) Jacaranda copaia (Aubl.) D. Don (Bignoniaceae). Eight species displayed interesting leishmanicidal activities (IC50 < 10 microg/ml): Carica papaya L. (Caricaceae), Piper dennisii Trel (Piperaceae), Hedychium coronarium J. König (Zingiberaceae), Cestrum racemosum Ruiz & Pav. (Solanaceae), Renealmia alpinia (Rottb.) Zingiberaceae, Lantana sp. (Verbenaceae), Hyptis lacustris A. St.-Hil. ex Benth. (Lamiaceae) and Calea montana Klat. (Asteraceae). Most of them are used against skin affections by Yanesha people. Results are discussed herein, according to the traditional use of the plants and compared with data obtained from the literature.

  17. A comparison of the anti-Staphylococcus aureus activity of extracts from commonly used medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, Rebecca; Harrington, Heather; Morrill, Kira; Jeane, LaDeana; Garrity, Joan; Orian, Michael; Lopez, Eric; Rezaie, Saman; Hassberger, Kelly; Familoni, Damilola; Moore, Jessica; Virdee, Kulveen; Albornoz-Sanchez, Leah; Walker, Michael; Cavins, Jami; Russell, Tonyelle; Guse, Emily; Reker, Mary; Tschudy, Onyria; Wolf, Jeremy; True, Teresa; Ukaegbu, Oluchi; Ahaghotu, Ezenwanyi; Jones, Ana; Polanco, Sara; Rochon, Yvan; Waters, Robert; Langland, Jeffrey

    2014-05-01

    Resurgences of Staphylococcus aureus infection continue globally, with antibiotic resistance increasing dramatically, making these infections more difficult to treat. S. aureus epidemics impose public health threats, and economic burdens on health care costs worldwide, presenting challenges modern medicine struggles to control. In order to answer today's call for effective treatments against S. aureus, we evaluated and compared various botanical extracts that have historically been suggested as useful for their antimicrobial properties against S. aureus. Briefly, S. aureus cultures were treated with selected botanical extracts and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) determined. In addition, to obtain more quantitative measures on bacterial growth, 24-hour growth studies were done to examine the temporal activity and stability of various botanicals on bacterial replication. The antimicrobial activity observed for the botanical extracts used in this comparative evaluation of efficacy included both bacteriostatic and bacteriocidal activity against S. aureus. Highly effective botanicals including Salvia officinalis, Eucalyptus globulus, Coleus forskohlii, Coptis chinensis, Turnera diffusa, and Larrea tridentata exhibited MIC values ranging from 60 to 300 μg/mL and a 10(6)-fold reduction in bacterial replication. Arctostaphylos uva-ursi and Allium sativum were slightly less effective, exhibiting MIC values ranging from 90 to 400 μg/mL and a 10(5)-fold reduction, while Anemopsis californica gave MIC value of 360 μg/mL and a 10(4)-fold reduction in bacterial replication. Many botanicals, especially at lower doses, had an initial inhibitory effect followed by a recovery in bacterial replication. Such botanicals included E. globulus, C. chinensis, T. diffusa, A. californica, and Berberis vulgaris. Our data demonstrate that S. officinalis, E. globulus, C. forskohlii, A. uva-ursi, C. chinensis, T. diffusa, A. californica, A. sativum, and L. tridentata all show

  18. Prediction of the Passive Intestinal Absorption of Medicinal Plant Extract Constituents with the Parallel Artificial Membrane Permeability Assay (PAMPA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Charlotte; Bujard, Alban; Skalicka-Woźniak, Krystyna; Cretton, Sylvian; Houriet, Joëlle; Christen, Philippe; Carrupt, Pierre-Alain; Wolfender, Jean-Luc

    2016-03-01

    At the early drug discovery stage, the high-throughput parallel artificial membrane permeability assay is one of the most frequently used in vitro models to predict transcellular passive absorption. While thousands of new chemical entities have been screened with the parallel artificial membrane permeability assay, in general, permeation properties of natural products have been scarcely evaluated. In this study, the parallel artificial membrane permeability assay through a hexadecane membrane was used to predict the passive intestinal absorption of a representative set of frequently occurring natural products. Since natural products are usually ingested for medicinal use as components of complex extracts in traditional herbal preparations or as phytopharmaceuticals, the applicability of such an assay to study the constituents directly in medicinal crude plant extracts was further investigated. Three representative crude plant extracts with different natural product compositions were chosen for this study. The first extract was composed of furanocoumarins (Angelica archangelica), the second extract included alkaloids (Waltheria indica), and the third extract contained flavonoid glycosides (Pueraria montana var. lobata). For each medicinal plant, the effective passive permeability values Pe (cm/s) of the main natural products of interest were rapidly calculated thanks to a generic ultrahigh-pressure liquid chromatography-UV detection method and because Pe calculations do not require knowing precisely the concentration of each natural product within the extracts. The original parallel artificial membrane permeability assay through a hexadecane membrane was found to keep its predictive power when applied to constituents directly in crude plant extracts provided that higher quantities of the extract were initially loaded in the assay in order to ensure suitable detection of the individual constituents of the extracts. Such an approach is thus valuable for the high

  19. Ctrl+Shift+Enter mastering Excel array formulas a book about building efficient formulas, advanced formulas, and array formulas for data analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Girvin, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Designed with Excel gurus in mind, this handbook outlines how to create formulas that can be used to solve everyday problems with a series of data values that standard Excel formulas cannot or would be too arduous to attempt. Beginning with an introduction to array formulas, this manual examines topics such as how they differ from ordinary formulas, the benefits and drawbacks of their use, functions that can and cannot handle array calculations, and array constants and functions. Among the practical applications surveyed include how to extract data from tables and unique lists, how to get resu

  20. Traditional Preparations and Methanol Extracts of Medicinal Plants from Papua New Guinea Exhibit Similar Cytochrome P450 Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica C. Larson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The hypothesis underlying this current work is that fresh juice expressed from Papua New Guinea (PNG medicinal plants (succus will inhibit human Cytochrome P450s (CYPs. The CYP inhibitory activity identified in fresh material was compared with inhibition in methanol extracts of dried material. Succus is the most common method of traditional medicine (TM preparation for consumption in PNG. There is increasing concern that TMs might antagonize or complicate drug therapy. We have previously shown that methanol extracts of commonly consumed PNG medicinal plants are able to induce and/or inhibit human CYPs in vitro. In this current work plant succus was prepared from fresh plant leaves. Inhibition of three major CYPs was determined using human liver microsomes and enzyme-selective model substrates. Of 15 species tested, succus from 6/15 was found to inhibit CYP1A2, 7/15 inhibited CYP3A4, and 4/15 inhibited CYP2D6. Chi-squared tests determined differences in inhibitory activity between succus and methanol preparations. Over 80% agreement was found. Thus, fresh juice from PNG medicinal plants does exhibit the potential to complicate drug therapy in at risk populations. Further, the general reproducibility of these findings suggests that methanol extraction of dried material is a reasonable surrogate preparation method for fresh plant samples.

  1. Interactions between crude drug extracts used in Japanese traditional Kampo medicines and organic anion-transporting polypeptide 2B1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Rie; Watanabe, Tomoki; Ishiuchi, Kan'ichiro; Matsumoto, Takashi; Watanabe, Junko; Makino, Toshiaki

    2018-03-25

    The use of herbal medicines has become popular worldwide, and the information on drug interactions between herbal medicines and chemical drugs is needed. We screened the inhibitory effects of crude drugs used in Kampo medicines used in Japan on organic anion-transporting polypeptide (OATP) 2B1 to predict potential interactions between Kampo medicines and chemical drugs used together. We chose 98 kinds of crude drugs frequently used as ingredients of Kampo formulations in Japan and prepared their boiling water extracts. We then screened their inhibitory effects on OATP2B1 by measuring the uptake of estrone 3-sulphate (E3S) by HEK293 cells stably expressing OATP2B1. At the concentration of 100µg/ml, the extracts prepared from 12 kinds of crude drugs, Scuteralliae Radix, Arecae Semen, Aurantii Fructus Immaturus, Perillae Herba, Panacis Japonici Rhizoma, Moutan Cortex, Polygalae Radix, Rhei Rhizoma, Cannabis Fructus, Chrysanthemi Flos, Eriobotryae Folium, and Querci Cortex, suppressed the function of OATP2B1 by less than 20%. The extract of bofutsushosan, a representative Kampo formulation, inhibited OATP2B1 function with sufficient levels to suppress absorption of OATP2B1 substrates in clinics. We further evaluated the inhibitory effects of several ingredients containing Rhei Rhizoma, Perillae Herba, and Moutan Cortex on OATP2B1. Because of crude drugs used in Kampo medicines might suppress absorption of OATP2B1 substrates, these results may contribute to the safe and effective use of Kampo medicine in clinics. A list of abbreviations: EC, (-)-epicatechin; ECG, epicatechin gallate; EGC, epigallocatechin; EGCG, Epigallocatechin gallate; FBS, fetal bovine serum; grapefruit juice; HEK293, Human embryonic kidney; IC 50, The half inhibitory concentration; OATP, organic anion-transporting polypeptide; β-PGG, penta-O-galloyl-β-D-glucose; t.i.d, 3 times a day. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Excel 2013 formulas

    CERN Document Server

    Walkenbach, John

    2013-01-01

    Maximize the power of Excel 2013 formulas with this must-have Excel reference John Walkenbach, known as ""Mr. Spreadsheet,"" is a master at deciphering complex technical topics and Excel formulas are no exception. This fully updated book delivers more than 800 pages of Excel 2013 tips, tricks, and techniques for creating formulas that calculate, developing custom worksheet functions with VBA, debugging formulas, and much more. Demonstrates how to use all the latest features in Excel 2013 Shows how to create financial formulas and tap into the power of array formulas

  3. The Eschericia coli Growth Inhibition Activity of Some Fermented Medicinal Plant Leaf Extract from the Karo Highland, North Sumatra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NOVIK NURHIDAYAT

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A lot of traditional medicinal plant has antibacterial acitivities. Most of these plants are freshly chewed or grounded and used directly to treat infectious bacterial deseases. However, some practices employ a traditionally spontaneous fermentation on boiled extracted leaf, root or other parts of the plant. This work reports a laboratory stimulated spontaneous fermentation of leaf extracts from selected medicinal plants collected from the Karo Higland. The spontaenous fermentation was stimulated to be carried out by the Acetobacter xylinum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The anti-infectious agent activity was assayed on the Eschericia coli growth inhibition. A complementary non fermented leaf extract was also made and assayed as a comparative measure. Indeed, the fermented leaf extract of bitter bush (Eupatorium pallescens, cacao (Theobroma cacao, avocado (Persia gratissima, passion fruit (Passiflora edulis, cassava (Cassava utillissima, diamond flower (Hedyotis corymbosa, periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus, and gandarusa (Justicia gendarussa have relatively higher anti-E.coli acitivity than those of non fermented ones. However, there were no anti-E.coli activity was detected in both fermented and non fermented leaf extract of the guava (Psidium guajava and common betel (Piper nigrum.

  4. Astragaloside IV Inhibits Membrane Ca[Formula: see text] Current but Enhances Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Ca[Formula: see text] Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mei-Mi; Lian, Wen-Wen; Li, Zhuo; Shao, Dong-Xue; Chen, Si-Chong; Sun, Xue-Fei; Hu, Hui-Yuan; Feng, Rui; Guo, Feng; Hao, Li-Ying

    2017-01-01

    Astragaloside IV (AS-IV) is one of the active ingredients in Astragalus membrananceus (Huangqi), a traditional Chinese medicine. The present study investigated the effects of AS-IV on Ca[Formula: see text] handling in cardiac myocytes to elucidate its possible mechanism in the treatment of cardiac disease. The results showed that AS-IV at 1 and 10[Formula: see text][Formula: see text]M reduced KCl-induced [Ca[Formula: see text

  5. Inhibition of Release of Vasoactive and Inflammatory Mediators in Airway and Vascular Tissues and Macrophages by a Chinese Herbal Medicine Formula for Allergic Rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Binh Lenon

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Herbal therapies are being used increasingly for the treatment of allergic rhinitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible pharmacological actions and cellular targets of a Chinese herbal formula (RCM-101, which was previously shown to be effective in reducing seasonal allergic rhinitis symptoms in a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Rat and guinea pig isolated tissues (trachea and aorta were used to study the effects of RCM-101 on responses to various mediators. Production of leukotriene B4 in porcine neutrophils and of prostaglandin E2 and nitric oxide (NO in Raw 264.7 cells were also measured. In rat and guinea pig tracheal preparations, RCM-101 inhibited contractile responses to compound 48/80 but not those to histamine (guinea pig preparations or serotonin (rat preparations. Contractile responses of guinea pig tracheal preparations to carbachol and leukotriene C4, and relaxant responses to substance P and prostaglandin E2 were not affected by RCM-101. In rat aortic preparations, precontracted with phenylephrine, endothelium-dependent relaxant responses to acetylcholine and endothelium-independent relaxant responses to sodium nitroprusside were not affected by RCM-101. However, RCM-101 inhibited relaxations to l-arginine in endothelium-denuded rat aortic preparations, which had been pre-incubated with lipopolysaccharide. RCM-101 did not affect leukotriene B4 formation in isolated porcine neutrophils, induced by the calcium ionophore A23187; however, it inhibited prostaglandin E2 and NO production in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated murine macrophages (Raw 264.7 cells.The findings indicate that RCM-101 may have multiple inhibitory actions on the release and/or synthesis of inflammatory mediators involved in allergic rhinitis.

  6. Integration of screening and identifying ligand(s) from medicinal plant extracts based on target recognition by using NMR spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Yalin Tang, Qian Shang, Junfeng Xiang, Qianfan Yang, Qiuju Zhou, Lin Li, Hong Zhang, Qian Li, Hongxia Sun, Aijiao Guan, Wei Jiang & Wei Gai ### Abstract This protocol presents the screening of ligand(s) from medicinal plant extracts based on target recognition by using NMR spectroscopy. A detailed description of sample preparation and analysis process is provided. NMR spectroscopies described here are 1H NMR, diffusion-ordered spectroscopy (DOSY), relaxation-edited NMR, 1H–1...

  7. Synergistic Effects of Natural Medicinal Plant Extracts on Growth Inhibition of Carcinoma (KB) Cells under Oxidative Stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jeong Hee; Ju, Eun Mi; Kim, Jin Kyu

    2000-01-01

    Medicinal plants with synergistic effects on growth inhibition of cancer cells under oxidative stress were screened in this study. Methanol extracts from 51 natural medicinal plants, which were reported to have anticancer effect on hepatoma, stomach cancer or colon cancers which are frequently found in Korean, were prepared and screened for their synergistic activity on growth inhibition of cancer cells under chemically-induced oxidative stress by using MTT assay. Twenty seven samples showed synergistic activity on the growth inhibition in various extent under chemically-induced oxidative stress. Among those samples, eleven samples, such as Melia azedarach, Agastache rugosa, Catalpa ovata, Prunus persica, Sinomenium acutum, Pulsatilla koreana, Oldenlandia diffiusa, Anthriscus sylvestris, Schizandra chinensis, Gleditsia sinensis, Cridium officinale, showed decrease in IC 50 values more than 50%, other 16 samples showed decrease in IC 50 values between 50-25%, compared with the value acquired when medicinal plant sample was used alone. Among those 11 samples, extract of Catalpa ovata showed the highest activity. IC 50 values were decrease to 61% and 28% when carcinoma cells were treated with Catalpa ovata extract in combination of 75 and 100 μM of hydrogen peroxide, respectively

  8. In vitro antitrypanosomal activity, antioxidant property and phytochemical constituents of aqueous extracts of nine Nigerian medicinal plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umar Ismaila Alhaji

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the in vitro antitrypanosomal activity, antioxidant property and phytochemical constituents of aqueous extracts of nine Nigerian medicinal plants. Methods: In vitro antitrypanosomal activity test was carried out on aqueous extracts of dried leaves of Acacia albida (A. albida, Artemisia absinthium, Bryophyllum pinnatum, Gongronema latifolium, Holarrhena floribunda, Leptadenia hastata, Pericopsis laxiflora (P. laxiflora and dried stem barks of A. albida and P. laxiflora. The phytochemical constituents and composition of the extracts and the in vitro antioxidant activity of the extracts were subsequently measured using the α,α-diphenyl-β-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH radical scavenging assay, Ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP assay, thiobarbituric acid (TBA activity assay and H2O2 radical scavenging activity assay. Results: From the study, it was discovered that the stem bark extracts of A. albida and P. laxiflora were most active against both Trypanosoma evansi and Trypanosoma congolense. There was complete cessation of motility in both trypanosomes within 5 min at 40 mg/mL of the stem bark extract of A. albida and complete cessation of motility within 25 min and 40 min at 40 mg/ mL with P. laxiflora stem bark extract for Trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma evansi, respectively. Quantitative analysis of the phytochemical constituents of the aqueous extracts of the plant parts such as alkaloids, saponins, flavonoids and phenols revealed that the stem barks of A. albida, P. laxiflora and leaves of Leptadenia hastata contained relatively high amount of all the phytochemicals quantified. The stem bark extracts of A. albida, P. laxiflora and leaves of Gongronema latifolium possess more scavenging capacity when compared to other extracts in relation to vitamin C, the reference antioxidant. Conclusions: This study provides scientific evidence for the use of A. albida, and P. laxiflora for the treatment of trypanosomosis and

  9. Larvicidal and repellent activity of medicinal plant extracts from Eastern Ghats of South India against malaria and filariasis vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaraj, Chinnaperumal; Rahuman, Abdul Abdul; Bagavan, Asokan; Elango, Gandhi; Zahir, Abdul Abduz; Santhoshkumar, Thirunavukkarasu

    2011-09-01

    To evaluate the larvicidal and repellent activities of ethyl acetate and methanol extracts of Acacia concinna (A. concinna), Cassia siamea (C. siamea), Coriandrum sativum (C. sativum),Cuminum cyminum (C. cyminum), Lantana camara (L. camara), Nelumbo nucifera (N. nucifera) Phyllanthus amarus (P. amarus), Piper nigrum (P. nigrum) and Trachyspermum ammi (T. ammi) against Anopheles stephensi (An. stephensi) and Culex quinquefasciatus (Cx. quinquefasciatus). The larvicidal activity of medicinal plant extracts were tested against early fourth-instar larvae of malaria and filariasis vectors. The mortality was observed 24 h and 48 h after treatment, data were subjected to probit analysis to determine the lethal concentrations (LC(50) and LC(90)) to kill 50 and 90 per cent of the treated larvae of the tested species. The repellent efficacy was determined against two mosquito species at five concentrations (31.25, 62.50, 125.00, 250.00, and 500.00 ppm) under the laboratory conditions. All plant extracts showed moderate effects after 24 h and 48 h of exposure; however, the highest activity was observed after 24 h in the leaf methanol extract of N. nucifera, seed ethyl acetate and methanol extract of P. nigrum against the larvae of An. stephensi (LC(50) = 34.76, 24.54 and 30.20 ppm) and against Cx. quinquefasciatus (LC(50) = 37.49, 43.94 and 57.39 ppm), respectively. The toxic effect of leaf methanol extract of C. siamea, seed methanol extract of C. cyminum, leaf ethyl acetate extract of N. nucifera, leaf ethyl acetate and methanol extract of P. amarus and seed methanol extract of T. ammi were showed 100% mortality against An. stephensi and Cx. quinquefasciatus after 48 h exposer. The maximum repellent activity was observed at 500 ppm in methanol extracts of N. nucifera, ethyl acetate and methanol extract of P. nigrum and methanol extract of T. ammi and the mean complete protection time ranged from 30 to 150 min with the different extracts tested. These results suggest that

  10. Proliferative effects of five traditional Nigerian medicinal plant extracts on human breast and bone cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, N; Oppermann, C; Falodun, A; Kragl, U

    2011-09-02

    The medicinal plants Hunteria umbellata (HUL), Cola lepidota (CCL), Persea americana leaf (PAL), Root bark of Persea americana (RPA) and Plukenetia conophora (PCL) are used in Nigerian traditional medicine for the treatment of cancer and cancer related diseases. To scientifically evaluate the cell proliferative and apoptotic effects of the plants extracts using breast and osteocarcinoma cell lines, and also to identify the possible components via LC-MS to have a kind of chemical fingerprint. The antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of methanolic extracts (10 μg/ml) of the five medicinal plants were subjected to in vitro evaluation using four cancer cell lines (breast-MCF-7 and BT-20; Osteocarcinoma-MG-63 and Saos-2) measured by flow cytometry. Non-tumorigenic controls MCF-12A and primary isolated osteoblasts (POB) were chosen to eliminate negative influence on healthy tissue. Of the five extracts RPA demonstrated a significant (Pcancer cell lines (MCF-7). The proliferative phase was decreased by 18%, whereas, a significant increase in cell proliferation (about 27%) was observed for RPA at a concentration of 10 μg/ml. PCL, CCL, HUL and PAL did not show marked inhibition of the proliferation of cell line MCF-7. These results give suggestive evidence that the plant extracts exhibit some correlation between the claimed ethnomedicinal uses and the cell proliferative activity. RPA extract includes chemical compounds with estrogen-like activity and validates its potential use as anticancer agent, particularly against breast carcinoma; provided important information potentially helpful in drug designing and discovery. Further studies will involve the isolation of anti tumour compounds in RPA by LC-MS and detailed mechanism of anticancer activities. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Inhibition of Neoplastic Transformation and Chemically-Induced Skin Hyperplasia in Mice by Traditional Chinese Medicinal Formula Si-Wu-Tang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandy M. Liu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Exploring traditional medicines may lead to the development of low-cost and non-toxic cancer preventive agents. Si-Wu-Tang (SWT, comprising the combination of four herbs, Rehmanniae, Angelica, Chuanxiong, and Paeoniae, is one of the most popular traditional Chinese medicines for women’s diseases. In our previous studies, the antioxidant Nrf2 pathways were strongly induced by SWT in vitro and in vivo. Since Nrf2 activation has been associated with anticarcinogenic effects, the purpose of this study is to evaluate SWT’s activity of cancer prevention. In the Ames test, SWT demonstrated an antimutagenic activity against mutagenicity induced by the chemical carcinogen 7,12-dimethylbenz(aanthracene (DMBA. In JB6 P+ cells, a non-cancerous murine epidermal model for studying tumor promotion, SWT inhibited epidermal growth factor (EGF-induced neoplastic transformation. The luciferase reporter gene assays demonstrated that SWT suppressed EGF-induced AP-1 and TNF-α-induced NF-κB activation, which are essential factors involved in skin carcinogenesis. In a DMBA-induced skin hyperplasia assay in ‘Sensitivity to Carcinogenesis’ (SENCAR mice, both topical and oral SWT inhibited DMBA-induced epidermal hyperplasia, expression of the proliferation marker Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, and H-ras mutations. These findings demonstrate, for the first time, that SWT prevents tumor promoter and chemical-induced carcinogenesis in vitro and in vivo, partly by inhibiting DNA damage and blocking the activation of AP-1 and NF-κB.

  12. Higher Education Funding Formulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeown-Moak, Mary P.

    1999-01-01

    One of the most critical components of the college or university chief financial officer's job is budget planning, especially using formulas. A discussion of funding formulas looks at advantages, disadvantages, and types of formulas used by states in budgeting for higher education, and examines how chief financial officers can position the campus…

  13. Study on Medicinal Plant Active Substances Extraction and Antibacterial Activity of Houttuynia Cordata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yubin, Ji; Junjun, Yang; Miao, Yu; Yue, Cao; Shizhen, Guo; Anna, Qiao

    2017-12-01

    This study was about the effective component extraction from Houttuynia cordata by steam distillation and antibacterial effect on Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis. The extraction of Herba Houttuyniae extract of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis were certain inhibitory effect of, which inhibitory effect on Staphylococcus aureus the most obvious.

  14. Effect of aqueous extracts of medicinal plants on growth of Fusarium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Autoclaving the extracts affected the fungitoxic activities of C. alata, B. nitida, and V. amygdalina, on the dry weight of the fungus. Sporulation was completely inhibited in cPDA medium amended with unautoclaved extracts of C. alata, B. nitida, A. indica, V. amygdalina and Z. officinale. However all the autoclaved extracts ...

  15. Evaluation of Antioxidant Activity of Medicinal Plant Extracts Produced for Commercial Purpose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Sathisha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The antioxidant potential of some herbal plant extracts (commercial products was measured using various in vitro assays. Among the extracts from Curcuma longa, Caffea arabica, Tribulus terrestris, Bacopa monnieri and Trigonella foenum- graecum, the Curcuma longa and coffee bean extract (Caffea Arabica showed greater antioxidant activity measured as scavenging of DPPH, superoxide radicals, reducing power and inhibition of microsomal lipid peroxidation.

  16. Effect of aqueous extracts of selected medicinal plants on germination of windgrass [Apera spica-venti (L. P. Beauv.] and lambsquarters (Chenopodium album L. seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Synowiec

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to determine the effect of aqueous extracts of medicinal plants (Matricaria chamomilla, Hypericum perforatum, Achillea millefolium, and Urtica dioica containing allelopathic compounds on seed germination in lambsquarters (Chenopodium album and herbicide-resistant windgrass (Apera spica-venti. A Petri-dish experiment was carried out, in which the effects of five concentrations of aqueous extracts on the germination of weeds were assessed for 10 consecutive days. It was found that the dynamics of seed germination are closely related to the type and concentration of aqueous extract of medicinal plants. The 8% U. dioica aqueous extract posed the strongest inhibitory effect, limiting the germination of both lambsquarters and windgrass. Additionally, weed germination was delayed by 12–72 h in the presence of extracts, compared with the control. Summing up, the aqueous extracts of medicinal plants, especially their higher concentrations, pose a desirable inhibiting effect against the germination of lambsquarters and herbicide-resistant windgrass seeds.

  17. Anticancer Properties and Phenolic Contents of Sequentially Prepared Extracts from Different Parts of Selected Medicinal Plants Indigenous to Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadiza Altine Adamu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Different parts of four edible medicinal plants (Casearia capitellata, Baccaurea motleyana, Phyllanthus pulcher and Strobilanthus crispus, indigenous to Malaysia, were extracted in different solvents, sequentially. The obtained 28 extracts were evaluated for their in vitro anticancer properties, using the MTS assay, on four human cancer cell lines: colon (HT-29, breast (MCF-7, prostate (DU-145 and lung (H460 cancers. The best anticancer activity was observed for the ethyl acetate (EA extract of Casearia capitellata leaves on MCF-7 cell lines with IC50 2.0 μg/mL and its methanolic (MeOH extract showed an outstanding activity against lung cancer cell lines. Dichloromethane (DCM extract of Phyllanthus pulcher aerial parts showed the highest anticancer activity against DU-145 cell lines, while significant activity was exhibited by DCM extract of Phyllanthus pulcher roots on colon cancer cell lines with IC50 value of 8.1 μg/mL. Total phenolic content (TPC ranged over 1–40 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE/g. For all the samples, highest yields of phenolics were obtained for MeOH extracts. Among all the extracts analyzed, the MeOH extracts of Strobilanthus crispus leaves exhibited the highest TPC than other samples (p < 0.05. This study shows that the nature of phenol determines its anticaner activity and not the number of phenols present.

  18. Membrane stability of sickle erythrocytes incubated in extracts of three medicinal plants: Anacardium occidentale, Psidium guajava, and Terminalia catappa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikezie, Paul Chidoka; Uwakwe, Augustine Amadikwa

    2011-04-01

    Many reports showed that medicinal plant extracts cause alterations on the shape and physiology of erythrocytes. The present study seeks to ascertain the osmotic stability of sickle erythrocytes incubated in aqueous extracts of Anacardium occidentale, Psidium guajava, and Terminalia catappa. The fraction of erythrocytes lysed when suspended in saline solution of varying concentrations was investigated by spectrophotometric method. The percentage hemolysis of erythrocytes in the control and test samples showed a sigmoidal relationship with increasing concentrations of saline solution. Membrane stability was ascertained as mean corpuscular fragility (MCF) index of erythrocytes incubated in 400 and 800 mg/dL aqueous concentrations of the three plant extracts. The two experimental concentrations of P. guajava and T. catappa protected the erythrocytes against osmotic stress, as evidenced by decreases in the values of MCF compared with the control sample (P catappa stabilized erythrocyte membrane, higher concentration (800 mg/dL) of A. occidentale exhibited no membrane protective effect.

  19. Anthelmintic properties of traditional African and Caribbean medicinal plants: identification of extracts with potent activity against Ascaris suum in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Andrew R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ascariasis affects more than 1 billion people worldwide, mainly in developing countries, causing substantial morbidity. Current treatments for Ascaris infection are based on mass drug administration (MDA with synthetic anthelmintic drugs such as albendazole, however continual re-infection and the threat of drug resistance mean that complementary treatment options would be highly valuable. Here, we screened ethanolic extracts from 29 medicinal plants used in Africa (Ghana and the Caribbean (US Virgin Islands for in vitro anthelmintic properties against Ascaris suum, a swine parasite that is very closely related to the human A. lumbricoides. A wide variety of activities were seen in the extracts, from negligible to potent. Extracts from Clausena anisata, Zanthoxylum zanthoxyloides and Punica granatum were identified as the most potent with EC50 values of 74, 97 and 164 μg/mL, respectively. Our results encourage further investigation of their use as complementary treatment options for ascariasis, alongside MDA.

  20. Excel2003 Formulas

    CERN Document Server

    Walkenbach, John

    2011-01-01

    Everything you need to know about* Mastering operators, error values, naming techniques, and absolute versus relative references* Debugging formulas and using the auditing tools* Importing and exporting XML files and mapping the data to specific cells* Using Excel 2003's rights management feature* Working magic with array formulas* Developing custom formulas to produce the results you needHere's the formula for Excel excellenceFormulas are the lifeblood of spreadsheets, and no one can bring a spreadsheet to life like John Walkenbach. In this detailed reference guide, he delves deeply into unde

  1. Anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities of methanol extracts and alkaloid fractions of four Mexican medicinal plants of Solanaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez A, Dora M; Bah, Moustapha; Garduño R, María L; Mendoza D, Sandra O; Serrano C, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Methanol extracts and alkaloid fractions of different parts of four plant species belonging to Solanaceae family and used in Mexican traditional medicine were investigated for their total phenolic contents, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. The total phenolic compounds of each extract was determined according to the Folin-Ciocalteu method, while the in vitro radical scavenging activities of the extracts were assessed using the DPPH and ABTS radicals. The in vivo anti-inflammatory activity was determined using the TPA-induced mouse ear edema model. The methanol extracts contained the highest concentrations of phenolic compounds and also exhibited the best reducing power on the DPPH and ABTS radicals, in a concentration-dependent fashion. However, the anti-inflammatory activity did not follow the same trend, as some alkaloid fractions that showed low radical reducing power exhibited the strongest anti-inflammatory activity. The methanol extract obtained from the flowers of Nicotiana glauca presented the best overall performance with the largest amount of phenolic compounds (111 µg garlic acid equivalents/g of extract), the best antioxidant activity (94.80% inhibition of DPPH and 97.57% of ABTS) and the highest anti-inflammatory activity (81.93% inhibition of the inflammation).

  2. LC-MS-based metabolite profiling of methanolic extracts from the medicinal and aromatic species Mentha pulegium and Origanum majorana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taamalli, Amani; Arráez-Román, David; Abaza, Leila; Iswaldi, Ihsan; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto; Zarrouk, Mokhtar; Segura-Carretero, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    There has been increasing interest dedicated to the phenolic compounds with a view to their antioxidant and healthy properties. Recent studies have focused on plants from the Lamiaceae family with special interest in phenolic compounds antioxidant potential. The metabolite profile of methanolic extracts from two Lamiacea medicinal plants was investigated. Mentha pulegium and Origanum majorana methanolic extracts were analysed using reversed-phase ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-UHPLC) coupled to electrospray ionisation quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-QTOF-MS) detection in the negative ion mode. A total of 85 metabolites were characterised from different families, such as organic acids and derivatives, amino acids and derivatives, nucleosides, phenolic compounds as well as other polar metabolites, by using the MS and MS/MS information provided by the QTOF-MS. However, the total phenols and flavonoids were also quantified spectrophotometrically and they registered higher amounts in Mentha pulegium than in Origanum majorana extract. Gallocatechin was the major compound in M. pulegium extract whereas quercetin dimethyl ether, jaceidin and dihydrokaempferide were the major ones in O. majorana extract. The distribution of phenolic compounds in the methanolic extract showed a variation among studied plants. Mentha pulegium can be considered as a source of gallocatechin. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Activity of Medicinal Plant Extracts on Multiplication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis under Reduced Oxygen Conditions Using Intracellular and Axenic Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatter, Purva D; Gupta, Pooja D; Birdi, Tannaz J

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Test the activity of selected medicinal plant extracts on multiplication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis under reduced oxygen concentration which represents nonreplicating conditions. Material and Methods. Acetone, ethanol and aqueous extracts of the plants Acorus calamus L. (rhizome), Ocimum sanctum L. (leaf), Piper nigrum L. (seed), and Pueraria tuberosa DC. (tuber) were tested on Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv intracellularly using an epithelial cell (A549) infection model. The extracts found to be active intracellularly were further studied axenically under reducing oxygen concentrations. Results and Conclusions. Intracellular multiplication was inhibited ≥60% by five of the twelve extracts. Amongst these 5 extracts, in axenic culture, P. nigrum (acetone) was active under aerobic, microaerophilic, and anaerobic conditions indicating presence of multiple components acting at different levels and P. tuberosa (aqueous) showed bactericidal activity under microaerophilic and anaerobic conditions implying the influence of anaerobiosis on its efficacy. P. nigrum (aqueous) and A. calamus (aqueous and ethanol) extracts were not active under axenic conditions but only inhibited intracellular growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, suggesting activation of host defense mechanisms to mediate bacterial killing rather than direct bactericidal activity.

  4. Influences of Realgar-Indigo naturalis, A Traditional Chinese Medicine Formula, on the Main CYP450 Activities in Rats Using a Cocktail Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan-Hua Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to study the influences of Realgar-Indigo naturalis (RIF and its principal element realgar on 4 main cytochrome P450 enzymes activities in rats. A simple and efficient cocktail method was developed to detect the four probe drugs simultaneously. In this study, Wistar rats were administered intragastric RIF and realgar for 14 days; mixed probe drugs were injected into rats by caudal vein. Through analyzing the pharmacokinetic parameter of mixed probe drugs in rats, we can calculate the CYPs activities. The results showed that RIF could inhibit CYP1A2 enzyme activity and induce CYP2C11 enzyme activity significantly. Interestingly, in realgar high dosage group, CYP3A1/2 enzyme activity was inhibited significantly, and different dosage of realgar manifested a good dose-dependent manner. The RIF results indicated that drug coadministrated with RIF may need to be paid attention in relation to drug-drug interactions (DDIs. Realgar, a toxic traditional Chinese medicine (TCM, does have curative effect on acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL. Its toxicity studies should be focused on. We found that, in realgar high dosage group, CYP3A1/2 enzymes activity was inhibited. This phenomenon may explain its potential toxicity mechanism.

  5. Quality assurance for Chinese herbal formulae: standardization of IBS-20, a 20-herb preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bensoussan Alan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The employment of well characterized test samples prepared from authenticated, high quality medicinal plant materials is key to reproducible herbal research. The present study aims to demonstrate a quality assurance program covering the acquisition, botanical validation, chemical standardization and good manufacturing practices (GMP production of IBS-20, a 20-herb Chinese herbal formula under study as a potential agent for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome. Methods Purity and contaminant tests for the presence of toxic metals, pesticide residues, mycotoxins and microorganisms were performed. Qualitative chemical fingerprint analysis and quantitation of marker compounds of the herbs, as well as that of the IBS-20 formula was carried out with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Extraction and manufacture of the 20-herb formula were carried out under GMP. Chemical standardization was performed with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS analysis. Stability of the formula was monitored with HPLC in real time. Results Quality component herbs, purchased from a GMP supplier were botanically and chemically authenticated and quantitative HPLC profiles (fingerprints of each component herb and of the composite formula were established. An aqueous extract of the mixture of the 20 herbs was prepared and formulated into IBS-20, which was chemically standardized by LC-MS, with 20 chemical compounds serving as reference markers. The stability of the formula was monitored and shown to be stable at room temperature. Conclusion A quality assurance program has been developed for the preparation of a standardized 20-herb formulation for use in the clinical studies for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS. The procedures developed in the present study will serve as a protocol for other poly-herbal Chinese medicine studies.

  6. Quality assurance for Chinese herbal formulae: standardization of IBS-20, a 20-herb preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Siu-Po; Zhao, Ming; Xian, Yanfang; Chen, Mengli; Zong, Yuying; Tjong, Yung-Wui; Tsai, Sam-Hip; Sung, Joseph J Y; Bensoussan, Alan; Berman, Brian; Fong, Harry H S; Che, Chun-Tao

    2010-02-22

    The employment of well characterized test samples prepared from authenticated, high quality medicinal plant materials is key to reproducible herbal research. The present study aims to demonstrate a quality assurance program covering the acquisition, botanical validation, chemical standardization and good manufacturing practices (GMP) production of IBS-20, a 20-herb Chinese herbal formula under study as a potential agent for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome. Purity and contaminant tests for the presence of toxic metals, pesticide residues, mycotoxins and microorganisms were performed. Qualitative chemical fingerprint analysis and quantitation of marker compounds of the herbs, as well as that of the IBS-20 formula was carried out with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Extraction and manufacture of the 20-herb formula were carried out under GMP. Chemical standardization was performed with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. Stability of the formula was monitored with HPLC in real time. Quality component herbs, purchased from a GMP supplier were botanically and chemically authenticated and quantitative HPLC profiles (fingerprints) of each component herb and of the composite formula were established. An aqueous extract of the mixture of the 20 herbs was prepared and formulated into IBS-20, which was chemically standardized by LC-MS, with 20 chemical compounds serving as reference markers. The stability of the formula was monitored and shown to be stable at room temperature. A quality assurance program has been developed for the preparation of a standardized 20-herb formulation for use in the clinical studies for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The procedures developed in the present study will serve as a protocol for other poly-herbal Chinese medicine studies.

  7. Effects of two medicinal plants Psidium guajava L. (Myrtaceae) and Diospyros mespiliformis L. (Ebenaceae) leaf extracts on rat skeletal muscle cells in primary culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belemtougri, R.G.; Constantin, B.; Cognard, C.; Raymond, G.; Sawadogo, L.

    2006-01-01

    Crude decoction, aqueous and ethanolic extracts of two medicinal plants (Psidium guajava and Diospyros mespiliformis), widely used in the central plateau of Burkina Faso to treat many diseases were evaluated for their antagonistic effects on caffeine induced calcium release from sarcoplasmic reticulum of rat skeletal muscle cells. These different extracts showed a decrease of caffeine induced calcium release in a dose dependent manner. Comparison of the results showed that Psidium guajava leaf extracts are more active than extracts of Diospyros mespiliformis and that crude decoctions show better inhibitory activity. The observed results could explaine their use as antihypertensive and antidiarrhoeal agents in traditional medicine, by inhibiting intracellular calcium release. PMID:16365927

  8. Cytotoxicity of Selected Medicinal and Nonmedicinal Plant Extracts to Microbial and Cervical Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary M. Booth

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the cytotoxicity of 55 species of plants. Each plant was rated as medicinal, or nonmedicinal based on the existing literature. About 79% of the medicinal plants showed some cytotoxicity, while 75% of the nonmedicinal plants showed bioactivity. It appears that Asteraceae, Labiatae, Pinaceae, and Chenopodiaceae were particularly active against human cervical cancer cells. Based on the literature, only three of the 55 plants have been significantly investigated for cytotoxicity. It is clear that there is much toxicological work yet to be done with both medicinal and nonmedicinal plants.

  9. Screening of medicinal natural extracts for their antibacterial activity against salmonella species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousaf, A.; Latif, Z.

    2014-01-01

    The present study was aimed to screen out natural crude extracts exhibiting antibacterial activity against Salmonella causing gastrointestinal problems in humans. Fifteen Salmonella species were isolated from uncooked chicken, polluted water, rotten potatoes, beef, rotten eggs etc. Aqueous plant extracts of Allium sativum (garlic), Nigella sativa (kalvanji), Azadirachta indica (neem), Ficus carica (anjeer), and Trigonella foenum-graecum (methi) were checked against Salmonella species by well plate method. In addition to plant extract, Honey was also used for antibacterial activity. Inhibition zones ranging from 2mm to 20mm were obtained with different concentration of plant extracts and honey. The antibacterial sensitivity pattern was in the order of kalvanji > garlic > honey > anjeer > methi > neem. The standard antibiotics such as Ceftriaxone and Ciprofloxacin were also used for comparison with natural extract for antibacterial activity. The extracts of Allium sativum, Nigella sativa and Honey were found to be more effective against Salmonella species for which even Ceftriaxone was found ineffective. (author)

  10. Extraction of Chemical Compounds from Medicinal Plants using Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    OpenAIRE

    Topiař, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Objective of this work was to optimize the SFE from eucalyptus (Eucalyptus grandis L.) leaves, which find application both in medicine and as botanical insecticide. In particular, terpenes and terpenoids belong to active components of eucalyptus essential oil.

  11. Extraction optimization of medicinally important metabolites from Datura innoxia Mill.: an in vitro biological and phytochemical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Humaira; Khan, Komal; Zia, Muhammad; Ur-Rehman, Tofeeq; Mirza, Bushra; Haq, Ihsan-ul

    2015-10-19

    Streptomyces 85E strain with 22 mm bald phenotype. A noteworthy antimicrobial activity was exhibited by leaf extracts against Micrococcus luteus and n-hexane fruit extract against Aspergillus niger (MIC 3.70 and 12.5 μg/ml respectively). Multiple solvent system is a crucial variable to retrieve pharmacological potential of medicinal plants and D. innoxia can be envisaged as a novel source of natural antioxidants, antimicrobials and anticancer compounds.

  12. Identification of the traditional Tibetan medicine "Shaji" and their different extracts through tri-step infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yue; Li, Jingyi; Fan, Gang; Sun, Suqin; Zhang, Yuxin; Zhang, Yi; Tu, Ya

    2016-11-01

    Hippophae rhamnoides subsp. sinensis Rousi, Hippophae gyantsensis (Rousi) Y. S. Lian, Hippophae neurocarpa S. W. Liu & T. N. He and Hippophae tibetana Schlechtendal are typically used under one name "Shaji", to treat cardiovascular diseases and lung disorders in Tibetan medicine (TM). A complete set of infrared (IR) macro-fingerprints of these four Hippophae species should be characterized and compared simply, accurately, and in detail for identification. In the present study, tri-step IR spectroscopy, which included Fourier transform IR (FT-IR) spectroscopy, second derivative IR (SD-IR) spectroscopy and two-dimensional correlation IR (2D-IR) spectroscopy, was employed to discriminate the four Hippophae species and their corresponding extracts using different solvents. The relevant spectra exhibited the holistic chemical compositions and variations. Flavonoids, fatty acids and sugars were found to be the main chemical components. Characteristic peak positions, intensities and shapes derived from FT-IR, SD-IR and 2D-IR spectra provided valuable information for sample discrimination. Principal component analysis (PCA) of spectral differences was performed to illustrate the objective identification. Results showed that the species and their extracts can be clearly distinguished. Thus, a quick, precise and effective tri-step IR spectroscopy combined with PCA can be applied to identify and discriminate medicinal materials and their extracts in TM research.

  13. Evaluation of antifungal activity of aqueous extracts of some medicinal plants against Aspergillus flavus, pistachio aflatoxin producing fungus in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar Omidpanah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Contamination with aflatoxin, by Aspergillus flavus, is one the major challenges in agriculture and food industry. Preparation of organic products using natural components is widely considered these days. Aims: In this study, effects of aqueous extracts of five medicinal herbs, including thyme, senna, mentha, basil, and safflower on the growth of the A. flavus were investigated. Mterials and Methods: The extracts with different concentrations (200-800 µg/mL and polyethylene glycol with the equal osmotic potential of plant extracts were added to the potato dextrose agar medium to evaluate fungus growth after 7 days using agar dilution method. Benomyl, a fungicide, was used as a positive standard. The tests were performed in triplicate, and the mean diameters of fungus growth were calculated as well. Results and Conclusion: All concentrations of the plants extracts significantly inhibited the fungus growth in comparison with each other and control treatments, while the extracts of thyme and safflower manifested the most effective prohibition compared to benomyl with minimum inhibitory concentration of 200 and 400 µg/mL, respectively.

