WorldWideScience

Sample records for medicine computer assisted

  1. Computer assisted radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemke, H.U.; Jaffe, C.C.; Felix, R.

    1993-01-01

    The proceedings of the CAR'93 symposium present the 126 oral papers and the 58 posters contributed to the four Technical Sessions entitled: (1) Image Management, (2) Medical Workstations, (3) Digital Image Generation - DIG, and (4) Application Systems - AS. Topics discussed in Session (1) are: picture archiving and communication systems, teleradiology, hospital information systems and radiological information systems, technology assessment and implications, standards, and data bases. Session (2) deals with computer vision, computer graphics, design and application, man computer interaction. Session (3) goes into the details of the diagnostic examination methods such as digital radiography, MRI, CT, nuclear medicine, ultrasound, digital angiography, and multimodality imaging. Session (4) is devoted to computer-assisted techniques, as there are: computer assisted radiological diagnosis, knowledge based systems, computer assisted radiation therapy and computer assisted surgical planning. (UWA). 266 figs [de

  2. Computer-assisted radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemke, H.U.

    1988-01-01

    New digital imaging modalities and more sophisticated image processing systems will have a profound effect on those areas of medicine concerned with imaging. This mainly means computer-assisted radiology (CAR) and implies a transition from analog film systems to digital imaging systems, integration of digital imaging modalities through picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) and the graduated employment of image-oriented medical work stations (MWS) for computer-assisted representation, communication, diagnosis, and therapy planning. (orig.) [de

  3. Proceedings of seventh symposium on sharing of computer programs and technology in nuclear medicine, computer assisted data processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, B.Y.; McClain, W.J.; Landay, M.

    1977-01-01

    The Council on Computers (CC) of the Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM) annually publishes the Proceedings of its Symposium on the Sharing of Computer Programs and Technology in Nuclear Medicine. This is the seventh such volume and has been organized by topic, with the exception of the invited papers and the discussion following them. An index arranged by author and by subject is included

  4. Proceedings of seventh symposium on sharing of computer programs and technology in nuclear medicine, computer assisted data processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, B.Y.; McClain, W.J.; Landay, M. (comps.)

    1977-01-01

    The Council on Computers (CC) of the Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM) annually publishes the Proceedings of its Symposium on the Sharing of Computer Programs and Technology in Nuclear Medicine. This is the seventh such volume and has been organized by topic, with the exception of the invited papers and the discussion following them. An index arranged by author and by subject is included.

  5. Computer assisted roentgenology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trajkova, N.; Velkova, K.

    1999-01-01

    This is a report on the potentials and superiorities of computer tomography (CT), assumed as an up-to-date imaging examination method in medicine. The current trend in the development of computer assisted roentgenology consists in the implementation of new computer and communication systems promoting diagnostic and therapeutic activities. CT-study application is discussed with special reference to diagnosis and treatment of brain, lung, mediastinal and abdominal diseases. The new trends in the particular implementation of CT are presented, namely: CT-assisted biopsy, CT-assisted abscess drainage, drug administration under CT control, as well as the wide use of CT in orthopaedic surgery, otorinolaryngology etc. Also emphasis is laid on the important role played by three-dimensional technologies in computer-assisted surgery, leading to qualitatively new stage in the surgical therapeutic approach to patients

  6. Computational Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Jens Vinge

    2017-01-01

    The Health Technology Program at Aarhus University applies computational biology to investigate the heterogeneity of tumours......The Health Technology Program at Aarhus University applies computational biology to investigate the heterogeneity of tumours...

  7. Computer-assisted intraoperative visualization of dental implants. Augmented reality in medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ploder, O.; Wagner, A.; Enislidis, G.; Ewers, R.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, a recently developed computer-based dental implant positioning system with an image-to-tissue interface is presented. On a computer monitor or in a head-up display, planned implant positions and the implant drill are graphically superimposed on the patient's anatomy. Electromagnetic 3D sensors track all skull and jaw movements; their signal feedback to the workstation induces permanent real-time updating of the virtual graphics' position. An experimental study and a clinical case demonstrates the concept of the augmented reality environment - the physician can see the operating field and superimposed virtual structures, such as dental implants and surgical instruments, without loosing visual control of the operating field. Therefore, the operation system allows visualization of CT planned implantposition and the implementation of important anatomical structures. The presented method for the first time links preoperatively acquired radiologic data, planned implant location and intraoperative navigation assistance for orthotopic positioning of dental implants. (orig.) [de

  8. Computer assisted diagnosis in renal nuclear medicine: rationale, methodology and interpretative criteria for diuretic renography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Andrew T; Garcia, Ernest V

    2014-01-01

    The goal of artificial intelligence, expert systems, decision support systems and computer assisted diagnosis (CAD) in imaging is the development and implementation of software to assist in the detection and evaluation of abnormalities, to alert physicians to cognitive biases, to reduce intra and inter-observer variability and to facilitate the interpretation of studies at a faster rate and with a higher level of accuracy. These developments are needed to meet the challenges resulting from a rapid increase in the volume of diagnostic imaging studies coupled with a concurrent increase in the number and complexity of images in each patient data. The convergence of an expanding knowledge base and escalating time constraints increases the likelihood of physician errors. Errors are even more likely when physicians interpret low volume studies such as 99mTc-MAG3 diuretic scans where imagers may have had limited training or experience. Decision support systems include neural networks, case-based reasoning, expert systems and statistical systems. iRENEX (renal expert) is an expert system for diuretic renography that uses a set of rules obtained from human experts to analyze a knowledge base of both clinical parameters and quantitative parameters derived from the renogram. Initial studies have shown that the interpretations provided by iRENEX are comparable to the interpretations of a panel of experts. iRENEX provides immediate patient specific feedback at the time of scan interpretation, can be queried to provide the reasons for its conclusions and can be used as an educational tool to teach trainees to better interpret renal scans. iRENEX also has the capacity to populate a structured reporting module and generate a clear and concise impression based on the elements contained in the report; adherence to the procedural and data entry components of the structured reporting module assures and documents procedural competency. Finally, although the focus is CAD applied to

  9. [Computer-assisted analysis of the results of training in internal medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrbová, H; Spunda, M

    1991-06-01

    Analysis of the results of teaching of clinical disciplines has in the long run an impact on the standard and value of medical care. It requires processing of quantitative and qualitative data. The selection of indicators which will be followed up and procedures used for their processing are of fundamental importance. The submitted investigation is an example how to use possibilities to process results of effectiveness analysis in teaching internal medicine by means of computer technique. As an indicator of effectiveness the authors selected the percentage of students who had an opportunity during the given period of their studies to observe a certain pathological condition, and as method of data collection a survey by means of questionnaires was used. The task permits to differentiate the students' experience (whether the student examined the patient himself or whether the patient was only demonstrated) and it makes it possible to differentiate the place of observation (at the university teaching hospital or regional non-teaching hospital attachment). The task permits also to form sub-groups of respondents to combine them as desired and to compare their results. The described computer programme support comprises primary processing of the output of the questionnaire survey. The questionnaires are transformed and stored by groups of respondents in data files of suitable format (programme SDFORM); the processing of results is described as well as their presentation as output listing or on the display in the interactive way (SDRESULT programme). Using the above programmes, the authors processed the results of a survey made among students during and after completion of the studies in a series of 70 recommended pathological conditions. As an example the authors compare results of observations in 20 selected pathological conditions important for the diagnosis and therapy in primary care in the final stage of the medical course in 1981 and 1985.

  10. Computer-assisted instruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, J.; Fisser, P.; Wright, J.D.

    2015-01-01

    Since the early days of computer technology in education in the 1960s, it was claimed that computers can assist instructional practice and hence improve student learning. Since then computer technology has developed, and its potential for education has increased. In this article, we first discuss

  11. Introducing computer-assisted training sessions in the clinical skills lab at the Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosny, Somaya; Mishriky, Adel M; Youssef, Mirella

    2008-01-01

    The Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University clinical skills lab was established in 1981 as the first skills lab in Egypt to cope with innovation in medical education adopted since school inauguration in 1978. Students are trained using their peers or models. Training is done weekly, guided by checklists tested for validity and reliability and updated regularly. Students receive immediate feedback on their performance. Recently, the number of students has increased, leading to challenges in providing adequate supervision and training experiences. A project to design and implement a computer-assisted training (CAT) system seemed to be a plausible solution. To assess the quality of a newly developed CAT product, faculty and students' satisfaction with it, and its impact on the learning process. The project involved preparation of multimedia video-films with a web interface for links of different scientific materials. The project was implemented on second year students. A quality check was done to assess the product's scientific content, and technical quality using questionnaires filled by 84 faculty members (139 filled forms) and 175 students (924 filled forms). For assessment of impact, results of examinations after project implementation were compared with results of 2nd year students of previous 3 years. More faculty (96.3%) were satisfied with the product and considered its quality good to excellent, compared to 93.9% of students, p < 0.001. Most faculty (76.2%) have agreed on its suitability for self-learning, while most students considered the product would be suitable after modification. The percentage of students' failures was lower after project implementation, compared to previous 3 years, p < 0.05. CAT materials developed for training of second year students in skills lab proved to be of good scientific content and quality, and suitable for self-learning. Their use was associated with lower failure rates among students. A randomized trial is recommended

  12. Computer Assisted Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Paul

    1976-01-01

    Methodology for developing a computer assisted instruction (CAI) lesson (scripting, programing, and testing) is reviewed. A project done by Informatics Education Ltd. (IEL) for the Department of National Defense (DND) is used as an example. (JT)

  13. COMPUTER-ASSISTED ACCOUNTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SORIN-CIPRIAN TEIUŞAN

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available What is computer-assisted accounting? Where is the place and what is the role of the computer in the financial-accounting activity? What is the position and importance of the computer in the accountant’s activity? All these are questions that require scientific research in order to find the answers. The paper approaches the issue of the support granted to the accountant to organize and manage the accounting activity by the computer. Starting from the notions of accounting and computer, the concept of computer-assisted accounting is introduced, it has a general character and it refers to the accounting performed with the help of the computer or using the computer to automate the procedures performed by the person who is doing the accounting activity; this is a concept used to define the computer applications of the accounting activity. The arguments regarding the use of the computer to assist accounting targets the accounting informatization, the automating of the financial-accounting activities and the endowment with modern technology of the contemporary accounting.

  14. Computer assisted radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemke, H.U.; Rhodes, M.L.; Jaffee, C.C.; Felix, R.

    1987-01-01

    The organization of the book follows the plan of the meeting, with chapters representing the general meeting sessions and articles representing the meeting presentations. These are grouped by modality or kindred application, where relevant. Some sessions are not similarly divided and individual papers are positioned, presumably, in order of presentation. Each section labeled workshop addresses a specific topic. The first session is on digital image generation and contains sections on magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear medicine, computed tomography, ultrasound, digital radiography, and digital subtraction and angiography. The remaining sections are on application programming, picture archiving and communications systems, computer graphics, and computer vision

  15. Sixth Computational Biomechanics for Medicine Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Nielsen, Poul MF; Miller, Karol; Computational Biomechanics for Medicine : Deformation and Flow

    2012-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges for mechanical engineers is to extend the success of computational mechanics to fields outside traditional engineering, in particular to biology, biomedical sciences, and medicine. This book is an opportunity for computational biomechanics specialists to present and exchange opinions on the opportunities of applying their techniques to computer-integrated medicine. Computational Biomechanics for Medicine: Deformation and Flow collects the papers from the Sixth Computational Biomechanics for Medicine Workshop held in Toronto in conjunction with the Medical Image Computing and Computer Assisted Intervention conference. The topics covered include: medical image analysis, image-guided surgery, surgical simulation, surgical intervention planning, disease prognosis and diagnostics, injury mechanism analysis, implant and prostheses design, and medical robotics.

  16. Computer assisted procedure maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisio, R.; Hulsund, J. E.; Nilsen, S.

    2004-04-01

    The maintenance of operating procedures in a NPP is a tedious and complicated task. Through the whole life cycle of the procedures they will be dynamic, 'living' documents. Several aspects of the procedure must be considered in a revision process. Pertinent details and attributes of the procedure must be checked. An organizational structure must be created and responsibilities allotted for drafting, revising, reviewing and publishing procedures. Available powerful computer technology provides solutions within document management and computerisation of procedures. These solutions can also support the maintenance of procedures. Not all parts of the procedure life cycle are equally amenable to computerized support. This report looks at the procedure life cycle in todays NPPs and discusses the possibilities associated with introduction of computer technology to assist the maintenance of procedures. (Author)

  17. Center for Disaster & Humanitarian Assistance Medicine

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Disaster and Humanitarian Assistance Medicine (CDHAM) was formally established at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS) by...

  18. Computers in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cradduck, T.D.; Knowles, L.G.

    1977-01-01

    The decision to buy a computer is difficult. The wide variety of computing systems available makes that decision even harder because each of the systems has unique advantages and disadvantages. The following list contains many of the essentials any computer system for nuclear medicine should embody: (1) sophisticated and reliable hardware with sufficient memory capacity to acquire or display at least 128 x 128 static images or 64 x 64 dynamic studies and with the facility for adding extra hardware and peripheral equipment at a later date; (2) a well-proved, general-purpose, real-time operating system to which the programs specific to the gamma camera have been interfaced and which will allow expansion or modification of both hardware and software in the future; (3) a display exhibiting at least 128 x 128 resolution, a monochrome mode with extended gray scale, and perhaps color; a varied set of programmed image formats and hardware system that includes local refresher capabilities; (4) a high-level language, such as FORTRAN or BASIC, with the ability to directly access all data files and interact with system programs as well as a macroprogramming capability so the user may write his own programs for data manipulation and analysis; (5) a comprehensive yet generally applicable set of system programs to enable data acquisition, storage, analysis, and display. In addition to the above, one should expect the services of a team of well-trained maintenance technicians and engineers. The manufacturer should offer software support and exhibit a plan for continued development and upgrading of the software initially provided

  19. Computer assisted radiology and surgery. CARS 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2010-01-01

    The conference proceedings include contributions to the following topics: (1) CARS Clinical Day: minimally invasive spiral surgery, interventional radiology; (2) CARS - computer assisted radiology and surgery: ophthalmology, stimulation methods, new approaches to diagnosis and therapy; (3) Computer assisted radiology 24th International congress and exhibition: computer tomography and magnetic resonance, digital angiographic imaging, digital radiography, ultrasound, computer assisted radiation therapy, medical workstations, image processing and display; (4) 14th Annual conference of the International Society for computer aided surgery; ENT-CMF head and neck surgery computer-assisted neurosurgery, cardiovascular surgery, image guided liver surgery, abdominal and laparoscopic surgery, computer-assisted orthopedic surgery, image processing and visualization, surgical robotics and instrumentation, surgical modeling, simulation and education; (5) 28th International EuroPACS meeting: image distribution and integration strategies, planning and evaluation, telemedicine and standards, workflow and data flow in radiology; (6) 11th CARS/SPIE/EuroPACS joint workshop on surgical PACS and the digital operating, management and assessment of OR systems and integration; (7) 12th International workshop on computer-aided diagnosis: special session on breast CAD, special session on thoracic CAD, special session on abdominal brain, lumbar spine CAD; (8) 16th computed Maxillofacial imaging congress: computed maxillofacial imaging in dental implantology, orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics; approaches to 3D maxillofacial imaging; surgical navigation; (9) 2nd EuroNOTES/CARS workshop on NOTES: an interdisciplinary challenge; (10) 2nd EPMA/CARS workshop on personalized medicine and ICT.; (11)poster sessions.

  20. Computer assisted radiology and surgery. CARS 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2010-06-15

    The conference proceedings include contributions to the following topics: (1) CARS Clinical Day: minimally invasive spiral surgery, interventional radiology; (2) CARS - computer assisted radiology and surgery: ophthalmology, stimulation methods, new approaches to diagnosis and therapy; (3) Computer assisted radiology 24th International congress and exhibition: computer tomography and magnetic resonance, digital angiographic imaging, digital radiography, ultrasound, computer assisted radiation therapy, medical workstations, image processing and display; (4) 14th Annual conference of the International Society for computer aided surgery; ENT-CMF head and neck surgery computer-assisted neurosurgery, cardiovascular surgery, image guided liver surgery, abdominal and laparoscopic surgery, computer-assisted orthopedic surgery, image processing and visualization, surgical robotics and instrumentation, surgical modeling, simulation and education; (5) 28th International EuroPACS meeting: image distribution and integration strategies, planning and evaluation, telemedicine and standards, workflow and data flow in radiology; (6) 11th CARS/SPIE/EuroPACS joint workshop on surgical PACS and the digital operating, management and assessment of OR systems and integration; (7) 12th International workshop on computer-aided diagnosis: special session on breast CAD, special session on thoracic CAD, special session on abdominal brain, lumbar spine CAD; (8) 16th computed Maxillofacial imaging congress: computed maxillofacial imaging in dental implantology, orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics; approaches to 3D maxillofacial imaging; surgical navigation; (9) 2nd EuroNOTES/CARS workshop on NOTES: an interdisciplinary challenge; (10) 2nd EPMA/CARS workshop on personalized medicine and ICT.; (11)poster sessions.

  1. Computer assisted functional analysis. Computer gestuetzte funktionelle Analyse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, H A.E.; Roesler, H

    1982-01-01

    The latest developments in computer-assisted functional analysis (CFA) in nuclear medicine are presented in about 250 papers of the 19th international annual meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine (Bern, September 1981). Apart from the mathematical and instrumental aspects of CFA, computerized emission tomography is given particular attention. Advances in nuclear medical diagnosis in the fields of radiopharmaceuticals, cardiology, angiology, neurology, ophthalmology, pulmonology, gastroenterology, nephrology, endocrinology, oncology and osteology are discussed.

  2. Computer Assisted Audit Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenia Iancu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available From the modern point of view, audit takes intoaccount especially the information systems representingmainly the examination performed by a professional asregards the manner for developing an activity by means ofcomparing it to the quality criteria specific to this activity.Having as reference point this very general definition ofauditing, it must be emphasized that the best known segmentof auditing is the financial audit that had a parallel evolutionto the accountancy one.The present day phase of developing the financial audithas as main trait the internationalization of the accountantprofessional. World wide there are multinational companiesthat offer services in the financial auditing, taxing andconsultancy domain. The auditors, natural persons and auditcompanies, take part at the works of the national andinternational authorities for setting out norms in theaccountancy and auditing domain.The computer assisted audit techniques can be classified inseveral manners according to the approaches used by theauditor. The most well-known techniques are comprised inthe following categories: testing data techniques, integratedtest, parallel simulation, revising the program logics,programs developed upon request, generalized auditsoftware, utility programs and expert systems.

  3. Computers in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giannone, Carlos A.

    1999-01-01

    This chapter determines: capture and observation of images in computers; hardware and software used, personal computers, networks and workstations. The use of special filters determine the quality image

  4. Computer applications in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lancaster, J.L.; Lasher, J.C.; Blumhardt, R.

    1987-01-01

    Digital computers were introduced to nuclear medicine research as an imaging modality in the mid-1960s. Widespread use of imaging computers (scintigraphic computers) was not seen in nuclear medicine clinics until the mid-1970s. For the user, the ability to acquire scintigraphic images into the computer for quantitative purposes, with accurate selection of regions of interest (ROIs), promised almost endless computational capabilities. Investigators quickly developed many new methods for quantitating the distribution patterns of radiopharmaceuticals within the body both spatially and temporally. The computer was used to acquire data on practically every organ that could be imaged by means of gamma cameras or rectilinear scanners. Methods of image processing borrowed from other disciplines were applied to scintigraphic computer images in an attempt to improve image quality. Image processing in nuclear medicine has evolved into a relatively extensive set of tasks that can be called on by the user to provide additional clinical information rather than to improve image quality. Digital computers are utilized in nuclear medicine departments for nonimaging applications also, Patient scheduling, archiving, radiopharmaceutical inventory, radioimmunoassay (RIA), and health physics are just a few of the areas in which the digital computer has proven helpful. The computer is useful in any area in which a large quantity of data needs to be accurately managed, especially over a long period of time

  5. Computer assisted holographic moire contouring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciammarella, Cesar A.

    2000-01-01

    Theoretical analyses and experimental results on holographic moire contouring on diffusely reflecting objects are presented. The sensitivity and limitations of the method are discussed. Particular emphasis is put on computer-assisted data retrieval, processing, and recording.

  6. Computer Assisted Advising Tool (CAAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsen, Marie E.

    Lane Community College's Computer Assisted Advising Tool (CAAT) is used by counselors to assist students in developing a plan for the completion of a degree or certificate. CAAT was designed to facilitate student advisement from matriculation to graduation by comparing degree requirements with the courses completed by students. Three major sources…

  7. Computational Mathematics in Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Garrido

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available AI requires Logic. But its Classical version shows too many insufficiencies. So, it is very necessary to introduce more sophisticated tools, as may be Fuzzy Logic, Modal Logic, Non-
    Monotonic Logic, and so on [2]. Among the things that AI needs to represent are Categories, Objects, Properties, Relations between objects, Situations, States, Time, Events, Causes and effects, Knowledge about knowledge, and so on. The problems in AI can be classified in two general types
    [3, 4], Search Problems and Representation Problem. There exist different ways to reach this objective. So, we have [3] Logics, Rules, Frames, Associative Nets, Scripts, and so on, many times interconnect. Also it will be very useful, in the treatment of the problems of uncertainty and causality, the introduction of Bayesian Networks and particularly, a principal tool as the Essential Graph. We attempt here to show the scope of application of such versatile methods, currently fundamental in Medicine.

  8. Computational Methods in Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Garrido

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial Intelligence requires Logic. But its Classical version shows too many insufficiencies. So, it is absolutely necessary to introduce more sophisticated tools, such as Fuzzy Logic, Modal Logic, Non-Monotonic Logic, and so on [2]. Among the things that AI needs to represent are Categories, Objects, Properties, Relations between objects, Situations, States, Time, Events, Causes and effects, Knowledge about knowledge, and so on. The problems in AI can be classified in two general types
    [3, 4], Search Problems and Representation Problem. There exist different ways to reach this objective. So, we have [3] Logics, Rules, Frames, Associative Nets, Scripts and so on, that are often interconnected. Also, it will be very useful, in dealing with problems of uncertainty and causality, to introduce Bayesian Networks and particularly, a principal tool as the Essential Graph. We attempt here to show the scope of application of such versatile methods, currently fundamental in Medicine.

  9. Computer assisted spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, D J; Toy, V M; Deininger, R A; Collopy, T K

    1983-06-01

    Three of the most popular microcomputers, the TRS-80 Model I, the APPLE II+, and the IBM Personal Computer were connected to a spirometer for data acquisition and analysis. Simple programs were written which allow the collection, analysis and storage of the data produced during spirometry. Three examples demonstrate the relative ease for automating spirometers.

  10. High speed computer assisted tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maydan, D.; Shepp, L.A.

    1980-01-01

    X-ray generation and detection apparatus for use in a computer assisted tomography system which permits relatively high speed scanning. A large x-ray tube having a circular anode (3) surrounds the patient area. A movable electron gun (8) orbits adjacent to the anode. The anode directs into the patient area xrays which are delimited into a fan beam by a pair of collimating rings (21). After passing through the patient, x-rays are detected by an array (22) of movable detectors. Detector subarrays (23) are synchronously movable out of the x-ray plane to permit the passage of the fan beam

  11. Method to assist conception of collimators in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gantet, P.; Esquerre, J.P.; Danet, B.; Roux, G.; Guiraud, R.

    1990-01-01

    Designing a collimator should begin by an accurate computation of its performances in order to minimize the usual expensive and time consuming phase of trial and error. The authors briefly describe several methods currently used, and present a method of simulation of the percussional response of collimators. The computation takes into account the attenuation of photons by the collimator septas. An other benefit is its ability to be used whatever the geometric specifications of the collimator. The program computes spatial resolution, geometric efficiency, septal penetration, as well as slice thickness when the collimator is used with a SPECT device. The study presents the results concerning two collimators: a general purpose parallel hole commercially available and a focused parallel one dedicated to a single slice SPECT system. In conclusion, this deterministic method which takes attenuation into account for collimators performances computation should be useful tool to assist conception of new collimators in nuclear medicine [fr

  12. Seventh Medical Image Computing and Computer Assisted Intervention Conference (MICCAI 2012)

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Karol; Nielsen, Poul; Computational Biomechanics for Medicine : Models, Algorithms and Implementation

    2013-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges for mechanical engineers is to extend the success of computational mechanics to fields outside traditional engineering, in particular to biology, biomedical sciences, and medicine. This book is an opportunity for computational biomechanics specialists to present and exchange opinions on the opportunities of applying their techniques to computer-integrated medicine. Computational Biomechanics for Medicine: Models, Algorithms and Implementation collects the papers from the Seventh Computational Biomechanics for Medicine Workshop held in Nice in conjunction with the Medical Image Computing and Computer Assisted Intervention conference. The topics covered include: medical image analysis, image-guided surgery, surgical simulation, surgical intervention planning, disease prognosis and diagnostics, injury mechanism analysis, implant and prostheses design, and medical robotics.

  13. Applied computing in medicine and health

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Jumeily, Dhiya; Mallucci, Conor; Oliver, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Applied Computing in Medicine and Health is a comprehensive presentation of on-going investigations into current applied computing challenges and advances, with a focus on a particular class of applications, primarily artificial intelligence methods and techniques in medicine and health. Applied computing is the use of practical computer science knowledge to enable use of the latest technology and techniques in a variety of different fields ranging from business to scientific research. One of the most important and relevant areas in applied computing is the use of artificial intelligence (AI) in health and medicine. Artificial intelligence in health and medicine (AIHM) is assuming the challenge of creating and distributing tools that can support medical doctors and specialists in new endeavors. The material included covers a wide variety of interdisciplinary perspectives concerning the theory and practice of applied computing in medicine, human biology, and health care. Particular attention is given to AI-bas...

  14. Computer assisted tutoring in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffery, N.

    1997-02-01

    The computer-based tutoring of visual concepts such as radiological images is a largely unexplored area. A review of the literature highlights limited use of computers as a means of radiological education, with the majority of systems being little more than hypermedia prototypes, on-line teaching files, and passive CD-Roms. Very few of the systems discussed in the research literature draw on the work from cognitive science and educational psychology for tutoring visual concepts. This thesis details and evaluates a method for indexing and retrieving images from large image databases via a cognitively informed graphical representation of visual concepts. This representation is derived using Multiple Correspondence Analysis from a statistical analysis of features present in the images. It is intended that this representation be used to assist in the computer based teaching of any discipline that requires the tutoring of visual concepts. The domain used as a test bed for this research is Magnetic Resonance Imaging in neuroradiology. Tutoring the interpretation of MR scans of the head represents a real practical problem due to the inherent complexity of the brain and variations in tissue contrast within image sequence and disease/pathology. The literature of concept categorisation and representation is critically reviewed to inform the design of a graphical representation of a concept (a pathology in the application domain). A specification for the design of an explicit representation of visual concepts is drawn from this literature review, together with methods of tutoring based around this model. A methodology for producing this representation is described, and implemented in the development of an overview plot for the concept of a disease of the brain, with associated statistical measures derived and operationalised for typicality and similarity of cases within a disease. These measures are precursors to the development of computer based tutoring strategies for image

  15. Computer assisted tutoring in radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffery, N

    1997-02-01

    The computer-based tutoring of visual concepts such as radiological images is a largely unexplored area. A review of the literature highlights limited use of computers as a means of radiological education, with the majority of systems being little more than hypermedia prototypes, on-line teaching files, and passive CD-Roms. Very few of the systems discussed in the research literature draw on the work from cognitive science and educational psychology for tutoring visual concepts. This thesis details and evaluates a method for indexing and retrieving images from large image databases via a cognitively informed graphical representation of visual concepts. This representation is derived using Multiple Correspondence Analysis from a statistical analysis of features present in the images. It is intended that this representation be used to assist in the computer based teaching of any discipline that requires the tutoring of visual concepts. The domain used as a test bed for this research is Magnetic Resonance Imaging in neuroradiology. Tutoring the interpretation of MR scans of the head represents a real practical problem due to the inherent complexity of the brain and variations in tissue contrast within image sequence and disease/pathology. The literature of concept categorisation and representation is critically reviewed to inform the design of a graphical representation of a concept (a pathology in the application domain). A specification for the design of an explicit representation of visual concepts is drawn from this literature review, together with methods of tutoring based around this model. A methodology for producing this representation is described, and implemented in the development of an overview plot for the concept of a disease of the brain, with associated statistical measures derived and operationalised for typicality and similarity of cases within a disease. These measures are precursors to the development of computer based tutoring strategies for image

  16. Computer assisted SCFE osteotomy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drapikowski, Pawel; Tyrakowski, Marcin; Czubak, Jaroslaw; Czwojdzinski, Adam

    2008-01-01

    Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is a common pediatric orthopedic disorder that requires surgical correction. Preoperative planning of a proximal femoral osteotomy is essential in cases of SCFE. This planning is usually done using 2D radiographs, but 3D data can be acquired with CT and analyzed with 3D visualization software. SCFEanalyzer is a computer program developed for preoperative planning of proximal femoral osteotomy to correct SCFE. Computed tomography scans were performed on human bone specimens: one pelvis and two femoral bones (right and left) and volume data of a patient. The CT data were used to test the abilities of the SCFEanalyzer software, which utilizes 3D virtual models of anatomic structures constructed from CT image data. Separation of anatomical bone structures is done by means of ''cutting'' 3D surface model of the pelvis. The software enables qualitative and quantitative spatial analysis of chosen parameters analogous to those done on the basis of plain radiographs. SCFEanalyzer makes it possible to evaluate the function of the hip joint by calculating the range of motion depending on the shape of bone structures based on oriented bounding box object representation. Pelvic and hip CT scans from a patient with SCFE were subjected to femoral geometry analysis and hip joint function assessment. These were done to plan and simulate osteotomy of the proximal femur. Analogous qualitative and quantitative evaluation after performing the virtual surgery were evaluated to determine the potential treatment effects. The use of computer assistance in preoperative planning enable us to increase objectivity and repeatability, and to compare the results of different types of osteotomy on the proximal femur, and thus to choose the optimal operation in each individual case. (orig.)

  17. Computer assisted SCFE osteotomy planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drapikowski, Pawel [Poznan University of Technology, Institute of Control and Information Engineering, Poznan (Poland); Tyrakowski, Marcin; Czubak, Jaroslaw; Czwojdzinski, Adam [Postgraduate Medical Education Center, Department of Orthopaedics, Warsaw (Poland)

    2008-11-15

    Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is a common pediatric orthopedic disorder that requires surgical correction. Preoperative planning of a proximal femoral osteotomy is essential in cases of SCFE. This planning is usually done using 2D radiographs, but 3D data can be acquired with CT and analyzed with 3D visualization software. SCFEanalyzer is a computer program developed for preoperative planning of proximal femoral osteotomy to correct SCFE. Computed tomography scans were performed on human bone specimens: one pelvis and two femoral bones (right and left) and volume data of a patient. The CT data were used to test the abilities of the SCFEanalyzer software, which utilizes 3D virtual models of anatomic structures constructed from CT image data. Separation of anatomical bone structures is done by means of ''cutting'' 3D surface model of the pelvis. The software enables qualitative and quantitative spatial analysis of chosen parameters analogous to those done on the basis of plain radiographs. SCFEanalyzer makes it possible to evaluate the function of the hip joint by calculating the range of motion depending on the shape of bone structures based on oriented bounding box object representation. Pelvic and hip CT scans from a patient with SCFE were subjected to femoral geometry analysis and hip joint function assessment. These were done to plan and simulate osteotomy of the proximal femur. Analogous qualitative and quantitative evaluation after performing the virtual surgery were evaluated to determine the potential treatment effects. The use of computer assistance in preoperative planning enable us to increase objectivity and repeatability, and to compare the results of different types of osteotomy on the proximal femur, and thus to choose the optimal operation in each individual case. (orig.)

  18. Computers for use in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surova, H.

    1991-01-01

    Brief information is presented on computers for nuclear medicine that are currently available on the market. The treatment is based on print material by various manufacturers and commercial organizations and on the publication ''Nuclear Medicine Computers - A Personal Comparison Chart'' of May 1991, issued by the Reilly Publishing Company. (Z.S.)

  19. Computers in nuclear medicine: introductory concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, D.A.

    1978-01-01

    Computers play an important role in image and data processing in nuclear medicine. Applications extend from relatively simple mathematical processing of in vitro specimen assays to more sophisticated image reconstruction procedures for emission tomography. The basic concepts and terminology associated with computer applications in image and data processing in nuclear medicine are presented here

  20. Computational fluid dynamics modelling in cardiovascular medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Paul D; Narracott, Andrew; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Silva Soto, Daniel Alejandro; Hsiao, Sarah; Lungu, Angela; Evans, Paul; Bressloff, Neil W; Lawford, Patricia V; Hose, D Rodney; Gunn, Julian P

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews the methods, benefits and challenges associated with the adoption and translation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling within cardiovascular medicine. CFD, a specialist area of mathematics and a branch of fluid mechanics, is used routinely in a diverse range of safety-critical engineering systems, which increasingly is being applied to the cardiovascular system. By facilitating rapid, economical, low-risk prototyping, CFD modelling has already revolutionised research and development of devices such as stents, valve prostheses, and ventricular assist devices. Combined with cardiovascular imaging, CFD simulation enables detailed characterisation of complex physiological pressure and flow fields and the computation of metrics which cannot be directly measured, for example, wall shear stress. CFD models are now being translated into clinical tools for physicians to use across the spectrum of coronary, valvular, congenital, myocardial and peripheral vascular diseases. CFD modelling is apposite for minimally-invasive patient assessment. Patient-specific (incorporating data unique to the individual) and multi-scale (combining models of different length- and time-scales) modelling enables individualised risk prediction and virtual treatment planning. This represents a significant departure from traditional dependence upon registry-based, population-averaged data. Model integration is progressively moving towards 'digital patient' or 'virtual physiological human' representations. When combined with population-scale numerical models, these models have the potential to reduce the cost, time and risk associated with clinical trials. The adoption of CFD modelling signals a new era in cardiovascular medicine. While potentially highly beneficial, a number of academic and commercial groups are addressing the associated methodological, regulatory, education- and service-related challenges. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission

  1. CARS 2009. Computer assisted radiology and surgery. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2009-01-01

    The CARS 2009 proceedings include contributions and poster sessions concerning different conferences and workshops: computer assisted radiology, 23rd international congress and exhibition, CARS clinical day, 13th annual conference of the international society for computer aided surgery, 10th CARS/SPIE/EuroPACS joint workshop on surgical PACS and the digital operating, 11th international workshop on computer-aided diagnosis, 15th computed maxillofacial imaging congress, CARS - computer assisted radiology and surgery, 1st EPMA/CARS workshop on personalized medicine and ICT, JICARS - Japanese institutes of CARS, 1st EuroNotes/CTAC/CARS workshop on NOTES: an interdisciplinary challenge, 13th annual conference for computer aided surgery, 27th international EuroPACS meeting.

  2. Computer applications in veterinary medicine | Hassan | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... become essential tools in almost every field of research and applied technology. ... Computers in veterinary medicine have been used for veterinary education; ... agro-veterinary project design, monitoring and implementation; preparation of ...

  3. Innovative Partnerships Assist Community College Computing Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Banion, Terry

    1987-01-01

    Relates efforts of major corporations in providing assistance to community college computing programs. Explains the goals of the League for Innovation in the Community College, a consortium of 19 community colleges, and cites examples of collaborative projects. (ML)

  4. Computed Tomography in Forensic Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Peter Mygind

    2015-01-01

    was not used. Autopsies were performed according to the Danish government's official guidelines. PMCT and autopsy findings were interpreted independent of each other. Diagnoses, including the cause of death and histology findings, were registered in a computer database (SPSS) together with information about...

  5. Competency Reference for Computer Assisted Drafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem. Div. of Vocational Technical Education.

    This guide, developed in Oregon, lists competencies essential for students in computer-assisted drafting (CAD). Competencies are organized in eight categories: computer hardware, file usage and manipulation, basic drafting techniques, mechanical drafting, specialty disciplines, three dimensional drawing/design, plotting/printing, and advanced CAD.…

  6. Broadcast Copywriting and Computer Assisted Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagerman, William L.

    The teaching of broadcast copywriting can be enhanced by computer assisted instruction, especially in screening students' writing for adherence to classic "formulas" or "rules" for broadcast writing. Such rules might include avoiding cliches or not beginning a sentence with a subordinate clause. Other rules the computer can…

  7. To EDF: PHOEBUS, computer-assisted engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecocq, P.; Goudal, J.C.; Barache, J.M.; Feingold, D.; Cornon, P.

    1986-01-01

    EDF has built a modular integrated computer-assisted nuclear engineering (CAE) system called POEBUS. Since 1975, the Organization has been interested in CAE which places computer methods and technology at the disposal of the engineering department. This paper describes the changes and their effect on the techniques in use, working methods and the personnel called on to put them into operation [fr

  8. Computer-Assisted Discovery and Proof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.

    2007-12-10

    With the advent of powerful, widely-available mathematical software, combined with ever-faster computer hardware, we are approaching a day when both the discovery and proof of mathematical facts can be done in a computer-assisted manner. his article presents several specific examples of this new paradigm in action.

  9. Microfocus computed tomography in medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obodovskiy, A. V.

    2018-02-01

    Recent advances in the field of high-frequency power schemes for X-ray devices allow the creation of high-resolution instruments. At the department of electronic devices and Equipment of the St. Petersburg State Electrotechnical University, a model of a microfocus computer tomograph was developed. Used equipment allows to receive projection data with an increase up to 100 times. A distinctive feature of the device is the possibility of implementing various schemes for obtaining projection data.

  10. Computer Assisted Instruction in Basic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-28

    LIBRARY........................16 Program Purpose.........................16 Flowcharts ..........................17 Lessons...17IFlowchart For Main Menu...............19 Flowchart for Lessons One Through Six......................20 CHAPTER Page Tests I1-6 .* 21 Flowchart For...Software support was limited to off-the-shelf packages. All of the computers were purchased with Beginners All Purpose Instruction Code (BASIC), a word

  11. Utilizing Computer Integration to Assist Nursing

    OpenAIRE

    Hujcs, Marianne

    1990-01-01

    As the use of computers in health care continues to increase, methods of using these computers to assist nursing practice are also increasing. This paper describes how integration within a hospital information system (HIS) contributed to the development of a report format and computer generated alerts used by nurses. Discussion also includes how the report and alerts impact those nurses providing bedside care as well as how integration of an HIS creates challenges for nursing.

  12. Computational biomechanics for medicine imaging, modeling and computing

    CERN Document Server

    Doyle, Barry; Wittek, Adam; Nielsen, Poul; Miller, Karol

    2016-01-01

    The Computational Biomechanics for Medicine titles provide an opportunity for specialists in computational biomechanics to present their latest methodologies and advancements. This volume comprises eighteen of the newest approaches and applications of computational biomechanics, from researchers in Australia, New Zealand, USA, UK, Switzerland, Scotland, France and Russia. Some of the interesting topics discussed are: tailored computational models; traumatic brain injury; soft-tissue mechanics; medical image analysis; and clinically-relevant simulations. One of the greatest challenges facing the computational engineering community is to extend the success of computational mechanics to fields outside traditional engineering, in particular to biology, the biomedical sciences, and medicine. We hope the research presented within this book series will contribute to overcoming this grand challenge.

  13. Smart Computer-Assisted Markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Kevin A.; Rassenti, Stephen J.; Smith, Vernon L.

    1991-10-01

    The deregulation movement has motivated the experimental study of auction markets designed for interdependent network industries such as natural gas pipelines or electric power systems. Decentralized agents submit bids to buy commodity and offers to sell transportation and commodity to a computerized dispatch center. Computer algorithms determine prices and allocations that maximize the gains from exchange in the system relative to the submitted bids and offers. The problem is important, because traditionally the scale and coordination economies in such industries were thought to require regulation. Laboratory experiments are used to study feasibility, limitations, incentives, and performance of proposed market designs for deregulation, providing motivation for new theory.

  14. Computer-assisted nuclear fuel manufacture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maloney, J.P.; Schaumann, S.M.; Stone, E.

    1976-01-01

    At the ERDA Savannah River Plant, a process monitor, which incorporates an online digital computer, assists in manufacturing fuel elements used to produce nuclides such as plutonium, tritium, and californium in the plant's nuclear reactors. Also, inventory functions assist in safeguarding fissile material and protecting against accidental nuclear criticality. Terminals at strategic locations throughout the process area enable production operators to send and receive instructions and information on each manufacturing step

  15. Computer-assisted nuclear fuel manufacture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maloney, J.P.; Schaumann, C.M.; Stone, E.

    1976-06-01

    At the ERDA Savannah River Plant, a process monitor, which incorporates an online digital computer, assists in manufacturing fuel elements used to produce nuclides such as plutonium, tritium, and californium in the plant's nuclear reactors. Also, inventory functions assist in safeguarding fissile material and protecting against accidental nuclear criticality. Terminals at strategic locations throughout the process area enable production operators to send and receive instructions and information on each manufacturing step. 11 fig

  16. Computer-assisted propofol administration.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, J P A

    2012-02-01

    The use of propofol for sedation in endoscopy may allow for better quality of sedation, quicker recovery and facilitate greater throughput in endoscopy units. The cost-effectiveness and utility of propofol sedation for endoscopic procedures is contingent on the personnel and resources required to carry out the procedure. Computer-based platforms are based on the patients response to stimulation and physiologic parameters. They offer an appealing means of delivering safe and effective doses of propofol. One such means is the bispectral index where continuous EEG recordings are used to assess the degree of sedation. Another is the closed-loop target-controlled system where a set of physical parameters, such as muscle relaxation and auditory-evoked potential, determine a level of medication appropriate to achieve sedation. Patient-controlled platforms may also be used. These electronic adjuncts may help endoscopists who wish to adopt propofol sedation to change current practices with greater confidence.

  17. Computer-assisted propofol administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, J P A; O'Moráin, C A; Vargo, J J

    2010-01-01

    The use of propofol for sedation in endoscopy may allow for better quality of sedation, quicker recovery and facilitate greater throughput in endoscopy units. The cost-effectiveness and utility of propofol sedation for endoscopic procedures is contingent on the personnel and resources required to carry out the procedure. Computer-based platforms are based on the patients response to stimulation and physiologic parameters. They offer an appealing means of delivering safe and effective doses of propofol. One such means is the bispectral index where continuous EEG recordings are used to assess the degree of sedation. Another is the closed-loop target-controlled system where a set of physical parameters, such as muscle relaxation and auditory-evoked potential, determine a level of medication appropriate to achieve sedation. Patient-controlled platforms may also be used. These electronic adjuncts may help endoscopists who wish to adopt propofol sedation to change current practices with greater confidence. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. [Computer-assisted temporomandibular joint reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwetyenga, N; Mommers, X-A; Cheynet, F

    2013-08-02

    Prosthetic replacement of TMJ is gradually becoming a common procedure because of good functional and aesthetic results and low morbidity. Prosthetic models available can be standard or custom-made. Custom-made prosthesis are usually reserved for complex cases, but we think that computer assistance for custom-made prosthesis should be indicated for each case because it gives a greater implant stability and fewer complications. Computer assistance will further enlarge TMJ prosthesis replacement indications. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  19. Artificial Intelligence to Assist Clinical Diagnosis in Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saúl Oswaldo Lugo-Reyes

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Medicine is one of the elds of knowledge that would most bene t from a closer interaction with Computer studies and Mathematics by optimizing complex, imperfect processes such as differential diagnosis; this is the domain of Machine Learning, a branch of Arti cial Intelligence that builds and studies systems capable of learning from a set of training data, in order to optimize classi cation and prediction processes. In Mexico during the last few years, progress has been made on the implementation of electronic clinical records, so that the National Institutes of Health already have accumulated a wealth of stored data. For those data to become knowledge, they need to be processed and analyzed through complex statistical methods, as it is already being done in other countries, employing: case-based reasoning, artificial neural networks, Bayesian classi ers, multivariate logistic regression, or support vector machines, among other methodologies; to assist the clinical diagnosis of acute appendicitis, breast cancer and chronic liver disease, among a wide array of maladies. In this review we sift through concepts, antecedents, current examples and methodologies of machine learning-assisted clinical diagnosis.

  20. [Artificial intelligence to assist clinical diagnosis in medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo-Reyes, Saúl Oswaldo; Maldonado-Colín, Guadalupe; Murata, Chiharu

    2014-01-01

    Medicine is one of the fields of knowledge that would most benefit from a closer interaction with Computer studies and Mathematics by optimizing complex, imperfect processes such as differential diagnosis; this is the domain of Machine Learning, a branch of Artificial Intelligence that builds and studies systems capable of learning from a set of training data, in order to optimize classification and prediction processes. In Mexico during the last few years, progress has been made on the implementation of electronic clinical records, so that the National Institutes of Health already have accumulated a wealth of stored data. For those data to become knowledge, they need to be processed and analyzed through complex statistical methods, as it is already being done in other countries, employing: case-based reasoning, artificial neural networks, Bayesian classifiers, multivariate logistic regression, or support vector machines, among other methodologies; to assist the clinical diagnosis of acute appendicitis, breast cancer and chronic liver disease, among a wide array of maladies. In this review we shift through concepts, antecedents, current examples and methodologies of machine learning-assisted clinical diagnosis.

  1. Computer-Assisted Evaluation of Videokymographic Data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novozámský, Adam; Sedlář, Jiří; Zita, A.; Švec, J. G.; Zitová, Barbara; Flusser, Jan; Hauzar, D.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 1 (2013), s. 49-49 ISSN 1805-8698. [EFMI STC Prague Data and Knowledge for Medical Decision Support. 17.04.2013-19.04.2013, Praha] Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : videokymography * image process ing * computerassisted evaluation Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2013/ZOI/novozamsky-computer-assisted evaluation of videokymographic data.pdf

  2. Directory of computer users in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, J.J.; Gurney, J.; McClain, W.J.

    1979-09-01

    The Directory of Computer Users in Nuclear Medicine consists primarily of detailed descriptions and indexes to these descriptions. A typical Installation Description contains the name, address, type, and size of the institution and the names of persons within the institution who can be contacted for further information. If the department has access to a central computer facility for data analysis or timesharing, the type of equipment available and the method of access to that central computer is included. The dedicated data processing equipment used by the department in its nuclear medicine studies is described, including the peripherals, languages used, modes of data collection, and other pertinent information. Following the hardware descriptions are listed the types of studies for which the data processing equipment is used, including the language(s) used, the method of output, and an estimate of the frequency of the particular study. An Installation Index and an Organ Studies Index are also included

  3. Directory of computer users in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erickson, J.J.; Gurney, J.; McClain, W.J. (eds.)

    1979-09-01

    The Directory of Computer Users in Nuclear Medicine consists primarily of detailed descriptions and indexes to these descriptions. A typical Installation Description contains the name, address, type, and size of the institution and the names of persons within the institution who can be contacted for further information. If the department has access to a central computer facility for data analysis or timesharing, the type of equipment available and the method of access to that central computer is included. The dedicated data processing equipment used by the department in its nuclear medicine studies is described, including the peripherals, languages used, modes of data collection, and other pertinent information. Following the hardware descriptions are listed the types of studies for which the data processing equipment is used, including the language(s) used, the method of output, and an estimate of the frequency of the particular study. An Installation Index and an Organ Studies Index are also included. (PCS)

  4. Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) Software: Evaluation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluating the nature and extent of the influence of Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) on the quality of language learning is highly problematic. This is owing to the number and complexity of interacting variables involved in setting the items for teaching and learning languages. This paper identified and ...

  5. Computer-Assisted Instruction and Continuing Motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosley, Mary Lou; And Others

    Effects of two feedback conditions--comment and no comment--on the motivation of sixth grade students to continue with computer assisted instruction (CAI) were investigated, and results for boys and for girls were compared. Subjects were 62 students--29 boys and 33 girls--from a suburban elementary school who were randomly assigned to the comment…

  6. 43 Computer Assisted Programmed Instruction and Cognitive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cce

    between Cognitive Preference Style and Computer Assisted Programmed ... teaching the subjects makes a wide range of students who have moderate numerical ability and ... on achievement of physics students, more so when such strategy has .... explaining prompting, thinking, discussing, clarifying concepts, asking ...

  7. Computer Assistance for Writing Interactive Programs: TICS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplow, Roy; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Investigators developed an on-line, interactive programing system--the Teacher-Interactive Computer System (TICS)--to provide assistance to those who were not programers, but nevertheless wished to write interactive instructional programs. TICS had two components: an author system and a delivery system. Underlying assumptions were that…

  8. Computer Assisted Programmed Instruction and Cognitive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study probes into the effect of Computer Assisted Instruction and Cognitive preference style on achievement of secondary school Physics Students in Ogun State of Nigeria. The population of the study comprises the SS II students in Abeokuta Educational Zone. 186 students sample were drawn from the population for ...

  9. International assistance and cooperation for access to essential medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Emily A

    2010-06-15

    Access to essential medicines is a critical problem that plagues many developing countries. With a daunting number of domestic constraints - technologically, economically, and otherwise - developing countries are faced with a steep uphill battle to meet the human rights obligation of providing essential medicines immediately. To meet these challenges, the international human rights obligations of international assistance and cooperation can play a key role to help developing countries fulfill the need for access to essential medicines. This article seeks to highlight and expand upon the current understanding of international assistance and cooperation for access to essential medicines through a review of obligations identified in international human rights law and a synthesis of official guidance provided on the matter.

  10. Cognitive Approaches for Medicine in Cloud Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogiela, Urszula; Takizawa, Makoto; Ogiela, Lidia

    2018-03-03

    This paper will present the application potential of the cognitive approach to data interpretation, with special reference to medical areas. The possibilities of using the meaning approach to data description and analysis will be proposed for data analysis tasks in Cloud Computing. The methods of cognitive data management in Cloud Computing are aimed to support the processes of protecting data against unauthorised takeover and they serve to enhance the data management processes. The accomplishment of the proposed tasks will be the definition of algorithms for the execution of meaning data interpretation processes in safe Cloud Computing. • We proposed a cognitive methods for data description. • Proposed a techniques for secure data in Cloud Computing. • Application of cognitive approaches for medicine was described.

