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Sample records for medical therapy x-ray

  1. X-ray diagnostics, X-ray therapy, diagnostics and therapy with radioactive materials in free medical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setzer, H.D.

    1976-01-01

    On the basis of the documents of the Kassenaerztliche Vereinigung Niederbayerns in Straubing, the work of the established general practicioners in the fields of X-ray and nuclear medicine was investigated for the 1st quarter of 1971, and the X-ray diagnostic services rendered were evaluated according to age and sex. 2/3 of all doctors participating in a health insurance plan in Lower Bavaria are general practitioners; all other fields are represented less often than in Munich. The values for the whole Federal Republic are in between. Internal specialists, radiologists, and urologists together carry out 85.7% of the ten examinations which contribute most to the total gonadal dose. An application of the data on the 1st quarter to the annual value is only possible by allowing for an error of 13.1%. All in all, 6% more X-ray services are administered to men than to women. For both sexes, the genetically most important group of 15-34 resp. 15-39 years of age is highly represented, although young men receive X-ray diagnostics more frequently. X-ray therapy makes up only about 0.5% of all services. Nuclear medical diagnostics is employed to the same extent by radiologists and internal specialists, while therapy with radioactive substances is almost exclusively provided by radiologists. Relative to the population density, radioactive substances are more often used in Lower Bavaria than in West Berlin. (orig.) [de

  2. Medical x-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Aziz Mhd Ramli; Gui Ah Auu; Husaini Salleh; Idris Besar; Mohd Ashhar Khalid; Muhammad Jamal Md Isa; Shaharuddin Mohd; Siti Najila Mohd Janib; Mohamed Ali Abdul Khader; Mahalatchimi Dave; Mohd Fazly Abdul Rahim; Ng Chee Moon; Ram Piari; Teoh Hoon Heng; Lee Peter

    2004-01-01

    This book describes the fundamental subject about medical radiography. It is a multidisciplinary field that requires cross professional input from scientists, engineers and medical doctors. However, it is presented in simple language to suit different levels of readers from x-ray operators and radiographers to physists, general practitioners and radiology specialists.The book is written in accordance to the requirements of the standard syllabus approved by the Ministry of Health Malaysia for the training of medical x-ray operator and general practitioners. In general, the content is not only designed to provide relevant and essential subject for related professionals in medical radiological services such as x-ray operator, radiographer and radiologists, but also to address those in associated radiological services including nurses, medical technologists and physicists.The book is organized and arranged sequentially into 3 parts for easy reference: Radiation safety; X-ray equipment and associated facilities; Radiography practices. With proper grasping of all these parts, the radiological services could be provided with confident and the highest professional standard. Thus, medical imaging with highest quality that can provide useful diagnostic information at minimum doses and at cost effective could be assured

  3. Tumours associated with medical X-ray therapy exposure in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colman, M.; Kirsch, M.; Creditor, M.

    1978-01-01

    A total of 5166 persons who were exposed to limited field (80-100 cm 2 ) X-ray irradiation to the head, neck and upper chest region during childhood and adolescence have provided an outstanding opportunity for the study of tumour incidence following medical X-ray therapy. More than 3254 subjects have been traced, 3108 have completed questionnaires eliciting information on tumour incidence, and 1539 of these were subjected to a thorough clinical screening procedure that included a thyroid scintigram. The prevalence of thyroid tumours in the 1539 clinically screened subjects and the prevalence of all other tumours in the 3254 subjects traced can therefore be assumed to reflect the risks in the group of irradiated subjects as a whole. Median age at irradiation was 3.5 years, and median radiation dose 790 rads (7.9 Gy). Thyroid tumour was diagnosed in 413 subjects. Of those undergoing surgery (273) 30.3% were found to have thyroid cancer. A total of 366 surgical pathology specimens of the thyroid, including 93 from subjects who were diagnosed at other hospitals, were examined revealing 73 papillary carcinomas, 12 follicular carcinomas and 26 microscopic papillary carcinomas. One hundred and eighty-seven other (non-thyroid) neoplasmas identified included 27 benign and 10 malignant salivary gland tumours, 16 benign and seven malignant tumours of neural origin (brain, spinal cord, cranial and peripheral nerves), 37 skin tumours, 9 lymphomas, 8 gonadal tumours, 45 breast tumours and 28 tumours of miscellaneous sites. The incidence of thyroid tumours, salivary gland tumours and primary brain tumours was considerably in excess of the expected incidence (p values<0.0001), and a radiation dose-effect correlation was observed for thyroid and brain tumours. Gonadal tumours and lymphomas did not occur in excess of the expected incidence

  4. Medical X-ray sources now and for the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behling, Rolf

    2017-11-01

    This paper focuses on the use of X-rays in their largest field of application: medical diagnostic imaging and image-guided therapy. For this purpose, vacuum electronics in the form of X-ray tubes as the source of bremsstrahlung (braking radiation) have been the number one choice for X-ray production in the range of photon energies between about 16 keV for mammography and 150 keV for general radiography. Soft tissue on one end and bony structures on the other are sufficiently transparent and the contrast delivered by difference of absorption is sufficiently high for this spectral range. The dominance of X-ray tubes holds even more than 120 years after Conrad Roentgen's discovery of the bremsstrahlung mechanism. What are the specifics of current X-ray tubes and their medical diagnostic applications? How may the next available technology at or beyond the horizon look like? Can we hope for substantial game changers? Will flat panel sources, less expensive X-ray "LED's", compact X-ray Lasers, compact synchrotrons or equivalent X-ray sources appear in medical diagnostic imaging soon? After discussing the various modalities of imaging systems and their sources of radiation, this overview will briefly touch on the physics of bremsstrahlung generation, key characteristics of X-ray tubes, and material boundary conditions, which restrict performance. It will discuss the deficits of the bremsstrahlung technology and try to sketch future alternatives and their prospects of implementation in medical diagnostics.

  5. X-ray therapy with enhanced effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silberbauer, F.

    1989-01-01

    The introduction of iodine atoms into a malignant tumor by intravenous injection of a contrast medium that is excreted by way of the kidneys selectively increases the tumor's capacity for the absorption of X-ray photons. This effect is exploited in CCT, but in high-voltage X-ray therapy it leads to an elevated focal dose while the incident dose remains the same. (orig.) [de

  6. Defects in medical X-ray equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eder, H.; Wahl, H.; Troeger, W.

    1979-01-01

    A careful estimate of the effects on the genetically significant radiation load shows that it is in the same order of magnitude as the increase in the skin dose area product. This is to say that of the genetically significant radiation dose of about 500 mJ/kg (50 mrem) per year and person due to medical X-ray diagnostics, about 75 mJ/kg (7.5 mrem) are due to serious defects in X-ray equipment. (orig.) [de

  7. X-ray detectors in medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spahn, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare systems are subject to continuous adaptation, following trends such as the change of demographic structures, the rise of life-style related and chronic diseases, and the need for efficient and outcome-oriented procedures. This also influences the design of new imaging systems as well as their components. The applications of X-ray imaging in the medical field are manifold and have led to dedicated modalities supporting specific imaging requirements, for example in computed tomography (CT), radiography, angiography, surgery or mammography, delivering projection or volumetric imaging data. Depending on the clinical needs, some X-ray systems enable diagnostic imaging while others support interventional procedures. X-ray detector design requirements for the different medical applications can vary strongly with respect to size and shape, spatial resolution, frame rates and X-ray flux, among others. Today, integrating X-ray detectors are in common use. They are predominantly based on scintillators (e.g. CsI or Gd 2 O 2 S) and arrays of photodiodes made from crystalline silicon (Si) or amorphous silicon (a-Si) or they employ semiconductors (e.g. Se) with active a-Si readout matrices. Ongoing and future developments of X-ray detectors will include optimization of current state-of-the-art integrating detectors in terms of performance and cost, will enable the usage of large size CMOS-based detectors, and may facilitate photon counting techniques with the potential to further enhance performance characteristics and foster the prospect of new clinical applications

  8. Urological complications after x-ray-therapy and their treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichtenauer, P; Nentwig, N; Lobsien, I [Medizinische Hochschule Luebeck (F.R. Germany). Chirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik

    1974-10-01

    Early reactions on X-ray-therapy in the bladder region usually begin with pain. Sterile irritations are reversible under symptomatic therapy. Real bladder infections should be dealt with according to antibiogram intensively and for a long time before the X-ray-stress is continued. Late reactions on X-ray-therapy mostly are organised and irreversible. The different manifestations are referred to and the respective therapy is recommended.

  9. Medical imaging: Material change for X-ray detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlands, John A.

    2017-10-01

    The X-ray sensitivity of radiology instruments is limited by the materials used in their detectors. A material from the perovskite family of semiconductors could allow lower doses of X-rays to be used for medical imaging. See Letter p.87

  10. 42 CFR 410.35 - X-ray therapy and other radiation therapy services: Scope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false X-ray therapy and other radiation therapy services... Other Health Services § 410.35 X-ray therapy and other radiation therapy services: Scope. Medicare Part B pays for X-ray therapy and other radiation therapy services, including radium therapy and...

  11. X-ray therapy in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windeyer, B.

    1976-01-01

    The results of the treatment of a randomly selected series of 277 patients is presented and some consideration is given to the complications and sequelae of the X-ray therapy here described. There is particular reference to the risk of leukaemogenesis, the decline in the use of X-ray therapy and the present position in Britain of the management of ankylosing spondylitis. (orig./MG) [de

  12. Development of X-ray protective clothes for medical treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, M.; Koike, K.; Fujinuma, T.; Aso, T.; Konba, T.

    1991-01-01

    As various medical treatments using X-ray irradiation are getting more important in modern medicine, effective, excellent X-ray protective clothes have been required. Elastomeric or PVC sheets containing powdery lead are usually employed as conventional X-ray protective clothes. In this case, enhancement of X-ray shielding efficiency increases the weight because the efficiency depends on the amount of lead incorporated. Such heavy clothes give significant fatigue and inconvenience during long term use. Consequently, lightweight and comfortable X-ray protective clothes have been eagerly desired in the medical field. The authors have improved these defects in the conventional clothes by means of elastomeric blending technologies and successfully developed new, lightweight and comfortable X-ray shielding clothes. The new clothes consist of lead-containing rubber sheet in which lead is homogeneously incorporated and lightweight PVC laminated with fabrics. They achieved favorable sense of touch, comfortable wearing and long-term durability. Furthermore, the clothes satisfy all requirements including X-ray shielding efficiency defined in JIS specifications. This article introduces the development of the new clothes and their properties in detail. (author)

  13. Image quality of medical X-ray systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoen, P.J. 't.

    1980-01-01

    The quality of images made by medical X-ray systems can only be properly described if the visual system is also taken into account. In this thesis, the visual threshold contrast of edges, bars and disks has been chosen as the criterion. Since these objects resemble medical objects like tumour-mass outlines, blood vessels and micro-calcifications, a correlation with X-ray practice is possible. Only the conventional X-ray systems are considered, but a brief analysis of computerized tomography is given. Considerable attention is paid to unsharpness and the minimization of its influence on the threshold contrast, to the influence of the noise on the threshold contrast, and to the contrast formation as such. The consequences for the dose administered to the patient are also briefly analysed. (Auth.)

  14. Human engineering design of medical x-ray system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohma, Hideo

    1981-01-01

    There have been remarkable progress in the area of X-ray diagnosis technology in recent years. However, there have been some cases of accident. Such accidents included those due to defective apparatus such as defects in apparatus and poor safety system, those caused by incorrect handling of apparatus by radiologic technologist, and those originating in a poor surrounding condition or bad management of apparatus. In this report, the following subjects are statistically studied: 1. Analysis of radiographic error. 2. Analysis of failure in medical X-ray systems. (author)

  15. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for x-ray ulcer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishina, Hitoshi; Haryu, Tsuneo; Shioshima, Shoji; Imaizumi, Akio; Sato, Yasushi

    1977-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy was performed in 6 cases (female) of x-ray ulcer following radiotherapy for breast cancer, esophageal cancer, uterine cancer, and rectal cancer. The exposed dose ranged from 4500 to 7500 R, and x-ray ulcer occurred after one to twelve years of the irradiation. The mixed intravenous instillation composed of 1200 mg of Glutathione, 1 g of VC, and 6000 unit of Uronase was performed before the performance of the hyperbaric oxygen therapy. This therapy was carried out once a day for 20 days (one period), and was suspended for one to two weeks between periods. It was carried out for about four periods. Furthermore, antibiotics and local ointment were used. Disappearance of ulcer was recognized in 5 of 6 cases, and the recurrence has not been found out for 4 years. One case, the rest, was given Cytorevie, and did not receive this therapy from his will. (Kanao, N.)

  16. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for x-ray ulcer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishina, Hitoshi; Haryu, Tsuneo; Shioshima, Shoji; Imaizumi, Akio; Sato, Yasushi [Tohoku Rosai Hospital, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan)

    1977-05-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy was performed in 6 cases (female) of x-ray ulcer following radiotherapy for breast cancer, esophageal cancer, uterine cancer, and rectal cancer. The exposed dose ranged from 4500 to 7500 R, and x-ray ulcer occurred after one to twelve years of the irradiation. The mixed intravenous instillation composed of 1200 mg of Glutathione, 1 g of VC, and 6000 unit of Uronase was performed before the performance of the hyperbaric oxygen therapy. This therapy was carried out once a day for 20 days (one period), and was suspended for one to two weeks between periods. It was carried out for about four periods. Furthermore, antibiotics and local ointment were used. Disappearance of ulcer was recognized in 5 of 6 cases, and the recurrence has not been found out for 4 years. One case, the rest, was given Cytorevie, and did not receive this therapy from his will.

  17. Cancer among medical diagnostic x-ray workers in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.X.; Boice, J.D. Jr.; Li, B.X.; Zhang, J.Y.; Fraumeni, J.F. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Cancer incidence among 27,011 diagnostic x-ray workers was compared to that of 25,782 other medical specialists employed between 1950 and 1980 in China. X-ray workers had a 50% higher risk of developing cancer than the other specialists [relative risk (RR) = 1.5; 95% CI = 1.3-1.7]. Leukemia was strongly linked to radiation work (RR = 3.5, n = 30). Cancers of the breast (RR = 1.4, n = 11), thyroid (RR = 2.1, n = 7), and skin (RR = 1.5, n = 6) were increased among x-ray workers employed for 10 or more years. High risks of cancers of the esophagus (RR = 3.5, n = 15) and liver (RR = 2.4, n = 48) were not consistent with a radiation effect since risk did not vary by duration of employment. This finding suggested that some differences might exist between groups of hospital workers in social class, alcohol intake, dietary habits, and other risk factors. No excess lung cancer (RR = 0.9, n = 22) or multiple myeloma (n = 0) was observed. Significant excesses of leukemia and cancers of the breast and thyroid occurred among x-ray workers first employed prior to 1960 when radiation exposures in China were high. In fact, it was not uncommon for employees to be given time off from x-ray work because their wbc count was severely depressed. These data indicated that repeated exposure to x-rays over many years can increase the risk of leukemia and several other tumors but apparently not that of lung cancer

  18. Automated Quality Assurance of Medical Digital X-Ray Equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelikman, Mikhail; Kruchinin, Sergey

    2013-06-01

    Quality assurance of the x-ray equipment includes a set of various tests among which are installation and periodic exams performed by qualified engineers as well as daily routine tests carried out by the medical staff of the Radiology Department. As a rule, the decision concerning the applicability of the x-ray equipment for using in clinical studies is made on the basis of the routine tests results. The presented method is based on the detector's output signals, Signal-to-Noise Ratio and Modulation Transfer Function evaluation in automated way using the simple test-object's digital image registered with given geometry and x-ray exposure parameters settings. Rectangular 20 mm thick aluminum plate with fixed 1 mm thick well-finished steel edge (for general x-ray radiography/fluoroscopy systems) or 2 mm thick aluminum plate with fixed 1 mm thick aluminum well-finished edge (for digital x-ray mammography systems) can be used as a test equipment. Relevant to the decision concerning the x-ray device operation status are the parameters: deviations from the reference levels of the tube voltage and mAs as well as internal detector's noise variance and detector's gain deviations. Everyday testing procedure includes the following steps. On the first step the roentgenographer places the test-object at the center of the detector's surface, makes an exposure with specified parameters setting and geometry and after this, test results are displayed on the work station monitor or console screen in automatic way. In order to provide an automated regime of the presenting algorithm, the software must be integrated with the program module intended for the x-ray device control. The use of the presented method in clinical practice provides the reliable daily monitoring of the x-ray equipment operation status prior to its utilizing for patient diagnostic process. As a rule, it will take not more than 3-5 minutes for the roentgenographer to complete the routine

  19. Liability for damage caused by medical X-ray treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    A case of liability for damage caused by X-ray medical treatment was recently brought before the courts in Norway. Following a mistake by the physician handling the X-ray apparatus the plaintiff had received an overdose of radiation on her nose and a lengthy and expensive plastic surgery treatment had been required to repair the damage. The local court of Aalesund ruled in April 1975 that the physician concerned had committed a fault but could not be accused of gross negligence or gross fault in view of Norwegian case law on medical liability. Therefore the plaintiff obtained compensation for her medical expenses but was refused compensation for non-material damage (disfigurement and pretium doloris). (NEA) [fr

  20. Cost Benefit Optimization of the Israeli Medical Diagnostic X-Ray Exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Shlomo, A.; Shlesinger, T.; Shani, G.; Kushilevsky, A.

    1999-01-01

    Diagnostic and therapeutic radiology is playing a major role in modern medicine. A preliminary survey was carried out during 1997 on 3 major Israeli hospitals in order to assess the extent of exposure of the population to medical x-rays (1). The survey has found that the annual collective dose of the Israeli population to x-ray medical imaging procedures (excluding radio-therapy) is about 7,500 Man-Sv. The results of the survey were analyzed in order to. 1. Carry out a cost-benefit optimization procedure related to the means that should be used to reduce the exposure of the Israeli patients under x-ray procedures. 2. Establish a set of practical recommendations to reduce the x-ray radiation exposure of patients and to increase the image quality. . Establish a number of basic rules to be utilized by health policy makers in Israel. Based on the ICRP-60 linear model risk assessments (2), the extent of the annual risk arising A.om the 7,500 Man-Sv medical x-ray collective dose in Israel has been found to be the potential addition of 567 cancer cases per year, 244 of which to be fatal, and a potential additional birth of 3-4 children with severe genetic damage per year. This assessment take into account the differential risk and the collective dose according to the age distribution in the Israeli exposed population, and excludes patients with chronic diseases

  1. Review of Radiation Safety in Medical X-Ray Diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koteng, O.A.

    2015-01-01

    Medical X-Ray machines have been used for more than a century for non-invasive diagnosis of patients for the benefit of mankind. The safety of operators and patients during such practice has improved with time, but, still cases of detrimental effects to Radiation Workers in Kenya including cancer related deaths have been reported in the recent past. An ongoing study is reviewing the safety status of the worker and patients during medical and dental exposures. The study was initiated following complaint of recurrent headaches by a radiographer working in a busy Kenyan hospital. (author)

  2. Nanoparticle-Assisted Scanning Focusing X-Ray Therapy with Needle Beam X Rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, R Andrew; Guo, Ting

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we show a new therapeutic approach using 40-120 keV X rays to deliver a radiation dose at the isocenter located many centimeters below the skin surface several hundred times greater than at the skin and how this dose enhancement can be augmented with nanomaterials to create several thousand-fold total dose enhancement effect. This novel approach employs a needle X-ray beam directed at the isocenter centimeters deep in the body while continuously scanning the beam to cover a large solid angle without overlapping at the skin. A Monte Carlo method was developed to simulate an X-ray dose delivered to the isocenter filled with X-ray absorbing and catalytic nanoparticles in a water phantom. An experimental apparatus consisting of a moving plastic phantom irradiated with a stationary 1 mm needle X-ray beam was built to test the theoretical predictions. X-ray films were used to characterize the dose profiles of the scanning X-ray apparatus. Through this work, it was determined that the X-ray dose delivered to the isocenter in a treatment voxel (t-voxel) underneath a 5 cm deep high-density polyethylene (HDPE) phantom was 295 ± 48 times greater than the surface dose. This measured value was in good agreement with the theoretical predicted value of 339-fold. Adding X-ray-absorbing nanoparticles, catalytic nanoparticles or both into the t-voxel can further augment the dose enhancement. For example, we predicted that adding 1 weight percentage (wp) of gold into water could increase the effective dose delivered to the target by onefold. Dose enhancement using 1 mm X-ray beam could reach about 1,600-fold in the t-voxel when 7.5 wp of 88 nm diameter silica-covered gold nanoparticles were added, which we showed in a previously published study can create a dose enhancement of 5.5 ± 0.46-fold without scanning focusing enhancement. Based on the experimental data from that study, mixing 0.02 wp 2.5 nm diameter small tetrakis hydroxymethyl phosphonium chloride (THPC

  3. A survey of chest medical X-ray doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomba, M.; Conha, P.G. da; Almeida, C.E. de

    1996-01-01

    The medical X-ray exposures due to radiological examinations are responsible for the largest contribution to the population collective dose as result of the normal use of artificial sources of radiation. The relative impact of the medical exposures to the total dose received by the population from all kinds of radiation sources varies from country to country and in some cases within the same country. The dose variations observed for a specific type of examination are in general associated to several factors i.e. the type of film-ecran combination, the choice of the appropriate physical parameters of the X-ray generator (Kvp, filament current, exposure time) and finally to the film processing conditions. At the present moment the data available in Brazil are scarce and scanty to allow a complete analyzis of this question so needed by the health authorities to justify the implementation of a quality assurance and dose reduction programs. In addition, it is desirable to establish a cost effective operation based on simple administrative concepts in order to reduce the number of films retake, then increasing the life expectancy of the equipment and the number of radiological procedures. The aim of this work was to assess the typical doses of an PA and LAT chest wall X-ray examinations in five different public hospitals (a University Hospital, a Cancer Hospital, a Navy Hospital, an Emergency Hospital and a State General Hospital), as representative of the city of Rio de Janeiro, and compare the results with the international data and recommendations available. (author)

  4. X-Ray Psoralen Activated Cancer Therapy (X-PACT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldham, Mark; Yoon, Paul; Fathi, Zak; Beyer, Wayne F.; Adamson, Justus; Liu, Leihua; Alcorta, David; Xia, Wenle; Osada, Takuya; Liu, Congxiao; Yang, Xiao Y.; Dodd, Rebecca D.; Herndon, James E.; Meng, Boyu; Kirsch, David G.; Lyerly, H. Kim; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Fecci, Peter; Walder, Harold; Spector, Neil L.

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates X-PACT (X-ray Psoralen Activated Cancer Therapy): a new approach for the treatment of solid cancer. X-PACT utilizes psoralen, a potent anti-cancer therapeutic with current application to proliferative disease and extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) of cutaneous T Cell Lymphoma. An immunogenic role for light-activated psoralen has been reported, contributing to long-term clinical responses. Psoralen therapies have to-date been limited to superficial or extracorporeal scenarios due to the requirement for psoralen activation by UVA light, which has limited penetration in tissue. X-PACT solves this challenge by activating psoralen with UV light emitted from novel non-tethered phosphors (co-incubated with psoralen) that absorb x-rays and re-radiate (phosphoresce) at UV wavelengths. The efficacy of X-PACT was evaluated in both in-vitro and in-vivo settings. In-vitro studies utilized breast (4T1), glioma (CT2A) and sarcoma (KP-B) cell lines. Cells were exposed to X-PACT treatments where the concentrations of drug (psoralen and phosphor) and radiation parameters (energy, dose, and dose rate) were varied. Efficacy was evaluated primarily using flow cell cytometry in combination with complimentary assays, and the in-vivo mouse study. In an in-vitro study, we show that X-PACT induces significant tumor cell apoptosis and cytotoxicity, unlike psoralen or phosphor alone (pphosphor, psoralen, or radiation increase. Finally, in an in-vivo pilot study of BALBc mice with syngeneic 4T1 tumors, we show that the rate of tumor growth is slower with X-PACT than with saline or AMT + X-ray (p<0.0001). Overall these studies demonstrate a potential therapeutic effect for X-PACT, and provide a foundation and rationale for future studies. In summary, X-PACT represents a novel treatment approach in which well-tolerated low doses of x-ray radiation are delivered to a specific tumor site to generate UVA light which in-turn unleashes both short- and potentially long

  5. X-Ray Psoralen Activated Cancer Therapy (X-PACT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Oldham

    Full Text Available This work investigates X-PACT (X-ray Psoralen Activated Cancer Therapy: a new approach for the treatment of solid cancer. X-PACT utilizes psoralen, a potent anti-cancer therapeutic with current application to proliferative disease and extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP of cutaneous T Cell Lymphoma. An immunogenic role for light-activated psoralen has been reported, contributing to long-term clinical responses. Psoralen therapies have to-date been limited to superficial or extracorporeal scenarios due to the requirement for psoralen activation by UVA light, which has limited penetration in tissue. X-PACT solves this challenge by activating psoralen with UV light emitted from novel non-tethered phosphors (co-incubated with psoralen that absorb x-rays and re-radiate (phosphoresce at UV wavelengths. The efficacy of X-PACT was evaluated in both in-vitro and in-vivo settings. In-vitro studies utilized breast (4T1, glioma (CT2A and sarcoma (KP-B cell lines. Cells were exposed to X-PACT treatments where the concentrations of drug (psoralen and phosphor and radiation parameters (energy, dose, and dose rate were varied. Efficacy was evaluated primarily using flow cell cytometry in combination with complimentary assays, and the in-vivo mouse study. In an in-vitro study, we show that X-PACT induces significant tumor cell apoptosis and cytotoxicity, unlike psoralen or phosphor alone (p<0.0001. We also show that apoptosis increases as doses of phosphor, psoralen, or radiation increase. Finally, in an in-vivo pilot study of BALBc mice with syngeneic 4T1 tumors, we show that the rate of tumor growth is slower with X-PACT than with saline or AMT + X-ray (p<0.0001. Overall these studies demonstrate a potential therapeutic effect for X-PACT, and provide a foundation and rationale for future studies. In summary, X-PACT represents a novel treatment approach in which well-tolerated low doses of x-ray radiation are delivered to a specific tumor site to generate UVA

  6. Course of radiological protection and safety in the medical diagnostic with X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez A, C.E.

    1997-01-01

    The obtention of images of human body to the medical diagnostic is one of the more old and generalized applications for X-ray. Therefore the design and performance of equipment and installations as well as the operation procedures must be oriented toward safety with the purpose to guarantee this radiological practice will bring a net positive benefit to the society. Given that in Mexico only exists the standardization related to source and equipment generators of ionizing radiation in the industrial area and medical therapy, but not so to the medical diagnostic area it is the purpose of this work to present those standards related with this application branch. Also it is presented the preparation of a manual for the course named Formation of teachers in radiological protection and safety in the X-ray medical diagnostic in 1997 which was imparted at ININ. (Author)

  7. Myelopathy and peripheral neuropathy after X-ray therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berstad, J.

    1986-03-01

    Three patients with injury to the spinal cord after X-ray therapy are reported. One patient suffered from a chronic progressive myelopathy, whereas two others were considered to have a peripheral motor neuropathy due to selective damage to the motoneurons. The prognosis of patients with peripheral motor neuropathy is good, in contrast to chronic progressive myelopathy which most often leads to severe disability and death. Characteristically there is a latent interval from months to years between completed radiation therapy and the appearance of neurological symptoms. The mechanism for delayed radiation injury to the cord is at present unknown, but the possibilities of fibrosis, injury to the microcirculation, or direct injury to the nervous tissue are discussed. The importance of a correct diagnosis before further treatment is decided upon is stressed. The most difficult differential diagnosis is intraspinal metastases.

  8. Myelopathy and peripheral neuropathy after X-ray therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berstad, J.

    1986-01-01

    Three patients with injury to the spinal cord after X-ray therapy are reported. One patient suffered from a chronic progressive myelopathy, whereas two others were considered to have a peripheral motor neuropathy due to selective damage to the motoneurons. The prognosis of patients with peripheral motor neuropathy is good, in contrast to chronic progressive myelopathy which most often leads to severe disability and death. Characteristically there is a latent interval from months to years between completed radiation therapy and the appearance of neurological symptoms. The mechanism for delayed radiation injury to the cord is at present unknown, but the possibilities of fibrosis, injury to the microcirculation, or direct injury to the nervous tissue are discussed. The importance of a correct diagnosis before further treatment is decided upon is stressed. The most difficult differential diagnosis is intraspinal metastases

  9. Stochastic risk estimation from medical x-ray diagnostic examinations, 2. Risk estimates of individuals from x-ray diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashizume, T; Maruyama, T; Noda, Y; Iwai, K; Tateno, Y [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Nishizawa, K

    1981-01-01

    The risks of genetic, leukemia and malignant diseases from medical X-ray diagnostic examinations were estimated using the frequency of radiographic and fluoroscopic exposures per diagnostic examination, child expectancy, leukemia and malignancy significant factors, and using a weighting factor determined on the basis of data concerning the cancer mortality among atomic bomb survivors in Nagasaki and of a recommendation of International Commission of Radiological Protection. The organ or tissue doses with respect to the stochastic risks were determined with ionization chambers and thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the positions of the organs or tissues in a RANDO woman phantom which was exposed to diagnostic X-rays according to technical factors of typical radiographic and fluoroscopic examinations obtained from a nationwide survey. The resultant risks by age-group and type of radiographic and fluoroscopic examination are tabulated in terms of risk level of 10/sup -6/. In general, the total risk defined as the sum of genetic, leukemia and malignant risks was a high value for the X-ray diagnosis of digestive organs involving barium meal and barium enema. For example, the total risk for young age-group was 100 to 200 x 10/sup -6/ for the X-ray diagnosis of digestive organs. The total risk from the chest radiography was lower value as compared with the risk from the X-ray diagnosis of other organs or tissues. On the contrary, the risk from the chest tomography was comparable to the risk from the diagnosis of digestive organs. The total risk decreased with increasing of age for every X-ray diagnostic examination.

  10. In-phantom spectrometry of medical diagnostic x rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stansbury, P.S.

    1977-10-01

    A program of measurements was made to determine the spectral fluence distributions at locations of significance in a heterogeneous, hominoid phantom exposed to x rays in a manner simulating medical diagnostic radiology. The measurements were made with a specially constructed NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. The detector had a spherically shaped active volume 0.6 cm in diameter. The resolution of this detector was five times worse than that of a more conventional NaI(Tl) spectrometer. Resolution broadening and other distortions were removed from the observed pulse height spectra with a computer-coded, iterative unfolding technique. The performance of the spectrometer and the unfolding scheme was assessed by comparing, in a few cases, the unfolded NaI(Tl) spectra with spectra determined with a high resolution Ge(Li) spectrometer. The measurements were made in a physical model of an idealized representation of an average adult patient

  11. X-ray medical diagnostics and thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsenova, T.; Chobanova, N.; Pavlova, A; Bajrakova, A.

    1998-01-01

    An analytical epidemiological study for assessment of X-ray medical diagnosis as a risk factor for thyroid cancer (TC) has been carried out. The data from the investigation of 90 TC cases and 180 controls matched by sex and age are used. The risk assessment is based on the distribution of investigated persons according to thyroid gland irradiation (as an equivalent dose cumulated from the procedures) and the number of different procedures of organs and systems. There is a significantly increased risk for TC from diagnostic lung examinations; fluoroscopy (OR=3.49, 95% CI=1.66±7.39, p=0.0002) and radiography (OR=2.48, 95% CI=1.05±5.86, p=0.02) (author)

  12. In-phantom spectrometry of medical diagnostic x rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stansbury, P. S.

    1977-10-01

    A program of measurements was made to determine the spectral fluence distributions at locations of significance in a heterogeneous, hominoid phantom exposed to x rays in a manner simulating medical diagnostic radiology. The measurements were made with a specially constructed NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. The detector had a spherically shaped active volume 0.6 cm in diameter. The resolution of this detector was five times worse than that of a more conventional NaI(Tl) spectrometer. Resolution broadening and other distortions were removed from the observed pulse height spectra with a computer-coded, iterative unfolding technique. The performance of the spectrometer and the unfolding scheme was assessed by comparing, in a few cases, the unfolded NaI(Tl) spectra with spectra determined with a high resolution Ge(Li) spectrometer. The measurements were made in a physical model of an idealized representation of an average adult patient.

  13. Cyclophosphamide/x-ray: combined mode preparation for transplantation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meredith, R.; Okunewick, J.; Shadduck, R.; Raikow, R.; Brozovich, B.; Seeman, P.

    1979-01-01

    Use of total body irradiation (TBI) and/or chemotherapy as a preparation for marrow transplantation in the treatment of leukemia has been only moderately successful in the clinic. Although cyclophosphamide (CY) has shown promise as a marrow ablative agent, leukemia relapses are often found, and optimal therapeutic protocols have not been established. Our transplantation therapy studies of murine leukemia with parental recipients and hybrid donors provide an excellent model for research aimed at improved survival of human transplant patients. Utilizing a murine leukemia induced by a virus, various doses of CY in combination with sub-lethal irradiation were compared to determine the optimal pretreatment for transplantation therapy. Both normal and leukemic mice were engrafted with virus resistant, histocompatible marrow following these preparations, then monitored for survival and long term effects. Leukemic mice were also evaluated for pluripotent as well as myeloid committed stem cells as a measure of the effectiveness of the treatment in elimination of leukemic cells. Leukemic groups were also compared for the percentage and time of leukemia relapse. All CY/X-ray combinations were more effective in elimination of stem cell populations than supralethal TBI alone. However, the best survival was obtained with lethal TBI alone or low dose CY in combination with 550 R

  14. Interactive X-ray and proton therapy training and simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza-Lup, Felix G; Farrar, Shane; Leon, Erik

    2015-10-01

    External beam X-ray therapy (XRT) and proton therapy (PT) are effective and widely accepted forms of treatment for many types of cancer. However, the procedures require extensive computerized planning. Current planning systems for both XRT and PT have insufficient visual aid to combine real patient data with the treatment device geometry to account for unforeseen collisions among system components and the patient. The 3D surface representation (S-rep) is a widely used scheme to create 3D models of physical objects. 3D S-reps have been successfully used in CAD/CAM and, in conjunction with texture mapping, in the modern gaming industry to customize avatars and improve the gaming realism and sense of presence. We are proposing a cost-effective method to extract patient-specific S-reps in real time and combine them with the treatment system geometry to provide a comprehensive simulation of the XRT/PT treatment room. The X3D standard is used to implement and deploy the simulator on the web, enabling its use not only for remote specialists' collaboration, simulation, and training, but also for patient education. An objective assessment of the accuracy of the S-reps obtained proves the potential of the simulator for clinical use.

  15. Medical X-ray techniques in diagnostic radiography. 4. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plaats, G.J. van der; Vijlbrief, P.

    1980-01-01

    A step by step account is given of every aspect of the technical factors involved in the production of X-ray images. Chapter titles include, methods of image formation and laws of projection, sharpness and unsharpness, contrast, perceptibility of detail in the radiographic image-image quality, properties of fluoroscopic screens, radiographic films, intensifying screens and cassettes, image intensification and X-ray television, processing technique, fluoroscopy and radiographic technique in general, special radiographic techniques, radiographic examinations using contrast media, exposure and exposure tables and automatic density control, diagnostic X-ray apparatus, and diagnostic stands and accessories. (C.F.)

  16. Trends and Technological Developments in Medical X-ray Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iacobovici, E.; Ben-Shlomo, A.

    2004-01-01

    Since the very beginning of X-rays discovery, about one hundred years ago, there has been an ongoing development of technological means, focusing on image quality and imaging capabilities improvement, as well as on awareness and radiation dosage reduction

  17. Skin Reactions and Quality of Life after X-Ray Therapy of Basal Cell Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skiveren, J.; Daugbjerg, H.; Wulf, H. C.; Mikkelsen, M. R.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Advanced basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is often treated by surgery or X-ray therapy. The consequences of X-ray therapy on the patients health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) have so far not been described. Objectives. To quantify quality of life in BCC patients before and after X-ray therapy compared with matched healthy controls. Materials. Twenty-five patients (mean age 69) with BCC completed the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) before and two weeks and three months after X-ray therapy and their results were compared with the DLQI scores for 25 matched controls. Results. Compared to the healthy controls the patients' DLQI score was significantly higher before and 2 weeks after X-ray therapy ( ρ=0.005;ρ=0.000). The patients' DLQI score decreased significantly from baseline to three months after X-ray therapy (ρ=0.024), when it became similar to that of the healthy controls (ρ=0.819). Three months after X-ray therapy eight patients had no skin reactions, 11 had slight atrophy, pigmentation change, and/or some hair loss, four had patch atrophy, moderate telangiectasia, and/or total hair loss. Conclusions. BCC has a negative effect on patients' quality of life. The study shows that HRQOL normalises shortly after X-ray therapy, despite minor skin manifestations.

  18. Medical management of severe local radiation injury after acute X-ray exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bushmanov, A.; Nadezhina, N.; Kretov, A.

    2008-01-01

    Medical management during acute period in a case of severe local radiation injury after acute X-ray exposure includes 3 stages. During the fist stage patient got conservative treatment according to the common pathogenetic mechanisms of LRI (dis aggregating therapy, stimulation of regeneration, dis intoxication therapy, antibiotic therapy, pain relief therapy, Local anti-burn therapy-specific non-adhesive bandage with antiseptic and anti-burn medicaments); estimation of severity, deepness and area of injury by clinical picture and dates of instrumental methods of examining; defining necessity and volume of surgical treatment; preparing arrangements for surgical treatment. This stage ends with forming of demarcation line of a very hard severity of a Local Radiation Injure. The second stage includes necrectomy of the area of a very hard severity with microsurgical plastic by re vascularized flap and auto dermoplastic. The third stage - adaptation of re vascularized flap and total epithelization of injured area. (author)

  19. Facility for testing and certification of medical x-ray films at BARC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Reena; Jayalakshmi, V.; Nair, C.P.R.

    2006-12-01

    The major problem faced in the x-ray department with regard to x-ray films is the non consistent image quality of x-ray films leading to lesions missed/ wrong diagnosis and as a result retakes of the examination and increased radiation dosage to the patient. This report illustrates the methodology adopted by this Division towards implementation of quality assurance of the basic imaging devices namely the medical x-ray films. The characteristics properties desirable in x-ray films are the qualitative response of the emulsion to standard set of exposure and processing conditions in terms of speed, contrast and density. It should be consistent for exposure conditions in a custom built equipment simulating the quantum and type of energy that would be received by the film during diagnostic examinations. The phantom, geometrical set up and beam quality specifications as per the ISO standards required for x-ray sensitometry have been described in this report. (author)

  20. Regulations No. 59 of 20 February 1978 on X-ray skin therapy equipment up to 50 kV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    These regulations lay down the provisions to be complied with for the protection of medical staff and patients when using X-ray equipment for skin therapy. The operators of such equipment must comply with the technical guidelines contained in the regulations and provision is made for annual inspections to ensure that the devices meet the necessary safety standards. (NEA) [fr

  1. Simulation of medical irradiation and X-ray detector signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreisler, Bjoern

    2010-02-08

    -Carlo simulation of the irradiation head of the medical linear accelerator is constructed for the irradiation with electrons and photons in the second part of this thesis. The simulation is validated by comparison with water phantom measurements. Available information from the measurements is limited to the depth dose deposition and dose profiles in selected water depths. The simulation allows the evaluation of dose depositions and spectral particle distributions at various locations. In the electron irradiation mode, a collimation close to the patient is performed by an electron applicator. A possible reduction of the side leakage is evaluated by optimising the collimation of the beam. Medical irradiation with MeV-electrons and X-ray photons is the part of the clinical tumour treatment which is evaluated in this work. (orig.)

  2. Simulation of medical irradiation and X-ray detector signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreisler, Bjoern

    2010-01-01

    the irradiation head of the medical linear accelerator is constructed for the irradiation with electrons and photons in the second part of this thesis. The simulation is validated by comparison with water phantom measurements. Available information from the measurements is limited to the depth dose deposition and dose profiles in selected water depths. The simulation allows the evaluation of dose depositions and spectral particle distributions at various locations. In the electron irradiation mode, a collimation close to the patient is performed by an electron applicator. A possible reduction of the side leakage is evaluated by optimising the collimation of the beam. Medical irradiation with MeV-electrons and X-ray photons is the part of the clinical tumour treatment which is evaluated in this work. (orig.)

  3. Human engineering design in medical x-ray system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Sadayoshi

    1981-01-01

    The dimension of control desk, design of controller and indicator are studied in relation with human body dimension of radiological technologist. First, in the design of apparatus, it is reasonable to adopt the cumulative distribution in stead of mean values of human body dimension because the mean values would be cause of inadequacy to the majority of operator. Second, I reported about the fundamental items e.g. the display of controller and indicator recommended from the point of view of human engineering. Up to now the radiological technologists were intended to take a serious view of performance of X-ray apparatus only, but hereafter, we think, it is also important to induce the thought of human engineering in the design of X-ray apparatus. (J.P.N.)

  4. Controlled area for mobile medical X-ray equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menzel, B; Taschner, P; Koenig, W [Staatliches Amt fuer Atomsicherheit und Strahlenschutz, Berlin (German Democratic Republic); Fuehr, K P; Kucharz, R [Rostock Univ. (German Democratic Republic). Radiologische Klinik

    1976-10-01

    On the basis of dose rate measurements the radiation protection situation during operation of mobile X-ray machines is described. According to these results, the controlled area has been definitely fixed by the National Board of Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection with respect to the following fields of application: stomatology, mobile radiography of patients confined to bed as well as performing radiological examinations in the operating theatre.