  14. Laboratory and field evaluation of medicinal plant extracts against filarial vector, Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, chemical extracts of Jatropha curcas, Hyptis suaveolens, Abutilon indicum, and Leucas aspera were tested for toxicity to larvae of the filariasis vector Culex quinquefasciatus. Respective median lethal concentrations (LC50) for hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and methanol extracts...

  15. Screening of crude extracts of twelve medicinal plants and “wonder ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The phytochemical analysis of the plant extract and the Epa-Ijebu showed the presence of bioactive compounds: tannin, flavonoid, alkaloids, phylobatanin, anthocyanin, reducing sugar, saponin and anthraquinone. Our results offer a scientific basis for the traditional use of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of A. ascalonicum, ...

  16. Effect of aqueous extracts of some medicinal plants on in vitro ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Autoclave heat treatment did not affect the inhibitory action of C. alata on the linear growth but reduced the efficacy of the leaf extract on dry weight and stroma production. Autoclaved extracts of A. cordifolia, A. indica, E. hirta and C. alata supported more stroma production, heat treatment did not stimulate production of more ...

  17. Evaluation of microbial transformations of dissolved organic matter - what information can be extracted from high-field FTICR-MS elemental formula data sets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzsprung, Peter; von Tümpling, Wolf; Harir, Mourad; Hertkorn, Norbert; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Norf, Helge; Weitere, Markus; Kamjunke, Norbert

    2017-04-01

    Transformation of DOC and DOM was and is widespread investigated (1-3). Due to the complex composition of DOC increased attention was payed to DOM quality change during degradation processes. In order to get a better insight in DOM transformation processes both resolution as a function of time and on a molecular level are promising. The observation of DOM quality changes requires sophisticated evaluation techniques. A new evaluation strategy of FTICR-MS elemental formula data sets is introduced. An experiment with seven flumes and leaf leachate was performed. All flumes were sampled on five dates (within 7 days) and the SPEDOM was characterized using high-field FTICR-MS analysis, resulting in together 35 elemental formula data sets. The time dependent change of components abundance was fitted by a simple linear regression model after normalization of mass peak intensities. All components were categorized by calculation of the slope (change of percent intensity per day) in all seven flumes. A positive slope means product formation, a negative slope means degradation of components. Specific data filtration was developed to find out components with relevant change of relative intensity. About 7000 different components were present in at least one of the 35 samples. Of those about 1800 components were present in all of the 35 samples. About 300 components with significant increase of intensity were identified. They were mainly unsaturated and oxygen-rich components (lignin-like or tannin-like) and had molecular masses less than 450 Dalton. A group of about 70 components was partially degraded (significant negative slope, present in all samples). These components were more saturated and less oxygen-rich compared to the product group and had molecular masses > 450 Dalton. A third group of about 150 components was identified with a tendency to total degradation (significant negative slope, not present in all samples, reduced or no abundance at the end of the experiment

  18. Qingfei Xiaoyan Wan, a traditional Chinese medicine formula, ameliorates Pseudomonas aeruginosa–induced acute lung inflammation by regulation of PI3K/AKT and Ras/MAPK pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yuanyuan; Nie, Yan; Cheng, Binfeng; Tao, Jin; Ma, Xiaoyao; Jiang, Min; Gao, Jie; Bai, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Gram-negative pathogen–induced nosocomial infections and resistance are a most serious menace to global public health. Qingfei Xiaoyan Wan (QF), a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) formula, has been used clinically in China for the treatment of upper respiratory tract infections, acute or chronic bronchitis and pulmonary infection. In this study, the effects of QF on Pseudomonas aeruginosa–induced acute pneumonia in mice were evaluated. The mechanisms by which four typical anti-inflammatory ingredients from QF, arctigenin (ATG), cholic acid (CLA), chlorogenic acid (CGA) and sinapic acid (SPA), regulate anti-inflammatory signaling pathways and related targets were investigated using molecular biology and molecular docking techniques. The results showed that pretreatment with QF significantly inhibits the release of cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6) and chemokines (IL-8 and RANTES), reduces leukocytes recruitment into inflamed tissues and ameliorates pulmonary edema and necrosis. In addition, ATG was identified as the primary anti-inflammatory agent with action on the PI3K/AKT and Ras/MAPK pathways. CLA and CGA enhanced the actions of ATG and exhibited synergistic NF-κB inactivation effects possibly via the Ras/MAPK signaling pathway. Moreover, CLA is speculated to target FGFR and MEK firstly. Overall, QF regulated the PI3K/AKT and Ras/MAPK pathways to inhibit pathogenic bacterial infections effectively. PMID:27175332

  19. Qingfei Xiaoyan Wan, a traditional Chinese medicine formula, ameliorates Pseudomonas aeruginosa–induced acute lung inflammation by regulation of PI3K/AKT and Ras/MAPK pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Hou

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Gram-negative pathogen–induced nosocomial infections and resistance are a most serious menace to global public health. Qingfei Xiaoyan Wan (QF, a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM formula, has been used clinically in China for the treatment of upper respiratory tract infections, acute or chronic bronchitis and pulmonary infection. In this study, the effects of QF on Pseudomonas aeruginosa–induced acute pneumonia in mice were evaluated. The mechanisms by which four typical anti-inflammatory ingredients from QF, arctigenin (ATG, cholic acid (CLA, chlorogenic acid (CGA and sinapic acid (SPA, regulate anti-inflammatory signaling pathways and related targets were investigated using molecular biology and molecular docking techniques. The results showed that pretreatment with QF significantly inhibits the release of cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6 and chemokines (IL-8 and RANTES, reduces leukocytes recruitment into inflamed tissues and ameliorates pulmonary edema and necrosis. In addition, ATG was identified as the primary anti-inflammatory agent with action on the PI3K/AKT and Ras/MAPK pathways. CLA and CGA enhanced the actions of ATG and exhibited synergistic NF-κB inactivation effects possibly via the Ras/MAPK signaling pathway. Moreover, CLA is speculated to target FGFR and MEK firstly. Overall, QF regulated the PI3K/AKT and Ras/MAPK pathways to inhibit pathogenic bacterial infections effectively.

  20. In vitro antiplasmodial activity of ethanolic extracts of South Indian medicinal plants against Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundaram Ravikumar

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the antiplasmodial potential of Catharanthus roseus L (C. roseus, Coccinea grandis (C. grandis, Thevetia peruviana (T. peruviana, Prosopis juliflora (P. juliflora, Acacia nilotica (A. nilotica, Azadirachta indica (A. indica (Abr. Juss and Morinda pubescens (M. pubescens. Methods: The C. roseus L, C. grandis, T. peruviana, P. juliflora, A. nilotica, A. indica (Abr. Juss and M. pubescens were collected from Ramanathapuram District, Tamil Nadu, India and the extraction was carried out in ethanol. The filter sterilized extracts (100, 50, 25, 12.5, 6.25 and 3.125 毺 g/mL were tested for antiplasmodial activity against Plasmodium falciparum. The phytochemical constituents in the potential extracts were also detected. Results: Of the selected plants species, the bark extract of A. indica (Abr. Juss showed excellent antiplasmodial activity (IC50 29.77 毺 g/mL followed by leaf extract of A. indica (Abr. Juss (IC50 47.20 毺 g/mL and leaf extract of C. roseus L (IC50 49.63 毺 g/mL. The leaf, bark and flower extracts of P. juliflora showed IC50 values of more than 100 毺 g/mL. Statistical analysis reveals significant antiplasmodial activity (P<0.01 between the concentrations and time of exposure. Additionally, no chemical injury was found in the erythrocytes incubated with the ethanolic extract of all the tested plants. The in vitro antiplasmodial activity might be due to the presence of alkaloids, glycosides, carbohydrates, flavonoids, phenols, saponins, triterpenoids, proteins and tannins in the ethanolic extracts of the tested plants. Conclusions: The ethanolic bark extracts of A. indica (Abr. Juss possess lead compounds for the development of antiplasmodial drugs.

  1. Formula tape or not

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, E.R.; Yoshimine, M.; Dierksen, G.H.F.

    1978-01-01

    Some notes are given on computer calculations of the configuration interaction with the use or nonuse of a formula tape. The cases of the direct, indirect, and general configuration interactions are considered, and the advantages and disadvantages of the formula tape are pointed out, the formula tape being needed for either potential surface calculations or a very long integral list. The Munich molecular program system is described. 3 references

  2. Extraction-condition Optimization of Baicalein and Schisandrin from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Porphyromonas gingivalis. LPS-stimulated macrophages. Immunol Lett 2011; 139: 93-101. 7. Guo LY, Cho SY, Kang SS, Lee SH, Baek HY, Kim YS. Orthogonal array design for optimizing extraction efficiency of active constituents from Jakyak-Gamcho. Decoction, the complex formula of herbal medicines,. Paeoniae Radix ...

  3. Exploration of Islamic medicine plant extracts as powerful antifungals for the prevention of mycotoxigenic Aspergilli growth in organic silage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tayel, Ahmed A.; Salem, Mohammed F.; El-Tras, Wael F.

    2011-01-01

    Feed contamination with mycotoxins is a major risk factor for animals and humans as several toxins can exist as residues in meat and milk products, giving rise to carry-over to consumers via ingestion of foods of animal origin. The starting point for prevention, in this chain, is to eliminate...... the growth of mycotoxigenic fungi in the animal forage. Ten plant extracts, recommended in Islamic medicine, were evaluated as antifungal agents against mycotoxigenic Aspergilli, i.e. Aspergillus flavus and A. ochraceus, growth in organic maize silage....

  4. Cytogenetic effects of aqueous extracts of the medicinal plant paico (chenopodium multifidum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadano, A; Gurni, A; Nigro López, M; López, P; Gratti, A; van Baren, C; Ferraro, G; Carballo, M

    2000-01-01

    The cytogenetic effects of aqueous extracts of Chenopodium multifidum L. (Paico) were determined by addition of the extracts and fractions to human lymphocyte cultures. Toxicity was evaluated by analysis of chromosomal aberrations (CA), sister chromatid exchange (SCE), mitotic (MI) and replication (RI) indexes. The results showed an increase in CA frequency in cultures exposed to infusion decoction, no modification in the CPK values either in the decoction or in the infusion, and a decrease in the MI of lymphocyte cultures exposed to the decoction. These results suggested genotoxic effects of "Paico" aqueous extracts.

  5. Effect of anti-inflamentation extracts from Korean traditional medicinal herb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xiaowan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Five Mix Plant Extracts according to different extraction solvents were assessed for its cell viability and anti-inflammatory activity by in vitro methods. The single plant extract was extracted with 70% ethanol(EtOH and the mix plants(C.kousa, R.multiflora, T.nucifera, M.basjoo and S.glabra were extracted with EtOH 30%, 70%; Butylene Glycol(BG 30%, 70%; Propylene Glycol(PG 30%, 70%; Distilled Water(D.W. Cell viability was measured using the Micro culture tetrazolium (MTT assay method and Human fibroblast cells, CCD 1102 KERTr were used. The plant extracts with the maximum concentration that none toxic to the cells were evaluated for anti-inflammatory activity. Anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated using lipoxygenase inhibition assay method. A dose response curve was plotted to determine the IC50 values. Results showed that, at the 5 kinds of single plant extracts by 70% EtOH extraction solvent, it showed the IC50 was 280ug/ml of S1, 370ug/ml of S2, 380ug/ml of S3, 170ug/ml of S4 and 190ug/ml of S5. At the mix plant extracts by 7 kinds of extraction solvents (70%, 30% EtOH; 70%, 30% BG; 70%, 30% PG; D.W, it showed the IC50 was 140ug/ml of M E70, 140ug/ml of M E30, 120ug/ml of M BG70, 110ug/ml of M BG30, 120ug/ml of M PG70, 136ug/ml of M PG30 and 120ug/ml of M D.W. From the results, it is concluded that when these five plants mixed before extraction, it will extract more active ingredients with anti-inflammatory effects. Further study we will analyzing plants effective single compound using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC profiling and progressing the experiments in vivo.

  6. [INFLUENCE OF MEDICINAL PLANT EXTRACTS ON THE FUNCTIONS AND ANTIOXIDANT PROTECTION OF ERYTHROCYTES IN RATS WITH EXPERIMENTAL DIABETES MELLITUS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vengerovskii, A I; Yakimova, T V; Nasanova, O N

    2016-01-01

    Experiments on rats with diabetes mellitus model induced by streptosotocin and high (30%) fat diet showed that the daily treatment with aqueous extracts of great nettle leaves (100 mg/kg) and common burdock roots (25 mg/kg) for a period of 10 days led to a decrease in the glycemic index and triglyceride level and produced protective action on erythrocytes both in animals kept on a fat-rich diet and on the background of a low-caloric ration. Both medicinal plant extracts were comparable with reference drug metformin in reducing the concentration of glycosylated hemoglobin (by 12-31%) and ectoglobular hemoglobin (1.7-1.8 times, p phytotherapy.

  7. Cytotoxicity of methanol extracts of 10 Cameroonian medicinal plants towards multi-factorial drug-resistant cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuete, Victor; Tchinda, Cedric F; Mambe, Flora T; Beng, Veronique P; Efferth, Thomas

    2016-08-02

    Cancer chemotherapy is still hampered by clinical failures due to multi-drug resistance (MDR) of tumor cells. In the present study, we have investigated the cytotoxicity of 20 methanol extracts from 10 medicinal plants against the sensitive leukemia CCRF-CEM cells. The most cytotoxic extracts were then further tested on a panel of 8 human cancer cell lines, including various MDR phenotypes. The cytotoxicity of the 20 methanol extracts from 10 Cameroonian medicinal plants was determined using a resazurin reduction assay. Meanwhile, flow cytometry was used to measure cell cycle, apoptosis, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), and reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the preliminary assay using CCRF-CEM cells, 12 extracts from five plants displayed IC50 values below 80 μg/mL, namely Albizia adianthifolia, Alchornea cordifolia, Alchornea laxiflora, Pennisetum purpureum, and Spathodea campanulata. the four best extracts were from two plants: Albizia adianthifolia roots (AAR) and bark (AAB) as well as Alchornea cordifolia leaves (ACL) and bark (ACB) had respective IC50 values of 0.98 μg/mL, 1.45 μg/mL, 8.02 μg/mL and 12.57 μg/mL in CCRF-CEM cells. They were further tested in 8 other cell lines as well as in normal AML12 hepatocytes. IC50 values ranging from 2.71 μg/mL (towards glioblastoma U87MG.ΔEGFR cells) to 10.30 μg/mL (towards breast adenocarcinoma MDA-MB-231-BCRP cells) for AAB, from 3.43 μg/mL (towards U87MG cells) to 10.77 μg/mL (towards colon carcinoma HCT116 (p53 (-/-) ) cells) for AAR and from 0.11 μg/mL (towards CCRF-CEM cells) to 108 μg/mL (towards leukemia CEM/ADR5000 cells) for doxorubicin (as control drug) were obtained. ACL and ACB extracts displayed selective activities. AAR and ACL extracts induced apoptosis in CCRF-CEM cells, through caspases activation and loss of MMP, while apoptotic cell death was mediated by MMP diruption and increase ROS production for ACL. Some of the tested plants namely Albizia adianthifolia, Alchornea

  8. In-vitro antibacterial activity of essential oils extracted from locally available medicinal plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ara, G.; Shawar, D.; Akbar, A.; Kanwal, F.; Imran, M.

    2011-01-01

    Extraction of essential oils from locally available species of four plants, Nigella sativa, Syzygium aromaticum, Cinnamomum tenuis and Curcuma aromatica was carried out using steam distillation followed by ether extraction. Dried and purified extracted oils were screened for their antibacterial activity against three bacterial strains namely, Bacillus lichaniformis (Gram +ve), Micrococcus leutus (Gram +ve) and Salmonella Typhimurium (Gram -ve) using Mc. Cartney's method. Minimum Inhibition Concentration (MIC) values of these oils were also determined. It was observed that the oils extracted from Nigella sativa and Cinnamomum tenuis were found to be more potent as compared to other two species. With the exception of Nigella sativa, all the other oils showed bacterial inhibition at 50 mmol concentration. These results support that these plant oils can be used to cure bacterial infections and may also have role as pharmaceuticals and preservatives. (author)

  9. In vitro antimalarial activity of vegetal extracts used in West African traditional medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, F; Valentin, A; Pelissier, Y; Diafouka, F; Marion, C; Kone-Bamba, D; Kone, M; Mallie, M; Yapo, A; Bastide, J M

    1996-01-01

    Among strategies for the development of new antimalarials, a study of plants traditionally used in Africa against malaria has been pursued. Extracts obtained from the plants Azadirachta indica, Cinnamonum camphora, Lippia multiflora, Vernonia colorata, Guiera senegalensis, Combretum micranthum, and Ximenia americana, commonly used in Cote d'Ivoire by native healers for the treatment of malaria, were tested on two strains of Plasmodium falciparum: FcB1-Colombia (chloroquine-resistant) and F32-Tanzania (chloroquine-sensitive). Extracts were obtained after infusion and decoction, both techniques being used by most native healers. The antimalarial activities of the extracts were tested first by parasite 3H-hypoxanthine incorporation and second by visual evaluation of the activities of plant extracts on thin blood smears, which also permitted the determination of parasitic stages and parasite alteration. Among the seven plants tested, some had an apparent inhibitory effect on P. falciparum growth in vitro, while other seemed to be less efficient.

  10. In vitro antioxidant and anti-proliferative activity of Ethiopian medicinal plant extracts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tauchen, J.; Doskočil, I.; Caffi, C.; Lulekal, E.; Maršík, Petr; Havlík, J.; Van Damme, P.; Kokoška, L.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 74, NOV 15 (2015), s. 671-679 ISSN 0926-6690 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Antioxidant * Anticarcinogenic * Plant extract Subject RIV: GM - Food Processing Impact factor: 3.449, year: 2015

  11. Study of antihyperglycaemic activity of medicinal plant extracts in alloxan induced diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anoja P Attanayake

    2013-01-01

    C onclusion: The aqueous extract of G. arborea, S. pinnata, K. zeylanica, S. caryophyllatum, S. dulcis, S. alnifolia, L. galanga and C. grandis possess potent acute antihyperglycaemic activity in alloxan induced diabetic rats.

  12. Evaluation of extraction protocols for anti-diabetic phytochemical substances from medicinal plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoduwa, Stanley Irobekhian Reuben; Umar, Ismaila A; James, Dorcas B; Inuwa, Hajara M; Habila, James D

    2016-01-01

    AIM To examine the efficacy of three extraction techniques: Soxhlet-extraction (SE), cold-maceration (CM) and microwave-assisted-extraction (MAE) using 80% methanol as solvent. METHODS The study was performed on each of 50 g of Vernonia amygdalina (VA) and Occimum gratissimum (OG) leaves respectively. The percentage yield, duration of extraction, volume of solvent used, qualitative and quantitative phytoconstituents present was compared. The biological activities (hypoglycemic effect) were investigated using albino wistar rat model of diabetes mellitus (n = 36) with a combined dose (1:1) of the two plants leaf extracts (250 mg/kg b.w.) from the three methods. The extracts were administered orally, once daily for 21 d. RESULTS In this report, the percentage VA extract yield from MAE was highest (20.9% ± 1.05%) within 39 min using 250 mL of solvent, when compared to the CM (14.35% ± 0.28%) within 4320 min using 900 mL of solvent and SE (15.75% ± 0.71%) within 265 min using 500 mL of solvent. The percentage differences in OG extract yield between: MAE vs SE was 41.05%; MAE vs CM was 46.81% and SE vs CM was 9.77%. The qualitative chemical analysis of the two plants showed no difference in the various phytoconstituents tested, but differs quantitatively in the amount of the individual phytoconstituents, as MAE had significantly high yield (P > 0.05) on phenolics, saponins and tannins. SE technique gave significantly high yield (P > 0.05) on alkaloid, while CM gave significant high yield on flavonoids. The extracts from CM exhibited a significantly (P > 0.05) better hypoglycemic activity within the first 14-d of treatment (43.3% ± 3.62%) when compared to MAE (36.5% ± 0.08%) and SE methods (33.3% ± 1.60%). However, the percentage hypoglycemic activity, 21 d post-treatment with 250 mg/kg b.w. extract from MAE was 72.6% ± 1.03% and it was more comparable to 10 mg/kg b.w. glibenclamide treated group (75.0% ± 0.73%), unlike the SE (69.5% ± 0.71%) and CM (69.1% ± 1

  13. Cytotoxic effect of Argentine medicinal plant extracts on human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffa, M J; Ferraro, G; Wagner, M L; Calcagno, M L; Campos, R H; Cavallaro, L

    2002-03-01

    Methanolic extracts from Achyrocline satureioides (Dc.) Lam, Aristolochia macroura Gomez, Lithraea molleoides (Vell.) Engl., Schinus molle L., unlike those from Celtis spinosa Spreng, Chenopodium ambrosioides L., Petiveria alliacea L., and Plantago major L. showed cytotoxic activity against a human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line, Hep G2. Schinus molle L. was the most active (IC50=50+/-7 microg/ml). These results call for further studies of these extracts.

  14. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of 81 Chinese Herb Extracts and Their Correlation with the Characteristics of Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Liang Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inducible nitrogen oxide synthase (iNOS is the primary contributor of the overproduction of nitric oxide and its inhibitors have been actively sought as effective anti-inflammatory agents. In this study, we prepared 70% ethanol extracts from 81 Chinese herbs. These extracts were subsequently evaluated for their effect on nitrogen oxide (NO production and cell growth in LPS/IFNγ-costimulated and unstimulated murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells by Griess reaction and MTT assay. Extracts of Daphne genkwa Sieb.et Zucc, Caesalpinia sappan L., Iles pubescens Hook.et Arn, Forsythia suspensa (Thunb. Vahl, Zingiber officinale Rosc, Inula japonica Thunb., and Ligusticum chuanxiong Hort markedly inhibited NO production (inhibition > 90% at 100 μg/mL. Among active extracts (inhibition > 50% at 100 μg/mL, Rubia cordifolia L., Glycyrrhiza glabra L., Iles pubescens Hook.et Arn, Nigella glandulifera Freyn et Sint, Pueraria lobata (Willd. Ohwi, and Scutellaria barbata D. Don displayed no cytotoxicity to unstimulated RAW246.7 cells while increasing the growth of LPS/IFNγ-costimulated cells. By analyzing the correlation between their activities and their Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM characteristics, herbs with pungent flavor displayed potent anti-inflammatory capability. Our study provides a series of potential anti-inflammatory herbs and suggests that herbs with pungent flavor are candidates of effective anti-inflammatory agents.

  15. Extracts and compounds active on TRP ion channels from Waldheimia glabra, a ritual medicinal plant from Himalaya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgi, Annamaria; Bassoli, Angela; Borgonovo, Gigliola; Panseri, Sara; Manzo, Alessandra; Pentimalli, Daniela; Schiano Moriello, Aniello; De Petrocellis, Luciano

    2017-08-15

    Waldheimia glabra (Decne.) Regel is a wild plant from the Himalayan Mountains, commonly known as Smooth Ground Daisy. This plant is traditionally used by local populations in religious rituals (incense) or in traditional herbal medicine to treat skin diseases, headache, joint pain and fever. In literature few data are available on the investigation of this aromatic plant. The present work aims at deepening knowledge about the chemical composition of W. glabra extracts and incense, as well as its activity on TRP ion channels. Extracts and incense of W. glabra were analyzed by using HS-SPME GC/MS, GC/MS and NMR analysis. Tests on the activity of W. glabra extracts and isolated compounds (+)-ludartin 1 and B-ring-homo-tonghaosu 2 on TRP channels were also performed. Some extracts and pure compounds from W. glabra showed an interesting activity in terms of efficacy and potency on rat TRPA1, an ion channel involved in several sensory mechanisms, including pungency, environmental irritation and pain perception. Activity is discussed and compared with that of other known TRPA1 natural agonists with different chemical structures. All compounds showed only a negligible inhibition activity on rat TRPM8 ion channel. Our findings demonstrate that W. glabra is involved in the receptor activation mechanism and therefore represents a new natural product potentially useful in pharmaceutical and agrifood research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Antioxidant Capacities of Hot Water Extracts and Endopolysaccharides of Selected Chinese Medicinal Fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Sang Chul; Tulasi, Ratna; Koyyalamudi, Sundar Rao

    2016-03-09

    Fruits are a rich source of antioxidants and traditional Chinese fruits have been studied for their chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic properties against cancers and other diseases. The total phenol and flavonoid contents of eleven Chinese fruits extracts were determined. Total phenolic and flavonoid contents were estimated by both the Folin-Ciocalteau and aluminium chloride methods. The antioxidant activities were evaluated by four assays: a biological assay using Saccharomyces cerevisiae, DPPH radical scavenging activity, chelating ability for ferrous ions and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP). The phenols and flavonoids contents of the hot water extracts were in the range of 17.7 to 94.7 mg/g and 12.3 to 295.4 mg/g, whereas the endopolysaccharides lie in the range of 4.5 to 77.4 mg/g and 22.7 to 230.0 mg/g. Significant amounts of phenols and flavonoids were present in the majority of the fruit extracts and showed strong antioxidant activities. The antioxidant properties of the fruit extracts of Crataegus pinnatifida, Illicium verum, Ligustrum lucidum, Momordica grosvenori and Psoralea corylifolia as determined by the DPPH and FRAP methods, were significant compared to other fruit extracts. In the present study, we found that significant amounts of phenolic and flavonoid compounds were present in these fruit extracts and may contribute to in vitro antioxidant activities.

  17. Antioxidant Capacities of Hot Water Extracts and Endopolysaccharides of Selected Chinese Medicinal Fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Chul Jeong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Fruits are a rich source of antioxidants and traditional Chinese fruits have been studied for their chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic properties against cancers and other diseases. The total phenol and flavonoid contents of eleven Chinese fruits extracts were determined. Total phenolic and flavonoid contents were estimated by both the Folin-Ciocalteau and aluminium chloride methods. The antioxidant activities were evaluated by four assays: a biological assay using Saccharomyces cerevisiae, DPPH radical scavenging activity, chelating ability for ferrous ions and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP. The phenols and flavonoids contents of the hot water extracts were in the range of 17.7 to 94.7 mg/g and 12.3 to 295.4 mg/g, whereas the endopolysaccharides lie in the range of 4.5 to 77.4 mg/g and 22.7 to 230.0 mg/g. Significant amounts of phenols and flavonoids were present in the majority of the fruit extracts and showed strong antioxidant activities. The antioxidant properties of the fruit extracts of Crataegus pinnatifida, Illicium verum, Ligustrum lucidum, Momordica grosvenori and Psoralea corylifolia as determined by the DPPH and FRAP methods, were significant compared to other fruit extracts. In the present study, we found that significant amounts of phenolic and flavonoid compounds were present in these fruit extracts and may contribute to in vitro antioxidant activities.

  18. Antibacterial activity of crude extracts of some South African medicinal plants against multidrug resistant etiological agents of diarrhoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisi-Johnson, Mary A; Obi, Chikwelu L; Samuel, Babatunde B; Eloff, Jacobus N; Okoh, Anthony I

    2017-06-19

    This study evaluated the antibacterial activity of some plants used in folklore medicine to treat diarrhoea in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa. The acetone extracts of Acacia mearnsii De Wild., Aloe arborescens Mill., A. striata Haw., Cyathula uncinulata (Schrad.) Schinz, Eucomis autumnalis (Mill.) Chitt., E. comosa (Houtt.) Wehrh., Hermbstaedtia odorata (Burch. ex Moq.) T.Cooke, Hydnora africana Thunb, Hypoxis latifolia Wight, Pelargonium sidoides DC, Psidium guajava L and Schizocarphus nervosus (Burch.) van der Merwe were screened against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, multi-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Isangi, S. typhi, S. enterica serovar Typhimurium, Shigella flexneri type 1b and Sh. sonnei phase II. A qualitative phytochemical screening of the plants extracts was by thin layer chromatography. Plants extracts were screened for antibacterial activity using serial dilution microplate technique and bioautography. The TLC fingerprint indicated the presence of terpenoids and flavonoids in the herbs. Most of the tested organisms were sensitive to the crude acetone extracts with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranging from 0.018-2.5 mg/mℓ. Extracts of A. striata, C. uncinulata, E. autumnalis and P. guajava were more active against enteropathogens. S. aureus and Sh. flexneri were the most sensitive isolates to the crude extracts but of significance is the antibacterial activity of A. arborescens and P. guajava against a confirmed extended spectrum betalactamase positive S. enterica serovar Typhimurium. The presence of bioactive compounds and the antibacterial activity of some of the selected herbs against multidrug resistant enteric agents corroborate assertions by traditional healers on their efficacies.

  19. Evaluation of antioxidant activity of medicinal plants containing polyphenol compounds. Comparison of two extraction systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kratchanova, M.; Denev, P.; Číž, Milan; Lojek, Antonín; Mihailov, A.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 2 (2010), s. 229-234 ISSN 0001-527X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) OC08058 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : medicinal plants * ORAC * polyphenols Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.234, year: 2010

  20. Study of aqueous extract of three medicinal plants on cell membrane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    rations. Saponins are found in a number of medicinal plants (Price et al., 1987; Lacaile, 2005). Absorption enhancing ability of surfactants in formu- lations with low absorption like peptides or proteins is used for drug delivery in non-injectable formulations. A board spectrum of surfactants used as enhancers includes ...

  1. Infant formulas - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to cow's milk may also be allergic to soy milk. Soy-based formulas should be used for infants with galactosemia , a rare condition. These formulas can also be used ... have allergies to milk protein and for those with skin rashes or ...

  2. Selected Baking Formulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdany, Melvin

    This manual is designed to help baking students learn to use formulas in the preparation of baking products. Tested and proven formulas are, for the most part, standard ones with only slight modifications. The recipes are taken mainly from bakery product manufacturers and are presented in quantities suitable for school-shop use. Each recipe…

  3. Formula misasi?! / Sten Soomlais

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Soomlais, Sten

    2008-01-01

    Formula Student on kõrgkoolide masinaehituse ja/või autotehnika tudengite meeskondade vaheline iga-aastane tootearendusvõistlus, mis kujutab endast väikese vormelauto projekteerimist, ehitamist ja võidusõitmist ringrajal. Lisa: Formula Student Eestis

  4. GC-MS analysis of leaf extracts of Terminalia macroptera and Dioclea reflexa, two medicinal plants used for the treatment of respiratory tract disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Theresa Ibibia Edewor; Nimotalai Olabisi Kazeem; Stephen Oluwagbemiga Owa

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the phytochemicals that are present in two medicinal plants which are used for the treatment of respiratory tract infections by gas chromatography-mass spectrometer. Methods: The plant leaves were extracted with n-hexane and methanol separately. Both extracts were analyzed for present phytochemicals using the method described by Harborne, 1985 while only methanol extracts were subjected to gas chromatography-mass spectrometer analysis. Results: Phytoche...

  5. Ameliorative potential of Artemisia Capillaris Formula on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Artemisia Capillaris Formula (ACF), a traditional Chinese medicinal therapy, has been used clinically in China to treat Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) for many years. However, the mechanism of action of this treatment on NAFLD is still unknown. The goal of the present study is to test whether ...

  6. Development and validation of a solid-phase extraction method coupled to liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection for the determination of fluoroquinolone residues in powdered infant formulae. Application to the analysis of samples from the Spanish and Latin American market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, E; Moreno-Bondi, M C; Marazuela, M D

    2008-10-31

    This paper describes a new method for the effective extraction, clean-up and chromatographic analysis of residues of four fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, danofloxacin and sarafloxacin) in powdered infant formulae and follow-on preparations. Samples were reconstituted following the manufacturer's recommendations and treated with trichloroacetic acid in methanol 10% (w/v) for deproteinization. Two solid-phase extraction cartridges have been evaluated for sample clean-up and preconcentration, Strata Screen A and Strata X and the later provided the best recoveries for all the analytes tested. Chromatographic analysis has been carried out using a polar endcapped column (AQUA C(18)) and fluorescence detection, with lomefloxacin (LOME) as internal standard. Method validation has been performed according to European Commission Decision 2002/657/EC criteria, in terms of linearity, recovery, precision, specificity, decision limit (CC(alpha)) and detection capability (CC(beta)). Typical recoveries ranged between 70 and 110% at levels below and above the maximum residue limits of the target analytes in bovine milk, with an excellent intralab reproducibility (RSDsmarket, using LC-MS/MS as confirmatory technique.

  7. Inhibition of Propionibacterium acnes lipase by extracts of Indian medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, V; Bandivadekar, A; Debjani, D

    2012-06-01

    Lipases play an important role in pathogenesis of acne by hydrolysing sebum triglycerides and releasing irritating free fatty acids in the pilosebaceous follicles. Lipase is a strong chemotactic and proinflammatory antigen. Therefore, lipase has generated a high interest as a pharmacological target for antiacne drugs. The aim of this study was to identify inhibitory effects of plant extracts on the lipase activity of Propionibacterium acnes. Colorimetric microassay was used to determine lipase activity. Extracts from Terminalia chebula and Embelia ribes showed lower IC(50) value (1 μg mL(-1) ) for lipase inhibition as compared to Vitex negundo and Picrorhiza kurroa (19 and 47 μg mL(-1) , respectively). The active component responsible for lipase inhibition was isolated. This study reports for the first time the novel antilipase activity of chebulagic acid (IC(50) : 60 μmol L(-1) ) with minimum inhibitory concentration value of 12.5 μg mL(-1) against P. acnes. The inhibitory potential of plant extracts was further confirmed by plate assay. The organism was grown in the presence of subinhibitory concentrations of extracts from P. kurroa, V. negundo, T. chebula, E. ribes and antibiotics such as clindamycin and tetracycline. Extract from T. chebula showed significant inhibition of lipase activity and number of P. acnes. © 2012 The Authors. ICS © 2012 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  8. Screening for antibacterial and antibiofilm activity in Thai medicinal plant extracts against oral microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teanpaisan, Rawee; Kawsud, Pajaree; Pahumunto, Nuntiya; Puripattanavong, Jindaporn

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the antibacterial activity of 12 ethanol extracts of Thai traditional herb against oral pathogens. The antibacterial activities were assessed by agar well diffusion, broth microdilution, and time-kill methods. Antibiofilm activity was investigated using a 3-[4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl]-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium-bromide (MTT) assay. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), thin layer chromatography (TLC) fingerprinting, and TLC-bioautography were used to determine the active antibacterial compounds. Piper betle showed the best antibacterial activities against all tested strains in the minimal inhibitory concentration and minimal bactericidal concentration, ranged from 1.04-5.21 mg/mL and 2.08-8.33 mg/mL, respectively. Killing ability depended on time and concentrations of the extract. P. betle extract acts as a potent antibiofilm agent with dual actions, preventing and eradicating the biofilm. The major constituent of P. betle extract was 4-chromanol, which responded for antibacteria and antibiofilm against oral pathogens. It suggests that the ethanol P. betle leaves extract may be used for preventing oral diseases.

  9. In vitro antimalarial activity of extracts of three plants used in the traditional medicine of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, G P; Surolia, N

    2001-10-01

    In an attempt to search for new antimalarial drugs, we studied plants used by traditional healers of southwest India to treat malaria. Aqueous and organic solvent extracts obtained from specific parts of the plants Swertia chirata, Carica papaya, and Citrus sinensis were tested on malaria strain Plasmodium falciparum FCK 2 in vitro. The temperatures of extraction were the same as that used by the traditional healers in their plant preparations. Visual evaluation of the antimalarial activity of the plant extracts on thin blood smears was followed by quantification of the activity by use of [35S]-methionine incorporation into parasite proteins to determine the value that inhibits 50% (IC50). Among the 3 plants tested, 2 had significant inhibitory effect on P. falciparum in vitro.

  10. Antibacterial activity of combined medicinal plants extract against multiple drug resistant strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafiqul Islam

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To find out the combined antibacterial efficacy of Aegle marmelos, Aphanamixis polystachya, Cuscuta reflexa and Aesclynomene indica against bacterial pathogens. Methods: Antibacterial potency of combined plant extracts has been tested against Bacillus subtilis IFO 3026, Sarcina lutea IFO 3232, Xanthomonas campestris IAM 1671, Escherichia coli IFO 3007, Klebsiella pneumoniae ATTC 10031, Proteus vulgaris MTCC 321 and Pseudomonas denitrificans KACC 32026 by disc diffusion assay. Commercially available standard antibiotic discs were also used to find out antibiotic resistance pattern of test organisms. Results: Among the test organisms, Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Proteus denitrificans showed resistance against multiple commercially available antibiotics. On the other hand, these multiple drug resistant organisms showed susceptibility against combined plant extracts. Conclusions: These combined plants extracts showed synergistic antibacterial activity and could lead to new antibacterial drug designing.

  11. Application of multiwalled carbon nanotubes as sorbents for the extraction of mycotoxins in water samples and infant milk formula prior to high performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socas-Rodríguez, Bárbara; González-Sálamo, Javier; Hernández-Borges, Javier; Rodríguez Delgado, Miguel Ángel

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a simple and environmental friendly methodology has been developed for the analysis of a group of six mycotoxins with estrogenic activity produced by Fusarium species (i.e. zearalanone, zearalenone, α-zearalanol, β-zearalanol, α-zearalenol, and β-zearalenol), using microdispersive SPE the symbol micro should de before dSPE with multiwalled carbon nanotubes as sorbent. Separation, determination, and quantification were achieved by HPLC coupled to ion trap MS with an ESI interface. Parameters affecting the extraction efficiency of µ-dSPE such as pH of the sample, amount of multiwalled carbon nanotubes, and type and volume of elution solvent, were studied and optimized. The methodology was validated for mineral, pond, and wastewater as well as for powdered infant milk using 17β-estradiol-2,4,16,16,17-d5 (17β-E2 -D5 ) as internal standard, obtaining recoveries ranging from 85 to 120% for the three types of water samples and from 77 to 115% for powdered infant milk. RSD values were lower than 10%. The LOQs achieved were in the range 0.05-2.90 μg/L for water samples and 2.02-31.9 μg/L for powdered infant milk samples. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Anti-UV activity of Kampo medicines and constituent plant extracts: re-evaluation with skin keratinocyte system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Takao; Hino, Shunsuke; Horie, Norio; Shimoyama, Tetsuo; Kaneko, Tadayoshi; Kusama, Kaoru; Sakagami, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    In order to search for new biological activity of Kampo medicines and their constituent plant extracts, we investigated their ability to protect the cells from UV irradiation (referred to as 'anti-UV activity') using the human immortalised skin keratinocyte cell line HaCaT. Anti-UV activity was represented by the selectivity index (SI), defined as the ratio of the concentration that reduced the viable cell number by 50% to the concentration that increased the viability of UV-irradiated cells to 50%. HaCaT cells were highly resistant to UV irradiation, approximately 20% of cells survived even when the exposure time was prolonged to 480 min. Sodium ascorbate, a popular antioxidant, used as positive control, had excellent anti-UV activity (SI=200). Among 10 Kampo medicines, Shosaikoto (SI=34) had the highest anti-UV activity, followed by Hangesyashinto (SI>28), Unseiin (SI>23) and Ninjinyoeito (SI=23), Saireito (SI>19), whereas another four Kampo medicines were much less active (SIUV activity (SI=38), followed by Polyporus sclerotium (SI>26), Gardenia fruit (SI>23), Japanese Gentian (SI>20) and Saposhnikovia root (SI>20). Glycyrrhizin also had potent anti-UV activity (SI=36). The SI values determined with the present HaCaT system were generally one order higher than those obtained with previously reported HSC-2 human oral squamous cell carcinoma system, although there was good correlation between these two systems (R(2)=0.9118). Conclusion. The present study highlights the improved sensitivity of anti-UV activity detection with the HaCaT system, and suggests the possible application of Kampo medicines as a component of sunscreening cosmetics. Copyright © 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  13. confronting aids - a plea for a national dried milk formula

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AfA has no interests in the buying, distribution or selling of medicines. It will, however, wo!"k closely with the . ... to buy milk formula should be discouraged from breast- feeding. Where does this approach leave the ... to the private sector for the manufacture of a suitable milk formula which should meet the basic nutritional ...

  14. Anti-HIV-1 activities of the extracts from the medicinal plant Linum grandiflorum Desf

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohammed, Magdy M. D.; Christensen, Lars Porskjær; Ibrahim, Nabaweya A.

    2009-01-01

    As part of our screening of anti-AIDS agents from natural sources e.g. Ixora undulata, Paulownia tomentosa, Fortunella margarita, Aegle marmelos and Erythrina abyssinica, the different organic and aqueous extracts of Linum grandiflorum leaves and seeds were evaluated in vitro by the microculture ...

  15. Mutagenicity induced by the hydroalcoholic extract of the medicinal plant Plathymenia reticulata Benth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Della Torre

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Plathymenia reticulata Benth has an anti-inflammatory effect and is capable of neutralizing the neuromuscular blockade induced by Bothrops jararacussu or Crotalus durissus terrificus venoms, probably by precipitating venom proteins (an effect caused by plant tannins. The present study aimed to evaluate the mutagenic activity of P. reticulata by using the Salmonella mutagenicity assay (Ames test and the micronucleus test in CHO-K1 cells. P. reticulata extract concentrations of 2.84, 5.68, 11.37, and 19.90 mg/plate were assayed by the Ames test using TA97a, TA98, TA100 and TA102 bacterial strains, with (+S9 and without (-S9 metabolic activation. Concentrations of 5, 1.6 and 0.5 μg/mL of P. reticulata extract were used for the micronucleus test. P. reticulata extract was mutagenic to TA98 (-S9 and showed signs of mutagenic activity in TA97a and TA102 (both -S9 strains. Micronucleus test CBPI values showed that the endogenous metabolic system increased the number of viable cells when compared to the non-activated samples and the micronucleus frequency increased when the cells were treated in the absence of S9. We concluded that P. reticulata extract may present direct mutagenic properties.

  16. Phenolic compounds present in medicinal mushroom extracts generate reactive oxygen species in human cells in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wei, S.; Helsper, J.P.F.G.; Griensven, van L.J.L.D.

    2008-01-01

    Hot-water extracts of the higher Basidiomycetes Agaricus bisporus (J. Lge) Imbach, A. brasiliensis S. Wasser et al., Coprinus comatus (O.F. Mull.) Pers., Ganoderma lucidum (W. Curt.: Fr.) P. Karst., and Phellinus linteus (Berk. et Curt.) Teng were made, and the resulting polysaccharide mixtures were

  17. Anti-diarrhoeal effects of three Nigerian medicinal plant extracts on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pawpaw root (Carica papaya), Guava leaf (Psidium guajava) and Bush Mango leaf (Irvingia gabonensis) are commonly used locally to treat diarrhoea. The present study evaluated the anti-diarrhoeal effects of these plant extracts on E. coli - induced diarrhoea in albino rats. Fresh tender roots and leaves of these plants were ...

  18. The use of crude extracts from traditional medicinal plants to eliminate Trichodina sp. in tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus fingerlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanagun Chitmanat

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The treatment for ectoparasitic diseases in freshwater fish with formalin seems at present to be ineffective. For this reason it is evidently a useless cost. In addition, formalin possibly leaves toxic residues in fish flesh and in the environment which are eventually harmful to consumers. The alternative way to solve this problem is to use traditional medicinal plants instead. The purpose of this research is to determine the possibility of using garlic (Allium sativum and Indian almond (Terminalia catappa as optional chemicals to treat fish ectoparasites, Trichodina sp. The results showed that crude extracts of either garlic or Indian almond at 800 mg/l significantly (P < 0.05 eliminated Trichodina sp. infections in tilapia (average weight 3.62±0.06 g each. To evaluate the acute toxicity of these products to the host fish, groups of 20 tilapia (same size as abovewere exposed to 3 concentrations of each product for 96 h. Mortality was then determined. The 2 h LC50 for tilapia exposed to crude extract of garlic was 2,259.44 mg/L while the 16 h LC50 for tilapia exposed to Indian almond extract was 46,665.94 mg/L. This information is the beneficial and fundamental knowledge to develop guidelines to reduce the use of chemicals and antibiotics in freshwater fish culture businesses. The research is underway to determine the long-term effect of Indian almond and garlic to tilapia, if any.