  11. [Basic concept in computer assisted surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merloz, Philippe; Wu, Hao

    2006-03-01

    To investigate application of medical digital imaging systems and computer technologies in orthopedics. The main computer-assisted surgery systems comprise the four following subcategories. (1) A collection and recording process for digital data on each patient, including preoperative images (CT scans, MRI, standard X-rays), intraoperative visualization (fluoroscopy, ultrasound), and intraoperative position and orientation of surgical instruments or bone sections (using 3D localises). Data merging based on the matching of preoperative imaging (CT scans, MRI, standard X-rays) and intraoperative visualization (anatomical landmarks, or bone surfaces digitized intraoperatively via 3D localiser; intraoperative ultrasound images processed for delineation of bone contours). (2) In cases where only intraoperative images are used for computer-assisted surgical navigation, the calibration of the intraoperative imaging system replaces the merged data system, which is then no longer necessary. (3) A system that provides aid in decision-making, so that the surgical approach is planned on basis of multimodal information: the interactive positioning of surgical instruments or bone sections transmitted via pre- or intraoperative images, display of elements to guide surgical navigation (direction, axis, orientation, length and diameter of a surgical instrument, impingement, etc. ). And (4) A system that monitors the surgical procedure, thereby ensuring that the optimal strategy defined at the preoperative stage is taken into account. It is possible that computer-assisted orthopedic surgery systems will enable surgeons to better assess the accuracy and reliability of the various operative techniques, an indispensable stage in the optimization of surgery.

  12. Computer Assisted Language Learning” (CALL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazlı Gündüz

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available This article will provide an overview of computers; an overview of the history of CALL, itspros and cons, the internet, World Wide Web, Multimedia, and research related to the uses of computers in the language classroom. Also, it also aims to provide some background for the beginnerson using the Internet in language classes today. It discusses some of the common types of Internetactivities that are being used today, what the minimum requirements are for using the Internet forlanguage learning, and some easy activities you can adapt for your classes. Some special terminology related to computers will also be used in this paper. For example, computer assisted language learning(CALL refers to the sets of instructions which need to be loaded into the computer for it to be able to work in the language classroom. It should be borne in mind that CALL does not refer to the use of acomputer by a teacher to type out a worksheet or a class list or preparing his/her own teaching alone.Hardware refers to any computer equipment used, including the computer itself, the keyboard, screen (or the monitor, the disc-drive, and the printer. Software (computer programs refers to the sets of instructions which need to be loaded into the computer for it to be able to work.

  13. Computer assisted diagnosis of benign bone tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samardziski, M.; Zafiroski, G.; Janevska, V.; Miladinova, D.; Popeska, Z.

    2004-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study is to determine the correlation between computer-assisted diagnosis (CAD) of benign bone tumours (BBT) and their histological type. Patients and method. Altogether 120 patients were included in two groups. The retrospective group comprised 68 patients in whom the histological type of BBT was known prior to computer analysis. The prospective group comprised 52 patients in whom the histological type of BBT was unknown prior to computer analysis. Computer program was efficient and easy to use. Results. Average percent of histological type confirmed with CAD in the retrospective and prospective groups was 72.06% and 76.92%, respectively. Histological confirmation of CAD in specific BBT was 91.42% for enchondroma, 96.15% for osteoid-osteoma, and 98.08% for osteochondroma. Significantly lower percentage of CAD confirmation of fibroma, chondromixoid fibroma, osteoclastoma, desmoplastic fibroma and osteobalstoma due to their adverse biological character or complex anatomic localization is understandable. Conclusions. The results speak in favour of the assumption that computer assisted diagnosis of bone tumours program may improve the diagnostic accuracy of the examiner. (author)

  14. Computational intelligence, medicine and biology selected links

    CERN Document Server

    Zaitseva, Elena

    2015-01-01

    This book contains an interesting and state-of the art collection of chapters presenting several examples of attempts to developing modern tools utilizing computational intelligence in different real life problems encountered by humans. Reasoning, prediction, modeling, optimization, decision making, etc. need modern, soft and intelligent algorithms, methods and methodologies to solve, in the efficient ways, problems appearing in human activity. The contents of the book is divided into two parts. Part I, consisting of four chapters, is devoted to selected links of computational intelligence, medicine, health care and biomechanics. Several problems are considered: estimation of healthcare system reliability, classification of ultrasound thyroid images, application of fuzzy logic to measure weight status and central fatness, and deriving kinematics directly from video records. Part II, also consisting of four chapters, is devoted to selected links of computational intelligence and biology. The common denominato...

  15. Computer Assisted Language Learning. Routledge Studies in Computer Assisted Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Martha

    2011-01-01

    Computer-assisted language learning (CALL) is an approach to language teaching and learning in which computer technology is used as an aid to the presentation, reinforcement and assessment of material to be learned, usually including a substantial interactive element. This books provides an up-to date and comprehensive overview of…

  16. Computer game assisted instruction and students' achievement in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Computer game assisted instruction and students' achievement in social studies. ... This paper examines the effects of computer game assisted instructional method, student's achievement in social studies in ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  17. 16th International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer Assisted Intervention

    CERN Document Server

    Klinder, Tobias; Li, Shuo

    2014-01-01

    This book contains the full papers presented at the MICCAI 2013 workshop Computational Methods and Clinical Applications for Spine Imaging. The workshop brought together researchers representing several fields, such as Biomechanics, Engineering, Medicine, Mathematics, Physics and Statistic. The works included in this book present and discuss new trends in those fields, using several methods and techniques in order to address more efficiently different and timely applications involving signal and image acquisition, image processing and analysis, image segmentation, image registration and fusion, computer simulation, image based modelling, simulation and surgical planning, image guided robot assisted surgical and image based diagnosis.

  18. Computers in Nuclear Medicine. Chapter 12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, J. A. [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-12-15

    In 1965, Gordon Moore, a co-founder of Intel, said that new memory chips have twice the capacity of prior chips, and that new chips are released every 18 to 24 months. This statement has become known as Moore’s law. Moore’s law means that memory size increases exponentially. More generally, the exponential growth of computers has applied not only to memory size, but also to many computer capabilities, and since 1965, Moore’s law has remained remarkably accurate. Further, this remarkable growth in capabilities has occurred with a steady decrease in price. Anyone who has even a little appreciation of exponential growth realizes that exponential growth cannot continue indefinitely. However, the history of computers is littered with ‘experts’ who have prematurely declared the end of Moore’s law. The quotation at the beginning of this section indicates that future growth of computers has often been underestimated. The exponential growth of computer capabilities has a very important implication for the management of a nuclear medicine department. The growth in productivity of the staff of a department is slow, especially when compared to the growth in capabilities of a computer. This means that whatever decision was made in the past about the balance between staff and computers is now out of date. A good heuristic is: always apply more computer capacity and less people to a new task. Or stated more simply, hardware is ‘cheap’, at least with respect to what you learned in training or what you decided last time you considered the balance between hardware and ‘peopleware’.

  19. Quality assurance of nuclear medicine computer software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cradduck, T.D.

    1986-01-01

    Although quality assurance activities have become well established for the hardware found in nuclear medicine little attention has been paid to computer software. This paper outlines some of the problems that exist and indicates some of the solutions presently under development. The major thrust has been towards establishment of programming standards and comprehensive documentation. Some manufacturers have developed installation verification procedures which programmers are urged to use as models for their own programs. Items that tend to cause erroneous results are discussed with the emphasis for error detection and correction being placed on proper education and training of the computer operator. The concept of interchangeable data files or 'software phantoms' for purposes of quality assurance is discussed. (Author)

  20. An industrial application of computer assisted tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonner, P.D.; Tosello, G.

    1984-10-01

    Computer assisted tomography (CAT) scanning is a nondestructive testing technique used to obtain quantitatively accurate mappings of the distribution of linear attenuation coefficients inside an object. To demonstrate the potential of the technique for accurately locating defects in three dimensions a sectioned 5 cm gate valve, with a shrink cavity made visible by the sectioning, was tomographically imaged using a Co-60 source. The tomographic images revealed a larger cavity below the sectioned surface. The position of this cavity was located with an in-plane and axial precision of approximately +- 1 mm. The volume of the cavity was estimated to be approximately 40 mm 3

  1. Computer-assisted diagnosis of melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Collin; Cellura, A Paul; Hibler, Brian P; Burris, Katy

    2016-03-01

    The computer-assisted diagnosis of melanoma is an exciting area of research where imaging techniques are combined with diagnostic algorithms in an attempt to improve detection and outcomes for patients with skin lesions suspicious for malignancy. Once an image has been acquired, it undergoes a processing pathway which includes preprocessing, enhancement, segmentation, feature extraction, feature selection, change detection, and ultimately classification. Practicality for everyday clinical use remains a vital question. A successful model must obtain results that are on par or outperform experienced dermatologists, keep costs at a minimum, be user-friendly, and be time efficient with high sensitivity and specificity. ©2015 Frontline Medical Communications.

  2. Computer-assisted spectral design and synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadakkumpadan, Fijoy; Wang, Qiqi; Sun, Yinlong

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a computer-assisted approach for spectral design and synthesis. This approach starts with some initial spectrum, modifies it interactively, evaluates the change, and decides the optimal spectrum. Given a requested change as function of wavelength, we model the change function using a Gaussian function. When there is the metameric constraint, from the Gaussian function of request change, we propose a method to generate the change function such that the result spectrum has the same color as the initial spectrum. We have tested the proposed method with different initial spectra and change functions, and implemented an interactive graphics environment for spectral design and synthesis. The proposed approach and graphics implementation for spectral design and synthesis can be helpful for a number of applications such as lighting of building interiors, textile coloration, and pigment development of automobile paints, and spectral computer graphics.

  3. Computer-assisted qualitative data analysis software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, Diane G

    2014-05-01

    Advances in technology have provided new approaches for data collection methods and analysis for researchers. Data collection is no longer limited to paper-and-pencil format, and numerous methods are now available through Internet and electronic resources. With these techniques, researchers are not burdened with entering data manually and data analysis is facilitated by software programs. Quantitative research is supported by the use of computer software and provides ease in the management of large data sets and rapid analysis of numeric statistical methods. New technologies are emerging to support qualitative research with the availability of computer-assisted qualitative data analysis software (CAQDAS).CAQDAS will be presented with a discussion of advantages, limitations, controversial issues, and recommendations for this type of software use.

  4. Directory of computer users in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henne, R.L.; Erickson, J.J.; McClain, W.J.; Kirch, D.L.

    1977-01-01

    The directory is composed of two major divisions, a Users' section and a Vendors' section. The Users' section consists of detailed installation descriptions and indexes to these descriptions. A typical description contains the name, address, type, and size of the institution as well as names of persons to contact. Following the hardware descriptions are listed the type of studies for which the computers are utilized, including the languages used, the method of output and an estimate of how often the study is performed. The Vendors' section contains short descriptions of current commercially available nuclear medicine systems as supplied by the vendors themselves. In order to reduce the amount of obsolete data and to include new institutions in future updates of the directory, a user questionnaire is included. (HLW)

  5. Directory of computer users in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henne, R.L.; Erickson, J.J.; McClain, W.J.; Kirch, D.L.

    1977-01-01

    The directory is composed of two major divisions, a Users' section and a Vendors' section. The Users' section consists of detailed installation descriptions and indexes to these descriptions. A typical description contains the name, address, type, and size of the institution as well as names of persons to contact. Following the hardware descriptions are listed the type of studies for which the computers are utilized, including the languages used, the method of output and an estimate of how often the study is performed. The Vendors' section contains short descriptions of current commercially available nuclear medicine systems as supplied by the vendors themselves. In order to reduce the amount of obsolete data and to include new institutions in future updates of the directory, a user questionnaire is included

  6. [Advancements of computer chemistry in separation of Chinese medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lingjuan; Hong, Hong; Xu, Xuesong; Guo, Liwei

    2011-12-01

    Separating technique of Chinese medicine is not only a key technique in the field of Chinese medicine' s research and development, but also a significant step in the modernization of Chinese medicinal preparation. Computer chemistry can build model and look for the regulations from Chinese medicine system which is full of complicated data. This paper analyzed the applicability, key technology, basic mode and common algorithm of computer chemistry applied in the separation of Chinese medicine, introduced the mathematic mode and the setting methods of Extraction kinetics, investigated several problems which based on traditional Chinese medicine membrane procession, and forecasted the application prospect.

  7. Computer Multimedia Assisted English Vocabulary Teaching Courseware

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Yue

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available English vocabulary is often regarded as the most boring link in English learning. However, English vocabulary is the basis of all aspects of English learning. Therefore, enriching the process of English vocabulary learning and stimulating the interest of English vocabulary learning are the keys to the reform of English vocabulary teaching. The computer multimedia is developing and popularizing rapidly with the rapid development of informationization and networking, which plays its role in more and more fields. The application of multimedia technology in the field of teaching is no longer strange. This paper mainly studied the design of computer multimedia assisted English vocabulary teaching courseware. First of all, this paper gave an overview of computer multimedia technology from the aspects of concept, characteristics, development and application situation, which cited and analyzed the cognitive learning theory and memory law. Under the guidance of scientific laws and in combination with the requirement analysis and pattern construction of English vocabulary teaching, this paper realized the module design, style design and database design of English vocabulary courseware. Finally, the content of English vocabulary teaching courseware was demonstrated, and its application effect was verified through the combination of subjective evaluation and objective evaluation. This article has an important guiding significance for stimulating students’ interest in English vocabulary learning and enhancing the quality of vocabulary teaching.

  8. Computers. A perspective on their usefulness in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loken, M.K.; Williams, L.E.; Ponto, R.A.; Ganatra, R.D.; Raikar, U.; Samuel, A.M.

    1977-01-01

    To date, many symposia have been held on computer applications in nuclear medicine. Despite all of these efforts, an appraisal of the true utility of computers in the day-to-day practice of nuclear medicine is yet to be achieved. Now that the technology of data storage and processing in nuclear medicine has reached a high degree of sophistication, as evidenced by many reports in the literature, the time has come to develop a perspective on the proper place of computers in nuclear medicine practice. The paper summarizes various uses of a dedicated computer (Nuclear Data Med II) at our two institutions and comments on its clinical utility. (author)

  9. Computer-assisted power plant management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boettcher, D.

    1990-01-01

    Operating a power plant and keeping it operational is ensured by a multiplicity of technical management subtasks which are cross referenced and based on an extensive inventory of descriptive and operational plant data. These data stocks are still registered in an isolated mode and managed and updated manually. This is a labor intensive, error prone procedure. In this situation, the introduction of a computer-assisted plant management system, whose core is a data-base of assured quality common to all activities, and which contains standardized processing aids fully planned for the subtasks occurring in the plant, is likely to achieve a considerable improvement in the quality of plant management and to relieve the staff of administrative activities. (orig.) [de

  10. Computer assisted visualization of digital mammography images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funke, M.; Breiter, N.; Grabbe, E.; Netsch, T.; Biehl, M.; Peitgen, H.O.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: In a clinical study, the feasibility of using a mammography workstation for the display and interpretation of digital mammography images was evaluated and the results were compared with the corresponding laser film hard copies. Materials and Methods: Digital phosphorous plate radiographs of the entire breast were obtained in 30 patients using a direct magnification mammography system. The images were displayed for interpretation on the computer monitor of a dedicated mammography workstation and also presented as laser film hard copies on a film view box for comparison. The images were evaluted with respect to the image handling, the image quality and the visualization of relevant structures by 3 readers. Results: Handling and contrast of the monitor displayed images were found to be superior compared with the film hard copies. Image noise was found in some cases but did not compromise the interpretation of the monitor images. The visualization of relevant structures was equal with both modalities. Altogether, image interpretation with the mammography workstation was considered to be easy, quick and confident. Conclusions: Computer-assisted visualization and interpretation of digital mammography images using a dedicated workstation can be performed with sufficiently high diagnostic accuracy. (orig.) [de

  11. Medicinal electrochemistry: integration of electrochemistry, medicinal chemistry and computational chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, M O; Maltarollo, V G; de Toledo, R A; Shim, H; Santos, M C; Honorio, K M

    2014-01-01

    Over the last centuries, there were many important discoveries in medicine that were crucial for gaining a better understanding of several physiological processes. Molecular modelling techniques are powerful tools that have been successfully used to analyse and interface medicinal chemistry studies with electrochemical experimental results. This special combination can help to comprehend medicinal chemistry problems, such as predicting biological activity and understanding drug action mechanisms. Electrochemistry has provided better comprehension of biological reactions and, as a result of many technological improvements, the combination of electrochemical techniques and biosensors has become an appealing choice for pharmaceutical and biomedical analyses. Therefore, this review will briefly outline the present scope and future advances related to the integration of electrochemical and medicinal chemistry approaches based on various applications from recent studies.

  12. Why physician-assisted suicide perpetuates the idolatory of medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Mark J

    2003-01-01

    Adequate response to physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia depends on fundamental philosophical and theological issues, including the character of an appropriate philosophically and theologically anchored anthropology, where the central element of traditional Christian anthropology is that humans are created to worship God. As I will argue, Christian morality and moral epistemology must be nested within and understood through this background Christian anthropology. As a result, I will argue that physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia can only be one-sidedly and inadequately appreciated through rational appeal to central values, such as "human dignity" and "self determination", or through "sola scriptura" biblical interpretation, or individual judgments of conscience. Adequately addressing physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia will depend on a more fundamental spiritual-therapeutic approach. This cluster of moral, epistemological, anthropological, and bioethical claims will be explored by drawing on the texts of St. Basil the Great, St. Maximos the Confessor, and St. Isaac the Syrian. Their reflections on medicine, the human good, and its relationship to worship, spiritual therapy, and God will be used as a basis to indicate a broader philosophical perspective, which will be needed to avoid a one-sided, incomplete approach to the challenges of physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia. Medical morality, I argue, is best understood within categories that transcend the right, the good, the just, and the virtuous; namely, the holy.

  13. CARS 2008: Computer Assisted Radiology and Surgery. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-06-15

    The proceedings contain contributions to the following topics: digital imaging, computed tomography, magnetic resonance, cardiac and vascular imaging, computer assisted radiation therapy, image processing and display, minimal invasive spinal surgery, computer assisted treatment of the prostate, the interventional radiology suite of the future, interventional oncology, computer assisted neurosurgery, computer assisted head and neck and ENT surgery, cardiovascular surgery, computer assisted orthopedic surgery, image processing and visualization, surgical robotics, instrumentation and navigation, surgical modelling, simulation and education, endoscopy and related techniques, workflow and new concepts in surgery, research training group 1126: intelligent surgery, digital operating room, image distribution and integration strategies, regional PACS and telemedicine, PACS - beyond radiology and E-learning, workflow and standardization, breast CAD, thoracic CAD, abdominal CAD, brain CAD, orthodontics, dentofacial orthopedics and airways, imaging and treating temporomandibular joint conditions, maxillofacial cone beam CT, craniomaxillofacial image fusion and CBCT incidental findings, image guided craniomaxillofacial procedures, imaging as a biomarker for therapy response, computer aided diagnosis. The Poster sessions cover the topics computer aided surgery, Euro PACS meeting, computer assisted radiology, computer aided diagnosis and computer assisted radiology and surgery.

  14. CARS 2008: Computer Assisted Radiology and Surgery. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The proceedings contain contributions to the following topics: digital imaging, computed tomography, magnetic resonance, cardiac and vascular imaging, computer assisted radiation therapy, image processing and display, minimal invasive spinal surgery, computer assisted treatment of the prostate, the interventional radiology suite of the future, interventional oncology, computer assisted neurosurgery, computer assisted head and neck and ENT surgery, cardiovascular surgery, computer assisted orthopedic surgery, image processing and visualization, surgical robotics, instrumentation and navigation, surgical modelling, simulation and education, endoscopy and related techniques, workflow and new concepts in surgery, research training group 1126: intelligent surgery, digital operating room, image distribution and integration strategies, regional PACS and telemedicine, PACS - beyond radiology and E-learning, workflow and standardization, breast CAD, thoracic CAD, abdominal CAD, brain CAD, orthodontics, dentofacial orthopedics and airways, imaging and treating temporomandibular joint conditions, maxillofacial cone beam CT, craniomaxillofacial image fusion and CBCT incidental findings, image guided craniomaxillofacial procedures, imaging as a biomarker for therapy response, computer aided diagnosis. The Poster sessions cover the topics computer aided surgery, Euro PACS meeting, computer assisted radiology, computer aided diagnosis and computer assisted radiology and surgery

  15. Computer-assisted oral and maxillofacial surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassfeld, S.; Brief, J.; Muehling, J.; Krempien, R.; Mende, U.; Raczkowsky, J.; Muenchenberg, J.; Woern, H.; Giess, H.; Meinzer, H.P.

    2000-01-01

    Background: Methods from the area of virtual reality are used in oral and maxillofacial surgery for the planning and three-dimensional individual simulation of surgeries. Simulation: In order to simulate complex surgeries with the aid of a computer, the diagnostic image data and especially various imaging modalities (CT, MRT, US) must be arranged in relation to each other, thus enabling rapid switching between the various modalities as well as the viewing of mixed images. Segmenting techniques for the reconstruction of three-dimensional representations of soft-tissue and osseous areas are required. We must develop ergonomic and intuitively useable interaction methods for the surgeon, thus allowing for precise and fast entry of the planned surgical intervention in the planning and simulation phase. Surgery: During the surgical phase, instrument navigation tools offer the surgeon interactive support through operation guidance and control of potential dangers. This feature is already available today. Future intraoperative assistance will take the form of such passive tools for the support of intraoperative orientation as well as so-called tracking systems (semi-active systems) which accompany and support the surgeons' work. The final form are robots which execute specific steps completely autonomously. Discussion: The techniques of virtual reality keep gaining in importance for medical applications. Many applications are still being developed or are still in the form of a prototype. However, it is already clear that developments in this area will have a considerable effect on the surgeon's routine work. (orig.) [de

  16. Computers in nuclear medicine - current trends and future directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Previously, a decision to purchase computing equipment for nuclear medicine usually required evaluation of the 'local' needs. With the advent of Pacs and state of the art computer techniques for image acquisition and manipulation, purchase and subsequent application is to become much more complex. Some of the current trends and future possibilities which may influence the choice and operation of computers within and outside the nuclear medicine environment is discussed. (author)

  17. Computer-Assisted Linguistic Analysis of the Peshitta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roorda, D.; Talstra, Eep; Dyk, Janet; van Keulen, Percy; Sikkel, Constantijn; Bosman, H.J.; Jenner, K.D.; Bakker, Dirk; Volkmer, J.A.; Gutman, Ariel; van Peursen, Wido Th.

    2014-01-01

    CALAP (Computer-Assisted Linguistic Analysis of the Peshitta), a joint research project of the Peshitta Institute Leiden and the Werkgroep Informatica at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam (1999-2005) CALAP concerned the computer-assisted analysis of the Peshitta to Kings (Janet Dyk and Percy van

  18. Incorporating computer-assisted assessment to Bachelor of Science ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of computers in education has already been established for decades. Computers have been used from lesson preparations, presentations, and student assessments. Many authors have studied the design, implementation, and impact of computer-assisted assessment (CAA) (also called computer-based testing, ...

  19. Computer-assisted trauma care prototype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzman, T G; Griffith, A; Hunter, W G; Allen, T; Simpson, R J

    1995-01-01

    accurately used in urban, rural, and military field settings. his demonstration will focus on the user interfaces for the hand-held computer device included in TCIMS, the Field Medic Associate (FMA). The FMA prototype is a ruggedized, water-resistant personal computer, weighing approximately 5 lbs. It has an LCD graphical user interface display for patient record input and output, pen-based and audio input, audio output, and wireless communications capabilities. Automatic recording and dynamic, graphical display of time-stamped trends in patient vital signs will be simulated during the demonstration. Means for accessing existing patient record information (e.g., allergies to particular medications) and updating the record with the nature of the injury, its cause, and the treatments that were administered will be shown. These will include use of an electronic pen to mark up anatoglyphs (standard drawings of human body appearing on computer screen) to show where injuries occurred and where treatments were applied, and to input textual descriptions of the nature of the injury, its cause, what treatments were administered, etc. Computer recognition of handwritten inputs will be shown. Likewise, voice annotation and audio playback of patient record information by medics and hospital personnel will be illustrated. These latter technologies free the care providers' hands to treat the patient; they can therefore provide inputs to the patient record while information is fresh in their minds. The audio playback option allows hospital personnel to select more detailed voice annotations of specific portions of the patient record by simply touching the electronic pen to a particular place where an electronic pen marking was made by a medic in the field and then listening to the medic's corresponding audio commentary. Finally, the FMA's means for assisting the medic in simultaneously managing several injured patients will be shown. (abstract truncated)

  20. Computer-assisted design/computer-assisted manufacturing systems: A revolution in restorative dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arbaz Sajjad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For the better part of the past 20 years, dentistry has seen the development of many new all-ceramic materials and restorative techniques fueled by the desire to capture the ever elusive esthetic perfection. This has resulted in the fusion of the latest in material science and the pen ultimate in computer-assisted design/computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM technology. This case report describes the procedure for restoring the esthetic appearance of both the left and right maxillary peg-shaped lateral incisors with a metal-free sintered finely structured feldspar ceramic material using the latest laboratory CAD/CAM system. The use of CAD/CAM technology makes it possible to produce restorations faster with precision- fit and good esthetics overcoming the errors associated with traditional ceramo-metal technology. The incorporation of this treatment modality would mean that the dentist working procedures will have to be adapted in the methods of CAD/CAM technology.

  1. Biotechnology Computing: Information Science for the Era of Molecular Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masys, Daniel R.

    1989-01-01

    The evolution from classical genetics to biotechnology, an area of research involving key macromolecules in living cells, is chronicled and the current state of biotechnology is described, noting related advances in computing and clinical medicine. (MSE)

  2. Computer-Assisted Learning in Anatomy at the International Medical School in Debrecen, Hungary: A Preliminary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kish, Gary; Cook, Samuel A.; Kis, Greta

    2013-01-01

    The University of Debrecen's Faculty of Medicine has an international, multilingual student population with anatomy courses taught in English to all but Hungarian students. An elective computer-assisted gross anatomy course, the Computer Human Anatomy (CHA), has been taught in English at the Anatomy Department since 2008. This course focuses on an…

  3. Practical clinical applications of the computer in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.R.; Erickson, J.J.; Patton, J.A.; Jones, J.P.; Lagan, J.E.; Rollo, F.D.

    1978-01-01

    The impact of the computer on the practice of nuclear medicine has been felt primarily in the area of rapid dynamic studies. At this time it is difficult to find a clinic which routinely performs computer processing of static images. The general purpose digital computer is a sophisticated and flexible instrument. The number of applications for which one can use the computer to augment data acquisition, analysis, or display is essentially unlimited. In this light, the purpose of this exhibit is not to describe all possible applications of the computer in nuclear medicine but rather to illustrate those applications which have generally been accepted as practical in the routine clinical environment. Specifically, we have chosen examples of computer augmented cardiac, and renal function studies as well as examples of relative organ blood flow studies. In addition, a short description of basic computer components and terminology along with a few examples of non-imaging applications are presented

  4. Center for Advanced Energy Studies: Computer Assisted Virtual Environment (CAVE)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The laboratory contains a four-walled 3D computer assisted virtual environment - or CAVE TM — that allows scientists and engineers to literally walk into their data...

  5. Effects of computer-assisted oral anticoagulant therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rune Skovgaard; Corell, Pernille; Madsen, Poul

    2012-01-01

    : Patients randomized to computer-assisted anticoagulation and the CoaguChek® system reached the therapeutic target range after 8 days compared to 14 days by prescriptions from physicians (p = 0.04). Time spent in the therapeutic target range did not differ between groups. The median INR value measured...... prescribed by physicians, and the total time spent within the therapeutic target range was similar. Thus computer-assisted oral anticoagulant therapy may reduce the cost of anticoagulation therapy without lowering the quality. INR values measured by CoaguChek® were reliable compared to measurements......UNLABELLED: BACKGROUND: Computer-assistance and self-monitoring lower the cost and may improve the quality of anticoagulation therapy. The main purpose of this clinical investigation was to use computer-assisted oral anticoagulant therapy to improve the time to reach and the time spent within...

  6. Research on the Use of Computer-Assisted Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft, C. O.

    1982-01-01

    Reviews recent research studies related to computer assisted instruction (CAI). The studies concerned program effectiveness, teaching of psychomotor skills, tool availability, and factors affecting the adoption of CAI. (CT)

  7. Computer-assisted optimization of chest fluoroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korolyuk, I.P.; Filippova, N.V.; Kirillov, L.P.; Momsenko, S.F.

    1987-01-01

    The main trends in the use of computer for the optimization of chest fluorography among employees and workers of a large industrial enterprise are considered. The following directions were determined: automatted sorting of fluorograms, formalization of X-ray signs in describing fluorograms, organization of a special system of fluorographic data management. Four levels of algorithms to solve the problems of fluorography were considered: 1) shops, personnel department, etc.; 2) an automated center for mass screening and a medical unit; 3) a computer center and 4) planning and management service. The results of computer use over a 3-year period were analyzed. The efficacy of computer was shown

  8. Experiences Providing Medical Assistance during the Sewol Ferry Disaster Using Traditional Korean Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Kyeong Han; Jang, Soobin; Lee, Ju Ah; Jang, Bo-Hyoung; Go, Ho-Yeon; Park, Sunju; Jo, Hee-Guen; Lee, Myeong Soo; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2017-01-01

    Background. This study aimed to investigate medical records using traditional Korean medicine (TKM) in Sewol Ferry disaster in 2014 and further explore the possible role of traditional medicine in disaster situation. Methods. After Sewol Ferry accident, 3 on-site tents for TKM assistance by the Association of Korean Medicine (AKOM) in Jindo area were installed. The AKOM mobilized volunteer TKM doctors and assistants and dispatched each on-site tent in three shifts within 24 hours. Anyone coul...

  9. Computer assisted pyeloplasty in children the retroperitoneal approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, L H; Jorgensen, T M

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE: We describe the first series of computer assisted retroperitoneoscopic pyeloplasty in children using the Da Vinci Surgical System (Intuitive Surgical, Inc., Mountainview, California) with regard to setup, method, operation time, complications and preliminary outcome. The small space...... with the Da Vinci Surgical System. With the patient in a lateral semiprone position the retroperitoneal space was developed by blunt and balloon dissection. Three ports were placed for the computer assisted system and 1 for assistance. Pyeloplasty was performed with the mounted system placed behind...

  10. Scientific information repository assisting reflectance spectrometry in legal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belenki, Liudmila; Sterzik, Vera; Bohnert, Michael; Zimmermann, Klaus; Liehr, Andreas W

    2012-06-01

    Reflectance spectrometry is a fast and reliable method for the characterization of human skin if the spectra are analyzed with respect to a physical model describing the optical properties of human skin. For a field study performed at the Institute of Legal Medicine and the Freiburg Materials Research Center of the University of Freiburg, a scientific information repository has been developed, which is a variant of an electronic laboratory notebook and assists in the acquisition, management, and high-throughput analysis of reflectance spectra in heterogeneous research environments. At the core of the repository is a database management system hosting the master data. It is filled with primary data via a graphical user interface (GUI) programmed in Java, which also enables the user to browse the database and access the results of data analysis. The latter is carried out via Matlab, Python, and C programs, which retrieve the primary data from the scientific information repository, perform the analysis, and store the results in the database for further usage.

  11. Computer-Assisted Management of Instruction in Veterinary Public Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Elsbeth; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Reviews a course in Food Hygiene and Public Health at the University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine in which students are sequenced through a series of computer-based lessons or autotutorial slide-tape lessons, the computer also being used to route, test, and keep records. Since grades indicated mastery of the subject, the course will…

  12. 76 Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) Software ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ike Odimegwu

    combination with other factors which may enhance or ameliorate the ... form of computer-based learning which carries two important features: .... To take some commonplace examples, a ... photographs, and even full-motion video clips.

  13. Early Childhood Teacher Candidates\\' Attitudes towards Computer and Computer Assisted Instruction

    OpenAIRE

    Oğuz, Evrim; Ellez, A. Murat; Akamca, Güzin Özyılmaz; Kesercioğlu, Teoman İ.; Girgin, Günseli

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this research is to evaluate preschool candidates’ attitudes towards computers andattitudes towards use of computer assisted instruction. The sample of this study includes 481 early childhoodeducation students who attended Dokuz Eylül University’s department of Early Childhood Education. Data werecollected by using “Scale of Computer Assisted Instruction Attitudes” developed by the Arslan (2006),“Computer Attitudes Scale” developed by Çelik & Bindak (2005) and “General Info...

  14. Oral and maxillofacial surgery with computer-assisted navigation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawachi, Homare; Kawachi, Yasuyuki; Ikeda, Chihaya; Takagi, Ryo; Katakura, Akira; Shibahara, Takahiko

    2010-01-01

    Intraoperative computer-assisted navigation has gained acceptance in maxillofacial surgery with applications in an increasing number of indications. We adapted a commercially available wireless passive marker system which allows calibration and tracking of virtually every instrument in maxillofacial surgery. Virtual computer-generated anatomical structures are displayed intraoperatively in a semi-immersive head-up display. Continuous observation of the operating field facilitated by computer assistance enables surgical navigation in accordance with the physician's preoperative plans. This case report documents the potential for augmented visualization concepts in surgical resection of tumors in the oral and maxillofacial region. We report a case of T3N2bM0 carcinoma of the maxillary gingival which was surgically resected with the assistance of the Stryker Navigation Cart System. This system was found to be useful in assisting preoperative planning and intraoperative monitoring.

  15. Computer-Assisted Language Learning: Diversity in Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockwell, Glenn, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Computer-assisted language learning (CALL) is an approach to teaching and learning languages that uses computers and other technologies to present, reinforce, and assess material to be learned, or to create environments where teachers and learners can interact with one another and the outside world. This book provides a much-needed overview of the…

  16. Computer-Assisted Instruction: Authoring Languages. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Thomas C.

    One of the most perplexing tasks in producing computer-assisted instruction (CAI) is the authoring process. Authoring is generally defined as the process of turning the flowcharts, control algorithms, format sheets, and other documentation of a CAI program's design into computer code that will operationalize the simulation on the delivery system.…

  17. Brain-Computer Interfaces in Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Jerry J.; Krusienski, Dean J.; Wolpaw, Jonathan R.

    2012-01-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) acquire brain signals, analyze them, and translate them into commands that are relayed to output devices that carry out desired actions. BCIs do not use normal neuromuscular output pathways. The main goal of BCI is to replace or restore useful function to people disabled by neuromuscular disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, cerebral palsy, stroke, or spinal cord injury. From initial demonstrations of electroencephalography-based spelling and single-neuron-based device control, researchers have gone on to use electroencephalographic, intracortical, electrocorticographic, and other brain signals for increasingly complex control of cursors, robotic arms, prostheses, wheelchairs, and other devices. Brain-computer interfaces may also prove useful for rehabilitation after stroke and for other disorders. In the future, they might augment the performance of surgeons or other medical professionals. Brain-computer interface technology is the focus of a rapidly growing research and development enterprise that is greatly exciting scientists, engineers, clinicians, and the public in general. Its future achievements will depend on advances in 3 crucial areas. Brain-computer interfaces need signal-acquisition hardware that is convenient, portable, safe, and able to function in all environments. Brain-computer interface systems need to be validated in long-term studies of real-world use by people with severe disabilities, and effective and viable models for their widespread dissemination must be implemented. Finally, the day-to-day and moment-to-moment reliability of BCI performance must be improved so that it approaches the reliability of natural muscle-based function. PMID:22325364

  18. Computational biomechanics for medicine new approaches and new applications

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Karol; Wittek, Adam; Nielsen, Poul

    2015-01-01

    The Computational Biomechanics for Medicine titles provide an opportunity for specialists in computational biomechanics to present their latest methodologiesand advancements. Thisvolumecomprises twelve of the newest approaches and applications of computational biomechanics, from researchers in Australia, New Zealand, USA, France, Spain and Switzerland. Some of the interesting topics discussed are:real-time simulations; growth and remodelling of soft tissues; inverse and meshless solutions; medical image analysis; and patient-specific solid mechanics simulations. One of the greatest challenges facing the computational engineering community is to extend the success of computational mechanics to fields outside traditional engineering, in particular to biology, the biomedical sciences, and medicine. We hope the research presented within this book series will contribute to overcoming this grand challenge.

  19. Computational Tools To Model Halogen Bonds in Medicinal Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Melissa Coates; Ho, P Shing

    2016-03-10

    The use of halogens in therapeutics dates back to the earliest days of medicine when seaweed was used as a source of iodine to treat goiters. The incorporation of halogens to improve the potency of drugs is now fairly standard in medicinal chemistry. In the past decade, halogens have been recognized as direct participants in defining the affinity of inhibitors through a noncovalent interaction called the halogen bond or X-bond. Incorporating X-bonding into structure-based drug design requires computational models for the anisotropic distribution of charge and the nonspherical shape of halogens, which lead to their highly directional geometries and stabilizing energies. We review here current successes and challenges in developing computational methods to introduce X-bonding into lead compound discovery and optimization during drug development. This fast-growing field will push further development of more accurate and efficient computational tools to accelerate the exploitation of halogens in medicinal chemistry.

  20. Terrace Layout Using a Computer Assisted System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Development of a web-based terrace design tool based on the MOTERR program is presented, along with representative layouts for conventional and parallel terrace systems. Using digital elevation maps and geographic information systems (GIS), this tool utilizes personal computers to rapidly construct ...

  1. Electromagnetic Induction: A Computer-Assisted Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrickson, J. E.; Moreland, L.

    1972-01-01

    By using minimal equipment it is possible to demonstrate Faraday's Law. An electronic desk calculator enables sophomore students to solve a difficult mathematical expression for the induced EMF. Polaroid pictures of the plot of induced EMF, together with the computer facility, enables students to make comparisons. (PS)

  2. Precision Medicine and PET/Computed Tomography: Challenges and Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Rathan M

    2017-01-01

    Precision Medicine is about selecting the right therapy for the right patient, at the right time, specific to the molecular targets expressed by disease or tumors, in the context of patient's environment and lifestyle. Some of the challenges for delivery of precision medicine in oncology include biomarkers for patient selection for enrichment-precision diagnostics, mapping out tumor heterogeneity that contributes to therapy failures, and early therapy assessment to identify resistance to therapies. PET/computed tomography offers solutions in these important areas of challenges and facilitates implementation of precision medicine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Toward computer-assisted diagnosis and telemedicine in ophthalmology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marrugo, A.; Millán, M. S.; Cristóbal, G.; Gabarda, S.; Šorel, Michal; Šroubek, Filip

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 2012, č. 6 (2012), s. 1-3 ISSN 1818-2259 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0572 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : computer-aided diagnosis * medical and retinal image * deconvolution * telemedicine Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2012/ZOI/sorel-toward computer-assisted diagnosis and telemedicine in ophthalmology.pdf

  4. Motivation in computer-assisted instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Amanda; Shewokis, Patricia A; Ting, Kimberly; Fung, Kevin

    2016-08-01

    Computer-aided instruction (CAI) is defined as instruction in which computers play a central role as the means of information delivery and direct interaction with learners. Computer-aided instruction has become mainstream in medical school curricula. For example, a three-dimensional (3D) computer module of the larynx has been created to teach laryngeal anatomy. Although the novelty and educational potential of CAI has garnered much attention, these new technologies have been plagued with low utilization rates. Several experts attribute this problem to lack of motivation in students. Motivation is defined as the desire and action toward goal-oriented behavior. Psychologist Dr. John Keller developed the ARCS theory of motivational learning, which proposed four components: attention (A), relevance (R), concentration (C), and satisfaction (S). Keller believed that motivation is not only an innate characteristic of the pupil; it can also be influenced by external factors, such as the instructional design of the curriculum. Thus, understanding motivation is an important step to designing CAI appropriately. Keller also developed a 36-item validated instrument called the Instructional Materials Motivation Survey (IMMS) to measure motivation. The objective of this study was to study motivation in CAI. Medical students learning anatomy with the 3D computer module will have higher laryngeal anatomy test scores and higher IMMS motivation scores. Higher anatomy test scores will be positively associated with higher IMMS scores. Prospective, randomized, controlled trial. After obtaining institutional review board approval, 100 medical students (mean age 25.5 ± 2.5, 49% male) were randomized to either the 3D computer module (n = 49) or written text (n = 51). Information content was identical in both arms. Students were given 30 minutes to study laryngeal anatomy and then completed the laryngeal anatomy test and IMMS. Students were categorized as either junior (year 1

  5. [Computer assisted orthognathic surgery: Condyle repositioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettega, G; Leitner, F

    2013-07-17

    Computer aided surgery has become a standard in many fields. It is rarely used in orthognathic surgery. Twenty years ago, we developed a navigation system adapted to this surgery, especially for mandibular condyle repositioning. The system has been improved along with technological progress. The authors of several clinical studies have validated this system. It is now routinely used in our department, because of its educational virtues among other assets. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  6. Equine-Assisted Therapies: Complementary Medicine or Not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliffe, Katherine T.; Sanekane, Cindy

    2009-01-01

    Equine-assisted therapies are interventions that use the unique qualities of a horse to assist persons with disabilities to improve their gross motor, language, social, and self-help skills. Programs offering these services are varied and operate on all major continents across the world. The effectiveness of equine-assisted therapies is generally…

  7. L'Enseignement des langues assiste par ordinateur: nouvelle pedagogie? (Computer Assisted Language Instruction: New Pedagogy?).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkabas, Charles

    1989-01-01

    Recent second language instruction computer software focuses almost exclusively on the structures and forms of language, and on programed learning instead of developing communicative skills. Until artificial intelligence changes these old behavioristic principles, computer-assisted language instruction can only play a minor role in language…

  8. [Computed tomography with computer-assisted detection of pulmonary nodules in dogs and cats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niesterok, C; Piesnack, S; Köhler, C; Ludewig, E; Alef, M; Kiefer, I

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the potential benefit of computer-assisted detection (CAD) of pulmonary nodules in veterinary medicine. Therefore, the CAD rate was compared to the detection rates of two individual examiners in terms of its sensitivity and false-positive findings. We included 51 dogs and 16 cats with pulmonary nodules previously diagnosed by computed tomography. First, the number of nodules ≥ 3 mm was recorded for each patient by two independent examiners. Subsequently, each examiner used the CAD software for automated nodule detection. With the knowledge of the CAD results, a final consensus decision on the number of nodules was achieved. The software used was a commercially available CAD program. The sensitivity of examiner 1 was 89.2%, while that of examiner 2 reached 87.4%. CAD had a sensitivity of 69.4%. With CAD, the sensitivity of examiner 1 increased to 94.7% and that of examiner 2 to 90.8%. The CAD-system, which we used in our study, had a moderate sensitivity of 69.4%. Despite its severe limitations, with a high level of false-positive and false-negative results, CAD increased the examiners' sensitivity. Therefore, its supportive role in diagnostics appears to be evident.

  9. Accuracy of computer-assisted cervicle pedicle screw installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Honglei; Zhou Dongsheng; Jang Zhensong

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the accuracy of computer-assisted cervical pedicle screw installation and the reason of screw malposition. Methods: A total of 172 cervical pedicle screws were installed by computer-assisted navigation for 30 patients with lower cervical spinal diseases. All the patients were examined by X-ray and CT after operation. Screw's position and direction were measured on the sagittal and transectional images of intraoperative navigation and post-operative CT. Then linear regression analysis was taken between navigational and post-operative CT's images. Results: Two screws perforated the upper pedicle wall, 3 perforated the lateral pedicle wall.There was a positive linear correlation between navigational and post-operative CT's images. Conclusion: Computer-assisted navigation can provide the high accuracy of cervical pedicle screw installation and excursion phenomenon is reason of screw malposition. (authors)

  10. Computational biomechanics for medicine from algorithms to models and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Joldes, Grand; Nielsen, Poul; Doyle, Barry; Miller, Karol

    2017-01-01

    This volume comprises the latest developments in both fundamental science and patient-specific applications, discussing topics such as: cellular mechanics; injury biomechanics; biomechanics of heart and vascular system; medical image analysis; and both patient-specific fluid dynamics and solid mechanics simulations. With contributions from researchers world-wide, the Computational Biomechanics for Medicine series of titles provides an opportunity for specialists in computational biomechanics to present their latest methodologies and advancements.

  11. Accuracy of computer-assisted orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Riu, Giacomo; Virdis, Paola Ilaria; Meloni, Silvio Mario; Lumbau, Aurea; Vaira, Luigi Angelo

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the difference between the planned and the actual movements of the jaws, using three-dimensional (3D) software for PC-assisted orthognathic surgery, to establish the accuracy of the procedure. A retrospective study was performed with 49 patients who had undergone PC-guided bimaxillary surgery. The accuracy of the protocol was determined by comparing planned movements of the jaws with the actual surgical movements, analysing frontal and lateral cephalometries. The overall results were deemed accurate, and differences among 12 of the 15 parameters were considered nonsignificant. Significant differences were reported for SNA (p = 0.008), SNB (p = 0.006), and anterior facial height (p = 0.033). The latter was significantly different in patients who had undergone genioplasty when compared with patients who had not. Virtual surgical planning presented a good degree of accuracy for most of the parameters assessed, with an average error of 1.98 mm for linear measures and 1.19° for angular measures. In general, a tendency towards under-projection in jaws was detected, probably due to imperfect condylar seating. A slight overcorrection of SNA and SNB during virtual planning (approximately 2°) could be beneficial. Further progress is required in the development of 3D simulation of the soft tissue, which currently does not allow an accurate management of the facial height and the chin position. Virtual planning cannot replace the need for constant intraoperative monitoring of the jaws' movements and real-time comparisons between planned and actual outcomes. It is therefore appropriate to leave some margin for correction of inaccuracies in the virtual planning. In this sense, it may be appropriate to use only the intermediate splint, and then use the planned occlusion and clinical measurements to guide repositioning of the second jaw and chin, respectively. Copyright © 2017 European Association for Cranio

  12. Computer Models and Automata Theory in Biology and Medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Baianu, I C

    2004-01-01

    The applications of computers to biological and biomedical problem solving goes back to the very beginnings of computer science, automata theory [1], and mathematical biology [2]. With the advent of more versatile and powerful computers, biological and biomedical applications of computers have proliferated so rapidly that it would be virtually impossible to compile a comprehensive review of all developments in this field. Limitations of computer simulations in biology have also come under close scrutiny, and claims have been made that biological systems have limited information processing power [3]. Such general conjectures do not, however, deter biologists and biomedical researchers from developing new computer applications in biology and medicine. Microprocessors are being widely employed in biological laboratories both for automatic data acquisition/processing and modeling; one particular area, which is of great biomedical interest, involves fast digital image processing and is already established for rout...

  13. Computer Assisted Orthopaedic Surgery – CAOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enes M. Kanlić

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of computer navigation in orthopedic surgery allows for real time intraoperative feedback resulting in higher precision of bone cuts, better alignment of implants and extremities, easier fracture reductions, less radiation and better documentation than what is possible in classical orthopaedic procedures. There is no need for direct and repeated visualization of many anatomical landmarks (classical method in order to have good intraoperative orientation. Navigation technology depicts anatomy and position of "smart tools" on the screen allowing for high surgical precision (smaller number of outliers from desired goal and with less soft tissue dissection (minimally invasive surgery - MIS. As a result, there are more happy patients with less pain, faster recovery, better functional outcome and well positioned, long lasting implants. In general, navigation cases are longer on the average 10 to 20 minutes, special training is required and equipment is relatively expensive. CAOS applications in knee and hip joint replacement are discussed.

  14. Agent assisted interactive algorithm for computationally demanding multiobjective optimization problems

    OpenAIRE

    Ojalehto, Vesa; Podkopaev, Dmitry; Miettinen, Kaisa

    2015-01-01

    We generalize the applicability of interactive methods for solving computationally demanding, that is, time-consuming, multiobjective optimization problems. For this purpose we propose a new agent assisted interactive algorithm. It employs a computationally inexpensive surrogate problem and four different agents that intelligently update the surrogate based on the preferences specified by a decision maker. In this way, we decrease the waiting times imposed on the decision maker du...

  15. Feedback in Computer Assisted Pronunciation Training: When technology meets pedagogy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neri, A.; Cucchiarini, C.; Strik, H.

    2002-01-01

    Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) has now established itself as a prolific and fast growing area whose advantages are already well-known to educators. Yet, many authors lament the lack of a reliable integrated conceptual framework linking technology advances and second language acquisition

  16. Conversation Analysis in Computer-Assisted Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Lloret, Marta

    2015-01-01

    The use of Conversation Analysis (CA) in the study of technology-mediated interactions is a recent methodological addition to qualitative research in the field of Computer-assisted Language Learning (CALL). The expansion of CA in Second Language Acquisition research, coupled with the need for qualitative techniques to explore how people interact…

  17. Optimizing Computer Assisted Instruction By Applying Principles of Learning Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Thomas O.