  5. Computer assisted analysis of medical x-ray images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson, Ewert

    1996-01-01

    X-rays were originally used to expose film. The early computers did not have enough capacity to handle images with useful resolution. The rapid development of computer technology over the last few decades has, however, led to the introduction of computers into radiology. In this overview paper, the various possible roles of computers in radiology are examined. The state of the art is briefly presented, and some predictions about the future are made.

  6. Russian medical X-ray engineering is confidently going into the year 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chikirdin, Eh.G.

    2000-01-01

    The achievements of the national medical X-ray technique are analyzed on the basis of the materials of the International exhibition Public health-99 which took place in November-December 1999, are analyzed. Great attention of the enterprises-developers was paid to fluorographic-digital equipment due to actuality of the lungs tuberculosis control in Russia. The characteristics for several fluorographic digital facilities, wherein by high technical characteristics it proves possible to improve the design and obtain low radiation doses for the patients and sufficiently low cost of the equipment, are presented. The characteristics of mobile facilities for X-ray diagnostics, including a fluorograph, mammograph, dental X-ray apparatus, are also presented. The attention was also paid to a X-ray diagnostic complex, feed devices, phantom sets, tomograph, dental apparatus and other developments in the area of X-ray technique. The outlooks for developments in the area of the national medical Xray technique are noted [ru

  7. ASSESSMENT OF RESTORATION METHODS OF X-RAY IMAGES WITH EMPHASIS ON MEDICAL PHOTOGRAMMETRIC USAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hosseinian

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, various medical X-ray imaging methods such as digital radiography, computed tomography and fluoroscopy are used as important tools in diagnostic and operative processes especially in the computer and robotic assisted surgeries. The procedures of extracting information from these images require appropriate deblurring and denoising processes on the pre- and intra-operative images in order to obtain more accurate information. This issue becomes more considerable when the X-ray images are planned to be employed in the photogrammetric processes for 3D reconstruction from multi-view X-ray images since, accurate data should be extracted from images for 3D modelling and the quality of X-ray images affects directly on the results of the algorithms. For restoration of X-ray images, it is essential to consider the nature and characteristics of these kinds of images. X-ray images exhibit severe quantum noise due to limited X-ray photons involved. The assumptions of Gaussian modelling are not appropriate for photon-limited images such as X-ray images, because of the nature of signal-dependant quantum noise. These images are generally modelled by Poisson distribution which is the most common model for low-intensity imaging. In this paper, existing methods are evaluated. For this purpose, after demonstrating the properties of medical X-ray images, the more efficient and recommended methods for restoration of X-ray images would be described and assessed. After explaining these approaches, they are implemented on samples from different kinds of X-ray images. By considering the results, it is concluded that using PURE-LET, provides more effective and efficient denoising than other examined methods in this research.

  8. The analysis of distribution of the chromosome aberration breakpoints from medical diagnostic X-ray workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qin; Li Jin; Tang Weisheng; Wang Zhiquan

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the distribution of the chromosome aberration breakpoints from medical diagnostic x-ray workers. Methods: The breakpoints of lymphocyte chromosomes are analyzed using G-banding. Results: There are 146 breakpoints among 3545 metaphase in 37 cases of X-ray workers. There are statistically significant differences between observed values and expected values (χ 2 =42.82, df=23, P 0.05). Conclusion: The chromosome aberration breakpoints of medical diagnostic X-ray workers are non-random. The observed values of breakpoint numbers are higher than those of the expected values in 7 and 14 chromosomes (P<0.05)

  9. Noise removal for medical X-ray images in wavelet domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ling; Lu, Jianming; Li, Yeqiu; Yahagi, Takashi; Okamoto, Takahide

    2006-01-01

    Many important problems in engineering and science are well-modeled by Poisson noise, the noise of medical X-ray image is Poisson noise. In this paper, we propose a method of noise removal for degraded medical X-ray image using improved preprocessing and improved BayesShrink (IBS) method in wavelet domain. Firstly, we pre-process the medical X-ray image, Secondly, we apply the Daubechies (db) wavelet transform to medical X-ray image to acquire scaling and wavelet coefficients. Thirdly, we apply the proposed IBS method to process wavelet coefficients. Finally, we compute the inverse wavelet transform for the thresholded coefficeints. Experimental results show that the proposed method always outperforms traditional methods. (author)

  10. An MCNP-based model of a medical linear accelerator x-ray photon beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajaj, F A; Ghassal, N M

    2003-09-01

    The major components in the x-ray photon beam path of the treatment head of the VARIAN Clinac 2300 EX medical linear accelerator were modeled and simulated using the Monte Carlo N-Particle radiation transport computer code (MCNP). Simulated components include x-ray target, primary conical collimator, x-ray beam flattening filter and secondary collimators. X-ray photon energy spectra and angular distributions were calculated using the model. The x-ray beam emerging from the secondary collimators were scored by considering the total x-ray spectra from the target as the source of x-rays at the target position. The depth dose distribution and dose profiles at different depths and field sizes have been calculated at a nominal operating potential of 6 MV and found to be within acceptable limits. It is concluded that accurate specification of the component dimensions, composition and nominal accelerating potential gives a good assessment of the x-ray energy spectra.

  11. Clinical studies on health conditions of medical diagnostic X-ray workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Liqun

    1984-01-01

    The results of investigations on general health conditions of 2484 medical X-ray workers and 1718 controls were reported. It was shown that the incidences of neurasthenic syndrome, loss of appetite, baldness etc. in X-ray workers were statistically higher than those in controls. Chronic rhinitis, pharyngitis, and paranasal sinusitis also occurred more frequently in the former group. The blood pressure, pulse rate, capillary resistance and past medical history showed no significant difference between these two groups. (Author)

  12. Clinical studies on health conditions of medical diagnostic X-ray workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liqun, Liu

    1984-10-01

    The results of investigations on general health conditions of 2484 medical X-ray workers and 1718 controls were reported. It was shown that the incidences of neurasthenic syndrome, loss of appetite, baldness etc. in X-ray workers were statistically higher than those in controls. Chronic rhinitis, pharyngitis, and paranasal sinusitis also occurred more frequently in the former group. The blood pressure, pulse rate, capillary resistance and past medical history showed no significant difference between these two groups. (Author).

  13. Exposure doses of the patient and the medical staff during urological X-ray examens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, H.; Loehr, H.; Haug, P.; Schuett, B.

    1977-01-01

    During 32 intravenous urografies and 48 angiografies of the kidney and the suprarenal glands the X-ray doses at the patient's skin and gonades were determined. During the angiografies the doses were mesured at the hands. the gonades and the front (eyes) of the medical staff. The results are discussed. Because the X-ray doses are relatively high, the number of the pictures and the exposure time is to be reduced to the minimum. Clinical experience and special knowledge is the best X-ray protection. (orig.) [de

  14. Combination use of lentinan with x-ray therapy in mouse experimental tumor system, (3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiio, Tsuyoshi; Ohishi, Kazuo; Niitsu, Iwayasu; Hayashibara, Hiromi; Tsuchiya, Yoshiharu; Yoshihama, Takashi; Moriyuki, Hirobumi

    1988-01-01

    Combination effect of lentinan with X-ray irradiation on the metastatic mouse tumors, L1210, KLN205 and Lewis lung carcinoma were studied. Combination use of lentinan with X-ray therapy prolonged the life of BDF 1 mice bearing L1210 leukemia in the suitable combination conditions. Combination effects of lentinan with X-ray therapy were also observed on the suppression of the growth of KLN205 squamus cell carcinoma and on the suppression of the metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma. Especially, in the case that lentinan was administered before or after X-ray local irradiation in the pulmorary metastasis system of Lewis lung carcinoma, a marked suppressin of pulmonary metastasis was observed and 2 to 4 mice among 8 tested mice were tumor free. (author)

  15. Future of X-ray phase imaging in medical imaging technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momose, Atsushi

    2007-01-01

    Weakly absorbing materials, such as biological, soft tissues, can be imaged by generating contrast due to the phase shift of X-rays. In the past decade, several methods for X-ray phase imaging were proposed and demonstrated. The performance of X-ray phase imaging is attractive in the field of medical imaging technology, and its development for practical use is expected. Many methods, however, have been developed under the assumption of the use of synchrotron radiation, which is an obstacle to practical use. The method based on Talbot (-Lau) interferometry enables us to use a compact X-ray source, and its development is expected as a breakthrough for medical applications. (author)

  16. Noncancer death for medical diagnostic X-ray workers in China, 1950-1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Weihua; Wang Jixian; Li Benxiao; Zhao Yongcheng; Zhang Jingyuan

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate occupational radiation exposure effects on human non-cancer diseases. Methods: A cohort study for medical diagnostic X-ray workers and medical workers who never engaged in X-ray work was carried out. Results: The significantly enhanced noncancer deaths for X-ray workers were showed as follows: ischemic heart disease, RR was 1.39 ( P < 0.01 ); cerebrovascular disease, RR = 1.36 ( P < 0.01 ); aplastic anemia, RR = 10.35 (P < 0.01 ); disease of the nervous system, RR = 2.06 (P < 0.01); disease of the skin and subcutaneous tissues, RR = 3.23 (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Long-term occupational X-ray irradiation can enhance the overall risk of deaths, in which, risk for heart disease, cerebrovascular disease and aplastic anemia deaths may significantly related to the occupational exposure

  17. Determination of protective concrete thickness for medical application of X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogbanje, G. O.

    2011-01-01

    Work was carried out to determine the appropriate thickness of concrete block that would be sufficient to protect the radiation worker and the public from X-rays for medical purpose. The results obtained from four X-ray machines are discussed. However, a minimum thickness of 36.0cm of concrete block was found to be sufficient to protect the two groups mentioned here.

  18. Photodynamic synchrotron x-ray therapy in Glioma cell using superparamagnetic iron nanoparticle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hong-Tae; Kim, Ki-Hong; Choi, Gi-Hwan; Jheon, Sanghoon; Park, Sung-Hwan; Kim, Bong-Il; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Ando, Masami; Kim, Jong-Ki

    2009-06-01

    In order to evaluate cytotoxic effects of secondary Auger electron emission(Photon Activation Therapy:PAT) from alginate-coated iron nanoparticles(Alg-SNP), Alg-SNP-uptaken C6 glioma cell lines were irradiated with 6.89/7.2 Kev synchrotron X-ray. 0-125 Gy were irradiated on three experimental groups including No-SNP group incubating without SNP as control group, 6hr-SNP group incubating with SNP for 6hr and ON-SNP group incubating with SNP overnight. Irradiated cells were stained with Acridine Orange(AO) and Edithium Bromide(EB) to count their viability with fluorescent microscopy in comparison with control groups. AO stained in damaged DNA, giving FL color change in X-ray plus SNP group. EB did not or less enter inside the cell nucleus of control group. In contrast, EB entered inside the cell nucleus of Alg-SNP group which means more damage compared with Control groups. The results of MTT assay demonstrated a X-ray dose-dependent reduction generally in cell viability in the experimental groups. 3 or 9 times increase in cell survival loss rate was observed at 6hr-SNP and ON-SNP groups, respectively compared to No-SNP control group in first experiment that was done to test cell survival rate at relatively lower dose, from 0 to 50 Gy. In second experiment X-ray dose was increased to 125 Gy. Survival loss was sharply decreased in a relatively lower dose from 5 to 25 Gy, and then demonstrated an exponentially decreasing behavior with a convergence until 125 Gy for each group. This observation suggests PAT effects on the cell directly by X-ray in the presence of Alg-SNP occurs within lower X-ray dose, and conventional X-ray radiation effect becomes dominant in higher X-ray dose. The cell viability loss of ON-SNP group was three times higher compared with that of 6hr-SNP group. In conclusion, it is possible to design photodynamic X-ray therapy study using a monochromatic x-ray energy and metal nanoparticle as x-ray sensitizer, which may enable new X-ray PDT to

  19. Use of silicon microstrip detectors in medical diagnostic x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabal Rodriguez, Ana Ester

    2004-11-01

    This work presents the development and characterization of a single photon counting system based on silicon microstrip detectors, used in High Energy Physics experiments, and on low noise multichannel readout electronics. The thesis evaluates the feasibility of dual energy X-ray imaging with silicon microstrip detectors to be applied on medical diagnosis. Dual energy mammographic and angiographic experimental tests have been performed using the developed counting systems proto types, properly phantoms and quasi-monochromatic X ray beams, obtained on a compact dichromatic source based on a conventional X-ray tube and a mosaic crystal. A Monte Carlo simulation of the performance of the experimental setup for dual X-ray imaging has also been carried out using MCNP-4C transport code. We obtained good agreement between MCNP results and the experimental data. (Author)

  20. Development of a fluorescent x-ray source for medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyofuku, F.; Tokumori, K.; Nishimura, K.; Saito, T.; Takeda, T.; Itai, Y.; Hyodo, K.; Ando, M.; Endo, M.; Naito, H.; Uyama, C.

    1995-02-01

    A fluorescent x-ray source for medical imaging, such as K-edge subtraction angiography and monochromatic x-ray CT, has been developed. Using a 6.5 GeV accumulation ring in Tsukuba, fluorescent x rays, which range from about 30 to 70 keV are generated by irradiating several target materials. Measurements have been made of output intensities and energy spectra for different target angles and extraction angles. The intensities of fluorescent x rays at a 30 mA beam current are on the order of 1-3×106 photons/mm2/s at 30 cm from the local spot where the incident beam is collimated to 1 mm2. A phantom which contains three different contrast media (iodine, barium, gadolinium) was used for the K-edge energy subtraction, and element selective CT images were obtained.

  1. Analysis of monochromatic and quasi-monochromatic X-ray sources in imaging and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, Maximillian; Lim, Sara; Nahar, Sultana; Orban, Christopher; Pradhan, Anil

    2017-04-01

    We studied biomedical imaging and therapeutic applications of recently developed quasi-monochromatic and monochromatic X-ray sources. Using the Monte Carlo code GEANT4, we found that the quasi-monochromatic 65 keV Gaussian X-ray spectrum created by inverse Compton scattering with relatavistic electron beams were capable of producing better image contrast with less radiation compared to conventional 120 kV broadband CT scans. We also explored possible experimental detection of theoretically predicted K α resonance fluorescence in high-Z elements using the European Synchrotron Research Facility with a tungsten (Z = 74) target. In addition, we studied a newly developed quasi-monochromatic source generated by converting broadband X-rays to monochromatic K α and β X-rays with a zirconium target (Z = 40). We will further study how these K α and K β dominated spectra can be implemented in conjunction with nanoparticles for targeted therapy. Acknowledgement: Ohio Supercomputer Center, Columbus, OH.

  2. Generation of high brightness x-ray source and its medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Sadao; Muro, Mikio; Oku, Yasunari; Daido, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Kenjiro

    2001-01-01

    Laser produced plasmas are one of the most feasible sources to be used for industrial applications, especially medical applications: Angiography, Protein crystallography, X-ray microscopy and XAFS. In the present paper, laser requirements are clarified for the medical and life science fields and then we estimate both the photon energy spectra and the number of photons based on Monte-Carlo simulation. (author)

  3. Retrospective Dose Reconstruction for Medical Diagnostic X Ray Workers in China using Stable Chromosome Aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Q.; Liu, P.; Li, J.; Wang, Q.; Tang, S.; Sun, M.; Wang, L.; Aoyama, T.; Sugahara, T.

    1998-01-01

    The chromosome rearrangements in medical diagnostic X ray workers were analysed using the G-banding technique and evaluated collectively in accumulated doses. A total of 9102 metaphase spreads from 84 medical diagnostic X ray workers and 17 controls were scored. The results showed that: (1) the frequencies of translocation, stable chromosome aberration and total aberration in X ray workers were significantly higher than those of controls (P < 0.05 γ 0.005), unstable chromosome aberrations (including dicentric and acentric aberration) tended upwards; (2) the main aberration in stable aberrations was reciprocal translocation; (3) the stable aberration predominated strikingly in total aberrations. The medical diagnostic X ray workers were divided into three groups according to calendar year of entry. The data showed that the frequencies of translocation, stable aberration and total aberration increased with earlier year of entry, especially in two groups who started working before 1970. According to the equation recommended by Straume et al, linear coefficient (α) in the linear quadratic model provided by Fernandez's experiment, their collective accumulation doses calculated were 0.53, 0.26 and 0.06 Gy for calendar year of entry before 1960, 1960-1969, and after 1970, in X ray workers, respectively. (author)

  4. Biodosimetry for medical diagnostic X-ray workers using stable chromosome aberration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhiquan; Liu Xuping; Li Jin

    1996-01-01

    The stable chromosome aberrations of medical diagnostic X-ray workers were analyzed using G-banding and their accumulative doses were evaluated. The results showed that the frequencies of reciprocal translocation, stable aberration and total aberration among the 4417 metaphase spread from 44 cases of medical diagnostic X-ray workers were distinctly higher than control values (P<0.05∼0.005). The stable aberration predominated strikingly in total aberration and reciprocal translocation was 57% in the stable aberrations. The medical diagnostic X-ray workers were divided into 3 groups according to calendar year of entry. The data showed that the frequencies of total aberration, stable aberration and reciprocal translocation increased with working years, especially in two groups who started working before 1970, there are statistically significant differences between the calendar year of entry before 1960 and 1960∼1969 in X-ray workers and control group. According to the equation recommended by Straume, linear coefficient (α) in linear quadratic model recommended by Schmid and the transformation coefficient by Lucas, the accumulative doses calculated are 0.58, 0.37 and 0.07 Gy for calendar year of entry before 1960, 1960∼1969 and after 1970 in X-ray workers, respectively

  5. Analysis of environmental impact assessment for large-scale X-ray medical equipments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Jin; Pei Chengkai

    2011-01-01

    Based on an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) project, this paper elaborates the basic analysis essentials of EIA for the sales project of large-scale X-ray medical equipment, and provides the analysis procedure of environmental impact and dose estimation method under normal and accident conditions. The key points of EIA for the sales project of large-scale X-ray medical equipment include the determination of pollution factor and management limit value according to the project's actual situation, the utilization of various methods of assessment and prediction such as analogy, actual measurement and calculation to analyze, monitor, calculate and predict the pollution during normal and accident condition. (authors)

  6. Modification of a Superficial X-Ray Therapy Machine for Rectal Contact Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barish, Robert J.; Donohue, Karen Episcopia

    2015-01-15

    X-ray therapy of superficial rectal cancers using a hand-held 50 kV contact unit (Philips RT-50) in a technique first described by Papillon had reached a point of widening clinical acceptability when the manufacturer of this equipment discontinued its production. To pursue this endocavitary approach to rectal therapy, technical modifications have to be made to conventional superficial x-ray therapy machines. Advantages over the original Papillon method include remote viewing of the lesion through the proctoscopic cone and a lower radiation exposure for the operator. We have evaluated a Bucky Combination Therapy Unit under conditions in which the operating voltage (65 kV), target skin distance (23.6 cm), and added filtration (0.39 mm Al) were selected in order to match as closely as possible the beam penetration characteristics of the “standard” (Papillon) technique. With this equipment, the thermal characteristics of the tube anode and housing limit the amount of radiation that can be delivered before a “rest period” for the machine is needed. In practice, 3 minutes of irradiation at an exposure rate of 500 R/min can be performed followed by an interval of 3 minutes before irradiation can be resumed.

  7. Effects of job stress on hypertension among medical diagnostic X-ray workers in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Zhigang; Wang Jixian; Zhao Yongcheng; Zhang Wei

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the relation between job stress and hypertension among medical diagnostic x-ray workers in China. Methods: A total of 264 confirmed cases of hypertension were selected among medical diagnostic X-ray workers from 10 provinces and cities. A case-control study with 1:2 matched pair was conducted. Job stress was defined according to Siegrist effort-reward imbalance model. Results: High imbalance ,high overcommitment and severe work environment were associated with enhanced hypertension risk significantly. The OR was 1.848 (P=0.018), 2.058 (P=0.000) and 1.797 (P=0.008) for imbalance, overcommitment and severe work environment, respectively. After controlling other risk factors, the relation still remained significant. Conclusion: The main work-related risk factors causing hypertension among diagnostic X-ray workers are effort-reward imbalance, overcommitment and severe work environment. (authors)

  8. Simulations of X-ray synchrotron beams using the EGS4 code system in medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orion, I.; Henn, A.; Sagi, I.; Dilmanian, F.A.; Pena, L.; Rosenfeld, A.B.

    2001-01-01

    X-ray synchrotron beams are commonly used in biological and medical research. The availability of intense, polarized low-energy photons from the synchrotron beams provides a high dose transfer to biological materials. The EGS4 code system, which includes the photoelectron angular distribution, electron motion inside a magnetic field, and the LSCAT package, found to be the appropriate Monte Carlo code for synchrotron-produced X-ray simulations. The LSCAT package was developed in 1995 for the EGS4 code to contain the routines to simulate the linear polarization, the bound Compton, and the incoherent scattering functions. Three medical applications were demonstrated using the EGS4 Monte Carlo code as a proficient simulation code system for the synchrotron low-energy X-ray source. (orig.)

  9. On the limitations and optimisation of high-resolution 3D medical X-ray imaging systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Shuang; Brahme, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Based on a quantitative analysis of both attenuation and refractive properties of X-ray propagation in human body tissues and the introduction of a mathematical model for image quality analysis, some limitations and optimisation of high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) medical X-ray imaging techniques are studied. A comparison is made of conventional attenuation-based X-ray imaging methods with the phase-contrast X-ray imaging modalities that have been developed recently. The results indicate that it is theoretically possible through optimal design of the X-ray imaging system to achieve high spatial resolution (<100 μm) in 3D medical X-ray imaging of the human body at a clinically acceptable dose level (<10 mGy) by introducing a phase-contrast X-ray imaging technique.

  10. Image quality assessment and medical physics evaluation of different portable dental X-ray units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittayapat, Pisha; Oliveira-Santos, Christiano; Thevissen, Patrick; Michielsen, Koen; Bergans, Niki; Willems, Guy; Debruyckere, Deborah; Jacobs, Reinhilde

    2010-09-10

    Recently developed portable dental X-ray units increase the mobility of the forensic odontologists and allow more efficient X-ray work in a disaster field, especially when used in combination with digital sensors. This type of machines might also have potential for application in remote areas, military and humanitarian missions, dental care of patients with mobility limitation, as well as imaging in operating rooms. To evaluate radiographic image quality acquired by three portable X-ray devices in combination with four image receptors and to evaluate their medical physics parameters. Images of five samples consisting of four teeth and one formalin-fixed mandible were acquired by one conventional wall-mounted X-ray unit, MinRay 60/70 kVp, used as a clinical standard, and three portable dental X-ray devices: AnyRay 60 kVp, Nomad 60 kVp and Rextar 70 kVp, in combination with a phosphor image plate (PSP), a CCD, or a CMOS sensor. Three observers evaluated images for standard image quality besides forensic diagnostic quality on a 4-point rating scale. Furthermore, all machines underwent tests for occupational as well as patient dosimetry. Statistical analysis showed good quality imaging for all system, with the combination of Nomad and PSP yielding the best score. A significant difference in image quality between the combination of the four X-ray devices and four sensors was established (p1m: Rextar <0.2 microGy, MinRay <0.1 microGy). The present study demonstrated the feasibility of three portable X-ray systems to be used for specific indications, based on acceptable image quality and sufficient accuracy of the machines and following the standard guidelines for radiation hygiene. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of dose to tooth enamel from medical diagnostic X-ray examinations at Mayak PA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieser, A., E-mail: wieser@helmholtz-muenchen.de [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen - German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Vasilenko, E. [Mayak Production Association, 456780 Ozyorsk (Russian Federation); Zankl, M.; Greiter, M.; Ulanovsky, A. [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen - German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Sabayev, A.; Knyazev, V.; Zahrov, P. [Mayak Production Association, 456780 Ozyorsk (Russian Federation)

    2011-09-15

    The nuclear workers of the Mayak Production Association had regular check-ups including medical diagnostic X-ray examinations since start of the production lines in 1948. Doses from diagnostic examinations need to be considered in reconstruction of occupational doses of the workers with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of tooth enamel. The numbers and types of examinations of an individual worker can be assessed from the Mayak PA archives but no information was available on doses delivered to teeth by a single specific examination. Of the twenty one applied examination procedures only three affected the teeth, these being X-ray examinations of teeth, skull and cervical spine. For these three kinds of examinations operational procedures and operating modes of X-ray units were compiled from the archive and photon spectra were obtained from a catalog of spectral data for diagnostic X-rays. Entrance doses in air kerma were calculated using the fluence of photon spectra and absorbed dose in tooth enamel for various tooth positions and exposure geometry was then calculated using dose conversion coefficients obtained from Monte Carlo simulations. Doses were calculated for examinations in 1948-2000. Except for examination of the skull, absorbed doses in enamel of incisors were found to be about twice as large as in enamel of molars. In the period before 1970 the largest mean absorbed doses in tooth enamel were due to X-ray examination of teeth, with 64 mGy and 34 mGy calculated for incisors and molars, respectively. In the same period the lowest mean doses were due to X-ray examination of the skull, with 11 mGy and 12 mGy calculated for incisors and molars, respectively. In the period from 1970 to 2000, largest mean doses in enamel were due to X-ray examination of cervical spine, with 23 mGy and 12 mGy calculated for incisors and molars, respectively.

  12. Fabrication of applicator system of miniature X-ray tube based on carbon nanotubes for a skin cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Han Beom; Kim, Hyun Jin; Lee, Ju Hyuk; Ha, Jun Mok; Cho, Sung Oh

    2016-01-01

    A miniature X-ray tube is a small X-ray generation device generally with a diameter of less than 10 mm. Because of the feasible installation in a spatially constrained area and the possibility of electrical on/off control, miniature X-ray tubes can be widely used for nondestructive X-ray radiography, hand held X-ray spectrometers, electric brachytherapy, and interstitial or intracavitary radiation therapy or imaging with the substitution of radioactive isotopes. Miniature X-ray tubes have been developed mostly using thermionic electron sources or secondary X-ray emission. The X-ray tube show excellent field emission properties and good X-ray spectrum. Also, the flattening filter was made to irradiate uniformly. The X-ray dose radial uniformities between installed flattening filter and non-installed flattening filter were measured. When flattening filter is equipped, X-ray uniformity was improved from higher than 20% to lower than 10%. As a result, the fabricated applicator system of the miniature X-ray tube using optimized flattening filter exhibited fairly excellent properties

  13. Detective quantum efficiency of medical x-ray image intensifiers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Thirlwall, JT

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available -energyphotons,thevariancesofstagesafterthe photoemitterhavenegligiblein?uenc eonthevalueofBand thesehavebeenomittedfromthecalculationsreportedhere. Ithasbeenpointedout,however,11 thatwithanintensex-ray input,theXRIIoutputsignalmayhavetobeattenuated,for examplewithanirisintheopticalcomponents....W.ArndtandD.J.Gilmore,J.Appl.Crystallogr.12,1~1979!. 9 M.Stanton,W.Phillips,Y.Li,andK.Kalata,J.Appl.Crystallogr.25, 638~1992!. 10 W.KuhlandJ.E.Schrijvers,Medicamundi22,6~1977!. 11 A.Makovski,MedicalImagingSystems~Prentice?Hall,Englewood Cliffs,NJ,1983!,p.87. 12 S...

  14. Frequency of medical and dental x-ray examinations in the UK. 1997/98

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, R.; Wall, B.; Shrimpton, P.

    2000-12-01

    A survey has been performed to assess the numbers of all types of radiological x-ray examination conducted in the UK during the period from April 1997 to March 1998. The survey covers all diagnostic and interventional procedures using x-rays for medical and dental purposes, both within and outside the National Health Service (NHS), but excludes a detailed analysis of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound and nuclear medicine. This is the first such national survey conducted by NRPB since 1983. The results provide a current picture of the pattern of medical x-ray imaging practice in the UK and will allow revised estimates to be made of the collective dose to the population from these procedures. The survey has utilised detailed information available from radiology management systems at a selected sample of 38 English NHS trusts. The different classifications of x-ray procedure have been re-arranged into 62 standardised categories based on anatomical location and whether they were conventional, computed tomography (CT) or interventional procedures. Extrapolation of the sample data to the whole of England was carried out using broad NHS radiology statistics (KH12 returns) for the period of the survey from the Department of Health. Additional data have been obtained covering NHS radiology practice in Wales and Northern Ireland and also for x-ray imaging practice outside NHS hospitals such as that performed in independent hospitals and by dentists and chiropractors. Results are presented giving the annual numbers and relative frequencies of x-ray examinations in the 62 categories and the contributions from radiology practice outside NHS hospitals and from the whole of the UK. Altogether, about 41.5 million medical and dental x-ray examinations were conducted in the UK in 1997/98, corresponding to 704 examinations per 1000 inhabitants. The increase since 1983 for medical examinations conducted in NHS hospitals has just kept pace with the increase in population

  15. The introduction of compulsory compliance testing of medical diagnostic x-ray equipment in Western Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafferty, M. W.; Jacob, C. S.

    1995-01-01

    Performance testing of medical diagnostic X-ray equipment can reveal equipment faults which, while not always clinically detectable, may contribute to reduced image quality and unnecessary radiation exposure of both patients and staff. Routine testing of such equipment is highly desirable to identify such faults and allows them to be rectified. The Radiological council of Western Australia is moving towards requiring compulsory compliance testing of all (new and existing) medical diagnostic X-ray equipment that all new mobile radiographic and new mammographic X-ray equipment be issued with a compliance test certificate as a prerequisite for registration. Workbooks which provide details of the tests required and recommended test methods have been prepared for medical radiographic (mobile and fixed), fluoroscopic and mammographic X-ray equipment. It is intended that future workbooks include details of the tests and methods for dental and computed tomography X-ray units. The workbooks are not limited to the compliance testing of items as specified in the Regulations, but include tests for other items such as film processing, darkrooms and image quality (for fluoroscopic equipment). Many of the workbook tests could be used within a regular quality assurance program for diagnostic X-ray equipment. Persons who conduct such compliance tests will need to be licensed and have all test certificates endorsed by a qualified expert. Suitable training and assessment of compliance testers will be required. Notification of such tests (including non-compliant items and corrective actions taken) will be required by the Radiological Council as a condition of equipment registration. 9 refs

  16. Skin reactions and quality of life after x-ray therapy of Basal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skiveren, Jette; Mikkelsen, Maria Rudkjaer; Daugbjerg, Helle

    2012-01-01

    controls (P = 0.819). Three months after X-ray therapy eight patients had no skin reactions, 11 had slight atrophy, pigmentation change, and/or some hair loss, four had patch atrophy, moderate telangiectasia, and/or total hair loss. Conclusions. BCC has a negative effect on patients' quality of life...

  17. Pomegranate Intake Protects Against Genomic Instability Induced by Medical X-rays In Vivo in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallanthighal, Sameera; Shirode, Amit B; Judd, Julius A; Reliene, Ramune

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is a well-documented human carcinogen. The increased use of IR in medical procedures has doubled the annual radiation dose and may increase cancer risk. Genomic instability is an intermediate lesion in IR-induced cancer. We examined whether pomegranate extract (PE) suppresses genomic instability induced by x-rays. Mice were treated orally with PE and exposed to an x-ray dose of 2 Gy. PE intake suppressed x-ray-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in peripheral blood and chromosomal damage in bone marrow. We hypothesized that PE-mediated protection against x-ray-induced damage may be due to the upregulation of DSB repair and antioxidant enzymes and/or increase in glutathione (GSH) levels. We found that expression of DSB repair genes was not altered (Nbs1 and Rad50) or was reduced (Mre11, DNA-PKcs, Ku80, Rad51, Rad52 and Brca2) in the liver of PE-treated mice. Likewise, mRNA levels of antioxidant enzymes were reduced (Gpx1, Cat, and Sod2) or were not altered (HO-1 and Sod1) as a function of PE treatment. In contrast, PE-treated mice with and without IR exposure displayed higher hepatic GSH concentrations than controls. Thus, ingestion of pomegranate polyphenols is associated with inhibition of x-ray-induced genomic instability and elevated GSH, which may reduce cancer risk.

  18. A color display device recording X ray spectra, especially intended for medical radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulch, J.-M.

    1975-01-01

    Said invention relates to a color display recording device for X ray spectra intended for medical radiography. The video signal of the X ray camera receiving the radiation having passed through the patient is amplified and transformed into a color coding according to the energy spectrum received by the camera. In a first version, the energy spectrum from the camera gives directly an image on the color tube. In a second version the energy spectrum, after having been transformed into digital signals, is first sent into a memory, then into a computer used as a spectrum analyzer, and finally into the color display device [fr

  19. X-Band Linac Beam-Line for Medical Compton Scattering X-Ray Source

    CERN Document Server

    Dobashi, Katsuhiro; Ebina, Futaro; Fukasawa, Atsushi; Hayano, Hitoshi; Higo, Toshiyasu; Kaneyasu, Tatsuo; Ogino, Haruyuki; Sakamoto, Fumito; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Urakawa, Junji; Yamamoto, Tomohiko

    2005-01-01

    Compton scattering hard X-ray source for 10~80 keV are under construction using the X-band (11.424 GHz) electron linear accelerator and YAG laser at Nuclear Engineering Research laboratory, University of Tokyo. This work is a part of the national project on the development of advanced compact medical accelerators in Japan. National Institute for Radiological Science is the host institute and U. Tokyo and KEK are working for the X-ray source. Main advantage is to produce tunable monochromatic hard ( 10-80

  20. Hard X-Ray Phase-Contrast Imaging for Medical Applications - Physicist's Dream or Radiologist's Mainstream?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkins, S. W.; Gureyev, T. E.; Mayo, S. C.; Nesterets, Ya. I.; Pogany, A.; Stevenson, A. W.; Paganin, D. M.

    2007-01-01

    We briefly review currently practiced methods of X-ray phase contrast imaging and consider some of their relative features, especially in regard to applicability to clinical medical studies. Various related technological issues and promising future areas of development are also briefly discussed

  1. Patient dose evaluations from medical X-ray exposure in Italy: an analysis of next data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchetti, A.; Paganini, F.M.; Susanna, A.

    1980-01-01

    NEXT (Nationwide Evaluation of X-ray Trends) is a program for the evaluation of patient exposure in X-ray diagnostic tests. The program is aimed at reducing patient exposure by pin-pointing poor radiological techniques and improving them. CNEN (Comitato Nazionale per l'Energia Nucleare) and ISS (Istituto Superiore di Sanita) have been developing such a program in Italy since 1976. Up to now two regional administrations applied the method and regional operators collected the needed data in all the medical institutions in their areas. The results show a wide spread of values for all the parameters studied in the 12 X-ray projections selected. Gonad dose and skin entrance exposure were found to be spread over a range up to about two orders of magnitude. (H.K.)

  2. An engineering development of fluoroscopic X-ray medical equipment based-on fluorescent screen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferry Suyatno; I Putu Susila; Djoko Sukmono

    2011-01-01

    Fluoroscopic x-ray medical equipment uses fluorescent screen to capture structural image of organs. Unlike conventional x-ray equipment which uses film, in the fluoroscopic x-ray, the resulting image is visualized on the fluorescent screen and directly observed by physicians in the patients' rooms. In this study, we developed an image capture system that transforms the image on the fluorescent screen into digital data, which is then transferred to computer for visualization and further processing. By using this system, the observation of the resulting image can be done on a computer that is placed in the control room. The image can also be stored easily and at low cost compared to conventional film. The experiment shows that the system could be used to capture image of the object. However, its quality needs to be improved. In the future, the system will be modified and tested with different types of cameras to obtain better results. (author)

  3. Aspects of the history of X-ray therapy in Austria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyklicky, H [Vienna Univ. (Austria). Inst. fuer Geschichte der Medizin

    1980-02-01

    Even before the turn of the century, the dermatologist Leopold Freund tried to treat a hairy naevus on the back of a child with the rays Roentgen had discovered in 1895 when all known forms of therapy had failed. Loss of hair, as desired, resulted therein. In order to prove that electric currents were not the effective agents, Freund abducted them and treated another part of the naevus pigmentosus piliferus, however, for a longer period in order to compensate for the supposed loss of energy. An ulcer resulted. A number of renowned researchers doubted the biological effect of the X-rays. Freund also began to doubt his original opinion and later even attacked his very own discovery. Only the findings of Robert Kienboeck after having carefully examined them, let Freund accept his former opinion again. Guido Holzknecht, recognized as a pioneer of X-ray diagnosis even before the First World War, occupied himself successfully with X-ray therapy under the influence of Kienboeck. He may be regarded as one of the world's first radiobiologists. Vincenz Czerny, of Austrian origin, and a pupil of Theodor Billroth, became a promotor of the X-ray therapy of malignant blastomas in Heidelberg. K.H. Kaercher, who has been head of the Department of Radiotherapy, Vienna University, for the past ten years is a graduate of this famous school.

  4. Stochastic risk estimation from medical x-ray diagnostic examinations, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashizume, Tadashi; Maruyama, Takashi; Noda, Yutaka; Iwai, Kazuo; Tateno, Y.; Nishizawa, Kanae.

    1981-01-01

    The risks of genetic, leukemia and malignant diseases from medical X-ray diagnostic examinations were estimated using the frequency of radiographic and fluoroscopic exposures per diagnostic examination, child expectancy, leukemia and malignancy significant factors, and using a weighting factor determined on the basis of data concerning the cancer mortality among atomic bomb survivors in Nagasaki and of a recommendation of International Commission of Radiological Protection. The organ or tissue doses with respect to the stochastic risks were determined with ionization chambers and thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the positions of the organs or tissues in a RANDO woman phantom which was exposed to diagnostic X-rays according to technical factors of typical radiographic and fluoroscopic examinations obtained from a nationwide survey. The resultant risks by age-group and type of radiographic and fluoroscopic examination are tabulated in terms of risk level of 10 -6 . In general, the total risk defined as the sum of genetic, leukemia and malignant risks was a high value for the X-ray diagnosis of digestive organs involving barium meal and barium enema. For example, the total risk for young age-group was 100 to 200 x 10 -6 for the X-ray diagnosis of digestive organs. The total risk from the chest radiography was lower value as compared with the risk from the X-ray diagnosis of other organs or tissues. On the contrary, the risk from the chest tomography was comparable to the risk from the diagnosis of digestive organs. The total risk decreased with increasing of age for every X-ray diagnostic examination. (author)

  5. Problems with film processing in medical X-ray imaging in Lithuania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sniureviciute, M.; Adliene, D.

    2005-01-01

    Optimisation in X-ray imaging in order to reduce patient doses during diagnostic X-ray examinations is a complex process given the high level of image quality required. When quality systems are implemented as a basis for optimisation, attention should be paid to the qualifications of the staff and quality control of the equipment and of the X-ray imaging procedures, as well as to the methods used to evaluate the quality of these procedures. Until recently, quality control procedures at health care institutions in Lithuania were limited to the testing of X-ray units. Since film processing is one of the most important factors influencing patient doses and image quality during X-ray examinations, in 2003 the Kaunas department of the Radiation Protection Centre organised inspections of film processing laboratories in 11 health care institutions - hospitals and outpatient departments - in the Kaunas region. Problems of non-compliance with requirements identified during these inspections are discussed in this paper. Most of the health care institutions inspected already had quality assurance programmes. However, the implementation of these programmes was sometimes erratic because of the insufficient attention paid to the film developing processes. The worst situation was found in 4 institutions where the films were developed manually. Only 3 of the 11 departments inspected had sensitometers and densitometers for quality control of the processing. In many cases there was no control of chemicals, film sensitivity and density, or else control was irregular. In only a few departments were the effects of repeated controls investigated and discussed. Despite the current problems occurring in medical X-ray diagnostic departments in Lithuania, the situation is rapidly improving. New equipment is being installed, new devices for quality control are being used and, last but not least, the view of hospital administrators, radiologists and laboratory workers towards quality

  6. Cancer risk analysis among medical diagnostic X-ray workers in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jixian; Li Benxiao; Gao Zhiwei; Xu Jun; Zhang Jingyuan; Aoyama, Takashi; Sugahara, Tsutomu

    1997-01-01

    To provide the evidence and related rules of human malignant tumors produced by prolonged exposure to low level ionizing radiation. The cancer incidence (1950-1990) among 27011 medical diagnostic X-ray workers was compared with that among 25782 other medical specialists employed between 1950 and 1980 in China by means of O/E system. A significantly elevated risk of cancer was seen among diagnostic x-ray workers (RR = 1.1,95%Cl:1.0-1.2,P <0.05). Significantly elevated risks were seen for leukemia and cancers of skin, female breast, liver and esophagus, the RR being 2.3, 5.0, 1.6, 1.3 and 4.4 respectively. The RR for leukemia was higher for X-ray workers who began employment before 1970 and also for those who were young when employment began. The patterns of risk associated with length of service and with age and calendar year of initial employment suggest that the excesses of leukemia, skin cancer and female breast cancer were due to occupational exposure to X-rays. The ERR and EAR for leukemia and solid cancer were calculated roughly. (author)

  7. Chromosome translocations in chinese medical X-ray workers analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yuanming; Li Jin; Wang Qin; Tang Weisheng; Wang Zhiquan

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study long-term radiation effect in occupational workers exposed to low dose X-rays using the method of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Method: Chromosome translocations of 25 medical X-ray workers were analyzed by FISH with chromosome No. 4 and No. 7 probes according to PAINT (The Protocol for Aberration Identification and Nomenclature Terminology) system. Results: The frequency of genome translocation in X-ray workers was (13.14 ± 1.23)/1000 cells. The rate of complete and incomplete translocation was 1:1.7. According to the calendar year of entry before/after the year of 1965 as the border, the data showed that the incomplete translocation of the after 1965 group was obviously higher than those of the controls (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05, respectively). Conclusion: The chromosome translocation in early Chinese medical X-ray workers is mainly the incomplete one, the frequency of translocation does not dependent on chromosomal DNA content, and incomplete and complete ones increase along with prolongation of working years in their position

  8. Update of diagnostic medical and dental x-ray exposures in Romania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorop, Ioana; Mossang, Daniela; Dadulescu, Elena [Radiation Hygiene Laboratory of Public Health Authority Dolj, 2, Constantin Lecca Street, Craiova (Romania); Iacob, Mihai Radu [University ' Alexandru Ioan Cuza' , 11, Carol I Street, 700506, Iasi (Romania); Iacob, Olga [Institute of Public Health, 14, Victor Babes Street, 700465 Iasi (Romania)], E-mail: danamossang@sanpubdj.ro

    2008-12-15

    This national study, the third in the last 15 years, updates the magnitude of medical radiation exposure from conventional x-ray examinations, in order to optimise the radiological protection to the population in a cost-effective manner. Effective doses from diagnostic radiology were estimated for adult and paediatric patients undergoing the 20 most important types of x-ray examination. Data were collected from 179 x-ray departments, selected by their annual workload, throughout the country. Estimates were made using two dosimetric quantities: entrance surface dose, derived from the absorbed dose in air measured by simulation of radiographic examinations, and dose-area product, measured during fluoroscopic examinations performed on adult and paediatric patients. Conversion coefficients to effective dose of the UK National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) have been used in all calculations. The effective dose per patient from all medical x-ray examinations was 0.74 mSv and the resulting annual collective effective dose was 6930 man Sv, with annual effective dose per caput of 0.33 mSv. The current size of population exposure from diagnostic radiology is lower than the previous one by 40%, but could be about 30% higher by taking into account the estimated contribution from computed tomography (CT) procedures.