  19. Nondestructive prediction of oren extract powder, a herbal medicine, in suppositories by chemometric near-infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teraoka, Ryutaro; Abe, Hiroyuki; Sugama, Tadaaki; Ito, Kiyomi; Aburada, Masaki; Otsuka, Makoto

    2012-04-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy combined with chemometrics has been utilized in predictions of natural medicine content without destroying samples. Suppositories (oren powdered extract content 0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.5, 10, 12.5, and 15%) were produced by mixing oren powdered extract with macrogol mixture consisting of 1 part macrogol 1500 and 2.5 parts macrogol 4000 at 54°C, and pouring the melt mixture into a plastic container. NIR spectra of the 10 prepared samples were recorded 10 times, and a total of 100 spectra were randomly divided into two data sets, one for calibration and the other for validation. The calibration model for the oren content of the suppository was calculated based on NIR spectra using a partial least-squares regression analysis after pre-treatment (smoothing and the multiplicative scatter correction). The relationship between the actual and predicted values for calibration and validation models had a straight line with correlation coefficients of 0.9936 and 0.9898, respectively. The regression vector result of the calibration model indicates that the peaks at 6945, 5747, and 5160 cm(-1) in the regression vector were consistent with those in oren powder extracts. NIR spectroscopy combined with chemometrics offers promise as a method of predicting the oren powder content in suppositories without destroying the samples.

  20. Therapeutic Efficacy of Topically Applied Antioxidant Medicinal Plant Extracts in a Mouse Model of Experimental Dry Eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won; Lee, Jee Bum; Cui, Lian; Li, Ying; Li, Zhengri; Choi, Ji Suk; Lee, Hyo Seok; Yoon, Kyung Chul

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the therapeutic effects of topical administration of antioxidant medicinal plant extracts in a mouse model of experimental dry eye (EDE). Methods. Eye drops containing balanced salt solution (BSS) or 0.001%, 0.01%, and 0.1% extracts were applied for the treatment of EDE. Tear volume, tear film break-up time (BUT), and corneal fluorescein staining scores were measured 10 days after desiccating stress. In addition, we evaluated the levels of interleukin- (IL-) 1β, tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α, IL-6, interferon- (IFN-) γ, and IFN-γ associated chemokines, percentage of CD4+C-X-C chemokine receptor type 3 positive (CXCR3+) T cells, goblet cell density, number of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) positive cells, and extracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Results. Compared to the EDE and BSS control groups, the mice treated with topical application of the 0.1% extract showed significant improvements in all clinical parameters, IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and IFN-γ levels, percentage of CD4+CXCR3+ T cells, goblet cell density, number of 4-HNE-positive cells, and extracellular ROS production (P model mice.

  1. Green synthesis and characterization of silver nanoparticles using aqueous petal extract of the medicinal plant Combretum indicum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahuguna, Gaurav; Kumar, Amit; Mishra, Neeraj K.; Kumar, Chitresh; Bahlwal, Aseema; Chaudhary, Pratibha; Singh, Rajeev

    2016-07-01

    For the first time, any type of plant extract from the medicinally important plant Combretum indicum has been used for the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). The present investigation reports the synthesis and characterization of AgNPs using the flower petal extract of Combretum indicum. For monitoring the formation and optical properties of the synthesized nanoparticles, they were analyzed using UV-visible spectroscopy. Apart from this, the luminescence properties were also studied by photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis revealed the formation of AgNPs and the surface morphology has been determined. The mean particle diameter using the dynamic light scattering (DLS) technique ranged from 50-120 nm depending upon the reaction time. The atomic percentage of Ag in synthesized NPs and the crystallinity were determined by energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) and x-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. This green approach of synthesizing AgNPs, using a biologically important plant extract is found to be cost effective, economical, eco-friendly and convenient in synthesis.

  2. Capillary electrophoresis with amperometric detection of curcumin in Chinese herbal medicine pretreated by solid-phase extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiuhua; Gao, Changlu; Cao, Weidong; Yang, Xiurong; Wang, Erkang

    2002-07-12

    In the present study, curcumin from Chinese herbal medicine turmeric was determined by capillary electrophoresis with amperometric detection (CE-AD) pretreated by a self-designed, simple, inexpensive solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridge based on the material of tributyl phosphate resin. An average concentration factor of 9 with the recovery of > 80% was achieved when applied to the analysis of curcumin in extracts of tumeric. Under the optimized CE-AD conditions: a running buffer composed of 15 mM phosphate buffer at a pH 9.7, separation voltage at 16 kV, injection for 6 s at 9 kV and detection at 1.20 V, CE-AD with SPE exhibited low detection limit as 3 x 10(-8) mol/l (S/N = 3), high efficiency of 1.0 x 10(5) N, linear range of 7 x 10(-4) -3 x 10(-6) mol/l (r = 0.9986) for curcumin extracted from light petroleum. The method developed resulted in enhancement of the detection sensitivity and reduction of interference from sample matrix in complicated samples and exhibited the potential application for routine analysis, especially in food, because a relatively complete process of sample treatment and analysis was described.

  3. Análise farmacognóstica e atividade antibacteriana de extratos vegetais empregados em formulação para a higiene bucal Herbal extracts in an experimental mouthwash: pharmacognostics analysis and antibacterial activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Helena Gontijo Cordeiro

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available A utilização de extratos vegetais vem se tornando uma alternativa importante para a prevenção de doenças periodontais. Este trabalho objetivou desenvolver uma formulação de enxagüatório bucal, contendo, em associação, extratos hidroalcoólicos de Rosmarinus officinalis, Plantago major, Tabebuia impetiginosa, Achillea millefollium e Nasturtium officinale; avaliar sua composição farmacognóstica e sua atividade antibacteriana, como também da fórmula proposta. Foram realizados estudos de pré-formulação e análises farmacognósticas para as espécies vegetais. A atividade antibacteriana in vitro foi observada por meio dos métodos de difusão em disco de papel, por hole- plate e por template, frente a Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia colik, Enterococcus faecalis e Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A concentração inibitória mínima (CIM foi determinada por meio do método de macrodiluições sucessivas em caldo. Os resultados obtidos apresentaram-se de acordo com o histórico farmacognóstico das drogas estudadas. Todas as bactérias foram inibidas pelos extratos, observando-se que as espécies S. aureus e B. subtilis mostraram, aparentemente, maior sensibilidade. A CIM variou, em relação a sensibilidade de cada espécie bacteriana estudada, de 312,5 µL/mL a 1250 µL/mL para os extratos vegetais e de 625 µL/mL a 2500 µL/mL para o enxaguatório bucal. São necessários estudos complementares para a confirmação da eficácia deste produto e sua utilização na prevenção de doenças periodontais.In this study, herbs and hidroalcoholic extracts of Nasturtium officinale, Rosmarinus officinalis, Tabebuia impetiginosa, Plantago major and Achillea millefollium, were investigated for pharmacognostics analysis (flavonoids, alkaloids, tanins, saponins and antraquinones and antibacterial activity (against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis e Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In vitro

  4. Screening of Six Medicinal Plant Extracts Obtained by Two Conventional Methods and Supercritical CO₂ Extraction Targeted on Coumarin Content, 2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl Radical Scavenging Capacity and Total Phenols Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Maja; Jerković, Igor; Suknović, Dragica; Bilić Rajs, Blanka; Aladić, Krunoslav; Šubarić, Drago; Jokić, Stela

    2017-02-24

    Six medicinal plants Helichrysum italicum (Roth) G. Don, Angelica archangelica L., Lavandula officinalis L., Salvia officinalis L., Melilotus officinalis L., and Ruta graveolens L. were used. The aim of the study was to compare their extracts obtained by Soxhlet (hexane) extraction, maceration with ethanol (EtOH), and supercritical CO₂ extraction (SC-CO₂) targeted on coumarin content (by high performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection, HPLC-UV), 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH) scavenging capacity, and total phenols (TPs) content (by Folin-Ciocalteu assay). The highest extraction yields were obtained by EtOH, followed by hexane and SC-CO₂. The highest coumarin content (316.37 mg/100 g) was found in M. officinalis EtOH extracts, but its SC-CO₂ extraction yield was very low for further investigation. Coumarin was also found in SC-CO₂ extracts of S. officinalis , R. graveolens , A. archangelica , and L. officinalis . EtOH extracts of all plants exhibited the highest DPPH scavenging capacity. SC-CO₂ extracts exhibited antiradical capacity similar to hexane extracts, while S. officinalis SC-CO₂ extracts were the most potent (95.7%). EtOH extracts contained the most TPs (up to 132.1 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/g from H. italicum ) in comparison to hexane or SC-CO₂ extracts. TPs content was highly correlated to the DPPH scavenging capacity of the extracts. The results indicate that for comprehensive screening of different medicinal plants, various extraction techniques should be used in order to get a better insight into their components content or antiradical capacity.

  5. Screening of Six Medicinal Plant Extracts Obtained by Two Conventional Methods and Supercritical CO2 Extraction Targeted on Coumarin Content, 2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl Radical Scavenging Capacity and Total Phenols Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Molnar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Six medicinal plants Helichrysum italicum (Roth G. Don, Angelica archangelica L., Lavandula officinalis L., Salvia officinalis L., Melilotus officinalis L., and Ruta graveolens L. were used. The aim of the study was to compare their extracts obtained by Soxhlet (hexane extraction, maceration with ethanol (EtOH, and supercritical CO2 extraction (SC-CO2 targeted on coumarin content (by high performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection, HPLC-UV, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH scavenging capacity, and total phenols (TPs content (by Folin–Ciocalteu assay. The highest extraction yields were obtained by EtOH, followed by hexane and SC-CO2. The highest coumarin content (316.37 mg/100 g was found in M. officinalis EtOH extracts, but its SC-CO2 extraction yield was very low for further investigation. Coumarin was also found in SC-CO2 extracts of S. officinalis, R. graveolens, A. archangelica, and L. officinalis. EtOH extracts of all plants exhibited the highest DPPH scavenging capacity. SC-CO2 extracts exhibited antiradical capacity similar to hexane extracts, while S. officinalis SC-CO2 extracts were the most potent (95.7%. EtOH extracts contained the most TPs (up to 132.1 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE/g from H. italicum in comparison to hexane or SC-CO2 extracts. TPs content was highly correlated to the DPPH scavenging capacity of the extracts. The results indicate that for comprehensive screening of different medicinal plants, various extraction techniques should be used in order to get a better insight into their components content or antiradical capacity.

  6. Screening for antibacterial and antibiofilm activity in Thai medicinal plant extracts against oral microorganisms

    OpenAIRE

    Teanpaisan, Rawee; Kawsud, Pajaree; Pahumunto, Nuntiya; Puripattanavong, Jindaporn

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the antibacterial activity of 12 ethanol extracts of Thai traditional herb against oral pathogens. The antibacterial activities were assessed by agar well diffusion, broth microdilution, and time-kill methods. Antibiofilm activity was investigated using a 3-[4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl]-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium-bromide (MTT) assay. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), thin layer chromatography (TLC) fingerprinting, and TLC-bioautography were used to determine the active ...

  7. Screening for Hypoglycemic Activity on the Leaf Extracts of Nine Medicinal Plants: In-Vivo Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Arya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional use of certain plants by the tribal community in central India involves using the young leaves for several ailments, including hyperglycaemia; this study was performed to evaluate the effects of the leaf extracts from 9 such plants in the management of diabetes. Initially, hypoglycemic screening was performed on normal rats whose blood glucose levels were measured before and after oral or intraperitoneal (i.p. administration of the extracts at different periods. The plants were screened at doses of 250 mg/kg i.p. or 500 mg/kg orally. Of these, only Centratherum anthelminticum (Asteraceae, Cissus quadrangularis (Vitaceae, and Woodfordia fruticosa Kurz (Lythraceae significantly reduced postprandial blood glucose levels in normal glycemic rats (P < 0.001, with slight reductions effected by Sida acuta Burm F. (P = 0.002 and Parthenium hysterophorus L. (P = 0.017. The extracts that reduced postprandial blood glucose levels both orally and i.p. in the hypoglycemic screening tests were evaluated for glucose challenge in glucose tolerance tests with i.p and oral administration in overnight-fasted normal rats. The results of these tests potentiate the screening data in the management of diabetes mellitus, which requires further studies on the plants that yielded positive results to determine the active compounds in the different plant parts that are responsible for the activity.

  8. Optimizing Pretreatment of Medicinal Raw Materials by RFC Plasma before Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.Yu. Kuznetsova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Optimization of the RF-plasma treatment modes of chaga raw materials using the Statistica 6.0 software package has been performed. Mathematical design has been carried out to calculate the optimum parameters of RF-plasma treatment using three plasma-forming gases – argon, air, and nitrogen. Plasma treatment of chaga raw materials has been undertaken at the constant parameters: pressure P = 30.0 Pa, anodic current J = 0.7 A, gas consumption G = 0.04 g/s; the variable parameters were power U = 5.0÷7.0 kV and treatment duration at the high-frequency capacitor category of the lowered pressure t = 30÷60 min. Optimization of four key parameters for extraction of chaga raw materials (solid residue, melanin yield, antioxidant activity of both extract and chaga melanin depending on the chosen plasma-forming gas (argon, air, or nitrogen has been achieved. The optimum modes of RF-plasma treatment allowing to obtain the extracts and melanin of chaga mushroom with the improved physicochemical and antioxidant characteristics have been calculated.

  9. Commercial Medicinal Plant Extraction in the Hills of Nepal: Local Management System and Ecological Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Helle Overgaard

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a case study from Jumla District, Nepal, investigating local management systems and ecological sustainability of commercial collection of a medicinal plant, spikenard ( Nardostachys grandiflora DC, Valerianaceae), growing in alpine meadows. Interviews were undertaken with local collectors, traders, and district forest office staff, and the dynamics of people-plant interactions are analyzed using the Oakerson model. In all, 110 sample plots 1m square were laid out in three areas with differing collection and grazing pressures for recording of floristic composition and abundance of spikenard root biomass. Comparisons show significantly more root biomass in uncollected than collected areas with local management and the interpretation of differences in abundance is discussed. The combination of qualitative and quantitative investigations can provide a framework for the study of people-plant interactions, and this study can serve as first step in a compilation of cases to create a more detailed picture of local management systems of Nepali nontimber forest products in general and commercially collected medicinal and aromatic plants in particular.

  10. Extracting physician group intelligence from electronic health records to support evidence based medicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Griffin M Weber

    Full Text Available Evidence-based medicine employs expert opinion and clinical data to inform clinical decision making. The objective of this study is to determine whether it is possible to complement these sources of evidence with information about physician "group intelligence" that exists in electronic health records. Specifically, we measured laboratory test "repeat intervals", defined as the amount of time it takes for a physician to repeat a test that was previously ordered for the same patient. Our assumption is that while the result of a test is a direct measure of one marker of a patient's health, the physician's decision to order the test is based on multiple factors including past experience, available treatment options, and information about the patient that might not be coded in the electronic health record. By examining repeat intervals in aggregate over large numbers of patients, we show that it is possible to 1 determine what laboratory test results physicians consider "normal", 2 identify subpopulations of patients that deviate from the norm, and 3 identify situations where laboratory tests are over-ordered. We used laboratory tests as just one example of how physician group intelligence can be used to support evidence based medicine in a way that is automated and continually updated.

  11. Formulae as Scientific Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsewell, Ian

    2017-01-01

    In science lessons many students struggle to apply the principles of rearranging formulae, even after coverage in maths. A structured approach is suggested that focuses on describing a narrative linking cause and effect before explicit mathematical terms are introduced.

  12. Abbott Infant Formula Recall

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This list includes products subject to recall since September 2010 related to infant formula distributed by Abbott. This list will be updated with publicly available...

  13. Antiosteoporosis Activity of New Oriental Medicine Preparation (Kyungokgo Mixed with Water Extract of Hovenia dulcis on the Ovariectomized Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Ho Hwang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Protective effect of new oriental medicine (Kyungokgo mixed with water extract of Hovenia dulcis, KOGHD was assessed on the bone loss induced mice by ovariectomy. In the in vivo experiments, antiosteoporosis effect of KOGHD was investigated using ovariectomized osteoporosis mice model. After 6 weeks of treatment, the mice were euthanized, and the effect of Kyungokgo (KOG and KOGHD on body weight, spleen weigh, thymus weight, uterine weight, serum biochemical indicators, bone weight and length, immune cell population, bone morphometric parameters, and histological stains was observed. Our results showed that KOGHD prevented the deterioration of trabecular microarchitecture caused by ovariectomy, which were accompanied by the lower levels of bone turnover markers and immune cell population as evidenced by the inhibition of RANKL-mediated osteoclast differentiation without cytotoxic effect on bone marrow derived macrophages (BMMs. Therefore, these results suggest that the Hovenia dulcis (HD supplementation in the KOG may also prevent and treat bone loss.

  14. Free radical scavenging activity of extracts prepared from fresh leaves of selected Chinese medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Fenglin; Lu, Ruili; Huang, Bao; Liang, Ming

    2004-01-01

    The free radical scavenging activity of the 80% methanolic extracts from fresh leaves of 300 Chinese medical woody plants was assessed with the aid of the stable DPPH radical. Among the plants screened, 56 species had strong free radical scavenging capacities, with IC50 values lower than 0.5 mg leaves per milliliter. Analysis of the medical uses of these plants showed that most of them are employed for their effects on hemostasis, as anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial or for treatment of dysentery. These uses may be directly linked to the content in tannins and flavonoids and consequently to their free radical scavenging activities.

  15. Isolation of high-quality DNA in 16 aromatic and medicinal Colombian species using silica-based extraction columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vega Vela Nelson Enrique

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Aromatic and medicinal plant species are a valuable resource for research and development of pharmaceutical, cosmetic, crop protection and nutritional agents, due to the high amount of bioactive phytochemicals that they contain. However, these compounds are a major obstacle in the isolation of high-quality DNA suitable for genetic analyses. In this paper, we report a protocol that optimizes the use of the cationic detergent CTAB and the reductant β-mercaptoethanol in cell lysis. The elimination of plant secondary metabolites such as polysaccharides and polyphenols, that typically co-isolate with DNA, was achieved using the chemical denaturing properties of the guanidinium cation, which together with the adsorbent chemical specificity of the silica, resulted in the purification of high-quality DNA suitable for digestion with restriction enzymes and optimal for PCR amplification of AFLP-type molecular markers. This protocol was evaluated on 16 Colombian aromatic and medicinal plant species promising for their essential oils. The results allow suggesting that this procedure might be appropriate for other species, tissues and sample types recalcitrant to DNA extraction.

  16. Radiation-Induced Testicular Injury and Its Amelioration by Tinospora cordifolia (An Indian Medicinal Plant Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of this investigation is to determine the deleterious effects of sub lethal gamma radiation on testes and their possible inhibition by Tinospora cordifolia extract (TCE. For this purpose, one group of male Swiss albino mice was exposed to 7.5 Gy gamma radiation to serve as the irradiated control, while the other group received TCE (75 mg/kg b. wt./day orally for 5 consecutive days half an hr before irradiation to serve as experimental. Exposure of animals to 7.5 Gy gamma radiation resulted into significant decrease in body weight, tissue weight, testes- body weight ratio and tubular diameter up to 15 days of irradiation. Cent percent mortality was recorded by day 17th in irradiated control, whereas all animals survived in experimental group. TCE pretreatment rendered significant increase in body weight, tissue weight, testes- body weight ratio and tubular diameter at various intervals as compared to irradiated group. Radiation induced histological lesions in testicular architecture were observed more severe in irradiated control then the experimental. TCE administration before irradiation significantly ameliorated radiation induced elevation in lipid peroxidation and decline in glutathione concentration in testes. These observations indicate the radio- protective potential of Tinospora cordifolia root extract in testicular constituents against gamma irradiation in mice.

  17. Therapeutic Efficacy of the Combined Extract of Herbal Medicine Against Infectious Bursal Disease in Chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changbo Ou, Ningning Shi1, Qing Pan, Deyu Tian, Wenshu Zeng and Cheng He*

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Currently, infectious bursal disease (IBD is a highly contagious disease leading to huge economic losses in poultry industry. Our objective was to investigate potential therapeutic effects of the combined extracts of Rhizoma Dryopteridis crassirhizomatis and Fructus mume (RDCFM against IBDV infection. Seventy-two 4-week-old SPF chickens were randomly divided into six groups and inoculated intranasally with 0.2 ml of 102.5 EID50 of IBDV strain CJ801. Twenty-four hours post infection, the birds were orally administered with 400, 200 and 100 mg/kg BW of RDCFM, respectively, 125 mg/kg Astragalus polysaccharide (ASP and saline water, respectively for 5 days and then monitored daily for 10 days. Finally, the remaining birds were euthanized to collect the sera for detecting antibodies and immune organs for determining the immune organs index as well as virus loads. The herbal extracts improved survival rate and relative body gain rate. Virus loads in bursa of Fabricius in herbal treated groups decreased significantly while higher antibody levels were detected in the three RDCFM groups as compared to those of ASP and infection group. These results implied that chickens administered with 100-200 mg/kg of RDCFM for 5 days could improve protection against IBDV infection and RDCFM may be a promising alternative to ASP and egg yolk antibody.

  18. Screening of antioxidant activity and phenolic content of 24 medicinal plant extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souri E.

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Antioxidants are vital substances which possess the ability to protect the body from damages caused by free radical-induced oxidative stress. A variety of free radical scavenging antioxidants are found in dietary sources like fruits, vegetables and tea. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant activity of methanolic extracts of 24 selected plant materials (seeds or fruits, which are used by Iranian people as folk remedies and/or food supplements. Methods: The antioxidant activity was evaluated against linoleic acid peroxidation using 1,3-diethyl-2-thiobarbituric acid as reagent. At the same time the phenolic content of the extracts was determined using Folin-Ciocalteau reagent to evaluate their contribution to total antioxidant activity. Results: The antioxidant activity expressed as IC50 ranged from 1.25 mg/ml in cucumber to 167.29 mg/ml in cardamom. Phenolic contents, expressed as gallic acid equivalents, varied from 21.76 mg/100g of the dried weight in linseed to 919.12 mg/100 g of the dried weight in Bishop's weed. No significant correlation was observed between antioxidant activity and phenolic content in the studied plant materials. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that there is no significant correlation between antioxidant activity and phenolic content of the studied plant materials and phenolic content could not be a good indicator of antioxidant capacity. 

  19. LC and UV determination of flavonoids from Passiflora alata medicinal extracts and leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Simony D; Vasconcelos, Sonia B; Coelho, Michelly; Biavatti, Maique W

    2005-02-23

    The leaves of Passiflora alata Curtis (an official species in the Brazilian Pharmacopoeia) are used to treat anxiety, as antispasmodics and sedatives. The development of new analytical methods for analysing flavonoids in Passiflora species is needed in order to improve the quality assurance of the plant and derived extracts and phytomedicines. A survey on the profile of flavonoids and content of isovitexin in the leaves and fluidextract of P. alata through LC was carried out, comparing its chromatographic profiles with a commercial P. incarnata fluidextract. Also, the concentration of the total flavonoids of extracts and leaves according to phamarcopoeial photometrical methods was determined and discussed. The fluidextract of P. alata was produced in accordance with the Pharmacopoeia Helvetica method; the presence of isovitexin in both species (which have distinct chromatographic profiles) was evidenced, this being the major flavonoid compound in the P. incarnata (1.198 g%), but not in P. alata (0.018 g%) fluidextract. Only traces of vitexin could be observed in the P. alata, as well as the absence of the other tested flavonoids: orientin and swertisin (P. incarnata markers), hyperoside, rutin, hesperidin and clorogenic acid. The LC developed method was shown to be appropriated for the qualitative and quantitative analyses and for differentiate species, suitable to be applied to commercial sample analysis. The spectrophotometrical results of three different methods described for P. incarnata were not comparable, the best performance being the British Pharmacopoeia method.

  20. Analysis of medicinal plant extracts by neutron activation method; Analise de extratos de plantas medicinais pelo metodo de ativacao com neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaz, Sandra Muntz

    1995-12-31

    This dissertation has presented the results from analysis of medicinal plant extracts using neutron activation method. Instrumental neutron activation analysis was applied to the determination of the elements Al, Br, Ca, Ce, Cl, Cr, Cs, Fe, K, La, Mg, Mn, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc and Zn in medicinal extracts obtained from Achyrolcline satureoides DC, Casearia sylvestris, Centella asiatica, Citrus aurantium L., Solano lycocarpum, Solidago microglossa, Stryphnondedron barbatiman and Zingiber officinale R. plants. The elements Hg and Se were determined using radiochemical separation by means of retention of Se in HMD inorganic exchanger and solvent extraction of Hg by bismuth diethyl-dithiocarbamate solution. Precision and accuracy of the results have been evaluated by analysing reference materials. The therapeutic action of some elements found in plant extracts analyzed was briefly discussed 70 refs., 13 figs., 15 tabs

  1. In vivo hair growth-stimulating effect of medicinal plant extract on BALB/c nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, Shahnaz; Gu, Li-Juan; Lee, Mi-Ra; Li, Zheng; Li, Jing-Jie; Hossain, Md Jamil; Wang, Yun-Bo; Sung, Chang Keun

    2015-08-01

    Chrysanthemum zawadskii var. latilobum (Asteraceae) (CZ) and Polygonum multiflorum Thunb. (Polygonaceae) (PM) have been used traditionally to treat different systemic diseases and acclaimed for various biological activities including hair growth. This study investigates the hair restoration efficacy of selected medicinal plant extracts on nude mice. Nude mice genetically predisposed to pattern balding were used in this study. Topical methanol extracts of CZ and PM (10 mg/mouse/d) with standardized vehicle formulation, only vehicle (propylene glycol:ethanol:dimethyl sulfoxide, 67:30:3% v/v) and Minoxidil (2%) were applied daily for 40 consecutive days. In our study, the maximum hair score (2.5 ± 0.29) was obtained in the CZ-treated group. Histological observation revealed a significant increase (p hair follicles (HF) in CZ-treated mice (58.66 ± 3.72) and Minoxidil-treated mice (40 ± 2.71). Subsequently, immunohistochemical analysis also confirmed the follicular keratinocyte proliferation by detection of BrdU-labeling, S-phase cells in Minoxidil and CZ-treated mouse follicular bulb and outer root sheaths. Our study revealed the underlying mechanism of stimulating hair growth in athymic nude mice by repair the nu/nu follicular keratin differentiation defect. Thus, the topical application of CZ may represent a novel strategy for the management and therapy of certain forms of alopecia.

  2. Study Bioprospecting of Medicinal Plant Extracts of the Semiarid Northeast: Contribution to the Control of Oral Microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Suênia P. Silva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental pathologies can be caused by plaque-forming bacteria and yeast, which reside in the oral cavity. The bacteria growing in dental plaque, a naturally occurring biofilm, display increased resistance to antimicrobial agents. The objective was the evaluation of a preclinical assay of medicinal plants of the semiarid region from the northeast against oral pathogenic microorganism, aiming at bioprospecting a new product. The selection of plant material for this study was based on the ethnobotanical data on the traditional use of plants from the semiarid region. The thirty extracts were subjected to the determination of antibiofilm activity against gram-positive, gram-negative bacteria and yeast. The hydroalcoholic extract which showed positive antibiofilm activity against most of the microorganisms tested in agar diffusion assay was further tested for the determination of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and Bioassay with Artemia salina. Plant samples tested in this study exhibited good antibiofilm activity for the treatment of oral problems. The Schinopsis brasiliensis showed greater activity for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, but toxicity against Artemia salina.

  3. Anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of some Jordanian medicinal plant extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atta, A H; Alkofahi, A

    1998-03-01

    The anti-nociceptive effect of ethanolic extract of 11 traditionally used Jordanian plants was studied by using the acetic acid-induced writhing and hot-plate test in mice. The anti-inflammatory effect of these plants was determined by xylene-induced ear oedema in mice and cotton pellet granuloma test in rats. Mentha piperita, Cinnamomum zeylanicum, Apium graveolens, Eucalyptus camaldulentis, and Ruta graveolens possess an anti-nociceptive effect against both acetic acid-induced writhing and hot plate-induced thermal stimulation. M. piperita, Jasminum officinale, Commiphora molmol, and Beta vulgaris possess an anti-inflammatory effect against acute (xylene-induced ear oedema) and chronic (cotton-pellet granuloma) inflammation. The anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects were dose dependent. These data affirm the traditional use of some of these plants for painful and inflammatory conditions.

  4. Cytotoxicity of methanol extracts of Annona muricata, Passiflora edulis and nine other Cameroonian medicinal plants towards multi-factorial drug-resistant cancer cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Kuete, Victor; Dzotam, Joachim K.; Voukeng, Igor K.; Fankam, Aim? G.; Efferth, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background Cancer cells rapidly acquire resistance leading to treatment failures. In the present study, we have evaluated the cytotoxicity of 17 methanol extracts from 11 Cameroonian medicinal plants against the sensitive leukemia CCRF?CEM cells and the best ones were further tested on a panel of 8 other human cancer cell lines, including various MDR phenotypes as well as against the normal AML12 hepatocytes. Methods The cytotoxicity of the extracts was determined using a resazurin reduction ...

  5. In vivo validation of anti-malarial activity of crude extracts of Terminalia macroptera, a Malian medicinal plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidara, Mahamane; Haddad, Mohamed; Denou, Adama; Marti, Guillaume; Bourgeade-Delmas, Sandra; Sanogo, Rokia; Bourdy, Geneviève; Aubouy, Agnès

    2018-02-05

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria is still one of the most deadly pathology worldwide. Efficient treatment is jeopardized by parasite resistance to artemisinin and its derivatives, and by poor access to treatment in endemic regions. Anti-malarial traditional remedies still offer new tracks for identifying promising antiplasmodial molecules, and a way to ensure that all people have access to care. The present study aims to validate the traditional use of Terminalia macroptera, a Malian plant used in traditional medicine. Terminalia macroptera was collected in Mali. Leaves (TML) and roots ethanolic extracts (TMR) were prepared and tested at 2000 mg/kg for in vivo acute toxicity in Albino Swiss mice. Antiplasmodial activity of the extracts was assessed against a chloroquine resistant strain P. falciparum (FcB1) in vitro. In vivo, anti-malarial efficacy was assessed by a 4-day suppressive test at 100 mg/kg in two malaria murine models of uncomplicated malaria (Plasmodium chabaudi chabaudi infection) and cerebral malaria (Plasmodium berghei strain ANKA infection). Constituents of TMR were characterized by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry. Top ranked compounds were putatively identified using plant databases and in silico fragmentation pattern. Lethal dose of TML and TMR were greater than 2000 mg/kg in Albino Swiss mice. According to the OECD's Globally Harmonized System of Classification, both extracts are non-toxic orally. Antiplasmodial activity of T. macroptera extracts was confirmed in vitro against P. falciparum FcB1 strain with IC50 values of 1.2 and 1.6 µg/mL for TML and TMR, respectively. In vivo, oral administration of TML and TMR induced significant reduction of parasitaemia (37.2 and 46.4% respectively) in P. chabaudi chabaudi infected mice at the 7th day of infection compared to untreated mice. In the cerebral malaria experimental model, mice treated with TMR and TML presented respectively 50 and 66

  6. In vitro antibacterial activity of crude extracts of 9 selected medicinal plants against UTI causing MDR bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monali P. Mishra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infection (UTI has become a more grievous problem today, due to multidrug resistance of infecting Gram-positive (GP and Gram-negative (GN bacteria, sometimes even with multiple infections. This study examines effectivity of 9 tropical flowering plants (Anogeissus acuminata, Azadirachta indica, Bauhinia variegata, Boerhaavia diffusa, Punica granatum, Soymida febrifuga, Terminalia chebula, Tinospora cordifolia and Tribulus terrestris for possible use as source of antimicrobials for multidrug resistant (MDR bacteria, along with main-stream antibiotics. Pathogenic bacteria were isolated from urine samples of patients attending and admitted in the hospital. Antibiograms of 11 isolated bacteria (GPs, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus; and GNs, Acinetobacter baumannii, Citrobacter freundii, Enterobacter aerogenes, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Proteus vulgaris and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were ascertained by the disc-diffusion method, and antibacterial effectivity of plant extracts was monitored by the agar-well diffusion method. Isolated bacteria were floridly MDR to most antibiotics of the day. Methanol extracts of 9 plants were used, and extracts of 3 plants, A. acuminata, P. granatum and S. febrifuga at least caused 25–29 mm as the maximum size of zone of inhibition on bacterial lawns. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC values of methanol extracts of 9 plants were recorded. The methanol extract of A. acuminata had 0.29 mg/ml as the lowest MIC value and 0.67 mg/ml as the lowest MBC value, against MDR S. aureus, signifying effectivity; but, it had the highest MIC value of 3.41 mg/ml. and the highest MBC value of 4.27 mg/ml for most other MDR bacteria including E. coli. Qualitative phytochemical analysis was done for these 9 plants and information on leading phytochemicals was presented retrieved from PubChem database. Thus

  7. Extracts of Canadian first nations medicinal plants, used as natural products, inhibit neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates with different antibiotic resistance profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulska, Paulina; Thakur, Sidharath D; Foster, Brian C; Scott, Ian M; Leduc, Renée I; Arnason, John T; Dillon, Jo-Anne R

    2011-07-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Ng) has developed resistance to most antimicrobial agents and the antibiotics recommended for therapy are restricted, for the most part, to third generation cephalosporins. In order to investigate new potential sources of antimicrobial agents, the antibacterial properties of 14 Canadian plants used in traditional First Nations' medicine were tested against Ng isolates having differing antimicrobial susceptibility profiles. Ethanolic extracts of 14 Canadian botanicals, analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography, were tested for their antimicrobial activity (disc diffusion and/or agar dilution assays) against susceptible Ng reference strains and a panel of 28 Ng isolates with various antimicrobial resistance profiles. Extracts of Arctostaphylos uva ursi (kinnikinnick or bearberry), Hydrastis canadensis (goldenseal), Prunus serotina (black cherry), and Rhodiola rosea (roseroot) inhibited the growth of all Ng isolates with minimum inhibitory concentrations of 32 μg/mL, 4 to 32 μg/mL, 16 to >32 μg/mL, and 32 to 64 μg/mL, respectively. Extracts of Acorus americanus (sweet flag), Berberis vulgaris (barberry), Cimicifuga racemosa (black cohosh), Equisetum arvense (field horsetail), Gaultheria procumbens (wintergreen), Ledum groenlandicum (Labrador tea), Ledum palustre (marsh Labrador tea), Oenothera biennis (common evening primrose), Sambucus nigra (elderberry), and Zanthoxylum americanum (prickly ash) had weak or no antimicrobial activity against the Ng isolates with minimum inhibitory concentrations ≥256 μg/mL. The phytochemical berberine from H. canadensis inhibited the growth of all Ng isolates. The phytochemicals, salidroside and rosavin, present in R. rosea, also showed inhibitory activity against Ng strains. Canadian botanicals represent a potential source of novel compounds which inhibit Ng, including isolates resistant to antibiotics.

  8. Antifungal activity of extracts of some plants used in Brazilian traditional medicine against the pathogenic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johann, Susana; Cisalpino, Patricia Silva; Watanabe, Gisele Almeida; Cota, Betania Barros; de Siqueira, Ezequias Pessoa; Pizzolatti, Moacir Geraldo; Zani, Carlos Leomar; de Resende, Maria Aparecida

    2010-04-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is a systemic granulomatous disease caused by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Almeida (Onygenales) that requires 1-2 years of treatment. In the absence of drug therapy, the disease is usually fatal, highlighting the need for the identification of safer, novel, and more effective antifungal compounds. With this need in mind, several plants employed in Brazilian traditional medicine were assayed on P. brasiliensis and murine macrophages. Extracts were prepared from 10 plant species: Inga spp. Mill. (Leguminosae), Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi (Anacardiaceae), Punica granatum L. (Punicaceae), Alternanthera brasiliana Kuntze (Amaranthaceae), Piper regnellii CDC. (Piperaceae), P. abutiloides Kunth (Piperaceae), Herissantia crispa L. Briz. (Malvaceae), Rubus urticaefolius Poir (Rosaceae), Rumex acetosa L. (Polygonaceae), and Baccharis dracunculifolia DC. (Asteraceae). Hexane fractions from hydroalcoholic extracts of Piper regnellii and Baccharis dracunculifolia were the most active against the fungus, displaying minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of 7.8 microg/mL and 7.8-30 mug/mL, respectively. Additionally, neither of the extracts exhibited any apparent cytotoxic effects on murine macrophages at 20 microg/mL. Analyses of these fractions using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) showed that the major components of B. dracunculifolia were ethyl hydrocinnamate (14.35%) and spathulenol (16.02%), while the major components of the hexane fraction of Piper regnellii were 1-methoxy-4-(1-propenyl) benzene (21.94%) and apiol (21.29%). The activities of these fractions against P. brasiliensis without evidence of cytotoxicity to macrophages justify their investigation as a potential source of new chemical agents for the treatment of PCM.

  9. Fuel formula for lighters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwayama, I.; Iwayama, A.

    1982-04-10

    A fuel formula that includes a homogenous mixture of benzine, aromatic ether oils, perfume and other perfuming agents, as well as the lowest possible aliphatic alcohol as a component solvent, surfactant, and possibly, a soluble pigment that colors the formula an appropriate color. This formula is used as an aromatic fuel for cigarette lights. The ether oils can be musk, amber, camomille, lavender, mint, anise, rose, camphor, and other aromatic oils; the perfuming agents are: geraniol, linalool, menthol, camphor, benzyl or phenetyl alcohols, phenylacetaldehyde, vanillin, coumarin, and so forth; the pigments are: beta-carotene, sudan dyes, etc.; the low aliphatic alcohols are EtOH, iso-PrOH. Example: 70 parts benzine, 10 parts EtOH, 15 parts oxide mezithylene and 5 parts borneol form a clear liquid that has a camphor aroma when it is lit.

  10. A concern on phthalate pollution of herbal extracts/medicines and detection methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Manayi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Esters of phthalates, mainly applied as plasticizer, cause several human health and environment    hazards. Phthalates are widely used in pharmaceutical products, cosmetics, as well as other plastic commercial products, and can penetrate in foods, water dusts, and air leading to ingestion and inhalation exposure followed by skin absorption for human. These compounds cause serious adverse effects on human health like destroying the endocrine system, and consequently developmental alterations and reproductive changes through induction of inflammation and oxidative stress. Some phthalates are able to bio-accumulate in water and have been isolated from aquatic organisms. Mammals and birds may be influenced by these compounds through food chain. Therefore, simple and rapid method for identification and quantification of these compounds is a debate especially for developing countries. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy has been successfully employed to determine and measure these compounds in volatile fractions of the plant or the algal materials without more essential chemical reactions. In this article, a rapid review on phthalate toxicity and related analysis methods to detect them in herbal extracts is presented.

  11. Hexa-herbal Chinese formula for eczema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, J.; Jäger, Anna; Heinrich, M.

    2014-01-01

    Diverse pharmacological activities and reliable clinical performances of Chinese herbal medicines have attracted worldwide attention in terms of its modernization. Here, a hexa-herbal Chinese formula (HHCF) for treating eczema topically has been studied from both chemical and biological perspective....... It consists of roots of Scutellaria baicalensis Gerogi, Rheum officinale Baill., Sophora flavescens Aiton; root's bark of Dictamnus dasycarpus Turcz.; bark of Phellodendron chinense C.K. Schnied and fruit of Kochia scoparia (L.) Schard.. To evaluate the anti-inflammatory effects of the hexa-herbal decoction...... colonizes the skin of most patients with AD and produces superantigens that could further increase severity of AD via subverting T-regulatory cell activity and inducing corticosteroid resistance. [3] Therefore, activity of the decoctions prepared from mixture and individual medicinal plants of the formula...

  12. In vitro anthelmintic activity of crude extracts of five medicinal plants against egg-hatching and larval development of Haemonchus contortus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguale, Tadesse; Tadesse, Dereje; Giday, Mirutse

    2011-09-01

    Senna occidentalis, Leonotis ocymifolia, Leucas martinicensis, Rumex abyssinicus, and Albizia schimperiana are traditionally used for treatment of various ailments including helminth infection in Ethiopia. In vitro egg hatch assay and larval development tests were conducted to determine the possible anthelmintic effects of crude aqueous and hydro-alcoholic extracts of the leaves of Senna occidentalis, aerial parts of Leonotis ocymifolia, Leucas martinicensis, Rumex abyssinicus, and stem bark of Albizia schimperiana on eggs and larvae of Haemonchus contortus. Both aqueous and hydro-alcoholic extracts of Leucas martinicensis, Leonotis ocymifolia and aqueous extract of Senna occidentalis and Albizia schimperiana induced complete inhibition of egg hatching at concentration less than or equal to 1mg/ml. Aqueous and hydro-alcoholic extracts of all tested medicinal plants have shown statistically significant and dose dependent egg hatching inhibition. Based on ED(50), the most potent extracts were aqueous and hydro-alcoholic extracts of Leucas martinicensis (0.09 mg/ml), aqueous extracts of Rumex abyssinicus (0.11 mg/ml) and Albizia schimperiana (0.11 mg/ml). Most of the tested plant extracts have shown remarkable larval development inhibition. Aqueous extracts of Leonotis ocymifolia, Leucas martinicensis, Albizia schimperiana and Senna occidentalis induced 100, 99.85, 99.31, and 96.36% inhibition of larval development, respectively; while hydro-alcoholic extracts of Albizia schimperiana induced 99.09 inhibition at the highest concentration tested (50mg/ml). Poor inhibition was recorded for hydro-alcoholic extracts of Senna occidentalis (9%) and Leonotis ocymifolia (37%) at 50mg/ml. The overall findings of the current study indicated that the evaluated medicinal plants have potential anthelmintic effect and further in vitro and in vivo evaluation is indispensable to make use of these plants. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect and Mechanism of Chinese Herbal Medicine on Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Bai-Yun

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder. Although both genetic and environmental factors are implicated in the development of Parkinson's disease, the cause of the disease is still unclear. So far conventional treatments to Parkinson's are symptomatic relief and focused mainly on motor symptoms. Chinese herbal medicine has been used to treat many conditions in China, Korea, Japan, and many Southeast Asian countries for 1000 years. During past a few decades, Chinese herbal medicine has gained wider and increasing acceptance within both public and medical profession due to its effectiveness on many conditions in western countries. In this chapter, mechanisms of action of many Chinese herbal compounds/extracts and Chinese herb formulas on the models of Parkinson's were reviewed. Further, reports of effectiveness of Chinese herb formulas on patients with Parkinson's were summarized. It was shown that both Chinese herbal compounds/extracts and herb formulas have either specific target mechanisms of action or multitargets mechanisms of action, as antioxidant, antiinflammatory, and antiapoptosis agents. Clinical studies showed that Chinese herb formulas as an adjunct improved both motor and nonmotor symptoms, and reduced dose of dopaminergic drugs and occurrence of dyskinesia. The evidence from the studies suggests that Chinese herb medicine has potential, acting as neuroprotective to slow down the progression of Parkinson's, and it is able to simultaneously treat both motor and nonmotor symptoms of Parkinson's. More studies are needed to explore the new compounds/extracts derived from Chinese herbs, in particular, their mechanisms of action. It is hopeful that new drugs developed from Chinese herb compounds/extracts and Chinese herb formulas will lead to better and complimentary therapy to PD. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Antimicrobial Activities of a Plethora of Medicinal Plant Extracts and Hydrolates against Human Pathogens and Their Potential to Reverse Antibiotic Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieudonné Lemuh Njimoh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial infections till date remain a scourge of humanity due to lack of vaccine against some infections, emergence of drug resistant phenotypes, and the resurgence of infections amongst others. Continuous quest for novel therapeutic approaches remains imperative. Here we (i assessed the effects of extracts/hydrolates of some medicinal plants on pathogenic microorganisms and (ii evaluated the inhibitory potential of the most active ones in combination with antibiotics. Extract E03 had the highest DZI (25 mm. Extracts E05 and E06 were active against all microorganisms tested. The MICs and MBCs of the methanol extracts ranged from 16.667 × 103 μg/mL to 2 μg/mL and hydrolates from 0.028 to 333333 ppm. Extract E30 had the highest activity especially against S. saprophyticus (MIC of 6 ppm and E. coli (MIC of 17 ppm. Combination with conventional antibiotics was shown to overcome resistance especially with E30. Analyses of the extracts revealed the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, triterpenes, steroids, phenols, and saponins. These results justify the use of these plants in traditional medicine and the practice of supplementing decoctions/concoctions with conventional antibiotics. Nauclea pobeguinii (E30, the most active and synergistic of all these extracts, and some hydrolates with antimicrobial activity need further exploration for the development of novel antimicrobials.