    The development of learning theory and its application to computer-assisted instruction (CAI) are described. Among the early theoretical constructs thought to be important are E. L. Thorndike's concept of learning connectisms, Neal Miller's theory of motivation, and B. F. Skinner's theory of operant conditioning. Early devices incorporating those…

  18. Assisted supervision of a computer aided tele-operation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Bars, H; Gravez, P; Fournier, R

    1994-12-31

    This paper talks about Computer Aided Tele-operation (CAT) in dismantling and maintenance of nuclear plants. The current research orientations at CEA, basic concepts of the supervision assistance system and the realisation of a prototype are presented. (TEC). 3 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Assisted supervision of a computer aided tele-operation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Bars, H.; Gravez, P.; Fournier, R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper talks about Computer Aided Tele-operation (CAT) in dismantling and maintenance of nuclear plants. The current research orientations at CEA, basic concepts of the supervision assistance system and the realisation of a prototype are presented. (TEC). 3 refs., 4 figs

  20. Computer-Assisted Periodical Routing and Renewal Audit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerkey, A. Neil

    1973-01-01

    A computer-assisted periodical control system was designed to reduce clerical time required to maintain records in three areas: renewal audit, routing, and records-keeping. The renewal audit features are unusual and are described in detail. (3 references) (Author/DH)

  1. Ethical and Professional Issues in Computer-Assisted Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, B. Douglas

    1993-01-01

    Discusses ethical and professional issues in psychology regarding computer-assisted therapy (CAT). Topics addressed include an explanation of CAT; whether CAT is psychotherapy; software, including independent use, validation of effectiveness, and restricted access; clinician resistance; client acceptance; the impact on ethical standards; and a…

  2. An Intelligent Computer Assisted Language Learning System for Arabic Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaalan, Khaled F.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an intelligent computer-assisted language learning (ICALL) system for learning Arabic. This system could be used for learning Arabic by students at primary schools or by learners of Arabic as a second or foreign language. It explores the use of Natural Language Processing (NLP) techniques for learning…

  3. Computer Assisted Drafting (CNC) Drawings. Drafting Module 6. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Missouri Vocational Instruction Management System instructor's drafting guide has been keyed to the drafting competency profile developed by state industry and education professionals. This unit contains information on computer-assisted drafting drawings. The guide contains a cross-reference table of instructional materials and 20 worksheets.…

  4. The Impact of Computer-Assisted Instruction on Secondary School ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research, carried out in Manicaland Province in Zimbabwe, aimed to investigate the impact of computer-assisted instruction on students' performance in Geography. The equivalent group research design which included a pre-test post-test control group design was used. Respondents to interviews and pre-test and ...

  5. Computer-Assisted Foreign Language Teaching and Learning: Technological Advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Bin; Xing, Minjie; Wang, Yuping; Sun, Mingyu; Xiang, Catherine H.

    2013-01-01

    Computer-Assisted Foreign Language Teaching and Learning: Technological Advances highlights new research and an original framework that brings together foreign language teaching, experiments and testing practices that utilize the most recent and widely used e-learning resources. This comprehensive collection of research will offer linguistic…

  6. Errors and Intelligence in Computer-Assisted Language Learning: Parsers and Pedagogues. Routledge Studies in Computer Assisted Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heift, Trude; Schulze, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    This book provides the first comprehensive overview of theoretical issues, historical developments and current trends in ICALL (Intelligent Computer-Assisted Language Learning). It assumes a basic familiarity with Second Language Acquisition (SLA) theory and teaching, CALL and linguistics. It is of interest to upper undergraduate and/or graduate…

  7. Blackboard architecture and qualitative model in a computer aided assistant designed to define computers for HEP computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nodarse, F.F.; Ivanov, V.G.

    1991-01-01

    Using BLACKBOARD architecture and qualitative model, an expert systm was developed to assist the use in defining the computers method for High Energy Physics computing. The COMEX system requires an IBM AT personal computer or compatible with than 640 Kb RAM and hard disk. 5 refs.; 9 figs

  8. Computational Exploration of Molecular Scaffolds in Medicinal Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ye; Stumpfe, Dagmar; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2016-05-12

    The scaffold concept is widely applied in medicinal chemistry. Scaffolds are mostly used to represent core structures of bioactive compounds. Although the scaffold concept has limitations and is often viewed differently from a chemical and computational perspective, it has provided a basis for systematic investigations of molecular cores and building blocks, going far beyond the consideration of individual compound series. Over the past 2 decades, alternative scaffold definitions and organization schemes have been introduced and scaffolds have been studied in a variety of ways and increasingly on a large scale. Major applications of the scaffold concept include the generation of molecular hierarchies, structural classification, association of scaffolds with biological activities, and activity prediction. This contribution discusses computational approaches for scaffold generation and analysis, with emphasis on recent developments impacting medicinal chemistry. A variety of scaffold-based studies are discussed, and a perspective on scaffold methods is provided.

  9. From Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) to Mobile Assisted Language Use (MALU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Huw; Achilleos, Marianna

    2013-01-01

    This article begins by critiquing the long-established acronym CALL (Computer Assisted Language Learning). We then go on to report on a small-scale study which examines how student non-native speakers of English use a range of digital devices beyond the classroom in both their first (L1) and second (L2) languages. We look also at the extent to…

  10. Computed tomographic practice and dosimetry: implications for nuclear medicine: editorial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mountford, P.J.; Harding, L.K.

    1992-01-01

    This editorial briefly discusses the results of an NRPB survey of x-ray computed tomography practice and dosimetry in the UK. A wide variation in practice and patient doses was revealed. The implications for nuclear medicine are considered. The NRPB is to issue formal guidance on protection of the patient undergoing a CT investigation with the aim of achieving a more systematic approach to the justification and optimization of such exposures. (UK)

  11. Improved computer-assisted nuclear imaging in renovascular hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, M.L.; Nally, J.V.; Potvini, W.J.; Clarke, H.S. Jr.; Higgins, J.T.; Windham, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    A computer-assisted program with digital background subtraction has been developed to analyze the initial 90 second Tc-99m DTPA renal flow scans in an attempt to quantitate the early isotope delivery to and uptake by the kidney. This study was designed to compare the computer-assisted 90 second DTPA scan with the conventional 30 minute I-131 Hippuran scan. Six patients with angiographically-proven unilateral renal artery stenosis were studied. The time activity curves for both studies were derived from regions of interest selected from the computer acquired dynamic images. The following parameters were used to assess renal blood flow: differential maximum activity, minimum/maximum activity ratio, and peak width. The computer-assisted DTPA study accurately predicted (6/6) the stenosed side documented angiographically, whereas the conventional Hippuran scan was clearly predictive in only 2/6. In selected cases successfully corrected surgically, the DTPA study proved superior in assessing the degree of patency of the graft. The best discriminatory factors when compared to a template synthesized from curves obtained from normal subjects were differential maximum activity and peak width. The authors conclude that: 1) the computer-assisted 90 second DTPA renal blood flow scan was superior to the conventional I-131 Hippuran scan in demonstrating unilateral reno-vascular disease; 2) the DTPA study was highly predictive of the angiographic findings; and 3) this non-invasive study should prove useful in the diagnosis and serial evaluation following surgery and/or angioplasty for renal artery stenosis

  12. The Evolution of Computer Based Learning Software Design: Computer Assisted Teaching Unit Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blandford, A. E.; Smith, P. R.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the style of design of computer simulations developed by Computer Assisted Teaching Unit at Queen Mary College with reference to user interface, input and initialization, input data vetting, effective display screen use, graphical results presentation, and need for hard copy. Procedures and problems relating to academic involvement are…

  13. Mechanical Design Technology--Modified. (Computer Assisted Drafting, Computer Aided Design). Curriculum Grant 84/85.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoolcraft Coll., Livonia, MI.

    This document is a curriculum guide for a program in mechanical design technology (computer-assisted drafting and design developed at Schoolcraft College, Livonia, Michigan). The program helps students to acquire the skills of drafters and to interact with electronic equipment, with the option of becoming efficient in the computer-aided…

  14. Interactive Computer-Assisted Instruction in Acid-Base Physiology for Mobile Computer Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longmuir, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    In this project, the traditional lecture hall presentation of acid-base physiology in the first-year medical school curriculum was replaced by interactive, computer-assisted instruction designed primarily for the iPad and other mobile computer platforms. Three learning modules were developed, each with ~20 screens of information, on the subjects…

  15. Computer Assisted Project-Based Instruction: The Effects on Science Achievement, Computer Achievement and Portfolio Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, Yavuz; Dede, Dinçer

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the effects of computer assisted project-based instruction on learners' achievement in a science and technology course, in a computer course and in portfolio development. With this aim in mind, a quasi-experimental design was used and a sample of 70 seventh grade secondary school students from Org. Esref…

  16. Computer-assisted detection of epileptiform focuses on SPECT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzegorczyk, Dawid; Dunin-Wąsowicz, Dorota; Mulawka, Jan J.

    2010-09-01

    Epilepsy is a common nervous system disease often related to consciousness disturbances and muscular spasm which affects about 1% of the human population. Despite major technological advances done in medicine in the last years there was no sufficient progress towards overcoming it. Application of advanced statistical methods and computer image analysis offers the hope for accurate detection and later removal of an epileptiform focuses which are the cause of some types of epilepsy. The aim of this work was to create a computer system that would help to find and diagnose disorders of blood circulation in the brain This may be helpful for the diagnosis of the epileptic seizures onset in the brain.

  17. Soft Tissue Biomechanical Modeling for Computer Assisted Surgery

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

      This volume focuses on the biomechanical modeling of biological tissues in the context of Computer Assisted Surgery (CAS). More specifically, deformable soft tissues are addressed since they are the subject of the most recent developments in this field. The pioneering works on this CAS topic date from the 1980's, with applications in orthopaedics and biomechanical models of bones. More recently, however, biomechanical models of soft tissues have been proposed since most of the human body is made of soft organs that can be deformed by the surgical gesture. Such models are much more complicated to handle since the tissues can be subject to large deformations (non-linear geometrical framework) as well as complex stress/strain relationships (non-linear mechanical framework). Part 1 of the volume presents biomechanical models that have been developed in a CAS context and used during surgery. This is particularly new since most of the soft tissues models already proposed concern Computer Assisted Planning, with ...

  18. Computer-assisted estimating for the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spooner, J.E.

    1976-02-01

    An analysis is made of the cost estimating system currently in use at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) and the benefits of computer assistance are evaluated. A computer-assisted estimating system (CAE) is proposed for LASL. CAE can decrease turnaround and provide more flexible response to management requests for cost information and analyses. It can enhance value optimization at the design stage, improve cost control and change-order justification, and widen the use of cost information in the design process. CAE costs are not well defined at this time although they appear to break even with present operations. It is recommended that a CAE system description be submitted for contractor consideration and bid while LASL system development continues concurrently

  19. Computer-assisted instruction; MR imaging of congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Young Hi; Yu, Pil Mun; Lee, Sang Hoon; Choe, Yeon Hyeon; Kim, Yang Min

    1996-01-01

    To develop a software program for computer-assisted instruction on MR imaging of congenital heart disease for medical students and residents to achieve repetitive and effective self-learning. We used a film scanner(Scan Maker 35t) and IBM-PC(486 DX-2, 60 MHz) for acquisition and storage of image data. The accessories attached to the main processor were CD-ROM drive(Sony), sound card(Soundblaster-Pro), and speaker. We used software of Adobe Photoshop(v 3.0) and paint shop-pro(v 3.0) for preprocessing image data, and paintbrush from microsoft windows 3.1 for labelling. The language used for programming was visual basic(v 3.0) from microsoft corporation. We developed a software program for computer-assisted instruction on MR imaging of congenital heart disease as an effective educational tool

  20. Applying Integrated Computer Assisted Media (ICAM in Teaching Vocabulary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Opick Dwi Indah

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to find out whether the use of integrated computer assisted media (ICAM is effective to improve the vocabulary achievement of the second semester students of Cokroaminoto Palopo University. The population of this research was the second semester students of English department of Cokroaminoto Palopo University in academic year 2013/2014. The samples of this research were 60 students and they were placed into two groups: experimental and control group where each group consisted of 30 students. This research used cluster random sampling technique. The research data was collected by applying vocabulary test and it was analyzed by using descriptive and inferential statistics. The result of this research was integrated computer assisted media (ICAM can improve vocabulary achievement of the students of English department of Cokroaminoto Palopo University. It can be concluded that the use of ICAM in the teaching vocabulary is effective to be implemented in improving the students’ vocabulary achievement.

  1. Pulmonary Diseases in the Neonate: A Computer Assisted Instruction

    OpenAIRE

    Tinsley, Larry; Easa, David

    1985-01-01

    This project consists of an interactive audiovisual learning program in respiratory diseases in premature and term infants. It is directed towards the primary care physicians to help increase their knowledge base of neonatal pulmonary diseases. This program will teach common respiratory diseases seen in the sick newborn infant by way of interactive computer assisted programs interfaced to a video display terminal showing such things as x-rays, laboratory findings, and physical signs. The need...

  2. COMPUTER ASSISTED LOOM IN THE REVIVAL OF CONTEMPORARY MONUMENTAL TAPESTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PINTILIE Anca-Aurelia

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The art of tapestry has its basics back in time, probably in the decorations of tent, the house of the nomad. Tapestry in its beginnings is the first wall of the nomad’s home and the decorative wall and canopy in the ancient Greek houses as architect Gottfried Semper stated in the nineteen century. The architectural approach is not unusual even in the next centuries. Tapestry becomes popular as a form of monumental art during the Middle Ages when it is used as decorative architectural element, coating the walls of medieval castles. During the next centuries dominated by decadent styles of baroque, rococo, the tapestry will lose its monumental spirit and architectural quality but at the middle of the XXth century a new approach will sustain the revival of the tapestry as monumental art. Later, in the XXIst century, renowned multimedia artists will approach this medium and will use computer assisted looms in ambitious tapestry projects. This technique will allow them to realize complex and exquisite tapestries, sustaining in this way the revival of the tapestry in the contemporary art world. The paper presents the importance of the architectural side of tapestry and the great achievement that computer assisted loom represents for this form of art. The research activity is willing to inform Romanian textile designers about the possibilities to create tapestries on computer assisted looms. The research was made during the initial stage of a doctoral thesis consisting in a documentary study on monumental aspects of contemporary tapestry.

  3. Voluntary euthanasia, physician-assisted suicide, and the goals of medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varelius, Jukka

    2006-04-01

    It is plausible that what possible courses of action patients may legitimately expect their physicians to take is ultimately determined by what medicine as a profession is supposed to do and, consequently, that we can determine the moral acceptability of voluntary euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide on the basis of identifying the proper goals of medicine. This article examines the main ways of defining the proper goals of medicine found in the recent bioethics literature and argues that they cannot provide a clear answer to the question of whether or not voluntary euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide are morally acceptable. It is suggested that to find a plausible answer to this question and to complete the task of defining the proper goals of medicine, we must determine what is the best philosophical theory about the nature of prudential value.

  4. Patterns of Relating Between Physicians and Medical Assistants in Small Family Medicine Offices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Nancy C.; Jacobson, C. Jeffrey; Bolon, Shannon K.; Fixler, Joseph; Pallerla, Harini; Busick, Christina; Gerrety, Erica; Kinney, Dee; Regan, Saundra; Pugnale, Michael

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The clinician-colleague relationship is a cornerstone of relationship-centered care (RCC); in small family medicine offices, the clinician–medical assistant (MA) relationship is especially important. We sought to better understand the relationship between MA roles and the clinician-MA relationship within the RCC framework. METHODS We conducted an ethnographic study of 5 small family medicine offices (having informed by clinicians’ roles in hiring and managing MAs and the social familiarity of MAs and clinicians. Within the RCC framework, these findings can be seen as previously undefined constraints and freedoms in what is known as the Complex Responsive Process of Relating between clinicians and MAs. CONCLUSIONS Improved understanding of clinician-MA relationships will allow a better appreciation of how clinicians and MAs function in family medicine teams. Our findings may assist small offices undergoing practice transformation and guide future research to improve the education, training, and use of MAs in the family medicine setting. PMID:24615311

  5. Computer-assisted indexing for the INIS database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nevyjel, A.

    2006-01-01

    INIS has identified computer-assisted indexing as areas where information technology could assist best in maintaining database quality and indexing consistency, while containing production costs. Subject analysis is a very important but also very expensive process in the production of the INIS database. Given the current necessity to process an increased number of records, including subject analysis, without additional staff, INIS as well as the member states need improvements in their processing efficiency. Computer assisted subject analysis is a promising way to achieve this. The quality of the INIS database is defined by its inputting rules. The Thesaurus is a terminological control device used in translating from the natural language of documents, indexers or users into a more constrained system language. It is a controlled and dynamic vocabulary of semantically and generically related terms. It is the essential tool for subject analysis as well as for advanced search engines. To support the identification of descriptors in the free text (title, abstract, free keywords) 'hidden terms' have been introduced as extension of the Thesaurus, which identify phrases or character strings of free text and point to the valid descriptor, which should be suggested. In the process of computer-assisted subject analysis the bibliographic records (including title and abstract) are analyzed by the software, resulting in a list of suggested descriptors. Within the working platform (graphical user interface) the suggested descriptors are sorted by importance (by their relevance for the content of the document) and the subject specialist clearly sees the highlighted context from which the terms were selected. The system allows the subject specialist to accept or reject descriptors from the suggested list and to assign additional descriptors when necessary. First experiences show that a performance enhancement of about 80-100% can be achieved in the subject analysis process. (author)

  6. Experiences Providing Medical Assistance during the Sewol Ferry Disaster Using Traditional Korean Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyeong Han; Jang, Soobin; Lee, Ju Ah; Jang, Bo-Hyoung; Go, Ho-Yeon; Park, Sunju; Jo, Hee-Guen; Lee, Myeong Soo; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate medical records using traditional Korean medicine (TKM) in Sewol Ferry disaster in 2014 and further explore the possible role of traditional medicine in disaster situation. After Sewol Ferry accident, 3 on-site tents for TKM assistance by the Association of Korean Medicine (AKOM) in Jindo area were installed. The AKOM mobilized volunteer TKM doctors and assistants and dispatched each on-site tent in three shifts within 24 hours. Anyone could use on-site tent without restriction and TKM treatments including herb medicine were administered individually. The total of 1,860 patients were treated during the periods except for medical assistance on the barge. Most patients were diagnosed in musculoskeletal diseases (66.4%) and respiratory diseases (7.4%) and circulatory diseases (8.4%) followed. The most frequently used herbal medicines were Shuanghe decoction (80 days), Su He Xiang Wan (288 pills), and Wuji powder (73 days). TKM in medical assistance can be helpful to rescue worker or group life people in open shelter when national disasters occur. Therefore, it is important to construct a rapid respond system using TKM resources based on experience.

  7. Experiences Providing Medical Assistance during the Sewol Ferry Disaster Using Traditional Korean Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyeong Han Kim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study aimed to investigate medical records using traditional Korean medicine (TKM in Sewol Ferry disaster in 2014 and further explore the possible role of traditional medicine in disaster situation. Methods. After Sewol Ferry accident, 3 on-site tents for TKM assistance by the Association of Korean Medicine (AKOM in Jindo area were installed. The AKOM mobilized volunteer TKM doctors and assistants and dispatched each on-site tent in three shifts within 24 hours. Anyone could use on-site tent without restriction and TKM treatments including herb medicine were administered individually. Results. The total of 1,860 patients were treated during the periods except for medical assistance on the barge. Most patients were diagnosed in musculoskeletal diseases (66.4% and respiratory diseases (7.4% and circulatory diseases (8.4% followed. The most frequently used herbal medicines were Shuanghe decoction (80 days, Su He Xiang Wan (288 pills, and Wuji powder (73 days. Conclusions. TKM in medical assistance can be helpful to rescue worker or group life people in open shelter when national disasters occur. Therefore, it is important to construct a rapid respond system using TKM resources based on experience.

  8. Two-Cloud-Servers-Assisted Secure Outsourcing Multiparty Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Qiaoyan; Zhang, Hua; Jin, Zhengping; Li, Wenmin

    2014-01-01

    We focus on how to securely outsource computation task to the cloud and propose a secure outsourcing multiparty computation protocol on lattice-based encrypted data in two-cloud-servers scenario. Our main idea is to transform the outsourced data respectively encrypted by different users' public keys to the ones that are encrypted by the same two private keys of the two assisted servers so that it is feasible to operate on the transformed ciphertexts to compute an encrypted result following the function to be computed. In order to keep the privacy of the result, the two servers cooperatively produce a custom-made result for each user that is authorized to get the result so that all authorized users can recover the desired result while other unauthorized ones including the two servers cannot. Compared with previous research, our protocol is completely noninteractive between any users, and both of the computation and the communication complexities of each user in our solution are independent of the computing function. PMID:24982949

  9. Two-cloud-servers-assisted secure outsourcing multiparty computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi; Wen, Qiaoyan; Zhang, Yudong; Zhang, Hua; Jin, Zhengping; Li, Wenmin

    2014-01-01

    We focus on how to securely outsource computation task to the cloud and propose a secure outsourcing multiparty computation protocol on lattice-based encrypted data in two-cloud-servers scenario. Our main idea is to transform the outsourced data respectively encrypted by different users' public keys to the ones that are encrypted by the same two private keys of the two assisted servers so that it is feasible to operate on the transformed ciphertexts to compute an encrypted result following the function to be computed. In order to keep the privacy of the result, the two servers cooperatively produce a custom-made result for each user that is authorized to get the result so that all authorized users can recover the desired result while other unauthorized ones including the two servers cannot. Compared with previous research, our protocol is completely noninteractive between any users, and both of the computation and the communication complexities of each user in our solution are independent of the computing function.

  10. Two-Cloud-Servers-Assisted Secure Outsourcing Multiparty Computation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We focus on how to securely outsource computation task to the cloud and propose a secure outsourcing multiparty computation protocol on lattice-based encrypted data in two-cloud-servers scenario. Our main idea is to transform the outsourced data respectively encrypted by different users’ public keys to the ones that are encrypted by the same two private keys of the two assisted servers so that it is feasible to operate on the transformed ciphertexts to compute an encrypted result following the function to be computed. In order to keep the privacy of the result, the two servers cooperatively produce a custom-made result for each user that is authorized to get the result so that all authorized users can recover the desired result while other unauthorized ones including the two servers cannot. Compared with previous research, our protocol is completely noninteractive between any users, and both of the computation and the communication complexities of each user in our solution are independent of the computing function.

  11. 77 FR 39498 - Guidances for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff: Computer-Assisted Detection...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-03

    ...] Guidances for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff: Computer-Assisted Detection Devices Applied... Clinical Performance Assessment: Considerations for Computer-Assisted Detection Devices Applied to... guidance, entitled ``Computer-Assisted Detection Devices Applied to Radiology Images and Radiology Device...

  12. Computer assisted radionuclide angiography to confirm reversible ischemic cerebral dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buell, U.; Lanksch, W.; Tosch, U.; Kleinhans, E.; Steinhoff, H.

    1982-01-01

    Computer assisted radionuclide angiography (CARNA) was employed in patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA) or prolonged reversible ischemic neurologic deficit (PRIND) to establish the sensitivity of CARNA in detecting and quantifying changes of cerebral perfusion in such selected patients. Moreover, results of CARNA were compared with findings of cranial radiographic angiography (RGA) to obtain data on combined sensitivities of these methods. CARNA may be the preferred noninvasive procedure employed because it detects and quantifies the vascular supply disorder in patients with TIA and PRIND. If no computer assistance is used to evaluate cranial radionuclide angiography, results are considerable less accurate. Specifity of CARNA is 84.6%. If CARNA is negative (25.2% in TIA; 12.7% in PRIND), a further method must be employed to confirm the cranial vascular origin of the attack. This may be RGA in TIA and transmission computed axial tomography (T-CAT) T-CAT in PRIND. This diagnos - tic sequence lead to 92.4% true positive in TIA and to 93.2% true positives in PRIND

  13. Computer-Vision-Assisted Palm Rehabilitation With Supervised Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vamsikrishna, K M; Dogra, Debi Prosad; Desarkar, Maunendra Sankar

    2016-05-01

    Physical rehabilitation supported by the computer-assisted-interface is gaining popularity among health-care fraternity. In this paper, we have proposed a computer-vision-assisted contactless methodology to facilitate palm and finger rehabilitation. Leap motion controller has been interfaced with a computing device to record parameters describing 3-D movements of the palm of a user undergoing rehabilitation. We have proposed an interface using Unity3D development platform. Our interface is capable of analyzing intermediate steps of rehabilitation without the help of an expert, and it can provide online feedback to the user. Isolated gestures are classified using linear discriminant analysis (DA) and support vector machines (SVM). Finally, a set of discrete hidden Markov models (HMM) have been used to classify gesture sequence performed during rehabilitation. Experimental validation using a large number of samples collected from healthy volunteers reveals that DA and SVM perform similarly while applied on isolated gesture recognition. We have compared the results of HMM-based sequence classification with CRF-based techniques. Our results confirm that both HMM and CRF perform quite similarly when tested on gesture sequences. The proposed system can be used for home-based palm or finger rehabilitation in the absence of experts.

  14. Computer-assisted modeling: Contributions of computational approaches to elucidating macromolecular structure and function: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, S.

    1987-01-01

    The Committee, asked to provide an assessment of computer-assisted modeling of molecular structure, has highlighted the signal successes and the significant limitations for a broad panoply of technologies and has projected plausible paths of development over the next decade. As with any assessment of such scope, differing opinions about present or future prospects were expressed. The conclusions and recommendations, however, represent a consensus of our views of the present status of computational efforts in this field

  15. Providing Assistive Technology Applications as a Service Through Cloud Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulfari, Davide; Celesti, Antonio; Villari, Massimo; Puliafito, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Users with disabilities interact with Personal Computers (PCs) using Assistive Technology (AT) software solutions. Such applications run on a PC that a person with a disability commonly uses. However the configuration of AT applications is not trivial at all, especially whenever the user needs to work on a PC that does not allow him/her to rely on his / her AT tools (e.g., at work, at university, in an Internet point). In this paper, we discuss how cloud computing provides a valid technological solution to enhance such a scenario.With the emergence of cloud computing, many applications are executed on top of virtual machines (VMs). Virtualization allows us to achieve a software implementation of a real computer able to execute a standard operating system and any kind of application. In this paper we propose to build personalized VMs running AT programs and settings. By using the remote desktop technology, our solution enables users to control their customized virtual desktop environment by means of an HTML5-based web interface running on any computer equipped with a browser, whenever they are.

  16. Monetary Value of a Prescription Assistance Program Service in a Rural Family Medicine Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, Heather P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the monetary value of medications provided to rural Alabamians through provision of pharmaceutical manufacturer-sponsored prescription assistance programs (PAPs) provided by a clinical pharmacist in a private Black Belt family medicine clinic during 2007 and 2008. Methods: Patients struggling to afford prescription medications…

  17. A computer assisted toolholder to guide surgery in stereotactic space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgi, C; Pluchino, F; Luzzara, M; Ongania, E; Casolino, D S

    1994-01-01

    A computer assisted toolholder, integrated with an anatomical graphic 3-D rendering programme, is presented. Stereotactic neuroanatomical images are acquired, and the same reference system is employed to represent the position of the toolholder on the monitor. The surgeon can check the orientation of different approach trajectories, moving the toolholder in a situation of virtual reality. Angular values expressed by high precision encoders on the five joints of the toolholder modify "on line" the representation of the configuration of the toolholder within the three dimensional representation of the patient's anatomy.

  18. Neuroradiology computer-assisted instruction using interactive videodisk: Pilot project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, C.L.; Goldsmith, D.G.; Osborn, A.G.; Stensaas, S.S.; Davidson, H.C.; Quigley, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    The availability of microcomputers, high-resolution monitors, high-level authoring languages, and videodisk technology make sophisticated neuroradiology instruction a cost-effective possibility. The authors developed a laser videodisk and interactive software to teach normal and pathologic gross and radiologic anatomy of the sellar/juxtasellar region. A spectrum of lesions is presented with information for differential diagnosis included. The exhibit permits conference participants to review the pilot module and experience the self-paced learning and self-evaluation possible with computer-assisted instruction. They also may choose to peruse a ''visual database'' by instant random access to the videodisk by hand control

  19. Computer Assisted Instruction (Cain) For Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaturonrusmee, Wasna; Arthonvorakul, Areerat; Assateranuwat, Adisorn

    2005-10-01

    A computer assisted instruction program for nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was developed by using Author ware 5.0, Adobe Image Styler 1.0, Adobe Photo shop 7.0 and Flash MX. The contents included the basic theory of 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, the instrumentation of NMR spectroscopy, the two dimensional (2D) NMR spectroscopy and the interpretation of NMR spectra. The program was also provided examples, and exercises, with emphasis on NMR spectra interpretation to determine the structure of unknown compounds and solutions for self study. The questionnaire from students showed that they were very satisfied with the software

  20. [Computer evaluation of hidden potential of phytochemicals of medicinal plants of the traditional Indian ayurvedic medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagunin, A A; Druzhilovsky, D S; Rudik, A V; Filimonov, D A; Gawande, D; Suresh, K; Goel, R; Poroikov, V V

    2015-01-01

    Applicability of our computer programs PASS and PharmaExpert to prediction of biological activity spectra of rather complex and structurally diverse phytocomponents of medicinal plants, both separately and in combinations has been evaluated. The web-resource on phytochemicals of 50 medicinal plants used in Ayurveda was created for the study of hidden therapeutic potential of Traditional Indian Medicine (TIM) (http://ayurveda.pharmaexpert.ru). It contains information on 50 medicinal plants, their using in TIM and their pharmacology activities, also as 1906 phytocomponents. PASS training set was updated by addition of information about 946 natural compounds; then the training procedure and validation were performed, to estimate the quality of PASS prediction. It was shown that the difference between the average accuracy of prediction obtained in leave-5%-out cross-validation (94,467%) and in leave-one-out cross-validation (94,605%) is very small. These results showed high predictive ability of the program. Results of biological activity spectra prediction for all phytocomponents included in our database are in good correspondence with the experimental data. Additional kinds of biological activity predicted with high probability provide the information about most promising directions of further studies. The analysis of prediction results of sets of phytocomponents in each of 50 medicinal plants was made by PharmaExpert software. Based on this analysis, we found that the combination of phytocomponents from Passiflora incarnata may exhibit nootropic, anticonvulsant and antidepressant effects. Experiments carried out in mice models confirmed the predicted effects of Passiflora incarnata extracts.

  1. Computer-assisted instruction: a library service for the community teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCorkel, J; Cook, V

    1986-04-01

    This paper reports on five years of experience with computer-assisted instruction (CAI) at Winthrop-University Hospital, a major affiliate of the SUNY at Stony Brook School of Medicine. It compares CAI programs available from Ohio State University and Massachusetts General Hospital (accessed by telephone and modem), and software packages purchased from the Health Sciences Consortium (MED-CAPS) and Scientific American (DISCOTEST). The comparison documents one library's experience of the cost of these programs and the use made of them by medical students, house staff, and attending physicians. It describes the space allocated for necessary equipment, as well as the marketing of CAI. Finally, in view of the decision of the National Board of Medical Examiners to administer the Part III examination on computer (the so-called CBX) starting in 1988, the paper speculates on the future importance of CAI in the community teaching hospital.

  2. Computer assisted surgery for malunited fractures in upper limb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoneda, Masahiro; Kazuki, Kenichi; Uemura, Takuya; Okada, Mitsuhiro; Takaoka, Kunio

    2006-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the usefulness of computer-assisted preoperative simulation of malunited fractures in the upper limb. Ten patients with malunited fractures underwent multislice computed tomography of both upper limbs with reconstruction of three-dimensional bone models using three-dimensional (3D) software. Preoperative simulation was comprised of four main procedures: performance of virtual corrective osteotomy, matching of reposition with a mirror-image model of the unaffected side, creating new data for the bone defect, and machining of an hydroxyapatite block as bone graft. In addition, we used full-sized three-dimensional virtual reality modeling with a rapid prototyping molding device, and performed preoperative rehearsals of osteotomies using plaster models. All patients tolerated the surgical procedure well. This technique permits the surgeon to recognize and correct three-dimensional deformities of malunited fracture with both accuracy and precision. (author)

  3. Computer-Assisted Technique for Surgical Tooth Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosamuddin Hamza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Surgical tooth extraction is a common procedure in dentistry. However, numerous extraction cases show a high level of difficulty in practice. This difficulty is usually related to inadequate visualization, improper instrumentation, or other factors related to the targeted tooth (e.g., ankyloses or presence of bony undercut. Methods. In this work, the author presents a new technique for surgical tooth extraction based on 3D imaging, computer planning, and a new concept of computer-assisted manufacturing. Results. The outcome of this work is a surgical guide made by 3D printing of plastics and CNC of metals (hybrid outcome. In addition, the conventional surgical cutting tools (surgical burs are modified with a number of stoppers adjusted to avoid any excessive drilling that could harm bone or other vital structures. Conclusion. The present outcome could provide a minimally invasive technique to overcome the routine complications facing dental surgeons in surgical extraction procedures.

  4. Towards ubiquitous access of computer-assisted surgery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Lufei, Hanping; Shi, Weishong; Chaudhary, Vipin

    2006-01-01

    Traditional stand-alone computer-assisted surgery (CAS) systems impede the ubiquitous and simultaneous access by multiple users. With advances in computing and networking technologies, ubiquitous access to CAS systems becomes possible and promising. Based on our preliminary work, CASMIL, a stand-alone CAS server developed at Wayne State University, we propose a novel mobile CAS system, UbiCAS, which allows surgeons to retrieve, review and interpret multimodal medical images, and to perform some critical neurosurgical procedures on heterogeneous devices from anywhere at anytime. Furthermore, various optimization techniques, including caching, prefetching, pseudo-streaming-model, and compression, are used to guarantee the QoS of the UbiCAS system. UbiCAS enables doctors at remote locations to actively participate remote surgeries, share patient information in real time before, during, and after the surgery.

  5. Affective medicine. A review of affective computing efforts in medical informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luneski, A; Konstantinidis, E; Bamidis, P D

    2010-01-01

    Affective computing (AC) is concerned with emotional interactions performed with and through computers. It is defined as "computing that relates to, arises from, or deliberately influences emotions". AC enables investigation and understanding of the relation between human emotions and health as well as application of assistive and useful technologies in the medical domain. 1) To review the general state of the art in AC and its applications in medicine, and 2) to establish synergies between the research communities of AC and medical informatics. Aspects related to the human affective state as a determinant of the human health are discussed, coupled with an illustration of significant AC research and related literature output. Moreover, affective communication channels are described and their range of application fields is explored through illustrative examples. The presented conferences, European research projects and research publications illustrate the recent increase of interest in the AC area by the medical community. Tele-home healthcare, AmI, ubiquitous monitoring, e-learning and virtual communities with emotionally expressive characters for elderly or impaired people are few areas where the potential of AC has been realized and applications have emerged. A number of gaps can potentially be overcome through the synergy of AC and medical informatics. The application of AC technologies parallels the advancement of the existing state of the art and the introduction of new methods. The amount of work and projects reviewed in this paper witness an ambitious and optimistic synergetic future of the affective medicine field.

  6. Use of computers and the Internet by residents in US family medicine programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Richard V; Murphy-Cullen, Cassie L; Mayo, Helen G; Marcee, Alice K; Schneider, Gregory W

    2007-06-01

    Computers, personal digital assistants (PDA), and the Internet are widely used as resources in medical education and clinical care. Educators who intend to incorporate these resources effectively into residency education programmes can benefit from understanding how residents currently use these tools, their skills, and their preferences. The researchers sent questionnaires to 306 US family medicine residency programmes for all of their residents to complete. Respondents were 1177 residents from 125 (41%) programmes. Access to a computer was reported by 95% of respondents. Of these, 97% of desktop and 89% of laptop computers could access the Internet. Residents accessed various educational and clinical resources. Half felt they had 'intermediate' skills at Web searches, 23% had 'some skills,' and 27% were 'quite skilled.' Those under 30 years of age reported higher skill levels. Those who experienced a Web-based curriculum in medical school reported higher search skills and greater success in finding clinical information. Respondents preferred to use technology to supplement the didactic sessions offered in resident teaching conferences. Favourable conditions exist in family medicine residency programmes to implement a blend of traditional and technology-based learning experiences. These conditions include residents' experience, skills, and preferences.

  7. Promoting Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation among Chemistry Students Using Computer-Assisted Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambari, Isiaka A.; Gbodi, Bimpe E.; Olakanmi, Eyitao U.; Abalaka, Eneojo N.

    2016-01-01

    The role of computer-assisted instruction in promoting intrinsic and extrinsic motivation among Nigerian secondary school chemistry students was investigated in this study. The study employed two modes of computer-assisted instruction (computer simulation instruction and computer tutorial instructional packages) and two levels of gender (male and…

  8. Pharmacokinetic study with computational tools in the medicinal chemistry course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Araújo de Brito

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available To improve the teaching-learning process in the Medicinal Chemistry course, new strategies have been incorporated into practical classes of this fundamental discipline of the pharmaceutical curriculum. Many changes and improvements have been made in the area of medicinal chemistry so far, and students should be prepared for these new approaches with the use of technological resources in this field. Practical activities using computational techniques have been directed to the evaluation of chemical and physicochemical properties that affect the pharmacokinetics of drugs. Their objectives were to allow students to know these tools, to learn how to access them, to search for the structures of drugs and to analyze results. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study in Brazil to demonstrate the use of computational practices in teaching pharmacokinetics. Practical classes using Osiris and Molinspiration were attractive to students, who developed the activities easily and acquired better theoretical knowledge.Para melhorar o processo ensino-aprendizagem no curso de Química Medicinal novas estratégias estão sendo incorporadas às aulas práticas desta disciplina fundamental do currículo farmacêutico. Muitas mudanças e melhorias vêm marcando a área de química medicinal e por isso é importante que os alunos sejam colocados nestas novas abordagens na área, com a utilização de recursos tecnológicos. As atividades práticas foram direcionadas para a avaliação dos dados químicos e físico-químicos de fármacos que influenciam as propriedades farmacocinéticas com o auxílio de técnicas computacionais. Os objetivos foram permitir aos alunos conhecer essas ferramentas, saber como acessá-las, procurar as estruturas de fármacos e analisar os resultados. Este é o primeiro estudo publicado no Brasil que apresenta aula prática computacional sobre o tema farmacocinética. As aulas práticas utilizando os servidores Osiris e

  9. Computer-assisted self interviewing in sexual health clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairley, Christopher K; Sze, Jun Kit; Vodstrcil, Lenka A; Chen, Marcus Y

    2010-11-01

    This review describes the published information on what constitutes the elements of a core sexual history and the use of computer-assisted self interviewing (CASI) within sexually transmitted disease clinics. We searched OVID Medline from 1990 to February 2010 using the terms "computer assisted interviewing" and "sex," and to identify published articles on a core sexual history, we used the term "core sexual history." Since 1990, 3 published articles used a combination of expert consensus, formal clinician surveys, and the Delphi technique to decide on what questions form a core sexual health history. Sexual health histories from 4 countries mostly ask about the sex of the partners, the number of partners (although the time period varies), the types of sex (oral, anal, and vaginal) and condom use, pregnancy intent, and contraceptive methods. Five published studies in the United States, Australia, and the United Kingdom compared CASI with in person interviews in sexually transmitted disease clinics. In general, CASI identified higher risk behavior more commonly than clinician interviews, although there were substantial differences between studies. CASI was found to be highly acceptable and individuals felt it allowed more honest reporting. Currently, there are insufficient data to determine whether CASI results in differences in sexually transmitted infection testing, diagnosis, or treatment or if CASI improves the quality of sexual health care or its efficiency. The potential public health advantages of the widespread use of CASI are discussed.

  10. Helping Children Learn Vocabulary during Computer-Assisted Oral Reading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Aist

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses an indispensable skill using a unique method to teach a critical component: helping children learn to read by using computer-assisted oral reading to help children learn vocabulary. We build on Project LISTEN’s Reading Tutor, a computer program that adapts automatic speech recognition to listen to children read aloud, and helps them learn to read (http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~listen. To learn a word from reading with the Reading Tutor, students must encounter the word and learn the meaning of the word in context. We modified the Reading Tutor first to help students encounter new words and then to help them learn the meanings of new words. We then compared the Reading Tutor to classroom instruction and to human-assisted oral reading as part of a yearlong study with 144 second and third graders. The result: Second graders did about the same on word comprehension in all three conditions. However, third graders who read with the 1999 Reading Tutor, modified as described in this paper, performed statistically significantly better than other third graders in a classroom control on word comprehension gains – and even comparably with other third graders who read one-on-one with human tutors.

  11. Computer-assisted learning in anatomy at the international medical school in Debrecen, Hungary: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kish, Gary; Cook, Samuel A; Kis, Gréta

    2013-01-01

    The University of Debrecen's Faculty of Medicine has an international, multilingual student population with anatomy courses taught in English to all but Hungarian students. An elective computer-assisted gross anatomy course, the Computer Human Anatomy (CHA), has been taught in English at the Anatomy Department since 2008. This course focuses on an introduction to anatomical digital images along with clinical cases. This low-budget course has a large visual component using images from magnetic resonance imaging and computer axial tomogram scans, ultrasound clinical studies, and readily available anatomy software that presents topics which run in parallel to the university's core anatomy curriculum. From the combined computer images and CHA lecture information, students are asked to solve computer-based clinical anatomy problems in the CHA computer laboratory. A statistical comparison was undertaken of core anatomy oral examination performances of English program first-year medical students who took the elective CHA course and those who did not in the three academic years 2007-2008, 2008-2009, and 2009-2010. The results of this study indicate that the CHA-enrolled students improved their performance on required anatomy core curriculum oral examinations (P computer-assisted learning may play an active role in anatomy curriculum improvement. These preliminary results have prompted ongoing evaluation of what specific aspects of CHA are valuable and which students benefit from computer-assisted learning in a multilingual and diverse cultural environment. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Anatomists.

  12. Some computer applications and digital image processing in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowinger, T.

    1981-01-01

    Methods of digital image processing are applied to problems in nuclear medicine imaging. The symmetry properties of central nervous system lesions are exploited in an attempt to determine the three-dimensional radioisotope density distribution within the lesions. An algorithm developed by astronomers at the end of the 19th century to determine the distribution of matter in globular clusters is applied to tumors. This algorithm permits the emission-computed-tomographic reconstruction of spherical lesions from a single view. The three-dimensional radioisotope distribution derived by the application of the algorithm can be used to characterize the lesions. The applicability to nuclear medicine images of ten edge detection methods in general usage in digital image processing were evaluated. A general model of image formation by scintillation cameras is developed. The model assumes that objects to be imaged are composed of a finite set of points. The validity of the model has been verified by its ability to duplicate experimental results. Practical applications of this work involve quantitative assessment of the distribution of radipharmaceuticals under clinical situations and the study of image processing algorithms

  13. Maxillary arch rehabilitation using implant-supported computer-assisted design-computer-assisted manufacturing-milled titanium framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulika S Khanna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Esthetic and functional rehabilitation of completely edentulous maxillary arch with fixed implant supported prosthesis is a challenging task. Newer technologies such as computer assisted design computer assisted manufacturing (CAD CAM and cone beam conventional tomography play an important role in achieving predictable results. Full mouth porcelain fused to metal (PFM individual crowns on CAD CAM milled titanium framework provides positive esthetic and functional outcome. This is a case report of rehabilitation of partially edentulous maxillary arch patient. Staged rehabilitation of this patient was planned. In the first stage, root canal treatment of key abutment teeth was done, nonsalvageable teeth were removed, and immediate interim overdenture was provided. In the second stage, five Nobel Biocare dental implants were placed. After integration impressions were made, CAD CAM milled titanium bar was fabricated. Individual PFM crowns were made and cemented. This method gives better esthetic compared to acrylic fused to metal hybrid prosthesis with the advantage of retrievability just like screw retained prosthesis. Hence, this technique is good for rehabilitation of patients with high esthetic demands.

  14. Computer-assisted navigational surgery enhances safety in dental implantology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, F C; Ho, K H; Wexler, A

    2005-06-01

    Dental implants are increasingly used to restore missing dentition. These titanium implants are surgically installed in the edentulous alveolar ridge and allowed to osteointegrate with the bone during the healing phase. After osseo-integration, the implant is loaded with a prosthesis to replace the missing tooth. Conventional implant treatment planning uses study models, wax-ups and panoramic x-rays to prefabricate surgical stent to guide the preparation of the implant site. The drilling into the alveolar ridge is invariably a "blind" procedure as the part of the drill in bone is not visible. Stereotactic systems were first introduced into neurosurgery in 1986. Since then, computer-assisted navigational technology has brought major advances to neuro-, midface and orthopaedic surgeries, and more recently, to implant placement. This paper illustrates the use of real-time computer-guided navigational technology in enhancing safety in implant surgical procedures. Real-time computer-guided navigational technology enhances accuracy and precision of the surgical procedure, minimises complications and facilitates surgery in challenging anatomical locations.

  15. Microwave assisted pyrolysis of halogenated plastics recovered from waste computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosi, Luca; Bartoli, Mattia; Frediani, Marco

    2018-03-01

    Microwave Assisted Pyrolysis (MAP) of the plastic fraction of Waste from Electric and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) from end-life computers was run with different absorbers and set-ups in a multimode batch reactor. A large amount of various different liquid fractions (up to 76.6wt%) were formed together with a remarkable reduction of the solid residue (up to 14.2wt%). The liquid fractions were characterized using the following different techniques: FT-IR ATR, 1 H NMR and a quantitative GC-MS analysis. The liquid fractions showed low density and viscosity, together with a high concentration of useful chemicals such as styrene (up to 117.7mg/mL), xylenes (up to 25.6mg/mL for p-xylene) whereas halogenated compounds were absent or present in a very low amounts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Translation Memory and Computer Assisted Translation Tool for Medieval Texts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Törcsvári Attila

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Translation memories (TMs, as part of Computer Assisted Translation (CAT tools, support translators reusing portions of formerly translated text. Fencing books are good candidates for using TMs due to the high number of repeated terms. Medieval texts suffer a number of drawbacks that make hard even “simple” rewording to the modern version of the same language. The analyzed difficulties are: lack of systematic spelling, unusual word orders and typos in the original. A hypothesis is made and verified that even simple modernization increases legibility and it is feasible, also it is worthwhile to apply translation memories due to the numerous and even extremely long repeated terms. Therefore, methods and algorithms are presented 1. for automated transcription of medieval texts (when a limited training set is available, and 2. collection of repeated patterns. The efficiency of the algorithms is analyzed for recall and precision.

  17. Mechatronics Interface for Computer Assisted Prostate Surgery Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altamirano del Monte, Felipe; Padilla Castañeda, Miguel A.; Arámbula Cosío, Fernando

    2006-09-01

    In this work is presented the development of a mechatronics device to simulate the interaction of the surgeon with the surgical instrument (resectoscope) used during a Transurethral Resection of the Prostate (TURP). Our mechatronics interface is part of a computer assisted system for training in TURP, which is based on a 3D graphics model of the prostate which can be deformed and resected interactively by the user. The mechatronics interface, is the device that the urology residents will manipulate to simulate the movements performed during surgery. Our current prototype has five degrees of freedom, which are enough to have a realistic simulation of the surgery movements. Two of these degrees of freedom are linear, to determinate the linear displacement of the resecting loop and the other three are rotational to determinate three directions and amounts of rotation.

  18. Computer-assisted Orthopaedic Surgery: Current State and Future Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoyan eZheng

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduced about two decades ago, computer-assisted orthopaedic surgery (CAOS has emerged as a new and independent area, due to the importance of treatment of musculoskeletal diseases in orthopaedics and traumatology, increasing availability of different imaging modalities, and advances in analytics and navigation tools. The aim of this paper is to present the basic elements of CAOS devices and to review state-of-the-art examples of different imaging modalities used to create the virtual representations, of different position tracking devices for navigation systems, of different surgical robots, of different methods for registration and referencing, and of CAOS modules that have been realized for different surgical procedures. Future perspectives will also be outlined.

  19. Conventional radiography and computed tomography of cardiac assist devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheffel, Hans; Stolzmann, Paul; Desbiolles, Lotus; Leschka, Sebastian; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Schertler, Thomas; Marincek, Borut; Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Wilhelm, Markus J.; Lachat, Mario [University Hospital Zurich, Clinic for Cardiovascular Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2009-09-15

    Patients intended for circulatory support by cardiac assist devices (CAD) usually suffer from end-stage acute or chronic heart failure. Since the introduction of CAD in 1963 by DeBakey and coworkers, the systems have gone through a substantial evolution and have been increasingly used in the intervening decades. The spectrum of CAD includes a variety of systems serving to assist the systolic function of the left ventricle, the right ventricle, or both. Conventional radiography and multislice spiral computed tomography (CT) are the most commonly used radiological techniques for imaging patients with a CAD. CT is very useful for evaluating CAD systems by using both two- and three-dimensional reconstructions of the volumetric data sets. The two techniques together allow for the comprehensive assessment of patients with devices by imaging the in- and outflow cannulae, the anastomoses, the position of the pump, as well as associated complications. A close collaboration with cardiac surgeons with expertise in the field of circulatory support is deemed necessary for adequate image interpretation. This article describes the technical diversity of the currently available CAD systems. The imaging characteristics on conventional radiography and multislice spiral CT as well as the typical complications of their use are demonstrated. (orig.)

  20. From assistance towards restoration with epidural brain-computer interfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharabaghi, Alireza; Naros, Georgios; Walter, Armin; Grimm, Florian; Schuermeyer, Marc; Roth, Alexander; Bogdan, Martin; Rosenstiel, Wolfgang; Birbaumer, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Today's implanted brain-computer interfaces make direct contact with the brain or even penetrate the tissue, bearing additional risks with regard to safety and stability. What is more, these approaches aim to control prosthetic devices as assistive tools and do not yet strive to become rehabilitative tools for restoring lost motor function. We introduced a less invasive, implantable interface by applying epidural electrocorticography in a chronic stroke survivor with a persistent motor deficit. He was trained to modulate his natural motor-related oscillatory brain activity by receiving online feedback. Epidural recordings of field potentials in the beta-frequency band projecting onto the anatomical hand knob proved most successful in discriminating between the attempt to move the paralyzed hand and to rest. These spectral features allowed for fast and reliable control of the feedback device in an online closed-loop paradigm. Only seven training sessions were required to significantly improve maximum wrist extension. For patients suffering from severe motor deficits, epidural implants may decode and train the brain activity generated during attempts to move with high spatial resolution, thus facilitating specific and high-intensity practice even in the absence of motor control. This would thus transform them from pure assistive devices to restorative tools in the context of reinforcement learning and neurorehabilitation.

  1. Medical image computing and computer-assisted intervention - MICCAI 2005. Proceedings; Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, J.S.; Gerig, G.