  9. Investigating Students' Ideas About X-rays While Developing Teaching Materials for a Medical Physics Course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalita, Spartak; Zollman, Dean

    2007-01-01

    The goal of the Modern Miracle Medical Machines project is to promote pre-med students' interest in physics by using the context of contemporary medical imaging. The X-ray medical imaging learning module will be a central part of this effort. To investigate students' transfer of learning in this context we have conducted a series of clinical and teaching interviews. In the latter interview, some of the proposed learning materials were used. The students brought to our discussion pieces of knowledge transferred from very different sources such as their own X-ray experiences, previous learning and the mass media. This transfer seems to result in more or less firm mental models which often are not always internally consistent or coherent

  10. Radiological safety status and quality assurance audit of medical X-ray diagnostic installations in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonawane, A U; Singh, Meghraj; Sunil Kumar, J V K; Kulkarni, Arti; Shirva, V K; Pradhan, A S

    2010-10-01

    We conducted a radiological safety and quality assurance (QA) audit of 118 medical X-ray diagnostic machines installed in 45 major hospitals in India. The main objective of the audit was to verify compliance with the regulatory requirements stipulated by the national regulatory body. The audit mainly covered accuracy check of accelerating potential (kVp), linearity of tube current (mA station) and timer, congruence of radiation and optical field, and total filtration; in addition, we also reviewed medical X-ray diagnostic installations with reference to room layout of X-ray machines and conduct of radiological protection survey. A QA kit consisting of a kVp Test-O-Meter (ToM) (Model RAD/FLU-9001), dose Test-O-Meter (ToM) (Model 6001), ionization chamber-based radiation survey meter model Gun Monitor and other standard accessories were used for the required measurements. The important areas where there was noncompliance with the national safety code were: inaccuracy of kVp calibration (23%), lack of congruence of radiation and optical field (23%), nonlinearity of mA station (16%) and timer (9%), improper collimator/diaphragm (19.6%), faulty adjustor knob for alignment of field size (4%), nonavailability of warning light (red light) at the entrance of the X-ray room (29%), and use of mobile protective barriers without lead glass viewing window (14%). The present study on the radiological safety status of diagnostic X-ray installations may be a reasonably good representation of the situation in the country as a whole. The study contributes significantly to the improvement of radiological safety by the way of the steps already taken and by providing a vital feed back to the national regulatory body.

  11. Radiological safety status and quality assurance audit of medical X-ray diagnostic installations in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonawane A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a radiological safety and quality assurance (QA audit of 118 medical X-ray diagnostic machines installed in 45 major hospitals in India. The main objective of the audit was to verify compliance with the regulatory requirements stipulated by the national regulatory body. The audit mainly covered accuracy check of accelerating potential (kVp, linearity of tube current (mA station and timer, congruence of radiation and optical field, and total filtration; in addition, we also reviewed medical X-ray diagnostic installations with reference to room layout of X-ray machines and conduct of radiological protection survey. A QA kit consisting of a kVp Test-O-Meter (ToM (Model RAD/FLU-9001, dose Test-O-Meter (ToM (Model 6001, ionization chamber-based radiation survey meter model Gun Monitor and other standard accessories were used for the required measurements. The important areas where there was noncompliance with the national safety code were: inaccuracy of kVp calibration (23%, lack of congruence of radiation and optical field (23%, nonlinearity of mA station (16% and timer (9%, improper collimator/diaphragm (19.6%, faulty adjustor knob for alignment of field size (4%, nonavailability of warning light (red light at the entrance of the X-ray room (29%, and use of mobile protective barriers without lead glass viewing window (14%. The present study on the radiological safety status of diagnostic X-ray installations may be a reasonably good representation of the situation in the country as a whole. The study contributes significantly to the improvement of radiological safety by the way of the steps already taken and by providing a vital feed back to the national regulatory body.

  12. Radiological safety status and quality assurance audit of medical X-ray diagnostic installations in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonawane, A.U.; Singh, Meghraj; Sunil Kumar, J.V.K.; Kulkarni, Arti; Shirva, V.K.; Pradhan, A.S.

    2010-01-01

    We conducted a radiological safety and quality assurance (QA) audit of 118 medical X-ray diagnostic machines installed in 45 major hospitals in India. The main objective of the audit was to verify compliance with the regulatory requirements stipulated by the national regulatory body. The audit mainly covered accuracy check of accelerating potential (kVp), linearity of tube current (mA station) and timer, congruence of radiation and optical field, and total filtration; in addition, we also reviewed medical X-ray diagnostic installations with reference to room layout of X-ray machines and conduct of radiological protection survey. A QA kit consisting of a kVp Test-O-Meter (ToM) (Model RAD/FLU-9001), dose Test-O-Meter (ToM) (Model 6001), ionization chamber-based radiation survey meter model Gun Monitor and other standard accessories were used for the required measurements. The important areas where there was noncompliance with the national safety code were: inaccuracy of kVp calibration (23%), lack of congruence of radiation and optical field (23%), nonlinearity of mA station (16%) and timer (9%), improper collimator/diaphragm (19.6%), faulty adjustor knob for alignment of field size (4%), nonavailability of warning light (red light) at the entrance of the X-ray room (29%), and use of mobile protective barriers without lead glass viewing window (14%). The present study on the radiological safety status of diagnostic X-ray installations may be a reasonably good representation of the situation in the country as a whole. The study contributes significantly to the improvement of radiological safety by the way of the steps already taken and by providing a vital feed back to the national regulatory body. (author)

  13. Review of medical imaging with emphasis on X-ray detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoheisel, Martin

    2006-07-01

    Medical imaging can be looked at from two different perspectives, the medical and the physical. The medical point of view is application-driven and involves finding the best way of tackling a medical problem through imaging, i.e. either to answer a diagnostic question, or to facilitate a therapy. For this purpose, industry offers a broad spectrum of radiographic, fluoroscopic, and angiographic equipment. The requirements depend on the medical problem: which organs have to be imaged, which details have to be made visible, how to deal with the problem of motion if any, and so forth. In radiography, for instance, large detector sizes of up to 43 cm×43 cm and relatively high energies are needed to image a whole chest. In mammography, pixel sizes between 25 and 70 μm are favorable for good spatial resolution, which is essential for detecting microcalcifications. In cardiology, 30-60 images per second are required to follow the heart's motion. In computed tomography, marginal contrast differences down to one Hounsfield unit have to be resolved. In all cases, but especially in pediatrics, the required radiation dose must be kept as low as reasonably achievable. Moreover, three-dimensional(3D) reconstruction of image data allows much better orientation in the body, permitting a more accurate diagnosis, precise treatment planning, and image-guided therapy. Additional functional information from different modalities is very helpful, information such as perfusion, flow rate, diffusion, oxygen concentration, metabolism, and receptor affinity for specific molecules. To visualize, functional and anatomical information are fused into one combined image. The physical point of view is technology-driven. A choice of different energies from the electromagnetic spectrum is available for imaging; not only X-rays in the range of 10-150 keV, but also γ rays, which are used in nuclear medicine, X-rays in the MeV range, which are used in portal imaging to monitor radiation therapy

  14. Review of medical imaging with emphasis on X-ray detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoheisel, Martin [Siemens AG Medical Solutions, Angiography, Fluoroscopic- and Radiographic Systems, Innovations, Siemensstr.1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany)]. E-mail: martin.hoheisel@siemens.com

    2006-07-01

    Medical imaging can be looked at from two different perspectives, the medical and the physical. The medical point of view is application-driven and involves finding the best way of tackling a medical problem through imaging, i.e. either to answer a diagnostic question, or to facilitate a therapy. For this purpose, industry offers a broad spectrum of radiographic, fluoroscopic, and angiographic equipment. The requirements depend on the medical problem: which organs have to be imaged, which details have to be made visible, how to deal with the problem of motion if any, and so forth. In radiography, for instance, large detector sizes of up to 43 cmx43 cm and relatively high energies are needed to image a whole chest. In mammography, pixel sizes between 25 and 70 {mu}m are favorable for good spatial resolution, which is essential for detecting microcalcifications. In cardiology, 30-60 images per second are required to follow the heart's motion. In computed tomography, marginal contrast differences down to one Hounsfield unit have to be resolved. In all cases, but especially in pediatrics, the required radiation dose must be kept as low as reasonably achievable. Moreover, three-dimensional(3D) reconstruction of image data allows much better orientation in the body, permitting a more accurate diagnosis, precise treatment planning, and image-guided therapy. Additional functional information from different modalities is very helpful, information such as perfusion, flow rate, diffusion, oxygen concentration, metabolism, and receptor affinity for specific molecules. To visualize, functional and anatomical information are fused into one combined image. The physical point of view is technology-driven. A choice of different energies from the electromagnetic spectrum is available for imaging; not only X-rays in the range of 10-150 keV, but also {gamma} rays, which are used in nuclear medicine, X-rays in the MeV range, which are used in portal imaging to monitor radiation

  15. Review of medical imaging with emphasis on X-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoheisel, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Medical imaging can be looked at from two different perspectives, the medical and the physical. The medical point of view is application-driven and involves finding the best way of tackling a medical problem through imaging, i.e. either to answer a diagnostic question, or to facilitate a therapy. For this purpose, industry offers a broad spectrum of radiographic, fluoroscopic, and angiographic equipment. The requirements depend on the medical problem: which organs have to be imaged, which details have to be made visible, how to deal with the problem of motion if any, and so forth. In radiography, for instance, large detector sizes of up to 43 cmx43 cm and relatively high energies are needed to image a whole chest. In mammography, pixel sizes between 25 and 70 μm are favorable for good spatial resolution, which is essential for detecting microcalcifications. In cardiology, 30-60 images per second are required to follow the heart's motion. In computed tomography, marginal contrast differences down to one Hounsfield unit have to be resolved. In all cases, but especially in pediatrics, the required radiation dose must be kept as low as reasonably achievable. Moreover, three-dimensional(3D) reconstruction of image data allows much better orientation in the body, permitting a more accurate diagnosis, precise treatment planning, and image-guided therapy. Additional functional information from different modalities is very helpful, information such as perfusion, flow rate, diffusion, oxygen concentration, metabolism, and receptor affinity for specific molecules. To visualize, functional and anatomical information are fused into one combined image. The physical point of view is technology-driven. A choice of different energies from the electromagnetic spectrum is available for imaging; not only X-rays in the range of 10-150 keV, but also γ rays, which are used in nuclear medicine, X-rays in the MeV range, which are used in portal imaging to monitor radiation therapy

  16. Radiation genetic effects among medical diagnostic X-ray workers in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jixian

    1984-01-01

    A survey of the birth status and offspring's congenital malformations and hereditary diseases of medical diagnostic X-ray workers during 1950-1980 was carried out in 25 provinces of China. The physicians and surgeons in the same hospitals, not exposed to X-rays, were observed as the control group. Analysis was made of the data of 13056 persons and 32348 pregnancies in the irradiated group, and 16925 persons and 41120 pregnancies in the control group. The results show that the main factors which influence the fertility in the irradiated group are much the same as in the control group. The differences of fertility and infertility rate and sex ratio of live births between the two groups are not statistically significant. The spontaneous abortion rate, multiple pregnancy rate and neonatal mortality rate are significantly higher in the irradiated group than those in the control group. The total incidence of 20 kinds of congenital malformations and hereditary diseases among the children of X-ray workers is significantly higher than that among the children of non-X-ray workers (9.19% for the formers and 4.27% for the latters). (Author)

  17. X-band RF gun and linac for medical Compton scattering X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobashi, Katsuhito; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Fukasawa, Atsushi; Sakamoto, Fumito; Ebina, Futaro; Ogino, Haruyuki; Urakawa, Junji; Higo, Toshiyasu; Akemoto, Mitsuo; Hayano, Hitoshi; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2004-12-01

    Compton scattering hard X-ray source for 10-80 keV are under construction using the X-band (11.424 GHz) electron linear accelerator and YAG laser at Nuclear Engineering Research laboratory, University of Tokyo. This work is a part of the national project on the development of advanced compact medical accelerators in Japan. National Institute for Radiological Science is the host institute and U.Tokyo and KEK are working for the X-ray source. Main advantage is to produce tunable monochromatic hard (10-80 keV) X-rays with the intensities of 108-1010 photons/s (at several stages) and the table-top size. Second important aspect is to reduce noise radiation at a beam dump by adopting the deceleration of electrons after the Compton scattering. This realizes one beamline of a 3rd generation SR source at small facilities without heavy shielding. The final goal is that the linac and laser are installed on the moving gantry. We have designed the X-band (11.424 GHz) traveling-wave-type linac for the purpose. Numerical consideration by CAIN code and luminosity calculation are performed to estimate the X-ray yield. X-band thermionic-cathode RF-gun and RDS(Round Detuned Structure)-type X-band accelerating structure are applied to generate 50 MeV electron beam with 20 pC microbunches (104) for 1 microsecond RF macro-pulse. The X-ray yield by the electron beam and Q-switch Nd:YAG laser of 2 J/10 ns is 107 photons/RF-pulse (108 photons/sec at 10 pps). We design to adopt a technique of laser circulation to increase the X-ray yield up to 109 photons/pulse (1010 photons/s). 50 MW X-band klystron and compact modulator have been constructed and now under tuning. The construction of the whole system has started. X-ray generation and medical application will be performed in the early next year.

  18. X-band RF gun and linac for medical Compton scattering X-ray source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobashi, Katsuhito; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Fukasawa, Atsushi; Sakamoto, Fumito; Ebina, Futaro; Ogino, Haruyuki; Urakawa, Junji; Higo, Toshiyasu; Akemoto, Mitsuo; Hayano, Hitoshi; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2004-01-01

    Compton scattering hard X-ray source for 10-80 keV are under construction using the X-band (11.424 GHz) electron linear accelerator and YAG laser at Nuclear Engineering Research laboratory, University of Tokyo. This work is a part of the national project on the development of advanced compact medical accelerators in Japan. National Institute for Radiological Science is the host institute and U.Tokyo and KEK are working for the X-ray source. Main advantage is to produce tunable monochromatic hard (10-80 keV) X-rays with the intensities of 108-1010 photons/s (at several stages) and the table-top size. Second important aspect is to reduce noise radiation at a beam dump by adopting the deceleration of electrons after the Compton scattering. This realizes one beamline of a 3rd generation SR source at small facilities without heavy shielding. The final goal is that the linac and laser are installed on the moving gantry. We have designed the X-band (11.424 GHz) traveling-wave-type linac for the purpose. Numerical consideration by CAIN code and luminosity calculation are performed to estimate the X-ray yield. X-band thermionic-cathode RF-gun and RDS(Round Detuned Structure)-type X-band accelerating structure are applied to generate 50 MeV electron beam with 20 pC microbunches (104) for 1 microsecond RF macro-pulse. The X-ray yield by the electron beam and Q-switch Nd:YAG laser of 2 J/10 ns is 107 photons/RF-pulse (108 photons/sec at 10 pps). We design to adopt a technique of laser circulation to increase the X-ray yield up to 109 photons/pulse (1010 photons/s). 50 MW X-band klystron and compact modulator have been constructed and now under tuning. The construction of the whole system has started. X-ray generation and medical application will be performed in the early next year

  19. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very small ... X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical ...

  20. Abdomen X-Ray (Radiography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Abdomen Abdominal x-ray uses a very small ... of an abdominal x-ray? What is abdominal x-ray? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical ...

  1. Bio-medical X-ray imaging with spectroscopic pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, A P H; Tipples, R; Cook, N; Watts, R; Meyer, J; Bell, A J; Melzer, T R; Butler, P H

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to review the clinical potential of spectroscopic X-ray detectors and to undertake a feasibility study using a novel detector in a clinical hospital setting. Detectors currently in development, such as Medipix-3, will have multiple energy thresholds allowing for routine use of spectroscopic bio-medical imaging. We have coined the term MARS (Medipix All Resolution System) for bio-medical images that provide spatial, temporal, and energy information. The full clinical significance of spectroscopic X-ray imaging is difficult to predict but insights can be gained by examining both image reconstruction artifacts and the current uses of dual-energy techniques. This paper reviews the known uses of energy information in vascular imaging and mammography, clinically important fields. It then presents initial results from using Medipix-2, to image human tissues within a clinical radiology department. Detectors currently in development, such as Medipix-3, will have multiple energy thresholds allo...

  2. Structural shielding of medical X-ray rooms for diagnostic installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabitsch, H.

    1979-06-01

    In Part I (RIG 8), the various design procedures for shielding against X-rays are discussed and compared. In particular, this comparison is carried out between the shielding obtained conforming to the Austrian Regulations for Radiation Protection and that obtained from the DIN-standard DIN 6812; this latter includes the various operating conditions of diagnostic installations up to 150 kV. Several examples for particular structural shielding components in medical radiation rooms are given. (author)

  3. The evaluation of the irradiation of medical team in critical X-ray diagnostic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markovic, S; Pavlovic, R [Inst. of Nuclear Science Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia). Radiation and Environmental Protection Lab.; Boreli, F [Fac. of Electrical Engineering, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1996-12-31

    A good realized assessment of the irradiation for any exposed group of population serves as the base for the radiation protection measures (emergency radiation preparedness, radiation protection optimization etc.). This is especially important, by the radiation protection point of view, in contrast X-ray diagnostic techniques - angiographies. This paper presents the way for the realization of the medical team irradiation assessment, based on originally derived simple equations for the scattered radiation field around patient. (author) 1 fig., 3 figs.

  4. Specification for high voltage cable plug and socket connections for medical X-ray equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Under the direction of the Light Engineering Standards Committee, a British Standard Specification has been prepared for three-conductor and four-conductor high-voltage cable plug and socket connections for medical X-ray equipment. The standard deals with the essential dimensions to ensure mechanical interchangeability, the recommended dimensions, the wiring connections to contacts of plug and socket and the marking of contacts of plug and socket. (U.K.)

  5. Quality assurance in X-ray medical diagnosis - a physicist's viewpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moores, B.M.

    1985-01-01

    The role of quality assurance in the overall framework of costs, risks and benefits in X-ray medical diagnosis is outlined. Justification for implementing quality assurance is highlighted in terms of the nature and extent of radiological practice, the levels of exposure involved and the cost of providing the service. Quality assurance is discussed in terms of (i) quantitation/assessment; (ii) administration/ management; (iii) organisation; (iv) implementation. In particular, the need to implement quality assurance cost-effectively is discussed. (author)

  6. Cancer mortality among patients with ankylosing spondylitis not given X-ray therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.G.; Doll, R.; Radford, E.P.

    1977-01-01

    The causes of death among 1021 patients with ankylosing spondylitis not treated with X-rays (the 'untreated' group) have been compared with (i) those expected in a population of similar age and sex subject to the national mortality rates for England and Wales over the same period and (ii) those observed in 14000 similar patients given deep X-ray therapy (the 'treated' group). The untreated patients with spondylitis were enrolled in Great Britain and Northern Ireland during the period 1935 to 57 and have been followed up to 1965. The men in both treatment groups appear to have had spondylitis of similar severity, as judged from their death rates from various causes, but the 'untreated' women appear to have had a milder form of the disease. The number of deaths from cancer in the untreated group was not greater than that expected from national death rates, and there was no death from leukaemia. In the treated series the number of deaths from leukaemia was significantly raised (P = 0.03) when compared with that among patients not treated with X-rays. Deaths from cancers of sites classified as 'heavily irradiated' were also higher in the treated group though this difference was not statistically significant. Thus the excess leukaemia mortality in the treated patients, and possibly also the excess from other cancers, is likely to be associated with the X-ray treatment rather than with the disease process itself. Death rates from causes other than cancer were similar among treated and untreated patients. It is likely that modern X-ray treatment with smaller fields and lower dosage will carry a smaller risk of induced malignancy. This risk must be balanced against the possible therapeutic advantages of radiation treatment, the extent of which can be determined only by controlled trials. (author)

  7. Imaging-therapy computed tomography with quasi-monochromatic X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jost, Gregor; Golfier, Sven; Lawaczeck, Ruediger; Weinmann, Hanns-Joachim; Gerlach, Martin; Cibik, Levent; Krumrey, Michael; Fratzscher, Daniel; Rabe, Johannis; Arkadiev, Vladimir; Haschke, Michael; Langhoff, Norbert; Wedell, Reiner

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Computed tomography (CT) is a widespread and highly precise technique working in the energy range around 50-100 keV. For radiotherapy, however, the MeV energy range enables a better dose distribution. This gap between diagnosis and therapy can be overcome by the use of a modified CT machine in combination with heavy elements targeted to the tumour and used as photoelectric radiation enhancer. Materials and methods: The experimental setup consists of an X-ray optical module mounted at the exit of the X-ray tube of a clinical CT. The module converts the standard fan-shaped beam into a high intensity, monochromatized and focused beam. The radiation was characterized using an energy-dispersive detection system calibrated by synchrotron radiation and gel dosimetry. The photoelectric radiation enhancement for different elements was calculated and experimentally verified. Results: The X-ray optical module filters selectively the energy of the tungsten Kα-emission line (59.3 keV) with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 5 keV and focused the radiation onto a focal spot which coincides with the isocentre of the gantry. This results in a steep dose gradient at the centre of rotation qualified for locoregional radiation therapy. The photon energy of the quasi-monochromatic radiation agrees with the energy range of maximal photoelectric dose enhancement for gadolinium and iodine. Conclusion: An additional X-ray optical module optimized for targeted therapy and photoelectric dose enhancement allows the combination of diagnosis and radiotherapy on a clinical CT

  8. Imaging-therapy computed tomography with quasi-monochromatic X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, Gregor; Golfier, Sven; Lawaczeck, Ruediger; Weinmann, Hanns-Joachim; Gerlach, Martin; Cibik, Levent; Krumrey, Michael; Fratzscher, Daniel; Rabe, Johannis; Arkadiev, Vladimir; Haschke, Michael; Langhoff, Norbert; Wedell, Reiner; Luedemann, Lutz; Wust, Peter; Pietsch, Hubertus

    2008-12-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a widespread and highly precise technique working in the energy range around 50-100 keV. For radiotherapy, however, the MeV energy range enables a better dose distribution. This gap between diagnosis and therapy can be overcome by the use of a modified CT machine in combination with heavy elements targeted to the tumour and used as photoelectric radiation enhancer. The experimental setup consists of an X-ray optical module mounted at the exit of the X-ray tube of a clinical CT. The module converts the standard fan-shaped beam into a high intensity, monochromatized and focused beam. The radiation was characterized using an energy-dispersive detection system calibrated by synchrotron radiation and gel dosimetry. The photoelectric radiation enhancement for different elements was calculated and experimentally verified. The X-ray optical module filters selectively the energy of the tungsten K alpha-emission line (59.3 keV) with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 5 keV and focused the radiation onto a focal spot which coincides with the isocentre of the gantry. This results in a steep dose gradient at the centre of rotation qualified for locoregional radiation therapy. The photon energy of the quasi-monochromatic radiation agrees with the energy range of maximal photoelectric dose enhancement for gadolinium and iodine. An additional X-ray optical module optimized for targeted therapy and photoelectric dose enhancement allows the combination of diagnosis and radiotherapy on a clinical CT.

  9. Imaging-therapy computed tomography with quasi-monochromatic X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jost, Gregor [Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Contrast Media Research, Muellerstrasse 178, 13353 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: gregor.jost@bayerhealthcare.com; Golfier, Sven [Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Contrast Media Research, Muellerstrasse 178, 13353 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: sven.golfier@bayerhealthcare.com; Lawaczeck, Ruediger [Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Contrast Media Research, Muellerstrasse 178, 13353 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: ruediger.lawaczeck@bayerhealthcare.com; Weinmann, Hanns-Joachim [Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Contrast Media Research, Muellerstrasse 178, 13353 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: hanns-joachim.weinmann@bayerhealthcare.com; Gerlach, Martin [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestrasse 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: martin.gerlach@ptb.de; Cibik, Levent [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestrasse 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: levent.cibik@ptb.de; Krumrey, Michael [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestrasse 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: michael.krumrey@ptb.de; Fratzscher, Daniel [Institute for Scientific Instruments GmbH, Rudower Chaussee 29/31, 12489 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: Fratzscher@ifg-adlershof.de; Rabe, Johannis [Institute for Scientific Instruments GmbH, Rudower Chaussee 29/31, 12489 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: Rabe@ifg-adlershof.de; Arkadiev, Vladimir [Institute for Scientific Instruments GmbH, Rudower Chaussee 29/31, 12489 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: Arkadiev@ifg-adlershof.de; Haschke, Michael [Institute for Scientific Instruments GmbH, Rudower Chaussee 29/31, 12489 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: Haschke@ifg-adlershof.de; Langhoff, Norbert [Institute for Scientific Instruments GmbH, Rudower Chaussee 29/31, 12489 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: Langhoff@ifg-adlershof.de; Wedell, Reiner [Institut fuer angewandte Photonik e.V., Rudower Chaussee 29/31, 12489 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: wedell-iap@ifg-adlershof.de (and others)

    2008-12-15

    Introduction: Computed tomography (CT) is a widespread and highly precise technique working in the energy range around 50-100 keV. For radiotherapy, however, the MeV energy range enables a better dose distribution. This gap between diagnosis and therapy can be overcome by the use of a modified CT machine in combination with heavy elements targeted to the tumour and used as photoelectric radiation enhancer. Materials and methods: The experimental setup consists of an X-ray optical module mounted at the exit of the X-ray tube of a clinical CT. The module converts the standard fan-shaped beam into a high intensity, monochromatized and focused beam. The radiation was characterized using an energy-dispersive detection system calibrated by synchrotron radiation and gel dosimetry. The photoelectric radiation enhancement for different elements was calculated and experimentally verified. Results: The X-ray optical module filters selectively the energy of the tungsten K{alpha}-emission line (59.3 keV) with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 5 keV and focused the radiation onto a focal spot which coincides with the isocentre of the gantry. This results in a steep dose gradient at the centre of rotation qualified for locoregional radiation therapy. The photon energy of the quasi-monochromatic radiation agrees with the energy range of maximal photoelectric dose enhancement for gadolinium and iodine. Conclusion: An additional X-ray optical module optimized for targeted therapy and photoelectric dose enhancement allows the combination of diagnosis and radiotherapy on a clinical CT.

  10. Physico technical conditions of X-ray study on the Russian X-ray diagnostic complexes Medics-R and Telemedics-R

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blinov, N.N.; Blinov, N.M. ml

    1999-01-01

    The exposure tables developed on the basis of technical tests and experience in applying new foreign X-ray films in combination with the national calcium-tungstate (TIS) and yttrium (YIS) intensification screens are proposed for the purpose of establishing the image electrical parameters (voltage and the X-ray tube current, exposure time) by certain geometry of the roentgenological study at the Medics-R and Telemedics-R complexes (focus, focal distance, raster-, screen- and film type). The difference in the screens sensitivity by work with the green-sensitive films depending on the anode voltage applied constitutes 2.5 (40-60 kV) up to 1.8 (above 60 kV). Attention is also paid to application of automatic means [ru

  11. Radio-epidemiological study on medical X-ray workers in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jixian; Zhao, Yongcheng; Li, Benxiao; Zhang, Liangan; Wang, Zhiquan; Zhang, Jingyuan; Jia, Weihua

    2008-01-01

    Cancer incidence and non-cancer disease mortality (1950-1995) among 27,011 medical X-ray workers was compared with that of 25,782 other medical specialists employed between 1950 and 1980. Significantly elevated cancer risks were found for leukemia and cancers of skin, female breast, lung, liver, bladder and esophagus, the RRs were 2.2, 4.1, 1.3, 1.2, 1.2, 1.8 and 2.7 respectively. The patterns of risk associated with years since beginning X-ray work and with age and calendar year of initial employment suggest that the excesses of leukemia, skin cancer and female breast cancer were related to occupational exposure to X-rays. Significantly elevated non-cancer disease risks were blood forming system diseases ( mainly from aplastic anemia ), nervous system diseases, coronary heart disease and stroke, and the RRs were 3.7, 2.1, 1.4 and 1.4 respectively. The analysis of risk patterns suggest that the excess RRs for blood forming system diseases and coronary heart disease and stroke in the earlier cohort might be related to radiation exposure, but for the later cohort the excess RRs of nervous system diseases and coronary heart disease and stroke could be more attributed to factors of other than radiation. The possible confounding effects of risk factors other than radiation were discussed. (author)

  12. Survey of radiation doses and health effects in medical diagnostic X-ray workers in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jixian; Zhang Liangan; Liu Jinzhong; Zhang Jingyuan

    1984-01-01

    The results of a nationwide survey of radiation doses and health effects in 26983 medical diagnostic X-ray workers in 28 provinces of China were reported. The control group was composed of 25785 non-X-ray medical workers in the same hospitals where the investigated X-ray workers worked. Of the radiological workers surveyed 75.3% received cumulative radiation doses below 50 mGy, only 2.7% received doses greater than 500 mGy, the average cumulative dose being 45.0 mGy. The average length of service was 11 years. The main radiation effects relating to radiation doses were the increase of frequencies of both chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei in peripheral blood lymphocytes, which were 0.362% and 0.0358% in the irradiated group, and 0.122% and 0.0138% in the control group, respectively. The incidence and mortality rate of leukemias increased significantly in the irradiated group. The incidence and standardized incidence of leukemias were 9.61 . 10 -5 and 9.67 . 10 -5 in the irradiated group and 2.74 . 10 -5 and 2.77 . 10 -5 in the control group. The leukemia mortality rates in the two groups were 8.60 . 10 -5 and 1.24 . 10 -5 respectively, and the standardized mortality rates were 8.60 . 10 -5 and 1.27 . 10 -5 respectively. (Author)

  13. Web Implementation of Quality Assurance (QA) for X-ray Units in Balkanic Medical Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urošević, Vlade; Ristić, Olga; Milošević, Danijela; Košutić, Duško

    2015-08-01

    Diagnostic radiology is the major contributor to the total dose of the population from all artificial sources. In order to reduce radiation exposure and optimize diagnostic x-ray image quality, it is necessary to increase the quality and efficiency of quality assurance (QA) and audit programs. This work presents a web application providing completely new QA solutions for x-ray modalities and facilities. The software gives complete online information (using European standards) with which the corresponding institutions and individuals can evaluate and control a facility's Radiation Safety and QA program. The software enables storage of all data in one place and sharing the same information (data), regardless of whether the measured data is used by an individual user or by an authorized institution. The software overcomes the distance and time separation of institutions and individuals who take part in QA. Upgrading the software will enable assessment of the medical exposure level to ionizing radiation.

  14. Acceptance, commissioning and clinical use of the WOmed T-200 kilovoltage X-ray therapy unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucchetti, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this work was to characterize the performance of the WOmed T-200-kilovoltage (kV) therapy machine. Methods: Mechanical functionality, radiation leakage, alignment and interlocks were investigated. Half-value layers (HVLs) (first and second HVLs) from X-ray beams generated from tube potentials between 30 and 200 kV were measured. Reference dose was determined in water. Beam start-up characteristics, dose linearity and reproducibility, beam flatness, and uniformity as well as deviations from inverse square law were assessed. Relative depth doses (RDDs) were determined in water and water-equivalent plastic. The quality assurance program included a dosimetry audit with thermoluminescent dosemeters. Results: All checks on machine performance were satisfactory. HVLs ranged between 0.45–4.52 mmAl and 0.69–1.78 mmCu. Dose rates varied between 0.2 and 3 Gy min−1 with negligible time-end errors. There were differences in measured RDDs from published data. Beam outputs were confirmed with the dosimetry audit. The use of published backscatter factors was implemented to account for changes in phantom scatter for treatments with irregularly shaped fields. Conclusion: Guidance on the determination of HVL and RDD in kV beams can be contradictory. RDDs were determined through measurement and curve fitting. These differed from published RDD data, and the differences observed were larger in the low-kV energy range. Advances in knowledge: This article reports on the comprehensive and novel approach to the acceptance, commissioning and clinical use of a modern kV therapy machine. The challenges in the dosimetry of kV beams faced by the medical physicist in the clinic are highlighted. PMID:26224430

  15. The one million volt X-ray therapy equipment at St Bartholomew's Hospital, 1936-1960

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Innes, G.S.

    1988-01-01

    St Bartholomew's Hospital in 1934 placed a contract with Messrs Metropolitan Vickers, of Manchester, for an X-ray therapy equipment to operate at 600 kV, 2mA d.c., but with the proviso that every effort would be made to attain an operating condition of 1000 kV, 4mA. The X-ray tube and rectifiers were to be continuously evacuated and demountable. This meant that components such as filaments, anodes and the target could be easily replaced, so providing cheap maintenance and continuous availability of the plant. No specification exists today, but one was assembled from the minutes of the Cancer Committee of the hospital and the contract pricing. A brief outline historical review is also presented, particularly of the personalities involved, and the War years 1939-1945. (author)

  16. Radiation safety in X-ray facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-09-01

    The guide specifies the radiation safety requirements for structural shielding and other safety arrangements used in X-ray facilities in medical and veterinary X-ray activities and in industry, research and education. The guide is also applicable to premises in which X-ray equipment intended for radiation therapy and operating at a voltage of less than 25 kV is used. The guide applies to new X-ray facilities in which X-ray equipment that has been used elsewhere is transferred. The radiation safety requirements for radiation therapy X-ray devices operating at a voltage exceeding 25 kV, and for the premices in which such devices are used, are set out in Guide ST 2.2

  17. Radiation safety in X-ray facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-09-01

    The guide specifies the radiation safety requirements for structural shielding and other safety arrangements used in X-ray facilities in medical and veterinary X-ray activities and in industry, research and education. The guide is also applicable to premises in which X-ray equipment intended for radiation therapy and operating at a voltage of less than 25 kV is used. The guide applies to new X-ray facilities in which X-ray equipment that has been used elsewhere is transferred. The radiation safety requirements for radiation therapy X-ray devices operating at a voltage exceeding 25 kV, and for the premices in which such devices are used, are set out in Guide ST 2.2.

  18. Development of cancer medical treatment/diagnostic equipment using the source of X-rays in space coherence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Isamu; Shintomi, Kazutaka; Hayakawa, Ken

    2009-01-01

    In Nihon University, the research and development of Parametric X-rays radiation (PXR) by the 100 MeV electron linac are advanced. It was proved by basic experiment that PXR was a source of coherent X-rays. Coherent X-rays have the characteristic that a refraction action is guided with an irradiation matter. According to this action, the contrast image pick-up of an irradiation matter is attained, and X-rays becomes possible to focus a point itself. Research of cancer medical treatment and diagnosis are advanced using the new source of X-ray. Miniaturization of the source is important for the spread of cancer medical new treatment and diagnoses. Recently, the tabletop type 100 MeV class cryogenic linac with energy recovery is under development. In symposium, we report progress of these research and development. (author)

  19. ABCC-JNIH adult health study Hiroshima and Nagasaki 1961 exposure to medical x-ray. Preliminary survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishimaru, Toranosuke; Russell, W J

    1962-05-16

    A survey was conducted for three months among subjects seen in the medical clinics of ABCC, Hiroshima and Nagasaki, to determine the extent of medical x-ray received in ABCC and other hospitals and clinics. Emphasis was chiefly methodological to prepare for later studies designed to evaluate the contribution of medical x-ray to total radiation dose received by survivors of the atomic bombings and controls. The frequency, the institution in which the subject received x-ray, as well as the types of exposure were the prime considerations in the survey. The data were analyzed for each city by sex, age, and exposure status. 2 references, 5 figures, 11 tables.

  20. Patient positioning with X-ray detector self-calibration for image guided therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, B.P.; Sakas, G.; Stilla, U.; Groch, W.-D.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Automatic alignment estimation from projection images has a range of applications, but misaligned cameras induce inaccuracies. Calibration methods for optical cameras requiring calibration bodies or detectable features have been a matter of research for years. Not so for image guided therapy, although exact patient pose recovery is crucial. To image patient anatomy, X-ray instead of optical equipment is used. Feature detection is often infeasible. Furthermore, a method not requiring a calibration body, usable during treatment, would be desirable to improve accuracy of the patient alignment. We present a novel approach not relying on image features but combining intensity based calibration with 3D pose recovery. A stereoscopic X-ray camera model is proposed, and effects of erroneous parameters on the patient alignment are evaluated. The relevant camera parameters are automatically computed by comparison of X-ray to CT images and are incorporated in the patient alignment computation. The methods were tested with ground truth data of an anatomic phantom with artificially produced misalignments and available real-patient images from a particle therapy machine. We show that our approach can compensate patient alignment errors through mis-calibration of a camera from more than 5 mm to below 0.2 mm. Usage of images with artificial noise shows that the method is robust against image degradation of 2-5%. X-ray camera sel calibration improves accuracy when cameras are misaligned. We could show that rigid body alignment was computed more accurately and that self-calibration is possible, even if detection of corresponding image features is not. (author)

  1. Empirical electro-optical and x-ray performance evaluation of CMOS active pixels sensor for low dose, high resolution x-ray medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvanitis, C. D.; Bohndiek, S. E.; Royle, G.; Blue, A.; Liang, H. X.; Clark, A.; Prydderch, M.; Turchetta, R.; Speller, R.

    2007-01-01

    Monolithic complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensors with high performance have gained attention in the last few years in many scientific and space applications. In order to evaluate the increasing capabilities of this technology, in particular where low dose high resolution x-ray medical imaging is required, critical electro-optical and physical x-ray performance evaluation was determined. The electro-optical performance includes read noise, full well capacity, interacting quantum efficiency, and pixels cross talk. The x-ray performance, including x-ray sensitivity, modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, and detection quantum efficiency, has been evaluated in the mammographic energy range. The sensor is a 525x525 standard three transistor CMOS active pixel sensor array with more than 75% fill factor and 25x25 μm pixel pitch. Reading at 10 f/s, it is found that the sensor has 114 electrons total additive noise, 10 5 electrons full well capacity with shot noise limited operation, and 34% interacting quantum efficiency at 530 nm. Two different structured CsI:Tl phosphors with thickness 95 and 115 μm, respectively, have been optically coupled via a fiber optic plate to the array resulting in two different system configurations. The sensitivity of the two different system configurations was 43 and 47 electrons per x-ray incident on the sensor. The MTF at 10% of the two different system configurations was 9.5 and 9 cycles/mm with detective quantum efficiency of 0.45 and 0.48, respectively, close to zero frequency at ∼0.44 μC/kg (1.72 mR) detector entrance exposure. The detector was quantum limited at low spatial frequencies and its performance was comparable with high resolution a:Si and charge coupled device based x-ray imagers. The detector also demonstrates almost an order of magnitude lower noise than active matrix flat panel imagers. The results suggest that CMOS active pixel sensors when coupled to structured CsI:Tl can

  2. A history of radiation shielding of x-ray therapy rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGinley, P.H.; Miner, M.S.

    1996-01-01

    In this report the history of shielding for radiation treatment rooms is traced from the time of the discovery of x rays to the present. During the early part of the twentieth century the hazards from ionizing radiation were recognized and the use of lead and other materials became common place for shielding against x rays. Techniques for the calculation of the shield thickness needed for x ray protection were developed in the 1920's, and shielding materials were characterized in terms of the half value layer or simple exponential factors. At the same time, better knowledge of the interaction between radiation and matter was acquired. With the development of high energy medical accelerators after 1940, new and more complex shielding problems had to be addressed. Recently, shielding requirements have become more stringent as standards for exposure of personnel and the general public have been reduced. The art of shielding of radiation treatment facilities is still being developed, and the need for a revision of the reports on shielding of medical accelerators from the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements is emphasized in this article. (author). 61 Refs., 3 Tabs

  3. Radiation exposure of the UK population from medical and dental x-ray examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, D.; Wall, B.F.