  15. A Formula for Factoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roebuck, Kay I. Meeks

    1997-01-01

    Suggests use of the quadratic formula to build understanding that connections between factors and solutions to equations work both ways. Making use of natural connections among concepts allows students to work more efficiently. Presents four sample problems showing the roots of equations. Messy quadratic equations with rational roots can be solved…

  16. Third order trace formula

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    adjoint operator is bounded and the perturbation is ... Keywords. Trace formula; spectral shift function; perturbations of self-adjoint operators. 1. Introduction. Notations. .... j=1 j−1. ∑ k=0. Ar− j−1. Y(A + X)k X Aj−k−1, leading to the estimate. ∥. ∥.

  17. PREBIOTICS IN INFANT FORMULAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvan Vandenplas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbiota of the gastrointestinal tract is different in breastfed infants and in children receiving standard infant formulas. While breast milk is rich in prebiotic oligosaccharides and can also contain some probiotics, standard infant formulas contain neither one thing nor the other. The formulation of an infant formula includes various prebiotic ingredients: galacto- and fructooligosaccharides, polydextrose and their combinations. There is evidence that the addition of prebiotics to baby food makes the microbiota of the gastrointestinal tract of infants receiving infant formulas more similar to the microbiota of breastfed children. Prebiotics alter the metabolic activity of the intestinal microflora (lower stool pH and increase the amount of short-chain fatty acids, have a bifidogenic effect and provide a stool consistency and bowel movement frequency that are similar to these parameters in breastfed infants. There is limited evidence that such changes in microbiota of the gastrointestinal tract may have some influence on the development of an infant's immune system. Adverse events are extremely rare in the application of prebiotics. 

  18. Third order trace formula

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences; Volume 123; Issue 4. Third Order Trace Formula. Arup Chattopadhyay Kalyan B Sinha. Volume 123 Issue 4 November 2013 pp 547-575. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/pmsc/123/04/0547-0575 ...

  19. Third order trace formula

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    adjoint operator is bounded and the .... This paper is organized as follows. In § 2, we establish the formula (1.4) for bounded ..... projection onto Ker(MAτ )) is continuous and since X1τ ≡ P0(τ)X we get that the map. [0, 1] τ −→ X1τ is continuous.

  20. Chen's inversion formula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, B.D.; Frankel, N.E.; Ninham, B.W.

    1990-01-01

    An alternative view is presented of the Chen's generalization of a formula of classic algebraic number theory, based on the Mellin transformation and Reimann's zeta function. The advantages of the Mellin transform, as a method with a primary role in asymptotic analysis, are outlined. 10 refs

  1. Formula tolerance in postbreastfed and exclusively formula-fed infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, B; Halter, R J; Kuchan, M J; Baggs, G E; Ryan, A S; Masor, M L

    1999-01-01

    Perceived intolerance to infant formula is a frequently reported reason for formula switching. Formula intolerance may be related to perceived symptoms of constipation, fussiness, abdominal cramps, and excessive spit-up or vomit. Commercially available formulas differ from each other in processing and in sources and levels of protein, lipids, and micronutrients. These differences may affect tolerance. The objective of this article was to compare the tolerance of two commercially available powder infant formulas that differ in composition. Measures of tolerance in exclusively breastfed infants weaned to an infant formula and exclusively formula-fed infants were evaluated. Two clinical studies were conducted. In study 1, 82 healthy, full-term infants who were exclusively breastfed at the time of enrollment were randomized at weaning to formula A (commercially available Similac With Iron Powder) or formula B (previously available Enfamil With Iron Powder). Parents completed daily records of tolerance during exclusive breast milk feeding, during the weaning period, and for a 2-week exclusive formula-feeding period. In study 2, 87 healthy, full-term infants who were exclusively formula-fed at the time of study enrollment (by 2 weeks of age) were fed a standard cow milk-based formula (previously commercially available Similac With Iron Powder) and then randomized to receive formula A or B for a 2-week period. Parents completed daily records of tolerance throughout the study. Formula A was a cow milk-based formula with a whey:casein ratio of 48:52 and a fat blend of 42% high-oleic safflower, 30% coconut, and 28% soy oils. Formula B was a cow milk-based formula with a whey:casein ratio of 60:40 and a fat blend of 45% palm olein, 20% soy, 20% coconut, and 15% high-oleic sunflower oils. Both formulas had lactose as the source of carbohydrate and contained 12 mg of iron per liter. Only formula A contained nucleotides at the time of the study. Measures of tolerance included

  2. Inorganic constituents determination in medicinal plants and their extracts; Determinacao dos constituintes inorganicos em plantas medicinais e seus extratos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francisconi, Lucilaine Silva

    2014-07-01

    Different types of therapies have been introduced as an alternative treatment to combat different types of human disorders. Among them, the use of herbal teas has been highlighted by the cost/benefit, easiness of acquisition and administration. The aim of this study was to determine the inorganic constituents, and evaluate the element concentrations of As, Ba, Br, Ca, Co, Cr, Cs, Fe, Hf, K, Mg. Mn, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, Ta, Th, Ti, U, V, Zn and Zr by neutron activation analysis; and Cd, Cu, Ni and Pb, by atomic emission spectrometry, with inductively coupled plasma source and Hg, by atomic absorption spectrometry, with cold vapor generation in medicinal plants and their extracts, whose marketing was recently regulated by National Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA). The relevance of these analyses is justified by the need of contributing to the recommendation of such plants as sources of minerals in the diet and, also, to verify if their concentrations cam pose some harm to the organism. The techniques showed adequate sensitivity in determining the concentration for most of the elements. Toxic elements were found in concentration not harmful to the human body. The results, also, allowed possible to correlate the elemental concentration in the analyzed species, by the determination the correlation coefficients and applications of cluster analysis. From these results it was confirmers in the groups of elements, regarding the variation of the concentrations observed in some plants and their extracts. The elements that play important roles in the human metabolism were determined in concentrations that can help both, to avoid the lack of these elements in the organisms, from the diet, and in treatment of disease. (author)

  3. Antidiabetic Effects of Carassius auratus Complex Formula in High Fat Diet Combined Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Hong Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carassius auratus complex formula, including Carassius auratus, Rhizoma dioscoreae, Lycium chinense, and Rehmannia glutinosa Libosch, is a combination prescription of traditional Chinese medicine, which has always been used to treat diabetes mellitus in ancient China. In this study, we provided experimental evidence for the use of Carassius auratus complex formula in the treatment of high fat diet combined streptozotocin- (STZ- induced type 2 diabetes. Carassius auratus complex formula aqueous extract was prepared and the effects of it on blood glucose, serum insulin, adipose tissue weight, oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT, total cholesterol, and triglyceride (TG levels in mice were measured. Moreover, adiponectin, TG synthesis related gene expressions, and the inhibitory effect of aldose reductase (AR were performed to evaluate its antidiabetic effects. After the 8-week treatment, blood glucose, insulin levels, and adipose tissue weight were significantly decreased. OGTT and HOMA-IR index showed improved glucose tolerance. It could also lower plasma TG, TC, and liver TG levels. Furthermore, Carassius auratus complex formula could inhibit the activity of AR and restore adiponectin expression in serum. Based on these findings, it is suggested that Carassius auratus complex formula possesses potent anti-diabetic effects on high fat diet combined STZ-induced diabetic mice.

  4. The physicochemical properties and antioxidative potential of raw thigh meat from broilers fed a dietary medicinal herb extract mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Shirzadegan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A 6-wk feeding study was conducted to evaluate the antioxidative potential, indices such as quality of the thigh meat and liver of broiler chickens fed with a dietary medicinal herb extract mixture (HEM, consisting: Iranian green tea, cinnamon, garlic and chicory at a ratio of 25:15:45:15. A total of 320, one-d-old Ross (male broiler chickens were used to investigate the effects of 0.0, 2.5, 5.0 and 7.5 g/kg HEM in the diet, on aforementioned factors. The HEM supplementation did not influence the composition of raw thigh meat except for the total phenols and crude ash (P<0.05. Furthermore, pH, water-holding capacity (WHC and acceptability of thigh meat were affecting by administration of HEM in diets (P<0.05. Meat flavor increased in the supplemented groups (P<0.05. According to our data, HEM supplementation decreased the amount of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS in various times of storage and improved the liver lipid peroxides and superoxide dismutase (SOD activities at week 6 (P<0.05, but did not influence the catalase activity. Our results reveal that the addition of 7.5 g/kg or higher HEM in diet could be sufficient to increase the antioxidative activity and 2.5 g/kg for meat taste of broilers in maximum levels.

  5. In vitro inhibitory activities of selected Australian medicinal plant extracts against protein glycation, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and digestive enzymes linked to type II diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deo, Permal; Hewawasam, Erandi; Karakoulakis, Aris; Claudie, David J; Nelson, Robert; Simpson, Bradley S; Smith, Nicholas M; Semple, Susan J

    2016-11-04

    There is a need to develop potential new therapies for the management of diabetes and hypertension. Australian medicinal plants collected from the Kuuku I'yu (Northern Kaanju) homelands, Cape York Peninsula, Queensland, Australia were investigated to determine their therapeutic potential. Extracts were tested for inhibition of protein glycation and key enzymes relevant to the management of hyperglycaemia and hypertension. The inhibitory activities were further correlated with the antioxidant activities. Extracts of five selected plant species were investigated: Petalostigma pubescens, Petalostigma banksii, Memecylon pauciflorum, Millettia pinnata and Grewia mesomischa. Enzyme inhibitory activity of the plant extracts was assessed against α-amylase, α-glucosidase and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE). Antiglycation activity was determined using glucose-induced protein glycation models and formation of protein-bound fluorescent advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs). Antioxidant activity was determined by measuring the scavenging effect of plant extracts against 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) and using the ferric reducing anti-oxidant potential assay (FRAP). Total phenolic and flavonoid contents were also determined. Extracts of the leaves of Petalostigma banksii and P. pubescens showed the strongest inhibition of α-amylase with IC 50 values of 166.50 ± 5.50 μg/mL and 160.20 ± 27.92 μg/mL, respectively. The P. pubescens leaf extract was also the strongest inhibitor of α-glucosidase with an IC 50 of 167.83 ± 23.82 μg/mL. Testing for the antiglycation potential of the extracts, measured as inhibition of formation of protein-bound fluorescent AGEs, showed that P. banksii root and fruit extracts had IC 50 values of 34.49 ± 4.31 μg/mL and 47.72 ± 1.65 μg/mL, respectively, which were significantly lower (p < 0.05) than other extracts. The inhibitory effect on α-amylase, α-glucosidase and the antiglycation potential of

  6. Antiviral activity of the Indian medicinal plant extract, Swertia chirata against herpes simplex viruses: A study by in-vitro and molecular approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verma H

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The antiviral activity of Indian Medicinal plant extract Swertia chirata was tested against Herpes simplex virus (HSV type-1, using multiple approaches both at cellular and molecular level. Methods: Cytotoxicity, plaque reduction, virus infectivity, antigen expression and polymerase chain reaction (PCR assays were conducted to test the antiviral activity of the plant extract. Results: Swertia plant crude extract (1gm/mL at 1:64 dilution inhibited HSV-1, plaque formation at more than 70% level. HSV antigen expression and time kinetics experiments conducted by indirect immunofluorescence (IFA test, revealed a characteristic pattern of small foci of single fluorescent cells in Swertia extract treated HSV-1 infected cells at 4 hours post infection dose, suggested drug inhibited viral dissemination. Infected cell cultures treated with Swertia extract at various time intervals, tested by PCR, failed to show amplification at 12, 24-72 hours. HSV-1 infected cells treated with Acyclovir (antiviral drug did not show any amplification by PCR. Conclusions: In this preliminary study, the Indian medicinal plant extract, Swertia chirata showed antiviral properties against Herpes simplex virus type-1.

  7. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of extracts from Cassia alata, Eleusine indica, Eremomastax speciosa, Carica papaya and Polyscias fulva medicinal plants collected in Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagnia, Bertrand; Fedeli, Donatella; Casetti, Rita; Montesano, Carla; Falcioni, Giancarlo; Colizzi, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    The vast majority of the population around the world has always used medicinal plants as first source of health care to fight infectious and non infectious diseases. Most of these medicinal plants may have scientific evidence to be considered in general practice. The aim of this work was to investigate the antioxidant capacities and anti-inflammatory activities of ethanol extracts of leaves of Cassia alata, Eleusine indica, Carica papaya, Eremomastax speciosa and the stem bark of Polyscias fulva, collected in Cameroon. Chemiluminescence was used to analyze the antioxidant activities of plant extracts against hydrogen peroxide or superoxide anion. Comet assays were used to analyze the protection against antioxidant-induced DNA damage induced in white blood cells after treating with hydrogen peroxide. Flow cytometry was used to measure γδ T cells proliferation and anti-inflammatory activity of γδ T cells and of immature dendritic cells (imDC) in the presence of different concentrations of plant extracts. Ethanol extracts showed strong antioxidant properties against both hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion. Cassia alata showed the highest antioxidant activity. The effect of plant extracts on γδ T cells and imDC was evidenced by the dose dependent reduction in TNF-α production in the presence of Cassia alata, Carica papaya, Eremomastax speciosa Eleusine indica, and Polyscias fulva. γδ T cells proliferation was affected to the greatest extent by Polyscias fulva. These results clearly show the antioxidant capacity and anti-inflammatory activities of plant extracts collected in Cameroon. These properties of leaves and stem bark extracts may contribute to the value for these plants in traditional medicine and in general medical practice.

  8. Young child formula

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hojsak, Iva; Bronsky, Jiri; Campoy, Cristina

    2018-01-01

    Young child formulae (YCF) are milk-based drinks or plant protein-based formulae intended to partially satisfy the nutritional requirements of young children ages 1 to 3 years. Although widely available on the market, their composition is, however, not strictly regulated and health effects have...... not been systematically studied. Therefore, the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) Committee on Nutrition (CoN) performed a systematic review of the literature to review the composition of YCF and consider their role in the diet of young children....... The review revealed limited data but identified that YCF have a highly variable composition, which is in some cases inappropriate with very high protein and carbohydrate content and even high amounts of added sugars. Based on the evidence, ESPGHAN CoN suggests that the nutrient composition of YCF should...

  9. Formulas of Revised MRP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Bregni

    2013-04-01

    innovation to the main process functioning. As a result, the proposed algorithm copes better with demand uncertainty, lowers the system nervousness and also removes the need for continuous forecast adjustments, thereby improving the ease in managing the material flow, allowing the development of new forms of collaboration among different supply chain partners and the creation of new business networks. The algorithm is presented in formulas to describe in detail each procedure step and calculations.

  10. Pharmacological Effects of Active Components of Chinese Herbal Medicine in the Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Yong; Liu, Jian-Gang; Li, Hao; Yang, Hui-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common neurodegenerative disorder associated with dementia, not only severely decreases the quality of life for its victims, but also brings a heavy economic burden to the family and society. Unfortunately, few chemical drugs designed for clinical applications have reached the expected preventive or therapeutic effect so far, and combined with their significant side-effects, there is therefore an urgent need for new strategies to be developed for AD treatment. Traditional Chinese Medicine has accumulated many experiences in the treatment of dementia during thousands of years of practice; modern pharmacological studies have confirmed the therapeutic effects of many active components derived from Chinese herbal medicines (CHM). Ginsenoside Rg1, extracted from Radix Ginseng, exerts a [Formula: see text]-secretase inhibitor effect so as to decrease A[Formula: see text] aggregation. It can also inhibit the apoptosis of neuron cells. Tanshinone IIA, extracted from Radix Salviae miltiorrhizae, and baicalin, extracted from Radix Scutellariae[Formula: see text] can inhibit the oxidative stress injury in neuronal cells. Icariin, extracted from Epimedium brevicornum, can decrease A[Formula: see text] levels and the hyperphosphorylation of tau protein, and can also inhibit oxidative stress and apoptosis. Huperzine A, extracted from Huperzia serrata, exerts a cholinesterase inhibitor effect. Evodiamine, extracted from Fructus Evodiae, and curcumin, extracted from Rhizoma Curcumae Longae, exert anti-inflammatory actions. Curcumin can act on A[Formula: see text] and tau too. Due to the advantages of multi-target effects and fewer side effects, Chinese medicine is more appropriate for long-term use. In this present review, the pharmacological effects of commonly used active components derived from Chinese herbal medicines in the treatment of AD are discussed.

  11. In vitro total phenolics, flavonoids contents and antioxidant activity of essential oil, various organic extracts from the leaves of tropical medicinal plant Tetrastigma from Sabah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, M Amzad; Shah, Muhammad Dawood; Gnanaraj, Charles; Iqbal, Muhammad

    2011-09-01

    To detect the in vitro total phenolics, flavonoids contents and antioxidant activity of essential oil, various organic extracts from the leaves of tropical medicinal plant Tetrastigma from Sabah. The dry powder leaves of Tetrastigma were extracted with different organic solvent such as hexane, ethyl acetate, chloroform, butanol and aqueous methanol. The total phenolic and total flavonoids contents of the essential oil and various organic extracts such as hexane, ethyl acetate, chloroform, butanol and aqueous ethanol were determined by Folin - Ciocalteu method and the assayed antioxidant activity was determined in vitro models such as antioxidant capacity by radical scavenging activity using α, α-diphenyl- β-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) method. The total phenolic contents of the essential oil and different extracts as gallic acid equivalents were found to be highest in methanol extract (386.22 mg/g) followed by ethyl acetate (190.89 mg/g), chloroform (175.89 mg/g), hexane (173.44 mg/g), and butanol extract (131.72 mg/g) and the phenolic contents not detected in essential oil. The antioxidant capacity of the essential oil and different extracts as ascorbic acid standard was in the order of methanol extract > ethyl acetate extract >chloroform> butanol > hexane extract also the antioxidant activity was not detected in essential oil. The findings show that the extent of antioxidant activity of the essential oil and all extracts are in accordance with the amount of phenolics present in that extract. Leaves of Tetrastigma being rich in phenolics may provide a good source of antioxidant. Copyright © 2011 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Immunomodulating and Antiprotozoal Effects of Different Extracts of the Oyster Culinary-Medicinal Mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus (Higher Basidiomycetes) Against Coccidiosis in Broiler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Muhammad Irfan; Akhtar, Masood; Iqbal, Zafar; Shahid, Muhammad; Awais, Mian Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    The culinary-medicinal oyster mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus, procured from local sources, was processed for hot water and methanolic extraction. Extracts obtained were subjected to proximate analysis to determine the amount of crude protein, crude fiber, ash, ether, and nitrogen-free extracts. These extracts were evaluated for immunomodulating and antiprotozoal effects against coccidiosis in a broiler. Cellular immune investigation revealed significantly higher (P 0.05) findings were observed in investigations of lymphoid organs. Antiprotozoal studies revealed a significantly higher (P < 0.05) percentage of protection against coccidiosis in groups administered P. ostreatus extracts when compared with controls. Moreover, lesion scoring and oocysts per gram of droppings observed in the control group were significantly higher (P < 0.05) compared with those in groups administered hot water and methanolic extracts of P. ostreatus. Results concluded that hot water and methanolic extracts of P. ostreatus had strong immune-enhancing activities. Further, these extracts also had excellent antiprotozoal activities against coccidiosis in a broiler.

  13. Artisanal Extraction and Traditional Knowledge Associated with Medicinal Use of Crabwood Oil (Carapa guianensis Aublet.) in a Peri-Urban Várzea Environment in the Amazon Estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, Mariane; Lira-Guedes, Ana Cláudia; Albuquerque Cunha, Helenilza Ferreira; Guedes, Marcelino Carneiro; Mustin, Karen; Gomes, Suellen Cristina Pantoja

    2016-01-01

    Várzea forests of the Amazon estuary contain species of importance to riverine communities. For example, the oil extracted from the seeds of crabwood trees is traditionally used to combat various illnesses and as such artisanal extraction processes have been maintained. The objectives of this study were to (1) describe the process involved in artisanal extraction of crabwood oil in the Fazendinha Protected Area, in the state of Amapá; (2) characterise the processes of knowledge transfer associated with the extraction and use of crabwood oil within a peri-urban riverine community; and (3) discern medicinal uses of the oil. The data were obtained using semistructured interviews with 13 community members involved in crabwood oil extraction and via direct observation. The process of oil extraction is divided into four stages: seed collection; cooking and resting of the seeds; shelling of the seeds and dough preparation; and oil collection. Oil extraction is carried out within the home for personal use, with surplus marketed within the community. More than 90% of the members of the community involved in extraction of crabwood oil highlighted the use of the oil to combat inflammation of the throat. Knowledge transfer occurs via oral transmission and through direct observation.

  14. Artisanal Extraction and Traditional Knowledge Associated with Medicinal Use of Crabwood Oil (Carapa guianensis Aublet. in a Peri-Urban Várzea Environment in the Amazon Estuary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariane Nardi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Várzea forests of the Amazon estuary contain species of importance to riverine communities. For example, the oil extracted from the seeds of crabwood trees is traditionally used to combat various illnesses and as such artisanal extraction processes have been maintained. The objectives of this study were to (1 describe the process involved in artisanal extraction of crabwood oil in the Fazendinha Protected Area, in the state of Amapá; (2 characterise the processes of knowledge transfer associated with the extraction and use of crabwood oil within a peri-urban riverine community; and (3 discern medicinal uses of the oil. The data were obtained using semistructured interviews with 13 community members involved in crabwood oil extraction and via direct observation. The process of oil extraction is divided into four stages: seed collection; cooking and resting of the seeds; shelling of the seeds and dough preparation; and oil collection. Oil extraction is carried out within the home for personal use, with surplus marketed within the community. More than 90% of the members of the community involved in extraction of crabwood oil highlighted the use of the oil to combat inflammation of the throat. Knowledge transfer occurs via oral transmission and through direct observation.

  15. Biological activity and LC-MS/MS profiling of extracts from the Australian medicinal plant Acacia ligulata (Fabaceae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Diana Jæger; Simpson, Bradley S.; Ndi, Chi P.

    2018-01-01

    and enzyme inhibitory effects relevant to traditional medicinal and food uses of the species were examined and LC-MS/MS was performed to investigate the chemical composition. Antibacterial activity was observed for bark and leaf extracts with an MIC for the bark extract of 62.5 μg/mL against Streptococcus...... pyogenes. Pod extracts showed cytotoxic effects against cancer cells, with the highest activity against melanoma SK-MEL28 cells with IC50 values between 40.8 and 80.6 μg/mL. Further, the leaf and pod extracts also inhibited α-amylase EC-3.2.1.1 and α-glucosidase EC-3.2.1.20 with IC50 values between 9...

  16. In vitro screening for anti-cholinesterase and antioxidant activity of methanolic extracts of ayurvedic medicinal plants used for cognitive disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Mathew

    Full Text Available Inhibition of Acetylcholinesterase (AChE is still considered as the main therapeutic strategy against Alzheimer's disease (AD. Many plant derived phytochemicals have shown AChE inhibitory activity in addition to the currently approved drugs for AD. In the present study, methanolic extracts of 20 plants used in Indian Ayurvedic system of medicine for improving cognitive function were screened for acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity by Ellman's microplate colorimetric method. Out of 20 extracts, Emblica officinalis, Nardostachys jatamansi, Nelumbo nucifera, Punica granatum and Raulfia Serpentina showed IC50 values <100 µg/ml for acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity. Antioxidant activities of these plants were assessed by DPPH scavenging assay. Among the extracts used, antioxidant activity was highest for Terminalia chebula and Emblica officinalis with IC50 values <10 µg/ml. Considering the complex multifactorial etiology of AD, these plant extracts will be safer and better candidates for the future disease modifying therapies against this devastating disease.

  17. Formulaic Language in Native and Second Language Speakers: Psycholinguistics, Corpus Linguistics, and TESOL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Nick C.; Simpson-Vlach, Rita; Maynard, Carson

    2008-01-01

    Natural language makes considerable use of recurrent formulaic patterns of words. This article triangulates the construct of "formula" from corpus linguistic, psycholinguistic, and educational perspectives. It describes the corpus linguistic extraction of pedagogically useful formulaic sequences for academic speech and writing. It determines…

  18. Twisting formula of epsilon factors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    For characters of a non-Archimedean local field we have explicit formula for epsilon factors. But in general, we do not have any generalized twisting formula of epsilon factors. In this paper, we give a generalized twisting formula of epsilon factorsvia local Jacobi sums.

  19. In Vitro Anti-leishmanial Effects of Hydroalcoholic Extracts From Six Iranian Medicinal Herbs on Leishmania major (MRHO/IR/75/ER Promastigotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feiz Haddad

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Cutaneous leishmaniasis is endemic in 11 Iranian provinces, and almost 80% of all cases are the rural cutaneous form caused by Leishmania major. The main important drug used to treat leishmaniasis is a five-capacity antimony compound that has hinders disease recurrence, drug resistance, complications, and long treatment duration. Objectives It seems necessary to search for new, natural medicine to replace the use of drugs, particularly herbal compounds with no side effects. Materials and Methods Different dilutions of extracts were prepared with 1 mg/mL of the extracts in 96-well plates. Cultivated 106 Leishmania major promastigotes in culture flasks containing RPMI1640 medium and 10% of brain heart infusion (BHI were counted using neobar lam and poured into each well. Following 72 hours incubation, MTT solution was added to each well, and then absorbance was documented with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA reader at 570 nm. Results IC50 of Allium hirtifolium (87 μg/mL and Ziziphus spina-christi (112 μg/mL extracts showed higher efficiency in inhibiting the growth of promastigotes over 72 hours. Conclusions Allium hirtifolium and Z. spina-christi extracts showed the most efficient activity in the inhibition of promastigote growth, but this was not total. The remaining plant extracts indicated ineffective or very weak efficiency on the Leishmania promastigotes. There is a possibility of achieving better results by changing the extraction method; determining materials affecting promastigotes and extracting these materials exactly; or converting extracts to other medicinal forms, such as ointment or gel.

  20. Study on preventive and therapeutic effect of Chinese medicinal herbal extracts on rat with bone marrow injury induced by radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Jun; Chen Baotian; Meng Hua; Liu Wenchao; Xie Wei; Sheng Rong

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effect of Chinese medicinal herbal extracts, Danggui (Radix angelicae sinensis), Chuanxiong (Rhizoma chuanxiong), Huangqi (Radix astragali), and Danshen (Radix salviae miltiorrhizae) on rats with bone marrow injury induced with whole-body gamma-ray exposure. Methods: Sixty male rats were randomly divided into three groups, control group, model group (irradiation only with no administration of the extracts), and drug treatment group (irradiation and administration of Chinese medicinal herbal extracts). Rats were irradiated with 6 Gy cobolt-60 gamma rays after administration of the extracts for two weeks. The number of marrow nucleate cells was counted, and VEGF and PDGF expression were measured with Western blot method on the 7th day since the irradiation. Results: Bone marrow nucleate cells and VEGF and PDGF expression in bone marrow cells in the model group were significantly lower than those in the control group (P<0.01), and these values in the drug treatment group were significantly higher than those in the model group (P<0.01 or P<0.05). Conclusion: The extracts of Chuanxiong, Danggui, Huangqi, and Danshen can be used to prevent from ration bone marrow injury in rats. (authors)