    2005-01-01

    The two-volume set LNCS 3749 and LNCS 3750 constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention, MICCAI 2005, held in Palm Springs, CA, USA, in October 2005. Based on rigorous peer reviews the program committee selected 237 carefully revised full papers from 632 submissions for presentation in two volumes. The first volume includes all the contributions related to image analysis and validation, vascular image segmentation, image registration, diffusion tensor image analysis, image segmentation and analysis, clinical applications - validation, imaging systems - visualization, computer assisted diagnosis, cellular and molecular image analysis, physically-based modeling, robotics and intervention, medical image computing for clinical applications, and biological imaging - simulation and modeling. The second volume collects the papers related to robotics, image-guided surgery and interventions, image registration, medical image computing, structural and functional brain analysis, model-based image analysis, image-guided intervention: simulation, modeling and display, and image segmentation and analysis. (orig.)

  2. Medical image computing and computer-assisted intervention - MICCAI 2005. Proceedings; Pt. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, J.S. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Biomedical Engineering and Diagnostic Radiology; Gerig, G. (eds.) [North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill (United States). Dept. of Computer Science

    2005-07-01

    The two-volume set LNCS 3749 and LNCS 3750 constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention, MICCAI 2005, held in Palm Springs, CA, USA, in October 2005. Based on rigorous peer reviews the program committee selected 237 carefully revised full papers from 632 submissions for presentation in two volumes. The first volume includes all the contributions related to image analysis and validation, vascular image segmentation, image registration, diffusion tensor image analysis, image segmentation and analysis, clinical applications - validation, imaging systems - visualization, computer assisted diagnosis, cellular and molecular image analysis, physically-based modeling, robotics and intervention, medical image computing for clinical applications, and biological imaging - simulation and modeling. The second volume collects the papers related to robotics, image-guided surgery and interventions, image registration, medical image computing, structural and functional brain analysis, model-based image analysis, image-guided intervention: simulation, modeling and display, and image segmentation and analysis. (orig.)

  3. Adaptive scapula bone remodeling computational simulation: Relevance to regenerative medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Gulshan B.; Robertson, Douglas D.

    2013-01-01

    actual specimen. Low predicted bone density was lower than actual specimen. Differences were probably due to applied muscle and joint reaction loads, boundary conditions, and values of constants used. Work is underway to study this. Nonetheless, the results demonstrate three dimensional bone remodeling simulation validity and potential. Such adaptive predictions take physiological bone remodeling simulations one step closer to reality. Computational analyses are needed that integrate biological remodeling rules and predict how bone will respond over time. We expect the combination of computational static stress analyses together with adaptive bone remodeling simulations to become effective tools for regenerative medicine research

  4. Computer-Assisted Inverse Design of Inorganic Electrides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunwei Zhang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Electrides are intrinsic electron-rich materials enabling applications as excellent electron emitters, superior catalysts, and strong reducing agents. There are a number of organic electrides; however, their instability at room temperature and sensitivity to moisture are bottlenecks for their practical uses. Known inorganic electrides are rare, but they appear to have greater thermal stability at ambient conditions and are thus better characterized for application. Here, we develop a computer-assisted inverse-design method for searching for a large variety of inorganic electrides unbiased by any known electride structures. It uses the intrinsic property of interstitial electron localization of electrides as the global variable function for swarm intelligence structure searches. We construct two rules of thumb on the design of inorganic electrides pointing to electron-rich ionic systems and low electronegativity of the cationic elements involved. By screening 99 such binary compounds through large-scale computer simulations, we identify 24 stable and 65 metastable new inorganic electrides that show distinct three-, two-, and zero-dimensional conductive properties, among which 18 are existing compounds that have not been pointed to as electrides. Our work reveals the rich abundance of inorganic electrides by providing 33 hitherto unexpected structure prototypes of electrides, of which 19 are not in the known structure databases.

  5. New Computer Assisted Diagnostic to Detect Alzheimer Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Rabeh Amira

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We describe a new Computer Assisted Diagnosis (CAD to automatically detect Alzheimer Patients (AD, Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI and elderly Controls, based on the segmentation and classification of the Hippocampus (H and Corpus Calosum (CC from Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI. For the segmentation we used a new method based on a deformable model to extract the area wishes, and then we computed the geometric and texture features. For the classification we proposed a new supervised method. We evaluated the accuracy of our method in a group of 25 patients with AD (age±standard-deviation (SD =70±6 years, 25 patients with MCI (age±SD=65±8 years and 25 elderly healthy controls (age±SD=60±8 years. For the AD patients we found an accuracy of the classification of 92%, for the MCI we found 88% and for the elderly patients we found 96%. Overall, we found our method to be 92% accurate. Our method can be a useful tool for diagnosing Alzheimer’s Disease in any of these Steps.

  6. Computer-assisted training in the thermal production department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felgines, R.

    1985-01-01

    For many years now, in the United States and Canada, computer-assisted training (CAT) experiments have been carried out in various fields: general or professional education, student testing in universities. This method seems very promising and particularly for continuing education and for keeping industrial process operating and maintenance personnel abreast of their specialities. Thanks to the progress in data processing and remote processing with central computers, this technique is being developed in France for professional training applications. Faced with many training problems, the Thermal Production Department of EDF (Electricite de France) first conducted in 1979 a test involving a limited subset of the nuclear power station operating personnel; this course amounted to some ten hours with very limited content. It seemed promising enough, so that in 1981, a real test was launched at 4 PWR plants: DAMPIERRE, FESSENHEIM, GRAVELINES, TRICASTIN. This test which involves about 700 employees has been fruitful and we decided to generalise this system to all the French nuclear power plants (40 units of 900 and 1300 MW). (author)

  7. Computer-Assisted Diagnosis of the Sleep Apnea-Hypopnea Syndrome: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Estevez, Diego; Moret-Bonillo, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Automatic diagnosis of the Sleep Apnea-Hypopnea Syndrome (SAHS) has become an important area of research due to the growing interest in the field of sleep medicine and the costs associated with its manual diagnosis. The increment and heterogeneity of the different techniques, however, make it somewhat difficult to adequately follow the recent developments. A literature review within the area of computer-assisted diagnosis of SAHS has been performed comprising the last 15 years of research in the field. Screening approaches, methods for the detection and classification of respiratory events, comprehensive diagnostic systems, and an outline of current commercial approaches are reviewed. An overview of the different methods is presented together with validation analysis and critical discussion of the current state of the art. PMID:26266052

  8. Using Precept-Assist® to predict performance on the American Board of Family Medicine In-Training Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Robert E; Jamena, Gemma P; Gamble, James D

    2014-09-01

    Precept-Assist® (PA) is a computer-based program developed by the Virtua Family Medicine Residency where residents receive a score on a Likert-type scale from an attending for each precept based on their knowledge base. The purpose of this study was to attempt to validate this program for precepting family medicine residents. This was a validation study. PA and American Board of Family Medicine (ABFM) In-Training Exam (ITE) scores for all residents from a community-based family medicine residency between the years 2002 and 2011 were included (n=216). Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated between PA scores for the second quarter of the academic year (October 1 to December 31) and scores on the ITE. An ROC curve was also created to determine sensitivity and specificity for various PA scores in predicting residents scoring 500 or above on the ITE. The PA mean (SD) score was 5.18 (0.84) and the ITE mean (SD) score was 425.1 (87.6). The Pearson correlation coefficient between PA and ITE scores was 0.55, which is a moderately positive correlation. The AUC of the ROC curve was 0.783 (95% CI 0.704-0.859). A PA score of 5.5 (between the level of a PGY-2 and PGY-3) was 72% sensitive and 77% specific for scoring 500 or above on the ITE with a positive LR of 3.12. There is a significant correlation between PA scores and ABFM In-Training Exam scores. PA is a valid screening tool that can be used as a predictor for future performance in Family Medicine In-Training exams.

  9. Microwave Assisted Organic Synthesis of Heterocycles in Aqueous Media: Recent Advances in Medicinal Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frecentese, Francesco; Saccone, Irene; Caliendo, Giuseppe; Corvino, Angela; Fiorino, Ferdinando; Magli, Elisa; Perissutti, Elisa; Severino, Beatrice; Santagada, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Green chemistry is a discipline of great interest in medicinal chemistry. It involves all fields of chemistry and it is based on the principle to conduct chemical reactions protecting the environment at the same time, through the use of chemical procedures able to avoid pollution. In this context, water as solvent is a good choice because it is abundant, nontoxic, non-caustic, and non-combustible. Even if microwave assisted organic reactions in conventional solvents have quickly progressed, in the recent years medicinal chemists have focused their attention to processes deemed not dangerous for the environment, using nanotechnology and greener solvents as water. Several reports of reaction optimizations and selectivities, demonstrating the capability of microwave to allow the obtaining of increased yields have been recently published using water as solvent. In this review, we selected the available knowledge related to microwave assisted organic synthesis in aqueous medium, furnishing examples of the newest strategies to obtain useful scaffolds and novel derivatives for medicinal chemistry purposes. The intention of this review is to demonstrate the exclusive ability of MAOS in water as solvent or as co-solvent. For this purpose we report here the most representative applications of MAOS using water as solvent, focusing on medicinal chemistry processes leading to interesting nitrogen containing heterocycles with potential pharmaceutical applications.

  10. Computer-assisted radiological quantification of rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peloschek, P.L.

    2000-03-01

    Specific objective was to develop the layout and structure of a platform for effective quantification of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A fully operative Java stand-alone application software (RheumaCoach) was developed to support the efficacy of the scoring process in RA (Web address: http://www.univie.ac.at/radio/radio.htm). Addressed as potential users of such a program are physicians enrolled in clinical trials to evaluate the course of RA and its modulation with drug therapies and scientists developing new scoring modalities. The software 'RheumaCoach' consists of three major modules: The Tutorial starts with 'Rheumatoid Arthritis', to teach the basic pathology of the disease. Afterwards the section 'Imaging Standards' explains how to produce proper radiographs. 'Principles - How to use the 'Larsen Score', 'Radiographic Findings' and 'Quantification by Scoring' explain the requirements for unbiased scoring of RA. At the Data Input Sheet care was taken to follow the radiologist's approach in analysing films as published previously. At the compute sheet the calculated Larsen-Score may be compared with former scores and the further possibilities (calculate, export, print, send) are easily accessible. In a first pre-clinical study the system was tested in an unstructured. Two structured evaluations (30 fully documented and blinded cases of RA, four radiologists scored hands and feet with or without the RheumaCoach) followed. Between the evaluations we permanently improved the software. For all readers the usage of the RheumaCoach fastened the procedure, all together the scoring without computer-assistance needed about 20 % percent more time. Availability of the programme via the internet provides common access for potential quality control in multi-center studies. Documentation of results in a specifically designed printout improves communication between radiologists and rheumatologists. The possibilities of direct export to other programmes and electronic

  11. Palliative medicine consultation for preparedness planning in patients receiving left ventricular assist devices as destination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swetz, Keith M; Freeman, Monica R; AbouEzzeddine, Omar F; Carter, Kari A; Boilson, Barry A; Ottenberg, Abigale L; Park, Soon J; Mueller, Paul S

    2011-06-01

    To assess the benefit of proactive palliative medicine consultation for delineation of goals of care and quality-of-life preferences before implantation of left ventricular assist devices as destination therapy (DT). We retrospectively reviewed the cases of patients who received DT between January 15, 2009, and January 1, 2010. Of 19 patients identified, 13 (68%) received proactive palliative medicine consultation. Median time of palliative medicine consultation was 1 day before DT implantation (range, 5 days before to 16 days after). Thirteen patients (68%) completed advance directives. The DT implantation team and families reported that preimplantation discussions and goals of care planning made postoperative care more clear and that adverse events were handled more effectively. Currently, palliative medicine involvement in patients receiving DT is viewed as routine by cardiac care specialists. Proactive palliative medicine consultation for patients being considered for or being treated with DT improves advance care planning and thus contributes to better overall care of these patients. Our experience highlights focused advance care planning, thorough exploration of goals of care, and expert symptom management and end-of-life care when appropriate.

  12. Computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA): capabilities and potential developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann, Rupert P; Waberski, Dagmar

    2014-01-01

    Computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) systems have evolved over approximately 40 years, through advances in devices to capture the image from a microscope, huge increases in computational power concurrent with amazing reduction in size of computers, new computer languages, and updated/expanded software algorithms. Remarkably, basic concepts for identifying sperm and their motion patterns are little changed. Older and slower systems remain in use. Most major spermatology laboratories and semen processing facilities have a CASA system, but the extent of reliance thereon ranges widely. This review describes capabilities and limitations of present CASA technology used with boar, bull, and stallion sperm, followed by possible future developments. Each marketed system is different. Modern CASA systems can automatically view multiple fields in a shallow specimen chamber to capture strobe-like images of 500 to >2000 sperm, at 50 or 60 frames per second, in clear or complex extenders, and in information for ≥ 30 frames and provide summary data for each spermatozoon and the population. A few systems evaluate sperm morphology concurrent with motion. CASA cannot accurately predict 'fertility' that will be obtained with a semen sample or subject. However, when carefully validated, current CASA systems provide information important for quality assurance of semen planned for marketing, and for the understanding of the diversity of sperm responses to changes in the microenvironment in research. The four take-home messages from this review are: (1) animal species, extender or medium, specimen chamber, intensity of illumination, imaging hardware and software, instrument settings, technician, etc., all affect accuracy and precision of output values; (2) semen production facilities probably do not need a substantially different CASA system whereas biology laboratories would benefit from systems capable of imaging and tracking sperm in deep chambers for a flexible period of time

  13. Animal-assisted interventions in internal and rehabilitation medicine: a review of the recent literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Lasa, S; Ferriero, G; Brigatti, E; Valero, R; Franchignoni, F

    2011-06-01

    While conventional wisdom has always affirmed the value of animals in promoting human well-being, only recently has their therapeutic role in medicine become the focus of dedicated research. Therapeutic modalities that use animals as a tool for improving the physical, emotional, cognitive and/or social functioning of humans are called animal-assisted interventions (AAI), and are classified into: animal-assisted activities (AAA); animal-assisted therapy (AAT); and service animal programs (SAP). The aim of this review is to analyze the papers published between 2001 and 2010 in the most influential medical journals dealing with AAI, and discuss their findings in the light of what may be of interest for internal medicine and rehabilitation. A total of 35 articles met the strict inclusion criteria for this review: 18 papers dealing with AAA, 8 with AAT, and 9 with SAP. The therapeutic outcomes associated with AAA are: enhancement of socialization; reduction of stress, anxiety and loneliness; improvement in mood and general well-being; and development of leisure/recreation skills. Regarding AAT, horses are often used as a complementary strategy to facilitate the normalization of muscle tone and improve motor skills in children with cerebral palsy and persons with lower limb spasticity. Finally, most SAP utilize dogs, that assist people with various disabilities in performing everyday activities, thus reducing their dependence on other persons. Further studies are needed to better define the fields and programs for the therapeutic use of animals and to increase their utilization in medicine, as a promising, complementary and natural means to improve both functional autonomy and quality of life.

  14. Computer assisted orthopaedic and trauma surgery. State of the art and future perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schep, N. W. L.; Broeders, I. A. M. J.; van der Werken, Chr

    2003-01-01

    In recent years computer technologies have become more and more integrated in surgical procedures. The potential advantages of computer assisted surgery (CAS) are: increase of accuracy of surgical interventions, less invasive operations, better planning and simulation and reduction of radiation

  15. Nurse practitioners and physician assistants: preparing new providers for hospital medicine at the mayo clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spychalla, Megan T; Heathman, Joanne H; Pearson, Katherine A; Herber, Andrew J; Newman, James S

    2014-01-01

    Hospital medicine is a growing field with an increasing demand for additional healthcare providers, especially in the face of an aging population. Reductions in resident duty hours, coupled with a continued deficit of medical school graduates to appropriately meet the demand, require an additional workforce to counter the shortage. A major dilemma of incorporating nonphysician providers such as nurse practitioners and physician assistants (NPPAs) into a hospital medicine practice is their varying academic backgrounds and inpatient care experiences. Medical institutions seeking to add NPPAs to their hospital medicine practice need a structured orientation program and ongoing NPPA educational support. This article outlines an NPPA orientation and training program within the Division of Hospital Internal Medicine (HIM) at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN. In addition to a practical orientation program that other institutions can model and implement, the division of HIM also developed supplemental learning modalities to maintain ongoing NPPA competencies and fill learning gaps, including a formal NPPA hospital medicine continuing medical education (CME) course, an NPPA simulation-based boot camp, and the first hospital-based NPPA grand rounds offering CME credit. Since the NPPA orientation and training program was implemented, NPPAs within the division of HIM have gained a reputation for possessing a strong clinical skill set coupled with a depth of knowledge in hospital medicine. The NPPA-physician model serves as an alternative care practice, and we believe that with the institution of modalities, including a structured orientation program, didactic support, hands-on learning, and professional growth opportunities, NPPAs are capable of fulfilling the gap created by provider shortages and resident duty hour restrictions. Additionally, the use of NPPAs in hospital medicine allows for patient care continuity that is otherwise missing with resident practice models.

  16. Chinese Herbal Medicine Meets Biological Networks of Complex Diseases: A Computational Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Gu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of cheminformatics, computational biology, and systems biology, great progress has been made recently in the computational research of Chinese herbal medicine with in-depth understanding towards pharmacognosy. This paper summarized these studies in the aspects of computational methods, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM compound databases, and TCM network pharmacology. Furthermore, we chose arachidonic acid metabolic network as a case study to demonstrate the regulatory function of herbal medicine in the treatment of inflammation at network level. Finally, a computational workflow for the network-based TCM study, derived from our previous successful applications, was proposed.

  17. Chinese Herbal Medicine Meets Biological Networks of Complex Diseases: A Computational Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Shuo; Pei, Jianfeng

    2017-01-01

    With the rapid development of cheminformatics, computational biology, and systems biology, great progress has been made recently in the computational research of Chinese herbal medicine with in-depth understanding towards pharmacognosy. This paper summarized these studies in the aspects of computational methods, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) compound databases, and TCM network pharmacology. Furthermore, we chose arachidonic acid metabolic network as a case study to demonstrate the regulatory function of herbal medicine in the treatment of inflammation at network level. Finally, a computational workflow for the network-based TCM study, derived from our previous successful applications, was proposed.

  18. Computer-assisted education system for arrhythmia (CAESAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, M; Inoue, M; Fukunami, M; Ishikawa, K; Inada, H; Abe, H

    1984-08-01

    A computer-assisted education system for arrhythmia (CAESAR) was developed for students to acquire the ability to logically diagnose complicated arrhythmias. This system has a logical simulator of cardiac rhythm using a mathematical model of the impulse formation and conduction system of the heart. A simulated arrhythmia (ECG pattern) is given on a graphic display unit with simulated series of the action potential of five pacemaker centers and the "ladder diagram" of impulse formation and conduction, which show the mechanism of that arrhythmia. For the purpose of the evaluation of this system, 13 medical students were given two types of tests concerning arrhythmias before and after 2-hr learning with this system. The scores they obtained after learning increased significantly from 73.3 +/- 11.9 to 93.2 +/- 3.0 (P less than 0.001) in one test and from 47.2 +/- 17.9 to 64.9 +/- 19.6 (P less than 0.001) in another one. These results proved that this CAI system is useful and effective for training ECG interpretation of arrhythmias.

  19. Natural language processing tools for computer assisted language learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandeventer Faltin, Anne

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper illustrates the usefulness of natural language processing (NLP tools for computer assisted language learning (CALL through the presentation of three NLP tools integrated within a CALL software for French. These tools are (i a sentence structure viewer; (ii an error diagnosis system; and (iii a conjugation tool. The sentence structure viewer helps language learners grasp the structure of a sentence, by providing lexical and grammatical information. This information is derived from a deep syntactic analysis. Two different outputs are presented. The error diagnosis system is composed of a spell checker, a grammar checker, and a coherence checker. The spell checker makes use of alpha-codes, phonological reinterpretation, and some ad hoc rules to provide correction proposals. The grammar checker employs constraint relaxation and phonological reinterpretation as diagnosis techniques. The coherence checker compares the underlying "semantic" structures of a stored answer and of the learners' input to detect semantic discrepancies. The conjugation tool is a resource with enhanced capabilities when put on an electronic format, enabling searches from inflected and ambiguous verb forms.

  20. Analisis cualitativo asistido por computadora Computer-assisted qualitative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César A. Cisneros Puebla

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Los objetivos de este ensayo son: por un lado, presentar una aproximación a la experiencia hispanoamericana en el Análisis Cualitativo Asistido por Computadora (ACAC al agrupar mediante un ejercicio de sistematización los trabajos realizados por diversos colegas provenientes de disciplinas afines. Aunque hubiese querido ser exhaustivo y minucioso, como cualquier intento de sistematización de experiencias, en este ejercicio son notables las ausencias y las omisiones. Introducir algunas reflexiones teóricas en torno al papel del ACAC en el desarrollo de la investigación cualitativa a partir de esa sistematización y con particular énfasis en la producción del dato es, por otro lado, objetivo central de esta primera aproximación.The aims of this article are: on the one hand, to present an approximation to the Hispano-American experience on Computer-Assisted Qualitative Data Analysis (CAQDAS, grouping as a systematization exercise the works carried out by several colleagues from related disciplines. Although attempting to be exhaustive and thorough - as in any attempt at systematizing experiences - this exercise presents clear lacks and omissions. On the other hand, to introduce some theoretical reflections about the role played by CAQDAS in the development of qualitative investigation after that systematization, with a specific focus on data generation.

  1. Implementation of Computer Assisted Test Selection System in Local Governments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Azis Basri

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available As an evaluative way of selection of civil servant system in all government areas, Computer Assisted Test selection system was started to apply in 2013. In phase of implementation for first time in all areas in 2014, this system selection had trouble in several areas, such as registration procedure and passing grade. The main objective of this essay was to describe implementation of new selection system for civil servants in the local governments and to seek level of effectiveness of this selection system. This essay used combination of study literature and field survey which data collection was made by interviews, observations, and documentations from various sources, and to analyze the collected data, this essay used reduction, display data and verification for made the conclusion. The result of this essay showed, despite there a few parts that be problem of this system such as in the registration phase but almost all phases of implementation of CAT selection system in local government areas can be said was working clearly likes in preparation, implementation and result processing phase. And also this system was fulfilled two of three criterias of effectiveness for selection system, they were accuracy and trusty. Therefore, this selection system can be said as an effective way to select new civil servant. As suggestion, local governments have to make prime preparation in all phases of test and make a good feedback as evaluation mechanism and together with central government to seek, fix and improve infrastructures as supporting tool and competency of local residents.

  2. Primary total knee arthroplasty assisted by computer (orthopilot)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naquira, Luis Felipe; Restrepo Tello, Fabio; Pineda Acero, Gustavo; Clavijo, Edgar; Buitrago, Mario

    2004-01-01

    Between December 2001 and December 2003, 21 patients suffering from osteoarthrosis of the knee were treated using computer assisted complete primary arthroplasty of the knee (Orthopilot) at the Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology in the Hospital Militar Central. Results were followed up for an average of 18 months. The criteria evaluated were function and mechanical axis, using ortho-radiography, and length of surgery. The average value obtained was 4.3 degrades with a mechanical axis passing through the centre of the knee joint in 95% of cases, confirmed by a mechanical femoral-tibial angle of -2.5 degrades. Length of surgery was increased by an average of 1 hour compared to the conventional technique. Complications were as follows: One patient experienced an infection which required the withdrawal of the prosthesis and in four of the operations technical problems with the navigator made it necessary to proceed using conventional techniques and these patients were excluded from the study. Radiological results ranged from Excellent to Good in 100% of cases

  3. A Look at Computer-Assisted Testing Operations. The Illinois Series on Educational Application of Computers, No. 12e.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muiznieks, Viktors; Dennis, J. Richard

    In computer assisted test construction (CATC) systems, the computer is used to perform the mechanical aspects of testing while the teacher retains control over question content. Advantages of CATC systems include question banks, decreased importance of test item security, computer analysis and response to student test answers, item analysis…

  4. Blind trials of computer-assisted structure elucidation software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moser Arvin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the largest challenges in chemistry today remains that of efficiently mining through vast amounts of data in order to elucidate the chemical structure for an unknown compound. The elucidated candidate compound must be fully consistent with the data and any other competing candidates efficiently eliminated without doubt by using additional data if necessary. It has become increasingly necessary to incorporate an in silico structure generation and verification tool to facilitate this elucidation process. An effective structure elucidation software technology aims to mimic the skills of a human in interpreting the complex nature of spectral data while producing a solution within a reasonable amount of time. This type of software is known as computer-assisted structure elucidation or CASE software. A systematic trial of the ACD/Structure Elucidator CASE software was conducted over an extended period of time by analysing a set of single and double-blind trials submitted by a global audience of scientists. The purpose of the blind trials was to reduce subjective bias. Double-blind trials comprised of data where the candidate compound was unknown to both the submitting scientist and the analyst. The level of expertise of the submitting scientist ranged from novice to expert structure elucidation specialists with experience in pharmaceutical, industrial, government and academic environments. Results Beginning in 2003, and for the following nine years, the algorithms and software technology contained within ACD/Structure Elucidator have been tested against 112 data sets; many of these were unique challenges. Of these challenges 9% were double-blind trials. The results of eighteen of the single-blind trials were investigated in detail and included problems of a diverse nature with many of the specific challenges associated with algorithmic structure elucidation such as deficiency in protons, structure symmetry, a large number of

  5. Effectiveness of Computer-Assisted Mathematics Education (CAME) over Academic Achievement: A Meta-Analysis Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Seda; Basol, Gülsah

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the current study is to determine the overall effects of Computer-Assisted Mathematics Education (CAME) on academic achievement. After an extensive review of the literature, studies using Turkish samples and observing the effects of Computer-Assisted Education (CAE) on mathematics achievement were examined. As a result of this…

  6. Personalized Computer-Assisted Mathematics Problem-Solving Program and Its Impact on Taiwanese Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chiu-Jung; Liu, Pei-Lin

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of a personalized computer-assisted mathematics problem-solving program on the performance and attitude of Taiwanese fourth grade students. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the personalized computer-assisted program improved student performance and attitude over the nonpersonalized program.…

  7. The Effects of Computer-Assisted Feedback Strategies in Technology Education: A Comparison of Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Ruifang Hope; Strickland, Jane

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of computer-assisted feedback strategies that have been utilized by university students in a technology education curriculum. Specifically, the study examined the effectiveness of the computer-assisted feedback strategy "Knowledge of Response feedback" (KOR), and the "Knowledge of Correct Responses feedback"…

  8. Applications of NLP Techniques to Computer-Assisted Authoring of Test Items for Elementary Chinese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao-Lin; Lin, Jen-Hsiang; Wang, Yu-Chun

    2010-01-01

    The authors report an implemented environment for computer-assisted authoring of test items and provide a brief discussion about the applications of NLP techniques for computer assisted language learning. Test items can serve as a tool for language learners to examine their competence in the target language. The authors apply techniques for…

  9. Public Computer Assisted Learning Facilities for Children with Visual Impairment: Universal Design for Inclusive Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Kin Wai Michael; Lam, Mei Seung

    2012-01-01

    Although computer assisted learning (CAL) is becoming increasingly popular, people with visual impairment face greater difficulty in accessing computer-assisted learning facilities. This is primarily because most of the current CAL facilities are not visually impaired friendly. People with visual impairment also do not normally have access to…

  10. 76 FR 71980 - SEDASYS Computer-Assisted Personalized Sedation System; Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Incorporated's...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2010-P-0176] SEDASYS Computer-Assisted Personalized Sedation System; Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Incorporated's Petition for... SEDASYS computer-assisted personalized sedation system (SEDASYS) submitted by Ethicon Endo-Surgery Inc...

  11. Advances in computational modelling for personalised medicine after myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangion, Kenneth; Gao, Hao; Husmeier, Dirk; Luo, Xiaoyu; Berry, Colin

    2018-04-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is a leading cause of premature morbidity and mortality worldwide. Determining which patients will experience heart failure and sudden cardiac death after an acute MI is notoriously difficult for clinicians. The extent of heart damage after an acute MI is informed by cardiac imaging, typically using echocardiography or sometimes, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). These scans provide complex data sets that are only partially exploited by clinicians in daily practice, implying potential for improved risk assessment. Computational modelling of left ventricular (LV) function can bridge the gap towards personalised medicine using cardiac imaging in patients with post-MI. Several novel biomechanical parameters have theoretical prognostic value and may be useful to reflect the biomechanical effects of novel preventive therapy for adverse remodelling post-MI. These parameters include myocardial contractility (regional and global), stiffness and stress. Further, the parameters can be delineated spatially to correspond with infarct pathology and the remote zone. While these parameters hold promise, there are challenges for translating MI modelling into clinical practice, including model uncertainty, validation and verification, as well as time-efficient processing. More research is needed to (1) simplify imaging with CMR in patients with post-MI, while preserving diagnostic accuracy and patient tolerance (2) to assess and validate novel biomechanical parameters against established prognostic biomarkers, such as LV ejection fraction and infarct size. Accessible software packages with minimal user interaction are also needed. Translating benefits to patients will be achieved through a multidisciplinary approach including clinicians, mathematicians, statisticians and industry partners. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless

  12. Medical image computing and computer-assisted intervention - MICCAI 2006. Pt. 1. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, R. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Informatics and Mathematical Modelling; Nielsen, M. [IT Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark); Sporring, J. (eds.) [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Dept. of Computer Science

    2006-07-01

    The two-volume set LNCS 4190 and LNCS 4191 constitute the refereed proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention, MICCAI 2006, held in Copenhagen, Denmark in October 2006. The program committee carefully selected 39 revised full papers and 193 revised poster papers from 578 submissions for presentation in two volumes, based on a rigorous peer reviews. The first volume includes 114 contributions related to bone shape analysis, robotics and tracking, segmentation, analysis of diffusion tensor MRI, shape analysis and morphometry, simulation and interaction, robotics and intervention, cardio-vascular applications, image analysis in oncology, brain atlases and segmentation, cardiac motion analysis, clinical applications, and registration. The second volume collects 118 papers related to segmentation, validation and quantitative image analysis, brain image processing, motion in image formation, image guided clinical applications, registration, as well as brain analysis and registration. (orig.)

  13. Medical image computing and computer-assisted intervention - MICCAI 2006. Pt. 2. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, R. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Informatics and Mathematical Modelling; Nielsen, M. [IT Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark); Sporring, J. (eds.) [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Dept. of Computer Science

    2006-07-01

    The two-volume set LNCS 4190 and LNCS 4191 constitute the refereed proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention, MICCAI 2006, held in Copenhagen, Denmark in October 2006. The program committee carefully selected 39 revised full papers and 193 revised poster papers from 578 submissions for presentation in two volumes, based on a rigorous peer reviews. The first volume includes 114 contributions related to bone shape analysis, robotics and tracking, segmentation, analysis of diffusion tensor MRI, shape analysis and morphometry, simulation and interaction, robotics and intervention, cardio-vascular applications, image analysis in oncology, brain atlases and segmentation, cardiac motion analysis, clinical applications, and registration. The second volume collects 118 papers related to segmentation, validation and quantitative image analysis, brain image processing, motion in image formation, image guided clinical applications, registration, as well as brain analysis and registration. (orig.)

  14. Medical image computing and computer-assisted intervention - MICCAI 2006. Pt. 2. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, R.; Sporring, J.

    2006-01-01

    The two-volume set LNCS 4190 and LNCS 4191 constitute the refereed proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention, MICCAI 2006, held in Copenhagen, Denmark in October 2006. The program committee carefully selected 39 revised full papers and 193 revised poster papers from 578 submissions for presentation in two volumes, based on a rigorous peer reviews. The first volume includes 114 contributions related to bone shape analysis, robotics and tracking, segmentation, analysis of diffusion tensor MRI, shape analysis and morphometry, simulation and interaction, robotics and intervention, cardio-vascular applications, image analysis in oncology, brain atlases and segmentation, cardiac motion analysis, clinical applications, and registration. The second volume collects 118 papers related to segmentation, validation and quantitative image analysis, brain image processing, motion in image formation, image guided clinical applications, registration, as well as brain analysis and registration. (orig.)

  15. Medical image computing and computer-assisted intervention - MICCAI 2006. Pt. 1. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, R.; Sporring, J.

    2006-01-01

    The two-volume set LNCS 4190 and LNCS 4191 constitute the refereed proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention, MICCAI 2006, held in Copenhagen, Denmark in October 2006. The program committee carefully selected 39 revised full papers and 193 revised poster papers from 578 submissions for presentation in two volumes, based on a rigorous peer reviews. The first volume includes 114 contributions related to bone shape analysis, robotics and tracking, segmentation, analysis of diffusion tensor MRI, shape analysis and morphometry, simulation and interaction, robotics and intervention, cardio-vascular applications, image analysis in oncology, brain atlases and segmentation, cardiac motion analysis, clinical applications, and registration. The second volume collects 118 papers related to segmentation, validation and quantitative image analysis, brain image processing, motion in image formation, image guided clinical applications, registration, as well as brain analysis and registration. (orig.)

  16. Chinese Herbal Medicine Meets Biological Networks of Complex Diseases: A Computational Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Shuo Gu; Jianfeng Pei

    2017-01-01

    With the rapid development of cheminformatics, computational biology, and systems biology, great progress has been made recently in the computational research of Chinese herbal medicine with in-depth understanding towards pharmacognosy. This paper summarized these studies in the aspects of computational methods, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) compound databases, and TCM network pharmacology. Furthermore, we chose arachidonic acid metabolic network as a case study to demonstrate the regula...

  17. A distance assisted training programme for nuclear medicine technologists methodology and international experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, Heather

    2002-01-01

    The Distance Assisted Training Programme for Nuclear Medicine Technologists (DAT) has been developed and coordinated through West mead Hospital, Sydney and directed under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The objective of the program is to provide primarily developing countries with teaching resources for development of technologist education and a framework for the delivery of training courses that can be adapted to best suit local need. Careful planning and development of learning materials, translation to several languages and program implementation have resulted in >400 technologists in 24 countries currently participating in the course of study within Asia, Latin America and Africa. The development and implementation of suitable assessment techniques has provided a structure for technologists to attain a common basic standard in competencies across the regions. Graduates have better opportunities to further their education as well as contribute to improved use of advancing technologies in nuclear medicine (Au)

  18. Lung surgery assisted by multidetector-row computed tomographic simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oizumi, Hiroyuki; Endoh, Makoto; Ota, Hiroshi; Takeda, Shinichi; Suzuki, Jun; Fukaya, Ken; Chiba, Masato; Sadahiro, Mitsuaki

    2009-01-01

    We describe the benefits of lung resection simulation using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). Since 2004, the 1.0-mm slice digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) server has been used for storing data obtained using 64-row MDCT. We observed that an abnormality could not be visualized from the pleural surface in 10 nodules of 18 lesions undergoing wedge lung resection. These 10 nodules were resected through simulation using a three-dimensional (3D) volume-rendering method by considering parameters such as the position, depth, or distance from the interlobar abnormalities, etc., without the need for any marking methods. For lung lobectomy, identification of the branching structures, diameter, and length of the arteries is useful in selecting the procedure for blood vessel treatment. However, in the initial 10 patients of this series, the preoperative identification of 2 small arterial branches was unsuccessful when this method was used. Therefore, it is important to carefully examine the original data in all 3 views, id est (i.e.), axial, sagittal, and coronal views. The visualization of venous branches in affected segments and intersegmental veins has facilitated the preoperative determination of the anatomical intersegmental plane. We divided the cases of thoracoscopic lung segmentectomy into 3 groups (level 1: simple, level 2: intermediate, and level 3: complex) on the basis of the technical complexity. Only level 1 segmentectomies were performed without MDCT simulation. Further, level 2 and 3 segmentectomies could be successfully performed because of the introduction of MDCT simulation in 25 of 35 patients. Thus, this simulation technique may be useful during a thoracoscopic procedure for lung surgery. (author)

  19. THE METHOD OF DESIGNING ASSISTED ON COMPUTER OF THE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUCA Cornelia

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available To the base of the footwear soles designing, is the shoe last. The shoe lasts have irregular shapes, with various curves witch can’t be represented by a simple mathematic function. In order to design the footwear’s soles it’s necessary to take from the shoe last some base contours. These contours are obtained with high precision in a 3D CAD system. In the paper, it will be presented a method of designing of the soles for footwear, computer assisted. The copying process of the shoe last is done using the 3D digitizer. For digitizing, the shoe last spatial shape is positioned on the peripheral of data gathering, witch follows automatically the shoe last’s surface. The wire network obtained through digitizing is numerically interpolated with the interpolator functions in order to obtain the spatial numerical shape of the shoe last. The 3D designing of the sole will be realized on the numerical shape of the shoe last following the next steps: the manufacture of the sole’s surface, the lateral surface realization of the sole’s shape, obtaining the link surface between the lateral side and the planner one of the sole, of the sole’s margin, the sole’s designing contains the skid proof area. The main advantage of the designing method is the design precision, visualization in 3D space of the sole and the possibility to take the best decision viewing the acceptance of new sole’s pattern.

  20. Computer-assisted initial diagnosis of rare diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Alves

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Most documented rare diseases have genetic origin. Because of their low individual frequency, an initial diagnosis based on phenotypic symptoms is not always easy, as practitioners might never have been exposed to patients suffering from the relevant disease. It is thus important to develop tools that facilitate symptom-based initial diagnosis of rare diseases by clinicians. In this work we aimed at developing a computational approach to aid in that initial diagnosis. We also aimed at implementing this approach in a user friendly web prototype. We call this tool Rare Disease Discovery. Finally, we also aimed at testing the performance of the prototype. Methods. Rare Disease Discovery uses the publicly available ORPHANET data set of association between rare diseases and their symptoms to automatically predict the most likely rare diseases based on a patient’s symptoms. We apply the method to retrospectively diagnose a cohort of 187 rare disease patients with confirmed diagnosis. Subsequently we test the precision, sensitivity, and global performance of the system under different scenarios by running large scale Monte Carlo simulations. All settings account for situations where absent and/or unrelated symptoms are considered in the diagnosis. Results. We find that this expert system has high diagnostic precision (≥80% and sensitivity (≥99%, and is robust to both absent and unrelated symptoms. Discussion. The Rare Disease Discovery prediction engine appears to provide a fast and robust method for initial assisted differential diagnosis of rare diseases. We coupled this engine with a user-friendly web interface and it can be freely accessed at http://disease-discovery.udl.cat/. The code and most current database for the whole project can be downloaded from https://github.com/Wrrzag/DiseaseDiscovery/tree/no_classifiers.

  1. Reliability analysis framework for computer-assisted medical decision systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habas, Piotr A.; Zurada, Jacek M.; Elmaghraby, Adel S.; Tourassi, Georgia D.

    2007-01-01

    We present a technique that enhances computer-assisted decision (CAD) systems with the ability to assess the reliability of each individual decision they make. Reliability assessment is achieved by measuring the accuracy of a CAD system with known cases similar to the one in question. The proposed technique analyzes the feature space neighborhood of the query case to dynamically select an input-dependent set of known cases relevant to the query. This set is used to assess the local (query-specific) accuracy of the CAD system. The estimated local accuracy is utilized as a reliability measure of the CAD response to the query case. The underlying hypothesis of the study is that CAD decisions with higher reliability are more accurate. The above hypothesis was tested using a mammographic database of 1337 regions of interest (ROIs) with biopsy-proven ground truth (681 with masses, 656 with normal parenchyma). Three types of decision models, (i) a back-propagation neural network (BPNN), (ii) a generalized regression neural network (GRNN), and (iii) a support vector machine (SVM), were developed to detect masses based on eight morphological features automatically extracted from each ROI. The performance of all decision models was evaluated using the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis. The study showed that the proposed reliability measure is a strong predictor of the CAD system's case-specific accuracy. Specifically, the ROC area index for CAD predictions with high reliability was significantly better than for those with low reliability values. This result was consistent across all decision models investigated in the study. The proposed case-specific reliability analysis technique could be used to alert the CAD user when an opinion that is unlikely to be reliable is offered. The technique can be easily deployed in the clinical environment because it is applicable with a wide range of classifiers regardless of their structure and it requires neither additional

  2. Human-Centred Computing for Assisting Nuclear Safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szoke, I.

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid evolution of enabling hardware and software, technologies including 3D simulation, virtual reality (VR), augmented reality (AR), advanced user interfaces (UI), and geographical information systems (GIS) are increasingly employed in many aspects of modern life. In line with this, the nuclear industry is rapidly adopting emerging technologies to improve efficiency and safety by supporting planning and optimization of maintenance and decommissioning work, as well as for knowledge management, surveillance, training and briefing field operatives, education, etc. For many years, the authors have been involved in research and development (R&D) into the application of 3D simulation, VR, and AR, for mobile, desktop, and immersive 3D systems, to provide a greater sense of presence and situation awareness, for training, briefing, and in situ work by field operators. This work has resulted in a unique software base and experience (documented in numerous reports) from evaluating the effects of the design of training programmes and briefing sessions on human performance and training efficiency when applying various emerging technologies. In addition, the authors are involved in R&D into the use of 3D simulation, advanced UIs, mobile computing, and GIS systems to support realistic visualization of the combined radiological and geographical environment, as well as acquisition, analyzes, visualization and sharing of radiological and other data, within nuclear installations and their surroundings. The toolkit developed by the authors, and the associated knowledge base, has been successfully applied to various aspects of the nuclear industry, and has great potential within the safeguards domain. It can be used to train safeguards inspectors, brief inspectors before inspections, assist inspectors in situ (data registration, analyzes, and communication), support the design and verification of safeguards systems, conserve data and experience, educate future safeguards

  3. Computer-assisted expert case definition in electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Alexander M; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N; Weiss, Lisa S; Shen, Rongjun; Sobel, Rachel E; Bate, Andrew; Reynolds, Robert F

    2016-02-01

    To describe how computer-assisted presentation of case data can lead experts to infer machine-implementable rules for case definition in electronic health records. As an illustration the technique has been applied to obtain a definition of acute liver dysfunction (ALD) in persons with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The technique consists of repeatedly sampling new batches of case candidates from an enriched pool of persons meeting presumed minimal inclusion criteria, classifying the candidates by a machine-implementable candidate rule and by a human expert, and then updating the rule so that it captures new distinctions introduced by the expert. Iteration continues until an update results in an acceptably small number of changes to form a final case definition. The technique was applied to structured data and terms derived by natural language processing from text records in 29,336 adults with IBD. Over three rounds the technique led to rules with increasing predictive value, as the experts identified exceptions, and increasing sensitivity, as the experts identified missing inclusion criteria. In the final rule inclusion and exclusion terms were often keyed to an ALD onset date. When compared against clinical review in an independent test round, the derived final case definition had a sensitivity of 92% and a positive predictive value of 79%. An iterative technique of machine-supported expert review can yield a case definition that accommodates available data, incorporates pre-existing medical knowledge, is transparent and is open to continuous improvement. The expert updates to rules may be informative in themselves. In this limited setting, the final case definition for ALD performed better than previous, published attempts using expert definitions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Interactive computer-assisted instruction in acid-base physiology for mobile computer platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longmuir, Kenneth J

    2014-03-01

    In this project, the traditional lecture hall presentation of acid-base physiology in the first-year medical school curriculum was replaced by interactive, computer-assisted instruction designed primarily for the iPad and other mobile computer platforms. Three learning modules were developed, each with ∼20 screens of information, on the subjects of the CO2-bicarbonate buffer system, other body buffer systems, and acid-base disorders. Five clinical case modules were also developed. For the learning modules, the interactive, active learning activities were primarily step-by-step learner control of explanations of complex physiological concepts, usually presented graphically. For the clinical cases, the active learning activities were primarily question-and-answer exercises that related clinical findings to the relevant basic science concepts. The student response was remarkably positive, with the interactive, active learning aspect of the instruction cited as the most important feature. Also, students cited the self-paced instruction, extensive use of interactive graphics, and side-by-side presentation of text and graphics as positive features. Most students reported that it took less time to study the subject matter with this online instruction compared with subject matter presented in the lecture hall. However, the approach to learning was highly examination driven, with most students delaying the study of the subject matter until a few days before the scheduled examination. Wider implementation of active learning computer-assisted instruction will require that instructors present subject matter interactively, that students fully embrace the responsibilities of independent learning, and that institutional administrations measure instructional effort by criteria other than scheduled hours of instruction.

  5. Ionic liquid-based microwave-assisted extraction of rutin from Chinese medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Huan; Wang, Yuzhi; Kong, Jinhuan; Nie, Chan; Yuan, Ya

    2010-12-15

    An ionic liquid-based microwave-assisted extraction (ILMAE) method has been developed for the effective extraction of rutin from Chinese medicinal plants including Saururus chinensis (Lour.) Bail. (S. chinensis) and Flos Sophorae. A series of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium ionic liquids with different anions were investigated. The results indicated that the characteristics of anions have remarkable effects on the extraction efficiency of rutin and among the investigated ionic liquids, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide ([bmim]Br) aqueous solution was the best. In addition, the ILMAE procedures for the two kinds of medicinal herbs were also optimized by means of a series of single factor experiments and an L(9) (3(4)) orthogonal design. Compared with the optimal ionic liquid-based heating extraction (ILHE), marinated extraction (ILME), ultrasonic-assisted extraction (ILUAE), the optimized approach of ILMAE gained higher extraction efficiency which is 4.879 mg/g in S. chinensis with RSD 1.33% and 171.82 mg/g in Flos Sophorae with RSD 1.47% within the shortest extraction time. Reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) with ultraviolet detection was employed for the analysis of rutin in Chinese medicinal plants. Under the optimum conditions, the average recoveries of rutin from S. chinensis and Flos Sophorae were 101.23% and 99.62% with RSD lower than 3%, respectively. The developed approach is linear at concentrations from 42 to 252 mg L(-1) of rutin solution, with the regression coefficient (r) at 0.99917. Moreover, the extraction mechanism of ILMAE and the microstructures and chemical structures of the two researched samples before and after extraction were also investigated. With the help of LC-MS, it was future demonstrated that the two researched herbs do contain active ingredient of rutin and ionic liquids would not influence the structure of rutin. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Introduction of Virtual Patient Software to Enhance Physician Assistant Student Knowledge in Palliative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prazak, Kristine A

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to infuse palliative medicine and end-of-life care creatively into physician assistant (PA) education. Nine second-year PA students volunteered to participate in this quasi-experimental, pretest-posttest pilot study. Students initially completed an anonymous survey evaluating seven domains of knowledge in palliative medicine coupled with a self-assessment in competence. Virtual patient software was then used to simulate clinical encounters that addressed major palliative care domains. Upon completion of these cases, the same survey, with the addition of three questions about their own personal feelings, was administered. Overall response was positive in regard to improved knowledge and the virtual patient experience. After completion of the cases, students rated their self-assessed skills higher in all domains than prior to completing the cases. Factual knowledge scores showed a slight but not significant improvement, with an average pre-survey score of 4.56 and post-survey score of 4.67. Using virtual patient software can be a way of infusing palliative medicine and end-of-life care into PA education. These encounters can then be modified to include interprofessional encounters within the health professions.

  7. Quantitative nuclear medicine imaging: application of computers to the gamma camera and whole-body scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budinger, T.F.

    1974-01-01

    The following topics are reviewed: properties of computer systems for nuclear medicine quantitation; quantitative information concerning the relation between organ isotope concentration and detected projections of the isotope distribution; quantitation using two conjugate views; three-dimensional reconstruction from projections; quantitative cardiac radioangiography; and recent advances leading to quantitative nuclear medicine of clinical importance. (U.S.)

  8. The Effectiveness of Computer-Assisted Instruction for Teaching Mathematics to Students with Specific Learning Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stultz, Sherry L.

    2013-01-01

    Using computers to teach students is not a new idea. Computers have been utilized for educational purposes for over 80 years. However, the effectiveness of these programs for teaching mathematics to students with specific learning disability is unclear. This study was undertaken to determine if computer-assisted instruction was as effective as…

  9. Generative Computer Assisted Instruction: An Application of Artificial Intelligence to CAI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koffman, Elliot B.

    Frame-oriented computer-assisted instruction (CAI) systems dominate the field, but these mechanized programed texts utilize the computational power of the computer to a minimal degree and are difficult to modify. Newer, generative CAI systems which are supplied with a knowledge of subject matter can generate their own problems and solutions, can…

  10. The Effects of Computer-assisted and Distance Learning of Geometric Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Faruk Sozcu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of computer-assisted and distance learning of geometric modeling and computer aided geometric design are studied. It was shown that computer algebra systems and dynamic geometric environments can be considered as excellent tools for teaching mathematical concepts of mentioned areas, and distance education technologies would be indispensable for consolidation of successfully passed topics

  11. Designing an Assistant System Encouraging Ergonomic Computer Usage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin GÜRÜLER

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Today, people of almost every age group are users of computers and computer aided systems. Technology makes our life easier, but it can also threaten our health. In recent years, one of the main causes of the proliferation of diseases such as lower back pain, neck pain or hernia, Arthritis, visual disturbances and obesity is wrong computer usage. The widespread use of computers also increases these findings. The purpose of this study is to direct computer users to use computers more carefully in terms of ergonomics. The user-interactive system developed for this purpose controls distance of the user to the screen and calculates the look angle and the time spent looking at the screen and provides audio or text format warning when necessary. It is thought that this system will reduce the health problems caused by the frequency of computer usage by encouraging individuals to use computers ergonomically.

  12. Computer assisted analysis of medical x-ray images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson, Ewert

    1996-01-01

    X-rays were originally used to expose film. The early computers did not have enough capacity to handle images with useful resolution. The rapid development of computer technology over the last few decades has, however, led to the introduction of computers into radiology. In this overview paper, the various possible roles of computers in radiology are examined. The state of the art is briefly presented, and some predictions about the future are made.