    2002-03-01

    Knowledge of recent trends in the radiation doses from x-ray examinations and their distribution for the UK population provides useful guidance on where best to concentrate efforts on patient dose reduction in order to optimise the protection of the population in a cost-effective manner. In this report, the results of a recent survey of the frequency of medical and dental x-ray examinations in the UK and contemporary data on the radiation doses typically received by patients, are used to assess trends in the extent and the pattern of the population exposure. Individual patient doses, expressed in terms of the effective dose, range from a few microsieverts for simple radiographic examinations of the teeth, limbs or chest to tens of millisieverts for prolonged fluoroscopic procedures or some computed tomography (CT) examinations. A total of about 41.5 million medical and dental x-ray examinations are now conducted each year in the UK (0.70 examination per head of population) resulting in an annual per caput effective dose of 330 μSv. This is not significantly different from the previous rough estimate of 350 μSv for 1991. However, over the last ten years CT has more than doubled its contribution and is now responsible for 40% of the total dose to the population from medical x-rays. In contrast, the contribution from conventional radiographic and fluoroscopic examinations has nearly halved to about 44%. Interventional and angiographic procedures together contribute the remaining 16%. The annual per caput dose of 330 μSv is low in comparison with other countries having similarly developed systems of health care. This is due to both a lower frequency of x-ray examinations per head of population and generally lower doses in the UK than in other developed countries. However, the much increased contributions of CT, angiography and interventional procedures to the UK population dose indicate an urgent need to develop radiation protection and optimisation activities for

  4. Diagnostic x-ray in use in federal medical centre, case study Makurdi metropolis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onoja, R.A.; Fiase, J.O.

    2009-01-01

    Every year more than two thousand patients go for routine medical check-up at the Federal Medical Centre using diagnostic x-rays. This paper is based on a study to determine the entrance surface doses per radiograph of 108 patients that had diagnostic examinations at the Federal Medical Centre Makurdi. The examinations considered in this study are chest x-ray examinations, abdomen, skull and other extremities, for both adults and children. The results show that the mean entrance surface doses of PA chest x-ray for female range between 237-275μGy, for male is between 1183-297μGy, and for children range between 47-237μGy. The AP chest x-ray for female range between 1943-3440μGy, for male is between 1583-3484μGy and for children it ranges between 177-451μGy. The PA examination of the skull for adult female ranged between 117-787μGy, for male it ranged between 117-532μGy and children from 472-948μGy. Also for the AP examination for skull the adult female mean entrance surface doses range from 129-798μGy, for the male it range from 145-178μGy and for children 138-650μGy. The AP abdomen for adult female produces a mean entrance surface doses range between 620-682μGy, for the male is between 105-930μGy, and children it range between 144-398μGy. In the case of extremities AP examination are between the range of 173-468μGy for adult female, 300-595μGy for adult male and between 254-887μGy for the children. In the case of extremities PA examination mean entrance surface doses are between the range of 145-517μGy for adult female, 363-517μGy for adult male and between 130-566μGy for the children. The data shows that the entrance surface doses due to the x-ray examination for adult and children are within the ICRP guidance levels. These guidance levels of dose for diagnostic radiography for a typical adult patient are 10 mGy for AP abdomen, 0.4 mGy PA chest, 7 mGy for AP chest and 5 mGy for PA skull

  5. X-ray evidence of low-energy photon therapy for cervical lordosis restoration and radial head spur healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitz-Ritson, Donald; Filonenko, Natalia; Salansky, Norman M.

    1994-09-01

    X rays were used for low energy photon therapy (LEPT) efficacy assessment for cervical lordosis restoration and radial head spur healing. Two cases, their evaluation, and treatment are discussed along with the follow-up results.

  6. Investigation of radiation absorption and X-ray fluorescence properties of medical imaging scintillators by Monte Carlo methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolopoulos, D.; Kandarakis, I.; Cavouras, D.; Valais, I.; Linardatos, D.; Michail, C.; David, S.; Gaitanis, A.; Nomicos, C.; Louizi, A.

    2006-01-01

    X-ray absorption and X-ray fluorescence properties of medical imaging scintillating screens were studied by Monte Carlo methods as a function of the incident photon energy and screen-coating thickness. The scintillating materials examined were Gd 2 O 2 S (GOS) Gd 2 SiO 5 (GSO) YAlO 3 (YAP), Y 3 Al 5 O 12 (YAG), LuSiO 5 (LSO), LuAlO 3 (LuAP) and ZnS. Monoenergetic photon exposures were modeled in the range from 10 to 100 keV. The corresponding ranges of coating thicknesses of the investigated scintillating screens ranged up to 200 mg cm -2 . Results indicated that X-ray absorption and X-ray fluorescence are affected by the incident photon energy and the screen's coating thickness. Regarding incident photon energy, this X-ray absorption and fluorescence was found to exhibit very intense changes near the corresponding K edge of the heaviest element in the screen's scintillating material. Regarding coating thickness, thicker screens exhibited higher X-ray absorption and X-ray fluorescence. Results also indicated that a significant fraction of the generated X-ray fluorescent quanta escape from the scintillating screen. This fraction was found to increase with screen's coating thickness. At the energy range studied, most of the incident photons were found to be absorbed via one-hit photoelectric effect. As a result, the reabsorption of scattered radiation was found to be of rather minor importance; nevertheless this was found to increase with the screen's coating thickness. Differences in X-ray absorption and X-ray fluorescence were found among the various scintillators studied. LSO scintillator was found to be the most attractive material for use in many X-ray imaging applications, exhibiting the best absorption properties in the largest part of the energy range studied. Y-based scintillators were also found to be of significant absorption performance within the low energy ranges

  7. Medical X-ray Image Hierarchical Classification Using a Merging and Splitting Scheme in Feature Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesharaki, Nooshin Jafari; Pourghassem, Hossein

    2013-07-01

    Due to the daily mass production and the widespread variation of medical X-ray images, it is necessary to classify these for searching and retrieving proposes, especially for content-based medical image retrieval systems. In this paper, a medical X-ray image hierarchical classification structure based on a novel merging and splitting scheme and using shape and texture features is proposed. In the first level of the proposed structure, to improve the classification performance, similar classes with regard to shape contents are grouped based on merging measures and shape features into the general overlapped classes. In the next levels of this structure, the overlapped classes split in smaller classes based on the classification performance of combination of shape and texture features or texture features only. Ultimately, in the last levels, this procedure is also continued forming all the classes, separately. Moreover, to optimize the feature vector in the proposed structure, we use orthogonal forward selection algorithm according to Mahalanobis class separability measure as a feature selection and reduction algorithm. In other words, according to the complexity and inter-class distance of each class, a sub-space of the feature space is selected in each level and then a supervised merging and splitting scheme is applied to form the hierarchical classification. The proposed structure is evaluated on a database consisting of 2158 medical X-ray images of 18 classes (IMAGECLEF 2005 database) and accuracy rate of 93.6% in the last level of the hierarchical structure for an 18-class classification problem is obtained.

  8. FDTD parallel computational analysis of grid-type scattering filter characteristics for medical X-ray image diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Koichi; Miyazaki, Yasumitsu; Goto, Nobuo

    2007-01-01

    X-ray diagnosis depends on the intensity of transmitted and scattered waves in X-ray propagation in biomedical media. X-ray is scattered and absorbed by tissues, such as fat, bone and internal organs. However, image processing for medical diagnosis, based on the scattering and absorption characteristics of these tissues in X-ray spectrum is not so much studied. To obtain precise information of tissues in a living body, the accurate characteristics of scattering and absorption are required. In this paper, X-ray scattering and absorption in biomedical media are studied using 2-dimensional finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. In FDTD method, the size of analysis space is very limited by the performance of available computers. To overcome this limitation, parallel and successive FDTD method is introduced. As a result of computer simulation, the amplitude of transmitted and scattered waves are presented numerically. The fundamental filtering characteristics of grid-type filter are also shown numerically. (author)

  9. Estimation of population dose from medical X-ray diagnosis and in vivo nuclear medicine examinations in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, W.H.; Kusama, T.; Kai, M.; Aoki, Y.; Wada, O.; Chen, F.D.

    1993-01-01

    A national survey of radiation exposure had been conducted in Taiwan from May 3 to May 9, 1993, to establish the population dose. We investigated the frequency, type of examination, age and sex distribution of the X-ray diagnosis examination. We investigated 9 medical centers (75% of the total), 15 area hospitals (34% of the total) and 52 local hospitals (10.3% of the total) in Taiwan,. Details of 54,000 X-ray examinations were collected. Total numbers of 5162 X-ray examinations were performed annually per 10,000 inhabitants in Taiwan. The chest examination was the largest contribution, 45%, of all X-ray examinations, Different types of hospitals showed different frequencies and different distributions of age and sex of X-ray diagnosis. (3 figs., 3 tabs.)

  10. X-ray targeting puncture collagenase chemonucleolysis combined with injection of medical ozone for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Lin; Zhu Genfa

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical value of X-ray target puncture collagenase chemonucleolysis combined with injection of medical ozone for lumbar disc herniation. Methods: One thousand and sixty-two cases of lumbar disc herniation accepted collagenase chemonucleolysis combined with injection of medical ozone targeted by X-ray. The therapeutic effects after operation were analyzed. Results: Of all the 1062 cases, the effective rate of X-ray target puncture collagenase chemonucleolysis combined with injection of medical ozone was 95.3% at 3 months, 92.3% at 12 months, and 91.2% at 24 months after operation. Conclusion: X-ray target puncture collagenase chemonucleolysis combined with injection of medical ozone is a simple and safe method for the lumbar disc herniation. It also had fewer adverse reactions and better therapeutic effects. (authors)

  11. The May 26, 1999 Resolution of the Joint Meeting of the Board of the Radiation Diagnosis and Radiation Therapy Section, Academic Council, Ministry of Health of Russia, the X-ray Diagnosis Ad Hoc Commission, Interdepartmental Scientific Council for Medical Radiology and Radiation Medicine, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, and the Executive Committee, Russian Association of Radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharchenko, V.P.; Rozhkova, N.I.; Vlasov, P.V.

    2000-01-01

    The text of the May 26, 1999 Resolution of the joint meeting of the Board of the Radiation Diagnosis and Radiation Therapy Section of the Ministry of Health of Russia with the X-ray Diagnostics Ad Hoc Problem Commission of the Intergovernmental Scientific Council for Medical Radiology and Radiation Medicine of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences and the Executive Committee of Russian Association of Radiologists is presented. It is noted that in spite of the fact that the intervention radiology as an independent branch has not yet been formed, separate developments, aimed at application of invasive interventions under the control of radiodiagnostic methods are carried out in the area of bronco pulmonology, gastroenterology, mammology, gynecology, urology, oncology above 30 years and steps in legalization of this trend are also undertaken. Absence of statistical documentation on technical and staff provision of therapeutical-prophylactic establishments as well as unified terminology is noted. The tasks aimed at broader introduction of intervention radiology in Russia are set up [ru

  12. An analysis of cancer death risk among medical diagnostic X-ray workers in China, 1950-1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yongcheng; Wang Jixian; Zhang Wei; Li Benxiao; Fan Tiqiang; Zhang Jingyuan

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate effects of occupational radiation exposure on cancer death among medical diagnostic X-ray workers. Methods: A cohort study on medical diagnostic X-ray workers and non-X-ray medical workers was carried out and a risk analysis of cancer death between 1950 and 1995 was conducted with the O/E system. Results: A significant enhancement in cancer death risk for X-ray workers was found, especially those engaged in X-ray work in early calendar years. The overall cancer RR was 1.26, (95 % CI: 1.14 - 1.38), for leukemia it was 2.48, (95% CI: 1.68-3.51 ); for esophagus cancer, 3.18, (95% CI: 2.02 -4.77); for liver cancer, 1.54, (95 % CI: 1.27 - 1.86); and for bone cancer, 2.48, (95 % CI: 1.00 - 5.40). In the late calendar year cohort a significant enhancement of cancer death was seen only in esophagus cancer (RR = 4.19, 95 % CI: 1.80 - 8.25) and lung cancer (RR = 1.60, 95% CI:1.10-2.25). Conclusion: Long-term occupational X-ray irradiation can enhance the risk of cancer death when the cumulative dose reached a certain level. The significant enhancement of cancer death for leukemia and some solid cancers may be related to the occupational exposure to X-rays

  13. Trends in Radiation Doses to Patients from Medical X-ray Examinations in Romania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olga Iacob; Irina Anca Popescu [Institute of Public Health, Iassy (Romania); Mihai Radu Iacob [University ' Al. I. Cuza' Iassy (Romania)

    2006-07-01

    Even if the doses received by patients during 2005 survey are lower than those estimated in the 2000 national survey on diagnostic medical radiation exposure by 27 percent, on average, their values still indicate an urgent need to develop radiation protection and optimization activities for X ray examinations, especially in pediatrics radiology. The increasing attention given in last years to radiation protection for conventional examinations, with development of national patient dosimetry protocols and reference doses, new radiation protection legislation and norms have played a significant part in this substantial reduction in effective doses. (N.C.)

  14. Performance and beam characteristics of the PANTAK THERAPAX HF225 X-ray therapy machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yiannakkaras, C; Papadopoulos, N; Christodoulides, G [Department of Medical Physics, Nicosia General Hospital, 1450 Nicosia (Cyprus)

    1999-12-31

    The performance and beam characteristics of the new PANTAK THERAPAX HF225 X-ray therapy machine have been measured, evaluated and discussed. Eight beam qualities within the working range of generating potentials between 50 and 225 kVp are used in our department. These beam qualities have been investigated in order to provide a data base specific to our machine. Beam Quality, Central Axis Depth Dose, Output, Relative Field Uniformity and Timer Error were investigated. (authors) 11 refs., 4 figs., 9 tabs.

  15. A survey of medical exposure during X-ray diagnosis in Aomori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kon, Masanori; Fukushi, Shouji; Oota, Fumio; Kawamura, Kouji; Shinohe, Tetsuo; Suwa, Kouki; Fujii, Kiyosuke; Yamagami, Hirofumi

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to survey medical exposure doses in Aomori Prefecture and compare them with guidance levels for X-ray diagnosis. A questionnaire survey on X-ray diagnosis was conducted at the main medical institutions in the prefecture. The questionnaire asked about technical conditions, and replies were obtained from 72.2% of the 79 institutions. The medical exposure doses (entrance surface doses) were calculated from the results of the questionnaires by the modified numerical dose determination (NDD) method. The distribution of the entrance surface doses at each site was calculated as the 1st quartile, median, 3rd quartile, average, standard deviation, maximum value and minimum value, by the quartile method. The distribution of exposed doses at each site showed a similar pattern with that of the national distribution. Some institutions used higher doses than the Japanese proposed guidance levels and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) guidance levels. Re-assessment of radiographic conditions and photosensitive materials is needed to reduce exposure doses. (K.H.)

  16. Flash X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Eiichi

    2003-01-01

    Generation of quasi-monochromatic X-ray by production of weakly ionized line plasma (flash X-ray), high-speed imaging by the X-ray and high-contrast imaging by the characteristic X-ray absorption are described. The equipment for the X-ray is consisted from the high-voltage power supply and condenser, turbo molecular pump, and plasma X-ray tube. The tube has a long linear anticathode to produce the line plasma and flash X-ray at 20 kA current at maximum. X-ray spectrum is measured by the imaging plate equipped in the computed radiography system after diffracted by a LiF single crystal bender. Cu anticathode generates sharp peaks of K X-ray series. The tissue images are presented for vertebra, rabbit ear and heart, and dog heart by X-ray fluoroscopy with Ce anticathode. Generation of K-orbit characteristic X-ray with extremely low bremsstrahung is to be attempted for medical use. (N.I.)

  17. Risk factors of coronary heart disease among medical diagnostic X-ray workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wei; Wang Jixian; Zhao Yongcheng; Li Benxiao; Fan Tiqiang; Zhao Zhigang; Lin Zhidong

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate risk factors of coronary heart disease (CHD) in medical diagnostic X-ray workers in China, especially the relationship of CHD with occupational irradiation. Methods: A 1:2 matched case-control study was carried out. The study subjects consisted of 112 pair-matched cases and controls coming from different hospitals in China. Information about occupational and non-occupational risk factors obtained by interviewing every subjects personally. Individual doses were estimated by normalized work load method. SAS 6.12 software conditional Logistic regression method was applied to data analysis. Results: Variables such as family history of CHD (OR=17.298, P = 0.0001), history of hypertension (OR = 6.172, P = 0.0003), overweight (OR = 2.679, P = 0.0150), physical exercises (OR = 0.421, P0.0333), diabetes (OR = 7.823, P = 0.0200), radiation protection condition (OR = 3.992, P 0.0027), and accumulated radiation dose (OR = 1.612, P 0.0454) were included in the last model. Conclusions: For the medical diagnostic X-ray workers, family history of coronary heart disease, history of hypertension, diabetes, etc. are the main risk factors of CHD, and occupational exposure may be a potential risk factor. As for the mechanism, further studies are needed

  18. K-edge subtraction synchrotron X-ray imaging in bio-medical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomlinson, W; Elleaume, H; Porra, L; Suortti, P

    2018-05-01

    High contrast in X-ray medical imaging, while maintaining acceptable radiation dose levels to the patient, has long been a goal. One of the most promising methods is that of K-edge subtraction imaging. This technique, first advanced as long ago as 1953 by B. Jacobson, uses the large difference in the absorption coefficient of elements at energies above and below the K-edge. Two images, one taken above the edge and one below the edge, are subtracted leaving, ideally, only the image of the distribution of the target element. This paper reviews the development of the KES techniques and technology as applied to bio-medical imaging from the early low-power tube sources of X-rays to the latest high-power synchrotron sources. Applications to coronary angiography, functional lung imaging and bone growth are highlighted. A vision of possible imaging with new compact sources is presented. Copyright © 2018 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The law for radiation and x-ray technicians engaging in medical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The Law aims to define the qulifications of radiation and x-ray technicians engaging in medical treatment and to regulate so that the works are carried out properly for helping popularization and improvement of medicine and public hygiene. Persons who wish to be radiation or x-ray technicians engaging in medical treatment are required to pass the examinations for such technicians and obtain the licenes of the Minister of Health and Welfare for the former technicians and the license of a prefectural governor for the latter technicians. Mentally disordered, deaf, dumb or blind persons are excluded from licensees. Registration of such technicians, delivery of the license certificates and other related matters are provided for. The examinations are held concerning the knowledges and skills necessary for such technicians and carried out by the Minister of Health and Welfare. Persons except doctors, dentists and such technicians are prohibited to engage in the practices to apply radiation to human bodies. Restrictions on the intensity of radiation applied and the places of work are defined concerning such practices. Penal servitude of less than a year and fines less than yen 10,000 or yen 5,000 are imposed upon the violation of such prohibitions or restrictions. (Okada, K.)

  20. Investigation of organ dose difference of age phantoms for medical X-ray examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Hyun; Kim, Woo Ran; Lee, Jai Ki; Lee, Choon Sik

    2003-01-01

    Methodology for calculating the organ equivalent doses and the effective doses of pediatric and adult patients undergoing medical X-ray examinations were established. The MIRD-type mathematical phantoms of 4 age groups were constructed with addition of the esophagus to the same phantoms. Two typical examination procedures, chest PA and abdomen AP, were simulated for the pediatric patients as well as the adult as illustrative examples. The results confirmed that patients pick up approximate 0.03 mSv of effective dose from a single chest PA examination, and 0.4 to 1.7 mSv from an abdomen AP examination depending on the ages. For dose calculations where irradiation is made with a limited field, the details of the position, size and shape of the organs and the organ depth from the entrance surface considerably affect the resulting doses. Therefore, it is important to optimize radiation protection by control of X-ray properties and beam examination field. The calculation result, provided in this study, can be used to implement optimization for medical radiation protection

  1. Database application of digital medical X-rays and labs: computerization, storage, retrieval, interpretation, and distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, Myron; Tabriziani, Hossein; Heetebry, Irene

    2005-08-01

    Stenter lets the health care worker order an X-ray that is produced as a computer image rather than on flat film. The health care provider can be in any location with the correct equipment, and view the digital image. The dimensions of this discussion are extensive. The cost savings because of reduced media and storage cost is substantial. Health care quality can be improved because of the ability to obtain consultation via telemedicine and the enhanced ability to track medical problems over time via trends. The major downside is the limited cost imbursement system to pay for technology. Unfortunately, this may impact on the improved quality of care. In simple terms someone needs to pay for the technology and the quality of health care needs to be maintained or improved. The real cost to the health care systems needs to be correctly calculated and inappropriate charging kept to a minimum. Specific costs need to be kept in mind and the first is the cost for new staff or staff training. The number of health care providers that are able to read the X-ray can be enlarged remembering that only American Board Certified Radiologists are allowed to give the final recommendation. How do we view the cost of missing something? It could be argued that this risk will be reduced because of improved technology for obtaining the digital X-ray and improved enhancement software. One way to view this situation is to include technology, management, and organization. The cost and benefits occur through the interplay of all three dimensions. The development of digital imaging hardware and artificial intelligence software will demand change in the management and organization. The organization will require changes in its design to accommodate the technology as to support and resources. Management will evolve to include methods for control and monitoring this technology. Business processes and standard operating procedures will change to integrate the technology into the organization in

  2. X-ray radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tronc, D.

    1995-01-01

    major medical equipment companies manufacture X-ray therapy systems - General Electric, Mitsubishi, Philips, Siemens and Varian. In this crowded marketplace where the useful lifespan of machines exceeds 10 years, purchase prices are less than $1 million per unit. X-ray therapy remains the most common and cheapest form of accelerator therapy. Ongoing technical developments aim to achieve better matching of dose delivery to tumour volume; multileaf collimators shape the X-ray field to the biomedical target, and portal imaging from behind the patient can control positioning and dose delivery. Combined compact X-ray sources are being developed with both treatment and realtime dosimetry control, incorporating CT scanning into one single device. Integrated diagnosis and therapy is the direction for R&D investment, and this should lead to smaller hospital space requirements, lower operating costs, and elimination of external data handling, resulting in simpler and more cost effective clinical procedures

  3. Stochastic risk estimation from medical x-ray diagnostic examinations, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashizume, Tadashi; Maruyama, Takashi; Noda, Yutaka; Iwai, Kazuo; Fukuhisa, Kenjiro

    1981-01-01

    The genetically significant dose (GSD), per Caput mean bone marrow dose (CMD), leukemia significant dose (LSD) and malignancy significant dose (MSD) from medical diagnostic X-ray examinations in Japan were estimated based on a 1979 nationwide survey of randomly sampled hospitals and clinics. The population risk estimates were carried out using the resultant values of GSD, LSD and MSD. In the risk estimates, the significant factors, namely, the relative child expectancy, the leukemia significant factor and the malignancy significant factor, for patients were assumed to be same as those of general population. The risk factors used were 185 x 10 -6 rad -1 for genetic risk of all generations, 20 x 10 -6 rad -1 for fatal leukemia and 165 x 10 -6 rad -1 for fatal malignant diseases, respectively. The resultant annual population doses per person were 15 mrad (0.15 mGy) for GSD, 107 mrad (1.07 mGy) for CMD, 86 mrad (0.86 mGy) for LSD and 43 mrad (0.43 mGy) for MSD, respectively. The present data other than the MSD were compared with the data in 1960, 1969 and 1974. For example, the GSD of 1979 was approximately same as that of 1974, although the annual number of examinations in 1979 increased by about 30 percent as compared with those of 1974. The population risks from X-ray diagnosis were estimated to be 260 persons per year for genetic risk of all generations, 192 person per year for fatal leukemic risk and 825 person per year for malignant risk, respectively, for the whole population in Japan, assuming that the X-ray diagnosis in 1979 will be performed continuously in the future. The average risks per one exposure for X-ray radiography were estimated using the weighted average of the significant factor and the organ or tissue dose with the number of radiographic exposures by age and by type of examination. The average risks per radiographic exposure were 176 x 10 -9 for genetic risk, 285 x 10 -9 for leukemic risk and 1.75 x 10 -6 for malignant risk respectively. (author)

  4. Course of radiological protection and safety in the medical diagnostic with X-rays; Curso de proteccion y seguridad radiologica en el diagnostico medico con rayos X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominguez A, C.E. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    The obtention of images of human body to the medical diagnostic is one of the more old and generalized applications for X-ray. Therefore the design and performance of equipment and installations as well as the operation procedures must be oriented toward safety with the purpose to guarantee this radiological practice will bring a net positive benefit to the society. Given that in Mexico only exists the standardization related to source and equipment generators of ionizing radiation in the industrial area and medical therapy, but not so to the medical diagnostic area it is the purpose of this work to present those standards related with this application branch. Also it is presented the preparation of a manual for the course named Formation of teachers in radiological protection and safety in the X-ray medical diagnostic in 1997 which was imparted at ININ. (Author)

  5. Delivery confirmation of bolus electron conformal therapy combined with intensity modulated x-ray therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavanaugh, James A.; Hogstrom, Kenneth R.; Fontenot, Jonas P.; Henkelmann, Gregory; Chu, Connel; Carver, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that a bolus electron conformal therapy (ECT) dose plan and a mixed beam plan, composed of an intensity modulated x-ray therapy (IMXT) dose plan optimized on top of the bolus ECT plan, can be accurately delivered. Methods: Calculated dose distributions were compared with measured dose distributions for parotid and chest wall (CW) bolus ECT and mixed beam plans, each simulated in a cylindrical polystyrene phantom that allowed film dose measurements. Bolus ECT plans were created for both parotid and CW PTVs (planning target volumes) using 20 and 16 MeV beams, respectively, whose 90% dose surface conformed to the PTV. Mixed beam plans consisted of an IMXT dose plan optimized on top of the bolus ECT dose plan. The bolus ECT, IMXT, and mixed beam dose distributions were measured using radiographic films in five transverse and one sagittal planes for a total of 36 measurement conditions. Corrections for film dose response, effects of edge-on photon irradiation, and effects of irregular phantom optical properties on the Cerenkov component of the film signal resulted in high precision measurements. Data set consistency was verified by agreement of depth dose at the intersections of the sagittal plane with the five measured transverse planes. For these same depth doses, results for the mixed beam plan agreed with the sum of the individual depth doses for the bolus ECT and IMXT plans. The six mean measured planar dose distributions were compared with those calculated by the treatment planning system for all modalities. Dose agreement was assessed using the 4% dose difference and 0.2 cm distance to agreement. Results: For the combined high-dose region and low-dose region, pass rates for the parotid and CW plans were 98.7% and 96.2%, respectively, for the bolus ECT plans and 97.9% and 97.4%, respectively, for the mixed beam plans. For the high-dose gradient region, pass rates for the parotid and CW plans were 93.1% and 94

  6. Occupational exposure of medical staff due to diagnostic X-ray examinations in veterinary medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mergel, E.; Feige, S.; Haeusler, U.

    2007-01-01

    The implementation of the Council directive 96/29 EURATOM and the corresponding national Radiation Protection Ordinance and the X-ray Protection Ordinance coming subsequently into effect led to a changed situation regarding the occupational radiation protection in the medical sector. To reduce the occupational exposure of veterinarians and assisting staff in veterinary radiography is particularly challenging as, in opposite to human radiological examination, the presence of staff is indispensable to restrain the patient. Beyond that the relevant literature reports about too high and/or about unnecessary radiation exposures. To gain a comprehensive knowledge upon the possible exposure of involved staff, the variety of typical examination methods in veterinary clinics and at practitioners had been investigated during the daily routine. Dose measurements were performed for different employees during the examinations taking into account several places of exposure (lens, thyroid, chest, hand, gonad, and feet). Veterinary X-ray diagnostic examinations for pets as well as in equine radiography had been accounted for this study. In total, 101 examination methods, 4.484 accompanied examinations and 53.892 single dose readings resulted in a reliable statistical base to set up a 'Job-Exposure-Matrix' allowing the dose assessment for a variable number and kind of examinations. The 'Job-Exposure-Matrix' is believed to be a useful tool for optimization of occupational radiation exposure of veterinarians by appraising the height of a possible dose, forcing a review of the status quo and triggering the improvement of personal protection by establishing adequate measures. (orig.)

  7. Effect of medical x-ray exposure on subsequent reproductive outcomes in scoliosis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visscher, W.A.

    1987-01-01

    A retrospective cohort study was done which was designed to assess the effects of medical x-ray exposure on cancer incidence among scoliosis patients. Although the primary purpose of the study was to assess cancer incidence, a secondary goal was to investigate whether diagnostic x-ray exposure is related to adverse reproductive events in the female subjects. A series of case-control analyses were done which were designed to assess these effects. Radiation exposure was measured both by total films received and by an estimate of the number of films received and by an estimate of the number of films which involved ovarian irradiation. Radiation appeared to increase a woman's risk of any adverse event in the overall analysis and her risk of a premature or low birth weight infant in the separate analyses. Radiation did not appear to be related to spontaneous abortion, complications of pregnancy or delivery or birth defects, although the results of the pregnancy complications analysis was suggestive

  8. Evaluation of quality control in the college of medical radiological sciences, conventional x-ray department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babiker, Esameldeen Mohamed Tom

    2002-02-01

    Quality control in diagnostic radiography aims to ensure continuous production of diagnostic images with optimum quality, using minimum necessary dose to the patients and staff. Therefore an ineffective quality control program can lead to poor quality images that can impair diagnosis, increase operating costs and contribute to unnecessary radiation exposure to both patients and staff. Apply basic quality control program is responsibility of each x-ray facility, and to achieve maximum benefits, all levels of management and technical staff must support and participate in operating the programme. The main parameters to be monitored during the quality control programme include: dose consistency, k Vp accuracy, k Vp variations, exposure timer accuracy, besides checking image receptors, recording system and processing conditions. The aims of this project is to evaluate the quality control in the x-ray department of the college of medical radiologic sciences. The evaluation was an experimental study done by checking the operational status of the radiographic equipment, beside data collection using questionnaires regarding quality control. In the applied experiments the results show that there is a noted variation in the accuracy of k Vp, exposure timer and also in the dose consistency. The obtained results from image receptors and processing system showed noted variations too. The results of the questionnaire and direct interviewing showed other causes of quality degradation such as absence of test tools, the status of the equipment, absence of regular quality control testing, in addition to absence of an organized team to deal with quality. (Author)

  9. Study on quantities of radiation protection in medical X-rays radiation field with polyhedron phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Shuyu; Dai Guangfu; Zhang Liangan

    1997-01-01

    The author have studied tissue-equivalent material with the elemental composition recommended by report No.44 of ICRU. Three different calibration phantoms in shape have been prepared with the tissue-equivalent material in order to study the influence of the angular dependence factor R(d,α) in the radiation field of X-rays on the calibration of individual dose equivalent Hp(d). The requirement of mono-genous radiation field to calibrate several dosimeters on one phantom at the same time can be met by application of dodecahedron phantom, which is difficult on ICRU sphere. Angular dependence factor R(d,α) of 0 degree∼90 degree and conversion coefficients between individual dose equivalent Hp(0.07, α) and the exposure of radiation of different energies and different angles have been established by taking advantage of the dodecahedron. Besides, the authors have studied the variation relation between the individual dose equivalent Hp (10,α) and Hp(0.07,α) in the medical X-rays radiation field

  10. Risk assessment of medical exposure in X-ray examinations of children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. G. Shatsky

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of the effective dose (the concept of which was developed for radiation protection of workers and public and the nominal risk coefficients, averaged by sex and age, to assess the radiation risks of medical exposure has some significant limitations. Age and sex distribution of the staff and the entire population may be quite different from the sex and age distribution of patients undergoing medical exposure. Moreover, the structure of the age and sex of patients may be different for various medical examinations. There are simplified methods for evaluating individual risk for patients undergoing medical exposure. The methods are based on the effective dose evaluation and those take in to account age and gender. A more accurate assessment of lifetime risk of delayed stochastic effects for health of the patient is achieved by using the organ doses and the age and gender risk factors. The aim of this work was evaluation of the lifetime risk of long-term stochastic health effects for different gender and age groups of children undergoing various radiographic investigations by using organ doses and the age and gender risk factors, and subsequent classification in accordance with generally accepted international risk scale. Data from surveys of33 X-ray units in 29 specialized pediatric health care organizations in Russia were used in the work. Organ doses and patient’s effective doses were calculated on the basis of the defined for each x-ray machine typical modes for the 12 radiographic procedures (X-ray exam of the skull, chest, cervical spine, thoracic spine, lumbar spine–all in two projections – of the abdomen and pelvis – both in one projectionusing a computer program PCXMC., Radiation risks for selected studies were estimated using the obtained organ doses and the age and gender risk factors calculated for the Russian population. The radiation risks were classified according to the international scale of the risks. It was found

  11. Academic training of radiation protection human resources in the X-ray medical diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaona, E.

    2008-12-01

    The current regulation, established by NOM-229-SSA1-2002 standard, T echnical requirements for facilities, health responsibilities, technical specifications for equipment and facilities for radiation protection in medical diagnosis with X-rays, t hat should be credited refresher courses, and training in radiation safety in accordance with current regulations, however, has been observed that the assistance and accreditation of courses is basically to cover administrative and regulatory requirements and therefore does not necessarily cover needs of the patient to radiation protection in the use of old and new technologies. David Brenner and Eric Hall claim that between 1.5 and 2% of all cancers in the USA may be attributable to exposure to X-ray computerized tomography techniques, given the intensive use of these techniques and the patient dose ranges in which incurred. While this is not debatable, if it is, the alternative does not seem to be abandoning the use of computerized tomography, because it gives them undoubted benefits with respect to invasive procedures. Deserves mention concerns the use of computerized tomography in children using scanning protocols designed for adults, in which case it incurs in 5 times higher dose. An additional warning about unwarranted use of computerized tomography is a procedure of this technique in abdomen resulting in an equivalent dose to 298 times that of a mammogram. Additional aspects such as biological effects (including deterministic) of both medical staff and patients of interventional procedures further reinforces the idea that there are education programs in radiation protection. Attention must put in the new generations, including in the curricula of medical residencies in radiology, endoscopy, cardiology and orthopedic, the education (no emerging courses) in radiation protection, radiobiology, radiology physics, and other topics, but previously must have medical physicists in radiology available to train new

  12. Combination use of lentinan with x-ray therapy in mouse experimental tumor system, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiio, Tsuyoshi; Tsuchiya, Yoshiharu; Ohishi, Kazuo; Yoshihama, Takashi

    1988-01-01

    Apparent reduction of leukocyte counts was observed in mice irradiated with 1,500 ∼ 3,000 rads of X-ray on the left hind leg. This reduction of leukocyto counts was completely protected by the pre-treatment with lentinan before X-ray irradiation. Suppressive effect of X-ray on the antitumor function of lentinan seems to be weak. When treatment with X-ray irradiation and lentinan was applied for mice bearing solid type sarcoma 180, additive effect was obtained by the combination of lentinan before or after X-ray irradiation. (author)

  13. Methods for improvement of some parameters of medical X-ray diagnostic equipment. Basic faults in selection of appropriate new or used units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonev, M.; Danev, N.; Constantinov, B.

    2004-01-01

    An analysis is made of the factors determining the quality and performance of the main types of medical equipment: conventional radiographic and fluoroscopic X-ray unit; X-ray computer tomograph (CT); angiographic, mammographic, densitometric and dental X-ray equipment; magnetic resonance MRI. The aim is to give certain directions for the method one should adopt on choosing and purchasing X-ray equipment. Also one should take into consideration the new Health law and the Regulation for radiation protection of persons undergoing medical examination or treatment. The problems can be solved with the close cooperation between radiologists, medical physicists and x-ray engineers

  14. Relationship between radiation dose and changes of blood cells in medical diagnostic X-ray workers in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Wenzheng

    1984-01-01

    The hematological changes of 2867 cases of medical X-ray workers and 1152 cases of non-X-ray medical workers were compared. It was shown that the total number of leukocytes, the numbers of neutrophils, lymphocytes and platelets were significantly lower in X-ray workers than those in controls. However, the percentages of monocytes, eosinophils, basophils and the concentration of hemoglobin were higher in the irradiated group. the difference between the two groups was statistically significant. The degree of changes in the number of blood cells was dose-dependent. A negative correlation could be found between the changes of leukocyte and neutrophil counts and cumulative dose (<250 mGy), annual dose (<15 mGy/a) and length of service of the X-ray workers; and a positive correlation existed between the percentages of basophils, eosinophils and monocytes, and the radiation dose. The abnormality rate of blood picture in the irradiated group was higher than that in the control group. Most X-ray workers with abnormal blood picture were distributed in low-dose group. The data also showed that radiation effect on male X-ray workers was greater than that on female workers. (Author)

  15. The Ottawa ankle rules for the use of diagnostic X-ray in after hours medical centres in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn-Thomas, Simon; Love, Tom; McLeod, Deborah; Vernall, Sue; Kljakovic, Marjan; Dowell, Antony; Durham, John

    2002-09-27

    The aims of this study were to measure baseline use of Ottawa ankle rules (OAR), validate the OAR and, if appropriate, explore the impact of implementing the Rules on X-ray rates in a primary care, after hours medical centre setting. General practitioners (GPs) were surveyed to find their awareness of ankle injury guidelines. Data concerning diagnosis and X-ray utilisation were collected prospectively for patients presenting with ankle injuries to two after hours medical centres. The OAR were applied retrospectively, and the sensitivity and specificity of the OAR were compared with GPs clinical judgement in ordering X-rays. The outcome measures were X-ray utilisation and diagnosis of fracture. Awareness of the OAR was low. The sensitivity of the OAR for diagnosis of fractures was 100% (95% CI: 75.3 - 100) and the specificity was 47% (95% CI: 40.5 - 54.5). The sensitivity of GPs clinical judgement was 100% (95% CI: 75.3 - 100) and the specificity was 37% (95% CI: 30.2 - 44.2). Implementing the OAR would reduce X-ray utilisation by 16% (95% CI: approx 10.8 - 21.3). The OAR are valid in a New Zealand primary care setting. Further implementation of the rules would result in some reduction of X-rays ordered for ankle injuries, but less than the reduction found in previous studies.

  16. Effect of dental metal in 10 MV X-ray beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mimura, Seiichi; Mikami, Yasutaka; Inamura, Keiji; Tahara, Seiji; Nagaya, Isao; Egusa, Tomomi; Nakagiri, Yoshitada; Sugita, Katsuhiko.

    1991-01-01

    We have often encountered patients with dental metal when employing the 10 MV X-ray beam therapy for head and neck tumors, and felt it important to investigate the effect of dental metal in relation to dose distribution. The absorbed dose rose abruptly in the vicinity of the metal reaching an interface value equal to 150% of the dose within the acrylic phantom. These results showed that an overdose occurred about 5 mm from the metal. We also learned that the overdose can be avoided by using a 5-mm thick tissue equivalent material. Six patients with dental metal were treated after first covering their metal with a 5-mm thick mouthpiece. No radiation stomatitis caused by the metal was observed in any of these cases. (author)

  17. A new technique for radiation shielding in superficial X-ray therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baily, B.; Coe, M.A.; Hearnden, T.M.

    1981-01-01

    A new technique is described for making face shields for superficial X-ray therapy of small lesions located near sharp face contour changes. A ''Darvic'' shell is first vacuum-formed on a plaster cast. A low-melting-point alloy is then finely sprayed on to the shell. The area to be treated is cut out of the alloy mask and Darvic shell. Four alloys of varying melting point and varying lead and/or tin content were tested: MCP 69, MCP 70 and MCP 124 alloys afforded better shielding over the whole energy range than MCP 137. This technique of spraying masks produces a perfectly fitting shield, it is quick to make and is cheap because the mask can be recycled once treatment is finished. (U.K.)

  18. Porphyrin conjugated SiC/SiOx nanowires for X-ray-excited photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, F.; Bedogni, E.; Bigi, F.; Rimoldi, T.; Cristofolini, L.; Pinelli, S.; Alinovi, R.; Negri, M.; Dhanabalan, S. C.; Attolini, G.; Fabbri, F.; Goldoni, M.; Mutti, A.; Benecchi, G.; Ghetti, C.; Iannotta, S.; Salviati, G.

    2015-01-01

    The development of innovative nanosystems opens new perspectives for multidisciplinary applications at the frontier between materials science and nanomedicine. Here we present a novel hybrid nanosystem based on cytocompatible inorganic SiC/SiOx core/shell nanowires conjugated via click-chemistry procedures with an organic photosensitizer, a tetracarboxyphenyl porphyrin derivative. We show that this nanosystem is an efficient source of singlet oxygen for cell oxidative stress when irradiated with 6 MV X-Rays at low doses (0.4-2 Gy). The in-vitro clonogenic survival assay on lung adenocarcinoma cells shows that 12 days after irradiation at a dose of 2 Gy, the cell population is reduced by about 75% with respect to control cells. These results demonstrate that our approach is very efficient to enhance radiation therapy effects for cancer treatments.

  19. Experimental and theoretical contributions to X-ray phase-contrast techniques for medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diemoz, P.C.