  1. Measurement of prompt and nonprompt [Formula: see text] production in [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] collisions at [Formula: see text].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Asilar, E; Bergauer, T; Brandstetter, J; Brondolin, E; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Flechl, M; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hartl, C; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; König, A; Krätschmer, I; Liko, D; Matsushita, T; Mikulec, I; Rabady, D; Rad, N; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, H; Schieck, J; Strauss, J; Waltenberger, W; Wulz, C-E; Dvornikov, O; Makarenko, V; Mossolov, V; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Zykunov, V; Shumeiko, N; Alderweireldt, S; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Lauwers, J; Van De Klundert, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Van Spilbeeck, A; Abu Zeid, S; Blekman, F; D'Hondt, J; Daci, N; De Bruyn, I; Deroover, K; Lowette, S; Moortgat, S; Moreels, L; Olbrechts, A; Python, Q; Skovpen, K; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Parijs, I; Brun, H; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Delannoy, H; Fasanella, G; Favart, L; Goldouzian, R; Grebenyuk, A; Karapostoli, G; Lenzi, T; Léonard, A; Luetic, J; Maerschalk, T; Marinov, A; Randle-Conde, A; Seva, T; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Vannerom, D; Yonamine, R; Zenoni, F; Zhang, F; Cimmino, A; Cornelis, T; Dobur, D; Fagot, A; Gul, M; Khvastunov, I; Poyraz, D; Salva, S; Schöfbeck, R; Tytgat, M; Van Driessche, W; Yazgan, E; Zaganidis, N; Bakhshiansohi, H; Beluffi, C; Bondu, O; Brochet, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, A; De Visscher, S; Delaere, C; Delcourt, M; Francois, B; Giammanco, A; Jafari, A; Komm, M; Krintiras, G; Lemaitre, V; Magitteri, A; Mertens, A; Musich, M; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Selvaggi, M; Vidal Marono, M; Wertz, S; Beliy, N; Aldá Júnior, W L; Alves, F L; Alves, G A; Brito, L; Hensel, C; Moraes, A; Pol, M E; Rebello Teles, P; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E; Carvalho, W; Chinellato, J; Custódio, A; Da Costa, E M; Da Silveira, G G; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Huertas Guativa, L M; Malbouisson, H; Matos Figueiredo, D; Mora Herrera, C; Mundim, L; Nogima, H; Prado Da Silva, W L; Santoro, A; Sznajder, A; Tonelli Manganote, E J; Torres Da Silva De Araujo, F; Vilela Pereira, A; Ahuja, S; Bernardes, C A; Dogra, S; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Gregores, E M; Mercadante, P G; Moon, C S; Novaes, S F; Padula, Sandra S; Romero Abad, D; Ruiz Vargas, J C; Aleksandrov, A; Hadjiiska, R; Iaydjiev, P; Rodozov, M; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Vutova, M; Dimitrov, A; Glushkov, I; Litov, L; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Fang, W; Ahmad, M; Bian, J G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Chen, M; Chen, Y; Cheng, T; Jiang, C H; Leggat, D; Liu, Z; Romeo, F; Ruan, M; Shaheen, S M; Spiezia, A; Tao, J; Wang, C; Wang, Z; Zhang, H; Zhao, J; Ban, Y; Chen, G; Li, Q; Liu, S; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Wang, D; Xu, Z; Avila, C; Cabrera, A; Chaparro Sierra, L F; Florez, C; Gomez, J P; González Hernández, C F; Ruiz Alvarez, J D; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, D; Puljak, I; Ribeiro Cipriano, P M; Sculac, T; Antunovic, Z; Kovac, M; Brigljevic, V; Ferencek, D; Kadija, K; Mesic, B; Susa, T; Attikis, A; Mavromanolakis, G; Mousa, J; Nicolaou, C; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Rykaczewski, H; Tsiakkouri, D; Finger, M; Finger, M; Carrera Jarrin, E; Assran, Y; Elkafrawy, T; Mahrous, A; Kadastik, M; Perrini, L; Raidal, M; Tiko, A; Veelken, C; Eerola, P; Pekkanen, J; Voutilainen, M; Härkönen, J; Järvinen, T; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Tuominiemi, J; Tuovinen, E; Wendland, L; Talvitie, J; Tuuva, T; Besancon, M; Couderc, F; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Favaro, C; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Ghosh, S; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Kucher, I; Locci, E; Machet, M; Malcles, J; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Titov, M; Abdulsalam, A; Antropov, I; Arleo, F; Baffioni, S; Beaudette, F; Busson, P; Cadamuro, L; Chapon, E; Charlot, C; Davignon, O; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Jo, M; Lisniak, S; Miné, P; Nguyen, M; Ochando, C; Ortona, G; Paganini, P; Pigard, P; Regnard, S; Salerno, R; Sirois, Y; Strebler, T; Yilmaz, Y; Zabi, A; Zghiche, A; Agram, J-L; Andrea, J; Aubin, A; Bloch, D; Brom, J-M; Buttignol, M; Chabert, E C; Chanon, N; Collard, C; Conte, E; Coubez, X; Fontaine, J-C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Le Bihan, A-C; Van Hove, P; Gadrat, S; Beauceron, S; Bernet, C; Boudoul, G; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Courbon, B; Depasse, P; El Mamouni, H; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Gouzevitch, M; Grenier, G; Ille, B; Lagarde, F; Laktineh, I B; Lethuillier, M; Mirabito, L; Pequegnot, A L; Perries, S; Popov, A; Sabes, D; Sordini, V; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Viret, S; Khvedelidze, A; Tsamalaidze, Z; Autermann, C; Beranek, S; Feld, L; Kiesel, M K; Klein, K; Lipinski, M; Preuten, M; Schomakers, C; Schulz, J; Verlage, T; Albert, A; Brodski, M; Dietz-Laursonn, E; Duchardt, D; Endres, M; Erdmann, M; Erdweg, S; Esch, T; Fischer, R; Güth, A; Hamer, M; Hebbeker, T; Heidemann, C; Hoepfner, K; Knutzen, S; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Millet, P; Mukherjee, S; Olschewski, M; Padeken, K; Pook, T; Radziej, M; Reithler, H; Rieger, M; Scheuch, F; Sonnenschein, L; Teyssier, D; Thüer, S; Cherepanov, V; Flügge, G; Kargoll, B; Kress, T; Künsken, A; Lingemann, J; Müller, T; Nehrkorn, A; Nowack, A; Pistone, C; Pooth, O; Stahl, A; Aldaya Martin, M; Arndt, T; Asawatangtrakuldee, C; Beernaert, K; Behnke, O; Behrens, U; Bin Anuar, A A; Borras, K; Campbell, A; Connor, P; Contreras-Campana, C; Costanza, F; Diez Pardos, C; Dolinska, G; Eckerlin, G; Eckstein, D; Eichhorn, T; Eren, E; Gallo, E; Garay Garcia, J; Geiser, A; Gizhko, A; Grados Luyando, J M; Grohsjean, A; Gunnellini, P; Harb, A; Hauk, J; Hempel, M; Jung, H; Kalogeropoulos, A; Karacheban, O; Kasemann, M; Keaveney, J; Kleinwort, C; Korol, I; Krücker, D; Lange, W; Lelek, A; Lenz, T; Leonard, J; Lipka, K; Lobanov, A; Lohmann, W; Mankel, R; Melzer-Pellmann, I-A; Meyer, A B; Mittag, G; Mnich, J; Mussgiller, A; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Raspereza, A; Roland, B; Sahin, M Ö; Saxena, P; Schoerner-Sadenius, T; Spannagel, S; Stefaniuk, N; Van Onsem, G P; Walsh, R; Wissing, C; Blobel, V; Centis Vignali, M; Draeger, A R; Dreyer, T; Garutti, E; Gonzalez, D; Haller, J; Hoffmann, M; Junkes, A; Klanner, R; Kogler, R; Kovalchuk, N; Lapsien, T; Marchesini, I; Marconi, D; Meyer, M; Niedziela, M; Nowatschin, D; Pantaleo, F; Peiffer, T; Perieanu, A; Poehlsen, J; Scharf, C; Schleper, P; Schmidt, A; Schumann, S; Schwandt, J; Stadie, H; Steinbrück, G; Stober, F M; Stöver, M; Tholen, H; Troendle, D; Usai, E; Vanelderen, L; Vanhoefer, A; Vormwald, B; Akbiyik, M; Barth, C; Baur, S; Baus, C; Berger, J; Butz, E; Caspart, R; Chwalek, T; Colombo, F; De Boer, W; Dierlamm, A; Fink, S; Freund, B; Friese, R; Giffels, M; Gilbert, A; Goldenzweig, P; Haitz, D; Hartmann, F; Heindl, S M; Husemann, U; Katkov, I; Kudella, S; Mildner, H; Mozer, M U; Müller, Th; Plagge, M; Quast, G; Rabbertz, K; Röcker, S; Roscher, F; Schröder, M; Shvetsov, I; Sieber, G; Simonis, H J; Ulrich, R; Wayand, S; Weber, M; Weiler, T; Williamson, S; Wöhrmann, C; Wolf, R; Anagnostou, G; Daskalakis, G; Geralis, T; Giakoumopoulou, V A; Kyriakis, A; Loukas, D; Topsis-Giotis, I; Kesisoglou, S; Panagiotou, A; Saoulidou, N; Tziaferi, E; Evangelou, I; Flouris, G; Foudas, C; Kokkas, P; Loukas, N; Manthos, N; Papadopoulos, I; Paradas, E; Filipovic, N; Pasztor, G; Bencze, G; Hajdu, C; Horvath, D; Sikler, F; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Zsigmond, A J; Beni, N; Czellar, S; Karancsi, J; Makovec, A; Molnar, J; Szillasi, Z; Bartók, M; Raics, P; Trocsanyi, Z L; Ujvari, B; Komaragiri, J R; Bahinipati, S; Bhowmik, S; Choudhury, S; Mal, P; Mandal, K; Nayak, A; Sahoo, D K; Sahoo, N; Swain, S K; Bansal, S; Beri, S B; Bhatnagar, V; Chawla, R; Bhawandeep, U; Kalsi, A K; Kaur, A; Kaur, M; Kumar, R; Kumari, P; Mehta, A; Mittal, M; Singh, J B; Walia, G; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, A; Choudhary, B C; Garg, R B; Keshri, S; Malhotra, S; Naimuddin, M; Ranjan, K; Sharma, R; Sharma, V; Bhattacharya, R; Bhattacharya, S; Chatterjee, K; Dey, S; Dutt, S; Dutta, S; Ghosh, S; Majumdar, N; Modak, A; Mondal, K; Mukhopadhyay, S; Nandan, S; Purohit, A; Roy, A; Roy, D; Roy Chowdhury, S; Sarkar, S; Sharan, M; Thakur, S; Behera, P K; Chudasama, R; Dutta, D; Jha, V; Kumar, V; Mohanty, A K; Netrakanti, P K; Pant, L M; Shukla, P; Topkar, A; Aziz, T; Dugad, S; Kole, G; Mahakud, B; Mitra, S; Mohanty, G B; Parida, B; Sur, N; Sutar, B; Banerjee, S; Dewanjee, R K; Ganguly, S; Guchait, M; Jain, Sa; Kumar, S; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Mazumdar, K; Sarkar, T; Wickramage, N; Chauhan, S; Dube, S; Hegde, V; Kapoor, A; Kothekar, K; Pandey, S; Rane, A; Sharma, S; Chenarani, S; Eskandari Tadavani, E; Etesami, S M; Khakzad, M; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M; Naseri, M; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F; Safarzadeh, B; Zeinali, M; Felcini, M; Grunewald, M; Abbrescia, M; Calabria, C; Caputo, C; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; Cristella, L; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; Fiore, L; Iaselli, G; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Miniello, G; My, S; Nuzzo, S; Pompili, A; Pugliese, G; Radogna, R; Ranieri, A; Selvaggi, G; Sharma, A; Silvestris, L; Venditti, R; Verwilligen, P; Abbiendi, G; Battilana, C; Bonacorsi, D; Braibant-Giacomelli, S; Brigliadori, L; Campanini, R; Capiluppi, P; Castro, A; Cavallo, F R; Chhibra, S S; Codispoti, G; Cuffiani, M; Dallavalle, G M; Fabbri, F; Fanfani, A; Fasanella, D; Giacomelli, P; Grandi, C; Guiducci, L; Marcellini, S; Masetti, G; Montanari, A; Navarria, F L; Perrotta, A; Rossi, A M; Rovelli, T; Siroli, G P; Tosi, N; Albergo, S; Costa, S; Di Mattia, A; Giordano, F; Potenza, R; Tricomi, A; Tuve, C; Barbagli, G; Ciulli, V; Civinini, C; D'Alessandro, R; Focardi, E; Lenzi, P; Meschini, M; Paoletti, S; Russo, L; Sguazzoni, G; Strom, D; Viliani, L; Benussi, L; Bianco, S; Fabbri, F; Piccolo, D; Primavera, F; Calvelli, V; Ferro, F; Monge, M R; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Brianza, L; Brivio, F; Ciriolo, V; Dinardo, M E; Fiorendi, S; Gennai, S; Ghezzi, A; Govoni, P; Malberti, M; Malvezzi, S; Manzoni, R A; Menasce, D; Moroni, L; Paganoni, M; Pedrini, D; Pigazzini, S; Ragazzi, S; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Buontempo, S; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Di Guida, S; Esposito, M; Fabozzi, F; Fienga, F; Iorio, A O M; Lanza, G; Lista, L; Meola, S; Paolucci, P; Sciacca, C; Thyssen, F; Azzi, P; Bacchetta, N; Benato, L; Boletti, A; Carlin, R; Checchia, P; Dall'Osso, M; De Castro Manzano, P; Dorigo, T; Dosselli, U; Gasparini, F; Gasparini, U; Gozzelino, A; Lacaprara, S; Margoni, M; Meneguzzo, A T; Pazzini, J; Pegoraro, M; Pozzobon, N; Ronchese, P; Sgaravatto, M; Simonetto, F; Torassa, E; Ventura, S; Zanetti, M; Zotto, P; Braghieri, A; Fallavollita, F; Magnani, A; Montagna, P; Ratti, S P; Re, V; Riccardi, C; Salvini, P; Vai, I; Vitulo, P; Alunni Solestizi, L; Bilei, G M; Ciangottini, D; Fanò, L; Lariccia, P; Leonardi, R; Mantovani, G; Menichelli, M; Saha, A; Santocchia, A; Androsov, K; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bernardini, J; Boccali, T; Castaldi, R; Ciocci, M A; Dell'Orso, R; Donato, S; Fedi, G; Giassi, A; Grippo, M T; Ligabue, F; Lomtadze, T; Martini, L; Messineo, A; Palla, F; Rizzi, A; Savoy-Navarro, A; Spagnolo, P; Tenchini, R; Tonelli, G; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Barone, L; Cavallari, F; Cipriani, M; Del Re, D; Diemoz, M; Gelli, S; Longo, E; Margaroli, F; Marzocchi, B; Meridiani, P; Organtini, G; Paramatti, R; Preiato, F; Rahatlou, S; Rovelli, C; Santanastasio, F; Amapane, N; Arcidiacono, R; Argiro, S; Arneodo, M; Bartosik, N; Bellan, R; Biino, C; Cartiglia, N; Cenna, F; Costa, M; Covarelli, R; Degano, A; Demaria, N; Finco, L; Kiani, B; Mariotti, C; Maselli, S; Migliore, E; Monaco, V; Monteil, E; Monteno, M; Obertino, M M; Pacher, L; Pastrone, N; Pelliccioni, M; Pinna Angioni, G L; Ravera, F; Romero, A; Ruspa, M; Sacchi, R; Shchelina, K; Sola, V; Solano, A; Staiano, A; Traczyk, P; Belforte, S; Casarsa, M; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Zanetti, A; Kim, D H; Kim, G N; Kim, M S; Lee, S; Lee, S W; Oh, Y D; Sekmen, S; Son, D C; Yang, Y C; Lee, A; Kim, H; Brochero Cifuentes, J A; Kim, T J; Cho, S; Choi, S; Go, Y; Gyun, D; Ha, S; Hong, B; Jo, Y; Kim, Y; Lee, K; Lee, K S; Lee, S; Lim, J; Park, S K; Roh, Y; Almond, J; Kim, J; Lee, H; Oh, S B; Radburn-Smith, B C; Seo, S H; Yang, U K; Yoo, H D; Yu, G B; Choi, M; Kim, H; Kim, J H; Lee, J S H; Park, I C; Ryu, G; Ryu, M S; Choi, Y; Goh, J; Hwang, C; Lee, J; Yu, I; Dudenas, V; Juodagalvis, A; Vaitkus, J; Ahmed, I; Ibrahim, Z A; Md Ali, M A B; Mohamad Idris, F; Wan Abdullah, W A T; Yusli, M N; Zolkapli, Z; Castilla-Valdez, H; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Hernandez-Almada, A; Lopez-Fernandez, R; Magaña Villalba, R; Mejia Guisao, J; Sanchez-Hernandez, A; Carrillo Moreno, S; Oropeza Barrera, C; Vazquez Valencia, F; Carpinteyro, S; Pedraza, I; Salazar Ibarguen, H A; Uribe Estrada, C; Morelos Pineda, A; Krofcheck, D; Butler, P H; Ahmad, A; Ahmad, M; Hassan, Q; Hoorani, H R; Khan, W A; Saddique, A; Shah, M A; Shoaib, M; Waqas, M; Bialkowska, H; Bluj, M; Boimska, B; Frueboes, T; Górski, M; Kazana, M; Nawrocki, K; Romanowska-Rybinska, K; Szleper, M; Zalewski, P; Bunkowski, K; Byszuk, A; Doroba, K; Kalinowski, A; Konecki, M; Krolikowski, J; Misiura, M; Olszewski, M; Walczak, M; Bargassa, P; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C; Calpas, B; Di Francesco, A; Faccioli, P; Ferreira Parracho, P G; Gallinaro, M; Hollar, J; Leonardo, N; Lloret Iglesias, L; Nemallapudi, M V; Rodrigues Antunes, J; Seixas, J; Toldaiev, O; Vadruccio, D; Varela, J; Vischia, P; Afanasiev, S; Bunin, P; Gavrilenko, M; Golutvin, I; Gorbunov, I; Kamenev, A; Karjavin, V; Lanev, A; Malakhov, A; Matveev, V; Palichik, V; Perelygin, V; Shmatov, S; Shulha, S; Skatchkov, N; Smirnov, V; Voytishin, N; Zarubin, A; Chtchipounov, L; Golovtsov, V; Ivanov, Y; Kim, V; Kuznetsova, E; Murzin, V; Oreshkin, V; Sulimov, V; Vorobyev, A; Andreev, Yu; Dermenev, A; Gninenko, S; Golubev, N; Karneyeu, A; Kirsanov, M; Krasnikov, N; Pashenkov, A; Tlisov, D; Toropin, A; Epshteyn, V; Gavrilov, V; Lychkovskaya, N; Popov, V; Pozdnyakov, I; Safronov, G; Spiridonov, A; Toms, M; Vlasov, E; Zhokin, A; Aushev, T; Bylinkin, A; Chadeeva, M; Chistov, R; Polikarpov, S; Andreev, V; Azarkin, M; Dremin, I; Kirakosyan, M; Leonidov, A; Terkulov, A; Baskakov, A; Belyaev, A; Boos, E; Ershov, A; Gribushin, A; Kaminskiy, A; Kodolova, O; Korotkikh, V; Lokhtin, I; Miagkov, I; Obraztsov, S; Petrushanko, S; Savrin, V; Snigirev, A; Vardanyan, I; Blinov, V; Skovpen, Y; Shtol, D; Azhgirey, I; Bayshev, I; Bitioukov, S; Elumakhov, D; Kachanov, V; Kalinin, A; Konstantinov, D; Krychkine, V; Petrov, V; Ryutin, R; Sobol, A; Troshin, S; Tyurin, N; Uzunian, A; Volkov, A; Adzic, P; Cirkovic, P; Devetak, D; Dordevic, M; Milosevic, J; Rekovic, V; Alcaraz Maestre, J; Barrio Luna, M; Calvo, E; Cerrada, M; Chamizo Llatas, M; Colino, N; De La Cruz, B; Delgado Peris, A; Escalante Del Valle, A; Fernandez Bedoya, C; Fernández Ramos, J P; Flix, J; Fouz, M C; Garcia-Abia, P; Gonzalez Lopez, O; Goy Lopez, S; Hernandez, J M; Josa, M I; Navarro De Martino, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Puerta Pelayo, J; Quintario Olmeda, A; Redondo, I; Romero, L; Soares, M S; de Trocóniz, J F; Missiroli, M; Moran, D; Cuevas, J; Fernandez Menendez, J; Gonzalez Caballero, I; González Fernández, J R; Palencia Cortezon, E; Sanchez Cruz, S; Suárez Andrés, I; Vizan Garcia, J M; Cabrillo, I J; Calderon, A; Curras, E; Fernandez, M; Garcia-Ferrero, J; Gomez, G; Lopez Virto, A; Marco, J; Martinez Rivero, C; Matorras, F; Piedra Gomez, J; Rodrigo, T; Ruiz-Jimeno, A; Scodellaro, L; Trevisani, N; Vila, I; Vilar Cortabitarte, R; Abbaneo, D; Auffray, E; Auzinger, G; Baillon, P; Ball, A H; Barney, D; Bloch, P; Bocci, A; Botta, C; Camporesi, T; Castello, R; Cepeda, M; Cerminara, G; Chen, Y; d'Enterria, D; Dabrowski, A; Daponte, V; David, A; De Gruttola, M; De Roeck, A; Di Marco, E; Dobson, M; Dorney, B; du Pree, T; Duggan, D; Dünser, M; Dupont, N; Elliott-Peisert, A; Everaerts, P; Fartoukh, S; Franzoni, G; Fulcher, J; Funk, W; Gigi, D; Gill, K; Girone, M; Glege, F; Gulhan, D; Gundacker, S; Guthoff, M; Harris, P; Hegeman, J; Innocente, V; Janot, P; Kieseler, J; Kirschenmann, H; Knünz, V; Kornmayer, A; Kortelainen, M J; Kousouris, K; Krammer, M; Lange, C; Lecoq, P; Lourenço, C; Lucchini, M T; Malgeri, L; Mannelli, M; Martelli, A; Meijers, F; Merlin, J A; Mersi, S; Meschi, E; Milenovic, P; Moortgat, F; Morovic, S; Mulders, M; Neugebauer, H; Orfanelli, S; Orsini, L; Pape, L; Perez, E; Peruzzi, M; Petrilli, A; Petrucciani, G; Pfeiffer, A; Pierini, M; Racz, A; Reis, T; Rolandi, G; Rovere, M; Sakulin, H; Sauvan, J B; Schäfer, C; Schwick, C; Seidel, M; Sharma, A; Silva, P; Sphicas, P; Steggemann, J; Stoye, M; Takahashi, Y; Tosi, M; Treille, D; Triossi, A; Tsirou, A; Veckalns, V; Veres, G I; Verweij, M; Wardle, N; Wöhri, H K; Zagozdzinska, A; Zeuner, W D; Bertl, W; Deiters, K; Erdmann, W; Horisberger, R; Ingram, Q; Kaestli, H C; Kotlinski, D; Langenegger, U; Rohe, T; Wiederkehr, S A; Bachmair, F; Bäni, L; Bianchini, L; Casal, B; Dissertori, G; Dittmar, M; Donegà, M; Grab, C; Heidegger, C; Hits, D; Hoss, J; Kasieczka, G; Lustermann, W; Mangano, B; Marionneau, M; Martinez Ruiz Del Arbol, P; Masciovecchio, M; Meinhard, M T; Meister, D; Micheli, F; Musella, P; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Pandolfi, F; Pata, J; Pauss, F; Perrin, G; Perrozzi, L; Quittnat, M; Rossini, M; Schönenberger, M; Starodumov, A; Tavolaro, V R; Theofilatos, K; Wallny, R; Aarrestad, T K; Amsler, C; Caminada, L; Canelli, M F; De Cosa, A; Galloni, C; Hinzmann, A; Hreus, T; Kilminster, B; Ngadiuba, J; Pinna, D; Rauco, G; Robmann, P; Salerno, D; Seitz, C; Yang, Y; Zucchetta, A; Candelise, V; Doan, T H; Jain, Sh; Khurana, R; Konyushikhin, M; Kuo, C M; Lin, W; Pozdnyakov, A; Yu, S S; Kumar, Arun; Chang, P; Chang, Y H; Chao, Y; Chen, K F; Chen, P H; Fiori, F; Hou, W-S; Hsiung, Y; Liu, Y F; Lu, R-S; Miñano Moya, M; Paganis, E; Psallidas, A; Tsai, J F; Asavapibhop, B; Singh, G; Srimanobhas, N; Suwonjandee, N; Adiguzel, A; Cerci, S; Damarseckin, S; Demiroglu, Z S; Dozen, C; Dumanoglu, I; Girgis, S; Gokbulut, G; Guler, Y; Hos, I; Kangal, E E; Kara, O; Kayis Topaksu, A; Kiminsu, U; Oglakci, M; Onengut, G; Ozdemir, K; Sunar Cerci, D; Topakli, H; Turkcapar, S; Zorbakir, I S; Zorbilmez, C; Bilin, B; Bilmis, S; Isildak, B; Karapinar, G; Yalvac, M; Zeyrek, M; Gülmez, E; Kaya, M; Kaya, O; Yetkin, E A; Yetkin, T; Cakir, A; Cankocak, K; Sen, S; Grynyov, B; Levchuk, L; Sorokin, P; Aggleton, R; Ball, F; Beck, L; Brooke, J J; Burns, D; Clement, E; Cussans, D; Flacher, H; Goldstein, J; Grimes, M; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Jacob, J; Kreczko, L; Lucas, C; Newbold, D M; Paramesvaran, S; Poll, A; Sakuma, T; Seif El Nasr-Storey, S; Smith, D; Smith, V J; Belyaev, A; Brew, C; Brown, R M; Calligaris, L; Cieri, D; Cockerill, D J A; Coughlan, J A; Harder, K; Harper, S; Olaiya, E; Petyt, D; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Thea, A; Tomalin, I R; Williams, T; Baber, M; Bainbridge, R; Buchmuller, O; Bundock, A; Burton, D; Casasso, S; Citron, M; Colling, D; Corpe, L; Dauncey, P; Davies, G; De Wit, A; Della Negra, M; Di Maria, R; Dunne, P; Elwood, A; Futyan, D; Haddad, Y; Hall, G; Iles, G; James, T; Lane, R; Laner, C; Lucas, R; Lyons, L; Magnan, A-M; Malik, S; Mastrolorenzo, L; Nash, J; Nikitenko, A; Pela, J; Penning, B; Pesaresi, M; Raymond, D M; Richards, A; Rose, A; Scott, E; Seez, C; Summers, S; Tapper, A; Uchida, K; Vazquez Acosta, M; Virdee, T; Wright, J; Zenz, S C; Cole, J E; Hobson, P R; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Reid, I D; Symonds, P; Teodorescu, L; Turner, M; Borzou, A; Call, K; Dittmann, J; Hatakeyama, K; Liu, H; Pastika, N; Bartek, R; Dominguez, A; Buccilli, A; Cooper, S I; Henderson, C; Rumerio, P; West, C; Arcaro, D; Avetisyan, A; Bose, T; Gastler, D; Rankin, D; Richardson, C; Rohlf, J; Sulak, L; Zou, D; Benelli, G; Cutts, D; Garabedian, A; Hakala, J; Heintz, U; Hogan, J M; Jesus, O; Kwok, K H M; Laird, E; Landsberg, G; Mao, Z; Narain, M; Piperov, S; Sagir, S; Spencer, E; Syarif, R; Breedon, R; Burns, D; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M; Chauhan, S; Chertok, M; Conway, J; Conway, R; Cox, P T; Erbacher, R; Flores, C; Funk, G; Gardner, M; Ko, W; Lander, R; Mclean, C; Mulhearn, M; Pellett, D; Pilot, J; Shalhout, S; Shi, M; Smith, J; Squires, M; Stolp, D; Tos, K; Tripathi, M; Bachtis, M; Bravo, C; Cousins, R; Dasgupta, A; Florent, A; Hauser, J; Ignatenko, M; Mccoll, N; Saltzberg, D; Schnaible, C; Valuev, V; Weber, M; Bouvier, E; Burt, K; Clare, R; Ellison, J; Gary, J W; Ghiasi Shirazi, S M A; Hanson, G; Heilman, J; Jandir, P; Kennedy, E; Lacroix, F; Long, O R; Olmedo Negrete, M; Paneva, M I; Shrinivas, A; Si, W; Wei, H; Wimpenny, S; Yates, B R; Branson, J G; Cerati, G B; Cittolin, S; Derdzinski, M; Gerosa, R; Holzner, A; Klein, D; Krutelyov, V; Letts, J; Macneill, I; Olivito, D; Padhi, S; Pieri, M; Sani, M; Sharma, V; Simon, S; Tadel, M; Vartak, A; Wasserbaech, S; Welke, C; Wood, J; Würthwein, F; Yagil, A; Zevi Della Porta, G; Amin, N; Bhandari, R; Bradmiller-Feld, J; Campagnari, C; Dishaw, A; Dutta, V; Franco Sevilla, M; George, C; Golf, F; Gouskos, L; Gran, J; Heller, R; Incandela, J; Mullin, S D; Ovcharova, A; Qu, H; Richman, J; Stuart, D; Suarez, I; Yoo, J; Anderson, D; Bendavid, J; Bornheim, A; Bunn, J; Duarte, J; Lawhorn, J M; Mott, A; Newman, H B; Pena, C; Spiropulu, M; Vlimant, J R; Xie, S; Zhu, R Y; Andrews, M B; Ferguson, T; Paulini, M; Russ, J; Sun, M; Vogel, H; Vorobiev, I; Weinberg, M; Cumalat, J P; Ford, W T; Jensen, F; Johnson, A; Krohn, M; Leontsinis, S; Mulholland, T; Stenson, K; Wagner, S R; Alexander, J; Chaves, J; Chu, J; Dittmer, S; Mcdermott, K; Mirman, N; Nicolas Kaufman, G; Patterson, J R; Rinkevicius, A; Ryd, A; Skinnari, L; Soffi, L; Tan, S M; Tao, Z; Thom, J; Tucker, J; Wittich, P; Zientek, M; Winn, D; Abdullin, S; Albrow, M; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Banerjee, S; Bauerdick, L A T; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhat, P C; Bolla, G; Burkett, K; Butler, J N; Cheung, H W K; Chlebana, F; Cihangir, S; Cremonesi, M; Elvira, V D; Fisk, I; Freeman, J; Gottschalk, E; Gray, L; Green, D; Grünendahl, S; Gutsche, O; Hare, D; Harris, R M; Hasegawa, S; Hirschauer, J; Hu, Z; Jayatilaka, B; Jindariani, S; Johnson, M; Joshi, U; Klima, B; Kreis, B; Lammel, S; Linacre, J; Lincoln, D; Lipton, R; Liu, M; Liu, T; Lopes De Sá, R; Lykken, J; Maeshima, K; Magini, N; Marraffino, J M; Maruyama, S; Mason, D; McBride, P; Merkel, P; Mrenna, S; Nahn, S; O'Dell, V; Pedro, K; Prokofyev, O; Rakness, G; Ristori, L; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Soha, A; Spalding, W J; Spiegel, L; Stoynev, S; Strait, J; Strobbe, N; Taylor, L; Tkaczyk, S; Tran, N V; Uplegger, L; Vaandering, E W; Vernieri, C; Verzocchi, M; Vidal, R; Wang, M; Weber, H A; Whitbeck, A; Wu, Y; Acosta, D; Avery, P; Bortignon, P; Bourilkov, D; Brinkerhoff, A; Carnes, A; Carver, M; Curry, D; Das, S; Field, R D; Furic, I K; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Low, J F; Ma, P; Matchev, K; Mei, H; Mitselmakher, G; Rank, D; Shchutska, L; Sperka, D; Thomas, L; Wang, J; Wang, S; Yelton, J; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Martinez, G; Rodriguez, J L; Ackert, A; Adams, T; Askew, A; Bein, S; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Johnson, K F; Prosper, H; Santra, A; Yohay, R; Baarmand, M M; Bhopatkar, V; Colafranceschi, S; Hohlmann, M; Noonan, D; Roy, T; Yumiceva, F; Adams, M R; Apanasevich, L; Berry, D; Betts, R R; Bucinskaite, I; Cavanaugh, R; Evdokimov, O; Gauthier, L; Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; Jung, K; Sandoval Gonzalez, I D; Varelas, N; Wang, H; Wu, Z; Zakaria, M; Zhang, J; Bilki, B; Clarida, W; Dilsiz, K; Durgut, S; Gandrajula, R P; Haytmyradov, M; Khristenko, V; Merlo, J-P; Mermerkaya, H; Mestvirishvili, A; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Ogul, H; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Penzo, A; Snyder, C; Tiras, E; Wetzel, J; Yi, K; Anderson, I; Blumenfeld, B; Cocoros, A; Eminizer, N; Fehling, D; Feng, L; Gritsan, A V; Maksimovic, P; Roskes, J; Sarica, U; Swartz, M; Xiao, M; Xin, Y; You, C; Al-Bataineh, A; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Boren, S; Bowen, J; Castle, J; Forthomme, L; Kenny, R P; Khalil, S; Kropivnitskaya, A; Majumder, D; Mcbrayer, W; Murray, M; Sanders, S; Stringer, R; Tapia Takaki, J D; Wang, Q; Ivanov, A; Kaadze, K; Maravin, Y; Mohammadi, A; Saini, L K; Skhirtladze, N; Toda, S; Rebassoo, F; Wright, D; Anelli, C; Baden, A; Baron, O; Belloni, A; Calvert, B; Eno, S C; Ferraioli, C; Gomez, J A; Hadley, N J; Jabeen, S; Jeng, G Y; Kellogg, R G; Kolberg, T; Kunkle, J; Mignerey, A C; Ricci-Tam, F; Shin, Y H; Skuja, A; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Abercrombie, D; Allen, B; Apyan, A; Azzolini, V; Barbieri, R; Baty, A; Bi, R; Bierwagen, K; Brandt, S; Busza, W; Cali, I A; D'Alfonso, M; Demiragli, Z; Di Matteo, L; Gomez Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; Hsu, D; Iiyama, Y; Innocenti, G M; Klute, M; Kovalskyi, D; Krajczar, K; Lai, Y S; Lee, Y-J; Levin, A; Luckey, P D; Maier, B; Marini, A C; Mcginn, C; Mironov, C; Narayanan, S; Niu, X; Paus, C; Roland, C; Roland, G; Salfeld-Nebgen, J; Stephans, G S F; Tatar, K; Varma, M; Velicanu, D; Veverka, J; Wang, J; Wang, T W; Wyslouch, B; Yang, M; Benvenuti, A C; Chatterjee, R M; Evans, A; Hansen, P; Kalafut, S; Kao, S C; Kubota, Y; Lesko, Z; Mans, J; Nourbakhsh, S; Ruckstuhl, N; Rusack, R; Tambe, N; Turkewitz, J; Acosta, J G; Oliveros, S; Avdeeva, E; Bloom, K; Claes, D R; Fangmeier, C; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Kamalieddin, R; Kravchenko, I; Malta Rodrigues, A; Monroy, J; Siado, J E; Snow, G R; Stieger, B; Alyari, M; Dolen, J; Godshalk, A; Harrington, C; Iashvili, I; Kaisen, J; Nguyen, D; Parker, A; Rappoccio, S; Roozbahani, B; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Hortiangtham, A; Massironi, A; Morse, D M; Nash, D; Orimoto, T; Teixeira De Lima, R; Trocino, D; Wang, R-J; Wood, D; Bhattacharya, S; Charaf, O; Hahn, K A; Kumar, A; Mucia, N; Odell, N; Pollack, B; Schmitt, M H; Sung, K; Trovato, M; Velasco, M; Dev, N; Hildreth, M; Hurtado Anampa, K; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kellams, N; Lannon, K; Marinelli, N; Meng, F; Mueller, C; Musienko, Y; Planer, M; Reinsvold, A; Ruchti, R; Rupprecht, N; Smith, G; Taroni, S; Wayne, M; Wolf, M; Woodard, A; Alimena, J; Antonelli, L; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Flowers, S; Francis, B; Hart, A; Hill, C; Hughes, R; Ji, W; Liu, B; Luo, W; Puigh, D; Winer, B L; Wulsin, H W; Cooperstein, S; Driga, O; Elmer, P; Hardenbrook, J; Hebda, P; Lange, D; Luo, J; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mei, K; Ojalvo, I; Olsen, J; Palmer, C; Piroué, P; Stickland, D; Svyatkovskiy, A; Tully, C; Malik, S; Barker, A; Barnes, V E; Folgueras, S; Gutay, L; Jha, M K; Jones, M; Jung, A W; Khatiwada, A; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Schulte, J F; Shi, X; Sun, J; Wang, F; Xie, W; Parashar, N; Stupak, J; Adair, A; Akgun, B; Chen, Z; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Guilbaud, M; Li, W; Michlin, B; Northup, M; Padley, B P; Roberts, J; Rorie, J; Tu, Z; Zabel, J; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Duh, Y T; Ferbel, T; Galanti, M; Garcia-Bellido, A; Han, J; Hindrichs, O; Khukhunaishvili, A; Lo, K H; Tan, P; Verzetti, M; Agapitos, A; Chou, J P; Gershtein, Y; Gómez Espinosa, T A; Halkiadakis, E; Heindl, M; Hughes, E; Kaplan, S; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R; Kyriacou, S; Lath, A; Nash, K; Osherson, M; Saka, H; Salur, S; Schnetzer, S; Sheffield, D; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Thomassen, P; Walker, M; Delannoy, A G; Foerster, M; Heideman, J; Riley, G; Rose, K; Spanier, S; Thapa, K; Bouhali, O; Celik, A; Dalchenko, M; De Mattia, M; Delgado, A; Dildick, S; Eusebi, R; Gilmore, J; Huang, T; Juska, E; Kamon, T; Mueller, R; Pakhotin, Y; Patel, R; Perloff, A; Perniè, L; Rathjens, D; Safonov, A; Tatarinov, A; Ulmer, K A; Akchurin, N; Cowden, C; Damgov, J; De Guio, F; Dragoiu, C; Dudero, P R; Faulkner, J; Gurpinar, E; Kunori, S; Lamichhane, K; Lee, S W; Libeiro, T; Peltola, T; Undleeb, S; Volobouev, I; Wang, Z; Greene, S; Gurrola, A; Janjam, R; Johns, W; Maguire, C; Melo, A; Ni, H; Sheldon, P; Tuo, S; Velkovska, J; Xu, Q; Arenton, M W; Barria, P; Cox, B; Goodell, J; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Li, H; Neu, C; Sinthuprasith, T; Sun, X; Wang, Y; Wolfe, E; Xia, F; Clarke, C; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Sturdy, J; Belknap, D A; Buchanan, J; Caillol, C; Dasu, S; Dodd, L; Duric, S; Gomber, B; Grothe, M; Herndon, M; Hervé, A; Klabbers, P; Lanaro, A; Levine, A; Long, K; Loveless, R; Perry, T; Pierro, G A; Polese, G; Ruggles, T; Savin, A; Smith, N; Smith, W H; Taylor, D; Woods, N

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports the measurement of [Formula: see text] meson production in proton-proton ([Formula: see text]) and proton-lead ([Formula: see text]) collisions at a center-of-mass energy per nucleon pair of [Formula: see text] by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The data samples used in the analysis correspond to integrated luminosities of 28[Formula: see text] and 35[Formula: see text] for [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] collisions, respectively. Prompt and nonprompt [Formula: see text] mesons, the latter produced in the decay of [Formula: see text] hadrons, are measured in their dimuon decay channels. Differential cross sections are measured in the transverse momentum range of [Formula: see text], and center-of-mass rapidity ranges of [Formula: see text] ([Formula: see text]) and [Formula: see text] ([Formula: see text]). The nuclear modification factor, [Formula: see text], is measured as a function of both [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]. Small modifications to the [Formula: see text] cross sections are observed in [Formula: see text] relative to [Formula: see text] collisions. The ratio of [Formula: see text] production cross sections in [Formula: see text]-going and Pb-going directions, [Formula: see text], studied as functions of [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], shows a significant decrease for increasing transverse energy deposited at large pseudorapidities. These results, which cover a wide kinematic range, provide new insight on the role of cold nuclear matter effects on prompt and nonprompt [Formula: see text] production.

  2. In Vitro Screening for Anti-Cholinesterase and Antioxidant Activity of Methanolic Extracts of Ayurvedic Medicinal Plants Used for Cognitive Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Mathew, Maya; Subramanian, Sarada

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is still considered as the main therapeutic strategy against Alzheimer's disease (AD). Many plant derived phytochemicals have shown AChE inhibitory activity in addition to the currently approved drugs for AD. In the present study, methanolic extracts of 20 plants used in Indian Ayurvedic system of medicine for improving cognitive function were screened for acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity by Ellman's microplate colorimetric method. Out of 20 e...

  3. Therapeutic potential of some plant extracts used in Turkish traditional medicine on streptozocin-induced type 1 diabetes mellitus in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkol, Halil; Tuluce, Yasin; Dilsiz, Nihat; Koyuncu, Ismail

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is known to impair many physiological functions. Some reports claim that medicinal plants can reduce these alterations caused by DM. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic potential of aqueous-methanol extracts of Urtica dioica, Thymus vulgaris (TV), Myrtus communis (MC), Scolymus hispanicus (SH) and Cinnamomun zeylanicum (CZ) on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 1 DM in rats. Diabetes was induced via a single i.p. injection of STZ (65 mg/kg body weight). After 1 week to allow for development of diabetes, each plant extract was administered to diabetic rats separately at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight daily for 28 days. The results showed that only SH extract significantly (P < 0.05) amended fasting blood glucose level. The lipid profile was ameliorated especially by supplementations of TV, MC and CZ extracts. Almost all plant extract treatments markedly (P < 0.05) increased reduced glutathione content and decreased lipid peroxidation levels of erythrocyte, plasma, retina and lens tissues. They also significantly (P < 0.05) amended erythrocyte catalase activity, levels of marker serum enzymes (except amylase), urea and blood urea nitrogen when compared to diabetic rats treated with nothing. Furthermore, none of the plant extracts counteracted body weight loss of diabetic rats. Our data revealed that the aforementioned plant extracts have remarkable potential to counteract DM-caused alterations, probably through their antioxidant and free radical-defusing effects.

  4. Insecticidal activities and phytochemical screening of crude extracts and its derived fractions from three medicinal plants Nepeta leavigata, Nepeta kurramensis and Rhynchosia reniformis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, N.; Shinwari, Z.K.

    2016-01-01

    The extracts and its derived fractions from three medicinal plants species Nepeta leavigata, Nepeta kurramensis and Rhynchosia reniformis were tested for insecticidal activities and preliminary phytochemical evaluation with the intention of standardization and proper manage of bioactive principles in such heterogonous botanicals and to encourage drug finding work with plants. The crude extracts and fractions from Nepeta plants showed moderate to strong insecticidal activity. Among the fractions from Nepeta kurramensis the n-butanol fraction showed strongest insecticidal activity with 89% mortality rate against Tribolium castaneum followed by methanol extract with 88% mortality ratio and in case of Nepeta leavigata the potential activity was showed by methanol extracts with 93% mortality rate against the tested insect. Surprisingly none of the extract / fractions obtained from Rhynchosia reniformis plant exhibited any insecticidal activity. The phytochemicals screening results revealed that both species of Nepeta showed similar phytochemicals profile. The group of chemicals terpenes, flavonoids and glycosides were observed in all the extracts/fractions of Nepeta plants. While phenolic compounds, acidic compounds and alkaloids were found in methanolic extracts, chloroform fraction and ethyl acetate fraction. The Rhynchosia reniformis was observed to be a good source of phenolic compounds, flavonoids, terpenes, alkaloids and fats. (author)

  5. Self-lubricating formula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borzenko, V.A.; Koltovskiy, L.V.; Koshelyov, Yu.I.; Kuzovlyev, G.F.; Lebedyev, S.I.; Sitnikov, S.A.; Telegin, V.D.

    1979-12-30

    To improve operation of scrubbers that operate in crystallizers for deparaffinization of oil products, a formula is being suggested which contains siliceous fibers, and a type of thermoactive resin - phenol-formaldehyde laquer, with the following component ration (% weight): carbon fiber 20-25, siliceous fibers 20-30, dry lubricant 10-15, phenolformaldehyde laquer up to 100. Phys.-mech. characteristics are flexure, compression, Ak of the suggested and known compositions (kgs/cm/sup 2/) 2150-2450 and 2550-2700, 32-37 and 1750, 2150 and 27 operation resource 2100:2500 and 1400.

  6. Bryant J. correction formula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tejera R, A.; Cortes P, A.; Becerril V, A.

    1990-03-01

    For the practical application of the method proposed by J. Bryant, the authors carried out a series of small corrections, related with the bottom, the dead time of the detectors and channels, with the resolution time of the coincidences, with the accidental coincidences, with the decay scheme and with the gamma efficiency of the beta detector beta and the beta efficiency beta of the gamma detector. The calculation of the correction formula is presented in the development of the present report, being presented 25 combinations of the probability of the first existent state at once of one disintegration and the second state at once of the following disintegration. (Author)

  7. Inhibition of Cytochrome P450 (CYP3A4) Activity by Extracts from 57 Plants Used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashour, Mohamed L; Youssef, Fadia S; Gad, Haidy A; Wink, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Background: Herbal medicine is widely used all over the world for treating various health disorders. It is employed either alone or in combination with synthetic drugs or plants to be more effective. Objective: The assessment of the effect of both water and methanol extracts of 57 widely used plants from Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) against the main phase I metabolizing enzyme CYP3A4 in vitro for the first time. Materials and Methods: The inhibition of cytochrome P450 activity was evaluated using a luminescence assay. The principal component analysis (PCA) was used to correlate the inhibitory activity with the main secondary metabolites present in the plant extracts. Molecular modeling studies on CYP3A4 (PDB ID 4NY4) were carried out with 38 major compounds present in the most active plant extracts to validate the observed inhibitory effect. Results: Aqueous extracts of Acacia catechu, Andrographis paniculata, Arctium lappa, Areca catechu, Bupleurum marginatum, Chrysanthemum indicum, Dysosma versipellis, and Spatholobus suberectus inhibited CYP3A4 is more than 85% (at a dose of 100 μg/mL). The corresponding methanol extracts of A. catechu, A. paniculata, A. catechu, Mahonia bealei, and Sanguisorba officinalis inhibited the enzyme by more than 50%. Molecular modeling studies revealed that two polyphenols, namely hesperidin and rutin, revealed the highest fitting scores in the active sites of the CYP3A4 with binding energies equal to -74.09 and -71.34 kcal/mol, respectively. Conclusion: These results provide evidence that many TCM plants can inhibit CYP3A4, which might cause a potential interference with the metabolism of other concomitantly administered herbs or drugs. SUMMARY In this study, the inhibitory activity of the aqueous and methanol extracts of 57 widely used plants from Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) against the main phase I metabolizing enzyme CYP3A4 was tested in vitro for the first time.Aqueous extracts of Acacia catechu, Andrographis

  8. Sodium metabisulfite–induced polymerization of sickle cell hemoglobin incubated in the extracts of three medicinal plants (Anacardium occidentale, Psidium guajava, and Terminalia catappa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikezie, Paul Chidoka

    2011-01-01

    Background: The exploitation and utilization of vast varieties of herbal extracts may serve as alternative measures to deter aggregation of deoxygenated sickle cell hemoglobin (deoxyHbS) molecules. Objective: The present in vitro study ascertained the capacity of three medicinal plants, namely, Anacardium occidentale, Psidium guajava, and Terminalia catappa, to alter polymerization of HbS. Materials and Methods: Spectrophotometric method was used to monitor the level of polymerization of hemolysate HbS molecules treated with sodium metabisulfite (Na2 S2 O5) at a regular interval of 30 s for a period of 180 s in the presence of separate aqueous extracts of A. occidentale, P. guajava, and T. catappa. At time intervals of 30 s, the level of polymerization was expressed as percentage of absorbance relative to the control sample at the 180th s. Results: Although extracts of the three medicinal plants caused significant (P guajava exhibited the highest capacity to reduced polymerization of deoxyHbS molecules. Whereas at t > 60 s, extract concentration of 400 mg% of A. occidentale activated polymerization of deoxyHbS molecules by 6.23±1.34, 14.53±1.67, 21.15±1.89, and 24.42±1.09%, 800 mg% of T. catappa at t > 30 s gave values of 2.50±1.93, 5.09±1.96, 10.00±0.99, 15.38±1.33, and 17.31±0.97%. Conclusion: The capacity of the three medicinal plants to interfere with polymerization of deoxyHbS molecules depended on the duration of incubation and concentration of the extracts. PMID:21716622

  9. Sodium metabisulfite-induced polymerization of sickle cell hemoglobin incubated in the extracts of three medicinal plants (Anacardium occidentale, Psidium guajava, and Terminalia catappa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikezie, Paul Chidoka

    2011-04-01

    The exploitation and utilization of vast varieties of herbal extracts may serve as alternative measures to deter aggregation of deoxygenated sickle cell hemoglobin (deoxyHbS) molecules. The present in vitro study ascertained the capacity of three medicinal plants, namely, Anacardium occidentale, Psidium guajava, and Terminalia catappa, to alter polymerization of HbS. Spectrophotometric method was used to monitor the level of polymerization of hemolysate HbS molecules treated with sodium metabisulfite (Na(2) S(2) O(5)) at a regular interval of 30 s for a period of 180 s in the presence of separate aqueous extracts of A. occidentale, P. guajava, and T. catappa. At time intervals of 30 s, the level of polymerization was expressed as percentage of absorbance relative to the control sample at the 180th s. Although extracts of the three medicinal plants caused significant (P 60 s, extract concentration of 400 mg% of A. occidentale activated polymerization of deoxyHbS molecules by 6.23±1.34, 14.53±1.67, 21.15±1.89, and 24.42±1.09%, 800 mg% of T. catappa at t > 30 s gave values of 2.50±1.93, 5.09±1.96, 10.00±0.99, 15.38±1.33, and 17.31±0.97%. The capacity of the three medicinal plants to interfere with polymerization of deoxyHbS molecules depended on the duration of incubation and concentration of the extracts.

  10. Antimicrobial and Anti-Biofilm Activities of the Methanol Extracts of Medicinal Plants against Dental PathogensStreptococcus mutansandCandida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyoung-An; Cheong, Dae-Eun; Lim, Ho-Dong; Kim, Won-Ho; Ham, Mi-Hyoun; Oh, Myung-Hwan; Wu, Yuanzheng; Shin, Hyun-Jae; Kim, Geun-Joong

    2017-07-28

    Several medicinal plants are ethnomedically used in Korea as agents for treating infection, anti-inflammation, and pain relief. However, beyond typical inhibitory effects on cell growth, little is known about the potential anti-biofilm activity of these herbs, which may help to prevent cavities and maintain good oral health. This study aimed to investigate the antimicrobial and anti-biofilm activities of the methanol extracts of 37 Korean medicinal plants against dental pathogens Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans , which synergize their virulence so as to induce the formation of plaque biofilms in the oral cavity. The antimicrobial activities were investigated by broth dilution and disk diffusion assay. The anti-biofilm and antioxidant activities were evaluated based on the inhibitory effect against glucosyltransferase (GTase) and the DPPH assay, respectively. Among 37 herbs, eight plant extracts presented growth and biofilm inhibitory activities against both etiologic bacteria. Among them, the methanol extracts (1.0 mg/ml) from Camellia japonica and Thuja orientalis significantly inhibited the growth of both bacteria by over 76% and over 83% in liquid media, respectively. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of these methanol extracts were determined to be 0.5 mg/ml using a disk diffusion assay on solid agar media. Biofilm formation was inhibited by more than 92.4% and 98.0%, respectively, using the same concentration of each extract. The present results demonstrate that the medicinal plants C. japonica and T. orientalis are potentially useful as antimicrobial and anti-biofilm agents in preventing dental diseases.

  11. Yokukan-san: a review of the evidence for use of this Kampo herbal formula in dementia and psychiatric conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okamoto H

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hideki Okamoto,1,2 Masaomi Iyo,2 Keigo Ueda,1 Cheolsun Han,1 Yoshiro Hirasaki,1 Takao Namiki1 1Department of Japanese-Oriental (Kampo Medicine, 2Department of Psychiatry, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba City, Japan Abstract: Japanese traditional herbal medicine (Kampo has its origins in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM. It was introduced to Japan in the middle of the sixth century and has evolved over the past 1,400 years after combining with Japan’s original folk remedies. While it retains some similarities to TCM, Kampo has evolved in Japan, resulting in a system of medicine that has many differences from TCM. Kampo medicine is considered to be very safe; in Japan, Kampo herbal formulas are manufactured by licensed pharmaceutical companies, prescribed by Western-trained medical doctors (usually as a freeze-dried extract, and have quality control standards similar to those of prescription drugs. The present study examined Yokukan-san (Yi-Gan San in TCM, a Kampo formula that has been used empirically in Japan for more than 400 years. Accumulating clinical trials have demonstrated Yokukan-san’s efficacy in treating patients with behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia, which has resulted in the Japanese Society of Neurology listing it in the Japanese Guidelines for the Management of Dementia 2010. Efficacy in other diseases and conditions, such as sleep disorders, tardive dyskinesia, aggression, and impulsivity has also been reported. This article reviews both clinical and basic studies of Yokukan-san, with the goal of clarifying its clinical indications. Keywords: Yokukan-san-ka-chimpi-hange, Japanese traditional medicine, Asian medicine, dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB, Alzheimer’s disease, BPSD, Parkinson’s disease

  12. The Effects of Bairesi Complex Prescription (a Uyghur Medicine Prescription and Its Five Crude Herbal Extracts on Melanogenesis in G-361 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuedan Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitiligo is considered a preimmune stage of a disease that is not well clarified. This condition is difficult to treat because there is no definite cure. Uyghur medicine is an important part of traditional Chinese medicine. There are many types of prescriptions that are used for the treatment of vitiligo. Bairesi complex prescription is one of the active prescriptions for vitiligo that is used in the clinic. However, the intensities of melanogenesis due to uses of Bairesi complex prescription and its five constituent crude herbs have not been reported yet. In the present study, we found that the hot water extracts of Bairesi complex prescription and the crude herbs were more effective in eliciting melanin production in G-361 cells than the EtOH extracts. Furthermore, the Bairesi complex prescription exhibited less cytotoxicity and was more effective in melanin formation than the five crude herbal extracts. In the present study, we also discuss the mechanisms of melanogenesis due to the use of the Bairesi complex prescription and its single crude herbal extracts.

  13. Antioxidant activity, phenolic content, and peroxide value of essential oil and extracts of some medicinal and aromatic plants used as condiments and herbal teas in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Mehmet Musa; Erel, Ozcan; Herken, Emine Etöz

    2009-02-01

    The antioxidant activity, total peroxide values, and total phenol contents of several medicinal and aromatic plant essential oil and extracts from Turkey were examined. Total phenolic contents were determined using a spectrophotometric technique and calculated as gallic acid equivalents. Total antioxidant activity of essential oil and extracts varied from 0.6853 to 1.3113 and 0.3189 to 0.6119 micromol of Trolox equivalents/g, respectively. The total phenolic content of essential oil ranged from 0.0871 to 0.5919 mg of gallic acid/g dry weight. However, the total phenolic contents of extracts were found to be higher compared with those of essential oils. The amount of total peroxide values of oils varied from 7.31 (pickling herb) to 58.23 (bitter fennel flower) mumol of H(2)O(2)/g. As a result, it is shown that medicinal plant derivatives such as extract and essential oils can be useful as a potential source of total phenol, peroxide, and antioxidant capacity for protection of processed foods.

  14. Breastfeeding vs. Formula Feeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... well worth doing all you can to overcome breastfeeding challenges. Most mothers find that the early struggles pass quickly, and ... Moore TR, Greene MF, eds. Creasy and Resnik's Maternal-Fetal Medicine: ... ER. Lactation and breastfeeding. In: Gabbe SG, Niebyl JR, Simpson JL, et ...

  15. Quadrature formulas for Fourier coefficients

    KAUST Repository

    Bojanov, Borislav

    2009-09-01

    We consider quadrature formulas of high degree of precision for the computation of the Fourier coefficients in expansions of functions with respect to a system of orthogonal polynomials. In particular, we show the uniqueness of a multiple node formula for the Fourier-Tchebycheff coefficients given by Micchelli and Sharma and construct new Gaussian formulas for the Fourier coefficients of a function, based on the values of the function and its derivatives. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Antioxidant activity from the leaf extracts of Jacaranda puberula Cham., Bignoniaceae, a Brazilian medicinal plant used for blood depuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Macedo Lessa dos Santos

    Full Text Available The antioxidant activity of leaf extracts from Jacaranda puberula Cham., Bignoniaceae, was assayed by the DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl free radical scavenging method. Three phytomedicines (F1, F2, and F3 used as blood depurative, were tested by the same method. The free radical scavenger potential was measured by the discoloration of the solution. The EC50 values from Gingko bilobaEGb 761® extract and rutin, used as antioxidant for medical purposes, were used as reference. The ethanol extract (EE, ethyl acetate (EA, butanol (EB, aqueous (EAq and the sample A (obtained from extract EB, showed lower EC50 values than other extracts and phytomedicines. The antioxidant activity (AA of the extracts was related with the presence of the polyphenol compounds such as verbascoside (1 and cis-caffeoyl aldehyde (2. These structures were determined by chemical and spectroscopic methods and comparison with literature data.

  17. Promotion of wound healing by Plantago major L. leaf extracts--ex-vivo experiments confirm experiences from traditional medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubair, Muhammad; Nybom, Hilde; Lindholm, Christina; Brandner, Johanna M; Rumpunen, Kimmo

    2016-01-01

    The wound-healing properties of Plantago major L. (plantain) were evaluated using an ex-vivo porcine wound-healing model. Ethanol- and water-based extracts were prepared from greenhouse-grown and freeze-dried leaves of P. major. Both types of extracts stimulated wound healing in porcine skin, but the ethanol-based extracts had a somewhat stronger effect. A concentration of 1.0 mg/mL (on dry weight basis) produced the best results for both types of extracts.

  18. Application of cytoplasmic Ca2+ fluorescence imaging techniques to study the molecular mechanisms of exercise-induced fatigue eliminated by Chinese medicine ginseng extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Zhao, Yanping; Zhang, Heming; Liu, Songhao

    2009-11-01

    The exercise-induced fatigue eliminated by Chinese medicine offers advantages including good efficiency and smaller side-effects, however, the exact mechanisms have not been classified. A lot of literatures indicated the cytosolic free Ca2+ concentrations of skeletal muscle cells increased significantly during exercise-induced fatigue. This study is aimed to establish a rat skeletal muscle cell model of exercise-induced fatigue. We applied cytoplasmic Ca2+ fluorescence imaging techniques to study the molecular mechanisms of exercise-induced fatigue eliminated by Chinese medicine ginseng extract. In our research, the muscle tissues from the newborn 3 days rats were taken out and digested into cells. The cells were randomly divided into the ginseng extract group and the control group. The cells from the two groups were cultured in the medium respectively added 2mg/ml ginseng extract and 2mg/ml D-hanks solution. After differentiating into myotubes, the two groups of cells treated with a fluorescent probe Fluo-3 AM were put on the confocal microscope and the fluorescence intensity of cells pre- and post- stimulation with dexamethasone were detected. It was found that cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentrations of the two groups of cells both increased post-stimulation, however, the increasing amplitude of fluorescence intensity of the ginseng extract group was significantly lower than that of the control group. In conclusion, stimulating the cells with dexamethasone is a kind of workable cell models of exercise-induced fatigue, and the molecular mechanisms of exercise-induced fatigue eliminated by ginseng extract may be connected to regulatating cytosolic free Ca2+ concentrations.