  13. Computational biomechanics for medicine fundamental science and patient-specific applications

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Karol; Wittek, Adam; Nielsen, Poul

    2014-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges facing the computational engineering community is to extend the success of computational mechanics to fields outside traditional engineering, in particular to biology, the biomedical sciences, and medicine. The Computational Biomechanics for Medicine titles provide an opportunity for specialists in computational biomechanics to present their latest methodologies and advancements. This latest installment comprises nine of the latest developments in both fundamental science and patient-specific applications, from researchers in Australia, New Zealand, USA, UK, France, Ireland, and China. Some of the interesting topics discussed are: cellular mechanics; tumor growth and modeling; medical image analysis; and both patient-specific fluid dynamics and solid mechanics simulations.

  14. 45 CFR 233.35 - Computing the assistance payment under retrospective budgeting after the initial one or two...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Computing the assistance payment under... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS § 233.35 Computing the assistance payment under retrospective budgeting after... shall be computed retrospectively, i.e., shall be based on income and other relevant circumstances in...

  15. Computer-Assisted Visual Search/Decision Aids as a Training Tool for Mammography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nodine, Calvin

    2000-01-01

    The primary goal of the project is to develop a computer-assisted visual search (CAVS) mammography training tool that will improve the perceptual and cognitive skills of trainees leading to mammographic expertise...

  16. Application of Computer-Assisted Learning Methods in the Teaching of Chemical Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayscough, P. B.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the application of computer-assisted learning methods to the interpretation of infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance, and mass spectra; and outlines extensions into the area of integrated spectroscopy. (Author/CMV)

  17. Computer-Assisted Visual Search/Decision Aids as a Training Tool for Mammography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nodine, Calvin

    1999-01-01

    The primary goal of the project is to develop a computer-assisted visual search (CAVS) mammography training tool that will improve the perceptual and cognitive skills of trainees leading to mammographic expertise...

  18. Computer-Assisted Visual Search/Decision Aids as a Training Tool for Mammography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nodine, Calvin

    1998-01-01

    The primary goal of the project is to develop a computer-assisted visual search (CAVS) mammography training tool that will improve the perceptual and cognitive skills of trainees leading to mammographic expertise...

  19. Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL): Using Internet for Effective Language Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kremenska, Anelly

    2006-01-01

    Please, cite this publication as: Kremenska, A. (2006). Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL): Using Internet for Effective Language Learning. Proceedings of International Workshop in Learning Networks for Lifelong Competence Development, TENCompetence Conference. March 30th-31st, Sofia,

  20. [APPLICATION OF COMPUTER-ASSISTED TECHNOLOGY IN ANALYSIS OF REVISION REASON OF UNICOMPARTMENTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Di; Li, Yanlin; Wang, Guoliang; Gao, Huanyu; Yu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    To conclude the revision reason of unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) using computer-assisted technology so as to provide reference for reducing the revision incidence and improving the level of surgical technique and rehabilitation. The relevant literature on analyzing revision reason of UKA using computer-assisted technology in recent years was extensively reviewed. The revision reasons by computer-assisted technology are fracture of the medial tibial plateau, progressive osteoarthritis of reserved compartment, dislocation of mobile bearing, prosthesis loosening, polyethylene wear, and unexplained persistent pain. Computer-assisted technology can be used to analyze the revision reason of UKA and guide the best operating method and rehabilitation scheme by simulating the operative process and knee joint activities.

  1. Computer-assisted training experiment used in the field of thermal energy production (EDF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felgines, R.

    1982-01-01

    In 1981, the EDF carried out an experiment with computer-assisted training (EAO). This new approach, which continued until June 1982, involved about 700 employees all of whom operated nuclear power stations. The different stages of this experiment and the lessons which can be drawn from it are given the lessons were of a positive nature and make it possible to envisage complete coverage of all nuclear power stations by computer-assisted training within a very short space of time [fr

  2. Computer-assisted command and control for Chooz B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    A new type of command and control system has been installed at the Chooz B nuclear power plant. A key feature of the system is a man/machine interface designed to provide operators with on-screen assistance more quickly than ever. (Author)

  3. La pratique du francais assiste par ordinateur (The Application of Computer-Assisted French).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malandain, Jean-Louis

    1985-01-01

    Language teachers are urged to explore, develop, and use the entire range of applications made possible by the computer and to realize that the computer can do almost anything but generate ideas. (MSE)

  4. Computer-Assisted Spanish-Composition Survey--1986.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, T. Edward

    1986-01-01

    A survey of high school and higher education teachers' (N=208) attitudes regarding the use of computers for Spanish-composition instruction revealed that: the lack of foreign-character support remains the major frustration; most teachers used Apple or IBM computers; and there was mixed opinion regarding the real versus the expected benefits of…

  5. Using Computer-Assisted Assessment Heuristics for Usability Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Gavin; Read, Janet C.

    2016-01-01

    Teaching practices within educational institutions have evolved through the increased adoption of technology to deliver the curriculum and the use of computers for assessment purposes. For educational technologists, there is a vast array of commercial computer applications available for the delivery of objective tests, and in some instances,…

  6. Effects of complex feedback on computer-assisted modular instruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gordijn, Jan; Nijhof, W.J.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the effects of two versions of Computer-Based Feedback within a prevocational system of modularized education in The Netherlands. The implementation and integration of Computer-Based Feedback (CBF) in Installation Technology modules in all schools (n=60) in The

  7. The use of Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) Devices ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite the numerous advantages that can be made of the computer in language teaching, many ... be made of the computer in English Language teaching by low technologically exposed teachers. ... http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/ict.v2i1.31950.

  8. Computer-assisted versus non-computer-assisted preoperative planning of corrective osteotomy for extra-articular distal radius malunions: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stockmans Filip

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malunion is the most common complication of distal radius fracture. It has previously been demonstrated that there is a correlation between the quality of anatomical correction and overall wrist function. However, surgical correction can be difficult because of the often complex anatomy associated with this condition. Computer assisted surgical planning, combined with patient-specific surgical guides, has the potential to improve pre-operative understanding of patient anatomy as well as intra-operative accuracy. For patients with malunion of the distal radius fracture, this technology could significantly improve clinical outcomes that largely depend on the quality of restoration of normal anatomy. Therefore, the objective of this study is to compare patient outcomes after corrective osteotomy for distal radius malunion with and without preoperative computer-assisted planning and peri-operative patient-specific surgical guides. Methods/Design This study is a multi-center randomized controlled trial of conventional planning versus computer-assisted planning for surgical correction of distal radius malunion. Adult patients with extra-articular malunion of the distal radius will be invited to enroll in our study. After providing informed consent, subjects will be randomized to two groups: one group will receive corrective surgery with conventional preoperative planning, while the other will receive corrective surgery with computer-assisted pre-operative planning and peri-operative patient specific surgical guides. In the computer-assisted planning group, a CT scan of the affected forearm as well as the normal, contralateral forearm will be obtained. The images will be used to construct a 3D anatomical model of the defect and patient-specific surgical guides will be manufactured. Outcome will be measured by DASH and PRWE scores, grip strength, radiographic measurements, and patient satisfaction at 3, 6, and 12 months

  9. Artificial intelligence in medicine and cardiac imaging: harnessing big data and advanced computing to provide personalized medical diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilsizian, Steven E; Siegel, Eliot L

    2014-01-01

    Although advances in information technology in the past decade have come in quantum leaps in nearly every aspect of our lives, they seem to be coming at a slower pace in the field of medicine. However, the implementation of electronic health records (EHR) in hospitals is increasing rapidly, accelerated by the meaningful use initiatives associated with the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services EHR Incentive Programs. The transition to electronic medical records and availability of patient data has been associated with increases in the volume and complexity of patient information, as well as an increase in medical alerts, with resulting "alert fatigue" and increased expectations for rapid and accurate diagnosis and treatment. Unfortunately, these increased demands on health care providers create greater risk for diagnostic and therapeutic errors. In the near future, artificial intelligence (AI)/machine learning will likely assist physicians with differential diagnosis of disease, treatment options suggestions, and recommendations, and, in the case of medical imaging, with cues in image interpretation. Mining and advanced analysis of "big data" in health care provide the potential not only to perform "in silico" research but also to provide "real time" diagnostic and (potentially) therapeutic recommendations based on empirical data. "On demand" access to high-performance computing and large health care databases will support and sustain our ability to achieve personalized medicine. The IBM Jeopardy! Challenge, which pitted the best all-time human players against the Watson computer, captured the imagination of millions of people across the world and demonstrated the potential to apply AI approaches to a wide variety of subject matter, including medicine. The combination of AI, big data, and massively parallel computing offers the potential to create a revolutionary way of practicing evidence-based, personalized medicine.

  10. Accuracy of treatment planning based on stereolithography in computer assisted surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schicho, Kurt; Figl, Michael; Seemann, Rudolf; Ewers, Rolf; Lambrecht, J. Thomas; Wagner, Arne; Watzinger, Franz; Baumann, Arnulf; Kainberger, Franz; Fruehwald, Julia; Klug, Clemens

    2006-01-01

    Three-dimensional stereolithographic models (SL models), made of solid acrylic resin derived from computed-tomography (CT) data, are an established tool for preoperative treatment planning in numerous fields of medicine. An innovative approach, combining stereolithography with computer-assisted point-to-point navigation, can support the precise surgical realization of a plan that has been defined on an SL model preoperatively. The essential prerequisites for the application of such an approach are: (1) The accuracy of the SL models (including accuracy of the CT scan and correspondence of the model with the patient's anatomy) and (2) the registration method used for the transfer of the plan from the SL model to the patient (i.e., whether the applied registration markers can be added to the SL model corresponding to the markers at the patient with an accuracy that keeps the ''cumulative error'' at the end of the chain of errors, in the order of the accuracy of contemporary navigation systems). In this study, we focus on these two topics: By applying image-matching techniques, we fuse the original CT data of the patient with the corresponding CT data of the scanned SL model, and measure the deviations of defined parameter (e.g., distances between anatomical points). To evaluate the registration method used for the planning transfer, we apply a point-merge algorithm, using four marker points that should be located at exactly corresponding positions at the patient and at connective bars that are added to the surface of the SL model. Again, deviations at defined anatomical structures are measured and analyzed statistically. Our results prove sufficient correspondence of the two data sets and accuracy of the registration method for routine clinical application. The evaluation of the SL model accuracy revealed an arithmetic mean of the relative deviations from 0.8% to 5.4%, with an overall mean deviation of 2.2%. Mean deviations of the investigated anatomical structures

  11. Validation of a novel computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) system using multitarget-tracking algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Mathew James; Pooley, Karen; Simpson, Tracey; Newton, Thomas; Hopkisson, James; Jayaprakasan, Kannamanadias; Jayaprakasan, Rajisha; Naeem, Asad; Pridmore, Tony

    2010-04-01

    To determine the accuracy and precision of a novel computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) system by comparison with existing recommended manual methods. Prospective study using comparative measurements of sperm concentration and motility on latex beads and immotile and motile sperm. Tertiary referral fertility center with strong academic links. Sperm donors and male partners of couples attending for fertility investigations. None. Achievement of Accubead target value for high and low concentration suspensions. Repeatability as demonstrated by coefficients of variation and intraclass correlation coefficients. Correlation and limits of agreement between CASA and manual methods. The CASA measurements of latex beads and sperm concentrations demonstrated a high level of accuracy and repeatability. Repeated Accubead measurements attained the required target value (mean difference from target of 2.61% and 3.71% for high- and low-concentration suspensions, respectively) and were highly reproducible. Limits of agreement analysis suggested that manual and CASA counts compared directly could be deemed to be interchangeable. Manual and CASA motility measurements were highly correlated for grades a, b, and d but could not be deemed to be interchangeable, and manual motility estimates were consistently higher for motile sperm. The novel CASA system was able to provide semen quality measurements for sperm concentration and motility measurements which were at least as reliable as current manual methods. Copyright 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Desk-top computer assisted processing of thermoluminescent dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archer, B.R.; Glaze, S.A.; North, L.B.; Bushong, S.C.

    1977-01-01

    An accurate dosimetric system utilizing a desk-top computer and high sensitivity ribbon type TLDs has been developed. The system incorporates an exposure history file and procedures designed for constant spatial orientation of each dosimeter. Processing of information is performed by two computer programs. The first calculates relative response factors to insure that the corrected response of each TLD is identical following a given dose of radiation. The second program computes a calibration factor and uses it and the relative response factor to determine the actual dose registered by each TLD. (U.K.)

  13. Cavity-assisted quantum computing in a silicon nanostructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Bao; Qin Hao; Zhang Rong; Xue Peng; Liu Jin-Ming

    2014-01-01

    We present a scheme of quantum computing with charge qubits corresponding to one excess electron shared between dangling-bond pairs of surface silicon atoms that couple to a microwave stripline resonator on a chip. By choosing a certain evolution time, we propose the realization of a set of universal single- and two-qubit logical gates. Due to its intrinsic stability and scalability, the silicon dangling-bond charge qubit can be regarded as one of the most promising candidates for quantum computation. Compared to the previous schemes on quantum computing with silicon bulk systems, our scheme shows such advantages as a long coherent time and direct control and readout. (general)

  14. [Clinical analysis of 12 cases of orthognathic surgery with digital computer-assisted technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xin-ying; Hu, Min; Liu, Chang-kui; Liu, Hua-wei; Liu, San-xia; Tao, Ye

    2014-06-01

    This study was to investigate the effect of the digital computer-assisted technique in orthognathic surgery. Twelve patients from January 2008 to December 2011 with jaw malformation were treated in our department. With the help of CT and three-dimensional reconstruction technique, 12 patients underwent surgical treatment and the results were evaluated after surgery. Digital computer-assisted technique could clearly show the status of the jaw deformity and assist virtual surgery. After surgery all patients were satisfied with the results. Digital orthognathic surgery can improve the predictability of the surgical procedure, and to facilitate patients' communication, shorten operative time, and reduce patients' pain.

  15. Magic in the machine: a computational magician's assistant

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Howard; McOwan, Peter W.

    2014-01-01

    A human magician blends science, psychology, and performance to create a magical effect. In this paper we explore what can be achieved when that human intelligence is replaced or assisted by machine intelligence. Magical effects are all in some form based on hidden mathematical, scientific, or psychological principles; often the parameters controlling these underpinning techniques are hard for a magician to blend to maximize the magical effect required. The complexity is often caused by inter...

  16. Magic in the machine: a computational magician's assistant

    OpenAIRE

    Howard eWilliams; Peter eMcOwan

    2014-01-01

    A human magician blends science, psychology and performance to create a magical effect. In this paper we explore what can be achieved when that human intelligence is replaced or assisted by machine intelligence. Magical effects are all in some form based on hidden mathematical, scientific or psychological principles; often the parameters controlling these underpinning techniques are hard for a magician to blend to maximise the magical effect required. The complexity is often caused by interac...

  17. Towards computer-assisted surgery in shoulder joint replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valstar, Edward R.; Botha, Charl P.; van der Glas, Marjolein; Rozing, Piet M.; van der Helm, Frans C. T.; Post, Frits H.; Vossepoel, Albert M.

    A research programme that aims to improve the state of the art in shoulder joint replacement surgery has been initiated at the Delft University of Technology. Development of improved endoprostheses for the upper extremities (DIPEX), as this effort is called, is a clinically driven multidisciplinary programme consisting of many contributory aspects. A part of this research programme focuses on the pre-operative planning and per-operative guidance issues. The ultimate goal of this part of the DIPEX project is to create a surgical support infrastructure that can be used to predict the optimal surgical protocol and can assist with the selection of the most suitable endoprosthesis for a particular patient. In the pre-operative planning phase, advanced biomechanical models of the endoprosthesis fixation and the musculo-skeletal system of the shoulder will be incorporated, which are adjusted to the individual's morphology. Subsequently, the support infrastructure must assist the surgeon during the operation in executing his surgical plan. In the per-operative phase, the chosen optimal position of the endoprosthesis can be realised using camera-assisted tools or mechanical guidance tools. In this article, the pathway towards the desired surgical support infrastructure is described. Furthermore, we discuss the pre-operative planning phase and the per-operative guidance phase, the initial work performed, and finally, possible approaches for improving prosthesis placement.

  18. [Analysis on traditional Chinese medicine prescriptions treating cancer based on traditional Chinese medicine inheritance assistance system and discovery of new prescriptions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ming; Cao, Qi-chen; Su, Yu-xi; Sui, Xin; Yang, Hong-jun; Huang, Lu-qi; Wang, Wen-ping

    2015-08-01

    Malignant tumor is one of the main causes for death in the world at present as well as a major disease seriously harming human health and life and restricting the social and economic development. There are many kinds of reports about traditional Chinese medicine patent prescriptions, empirical prescriptions and self-made prescriptions treating cancer, and prescription rules were often analyzed based on medication frequency. Such methods were applicable for discovering dominant experience but hard to have an innovative discovery and knowledge. In this paper, based on the traditional Chinese medicine inheritance assistance system, the software integration of mutual information improvement method, complex system entropy clustering and unsupervised entropy-level clustering data mining methods was adopted to analyze the rules of traditional Chinese medicine prescriptions for cancer. Totally 114 prescriptions were selected, the frequency of herbs in prescription was determined, and 85 core combinations and 13 new prescriptions were indentified. The traditional Chinese medicine inheritance assistance system, as a valuable traditional Chinese medicine research-supporting tool, can be used to record, manage, inquire and analyze prescription data.

  19. A Computer-Assisted Laboratory Sequence for Petroleum Geology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumsden, David N.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a competitive oil-play game for petroleum geology students. It is accompanied by a computer program written in interactive Fortran. The program, however, is not essential, but useful for adding more interest. (SA)

  20. Computer Assisted Assessment and The Role it Plays in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although the use of computers in data-driven decision making in education was ... educational leaders are now using this approach to transform other aspects of ... machine decision-making without losing the opportunity for rational thought.

  1. Learning theories in computer-assisted foreign language acquisition

    OpenAIRE

    Baeva, D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the learning theories, focusing to the strong interest in technology use for language learning. It is important to look at how technology has been used in the field thus far. The goals of this review are to understand how computers have been used in the past years to support foreign language learning, and to explore any research evidence with regards to how computer technology can enhance language skills acquisition

  2. 45 CFR 233.34 - Computing the assistance payment in the initial one or two months (AFDC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Computing the assistance payment in the initial... § 233.34 Computing the assistance payment in the initial one or two months (AFDC). A State shall compute...) If the initial month is computed prospectively as in paragraph (a) of this section, the second month...

  3. Computer-Assisted Mathematics Instruction for Students with Specific Learning Disability: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stultz, Sherry L.

    2017-01-01

    This review was conducted to evaluate the current body of scholarly research regarding the use of computer-assisted instruction (CAI) to teach mathematics to students with specific learning disability (SLD). For many years, computers are utilized for educational purposes. However, the effectiveness of CAI for teaching mathematics to this specific…

  4. Integrating Computer-Assisted Language Learning in Saudi Schools: A Change Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alresheed, Saleh; Leask, Marilyn; Raiker, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Computer-assisted language learning (CALL) technology and pedagogy have gained recognition globally for their success in supporting second language acquisition (SLA). In Saudi Arabia, the government aims to provide most educational institutions with computers and networking for integrating CALL into classrooms. However, the recognition of CALL's…

  5. Algerian EFL University Teachers' Attitudes towards Computer Assisted Language Learning: The Case of Djilali Liabes University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchefra, Miloud; Baghoussi, Meriem

    2017-01-01

    Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) is still groping its way into Algerian English as a Foreign Language (EFL) classroom, where Information Communications Technologies (ICTs) are defined in terms of occasional use of computers and data projectors for material presentation in the classroom. Though major issues in the image of the lack of…

  6. Effects of Using Simultaneous Prompting and Computer-Assisted Instruction during Small Group Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozen, Arzu; Ergenekon, Yasemin; Ulke-Kurkcuoglu, Burcu

    2017-01-01

    The current study investigated the relation between simultaneous prompting (SP), computer-assisted instruction (CAI), and the receptive identification of target pictures (presented on laptop computer) for four preschool students with developmental disabilities. The students' acquisition of nontarget information through observational learning also…

  7. A Computer-Assisted Instruction in Teaching Abstract Statistics to Public Affairs Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Ali Osman

    2012-01-01

    This article attempts to demonstrate the applicability of a computer-assisted instruction supported with simulated data in teaching abstract statistical concepts to political science and public affairs students in an introductory research methods course. The software is called the Elaboration Model Computer Exercise (EMCE) in that it takes a great…

  8. Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medicines can treat diseases and improve your health. If you are like most people, you need to take medicine at some point in your life. You may need to take medicine every day, or you may only need to ...

  9. Computer-assisted Particle-in-Cell code development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawata, S.; Boonmee, C.; Teramoto, T.; Drska, L.; Limpouch, J.; Liska, R.; Sinor, M.

    1997-12-01

    This report presents a new approach for an electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell (PIC) code development by a computer: in general PIC codes have a common structure, and consist of a particle pusher, a field solver, charge and current density collections, and a field interpolation. Because of the common feature, the main part of the PIC code can be mechanically developed on a computer. In this report we use the packages FIDE and GENTRAN of the REDUCE computer algebra system for discretizations of field equations and a particle equation, and for an automatic generation of Fortran codes. The approach proposed is successfully applied to the development of 1.5-dimensional PIC code. By using the generated PIC code the Weibel instability in a plasma is simulated. The obtained growth rate agrees well with the theoretical value. (author)

  10. Computer-assisted instruction and diagnosis of radiographic findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, D; Butler, C; Hodder, R; Allman, R; Woods, J; Riordan, D

    1984-04-01

    Recent advances in computer technology, including high bit-density storage, digital imaging, and the ability to interface microprocessors with videodisk, create enormous opportunities in the field of medical education. This program, utilizing a personal computer, videodisk, BASIC language, a linked textfile system, and a triangulation approach to the interpretation of radiographs developed by Dr. W. L. Thompson, can enable the user to engage in a user-friendly, dynamic teaching program in radiology, applicable to various levels of expertise. Advantages include a relatively more compact and inexpensive system with rapid access and ease of revision which requires little instruction to the user.

  11. Computer assisted surgery in preoperative planning of acetabular fracture surgery: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudissa, Mehdi; Courvoisier, Aurélien; Chabanas, Matthieu; Tonetti, Jérôme

    2018-01-01

    The development of imaging modalities and computer technology provides a new approach in acetabular surgery. Areas covered: This review describes the role of computer-assisted surgery (CAS) in understanding of the fracture patterns, in the virtual preoperative planning of the surgery and in the use of custom-made plates in acetabular fractures with or without 3D printing technologies. A Pubmed internet research of the English literature of the last 20 years was carried out about studies concerning computer-assisted surgery in acetabular fractures. The several steps for CAS in acetabular fracture surgery are presented and commented by the main author regarding to his personal experience. Expert commentary: Computer-assisted surgery in acetabular fractures is still initial experiences with promising results. Patient-specific biomechanical models considering soft tissues should be developed to allow a more realistic planning.

  12. Virtual reality in medicine-computer graphics and interaction techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haubner, M; Krapichler, C; Lösch, A; Englmeier, K H; van Eimeren, W

    1997-03-01

    This paper describes several new visualization and interaction techniques that enable the use of virtual environments for routine medical purposes. A new volume-rendering method supports shaded and transparent visualization of medical image sequences in real-time with an interactive threshold definition. Based on these rendering algorithms two complementary segmentation approaches offer an intuitive assistance for a wide range of requirements in diagnosis and therapy planning. In addition, a hierarchical data representation for geometric surface descriptions guarantees an optimal use of available hardware resources and prevents inaccurate visualization. The combination of the presented techniques empowers the improved human-machine interface of virtual reality to support every interactive task in medical three-dimensional (3-D) image processing, from visualization of unsegmented data volumes up to the simulation of surgical procedures.

  13. Community effort endorsing multiscale modelling, multiscale data science and multiscale computing for systems medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanin, Massimiliano; Chorbev, Ivan; Stres, Blaz; Stalidzans, Egils; Vera, Julio; Tieri, Paolo; Castiglione, Filippo; Groen, Derek; Zheng, Huiru; Baumbach, Jan; Schmid, Johannes A; Basilio, José; Klimek, Peter; Debeljak, Nataša; Rozman, Damjana; Schmidt, Harald H H W

    2017-12-05

    Systems medicine holds many promises, but has so far provided only a limited number of proofs of principle. To address this road block, possible barriers and challenges of translating systems medicine into clinical practice need to be identified and addressed. The members of the European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) Action CA15120 Open Multiscale Systems Medicine (OpenMultiMed) wish to engage the scientific community of systems medicine and multiscale modelling, data science and computing, to provide their feedback in a structured manner. This will result in follow-up white papers and open access resources to accelerate the clinical translation of systems medicine. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  14. Computer Assisted Instruction in Special Education Three Case Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İbrahim DOĞAN

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate the computer use of three students attending the special education center. Students have mental retardation, hearing problem and physical handicap respectively. The maximum variation sampling is used to select the type of handicap while the convenience sampling is used to select the participants. Three widely encountered handicap types in special education are chosen to select the study participants. The multiple holistic case study design is used in the study. Results of the study indicate that teachers in special education prefer to use educational games and drill and practice type of computers programs. Also it is found that over use of the animation, text and symbols cause cognitive overload on the student with mental retardation. Additionally, it is also discovered that the student with hearing problem learn words better when the computers are used in education as compared to the traditional method. Furthermore the student with physical handicap improved his fine muscle control abilities besides planned course objectives when computers are used in special education.

  15. Plant Closings and Capital Flight: A Computer-Assisted Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Stanley; Breitbart, Myrna M.

    1989-01-01

    A course at Hampshire College was designed to simulate the decision-making environment in which constituencies in a medium-sized city would respond to the closing and relocation of a major corporate plant. The project, constructed as a role simulation with a computer component, is described. (MLW)

  16. Computer-Assisted School Facility Planning with ONPASS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban Decision Systems, Inc., Los Angeles, CA.

    The analytical capabilities of ONPASS, an on-line computer-aided school facility planning system, are described by its developers. This report describes how, using the Canoga Park-Winnetka-Woodland Hills Planning Area as a test case, the Department of City Planning of the city of Los Angeles employed ONPASS to demonstrate how an on-line system can…

  17. Computer Assisted Instruction: The Game "Le Choc des Multinationales."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Hazel

    "Le Choc de Multinationales" is a microcomputer game for students in an upper-level commercial French couse, to be played by two opponents, one of whom may be another student or the computer itself as a direct business competitor. The game's requirements for language use and knowledge of business and economics theory and principles are moderate,…

  18. "Tennis elbow". A challenging call for computation and medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfetsioris, D.; Bontioti, E. N.

    2014-10-01

    An attempt to give an insight on the features composing this musculotendinous disorder. We address the issues of definition, pathophysiology and the mechanism underlying the onset and the occurrence of the disease, diagnosis and diagnostic tools as well as the methods of treatment. We focus mostly on conservative treatment protocols and we recognize the need for a more thorough investigation with the aid of computation.

  19. Computer-assisted learning and simulation systems in dentistry--a challenge to society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welk, A; Splieth, Ch; Wierinck, E; Gilpatrick, R O; Meyer, G

    2006-07-01

    Computer technology is increasingly used in practical training at universities. However, in spite of their potential, computer-assisted learning (CAL) and computer-assisted simulation (CAS) systems still appear to be underutilized in dental education. Advantages, challenges, problems, and solutions of computer-assisted learning and simulation in dentistry are discussed by means of MEDLINE, open Internet platform searches, and key results of a study among German dental schools. The advantages of computer-assisted learning are seen for example in self-paced and self-directed learning and increased motivation. It is useful for both objective theoretical and practical tests and for training students to handle complex cases. CAL can lead to more structured learning and can support training in evidence-based decision-making. The reasons for the still relatively rare implementation of CAL/CAS systems in dental education include an inability to finance, lack of studies of CAL/CAS, and too much effort required to integrate CAL/CAS systems into the curriculum. To overcome the reasons for the relative low degree of computer technology use, we should strive for multicenter research and development projects monitored by the appropriate national and international scientific societies, so that the potential of computer technology can be fully realized in graduate, postgraduate, and continuing dental education.

  20. Computer-assisted organization of the weld seam test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, H.; Richter, I.; Hansen, W.

    1986-01-01

    The article describes the task set and the solution found for an EDP program to be used for assisting in non-destructive tests. It covers the activities of test planning, disposition, calculation, test instructions, documentation and quality statistics. The phases of development and implementation have been essentially concluded. The program is not expected to reduce actual test work. Its advantages rather result from complete planning and execution, from early sensing of deviations, easier documentation and fast as well as easily surveyed informations. When the program has been fully integrated into the flow schedule of order handling, it is expected that 'additional work' will be reduced to an extent close to abt. 15 percent of the total work invested. By transferring the invested work from the test and documentation phase to the planning phase, the target of the program system meets the principle of modern quality assurance, namely to intensify measures for preventing errors. (orig.) [de

  1. Using computer assisted learning for clinical skills education in nursing: integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Jacqueline G; While, Alison E; Roberts, Julia D

    2008-08-01

    This paper is a report of an integrative review of research investigating computer assisted learning for clinical skills education in nursing, the ways in which it has been studied and the general findings. Clinical skills are an essential aspect of nursing practice and there is international debate about the most effective ways in which these can be taught. Computer assisted learning has been used as an alternative to conventional teaching methods, and robust research to evaluate its effectiveness is essential. The CINAHL, Medline, BNI, PsycInfo and ERIC electronic databases were searched for the period 1997-2006 for research-based papers published in English. Electronic citation tracking and hand searching of reference lists and relevant journals was also undertaken. Twelve studies met the inclusion criteria. An integrative review was conducted and each paper was explored in relation to: design, aims, sample, outcome measures and findings. Many of the study samples were small and there were weaknesses in designs. There is limited empirical evidence addressing the use of computer assisted learning for clinical skills education in nursing. Computer assisted learning has been used to teach a limited range of clinical skills in a variety of settings. The paucity of evaluative studies indicates the need for more rigorous research to investigate the effect of computer assisted learning for this purpose. Areas that need to be addressed in future studies include: sample size, range of skills, longitudinal follow-up and control of confounding variables.

  2. The research of computer multimedia assistant in college English listening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian

    2012-04-01

    With the technology development of network information, there exists more and more seriously questions to our education. Computer multimedia application breaks the traditional foreign language teaching and brings new challenges and opportunities for the education. Through the multiple media application, the teaching process is full of animation, image, voice, and characters. This can improve the learning initiative and objective with great development of learning efficiency. During the traditional foreign language teaching, people use characters learning. However, through this method, the theory performance is good but the practical application is low. During the long time computer multimedia application in the foreign language teaching, many teachers still have prejudice. Therefore, the method is not obtaining the effect. After all the above, the research has significant meaning for improving the teaching quality of foreign language.

  3. Easy computer assisted teaching method for undergraduate surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal, Vijay P

    2015-01-01

    Use of computers to aid or support the education or training of people has become commonplace in medical education. Recent studies have shown that it can improve learning outcomes in diagnostic abilities, clinical skills and knowledge across different learner levels from undergraduate medical education to continuing medical education. It also enhance the educational process by increasing access to learning materials, standardising the educational process, providing opportunities for asynchron...

  4. Computer assisted analysis of hand radiographs in infantile hypophosphatasia carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chodirker, B.N.; Greenberg, C.R.; Manitoba Univ., Winnipeg, MB; Roy, D.; Cheang, M.; Evans, J.A.; Manitoba Univ., Winnipeg, MB; Manitoba Univ., Winnipeg, MB; Reed, M.H.; Manitoba Univ., Winnipeg, MB

    1991-01-01

    Hand radiographs of 49 carriers of infantile hypophosphatasia and 67 non-carriers were evaluated using two Apple IIe Computer Programs and Apple Graphics Tablet. CAMPS was used to determine the bone lengths and calculate the metacarpophalangeal profiles. A newly developed program (ADAM) was used to determine bone density based on percent cortical area of the second metacarpal. Carriers of infantile hypophosphatasia had significantly less dense bones. (orig.)

  5. Computer Assisted Instruction in Special Education Three Case Studies

    OpenAIRE

    İbrahim DOĞAN; Ömür AKDEMİR

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the computer use of three students attending the special education center. Students have mental retardation, hearing problem and physical handicap respectively. The maximum variation sampling is used to select the type of handicap while the convenience sampling is used to select the participants. Three widely encountered handicap types in special education are chosen to select the study participants. The multiple holistic case study design is used i...

  6. [Assisted reproductive medicine in Poland, 2011--SPiN PTG report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicka, Anna; Spaczyński, Robert Z; Kurzawa, Rafał

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this report is to present data concerning results and complications related to infertility treatment using assisted reproductive technology (ART) and insemination (IUI) in Poland in 2011. The report was prepared by the Fertility and Sterility Special Interest Group of the Polish Gynaecological Society (SPiN PTG), based on individual data provided by fertility clinics in Poland. Reporting was voluntary and the provided data was not subject to external control. The report presents the availability and the structure of infertility treatment services, the number of procedures performed, their effectiveness and the most common complications. In 2013, 33 Polish fertility clinics provided information to the SPiN PTG report, presenting data from the year 2011. The total number of reported treatment cycles using ART was 15,340 (incl. 10,011 IVF/ICSI procedures) and 15,627 IUI procedures. The rate of clinical pregnancies in terms of a cycle was 34.2% in case of IVF/ ICSI procedures and 13.4% in case of IUI. The prevalence of multiple births was 20.2% and 8.3% respectively in case of IVF/ICSI and IUI methods. The most frequent complication in the course of treatment using ART was ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). The SPiN PTG report allows to find out the average effectiveness and safety of assisted reproduction technologies and is currently the only proof of responsibility and due diligence of fertility centres in Poland. However due to the lack of a central register of fertility clinics, facultative participation in the report as well as incomplete information on pregnancy and delivery the collected data does not reflect the full spectrum of the Polish reproductive medicine.

  7. A Peer-Assisted Learning Experience in Computer Programming Language Learning and Developing Computer Programming Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Tugba; Gunes, Ali; Sayan, Hamiyet

    2016-01-01

    Peer learning or, as commonly expressed, peer-assisted learning (PAL) involves school students who actively assist others to learn and in turn benefit from an effective learning environment. This research was designed to support students in becoming more autonomous in their learning, help them enhance their confidence level in tackling computer…

  8. Faculty Attitudes towards Computer Assisted Instruction at the University of Gaziantep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiz Yalçın TILFARLIOĞLU

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at revealing faculty attitudes towards computer assistedinstruction at University of Gaziantep, Turkey in a multifaceted way. Additionally, ittries to determine underlying factors that shape these attitudes. After a pilot study, thequestionnaire was applied to a sample population of 145 faculty that were chosenrandomly. The results revealed that faculty attitudes towards computer assistedinsruction are positive. Age, sex, teaching experience, level of proficiency in Englishand computer usage skills have no or little effects over these attitudes.According to theresults of the study, faculty who have prior knowledge on computers expose ratherpositive attitudes towards computers in education.Another important outcome of thestudy is the existence of a gender gap in terms of computer assisted instruction.Althoughthere seems to be no difference between male and female faculty concerning theirbackground education regarding computers, male faculty feel confident about thematter, whereas female faculty feel uncomfortable about using computers in theirlessons.

  9. Computer-Assisted Search Of Large Textual Data Bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, James R.

    1995-01-01

    "QA" denotes high-speed computer system for searching diverse collections of documents including (but not limited to) technical reference manuals, legal documents, medical documents, news releases, and patents. Incorporates previously available and emerging information-retrieval technology to help user intelligently and rapidly locate information found in large textual data bases. Technology includes provision for inquiries in natural language; statistical ranking of retrieved information; artificial-intelligence implementation of semantics, in which "surface level" knowledge found in text used to improve ranking of retrieved information; and relevance feedback, in which user's judgements of relevance of some retrieved documents used automatically to modify search for further information.

  10. Models of the Learner in Computer-Assisted Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-12-01

    De ~.elopment Center San Diego, California 92152 !4" N il 0 ’U ’ UNCI.ASbp kW ILL SECURITY CLASSIVICATION OF TNO;S PAA;E 11%.. Daea t,,i...d) fREAD...and computer programaing . Advo.itional efforts are being, made to extend this approach to less formal subiect matter such as South American geography...Laubsch’s call for a time-dependent forgetting process. Despite the inclusion of a forgetting process, presentation strategies based on the family of

  11. Computer Assisted Circulation Control at Health Sciences Library SUNYAB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean K. Miller

    1972-06-01

    Full Text Available A description of the circulation system which the Health Sciences Library at the State University of New York at Buffalo has been using since October 1970. Features of the system include automatic production of overdue, fine, and billing notices; notices for call-in of requested books; and book availability notices. Remote operation and processing on the IBM 360/40 and CDC 6400 computer are accomplished via the Administrative Terminal System (ATS and Terminal job Entry (T]E. The system provides information for management of the collection and improved service to the user.

  12. Application of computer assisted tomography in gynaecological oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickel, H.; Schreithofer, H.; Sager, W.D.; Graz Univ.

    1980-01-01

    The non invasive radiologic technique of computed tomography has been employed since 1978 at the University Women's Clinic and Radiologic Clinic, Graz. One hundred and fourty six examinations of the pelvis, abdomen and chest were performed on 63 oncologic patients. The method was employed for the preoperative detection and measurement of the size of benign and malignant neoplasms; in tumour staging and assessment of therapeutic response. The results suggest that CT might be the best method for the assessment of response to cytotoxic therapy of ovarian cancer. (orig.) [de

  13. Magic in the machine: a computational magician's assistant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard eWilliams

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A human magician blends science, psychology and performance to create a magical effect. In this paper we explore what can be achieved when that human intelligence is replaced or assisted by machine intelligence. Magical effects are all in some form based on hidden mathematical, scientific or psychological principles; often the parameters controlling these underpinning techniques are hard for a magician to blend to maximise the magical effect required. The complexity is often caused by interacting and often conflicting physical and psychological constraints that need to be optimally balanced. Normally this tuning is done by trial and error, combined with human intuitions. Here we focus on applying Artificial Intelligence methods to the creation and optimisation of magic tricks exploiting mathematical principles. We use experimentally derived data about particular perceptual and cognitive features, combined with a model of the underlying mathematical process to provide a psychologically valid metric to allow optimisation of magical impact. In the paper we introduce our optimisation methodology and describe how it can be flexibly applied to a range of different types of mathematics based tricks. We also provide two case studies as exemplars of the methodology at work: a magical jigsaw, and a mind reading card trick effect. We evaluate each trick created through testing in laboratory and public performances, and further demonstrate the real world efficacy of our approach for professional performers through sales of the tricks in a reputable magic shop in London.

  14. Magic in the machine: a computational magician's assistant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Howard; McOwan, Peter W

    2014-01-01

    A human magician blends science, psychology, and performance to create a magical effect. In this paper we explore what can be achieved when that human intelligence is replaced or assisted by machine intelligence. Magical effects are all in some form based on hidden mathematical, scientific, or psychological principles; often the parameters controlling these underpinning techniques are hard for a magician to blend to maximize the magical effect required. The complexity is often caused by interacting and often conflicting physical and psychological constraints that need to be optimally balanced. Normally this tuning is done by trial and error, combined with human intuitions. Here we focus on applying Artificial Intelligence methods to the creation and optimization of magic tricks exploiting mathematical principles. We use experimentally derived data about particular perceptual and cognitive features, combined with a model of the underlying mathematical process to provide a psychologically valid metric to allow optimization of magical impact. In the paper we introduce our optimization methodology and describe how it can be flexibly applied to a range of different types of mathematics based tricks. We also provide two case studies as exemplars of the methodology at work: a magical jigsaw, and a mind reading card trick effect. We evaluate each trick created through testing in laboratory and public performances, and further demonstrate the real world efficacy of our approach for professional performers through sales of the tricks in a reputable magic shop in London.

  15. deNIS IIplus - computer-assisted crisis management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corr, B.

    2007-01-01

    The management of catastrophes, as natural disasters or manmade disasters, will only be effective and successful if all relevant information is available in time for decision-makers. During previous large-scale disasters it became evident that information needed for the disaster management was only partially available and that there were fundamental deficits in regard to the flow of information between federal states (''Laender'') as well as communication problems between disaster response teams in the effected regions. On this account in summer 2001 the Federal Ministry of the Interior has decided to develop the ''German Emergency Preparedness Information System (deNIS)''. The aim of the enhanced version deNIS II plus is to built up a network for the civil and disaster response and to assist as an information and communication system for decision-makers of the Federal Government and the Laender Governments to better co-ordination relief and rescue teams in the event of a natural disaster or technical accident. Correspondingly the primary task of deNIS is to support the decision-making of disaster management authorities. (orig.)

  16. Ultrasound-assisted extraction of three bufadienolides from Chinese medicine ChanSu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yinshi; Bi, Jianjie; Zhang, Li; Ye, Baoxing

    2012-11-01

    In this study, the application of ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) method was shown to be more efficient in extracting anti-tumor bufadienolides (bufalin, cinobufagin and resibufogenin) from important animal medicine of ChanSu than the maceration extraction (ME) and soxhlet extraction (SE) method. The effects of ultrasonic variables including extraction solvent, solvent concentration, solvent to solid ratio, ultrasound power, temperature, extraction time and particle size on the yields of three bufadienolides were investigated. The optimum extraction conditions found were: 70% (v/v) methanol solution, solvent to solid ratio of 10ml/g, ultrasound power of 125W, temperature of 20°C, extraction time of 20min and particle size of 60-80 mesh. The extraction yields of bufalin, cinobufagin and resibufogenin were 43.17±0.85, 52.58±1.12, 137.70±2.65mg/g, respectively. In order to achieve a similar yield as UAE, soxhlet extraction required 6h and maceration extraction required much longer time of 18h. The results indicated that UAE is an alternative method for extracting bufadienolides from ChanSu. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Surface Modeling, Solid Modeling and Finite Element Modeling. Analysis Capabilities of Computer-Assisted Design and Manufacturing Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nee, John G.; Kare, Audhut P.

    1987-01-01

    Explores several concepts in computer assisted design/computer assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM). Defines, evaluates, reviews and compares advanced computer-aided geometric modeling and analysis techniques. Presents the results of a survey to establish the capabilities of minicomputer based-systems with the CAD/CAM packages evaluated. (CW)

  18. The use of computer graphics to assist in-reactor operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.L.

    1995-01-01

    A number of complex inspection and repair tasks have been carried out inside Nuclear Electric's gas cooled reactors using multi-link manipulators. The paper describes how computer graphics are integrated into the manipulator system and perform a key role during many phases of a project. Graphics simulation is used to assist with conceptual design, detailed path planning, rehearsals, quality assurance, demonstrations and, critically, as an on-line tool to assist the real-time operation of the equipment whilst performing complex in-reactor tasks. The techniques used are illustrated by recent examples of use to assist the inspection and repair of in-reactor components. (Author)

  19. Deep neural network-based computer-assisted detection of cerebral aneurysms in MR angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Takahiro; Hanaoka, Shouhei; Nomura, Yukihiro; Sato, Issei; Nemoto, Mitsutaka; Miki, Soichiro; Maeda, Eriko; Yoshikawa, Takeharu; Hayashi, Naoto; Abe, Osamu

    2018-04-01

    The usefulness of computer-assisted detection (CAD) for detecting cerebral aneurysms has been reported; therefore, the improved performance of CAD will help to detect cerebral aneurysms. To develop a CAD system for intracranial aneurysms on unenhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) images based on a deep convolutional neural network (CNN) and a maximum intensity projection (MIP) algorithm, and to demonstrate the usefulness of the system by training and evaluating it using a large dataset. Retrospective study. There were 450 cases with intracranial aneurysms. The diagnoses of brain aneurysms were made on the basis of MRA, which was performed as part of a brain screening program. Noncontrast-enhanced 3D time-of-flight (TOF) MRA on 3T MR scanners. In our CAD, we used a CNN classifier that predicts whether each voxel is inside or outside aneurysms by inputting MIP images generated from a volume of interest (VOI) around the voxel. The CNN was trained in advance using manually inputted labels. We evaluated our method using 450 cases with intracranial aneurysms, 300 of which were used for training, 50 for parameter tuning, and 100 for the final evaluation. Free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) analysis. Our CAD system detected 94.2% (98/104) of aneurysms with 2.9 false positives per case (FPs/case). At a sensitivity of 70%, the number of FPs/case was 0.26. We showed that the combination of a CNN and an MIP algorithm is useful for the detection of intracranial aneurysms. 4 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018;47:948-953. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  20. Computer-assisted mechanistic evaluation of organic reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gushurst, A.J.

    1988-01-01

    CAMEO, an interactive computer program which predicts the products of organic reactions given starting materials and conditions, has been refined and extended in the area of base-catalyzed and nucleophilic processes. The present capabilities of the program are outlined including brief discussion on the major segments in CAMEO: graphics, perception, and reaction evaluation. The implementation of general algorithms for predicting the acidities of a vast number of organic compounds to within 2 pK{sub a} units in dimethylsulfoxide and water are then described, followed by a presentation of the reactivity rules used by the program to evaluate nucleophilc reactions. Finally, a treatment of sulfur and phosphorus ylides, iminophosphoranes, and P=X-activated anions is given illuminating the various competitions available for these reagents, such as between proton transfer and addition, 1,2- and 1,4-addition, and the Peterson, Wittig, and Horner-Emmons olefination reactions.

  1. Computer assisted instruction in the general chemistry laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pate, Jerry C.

    This dissertation examines current applications concerning the use of computer technology to enhance instruction in the general chemistry laboratory. The dissertation critiques widely-used educational software, and explores examples of multimedia presentations such as those used in beginning chemistry laboratory courses at undergraduate and community colleges. The dissertation describes a prototype compact disc (CD) used to (a) introduce the general chemistry laboratory, (b) familiarize students with using chemistry laboratory equipment, (c) introduce laboratory safety practices, and (d) provide approved techniques for maintaining a laboratory notebook. Upon completing the CD portion of the pre-lab, students are linked to individual self-help (WebCT) quizzes covering the information provided on the CD. The CD is designed to improve student understanding of basic concepts, techniques, and procedures used in the general chemistry laboratory.

  2. Tablet computer enhanced training improves internal medicine exam performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgart, Daniel C; Wende, Ilja; Grittner, Ulrike

    2017-01-01

    Traditional teaching concepts in medical education do not take full advantage of current information technology. We aimed to objectively determine the impact of Tablet PC enhanced training on learning experience and MKSAP® (medical knowledge self-assessment program) exam performance. In this single center, prospective, controlled study final year medical students and medical residents doing an inpatient service rotation were alternatingly assigned to either the active test (Tablet PC with custom multimedia education software package) or traditional education (control) group, respectively. All completed an extensive questionnaire to collect their socio-demographic data, evaluate educational status, computer affinity and skills, problem solving, eLearning knowledge and self-rated medical knowledge. Both groups were MKSAP® tested at the beginning and the end of their rotation. The MKSAP® score at the final exam was the primary endpoint. Data of 55 (tablet n = 24, controls n = 31) male 36.4%, median age 28 years, 65.5% students, were evaluable. The mean MKSAP® score improved in the tablet PC (score Δ + 8 SD: 11), but not the control group (score Δ- 7, SD: 11), respectively. After adjustment for baseline score and confounders the Tablet PC group showed on average 11% better MKSAP® test results compared to the control group (plearning to their respective training programs.

  3. High-order computer-assisted estimates of topological entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grote, Johannes

    The concept of Taylor Models is introduced, which offers highly accurate C0-estimates for the enclosures of functional dependencies, combining high-order Taylor polynomial approximation of functions and rigorous estimates of the truncation error, performed using verified interval arithmetic. The focus of this work is on the application of Taylor Models in algorithms for strongly nonlinear dynamical systems. A method to obtain sharp rigorous enclosures of Poincare maps for certain types of flows and surfaces is developed and numerical examples are presented. Differential algebraic techniques allow the efficient and accurate computation of polynomial approximations for invariant curves of certain planar maps around hyperbolic fixed points. Subsequently we introduce a procedure to extend these polynomial curves to verified Taylor Model enclosures of local invariant manifolds with C0-errors of size 10-10--10 -14, and proceed to generate the global invariant manifold tangle up to comparable accuracy through iteration in Taylor Model arithmetic. Knowledge of the global manifold structure up to finite iterations of the local manifold pieces enables us to find all homoclinic and heteroclinic intersections in the generated manifold tangle. Combined with the mapping properties of the homoclinic points and their ordering we are able to construct a subshift of finite type as a topological factor of the original planar system to obtain rigorous lower bounds for its topological entropy. This construction is fully automatic and yields homoclinic tangles with several hundred homoclinic points. As an example rigorous lower bounds for the topological entropy of the Henon map are computed, which to the best knowledge of the authors yield the largest such estimates published so far.

  4. [Computer-assisted navigation in orthognathic surgery. Application to Le Fort I osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benassarou, M; Benassarou, A; Meyer, C

    2013-08-05

    Computer-assisted navigation is a tool that allows the surgeon to reach intraoperatively a previously defined target. This technique can be applied to the positioning of bone fragments in orthognathic surgery. It is not used routinely yet because there are no specifically dedicated systems available on the market for this kind of surgery. The goal of our study was to describe the various systems that could be used in orthognathic surgery and to report our experience of computer-assisted surgery in the positioning of the maxilla during maxillomandibular osteotomies. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  5. Computer assisted surgery with 3D robot models and visualisation of the telesurgical action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovetta, A

    2000-01-01

    This paper deals with the support of virtual reality computer action in the procedures of surgical robotics. Computer support gives a direct representation of the surgical theatre. The modelization of the procedure in course and in development gives a psychological reaction towards safety and reliability. Robots similar to the ones used by the manufacturing industry can be used with little modification as very effective surgical tools. They have high precision, repeatability and are versatile in integrating with the medical instrumentation. Now integrated surgical rooms, with computer and robot-assisted intervention, are operating. The computer is the element for a decision taking aid, and the robot works as a very effective tool.