    2011-01-01

    Several X-ray phase-contrast techniques have recently been developed. Unlike conventional X-ray methods, which measure the absorption properties of the tissues, these techniques derive contrast also from the modulation of the phase produced by the sample. Since the phase shift can be significant even for small details characterized by weak or absent absorption, the achievable image contrast can be greatly increased, notably for the soft biological tissues. These methods are therefore very promising for applications in the medical domain. The aim of this work is to contribute to a deeper understanding of these techniques, in particular propagation-based imaging (PBI), analyzer-based imaging (ABI) and grating interferometry (GIFM), and to study their potential and the best practical implementation for medical imaging applications. An important part of this work is dedicated to the use of mathematical algorithms for the extraction, from the acquired images, of quantitative sample information (the absorption, refraction and scattering sample properties). In particular, five among the most known algorithms based on the geometrical optics approximation have been theoretically analysed and experimentally compared, in planar and tomographic modalities, by using geometrical phantoms and human bone-cartilage and breast samples. A semi-quantitative method for the acquisition and reconstruction of tomographic images in the ABI and GIFM techniques has also been proposed. The validity conditions are analyzed in detail and the method, enabling a considerable simplification of the imaging procedure, has been experimentally checked on phantoms and human samples. Finally, a theoretical and experimental comparison of the PBI, ABI and GIFM techniques is presented. The advantages and drawbacks of each of these techniques are discussed. The results obtained from this analysis can be very useful for determining the most adapted technique for a given application. (author)

  20. High resolution X-ray fluorescence imaging for a microbeam radiation therapy treatment planning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chtcheprov, Pavel; Inscoe, Christina; Burk, Laurel; Ger, Rachel; Yuan, Hong; Lu, Jianping; Chang, Sha; Zhou, Otto

    2014-03-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) uses an array of high-dose, narrow (~100 μm) beams separated by a fraction of a millimeter to treat various radio-resistant, deep-seated tumors. MRT has been shown to spare normal tissue up to 1000 Gy of entrance dose while still being highly tumoricidal. Current methods of tumor localization for our MRT treatments require MRI and X-ray imaging with subject motion and image registration that contribute to the measurement error. The purpose of this study is to develop a novel form of imaging to quickly and accurately assist in high resolution target positioning for MRT treatments using X-ray fluorescence (XRF). The key to this method is using the microbeam to both treat and image. High Z contrast media is injected into the phantom or blood pool of the subject prior to imaging. Using a collimated spectrum analyzer, the region of interest is scanned through the MRT beam and the fluorescence signal is recorded for each slice. The signal can be processed to show vascular differences in the tissue and isolate tumor regions. Using the radiation therapy source as the imaging source, repositioning and registration errors are eliminated. A phantom study showed that a spatial resolution of a fraction of microbeam width can be achieved by precision translation of the mouse stage. Preliminary results from an animal study showed accurate iodine profusion, confirmed by CT. The proposed image guidance method, using XRF to locate and ablate tumors, can be used as a fast and accurate MRT treatment planning system.

  1. Rapid detection of chromosome rearrangement in medical diagnostic X-ray workers by using fluorescence in situ hybridization and study on dose estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhiquan; Sun Yuanming; Li Jin

    1998-01-01

    Objective: Biological doses were estimated for medical diagnostic X-ray workers. Methods: Chromosome rearrangements in X-ray workers were analysed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with composite whole chromosome paintings number 4 and number 7. Results: The frequency of translocation in medical diagnostic X-ray workers was much higher than that in control group (P<0.01). The biological doses to individual X-ray workers were calculated by their translocation frequency. The translocation frequencies of both FISH and G-banding were in good agreement. Conclusion: The biological doses to X-ray workers are estimated by FISH first when their dosimetry records are not documented

  2. New amorphous-silicon image sensor for x-ray diagnostic medical imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisfield, Richard L.; Hartney, Mark A.; Street, Robert A.; Apte, Raj B.

    1998-07-01

    This paper introduces new high-resolution amorphous Silicon (a-Si) image sensors specifically configured for demonstrating film-quality medical x-ray imaging capabilities. The devices utilizes an x-ray phosphor screen coupled to an array of a-Si photodiodes for detecting visible light, and a-Si thin-film transistors (TFTs) for connecting the photodiodes to external readout electronics. We have developed imagers based on a pixel size of 127 micrometer X 127 micrometer with an approximately page-size imaging area of 244 mm X 195 mm, and array size of 1,536 data lines by 1,920 gate lines, for a total of 2.95 million pixels. More recently, we have developed a much larger imager based on the same pixel pattern, which covers an area of approximately 406 mm X 293 mm, with 2,304 data lines by 3,200 gate lines, for a total of nearly 7.4 million pixels. This is very likely to be the largest image sensor array and highest pixel count detector fabricated on a single substrate. Both imagers connect to a standard PC and are capable of taking an image in a few seconds. Through design rule optimization we have achieved a light sensitive area of 57% and optimized quantum efficiency for x-ray phosphor output in the green part of the spectrum, yielding an average quantum efficiency between 500 and 600 nm of approximately 70%. At the same time, we have managed to reduce extraneous leakage currents on these devices to a few fA per pixel, which allows for very high dynamic range to be achieved. We have characterized leakage currents as a function of photodiode bias, time and temperature to demonstrate high stability over these large sized arrays. At the electronics level, we have adopted a new generation of low noise, charge- sensitive amplifiers coupled to 12-bit A/D converters. Considerable attention was given to reducing electronic noise in order to demonstrate a large dynamic range (over 4,000:1) for medical imaging applications. Through a combination of low data lines capacitance

  3. Improving Patient Safety with X-Ray and Anesthesia Machine Ventilator Synchronization: A Medical Device Interoperability Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arney, David; Goldman, Julian M.; Whitehead, Susan F.; Lee, Insup

    When a x-ray image is needed during surgery, clinicians may stop the anesthesia machine ventilator while the exposure is made. If the ventilator is not restarted promptly, the patient may experience severe complications. This paper explores the interconnection of a ventilator and simulated x-ray into a prototype plug-and-play medical device system. This work assists ongoing interoperability framework development standards efforts to develop functional and non-functional requirements and illustrates the potential patient safety benefits of interoperable medical device systems by implementing a solution to a clinical use case requiring interoperability.

  4. Occupational exposure of medical staff due to diagnostic X-ray examinations in veterinary medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mergel, E.; Feige, S. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS) (Germany); Haeusler, U. [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz (BfS), Salzgitter (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    The implementation of the Council directive 96/29 EURATOM and the corresponding national Radiation Protection Ordinance and the X-ray Protection Ordinance coming subsequently into effect led to a changed situation regarding the occupational radiation protection in the medical sector. To reduce the occupational exposure of veterinarians and assisting staff in veterinary radiography is particularly challenging as, in opposite to human radiological examination, the presence of staff is indispensable to restrain the patient. Beyond that the relevant literature reports about too high and/or about unnecessary radiation exposures. To gain a comprehensive knowledge upon the possible exposure of involved staff, the variety of typical examination methods in veterinary clinics and at practitioners had been investigated during the daily routine. Dose measurements were performed for different employees during the examinations taking into account several places of exposure (lens, thyroid, chest, hand, gonad, and feet). Veterinary X-ray diagnostic examinations for pets as well as in equine radiography had been accounted for this study. In total, 101 examination methods, 4.484 accompanied examinations and 53.892 single dose readings resulted in a reliable statistical base to set up a 'Job-Exposure-Matrix' allowing the dose assessment for a variable number and kind of examinations. The 'Job-Exposure-Matrix' is believed to be a useful tool for optimization of occupational radiation exposure of veterinarians by appraising the height of a possible dose, forcing a review of the status quo and triggering the improvement of personal protection by establishing adequate measures. (orig.)

  5. Evaluation of the GSO:Ce scintillator in the X-ray energy range from 40 to 140 kV for possible applications in medical X-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolopoulos, D.; Valais, I.; Kandarakis, I.; Cavouras, D.; Linardatos, D.; Sianoudis, I.; Louizi, A.; Dimitropoulos, N.; Vattis, D.; Episkopakis, A.; Nomicos, C.; Panayiotakis, G.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate, under X-ray medical imaging conditions, the X-ray luminescence efficiency (XLE) and the optical quantum gain (OQG) of the Gd 2 SiO 5 :Ce scintillator in single crystal form, suitable for tomographic applications. Intrinsic physical properties and light emission characteristics of the Gd 2 SiO 5 :Ce scintillator, were also studied. Both experimental and Monte Carlo techniques were used. Various X-ray tube voltages (40-140 kV), currently employed in X-ray imaging applications, were used. XLE was found to vary slowly with X-ray tube voltage from (0.021±0.003) to (0.017±0.003). OQG varied from (317±18) to (466±23) light photons per incident X-ray. These values were adequately high for imaging applications using the particular energy range. Additionally, it was found by Monte Carlo simulations that for crystal thicknesses higher than 0.5 cm both XLE and OQG reached saturation levels, indicating that higher thickness crystals are of no practical use in X-ray medical imaging

  6. Characterization and quantification of cerebral edema induced by synchrotron x-ray microbeam radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serduc, Raphael; Looij, Yohan van de; Francony, Gilles; Verdonck, Olivier; Sanden, Boudewijn van der; Farion, Regine; Segebarth, Christoph; Remy, Chantal; Lahrech, Hana [INSERM, U836, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Laissue, Jean [Institute of Pathology, University of Bern (Switzerland); Braeuer-Krisch, Elke; Siegbahn, Erik Albert; Bravin, Alberto; Prezado, Yolanda [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, F-38043 Grenoble (France)], E-mail: serduc@esrf.fr

    2008-03-07

    Cerebral edema is one of the main acute complications arising after irradiation of brain tumors. Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT), an innovative experimental radiotherapy technique using spatially fractionated synchrotron x-rays, has been shown to spare radiosensitive tissues such as mammal brains. The aim of this study was to determine if cerebral edema occurs after MRT using diffusion-weighted MRI and microgravimetry. Prone Swiss nude mice's heads were positioned horizontally in the synchrotron x-ray beam and the upper part of the left hemisphere was irradiated in the antero-posterior direction by an array of 18 planar microbeams (25 mm wide, on-center spacing 211 mm, height 4 mm, entrance dose 312 Gy or 1000 Gy). An apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was measured at 7 T 1, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days after irradiation. Eventually, the cerebral water content (CWC) was determined by microgravimetry. The ADC and CWC in the irradiated (312 Gy or 1000 Gy) and in the contralateral non-irradiated hemispheres were not significantly different at all measurement times, with two exceptions: (1) a 9% ADC decrease (p < 0.05) was observed in the irradiated cortex 1 day after exposure to 312 Gy, (2) a 0.7% increase (p < 0.05) in the CWC was measured in the irradiated hemispheres 1 day after exposure to 1000 Gy. The results demonstrate the presence of a minor and transient cellular edema (ADC decrease) at 1 day after a 312 Gy exposure, without a significant CWC increase. One day after a 1000 Gy exposure, the CWC increased, while the ADC remained unchanged and may reflect the simultaneous presence of cellular and vasogenic edema. Both types of edema disappear within a week after microbeam exposure which may confirm the normal tissue sparing effect of MRT. For more information on this article, see medicalphysicsweb.org.

  7. Order No. 217 of 29 April 1977 on X-ray diagnostic equipment for medical use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This Order was made by the National Health Service and is divided into several parts covering inter alia approval and notification of X-ray installations, conditions of liability, occupational radiation protection, construction of X-ray apparatus and its shielding and inspection of such equipment by the National Health Service. (NEA) [fr

  8. Study on Construction of a Medical X-Ray Direct Digital Radiography System and Hybrid Preprocessing Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Ren

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We construct a medical X-ray direct digital radiography (DDR system based on a CCD (charge-coupled devices camera. For the original images captured from X-ray exposure, computer first executes image flat-field correction and image gamma correction, and then carries out image contrast enhancement. A hybrid image contrast enhancement algorithm which is based on sharp frequency localization-contourlet transform (SFL-CT and contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization (CLAHE, is proposed and verified by the clinical DDR images. Experimental results show that, for the medical X-ray DDR images, the proposed comprehensive preprocessing algorithm can not only greatly enhance the contrast and detail information, but also improve the resolution capability of DDR system.

  9. Development of a handmade device for collimation and central ray alignment tests in medical X-ray equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, B.L. da; Brito, E.B.; Gomes, A.S.

    2017-01-01

    Ordinance 453/98 of the Ministry of Health establishes that medical X-ray equipment should be monitored by tests that prove its efficiency. This practice is called quality control (QC), and two important tests jointly evaluate the operation of the collimation and alignment systems of the central axis of the X-ray beam. The low supply and the high cost generate allegations of difficulties in the periodic realization of the tests. The aim of this work is to design, make and evaluate the performance of a handmade device for the mentioned tests, using low cost materials. Once built, the device had its performance evaluated and compared with the traditionally marketed device. The handmade device proved to be fit in its functions. It is possible to make a device that tests X-ray medical equipment, using the radiology technologist himself as the test runner. Radiation protection is promoted and legislation with no real financial burden

  10. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the body. X-rays are the oldest and most frequently used form of medical imaging. A bone ... bones. top of page How should I prepare? Most bone x-rays require no special preparation. You ...

  11. Flash X-Ray Apparatus With Spectrum Control Functions For Medical Use And Fuji Computed Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, H.; Sato, E.; Hayasi, Y.; Suzuki, M.; Arima, H.; Hoshino, F.

    1985-02-01

    Flash radiographic bio-medical studies at sub-microsecond intervals were performed by using both a new type of flash X-ray(FX) apparatus with spectrum control functions and Fuji Computed Radiography(FCR). This single flasher tends to have a comparatively long exposure time and the electric pulse width of the FX wave form is about 0.3,usec. The maximum FX dose is about 50mR at 1m per pulse, and the effective focal spot varies according to condenser charging voltage, A-C distance, etc., ranging from 1.0 to 3.0mm in diameter, but in the low dose rate region it can be reduced to less than 1.0mm in diameter. The FX dose is determined by the condenser charging voltage and the A-C distance, while the FX spectrum is determined by the average voltage of the FX tube and filters. Various clear FX images were obtained by controlling the spectrum and dose. FCR is a new storage medium for medical radiography developed by the Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd. and this apparatus has various image forming functions: low dose radiography, film density control, image contrast control, subtraction management and others. We have used this new apparatus in conjunction with our FX radiography and have obtained some new and interesting biomedical radiograms: the edge enhancement image, the instantaneous enlarged image, and the single exposure energy subtraction image using the FX spectrum distribution.

  12. Results of high energy x-ray therapy of gastric carcinoma, 2. Recurrent gastric carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asakawa, H; Otawa, H; Yamada, S [Miyagi Prefectural Adult Disease Center, Natori (Japan)

    1979-01-01

    Thirty cases with recurrent gastric carcinoma were treated with a combination of high energy x-ray and some anti-cancer drugs at Miyagi Seijinbyo Center between 1967 and 1977. Twenty three cases of them tolerated well such treatment; the irradiated dose was more than 4000 rad without any serious complication. The response of recurrent tumor to irradiation was marked in 11 lesions of 21 local recurrences and 4 metastases of the lymph node. The survival rates of those irradiated more than 4000 rad were 22% at one year, 15% at two years and 5% at three years. The median survival month was 6,9 months. These rates obtained in a combined radiation therapy seemed to be well matched for those reported by other authors in a surgical management of recurrent gastric carcinoma. As a conclusion, it was suggested that a combined radiation therapy with some anticancer drugs should be an effective procedure to prolong the life of a patient of recurrent gastric carcinoma.

  13. Absolute x-ray dosimetry on a synchrotron medical beam line with a graphite calorimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harty, P D; Lye, J E; Ramanathan, G; Butler, D J; Hall, C J; Stevenson, A W; Johnston, P N

    2014-05-01

    The absolute dose rate of the Imaging and Medical Beamline (IMBL) on the Australian Synchrotron was measured with a graphite calorimeter. The calorimetry results were compared to measurements from the existing free-air chamber, to provide a robust determination of the absolute dose in the synchrotron beam and provide confidence in the first implementation of a graphite calorimeter on a synchrotron medical beam line. The graphite calorimeter has a core which rises in temperature when irradiated by the beam. A collimated x-ray beam from the synchrotron with well-defined edges was used to partially irradiate the core. Two filtration sets were used, one corresponding to an average beam energy of about 80 keV, with dose rate about 50 Gy/s, and the second filtration set corresponding to average beam energy of 90 keV, with dose rate about 20 Gy/s. The temperature rise from this beam was measured by a calibrated thermistor embedded in the core which was then converted to absorbed dose to graphite by multiplying the rise in temperature by the specific heat capacity for graphite and the ratio of cross-sectional areas of the core and beam. Conversion of the measured absorbed dose to graphite to absorbed dose to water was achieved using Monte Carlo calculations with the EGSnrc code. The air kerma measurements from the free-air chamber were converted to absorbed dose to water using the AAPM TG-61 protocol. Absolute measurements of the IMBL dose rate were made using the graphite calorimeter and compared to measurements with the free-air chamber. The measurements were at three different depths in graphite and two different filtrations. The calorimetry measurements at depths in graphite show agreement within 1% with free-air chamber measurements, when converted to absorbed dose to water. The calorimetry at the surface and free-air chamber results show agreement of order 3% when converted to absorbed dose to water. The combined standard uncertainty is 3.9%. The good agreement of

  14. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube emitter on metal foil for medical X-ray imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Je Hwang; Kim, Wan Sun; Lee, Seung Ho; Eom, Young Ju; Park, Hun Kuk; Park, Kyu Chang

    2013-10-01

    A simple method is proposed for growing vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on metal foil using the triode direct current plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The carbon nanotube (CNT) electron emitter was fabricated using fewer process steps with an acid treated metal substrate. The CNT emitter was used for X-ray generation, and the X-ray image of mouse's joint was obtained with an anode current of 0.5 mA at an anode bias of 60 kV. The simple fabrication of a well-aligned CNT with a protection layer on metal foil, and its X-ray application, were studied.

  15. Transition radiation in metal-metal multilayer nanostructures as a medical source of hard x-ray radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokrovsky, A. L.; Kaplan, A. E.; Shkolnikov, P. L.

    2006-01-01

    We show that a periodic metal-metal multilayer nanostructure can serve as an efficient source of hard x-ray transition radiation. Our research effort is aimed at developing an x-ray source for medical applications, which is based on using low-energy relativistic electrons. The approach toward choosing radiator-spacer couples for the generation of hard x-ray resonant transition radiation by few-MeV electrons traversing solid multilayer structures for the energies of interest to medicine (30-50 keV) changes dramatically compared with that for soft x-ray radiation. We show that one of the main factors in achieving the required resonant line is the absence of the contrast of the refractive indices between the spacer and the radiator at the far wings of the radiation line; for that purpose, the optimal spacer, as a rule, should have a higher atomic number than the radiator. Having experimental goals in mind, we have considered also the unwanted effects due to bremsstrahlung radiation, absorption and scattering of radiated photons, detector-related issues, and inhibited coherence of transition radiation due to random deviation of spacing between the layers. Choosing as a model example a Mo-Ag radiator-spacer pair of materials, we demonstrate that the x-ray transition radiation line can be well resolved with the use of spatial and frequency filtering

  16. Digital radiography - usability of experience in medical technology with fluorescent storage material for technical X-ray testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattis, A.; Winterberg, K.H.

    1992-01-01

    In nearly 100 years' development of X-ray technique, synergy effects between medical technology and non-destructive material testing (NDT) have repeatedly led to new applications. Thus digital radiography in medicine is a 'low dose' process introduced years ago which, by using a specially developed storage foil technique, offers extensive possibilities of application for NDT. (orig.) [de

  17. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... An MRI Story Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray ... posted: How to Obtain and Share Your Medical Images Movement Disorders Video: The Basketball Game: An MRI ...

  18. ImaSim, a software tool for basic education of medical x-ray imaging in radiotherapy and radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Guillaume; deBlois, François; Verhaegen, Frank

    2013-11-01

    Introduction: X-ray imaging is an important part of medicine and plays a crucial role in radiotherapy. Education in this field is mostly limited to textbook teaching due to equipment restrictions. A novel simulation tool, ImaSim, for teaching the fundamentals of the x-ray imaging process based on ray-tracing is presented in this work. ImaSim is used interactively via a graphical user interface (GUI). Materials and methods: The software package covers the main x-ray based medical modalities: planar kilo voltage (kV), planar (portal) mega voltage (MV), fan beam computed tomography (CT) and cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging. The user can modify the photon source, object to be imaged and imaging setup with three-dimensional editors. Objects are currently obtained by combining blocks with variable shapes. The imaging of three-dimensional voxelized geometries is currently not implemented, but can be added in a later release. The program follows a ray-tracing approach, ignoring photon scatter in its current implementation. Simulations of a phantom CT scan were generated in ImaSim and were compared to measured data in terms of CT number accuracy. Spatial variations in the photon fluence and mean energy from an x-ray tube caused by the heel effect were estimated from ImaSim and Monte Carlo simulations and compared. Results: In this paper we describe ImaSim and provide two examples of its capabilities. CT numbers were found to agree within 36 Hounsfield Units (HU) for bone, which corresponds to a 2% attenuation coefficient difference. ImaSim reproduced the heel effect reasonably well when compared to Monte Carlo simulations. Discussion: An x-ray imaging simulation tool is made available for teaching and research purposes. ImaSim provides a means to facilitate the teaching of medical x-ray imaging.

  19. Determination of Entrance Skin Doses and Organ Doses for Medical X Ray Examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tung, C.J.; Cheng, C.Y.; Chao, T.C.; Tsai, H.Y.

    1999-01-01

    A national survey of patient doses for diagnostic X ray radiographs is planned in Taiwan. Entrance skin doses and organ doses for all installed X ray machines will be investigated. A pilot study has been carried out for the national survey to develop a protocol for the dose assessment. Entrance skin doses and organ doses were measured by thermoluminescence dosemeters and calculated by Monte Carlo simulations for several X ray examinations. The conversion factor from free air entrance absorbed dose to entrance skin dose was derived. A formula for the computation of entrance skin doses from inputs of kV p , mA.s, source to skin distance, aluminium filtration, and generator rectifying was constructed. Organ doses were measured using a RANDO phantom and calculated using a mathematical phantom. All data will be passed to the Atomic Energy Council for developing a programme of national survey and regulatory controls for diagnostic X ray examinations. (author)

  20. Safety assessment and quality control of medical x-ray facilities in some hospitals in Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darko, E.O.; Charles, D.F.

    1998-01-01

    Safety assessment and quality control measurements of diagnostic x-ray installations were carried out in five hospitals in Ghana. The study was focused on the siting, design and construction of the buildings housing the x-ray units, assessment of safety systems and devices and measurements of the technical performance, and film processing conditions. The location, inadequacies in the design/construction, unavailability of relevant safety systems and devices, violation of basic safety principles and poor performance of some of the x-ray facilities indicate the need to improve quality control programmes, safety culture and enforcement of regulatory standards in diagnostic x-ray examinations in Ghana. (author). 8 refs., 11 tabs., 8 figs

  1. A study on developpement of guideline on writing technical document for electrical medical devices: Dental x-ray equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Youl; Kim, Jae Ryang; Lee, Jun Ho; Park, Chang Won [Division of Medical Device Research, National Institute of Food and Drug Safety Evaluation, Mnistry of Food and Drug Safety (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Due to recent population aging, the number of check-up for senior citizens has increased steadily. According to this trend, the market size of dental X-ray equipment and the number of approval and review for these devices have simultaneously increased. The technical document of medical device is required for approval and review for medical device, and medical device companies needs to have work comprehension and expertise, as the document needs to include the overall contents such as performances, test criteria, etc.. Yet, since most of domestic manufacturers or importers of medical devices are small businesses, it is difficult for them to recruit professional manpower for approval of medical devices, and submission of inaccurate technical documents has increased. These problems lead to delay of the approval process and to difficulties in quick entering into the market. Especially, the Ministry of Food and Drug safety (MFDS) standards of a dental extra-oral X-ray equipment, a dental intra-oral X-ray equipment, an arm-type computed tomography, and a portable X-ray system have been recently enacted or not. this guideline of dental X-ray equipment adjusting revised standards was developed to help relative companies and reviewers. For this study, first, the methods to write technical document have been reviewed with revised international and domestic regulations and system. Second, the domestic and foreign market status of each item has been surveyed and analyzed. Third, the contents of technical documents already approved by MFDS have been analyzed to select the correct example, test items, criteria, and methods. Finally, the guideline has been developed based on international and domestic regulation, through close review of a consultative body composed of academic, industrial, research institute and government experts.

  2. A study on developpement of guideline on writing technical document for electrical medical devices: Dental x-ray equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Youl; Kim, Jae Ryang; Lee, Jun Ho; Park, Chang Won

    2016-01-01

    Due to recent population aging, the number of check-up for senior citizens has increased steadily. According to this trend, the market size of dental X-ray equipment and the number of approval and review for these devices have simultaneously increased. The technical document of medical device is required for approval and review for medical device, and medical device companies needs to have work comprehension and expertise, as the document needs to include the overall contents such as performances, test criteria, etc.. Yet, since most of domestic manufacturers or importers of medical devices are small businesses, it is difficult for them to recruit professional manpower for approval of medical devices, and submission of inaccurate technical documents has increased. These problems lead to delay of the approval process and to difficulties in quick entering into the market. Especially, the Ministry of Food and Drug safety (MFDS) standards of a dental extra-oral X-ray equipment, a dental intra-oral X-ray equipment, an arm-type computed tomography, and a portable X-ray system have been recently enacted or not. this guideline of dental X-ray equipment adjusting revised standards was developed to help relative companies and reviewers. For this study, first, the methods to write technical document have been reviewed with revised international and domestic regulations and system. Second, the domestic and foreign market status of each item has been surveyed and analyzed. Third, the contents of technical documents already approved by MFDS have been analyzed to select the correct example, test items, criteria, and methods. Finally, the guideline has been developed based on international and domestic regulation, through close review of a consultative body composed of academic, industrial, research institute and government experts

  3. An epidemiologic investigation of cancers among medical diagnostic X-ray workers of 1950-1996 in Jiangsu province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Ningle; Wang Jin; Xu Cuizhen; Hu Lianzhi; Hou Bijun

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To research the phenomenon and characteristic of radiation oncogenesis among medical diagnostic X-ray workers. Methods: The cancer incidence data of the fixed cohort from the beginning of 1950 to the end of 1996 were collected. The estimates of relative risk (RR) were calculated by AMFIT in Epicure (Hirosoft International Corp, 1988-1992). Results: During the period of 1950-1996 there were 312 cancers among 215 355 person-years at risk in a cohort of 7701 subjects, including, medical diagnostic X-ray workers and workers of other departments in the same hospitals. The RR adjusted for sex and age for overall cancers was more than 1. The incidence of female breast cancer increased significantly (RR = 3.3, 95%, CI = 1.39 - 8.07), and the relative risks for solid cancer and leukemia were 1.2 and 2.6, respectively. The average age of occurrence of malignant tumors was moved up from 55.0 years in the controls to 51.3 years in the X-ray workers. Conclusions: There is a positive effect of radiation oncogenesis on medical diagnostic X-ray workers, although the sample size is not large enough to make a definite overall conclusion statistically. Further follow-up is needed

  4. Radiation exposure of medical staff from interventional x-ray procedures: a multicentre study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeusler, Uwe; Brix, Gunnar; Czarwinski, Renate

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the radiation exposure of medical staff from interventional x-ray procedures. Partial-body dose measurements were performed with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) in 39 physicians and nine assistants conducting 73 interventional procedures of nine different types in 14 hospitals in Germany. Fluoroscopy time and the dose-area product (DAP) were recorded too. The median (maximum) equivalent body dose per procedure was 16 (2,500) μSv for an unshielded person; the partial-body dose per procedure was 2.8 (240) μSv to the eye lens, 4.1 (730) μSv to the thyroid, 44 (1,800) μSv to one of the feet and 75 (13,000) μSv to one of the hands. A weak correlation between fluoroscopy time or DAP and the mean TLD dose was observed. Generally, the doses were within an acceptable range from a radiation hygiene point of view. However, relatively high exposures were measured to the hand in some cases and could cause a partial-body dose above the annual dose limit of 500 mSv. Thus, the use of finger dosimeters is strongly recommended. (orig.)

  5. Relationship between mutation frequency of GPA locus and cumulative dose among medical diagnostic X-ray workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jixian; Yu Wenru; Li Benxiao; Fan Tiqiang; Li Zhen; Gao Zhiwei; Chen Zhenjun; Zhao Yongcheng

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To explore the feasibility of using GPA locus mutation assay as a bio-dosimeter for occupational exposure to ionizing radiation. Methods: An improved technique of GPA locus mutation assay was used in th study. The frequencies of mutant RBC in peripheral blood of 55 medical X-ray workers and 50 controls employed in different calendar-year periods were detected. The relationship between mutation frequencies (MFs) and period of entry, working years and cumulative doses were analyzed. Results: The MFs were significantly elevated among X-ray workers employed before 1970. This finding is similar to the result of cancer epidemiological study among medical X-ray workers , in which the cancer risk was significantly increased only X-ray workers employed before 1970. The MFs of GPA increased with increasing cumulative dose. The dose-effect relationship of Nφ MF with cumulative dose was closer than that of NN MF. Conclusion: There are many problems to be solved for using GPA MF assay as a bio-dosimeter such as individual variation, specificity and calibration curve of dose-effect relationship

  6. The x-ray time of flight method for investigation of ghosting in amorphous selenium-based flat panel medical x-ray imagers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, A.W.; Bakueva, L.; Rowlands, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    Amorphous selenium (a-Se) based real-time flat-panel imagers (FPIs) are finding their way into the digital radiology department because they offer the practical advantages of digital x-ray imaging combined with an image quality that equals or outperforms that of conventional systems. The temporal imaging characteristics of FPIs can be affected by ghosting (i.e., radiation-induced changes of sensitivity) when the dose to the detector is high (e.g., portal imaging and mammography) or the images are acquired at a high frame rate (e.g., fluoroscopy). In this paper, the x-ray time-of-flight (TOF) method is introduced as a tool for the investigation of ghosting in a-Se photoconductor layers. The method consists of irradiating layers of a-Se with short x-ray pulses. From the current generated in the a-Se layer, ghosting is quantified and the ghosting parameters (charge carrier generation rate and carrier lifetimes and mobilities) are assessed. The x-ray TOF method is novel in that (1) x-ray sensitivity (S) and ghosting parameters can be measured simultaneously (2) the transport of both holes and electrons can be isolated, and (3) the method is applicable to the practical a-Se layer structure with blocking contacts used in FPIs. The x-ray TOF method was applied to an analysis of ghosting in a-Se photoconductor layers under portal imaging conditions, i.e., 1 mm thick a-Se layers, biased at 5 V/μm, were irradiated using a 6 MV LINAC x-ray beam to a total dose (ghosting dose) of 30 Gy. The initial sensitivity (S 0 ) of the a-Se layers was 63±2 nC cm -2 cGy -1 . It was found that S decreases to 30% of S 0 after a ghosting dose of 5 Gy and to 21% after 30 Gy at which point no further change in S occurs. At an x-ray intensity of 22 Gy/s (instantaneous dose rate during a LINAC x-ray pulse), the charge carrier generation rate was 1.25±0.1x10 22 ehp m -3 s -1 and, to a first approximation, independent of the ghosting dose. However, both hole and electron transport showed a

  7. Method for calculating required shielding in medical x-ray rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karppinen, J.

    1997-10-01

    The new annual radiation dose limits - 20 mSv (previously 50 mSv) for radiation workers and 1 mSv (previously 5 mSv) for other persons - implies that the adequacy of existing radiation shielding must be re-evaluated. In principle, one could assume that the thicknesses of old radiation shields should be increased by about one or two half-value layers in order to comply with the new dose limits. However, the assumptions made in the earlier shielding calculations are highly conservative; the required shielding was often determined by applying the maximum high-voltage of the x-ray tube for the whole workload. A more realistic calculation shows that increased shielding is typically not necessary if more practical x-ray tube voltages are used in the evaluation. We have developed a PC-based calculation method for calculating the x-ray shielding which is more realistic than the highly conservative method formerly used. The method may be used to evaluate an existing shield for compliance with new regulations. As examples of these calculations, typical x-ray rooms are considered. The lead and concrete thickness requirements as a function of x-ray tube voltage and workload are also given in tables. (author)

  8. Segmented-spectrum detection mechanism for medical x-ray in CdTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zaifeng; Meng, Qingzhen; Cao, Qingjie; Yao, Suying

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a segmented X-ray spectrum detection method based on a layered X-ray detector in Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) substrate. We describe the three-dimensional structure of proposed detector pixel and investigate the matched spectrum-resolving method. Polychromatic X-ray beam enter the CdTe substrate edge on and will be absorbed completely in different thickness varying with photon energy. Discrete potential wells are formed under external controlling voltage to collect the photo-electrons generated in different layers, and segmented X-ray spectrum can be deduced from the quantity of photo-electrons. In this work, we verify the feasibility of the segmented-spectrum detection mechanism by simulating the absorption of monochromatic X-ray in a CdTe substrate. Experiments in simulation show that the number of photo-electrons grow exponentially with the increase of incident thickness, and photons with different energy will be absorbed in various thickness. The charges generated in different layers are collected into adjacent potential wells, and collection efficiency is estimated to be about 87% for different incident intensity under the 40000V/cm electric field. Errors caused by charge sharing between neighboring layers are also analyzed, and it can be considered negligible by setting appropriate size of electrodes.

  9. X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masswig, I.

    1986-01-01

    The tkb market survey comparatively evaluates the X-ray sources and replacement tubes for stationary equipment currently available on the German market. It lists the equipment parameters of 235 commercially available X-ray sources and their replacement tubes and gives the criteria for purchase decisions. The survey has been completed with December 1985, and offers good information concerning medical and technical aspects as well as those of safety and maintenance. (orig.) [de

  10. The enforcement regulation for the law for radiation and x-ray technicians engaging in medical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    These provisions are established on the basis of and to enforce the ''Law for radiation and X-ray technicians engaging in medical treatment''. Applications for the license of radiation and X-ray technicians engaging in medical treatment shall be filed, attached with a copy or an abstract of the census register of the applicant and a medical certificate by a doctor of whether the applicant is an insane, a deaf, a dumb or a blind person or a person caught by an infectious disease or not. In the register of such technicians, the number and the date of registration, the names of the prefectures where the technicians are legally domiciled, their names and the date of birth, the year and month of passing the examination, the matters concerning withdrawal of the license or suspension of the practice must be written. The date and the place of the examination for such technicians shall be published beforehand on the official gazette. The examinations for such radiation and X-ray technicians are made on the subjects, such as physics, electrical engineering, chemistry, elementary medical science, radiology, photographing technique, medical treatment technique and control technique. (Okada, K.)

  11. Estimation of the population dose from medical X-ray diagnostic examination in Shandong province, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Xieming

    1985-01-01

    The exposure doses on the examinated body surface for verious types of X-ray diagnostic examanition in Shandong Province were surveyed. The collective effective dose equivalent in per million population were calculated with the measured results, the ratios of orga absorbed doses to irradiated surface exposure doses and the frequencies of X-ray examination in Shandong Province. The result was 326 man.Sv per million total population in 1980, of which chest fluoroscopies. lumbar spine radiographies and G.I. examination were estimated to be about 78, 9 and 5 precent, respectively

  12. Dose corrections for field obliquity for 45-MV x-ray therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGinley, P.H.; Clanton, A.; Downes, B.; Nuskind, J.

    1983-01-01

    The degree of dose perturbation produced by a 25.7-cm-diam circular water phantom was determined for a 45-MV x-ray beam by direct measurement. Data obtained in a circular and a cubical water phantom was utilized to test three accepted techniques (isodose shift, TAR method, and effective SSD method) for the correction of isodose levels to account for patient curvature. In general, the effective SSD method yielded the most accurate results for all depth including the buildup region. An isodose shift factor of 0.8 was found for the 45-MV x-ray beam. Key words: curvature corrections, 45-MV x ray, isodose shift, TAR, effective SSD method

  13. [Effective Techniques to Reduce Radiation Exposure to Medical Staff during Assist of X-ray Computed Tomography Examination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyajima, Ryuichi; Fujibuchi, Toshioh; Miyachi, Yusuke; Tateishi, Satoshi; Uno, Yoshinori; Amakawa, Kazutoshi; Ohura, Hiroki; Orita, Shinichi

    2018-01-01

    Medical staffs like radiological technologists, doctors, and nurses are at an increased risk of exposure to radiation while assisting the patient in a position or monitor contrast medium injection during computed tomography (CT). However, methods to protect medical staff from radiation exposure and protocols for using radiological protection equipment have not been standardized and differ among hospitals. In this study, the distribution of scattered X-rays in a CT room was measured by placing electronic personal dosimeters in locations where medical staff stands beside the CT scanner gantry while assisting the patient and the exposure dose was measured. Moreover, we evaluated non-uniform exposure and revealed effective techniques to reduce the exposure dose to medical staff during CT. The dose of the scattered X-rays was the lowest at the gantry and at the examination table during both head and abdominal CT. The dose was the highest at the trunk of the upper body of the operator corresponding to a height of 130 cm during head CT and at the head corresponding to a height of 150 cm during abdominal CT. The maximum dose to the crystalline lens was approximately 600 μSv during head CT. We found that the use of volumetric CT scanning and X-ray protective goggles, and face direction toward the gantry reduced the exposure dose, particularly to the crystalline lens, for which lower equivalent dose during CT scan has been recently recommended in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 118.

  14. Air kerma national standard of Russian Federation for x-ray and gamma radiation. Activity SSDL/VNIIM in medical radiation dosimetry field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharitonov, I.A.; Villevalde, N.D.; Oborin, A.V.; Fominykh, V.I.

    2002-01-01

    for medium-energy X-ray range in 1998. The results of comparisons are presented in the table 1. Dimensions of unities of air kerma and air kerma rate are transmitted from primary standard to secondary standards with expanded uncertainty from 1,3 to 2,5 % (k=2), which are including and at laboratory SSDL/VNIIM and base dosimetry laboratory CNIRRI. The comparisons of secondary standards with the primary standard VNIIM are performed one time in 5 years. The laboratory SSDL/VNIIM is the component of state primary standards laboratory in the field of measurement ionizing radiations VNIIM. SSDL/VNIIM has the secondary standard - universal dosimeter UNIDOS with ionization chambers of volume from 0,6 cm 3 to 10 liters, radioactive sources from Fe-55, Cd-109, Am-241, Cs-137 and Co-60 with activity from 0,03 to 140 GBq. The primary standard equipment and facility on the basis industrial X-ray apparatus YRD-1 with a tungsten-anode X-ray tube and inherent filtration of around 3 mm Al (at generating potential from 50 to 250 kV) are used for calibration dosimetric devices in the field X-ray. There is termoluminescence dosimetric system such as KDT-02M with TL detectors from LiF for spending audit measurements by method 'dose-post'. Laboratory SSDL/VNIIM and base dosimetric laboratory CNIRRI are carried out calibrations and verifications of air kerma and air kerma rate reference standards and working measurement means for X-ray and gamma therapy and diagnostics, belonging to the oncology and diagnostic centers, clinics and hospitals. The laboratory CNIRRI fulfils the verification of measurement means and supervision of the application in the medical radiology, but the regional departments of radial diagnostics put into practice monitoring of doses, obtained by patients and staff at fulfilling of diagnostic and medical procedures. The diagnostic and clinical dosimeters are calibrated directly under the primary standard of air kerma and air kerma rate for achievement the highest

  15. Advance of the National Program of Radiological Protection and Safety for medical diagnostic with X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdejo S, M.

    1999-01-01

    The National Program of Radiological Protection and Safety for medical diagnostic with X-ray (Programa Nacional de Proteccion y Seguridad Radiologica para diagnostico medico con rayos X) was initiated in the General Direction of Environmental Health (Direccion General de Salud Ambiental) in 1995. Task coordinated with different dependences of the Public Sector in collaboration between the Secretary of Health (Secretaria de Salud), the National Commission of Nuclear Safety and Safeguards (Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias) and, the National Institute of Nuclear Research (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares). The surveillance to the fulfilment of the standardization in matter of Radiological Protection and Safety in the medical diagnostic with X-rays has been obtained for an important advance in the Public sector and it has been arousing interest in the Private sector. (Author)

  16. Physical-technical quality control for medical x-ray apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aalbers, A.H.L.

    1989-01-01

    The technical aspects of quality control in medial x-ray diagnostics are discussed. It is recommended to hurry, also in the Netherlands, on the basis of already existing starting-up's abroad, with drawing up quality standards and judgement criteria. (author). 6 refs.; 2 figs.; 1 tab

  17. Soft X-ray therapy of recurrent pterygium - an alternative to {sup 90}Sr eye applicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willner, J.; Flentje, M. [Dept. of Radiation Therapy, Univ. of Wuerzburg (Germany); Lieb, W. [Dept. of Ophthalmology, Univ. of Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2001-08-01

    Background: Analysis of effectiveness of perioperative 20 kV soft X-ray irradiation in recurrent pterygium as an alternative to postoperative {sup 90}Sr beta irradiation. Patients and Methods: Between 1987 and 2000 a total of 65 patients with 81 pterygia were treated with 20 kV X-ray therapy in the course of surgical treatment of recurrent pterygium. Until 1995 simple excision (bare sclera technique) followed by postoperative irradiation (generally four fractions of 5 Gy) was applied, with radiation starting on mean 4 days following surgery (34 cases, mean follow-up 52 months). Since 1995 we have changed our policy to a perioperative regimen starting with a single dose of 7 Gy prior to microsurgical excision with conjunctival autograft and proceeding within 24 hours with 5 Gy single dose to the surgical bed and then every other day to a total dose of 27 Gy (47 cases, mean follow-up 31 months). Recurrence rate was calculated by Kaplan Meier method. A multivariate Cox regression analysis of prognostic factors for recurrence was performed. Results: A total of 19 recurrences were observed, 15 in the historical postoperative group and four in the perioperative group. Actuarial 2- and 5-year recurrence rate is 9% in the ''new treatment group'' compared to 34% and 56% in the historical group (p = 0,001). Only one of the four recurrences among the pre- and postoperatively irradiated group required a new surgical procedure. In this case radiation had been terminated at 17 Gy. Actuarial rate of surgical reintervention was only 2% at 2 and 5 years compared to 28% and 36% in the historical group. In multivariate Cox regression analysis only the new treatment strategy was found to influence control rate significantly. Until now no case of severe side effects like scleral necrosis or thinning, symble-pharon, radiation-induced cataract or glaucoma were observed in both groups. Conclusion: The combination of pre- and postoperative 20 kV X-ray therapy and

  18. Accuracy of cranial coplanar beam therapy using an oblique, stereoscopic x-ray image guidance system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinci, Justin P.; Hogstrom, Kenneth R.; Neck, Daniel W.