  19. Novel Approach to the Development of Functional Goat’s Milk-Based Beverages Using Medicinal Plant Extracts in Combination with High Intensity Ultrasound Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Draženka Komes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Regardless of its highly valuable nutritive composition, goat’s milk is less preferred by consumers due to its specific sensory characteristics that are very often regarded as undesirable. On the other hand, traditional medicinal plants from Lamiaceae family, due to their rich bioactive composition, especially polyphenols, and desirable aroma profile, can be used to enhance and improve bioactive and sensory properties of food. In the present study nutritively valuable beverages were produced by enrichment of goat’s milk with medicinal plant extracts derived from the Lamiaceae family and stabilized by homogenization with high intensity ultrasound treatment. The impact of plant species (lemon balm, mint, lavender, rosemary and sage and ultrasound treatment duration (5 or 10 min on the physicochemical, bioactive and sensory characteristics of enriched beverages was evaluated. The addition of plant extracts to goat’s milk significantly increased the concentration of bioactive components (rosmarinic acid, hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives and luteolin derivatives, in dependence of the added plant extract. The prolongation of the ultrasound homogenization markedly decreased the fat globule size and thus beneficially affected the product stability. Apart from the achieved bioactive enrichment and stability, the developed beverages exhibited significantly improved sensory properties in comparison to plain goat’s milk, with the highest overall acceptability determined for samples enriched with mint and rosemary.

  20. A Metabolomics-Based Strategy for the Mechanism Exploration of Traditional Chinese Medicine: Descurainia sophia Seeds Extract and Fractions as a Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Zhou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A UPLC-QTOF-MS based metabolomics research was conducted to explore potential biomarkers which would increase our understanding of the model and to assess the integral efficacy of Descurainia sophia seeds extract (DS-A. Additionally, DS-A was split into five fractions in descending order of polarity, which were utilized to illustrate the mechanism together. The 26 identified biomarkers were mainly related to disturbances in phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan, purine, arginine, and proline metabolism. Furthermore, heat map, hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA, and correlation network diagram of biomarkers perturbed by modeling were all conducted. The results of heat map and HCA suggested that fat oil fraction could reverse the abnormal metabolism in the model to some extent; meanwhile the metabolic inhibitory effect produced by the other four fractions helped to relieve cardiac load and compensate the insufficient energy supplement induced by the existing heart and lung injury in model rats. Briefly, the split fractions interfered with the model from different aspects and ultimately constituted the overall effects of extract. In conclusion, the metabolomics method, combined with split fractions of extract, is a powerful approach for illustrating pathologic changes of Chinese medicine syndrome and action mechanisms of traditional Chinese medicine.

  1. In vivo pharmacokinetic comparisons of ferulic acid and puerarin after oral administration of monomer, medicinal substance aqueous extract and Nao-De-Sheng to rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Zhen; Zhao, Ming; Tang, Jianming; Pan, Lulin

    2012-01-01

    Background: Nao-De-Sheng decoction (NDS), a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) prescription containing Radix puerariae lobatae, Floscarthami, Radix et Rhizoma Notoginseng, Rhizoma chuanxiong and Fructus crataegi, is effective in the treatment of cerebral arteriosclerosis, ischemic cerebral stroke and apoplexy linger effect. Ferulic acid and puerarin are the main absorbed effective ingredients of NDS. Objective: To assess the affection of other components in medical material and compound recipe compatibility on the pharmacokinetics of ferulaic acid and puerarin, of ferulic acid from the monomer Rhizoma chuanxiong aqueous extract and NDS were studied. And pharmacokinetics comparisons of puerarin from the monomer Radix puerariae extract and NDS decoction were investigated simultaneously. Materials and Methods: At respective different time points after oral administration of the monomer, medicinal substance aqueous extract and NDS at the same dose in rats, plasma concentrations of ferulic acid and puerarin in rats were determined by RP-HPLC, and the main pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated with 3P97 software. Results: The plasma concentration-time curves of ferulaic acid and puerarin were both best fitted with a two-compartment model. AUC0−t, AUC0→∞, Tmax, and Cmax of ferulic acid in the monomer and NDS decoction were increased significantly (P acid and puerarin. Some ingredients in NDS may increase dissolution and absorption of ferulaic acid and puerarin, delay elimination, and subsequently enhance bioavailability of ferulaic acid and puerarin in rats after compatibility. PMID:24082627

  2. Evaluation of the antiplasmodial and cytotoxicity potentials of husk fiber extracts from Cocos nucifera, a medicinal plant used in Nigeria to treat human malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebayo, J O; Santana, A E G; Krettli, A U

    2012-03-01

    Nigeria is an African country where transmission of malaria occurs all year round and where most inhabitants use plants as remedies against parasitic diseases, including malaria. Some of such medicinal plants have their antimalarial efficacies already demonstrated experimentally, active compounds isolated and the mechanism of drug action suggested. Decoction of Cocos nucifera husk is used in the middle belt region of Nigeria as an antimalarial remedy. In our current studies, we tested extracts from husks of four varieties of C. nucifera, all collected in Brazil, where the plant fruit is popularly named 'coco'. The husks of coco mestiço, amarelo, anão and gigante collected in the Northeast of Brazil were used to prepare extracts at the Chemistry Department, Federal University of Alagoas (UFAL), which were then tested for their antiplasmodial activities, cytotoxicities and hemolytic activities in vitro. Only the hexane extract of coco mestiço was active against the blood forms of Plasmodium falciparum human malaria parasite maintained in continuous culture. Most extracts presented selectivity indices of coco mestiço had a selectivity index of 35, meaning that the extract is not toxic. The isolation of the active compounds from coco mestiço husks has not yet been done.

  3. Extracts from the Mongolian traditional medicinal plants Dianthus versicolorFisch. and Lilium pumilum Delile stimulate bile flow in an isolated perfused rat liver model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obmann, Astrid; Tsendayush, Damba; Thalhammer, Theresia; Zehl, Martin; Vo, Thanh Phuong Nha; Purevsuren, Sodnomtseren; Natsagdorj, Damdinsuren; Narantuya, Samdan; Kletter, Christa; Glasl, Sabine

    2010-10-05

    Dianthus versicolor (Caryophyllaceae) and Lilium pumilum (Liliaceae) are two medicinal plants used in traditional Mongolian medicine to treat hepatic and gastrointestinal disorders. In this study aqueous (AE) and methanolic (ME) extracts of Dianthus versicolor and Lilium pumilum were investigated for their influence on the bile flow. The aqueous extracts of both plants were tested in absence and presence of 10 μM taurocholic acid at three different concentrations (100, 250, and 500 mg/L). The aqueous extract of Dianthus versicolor was further purified in order to locate the active principles. Two resulting fractions, one enriched in flavonoids and the other in sugars, were investigated for their influence on the bile flow in absence of taurocholic acid at 10, 20, and 40 mg/L. The aqueous extracts of both plants were analysed qualitatively by LC-MS(n) and quantitatively by UV-spectrophotometry. The bile flow experiments were performed in the isolated perfused rat liver. The compounds were identified by LC-DAD-MS(n) and TLC using references. The UV-spectrophotometric analysis was based on the monograph "Passiflorae herba" of the European Pharmacopoeia, and the total flavonoid contents were calculated and expressed as vitexin. AE and ME of both plants increased the bile flow dose-dependently (between 9% and 30%), and no hepatotoxic effect was seen even during longer perfusions. Stimulation of bile secretion was comparable in the presence and in the absence of taurocholic acid. The flavonoid fraction of Dianthus versicolor increased the bile flow by 18% (pLilium pumilum (total flavonoid content 1.04%) the flavonoids rutoside, kaempferol-3-O-rutinoside, and isorhamnetin-3-O-rutinoside were detected. The results show that choleresis under extract application is due to a stimulation of the bile-salt-independent bile flow which might be caused by the osmotic power of the extracts (hydrocholeresis). The flavonoids seem to contribute to the bile-flow-stimulating effect of

  4. Final state interactions in [Formula: see text] decays: [Formula: see text] rule vs. [Formula: see text].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buras, Andrzej J; Gérard, Jean-Marc

    2017-01-01

    Dispersive effects from strong [Formula: see text] rescattering in the final state interaction (FSI) of weak [Formula: see text] decays are revisited with the goal to have a global view on their relative importance for the [Formula: see text] rule and the ratio [Formula: see text] in the standard model (SM). We point out that this goal cannot be reached within a pure effective (meson) field approach like chiral perturbation theory in which the dominant current-current operators governing the [Formula: see text] rule and the dominant density-density (four-quark) operators governing [Formula: see text] cannot be disentangled from each other. But in the context of a dual QCD approach, which includes both long-distance dynamics and the UV completion, that is, QCD at short-distance scales, such a distinction is possible. We find then that beyond the strict large N limit, N being the number of colours, FSIs are likely to be important for the [Formula: see text] rule but much less relevant for [Formula: see text]. The latter finding diminishes significantly hopes that improved calculations of [Formula: see text] would bring its SM prediction to agree with the experimental data, opening thereby an arena for important new physics contributions to this ratio.

  5. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of different organic crude extracts from the local medicinal plant of Thymus vulgaris L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashmi, Laila Salim Al; Hossain, Mohammad Amzad; Weli, Afaf Mohammed; Al-Riyami, Qasim; Al-Sabahi, Jamal Nasser

    2013-01-01

    To isolate and analyze the chemical composition in different crude extracts of from the leaves of locally grown of Thymus vulgaris L (T. vulgaris) by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The shade dried leaves powder was extracted with methanol by using Soxhlet extractor. Methanol crude extracts of T. vulgaris and the derived fractions of hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate and butanol were obtained. Qualitative analyses of various organic crude extracts of T. vulgaris by using GC-MS showed that there were different types of high and low molecular weight compounds. Most of the isolated and identified compounds by GC-MS in the crude extracts are basically biologically important. Further, the T. vulgaris leaf possessed certain characteristics that can be ascribed to cultivation on a domestic plantation. The crude extracts were prepared from the powder leaves of T. vulgaris for respective compounds can be chosen on the basis of above GC-MS analysis. All the major compounds were identified and characterized by spectroscopic method in different organic crude extracts of T. vulgaris are biologically active molecules. Thus the identification of a good number of compounds in various crude extracts of T. vulgaris might have some ecological role.

  6. [Butanol extraction combined with dilute hydrochloric acid dissolution-atomic fluorescence spectrometric method for indirect determination of molybdenum in Chinese herbal medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jian-Ping; Geng, Guo-Xing; Tang, Yan-Kui; Lu, Zhi-Yong

    2012-12-01

    A method for indirectly determining the molybdenum in Chinese herbal medicine by butanol extraction and dilute hydrochloric acid dissolution was established for atomic fluorescence spectrometry. The molybdoarsenate heteropoly acid, formed in the presence of As(V) and ammonium molybdate in 0.3 mol x L(-1) sulphuric acid medium, was separated and enriched in the organic solvent, then the evaporation of organic reagent was implemented and the left residue was dissolved in dilute hydrochloric acid in which the arsenic content was determined on behalf of molybdenum. In the optimum experimental conditions, molybdenum content in 0-15 microg x L(-1) range depicts a good linear relationship, the detection limit and relative standard deviation of 0.44 microg x L(-1) and 1.1% were obtained, respectively. Spiked Chinese herbal medicine samples were determined with the proposed method, and recoveries of 95.6%-101.3% were achieved.

  7. Statistics Using Just One Formula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Jeffrey S.

    2018-01-01

    This article advocates that introductory statistics be taught by basing all calculations on a single simple margin-of-error formula and deriving all of the standard introductory statistical concepts (confidence intervals, significance tests, comparisons of means and proportions, etc) from that one formula. It is argued that this approach will…

  8. Discontinuity formulas for multiparticle amplitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stapp, H.P.

    1976-03-01

    It is shown how discontinuity formulas for multiparticle scattering amplitudes are derived from unitarity and analyticity. The assumed analyticity property is the normal analytic structure, which was shown to be equivalent to the space-time macrocausality condition. The discontinuity formulas to be derived are the basis of multi-particle fixed-t dispersion relations

  9. Measurement of the [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] production cross sections in multilepton final states using 3.2 fb[Formula: see text] of [Formula: see text] collisions at [Formula: see text] = 13 TeV with the ATLAS detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaboud, M; Aad, G; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdinov, O; Abeloos, B; Aben, R; AbouZeid, O S; Abraham, N L; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Abreu, R; Abulaiti, Y; Acharya, B S; Adamczyk, L; Adams, D L; Adelman, J; Adomeit, S; Adye, T; Affolder, A A; Agatonovic-Jovin, T; Agricola, J; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Ahlen, S P; Ahmadov, F; Aielli, G; Akerstedt, H; Åkesson, T P A; Akimov, A V; Alberghi, G L; Albert, J; Albrand, S; Alconada Verzini, M J; Aleksa, M; Aleksandrov, I N; Alexa, C; Alexander, G; Alexopoulos, T; Alhroob, M; Ali, B; Aliev, M; Alimonti, G; Alison, J; Alkire, S P; Allbrooke, B M M; Allen, B W; Allport, P P; Aloisio, A; Alonso, A; Alonso, F; Alpigiani, C; Alstaty, M; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Álvarez Piqueras, D; Alviggi, M G; Amadio, B T; Amako, K; Amaral Coutinho, Y; Amelung, C; Amidei, D; Amor Dos Santos, S P; Amorim, A; Amoroso, S; Amundsen, G; Anastopoulos, C; Ancu, L S; Andari, N; Andeen, T; Anders, C F; Anders, G; Anders, J K; Anderson, K J; Andreazza, A; Andrei, V; Angelidakis, S; Angelozzi, I; Anger, P; Angerami, A; Anghinolfi, F; Anisenkov, A V; Anjos, N; Annovi, A; Antel, C; Antonelli, M; Antonov, A; Anulli, F; Aoki, M; Aperio Bella, L; Arabidze, G; Arai, Y; Araque, J P; Arce, A T H; Arduh, F A; Arguin, J-F; Argyropoulos, S; Arik, M; Armbruster, A J; Armitage, L J; Arnaez, O; Arnold, H; Arratia, M; Arslan, O; Artamonov, A; Artoni, G; Artz, S; Asai, S; Asbah, N; Ashkenazi, A; Åsman, B; Asquith, L; Assamagan, K; Astalos, R; Atkinson, M; Atlay, N B; Augsten, K; Avolio, G; Axen, B; Ayoub, M K; Azuelos, G; Baak, M A; Baas, A E; Baca, M J; Bachacou, H; Bachas, K; Backes, M; Backhaus, M; Bagiacchi, P; Bagnaia, P; Bai, Y; Baines, J T; Baker, O K; Baldin, E M; Balek, P; Balestri, T; Balli, F; Balunas, W K; Banas, E; Banerjee, Sw; Bannoura, A A E; Barak, L; Barberio, E L; Barberis, D; Barbero, M; Barillari, T; Barklow, T; Barlow, N; Barnes, S L; Barnett, B M; Barnett, R M; Barnovska-Blenessy, Z; Baroncelli, A; Barone, G; Barr, A J; Barranco Navarro, L; Barreiro, F; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J; Bartoldus, R; Barton, A E; Bartos, P; Basalaev, A; Bassalat, A; Bates, R L; Batista, S J; Batley, J R; Battaglia, M; Bauce, M; Bauer, F; Bawa, H S; Beacham, J B; Beattie, M D; Beau, T; Beauchemin, P H; Bechtle, P; Beck, H P; Becker, K; Becker, M; Beckingham, M; Becot, C; Beddall, A J; Beddall, A; Bednyakov, V A; Bedognetti, M; Bee, C P; Beemster, L J; Beermann, T A; Begel, M; Behr, J K; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bell, A S; Bella, G; Bellagamba, L; Bellerive, A; Bellomo, M; Belotskiy, K; Beltramello, O; Belyaev, N L; Benary, O; Benchekroun, D; Bender, M; Bendtz, K; Benekos, N; Benhammou, Y; Benhar Noccioli, E; Benitez, J; Benjamin, D P; Bensinger, J R; Bentvelsen, S; Beresford, L; Beretta, M; Berge, D; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E; Berger, N; Beringer, J; Berlendis, S; Bernard, N R; Bernius, C; Bernlochner, F U; Berry, T; Berta, P; Bertella, C; Bertoli, G; Bertolucci, F; Bertram, I A; Bertsche, C; Bertsche, D; Besjes, G J; Bessidskaia Bylund, O; Bessner, M; Besson, N; Betancourt, C; Bethke, S; Bevan, A J; Bhimji, W; Bianchi, R M; Bianchini, L; Bianco, M; Biebel, O; Biedermann, D; Bielski, R; Biesuz, N V; Biglietti, M; De Mendizabal, J Bilbao; Bilokon, H; Bindi, M; Binet, S; Bingul, A; Bini, C; Biondi, S; Bjergaard, D M; Black, C W; Black, J E; Black, K M; Blackburn, D; Blair, R E; Blanchard, J-B; Blanco, J E; Blazek, T; Bloch, I; Blocker, C; Blum, W; Blumenschein, U; Blunier, S; Bobbink, G J; Bobrovnikov, V S; Bocchetta, S S; Bocci, A; Bock, C; Boehler, M; Boerner, D; Bogaerts, J A; Bogavac, D; Bogdanchikov, A G; Bohm, C; Boisvert, V; Bokan, P; Bold, T; Boldyrev, A S; Bomben, M; Bona, M; Boonekamp, M; Borisov, A; Borissov, G; Bortfeldt, J; Bortoletto, D; Bortolotto, V; Bos, K; Boscherini, D; Bosman, M; Bossio Sola, J D; Boudreau, J; Bouffard, J; Bouhova-Thacker, E V; Boumediene, D; Bourdarios, C; Boutle, S K; Boveia, A; Boyd, J; Boyko, I R; Bracinik, J; Brandt, A; Brandt, G; Brandt, O; Bratzler, U; Brau, B; Brau, J E; Braun, H M; Breaden Madden, W D; Brendlinger, K; Brennan, A J; Brenner, L; Brenner, R; Bressler, S; Bristow, T M; Britton, D; Britzger, D; Brochu, F M; Brock, I; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Brooks, T; Brooks, W K; Brosamer, J; Brost, E; Broughton, J H; de Renstrom, P A Bruckman; Bruncko, D; Bruneliere, R; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bruni, L S; Brunt, B H; Bruschi, M; Bruscino, N; Bryant, P; Bryngemark, L; Buanes, T; Buat, Q; Buchholz, P; Buckley, A G; Budagov, I A; Buehrer, F; Bugge, M K; Bulekov, O; Bullock, D; Burckhart, H; Burdin, S; Burgard, C D; Burghgrave, B; Burka, K; Burke, S; Burmeister, I; Burr, J T P; Busato, E; Büscher, D; Büscher, V; Bussey, P; Butler, J M; Buttar, C M; Butterworth, J M; Butti, P; Buttinger, W; Buzatu, A; Buzykaev, A R; Cabrera Urbán, S; Caforio, D; Cairo, V M; Cakir, O; Calace, N; Calafiura, P; Calandri, A; Calderini, G; Calfayan, P; Caloba, L P; Lopez, S Calvente; Calvet, D; Calvet, S; Calvet, T P; Toro, R Camacho; Camarda, S; Camarri, P; Cameron, D; Caminal Armadans, R; Camincher, C; Campana, S; Campanelli, M; Camplani, A; Campoverde, A; Canale, V; Canepa, A; Cano Bret, M; Cantero, J; Cantrill, R; Cao, T; Capeans Garrido, M D M; Caprini, I; Caprini, M; Capua, M; Caputo, R; Carbone, R M; Cardarelli, R; Cardillo, F; Carli, I; Carli, T; Carlino, G; Carminati, L; Caron, S; Carquin, E; Carrillo-Montoya, G D; Carter, J R; Carvalho, J; Casadei, D; Casado, M P; Casolino, M; Casper, D W; Castaneda-Miranda, E; Castelijn, R; Castelli, A; Gimenez, V Castillo; Castro, N F; Catinaccio, A; Catmore, J R; Cattai, A; Caudron, J; Cavaliere, V; Cavallaro, E; Cavalli, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cavasinni, V; Ceradini, F; Cerda Alberich, L; Cerio, B C; Cerqueira, A S; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Cerutti, F; Cerv, M; Cervelli, A; Cetin, S A; Chafaq, A; Chakraborty, D; Chan, S K; Chan, Y L; Chang, P; Chapman, J D; Charlton, D G; Chatterjee, A; Chau, C C; Chavez Barajas, C A; Che, S; Cheatham, S; Chegwidden, A; Chekanov, S; Chekulaev, S V; Chelkov, G A; Chelstowska, M A; Chen, C; Chen, H; Chen, K; Chen, S; Chen, S; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Cheng, H C; Cheng, H J; Cheng, Y; Cheplakov, A; Cheremushkina, E; Moursli, R Cherkaoui El; Chernyatin, V; Cheu, E; Chevalier, L; Chiarella, V; Chiarelli, G; Chiodini, G; Chisholm, A S; Chitan, A; Chizhov, M V; Choi, K; Chomont, A R; Chouridou, S; Chow, B K B; Christodoulou, V; Chromek-Burckhart, D; Chudoba, J; Chuinard, A J; Chwastowski, J J; Chytka, L; Ciapetti, G; Ciftci, A K; Cinca, D; Cindro, V; Cioara, I A; Ciocca, C; Ciocio, A; Cirotto, F; Citron, Z H; Citterio, M; Ciubancan, M; Clark, A; Clark, B L; Clark, M R; Clark, P J; Clarke, R N; Clement, C; Coadou, Y; Cobal, M; Coccaro, A; Cochran, J; Coffey, L; Colasurdo, L; Cole, B; Colijn, A P; Collot, J; Colombo, T; Compostella, G; Conde Muiño, P; Coniavitis, E; Connell, S H; Connelly, I A; Consorti, V; Constantinescu, S; Conti, G; Conventi, F; Cooke, M; Cooper, B D; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Cormier, K J R; Cornelissen, T; Corradi, M; Corriveau, F; Corso-Radu, A; Cortes-Gonzalez, A; Cortiana, G; Costa, G; Costa, M J; Costanzo, D; Cottin, G; Cowan, G; Cox, B E; Cranmer, K; Crawley, S J; Cree, G; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Crescioli, F; Cribbs, W A; Crispin Ortuzar, M; Cristinziani, M; Croft, V; Crosetti, G; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T; Cummings, J; Curatolo, M; Cúth, J; Cuthbert, C; Czirr, H; Czodrowski, P; D'amen, G; D'Auria, S; D'Onofrio, M; De Sousa, M J Da Cunha Sargedas; Da Via, C; Dabrowski, W; Dado, T; Dai, T; Dale, O; Dallaire, F; Dallapiccola, C; Dam, M; Dandoy, J R; Dang, N P; Daniells, A C; Dann, N S; Danninger, M; Dano Hoffmann, M; Dao, V; Darbo, G; Darmora, S; Dassoulas, J; Dattagupta, A; Davey, W; David, C; Davidek, T; Davies, M; Davison, P; Dawe, E; Dawson, I; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R K; De, K; de Asmundis, R; De Benedetti, A; De Castro, S; De Cecco, S; De Groot, N; de Jong, P; De la Torre, H; De Lorenzi, F; De Maria, A; De Pedis, D; De Salvo, A; De Sanctis, U; De Santo, A; De Regie, J B De Vivie; Dearnaley, W J; Debbe, R; Debenedetti, C; Dedovich, D V; Dehghanian, N; Deigaard, I; Del Gaudio, M; Del Peso, J; Del Prete, T; Delgove, D; Deliot, F; Delitzsch, C M; Deliyergiyev, M; Dell'Acqua, A; Dell'Asta, L; Dell'Orso, M; Della Pietra, M; Della Volpe, D; Delmastro, M; Delsart, P A; DeMarco, D A; Demers, S; Demichev, M; Demilly, A; Denisov, S P; Denysiuk, D; Derendarz, D; Derkaoui, J E; Derue, F; Dervan, P; Desch, K; Deterre, C; Dette, K; Deviveiros, P O; Dewhurst, A; Dhaliwal, S; Di Ciaccio, A; Di Ciaccio, L; Di Clemente, W K; Di Donato, C; Di Girolamo, A; Di Girolamo, B; Di Micco, B; Di Nardo, R; Di Simone, A; Di Sipio, R; Di Valentino, D; Diaconu, C; Diamond, M; Dias, F A; Diaz, M A; Diehl, E B; Dietrich, J; Diglio, S; Dimitrievska, A; Dingfelder, J; Dita, P; Dita, S; Dittus, F; Djama, F; Djobava, T; Djuvsland, J I; do Vale, M A B; Dobos, D; Dobre, M; Doglioni, C; Dohmae, T; Dolejsi, J; Dolezal, Z; Dolgoshein, B A; Donadelli, M; Donati, S; Dondero, P; Donini, J; Dopke, J; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Doyle, A T; Drechsler, E; Dris, M; Du, Y; Duarte-Campderros, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Ducu, O A; Duda, D; Dudarev, A; Duffield, E M; Duflot, L; Duguid, L; Dührssen, M; Dumancic, M; Dunford, M; Duran Yildiz, H; Düren, M; Durglishvili, A; Duschinger, D; Dutta, B; Dyndal, M; Eckardt, C; Ecker, K M; Edgar, R C; Edwards, N C; Eifert, T; Eigen, G; Einsweiler, K; Ekelof, T; El Kacimi, M; Ellajosyula, V; Ellert, M; Elles, S; Ellinghaus, F; Elliot, A A; Ellis, N; Elmsheuser, J; Elsing, M; Emeliyanov, D; Enari, Y; Endner, O C; Endo, M; Ennis, J S; Erdmann, J; Ereditato, A; Ernis, G; Ernst, J; Ernst, M; Errede, S; Ertel, E; Escalier, M; Esch, H; Escobar, C; Esposito, B; Etienvre, A I; Etzion, E; Evans, H; Ezhilov, A; Fabbri, F; Fabbri, L; Facini, G; Fakhrutdinov, R M; Falciano, S; Falla, R J; Faltova, J; Fang, Y; Fanti, M; Farbin, A; Farilla, A; Farina, C; Farina, E M; Farooque, T; Farrell, S; Farrington, S M; Farthouat, P; Fassi, F; Fassnacht, P; Fassouliotis, D; Faucci Giannelli, M; Favareto, A; Fawcett, W J; Fayard, L; Fedin, O L; Fedorko, W; Feigl, S; Feligioni, L; Feng, C; Feng, E J; Feng, H; Fenyuk, A B; Feremenga, L; Fernandez Martinez, P; Fernandez Perez, S; Ferrando, J; Ferrari, A; Ferrari, P; Ferrari, R; de Lima, D E Ferreira; Ferrer, A; Ferrere, D; Ferretti, C; Ferretto Parodi, A; Fiedler, F; Filipčič, A; Filipuzzi, M; Filthaut, F; Fincke-Keeler, M; Finelli, K D; Fiolhais, M C N; Fiorini, L; Firan, A; Fischer, A; Fischer, C; Fischer, J; Fisher, W C; Flaschel, N; Fleck, I; Fleischmann, P; Fletcher, G T; Fletcher, R R M; Flick, T; Floderus, A; Flores Castillo, L R; Flowerdew, M J; Forcolin, G T; Formica, A; Forti, A; Foster, A G; Fournier, D; Fox, H; Fracchia, S; Francavilla, P; Franchini, M; Francis, D; Franconi, L; Franklin, M; Frate, M; Fraternali, M; Freeborn, D; Fressard-Batraneanu, S M; Friedrich, F; Froidevaux, D; Frost, J A; Fukunaga, C; Fullana Torregrosa, E; Fusayasu, T; Fuster, J; Gabaldon, C; Gabizon, O; Gabrielli, A; Gabrielli, A; Gach, G P; Gadatsch, S; Gadomski, S; Gagliardi, G; Gagnon, L G; Gagnon, P; Galea, C; Galhardo, B; Gallas, E J; Gallop, B J; Gallus, P; Galster, G; Gan, K K; Gao, J; Gao, Y; Gao, Y S; Garay Walls, F M; García, C; García Navarro, J E; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Gardner, R W; Garelli, N; Garonne, V; Gascon Bravo, A; Gatti, C; Gaudiello, A; Gaudio, G; Gaur, B; Gauthier, L; Gavrilenko, I L; Gay, C; Gaycken, G; Gazis, E N; Gecse, Z; Gee, C N P; Geich-Gimbel, Ch; Geisen, M; Geisler, M P; Gemme, C; Genest, M H; Geng, C; Gentile, S; George, S; Gerbaudo, D; Gershon, A; Ghasemi, S; Ghazlane, H; Ghneimat, M; Giacobbe, B; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibbard, B; Gibson, S M; Gignac, M; Gilchriese, M; Gillam, T P S; Gillberg, D; Gilles, G; Gingrich, D M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M P; Giorgi, F M; Giorgi, F M; Giraud, P F; Giromini, P; Giugni, D; Giuli, F; Giuliani, C; Giulini, M; Gjelsten, B K; Gkaitatzis, S; Gkialas, I; Gkougkousis, E L; Gladilin, L K; Glasman, C; Glatzer, J; Glaysher, P C F; Glazov, A; Goblirsch-Kolb, M; Godlewski, J; Goldfarb, S; Golling, T; Golubkov, D; Gomes, A; Gonçalo, R; Costa, J Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da; Gonella, G; Gonella, L; Gongadze, A; de la Hoz, S González; Gonzalez Parra, G; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S; Goossens, L; Gorbounov, P A; Gordon, H A; Gorelov, I; Gorini, B; Gorini, E; Gorišek, A; Gornicki, E; Goshaw, A T; Gössling, C; Gostkin, M I; Goudet, C R; Goujdami, D; Goussiou, A G; Govender, N; Gozani, E; Graber, L; Grabowska-Bold, I; Gradin, P O J; Grafström, P; Gramling, J; Gramstad, E; Grancagnolo, S; Gratchev, V; Gravila, P M; Gray, H M; Graziani, E; Greenwood, Z D; Grefe, C; Gregersen, K; Gregor, I M; Grenier, P; Grevtsov, K; Griffiths, J; Grillo, A A; Grimm, K; Grinstein, S; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Groh, S; Grohs, J P; Gross, E; Grosse-Knetter, J; Grossi, G C; Grout, Z J; Guan, L; Guan, W; Guenther, J; Guescini, F; Guest, D; Gueta, O; Guido, E; Guillemin, T; Guindon, S; Gul, U; Gumpert, C; Guo, J; Guo, Y; Gupta, S; Gustavino, G; Gutierrez, P; Gutierrez Ortiz, N G; Gutschow, C; Guyot, C; Gwenlan, C; Gwilliam, C B; Haas, A; Haber, C; Hadavand, H K; Haddad, N; Hadef, A; Haefner, P; Hageböck, S; Hajduk, Z; Hakobyan, H; Haleem, M; Haley, J; Halladjian, G; Hallewell, G D; Hamacher, K; Hamal, P; Hamano, K; Hamilton, A; Hamity, G N; Hamnett, P G; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hanawa, K; Hance, M; Haney, B; Hanke, P; Hanna, R; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, M C; Hansen, P H; Hara, K; Hard, A S; Harenberg, T; Hariri, F; Harkusha, S; Harrington, R D; Harrison, P F; Hartjes, F; Hartmann, N M; Hasegawa, M; Hasegawa, Y; Hasib, A; Hassani, S; Haug, S; Hauser, R; Hauswald, L; Havranek, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R J; Hayden, D; Hays, C P; Hays, J M; Hayward, H S; Haywood, S J; Head, S J; Heck, T; Hedberg, V; Heelan, L; Heim, S; Heim, T; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J J; Heinrich, L; Heinz, C; Hejbal, J; Helary, L; Hellman, S; Helsens, C; Henderson, J; Henderson, R C W; Heng, Y; Henkelmann, S; Henriques Correia, A M; Henrot-Versille, S; Herbert, G H; Hernández Jiménez, Y; Herten, G; Hertenberger, R; Hervas, L; Hesketh, G G; Hessey, N P; Hetherly, J W; Hickling, R; Higón-Rodriguez, E; Hill, E; Hill, J C; Hiller, K H; Hillier, S J; Hinchliffe, I; Hines, E; Hinman, R R; Hirose, M; Hirschbuehl, D; Hobbs, J; Hod, N; Hodgkinson, M C; Hodgson, P; Hoecker, A; Hoeferkamp, M R; Hoenig, F; Hohn, D; Holmes, T R; Homann, M; Hong, T M; Hooberman, B H; Hopkins, W H; Horii, Y; Horton, A J; Hostachy, J-Y; Hou, S; Hoummada, A; Howarth, J; Hrabovsky, M; Hristova, I; Hrivnac, J; Hryn'ova, T; Hrynevich, A; Hsu, C; Hsu, P J; Hsu, S-C; Hu, D; Hu, Q; Huang, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hubaut, F; Huegging, F; Huffman, T B; Hughes, E W; Hughes, G; Huhtinen, M; Huo, P; Huseynov, N; Huston, J; Huth, J; Iacobucci, G; Iakovidis, G; Ibragimov, I; Iconomidou-Fayard, L; Ideal, E; Idrissi, Z; Iengo, P; Igonkina, O; Iizawa, T; Ikegami, Y; Ikeno, M; Ilchenko, Y; Iliadis, D; Ilic, N; Ince, T; Introzzi, G; Ioannou, P; Iodice, M; Iordanidou, K; Ippolito, V; Ishijima, N; Ishino, M; Ishitsuka, M; Ishmukhametov, R; Issever, C; Istin, S; Ito, F; Iturbe Ponce, J M; Iuppa, R; Iwanski, W; Iwasaki, H; Izen, J M; Izzo, V; Jabbar, S; Jackson, B; Jackson, M; Jackson, P; Jain, V; Jakobi, K B; Jakobs, K; Jakobsen, S; Jakoubek, T; Jamin, D O; Jana, D K; Jansen, E; Jansky, R; Janssen, J; Janus, M; Jarlskog, G; Javadov, N; Javůrek, T; Jeanneau, F; Jeanty, L; Jeng, G-Y; Jennens, D; Jenni, P; Jentzsch, J; Jeske, C; Jézéquel, S; Ji, H; Jia, J; Jiang, H; Jiang, Y; Jiggins, S; Jimenez Pena, J; Jin, S; Jinaru, A; Jinnouchi, O; Johansson, P; Johns, K A; Johnson, W J; Jon-And, K; Jones, G; Jones, R W L; Jones, S; Jones, T J; Jongmanns, J; Jorge, P M; Jovicevic, J; Ju, X; Juste Rozas, A; Köhler, M K; Kaczmarska, A; Kado, M; Kagan, H; Kagan, M; Kahn, S J; Kajomovitz, E; Kalderon, C W; Kaluza, A; Kama, S; Kamenshchikov, A; Kanaya, N; Kaneti, S; Kanjir, L; Kantserov, V A; Kanzaki, J; Kaplan, B; Kaplan, L S; Kapliy, A; Kar, D; Karakostas, K; Karamaoun, A; Karastathis, N; Kareem, M J; Karentzos, E; Karnevskiy, M; Karpov, S N; Karpova, Z M; Karthik, K; Kartvelishvili, V; Karyukhin, A N; Kasahara, K; Kashif, L; Kass, R D; Kastanas, A; Kataoka, Y; Kato, C; Katre, A; Katzy, J; Kawade, K; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kawamura, G; Kazama, S; Kazanin, V F; Keeler, R; Kehoe, R; Keller, J S; Kempster, J J; Keoshkerian, H; Kepka, O; Kerševan, B P; Kersten, S; Keyes, R A; Khader, M; Khalil-Zada, F; Khanov, A; Kharlamov, A G; Khoo, T J; Khovanskiy, V; Khramov, E; Khubua, J; Kido, S; Kim, H Y; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kind, O M; King, B T; King, M; King, S B; Kirk, J; Kiryunin, A E; Kishimoto, T; Kisielewska, D; Kiss, F; Kiuchi, K; Kivernyk, O; Kladiva, E; Klein, M H; Klein, M; Klein, U; Kleinknecht, K; Klimek, P; Klimentov, A; Klingenberg, R; Klinger, J A; Klioutchnikova, T; Kluge, E-E; Kluit, P; Kluth, S; Knapik, J; Kneringer, E; Knoops, E B F G; Knue, A; Kobayashi, A; Kobayashi, D; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Kocian, M; Kodys, P; Koffas, T; Koffeman, E; Koi, T; Kolanoski, H; Kolb, M; Koletsou, I; Komar, A A; Komori, Y; Kondo, T; Kondrashova, N; Köneke, K; König, A C; Kono, T; Konoplich, R; Konstantinidis, N; Kopeliansky, R; Koperny, S; Köpke, L; Kopp, A K; Korcyl, K; Kordas, K; Korn, A; Korol, A A; Korolkov, I; Korolkova, E V; Kortner, O; Kortner, S; Kosek, T; Kostyukhin, V V; Kotwal, A; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, A; Kourkoumelis, C; Kouskoura, V; Kowalewska, A B; Kowalewski, R; Kowalski, T Z; Kozakai, C; Kozanecki, W; Kozhin, A S; Kramarenko, V A; Kramberger, G; Krasnopevtsev, D; Krasny, M W; Krasznahorkay, A; Kraus, J K; Kravchenko, A; Kretz, M; Kretzschmar, J; Kreutzfeldt, K; Krieger, P; Krizka, K; Kroeninger, K; Kroha, H; Kroll, J; Kroseberg, J; Krstic, J; Kruchonak, U; Krüger, H; Krumnack, N; Kruse, A; Kruse, M C; Kruskal, M; Kubota, T; Kucuk, H; Kuday, S; Kuechler, J T; Kuehn, S; Kugel, A; Kuger, F; Kuhl, A; Kuhl, T; Kukhtin, V; Kukla, R; Kulchitsky, Y; Kuleshov, S; Kuna, M; Kunigo, T; Kupco, A; Kurashige, H; Kurochkin, Y A; Kus, V; Kuwertz, E S; Kuze, M; Kvita, J; Kwan, T; Kyriazopoulos, D; La Rosa, A; La Rosa Navarro, J L; La Rotonda, L; Lacasta, C; Lacava, F; Lacey, J; Lacker, H; Lacour, D; Lacuesta, V R; Ladygin, E; Lafaye, R; Laforge, B; Lagouri, T; Lai, S; Lammers, S; Lampl, W; Lançon, E; Landgraf, U; Landon, M P J; Lang, V S; Lange, J C; Lankford, A J; Lanni, F; Lantzsch, K; Lanza, A; Laplace, S; Lapoire, C; Laporte, J F; Lari, T; Lasagni Manghi, F; Lassnig, M; Laurelli, P; Lavrijsen, W; Law, A T; Laycock, P; Lazovich, T; Lazzaroni, M; Le, B; Le Dortz, O; Le Guirriec, E; Quilleuc, E P Le; LeBlanc, M; LeCompte, T; Ledroit-Guillon, F; Lee, C A; Lee, S C; Lee, L; Lefebvre, G; Lefebvre, M; Legger, F; Leggett, C; Lehan, A; Lehmann Miotto, G; Lei, X; Leight, W A; Leisos, A; Leister, A G; Leite, M A L; Leitner, R; Lellouch, D; Lemmer, B; Leney, K J C; Lenz, T; Lenzi, B; Leone, R; Leone, S; Leonidopoulos, C; Leontsinis, S; Lerner, G; Leroy, C; Lesage, A A J; Lester, C G; Levchenko, M; Levêque, J; Levin, D; Levinson, L J; Levy, M; Lewis, D; Leyko, A M; Leyton, M; Li, B; Li, H; Li, H L; Li, L; Li, L; Li, Q; Li, S; Li, X; Li, Y; Liang, Z; Liberti, B; Liblong, A; Lichard, P; Lie, K; Liebal, J; Liebig, W; Limosani, A; Lin, S C; Lin, T H; Lindquist, B E; Lionti, A E; Lipeles, E; Lipniacka, A; Lisovyi, M; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litke, A M; Liu, B; Liu, D; Liu, H; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, J B; Liu, K; Liu, L; Liu, M; Liu, M; Liu, Y L; Liu, Y; Livan, M; Lleres, A; Llorente Merino, J; Lloyd, S L; Lo Sterzo, F; Lobodzinska, E M; Loch, P; Lockman, W S; Loebinger, F K; Loevschall-Jensen, A E; Loew, K M; Loginov, A; Lohse, T; Lohwasser, K; Lokajicek, M; Long, B A; Long, J D; Long, R E; Longo, L; Looper, K A; Lopes, L; Lopez Mateos, D; Lopez Paredes, B; Lopez Paz, I; Lopez Solis, A; Lorenz, J; Lorenzo Martinez, N; Losada, M; Lösel, P J; Lou, X; Lounis, A; Love, J; Love, P A; Lu, H; Lu, N; Lubatti, H J; Luci, C; Lucotte, A; Luedtke, C; Luehring, F; Lukas, W; Luminari, L; Lundberg, O; Lund-Jensen, B; Luzi, P M; Lynn, D; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Lyubushkin, V; Ma, H; Ma, L L; Ma, Y; Maccarrone, G; Macchiolo, A; Macdonald, C M; Maček, B; Machado Miguens, J; Madaffari, D; Madar, R; Maddocks, H J; Mader, W F; Madsen, A; Maeda, J; Maeland, S; Maeno, T; Maevskiy, A; Magradze, E; Mahlstedt, J; Maiani, C; Maidantchik, C; Maier, A A; Maier, T; Maio, A; Majewski, S; Makida, Y; Makovec, N; Malaescu, B; Malecki, Pa; Maleev, V P; Malek, F; Mallik, U; Malon, D; Malone, C; Maltezos, S; Malyukov, S; Mamuzic, J; Mancini, G; Mandelli, B; Mandelli, L; Mandić, I; Maneira, J; Filho, L Manhaes de Andrade; Manjarres Ramos, J; Mann, A; Manousos, A; Mansoulie, B; Mansour, J D; Mantifel, R; Mantoani, M; Manzoni, S; Mapelli, L; Marceca, G; March, L; Marchiori, G; Marcisovsky, M; Marjanovic, M; Marley, D E; Marroquim, F; Marsden, S P; Marshall, Z; Marti-Garcia, S; Martin, B; Martin, T A; Martin, V J; Latour, B Martin Dit; Martinez, M; Martinez Outschoorn, V I; Martin-Haugh, S; Martoiu, V S; Martyniuk, A C; Marx, M; Marzin, A; Masetti, L; Mashimo, T; Mashinistov, R; Masik, J; Maslennikov, A L; Massa, I; Massa, L; Mastrandrea, P; Mastroberardino, A; Masubuchi, T; Mättig, P; Mattmann, J; Maurer, J; Maxfield, S J; Maximov, D A; Mazini, R; Mazza, S M; Mc Fadden, N C; Goldrick, G Mc; Mc Kee, S P; McCarn, A; McCarthy, R L; McCarthy, T G; McClymont, L I; McDonald, E F; McFarlane, K W; Mcfayden, J A; Mchedlidze, G; McMahon, S J; McPherson, R A; Medinnis, M; Meehan, S; Mehlhase, S; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Meineck, C; Meirose, B; Melini, D; Mellado Garcia, B R; Melo, M; Meloni, F; Mengarelli, A; Menke, S; Meoni, E; Mergelmeyer, S; Mermod, P; Merola, L; Meroni, C; Merritt, F S; Messina, A; Metcalfe, J; Mete, A S; Meyer, C; Meyer, C; Meyer, J-P; Meyer, J; Meyer Zu Theenhausen, H; Miano, F; Middleton, R P; Miglioranzi, S; Mijović, L; Mikenberg, G; Mikestikova, M; Mikuž, M; Milesi, M; Milic, A; Miller, D W; Mills, C; Milov, A; Milstead, D A; Minaenko, A A; Minami, Y; Minashvili, I A; Mincer, A I; Mindur, B; Mineev, M; Ming, Y; Mir, L M; Mistry, K P; Mitani, T; Mitrevski, J; Mitsou, V A; Miucci, A; Miyagawa, P S; Mjörnmark, J U; Moa, T; Mochizuki, K; Mohapatra, S; Molander, S; Moles-Valls, R; Monden, R; Mondragon, M C; Mönig, K; Monk, J; Monnier, E; Montalbano, A; Montejo Berlingen, J; Monticelli, F; Monzani, S; Moore, R W; Morange, N; Moreno, D; Moreno Llácer, M; Morettini, P; Morgenstern, S; Mori, D; Mori, T; Morii, M; Morinaga, M; Morisbak, V; Moritz, S; Morley, A K; Mornacchi, G; Morris, J D; Mortensen, S S; Morvaj, L; Mosidze, M; Moss, J; Motohashi, K; Mount, R; Mountricha, E; Mouraviev, S V; Moyse, E J W; Muanza, S; Mudd, R D; Mueller, F; Mueller, J; Mueller, R S P; Mueller, T; Muenstermann, D; Mullen, P; Mullier, G A; Munoz Sanchez, F J; Murillo Quijada, J A; Murray, W J; Musheghyan, H; Muškinja, M; Myagkov, A G; Myska, M; Nachman, B P; Nackenhorst, O; Nagai, K; Nagai, R; Nagano, K; Nagasaka, Y; Nagata, K; Nagel, M; Nagy, E; Nairz, A M; Nakahama, Y; Nakamura, K; Nakamura, T; Nakano, I; Namasivayam, H; Naranjo Garcia, R F; Narayan, R; Narrias Villar, D I; Naryshkin, I; Naumann, T; Navarro, G; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Nechaeva, P Yu; Neep, T J; Nef, P D; Negri, A; Negrini, M; Nektarijevic, S; Nellist, C; Nelson, A; Nemecek, S; Nemethy, P; Nepomuceno, A A; Nessi, M; Neubauer, M S; Neumann, M; Neves, R M; Nevski, P; Newman, P R; Nguyen, D H; Manh, T Nguyen; Nickerson, R B; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, J; Nikiforov, A; Nikolaenko, V; Nikolic-Audit, I; Nikolopoulos, K; Nilsen, J K; Nilsson, P; Ninomiya, Y; Nisati, A; Nisius, R; Nobe, T; Nodulman, L; Nomachi, M; Nomidis, I; Nooney, T; Norberg, S; Nordberg, M; Norjoharuddeen, N; Novgorodova, O; Nowak, S; Nozaki, M; Nozka, L; Ntekas, K; Nurse, E; Nuti, F; O'grady, F; O'Neil, D C; O'Rourke, A A; O'Shea, V; Oakham, F G; Oberlack, H; Obermann, T; Ocariz, J; Ochi, A; Ochoa, I; Ochoa-Ricoux, J P; Oda, S; Odaka, S; Ogren, H; Oh, A; Oh, S H; Ohm, C C; Ohman, H; Oide, H; Okawa, H; Okumura, Y; Okuyama, T; Olariu, A; Oleiro Seabra, L F; Olivares Pino, S A; Oliveira Damazio, D; Olszewski, A; Olszowska, J; Onofre, A; Onogi, K; Onyisi, P U E; Oreglia, M J; Oren, Y; Orestano, D; Orlando, N; Orr, R S; Osculati, B; Ospanov, R; Garzon, G Otero Y; Otono, H; Ouchrif, M; Ould-Saada, F; Ouraou, A; Oussoren, K P; Ouyang, Q; Owen, M; Owen, R E; Ozcan, V E; Ozturk, N; Pachal, K; Pacheco Pages, A; Pacheco Rodriguez, L; Padilla Aranda, C; Pagáčová, M; Pagan Griso, S; Paige, F; Pais, P; Pajchel, K; Palacino, G; Palazzo, S; Palestini, S; Palka, M; Pallin, D; Palma, A; St Panagiotopoulou, E; Pandini, C E; Panduro Vazquez, J G; Pani, P; Panitkin, S; Pantea, D; Paolozzi, L; Papadopoulou, Th D; Papageorgiou, K; Paramonov, A; Paredes Hernandez, D; Parker, A J; Parker, M A; Parker, K A; Parodi, F; Parsons, J A; Parzefall, U; Pascuzzi, V R; Pasqualucci, E; Passaggio, S; Pastore, Fr; Pásztor, G; Pataraia, S; Pater, J R; Pauly, T; Pearce, J; Pearson, B; Pedersen, L E; Pedersen, M; Lopez, S Pedraza; Pedro, R; Peleganchuk, S V; Pelikan, D; Penc, O; Peng, C; Peng, H; Penwell, J; Peralva, B S; Perego, M M; Perepelitsa, D V; Perez Codina, E; Perini, L; Pernegger, H; Perrella, S; Peschke, R; Peshekhonov, V D; Peters, K; Peters, R F Y; Petersen, B A; Petersen, T C; Petit, E; Petridis, A; Petridou, C; Petroff, P; Petrolo, E; Petrov, M; Petrucci, F; Pettersson, N E; Peyaud, A; Pezoa, R; Phillips, P W; Piacquadio, G; Pianori, E; Picazio, A; Piccaro, E; Piccinini, M; Pickering, M A; Piegaia, R; Pilcher, J E; Pilkington, A D; Pin, A W J; Pinamonti, M; Pinfold, J L; Pingel, A; Pires, S; Pirumov, H; Pitt, M; Plazak, L; Pleier, M-A; Pleskot, V; Plotnikova, E; Plucinski, P; Pluth, D; Poettgen, R; Poggioli, L; Pohl, D; Polesello, G; Poley, A; Policicchio, A; Polifka, R; Polini, A; Pollard, C S; Polychronakos, V; Pommès, K; Pontecorvo, L; Pope, B G; Popeneciu, G A; Popovic, D S; Poppleton, A; Pospisil, S; Potamianos, K; Potrap, I N; Potter, C J; Potter, C T; Poulard, G; Poveda, J; Pozdnyakov, V; Pozo Astigarraga, M E; Pralavorio, P; Pranko, A; Prell, S; Price, D; Price, L E; Primavera, M; Prince, S; Proissl, M; Prokofiev, K; Prokoshin, F; Protopopescu, S; Proudfoot, J; Przybycien, M; Puddu, D; Purohit, M; Puzo, P; Qian, J; Qin, G; Qin, Y; Quadt, A; Quayle, W B; Queitsch-Maitland, M; Quilty, D; Raddum, S; Radeka, V; Radescu, V; Radhakrishnan, S K; Radloff, P; Rados, P; Ragusa, F; Rahal, G; Raine, J A; Rajagopalan, S; Rammensee, M; Rangel-Smith, C; Ratti, M G; Rauscher, F; Rave, S; Ravenscroft, T; Ravinovich, I; Raymond, M; Read, A L; Readioff, N P; Reale, M; Rebuzzi, D M; Redelbach, A; Redlinger, G; Reece, R; Reeves, K; Rehnisch, L; Reichert, J; Reisin, H; Rembser, C; Ren, H; Rescigno, M; Resconi, S; Rezanova, O L; Reznicek, P; Rezvani, R; Richter, R; Richter, S; Richter-Was, E; Ricken, O; Ridel, M; Rieck, P; Riegel, C J; Rieger, J; Rifki, O; Rijssenbeek, M; Rimoldi, A; Rimoldi, M; Rinaldi, L; Ristić, B; Ritsch, E; Riu, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rizvi, E; Rizzi, C; Robertson, S H; Robichaud-Veronneau, A; Robinson, D; Robinson, J E M; Robson, A; Roda, C; Rodina, Y; Rodriguez Perez, A; Rodriguez Rodriguez, D; Roe, S; Rogan, C S; Røhne, O; Romaniouk, A; Romano, M; Romano Saez, S M; Romero Adam, E; Rompotis, N; Ronzani, M; Roos, L; Ros, E; Rosati, S; Rosbach, K; Rose, P; Rosenthal, O; Rosien, N-A; Rossetti, V; Rossi, E; Rossi, L P; Rosten, J H N; Rosten, R; Rotaru, M; Roth, I; Rothberg, J; Rousseau, D; Royon, C R; Rozanov, A; Rozen, Y; Ruan, X; Rubbo, F; Rudolph, M S; Rühr, F; Ruiz-Martinez, A; Rurikova, Z; Rusakovich, N A; Ruschke, A; Russell, H L; Rutherfoord, J P; Ruthmann, N; Ryabov, Y F; Rybar, M; Rybkin, G; Ryu, S; Ryzhov, A; Rzehorz, G F; Saavedra, A F; Sabato, G; Sacerdoti, S; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sadykov, R; Safai Tehrani, F; Saha, P; Sahinsoy, M; Saimpert, M; Saito, T; Sakamoto, H; Sakurai, Y; Salamanna, G; Salamon, A; Loyola, J E Salazar; Salek, D; De Bruin, P H Sales; Salihagic, D; Salnikov, A; Salt, J; Salvatore, D; Salvatore, F; Salvucci, A; Salzburger, A; Sammel, D; Sampsonidis, D; Sanchez, A; Sánchez, J; Sanchez Martinez, V; Sandaker, H; Sandbach, R L; Sander, H G; Sandhoff, M; Sandoval, C; Sandstroem, R; Sankey, D P C; Sannino, M; Sansoni, A; Santoni, C; Santonico, R; Santos, H; Santoyo Castillo, I; Sapp, K; Sapronov, A; Saraiva, J G; Sarrazin, B; Sasaki, O; Sasaki, Y; Sato, K; Sauvage, G; Sauvan, E; Savage, G; Savard, P; Sawyer, C; Sawyer, L; Saxon, J; Sbarra, C; Sbrizzi, A; Scanlon, T; Scannicchio, D A; Scarcella, M; Scarfone, V; Schaarschmidt, J; Schacht, P; Schachtner, B M; Schaefer, D; Schaefer, R; Schaeffer, J; Schaepe, S; Schaetzel, S; Schäfer, U; Schaffer, A C; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scharf, V; Schegelsky, V A; Scheirich, D; Schernau, M; Schiavi, C; Schier, S; Schillo, C; Schioppa, M; Schlenker, S; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, K R; Schmieden, K; Schmitt, C; Schmitt, S; Schmitz, S; Schneider, B; Schnoor, U; Schoeffel, L; Schoening, A; Schoenrock, B D; Schopf, E; Schott, M; Schovancova, J; Schramm, S; Schreyer, M; Schuh, N; Schulte, A; Schultens, M J; Schultz-Coulon, H-C; Schulz, H; Schumacher, M; Schumm, B A; Schune, Ph; Schwartzman, A; Schwarz, T A; Schwegler, Ph; Schweiger, H; Schwemling, Ph; Schwienhorst, R; Schwindling, J; Schwindt, T; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Scutti, F; Searcy, J; Seema, P; Seidel, S C; Seiden, A; Seifert, F; Seixas, J M; Sekhniaidze, G; Sekhon, K; Sekula, S J; Seliverstov, D M; Semprini-Cesari, N; Serfon, C; Serin, L; Serkin, L; Sessa, M; Seuster, R; Severini, H; Sfiligoj, T; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shabalina, E; Shaikh, N W; Shan, L Y; Shang, R; Shank, J T; Shapiro, M; Shatalov, P B; Shaw, K; Shaw, S M; Shcherbakova, A; Shehu, C Y; Sherwood, P; Shi, L; Shimizu, S; Shimmin, C O; Shimojima, M; Shiyakova, M; Shmeleva, A; Shoaleh Saadi, D; Shochet, M J; Shojaii, S; Shrestha, S; Shulga, E; Shupe, M A; Sicho, P; Sickles, A M; Sidebo, P E; Sidiropoulou, O; Sidorov, D; Sidoti, A; Siegert, F; Sijacki, Dj; Silva, J; Silverstein, S B; Simak, V; Simard, O; Simic, Lj; Simion, S; Simioni, E; Simmons, B; Simon, D; Simon, M; Sinervo, P; Sinev, N B; Sioli, M; Siragusa, G; Sivoklokov, S Yu; Sjölin, J; Skinner, M B; Skottowe, H P; Skubic, P; Slater, M; Slavicek, T; Slawinska, M; Sliwa, K; Slovak, R; Smakhtin, V; Smart, B H; Smestad, L; Smiesko, J; Smirnov, S Yu; Smirnov, Y; Smirnova, L N; Smirnova, O; Smith, M N K; Smith, R W; Smizanska, M; Smolek, K; Snesarev, A A; Snyder, S; Sobie, R; Socher, F; Soffer, A; Soh, D A; Sokhrannyi, G; Sanchez, C A Solans; Solar, M; Soldatov, E Yu; Soldevila, U; Solodkov, A A; Soloshenko, A; Solovyanov, O V; Solovyev, V; Sommer, P; Son, H; Song, H Y; Sood, A; Sopczak, A; Sopko, V; Sorin, V; Sosa, D; Sotiropoulou, C L; Soualah, R; Soukharev, A M; South, D; Sowden, B C; Spagnolo, S; Spalla, M; Spangenberg, M; Spanò, F; Sperlich, D; Spettel, F; Spighi, R; Spigo, G; Spiller, L A; Spousta, M; Denis, R D St; Stabile, A; Stamen, R; Stamm, S; Stanecka, E; Stanek, R W; Stanescu, C; Stanescu-Bellu, M; Stanitzki, M M; Stapnes, S; Starchenko, E A; Stark, G H; Stark, J; Staroba, P; Starovoitov, P; Stärz, S; Staszewski, R; Steinberg, P; Stelzer, B; Stelzer, H J; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stenzel, H; Stewart, G A; Stillings, J A; Stockton, M C; Stoebe, M; Stoicea, G; Stolte, P; Stonjek, S; Stradling, A R; Straessner, A; Stramaglia, M E; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strandlie, A; Strauss, M; Strizenec, P; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D M; Stroynowski, R; Strubig, A; Stucci, S A; Stugu, B; Styles, N A; Su, D; Su, J; Subramaniam, R; Suchek, S; Sugaya, Y; Suk, M; Sulin, V V; Sultansoy, S; Sumida, T; Sun, S; Sun, X; Sundermann, J E; Suruliz, K; Susinno, G; Sutton, M R; Suzuki, S; Svatos, M; Swiatlowski, M; Sykora, I; Sykora, T; Ta, D; Taccini, C; Tackmann, K; Taenzer, J; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Taiblum, N; Takai, H; Takashima, R; Takeshita, T; Takubo, Y; Talby, M; Talyshev, A A; Tan, K G; Tanaka, J; Tanaka, R; Tanaka, S; Tannenwald, B B; Araya, S Tapia; Tapprogge, S; Tarem, S; Tartarelli, G F; Tas, P; Tasevsky, M; Tashiro, T; Tassi, E; Tavares Delgado, A; Tayalati, Y; Taylor, A C; Taylor, G N; Taylor, P T E; Taylor, W; Teischinger, F A; Teixeira-Dias, P; Temming, K K; Temple, D; Ten Kate, H; Teng, P K; Teoh, J J; Tepel, F; Terada, S; Terashi, K; Terron, J; Terzo, S; Testa, M; Teuscher, R J; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T; Thomas, J P; Thomas-Wilsker, J; Thompson, E N; Thompson, P D; Thompson, A S; Thomsen, L A; Thomson, E; Thomson, M; Tibbetts, M J; Ticse Torres, R E; Tikhomirov, V O; Tikhonov, Yu A; Timoshenko, S; Tipton, P; Tisserant, S; Todome, K; Todorov, T; Todorova-Nova, S; Tojo, J; Tokár, S; Tokushuku, K; Tolley, E; Tomlinson, L; Tomoto, M; Tompkins, L; Toms, K; Tong, B; Torrence, E; Torres, H; Torró Pastor, E; Toth, J; Touchard, F; Tovey, D R; Trefzger, T; Tricoli, A; Trigger, I M; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tripiana, M F; Trischuk, W; Trocmé, B; Trofymov, A; Troncon, C; Trottier-McDonald, M; Trovatelli, M; Truong, L; Trzebinski, M; Trzupek, A; Tseng, J C-L; Tsiareshka, P V; Tsipolitis, G; Tsirintanis, N; Tsiskaridze, S; Tsiskaridze, V; Tskhadadze, E G; Tsui, K M; Tsukerman, I I; Tsulaia, V; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Tudorache, A; Tudorache, V; Tuna, A N; Tupputi, S A; Turchikhin, S; Turecek, D; Turgeman, D; Turra, R; Turvey, A J; Tuts, P M; Tyndel, M; Ucchielli, G; Ueda, I; Ughetto, M; Ukegawa, F; Unal, G; Undrus, A; Unel, G; Ungaro, F C; Unno, Y; Unverdorben, C; Urban, J; Urquijo, P; Urrejola, P; Usai, G; Usanova, A; Vacavant, L; Vacek, V; Vachon, B; Valderanis, C; Valdes Santurio, E; Valencic, N; Valentinetti, S; Valero, A; Valery, L; Valkar, S; Vallecorsa, S; Valls Ferrer, J A; Van Den Wollenberg, W; Van Der Deijl, P C; van der Geer, R; van der Graaf, H; van Eldik, N; van Gemmeren, P; Van Nieuwkoop, J; van Vulpen, I; van Woerden, M C; Vanadia, M; Vandelli, W; Vanguri, R; Vaniachine, A; Vankov, P; Vardanyan, G; Vari, R; Varnes, E W; Varol, T; Varouchas, D; Vartapetian, A; Varvell, K E; Vasquez, J G; Vazeille, F; Vazquez Schroeder, T; Veatch, J; Veloce, L M; Veloso, F; Veneziano, S; Ventura, A; Venturi, M; Venturi, N; Venturini, A; Vercesi, V; Verducci, M; Verkerke, W; Vermeulen, J C; Vest, A; Vetterli, M C; Viazlo, O; Vichou, I; Vickey, T; Vickey Boeriu, O E; Viehhauser, G H A; Viel, S; Vigani, L; Vigne, R; Villa, M; Villaplana Perez, M; Vilucchi, E; Vincter, M G; Vinogradov, V B; Vittori, C; Vivarelli, I; Vlachos, S; Vlasak, M; Vogel, M; Vokac, P; Volpi, G; Volpi, M; von der Schmitt, H; von Toerne, E; Vorobel, V; Vorobev, K; Vos, M; Voss, R; Vossebeld, J H; Vranjes, N; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M; Vrba, V; Vreeswijk, M; Vuillermet, R; Vukotic, I; Vykydal, Z; Wagner, P; Wagner, W; Wahlberg, H; Wahrmund, S; Wakabayashi, J; Walder, J; Walker, R; Walkowiak, W; Wallangen, V; Wang, C; Wang, C; Wang, F; Wang, H; Wang, H; Wang, J; Wang, J; Wang, K; Wang, R; Wang, S M; Wang, T; Wang, T; Wang, W; Wang, X; Wanotayaroj, C; Warburton, A; Ward, C P; Wardrope, D R; Washbrook, A; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, M F; Watts, G; Watts, S; Waugh, B M; Webb, S; Weber, M S; Weber, S W; Webster, J S; Weidberg, A R; Weinert, B; Weingarten, J; Weiser, C; Weits, H; Wells, P S; Wenaus, T; Wengler, T; Wenig, S; Wermes, N; Werner, M; Werner, M D; Werner, P; Wessels, M; Wetter, J; Whalen, K; Whallon, N L; Wharton, A M; White, A; White, M J; White, R; Whiteson, D; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Wienemann, P; Wiglesworth, C; Wiik-Fuchs, L A M; Wildauer, A; Wilk, F; Wilkens, H G; Williams, H H; Williams, S; Willis, C; Willocq, S; Wilson, J A; Wingerter-Seez, I; Winklmeier, F; Winston, O J; Winter, B T; Wittgen, M; Wittkowski, J; Wolter, M W; Wolters, H; Worm, S D; Wosiek, B K; Wotschack, J; Woudstra, M J; Wozniak, K W; Wu, M; Wu, M; Wu, S L; Wu, X; Wu, Y; Wyatt, T R; Wynne, B M; Xella, S; Xu, D; Xu, L; Yabsley, B; Yacoob, S; Yakabe, R; Yamaguchi, D; Yamaguchi, Y; Yamamoto, A; Yamamoto, S; Yamanaka, T; Yamauchi, K; Yamazaki, Y; Yan, Z; Yang, H; Yang, H; Yang, Y; Yang, Z; Yao, W-M; Yap, Y C; Yasu, Y; Yatsenko, E; Wong, K H Yau; Ye, J; Ye, S; Yeletskikh, I; Yen, A L; Yildirim, E; Yorita, K; Yoshida, R; Yoshihara, K; Young, C; Young, C J S; Youssef, S; Yu, D R; Yu, J; Yu, J M; Yu, J; Yuan, L; Yuen, S P Y; Yusuff, I; Zabinski, B; Zaidan, R; Zaitsev, A M; Zakharchuk, N; Zalieckas, J; Zaman, A; Zambito, S; Zanello, L; Zanzi, D; Zeitnitz, C; Zeman, M; Zemla, A; Zeng, J C; Zeng, Q; Zengel, K; Zenin, O; Ženiš, T; Zerwas, D; Zhang, D; Zhang, F; Zhang, G; Zhang, H; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhang, R; Zhang, R; Zhang, X; Zhang, Z; Zhao, X; Zhao, Y; Zhao, Z; Zhemchugov, A; Zhong, J; Zhou, B; Zhou, C; Zhou, L; Zhou, L; Zhou, M; Zhou, N; Zhu, C G; Zhu, H; Zhu, J; Zhu, Y; Zhuang, X; Zhukov, K; Zibell, A; Zieminska, D; Zimine, N I; Zimmermann, C; Zimmermann, S; Zinonos, Z; Zinser, M; Ziolkowski, M; Živković, L; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; Zur Nedden, M; Zwalinski, L