  6. Effectiveness of computer-assisted interactive videodisc instruction in teaching rheumatology to physical and occupational therapy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, M K; Hazelwood, S E; Bridges, A J; Cutts, J H; Mitchell, J A; Reid, J C; Sharp, G

    1996-01-01

    A computer-assisted interactive videodisc instructional program, HP-RHEUM was designed to teach clinical findings in arthritis to occupational and physical therapy students. Using the Rheumatology Image Library videodisc produced by the National Library of Medicine, HP-RHEUM consists of instructional modules which employ advance organizers, examples/nonexamples, summaries, and immediate feedback. To see if HP-RHEUM would be as effective as traditional classroom instruction, control data were collected in 1991 from 52 OT and PT students. Treatment data were collected from 61 students in 1992 when HP-RHEUM entirely replaced lectures. Identical pre- and post-tests consisted of 70 multiple choice questions, with 24 matched to slides. On the slide questions the HP-RHEUM group had significantly higher scores. Otherwise, there was no significant difference in performance between groups. HP-RHEUM provided an independent learning method and enhanced visual comprehension of rheumatologic disease concepts.

  7. From computer-assisted intervention research to clinical impact: The need for a holistic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ourselin, Sébastien; Emberton, Mark; Vercauteren, Tom

    2016-10-01

    The early days of the field of medical image computing (MIC) and computer-assisted intervention (CAI), when publishing a strong self-contained methodological algorithm was enough to produce impact, are over. As a community, we now have substantial responsibility to translate our scientific progresses into improved patient care. In the field of computer-assisted interventions, the emphasis is also shifting from the mere use of well-known established imaging modalities and position trackers to the design and combination of innovative sensing, elaborate computational models and fine-grained clinical workflow analysis to create devices with unprecedented capabilities. The barriers to translating such devices in the complex and understandably heavily regulated surgical and interventional environment can seem daunting. Whether we leave the translation task mostly to our industrial partners or welcome, as researchers, an important share of it is up to us. We argue that embracing the complexity of surgical and interventional sciences is mandatory to the evolution of the field. Being able to do so requires large-scale infrastructure and a critical mass of expertise that very few research centres have. In this paper, we emphasise the need for a holistic approach to computer-assisted interventions where clinical, scientific, engineering and regulatory expertise are combined as a means of moving towards clinical impact. To ensure that the breadth of infrastructure and expertise required for translational computer-assisted intervention research does not lead to a situation where the field advances only thanks to a handful of exceptionally large research centres, we also advocate that solutions need to be designed to lower the barriers to entry. Inspired by fields such as particle physics and astronomy, we claim that centralised very large innovation centres with state of the art technology and health technology assessment capabilities backed by core support staff and open

  8. Computed tomography, nuclear medicine, ultrasound. Advanced diagnostic imaging for problematic areas in paediatric otolaryngology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noyek, A.M.; Friedberg, J.; Fitz, C.R.; Greyson, N.D.; Gilday, D.; Ash, J.; Miskin, M.; Rothberg, R.

    1982-01-01

    This presentation considers the diagnostic role of three major advanced imaging modalities in paediatric otolaryngology: computed tomography, nuclear medicine and ultrasound. These techniques allow for both more specific diagnosis, and for more precise understanding of the natural history of diagnoses already rendered. (Auth.)

  9. The impact of computer science in molecular medicine: enabling high-throughput research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Iglesia, Diana; García-Remesal, Miguel; de la Calle, Guillermo; Kulikowski, Casimir; Sanz, Ferran; Maojo, Víctor

    2013-01-01

    The Human Genome Project and the explosion of high-throughput data have transformed the areas of molecular and personalized medicine, which are producing a wide range of studies and experimental results and providing new insights for developing medical applications. Research in many interdisciplinary fields is resulting in data repositories and computational tools that support a wide diversity of tasks: genome sequencing, genome-wide association studies, analysis of genotype-phenotype interactions, drug toxicity and side effects assessment, prediction of protein interactions and diseases, development of computational models, biomarker discovery, and many others. The authors of the present paper have developed several inventories covering tools, initiatives and studies in different computational fields related to molecular medicine: medical informatics, bioinformatics, clinical informatics and nanoinformatics. With these inventories, created by mining the scientific literature, we have carried out several reviews of these fields, providing researchers with a useful framework to locate, discover, search and integrate resources. In this paper we present an analysis of the state-of-the-art as it relates to computational resources for molecular medicine, based on results compiled in our inventories, as well as results extracted from a systematic review of the literature and other scientific media. The present review is based on the impact of their related publications and the available data and software resources for molecular medicine. It aims to provide information that can be useful to support ongoing research and work to improve diagnostics and therapeutics based on molecular-level insights.

  10. Accurate measurement of surface areas of anatomical structures by computer-assisted triangulation of computed tomography images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allardice, J.T.; Jacomb-Hood, J.; Abulafi, A.M.; Williams, N.S. (Royal London Hospital (United Kingdom)); Cookson, J.; Dykes, E.; Holman, J. (London Hospital Medical College (United Kingdom))

    1993-05-01

    There is a need for accurate surface area measurement of internal anatomical structures in order to define light dosimetry in adjunctive intraoperative photodynamic therapy (AIOPDT). The authors investigated whether computer-assisted triangulation of serial sections generated by computed tomography (CT) scanning can give an accurate assessment of the surface area of the walls of the true pelvis after anterior resection and before colorectal anastomosis. They show that the technique of paper density tessellation is an acceptable method of measuring the surface areas of phantom objects, with a maximum error of 0.5%, and is used as the gold standard. Computer-assisted triangulation of CT images of standard geometric objects and accurately-constructed pelvic phantoms gives a surface area assessment with a maximum error of 2.5% compared with the gold standard. The CT images of 20 patients' pelves have been analysed by computer-assisted triangulation and this shows the surface area of the walls varies from 143 cm[sup 2] to 392 cm[sup 2]. (Author).

  11. Automated and Assistive Tools for Accelerated Code migration of Scientific Computing on to Heterogeneous MultiCore Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-13

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2017-0029 Automated and Assistive Tools for Accelerated Code migration of Scientific Computing on to Heterogeneous MultiCore Systems ...2012, “ Automated and Assistive Tools for Accelerated Code migration of Scientific Computing on to Heterogeneous MultiCore Systems .” 2. The objective...2012 - 01/25/2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Automated and Assistive Tools for Accelerated Code migration of Scientific Computing on to Heterogeneous

  12. Computer-generated ovaries to assist follicle counting experiments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelos Skodras

    Full Text Available Precise estimation of the number of follicles in ovaries is of key importance in the field of reproductive biology, both from a developmental point of view, where follicle numbers are determined at specific time points, as well as from a therapeutic perspective, determining the adverse effects of environmental toxins and cancer chemotherapeutics on the reproductive system. The two main factors affecting follicle number estimates are the sampling method and the variation in follicle numbers within animals of the same strain, due to biological variability. This study aims at assessing the effect of these two factors, when estimating ovarian follicle numbers of neonatal mice. We developed computer algorithms, which generate models of neonatal mouse ovaries (simulated ovaries, with characteristics derived from experimental measurements already available in the published literature. The simulated ovaries are used to reproduce in-silico counting experiments based on unbiased stereological techniques; the proposed approach provides the necessary number of ovaries and sampling frequency to be used in the experiments given a specific biological variability and a desirable degree of accuracy. The simulated ovary is a novel, versatile tool which can be used in the planning phase of experiments to estimate the expected number of animals and workload, ensuring appropriate statistical power of the resulting measurements. Moreover, the idea of the simulated ovary can be applied to other organs made up of large numbers of individual functional units.

  13. Summaries of recent computer-assisted Feynam diagram calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark Fischler

    2001-01-01

    The AIHENP Workshop series has traditionally included cutting edge work on automated computation of Feynman diagrams. The conveners of the Symbolic Problem Solving topic in this ACAT conference felt it would be useful to solicit presentations of brief summaries of the interesting recent calculations. Since this conference was the first in the series to be held in the Western Hemisphere, it was decided that the summaries would be solicited both from attendees and from researchers who could not attend the conference. This would represent a sampling of many of the key calculations being performed. The results were presented at the Poster session; contributions from ten researchers were displayed and posted on the web. Although the poster presentation, which can be viewed at conferences.fnal.gov/acat2000/ placed equal emphasis on results presented at the conference and other contributions, here we primarily discuss the latter, which do not appear in full form in these proceedings. This brief paper can't do full justice to each contribution; interested readers can find details of the work not presented at this conference in references (1), (2), (3), (4), (5), (6), (7)

  14. Evaluation of Computer-Assisted Instruction in Principles of Economics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Coates

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite increasing use, little is known about the effectiveness of web-based instructional material. This study assesses the effectiveness of supplementary web-based materials and activities in introductory economics courses. We have collected data on 66 students from three principles sections that describe demographic characteristics, use of web-based instructional resources, and performance on graded quizzes and examinations. We use this data to statistically assess the effectiveness of the web-based material. Student utilization of web-based material was extensive. Students frequently used on-line practice quizzes and accessed the web-based material often. A sizable fraction of the students actively posted and read threaded discussions on the course bulletin board. The statistical analysis shows that both on-line computer graded practice quizzes and posting to the class bulletin board are positively correlated with student performance on the quizzes and exams, but use of web-based content and passive reading of bulletin board posts ("lurking" is not. These results suggest that faculty should focus more on developing self-test quizzes and effective bulletin board discussion projects and less on generating on-line content.

  15. [Computer-assisted diet therapy in pediatric kidney diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dartois, A M; Ducamp, S; Decaux, F; Broyer, M

    1989-01-01

    The authors present a computer program written in UCSD Pascal) which monitors the dietary management of children with kidney diseases. Diet is established according to height, weight, chronological and statural age and recommended dietary allowances (USRDA). The composition of the prescribed diet and of food intake is given as amounts of animal and vegetable protein, fat, carbohydrates, energy, water, Na, K, Ca, P and renal solute load, per day and per kilo BW as compared to RDA. The amount of food is presented in tabular form, per day, per meal, per feed, or per tube-feeding with the schedule. It is possible to calculate the nutrients of food recipes. The food table includes 500 items, that can be modified as required. The drug table contains 100 items. The program calculates also average food consumption for dietary surveys. Diets, recipes and food tables may be viewed and modified before print out at each step of the calculation. The diet data bank stores 100 diets per floppy disk.

  16. A unique style of computer-assisted assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Thelwall

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available The Computer-Based Assessment project at the University of Wolverhampton has produced a number of tests built around a common framework. There are three main tests that are used by about 800 students per year, and they replace written tests. There are also two diagnostic tests that are not part of any formal assessment but are used by about 400 students per year. We have produced numerous special versions of these tests for short courses, different teaching techniques, and one for a Broadnet Online training module (Broadnet, n.d.. The tests are all written with 80,000 permutations built in to allow them to be made available for students to use and practise on at all times without compromising security. In fact, there are no serious security concerns because of the random factors, and so the same tests are used every year without the need to be hidden or rewritten. Similar advantages have been found on other projects using random factors; see for example Thoennessen and Harrison (1996.

  17. Computer Assisted Instructional Design for Computer-Based Instruction. Final Report. Working Papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Daniel M.; Pirolli, Peter

    Recent advances in artificial intelligence and the cognitive sciences have made it possible to develop successful intelligent computer-aided instructional systems for technical and scientific training. In addition, computer-aided design (CAD) environments that support the rapid development of such computer-based instruction have also been recently…

  18. Computer assisted Objective structured clinical examination versus Objective structured clinical examination in assessment of Dermatology undergraduate students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richa Chaudhary

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Computer assisted objective structured clinical examination was found to be a valid, reliable and effective format for dermatology assessment, being rated as the preferred format by examiners.

  19. Secondary School Mathematics Teachers’ and Students’ Views on Computer Assisted Mathematics Instruction in Turkey: Mathematica Example

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet Alper Ardıç; Tevfik İşleyen

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed at determining the secondary school mathematics teachers’ and students’ views on computer-assisted mathematics instruction (CAMI) conducted via Mathematica. Accordingly, three mathematics teachers in Adıyaman and nine 10th-grade students participated in the research. Firstly, the researchers trained the mathematics teachers in the Mathematica program, a computer algebra system (CAS) and CAMI. Then, they provided a suitable environment for teachers to practice CAMI with their ...

  20. Intelligent Decisional Assistant that Facilitate the Choice of a Proper Computer System Applied in Busines

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolae MARGINEAN

    2009-01-01

    The choice of a proper computer system is not an easy task for a decider. One reason could be the present market development of computer systems applied in business. The big number of the Romanian market players determines a big number of computerized products, with a multitude of various properties. Our proposal tries to optimize and facilitate this decisional process within an e-shop where are sold IT packets applied in business, building an online decisional assistant, a special component ...

  1. Computational anatomy based on whole body imaging basic principles of computer-assisted diagnosis and therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Masutani, Yoshitaka

    2017-01-01

    This book deals with computational anatomy, an emerging discipline recognized in medical science as a derivative of conventional anatomy. It is also a completely new research area on the boundaries of several sciences and technologies, such as medical imaging, computer vision, and applied mathematics. Computational Anatomy Based on Whole Body Imaging highlights the underlying principles, basic theories, and fundamental techniques in computational anatomy, which are derived from conventional anatomy, medical imaging, computer vision, and applied mathematics, in addition to various examples of applications in clinical data. The book will cover topics on the basics and applications of the new discipline. Drawing from areas in multidisciplinary fields, it provides comprehensive, integrated coverage of innovative approaches to computational anatomy. As well,Computational Anatomy Based on Whole Body Imaging serves as a valuable resource for researchers including graduate students in the field and a connection with ...

  2. Artroplastia total do joelho assistida por computador Computer-assisted knee total arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Freire da Mota e Albuquerque

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Um dos avanços tecnológicos mais significativos da medicina atual é a cirurgia assistida por computador, sendo que na ortopedia uma das aplicações mais importantes dessa tecnologia é na artroplastia do joelho. A principal contribuição da cirurgia ortopédica assistida por computador (Computer Aided Orthopaedic Surgery’s - CAOS na artroplastia do joelho é o seu potencial em aprimorar a precisão da implantação das próteses e do alinhamento do membro operado contribuindo para a otimização e longevidade dos resultados. A navegação independente de imagens, baseada em referências anatômicas adquiridas durante o ato cirúrgico através de transmissores de raios infra-vermelho, tem sido a técnica preponderante na artroplastia do joelho. Utilizamos o sistema de navegação para artroplastia total do joelho "OrthoPilot" versão 2.2 para a colocação de 72 próteses de joelho "Search Evolution" da "Aesculap AG CO. KG" com ou sem estabilização posterior em uma série contínua. O objetivo foi aferir a precisão do alinhamento obtido com a navegação através de radiografias panorâmicas obtidas no período pós-operatório. Obtivemos um desvio médio do eixo mecânico nulo de 0,66º com desvio padrão de 0,7º, sendo que 98,6% dos joelhos ficaram dentro de uma margem de erro de 3º e 79,2% com erro inferior a 1º. Concluímos que o sistema é seguro e preciso, não adicionando morbidade à cirurgia convencional.One of the most significant technological advancements in current medicine is the computer-assisted surgery, which, for orthopaedics, one of the major uses of this technology is in knee arthroplasty. The main contribution provided by computer-assisted orthopaedic surgery (CAOS to knee arthroplasty is its potential to improve prosthesis implant precision and the operated limb alignment, contributing to results optimization and longevity. The image-independent navigation, based on anatomical references acquired during surgical

  3. Gold-standard for computer-assisted morphological sperm analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Violeta; Garcia, Alejandra; Hitschfeld, Nancy; Härtel, Steffen

    2017-04-01

    Published algorithms for classification of human sperm heads are based on relatively small image databases that are not open to the public, and thus no direct comparison is available for competing methods. We describe a gold-standard for morphological sperm analysis (SCIAN-MorphoSpermGS), a dataset of sperm head images with expert-classification labels in one of the following classes: normal, tapered, pyriform, small or amorphous. This gold-standard is for evaluating and comparing known techniques and future improvements to present approaches for classification of human sperm heads for semen analysis. Although this paper does not provide a computational tool for morphological sperm analysis, we present a set of experiments for comparing sperm head description and classification common techniques. This classification base-line is aimed to be used as a reference for future improvements to present approaches for human sperm head classification. The gold-standard provides a label for each sperm head, which is achieved by majority voting among experts. The classification base-line compares four supervised learning methods (1- Nearest Neighbor, naive Bayes, decision trees and Support Vector Machine (SVM)) and three shape-based descriptors (Hu moments, Zernike moments and Fourier descriptors), reporting the accuracy and the true positive rate for each experiment. We used Fleiss' Kappa Coefficient to evaluate the inter-expert agreement and Fisher's exact test for inter-expert variability and statistical significant differences between descriptors and learning techniques. Our results confirm the high degree of inter-expert variability in the morphological sperm analysis. Regarding the classification base line, we show that none of the standard descriptors or classification approaches is best suitable for tackling the problem of sperm head classification. We discovered that the correct classification rate was highly variable when trying to discriminate among non-normal sperm

  4. The transfer of computer processed pictures for nuclear medicine to cassette VTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komaya, Akio; Takahashi, Kazue; Suzuki, Toshi

    1980-01-01

    With the increasing clinical importance of data-processing computers in nuclear medicine, the applications are now widely established. As for the output methods and output devices of data, processed pictures, and animation pictures, contrivance is necessary for the easy appreciation and utilization of the information obtained. In the cine-mode display of heart wall motion in particular, it is desirable to reproduce conveniently the output images as animated for image reading at any time or place. The apparatus for this purpose has been completed by using an ordinary home-use cassette VTR and a video monitor. The computer output pictures as nuclear medicine data are recorded in the VTR. Recording and reprocuction are possible only by a few additional components and some adjustments. Animation pictures such as the cine-mode display of heart wall motion can be conveniently reproduced for image reading, away from computers. (J.P.N.)

  5. Transfer of computer processed pictures for nuclear medicine to cassette VTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komaya, A; Takahashi, K; Suzuki, T [Yamagata Univ. (Japan)

    1980-05-01

    With the increasing clinical importance of data-processing computers in nuclear medicine, the applications are now widely established. As for the output methods and output devices of data, processed pictures, and animation pictures, contrivance is necessary for the easy appreciation and utilization of the information obtained. In the cine-mode display of heart wall motion in particular, it is desirable to reproduce conveniently the output images as animated for image reading at any time or place. The apparatus for this purpose has been completed by using an ordinary home-use cassette VTR and a video monitor. The computer output pictures as nuclear medicine data are recorded in the VTR. Recording and reprocuction are possible only by a few additional components and some adjustments. Animation pictures such as the cine-mode display of heart wall motion can be conveniently reproduced for image reading, away from computers.

  6. Computer-Aided Design/Computer-Assisted Manufacture Monolithic Restorations for Severely Worn Dentition: A Case History Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Ayash, Samir; Boldt, Johannes; Vuck, Alexander

    Full-arch rehabilitation of patients with severe tooth wear due to parafunctional behavior is a challenge for dentists and dental technicians, especially when a highly esthetic outcome is desired. A variety of different treatment options and prosthetic materials are available for such a clinical undertaking. The ongoing progress of computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture technologies in combination with all-ceramic materials provides a predictable workflow for these complex cases. This case history report describes a comprehensive, step-by-step treatment protocol leading to an optimally predictable treatment outcome for an esthetically compromised patient.

  7. Secondary School Students' Attitudes towards Mathematics Computer--Assisted Instruction Environment in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwei, Philip K.; Wando, Dave; Too, Jackson K.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the results of research conducted in six classes (Form IV) with 205 students with a sample of 94 respondents. Data represent students' statements that describe (a) the role of Mathematics teachers in a computer-assisted instruction (CAI) environment and (b) effectiveness of CAI in Mathematics instruction. The results indicated…

  8. Secondary School Mathematics Teachers' and Students' Views on Computer Assisted Mathematics Instruction in Turkey: Mathematica Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardiç, Mehmet Alper; Isleyen, Tevfik

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed at determining the secondary school mathematics teachers' and students' views on computer-assisted mathematics instruction (CAMI) conducted via Mathematica. Accordingly, three mathematics teachers in Adiyaman and nine 10th-grade students participated in the research. Firstly, the researchers trained the mathematics teachers in the…

  9. Variables that Affect Math Teacher Candidates' Intentions to Integrate Computer-Assisted Mathematics Education (CAME)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, Ahmet

    2010-01-01

    Based on Social Cognitive Carier Theory (SCCT) (Lent, Brown, & Hackett, 1994, 2002), this study tested the effects of mathematics teacher candidates' self-efficacy in, outcome expectations from, and interest in CAME on their intentions to integrate Computer-Assisted Mathematics Education (CAME). While mathematics teacher candidates' outcome…

  10. Computer-Assisted Analysis of Spontaneous Speech: Quantification of Basic Parameters in Aphasic and Unimpaired Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussmann, Katja; Grande, Marion; Meffert, Elisabeth; Christoph, Swetlana; Piefke, Martina; Willmes, Klaus; Huber, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Although generally accepted as an important part of aphasia assessment, detailed analysis of spontaneous speech is rarely carried out in clinical practice mostly due to time limitations. The Aachener Sprachanalyse (ASPA; Aachen Speech Analysis) is a computer-assisted method for the quantitative analysis of German spontaneous speech that allows for…

  11. An intercomparison of computer assisted date processing and display methods in radioisotope scintigraphy using mathematical tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houston, A.S.; Macleod, M.A.

    1977-01-01

    Several computer assisted processing and display methods are evaluated using a series of 100 normal brain scintigrams, 50 of which have had single 'mathematical tumours' superimposed. Using a standard rating system, or in some cases quantitative estimation, LROC curves are generated for each method and compared. (author)

  12. Research Skills for Journalism Students: From Basics to Computer-Assisted Reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drueke, Jeanetta; Streckfuss, Richard

    1997-01-01

    Despite the availability of computer-assisted research, a survey of 300 newspapers found that many journalists still rely on paper sources or neglect research altogether. This article describes the development and implementation of a beginning reporting course that integrates research skills, demonstrates the value of research in reporting, and…

  13. Environmental Factors Affecting Computer Assisted Language Learning Success: A Complex Dynamic Systems Conceptual Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Michael W.; Wu, Wen-Chi Vivian

    2014-01-01

    This conceptual, interdisciplinary inquiry explores Complex Dynamic Systems as the concept relates to the internal and external environmental factors affecting computer assisted language learning (CALL). Based on the results obtained by de Rosnay ["World Futures: The Journal of General Evolution", 67(4/5), 304-315 (2011)], who observed…

  14. A Compilation of Postgraduate Theses Written in Turkey on Computer Assisted Instruction in Chemistry Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozdogan, Aykut Emre; Demirbas, Murat

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study conducted is to present in-depth information about the postgraduate theses written within the context of Computer Assisted Instruction in Chemistry Education in Turkey. The theses collected in National Thesis Centre of Turkish Council of Higher Education were examined. As a result of an examination, it was found that about…

  15. Attitudes of Jordanian Undergraduate Students towards Using Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Farah Jamal Abed Alrazeq; Al-Zayed, Norma Nawaf

    2018-01-01

    The study aimed at investigating the attitudes of Jordanian undergraduate students towards using computer assisted-language learning (CALL) and its effectiveness in the process of learning the English language. In order to fulfill the study's objective, the researchers used a questionnaire to collect data, followed-up with semi-structured…

  16. A Multidisciplinary Model for Development of Intelligent Computer-Assisted Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ok-choon; Seidel, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    Proposes a schematic multidisciplinary model to help developers of intelligent computer-assisted instruction (ICAI) identify the types of required expertise and integrate them into a system. Highlights include domain types and expertise; knowledge acquisition; task analysis; knowledge representation; student modeling; diagnosis of learning needs;…

  17. Listening Strategy Use and Influential Factors in Web-Based Computer Assisted Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L.; Zhang, R.; Liu, C.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates second and foreign language (L2) learners' listening strategy use and factors that influence their strategy use in a Web-based computer assisted language learning (CALL) system. A strategy inventory, a factor questionnaire and a standardized listening test were used to collect data from a group of 82 Chinese students…

  18. Information-Processing Correlates of Computer-Assisted Word Learning by Mentally Retarded Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conners, Frances A.; Detterman, Douglas K.

    1987-01-01

    Nineteen moderately/severely retarded students (ages 9-22) completed ten 15-minute computer-assisted instruction sessions and seven basic cognitive tasks measuring simple learning, choice reaction time, relearning, probed recall, stimulus discrimination, tachictoscopic threshold, and recognition memory. Stimulus discrimination, probed recall, and…

  19. Computer-Assisted Instruction: A Case Study of Two Charter Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keengwe, Jared; Hussein, Farhan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship in achievement gap between English language learners (ELLs) utilizing computer-assisted instruction (CAI) in the classroom, and ELLs relying solely on traditional classroom instruction. The study findings showed that students using CAI to supplement traditional lectures performed better…

  20. A Comparison of Computer-Assisted Instruction and Tutorials in Hematology and Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, T. J.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    A study comparing the effectiveness of computer-assisted instruction (CAI) and small group instruction found no significant difference in medical student achievement in oncology but higher achievement through small-group instruction in hematology. Students did not view CAI as more effective, but saw it as a supplement to traditional methods. (MSE)

  1. Climate Change Discourse in Mass Media: Application of Computer-Assisted Content Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirilenko, Andrei P.; Stepchenkova, Svetlana O.

    2012-01-01

    Content analysis of mass media publications has become a major scientific method used to analyze public discourse on climate change. We propose a computer-assisted content analysis method to extract prevalent themes and analyze discourse changes over an extended period in an objective and quantifiable manner. The method includes the following: (1)…

  2. Promoting Creativity through Assessment: A Formative Computer-Assisted Assessment Tool for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cropley, David; Cropley, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Computer-assisted assessment (CAA) is problematic when it comes to fostering creativity, because in educational thinking the essence of creativity is not finding the correct answer but generating novelty. The idea of "functional" creativity provides rubrics that can serve as the basis for forms of CAA leading to either formative or…

  3. A Framework for the Design of Computer-Assisted Simulation Training for Complex Police Situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderström, Tor; Åström, Jan; Anderson, Greg; Bowles, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report progress concerning the design of a computer-assisted simulation training (CAST) platform for developing decision-making skills in police students. The overarching aim is to outline a theoretical framework for the design of CAST to facilitate police students' development of search techniques in…

  4. Computer-Assisted Career Guidance Systems: A Part of NCDA History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris-Bowlsbey, JoAnn

    2013-01-01

    The first computer-assisted career planning systems were developed in the late 1960s and were based soundly on the best of career development and decision-making theory. Over the years, this tradition has continued as the technology that delivers these systems' content has improved dramatically and as they have been universally accepted as…

  5. Detection of defects in logs using computer assisted tomography (CAT) scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonner, P.D.; Lupton, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories of AECL have performed a preliminary feasibility study on the applicability of computer assisted tomographic techniques to detect the internal structure of logs. Cross sections of three logs have been obtained using a medical CAT scanner. The results show that knots, rot and growth rings are easily recognized in both dry and wet logs

  6. The pedagogical effectiveness of ASR-based computer assisted pronunciation training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neri, A.

    2007-01-01

    Computer Assisted Pronunciation Training (CAPT) systems with Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) technology have become increasingly popular to train pronunciation in the second language (L2). The advantage of these systems is the provision of a self-paced, stress-free type of training with automatic

  7. Using a Dialogue System Based on Dialogue Maps for Computer Assisted Second Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung-Kwon; Kwon, Oh-Woog; Kim, Young-Kil; Lee, Yunkeun

    2016-01-01

    In order to use dialogue systems for computer assisted second-language learning systems, one of the difficult issues in such systems is how to construct large-scale dialogue knowledge that matches the dialogue modelling of a dialogue system. This paper describes how we have accomplished the short-term construction of large-scale and…

  8. Learning Auditory Discrimination with Computer-Assisted Instruction: A Comparison of Two Different Performance Objectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhaus, Kurt A.

    A 12-week study of two groups of 14 college freshmen music majors was conducted to determine which group demonstrated greater achievement in learning auditory discrimination using computer-assisted instruction (CAI). The method employed was a pre-/post-test experimental design using subjects randomly assigned to a control group or an experimental…

  9. Decreasing Transition Times in Elementary School Classrooms: Using Computer-Assisted Instruction to Automate Intervention Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hine, Jeffrey F.; Ardoin, Scott P.; Foster, Tori E.

    2015-01-01

    Research suggests that students spend a substantial amount of time transitioning between classroom activities, which may reduce time spent academically engaged. This study used an ABAB design to evaluate the effects of a computer-assisted intervention that automated intervention components previously shown to decrease transition times. We examined…

  10. Computer-Assisted Instruction to Teach DOS Commands: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWeeney, Mark G.

    1992-01-01

    Describes a computer-assisted instruction (CAI) program used to teach DOS commands. Pretest and posttest results for 65 graduate students using the program are reported, and it is concluded that the CAI program significantly aided the students. Sample screen displays for the program and several questions from the pre/posttest are included. (nine…

  11. Associations among Teachers' Attitudes towards Computer-Assisted Education and TPACK Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baturay, Meltem Huri; Gökçearslan, Sahin; Sahin, Semsettin

    2017-01-01

    The current study investigates the attitudes of teachers towards Computer-Assisted Education (CAE) and their knowledge of technology, pedagogy and content via TPACK model that assesses the competencies for developing and implementing successful teaching. There were 280 participants in the study. The results of the study indicate that teachers'…

  12. OBJECTIVE EVALUATION OF HYPERACTIVATED MOTILITY IN RAT SPERMATOZA USING COMPUTER-ASSISTED SPERM ANALYSIS (CASA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective evaluation of hyperactivated motility in rat spermatozoa using computer-assisted sperm analysis.Cancel AM, Lobdell D, Mendola P, Perreault SD.Toxicology Program, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.The aim of this study was t...

  13. MONTHLY VARIATION IN SPERM MOTILITY IN COMMON CARP ASSESSED USING COMPUTER-ASSISTED SPERM ANALYSIS (CASA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperm motility variables from the milt of the common carp Cyprinus carpio were assessed using a computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) system across several months (March-August 1992) known to encompass the natural spawning period. Two-year-old pond-raised males obtained each mo...

  14. The Lower Manhattan Project: A New Approach to Computer-Assisted Learning in History Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crozier, William; Gaffield, Chad

    1990-01-01

    The Lower Manhattan Project, a computer-assisted undergraduate course in U.S. history, enhances student appreciation of the historical process through research and writing. Focuses on the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries emphasizing massive immigration, rapid industrialization, and the growth of cities. Includes a reading list and…

  15. Computerized Games and Simulations in Computer-Assisted Language Learning: A Meta-Analysis of Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Mark

    2010-01-01

    This article explores research on the use of computerized games and simulations in language education. The author examined the psycholinguistic and sociocultural constructs proposed as a basis for the use of games and simulations in computer-assisted language learning. Research in this area is expanding rapidly. However, to date, few studies have…

  16. Applying Computer-Assisted Musical Instruction to Music Appreciation Course: An Example with Chinese Musical Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Shi-Jer; Guo, Yuan-Chang; Zhu, Yi-Zhen; Shih, Ru-Chu; Dzan, Wei-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to explore the effectiveness of computer-assisted musical instruction (CAMI) in the Learning Chinese Musical Instruments (LCMI) course. The CAMI software for Chinese musical instruments was developed and administered to 228 students in a vocational high school. A pretest-posttest non-equivalent control group design with three…

  17. Computer-assisted semen analysis parameters as predictors for fertility of men from the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, L; Scheike, Thomas Harder; Jensen, Tina Kold

    2000-01-01

    The predictive value of sperm motility parameters obtained by computer-assisted semen analysis (CASA) was evaluated for the fertility of men from general population. In a prospective study with couples stopping use of contraception in order to try to conceive, CASA was performed on semen samples...

  18. Effects of Computer-Assisted Jigsaw II Cooperative Learning Strategy on Physics Achievement and Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambari, Isiaka Amosa; Yusuf, Mudasiru Olalere

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of computer-assisted Jigsaw II cooperative strategy on physics achievement and retention. The study also determined how moderating variables of achievement levels as it affects students' performance in physics when Jigsaw II cooperative learning is used as an instructional strategy. Purposive sampling technique…

  19. The Effects of Computer Assisted Instruction Materials on Approximate Number Skills of Students with Dyscalculia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutlu, Yilmaz; Akgün, Levent

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the effects of computer assisted instruction materials on approximate number skills of students with mathematics learning difficulties. The study was carried out with pretest-posttest quasi experimental method with a single subject. The participants of the study consist of a girl and two boys who attend 3rd…

  20. A Survey of Students Participating in a Computer-Assisted Education Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yel, Elif Binboga; Korhan, Orhan

    2015-01-01

    This paper mainly examines anthropometric data, data regarding the habits, experiences, and attitudes of the students about their tablet/laptop/desktop computer use, in addition to self-reported musculoskeletal discomfort levels and frequencies of students participating in a tablet-assisted interactive education programme. A two-part questionnaire…

  1. Computer-Assisted English Learning System Based on Free Conversation by Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung-Kwon; Kwon, Oh-Woog; Kim, Young-Kil

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to describe a computer-assisted English learning system using chatbots and dialogue systems, which allow free conversation outside the topic without limiting the learner's flow of conversation. The evaluation was conducted by 20 experimenters. The performance of the system based on a free conversation by topic was measured by the…

  2. Effect of Tutorial Mode of Computer-Assisted Instruction on Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the effect of Tutorial Mode of Computer- Assisted Instruction (CAI) on students' academic performance in practical geography in Nigeria, However, the sample population of eighty (80) Senior Secondary School Two geography students that were randomly selected from two privately owned secondary ...

  3. A PERT/CPM of the Computer Assisted Completion of The Ministry September Report. Research Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeney, J. D.

    Using two statistical analysis techniques (the Program Evaluation and Review Technique and the Critical Path Method), this study analyzed procedures for compiling the required yearly report of the Metropolitan Separate School Board (Catholic) of Toronto, Canada. The computer-assisted analysis organized the process of completing the report more…

  4. 76 FR 75887 - SEDASYS Computer-Assisted Personalized Sedation System; Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Incorporated's...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2010-P-0176] SEDASYS Computer-Assisted Personalized Sedation System; Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Incorporated's Petition for... system (SEDASYS) submitted by Ethicon Endo-Surgery Inc. (EES), the sponsor for SEDASYS. This meeting has...

  5. A novel approach for computer assisted EEG monitoring in the adult ICU

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cloostermans, M.C.; de Vos, Cecilia Cecilia Clementine; van Putten, Michel Johannes Antonius Maria

    2011-01-01

    Objective The implementation of a computer assisted system for real-time classification of the electroencephalogram (EEG) in critically ill patients. Methods Eight quantitative features were extracted from the raw EEG and combined into a single classifier. The system was trained with 41 EEG

  6. A brain-computer interface as input channel for a standard assistive technology software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zickler, Claudia; Riccio, Angela; Leotta, Francesco; Hillian-Tress, Sandra; Halder, Sebastian; Holz, Elisa; Staiger-Sälzer, Pit; Hoogerwerf, Evert-Jan; Desideri, Lorenzo; Mattia, Donatella; Kübler, Andrea

    2011-10-01

    Recently brain-computer interface (BCI) control was integrated into the commercial assistive technology product QualiWORLD (QualiLife Inc., Paradiso-Lugano, CH). Usability of the first prototype was evaluated in terms of effectiveness (accuracy), efficiency (information transfer rate and subjective workload/NASA Task Load Index) and user satisfaction (Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with assistive Technology, QUEST 2.0) by four end-users with severe disabilities. Three assistive technology experts evaluated the device from a third person perspective. The results revealed high performance levels in communication and internet tasks. Users and assistive technology experts were quite satisfied with the device. However, none could imagine using the device in daily life without improvements. Main obstacles were the EEG-cap and low speed.

  7. Accuracy of a computer-assisted planning and placement system for anatomical femoral tunnel positioning in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luites, J.W.H.; Wymenga, A.B.; Blankevoort, L.; Eygendaal, D.; Verdonschot, Nicolaas Jacobus Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Background Femoral tunnel positioning is a difficult, but important factor in successful anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Computer navigation can improve the anatomical planning procedure besides the tunnel placement procedure. Methods The accuracy of the computer-assisted femoral

  8. Effects of Computer-Assisted Instruction with Conceptual Change Texts on Removing the Misconceptions of Radioactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet YUMUŞAK

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Training young scientists, enabling conceptual understanding in science education is quite important. Misconception is one of the important indications for whether the concepts are understood or not. The most important educational tools to remove misconceptions are conceptual change texts. In addition, one of the important methods to remove misconceptions is computer-assisted instruction. The goal of this study is to research the effects of the use of computer-assisted instruction (CAI, conceptual change texts (CCT, computer-assisted instruction with conceptual change texts (CAI+CCT, and use of traditional teaching method (TTM on removing the misconceptions of science teacher candidates on the subject of radioactivity. Research sample was made of totally 92 students studying at four different groups of senior students in Celal Bayar University, Faculty of Education, Department of Science Education in 2011-2012 academic year. A different teaching method was used in each group. Experimental groups were randomly determined; in the first experimental group, computer-assisted instruction was used (23 students; in the second experimental group, conceptual change texts were used (23 students; in the third experimental group, computer-assisted instruction with conceptual change texts were used (23 students; and the fourth group, on which traditional education method was used, was called control group (23 students. Two-tier misconception diagnostic instrument, which was developed by the researcher, was used as data collection tool of the research. “Nonequivalent Control Groups Experimental Design” was used in this research in order to determine the efficiency of different teaching methods. Obtained data were analyzed by using SPSS 21.0. As a result of the research, it was determined that methods used on experimental groups were more successful than traditional teaching method practiced on control group in terms of removing misconceptions on

  9. Three-Dimensional Computer-Assisted Two-Layer Elastic Models of the Face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Koichi; Shigemura, Yuka; Otsuki, Yuki; Fuse, Asuka; Mitsuno, Daisuke

    2017-11-01

    To make three-dimensional computer-assisted elastic models for the face, we decided on five requirements: (1) an elastic texture like skin and subcutaneous tissue; (2) the ability to take pen marking for incisions; (3) the ability to be cut with a surgical knife; (4) the ability to keep stitches in place for a long time; and (5) a layered structure. After testing many elastic solvents, we have made realistic three-dimensional computer-assisted two-layer elastic models of the face and cleft lip from the computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging stereolithographic data. The surface layer is made of polyurethane and the inner layer is silicone. Using this elastic model, we taught residents and young doctors how to make several typical local flaps and to perform cheiloplasty. They could experience realistic simulated surgery and understand three-dimensional movement of the flaps.

  10. Using computer-assisted learning to engage diverse learning styles in understanding business management principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Mary E; Derby, Dustin C; Haan, Andrea G

    2013-01-01

    Objective : Changes in small business and insurance present challenges for newly graduated chiropractors. Technology that reaches identified, diverse learning styles may assist the chiropractic student in business classes to meet course outcomes better. Thus, the purpose of our study is to determine if the use of technology-based instructional aids enhance students' mastery of course learning outcomes. Methods : Using convenience sampling, 86 students completed a survey assessing course learning outcomes, learning style, and the helpfulness of lecture and computer-assisted learning related to content mastery. Quantitative analyses occurred. Results : Although respondents reported not finding the computer-assisted learning as helpful as the lecture, significant relationships were found between pre- and post-assisted learning measures of the learning outcomes 1 and 2 for the visual and kinesthetic groups. Surprisingly, however, all learning style groups exhibited significant pre- and post-assisted learning appraisal relationships with learning outcomes 3 and 4. Conclusion : While evidence exists within the current study of a relationship between students' learning of the course content corollary to the use of technologic instructional aids, the exact nature of the relationship remains unclear.

  11. A Randomized Rounding Approach for Optimization of Test Sheet Composing and Exposure Rate Control in Computer-Assisted Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chu-Fu; Lin, Chih-Lung; Deng, Jien-Han

    2012-01-01

    Testing is an important stage of teaching as it can assist teachers in auditing students' learning results. A good test is able to accurately reflect the capability of a learner. Nowadays, Computer-Assisted Testing (CAT) is greatly improving traditional testing, since computers can automatically and quickly compose a proper test sheet to meet user…

  12. Pre-Service Teachers' Uses of and Barriers from Adopting Computer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL) Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samani, Ebrahim; Baki, Roselan; Razali, Abu Bakar

    2014-01-01

    Success in implementation of computer-assisted language learning (CALL) programs depends on the teachers' understanding of the roles of CALL programs in education. Consequently, it is also important to understand the barriers teachers face in the use of computer-assisted language learning (CALL) programs. The current study was conducted on 14…

  13. Effects of a Computer-Assisted Concept Mapping Learning Strategy on EFL College Students' English Reading Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pei-Lin; Chen, Chiu-Jung; Chang, Yu-Ju

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the effects of a computer-assisted concept mapping learning strategy on EFL college learners' English reading comprehension. The research questions were: (1) what was the influence of the computer-assisted concept mapping learning strategy on different learners' English reading comprehension? (2) did…

  14. Intelligent Computer-Assisted Instruction: A Review and Assessment of ICAI Research and Its Potential for Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dede, Christopher J.; And Others

    The first of five sections in this report places intelligent computer-assisted instruction (ICAI) in its historical context through discussions of traditional computer-assisted instruction (CAI) linear and branching programs; TICCIT and PLATO IV, two CAI demonstration projects funded by the National Science Foundation; generative programs, the…

  15. Augmented Reality Based Navigation for Computer Assisted Hip Resurfacing: A Proof of Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, He; Auvinet, Edouard; Giles, Joshua; Rodriguez Y Baena, Ferdinando

    2018-05-23

    Implantation accuracy has a great impact on the outcomes of hip resurfacing such as recovery of hip function. Computer assisted orthopedic surgery has demonstrated clear advantages for the patients, with improved placement accuracy and fewer outliers, but the intrusiveness, cost, and added complexity have limited its widespread adoption. To provide seamless computer assistance with improved immersion and a more natural surgical workflow, we propose an augmented-reality (AR) based navigation system for hip resurfacing. The operative femur is registered by processing depth information from the surgical site with a commercial depth camera. By coupling depth data with robotic assistance, obstacles that may obstruct the femur can be tracked and avoided automatically to reduce the chance of disruption to the surgical workflow. Using the registration result and the pre-operative plan, intra-operative surgical guidance is provided through a commercial AR headset so that the user can perform the operation without additional physical guides. To assess the accuracy of the navigation system, experiments of guide hole drilling were performed on femur phantoms. The position and orientation of the drilled holes were compared with the pre-operative plan, and the mean errors were found to be approximately 2 mm and 2°, results which are in line with commercial computer assisted orthopedic systems today.

  16. Opening up to Big Data: Computer-Assisted Analysis of Textual Data in Social Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Wiedemann

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Two developments in computational text analysis may change the way qualitative data analysis in social sciences is performed: 1. the availability of digital text worth to investigate is growing rapidly, and 2. the improvement of algorithmic information extraction approaches, also called text mining, allows for further bridging the gap between qualitative and quantitative text analysis. The key factor hereby is the inclusion of context into computational linguistic models which extends conventional computational content analysis towards the extraction of meaning. To clarify methodological differences of various computer-assisted text analysis approaches the article suggests a typology from the perspective of a qualitative researcher. This typology shows compatibilities between manual qualitative data analysis methods and computational, rather quantitative approaches for large scale mixed method text analysis designs. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1302231

  17. The Computer Book of the Internal Medicine Resident: competence acquisition and achievement of learning objectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oristrell, J; Oliva, J C; Casanovas, A; Comet, R; Jordana, R; Navarro, M

    2014-01-01

    The Computer Book of the Internal Medicine resident (CBIMR) is a computer program that was validated to analyze the acquisition of competences in teams of Internal Medicine residents. To analyze the characteristics of the rotations during the Internal Medicine residency and to identify the variables associated with the acquisition of clinical and communication skills, the achievement of learning objectives and resident satisfaction. All residents of our service (n=20) participated in the study during a period of 40 months. The CBIMR consisted of 22 self-assessment questionnaires specific for each rotation, with items on services (clinical workload, disease protocolization, resident responsibilities, learning environment, service organization and teamwork) and items on educational outcomes (acquisition of clinical and communication skills, achievement of learning objectives, overall satisfaction). Associations between services features and learning outcomes were analyzed using bivariate and multivariate analysis. An intense clinical workload, high resident responsibilities and disease protocolization were associated with the acquisition of clinical skills. High clinical competence and teamwork were both associated with better communication skills. Finally, an adequate learning environment was associated with increased clinical competence, the achievement of educational goals and resident satisfaction. Potentially modifiable variables related with the operation of clinical services had a significant impact on the acquisition of clinical and communication skills, the achievement of educational goals, and resident satisfaction during the specialized training in Internal Medicine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  18. Medical and administrative management by computing devices in the service of nuclear medicine of Nancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legras, B.; Chau, N.; Lambert, J.-P.; Martin, J.; Bertrand, A.

    1977-01-01

    The results of the processing of the administrative and medical data collected in a Department of Nuclear medicine are presented. For a moderate increase in the secretaries' work (limited by the use of carbon copies) and for minor efforts of the doctors, the resulting dvantages are tremendous. A detailed balance of the Department activity can be obtained monthly. From the medical files, the computer provides statistical data and listings in clear form (with or without sort) of the selected records [fr

  19. Computed tomography (CT), nuclear medicine (NM), and ultrasound (US) in oncology patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeil, B.J.

    1982-01-01

    This review will summarize the effectiveness of computed tomography, ultrasound, and nuclear medicine imaging procedures in several different disease processes. The results indicate: (1) CT is clearly better than ultrasound for diseases of the adrenal gland and pancreas; (2) for patients with gynecologic malignancies, CT and ultrasound are approximately equivalent in their ability to define treatment options effectively; (3) in the liver, the differences among the three modalities are less marked and are disease specific. For example, for patients with colon cancer the increased effectiveness of CT relative to ultrasound or nuclear medicine is small. For patients with breast cancer, the difference is greater; (4) for patients suspected to have a focal source of sepsis, CT is slightly better than ultrasound or nuclear medicine. In these patients, however, when nuclear medicine images are obtained on a rectilinear scanner, the results are significantly worse compared to nuclear medicine images on a LFOV gamma camera or to ultrasound. As a result of the above studies and concommitant statistical analyses, several conclusions can be drawn about optimum experimental design and statistical approaches for comparing imaging modalities

  20. Artificial intelligence. Application of the Statistical Neural Networks computer program in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefaniak, B.; Cholewinski, W.; Tarkowska, A.

    2005-01-01

    Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) may be a tool alternative and complementary to typical statistical analysis. However, in spite of many computer application of various ANN algorithms ready for use, artificial intelligence is relatively rarely applied to data processing. In this paper practical aspects of scientific application of ANN in medicine using the Statistical Neural Networks Computer program, were presented. Several steps of data analysis with the above ANN software package were discussed shortly, from material selection and its dividing into groups to the types of obtained results. The typical problems connected with assessing scintigrams by ANN were also described. (author)

  1. ASSESSMENT OF KNOWLEDGE AND ATTITUDE OF COMPUTER ASSISTED LEARNING AMONG MEDICAL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravish

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: It is going truth globally that the medical course in medical college students are developed via computer mediated learning.1 Utilization of both the range upon online messages options must create study exciting, monetization, and likely as hired. We Hypothesized that survey will facilitate to permit us to be able to blueprint some on this necessary condition among my medical students and also to improve our study facilities a lot of automatically. A set of closed ended problems remained displayed on departmental website, to evaluate their computer skills and talents and their own assessment in computer and internet skills helping in learning. In the beginning months of 1st year MBBS college students 2014-15 batch taken up voluntarily to the study through MCQs questions provided to them in the form of departmental website. A batch of 50 college students surveyed on 3 different days. Although 80% students were confident with the operational skills of the computer, the opinion regarding the usage of computers for web based learning activities was not uniform i.e., 55% of the participants felt uncomfortable with web assisted activity in comparison to paper based activity. However, 49% were of the opinion that paper based activity might become redundant and websites will take over books in the future. Expansion on computer-assisted study requires traditional changes as well as thoughtful strategic planning, resource giving, staff benefits, Edutainment promotion by multidisciplinary working, and efficient quality control.

  2. The current status and future prospects of computer-assisted hip surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Yutaka; Kobayashi, Naomi; Ike, Hiroyuki; Kubota, So; Saito, Tomoyuki

    2016-03-01

    The advances in computer assistance technology have allowed detailed three-dimensional preoperative planning and simulation of preoperative plans. The use of a navigation system as an intraoperative assistance tool allows more accurate execution of the preoperative plan, compared to manual operation without assistance of the navigation system. In total hip arthroplasty using CT-based navigation, three-dimensional preoperative planning with computer software allows the surgeon to determine the optimal angle of implant placement at which implant impingement is unlikely to occur in the range of hip joint motion necessary for daily activities of living, and to determine the amount of three-dimensional correction for leg length and offset. With the use of computer navigation for intraoperative assistance, the preoperative plan can be precisely executed. In hip osteotomy using CT-based navigation, the navigation allows three-dimensional preoperative planning, intraoperative confirmation of osteotomy sites, safe performance of osteotomy even under poor visual conditions, and a reduction in exposure doses from intraoperative fluoroscopy. Positions of the tips of chisels can be displayed on the computer monitor during surgery in real time, and staff other than the operator can also be aware of the progress of surgery. Thus, computer navigation also has an educational value. On the other hand, its limitations include the need for placement of trackers, increased radiation exposure from preoperative CT scans, and prolonged operative time. Moreover, because the position of a bone fragment cannot be traced after osteotomy, methods to find its precise position after its movement need to be developed. Despite the need to develop methods for the postoperative evaluation of accuracy for osteotomy, further application and development of these systems are expected in the future. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Orthopaedic Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The Effects of Computer-Assisted Instruction of Simple Circuits on Experimental Process Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şeyma ULUKÖK

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The experimental and control groups were composed of 30 sophomores majoring in Classroom Teaching for this study investigating the effects of computer-assisted instruction of simple circuits on the development of experimental process skills. The instruction includes experiments and studies about simple circuits and its elements (serial, parallel, and mixed conncetions of resistors covered in Science and Technology Laboratory II course curriculum. In this study where quantitative and qualitative methods were used together, the control list developed by the researchers was used to collect data. Results showed that experimental process skills of sophomores in experimental group were more developed than that of those in control group. Thus, it can be said that computer-assisted instruction has a positive impact on the development of experimental process skills of students.