    2008-01-01

    A system for measuring two-dimensional (2D) dose distributions in orthogonal anatomical planes in the cranium was developed and used to evaluate the accuracy of coplanar conformal therapy using ExacTrac image guidance. Dose distributions were measured in the axial, sagittal, and coronal planes using a CIRS (Computerized Imaging Reference Systems, Inc.) anthropomorphic head phantom with a custom internal film cassette. Sections of radiographic Kodak EDR2 film were cut, processed, and digitized using custom templates. Spatial and dosimetric accuracy and precision of the film system were assessed. BrainScan planned a coplanar-beam treatment to conformally irradiate a 2-cm-diameterx2-cm-long cylindrical planning target volume. Prior to delivery, phantom misalignments were imposed in combinations of ±8 mm offsets in each of the principal directions. ExacTrac x-ray correction was applied until the phantom was within an acceptance criteria of 1 mm/1 deg. (first two measurement sets) or 0.4 mm/0.4 deg. (last two measurement sets). Measured dose distributions from film were registered to the treatment plan dose calculations and compared. Alignment errors, displacement between midpoints of planned and measured 70% isodose contours (Δc), and positional errors of the 80% isodose line were evaluated using 49 2D film measurements (98 profiles). Comparison of common, but independent measurements of Δc showed that systematic errors in the measurement technique were 0.2 mm or less along all three anatomical axes and that random error averaged (σ±σ σ ) 0.29±0.06 mm for the acceptance criteria of 1 mm/1 deg. and 0.15±0.02 mm for the acceptance criteria of 0.4 mm/0.4 deg. . The latter was consistent with independent estimates that showed the precision of the measurement system was 0.3 mm (2σ). Values of Δc were as great as 0.9, 0.3, and 1.0 mm along the P-A, R-L, and I-S axes, respectively. Variations in Δc along the P-A axis were correlated to misalignments between laser

  19. PCXMC. A PC-based Monte Carlo program for calculating patient doses in medical x-ray examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapiovaara, M.; Lakkisto, M.; Servomaa, A.

    1997-02-01

    The report describes PCXMC, a Monte Carlo program for calculating patients' organ doses and the effective dose in medical x-ray examinations. The organs considered are: the active bone marrow, adrenals, brain, breasts, colon (upper and lower large intestine), gall bladder, heats, kidneys, liver, lungs, muscle, oesophagus, ovaries, pancreas, skeleton, skin, small intestine, spleen, stomach, testes, thymes, thyroid, urinary bladder, and uterus. (42 refs.)

  20. Review of the regulation on the installation and use of X-ray equipment for medical diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez Garcia, C.; Arguelles Sanchez, R.; Franco Artero, P.; Gil Gahete, M.; Rodriguez Marti, M.; Rueda Guerrero, M. D.; Villarroel Gonzalez-Eipe, R.

    2009-01-01

    The first regulation on the installation and use of X-ray equipment for the purposes of medical diagnosis was approved in 1991. This allowed the control of the safety of such equipment to be significantly improved. Royal Decree 1891/1991 has now been subjected to a review to update its contents and include the regulatory changes that have been incorporated in later standards, this having materialised with the Royal Decree 1085/2009, of July 3rd. (Author)

  1. Present status and issues regarding X-ray medical checkup vehicles in preventive medicine. Usefulness of mass screening for lung cancer by an X-ray medical checkup vehicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Yasuyuki; Yamada, Takaki; Doi, Masaya; Tamanoi, Toshio; Murase, Ken-ya; Mochizuki, Teruhito

    2005-01-01

    Although the prevention of habituation-related diseases has become an important topic in Japan, the early detection of cancers such as lung, gastric, and breast cancers is an important issue for x-ray-related imaging modalities. High cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness are necessary to perform mass screenings such as those for lung cancer. In order to assess cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness, a total of 100 institutions nationwide were investigated, with a 41% of recovery rate. There were at least one or two institutions in each prefecture. Cost-benefit analysis was based on factors including the price of the medical check-up vehicle, its service life, and income from the examinations. The mean price of medical check-up vehicles used for chest X-ray examinations was 4,445,000 yen. Cost-effectiveness analysis was based on the expense incurred to discover one lung cancer. According to our research, the cost-effectiveness involved in detecting one lung cancer by conventional chest X-ray examination was about 2,270,167 yen/person. Since this amount seems unduly high, it is necessary to improve cost-effectiveness. (author)

  2. A dual-energy medical instrument for measurement of x-ray source voltage and dose rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhikov, V. D.; Naydenov, S. V.; Volkov, V. G.; Opolonin, O. D.; Makhota, S.; Pochet, T.; Smith, C. F.

    2016-03-01

    An original dual-energy detector and medical instrument have been developed to measure the output voltages and dose rates of X-ray sources. Theoretical and experimental studies were carried out to characterize the parameters of a new scintillator-photodiode sandwich-detector based on specially-prepared zinc selenide crystals in which the low-energy detector (LED) works both as the detector of the low-energy radiation and as an absorption filter allowing the highenergy fraction of the radiation to pass through to the high-energy detector (HED). The use of the LED as a low-energy filter in combination with a separate HED opens broad possibilities for such sandwich structures. In particular, it becomes possible to analyze and process the sum, difference and ratio of signals coming from these detectors, ensuring a broad (up to 106) measurement range of X-ray intensity from the source and a leveling of the energy dependence. We have chosen an optimum design of the detector and the geometry of the component LED and HED parts that allow energy-dependence leveling to within specified limits. The deviation in energy dependence of the detector does not exceed about 5% in the energy range from 30 to 120 keV. The developed detector and instrument allow contactless measurement of the anode voltage of an X-ray emitter from 40 to 140 kV with an error no greater than 3%. The dose rate measurement range is from 1 to 200 R/min. An original medical instrument has passed clinical testing and was recommended for use in medical institutions for X-ray diagnostics.

  3. Compliance testing of medical diagnostic x-ray equipment: three years experience of a public hospital in western Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuchyna, T.; Jacob, C.S.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: A formal compliance testing program which began on 1 January 1997 called for all medical and diagnostic x-ray equipment to be tested according to protocols established by the Western Australian Radiological Council. This work describes the impact of the legislation three years post implementation on a major teaching Hospital with 45 x-ray tubes located throughout 37 rooms. Testing is performed prior to scheduled service by licensed compliance testers according to test methods specified in the Western Australian Compliance Testing Workbook, 1997. A dedicated non-invasive x-ray beam analyser is instrumental in accurately determining radiation output parameters of the generator and x-ray tube. Assessment of compliance is determined by a Qualified Expert. Repair and re-testing of non-compliant items is coordinated with service personnel. Notices of non-compliance were received for approximately 60% of the equipment in the Hospital following the equipment' first annual test. Reasons and seriousness of failure varied according to equipment category, test category, equipment use and age. The majority of non-compliance issues were resolved within 90 days. At the end of the third year of testing, approximately 75% of the x-ray units tested met the compliance criteria. The main reasons for non-compliance were found to be design limitations associated with old technology and the current radiation legislation that makes it difficult for older equipment to meet the stringent criteria. The number and categories of failure did not significantly decrease in the second or third years of testing. Exemptions from compliance criteria have been sought for two units on the basis of age and design. Units unable to meet the criteria following several repair attempts or where the cost of repair was deemed not justified, were decommissioned. Formal testing of medical x-ray equipment has demonstrated various non-compliance issues that did not significantly improve during the

  4. X-ray performance of a wafer-scale CMOS flat panel imager for applications in medical imaging and nondestructive testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Bo Kyung; Jeon, Seongchae; Seo, Chang-Woo

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a wafer-scale complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-based X-ray flat panel detector for medical imaging and nondestructive testing applications. In this study, our proposed X-ray CMOS flat panel imager has been fabricated by using a 0.35 µm 1-poly/4-metal CMOS process. The pixel size is 100 µm×100 µm and the pixel array format is 1200×1200 pixels, which provide a field-of-view (FOV) of 120mm×120 mm. The 14.3-bit extended counting analog-to digital converter (ADC) with built-in binning mode was used to reduce the area and simultaneously improve the image resolution. The different screens such as thallium-doped CsI (CsI:Tl) and terbium gadolinium oxysulfide (Gd_2O_2S:Tb) scintillators were used as conversion materials for X-rays to visible light photons. The X-ray imaging performance such as X-ray sensitivity as a function of X-ray exposure dose, spatial resolution, image lag and X-ray images of various objects were measured under practical medical and industrial application conditions. This paper results demonstrate that our prototype CMOS-based X-ray flat panel imager has the significant potential for medical imaging and non-destructive testing (NDT) applications with high-resolution and high speed rate.

  5. X-ray performance of a wafer-scale CMOS flat panel imager for applications in medical imaging and nondestructive testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Bo Kyung, E-mail: goldrain99@kaist.ac.kr [Advanced Medical Device Research Center, Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Seongchae [Advanced Medical Device Research Center, Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Chang-Woo [Department of Radiological Science, Yonsei University, Gangwon-do 220-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-21

    This paper presents a wafer-scale complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-based X-ray flat panel detector for medical imaging and nondestructive testing applications. In this study, our proposed X-ray CMOS flat panel imager has been fabricated by using a 0.35 µm 1-poly/4-metal CMOS process. The pixel size is 100 µm×100 µm and the pixel array format is 1200×1200 pixels, which provide a field-of-view (FOV) of 120mm×120 mm. The 14.3-bit extended counting analog-to digital converter (ADC) with built-in binning mode was used to reduce the area and simultaneously improve the image resolution. The different screens such as thallium-doped CsI (CsI:Tl) and terbium gadolinium oxysulfide (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Tb) scintillators were used as conversion materials for X-rays to visible light photons. The X-ray imaging performance such as X-ray sensitivity as a function of X-ray exposure dose, spatial resolution, image lag and X-ray images of various objects were measured under practical medical and industrial application conditions. This paper results demonstrate that our prototype CMOS-based X-ray flat panel imager has the significant potential for medical imaging and non-destructive testing (NDT) applications with high-resolution and high speed rate.

  6. Method of estimating patient skin dose from dose displayed on medical X-ray equipment with flat panel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Atsushi; Koshida, Kichiro; Togashi, Atsuhiko; Matsubara, Kousuke

    2004-01-01

    The International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) has stipulated that medical X-ray equipment for interventional procedures must display radiation doses such as air kerma in free air at the interventional reference point and dose area product to establish radiation safety for patients (IEC 60601-2-43). However, it is necessary to estimate entrance skin dose for the patient from air kerma for an accurate risk assessment of radiation skin injury. To estimate entrance skin dose from displayed air kerma in free air at the interventional reference point, it is necessary to consider effective energy, the ratio of the mass-energy absorption coefficient for skin and air, and the backscatter factor. In addition, since automatic exposure control is installed in medical X-ray equipment with flat panel detectors, it is necessary to know the characteristics of control to estimate exposure dose. In order to calculate entrance skin dose under various conditions, we investigated clinical parameters such as tube voltage, tube current, pulse width, additional filter, and focal spot size, as functions of patient body size. We also measured the effective energy of X-ray exposure for the patient as a function of clinical parameter settings. We found that the conversion factor from air kerma in free air to entrance skin dose is about 1.4 for protection. (author)

  7. Comparison of simulated light sensitometer and x-ray sensitometer for screen-film system in medical radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuyama, Yasuko; Yamamoto, Yoshinori.

    1983-01-01

    Sensitometric techniques are used for determining the characteristic curve in medical imaging. In this study intensity-scale (inverse square law, simulated light) methods are used in the determination of radiographic screen-film system characteristic curve. Films which were exposed to simulated light and x-ray were processed in the same automatic processor simultaneously. These curves were overlapped at Net density of 1.0 to compare the curve shapes. The results show there is a good correlation between the density of x-ray sensitometry and that of simulated light sensitometry. The differences of density are within +- 0.12 (+- 10 % log exposure). This applies to both blue sensitive and green sensitive systems. (author)

  8. Measurement of Heart size by mass chest X-ray in Medical students

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wai, Khin San; Mon, Khin Aye [Department of Physiology, Institute of Medicine, Mandalay (Myanmar)

    1971-07-01

    Mass miniature P-A view chest X-ray films of 83 students were taken at the TB clinic and were used for measuring the heart size. Measurements taken on 70 mm film were changed to the equivalent values for standard 6 foot chest films, by multiplying with a factor 5.23 which is the ratio between 70 mm mass miniature X-ray film and 6 foot chest film. Frontal cardiac area was also calculated. The mean heart diameters and frontal cardiac area for 54 male students were transverse diameter-11.30 cm, length-11.98 cm, breadth-10.32 cm, frontal area-106.50 sq cm and aortic diameter-5.31 cm. Those for 28 female students were:transverse diameter-10.27 cm, length-11.56, breadth-9.45 cm, frontal area-88.70 sq cm and aortic diameter-4.75 cm.

  9. Measurement of Heart size by mass chest X-ray in Medical students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khin San Wai; Khin Aye Mon

    1971-01-01

    Mass miniature P-A view chest X-ray films of 83 students were taken at the TB clinic and were used for measuring the heart size. Measurements taken on 70 mm film were changed to the equivalent values for standard 6 foot chest films, by multiplying with a factor 5.23 which is the ratio between 70 mm mass miniature X-ray film and 6 foot chest film. Frontal cardiac area was also calculated. The mean heart diameters and frontal cardiac area for 54 male students were transverse diameter-11.30 cm, length-11.98 cm, breadth-10.32 cm, frontal area-106.50 sq cm and aortic diameter-5.31 cm. Those for 28 female students were:transverse diameter-10.27 cm, length-11.56, breadth-9.45 cm, frontal area-88.70 sq cm and aortic diameter-4.75 cm

  10. Spectral and dual-energy X-ray imaging for medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredenberg, Erik

    2018-01-01

    Spectral imaging is an umbrella term for energy-resolved X-ray imaging in medicine. The technique makes use of the energy dependence of X-ray attenuation to either increase the contrast-to-noise ratio, or to provide quantitative image data and reduce image artefacts by so-called material decomposition. Spectral imaging is not new, but has gained interest in recent years because of rapidly increasing availability of spectral and dual-energy CT and the dawn of energy-resolved photon-counting detectors. This review examines the current technological status of spectral and dual-energy imaging and a number of practical applications of the technology in medicine.

  11. Optimization of an X-ray diffraction imaging system for medical and security applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marticke, Fanny

    2016-01-01

    X-ray diffraction imaging is a powerful noninvasive technique to identify or characterize different materials. Compared to traditional techniques using X-ray transmission, it allows to extract more material characteristic information, such as the Bragg peak positions for crystalline materials as well as the molecular form factor for amorphous materials. The potential of this technique has been recognized by many researchers and numerous applications such as luggage inspection, nondestructive testing, drug detection and biological tissue characterization have been proposed. The method of energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) is particularly suited for this type of applications as it allows the use of a conventional X-ray tube, the acquisition of the whole spectrum at the same time and parallelized architectures to inspect an entire object in a reasonable time. The purpose of the present work is to optimize the whole material characterization chain. Optimization comprises two aspects: optimization of the acquisition system and of data processing. The last one concerns especially the correction of diffraction pattern degraded by acquisition process. Reconstruction methods are proposed and validated on simulated and experimental spectra. System optimization is realized using figures of merit such as detective quantum efficiency (DQE), contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves.The first chosen application is XRD based breast imaging which aims to distinguish cancerous tissues from healthy tissues. Two non-multiplexed collimation configurations combining EDXRD and ADXRD are proposed after optimization procedure. A simulation study of the whole system and a breast phantom was realized to determine the required dose to detect a 4 mm carcinoma nodule. The second application concerns detection of illicit materials during security check. The possible benefit of a multiplexed collimation system was examined. (author) [fr

  12. MODERN PECULIARITIES OF THE MEDICAL EXPOSURE LEVELS FORMING OF THE TATARSTAN REPUBLIC POPULATION DURING X-RAY PROCEDURES IMPLEMENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Ryzhkin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose. The purpose of the investigation is an assessment of the peculiarities of forming and registration of the collective doses of patients and the population of the Tatarsatan Republic (RT from medical exposure and the development of measures for optimization of this radiation factor.Materials and methods. The analysis is based on the forms of the Federal statistical observation № 3-DOZ «Data on the exposure doses to patients obtained during medical radiological examination» (form № 3-DOZ and radiation-hygienic passports of RT for the period from 2006 to 2013.The results. Annually in RT there is an increase of the number of performed X-ray procedures, which reached the value of 6279696 (1.64 procedures per resident per year in 2013. During the reporting period (from 2006 to 2013 the structure of the performed X-ray procedures has also changed. It is observed that the percentage of fluorography procedures in the overall structure decreased from 41.3% to 31.3% at the same time the level of absolute value of annually performed fluorography procedures is stable. There is an increase in the absolute number of radiographic procedures performed during the period from 2578754 to 4072810 X-rays per year, that is 1.58 times higher. Absolute and relative values related to X-ray fluoroscopy examinations decreased from 1.1% to 0.7%. In contrast, the absolute number of annually performed X-ray computed tomography examinations (CT has increased over the period by 3.3 times and percentage of CT in overall structure of X-ray procedure is 2.7%. The number of special investigations has increased in 2.1 times, but the relative value remained at average level of 0.4% on general background of the increasing of X-ray activity in the region. This fact influenced the change in the radiation-hygienic indexes of medical radiation exposure of the population of RT. According to №3-DOZ forms and radiation-hygienic passports of the

  13. Metrological analysis of constancy tests in conventional medical X-ray equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarenga, Frederico L.; Oliveira, Paulo Marcio C.; Squair, Peterson L.; Soares, Carlos M.; Silva, Teogenes A. da

    2005-01-01

    Constancy tests in x-ray diagnostic machines should follow performance requirements with the aim to verify their safety and quality and to protect workers, patients and public members that are or may be exposed to ionizing radiation risks. In the Brazilian state of Minas Gerais, from 1999 to 2004, 110 radiometric and evaluation reports of x-ray machines were issued by accredited professionals. Most of the reports did not provide the estimation of the measurement uncertainty that should be part of the results; it means that there is a lack of metrological care in such reports which may cause difficulties to get a conclusive analysis. In this work, relevant sources of uncertainties were identified and estimated for the following tests carried out in a conventional x-ray machine: high voltage accuracy and reproducibility, air kerma rate repeatability and linearity and half-value layer determination. This work gives details on the methodology and the expanded and combined uncertainty values for each measuring procedure, which may be adopted as representative values for analysis of radiometric report. (author)

  14. Investigation Biological And Medical Specimen Using X-Ray Dark Field Imagine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pattanasiriwisawa, Wanwisa; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Maksimenko, Anton; Kazuyuki, Hyodo; Ando, Masami

    2005-10-01

    X-ray dark-field imaging (DFI) and bright-field imaging (BFI) in the Laue geometry has been successfully demonstrated. Using a Bragg-case asymmetric monochromator which produces an x-ray beam with a 0.3 μrad divergence incident onto an object and a Laue geometry analyzer that can simultaneously provide DFI and BFI. The imaging technique of DFI is quite novel one that we did not have before in that the central bright line satisfying the Bragg condition is removed by the analyzer crystal and the background radiation obscuring the image of the object does not come to record film. This is not the case in BFI and the strong background radiation obscures the real image of the object. X-ray optics comprising two Laue case diffraction wafers working at 35 keV has been successfully applied to some biological samples such as ivory, tusk, horn, tooth and a phantom of breast cancer. Images of ivory and others have shown very clear and informative inside structure. All pieces of the breast cancer phantom provide us with very fine images to simulate cancer

  15. Observation of X-ray occupational exposure on psychological function of medical workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Zhaolong; Li Xiuqin

    1988-01-01

    The present research is an attempt to study the psychological effects of long-term exposure to low-level X-ray on man. The subjects included 50 exposed people and 50 control. The battery of psychological tests consists of 10 subtests mainly involving memory and coordination ability. The results indicate that there are no statistical differences in all subtests between exposure and control group, but exposure group appears to be a little lower on most subtests about memory. With age, decline of psychological function is observed in all subtests in both groups. The subjects are further divided into three subgroups according to the number of X-ray exposed years. No statistical differences are found in all subgroups between exposure and control. Factor analysis has been made and two factors are obtained. factor 1 is mainly about speed of coordination, factor 2 is mainly about memory and attention. No statistical differences in factor scores are observed in all subgroups between exposure and control. Yet decline is found in factor 1 and factor 2 in both exposure and control groups with age. The results show that there is no significant effect of current dose level of X-ray exposure on human psychological function

  16. Hospital and clinic survey estimates of medical x-ray exposures in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Shozo; Land, C.E.; Otake, Masanori; Russell, W.J.; Takeshita, Kenji.

    1980-11-01

    All large hospitals and 40% of the small hospitals and clinics in Hiroshima and Nagasaki cities were surveyed for the X-ray examinations they performed during a 2-week period in 1974. The frequency and type of X-ray examinations received by members of the RERF Adult Health Study (AHS) and the RERF Life Span Study (LSS) extended, excluding AHS (Non-AHS), were compared with the general population in each city. Radiologic exposures of patients at hospitals and clinics were most frequent among the general populations. The number of patients, examinations, and exposures per caput per year in each population were estimated. Since the age distribution differed among the three populations, comparisons were made only after correcting for age. On a per caput per year basis exposure frequency was relatively high in the AHS and low in the general populations, a reflection of the greater number of patients in the AHS than in the general populations. Non-AHS males in Nagasaki had a higher X-ray examination rate than did the AHS subjects. The others in the Non-AHS did not differ appreciably from the general populations. There was no difference among these groups according to body sites examined. (author)

  17. Combination use of lentinan with x-ray therapy in mouse experimental tumor system, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiio, Tsuyoshi; Ohishi, Kazuo; Tsuchiya, Yoshiharu; Niitsu, Iwayasu; Hayashibara, Hiromi; Yoshihama, Takashi; Moriyuki, Hirobumi

    1988-01-01

    C3H/He mice transplanted syngeneic MM102 tumor subcutaneously in the footpad were used to study the timing of administration of lentinan when combined with local irradiation of X-ray. In combination with 1,000 rads irradiation, the administration of lentinan after X-ray was not effective. When lentinan was administered in combination with 2,000 to 3,000 rads irradiation, the growth of tumor was decreased significantly in comparison with the groups which received radiotherapy alone and those that received lentinan alone. The administration of lentinan before irradiation was effective at the same degree in the group that received lentinan after irradiation. Life prolongation effect was also observed in the group that received lentinan before and after irradiation, and 4 mice among 8 tested mice were survived at 70th day after tumor transplantation. (author)

  18. The enforcement order for the law for radiation and x-ray technicians engaging in medical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The enforcement order provides for the medical radiation technicians and medical X-ray technicians according to the established for them. The applicants for the license thereof must present their applications, together with the necessary documents, to the Government (or the prefectural government). The contents are as follows: application for license; to be entered in the register (with the items of the license); alteration of the registered items (the immediate corrective action, to the Government); elimination of the technicians from the register (to the Government); alteration of the license (the corrective action, to the Government); application for reissue of the license (to the Government); notification concerning the administrative measures. (Mori, K.)

  19. A study on development of guideline on writing technical document for electrical medical devices: Bone absorptiometric X-ray system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sung Youl; Kim, Jae Ryang; Kim, Eun Rim; Lee, Jun Ho; Lee, Chang Hyung; Park, Chang Won

    2016-01-01

    The market size of the bone absorptiometric X-ray system and the number of its approval by Ministry of Food and Drug Safety (MFDS) has annually increased, with a trend of increasing aging population and osteoporosis patients. For approval of manufactured or imported medical devices in Republic of Korea, it is required to submit its technical document. Therefore, it is need to develop the technical document guideline for the bone absorptiometric X-ray system for manufacturers, importers and reviewers. First of all, the technical documents which were already approved were examined and analyzed through MFDS approval administration system. Second, safety and performance test standards and methods that match international standards were drawn after conducting survey of the market status and the technology development trend for it, with examination and analysis of applicable domestic and overseas standards. Third, by operating industry-research-government cooperation, the guideline draft on writing technical document for the bone absorptiometric X-ray system was discussed, collecting their opinion. As a result, it is suitable to international and domestic condition, includes test evaluation methods and offer various information with appropriate examples to civil petitioner, when they write the technical documents

  20. A study on development of guideline on writing technical document for electrical medical devices: Bone absorptiometric X-ray system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Youl; Kim, Jae Ryang; Kim, Eun Rim; Lee, Jun Ho; Lee, Chang Hyung; Park, Chang Won [Medical Device Research Division, Ministry of Food and Drug Safety, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The market size of the bone absorptiometric X-ray system and the number of its approval by Ministry of Food and Drug Safety (MFDS) has annually increased, with a trend of increasing aging population and osteoporosis patients. For approval of manufactured or imported medical devices in Republic of Korea, it is required to submit its technical document. Therefore, it is need to develop the technical document guideline for the bone absorptiometric X-ray system for manufacturers, importers and reviewers. First of all, the technical documents which were already approved were examined and analyzed through MFDS approval administration system. Second, safety and performance test standards and methods that match international standards were drawn after conducting survey of the market status and the technology development trend for it, with examination and analysis of applicable domestic and overseas standards. Third, by operating industry-research-government cooperation, the guideline draft on writing technical document for the bone absorptiometric X-ray system was discussed, collecting their opinion. As a result, it is suitable to international and domestic condition, includes test evaluation methods and offer various information with appropriate examples to civil petitioner, when they write the technical documents.

  1. 3D RECONSTRUCTION FROM MULTI-VIEW MEDICAL X-RAY IMAGES – REVIEW AND EVALUATION OF EXISTING METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hosseinian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The 3D concept is extremely important in clinical studies of human body. Accurate 3D models of bony structures are currently required in clinical routine for diagnosis, patient follow-up, surgical planning, computer assisted surgery and biomechanical applications. However, 3D conventional medical imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI have serious limitations such as using in non-weight-bearing positions, costs and high radiation dose(for CT. Therefore, 3D reconstruction methods from biplanar X-ray images have been taken into consideration as reliable alternative methods in order to achieve accurate 3D models with low dose radiation in weight-bearing positions. Different methods have been offered for 3D reconstruction from X-ray images using photogrammetry which should be assessed. In this paper, after demonstrating the principles of 3D reconstruction from X-ray images, different existing methods of 3D reconstruction of bony structures from radiographs are classified and evaluated with various metrics and their advantages and disadvantages are mentioned. Finally, a comparison has been done on the presented methods with respect to several metrics such as accuracy, reconstruction time and their applications. With regards to the research, each method has several advantages and disadvantages which should be considered for a specific application.

  2. Nordic working group for medical x-ray diagnostics: Diagnostic reference levels within xray diagnostics - experiences in the Nordic countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitz, W.; Groen, P.; Servomaa, A.; Einarsson, G.; Olerud, H.

    2003-01-01

    Medical x-ray diagnostics is one of the few applications of ionising radiation where people are irradiated on purpose. The strategy for radiation protection is also different compared to that in other areas that have the zero-alternative as its ultimate goal, meaning that no human beings at all are exposed in these practices. The focus in x-ray diagnostics concerning radiation protection is justification and optimisation. Optimisation implies that the examination is performed in such a way that the radiation dose is as small as possible without jeopardising the diagnostic security. X- ray diagnostics is a complex method where many technical parameters and methodology factors together are interacting in the determination of radiation dose and image quality. The optimisation process is not a simple and uncomplicated procedure, this difficulty is reflected in many international and national surveys showing a large spread of patient doses for one and the same type of examination. The concept diagnostic reference levels (DRL) has been introduced as a tool for reducing this wide distribution that is obviously indicating a lack of optimisation, and for cutting the highest radiation doses. In this presentation the concept for DRL and the experience gained in the Nordic countries with DRL are described. (orig.)

  3. New medical imaging systems exploiting the energy dispersive X-ray diffraction with spectrometric CdZnTe based detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbes, Damien

    2016-01-01

    This thesis studies the interest of measuring the coherent scattering of X-rays for breast diagnosis imaging. Nowadays, most of X-ray-based medical imaging techniques use the information of X-rays attenuation through the tissues. It is the case for mammography, the most common breast imaging modality. The recent emergence of energy resolved detectors (based on semiconductors in particular) allows to consider using another phenomenon: the coherent X-ray scattering. Measurement of diffracted spectra can provide new information related to the molecular structure of the examined tissues, in order to improve their characterization and therefore improve the final diagnosis. Two modalities are considered: the breast cancer detection in vivo, following a suspicious mammography result, or biopsy analysis. The coherent scattering measurement system developed during this thesis work uses energy-resolved CdZnTe-based detectors, these detectors combining performances (energy resolution, sensitivity, spatial resolution, and compactness) promising for clinical application. This system is also based on the detector pixelation, which allows to provide an imaging modality capable of characterizing analyzed materials or tissues in one direction without any translation or rotation. A complete study of the measurement system is proposed in this thesis, structured in three main parts: modeling and simulation of the system, development of the processing of the data measured by the detector in order to image and characterize the analyzed sample and finally, designing of a new and more complex experimental setup based on a whole detector and multi-slit collimation system. An experimental validation is proposed for each of these three parts. (author) [fr

  4. Radiation exposure of the Yazd Population from medical conventional X-ray examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouzarjomehri, F.; Zare, M. H.; Dashti, M. H.

    2007-01-01

    Radiation dose knowledge through X-ray examinations and their distribution in Iran provides useful guidance on patient dose reduction. The results of the entrance skin dose (ESD s ) of five common radiographs in all radiology centers in Yazd province were reported in our previous study (2003). In the present study we have evaluated the collective effective dose of conventional X-ray examinations, as well as the annual per caput of Yazd population.Materials and Methods: The annual frequencies of 18 different types of conventional radiology examinations during April 2005 to March 2006 were recorded from all 35 radiology centers in Yazd province. The exposure conditions consisted of kVp, mAs, and Focus surface distance (FSD) of the examinations for the mode of exposure in each X-ray unit. 620 ESD were measured by diode dosimeter in 35 hospitals and clinics. The real exposure kVp for each radiology unit was measured by a Molt-0-Meter. The conversion coefficient (effective dose - ESD ratio) for each radiology examination was determined by using SR262 tables. Finally, the patients' effective dose was calculated by multiplying the conversion factor to the ESD. Results: The patients' annual collective effective dose due to the conventional radiology examinations was 31.159 man-Sv (0.03 mSv per inhabitant). The frequency of examinations was 311813 i.e. 0.36 examinations per head of the population for one year. Conclusion: According to our findings, the effective per caput dose seems to be optimally relative to HCL-II countries, which may be due to low mean effective dose that could obscure high examination frequency. The number of radiology conventional examinations and frequency of radiologist per1000 population of Yazd was more and lower than HCL-II countries respectively. Thus the justification of radiography requests in this province must be revised

  5. Study of x-ray medical mitigation with lead and aluminium shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malheiros, Emiliane A.; Ramos, Roberto Paulo B.; Oliveira, Ezequias Fernandes

    2016-01-01

    In this work, lead and aluminum as shielding materials and their variations in the spectra emitted by the X-ray equipment through the use of a computer program that determines the photon fluence . The study of the primary beam for power spectra used in the practice of diagnostic radiology allows you to analyze data representative of the average transmission and fluency for the studied materials. So we seek to analyze the transmission curves of lead and aluminum, as well as its influence on the thickness of shielding and changing the radiation spectrum characteristics X in the transmission of photons. (author)

  6. Simple method to estimate mean heart dose from Hodgkin lymphoma radiation therapy according to simulation X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nimwegen, Frederika A; Cutter, David J; Schaapveld, Michael; Rutten, Annemarieke; Kooijman, Karen; Krol, Augustinus D G; Janus, Cécile P M; Darby, Sarah C; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Aleman, Berthe M P

    2015-05-01

    To describe a new method to estimate the mean heart dose for Hodgkin lymphoma patients treated several decades ago, using delineation of the heart on radiation therapy simulation X-rays. Mean heart dose is an important predictor for late cardiovascular complications after Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) treatment. For patients treated before the era of computed tomography (CT)-based radiotherapy planning, retrospective estimation of radiation dose to the heart can be labor intensive. Patients for whom cardiac radiation doses had previously been estimated by reconstruction of individual treatments on representative CT data sets were selected at random from a case-control study of 5-year Hodgkin lymphoma survivors (n=289). For 42 patients, cardiac contours were outlined on each patient's simulation X-ray by 4 different raters, and the mean heart dose was estimated as the percentage of the cardiac contour within the radiation field multiplied by the prescribed mediastinal dose and divided by a correction factor obtained by comparison with individual CT-based dosimetry. According to the simulation X-ray method, the medians of the mean heart doses obtained from the cardiac contours outlined by the 4 raters were 30 Gy, 30 Gy, 31 Gy, and 31 Gy, respectively, following prescribed mediastinal doses of 25-42 Gy. The absolute-agreement intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.93 (95% confidence interval 0.85-0.97), indicating excellent agreement. Mean heart dose was 30.4 Gy with the simulation X-ray method, versus 30.2 Gy with the representative CT-based dosimetry, and the between-method absolute-agreement intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.87 (95% confidence interval 0.80-0.95), indicating good agreement between the two methods. Estimating mean heart dose from radiation therapy simulation X-rays is reproducible and fast, takes individual anatomy into account, and yields results comparable to the labor-intensive representative CT-based method. This simpler method may produce a

  7. Simple Method to Estimate Mean Heart Dose From Hodgkin Lymphoma Radiation Therapy According to Simulation X-Rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nimwegen, Frederika A. van [Department of Psychosocial Research, Epidemiology, and Biostatistics, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Cutter, David J. [Clinical Trial Service Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Oxford Cancer Centre, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, Oxford (United Kingdom); Schaapveld, Michael [Department of Psychosocial Research, Epidemiology, and Biostatistics, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rutten, Annemarieke [Department of Radiology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kooijman, Karen [Department of Psychosocial Research, Epidemiology, and Biostatistics, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Krol, Augustinus D.G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Janus, Cécile P.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Darby, Sarah C. [Clinical Trial Service Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Leeuwen, Flora E. van [Department of Psychosocial Research, Epidemiology, and Biostatistics, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Aleman, Berthe M.P., E-mail: b.aleman@nki.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: To describe a new method to estimate the mean heart dose for Hodgkin lymphoma patients treated several decades ago, using delineation of the heart on radiation therapy simulation X-rays. Mean heart dose is an important predictor for late cardiovascular complications after Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) treatment. For patients treated before the era of computed tomography (CT)-based radiotherapy planning, retrospective estimation of radiation dose to the heart can be labor intensive. Methods and Materials: Patients for whom cardiac radiation doses had previously been estimated by reconstruction of individual treatments on representative CT data sets were selected at random from a case–control study of 5-year Hodgkin lymphoma survivors (n=289). For 42 patients, cardiac contours were outlined on each patient's simulation X-ray by 4 different raters, and the mean heart dose was estimated as the percentage of the cardiac contour within the radiation field multiplied by the prescribed mediastinal dose and divided by a correction factor obtained by comparison with individual CT-based dosimetry. Results: According to the simulation X-ray method, the medians of the mean heart doses obtained from the cardiac contours outlined by the 4 raters were 30 Gy, 30 Gy, 31 Gy, and 31 Gy, respectively, following prescribed mediastinal doses of 25-42 Gy. The absolute-agreement intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.93 (95% confidence interval 0.85-0.97), indicating excellent agreement. Mean heart dose was 30.4 Gy with the simulation X-ray method, versus 30.2 Gy with the representative CT-based dosimetry, and the between-method absolute-agreement intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.87 (95% confidence interval 0.80-0.95), indicating good agreement between the two methods. Conclusion: Estimating mean heart dose from radiation therapy simulation X-rays is reproducible and fast, takes individual anatomy into account, and yields results comparable to the labor

  8. Estimation of identification limit for a small-type OSL dosimeter on the medical images by measurement of X-ray spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takegami, Kazuki; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Okino, Hiroki; Kimoto, Natsumi; Maehata, Itsumi; Kanazawa, Yuki; Okazaki, Tohru; Hashizume, Takuya; Kobayashi, Ikuo

    2016-07-01

    Our aim in this study is to derive an identification limit on a dosimeter for not disturbing a medical image when patients wear a small-type optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeter on their bodies during X-ray diagnostic imaging. For evaluation of the detection limit based on an analysis of X-ray spectra, we propose a new quantitative identification method. We performed experiments for which we used diagnostic X-ray equipment, a soft-tissue-equivalent phantom (1-20 cm), and a CdTe X-ray spectrometer assuming one pixel of the X-ray imaging detector. Then, with the following two experimental settings, corresponding X-ray spectra were measured with 40-120 kVp and 0.5-1000 mAs at a source-to-detector distance of 100 cm: (1) X-rays penetrating a soft-tissue-equivalent phantom with the OSL dosimeter attached directly on the phantom, and (2) X-rays penetrating only the soft-tissue-equivalent phantom. Next, the energy fluence and errors in the fluence were calculated from the spectra. When the energy fluence with errors concerning these two experimental conditions was estimated to be indistinctive, we defined the condition as the OSL dosimeter not being identified on the X-ray image. Based on our analysis, we determined the identification limit of the dosimeter. We then compared our results with those for the general irradiation conditions used in clinics. We found that the OSL dosimeter could not be identified under the irradiation conditions of abdominal and chest radiography, namely, one can apply the OSL dosimeter to measurement of the exposure dose in the irradiation field of X-rays without disturbing medical images.

  9. Skull x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - head; X-ray - skull; Skull radiography; Head x-ray ... There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored and regulated to provide the minimum amount of radiation exposure needed to produce the image. Most ...

  10. Neck x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - neck; Cervical spine x-ray; Lateral neck x-ray ... There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored so that the lowest amount of radiation is used to produce the image. Pregnant women and ...

  11. The study on cytogenetic analysis and dosimetry reconstruction for medical diagnostic X-ray workers using G-banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jin; Wang Qin; Tang Weisheng; Sun Yuanming; Wang Zhiquan

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the dose of medical diagnostic X-ray workers. Methods: The chromosome aberrations were analyzed by G-banding or FISH in medical diagnostic X-ray workers with different calendar years of entry. Results: The biological doses estimated by the two methods were in agreement with the doses evaluated by physical methods. Conclusion: G-banding and FISH are effective ways to analyse the chromosome translocations

  12. Modeling quantum noise of phosphors used in medical X-ray imaging detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Kalivas, N; Cavouras, D; Costaridou, L; Nomicos, C D; Panayiotakis, G S

    1999-01-01

    The noise properties of the granular phosphor screens, which are utilized in X-ray imaging detectors, are studied in terms of the quantum noise transfer function (QNTF). An analytical model, taking into account the effect of K-characteristic X-rays reabsorption within the phosphor material and the optical properties of the phosphor, was developed. The optical properties of the phosphor material required by the model were obtained from literature, except for the optical diffusion length (sigma) that was determined by data fitting and was found to be 26 cm sup 2 /g. The deviation between theoretical and experimental data is sigma depended. Specifically for sigma=26 cm sup 2 /g and sigma=25 cm sup 2 /g the respective deviations between experimental and predicted results were 0.698% and -1.597%. However for relative differences in sigma more than 15% from the value 26 cm sup 2 /g, the corresponding deviations exceed by 6 times the value of 0.698%. The model was tested via comparison to experimental results obtain...

  13. Americium-241 use of measurement lead equivalent thickness for medical x-ray room: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Khalid Matori; Husaini Saleh; Abd Aziz Mhd Ramli; Muhammad Jamal Md Isa; Mohd Firdaus Abd Rahman; Zainal Jamaluddin

    2010-01-01

    Lead equivalent thickness measurement of a shielding material in diagnostic radiology is very important to ensure that requirements for the purpose of radiation protection of patients, employees and the public are met. The Malaysian Ministry of Health (MOH) has established that the irradiation room must have sufficient shielding thickness, for example for general radiography it must be at least equal to 2.0 mm of Pb, for panoramic dental radiography at least equal to 1.5 mm of Pb and for mammography should be a minimum of 1.0 mm of Pb. This paper presents a technique using americium-241 source to test and verify the integrity of the shielding thickness in term of lead equivalent for X-ray room at health centres. Results of measurement of 30 irradiation rooms conducted from 2009 to mid 2010 were analyzed for this presentation. Technical comparison of the attenuation of gamma rays from Am-241 source through the walls of the irradiation room and pieces of lead were used to assess the lead equivalent thickness of the walls. Results showed that 96.7 % of the irradiation rooms tested meet the requirements of the Ministry of Health and is suitable for the installation of the intended diagnostic X-ray apparatus. Some specific positions such as door knobs and locks, electrical plug sockets were identified with potential to not met the required lead equivalent thickness hence may contribute to higher radiation exposure to workers and the public. (author)

  14. Three-dimensional x-ray microtomography for medical and biological applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morton, E.J.; Webb, S.; Clarke, L.J.; Shelton, C.G.