    2017-01-01

    A measurement of the [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] production cross sections in final states with either two same-charge muons, or three or four leptons (electrons or muons) is presented. The analysis uses a data sample of proton-proton collisions at [Formula: see text] TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider in 2015, corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb[Formula: see text]. The inclusive cross sections are extracted using likelihood fits to signal and control regions, resulting in [Formula: see text] pb and [Formula: see text] pb, in agreement with the Standard Model predictions.

  10. The male reproductive system and the effect of an extract of a medicinal plant (Hypericum perforatum) on the labeling process of blood constituents with technetium-99m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos-Filho, Sebastiao David; Fonseca, Adenilson de Souza da; Bernardo-Filho, Mario

    2007-01-01

    Hypericum perforatum (hiperico) is a plant that has been used to treat diseases and also inhibits rat and human vas deferens contractility. In nuclear medicine, stannous chloride (SnCl 2 ) is used as a reducing agent to obtain radiopharmaceuticals labeling with technetium-99m. As the SnCl 2 seems to have adverse effects related with the reproductive performance of male rabbits as well as the human consumption of hiperico might affect sexual function. In the present work, consistent results show significant changes on the blood constituents labeled by technetium-99m obtained from young rats under the effect of an hiperico extract as opposed to blood samples equally treated taken from elderly rat. Supposedly, this extract could protect the male reproductive system against action of SnCl 2 at least in young rats. The findings described in this work allow introducing a simple assay to evaluate the action of products that could interfere with the male reproductive system. (author)

  11. Comparison of the antibacterial activity of essential oils and extracts of medicinal and culinary herbs to investigate potential new treatments for irritable bowel syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common functional gastrointestinal disorder, which may result from alteration of the gastrointestinal microbiota following gastrointestinal infection, or with intestinal dysbiosis or small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. This may be treated with antibiotics, but there is concern that widespread antibiotic use might lead to antibiotic resistance. Some herbal medicines have been shown to be beneficial, but their mechanism(s) of action remain incompletely understood. To try to understand whether antibacterial properties might be involved in the efficacy of these herbal medicines, and to investigate potential new treatments for IBS, we have conducted a preliminary study in vitro to compare the antibacterial activity of the essential oils of culinary and medicinal herbs against the bacterium, Esherichia coli. Methods Essential oils were tested for their ability to inhibit E. coli growth in disc diffusion assays and in liquid culture, and to kill E. coli in a zone of clearance assay. Extracts of coriander, lemon balm and spearmint leaves were tested for their antibacterial activity in the disc diffusion assay. Disc diffusion and zone of clearance assays were analysed by two-tailed t tests whereas ANOVA was performed for the turbidometric assays. Results Most of the oils exhibited antibacterial activity in all three assays, however peppermint, lemon balm and coriander seed oils were most potent, with peppermint and coriander seed oils being more potent than the antibiotic rifaximin in the disc diffusion assay. The compounds present in these oils were identified by gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Finally, extracts were made of spearmint, lemon balm and coriander leaves with various solvents and these were tested for their antibacterial activity against E. coli in the disc diffusion assay. In each case, extracts made with ethanol and methanol exhibited potent antibacterial activity. Conclusions Many of the essential oils

  12. Comparative effectiveness of six Chinese herb formulas for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: protocol for systematic review and network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shaonan; Chen, Jing; He, Yihan; Wu, Lei; Lai, Jiaqi; Zuo, Jinhong; Yang, Lihong; Guo, Xinfeng

    2017-08-11

    Chinese medicine is commonly used to combine with pharmacotherapy for the treatment of acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD). Six Chinese herb formulas involving Weijing decoction, Maxingshigan decoction, Yuebijiabanxia decoction, Qingqihuatan decoction, Dingchuan decoction and Sangbaipi decoction are recommended in Chinese medicine clinical guideline or textbook, to relieve patients with phlegm-heat according to Chinese syndrome differentiation. However, the comparative effectiveness among these six formulas has not been investigated in published randomised controlled trials. We plan to summarise the direct and indirect evidence for these six formulas combined with pharmacotherapy to determine the relative merits options for the management of AECOPD. We will perform the comprehensive search for the randomised controlled trials to evaluate the effectiveness of six Chinese herb formulas recommended in Chinese medicine clinical guideline or textbook. The combination of pharmacotherapy includes bronchodilators, antibiotics and corticosteroids that are routinely prescribed for AECOPD. The primary outcome will be lung function, arterial blood gases and length of hospital stay. The data screening and extraction will be conducted by two different reviewers. The quality of RCT will be assessed according to the Cochrane handbook risk of bias tool. The Bayes of network meta-analysis (NMA) will be conducted with WinBUGS to compare the effectiveness of six formulas. We will also use the surface under the cumulative ranking curve (SUCRA) to obtain the comprehensive rank for these treatments. This review does not require ethics approval and the results of NMA will be submitted to a peer-review journal. PROSPERO (CRD42016052699). © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. Water-Soluble Polysaccharide Extracts from the Oyster Culinary-Medicinal Mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus (Agaricomycetes) with HMGCR Inhibitory Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Ramirez, Alicia; Smiderle, Fhernanda R; Morales, Diego; Govers, Coen; Synytsya, Andriy; Wichers, Harry J; Iacomini, Marcello; Soler-Rivas, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Water extracts from Pleurotus ostreatus containing no statins showed 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl CoA reductase (HMGCR) inhibitory activity (in vitro) that might be due to specific water-soluble polysaccharides (WSPs); when isolated and deproteinized, increasing concentrations of the WSP extract induced higher inhibition. The WSP extract contained mainly β-glucans, mannogalactans, and glycogen (e.g., α-glucans), although derivatives or fragments with lower molecular weights (between 14 and 3.5 kDa) were present and were able to induce the inhibitory activity. The extract contained more β-(1→3)-glucans than β-(11→3),(11→6)-glucans, and they partially survived digestion and managed to pass through Caco2 cell monolayers to the lower compartment after in vitro digestion and transport experiments. The WSP might also modulate Caco2 membrane integrity.

  14. Cytotoxic, antimigratory, pro-and antioxidative activities of extracts from medicinal mushrooms on colon cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šeklić Dragana S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Methanol extracts of five commercially available mushroom species (Phellinus linteus (Berk. et Curt Teng, Cordyceps sinensis (Berk. Sacc., Lentinus edodes (Berk. Pegler, Coprinus comatus (O. F. Müll. Pers. and Ganoderma lucidum (Curtis P. Karst, traditionally used as anticancer agents, were evaluated in vitro for their total phenol and flavonoid contents, cytotoxic and antimigratory activities and antioxidant/prooxidant effects on colon cancer cell lines (HCT-116 and SW-480. Spectrophotometric methods were used for the determination of total phenol content, flavonoid concentrations and DPPH activity of the extracts. Cytotoxic activity was measured by the MTT assay. The antimigratory activity of extracts was determined using the Transwell assay and immunofluorescence staining of β-catenin. The prooxidant/antioxidant status was followed by measuring the superoxide anion radical (O2•-, nitrite and reduced glutathione (GSH concentrations. Our results show that the highest phenolic and flavonoid content was found in P. linteus, and its DPPH-scavenging capacity was significantly higher than in other samples. The P. linteus extract significantly decreased cell viability of both tested cancer cell lines. All other extracts selectively inhibited SW-480 cell viability, but did not show significant cytotoxic activity. The mushroom extracts caused changes in the prooxidant/antioxidant status of cells, inducing oxidative stress. All extracts tested on HCT-116 cells demonstrated significant antimigratory effects, which correlated with increased production of O2•- and a reduced level of β-catenin protein expression, while only P. linteus showed the same effect on SW-480 cells. The results of the present research indicate that the mushroom extracts causes oxidative stress which has a pronounced impact on the migratory status of colon cancer cell lines. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III41010

  15. Extrinsic and Intrinsic Apoptotic Responses Induced by Shiitake Culinary-Medicinal Mushroom Lentinus edodes (Agaricomycetes) Aqueous Extract against a Larynx Carcinoma Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finimundy, Tiane C; Scola, Gustavo; Scariot, Fernando J; Dillon, Aldo J P; Moura, Sidnei; Echeverrigaray, Sérgio; Henriques, João Pegas; Roesch-Ely, Mariana

    2018-01-01

    Cumulative evidence from research studies has shown that the shiitake culinary-medicinal mushroom, Lentinus edodes, is an excellent source of natural antitumor agents and is capable of inhibiting cancer cell growth. However, the cell signaling pathway that leads tumor cells to apoptosis is not well understood because many chemical compounds may be acting. This study investigated the chemopreventive effects of an L. edodes aqueous extract on human HEp-2 epithelial larynx carcinoma cells and normal human MRC-5 lung fibroblasts by identifying proliferative and apoptotic pathways. The chemical characterization of the dry powder was assessed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects induced by the extract were evaluated by assessing proliferative markers, cell sorting through flow cytometry, and expression levels of apoptotic proteins with Western blotting. The results suggest that inhibition of cell proliferation was more prominent in HEp-2 than in MRC-5 cells. Cell death analysis showed the appearance of cell populations in the sub-G1 phase, with late apoptotic signal increased in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the aqueous extract induced depolarization of mitochondria, activating the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species in HEp-2 cells. These observations suggest that L. edodes extract may exert a chemopreventive effect, regulating mitotic induction of apoptogenic signals. These findings highlight the mushroom's pharmacological potential in cancer treatment.

  16. Selective extraction and determination of chlorogenic acids as combined quality markers in herbal medicines using molecularly imprinted polymers based on a mimic template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Wenhua; Zhang, Mingming; Yan, Huijiao; Zhao, Hengqiang; Mu, Yan; Guo, Lanping; Wang, Xiao

    2017-12-01

    We describe a solid-phase extraction adsorbent based on molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs), prepared with use of a mimic template. The MIPs were used for the selective extraction and determination of three chlorogenic acids as combined quality markers for Lonicera japonica and Lianhua qingwen granules. The morphologies and surface groups of the MIPs were assessed by scanning electron microscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area analysis, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The adsorption isotherms, kinetics, and selectivity of the MIPs were systematically compared with those of non-molecularly imprinted polymers. The MIPs showed high selectivity toward three structurally similar chlorogenic acids (chlorogenic acid, cryptochlorogenic acid, and neochlorogenic acid). A procedure using molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography was established for the determination of three chlorogenic acids from Lonicera japonica and Lianhua qingwen granules. The recoveries of the chlorogenic acids ranged from 93.1% to 101.4%. The limits of detection and limits of quantification for the three chlorogenic acids were 0.003 mg g -1 and 0.01 mg g -1 , respectively. The newly developed method is thus a promising technique for the enrichment and determination of chlorogenic acids from herbal medicines. Graphical Abstract Mimic molecularly imprinted polymers for the selective extraction of chlorogenic acids.

  17. Comparative Study of the Analgesic Activity of Two Iraqi Medicinal Plants, Ruta graveolens and Matricaria chamomilla Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Abdulrahman Hussain

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The study was performed to compare the analgesic activity of different fractions of the extracts of Ruta graveolens and Matricaria chamomilla. Materials and Methods: The plant materials were extracted with 70% ethanol, petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and n-butanol. The ethyl acetate and n-butanol fractions of each plant were evaporated to dryness and analyzed by HPLC. The analgesic activity of these extracts was evaluated using writhing reflex test and compared with that produced by a standard drug (Diclofenac sodium. Results: Flavonoids were found in all fractions of both plants (i.e ethyl acetate and n-butanol, while trace of alkaloids in were found in the ethyl acetate fraction of Ruta. The prepared extracts showed better analgesic activity than the standard drug; when compared with each other, Matricaria extracts showed better analgesic activity compared to Ruta extracts. Conclusion: There is similar efficacy of chamomile and common rue as analgesic agents. [J Intercult Ethnopharmacol 2012; 1(2.000: 79-83

  18. Neuropharmacological and genotoxic evaluation of ethanol extract from Erythrina falcata leaves, a plant used in Brazilian folk medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone A. Dias

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine neurobehavioral and genotoxic activities of ethanol extract of Erythrina falcata Benth., Fabaceae, leaves on rats. Animals were treated with ethanol extract of E. falcata (100, 300 or 500 mg/kg; i.p. and the open field and elevated plus-maze tasks were used as behavioral models to investigate a possible effect on the locomotor and exploratory activity and anxiety, respectively. Genotoxic effect was investigated using the Comet assay. Ethanol extract of E. falcata leaves decreased the number of crossings and rearings in the open field task and increased the latency to start locomotion, though it was not able to affect habituation to apparatus measured 24h after the first session. Behavioral parameters in the plus-maze test were not affected by E. falcata. Ethanol extract did not increase damage index and damage frequency in blood or brain, indicating no genotoxic effect. The results suggest that ethanol extract of E. falcata leaves was able to affect locomotion, exploration, and motivation of animals without anxiolytic/anxiogenic effect, indicating a possible depressant action on the central nervous system. Furthermore, the lack of DNA damage in brain is an indicative that ethanol extract of E. falcata leaves may not induce neurotoxic effects.

  19. Neuropharmacological and genotoxic evaluation of ethanol extract from Erythrina falcata leaves, a plant used in Brazilian folk medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone A. Dias

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine neurobehavioral and genotoxic activities of ethanol extract of Erythrina falcata Benth., Fabaceae, leaves on rats. Animals were treated with ethanol extract of E. falcata (100, 300 or 500 mg/kg; i.p. and the open field and elevated plus-maze tasks were used as behavioral models to investigate a possible effect on the locomotor and exploratory activity and anxiety, respectively. Genotoxic effect was investigated using the Comet assay. Ethanol extract of E. falcata leaves decreased the number of crossings and rearings in the open field task and increased the latency to start locomotion, though it was not able to affect habituation to apparatus measured 24h after the first session. Behavioral parameters in the plus-maze test were not affected by E. falcata. Ethanol extract did not increase damage index and damage frequency in blood or brain, indicating no genotoxic effect. The results suggest that ethanol extract of E. falcata leaves was able to affect locomotion, exploration, and motivation of animals without anxiolytic/anxiogenic effect, indicating a possible depressant action on the central nervous system. Furthermore, the lack of DNA damage in brain is an indicative that ethanol extract of E. falcata leaves may not induce neurotoxic effects.

  20. GC-MS analysis of leaf extracts of Terminalia macroptera and Dioclea reflexa, two medicinal plants used for the treatment of respiratory tract disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa Ibibia Edewor

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the phytochemicals that are present in two medicinal plants which are used for the treatment of respiratory tract infections by gas chromatography-mass spectrometer. Methods: The plant leaves were extracted with n-hexane and methanol separately. Both extracts were analyzed for present phytochemicals using the method described by Harborne, 1985 while only methanol extracts were subjected to gas chromatography-mass spectrometer analysis. Results: Phytochemical screening of the methanolic extracts of Terminalia macroptera (T. macroptera revealed the presence of glycosides, tannins, flavonoids, saponins and steroids while that of Dioclea reflexa (D. reflexa showed the presence of flavonoids, saponins and steroids. The n-hexane extracts were devoid of the screened phytochemicals. Twelve and twenty-five compounds were identified in the leaves of T. macroptera and D. reflexa respectively. These compounds were fatty acids, fatty acid esters, other esters, heterocyclics and phenolics. The most abundant compound in T. macroptera was benzenetriol (53.30% while the predominant compounds in D. reflexa were dodecanoic acid, methyl ester (15.31%, 5, 5, 8a-trimethyl-3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 8a-hexahydro-2H-chromene (9.73%, 10-octadecenoic acid, methyl ester and 2-hexadecanoic acid, methyl ester (8.95%. Benzofuran, 2, 3-dihydro, 3, 7, 11, 15- tetramethyl-2-hexadecen-1-ol and hexadecanoic acid, methyl ester were common in both plant extracts. The antimicrobial properties of the leaves of these plants could be responsible for their use in the treatment of respiratory tract infections. Conclusions: Some of the identified phytochemicals in the plant leaves are responsible for its use in the treatment of respiratory tract infections.

  1. Effects of Ciji Hua'Ai Baosheng formula on apoptosis correlation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Side effects of chemotherapy are major issues for cancer patients and there are few methods to release these. However, traditional Chinese medicine is one of the options for these patients. This study is to evaluate one traditional Chinese empirical formula – the Ciji Hua'ai Baosheng Formula (CHBF) on ...

  2. Evaluating four readability formulas for Afrikaans

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kate H

    Abstract. For almost a hundred years now,readability formulas have been used to measure how difficult it is to comprehend a given text. To date, four readability formulas have been developed for. Afrikaans. Two such formulas were published by Van Rooyen (1986), one formula by. McDermid Heyns (2007) and one formula ...

  3. Acupuncture plus Herbal Medicine for Alzheimer's Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Simin; Dong, Lanlan; He, Yuan; Xiao, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with the unprecedented aging tendency in our world population and has become a significant health issue. The use of Traditional Chinese Medicine to treat AD has been increasing in recent years. The objective of this meta-analysis is to evaluate the effectiveness of combining acupuncture with herbal medicine to treat AD. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of acupuncture plus herbals versus treatment with western drugs for AD were retrieved from 11 databases. The data were extracted by two authors; dichotomous data were expressed as odds ratio (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), while continuous data were calculated by mean differences (MDs) with 95% CIs. Although the combined analysis of the score of Activity of Daily Life (ADL) scale MD was [Formula: see text]3.59 (95% CI [Formula: see text]7.18-0.01, [Formula: see text]), which indicates there was no statistically significant difference between the two treatments at reducing the ADL scale score, the pooled results of 12 trials indicated that acupuncture plus Chinese herbal medicine was better than western drugs at improving the effectiveness rate (OR 2.24, 95% CI 1.40-3.56), the combined evidence of 11 articles showed that acupuncture plus Chinese herbal medicine was more effective than western drugs at improving the scores for the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) scale (2.10, 95% CI 0.69-3.51, [Formula: see text]) and the traditional Chinese medicine symptom (MD 5.07, 95% CI 3.90-6.25, [Formula: see text]). From the current research results, acupuncture plus herbal medicine may have advantages over western drugs for treating AD. Nevertheless, well-designed RCTs with a larger sample size are required in the future.

  4. Pretreatment with Shuanghe-Tang Extract Attenuates Postischemic Brain Injury and Edema in a Mouse Model of Stroke: An Analysis of Medicinal Herbs Listed in Dongui Bogam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Jae Kim

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Although stroke is among the leading causes of death and long-term disability, there are few effective treatments for limiting the severity of neurological sequelae. We evaluated the effects of 29 medicinal herbs listed in the Pung chapter of the 17th century Korean medical text Dongui Bogam on stroke symptoms in a mouse model of cerebral ischemia. Methods. Focal cerebral ischemia was induced via photothrombosis. Infarct volume, brain edema, and neurological deficits were evaluated. Immunofluorescence staining for tight junction proteins and aquaporin 4 (AQP4 was performed following ischemic injury. Results. Based on our initial findings, we examined the effects of two prescriptions in which the candidate herbs comprised more than 60% of the total formula: Shuanghe-tang and Zengsunsiwu-tang. Pretreatment with Shuanghe-tang significantly reduced infarct volume, decreased blood-brain barrier (BBB breakdown, attenuated edema, and improved neurological and motor functions in a dose-dependent manner (30, 100, and 300 mg/kg, while no such effects were observed in mice pretreated with Zengsunsiwu-tang. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed significant increases in ipsilateral occludin and zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1 expression in Shuanghe-tang-pretreated mice, as well as increased AQP4 immunofluorescence. Conclusions. These results indicate that Shuanghe-tang may protect against brain injury and promote recovery of neurological function following ischemia.

  5. Trace formulae for arithmetical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogomolny, E.B.; Georgeot, B.; Giannoni, M.J.; Schmit, C.

    1992-09-01

    For quantum problems on the pseudo-sphere generated by arithmetic groups there exist special trace formulae, called trace formulae for Hecke operators, which permit the reconstruction of wave functions from the knowledge of periodic orbits. After a short discussion of this subject, the Hecke operators trace formulae are presented for the Dirichlet problem on the modular billiard, which is a prototype of arithmetical systems. The results of numerical computations for these semiclassical type relations are in good agreement with the directly computed eigenfunctions. (author) 23 refs.; 2 figs

  6. Chloroform Extract of Rasagenthi Mezhugu, a Siddha Formulation, as an Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine for HPV-Positive Cervical Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anvarbatcha Riyasdeen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rasagenthi Mezhugu (RGM is a herbomineral formulation in the Siddha system of traditional medicine and is prescribed in the southern parts of India as a remedy for all kinds of cancers. However, scientific evidence for its therapeutic efficacy in cervical cancer is lacking, and it contains heavy metals. To overcome these limitations, RGM was extracted, and the fractions were tested on HPV-positive cervical cancer cells, ME-180 and SiHa. The extracts, free from the toxic heavy metals, affected the viability of both the cells. The chloroform fraction (cRGM induced DNA damage and apoptosis. Mitochondria-mediated apoptosis was indicated. Though both the cells responded to the treatment, ME-180 was more responsive. Thus, this study brings up scientific evidence for the efficacy of RGM against the HPV-mediated cervical cancer cells and, if the toxic heavy metals are the limitation in its use, cRGM would be a suitable candidate as evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine for HPV-positive cervical cancers.