  4. In vivo bioprinting for computer- and robotic-assisted medical intervention: preliminary study in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keriquel, Virginie; Guillemot, Fabien; Arnault, Isabelle; Guillotin, Bertrand; Amedee, Joelle; Fricain, Jean-Christophe; Catros, Sylvain; Miraux, Sylvain

    2010-01-01

    We present the first attempt to apply bioprinting technologies in the perspective of computer-assisted medical interventions. A workstation dedicated to high-throughput biological laser printing has been designed. Nano-hydroxyapatite (n-HA) was printed in the mouse calvaria defect model in vivo. Critical size bone defects were performed in OF-1 male mice calvaria with a 4 mm diameter trephine. Prior to laser printing experiments, the absence of inflammation due to laser irradiation onto mice dura mater was shown by means of magnetic resonance imaging. Procedures for in vivo bioprinting and results obtained using decalcified sections and x-ray microtomography are discussed. Although heterogeneous, these preliminary results demonstrate that in vivo bioprinting is possible. Bioprinting may prove to be helpful in the future for medical robotics and computer-assisted medical interventions.

  5. In vivo bioprinting for computer- and robotic-assisted medical intervention: preliminary study in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keriquel, Virginie; Guillemot, Fabien; Arnault, Isabelle; Guillotin, Bertrand; Amedee, Joelle; Fricain, Jean-Christophe; Catros, Sylvain [INSERM, U577, Bordeaux, F-33076 (France) and Universite Victor Segalen Bordeaux 2, UMR-S577 Bordeaux, F-33076 (France); Miraux, Sylvain [Centre de Resonance Magnetique des Systemes Biologiques, UMR 5536 (France)

    2010-03-15

    We present the first attempt to apply bioprinting technologies in the perspective of computer-assisted medical interventions. A workstation dedicated to high-throughput biological laser printing has been designed. Nano-hydroxyapatite (n-HA) was printed in the mouse calvaria defect model in vivo. Critical size bone defects were performed in OF-1 male mice calvaria with a 4 mm diameter trephine. Prior to laser printing experiments, the absence of inflammation due to laser irradiation onto mice dura mater was shown by means of magnetic resonance imaging. Procedures for in vivo bioprinting and results obtained using decalcified sections and x-ray microtomography are discussed. Although heterogeneous, these preliminary results demonstrate that in vivo bioprinting is possible. Bioprinting may prove to be helpful in the future for medical robotics and computer-assisted medical interventions.

  6. COMPUTER-ASSISTED SEMEN ANALYSIS OF RAT SPERMATOZOA AFTER AN INTRAPERITONEAL ADMINISTRATION OF INSECTICIDE DIAZINON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. TOMAN

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to reveal the effect of diazinon on the rat spermatozoa motility characteristics using the computer-assisted semen analysis (CASA. Motility, progressive motility, DAP, DCL, DSL, VAP, VCL, VSL, STR, LIN, WOB, ALH, and BCF after the diazinon i.p. administration of 20 mg/kg b.w. were evaluated. 36 hours after the diazinon administration, only slight decrease in VCL, DCL and increase in percentage of progressive motility in the diazinon-treated group. Significant decrease (P<0.01 was only observed in BCF in diazinon-treated group. Computer-assisted semen analysis (CASA of rat sperm motility showed that acute diazinon administration slightly affected the rat sperm motility which can be the first step in the decreased fertilization capacity caused by pesticides. Further investigation of reproductive effects of diazinon is needed.

  7. A computer-assisted proof for the existence of horseshoe in a novel chaotic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Wenjuan; Chen Zengqiang; Yuan Zhuzhi

    2009-01-01

    The dynamics of a novel chaotic system are studied, and a rigorous computer-assisted proof for existence of horseshoe in this system is given. A Poincare section is properly chosen to obtain the Poincare map, which is proved to be semi-conjugate to the 4-shift map by utilizing topological horseshoe theory. This implies the entropy of the system is no less than log 4, and the system definitely exhibits chaos.

  8. Computer Assisted Implementation of the 1999 WHO/ISH Hypertension Guidelines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Peleška, Jan; Zvára Jr., Karel; Tomečková, Marie; Zvárová, Jana

    20 Suppl. 4, - (2002), s. 86 ISSN 0263-6352. [Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Hypertension /19./, Europeean Meeting on Hypertension /12./. 23.06.2002-27.06.2002, Prague] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00B107 Grant - others:MGT(XE) EC 4.FP Keywords : guidelines for hypertension * implementation * computer assisted implementation Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  9. Embedded Platforms for Computer Vision-based Advanced Driver Assistance Systems: a Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Velez, Gorka; Otaegui, Oihana

    2015-01-01

    Computer Vision, either alone or combined with other technologies such as radar or Lidar, is one of the key technologies used in Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS). Its role understanding and analysing the driving scene is of great importance as it can be noted by the number of ADAS applications that use this technology. However, porting a vision algorithm to an embedded automotive system is still very challenging, as there must be a trade-off between several design requisites. Further...

  10. Auditors’ Usage of Computer Assisted Audit Tools and Techniques: Empirical Evidence from Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Appah Ebimobowei; G.N. Ogbonna; Zuokemefa P. Enebraye

    2013-01-01

    This study examines use of computer assisted audit tool and techniques in audit practice in the Niger Delta of Nigeria. To achieve this objective, data was collected from primary and secondary sources. The secondary sources were from scholarly books and journals while the primary source involved a well structured questionnaire of three sections of thirty seven items with an average reliability of 0.838. The data collected from the questionnaire were analyzed using relevant descriptive statist...

  11. Perancangan Perangkat Lunak Media Pembelajaran Menggunakan Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI untuk Pembelajaran Ilmu Tajwid Berbasis Web

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenny Purwani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Strategi penggunaan Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI sebagai media pembelajaran dibutuhkan untuk mengatasi permasalahan yang muncul dalam proses pembelajaran. Pembelajaran yang dikemas dengan baik memberikan dampak yang positif dalam memajukan potensi pada diri manusia. CAI sebagai media pembelajaran berbasis computer dibangun sebagai pelengkap dan pendukung metode pembelajaran yang selama ini hanya menggunakan metode ceramah, diskusi informasi dan demonstrasi. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah merancang dan membangun media pembelajaran CAI yang interaktif dengan berbasis Web. Kemudian hasilnya berupa rancangan CAI dengan model tutorial, serta dilengkapi dengan latihan soal-soal dari materi yang diberikan. Perancangan CAI ini kemudian digunakan untuk media pembelajaran ilmu Tajwid dengan komputer. Strategic use of Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI as a learning media needed to overcome the problems that appeared in the learning process. Learning that was packaged well gave a positive impact in advancing the potential in human beings. CAI as a computer-based learning media was built to complement and support the learning method which as long as only used the speech, discussions, information and demonstrations method. The purpose of this study was to design and build learning media of CAI which was interactive with Web-based. Then the result was a design of CAI with tutorial model and completed with practicing questions from the material provided. This CAI design was then used for learning media of Tajwid with computer.

  12. Computer-assisted planning and dosimetry for radiation treatment of head and neck cancer in Cameroon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yomi, J.; Ngniah, A.; Kingue, S.; Muna, W.F.T.; Durosinmi-Etti, F.A.

    1995-01-01

    This evaluation was part of a multicenter, multinational study sponsored by the International Agency for Atomic Energy (Vienna) to investigate a simple, reliable computer-assisted planning and dosimetry system for radiation treatment of head and neck cancers in developing countries. Over a 13-month period (April 1992-April 1993), 120 patients with histologically-proven head or neck cancer were included in the evaluation. In each patient, planning and dosimetry were done both manually and using the computer-assisted system. The manual and computerized systems were compared on the basis of accuracy of determination of the outer contour, target volume, and critical organs; volume inequality resolution; structure heterogeneity correction; selection of the number, angle, and size of beams; treatment time calculation; availability of dosimetry predictions; and duration and cost of the procedure. Results demonstrated that the computer-assisted procedure was superior over the manual procedure, despite less than optimal software. The accuracy provided by the completely computerized procedure is indispensable for Level II radiation therapy, which is particularly useful in tumors of the sensitive, complex structures in the head and neck. (authors). 7 refs., 3 tabs

  13. Use of inpatient continuous passive motion versus no CPM in computer-assisted total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkire, Martha R; Swank, Michael L

    2010-01-01

    Continuous passive motion (CPM) has shown positive effects on tissue healing, edema, hemarthrosis, and joint function (L. Brosseau et al., 2004). CPM has also been shown to increase short-term early flexion and decrease length of stay (LOS) ( L. Brosseau et al., 2004; C. M. Chiarello, C. M. S. Gundersen, & T. O'Halloran, 2004). The benefits of CPM for the population of patients undergoing computer-assisted total knee arthroplasty (TKA) have not been examined. The primary objective of this study was to determine whether the use of CPM following computer-assisted TKA resulted in differences in range of motion, edema/drainage, functional ability, and pain. This was an experimental, prospective, randomized study of patients undergoing unilateral, computer-assisted TKA. The experimental group received CPM thrice daily and physical therapy (PT) twice daily during their hospitalization. The control group received PT twice daily and no CPM during the hospital stay. Both groups received PT after discharge. Measurement included Knee Society scores, Western Ontario McMaster Osteoarthritis Index values, range of motion, knee circumference, and HemoVac drainage. Data were collected at various intervals from preoperatively through 3 months. Although the control group was found to be higher functioning preoperatively, there was no statistically significant difference in flexion, edema or drainage, function, or pain between groups through the 3-month study period.

  14. Effect of Premolar Axial Wall Height on Computer-Aided Design/Computer-Assisted Manufacture Crown Retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Curt; Harris, Ashley; DuVall, Nicholas; Wajdowicz, Michael; Roberts, Howard Wayne

    2018-03-28

    To evaluate the effect of premolar axial wall height on the retention of adhesive, full-coverage, computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture (CAD/CAM) restorations. A total of 48 premolar teeth randomized into four groups (n = 12 per group) received all-ceramic CAD/CAM restorations with axial wall heights (AWH) of 3, 2, 1, and 0 mm and 16-degree total occlusal convergence (TOC). Specimens were restored with lithium disilicate material and cemented with self-adhesive resin cement. Specimens were loaded to failure after 24 hours. The 3- and 2-mm AWH specimens demonstrated significantly greater failure load. Failure analysis suggests a 2-mm minimum AWH for premolars with a TOC of 16 degrees. Adhesive technology may compensate for compromised AWH.

  15. Fundamentals of nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alazraki, N.P.; Mishkin, F.S.

    1984-01-01

    This guidebook for clinical nuclear medicine is written as a description of how nuclear medicine procedures should be used by clinicians in evaluating their patients. It is designed to assist medical students and physicians in becoming acquainted with nuclear medicine techniques for detecting and evaluating most common disorders. The material provides an introduction to, not a textbook of, nuclear medicine. Each chapter is devoted to a particular organ system or topic relevant to the risks and benefits involved in nuclear medicine studies. The emphasis is on presenting the rationales for ordering the various clinical imaging procedures performed in most nuclear medicine departments. Where appropriate, alternative imaging modalities including ultrasound, computed tomography imaging, and radiographic special procedures are discussed. Comparative data between nuclear medicine imaging and other modalities are presented to help guide the practicing clinician in the selection of the most appropriate procedure for a given problem.

  16. Consumer attitudes towards computer-assisted self-care of the common cold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, J; Wrestler, F

    1994-04-01

    Knowledge of colds and flu and attitudes towards use of computers for self-care are compared for 260 young adult users and 194 young adult non-users of computer-assisted self-care for colds and flu. Participants completed a knowledge questionnaire on colds and flu, used a computer program designed to enhance self-care for colds and flu, and then completed a questionnaire on their attitudes towards using a computer for self-care for colds and flu, and then completed a questionnaire on their attitudes towards using a computer for self-care for colds and flu, perceived importance of physician interactions, physician expertise, and patient-physician communication. Compared with users, non-users preferred personal contact with their physicians and felt that computerized health assessments would be limited in vocabulary and range of current medical information. Non-users were also more likely to agree that people could not be trusted to do an accurate computerized health assessment and that the average person was too computer illiterate to use computers for self-care.

  17. French diagnostic reference levels in diagnostic radiology, computed tomography and nuclear medicine: 2004-2008 Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roch, P.; Aubert, B.

    2013-01-01

    After 5 y of collecting data on diagnostic reference levels (DRLs), the Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection French Inst. (IRSN) presents the analyses of this data. The analyses of the collected data for radiology, computed tomography (CT) and nuclear medicine allow IRSN to estimate the level of regulatory application by health professionals and the representativeness of current DRL in terms of relevant examinations, dosimetric quantities, numerical values and patient morphologies. Since 2004, the involvement of professionals has highly increased, especially in nuclear medicine, followed by CT and then by radiology. Analyses show some discordance between regulatory examinations and clinical practice. Some of the dosimetric quantities used for the DRL setting are insufficient or not relevant enough, and some numerical values should also be reviewed. On the basis of these findings, IRSN formulates recommendations to update regulatory DRL with current and relevant examination lists, dosimetric quantities and numerical values. (authors)

  18. Undergraduate teaching in geriatric medicine using computer-aided learning improves student performance in examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daunt, Laura A; Umeonusulu, Patience I; Gladman, John R F; Blundell, Adrian G; Conroy, Simon P; Gordon, Adam L

    2013-07-01

    computer-aided learning (CAL) is increasingly used to deliver teaching, but few studies have evaluated its impact on learning within geriatric medicine. We developed and implemented CAL packages on falls and continence, and evaluated their effect on student performance in two medical schools. traditional ward based and didactic teaching was replaced by blended learning (CAL package combined with traditional teaching methods). Examination scores were compared for cohorts of medical students receiving traditional learning and those receiving blended learning. Control questions were included to provide data on cohort differences. in both medical schools, there was a trend towards improved scores following blended learning, with a smaller number of students achieving low scores (P learning was associated with improvement in student examination performance, regardless of the setting or the methods adopted, and without increasing teaching time. Our findings support the use of CAL in teaching geriatric medicine, and this method has been adopted for teaching other topics in the undergraduate curriculum.

  19. Application of micro-computed tomography to microstructure studies of the medicinal fungus Hericium coralloides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallua, Johannes D; Kuhn, Volker; Pallua, Anton F; Pfaller, Kristian; Pallua, Anton K; Recheis, Wolfgang; Pöder, Reinhold

    2015-01-01

    The potential of 3-D nondestructive imaging techniques such as micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) was evaluated to study morphological patterns of the potential medicinal fungus Hericium coralloides (Basidiomycota). Micro-CT results were correlated with histological information gained from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and light microscopy (LM). It is demonstrated that the combination of these imaging methods results in a more distinct picture of the morphology of the edible and potentially medicinal Hericium coralloides basidiomata. In addition we have created 3-D reconstructions and visualizations based on micro-CT imagery from a randomly selected part of the upper region of a fresh H. coralloides basidioma: Analyses for the first time allowed an approximation of the evolutionary effectiveness of this bizarrely formed basidioma type in terms of the investment of tissue biomass and its reproductive output (production of basidiospores). © 2015 by The Mycological Society of America.

  20. Computer-assisted assessment of ultrasound real-time elastography: initial experience in 145 breast lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue; Xiao, Yang; Zeng, Jie; Qiu, Weibao; Qian, Ming; Wang, Congzhi; Zheng, Rongqin; Zheng, Hairong

    2014-01-01

    To develop and evaluate a computer-assisted method of quantifying five-point elasticity scoring system based on ultrasound real-time elastography (RTE), for classifying benign and malignant breast lesions, with pathologic results as the reference standard. Conventional ultrasonography (US) and RTE images of 145 breast lesions (67 malignant, 78 benign) were performed in this study. Each lesion was automatically contoured on the B-mode image by the level set method and mapped on the RTE image. The relative elasticity value of each pixel was reconstructed and classified into hard or soft by the fuzzy c-means clustering method. According to the hardness degree inside lesion and its surrounding tissue, the elasticity score of the RTE image was computed in an automatic way. Visual assessments of the radiologists were used for comparing the diagnostic performance. Histopathologic examination was used as the reference standard. The Student's t test and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis were performed for statistical analysis. Considering score 4 or higher as test positive for malignancy, the diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were 93.8% (136/145), 92.5% (62/67), 94.9% (74/78), 93.9% (62/66), and 93.7% (74/79) for the computer-assisted scheme, and 89.7% (130/145), 85.1% (57/67), 93.6% (73/78), 92.0% (57/62), and 88.0% (73/83) for manual assessment. Area under ROC curve (Az value) for the proposed method was higher than the Az value for visual assessment (0.96 vs. 0.93). Computer-assisted quantification of classical five-point scoring system can significantly eliminate the interobserver variability and thereby improve the diagnostic confidence of classifying the breast lesions to avoid unnecessary biopsy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Computer-assisted assessment of ultrasound real-time elastography: Initial experience in 145 breast lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xue; Xiao, Yang [Shenzhen Key Lab for Molecular Imaging, Paul C. Lauterbur Research Center for Biomedical Imaging, Institute of Biomedical and Health Engineering, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen (China); Zeng, Jie [Department of Medical Ultrasonics, Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Qiu, Weibao; Qian, Ming; Wang, Congzhi [Shenzhen Key Lab for Molecular Imaging, Paul C. Lauterbur Research Center for Biomedical Imaging, Institute of Biomedical and Health Engineering, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen (China); Zheng, Rongqin, E-mail: zhengronggin@hotmail.com [Department of Medical Ultrasonics, Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Zheng, Hairong, E-mail: hr.zheng@siat.ac.cn [Shenzhen Key Lab for Molecular Imaging, Paul C. Lauterbur Research Center for Biomedical Imaging, Institute of Biomedical and Health Engineering, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen (China)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a computer-assisted method of quantifying five-point elasticity scoring system based on ultrasound real-time elastography (RTE), for classifying benign and malignant breast lesions, with pathologic results as the reference standard. Materials and methods: Conventional ultrasonography (US) and RTE images of 145 breast lesions (67 malignant, 78 benign) were performed in this study. Each lesion was automatically contoured on the B-mode image by the level set method and mapped on the RTE image. The relative elasticity value of each pixel was reconstructed and classified into hard or soft by the fuzzy c-means clustering method. According to the hardness degree inside lesion and its surrounding tissue, the elasticity score of the RTE image was computed in an automatic way. Visual assessments of the radiologists were used for comparing the diagnostic performance. Histopathologic examination was used as the reference standard. The Student's t test and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis were performed for statistical analysis. Results: Considering score 4 or higher as test positive for malignancy, the diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were 93.8% (136/145), 92.5% (62/67), 94.9% (74/78), 93.9% (62/66), and 93.7% (74/79) for the computer-assisted scheme, and 89.7% (130/145), 85.1% (57/67), 93.6% (73/78), 92.0% (57/62), and 88.0% (73/83) for manual assessment. Area under ROC curve (A{sub z} value) for the proposed method was higher than the A{sub z} value for visual assessment (0.96 vs. 0.93). Conclusion: Computer-assisted quantification of classical five-point scoring system can significantly eliminate the interobserver variability and thereby improve the diagnostic confidence of classifying the breast lesions to avoid unnecessary biopsy.

  2. Innovation in engineering education through computer assisted learning and virtual university model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raicu, A.; Raicu, G.

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents the most important aspects of innovation in Engineering Education using Computer Assisted Learning. The authors propose to increase the quality of Engineering Education programs of study at European standards. The use of computer assisted learning methodologies in all studies is becoming an important resource in Higher Education. We intend to improve the concept of e-Learning using virtual terminals, online support and assisting special training through live seminars and interactive labs to develop a virtual university model. We intend to encourage computer assisted learning and innovation as sources of competitive advantage, to permit vision and learning analysis, identifies new sources of technology and ideas. Our work is based on our university datasets collected during last fifteen years using several e-Learning systems. In Constanta Maritime University (CMU), using eLearning and Knowledge Management Services (KMS) is very important and we apply it effectively to achieve strategic objectives, such as collaboration, sharing and good practice. We have experience in this field since 2000 year using Moodle as KMS in our university. The term KMS can be associated to Open Source Software, Open Standards, Open Protocols and Open Knowledge licenses, initiatives and policies. In CMU Virtual Campus we have today over 12500 active users. Another experience of the authors is the implementation of MariTrainer Wiki educational platform based on Dokeos and DekiWiki under MARICOMP and MEP Leonardo da Vinci Project. We'll also present in this paper a case study under EU funded project POSDRU, where the authors implemented other educational platform in Technological High Schools from Romania used over 1000 teachers. Based on large datasets the study tries to improve the concept of e-Learning teaching using the revolutionary technologies. The new concept present in this paper is that the teaching and learning will be interactive and live. The new and modern

  3. Virtual international experiences in veterinary medicine: an evaluation of students' attitudes toward computer-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Brigitte C; Hird, David W; Romano, Patrick S; Hayes, Rick H; Nijhof, Ard M; Jongejan, Frans; Mellor, Dominic J; Singer, Randall S; Fine, Amanda E; Gay, John M; Davis, Radford G; Conrad, Patricia A

    2007-01-01

    While many studies have evaluated whether or not factual information can be effectively communicated using computer-aided tools, none has focused on establishing and changing students' attitudes toward international animal-health issues. The study reported here was designed to assess whether educational modules on an interactive computer CD elicited a change in veterinary students' interest in and attitudes toward international animal-health issues. Volunteer veterinary students at seven universities (first-year students at three universities, second-year at one, third-year at one, and fourth-year at two) were given by random assignment either an International Animal Health (IAH) CD or a control CD, ParasitoLog (PL). Participants completed a pre-CD survey to establish baseline information on interest and attitudes toward both computers and international animal-health issues. Four weeks later, a post-CD questionnaire was distributed. On the initial survey, most students expressed an interest in working in the field of veterinary medicine in another country. Responses to the three pre-CD questions relating to attitudes toward the globalization of veterinary medicine, interest in foreign animal disease, and inclusion of a core course on international health issues in the veterinary curriculum were all positive, with average values above 3 (on a five-point scale where 5 represented strong agreement or interest). Almost all students considered it beneficial to learn about animal-health issues in other countries. After students reviewed the IAH CD, we found a decrease at four universities, an increase at one university, and no change at the remaining two universities in students' interest in working in some area of international veterinary medicine. However, none of the differences was statistically significant.

  4. Translational medicine in the field of ablative fractional laser (AFXL)-assisted drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haedersdal, Merete; Erlendsson, Andrés M; Paasch, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Ablative fractional lasers enhance uptake of topical therapeutics and the concept of fractional laser-assisted drug delivery has now been taken into clinical practice. Objectives We systematically reviewed preclinical data and clinical evidence for fractional lasers to enhance drug uptake...... level of evidence was reached for actinic keratoses treated with methylaminolevulinate for photodynamic therapy (level IB, 5 randomized controlled trials), substantiating superior and long-lasting efficacy versus conventional photodynamic therapy. No adverse events were reported, but ablative fractional...... laser-assisted drug delivery implies risks of systemic drug absorption, especially when performed over large skin areas. Conclusions Fractional laser-assisted drug delivery is beneficial in enhancing preclinical and clinical outcomes for certain skin conditions....

  5. Validation of an Improved Computer-Assisted Technique for Mining Free-Text Electronic Medical Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duz, Marco; Marshall, John F; Parkin, Tim

    2017-06-29

    The use of electronic medical records (EMRs) offers opportunity for clinical epidemiological research. With large EMR databases, automated analysis processes are necessary but require thorough validation before they can be routinely used. The aim of this study was to validate a computer-assisted technique using commercially available content analysis software (SimStat-WordStat v.6 (SS/WS), Provalis Research) for mining free-text EMRs. The dataset used for the validation process included life-long EMRs from 335 patients (17,563 rows of data), selected at random from a larger dataset (141,543 patients, ~2.6 million rows of data) and obtained from 10 equine veterinary practices in the United Kingdom. The ability of the computer-assisted technique to detect rows of data (cases) of colic, renal failure, right dorsal colitis, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use in the population was compared with manual classification. The first step of the computer-assisted analysis process was the definition of inclusion dictionaries to identify cases, including terms identifying a condition of interest. Words in inclusion dictionaries were selected from the list of all words in the dataset obtained in SS/WS. The second step consisted of defining an exclusion dictionary, including combinations of words to remove cases erroneously classified by the inclusion dictionary alone. The third step was the definition of a reinclusion dictionary to reinclude cases that had been erroneously classified by the exclusion dictionary. Finally, cases obtained by the exclusion dictionary were removed from cases obtained by the inclusion dictionary, and cases from the reinclusion dictionary were subsequently reincluded using Rv3.0.2 (R Foundation for Statistical Computing, Vienna, Austria). Manual analysis was performed as a separate process by a single experienced clinician reading through the dataset once and classifying each row of data based on the interpretation of the free

  6. Precision of lumbar intervertebral measurements: does a computer-assisted technique improve reliability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Adam M; Spratt, Kevin F; Genuario, James; McGough, William; Kosman, Katherine; Lurie, Jon; Sengupta, Dilip K

    2011-04-01

    Comparison of intra- and interobserver reliability of digitized manual and computer-assisted intervertebral motion measurements and classification of "instability." To determine if computer-assisted measurement of lumbar intervertebral motion on flexion-extension radiographs improves reliability compared with digitized manual measurements. Many studies have questioned the reliability of manual intervertebral measurements, although few have compared the reliability of computer-assisted and manual measurements on lumbar flexion-extension radiographs. Intervertebral rotation, anterior-posterior (AP) translation, and change in anterior and posterior disc height were measured with a digitized manual technique by three physicians and by three other observers using computer-assisted quantitative motion analysis (QMA) software. Each observer measured 30 sets of digital flexion-extension radiographs (L1-S1) twice. Shrout-Fleiss intraclass correlation coefficients for intra- and interobserver reliabilities were computed. The stability of each level was also classified (instability defined as >4 mm AP translation or 10° rotation), and the intra- and interobserver reliabilities of the two methods were compared using adjusted percent agreement (APA). Intraobserver reliability intraclass correlation coefficients were substantially higher for the QMA technique THAN the digitized manual technique across all measurements: rotation 0.997 versus 0.870, AP translation 0.959 versus 0.557, change in anterior disc height 0.962 versus 0.770, and change in posterior disc height 0.951 versus 0.283. The same pattern was observed for interobserver reliability (rotation 0.962 vs. 0.693, AP translation 0.862 vs. 0.151, change in anterior disc height 0.862 vs. 0.373, and change in posterior disc height 0.730 vs. 0.300). The QMA technique was also more reliable for the classification of "instability." Intraobserver APAs ranged from 87 to 97% for QMA versus 60% to 73% for digitized manual

  7. Positive ventriculography and computer assisted tomography of the skull in the evaluation of megalocephaly in newborns and infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellermann, K.; Heuser, L.; Bliesener, J.A.

    1979-01-01

    To clarify indications and limits of computer assisted tomography and positive ventriculography the results of both methods were compared with each other retrospectively in 55 macrocephalic newborns and infants. It could be shown that positive ventriculography, even if combined with coronal views, was superseded by computer assisted tomography to only a certain extent. To complete the appropriate diagnosis preoperatively positive ventriculography was necessary most often in patients with paranatal disturbances who had undergone intensive care treatment. The non-invasive method of computer assisted tomography often yielded sufficient information on localisation, size, and nature of the underlying pathologic process. Both methods turned out to be complementary when topographical and functional interrelations of cranial cysts were to be analysed, or when anatomical details had to be demonstrated, especially structures of the midline and of the posterior fossa, which could not be visualized by computer assisted tomography alone. (orig.) [de

  8. InterviewStreamliner, a minimalist, free, open source, relational approach to computer-assisted qualitative data analysis software

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.D. Pruijt (Hans)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractInterviewStreamliner is a free, open source, minimalist alternative to complex computer-assisted qualitative data analysis packages. It builds on the flexibility of relational database management technology.

  9. The growth of computer-assisted (robotic surgery in urology 2000–2014: The role of Asian surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepansh Dalela

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The addition of robot to the surgical armamentarium has allowed better patient care and improved disease outcomes. VUI and surgeons of Asian origin have played a pioneering role in dissemination of computer-assisted surgery.

  10. Medical Computational Thinking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musaeus, Peter; Tatar, Deborah Gail; Rosen, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    Computational thinking (CT) in medicine means deliberating when to pursue computer-mediated solutions to medical problems and evaluating when such solutions are worth pursuing in order to assist in medical decision making. Teaching computational thinking (CT) at medical school should be aligned...

  11. Design of Intelligent Robot as A Tool for Teaching Media Based on Computer Interactive Learning and Computer Assisted Learning to Improve the Skill of University Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuhrie, M. S.; Basuki, I.; Asto B, I. G. P.; Anifah, L.

    2018-01-01

    The focus of the research is the teaching module which incorporates manufacturing, planning mechanical designing, controlling system through microprocessor technology and maneuverability of the robot. Computer interactive and computer-assisted learning is strategies that emphasize the use of computers and learning aids (computer assisted learning) in teaching and learning activity. This research applied the 4-D model research and development. The model is suggested by Thiagarajan, et.al (1974). 4-D Model consists of four stages: Define Stage, Design Stage, Develop Stage, and Disseminate Stage. This research was conducted by applying the research design development with an objective to produce a tool of learning in the form of intelligent robot modules and kit based on Computer Interactive Learning and Computer Assisted Learning. From the data of the Indonesia Robot Contest during the period of 2009-2015, it can be seen that the modules that have been developed confirm the fourth stage of the research methods of development; disseminate method. The modules which have been developed for students guide students to produce Intelligent Robot Tool for Teaching Based on Computer Interactive Learning and Computer Assisted Learning. Results of students’ responses also showed a positive feedback to relate to the module of robotics and computer-based interactive learning.

  12. Computer-aided-design-model-assisted absolute three-dimensional shape measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Beiwen; Bell, Tyler; Zhang, Song

    2017-08-20

    Conventional three-dimensional (3D) shape measurement methods are typically generic to all types of objects. Yet, for many measurement conditions, such a level of generality is inessential when having the preknowledge of the object geometry. This paper introduces a novel adaptive algorithm for absolute 3D shape measurement with the assistance of the object computer-aided-design (CAD) model. The proposed algorithm includes the following major steps: (1) export the 3D point cloud data from the CAD model; (2) transform the CAD model into the camera perspective; (3) obtain a wrapped phase map from three phase-shifted fringe images; and (4) retrieve absolute phase and 3D geometry assisted by the CAD model. We demonstrate that if object CAD models are available, such an algorithm is efficient in recovering absolute 3D geometries of both simple and complex objects with only three phase-shifted fringe images.

  13. Usability of an adaptive computer assistant that improves self-care and health literacy of older adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanson Henkemans, O.A.; Rogers, W.A.; Fisk, A.D.; Neerincx, M.A.; Lindenberg, J.; Mast, C.A.P.G. van der

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: We developed an adaptive computer assistant for the supervision of diabetics' self-care, to support limiting illness and need for acute treatment, and improve health literacy. This assistant monitors self-care activities logged in the patient's electronic diary. Accordingly, it provides

  14. Implementation of computer learning cases into the curriculum of internal medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer, Martin R.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Computer-based interactive clinical cases were introduced in 1999 to improve problem-solving abilities in undergraduate education in internal medicine at the University of Munich; the content of online cases was matched with the main lecture. Course credits were given for the successful processing of four cases; an additional eight cases were offered to the students for voluntary use. Only the required cases were used substantially (between 89% and 95% of all students whereas a minority of students (between 5% and 11% used the cases voluntarily. In spite of this predominantly extrinsic motivation, most students expressed a high level of intrinsic motivation and rated their self-reported learning success as high. The difficulty of cases was rated as appropriate. This was supported by quantitative data on the correctness of students' answers. In summary, the integration of computer-based cases into a face-to-face learning curriculum should be coupled with the course assessment framework.

  15. Conference Report: 18th Conference on Computer-Assisted Qualitative Data Analysis (CAQD) 2016: MAXQDA User Conference

    OpenAIRE

    Galan-Diaz, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    During the first week of March 2016, 120 researchers from 12 different countries, including Syria, Japan, the USA and Turkey, met in Berlin (Germany) to learn more about their computer-assisted qualitative data analysis skills. The 18th Conference on Computer-Assisted Qualitative Data Analysis (CAQD) offered several workshops, a research methods poster session, and the opportunity to share and discuss best practice between attendees, trainers and speakers (informally and through the user foru...

  16. Design and Study of a Next-Generation Computer-Assisted System for Transoral Laser Microsurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil Deshpande PhD

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective To present a new computer-assisted system for improved usability, intuitiveness, efficiency, and controllability in transoral laser microsurgery (TLM. Study Design Pilot technology feasibility study. Setting A dedicated room with a simulated TLM surgical setup: surgical microscope, surgical laser system, instruments, ex vivo pig larynxes, and computer-assisted system. Subjects and Methods The computer-assisted laser microsurgery (CALM system consists of a novel motorized laser micromanipulator and a tablet- and stylus-based control interface. The system setup includes the Leica 2 surgical microscope and the DEKA HiScan Surgical laser system. The system was validated through a first-of-its-kind observational study with 57 international surgeons with varied experience in TLM. The subjects performed real surgical tasks on ex vivo pig larynxes in a simulated TLM scenario. The qualitative aspects were established with a newly devised questionnaire assessing the usability, efficiency, and suitability of the system. Results The surgeons evaluated the CALM system with an average score of 6.29 (out of 7 in ease of use and ease of learning, while an average score of 5.96 was assigned for controllability and safety. A score of 1.51 indicated reduced workload for the subjects. Of 57 subjects, 41 stated that the CALM system allows better surgical quality than the existing TLM systems. Conclusions The CALM system augments the usability, controllability, and efficiency in TLM. It enhances the ergonomics and accuracy beyond the current state of the art, potentially improving the surgical safety and quality. The system offers the intraoperative automated scanning of customized long incisions achieving uniform resections at the surgical site.

  17. Emotion-Aware Assistive System for Humanistic Care Based on the Orange Computing Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhing-Fa Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mental care has become crucial with the rapid growth of economy and technology. However, recent movements, such as green technologies, place more emphasis on environmental issues than on mental care. Therefore, this study presents an emerging technology called orange computing for mental care applications. Orange computing refers to health, happiness, and physiopsychological care computing, which focuses on designing algorithms and systems for enhancing body and mind balance. The representative color of orange computing originates from a harmonic fusion of passion, love, happiness, and warmth. A case study on a human-machine interactive and assistive system for emotion care was conducted in this study to demonstrate the concept of orange computing. The system can detect emotional states of users by analyzing their facial expressions, emotional speech, and laughter in a ubiquitous environment. In addition, the system can provide corresponding feedback to users according to the results. Experimental results show that the system can achieve an accurate audiovisual recognition rate of 81.8% on average, thereby demonstrating the feasibility of the system. Compared with traditional questionnaire-based approaches, the proposed system can offer real-time analysis of emotional status more efficiently.

  18. Computer network that assists in the planning, execution and evaluation of in-reactor experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, T.H.; Froehle, P.H.; August, C.; Baldwin, R.D.; Johanson, E.W.; Kraimer, M.R.; Simms, R.; Klickman, A.E.

    1985-01-01

    For over 20 years complex, in-reactor experiments have been performed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to investigate the performance of nuclear reactor fuel and to support the development of large computer codes that address questions of reactor safety in full-scale plants. Not only are computer codes an important end-product of the research, but computer analysis is also involved intimately at most stages of experiment planning, data reduction, and evaluation. For instance, many experiments are of sufficiently long duration or, if they are of brief duration, occur in such a purposeful sequence that need for speedy availability of on-line data is paramount. This is made possible most efficiently by computer assisted displays and evaluation. A purposeful linking of main-frame, mini, and micro computers has been effected over the past eight years which greatly enhances the speed with which experimental data are reduced to useful forms and applied to the relevant technological issues. This greater efficiency in data management led also to improvements in the planning and execution of subsequent experiments. Raw data from experiments performed at INEL is stored directly on disk and tape with the aid of minicomputers. Either during or shortly after an experiment, data may be transferred, via a direct link, to the Illinois offices of ANL where the data base is stored on a minicomputer system. This Idaho-to-Illinois link has both enhanced experiment performance and allowed rapid dissemination of results

  19. Computer-assisted mammography in clinical practice: Another set of problems to solve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gale, A.G.; Roebuck, E.J.; Worthington, B.S.

    1986-01-01

    To be adopted in radiological practice, computer-assisted diagnosis must address a domain of realistic complexity and have a high performance in terms of speed and reliability. Use of a microcomputer-based system of mammographic diagnoses employing discriminant function analysis resulted in significantly fewer false-positive diagnoses while producing a similar level of correct diagnoses of cancer as normal reporting. Although such a system is a valuable teaching aid, its clinical use is constrained by the problems of unambiguously codifying descriptors, data entry time, and the tendency of radiologists to override predicted diagnoses which conflict with their own

  20. Computer assisted collimation gamma camera: A new approach to imaging contaminated tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quartuccio, M.; Franck, D.; Pihet, P.; Begot, S.; Jeanguillaume, C.

    2000-01-01

    Measurement systems with the capability of imaging tissues contaminated with radioactive materials would find relevant applications in medical physics research and possibly in health physics. The latter in particular depends critically on the performance achieved for sensitivity and spatial resolution. An original approach of computer assisted collimation gamma camera (French acronym CACAO) which could meet suitable characteristics has been proposed elsewhere. CACAO requires detectors with high spatial resolution. The present work was aimed at investigating the application of the CACAO principle on a laboratory testing bench using silicon detectors made of small pixels. (author)

  1. Computer assisted collimation gamma camera: A new approach to imaging contaminated tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quartuccio, M.; Franck, D.; Pihet, P.; Begot, S.; Jeanguillaume, C

    2000-07-01

    Measurement systems with the capability of imaging tissues contaminated with radioactive materials would find relevant applications in medical physics research and possibly in health physics. The latter in particular depends critically on the performance achieved for sensitivity and spatial resolution. An original approach of computer assisted collimation gamma camera (French acronym CACAO) which could meet suitable characteristics has been proposed elsewhere. CACAO requires detectors with high spatial resolution. The present work was aimed at investigating the application of the CACAO principle on a laboratory testing bench using silicon detectors made of small pixels. (author)

  2. Integrating Online and Active Learning in a Computer-Assisted Translation Workbench

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alabau, Vicent; González-Rubio, Jésus; Ortíz-Martínez, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a pilot study with a computed-assisted translation workbench aiming at testing the integration of online and active learning features. We investigate the effect of these features on translation productivity, using interactive translation prediction (ITP) as a baseline. User...... activity data were collected from five beta testers using key-logging and eye-tracking. User feedback was also collected at the end of the experiments in the form of retrospective think-aloud protocols. We found that OL performs better than ITP, especially in terms of translation speed. In addition, AL...

  3. State-of-the-art review of nondestructive testing with computer-assisted tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bansal, A; Islam, M.R.

    1991-01-01

    Computer assisted tomography (CAT) has been a revolutionary technique in medical radiology. Recently, CAT scanners started to be used as non-destructive testing facilities in different industrial applications. Most of the application of the new technology are in the areas of petroleum engineering. Majority of this CAT scanner technology has been developed in the U.S.A. However, several Canadian companies have acquired CAT scanners and are using for novel commercial as well as research applications. This paper presents a comprehensive review of advances made in the areas of CAT scan technology as applied to the petroleum industry

  4. Computer assisted tomography for the non-destructive evaluation of hydrogen-induced cracking in steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapping, R.L.; Sawicka, B.D.

    1986-06-01

    Computer assisted tomography (CAT) was used to assess hydrogen-induced cracking in steel exposed to an H 2 S-saturated ('sour') environment. In this case the environment was the NACE TM-02-84 test for susceptibility to hydrogen-induced cracking. The feasibility of using CAT in this application was shown in a previous paper. This study extends the application of CAT to a quantitative assessment of the cracking. Optimal parameters for CAT imaging in such an application are determined and the advantages of using CAT in comparison to traditional inspection methods are discussed

  5. Rancangan Perangkat Lunak Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI Untuk Ilmu Tajwid Berbasis Web

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenny Purwani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The development of information technology and science refer to the need of teching-learning concept and mechanism wich are based on information technology, undoubtedly. Regarding the development, it needs qualified human resources and flexible material changing and it should be appropriate with technology and science development. Additionaly, this combines between education based on religious and techology (IMTAK and IPTEK. Internet techology can be used as teaching tool which is known as Computer Assisted Intruction (CAI. CAI software might be one of media or tool in learnig tajwid and it can help people to learn Tajwid easier.

  6. The display of multiple images derived from emission computed assisted tomography (ECAT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, P.C.; Davies, E.R.; Goddard, P.R.; Wilde, R.P.H.

    1983-01-01

    In emission computed assisted tomography, a technique has been developed to display the multiple sections of an organ within a single image, such that three dimensional appreciation of the organ can be obtained, whilst also preserving functional information. The technique when tested on phantoms showed no obvious deterioration in resolution and when used clinically gave satisfactory visual results. Such a method should allow easier appreciation of the extent of a lesion through an organ and thus allow dimensions to be obtained by direct measurement. (U.K.)

  7. Computer-assisted evaluation of the thermochemical data of the compounds of thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagman, D.D.; Schumm, R.H.; Parker, V.B.

    1977-08-01

    Selected values are given for the thermochemical properties of the compounds of thorium. They are obtained from a computer-assisted least sums-least squares approach to the evaluation of thermodynamic data networks. The properties given, where data are available, are enthalpy of formation, Gibbs energy of formation, and entropy at 298.15 K (Δ Hf (298), Δ Gf (298), and S (298)). The values are consistent with the CODATA Key Values for Thermodynamics. The reaction catalog from which this self consistent set of values is generated is given with a statistical analysis. Some thermal functions are also given, as well as detailed comments when necessary

  8. Developing Computer-Assisted Instruction Multimedia For Educational Technology Course of Coastal Area Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Husni; Nurhayati, Nurhayati; Satriani, Satriani

    2018-05-01

    This research aims to a) identify instructional software (interactive multimedia CDs) by developing Computer-Assisted Instruction (CAI) multimedia that is eligible to be used in the instruction of the Educational Technology course; b) analysis the role of instructional software (interactive multimedia CDs) on the Educational Technology course through the development of Computer-Assisted Instruction (CAI) multimedia to improve the quality of education and instructional activities. This is Research and Development (R&D). It employed the descriptive procedural model of development, which outlines the steps to be taken to develop a product, which is instructional multimedia. The number of subjects of the research trial or respondents for each stage was 20 people. To maintain development quality, an expert in materials outside the materials under study, an expert in materials who is also a Educational Technology lecturer, a small groupof 3 students, a medium-sized group of 10 students, and 20 students to participate in the field testing took part in this research. Then, data collection instruments were developed in two stages, namely: a) developing the instruments; and b) trying out instruments. Data on students’ responses were collected using questionnaires and analyzed using descriptive statistics with percentage and categorization techniques. Based on data analysis results, it is revealed that the Computer-Assisted Instruction (CAI) multimedia developed and tried out among students during the preliminary field testing falls into the “Good” category, with the aspects of instruction, materials, and media falling into the “Good” category. Subsequently, results of the main field testing among students also suggest that it falls into the “Good” category, with the aspects of instruction, materials, and media falling into the “Good” category. Similarly, results of the operational field testing among students also suggest that it falls into the

  9. Computer assisted analysis of sup(99m)Tc pyrophosphate bone uptake in Paget's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maayan, M.L.; Eisenberg, J.; Volpert, E.; Shai, F.; Mroczek, R.

    1982-01-01

    The present clinical study describes a method of evaluation of Paget's disease bone by computer assisted analysis of activity curves obtained over normal and pathological portions of the skeleton in the same patient. The data obtained lead to a differential diagnosis between Paget's and metastatic disease of the bone, as well as an evaluation of subsequent therapy. The results indicate a higher bone activity, (expressed by bone flow and bone uptake, of sup(99m)Tc pyrophosphate) in Paget's than in metastatic disease of the bone, as well as a normalization of these parameters after prolonged therapy of Paget's patients with salmon calcitonin

  10. Computer-assisted sequential quantitative analysis of gallium scans in pulmonary sarcoidosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohatgi, P.K.; Bates, H.R.; Noss, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    Fifty-one sequential gallium citrate scans were performed in 22 patients with biopsy-proven sarcoidosis. A computer-assisted quantitative analysis of these scans was performed to obtain a gallium score. The changes in gallium score were correlated with changes in serum angiotensin converting enzyme (SACE) activity and objective changes in clinical status. There was a good concordance between changes in gallium score, SACE activity and clinical assessment in patients with sarcoidosis, and changes in gallium index were slightly superior to SACE index in assessing activity of sarcoidosis. (author)

  11. A web ontology for brain trauma patient computer-assisted rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zikos, Dimitrios; Galatas, George; Metsis, Vangelis; Makedon, Fillia

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we describe CABROnto, which is a web ontology for the semantic representation of the computer assisted brain trauma rehabilitation. This is a novel and emerging domain, since it employs the use of robotic devices, adaptation software and machine learning to facilitate interactive and adaptive rehabilitation care. We used Protégé 4.2 and Protégé-Owl schema editor. The primary goal of this ontology is to enable the reuse of the domain knowledge. CABROnto has nine main classes, more than 50 subclasses, existential and cardinality restrictions. The ontology can be found online at Bioportal.

  12. Using computer-aided drug design and medicinal chemistry strategies in the fight against diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semighini, Evandro P; Resende, Jonathan A; de Andrade, Peterson; Morais, Pedro A B; Carvalho, Ivone; Taft, Carlton A; Silva, Carlos H T P

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this work is to present a simple, practical and efficient protocol for drug design, in particular Diabetes, which includes selection of the illness, good choice of a target as well as a bioactive ligand and then usage of various computer aided drug design and medicinal chemistry tools to design novel potential drug candidates in different diseases. We have selected the validated target dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV), whose inhibition contributes to reduce glucose levels in type 2 diabetes patients. The most active inhibitor with complex X-ray structure reported was initially extracted from the BindingDB database. By using molecular modification strategies widely used in medicinal chemistry, besides current state-of-the-art tools in drug design (including flexible docking, virtual screening, molecular interaction fields, molecular dynamics, ADME and toxicity predictions), we have proposed 4 novel potential DPP-IV inhibitors with drug properties for Diabetes control, which have been supported and validated by all the computational tools used herewith.

  13. A pharmacy student's role as a teaching assistant in an undergraduate medicinal chemistry course - Implementation, evaluation, and unexpected opportunities for educational outreach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DellaVecchia, Matthew J; Claudio, Alyssa M; Fairclough, Jamie L

    2017-11-01

    To describe 1) a pharmacy student's teaching assistant (TA) role in an undergraduate medicinal chemistry course, 2) an active learning module co-developed by the TA and instructor, and 3) the unexpected opportunities for pharmacy educational outreach that resulted from this collaboration. Medicinal Chemistry (CHM3413) is an undergraduate course offered each fall at Palm Beach Atlantic University (PBA). As a TA for CHM3413, a pharmacy student from the Gregory School of Pharmacy (GSOP) at PBA co-developed and implemented an active learning module emphasizing foundational medicinal chemistry concepts as they pertain to performance enhancing drugs (PEDs). Surveys assessed undergraduate students' perceived knowledge of medicinal chemistry concepts, PEDs, and TA involvement. Students' (total n = 60, three fall semesters) perceived confidence in knowledge of medicinal chemistry concepts and PEDs increased significantly (p medicinal chemistry course. An advanced pharmacy practice experience elective in sports pharmacy (based on Ambrose's model) begins Fall 2017. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Intelligent Decisional Assistant that Facilitate the Choice of a Proper Computer System Applied in Busines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolae MARGINEAN

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The choice of a proper computer system is not an easy task for a decider. One reason could be the present market development of computer systems applied in business. The big number of the Romanian market players determines a big number of computerized products, with a multitude of various properties. Our proposal tries to optimize and facilitate this decisional process within an e-shop where are sold IT packets applied in business, building an online decisional assistant, a special component conceived to facilitate the decision making needed for the selection of the pertinent IT package that fits the requirements of one certain business, described by the decider. The user interacts with the system as an online buyer that visit an e-shop where are sold IT package applied in economy.

  15. Computer Assisted Surgery and Current Trends in Orthopaedics Research and Total Joint Replacements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirouche, Farid

    2008-06-01

    Musculoskeletal research has brought about revolutionary changes in our ability to perform high precision surgery in joint replacement procedures. Recent advances in computer assisted surgery as well better materials have lead to reduced wear and greatly enhanced the quality of life of patients. The new surgical techniques to reduce the size of the incision and damage to underlying structures have been the primary advance toward this goal. These new techniques are known as MIS or Minimally Invasive Surgery. Total hip and knee Arthoplasties are at all time high reaching 1.2 million surgeries per year in the USA. Primary joint failures are usually due to osteoarthristis, rheumatoid arthritis, osteocronis and other inflammatory arthritis conditions. The methods for THR and TKA are critical to initial stability and longevity of the prostheses. This research aims at understanding the fundamental mechanics of the joint Arthoplasty and providing an insight into current challenges in patient specific fitting, fixing, and stability. Both experimental and analytical work will be presented. We will examine Cementless total hip arthroplasty success in the last 10 years and how computer assisted navigation is playing in the follow up studies. Cementless total hip arthroplasty attains permanent fixation by the ingrowth of bone into a porous coated surface. Loosening of an ingrown total hip arthroplasty occurs as a result of osteolysis of the periprosthetic bone and degradation of the bone prosthetic interface. The osteolytic process occurs as a result of polyethylene wear particles produced by the metal polyethylene articulation of the prosthesis. The total hip arthroplasty is a congruent joint and the submicron wear particles produced are phagocytized by macrophages initiating an inflammatory cascade. This cascade produces cytokines ultimately implicated in osteolysis. Resulting bone loss both on the acetabular and femoral sides eventually leads to component instability. As

  16. Comprehensive automatic assessment of retinal vascular abnormalities for computer-assisted retinopathy grading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Vinayak; Agurto, Carla; VanNess, Richard; Nemeth, Sheila; Soliz, Peter; Barriga, Simon

    2014-01-01

    One of the most important signs of systemic disease that presents on the retina is vascular abnormalities such as in hypertensive retinopathy. Manual analysis of fundus images by human readers is qualitative and lacks in accuracy, consistency and repeatability. Present semi-automatic methods for vascular evaluation are reported to increase accuracy and reduce reader variability, but require extensive reader interaction; thus limiting the software-aided efficiency. Automation thus holds a twofold promise. First, decrease variability while increasing accuracy, and second, increasing the efficiency. In this paper we propose fully automated software as a second reader system for comprehensive assessment of retinal vasculature; which aids the readers in the quantitative characterization of vessel abnormalities in fundus images. This system provides the reader with objective measures of vascular morphology such as tortuosity, branching angles, as well as highlights of areas with abnormalities such as artery-venous nicking, copper and silver wiring, and retinal emboli; in order for the reader to make a final screening decision. To test the efficacy of our system, we evaluated the change in performance of a newly certified retinal reader when grading a set of 40 color fundus images with and without the assistance of the software. The results demonstrated an improvement in reader's performance with the software assistance, in terms of accuracy of detection of vessel abnormalities, determination of retinopathy, and reading time. This system enables the reader in making computer-assisted vasculature assessment with high accuracy and consistency, at a reduced reading time.