    1990-01-01

    To obtain microtomographic images apparatus has been developed consisting of a microfocal x-ray source, a computer-controlled stage for rotating the object, a 2D multi-wire gas proportional x-ray counter and a microcomputer to control image acquisition. Projection data were generated by rotating the object to discrete orientations around a single axis until of the order of 100 2D projection images of the object were collected. The projection images were transferred to a VAX 11/750 computer for 3D reconstruction using a convolution and back-projection algorithm in cone-beam geometry. Reconstructed data, comprising cubic voxels, may be displayed as sets of sequential transaxial, sagittal and coronal planes through the object, or perspective displays of individual orthogonal sections formed with either intersecting planes or with these planes projected on the surfaces of a box-like structure. The technique provides for investigation of small-scale structures in biological specimens and some images of dead insects are shown. (author)

  15. Indirect radio-chemo-beta therapy: a targeted approach to increase biological efficiency of x-rays based on energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktaria, Sianne; Corde, Stéphanie; Lerch, Michael L F; Konstantinov, Konstantin; Rosenfeld, Anatoly B; Tehei, Moeava

    2015-10-21

    Despite the use of multimodal treatments incorporating surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, local control of gliomas remains a major challenge. The potential of a new treatment approach called indirect radio-chemo-beta therapy using the synergy created by combining methotrexate (MTX) with bromodeoxyuridine (BrUdR) under optimum energy x-ray irradiation is assessed. 9L rat gliosarcoma cells pre-treated with 0.01 μM MTX and/or 10 μM BrUdR were irradiated in vitro with 50 kVp, 125 kVp, 250 kVp, 6 MV and 10 MV x-rays. The cytotoxicity was assessed using clonogenic survival as the radiobiological endpoint. The photon energy with maximum effect was determined using radiation sensitization enhancement factors at 10% clonogenic survival (SER10%). The cell cycle distribution was investigated using flow cytometric analysis with propidium iodide staining. Incorporation of BrUdR in the DNA was detected by the fluorescence of labelled anti-BrUdR antibodies. The radiation sensitization enhancement exhibits energy dependence with a maximum of 2.3 at 125 kVp for the combined drug treated cells. At this energy, the shape of the clonogenic survival curve of the pharmacological agents treated cells changes substantially. This change is interpreted as an increased lethality of the local radiation environment and is attributed to supplemented inhibition of DNA repair. Radiation induced chemo-beta therapy was demonstrated in vitro by the targeted activation of combined pharmacological agents with optimized energy tuning of x-ray beams on 9 L cells. Our results show that this is a highly effective form of chemo-radiation therapy.

  16. Isolation of an X-ray-responsive element in the promoter region of tissue-type plasminogen activator: Potential uses of X-ray-responsive elements for gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boothman, D.A.; Lee, I.W.; Sahijdak, W.M.

    1994-01-01

    Tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) was induced over 50-fold after X irradiation in radioresistant human melanoma cells. Activities of t-PA were induced 14-fold in ataxia telangiectasia, 9-fold in Bloom's syndrome and 6-fold in Fanconi's anemia cells, compared to normal human fibroblasts. X-ray-inducible synthesis of the protease, t-PA, may play a role(s) in damage-inducible repair processes in mammalian cells, similar to the SOS repair systems in lower eukaryotes and prokaryotes. DNA band shift and DNase I footprinting assays were used to determine binding if transcription factors to a previously unknown X-ray-responsive element (XRE) in the t-PA promoter. The major goals of our research with XREs are to understand (a) which transcription factor(s) regulates to-PA induction after X-rays, and (b) the role(s) of t-PA in DNA repair, apoptosis or other responses to X rays. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the potential use of an XRE, such as the one in the t-PA promoter, for gene radiotherapy. Several gene therapy strategies are proposed. 22 refs., 3 figs

  17. Radiation doses to patients in medical diagnostic x-ray examinations in New Zealand: a 1983-84 survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, B.D.P.; Poletti, J.L.; Cartwright, P.H.; Le Heron, J.C.

    1993-06-01

    A survey of doses to patients undergoing diagnostic x-ray examinations was performed in 1983-84. Developments since 1983-84 were reviewed and estimates made of the frequency of x-ray examinations, and doses to patients, as at 1992. The collective effective dose from general medical diagnostic radiology in 1983-84 was estimated to have been about 443 μSv per capita per annum. The figure excluded computed tomography which was estimated to have contributed about 5.6 μSv per capita per annum and mammography gave 0.3 μSv per annum. The total per capital effective dose from all medical diag over the whole period from 1983-84 to 1992. The highest dose examinations in 1983-84 were the fluoroscopic procedures barium enema and meal. Over the whole period 1983-84 to 1992 the genetically significant dose (GSD) to the population of New Zealand from medical diagnostic radiology was estimated to have been in the range 200-250 μSv per capita per annum. The two opposing tendencies noted for effective dose, viz, the fall in frequency of some examination types and the rise of Computed tomography, acted also upon this dose index. 43 refs., tabs., figs., ills

  18. Range verification for eye proton therapy based on proton-induced x-ray emissions from implanted metal markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Rosa, Vanessa; Kacperek, Andrzej; Royle, Gary; Gibson, Adam

    2014-06-01

    Metal fiducial markers are often implanted on the back of the eye before proton therapy to improve target localization and reduce patient setup errors. We aim to detect characteristic x-ray emissions from metal targets during proton therapy to verify the treatment range accuracy. Initially gold was chosen for its biocompatibility properties. Proton-induced x-ray emissions (PIXE) from a 15 mm diameter gold marker were detected at different penetration depths of a 59 MeV proton beam at the CATANA proton facility at INFN-LNS (Italy). The Monte Carlo code Geant4 was used to reproduce the experiment and to investigate the effect of different size markers, materials, and the response to both mono-energetic and fully modulated beams. The intensity of the emitted x-rays decreases with decreasing proton energy and thus decreases with depth. If we assume the range to be the depth at which the dose is reduced to 10% of its maximum value and we define the residual range as the distance between the marker and the range of the beam, then the minimum residual range which can be detected with 95% confidence level is the depth at which the PIXE peak is equal to 1.96 σbkg, which is the standard variation of the background noise. With our system and experimental setup this value is 3 mm, when 20 GyE are delivered to a gold marker of 15 mm diameter. Results from silver are more promising. Even when a 5 mm diameter silver marker is placed at a depth equal to the range, the PIXE peak is 2.1 σbkg. Although these quantitative results are dependent on the experimental setup used in this research study, they demonstrate that the real-time analysis of the PIXE emitted by fiducial metal markers can be used to derive beam range. Further analysis are needed to demonstrate the feasibility of the technique in a clinical setup.

  19. Applications of the X-ray fluorescence technique to medical dynamic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magrini, A.; Cesareo, R.; Salmi, M.; Gigante, G.E.

    1978-01-01

    The energy dispersive X ray fluorescence technique (XRF) was employed to follow the evolution of the concentration of stable tracers for diagnostic purposes. A simple and relatively inexpensive XRF system, based on the use of a small sealed-off radioisotopic source and a proportional gas counter, was utilized in the study of human blood platelet survival 'in vitro', rabbit platelet survival 'in vivo' and in clearance studies of the human knee joint 'in vivo'. The survival curves of human and rabbit platelets were determined employing stable Rubidium as a tracer. The clearance rate of a stable Iodinate compound from the synovial cavity was measured in normal and pathological conditions. Results obtained suggest that the method can be usefully employed to monitor the course of disease and to establish the efficacy of treatment

  20. Risks associated to exposition to X-rays for medical diagnosis during pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espana, M. L.; Prieto, C.; Lopez Franco, P.

    1999-01-01

    The risks for the embryo-foetus in the developing stages, associated to pregnant patients being exposed to X-rays for diagnostic procedures, implies that the fulfillment of the principles of justification and optimisation and the recommendations established by the different organisations related to radiological protection are carried out. In order to do so, it is necessary for the professional people involved to have the maximum information available on the biological effects of ionising radiation on the embryo-foetus that is developing. In this article this matter is updated: the estimated doses values on the embryo-foetus in radiodiagnosis and the risks associated, as well as a series of recommendations that can be of use to establish procedure protocols, on which the measurements taken to reduce the risks of exposition to ionising radiation on the embryo-foetus in the developing stages are recorded. (Author) 11 refs

  1. Estimation of identification limit for a small-type OSL dosimeter on the medical images by measurement of X-ray spectra

    OpenAIRE

    Takegami, Kazuki ; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Okino, Hiroki; Kimoto, Natsumi ; Maehata, Itsumi ; Kanazawa, Yuki ; Okazaki, Tohru ; Hashizume, Takuya ; Kobayashi, Ikuo 

    2016-01-01

    Our aim in this study is to derive an identification limit on a dosimeter for not disturbing a medical image when patients wear a small-type optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeter on their bodies during X-ray diagnostic imaging. For evaluation of the detection limit based on an analysis of X-ray spectra, we propose a new quantitative identification method. We performed experiments for which we used diagnostic X-ray equipment, a soft-tissue-equivalent phantom (1–20 cm), and a CdTe X...

  2. Combination use of lentinan with x-ray therapy in mouse experimental tumor system, (3). Combination effect on the metastatic tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiio, Tsuyoshi; Ohishi, Kazuo; Niitsu, Iwayasu; Hayashibara, Hiromi; Tsuchiya, Yoshiharu; Yoshihama, Takashi; Moriyuki, Hirobumi

    1988-03-01

    Combination effect of lentinan with X-ray irradiation on the metastatic mouse tumors, L1210, KLN205 and Lewis lung carcinoma were studied. Combination use of lentinan with X-ray therapy prolonged the life of BDF/sub 1/ mice bearing L1210 leukemia in the suitable combination conditions. Combination effects of lentinan with X-ray therapy were also observed on the suppression of the growth of KLN205 squamus cell carcinoma and on the suppression of the metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma. Especially, in the case that lentinan was administered before or after X-ray local irradiation in the pulmorary metastasis system of Lewis lung carcinoma, a marked suppressin of pulmonary metastasis was observed and 2 to 4 mice among 8 tested mice were tumor free.

  3. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is repeated. Two or three images (from different angles) will typically be taken. An x-ray may ... RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your physician with specific medical questions or for ...

  4. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the oldest and most frequently used form of medical imaging. A bone x-ray makes images of any ... a radiologist or other physician. To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you ...

  5. Investigation of mineral distribution in bone by synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy after tibolone therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, I. [Rio de Janeiro State Univ., Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Energy; Federal Univ. of Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Nuclear Instrumentation Lab. - COPPE; Carvalho, A.C.B.; Henriques, H.N.; Guzman-Silva, M.A. [Fluminense Federal Univ., Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Lab. of Experimental Pathology; Sales, E.; Lopes, R.T. [Federal Univ. of Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Nuclear Instrumentation Lab. - COPPE; Granjeiro, J.M. [Fluminense Federal Univ., Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Dept. of Cellular and Molecular Biology

    2011-07-01

    Tibolone is a synthetic steroid with estrogenic, androgenic, and progestagenic properties used for the prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis and treatment of climacteric symptoms. Tibolone shows almost no action on breast and endometrium, which are target-organs for estrogens and progesterone activity. The aim of this work was to investigate the spatial distribution of calcium and zinc minerals in the femoral head of ovariectomized rat in order to evaluate the effects of the long-term administration of tibolone. For that purpose X-ray microfluorescence was used with synchrotron radiation imaging technique which was performed at Brazilian Light Synchrotron Laboratory, Campinas, SP. Minerals were not homogeneously distributed in trabecular bone areas; a higher concentration of calcium in the trabecular regions at femoral heads was found in ovariectomized and tibolone-treated rats compared to ovariectomized and control groups. (orig.)

  6. Effect of intrinsic-gain fluctuations on quantum noise of phosphor materials used in medical X-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalivas, N.; Costaridou, L.; Panayiotakis, G.; Nomicos, C.D.

    1999-01-01

    The quality of a medical image depends, among other parameters, on quantum noise. Quantum noise is affected by the fluctuations in the number of optical quanta produced within the phosphor, per absorbed X-ray (i.e. phosphor intrinsic-gain fluctuations). This effect is considered by means of a factor, called in this study intrinsic-gain noise factor, IGNF(E). In existing theoretical models of quantum noise, the corresponding factor is taken to be equal to one. In this paper, an expression that accounts for the coefficient of variation of the phosphor intrinsic gain is introduced. This expression takes into account the process of electron-hole pair conversion to optical photons and the frequency distribution function of the emitted optical photon energy. Subsequently IGNF(E) is expressed in terms of this coefficient of variation. IGNF(E) has been calculated for several phosphors and for various energies. For all medical X-ray energies studied, phosphors that exhibit a high relative fluctuation of emitted optical photon energy, IGNF(E) exceeds by 2% to over 17% the corresponding factor of the existing theoretical models of quantum noise. (orig.)

  7. Comparative Investigation of Ce3+ Doped Scintillators in a Wide Range of Photon Energies Covering X-ray CT, Nuclear Medicine and Megavoltage Radiation Therapy Portal Imaging Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valais, Ioannis G.; Michail, Christos M.; David, Stratos L.; Liaparinos, Panagiotis F.; Fountos, George P.; Paschalis, Theodoros V.; Kandarakis, Ioannis S.; Panayiotakis, George S.

    2010-02-01

    The aim of the present work is to study the performance of scintillators currently used in PET and animal PET systems, under conditions met in radiation therapy and PET/CT imaging. The results of this study will be useful in applications where both CT and PET photons as well as megavoltage cone beam CT (MV CBCT) photons could be detected using a common detector unit. To this aim crystal samples of GSO, LSO, LYSO, LuYAP and YAP scintillators, doped with cerium (Ce+3) were examined under a wide energy range of photon energies. Evaluation was performed by determining the absolute luminescence efficiency (emitted light flux over incident X-ray exposure) in the energy range employed in X-ray CT, in Nuclear Medicine (70 keV up to 662 keV) and in radiotherapy 6 MV (approx. 2.0 MeV mean energy)-18 MV (approx. 4.5 MeV mean energy). Measurements were performed using an experimental set-up based on a photomultiplier coupled to a light integration sphere. The emission spectrum under X-ray excitation was measured, using an optical grating monochromator, to determine the spectral compatibility to optical photon detectors incorporated in medical imaging systems. Maximum absolute luminescence efficiency values were observed at 70 keV for YAP:Ce and LuYAP:Ce and at 140 keV for LSO:Ce, LYSO:Ce and GSO:Ce. Highest absolute efficiency between the scintillators examined was observed for LSO:Ce, followed by LYSO:Ce. The detector optical gain (DOG) exhibited a significant variation with the increase of energy between 70 keV to 2.0 MeV. All scintillators exhibited low compatibility when combined with GaAsP (G5645) photodetector.

  8. Radiation dose reduction in medical x-ray CT via Fourier-based iterative reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahimian, Benjamin P; Zhao, Yunzhe; Huang, Zhifeng; Fung, Russell; Mao, Yu; Zhu, Chun; Khatonabadi, Maryam; DeMarco, John J; Osher, Stanley J; McNitt-Gray, Michael F; Miao, Jianwei

    2013-03-01

    A Fourier-based iterative reconstruction technique, termed Equally Sloped Tomography (EST), is developed in conjunction with advanced mathematical regularization to investigate radiation dose reduction in x-ray CT. The method is experimentally implemented on fan-beam CT and evaluated as a function of imaging dose on a series of image quality phantoms and anonymous pediatric patient data sets. Numerical simulation experiments are also performed to explore the extension of EST to helical cone-beam geometry. EST is a Fourier based iterative algorithm, which iterates back and forth between real and Fourier space utilizing the algebraically exact pseudopolar fast Fourier transform (PPFFT). In each iteration, physical constraints and mathematical regularization are applied in real space, while the measured data are enforced in Fourier space. The algorithm is automatically terminated when a proposed termination criterion is met. Experimentally, fan-beam projections were acquired by the Siemens z-flying focal spot technology, and subsequently interleaved and rebinned to a pseudopolar grid. Image quality phantoms were scanned at systematically varied mAs settings, reconstructed by EST and conventional reconstruction methods such as filtered back projection (FBP), and quantified using metrics including resolution, signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs). Pediatric data sets were reconstructed at their original acquisition settings and additionally simulated to lower dose settings for comparison and evaluation of the potential for radiation dose reduction. Numerical experiments were conducted to quantify EST and other iterative methods in terms of image quality and computation time. The extension of EST to helical cone-beam CT was implemented by using the advanced single-slice rebinning (ASSR) method. Based on the phantom and pediatric patient fan-beam CT data, it is demonstrated that EST reconstructions with the lowest scanner flux setting of 39 m

  9. Radiation dose reduction in medical x-ray CT via Fourier-based iterative reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahimian, Benjamin P.; Zhao Yunzhe; Huang Zhifeng; Fung, Russell; Zhu Chun; Miao Jianwei; Mao Yu; Khatonabadi, Maryam; DeMarco, John J.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; Osher, Stanley J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: A Fourier-based iterative reconstruction technique, termed Equally Sloped Tomography (EST), is developed in conjunction with advanced mathematical regularization to investigate radiation dose reduction in x-ray CT. The method is experimentally implemented on fan-beam CT and evaluated as a function of imaging dose on a series of image quality phantoms and anonymous pediatric patient data sets. Numerical simulation experiments are also performed to explore the extension of EST to helical cone-beam geometry. Methods: EST is a Fourier based iterative algorithm, which iterates back and forth between real and Fourier space utilizing the algebraically exact pseudopolar fast Fourier transform (PPFFT). In each iteration, physical constraints and mathematical regularization are applied in real space, while the measured data are enforced in Fourier space. The algorithm is automatically terminated when a proposed termination criterion is met. Experimentally, fan-beam projections were acquired by the Siemens z-flying focal spot technology, and subsequently interleaved and rebinned to a pseudopolar grid. Image quality phantoms were scanned at systematically varied mAs settings, reconstructed by EST and conventional reconstruction methods such as filtered back projection (FBP), and quantified using metrics including resolution, signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs). Pediatric data sets were reconstructed at their original acquisition settings and additionally simulated to lower dose settings for comparison and evaluation of the potential for radiation dose reduction. Numerical experiments were conducted to quantify EST and other iterative methods in terms of image quality and computation time. The extension of EST to helical cone-beam CT was implemented by using the advanced single-slice rebinning (ASSR) method. Results: Based on the phantom and pediatric patient fan-beam CT data, it is demonstrated that EST reconstructions with the lowest

  10. The histories of capillary optics for x-rays and ion beams in Russia, USA, and Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umezawa, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    This article introduces the history of X-ray lens and the present situation of ion beam focusing with glass capillaries systems. The basic technology of X-ray lens using glass capillaries was independently developed over 20 years by Prof. Kumakhov in the former Soviet Union and Dr. Soejima in Japan, respectively. In the 1990's, Prof. W.M. Gibson and his coworkers intensively studied X-rays and neutron optics in Albany, NY, USA. X-ray optics with glass capillaries, in these days is well known in the world. This unique technique was fabricated to collimate X-rays. Also, new ion beam analysis technique with glass capillaries systems has been intensively developed by Dr. Nebiki and Prof. Narusawa in Kochi, Japan. These X-rays and ion beams techniques have brought new application for many fields; X-ray detector, X-ray lithography, X-ray astronomy, microdiffraction, medical therapy and biological applications. (author)

  11. Evaluation of the distribution of absorbed dose in child phantoms exposed to diagnostic medical x rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, W. L.; Poston, J. W.; Warner, G. G.

    1978-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine, by theoretical calculation and experimental measurement, the absorbed dose distributions in two heterogeneous phantoms representing one-year- and five-year-old children from typical radiographic examinations for those ages. Theoretical work included the modification of an existing internal dose code which uses Monte Carlo methods to determine doses within the Snyder-Fisher mathematical phantom. A Ge(Li) detector and a pinhole collimator were used to measure x-ray spectra which served as input to the modified Monte Carlo codes which were used to calculate organ doses in children. The calculated and measured tissue-air values were compared for a number of organs. For most organs, the results of the calculated absorbed doses agreed with the measured absorbed doses within twice the coefficient of variation of the calculated value. The absorbed dose to specific organs for several selected radiological examinations are given for one-year-old, five-year-old, and adult phantoms.

  12. Analysis of stability of tomographic reconstruction of x-ray medical images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Л. А. Булавін

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Slice reconstruction in X-ray computed tomography is reduced to the solution of integral equations, or a system of algebraic equations in discrete case. It is considered to be an ill-posed problem due to the inconsistencies in the number of equations and variables and due to errors in the experimental data. Therefore, determination of the best method of the slice reconstruction is of great interest. Furthermore, all available methods give approximate results. The aim of this article was two-fold: i to compare two methods of image reconstruction, viz. inverse projection and variation, using the numerical experiment; ii to obtain the relationship between image accuracy and experimental error. It appeared that the image obtained by inverse projection is unstable: there was no convergence of the approximate image to the accurate one, when the experimental error reached zero. In turn, the image obtained by variational method was accurate at zero experimental error. Finally, the latter showed better slice reconstruction, despite the low number of projections and the experimental errors.

  13. Doses to patients from medical X-ray examinations in the UK. 2000 review

    CERN Document Server

    Hart, D; Wall, B F

    2002-01-01

    In 1992 NRPB established a National Collation Centre for measurements of doses to patients made by x-ray departments throughout the UK. This report is the second in a series of five-yearly reviews of the national patient dose database and analyses the information collected during the period January 1996 to December 2000. It includes the results of 28,000 entrance surface dose (ESD) measurements and 13,000 dose-area product (DAP) measurements for single radiographs, and 140,000 DAP measurements and 128,000 records of the fluoroscopy time for complete examinations, collected from 371 hospitals throughout the UK. Information on the patient dose distributions and exposure conditions for over 30 types of examination and radiograph is presented. National reference doses based on the rounded third quartile values of these dose distributions are recommended and are seen to be about 20% lower than corresponding values in the previous (1995) review. They have approximately halved since the original UK national referenc...

  14. Evaluation of the distribution of absorbed dose in child phantoms exposed to diagnostic medical x rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, W.L.; Poston, J.W.; Warner, G.G.

    1978-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine, by theoretical calculation and experimental measurement, the absorbed dose distributions in two heterogeneous phantoms representing one-year- and five-year-old children from typical radiographic examinations for those ages. Theoretical work included the modification of an existing internal dose code which uses Monte Carlo methods to determine doses within the Snyder-Fisher mathematical phantom. A Ge(Li) detector and a pinhole collimator were used to measure x-ray spectra which served as input to the modified Monte Carlo codes which were used to calculate organ doses in children. The calculated and measured tissue-air values were compared for a number of organs. For most organs, the results of the calculated absorbed doses agreed with the measured absorbed doses within twice the coefficient of variation of the calculated value. The absorbed dose to specific organs for several selected radiological examinations are given for one-year-old, five-year-old, and adult phantoms

  15. Application of the autoblood treated by preliminary extracorporeal X-ray irradiation in the therapy of bronchial asthma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goguev, N.T.

    1985-01-01

    A therapeutic method including extracorporeal x-ray irradiation of the autoblood of patients with bronchial asthma complicated by cortisone dependence and polyvalent drug intolerance, has been elaborated and clinically tested. The use of this method brings about good short-term results in 90% of cases and good long-term results in 40% of cases (14-38 months). It provides an opportunity to give up corticosteroids in more than 60% of patients and to decrease the hormone dose in the rest of cortisone-dependent patients with bronchial asthma. The above therapeutic method can be used as an independent type of treatment, especially in the presence of polyvalent drug allergy and as an element of multiple modality therapy of bronchial asthma patients. The method was used under in-patient conditions only. No side effects were marked in the course of the clinical trial. To carry out this type of therapy, patients should be thoroughly screened

  16. Implementation of a radiation protection framework for medical and dental X-ray diagnostic services in Minas Gerais/Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Teogenes A. da; Pereira, Elton G.; Nogueira, Maria do S.; Ferreira, Hudson R.; Alonso, Thessa C.; Castro, Jose G.L. de; Andrade, Mauricio C.; Joana, Georgia S.; Oliveira, Mauricio de; Cezar, Adriana C. Z.

    2008-01-01

    The Brazilian Sanitary Vigilance Agency is the regulatory authority for radiation protection and quality control of all practices with X-rays for diagnostic purpose. In 1998, the technical regulation 'Guidelines for Radiation Protection in Medical and Dental Radiodiagnostic' was issued by the government that reflected the most updated policy recommended by the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation. To accomplish the objective of improving radiation protection conditions in the state of Minas Gerais, the Development Centre of Nuclear Technology (CDTN) and the Superintendence of Sanitary Vigilance (SVS) signed a formal cooperation agreement that included: an accreditation process for radiation protection professionals, a follow-up program of the services provided by those professionals, technical support from CDTN for audits carried out by SVS and training of SVS inspectors. Actions to improve and assure metrological reliability of the radiation measurements and special attention to mammography services were done. This paper provides details and results of the radiation protection framework for X-ray radiodiagnostic services in Minas Gerais; the success of the adopted model suggests that it can be used as a basic model to other regions. (author)

  17. Studies on the radiation exposure and protection at the X-ray radiography in the medical care at home

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Shoichi; Fujii, Shigehisa; Asada, Yasuo; Orito, Takeo; Kamei, Tetsuya; Koga, Sukehiko

    1998-01-01

    Since there are scarce studies on the exposure and protection at the radiography in the medical care at home, authors performed such studies as comparison of doses from self-rectifying and inverter tubes, exposure and protection to patients and nursing persons and actual measurement (October, 1997) at home in Tohno city, Iwate prefecture, of scattering radiation dose at radiography. Apparatuses used were: Portable X-ray equipments; self-rectifying types (Toshiba TR-20 and Medisonacoma PX 30N) and an inverter type (Medisonacoma PX-15HF), Kyoto Kagaku WAC water phantom, X-ray analyzer Model 200 of Kasei Optonics, and Dosimeters (Victoreen Radocon ionization dosimeter and Aloka ICS-301 ionization chamber survey meters). Radiation qualities, surface doses and scattering doses of the equipments under various conditions were compared by the half value layer and effective energy measured with the analyzer. Actual measurement of scattering dose was done at home for 4 patients at chest radiography. Annual dose in monthly ordinary radiography at home, when the distance was >200 cm far from the flux center, was found about 1/100 of 1 mSv (the annual public dose limit), thus securing the safety of nurses. (K.H.)

  18. Studies on the radiation exposure and protection at the X-ray radiography in the medical care at home

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Shoichi; Fujii, Shigehisa; Asada, Yasuo; Orito, Takeo [Fujita Health Univ., Toyoake, Aichi (Japan). School of Health Science; Kamei, Tetsuya; Koga, Sukehiko

    1998-12-01

    Since there are scarce studies on the exposure and protection at the radiography in the medical care at home, authors performed such studies as comparison of doses from self-rectifying and inverter tubes, exposure and protection to patients and nursing persons and actual measurement (October, 1997) at home in Tohno city, Iwate prefecture, of scattering radiation dose at radiography. Apparatuses used were: Portable X-ray equipments; self-rectifying types (Toshiba TR-20 and Medisonacoma PX 30N) and an inverter type (Medisonacoma PX-15HF), Kyoto Kagaku WAC water phantom, X-ray analyzer Model 200 of Kasei Optonics, and Dosimeters (Victoreen Radocon ionization dosimeter and Aloka ICS-301 ionization chamber survey meters). Radiation qualities, surface doses and scattering doses of the equipments under various conditions were compared by the half value layer and effective energy measured with the analyzer. Actual measurement of scattering dose was done at home for 4 patients at chest radiography. Annual dose in monthly ordinary radiography at home, when the distance was >200 cm far from the flux center, was found about 1/100 of 1 mSv (the annual public dose limit), thus securing the safety of nurses. (K.H.)

  19. Head and Neck Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer Treated By Superficial X-Ray Therapy: An Analysis of 1021 Cases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Grossi Marconi

    Full Text Available To report a single-institutional experience with the use of Superficial X-Ray Therapy (SXRT for head and neck non-melanoma skin cancer (N-MSC and to compare outcomes by prescribed fractionation schedules.The medical records of 597 patients with 1021 lesions (720 BCC, 242 SCC, 59 SCC in situ treated with kilovoltage radiation from 1979-2013 were retrospectively reviewed. The majority of patients were treated according to 1 of 3 institutional protocols based on the discretion of the radiation oncologist: 1 22 x 2.5 Gy; 2 20 x 2.5 Gy; 3 30 x 2.0 Gy. "T" stage at first presentation was as follows: Tis (59; T1 (765; T2 (175; T3 (6, T4 (9; Tx, (7. All patients were clinical N0 and M0 at presentation. Chi-square test was used to evaluate any potential association between variables. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to analyze survival with the Log Rank test used for comparison. A Cox Regression analysis was performed for multivariate analysis.The median follow up was 44 months. No significant difference was observed among the 3 prescribed fractionation schemes (p = 0.78 in terms of RTOG toxicity. There were no failures among SCC in situ, 37 local failures (23 BCC, 14 SCC, 5 regional failures (all SCC and 2 distant failures (both SCC. For BCC, the 5-year LC was 96% and the 10-year LC was 94%. For SCC the corresponding rates of local control were 92% and 87%, respectively (p = 0.03. The use of >2.0 Gy daily was significantly associated with improved LC on multivariate analysis (HR: 0.17; CI 95%: 0.05-0.59.SXRT for N-MSC of the head and neck is well tolerated, achieves excellent local control, and should continue to be recommended in the management of this disease. Fractionation schedules using >2.0 Gy daily appear to be associated with improved LC.

  20. Combination use of lentinan with x-ray therapy in mouse experimental tumor system, (1). Fundamental studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiio, Tsuyoshi; Tsuchiya, Yoshiharu; Ohishi, Kazuo; Yoshihama, Takashi

    1988-02-01

    Apparent reduction of leukocyte counts was observed in mice irradiated with 1,500 approx. 3,000 rads of X-ray on the left hind leg. This reduction of leukocyto counts was completely protected by the pre-treatment with lentinan before X-ray irradiation. Suppressive effect of X-ray on the antitumor function of lentinan seems to be weak. When treatment with X-ray irradiation and lentinan was applied for mice bearing solid type sarcoma 180, additive effect was obtained by the combination of lentinan before or after X-ray irradiation.

  1. X-ray microbeams: Tumor therapy and central nervous system research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dilmanian, F.A.; Qu, Y.; Liu, S.; Cool, C.D.; Gilbert, J.; Hainfeld, J.F.; Kruse, C.A.; Laterra, J.; Lenihan, D.; Nawrocky, M.M.; Pappas, G.; Sze, C.-I.; Yuasa, T.; Zhong, N.; Zhong, Z.; McDonald, J.W.

    2005-01-01

    Irradiation with parallel arrays of thin, planar slices of X-ray beams (microplanar beams, or microbeams) spares normal tissue, including the central nervous system (CNS), and preferentially damages tumors. The effects are mediated, at least in part, by the tissue's microvasculature that seems to effectively repair itself in normal tissue but fails to do so in tumors. Consequently, the therapeutic index of single-fraction unidirectional microbeam irradiations has been shown to be larger than that of single-fraction unidirectional unsegmented beams in treating the intracranial rat 9L gliosarcoma tumor model (9LGS) and the subcutaneous murine mammary carcinoma EMT-6. This paper presents results demonstrating that individual microbeams, or arrays of parallel ones, can also be used for targeted, selective cell ablation in the CNS, and also to induce demyelination. The results highlight the value of the method as a powerful tool for studying the CNS through selective cell ablation, besides its potential as a treatment modality in clinical oncology

  2. X-Rays, Pregnancy and You

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Emitting Products and Procedures Medical Imaging Medical X-ray Imaging X-Rays, Pregnancy and You Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... the decision with your doctor. What Kind of X-Rays Can Affect the Unborn Child? During most x- ...

  3. Evaluation of the distribution of absorbed dose in child phantoms exposed to diagnostic medical x rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, W.L.

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine, by theoretical calculation and experimental measurement, the absorbed dose distributions in two heterogeneous phantoms representing one-year- and five-year-old children from typical radiographic examinations for those ages. Theoretical work included the modification of an existing internal dose code which used Monte Carlo methods to determine doses within the Snyder-Fisher mathematical phantom. A Ge(Li) detector and a pinhole collimator were used to measure x-ray spectra which served as input (i.e., the source routine) to the modified Monte Carlo codes which were used to calculate organ doses in children. Experimental work included the fabrication of child phantoms to match the existing mathematical models. These phantoms were constructed of molded lucite shells filled with differing materials to simulate lung, skeletal, and soft-tissue regions. The skeleton regions of phantoms offered the opportunity to perform meaningful measurements of absorbed dose to bone marrow and bone. Thirteen to fourteen sites in various bones of the skeleton were chosen for placement of TLDs. These sites represented important regions in which active bone marrow is located. Sixteen typical radiographic examinations were performed representing common pediatric diagnostic procedures. The calculated and measured tissue-air values were compared for a number of organs. For most organs, the results of the calculated absorbed doses agreed with the measured absorbed doses within twice the coefficient of variation of the calculated value. The absorbed dose to specific organs for several selected radiological examinations are given for one-year-old, five-year-old, and adult phantoms. For selected radiological exposures, the risk factors of leukemia, thyroid cancer, and genetic death are estimated for one-year- and five-year-old children

  4. Effects of amiodarone therapy on thyroid iodine content as measured by x-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fragu, P.; Schlumberger, M.; Davy, J.M.; Slama, M.; Berdeaux, A.

    1988-01-01

    Thyroid iodine content (TIC) was measured by x-ray fluorescence in 68 patients who had received amiodarone treatment for varying intervals (1 g/week for 1-120 months). Thirty-six patients were euthyroid; the mean TIC of the patients (n = 15), who had been treated for less than 12 months was 30 +/- 19 (+/- SD) mg, twice the normal mean value (14.6 +/- 5.0 mg), and it was 39 +/- 17 mg in those (n = 16) who had been treated for 12-60 months and 29 +/- 6 mg in those (n = 5) who had been treated longer (greater than 60 months). Nineteen patients were hyperthyroid and had elevated TIC values. Of them, 6 patients had a goiter; their TIC (50 +/- 19 mg) was not significantly different from that of the hyperthyroid patients with no goiter (55 +/- 29 mg), but they became hyperthyroid more rapidly. Thirteen patients were hypothyroid; none had TIC values above the normal range, and it was below 2.5 mg in 5 patients. A sequential study was undertaken in 11 euthyroid patients who had no detectable antithyroid antibodies. TIC did not increase during treatment in 2 patients; both developed hypothyroidism, which was transient in 1 despite continuation of amiodarone treatment. The TIC initially increased during amiodarone treatment in the other 9 patients, leveling off at the end of the first year. The TIC rose well above the upper limit of the normal range in 4 patients, of whom 2 became hyperthyroid during the second year of treatment. TIC remained within the normal range in the other 5 patients, of whom 3 became hypothyroid after 12-24 months of treatment (1 subclinical, 2 overt). Although the TIC was significantly higher in the patients with hyperthyroidism than in the patients who remained euthyroid, the TIC test cannot be used to predict the occurrence of hyperthyroidism

  5. X-Ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enema. What you can expect During the X-ray X-rays are performed at doctors' offices, dentists' offices, ... as those using a contrast medium. Your child's X-ray Restraints or other techniques may be used to ...

  6. Abdominal x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdominal film; X-ray - abdomen; Flat plate; KUB x-ray ... There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored and regulated to provide the minimum amount of radiation exposure needed to produce the image. Most ...

  7. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... talk with you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the ... treatment for a variety of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray ...

  8. A simple calculation for the determination of organ or tissue dose from medical x-ray diagnosis for stomach and chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizawa, Kanae

    1984-01-01

    A simple calculation method has been developed to determine the organ or tissue doses of patients for typical X-ray diagnoses. The absorbed doses related to radiation-induced stochastic effects were calculated based on the dosimetric parameters experimentally determined and technical parameters for X-ray diagnostic examinations. The present method is principally based on the TRA method for the beam therapy. The dosimetric parameters such as percentage depth-dose curves and isodose curves were measured with ionization chambers in the MixDP phantom. The distance from the incident surface of X-ray beams to the organ or tissue of interest was determined with a mathematical phantom, which was the modified version of the MIRD phantom for the average Japanese adult. The absorbed doses were determined with a simple table look-up method using a computer. The calculated doses were tabulated for various technical parameters of stomach and chest X-ray examinations. The present calculation was applied to the Rando woman phantom to compare with the phantom measurements. The calculated values agree with the experimental doses within 20% discrepancy. It was concluded that the present calculation method can determine organ or tissue doses very simply for various X-ray examinations and that it was valuable for the estimation of population doses and risks from X-ray diagnoses. (author)

  9. Repair of potentially lethal radiation damage: comparison of neutron and x-ray RBE and implications for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, E.J.; Kraljevic, U.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments with Chinese hamster cells have shown that neutron irradiation does not result in repair of potentially lethal damage (PLD), i.e., that which can be influenced by changes in environmental conditions following irradiation. Since PLD is presumed to be repaired in tumors but not in normal tissues, this absence of differential sparing of tumor cells relative to normal tissues--a feature characteristic of irradiation with x rays--represents an advantage of neutrons in addition to their reduced oxygen effect. At a given dose, the difference in relative biological effectiveness (RBE) between tumors and normal tissues corresponds to a 5 percent increase in tumor dose with no concomitant increase in dose to normal tissues, which could be significant in cancer therapy

  10. Influence of fractionation of dose on 3 year results of X-ray therapy of skin cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szymczyk, W.; Radziszewska, J.; Cyplik, I.; Glinska, H.

    1985-01-01

    Three-year results of X-ray therapy of skin cancer in 345 patients are presented. The dependence of results on the size of irradiated field and the method of dose fractionation is analysed. The clinical usefulness of a cumulative radiation effect (CRE) is evaluated. 96.5% of three-year cures were obtained. Recurrences amounted to 1.6% and necroses to 1.9% of treated lesions. It has been shown that treatment of small fields with 8-fractions gave equally positive results as with 15-fractions whereas in the treatment of large lesions the selection of CRE value, a number of fractions and dose should let the value of CRE minimally exceeds the level of tolerance of healthy tissues. The regard to CRE value in the treatment of large lesions or the introduction of additional dosimetric acts seems to be useful. 10 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs. (author)

  11. Range verification for eye proton therapy based on proton-induced x-ray emissions from implanted metal markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, Vanessa La; Royle, Gary; Gibson, Adam; Kacperek, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Metal fiducial markers are often implanted on the back of the eye before proton therapy to improve target localization and reduce patient setup errors. We aim to detect characteristic x-ray emissions from metal targets during proton therapy to verify the treatment range accuracy. Initially gold was chosen for its biocompatibility properties. Proton-induced x-ray emissions (PIXE) from a 15 mm diameter gold marker were detected at different penetration depths of a 59 MeV proton beam at the CATANA proton facility at INFN-LNS (Italy). The Monte Carlo code Geant4 was used to reproduce the experiment and to investigate the effect of different size markers, materials, and the response to both mono-energetic and fully modulated beams. The intensity of the emitted x-rays decreases with decreasing proton energy and thus decreases with depth. If we assume the range to be the depth at which the dose is reduced to 10% of its maximum value and we define the residual range as the distance between the marker and the range of the beam, then the minimum residual range which can be detected with 95% confidence level is the depth at which the PIXE peak is equal to 1.96 σ bkg , which is the standard variation of the background noise. With our system and experimental setup this value is 3 mm, when 20 GyE are delivered to a gold marker of 15 mm diameter. Results from silver are more promising. Even when a 5 mm diameter silver marker is placed at a depth equal to the range, the PIXE peak is 2.1 σ bkg . Although these quantitative results are dependent on the experimental setup used in this research study, they demonstrate that the real-time analysis of the PIXE emitted by fiducial metal markers can be used to derive beam range. Further analysis are needed to demonstrate the feasibility of the technique in a clinical setup. (paper)

  12. Training for instructor in radiation protection courses in the medical diagnosis with X-Rays in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Aguilar, J.; Rodriguez Aranda, F.; Dominguez Anaya, E.

    2003-01-01

    The General Regulation of Radiological Security establishes in its article 159 that the occupationally exposed professionals will have to count on the authorization of the National Commission of Nuclear Security and Safety (CNSNS) with respect to their training. The Mexican official norm NOM-157-SSA1-1996: Protection and radiological safety in the medical diagnosis with X-rays, indicates that the personnel must receive and accept the information, instructions and training related to the protection and radiological safety, in order to accomplish their work according to the requirements and obligations established in the outstanding procedures. Therefore it was designed an initial training course of instructors in the field of the radiological protection to train occupationally exposed professionals who work in the medical diagnosis establishments with X-rays. The didactic material was elaborated considering a period of training of 10 working days, 8.0 daily hours considering theoretical topics, as well as 11 practical. It is used a conventional radiology equipment, a ionization chamber of brand INOVISIOB model 451 P-DE-SI for increasing the radiation levels, and equipment Radical model 9015 with two ionization chambers of 150 cc and 150 cc respectively, as well as a calibrated plates game of aluminium type 110 and a phantom of acrylic as disperser. To date 73 persons have been trained, from which only 37% approved the initial training course. It has been seen that it is necessary to count on a previous training in the filed of the radiological protection to better profit from this training, since if students do not have good bases it is not possible for them to learn all the content in only 80 hours. To date it has been trained to 73 persons, of alone those which 37.0% approved the initial. (Author)

  13. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please ... is further reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of ...

  14. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... position possible that still ensures x-ray image quality. top of page Who interprets the results and ... accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, ...

  15. X-ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giacconi, R.; Gursky, H.

    1974-01-01

    This text contains ten chapters and three appendices. Following an introduction, chapters two through five deal with observational techniques, mechanisms for the production of x rays in a cosmic setting, the x-ray sky and solar x-ray emission. Chapters six through ten include compact x-ray sources, supernova remnants, the interstellar medium, extragalactic x-ray sources and the cosmic x-ray background. Interactions of x rays with matter, units and conversion factors and a catalog of x-ray sources comprise the three appendices. (U.S.)

  16. X-ray filter for chest x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferlic, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    Filter for use in medical x-ray apparatus to permit higher intensity x-ray exposure in the heart and mediastinum area while maintaining a normal level of x-ray exposure in other areas of the body, particlarly in the lung area. The filter comprises a sheet of radiation absorbing material having an opening therein, said opening corresponding to the spine and central portion of the heart. Accordingly, the upper portion of the filter exhibits a relatively narrow opening which becomes gradually wider toward the lower portion of the filter

  17. Effect of basic fog of medical x-ray films on image quality and patient dose-method of evaluation and steps to control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohra, Reena; Nair, C.P.R.; Jayalakshmi, V.; Govindarajan, K.N.; Bhatt, B.C.