  7. A liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure photoionization tandem mass spectrometric (LC-APPI-MS/MS) method for the determination of triterpenoids in medicinal plant extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobo, Luciana Assis; Viana, Carine; Lameira, Osmar Alves; de Carvalho, Leandro Machado

    2016-08-01

    An analytical method using liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure photoionization tandem mass spectrometry with toluene as a dopant was developed for the determination of triterpenes in medicinal plant extracts. The 12 compounds determined have been shown to exhibit biological activity, such as gastroprotective, hepatoprotective, anti-inflammatory, antiviral and anti-tumor effects. The parameters of the atmospheric pressure photoionization interface were optimized to obtain the highest possible sensitivity for all of the compounds. The limits of detection and quantification ranged from 0.4 to 157.9 µg l -1 and 1.3 to 526.4 µg l -1 , respectively. The method was validated and applied to extracts of five medicinal plants species (Mansoa alliacea (Lam.) A.H.Gentry, Bauhinia variegata var variegata, Bauhinia variegata var alboflava, Cecropia obtuse Trécul and Cecropia palmate Willd) from the Amazonian region. The concentrations of the six triterpenes quantified in the samples ranged from 0.424 mg kg -1 for ursolic acid to 371.96 mg kg -1 for β-amyrin, which were quantified by using the standard addition method (n = 3). Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Development of a method to extract and purify target compounds from medicinal plants in a single step: online hyphenation of expanded bed adsorption chromatography and countercurrent chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Wang, Nan; Zhang, Min; Ito, Yoichiro; Zhang, Hongyang; Wang, Yuerong; Guo, Xin; Hu, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Pure compounds extracted and purified from natural sources are crucial to lead discovery and drug screening. This study presents a novel two-dimensional hyphenation of expanded bed adsorption chromatography (EBAC) and high-speed countercurrent chromatography (HSCCC) for extraction and purification of target compounds from medicinal plants in a single step. The EBAC and HSCCC were hyphenated via a six-port injection valve as an interface. Fractionation of ingredients of Salvia miltiorrhiza and Rhizoma coptidis was performed on the hyphenated system to verify its efficacy. An amount each of 52.9 mg of salvianolic acid B and 2.1 mg of rosmarinic acid was obtained from Salvia miltiorrhiza by the two-dimensional system in a single step. The purities of the targets were over 96% of salvianolic acid B and 74% of rosmarinic acid. An amount each of 4.6 mg of coptisine and 4.1 mg of berberine was obtained from Rhizoma coptidis each with 98% and 82% purity, respectively. The processing time was nearly 50% that of the multi-step method. These results indicate that the present method is a rapid and green way to harvest targets from medicinal plants in a single step. PMID:24588208

  9. Traditional Chinese medicine herbal extracts of Cibotium barometz, Gentiana scabra, Dioscorea batatas, Cassia tora, and Taxillus chinensis inhibit SARS-CoV replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Chih-Chun; Shyur, Lie-Fen; Jan, Jia-Tsrong; Liang, Po-Huang; Kuo, Chih-Jung; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Wu, Jin-Bin; Kuo, Sheng-Chu; Yang, Ning-Sun

    2011-10-01

    Development of anti-severe acute respiratory syndrome associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) agents is pivotal to prevent the reemergence of the life-threatening disease, SARS. In this study, more than 200 extracts from Chinese medicinal herbs were evaluated for anti-SARS-CoV activities using a cell-based assay that measured SARS-CoV-induced cytopathogenic effect (CPE) in vitro on Vero E6 cells. Six herbal extracts, one each from Gentianae Radix ( lóng dǎn; the dried rhizome of Gentiana scabra), Dioscoreae Rhizoma ( shān yào; the tuber of Dioscorea batatas), Cassiae Semen ( jué míng zǐ; the dried seed of Cassia tora) and Loranthi Ramus ( sāng jì shēng; the dried stem, with leaf of Taxillus chinensis) (designated as GSH, DBM, CTH and TCH, respectively), and two from Rhizoma Cibotii ( gǒu jǐ; the dried rhizome of Cibotium barometz) (designated as CBE and CBM), were found to be potent inhibitors of SARS-CoV at concentrations between 25 and 200 μg/ml. The concentrations of the six extracts needed to inhibit 50% of Vero E6 cell proliferation (CC50) and 50% of viral replication (EC50) were determined. The resulting selective index values (SI = CC50/EC50) of the most effective extracts CBE, GSH, DBM, CTH and TCH were > 59.4, > 57.5, > 62.1, > 59.4, and > 92.9, respectively. Among these extracts, CBM and DBM also showed significant inhibition of SARS-CoV 3CL protease activity with IC50 values of 39 μg/ml and 44 μg/ml, respectively. Our findings suggest that these six herbal extracts may have potential as candidates for future development of anti-SARS therapeutics.AbbreviationsSARS,severe acute respiratory syndromeCoV,coronavirusCPE,cytopathogenic effectTCM,traditional Chinese medicine.

  10. SYNERGISTIC EFFECTS OF ETHANOL MEDICINAL PLANT EXTRACTS WITH ERYTHROMYCIN AGAINST SKIN STRAINS OF STAPHYLOCOCCI WITH INDUCIBLE PHENOTYPE OF MLS-RESISTANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurchyshyn O.I.

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. One of the main ways to control microorganisms’ resistance to antibiotics is to find substances that are able to overcome it and potentiate antibiotics action, in particular to neutralize the antibiotic-inactivating enzymes or block the active efflux of antibiotic from microbial cells. Every year there is a growing interest in the therapeutic potential of herbal active compounds as modifiers of antibiotic resistance including MLS-resistance (macrolide-lincosamide-streptoramin B. It should be emphasized that a number of biologically active substances of plant origin can potentiate antimicrobial activity of erythromycin (ERY against MLS-resistant staphylococci. The present study was designed to investigate the antibacterial and synergistic effects of eight Ukrainian ethanol medicinal plant extracts with erythromycin against skin strains of staphylococci with inducible phenotype of MLS-resistance. Material & methods. S. aureus and S. epidermidis strains were tested for susceptibility to antibiotics of MLS-group by disk diffusion test. Effective antimicrobial concentrations of plant extracts and erythromycin were determined by two-fold serial dilution in nutrient agar and broth. Combinatory effects between organic extracts and ERY were assessed using the checkerboard assay against tested strains to evaluate culture growth in the presence of two antimicrobials with different concentrations. Results & discussion. The Alnus incana L. fruits extract was the most potent inhibitor against tested strains (MIC 40.625-162.5 µg/mL; while Geranium pratense L. rhizomes extract exhibited the least antimicrobial activity (MIC 650-2,600 µg/mL. The Alnus incana L. fruits extract and the Geranium pratense L. rhizomes extract showed synergistic effect with erythromycin against 100% strains of staphylococci (average FICI 0.028 – 0.057; p<0.001. In the presence of 1/4 MIC of ERY Alnus incana L. fruits extract antimicrobial concentration was

  11. Immunomodulation Effect of Aqueous Extract of the Artist's Conk Medicinal Mushroom, Ganoderma applanatum (Agaricomycetes), on the Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manayi, Azadeh; Vazirian, Mahdi; Zade, Fereshteh Hassan; Tehranifard, Akram

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that innate immunity in fish can be activated by many synthetic and natural immunos-timulants; several natural substances induced immunity in fish in previous surveys. This study discussed data regarding the effect of Ganoderma applanatum aqueous extract on the defense mechanisms of rainbow trout in feeding trials. Fish were fed 250, 500, and 1000 mg extract/kg diet 4 times daily. Growth, humoral parameters, lysozyme activity, and serum protein concentrations were assessed after a period of 45 days. The results indicated that dietary supplementation with the mushroom extract did not positively affect the growth of fish compared with the control group. The numbers/amounts of red blood cells, hemoglobin, hematocrit, white blood cells, monocytes, and neutrophils increased significantly in the treated fish. Other red cell indices, including mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, and mean corpuscular hemoglobin values, indicated no significant differences among all groups. The values of immunologic parameters in the all treatment groups were elevated, especially with a concentration of 1000 mg mushroom extract/kg diet: lysozyme activity, 50.00 ± 1.15 U/mL; total protein, 4.40 ± 0.12 g/dL; albumin, 2.40 ± 0.23 mg/dL; total immunoglobulin, 23.50 ± 0.76 mg/dL. These findings suggested the potential ability of G. applanatum aqueous extract to activate immunologic parameters in rainbow trout.

  12. Combination Effect of Antituberculosis Drugs and Ethanolic Extract of Selected Medicinal Plants against Multi-Drug Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauziyah, Prabasiwi Nur; Sukandar, Elin Yulinah; Ayuningtyas, Dhyan Kusuma

    2017-01-01

    Adverse drug reaction and resistance to antituberculosis drugs remain the causes of tuberculosis therapeutic failure. This research aimed to find the combination effect of standard antituberculosis drugs with Hibiscus sabdariffa L., Kaempferia galanga L., and Piper crocatum N.E. Br against multi-drug resistant (MDR) Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates. Two MDR strains (i.e., isoniazid/ethambutol resistant and rifampicin/streptomycin resistant) of M. tuberculosis were inoculated in Löwenstein–Jensen medium containing a combination of standard antituberculosis drugs and ethanolic extracts of H. sabdariffa calyces, K. galanga rhizomes, and P. crocatum leaves using various concentration combinations of drug and extract. The colony numbers were observed for 8 weeks. The effect of the combination was analyzed using the proportion method which was calculated by the mean percentage of inhibition reduction in a number of colonies on drug–extract containing medium compared to extract-free control medium. The results showed that all three plant extracts achieved good combination effects with rifampicin against the rifampicin/streptomycin resistant strain. Antagonistic effects were, however, observed with streptomycin, ethambutol and isoniazid, therefore calling for caution when using these plants in combination with antituberculosis treatment. PMID:28335544

  13. Inhibition of CYP2B6 by Medicinal Plant Extracts: Implication for Use of Efavirenz and Nevirapine-Based Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy (HAART in Resource-Limited Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas E. Thomford

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has greatly improved health parameters of HIV infected individuals. However, there are several challenges associated with the chronic nature of HAART administration. For populations in health transition, dual use of medicinal plant extracts and conventional medicine poses a significant challenge. There is need to evaluate interactions between commonly used medicinal plant extracts and antiretroviral drugs used against HIV/AIDS. Efavirenz (EFV and nevirapine (NVP are the major components of HAART both metabolized by CYP2B6, an enzyme that can potentially be inhibited or induced by compounds found in medicinal plant extracts. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of extracts of selected commonly used medicinal plants on CYP2B6 enzyme activity. Recombinant human CYP2B6 was used to evaluate inhibition, allowing the assessment of herb-drug interactions (HDI of medicinal plants Hyptis suaveolens, Myrothamnus flabellifolius, Launaea taraxacifolia, Boerhavia diffusa and Newbouldia laevis. The potential of these medicinal extracts to cause HDI was ranked accordingly for reversible inhibition and also classified as potential time-dependent inhibitor (TDI candidates. The most potent inhibitor for CYP2B6 was Hyptis suaveolens extract (IC50 = 19.09 ± 1.16 µg/mL, followed by Myrothamnus flabellifolius extract (IC50 = 23.66 ± 4.86 µg/mL, Launaea taraxacifolia extract (IC50 = 33.87 ± 1.54 µg/mL, and Boerhavia diffusa extract (IC50 = 34.93 ± 1.06 µg/mL. Newbouldia laevis extract, however, exhibited weak inhibitory effects (IC50 = 100 ± 8.71 µg/mL on CYP2B6. Launaea taraxacifolia exhibited a TDI (3.17 effect on CYP2B6 and showed a high concentration of known CYP450 inhibitory phenolic compounds, chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid. The implication for these observations is that drugs that are metabolized by CYP2B6 when co-administered with these herbal medicines and when adequate amounts of the

  14. Antibacterial activity of crude extracts of Thai medicinal plants against clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitpipit, L.

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Aqueous and ethanolic extracts of Acacia catechu, Garcinia mangostana, Impatiens balsamina, Peltophorum pterocarpum, Psidium guajava, Punica granatum, Quercus infectoria, Tamarindus indica, Uncaria gambir, Walsura robusta were primarily tested for their antibacterial activities against 35 clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant S. aureus and S. aureus ATCC 25923 using disc diffusion method (2.5 mg/disc. Almost all extracts, except Tamarindus indica exhibited antibacterial activity. Both aqueous and ethanolic extracts of Acacia catechu, Psidium guajava, Punica granatum, Quercus infectoria, and Uncaria gambir, and ethanolic extracts of Garcinia mangostana, Impatiens balsamina, Peltophorum pterocarpum, and Walsura robusta demonstrated inhibition zones, ranging from 6 to 22 mm. Determination of minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC values were performed using agar dilution method. The MIC/MBC values of aqueous extracts of Quercus infectoria against clinical isolates of MRSA and S. aureus were 0.2 to 0.4/0.4 to 1.6 and 0.2/1.6 mg/ ml, respectively. Ethanolic extracts of Garcinia mangostana, Punica granatum and Quercus infectoria were demonstrated to be the most effective. The MIC values against MRSA isolates and S. aureus ranged from 0.05 to 0.4 and 0.1, 0.2 to 0.4 and 0.1, 0.2 to 0.4 and 0.2 mg/ml, respectively. The MBC values against MRSA ranged from 0.1 to 0.4, 0.4 to 1.6, and 1.6 to 3.1 mg/ml and against S. aureus at 0.4, 3.2, and 1.6 mg/ml, respectively.

  15. Analysis and identification of two similar traditional Chinese medicines by using a three-stage infrared spectroscopy: Ligusticum chuanxiong, Angelica sinensis and their different extracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Li; Wang, Jingjuan; Zhang, Guijun; Rong, Lixin; Wu, Haozhong; Sun, Suqin; Guo, Yizhen; Yang, Yanfang; Lu, Lina; Qu, Lei

    2016-11-01

    Rhizoma Chuanxiong (CX) and Radix Angelica sinensis (DG) are very important Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and usually used in clinic. They both are from the Umbelliferae family, and have almost similar chemical constituents with each other. It is complicated, time-consuming and laborious to discriminate them by using the chromatographic methods such as high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography (GC). Therefore, to find a fast, applicable and effective identification method for two herbs is urged in quality research of TCM. In this paper, by using a three-stage infrared spectroscopy (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), the second derivative infrared spectroscopy (SD-IR) and two-dimensional correlation infrared spectroscopy (2D-IR)), we analyzed and discriminated CX, DG and their different extracts (aqueous extract, alcoholic extract and petroleum ether extract). In FT-IR, all the CX and DG samples' spectra seemed similar, but they had their own unique macroscopic fingerprints to identify. Through comparing with the spectra of sucrose and the similarity calculation, we found the content of sucrose in DG raw materials was higher than in CX raw materials. The significant differences in alcoholic extract appeared that in CX alcoholic extract, the peaks at 1743 cm-1 was obviously stronger than the peak at same position in DG alcoholic extract. Besides in petroleum ether extract, we concluded CX contained much more ligustilide than DG by the similarity calculation. With the function of SD-IR, some tiny differences were amplified and overlapped peaks were also unfolded in FT-IR. In the range of 1100-1175 cm-1, there were six peaks in the SD-IR spectra of DG and the intensity, shape and location of those six peaks were similar to that of sucrose, while only two peaks could be observed in that of CX and those two peaks were totally different from sucrose in shape and relative intensity. This result was consistent with that of the

  16. FDA Abbott Infant Formula Recall

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — On September 22, 2010, Abbott issued a voluntary recall of certain Similac powdered infant formula after identifying a common warehouse beetle (both larvae and...

  17. Three Dimensional Tropical Correspondence Formula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Brett

    2017-07-01

    A tropical curve in R3 contributes to Gromov-Witten invariants in all genus. Nevertheless, we present a simple formula for how a given tropical curve contributes to Gromov-Witten invariants when we encode these invariants in a generating function with exponents of {λ} recording Euler characteristic. Our main modification from the known tropical correspondence formula for rational curves is as follows: a trivalent vertex, which before contributed a factor of n to the count of zero-genus holomorphic curves, contributes a factor of {2sin(nλ/2)}. We explain how to calculate relative Gromov-Witten invariants using this tropical correspondence formula, and how to obtain the absolute Gromov-Witten and Donaldson-Thomas invariants of some 3-dimensional toric manifolds including {CP3}. The tropical correspondence formula counting Donaldson-Thomas invariants replaces n by {i^{-(1+n)}q^{n/2}+i^{1+n}q^{-n/2}}.

  18. Toxicity assessment and analgesic activity investigation of aqueous acetone extracts of Sida acuta Burn f . and Sida cordifolia L. (Malvaceae), medicinal plants of Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konaté, Kiessoun; Bassolé, Imaël Henri Nestor; Hilou, Adama; Aworet-Samseny, Raïssa R R; Souza, Alain; Barro, Nicolas; Dicko, Mamoudou H; Datté, Jacques Y; M'Batchi, Bertrand

    2012-08-11

    Sida acuta Burn f. and Sida cordifolia L. (Malvaceae) are traditionally used in Burkina Faso to treat several ailments, mainly pains, including abdominal infections and associated diseases. Despite the extensive use of these plants in traditional health care, literature provides little information regarding their toxicity and the pharmacology. This work was therefore designed to investigate the toxicological effects of aqueous acetone extracts of Sida acuta Burn f. and Sida cordifolia L. Furthermore, their analgesic capacity was assessed, in order to assess the efficiency of the traditional use of these two medicinal plants from Burkina Faso. For acute toxicity test, mice were injected different doses of each extract by intraperitoneal route and the LD50 values were determined. For the subchronic toxicity evaluation, Wistar albinos rats were treated by gavage during 28 days at different doses of aqueous acetone extracts and then haematological and biochemical parameters were determined. The analgesic effect was evaluated in mice by the acetic-acid writhing test and by the formalin test. For the acute toxicity test, the LD50 values of 3.2 g/kg and 3.4 g/kg respectively for S. acuta Burn f. and S. cordifolia L. were obtained. Concerning the haematological and biochemical parameters, data varied widely (increase or decrease) according to dose of extracts and weight of rats and did not show clinical correlations. The extracts have produced significant analgesic effects by the acetic acid writhing test and by the hot plate method (p <0.05) and a dose-dependent inhibition was observed. The overall results of this study may justify the traditional uses of S. acuta and S. cordifolia .

  19. Toxicity assessment and analgesic activity investigation of aqueous acetone extracts of Sida acuta Burn f . and Sida cordifolia L. (Malvaceae, medicinal plants of Burkina Faso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konaté Kiessoun

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sida acuta Burn f. and Sida cordifolia L. (Malvaceae are traditionally used in Burkina Faso to treat several ailments, mainly pains, including abdominal infections and associated diseases. Despite the extensive use of these plants in traditional health care, literature provides little information regarding their toxicity and the pharmacology. This work was therefore designed to investigate the toxicological effects of aqueous acetone extracts of Sida acuta Burn f. and Sida cordifolia L. Furthermore, their analgesic capacity was assessed, in order to assess the efficiency of the traditional use of these two medicinal plants from Burkina Faso. Method For acute toxicity test, mice were injected different doses of each extract by intraperitoneal route and the LD50 values were determined. For the subchronic toxicity evaluation, Wistar albinos rats were treated by gavage during 28 days at different doses of aqueous acetone extracts and then haematological and biochemical parameters were determined. The analgesic effect was evaluated in mice by the acetic-acid writhing test and by the formalin test. Results For the acute toxicity test, the LD50 values of 3.2 g/kg and 3.4 g/kg respectively for S. acuta Burn f. and S. cordifolia L. were obtained. Concerning the haematological and biochemical parameters, data varied widely (increase or decrease according to dose of extracts and weight of rats and did not show clinical correlations. The extracts have produced significant analgesic effects by the acetic acid writhing test and by the hot plate method (p Conclusion The overall results of this study may justify the traditional uses of S. acuta and S. cordifolia .

  20. Inorganic profile of some Brazilian medicinal plants obtained from ethanolic extract and ''in natura'' samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, M.O.M.; de Sousa, P.T.; Salvador, V.L.R.; Sato, I.M.

    2004-10-03

    The Anadenathera macrocarpa, Schinus molle, Hymenaea courbaril, Cariniana legalis, Solidago microglossa and Stryphnodendron barbatiman, were collected ''in natura'' samples (leaves, flowers, barks and seeds) from different commercial suppliers. The pharmaco-active compounds in ethanolic extracts had been made by the Mato Grosso Federal University (UFMT). The energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence (ED-XRF) spectrometry was used for the elemental analysis in different parts of the plants and respective ethanolic extracts. The Ca, Cl, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, P, Rb, S, Sr and Zn concentrations were determined by the fundamental parameters method. Some specimens showed a similar inorganic profile for ''in natura'' and ethanolic extract samples and some ones showed a distinct inorganic profile. For example, the Anadenathera macrocarpa showed a similar concentration in Mg, P, Cu, Zn and Rb elements in ''in natura'' and ethanolic extract samples; however very different concentration in Na, S, Cl, K , Ca, Mn, Fe and Sr was observed in distinctive samples. The Solidago microglossa showed the K, Ca, Cl, S, Mg, P and Fe elements as major constituents in both samples, suggesting that the extraction process did not affect in a considerable way the ''in natura'' inorganic composition. The elemental composition of the different parts of the plants (leaves, flowers, barks and seeds) has been also determined. For example, the Schinus molle specimen showed P, K, Cl and Ca elements as major constituents in the seeds, Mg, K and Sr in the barks and Mg, S, Cl and Mn in the leaves, demonstrating a differentiated elementary distribution. These inorganic profiles will contribute to evaluate the quality control of the Brazilian herbaceous trade and also will assist to identify which parts of the medicinal plants has greater therapeutic effect.

  1. From medicinal plant extracts to defined chemical compounds targeting the histamine H4 receptor: Curcuma longa in the treatment of inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Annika; Abu-Lafi, Saleh; Adawi, Azmi; Schwed, Johannes S; Stark, Holger; Rayan, Anwar

    2017-10-01

    The aim was to evaluate the activity of seven medicinal, anti-inflammatory plants at the hH 4 R with focus on defined chemical compounds from Curcuma longa. Activities were analyzed with membrane preparations from Sf9 cells, transiently expressing the hH 4 R, G αi2 and G β1γ2 subunits. From the methanolic extract of C. longa curcumin (1), demethoxycurcumin (2) and bis(4-hydroxy-cinnamoyl)methane (3) were isolated, purified with HPLC (elution-time 10.20, 9.66, 9.20 min, respectively) and together with six additional extracts, were characterized via radioligand binding studies at the hH 4 R. Compounds from C. longa were the most potent ligands at the hH 4 R. They exhibited estimated K i values of 4.26-6.26 µM (1.57-2.31 µg/mL) (1); 6.66--8.97 µM (2.26-3.04 µg/mL) (2) and 10.24-14.57 µM (3.16-4.49 µg/mL) (3) (95% CI). The estimated K i value of the crude extract of curcuma was 0.50-0.81 µg/mL. Fractionated curcumin and the crude extract surpassed the effect of pure curcumin with a K i value of 5.54 µM or 2.04 µg/mL [95% CI (4.47-6.86 µM), (1.65-2.53 µg/mL)]. Within this study, defined compounds of C. longa were recognized as potential ligands and reasonable lead structures at the hH 4 R. The mode of anti-inflammatory action of curcumin was further elucidated and the role of extracts in traditional phytomedicine was strengthened.

  2. Sequential extraction results in improved proteome profiling of medicinal plant Pinellia ternata tubers, which contain large amounts of high-abundance proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin Wu

    Full Text Available Pinellia ternata tuber is one of the well-known Chinese traditional medicines. In order to understand the pharmacological properties of tuber proteins, it is necessary to perform proteome analysis of P. ternata tubers. However, a few high-abundance proteins (HAPs, mainly mannose-binding lectin (agglutinin, exist in aggregates of various sizes in the tubers and seriously interfere with proteome profiling by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE. Therefore, selective depletion of these HAPs is a prerequisite for enhanced proteome analysis of P. ternata tubers. Based on differential protein solubility, we developed a novel protocol involving two sequential extractions for depletion of some HAPs and prefractionation of tuber proteins prior to 2-DE. The first extraction using 10% acetic acid selectively extracted acid-soluble HAPs and the second extraction using the SDS-containing buffer extracted remaining acid-insoluble proteins. After application of the protocol, 2-DE profiles of P. ternata tuber proteins were greatly improved and more protein spots were detected, especially low-abundance proteins. Moreover, the subunit composition of P. ternata lectin was analyzed by electrophoresis. Native lectin consists of two hydrogen-bonded subunits (11 kDa and 25 kDa and the 11 kDa subunit was a glycoprotein. Subsequently, major HAPs in the tubers were analyzed by mass spectrometry, with nine protein spots being identified as lectin isoforms. The methodology was easy to perform and required no specialized apparatus. It would be useful for proteome analysis of other tuber plants of Araceae.

  3. Effects of black hoof medicinal mushroom, phellinus linteus (Agaricomycetes), polysaccharide extract in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yamaç, Mustafa; Zeytinoğlu, Melih; Şentürk, Hakan; Kartkaya, Kazim; Kanbak, Göngör; Bayramoğlu, Gökhan; Oğlakci, Ayşegül; Griensven, van Leo J.L.D.

    2016-01-01

    In this article we report the healing effects of a Phellinus linteus fruiting body hot water extract (PLE) in streptozotocin (STZ)–induced diabetic rats. PLE was given before and after STZ. The preprotective, protective, and postprotective effects of PLE on STZ-induced oxidative stress were

  4. Assessment of the medicinal potentials of the methanol extracts of the leaves and stems of Buddleja saligna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adedapo, Adeolu A; Jimoh, Florence O; Koduru, Srinivas; Masika, Patrick J; Afolayan, Anthony J

    2009-07-06

    Buddleja saligna Willd (Loganiaceae) is a small to medium-sized evergreen tree; trunk short, often gnarled and crooked; crown dense, rounded or domed-shaped; foliage greyish green. The wild olives are traditionally used to lower blood pressures in many parts of the world. In southern Africa, bark and leaf decoctions are used to treat colic, coughs, colds, sore eyes, urinary problems and as purgatives. The antibacterial, antioxidant activities and phenolic contents of the methanol extracts of the leaves and stems of Buddleja saligna were evaluated using in vitro standard methods. Spectrophotometry was the basis for the determinations of total phenol, total flavonoids, flavonols, and proanthocyanidins. Tannins, quercetin and catechin equivalents were used for these parameters. The antioxidant activities of the leaves and stem extracts of Buddleja saligna were determined by ABTS, DPPH, and ferrous reducing antioxidant property (FRAP) methods. Laboratory isolates of 10 bacteria species which included five Gram-positive and five Gram-negative strains were used to assay for antibacterial activity of this plant. The antioxidant activities of the leaves as determined by the ABTS and DPPH were similar to that of the stem. The flavonoids and the flavonols contents of the leaves were higher than that of the stem but the total phenols, proanthocyanidins and FRAP activities were higher in the methanol extracts of the stem. The extracts did show activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. For instance, while the methanol extract of the leaves showed good activities on all the organisms except Serratia marcescens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa at MICs of between 2.5 and 5.0 mg/ml, the extract of the stem only showed activities on Bacillus cereus, Streptococcus pyrogens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa at the same concentration. The results from this study indicate that the leaves and stem extracts of Buddleja saligna possess antioxidant properties and could serve as

  5. Assessment of the medicinal potentials of the methanol extracts of the leaves and stems of Buddleja saligna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masika Patrick J

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Buddleja saligna Willd (Loganiaceae is a small to medium-sized evergreen tree; trunk short, often gnarled and crooked; crown dense, rounded or domed-shaped; foliage greyish green. The wild olives are traditionally used to lower blood pressures in many parts of the world. In southern Africa, bark and leaf decoctions are used to treat colic, coughs, colds, sore eyes, urinary problems and as purgatives. Methods The antibacterial, antioxidant activities and phenolic contents of the methanol extracts of the leaves and stems of Buddleja saligna were evaluated using in vitro standard methods. Spectrophotometry was the basis for the determinations of total phenol, total flavonoids, flavonols, and proanthocyanidins. Tannins, quercetin and catechin equivalents were used for these parameters. The antioxidant activities of the leaves and stem extracts of Buddleja saligna were determined by ABTS, DPPH, and ferrous reducing antioxidant property (FRAP methods. Laboratory isolates of 10 bacteria species which included five Gram-positive and five Gram-negative strains were used to assay for antibacterial activity of this plant. Results The antioxidant activities of the leaves as determined by the ABTS and DPPH were similar to that of the stem. The flavonoids and the flavonols contents of the leaves were higher than that of the stem but the total phenols, proanthocyanidins and FRAP activities were higher in the methanol extracts of the stem. The extracts did show activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. For instance, while the methanol extract of the leaves showed good activities on all the organisms except Serratia marcescens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa at MICs of between 2.5 and 5.0 mg/ml, the extract of the stem only showed activities on Bacillus cereus, Streptococcus pyrogens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa at the same concentration. Conclusion The results from this study indicate that the leaves and stem extracts of

  6. Band head spin assignment of superdeformed bands in 133Pr using two-parameter formulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Honey; Mittal, H. M.

    2018-03-01

    The two-parameter formulae viz. the power index formula, the nuclear softness formula and the VMI model are adopted to accredit the band head spin (I0) of four superdeformed rotational bands in 133Pr. The technique of least square fitting is used to accredit the band head spin for four superdeformed rotational bands in 133Pr. The root mean deviation among the computed transition energies and well-known experimental transition energies are attained by extracting the model parameters from the two-parameter formulae. The determined transition energies are in excellent agreement with the experimental transition energies, whenever exact spins are accredited. The power index formula coincides well with the experimental data and provides minimum root mean deviation. So, the power index formula is more efficient tool than the nuclear softness formula and the VMI model. The deviation of dynamic moment of inertia J(2) against the rotational frequency is also examined.

  7. Floral Biosynthesis of Mn3O4 and Fe2O3 Nanoparticles Using Chaenomeles sp. Flower Extracts for Efficient Medicinal Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunakaran, Gopalu; Jagathambal, Matheswaran; Kolesnikov, Evgeny; Dmitry, Arkhipov; Ishteev, Artur; Gusev, Alexander; Kuznetsov, Denis

    2017-08-01

    Manganese oxide (Mn3O4) and iron oxide (Fe2O3) nanoparticles were successfully synthesized with the flower extracts of Chaenomeles sp. This is the first ever approach to synthesize nanoparticles from Chaenomeles sp. flower extracts. The organic molecules present in the flower extracts actively converted the nitrate precursor into its corresponding nanoparticles. The organic molecules that are involved in the synthesis of nanoparticles are identified using different phytochemical and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses. The identified components are glycosides, alkaloids, terpenoids, saponins, flavonoids, quinines, and steroids. The structural and chemical compositions of the synthesized powder were also analyzed. The x-ray powder diffraction analysis revealed that the particles show tetragonal and rhombohedral crystalline phases. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis showed the functional groups that are involved in the reduction of nitrates into the corresponding nanoparticles. Energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis confirmed the presence of the elements in the synthesized nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy images showed the formation of spherical nanoparticles with an average size of 30-100 nm. Antioxidant analysis showed that the synthesized nanoparticles had excellent antioxidant potential. The antibacterial study showed that they inhibit the growth of harmful bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus pyogenes. Thus, this study proposes a new eco-friendly and nontoxic method to synthesize nanoparticles for medicinal applications.

  8. Aqueous and Organic Solvent-Extracts of Selected South African Medicinal Plants Possess Antimicrobial Activity against Drug-Resistant Strains of Helicobacter pylori: Inhibitory and Bactericidal Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collise Njume

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify sources of cheap starting materials for the synthesis of new drugs against Helicobacter pylori. Solvent-extracts of selected medicinal plants; Combretum molle, Sclerocarya birrea, Garcinia kola, Alepidea amatymbica and a single Strychnos species were investigated against 30 clinical strains of H. pylori alongside a reference control strain (NCTC 11638 using standard microbiological techniques. Metronidazole and amoxicillin were included in these experiments as positive control antibiotics. All the plants demonstrated anti-H. pylori activity with zone diameters of inhibition between 0 and 38 mm and 50% minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC50 values ranging from 0.06 to 5.0 mg/mL. MIC50 values for amoxicillin and metronidazole ranged from 0.001 to 0.63 mg/mL and 0.004 to 5.0 mg/mL respectively. The acetone extracts of C. molle and S. birrea exhibited a remarkable bactericidal activity against H. pylori killing more than 50% of the strains within 18 h at 4× MIC and complete elimination of the organisms within 24 h. Their antimicrobial activity was comparable to the control antibiotics. However, the activity of the ethanol extract of G. kola was lower than amoxicillin (P < 0.05 as opposed to metronidazole (P > 0.05. These results demonstrate that S. birrea, C. molle and G. kola may represent good sources of compounds with anti-H. pylori activity.

  9. Experimental evidence for in vitro fluid transport in the presence of a traditional medicinal fruit extract across rat everted intestinal sacs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahomoodally, Mohamad Fawzi; Gurib-Fakim, Ameenah; Subratty, Anwar Hussein

    2005-02-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of aqueous fruit extract of Momordica charantia (MC), a traditional medicinal plant, on the transport of fluid in vitro. Everted intestinal sacs from rats were mounted in an organ bath containing Krebs solution. We compared the effect of MC extract on water transport with increasing inorganic phosphate concentration with or without D-glucose in the buffer. In the control experiments, fluid uptake was enhanced significantly (P side inhibits the uptake of fluid significantly (P 0.05) when incubated with 3.0 mg/mL MC fruit extract. It is hypothesized that an increase in inorganic phosphate enhances oxidative phosphorylation thereby increasing the fluid uptake across everted intestinal sacs of rat. These findings seem to indicate that the MC-induced reduction on intestinal fluid absorption capacity could be mainly the result of an interference with the carrier-mediated coupled entrance of glucose and Na(+) across the brush-border membrane.

  10. Avaliação da inibição da acetilcolinesterase por extratos de plantas medicinais Evaluation of acetylcholinesterase inhibition by extracts from medicinal plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.M. Mota

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho foi avaliada a atividade inibitória da acetilcolinesterase (AChE pelo método de Ellman, modificado por Rhee, de extratos aquosos e etanólicos de oito plantas utilizadas na medicina popular da região Nordeste do Brasil. O extrato aquoso de E. velutina não apresentou atividade inibitória enquanto o extrato aquoso de Maytenus rigida apresentou baixa atividade inibitória (percentual de inibição de 4%. Detectou-se atividade inibitória moderada com o extrato aquoso de P. piperoides (percentual de inibição de 40 %, enquanto o extrato de V. agnus-castus L. inibiu 74% da atividade da AChE, caracterizando-se como potente atividade inibitória. A avaliação da inibição da AChE com os extratos etanólicos demonstrou que os extratos de Sideroxylon obtusifolium, Erythrina velutina, Vitex agnus-castus, Phoradendron piperoides, Chrysobalanus icaco, Bauhinia cheilantha e Orbignya phalerata não apresentaram atividade inibitória. Baixa atividade inibitória foi observada com os extratos etanólicos de Maytenus rigida (percentual de inibição de 7% e de Hyptis fruticosa (percentual de inibição de 11%. O extrato etanólico de Moringa oleifera apresentou atividade inibitória moderada, inibindo 47% da atividade dessa enzima. Nenhum dos extratos etanólicos testados apresentou atividade inibitória potente da AChE. Os resultados dos estudos de inibição da acetilcolinesterase permitem concluir que o extrato aquoso de V. agnus-castus L. mostrou-se o mais eficaz quanto a inibição da AChE. Este resultado reforça a necessidade da continuidade do estudo desse extrato, de forma a realizar a partição do extrato e a purificação das frações para isolar a molécula responsável pela inibição observada.In this study, we evaluated the inhibitory activity against acetylcholinesterase (AChE according to Ellman's method, modified by Rhee, for ethanol and aqueous extracts from eight plants used in folk medicine in the northeast region of

  11. Neuroprotective Effect of Coptis chinensis in MPP[Formula: see text] and MPTP-Induced Parkinson's Disease Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedemann, Thomas; Ying, Yue; Wang, Weigang; Kramer, Edgar R; Schumacher, Udo; Fei, Jian; Schröder, Sven

    2016-01-01

    The rhizome of Coptis chinensis is commonly used in traditional Chinese medicine alone or in combination with other herbs to treat diseases characterized by causing oxidative stress including inflammatory diseases, diabetes mellitus and neurodegenerative diseases. In particular, there is emerging evidence that Coptis chinensis is effective in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases associated with oxidative stress. Hence, the aim of this study was to investigate the neuroprotective effect of Coptis chinensis in vitro and in vivo using MPP[Formula: see text] and MPTP models of Parkinson's disease. MPP[Formula: see text] treated human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells were used as a cell model of Parkinson's disease. A 24[Formula: see text]h pre-treatment of the cells with the watery extract of Coptis chinensis significantly increased cell viability, as well as the intracellular ATP concentration and attenuated apoptosis compared to the MPP[Formula: see text] control. Further experiments with the main alkaloids of Coptidis chinensis, berberine, coptisine, jaterorrhizine and palmatine revealed that berberine and coptisine were the main active compounds responsible for the observed neuroprotective effect. However, the full extract of Coptis chinensis was more effective than the tested single alkaloids. In the MPTP-induced animal model of Parkinson's disease, Coptis chinensis dose-dependently improved motor functions and increased tyrosine hydroxylase-positive neurons in the substantia nigra compared to the MPTP control. Based on the results of this work, Coptis chinensis and its main alkaloids could be considered potential candidates for the development of new treatment options for Parkinson's disease.

  12. Extracts of edible and medicinal plants in inhibition of growth, adherence, and cytotoxin production of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Sandra L; Heredia, Norma; Contreras, Juan F; García, Santos

    2011-08-01

    Campylobacter spp. is recognized as one of the most common cause of food-borne bacterial gastroenteritis in humans. Campylobacter infection causes campylobacteriosis, which can range from asymptomatic to dysentery-type illnesses with severe complications, such as Guillian-Barre syndrome. Epidemiological studies have revealed that consumption of poultry products is an important risk factor of this disease. Adherence and cytotoxic activity of the bacteria to host mucosal surfaces have been proposed to be critical steps in pathogenesis. Innovative tools for controlling Campylobacter, such as natural products from plants, represent good alternatives for use in foods or as therapeutic agents. In this study, 28 edible or medicinal plants species were analyzed for their bactericidal effects on the growth of Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli. The extracts of Acacia farnesiana, Artemisia ludoviciana, Opuntia ficus-indica, and Cynara scolymus were the most effective against these microorganisms at minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of 0.3, 0.5, 0.4, and 2.0 mg/mL, respectively. No effect on growth was detected with lower concentrations of extract (25%, 50%, or 75% of the MBC) added to the media. The effect of each extract (75% of the MBC) on adherence and cytotoxicity of C. jejuni and C. coli was evaluated in Vero cells. Adherence of Campylobacter to Vero cells was significantly affected by all the extracts. Cytotoxic activity of bacterial cultures was inhibited by A. farnesiana and A. ludoviciana. These plant extracts are potential candidates to be studied for controlling Campylobacter contamination in foods and the diseases associated with this microorganism. Innovative tools for controlling Campylobacter, such as natural products from plants, represent good alternatives for use in foods or as therapeutic agents. The extracts of Acacia farnesiana, Artemisia ludoviciana, Opuntia ficus-indica, and Cynara scolymus

  13. [Cloud Point extraction for determination of mercury in Chinese herbal medicine by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry with optimization using Box-Behnken design].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mei; Li, Shan; Zhou, Jian-dong; Xu, Ying; Long, Jun-biao; Yang, Bing-yi

    2014-08-01

    Cloud point extraction (CPE) is proposed as a pre-concentration procedure for the determination of Hg in Chinese herbal medicine samples by hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS). Hg2+ was reacted with dithizone to form hydrophobic chelate under the condition of pH. Using Triton X-114, as surfactant, chelate was quantitatively extracted into small volume of the surfactant-rich phase by heating the solution in a water bath for 15 min and centrifuging. Four variables including pH, dithizone concentration, Triton X-114 concentration and equilibrium temperature (T) showed the significant effect on extraction efficiency of total Hg evaluated by single-factor experiment, and Box-Behnken design and response surface method- ology were adopted to further investigate the mutual interactions between these variables and to identify their optimal values that would generate maximum extraction efficiency. The results showed that the binomial was used to fit the response to experimental levels of each variable. ALL linear, quadratic terms of four variables, and interactions between pH and Trion X-114, pH and di- thizone affected the response value(extraction efficiency) significantly at 5% level. The optimum extraction conditions were as follows: pH 5.1, Triton X-114 concentration of 1.16 g x L(-1), dithizone concentration of 4.87 mol x L(-1), and T 58.2 degrees C, the predicted value of fluorescence was 4528.74 under the optimum conditions, and the experimental value had only 2.1% difference with it. Under the conditions, fluorescence was linear to mercury concentration in the range of 1-5 microg x L(-1). The limit of detection obtained was 0.01247 microg x L(-1) with the relative standard deviations (R.S.D.) for six replicate determinations of 1.30%. The proposed method was successfully applied to determination of Hg in morindae Radix, Andrographitis and dried tangerine samples with the recoveries of 95.0%-100.0%. Apparently Box-Behnken design combined with

  14. Cytotoxicity of the methanol extracts of Elephantopus mollis, Kalanchoe crenata and 4 other Cameroonian medicinal plants towards human carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuete, Victor; Fokou, Fabrice W; Karaosmanoğlu, Oğuzhan; Beng, Veronique P; Sivas, Hülya

    2017-05-25

    Cancer still constitutes one of the major health concerns globally, causing serious threats on patients, their families, and the healthcare system. In this study, the cytotoxicity of the methanol extract of Elephantopus mollis whole plant (EMW), Enantia chlorantha bark (ECB), Kalanchoe crenata leaves (KCL), Lophira alata bark (LAB), Millettia macrophylla leaves (MML) and Phragmanthera capitata leaves (PCL) towards five human solid cancer cell lines and normal CRL2120 fibroblasts, was evaluated. Extracts were subjected to qualitative chemical screening of their secondary metabolite contents using standard methods. The cytotoxicity of samples was evaluated using neutral red uptake (NR) assay meanwhile caspase activation was detected by caspase-Glo assay. Flow cytometry was used to analyze the cell cycle distribution and the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) whilst spectrophotometry was used to measure the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of polyphenols, triterpenes and sterols in all extracts. The IC 50 values of the best samples ranged from 3.29 μg/mL (towards DLD-1 colorectal adenocarcinoma cells) to 24.38 μg/mL (against small lung cancer A549 cells) for EMW, from 2.33 μg/mL (mesothelioma SPC212 cells) to 28.96 μg/mL (HepG2 hepatocarcinoma) for KCL, and from 0.04 μg/mL (towards SPC212 cells) to 0.55 μg/mL (towards A549 cells) for doxorubicin. EMW induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells mediated by MMP loss and increased ROS production whilst KCL induced apoptosis via ROS production. This study provides evidences of the cytotoxicity of the tested plant extract and highlights the good activity of Elephantopus mollis and Kalanchoe crenata. They deserve more exploration to develop novel cytotoxic drugs.

  15. Medicinal Mushrooms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindequist, U.; Won Kim, H.; Tiralongo, E.; Griensven, van L.J.L.D.

    2014-01-01

    Since beginning of mankind nature is the most important source of medicines. Bioactive compounds produced by living organisms can be used directly as drugs or as lead compounds for drug development. Besides, the natural material can be used as crude drug for preparation of powder or extracts. Plants

  16. Potential nutritional and antioxidant activity of various solvent extracts from leaves and stem bark of Anisophyllea laurina R. Br ex Sabine used in folk medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gbago Onivogui

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Anisophyllea laurina is a plant that has been used in folk medicine to treat malaria, dysentery, diabetes, toothache and various skin diseases. Leaves extract had protein content of 9.68% and a high calcium content of 25084.317 mg/100 g while stem bark extract was found to contain greater amounts of calcium (8560.96 mg/100 g, potassium (7649.47 mg/100 g, magnesium (1462.49 mg/100 g and iron (973.33 mg/100 g. Palmitic acid, linolenic acid, linoleic acid and oleic acid were the most abundant fatty acids in leaves and stem bark extracts. Furthermore, total phenolic (2382.39 mg GAE /100 g and total flavonoid (385.79 mg QE/100 g contents were abundant in stem bark while leaves extract was rich in total tannin content (3466.63 mg CE/100 g. However, both leaves and stem bark contained great amounts of vitamins and amino acids were a good source of antioxidant activities. For the individual polyphenol, stenophyllanin A (45.87 mg/g, casuarinin (24.55 mg/g and digalloyl-HHDP-glucopyranose isomer (15.63 mg/g were found to be the major compounds from the leaves whereas procyanidin tetramer (14.89 mg/g, (--Epicatechin (12.18 mg/g and procyanidin trimer (11.25 mg/g were the most predominant compounds from the stem bark. Additionally, the results revealed a significant and strong correlation between phenolic compounds and antioxidant activities.

  17. Measurement of [Formula: see text] polarisation in [Formula: see text] collisions at [Formula: see text] = 7 TeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Counts, I; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Esen, S; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Giani, S; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P;