  17. Bulletin bibliographique sur l'E.A.O. (l'enseignement assiste par ordinateur) (Bibliographic Bulletin on Computer Assisted Instruction). Publication K-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaForge, Lorne, Ed.

    The bibliography contains about 150 citations of journal articles, monographs, collected works, research reports, and essays drawn from the BIBELO database and concerning computer-assisted language instruction. The first half of the volume is an annotated bibliography in alphabetical order by author. The second section contains subject and…

  18. Assisted reproductive technology in the United States: 2001 results generated from the American Society for Reproductive Medicine/Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    To summarize the procedures and outcomes of assisted reproductive technologies (ART) that were initiated in the United States in 2001. Data were collected electronically using the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART) Clinic Outcome Reporting System software and submitted to the American Society for Reproductive Medicine/SART Registry. Three hundred eighty-five clinics submitted data on procedures performed in 2001. Data were collated after November 2002 [corrected] so that the outcomes of all pregnancies would be known. Incidence of clinical pregnancy, ectopic pregnancy, abortion, stillbirth, and delivery. Programs reported initiating 108,130 cycles of ART treatment. Of these, 79,042 cycles involved IVF (with and without micromanipulation), with a delivery rate per retrieval of 31.6%; 340 were cycles of gamete intrafallopian transfer, with a delivery rate per retrieval of 21.9%; 661 were cycles of zygote intrafallopian transfer, with a delivery rate per retrieval of 31.0%. The following additional ART procedures were also initiated: 8,147 fresh donor oocyte cycles, with a delivery rate per transfer of 47.3%; 14,509 frozen ET procedures, with a delivery rate per transfer of 23.5%; 3,187 frozen ETs employing donated oocytes or embryos, with a delivery rate per transfer of 27.4%; and 1,366 cycles using a host uterus, with a delivery rate per transfer of 38.7%. In addition, 112 cycles were reported as combinations of more than one treatment type, 8 cycles as research, and 85 as embryo banking. As a result of all procedures, 29,585 deliveries were reported, resulting in 41,168 neonates. In 2001, there were more programs reporting ART treatment and a significant increase in reported cycles compared with 2000.

  19. A new method of three-dimensional computer assisted reconstruction of the developing biliary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudhomme, M; Gaubert-Cristol, R; Jaeger, M; De Reffye, P; Godlewski, G

    1999-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) computer assisted reconstruction of the biliary tract was performed in human and rat embryos at Carnegie stage 23 to describe and compare the biliary structures and to point out the anatomic relations between the structures of the hepatic pedicle. Light micrograph images from consecutive serial sagittal sections (diameter 7 mm) of one human and 16 rat embryos were directly digitalized with a CCD camera. The serial views were aligned automatically by software. The data were analysed following segmentation and thresholding, allowing automatic reconstruction. The main bile ducts ascended in the mesoderm of the hepatoduodenal ligament. The extrahepatic bile ducts: common bile duct (CD), cystic duct and gallbladder in the human, formed a compound system which could not be shown so clearly in histologic sections. The hepato-pancreatic ampulla was studied as visualised through the duodenum. The course of the CD was like a chicane. The gallbladder diameter and length were similar to those of the CD. Computer-assisted reconstruction permitted easy acquisition of the data by direct examination of the sections through the microscope. This method showed the relationships between the different structures of the hepatic pedicle and allowed estimation of the volume of the bile duct. These findings were not obvious in two-dimensional (2-D) views from histologic sections. Each embryonic stage could be rebuilt in 3-D, which could introduce the time as a fourth dimension, fundamental for the study of organogenesis.

  20. Complications of fixed infrared emitters in computer-assisted total knee arthroplasties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suárez-Vázquez Abelardo

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The first stage in the implant of a total knee arthroplasty with computer-assisted surgery is to fasten the emitters to the femur and the tibia. These trackers must be hard-fixed to the bone. The objectives of our study are to evaluate the technical problems and complications of these tracker-pins, the necessary time to fix them to the bone and the possible advantages of a new femoral-fixed tracker-pin. Methods Three hundred and sixty seven tracker-pins were used in one hundred and fifty one computer-assisted total knee replacements. A bicortical screw was used to fix the tracker to the tibia in all cases; in the femur, however, a bicortical tracker was used in 112 cases, while a new device (OrthoLock with percutaneous fixation pins was employed in the remaining 39. Results Technical problems related to the fixing of the trackers appeared in nine cases (2.5%. The mean surgery time to fix the tracker pin to the tibia was 3 minutes (range 2–7, and 5 minutes in the case of the femoral pin (range: 4–11, although with the new tool it was only three minutes (range 2–4 (p Conclusion The incidence of problems and complications with the fixing systems used in knee navigation is very small. The use of a new device with percutaneous pins facilitates the fixing of femoral trackers and decreases the time needed to place them.

  1. Using embedded computer-assisted instruction to teach science to students with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Bethany

    The need for promoting scientific literacy for all students has been the focus of recent education reform resulting in the rise of the Science Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics movement. For students with Autism Spectrum Disorders and intellectual disability, this need for scientific literacy is further complicated by the need for individualized instruction that is often required to teach new skills, especially when those skills are academic in nature. In order to address this need for specialized instruction, as well as scientific literacy, this study investigated the effects of embedded computer-assisted instruction to teach science terms and application of those terms to three middle school students with autism and intellectual disability. This study was implemented within an inclusive science classroom setting. A multiple probe across participants research design was used to examine the effectiveness of the intervention. Results of this study showed a functional relationship between the number of correct responses made during probe sessions and introduction of the intervention. Additionally, all three participants maintained the acquired science terms and applications over time and generalized these skills across materials and settings. The findings of this study suggest several implications for practice within inclusive settings and provide suggestions for future research investigating the effectiveness of computer-assisted instruction to teach academic skills to students with Autism Spectrum Disorders and intellectual disability.

  2. Computer-assisted cognitive behavioral therapy for children with epilepsy and anxiety: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blocher, Jacquelyn B; Fujikawa, Mayu; Sung, Connie; Jackson, Daren C; Jones, Jana E

    2013-04-01

    Anxiety disorders are prevalent in children with epilepsy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy, adaptability, and feasibility of a manual-based, computer-assisted cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) intervention for anxiety disorders in children with epilepsy. Fifteen anxious youth (aged 8-13 years) with epilepsy completed 12 weeks of manualized computer-assisted CBT. The children and parents completed a semi-structured interview at baseline, and questionnaires assessing symptoms of anxiety, depression, and behavior problems were completed prior to treatment, at treatment midpoint, after treatment completion, and at three months posttreatment. There were significant reductions in the symptoms of anxiety and depression reported by the children at completion of the intervention and at the three-month follow-up. Similarly, the parents reported fewer symptoms of anxiety and a reduction in behavior problems. No adverse events were reported. This CBT intervention for children with epilepsy and anxiety disorders appears to be safe, effective, and feasible and should be incorporated into future intervention studies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Guided and computer-assisted implant surgery and prosthetic: The continuous digital workflow].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, D; Vaysse, J

    2016-02-01

    New continuous digital workflow protocols of guided and computer-assisted implant surgery improve accuracy of implant positioning. The design of the future prosthesis is based on the available prosthetic space, gingival height and occlusal relationship with the opposing and adjacent teeth. The implant position and length depend on volume, density and bone quality, gingival height, tooth-implant and implant-implant distances, implant parallelism, axis and type of the future prosthesis. The crown modeled on the software will therefore serve as a guide to the future implant axis and not the reverse. The guide is made by 3D printing. The software determines surgical protocol with the drilling sequences. The unitary or plural prosthesis, modeled on the software and built before surgery, is loaded directly after implant placing, if needed. These protocols allow for a full continuity of the digital workflow. The software provides the surgeon and the dental technician a total freedom for the prosthetic-surgery guide design and the position of the implants. The prosthetic project, occlusal and aesthetic, taking the bony and surgical constraints into account, is optimized. The implant surgery is simplified and becomes less "stressful" for the patient and the surgeon. Guided and computer-assisted surgery with continuous digital workflow is becoming the technique of choice to improve the accuracy and quality of implant rehabilitation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. The use of computer assisted technology to enhance student psychiatric nurses learning during a practice placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Margaret; Higgins, Agnes

    2003-06-01

    Despite the available literature that identifies the value of integrating computer-assisted learning into the curriculum, psychiatric nurse education lags behind in this area of curriculum development. The purpose of this paper is to report on a pilot project involving the use of a computer assisted learning (CAL) interactive multimedia (IMM) package called 'Admissions,' as a self-directed learning tool with two-second year psychiatric nursing students. The students were on a practice placement in an Irish mental health service. The aim of using the multimedia resource was to augment the students' learning during their practice placement and enable them to re-examine the issue of psychosis from a multiplicity of perspectives. This paper provides a brief description of the interactive multimedia package, together with a discussion on the support offered to the students during its use. experiential taxonomy is used as a framework to guide the discussion on the learning and evaluation process used. Feedback from the students suggests that the CAL package is easy to use, informative and promoted independence and self-directed study.

  5. A Brief Review of Computer-Assisted Approaches to Rational Design of Peptide Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashesh Nandy

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The growing incidences of new viral diseases and increasingly frequent viral epidemics have strained therapeutic and preventive measures; the high mutability of viral genes puts additional strains on developmental efforts. Given the high cost and time requirements for new drugs development, vaccines remain as a viable alternative, but there too traditional techniques of live-attenuated or inactivated vaccines have the danger of allergenic reactions and others. Peptide vaccines have, over the last several years, begun to be looked on as more appropriate alternatives, which are economically affordable, require less time for development and hold the promise of multi-valent dosages. The developments in bioinformatics, proteomics, immunogenomics, structural biology and other sciences have spurred the growth of vaccinomics where computer assisted approaches serve to identify suitable peptide targets for eventual development of vaccines. In this mini-review we give a brief overview of some of the recent trends in computer assisted vaccine development with emphasis on the primary selection procedures of probable peptide candidates for vaccine development.

  6. Total knee arthroplasty with computer-assisted navigation: an analysis of 200 cases,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Vinicius Malheiros Luzo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to evaluate the results from surgery with computer-assisted navigation in cases of total knee arthroplasty.METHOD: a total of 196 patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty with computer-assisted navigation were evaluated. The extension and flexion spaces (gaps were evaluated during the operation and the alignment after the operation was assessed. The Knee Society Score (KSS questionnaire for assessing patient's function was applied preoperatively and postoperatively after a mean follow-up of 22 months.RESULTS: in all, 86.7% of the patients presented good alignment of the mechanical axis (less than 3◦ of varus or valgus in relation to the mechanical axis and 96.4% of the patients presented balanced flexion and extension gaps. Before the operation, 97% of the patients presented poor or insufficient KSS, but after the operation, 77.6% presented good or excellent KSS.CONCLUSION: the navigation system made it possible to achieve aligned and balanced implants, with notable functional improvement among the patients. It was found to be useful in assessing, understanding and improving knowledge in relation to performing arthroplasty procedures.

  7. A guide for the selection of computer assisted mapping (CAM) and facilities informations systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haslin, S.; Baxter, P.; Jarvis, L.

    1980-12-01

    Many distribution engineers are now aware that computer assisted mapping (CAM) and facilities informations systems are probably the most significant breakthrough to date in computer applications for distribution engineering. The Canadian Electrical Asociation (CEA) recognized this and requested engineers of B.C. Hydro make a study of the state of the art in Canadian utilities and the progress of CAM systems on an international basis. The purpose was to provide a guide to assist Canadian utility distribution engineers faced with the problem of studying the application of CAM systems as an alternative to present methods, consideration being given to the long-term and other benefits that were perhaps not apparent for those approaching this field for the first time. It soon became apparent that technology was developing at a high rate and competition in the market was very strong. Also a number of publications were produced by other sources which adequately covered the scope of this study. This report is thus a collection of references to reports, manuals, and other documents with a few considerations provided for those companies interested in exploring further the use of interactive graphics. 24 refs.

  8. Embryo transfer techniques: an American Society for Reproductive Medicine survey of current Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Thomas L; Lee, Malinda S; Bendikson, Kristin A; Reindollar, Richard H

    2017-04-01

    To better understand practice patterns and opportunities for standardization of ET. Cross-sectional survey. Not applicable. Not applicable. An anonymous 82-question survey was emailed to the medical directors of 286 Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology member IVF practices. A follow-up survey composed of three questions specific to ET technique was emailed to the same medical directors. Descriptive statistics of the results were compiled. The survey assessed policies, protocols, restrictions, and specifics pertinent to the technique of ET. There were 117 (41%) responses; 32% practice in academic settings and 68% in private practice. Responders were experienced clinicians, half of whom had performed Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Attitudes of Jordanian Undergraduate Students towards Using Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah Jamal Abed Alrazeq Saeed

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed at investigating the attitudes of Jordanian undergraduate students towards using computer assisted -language learning (CALL and its effectiveness in the process of learning the English language.  In order to fulfill the study’s objective, the researchers used a questionnaire to collect data, followed-up with semi-structured interviews to investigate the students’ beliefs towards CALL. Twenty- one of Jordanian BA students majoring in English language and literature were selected according to simple random sampling. The results revealed positive attitudes towards CALL in facilitating the process of writing assignments, gaining information; making learning enjoyable; improving their creativity, productivity, academic achievement, critical thinking skills, and enhancing their knowledge about vocabulary grammar, and culture. Furthermore, they believed that computers can motivate them to learn English language and help them to communicate and interact with their teachers and colleagues. The researchers recommended conducting a research on the same topic, taking into consideration the variables of age, gender, experience in using computers, and computer skills.

  10. Computer-Assisted Digital Image Analysis of Plus Disease in Retinopathy of Prematurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Pavlina S; VanderVeen, Deborah K

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to review the current state and role of computer-assisted analysis in diagnosis of plus disease in retinopathy of prematurity. Diagnosis and documentation of retinopathy of prematurity are increasingly being supplemented by digital imaging. The incorporation of computer-aided techniques has the potential to add valuable information and standardization regarding the presence of plus disease, an important criterion in deciding the necessity of treatment of vision-threatening retinopathy of prematurity. A review of literature found that several techniques have been published examining the process and role of computer aided analysis of plus disease in retinopathy of prematurity. These techniques use semiautomated image analysis techniques to evaluate retinal vascular dilation and tortuosity, using calculated parameters to evaluate presence or absence of plus disease. These values are then compared with expert consensus. The study concludes that computer-aided image analysis has the potential to use quantitative and objective criteria to act as a supplemental tool in evaluating for plus disease in the setting of retinopathy of prematurity.

  11. Application of computer assisted combinatorial chemistry in antivirial, antimalarial and anticancer agents design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burello, E.; Bologa, C.; Frecer, V.; Miertus, S.

    Combinatorial chemistry and technologies have been developed to a stage where synthetic schemes are available for generation of a large variety of organic molecules. The innovative concept of combinatorial design assumes that screening of a large and diverse library of compounds will increase the probability of finding an active analogue among the compounds tested. Since the rate at which libraries are screened for activity currently constitutes a limitation to the use of combinatorial technologies, it is important to be selective about the number of compounds to be synthesized. Early experience with combinatorial chemistry indicated that chemical diversity alone did not result in a significant increase in the number of generated lead compounds. Emphasis has therefore been increasingly put on the use of computer assisted combinatorial chemical techniques. Computational methods are valuable in the design of virtual libraries of molecular models. Selection strategies based on computed physicochemical properties of the models or of a target compound are introduced to reduce the time and costs of library synthesis and screening. In addition, computational structure-based library focusing methods can be used to perform in silico screening of the activity of compounds against a target receptor by docking the ligands into the receptor model. Three case studies are discussed dealing with the design of targeted combinatorial libraries of inhibitors of HIV-1 protease, P. falciparum plasmepsin and human urokinase as potential antivirial, antimalarial and anticancer drugs. These illustrate library focusing strategies.

  12. Design and Construction of Computer-Assisted Instructional Material: A Handbook for Reading/Language Arts Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balajthy, Ernest

    Intended for reading and language arts teachers at all educational levels, this guide presents information to be used by teachers in constructing their own computer assisted educational software using the BASIC programming language and Apple computers. Part 1 provides an overview of the components of traditional tutorial and drill-and-practice…

  13. Development of a Computer-Assisted Instrumentation Curriculum for Physics Students: Using LabVIEW and Arduino Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Wen-Hsuan; Tseng, Chi-Hung; Chen, Sufen; Wong, Ching-Chang

    2016-01-01

    We propose an integrated curriculum to establish essential abilities of computer programming for the freshmen of a physics department. The implementation of the graphical-based interfaces from Scratch to LabVIEW then to LabVIEW for Arduino in the curriculum "Computer-Assisted Instrumentation in the Design of Physics Laboratories" brings…

  14. 24 CFR 290.21 - Computing annual number of units eligible for substitution of tenant-based assistance or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Computing annual number of units eligible for substitution of tenant-based assistance or alternative uses. 290.21 Section 290.21 Housing and... Multifamily Projects § 290.21 Computing annual number of units eligible for substitution of tenant-based...

  15. Computer-assisted surgery for screw insertion into the distal sesamoid bone in horses: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gygax, Diego; Lischer, Christoph; Auer, Joerg A

    2006-10-01

    To compare the precision of computer-assisted surgery with a conventional technique (CV) using a special guiding device for screw insertion into the distal sesamoid bone in horses. In vitro experimental study. Cadaveric forelimb specimens. Insertion of a 3.5 mm cortex screw in lag fashion along the longitudinal axis of intact (non-fractured) distal sesamoid bones was evaluated in 2 groups (8 limbs each): CV and computer-assisted surgery (CAS). For CV, the screw was inserted using a special guiding device and fluoroscopy, whereas for CAS, the screw was inserted using computer-assisted navigation. The accuracy of screw placement was verified by radiography, computed tomography, and specimen dissection. Surgical precision was better in CAS compared with CV. CAS improves the accuracy of lateromedial screw insertion, in lag fashion, into the distal sesamoid bone. The CAS technique should be considered for improved accuracy of screw insertion in fractures of the distal sesamoid bone.

  16. Effects of acupuncture and computer-assisted cognitive training for post-stroke attention deficits: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jia; McCaskey, Michael A; Yang, Shanli; Ye, Haicheng; Tao, Jing; Jiang, Cai; Schuster-Amft, Corina; Balzer, Christian; Ettlin, Thierry; Schupp, Wilfried; Kulke, Hartwig; Chen, Lidian

    2015-12-02

    A majority of stroke survivors present with cognitive impairments. Attention disturbance, which leads to impaired concentration and overall reduced cognitive functions, is strongly associated with stroke. The clinical efficacy of acupuncture with Baihui (GV20) and Shenting (GV24) as well as computer-assisted cognitive training in stroke and post-stroke cognitive impairment have both been demonstrated in previous studies. To date, no systematic comparison of these exists and the potential beneficial effects of a combined application are yet to be examined. The main objective of this pilot study is to evaluate the effects of computer-assisted cognitive training compared to acupuncture on the outcomes of attention assessments. The second objective is to test the effects of a combined cognitive intervention that incorporates computer-assisted cognitive training and acupuncture (ACoTrain). An international multicentre, single-blinded, randomised controlled pilot trial will be conducted. In a 1:1:1 ratio, 60 inpatients with post-stroke cognitive dysfunction will be randomly allocated into either the acupuncture group, the computer-assisted cognitive training group, or the ACoTrain group in addition to their individual rehabilitation programme. The intervention period of this pilot trial will last 4 weeks (30 minutes per day, 5 days per week, Monday to Friday). The primary outcome is the test battery for attentional performance. The secondary outcomes include the Trail Making Test, Test des Deux Barrages, National Institute of Health Stroke Scale, and Modified Barthel Index for assessment of daily life competence, and the EuroQol Questionnaire for health-related quality of life. This trial mainly focuses on evaluating the effects of computer-assisted cognitive training compared to acupuncture on the outcomes of attention assessments. The results of this pilot trial are expected to provide new insights on how Eastern and Western medicine can complement one another and

  17. Effective dose evaluation for workers assisting new-borns in nuclear medicine procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falivene, A.; Gori, C.; Mazzocchi, S.; Targetti, S.; Zatelli, G.

    2002-01-01

    Renal scintigraphy is a very frequent nuclear medicine procedure for new-borns when deemed necessary after prenatal ultrasounds investigation. The procedure requires the physical proximity of workers to the patient, particularly during the examination of new-borns, in order to keep the young patients still. The irradiation of nurses during kidney examination of new-borns has been measured by simulating the examination procedure with an Alderson Rando phantom stuffed with thermoluminescent detectors, positioned near a radioactive source obtained with a tank filled with a 9 9mT c solution. Measurements have been carried out both with and without radiation protection devices positioned on the Rando phantom. Different organ doses have been evaluated. The aim of this analysis is to evaluate the amount of dose reduction that can be achieved by utilising lead aprons, glasses and thyroid collars

  18. [Attitudes and experiences regarding physician assisted suicide : A survey among members of the German Association for Palliative Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansky, Maximiliane; Jaspers, Birgit; Radbruch, Lukas; Nauck, Friedemann

    2017-01-01

    The need to regulate physician-assisted suicide (PAS) and organizations offering assisted suicide has been controversially debated in Germany. Before the German parliament voted on various drafts in November 2015, the German Association for Palliative Medicine surveyed its members on their attitudes and experiences regarding PAS. Items for the survey were derived from the literature and consented in a focus group. 2005-2015 - PubMed: PAS [Title/Abstract] UND survey (all countries), grey literature. We invited 5152 members of the DGP to participate in the online/paper survey. Descriptive quantitative and content analytic qualitative analysis of data using SPSS and MaxQDA. We obtained 1811 valid data sets (response rate 36.9%). 33.7% of the participants were male, 43.6% were female, and 0.4% identifed as other. Physicians accounted for 48.5% of the respondents, 17.8% nurses, other professions 14.3%, and about 20% of the data was missing socio-demographic information. More than 90% agreed that "wishes for PAS may be ambivalent" and "are rather a wish to end an unbearable situation". Of the 833 participating physicians, 56% refused participating in PAS and 74.2% had been asked to perform PAS. PAS was actually performed by 3%. Of all participating members, 56% approved of a legal ban of organizations offering assisted suicide. More than 60% of all professions agreed that PAS is not a part of palliative care. The respondents show a broad spectrum of attitudes, only partly supporting statements of relevant bodies, such as DGP. Because many are confronted with the issue, PAS is relevant to professionals in palliative care.

  19. Midi-maxi computer interaction in the interpretation of nuclear medicine procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlapper, G.A.

    1977-01-01

    A study of renal function with an Anger Gamma Camera coupled with a Digital Equipment Corporation Gamma-11 System and an IBM System 370 demonstrates the potential of quantitative determinations of physiological function through the application of midi-maxi computer interaction in the interpretation of nuclear medicine procedures. It is shown that radiotracers can provide an opportunity to assess physiological processes of renal function by noninvasively following the path of a tracer as a function of time. Time-activity relationships obtained over seven anatomically defined regions are related to parameters of a seven compartment model employed to describe the renal clearance process. The values obtained for clinically significant parameters agree with known renal pathophysiology. Differentiation of failure of acute, chronic, and obstructive forms is indicated

  20. [The Computer Book of the Internal Medicine resident: validity and reliability of a questionnaire for self-assessment of competences in internal medicine residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oristrell, J; Casanovas, A; Jordana, R; Comet, R; Gil, M; Oliva, J C

    2012-12-01

    There are no simple and validated instruments for evaluating the training of specialists. To analyze the reliability and validity of a computerized self-assessment method to quantify the acquisition of medical competences during the Internal Medicine residency program. All residents of our department participated in the study during a period of 28 months. Twenty-two questionnaires specific for each rotation (the Computer-Book of the Internal Medicine Resident) were constructed with items (questions) corresponding to three competence domains: clinical skills competence, communication skills and teamwork. Reliability was analyzed by measuring the internal consistency of items in each competence domain using Cronbach's alpha index. Validation was performed by comparing mean scores in each competence domain between senior and junior residents. Cut-off levels of competence scores were established in order to identify the strengths and weaknesses of our training program. Finally, self-assessment values were correlated with the evaluations of the medical staff. There was a high internal consistency of the items of clinical skills competences, communication skills and teamwork. Higher scores of clinical skills competence and communication skills, but not in those of teamwork were observed in senior residents than in junior residents. The Computer-Book of the Internal Medicine Resident identified the strengths and weaknesses of our training program. We did not observe any correlation between the results of the self- evaluations and the evaluations made by staff physicians. The items of Computer-Book of the Internal Medicine Resident showed high internal consistency and made it possible to measure the acquisition of medical competences in a team of Internal Medicine residents. This self-assessment method should be complemented with other evaluation methods in order to assess the acquisition of medical competences by an individual resident. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Espa

  1. Manual vs. computer-assisted sperm analysis: can CASA replace manual assessment of human semen in clinical practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talarczyk-Desole, Joanna; Berger, Anna; Taszarek-Hauke, Grażyna; Hauke, Jan; Pawelczyk, Leszek; Jedrzejczak, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to check the quality of computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) system in comparison to the reference manual method as well as standardization of the computer-assisted semen assessment. The study was conducted between January and June 2015 at the Andrology Laboratory of the Division of Infertility and Reproductive Endocrinology, Poznań University of Medical Sciences, Poland. The study group consisted of 230 men who gave sperm samples for the first time in our center as part of an infertility investigation. The samples underwent manual and computer-assisted assessment of concentration, motility and morphology. A total of 184 samples were examined twice: manually, according to the 2010 WHO recommendations, and with CASA, using the program set-tings provided by the manufacturer. Additionally, 46 samples underwent two manual analyses and two computer-assisted analyses. The p-value of p CASA and manually. In the group of patients where all analyses with each method were performed twice on the same sample we found no significant differences between both assessments of the same probe, neither in the samples analyzed manually nor with CASA, although standard deviation was higher in the CASA group. Our results suggest that computer-assisted sperm analysis requires further improvement for a wider application in clinical practice.

  2. Spirometry-Assisted High Resolution Chest Computed Tomography in Children: Is it Worth the Effort?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otjen, Jeffrey Parke; Swanson, Jonathan Ogden; Oron, Assaf; DiBlasi, Robert M; Swortzel, Tim; van Well, Jade Adriana Marie; Gommers, Eva Anna Elisabeth; Rosenfeld, Margaret

    Image quality of high resolution chest computed tomographies (HRCTs) depends on adequate breath holds at end inspiration and end expiration. We hypothesized that implementation of spirometry-assisted breath holds in children undergoing HRCTs would improve image quality over that obtained with voluntary breath holds by decreasing motion artifact and atelectasis. This is a retrospective case-control study of HRCTs obtained at a tertiary care children's hospital before and after implementation of a spirometry-assisted CT protocol, in which children ≥8 years of age are first trained in supine slow vital capacity maneuvers and then repeat the maneuvers in the CT scanner, coached by a respiratory therapist. Spirometry-assisted CT scans (cases) were matched by age, gender and diagnosis (cystic fibrosis vs other) to CT scans obtained with voluntary breath holds in the 6 years before implementation of the spirometry assistance protocol (controls), and evaluated by 2 blinded pediatric radiologists. Among both cases and controls (N = 50 each), 10 carried the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis and 40 had other diagnoses. Mean age was 12.9 years (range: 7.5-20.1) among cases and 13.0 (7.1-19.7) among controls. Mean (SD) inspiratory image density among cases was -852 (37) Hounsfield units (HU) and -828 (43) among controls (p = 0.006). Mean (SD) expiratory image density was -629 (95) HU among cases and -688 (83) HU among controls (p = 0.002). Mean (SD) change in image density between inspiratory and expiratory images was +222 (85) HU among cases and +140 (76) HU among controls (p 0.80). Atelectasis was present on inspiratory images in 8 cases and 9 controls and on expiratory images in 9 cases and 10 controls (p > 0.80). Spirometry-assisted CTs had a significantly greater difference in lung density between inspiratory and expiratory scans than those performed with voluntary breath holds, likely improving the ability to detect air trapping. No appreciable difference in image quality

  3. Microwave assisted leaching and electrochemical recovery of copper from printed circuit boards of computer waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivǎnuş, R. C.; ǎnuş, D., IV; Cǎlmuc, F.

    2010-06-01

    Due to the rapid technological progress, the replacement of electronic equipment is very often necessary, leading to huge amounts that end up as waste. In addition, waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) contains metals of high commercial value and others that are supposed to be hazardous for the environment. Consequently, WEEE could be considered as a significant source for recovery of nonferrous metals. Among these wastes, computers appear to be distinctive, as far as further exploitation is concerned. The most ″useful″ parts of the computers are the printed circuit boards that contain many metals of interest. A study on microwave assisted electronic scrap (printed circuit boards of computer waste - PCBs) leaching was carried out with a microwave hydrothermal reactor. The leaching was conducted with thick slurries (50-100 g/L). The leaching media is a mixed solution of CuCl2 and NaCl. Preliminary electrolysis from leaching solution has investigated the feasibility of electrodeposition of copper. The results were discussed and compared with the conventional leaching method and demonstrated the potential for selective extraction of copper from PCBs.

  4. Combining Brain–Computer Interfaces and Assistive Technologies: State-of-the-Art and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millán, J. d. R.; Rupp, R.; Müller-Putz, G. R.; Murray-Smith, R.; Giugliemma, C.; Tangermann, M.; Vidaurre, C.; Cincotti, F.; Kübler, A.; Leeb, R.; Neuper, C.; Müller, K.-R.; Mattia, D.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, new research has brought the field of electroencephalogram (EEG)-based brain–computer interfacing (BCI) out of its infancy and into a phase of relative maturity through many demonstrated prototypes such as brain-controlled wheelchairs, keyboards, and computer games. With this proof-of-concept phase in the past, the time is now ripe to focus on the development of practical BCI technologies that can be brought out of the lab and into real-world applications. In particular, we focus on the prospect of improving the lives of countless disabled individuals through a combination of BCI technology with existing assistive technologies (AT). In pursuit of more practical BCIs for use outside of the lab, in this paper, we identify four application areas where disabled individuals could greatly benefit from advancements in BCI technology, namely, “Communication and Control”, “Motor Substitution”, “Entertainment”, and “Motor Recovery”. We review the current state of the art and possible future developments, while discussing the main research issues in these four areas. In particular, we expect the most progress in the development of technologies such as hybrid BCI architectures, user–machine adaptation algorithms, the exploitation of users’ mental states for BCI reliability and confidence measures, the incorporation of principles in human–computer interaction (HCI) to improve BCI usability, and the development of novel BCI technology including better EEG devices. PMID:20877434

  5. Development of computer assisted learning program using cone beam projection for head radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazeko, Kazuma; Araki, Misao; Kajiwara, Hironori; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Kuwayama, Jun; Karube, Shuhei; Hashimoto, Takeyuki; Shinohara, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    We present a computer assisted learning (CAL) program to simulate head radiography. The program provides cone beam projections of a target volume, simulating three-dimensional computed tomography (CT) of a head phantom. The generated image is 512 x 512 x 512 pixels with each pixel 0.6 mm on a side. The imaging geometry, such as X-ray tube orientation and phantom orientation, can be varied. The graphical user interface (GUI) of the CAL program allows the study of the effects of varying the imaging geometry; each simulated projection image is shown quickly in an adjoining window. Simulated images with an assigned geometry were compared with the image obtained using the standard geometry in clinical use. The accuracy of the simulated image was verified through comparison with the image acquired using radiography of the head phantom, subsequently processed with a computed radiography system (CR image). Based on correlation coefficient analysis and visual assessment, it was concluded that the CAL program can satisfactorily simulate the CR image. Therefore, it should be useful for the training of head radiography. (author)

  6. A Computer-Assisted Personalized Approach in an Undergraduate Plant Physiology Class1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artus, Nancy N.; Nadler, Kenneth D.

    1999-01-01

    We used Computer-Assisted Personalized Approach (CAPA), a networked teaching and learning tool that generates computer individualized homework problem sets, in our large-enrollment introductory plant physiology course. We saw significant improvement in student examination performance with regular homework assignments, with CAPA being an effective and efficient substitute for hand-graded homework. Using CAPA, each student received a printed set of similar but individualized problems of a conceptual (qualitative) and/or quantitative nature with quality graphics. Because each set of problems is unique, students were encouraged to work together to clarify concepts but were required to do their own work for credit. Students could enter answers multiple times without penalty, and they were able to obtain immediate feedback and hints until the due date. These features increased student time on task, allowing higher course standards and student achievement in a diverse student population. CAPA handles routine tasks such as grading, recording, summarizing, and posting grades. In anonymous surveys, students indicated an overwhelming preference for homework in CAPA format, citing several features such as immediate feedback, multiple tries, and on-line accessibility as reasons for their preference. We wrote and used more than 170 problems on 17 topics in introductory plant physiology, cataloging them in a computer library for general access. Representative problems are compared and discussed. PMID:10198076

  7. Computer-assisted surgery: virtual- and augmented-reality displays for navigation during urological interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oosterom, Matthias N; van der Poel, Henk G; Navab, Nassir; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; van Leeuwen, Fijs W B

    2018-03-01

    To provide an overview of the developments made for virtual- and augmented-reality navigation procedures in urological interventions/surgery. Navigation efforts have demonstrated potential in the field of urology by supporting guidance for various disorders. The navigation approaches differ between the individual indications, but seem interchangeable to a certain extent. An increasing number of pre- and intra-operative imaging modalities has been used to create detailed surgical roadmaps, namely: (cone-beam) computed tomography, MRI, ultrasound, and single-photon emission computed tomography. Registration of these surgical roadmaps with the real-life surgical view has occurred in different forms (e.g. electromagnetic, mechanical, vision, or near-infrared optical-based), whereby the combination of approaches was suggested to provide superior outcome. Soft-tissue deformations demand the use of confirmatory interventional (imaging) modalities. This has resulted in the introduction of new intraoperative modalities such as drop-in US, transurethral US, (drop-in) gamma probes and fluorescence cameras. These noninvasive modalities provide an alternative to invasive technologies that expose the patients to X-ray doses. Whereas some reports have indicated navigation setups provide equal or better results than conventional approaches, most trials have been performed in relatively small patient groups and clear follow-up data are missing. The reported computer-assisted surgery research concepts provide a glimpse in to the future application of navigation technologies in the field of urology.

  8. Microwave assisted leaching and electrochemical recovery of copper from printed circuit boards of computer waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivănuş R.C.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to the rapid technological progress, the replacement of electronic equipment is very often necessary, leading to huge amounts that end up as waste. In addition, waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE contains metals of high commercial value and others that are supposed to be hazardous for the environment. Consequently, WEEE could be considered as a significant source for recovery of nonferrous metals. Among these wastes, computers appear to be distinctive, as far as further exploitation is concerned. The most ″useful″ parts of the computers are the printed circuit boards that contain many metals of interest. A study on microwave assisted electronic scrap (printed circuit boards of computer waste – PCBs leaching was carried out with a microwave hydrothermal reactor. The leaching was conducted with thick slurries (50-100 g/L. The leaching media is a mixed solution of CuCl2 and NaCl. Preliminary electrolysis from leaching solution has investigated the feasibility of electrodeposition of copper. The results were discussed and compared with the conventional leaching method and demonstrated the potential for selective extraction of copper from PCBs.

  9. A computer-assisted personalized approach in an undergraduate plant physiology class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artus; Nadler

    1999-04-01

    We used Computer-Assisted Personalized Approach (CAPA), a networked teaching and learning tool that generates computer individualized homework problem sets, in our large-enrollment introductory plant physiology course. We saw significant improvement in student examination performance with regular homework assignments, with CAPA being an effective and efficient substitute for hand-graded homework. Using CAPA, each student received a printed set of similar but individualized problems of a conceptual (qualitative) and/or quantitative nature with quality graphics. Because each set of problems is unique, students were encouraged to work together to clarify concepts but were required to do their own work for credit. Students could enter answers multiple times without penalty, and they were able to obtain immediate feedback and hints until the due date. These features increased student time on task, allowing higher course standards and student achievement in a diverse student population. CAPA handles routine tasks such as grading, recording, summarizing, and posting grades. In anonymous surveys, students indicated an overwhelming preference for homework in CAPA format, citing several features such as immediate feedback, multiple tries, and on-line accessibility as reasons for their preference. We wrote and used more than 170 problems on 17 topics in introductory plant physiology, cataloging them in a computer library for general access. Representative problems are compared and discussed.

  10. Application of computer assisted moire to the study of a crack tip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciammarella, C. A.; Albertazzi, A., Jr.; Mourikes, J.

    The basic principles of computer assisted moire are discussed. The influence of the image sensor and its finite dimensions on the sampling theorem requirements is discussed. Criteria for the selection of grating pitch on the basis of the spatial bandwidth of the pattern to be observed and the requirements arising from sensitivity considerations are given. The method is used to analyze the strain field in the neighborhood of the crack tip of a standard ASTM compact tension specimen. From the displacements the strains are computed, and from the strains the stresses are obtained using the generalized Ramberg-Osgood stress strain relationship. The stresses are used to compute the values for the J-integral in several circuits surrounding the crack. Good agreement is obtained between the values of the stress intensity factors obtained by different methods. The plastic region surrounding the crack does not show a HRR field and thus the usual rationale to justify the J-integral methods must be re-evaluated.

  11. Effect of Preparation Depth on the Marginal and Internal Adaptation of Computer-aided Design/Computer-assisted Manufacture Endocrowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaintantzopoulou, M D; El-Damanhoury, H M

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of preparation depth and intraradicular extension on the marginal and internal adaptation of computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture (CAD/CAM) endocrown restorations. Standardized preparations were made in resin endodontic tooth models (Nissin Dental), with an intracoronal preparation depth of 2 mm (group H2), with extra 1- (group H3) or 2-mm (group H4) intraradicular extensions in the root canals (n=12). Vita Enamic polymer-infiltrated ceramic-network material endocrowns were fabricated using the CEREC AC CAD/CAM system and were seated on the prepared teeth. Specimens were evaluated by microtomography. Horizontal and vertical tomographic sections were recorded and reconstructed by using the CTSkan software (TView v1.1, Skyscan).The surface/void volume (S/V) in the region of interest was calculated. Marginal gap (MG), absolute marginal discrepancy (MD), and internal marginal gap were measured at various measuring locations and calculated in microscale (μm). Marginal and internal discrepancy data (μm) were analyzed with nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance by ranks with Dunn's post hoc, whereas S/V data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and Bonferroni multiple comparisons (α=0.05). Significant differences were found in MG, MD, and internal gap width values between the groups, with H2 showing the lowest values from all groups. S/V calculations presented significant differences between H2 and the other two groups (H3 and H4) tested, with H2 again showing the lowest values. Increasing the intraradicular extension of endocrown restorations increased the marginal and internal gap of endocrown restorations.

  12. Alkaloid profiling of the Chinese herbal medicine Fuzi by combination of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, J.; Heijden, R. van der; Spijksma, G.; Reijmers, T.; Wang, M.; Xu, G.; Hankemeier, T.; Greef, J. van der

    2009-01-01

    A matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) method was developed for the high throughput and robust qualitative profiling of alkaloids in Fuzi-the processed lateral roots of the Chinese herbal medicine Aconitum carmichaeli Debx (A. carmichaeli). After optimization,

  13. [Interactive computer-assisted learning program for diagnosis and therapy of recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stehle, A; Gross, M

    1998-12-01

    With the increasing capacity of personal computers more and more multimedia training programs are becoming available which make use of these possibilities. Computer-based presentation is usually interesting because it is visually attractive. However, the extent to which computer-based training programs correspond to international standards of quality of software ergonomics has never been the subject of systematic research. Another question is how much these programs motivate learning and what increase in knowledge can be achieved by using them. Using a multimedia interactive training program developed in our facility, 100 medical students were asked to evaluate the program after they had been using it for about one hour. In a questionnaire they first rated suitability for the task, self-descriptiveness, controllability, conformity with user expectation, error tolerance, suitability for individualization, and suitability for learning on a bipolar scale from "---" to "+3" (in numbers 1, worst result, to 7, best result). The median values achieved were rated between 6.0 and 6.2--software ergonomic criteria of the program ranged from good to very good. The second part was a subjective evaluation of the program's ability to deliver "medical knowledge which is relevant for the exam" (median = 6.0), "knowledge about systematic procedure in medicine" (median = 5.5), "knowledge about sensible use of diagnostic methods" (median = 6.0), "knowledge about clinical methods", and "experience with selective learning" (median = 6.0). This part was also rated good to very good. The third part of the questionnaire involved a pretest-posttest comparison. Two groups of students were asked how much benefit they had achieved by using the program. It was shown that the students were able to answer the exam questions significantly better than the control questions after they had used the program. This study confirms that the interactive computer-based training program is very well suited

  14. Computer assisted design of poly-silicon gated enhancement-mode, lateral double quantum dot devices for quantum computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Nathaniel; Young, Ralph; Borras Pinilla, Carlos; Stalford, Harold; Nielsen, Erik; Muller, Richard; Rahman, Rajib; Tracy, Lisa; Wendt, Joel; Lilly, Michael; Carroll, Malcolm

    2012-02-01

    We discuss trade-offs of different double quantum dot and charge sensor lay-outs using computer assisted design (CAD). We use primarily a semi-classical model, augmented with a self-consistent configuration interaction method. Although CAD for quantum dots is difficult due to uncontrolled factors (e.g., disorder), different ideal designs can still be compared. Comparisons of simulation and measured dot characteristics, such as capacitance, show that CAD can agree well with experiment for relevant cases. CAD results comparing several different designs will be discussed including a comparison to measurement results from the same designs. Trade-offs between poly-silicon and metal gate lay-outs will also be discussed. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. The work was supported by the Sandia National Laboratories Directed Research and Development Program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  15. Effect of Computer-Assisted Learning on Students' Dental Anatomy Waxing Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, So Ran; Hernández, Marcela; Blanchette, Derek R; Lam, Matthew T; Gratton, David G; Aquilino, Steven A

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of computer-assisted learning on first-year dental students' waxing abilities and self-evaluation skills. Additionally, this study sought to determine how well digital evaluation software performed compared to faculty grading with respect to students' technical scores on a practical competency examination. First-year students at one U.S. dental school were assigned to one of three groups: control (n=40), E4D Compare (n=20), and Sirona prepCheck (n=19). Students in the control group were taught by traditional teaching methodologies, and the technology-assisted groups received both traditional training and supplementary feedback from the corresponding digital system. Five outcomes were measured: visual assessment score, self-evaluation score, and digital assessment scores at 0.25 mm, 0.30 mm, and 0.35 mm tolerance. The scores from visual assessment and self-evaluation were examined for differences among groups using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Correlation between the visual assessment and digital scores was measured using Pearson and Spearman rank correlation coefficients. At completion of the course, students were asked to complete a survey on the use of these digital technologies. All 79 students in the first-year class participated in the study, for a 100% response rate. The results showed that the visual assessment and self-evaluation scores did not differ among groups (p>0.05). Overall correlations between visual and digital assessment scores were modest though statistically significant (5% level of significance). Analysis of survey responses completed by students in the technology groups showed that profiles for the two groups were similar and not favorable towards digital technology. The study concluded that technology-assisted training did not affect these students' waxing performance or self-evaluation skills and that visual scores given by faculty and digital assessment scores correlated moderately.

  16. Non invasive Brain-Computer Interface system: towards its application as assistive technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cincotti, Febo; Mattia, Donatella; Aloise, Fabio; Bufalari, Simona; Schalk, Gerwin; Oriolo, Giuseppe; Cherubini, Andrea; Marciani, Maria Grazia; Babiloni, Fabio

    2010-01-01

    The quality of life of people suffering from severe motor disabilities can benefit from the use of current assistive technology capable of ameliorating communication, house-environment management and mobility, according to the user's residual motor abilities. Brain Computer Interfaces (BCIs) are systems that can translate brain activity into signals that control external devices. Thus they can represent the only technology for severely paralyzed patients to increase or maintain their communication and control options. Here we report on a pilot study in which a system was implemented and validated to allow disabled persons to improve or recover their mobility (directly or by emulation) and communication within the surrounding environment. The system is based on a software controller that offers to the user a communication interface that is matched with the individual's residual motor abilities. Patients (n=14) with severe motor disabilities due to progressive neurodegenerative disorders were trained to use the system prototype under a rehabilitation program carried out in a house-like furnished space. All users utilized regular assistive control options (e.g., microswitches or head trackers). In addition, four subjects learned to operate the system by means of a non-invasive EEG-based BCI. This system was controlled by the subjects' voluntary modulations of EEG sensorimotor rhythms recorded on the scalp; this skill was learnt even though the subjects have not had control over their limbs for a long time. We conclude that such a prototype system, which integrates several different assistive technologies including a BCI system, can potentially facilitate the translation from pre-clinical demonstrations to a clinical useful BCI. PMID:18394526

  17. Non-invasive brain-computer interface system: towards its application as assistive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cincotti, Febo; Mattia, Donatella; Aloise, Fabio; Bufalari, Simona; Schalk, Gerwin; Oriolo, Giuseppe; Cherubini, Andrea; Marciani, Maria Grazia; Babiloni, Fabio

    2008-04-15

    The quality of life of people suffering from severe motor disabilities can benefit from the use of current assistive technology capable of ameliorating communication, house-environment management and mobility, according to the user's residual motor abilities. Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are systems that can translate brain activity into signals that control external devices. Thus they can represent the only technology for severely paralyzed patients to increase or maintain their communication and control options. Here we report on a pilot study in which a system was implemented and validated to allow disabled persons to improve or recover their mobility (directly or by emulation) and communication within the surrounding environment. The system is based on a software controller that offers to the user a communication interface that is matched with the individual's residual motor abilities. Patients (n=14) with severe motor disabilities due to progressive neurodegenerative disorders were trained to use the system prototype under a rehabilitation program carried out in a house-like furnished space. All users utilized regular assistive control options (e.g., microswitches or head trackers). In addition, four subjects learned to operate the system by means of a non-invasive EEG-based BCI. This system was controlled by the subjects' voluntary modulations of EEG sensorimotor rhythms recorded on the scalp; this skill was learnt even though the subjects have not had control over their limbs for a long time. We conclude that such a prototype system, which integrates several different assistive technologies including a BCI system, can potentially facilitate the translation from pre-clinical demonstrations to a clinical useful BCI.

  18. Outlook of Instructors and Students on Ethical Issues in Computer Assisted Language Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. R. Mirzaeian

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available One of major concerns of human beings regardless of their religion or school of thought is to observe ethical issues. This paper discusses the issue and lays emphasis on observing ethical matters in teaching in virtual learning environments in general and computer assisted language learning in particular. The paper tries to throw light on the current status of observing ethical issues in virtual learning environments and drawing both instructors and students’ attention to this issue. The research has been conducted by using two questionnaires one given to students and the other to instructors. Data analysis revealed that majority of instructors observed ethical issues when confronted with students’ personal details. Students were most sensitive regarding disclosing their personal photos in these virtual environments; however, they were comfortable if their personal details were controlled by the instructors. The Chi-Square test showed no substantial difference between gender and observing ethical issues in virtual learning environments.

  19. Comparison of radionuclide scans with computer-assisted tomography in diagnosis of intracranial disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clifford, J.R.; Connolly, E.S.; Voorhies, R.M.

    1976-01-01

    Radionuclide brain scans were compared with computer-assisted tomography (CAT) for the diagnosis of intracranial disorders in 297 patients. The diagnosis was confirmed in 281 patients who formed the population for the study. The radionuclide scan was false positive for 12 patients (3.9 percent) and false negative for eight (2.6 percent). The CAT was false positive for three patients (1 percent) and false negative for one (0.3 percent). In the 133 patients in whom both tests were negative, no evidence of central nervous system pathology has been found during the 6 to 18 month follow-up. Brain tumors and intracerebral hemorrhage are more readily detectable with CAT

  20. Computer assisted active learning system development for critical thinking in history of civilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adem Karahoca

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates a Computer Assisted Learning System (CALS according to the several factors that promote flow wherestudents are fully involved into the learning activities for history of civilization lessons. The designed CALS supported bymeta – cognitive (cognitive maps and multimedia tools (movies, flash cards and quiz applications that help students to reacha flow state in learning by actively by engaging students’ critical thinking and providing an environment for active participation.The research data was collected using focus group surveys from a randomly selected 54 students enrolled in history ofcivilization at Bahcesehir University in Istanbul, Turkey. Results showed that 53.7% of students can be in flow via implementedCALS. Also according to the results, the flow has significant predictors in the course enjoyment, perceived competence ofcourse, value–usefulness and the challenge–learning style match according to nature of course in such a CALS.