    2003-01-01

    Unacceptable basic fog of medical x-ray films has been reported recently from many hospitals. The paper presents the effect of basic fog on radiographic quality of films like sensitivity (speed), contrast and maximum density (DMax). Several batches of general- purpose medical x-ray films from five different manufacturers were studied to evaluate batch-to-batch variation in basic fog. Increase in basic fog with aging of films was also evaluated. Reasons for increased basic fog observed in the film processing facilities of a few hospitals were analysed. Factors responsible for increase in basic fog and the steps to control it have been discussed

  18. On the response of Y 3Al 5O 12: Ce (YAG: Ce) powder scintillating screens to medical imaging X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandarakis, I.; Cavouras, D.; Sianoudis, I.; Nikolopoulos, D.; Episkopakis, A.; Linardatos, D.; Margetis, D.; Nirgianaki, E.; Roussou, M.; Melissaropoulos, P.; Kalivas, N.; Kalatzis, I.; Kourkoutas, K.; Dimitropoulos, N.; Louizi, A.; Nomicos, C.; Panayiotakis, G.

    2005-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine Y 3Al 5O 12:Ce (also known as YAG:Ce) powder scintillator under X-ray imaging conditions. This material shows a very fast scintillation decay time and it has never been used in X-ray medical imaging. In the present study various scintillator layers (screens) with coating thickness ranging from 13 to 166 mg/cm 2 were prepared in our laboratory by sedimentation of Y 3Al 5O 12: Ce powder. Optical emission spectra and light emission efficiency (spectrum area over X-ray exposure) of the layers were measured under X-ray excitation using X-ray tube voltages (80-120 kVp) often employed in general medical radiography and fluoroscopy. Spectral compatibility with various optical photon detectors (photodiodes, photocathodes, charge coupled devices, films) and intrinsic conversion efficiency values were determined using emission spectrum data. In addition, parameters related to X-ray detection, energy absorption efficiency and K-fluorescence characteristic emission were calculated. A theoretical model describing radiation and light transfer through scattering media was used to fit experimental data. Intrinsic conversion efficiency (η≈0.03-0.05) and light attenuation coefficients (σ≈26.5 cm/g) were derived through this fitting. Y 3Al 5O 12:Ce showed peak emission in the wavelength range 530-550 nm. The light emission efficiency was found to be maximum for the 107 mg/cm 2 layer. Due to its "green" emission spectrum, Y 3Al 5O 12:Ce showed excellent compatibility (of the order of 0.9) with the sensitivity of many currently used photodetectors. Taking into account its very fast response Y 3Al 5O 12:Ce could be considered for application in X-ray imaging especially in various digital detectors.

  19. On the response of Y3Al5O12: Ce (YAG: Ce) powder scintillating screens to medical imaging X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandarakis, I.; Cavouras, D.; Sianoudis, I.; Nikolopoulos, D.; Episkopakis, A.; Linardatos, D.; Margetis, D.; Nirgianaki, E.; Roussou, M.; Melissaropoulos, P.; Kalivas, N.; Kalatzis, I.; Kourkoutas, K.; Dimitropoulos, N.; Louizi, A.; Nomicos, C.; Panayiotakis, G.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine Y 3 Al 5 O 12 :Ce (also known as YAG:Ce) powder scintillator under X-ray imaging conditions. This material shows a very fast scintillation decay time and it has never been used in X-ray medical imaging. In the present study various scintillator layers (screens) with coating thickness ranging from 13 to 166mg/cm 2 were prepared in our laboratory by sedimentation of Y 3 Al 5 O 12 : Ce powder. Optical emission spectra and light emission efficiency (spectrum area over X-ray exposure) of the layers were measured under X-ray excitation using X-ray tube voltages (80-120kVp) often employed in general medical radiography and fluoroscopy. Spectral compatibility with various optical photon detectors (photodiodes, photocathodes, charge coupled devices, films) and intrinsic conversion efficiency values were determined using emission spectrum data. In addition, parameters related to X-ray detection, energy absorption efficiency and K-fluorescence characteristic emission were calculated. A theoretical model describing radiation and light transfer through scattering media was used to fit experimental data. Intrinsic conversion efficiency (ηC ∼0.03-0.05) and light attenuation coefficients (σ∼26.5cm 2 /g) were derived through this fitting. Y 3 Al 5 O 12 :Ce showed peak emission in the wavelength range 530-550nm. The light emission efficiency was found to be maximum for the 107mg/cm 2 layer. Due to its 'green' emission spectrum, Y 3 Al 5 O 12 :Ce showed excellent compatibility (of the order of 0.9) with the sensitivity of many currently used photodetectors. Taking into account its very fast response Y 3 Al 5 O 12 :Ce could be considered for application in X-ray imaging especially in various digital detectors

  20. Clinical implementation of a low energy x-ray therapy device in the treatment of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haworth, A.; University of Western Australia, WA; Joseph, D.; Lanzon, P.; Caswell, N.; Ebert, M.; University of Western Asutralia, WA

    2001-01-01

    Full text: A low energy device producing x-rays of maximum operating potential of 50kV is used to treat primary breast tumours intraoperatively. In pathologically favourable cases, the treatment replaces conventional external beam irradiation. For patients at greater risk of local recurrence, the treatment replaces conventional 'boost' therapy. The dosimetry of the device will be described in a companion paper. QA tests prior to irradiation include: output calibration/verification; isotropy verification and external radiation monitor (the secondary beam termination device) functionality. The internal radiation monitor count (similar to setting monitor units on a linac) for a prescribed dose is calculated from tables of measured depth dose and applicator factors. The spherical applicator which best suits the size of the excised tumour is lightly sutured into position maintaining as much distance between the skin surface as possible to minimise skin erythema. Radiation protection is achieved with the use of portable lead shields and tungsten impregnated silicon drapes. Patients entered into a TROG randomised clinical trial comparing intraoperative with conventional postoperative radiotherapy after conservative breast surgery for women with early stage breast cancer will be studied in collaboration with the CRC/University College London, Cancer Trials Centre (UK) to record the effects of local tumour control, cosmesis, patient satisfaction and health economics. QA tests take approximately 15 minutes to perform and a treatment prescription of 5Gy at 1cm depth with a 5cm applicator would take approximately 30 minutes. A low energy x-ray device may be used intraoperatively in selected cases to replace conventional radiotherapy minimising the inconvenience for patients and reducing waiting lists on treatment machines. Copyright (2001) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  1. X-ray Ordinance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, R.; Zerlett, G.

    1983-01-01

    This commentary, presented as volume 2 of the Deutsches Strahlenschutzrecht (German legislation on radiation protection) deals with the legal provisions of the ordinance on the protection against harmful effects of X-radiation (X-ray Ordinance - RoeV), of March 1, 1973 (announced in BGBl.I, page 173), as amended by the ordinance on the protection against harmful effects of ionizing radiation, of October 13, 1976 (announced in BGBl. I, page 2905). Thus volume 2 completes the task started with volume 1, namely to present a comprehensive view and account of the body of laws governing radiation protection, a task which was thought useful as developments in the FRG led to regulations being split up into the X-ray Ordinance, and the Radiation Protection Ordinance. In order to present a well-balanced commentary on the X-ray Ordinance, it was necessary to discuss the provisions both from the legal and the medical point of view. This edition takes into account the Fourth Public Notice of the BMA (Fed. Min. of Labour and Social Affairs) concerning the implementation of the X-ray Ordinance of January 4, 1982, as well as court decisions and literature published in this field, until September 1982. In addition, the judgment of the Federal Constitutional Court, dated October 19, 1982, concerning the voidness of the law on government liability, and two decisions by the Federal High Court, dated November 23, 1982, concerning the right to have insight into medical reports - of great significance in practice - have been considered. This commentary therefore is up to date with current developments. (orig.) [de

  2. The enforcement regulation for the law for radiation and x-ray technicians engaging in medical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The ordinance is set up under the provisions of the law concerning radiation and X-ray technicians engaging in medical treatment, to enforce it. An application for the license of such a technician shall be filed according to the form prescribed, attached with a copy or an abstract of the census register of the applicant and a medical certificate of a doctor concerning whether the applicant is an insane, deaf or blind person, or a case of epidemic. The membership registration of such a technician shall include the number and date of the registration, the prefecture of his legal domicile, name, birth date and sex distinction, the year and month of his success in the examination for such technicains, the items concerning the cancellation of the license or the suspension of the business, etc. The subjects of the examination for such technicians are physics, radiological physics, electrical engineering, chemistry, general basic medical science, radiological biology, photographing technology, treatment technics and others. An application for the examination for such technicians shall be filed to the Minister of Health and Welfare, attached with a personal history, a study certificate or a diploma of graduation, a photograph of the applicant and other specified documents. (Okada, K.)

  3. X-ray diagnostics - benefits and risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartholomaeus, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    The brochure on benefits and risks of X-ray diagnostics discusses the following issues: X radiation - a pioneering discovery and medical sensation, fundamentals of X radiation, frequency of X-ray examinations in Germany in relation to CT imaging, radiation doses resulting from X-ray diagnostics, benefits of X-ray diagnostics - indication and examples, risks - measures for radiation exposure reductions, avoidance of unnecessary examinations.

  4. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed x-ray exams and use a very small dose of ... of the inside of the chest. A chest x-ray is used to evaluate the lungs, heart and ...

  5. DMF-T index in patients undergoing radiation therapy with LINAC X-ray radiation for head and neck cancer at Department of Radiotherapy, Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sabrina

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy for head and neck cancer frequently caused severe salivary gland dysfunction. The salivary gland dysfunction possibly decreased the protective function of saliva and caused dental caries. The purpose of this study was to obtain an illustration about DMF-T index in patient undergoing radiation therapy with LINAC X-ray radiation for head and neck cancer at Department of Radiotherapy, Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital in January-February 2007. The study was a simple descriptive. The study was conducted on 7 males and 9 females undergoing radiation therapy with LINAC X-ray radiation for head and neck cancer. The ages of patient are between 37 years and 77 years. The severity of caries was measured by DMF-T index. DMF-T index in 16 patient undergoing radiation therapy with LINAC X-ray radiation for head and neck cancer at Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital is 10.6 as the result of this study. The conclusion of this study showed that the DMF-T index in 16 patient undergoing radiation therapy with LINAC X-ray radiation for head and neck cancer at Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital had very high grade based on WHO classification, which the value was over 6.6.

  6. Deformable motion reconstruction for scanned proton beam therapy using on-line x-ray imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Ye; Knopf, A; Tanner, Colby; Boye, Dirk; Lomax, Antony J.

    2013-01-01

    Organ motion is a major problem for any dynamic radiotherapy delivery technique, and is particularly so for spot scanned proton therapy. On the other hand, the use of narrow, magnetically deflected proton pencil beams is potentially an ideal delivery technique for tracking tumour motion on-line. At

  7. Role of the medical physicist in quality control in diagnostic x-ray departments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, J.R.

    1973-01-01

    Medical physicists can play a role in education of future radiologists and technologists by teaching quality control needs and techniques. He or she can also provide service to the diagnostic section by establishing a quality control program. Finally, the medical physicist can play an important role in the development of simple and inexpensive techniques for quality control by radiological technologists. The ongoing work at the University of Wisconsin in this area is to provide quality control in measurement of the effective kVcp, the measurement of the effective focal spot size, the performance of the processing equipment, the output in mR/mAs, and the measurement of the half-value-layer and the total filtration. (U.S.)

  8. A compact hard X-ray source for medical imaging and biomolecular studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cline, D.B.; Green, M.A.; Kolonko, J.

    1995-01-01

    There are a large number of synchrotron light sources in the world. However, these sources are designed for physics, chemistry, and engineering studies. To our knowledge, none have been optimized for either medical imaging or biomolecular studies. There are special needs for these applications. We present here a preliminary design of a very compact source, small enough for a hospital or a biomolecular laboratory, that is suitable for these applications. (orig.)

  9. Protection by lead aprons against diffused radiation by medical x-ray utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huyskens, C.J.; Franken, Y.; Hummel, W.

    1995-01-01

    A lead apron can reduce the effective dose of radiological workers in medical roentgen applications. The reduction is not only determined by the thickness of the lead, but in particular by the model and fit of the apron. It also depends on the geometry of the radiation field to which the worker is exposed and the tube voltage. Based on model calculations it is determined how much protection against radiation is possible. 6 figs., 1 tab., 5 refs

  10. X-ray sky

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruen, M.; Koubsky, P.

    1977-01-01

    The history is described of the discoveries of X-ray sources in the sky. The individual X-ray detectors are described in more detail, i.e., gas counters, scintillation detectors, semiconductor detectors, and the principles of X-ray spectrometry and of radiation collimation aimed at increased resolution are discussed. Currently, over 200 celestial X-ray sources are known. Some were identified as nebulae, in some pulsations were found or the source was identified as a binary star. X-ray bursts of novae were also observed. The X-ray radiation is briefly mentioned of spherical star clusters and of extragalactic X-ray sources. (Oy)

  11. Guideline development and impact assessment for registration of medical, dental and veterinary x-ray apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colgan, P.; Harrison, D.; Moore, W.

    1996-01-01

    Under the NSW Radiation Control Act 1990, radiation apparatus used for diagnostic medical, dental and veterinary purposes will be required to become registered. The inspection required prior to registration will be conducted by a Consulting Radiation Expert who has been accredited by the Environment Protection Authority (EPA) as being competent in the field of quality assurance assessment of radiation apparatus used for diagnostic medical, dental and veterinary purposes. When regulating any activity in NSW, there is a requirement to undertake a regulatory impact statement of the proposed regulation. In addition, the introduction of any accompanying guideline requires a cost-benefit analysis. Costs may include enforcement, administrative and compliance activities. The calculation of benefit relies heavily on the improvement in apparatus performance (and hence dose reduction) that can be obtained with the introduction of a mandatory practice such as apparatus registration. This paper discusses the development of the registration guideline for NSW, including a summary of the public comments received. It further discusses the methodology and data used for the accompanying cost-benefit analysis. Information in this paper is presented in three parts: EPA field survey, cost analysis, and benefit analysis. For NSW it was estimated that the introduction of registration of these apparatus, over a two year period, would result in early replacement and repair costs (present values) to the medical industry of between $5.7 and $11.0 million, with an additional $2.5 million in EPA enforcement costs. The introduction of the proposed system of registration is expected to result in an estimated savings in quantifiable health detriment costs to NSW of between $11.8 and $17.7 million, and reduce the risk of radiation induced mortality. (authors)

  12. X-ray electromagnetic application technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The investigating committee aimed at research on electromagnetic fields in functional devices and X-ray fibers for efficient coherent X-ray generation and their material science, high-precision manufacturing, particularly for X-ray electromagnetic application technology from January 2006 to December 2008. In this report, we describe our research results, in particular, on the topics of synchrotron radiation and free-electron laser, Saga Synchrotron Project, X-ray waveguides and waveguide-based lens-less hard-X-ray imaging, X-ray nanofocusing for capillaries and zone plates, dispersion characteristics in photonics crystal consisting of periodic atoms for nanometer waveguides, electromagnetic characteristics of grid structures for scattering fields of nano-meter electromagnetic waves and X-rays, FDTD parallel computing of fundamental scattering and attenuation characteristics of X-ray for medical imaging diagnosis, orthogonal relations of electromagnetic fields including evanescent field in dispersive medium. (author)

  13. Combined therapy of the Walker-256 carcinosarcoma with X-rays and ICRF-159

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaphaus, A.

    1974-01-01

    The radiosensitivity of the Walker-256 carcinosarcoma of the rat under the influence of the tumour-inhibiting bisdioxopiperazine ICRF-159 was studied in collectives of 11-16 animals with tumours. In the combined radio- and chemotherapy, the animals received a daily i.p. injection of 30 mg/kg K.G. of the bisdioxopiperazine ICRF-159 in 1.0 ml NaCl solution containing carboxyl methyl cellulose. The tumour inhibition was determined by multidimensional measurements of the increase in tumour size with the aid of a slide gange. The combined therapy had a better inhibiting effect on tumour growth than radiotherapy alone. (orig./AK) [de

  14. Method and apparatus for enhanced sensitivity filmless medical x-ray imaging, including three-dimensional imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Sherwood

    1995-01-01

    A filmless X-ray imaging system includes at least one X-ray source, upper and lower collimators, and a solid-state detector array, and can provide three-dimensional imaging capability. The X-ray source plane is distance z.sub.1 above upper collimator plane, distance z.sub.2 above the lower collimator plane, and distance z.sub.3 above the plane of the detector array. The object to be X-rayed is located between the upper and lower collimator planes. The upper and lower collimators and the detector array are moved horizontally with scanning velocities v.sub.1, v.sub.2, v.sub.3 proportional to z.sub.1, z.sub.2 and z.sub.3, respectively. The pattern and size of openings in the collimators, and between detector positions is proportional such that similar triangles are always defined relative to the location of the X-ray source. X-rays that pass through openings in the upper collimator will always pass through corresponding and similar openings in the lower collimator, and thence to a corresponding detector in the underlying detector array. Substantially 100% of the X-rays irradiating the object (and neither absorbed nor scattered) pass through the lower collimator openings and are detected, which promotes enhanced sensitivity. A computer system coordinates repositioning of the collimators and detector array, and X-ray source locations. The computer system can store detector array output, and can associate a known X-ray source location with detector array output data, to provide three-dimensional imaging. Detector output may be viewed instantly, stored digitally, and/or transmitted electronically for image viewing at a remote site.

  15. Hospital and clinic survey estimates of medical X-ray exposure in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoku, Shigetoshi; Hoshi, Masaharu; Sawada, Shozo; Russell, W.J.

    1987-07-01

    The technical factors used during radiological examinations performed in Hiroshima and Nagasaki medical institutions were analyzed. The most frequently performed examination was chest radiography, followed by upper GI series. More than half the radiographic exposures were from upper GI series due to the many spot films made during fluoroscopy. Comparison of the present survey results with those of a previous one showed that relatively high kVp, low mAs and mA, and smaller field sizes are now more widely used. Though there have been decreased in fluoroscopy times and tube currents over the past 10 years, the numbers of spot films used have increased. Based on these technical factors, tables of organ doses from fluoroscopic examinations were compiled. (author)

  16. Comparison of x-ray cross sections for diagnostic and therapeutic medical physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boone, J.M.; Chavez, A.E.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this technical report is to make available an up-to-date source of attenuation coefficient data to the medical physics community, and to compare these data with other more familiar sources. Data files from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (in Livermore, CA) were truncated to match the needs of the medical physics community, and an interpolation routine was written to calculate a continuous set of cross sections spanning energies from 1 keV to 50 MeV. Coefficient data are available for elements Z=1 through Z=100. Values for mass attenuation coefficients, mass-energy-transfer coefficients, and mass-energy absorption coefficients are produced by a single computer subroutine. In addition to total interaction cross sections, the cross sections for the photoelectric, Rayleigh, Compton, pair, and some triplet interactions are also produced by this single program. The coefficients were compared to the 1970 data of Storm and Israel over the energy interval from 1 to 1000 keV; for elements 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, and 80, the average positive difference between the Storm and Israel coefficients and the coefficients reported here are 1.4%, 2.7%, and 2.6%, for the mass attenuation, mass energy-transfer, and mass-energy absorption coefficients, respectively. The 1969 data compilation of mass attenuation coefficients from McMaster et al. were also compared with the newer LLNL data. Over the energy region from 10 keV to 1000 keV, and from elements Z=1 to Z=82 (inclusive), the overall average difference was 1.53% (σ=0.85%). While the overall average difference was small, there was larger variation (>5%) between cross sections for some elements. In addition to coefficient data, other useful data such as the density, atomic weight, K, L 1 , L 2 , L 3 , M, and N edges, and numerous characteristic emission energies are output by the program, depending on a single input variable

  17. X-ray induced singlet oxygen generation by nanoparticle-photosensitizer conjugates for photodynamic therapy: determination of singlet oxygen quantum yield

    OpenAIRE

    Clement, Sandhya; Deng, Wei; Camilleri, Elizabeth; Wilson, Brian C.; Goldys, Ewa M.

    2016-01-01

    Singlet oxygen is a primary cytotoxic agent in photodynamic therapy. We show that CeF3 nanoparticles, pure as well as conjugated through electrostatic interaction with the photosensitizer verteporfin, are able to generate singlet oxygen as a result of UV light and 8?keV X-ray irradiation. The X-ray stimulated singlet oxygen quantum yield was determined to be 0.79???0.05 for the conjugate with 31 verteporfin molecules per CeF3 nanoparticle, the highest conjugation level used. From this result ...

  18. MONITORING OF INDIVIDUAL DOSES FOR MEDICAL WORKERS OF DENTAL POLYCLINIC’S X-RAY ROOMS IN DUSHANBE, THE REPUBLIC OF TADJIKISTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. U. Hakimova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the data and analyses of personnel’s average annual external exposure doses monitoring via the thermoluminescent dosimetry method used for X-ray radiological personnel in dental polyclinics of Dushanbe, Tadjikistan Republic over a 5-year period ( 2010–2014 . Out of 42 registered medical institutions dental polyclinics amounted up to only just 14%. For this work thermoluminescent dosimeters were used ( with LiF: Mg, Ti with the thermoluminescent dosimetric installation “ Harshaw – 4500” as the reader device. Monitoring results comparison of individual dose equivalent Hp ( 10 values was conducted for two groups of medical workers: medical doctors and X-ray lab technicians. It is demonstrated that radiological technicians’ professional exposure doses are on the average by 23% higher than those for medical doctors.The average individual exposure doses over the above indicated period amount to 0,93 mSv and 1,3 mSv for doctors and X-ray lab technicians, respectively, and are in the range from 0,45 mSv to 2,39 mSv. The doses include contribution from the natural background. The values of doses recorded for the personnel in dental polyclinic correspond to those recorded for the workers in the routine X-ray rooms.

  19. Pocket book on setting techniques for medical imaging. X-ray diagnostics, angiography, CT, MRT. 4. rev. and enl. ed.; Taschenatlas Einstelltechnik. Roentgendiagnostik, Angiografie, CT, MRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, Torsten B.; Reif, Emil [Caritas-Krankenhaus, Dillingen/Saar (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    The pocketbook on setting techniques for medical imaging is concerned with the problem to prepare appropriate images for diagnostic purposes using modern high-technology instruments like x-ray diagnostics, angiography, computerized tomography and magnetic resonance tomography. The following issues are covered: Head, spinal column, upper extremities, lower extremities, thorax, gastrointestinal tract, intravenous organ examination, angiography, computerized tomography, NMR imaging.

  20. Comparison of x-ray cross sections for diagnostic and therapeutic medical physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, J M; Chavez, A E

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of this technical report is to make available an up-to-date source of attenuation coefficient data to the medical physics community, and to compare these data with other more familiar sources. Data files from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (in Livermore, CA) were truncated to match the needs of the medical physics community, and an interpolation routine was written to calculate a continuous set of cross sections spanning energies from 1 keV to 50 MeV. Coefficient data are available for elements Z = 1 through Z = 100. Values for mass attenuation coefficients, mass-energy-transfer coefficients, and mass-energy absorption coefficients are produced by a single computer subroutine. In addition to total interaction cross sections, the cross sections for photoelectric, Rayleigh, Compton, pair, and some triplet interactions are also produced by this single program. The coefficients were compared to the 1970 data of Storm and Israel over the energy interval from 1 to 1000 keV; for elements 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, and 80, the average positive difference between the Storm and Israel coefficients and the coefficients reported here are 1.4%, 2.7%, and 2.6%, for the mass attenuation, mass energy-transfer, and mass-energy absorption coefficients, respectively. The 1969 data compilation of mass attenuation coefficients from McMaster et al. were also compared with the newer LLNL data. Over the energy region from 10 keV to 1000 keV, and from elements Z = 1 to Z = 82 (inclusive), the overall average difference was 1.53% (sigma = 0.85%). While the overall average difference was small, there was larger variation (> 5%) between cross sections for some elements. In addition to coefficient data, other useful data such as the density, atomic weight, K, L1, L2, L3, M, and N edges, and numerous characteristic emission energies are output by the program, depending on a single input variable. The computer source code, written in C, can be accessed and downloaded from

  1. Amorphous silicon solid-state detectors and their future application in medical X-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spahn, M.; Alexander, J.; Gmeinwieser, J.

    1997-01-01

    With the goal of testing the new technology under clinical conditions, in a cooperation between Thomson Tubes Electroniques (Moirans, France) and the Siemens Medical Engineering Group the first a-Si detector prototypes have been developed. On the basis of these activities and together with another European partner the independent company Trixell S.A.S. was established. A technological prototype with a matrix size of 1k x 1k and a pixel size of 200 μm [4] was installed in 1995 in the Cardiology Department of the University Hospital in Freiburg (Germany). The system was designed to operate at 12.5 frames per seconds with full geometrical resolution and 25 frames per second with half the full geometrical resolution. In the clinical environment, both the high contrast and the good image impression, especially at cinematographic doses, was acknowledged. In this early stage of development, however, the signal-to-noise ratio was somewhat inferior to that of I.I.-TV systems at fluoroscopic doses. (orig.)

  2. Evaluation of the procedures in medical applications of X-rays using fuzzy logic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Luiz A.C.; Teixeira, Marcello G.; Ferreira, Nadya M.P.D.

    2005-01-01

    A project is being developed in a large hospital III, located in the city of Rio de Janeiro, with the objective of implementing coordinated actions and procedures, in order to optimize the images obtained in conventional radiology equipment,taking into account the lower risk to the patient and images with information for a safe diagnosis. In this paper Fuzzy Logic was used for modeling the problem of image evaluation of chest radiographs. The evaluation system was modeled as a diffuse network of three layers. The first, formed by the input variables of the system, that were considered relevant to the decision-making processes of the radiographic image quality, and are related to questions observed by radiologists during the report of examination of the chest. The second formed by the outputs of two inferences that evaluate the sharpness and visibility, and a third, consisting of an final inference that groups the two inferences of second layer, providing the final evaluation of radiography. The comparison of the results obtained with the evaluation of chest radiographs by medical experts shows that are consistent using this modeling

  3. Inverse planning for x-ray rotation therapy: a general solution of the inverse problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oelfke, U.; Bortfeld, T.

    1999-01-01

    Rotation therapy with photons is currently under investigation for the delivery of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). An analytical approach for inverse treatment planning of this radiotherapy technique is described. The inverse problem for the delivery of arbitrary 2D dose profiles is first formulated and then solved analytically. In contrast to previously applied strategies for solving the inverse problem, it is shown that the most general solution for the fluence profiles consists of two independent solutions of different parity. A first analytical expression for both fluence profiles is derived. The mathematical derivation includes two different strategies, an elementary expansion of fluence and dose into polynomials and a more practical approach in terms of Fourier transforms. The obtained results are discussed in the context of previous work on this problem. (author)

  4. Proton- and x-ray beams generated by ultra-fast CO2 lasers for medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorelsky, Igor; Polyanskiy, Mikhail; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Shkolnikov, Peter; Najmudin, Zulfikar; Palmer, Charlotte A. J.; Dover, Nicholas P.; Oliva, Piernicola; Carpinelli, Massimo

    2011-05-01

    Recent progress in using picosecond CO2 lasers for Thomson scattering and ion-acceleration experiments underlines their potentials for enabling secondary radiation- and particle- sources. These experiments capitalize on certain advantages of long-wavelength CO2 lasers, such as higher number of photons per energy unit, and favorable scaling of the electrons' ponderomotive energy and critical plasma density. The high-flux x-ray bursts produced by Thomson scattering of the CO2 laser off a counter-propagating electron beam enabled high-contrast, time-resolved imaging of biological objects in the picosecond time frame. In different experiments, the laser, focused on a hydrogen jet, generated monoenergetic proton beams via the radiation-pressure mechanism. The strong power-scaling of this regime promises realization of proton beams suitable for laser-driven proton cancer therapy after upgrading the CO2 laser to sub-PW peak power. This planned improvement includes optimizing the 10-μm ultra-short pulse generation, assuring higher amplification in the CO2 gas under combined isotopic- and power-broadening effects, and shortening the postamplification pulse to a few laser cycles (150-200 fs) via chirping and compression. These developments will move us closer to practical applications of ultra-fast CO2 lasers in medicine and other areas.

  5. Analysis of sulfidic linkages formed in natural rubber latex medical gloves by using X-ray absorption near edge structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chankrachang, M.; Limphirat, W.; Yongyingsakthavorn, P.; Nontakaew, U.; Tohsan, A.

    2017-09-01

    A study of sulfidic linkages formed in natural rubber (NR) latex medical gloves by using X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) is presented in this paper. The NR latex compound was prepared by using prevulcanization method, that is, it was prevulcanized at room temperature for 24 hrs before utilization. After the 24 hrs of prevulcanization, the latex film samples were obtained by dipping process. The dipped films were subjected to vulcanize at 110°C for 5 to 25 min. It was observed that after the compound was prevulcanized for 24 hrs, polysulfidic linkages were mainly formed in the sample. It was however found that after curing at 110°C for 5-25 min, the polysulfidic linkages are tended to change into disulfide linkages. Especially, in the case of 25 minutes cured sample, disulfide linkages are found to be the main linkages. In term of tensile strength, it was observed that when cure time increased from 5 - 10 min, tensile strengths were also increased. But when the cure time of the film is 25 minutes, tensile strength was slightly dropped. The dropped of tensile strength when cure time is longer than 10 minutes can be ascribed to a degradation of polysulfidic and disulfidic linkages during curing. Therefore, by using XANES analysis, it was found to be very useful to understand the cure characteristic, thus it can be very helpful to optimize cure time and tensile properties of the product.

  6. NIKOLA TESLA AND THE X-RAY

    OpenAIRE

    Rade R. Babic

    2005-01-01

    After professor Wilhelm Konrad Röntgen published his study of an x-ray discovery (Academy Bulletin, Berlin, 08. 11. 1895.), Nikola Tesla published his first study of an x-ray on the 11th of March in 1896. (X-ray, Electrical Review). Until the 11th of August in 1897 he had published ten studies on this subject. All Tesla,s x-ray studies were experimental, which is specific to his work. Studying the nature of the x-ray, he established a new medical branch-radiology. He wrote:” There’s no doubt...

  7. Important changes in medical x-ray imaging facility shielding design methodology. A brief summary of recommendations in NCRP Report No. 147

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archer, Benjamin R.; Gray, Joel E.

    2005-01-01

    The recently published Report No. 147 of The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements entitled 'Structural shielding design for medical x-ray imaging facilities' provides an update of shielding recommendations for x rays used for medical imaging. The goal of this report is to ensure that the shielding in these facilities limits radiation exposures to employees and members of the public to acceptable levels. Board certified medical and health physicists, as defined in this report, are the 'qualified experts' who are competent to design radiation shielding for these facilities. As such, physicists must be aware of the new technical information and the changes from previous reports that Report No. 147 supersedes. In this article we summarize the new data, models and recommendations for the design of radiation barriers in medical imaging facilities that are presented in Report No. 147

  8. Medical X-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... do as Parent? and Frequently Asked Questions pages Health Physics Society — Radiation Safety Information for the Public International ... and Risks in Decision Making [proceedings published in Health Physics , 101(5), 497–629 (2011)], communicating about risks ...

  9. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... some concerns about chest x-rays. However, it’s important to consider the likelihood of benefit to your health. While a chest x-ray use a ... posted: How to Obtain and Share ...

  10. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... X-ray Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, I’m Dr. Geoffrey Rubin, a radiologist ... about chest x-rays, visit Radiology Info dot org. Thank you for your time! Spotlight Recently posted: ...

  11. X-ray apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sell, L.J.

    1981-01-01

    A diagnostic x-ray device, readily convertible between conventional radiographic and tomographic operating modes, is described. An improved drive system interconnects and drives the x-ray source and the imaging device through coordinated movements for tomography

  12. X-ray - skeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003381.htm X-ray - skeleton To use the sharing features on this ... Degenerative bone conditions Osteomyelitis Risks There is low radiation exposure. X-rays machines are set to provide the smallest ...

  13. On the future of 3-D visualization in non-medical industrial x-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of imaging is to capture and record the details of an object for both current and future analysis in a transportable and archival format. Generally, the development and understanding of the relationships of the features of interest thus revealed in the image is ultimately essential for the beneficial utilization of that that knowledge. Modern advanced imaging methods utilized in both medical and industrial applications are predominantly of a digital format, and increasingly moving from a 2-D to 3-D modality to allow for significantly improved detail resolution and clarity of volumetric visualization. Conventional digital radiography (DR), for example, compresses an entire object volume onto a 2-D planar image with consequent lack of spatial resolution and considerable loss of small volume feature resolution. Computed tomography (CT) overcomes both of these limitations, providing the highly desirable capability of precise 3-D detection, localization and characterization of multiple features throughout the subject object volume. CT has the further capability to reconstruct virtual 3-D solid object images with arbitrary and reversible planar sectioning and of variable transparency to clearly visualize features of different densities in situ within an otherwise opaque object. While tomographic imaging is utilized in various medical CT, MRI, PET, EBCT and 3-D Ultrasound modalities, only the X-ray CT imaging is briefly discussed here as it presents comparable high quality images and is quite similar and synergistic with industrial XCT. Medical CT procedures started in the late 1970's (originally known as CAT Scan) and have progressed to the extent of being experienced and accepted by much of the general population. Non-Medical CT (or Industrial XCT) technology has historically followed in the shadow of Medical CT but remains today considerably less pervasive. There are however increasingly several important equipment and application distinctions. These will

  14. WE-DE-207A-01: Parallels in the Evolution of X-Ray Angiographic Systems and Devices Used for Minimally Invasive Endovascular Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strother, C. [University of Wisconsin (United States)

    2016-06-15

    1. Parallels in the evolution of x-ray angiographic systems and devices used for minimally invasive endovascular therapy Charles Strother - DSA, invented by Dr. Charles Mistretta at UW-Madison, was the technology which enabled the development of minimally invasive endovascular procedures. As DSA became widely available and the potential benefits for accessing the cerebral vasculature from an endovascular approach began to be apparent, industry began efforts to develop tools for use in these procedures. Along with development of catheters, embolic materials, pushable coils and the GDC coils there was simultaneous development and improvement of 2D DSA image quality and the introduction of 3D DSA. Together, these advances resulted in an enormous expansion in the scope and numbers of minimally invasive endovascular procedures. The introduction of flat detectors for c-arm angiographic systems in 2002 provided the possibility of the angiographic suite becoming not just a location for vascular imaging where physiological assessments might also be performed. Over the last decade algorithmic and hardware advances have been sufficient to now realize this potential in clinical practice. The selection of patients for endovascular treatments is enhanced by this dual capability. Along with these advances has been a steady reduction in the radiation exposure required so that today, vascular and soft tissue images may be obtained with equal or in many cases less radiation exposure than is the case for comparable images obtained with multi-detector CT. Learning Objectives: To understand the full capabilities of today’s angiographic suite To understand how c-arm cone beam CT soft tissue imaging can be used for assessments of devices, blood flow and perfusion. Advances in real-time x-ray neuro-endovascular image guidance Stephen Rudin - Reacting to the demands on real-time image guidance for ever finer neurovascular interventions, great improvements in imaging chains are being

  15. WE-DE-207A-01: Parallels in the Evolution of X-Ray Angiographic Systems and Devices Used for Minimally Invasive Endovascular Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strother, C.

    2016-01-01

    1. Parallels in the evolution of x-ray angiographic systems and devices used for minimally invasive endovascular therapy Charles Strother - DSA, invented by Dr. Charles Mistretta at UW-Madison, was the technology which enabled the development of minimally invasive endovascular procedures. As DSA became widely available and the potential benefits for accessing the cerebral vasculature from an endovascular approach began to be apparent, industry began efforts to develop tools for use in these procedures. Along with development of catheters, embolic materials, pushable coils and the GDC coils there was simultaneous development and improvement of 2D DSA image quality and the introduction of 3D DSA. Together, these advances resulted in an enormous expansion in the scope and numbers of minimally invasive endovascular procedures. The introduction of flat detectors for c-arm angiographic systems in 2002 provided the possibility of the angiographic suite becoming not just a location for vascular imaging where physiological assessments might also be performed. Over the last decade algorithmic and hardware advances have been sufficient to now realize this potential in clinical practice. The selection of patients for endovascular treatments is enhanced by this dual capability. Along with these advances has been a steady reduction in the radiation exposure required so that today, vascular and soft tissue images may be obtained with equal or in many cases less radiation exposure than is the case for comparable images obtained with multi-detector CT. Learning Objectives: To understand the full capabilities of today’s angiographic suite To understand how c-arm cone beam CT soft tissue imaging can be used for assessments of devices, blood flow and perfusion. Advances in real-time x-ray neuro-endovascular image guidance Stephen Rudin - Reacting to the demands on real-time image guidance for ever finer neurovascular interventions, great improvements in imaging chains are being

  16. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... I’d like to talk with you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most ... far outweighs any risk. For more information about chest x-rays, visit Radiology Info dot org. Thank you for your time! ...

  17. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed ...

  18. Wide-area phase-contrast X-ray imaging using large X-ray interferometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momose, Atsushi E-mail: momose@exp.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Takeda, Tohoru; Yoneyama, Akio; Koyama, Ichiro; Itai, Yuji

    2001-07-21

    Large X-ray interferometers are developed for phase-contrast X-ray imaging aiming at medical applications. A monolithic X-ray interferometer and a separate one are studied, and currently a 25 mmx20 mm view area can be generated. This paper describes the strategy of our research program and some recent developments.

  19. Wide-area phase-contrast X-ray imaging using large X-ray interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momose, Atsushi; Takeda, Tohoru; Yoneyama, Akio; Koyama, Ichiro; Itai, Yuji

    2001-07-01

    Large X-ray interferometers are developed for phase-contrast X-ray imaging aiming at medical applications. A monolithic X-ray interferometer and a separate one are studied, and currently a 25 mm×20 mm view area can be generated. This paper describes the strategy of our research program and some recent developments.

  20. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  1. Direct Synthesis of Carbon Nanotube Field Emitters on Metal Substrate for Open-Type X-ray Source in Medical Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amar Prasad Gupta

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We report the design, fabrication and characterization of a carbon nanotube enabled open-type X-ray system for medical imaging. We directly grew the carbon nanotubes used as electron emitter for electron gun on a non-polished raw metallic rectangular-rounded substrate with an area of 0.1377 cm2 through a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system. The stable field emission properties with triode electrodes after electrical aging treatment showed an anode emission current of 0.63 mA at a gate field of 7.51 V/μm. The 4.5-inch cubic shape open type X-ray system was developed consisting of an X-ray aperture, a vacuum part, an anode high voltage part, and a field emission electron gun including three electrodes with focusing, gate and cathode electrodes. Using this system, we obtained high-resolution X-ray images accelerated at 42–70 kV voltage by digital switching control between emitter and ground electrode.

  2. Direct Synthesis of Carbon Nanotube Field Emitters on Metal Substrate for Open-Type X-ray Source in Medical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Amar Prasad; Park, Sangjun; Yeo, Seung Jun; Jung, Jaeik; Cho, Chonggil; Paik, Sang Hyun; Park, Hunkuk; Cho, Young Chul; Kim, Seung Hoon; Shin, Ji Hoon; Ahn, Jeung Sun; Ryu, Jehwang

    2017-07-29

    We report the design, fabrication and characterization of a carbon nanotube enabled open-type X-ray system for medical imaging. We directly grew the carbon nanotubes used as electron emitter for electron gun on a non-polished raw metallic rectangular-rounded substrate with an area of 0.1377 cm² through a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system. The stable field emission properties with triode electrodes after electrical aging treatment showed an anode emission current of 0.63 mA at a gate field of 7.51 V/μm. The 4.5-inch cubic shape open type X-ray system was developed consisting of an X-ray aperture, a vacuum part, an anode high voltage part, and a field emission electron gun including three electrodes with focusing, gate and cathode electrodes. Using this system, we obtained high-resolution X-ray images accelerated at 42-70 kV voltage by digital switching control between emitter and ground electrode.

  3. X-ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culhane, J.L.; Sanford, P.W.

    1981-01-01

    X-ray astronomy has been established as a powerful means of observing matter in its most extreme form. The energy liberated by sources discovered in our Galaxy has confirmed that collapsed stars of great density, and with intense gravitational fields, can be studied by making observations in the X-ray part of the electromagnetic spectrum. The astronomical objects which emit detectable X-rays include our own Sun and extend to quasars at the edge of the Universe. This book describes the history, techniques and results obtained in the first twenty-five years of exploration. Space rockets and satellites are essential for carrying the instruments above the Earth's atmosphere where it becomes possible to view the X-rays from stars and nebulae. The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: the birth of X-ray astronomy; the nature of X-radiation; X-rays from the Sun; solar-flare X-rays; X-rays from beyond the solar system; supernovae and their remnants; X-rays from binary stars; white dwarfs and neutron stars; black holes; X-rays from galaxies and quasars; clusters of galaxies; the observatories of the future. (author)

  4. X-ray image intensifier tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    An improved real-time x-ray image intensifier tube of the proximity type used for medical x-ray fluoroscopy is described. It is claimed that this intensifier is of sufficient gain and resolution whilst remaining convenient to use and that the design is such that the patient dosage is minimized whilst the x-ray image information content at the scintillator-photocathode screen is maximized. (U.K.)

  5. Semiconductor X-ray spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muggleton, A.H.F.

    1978-02-01

    An outline is given of recent developments in particle and photon induced x-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis. Following a brief description of the basic mechanism of semiconductor detector operation a comparison is made between semiconductor detectors, scintillators and gas filled proportional devices. Detector fabrication and cryostat design are described in more detail and the effects of various device parameters on system performance, such as energy resolution, count rate capability, efficiency, microphony, etc. are discussed. The main applications of these detectors in x-ray fluorescence analysis, electron microprobe analysis, medical and pollution studies are reviewed

  6. Portable X-Ray Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Portable x-ray instrument developed by NASA now being produced commercially as an industrial tool may soon find further utility as a medical system. The instrument is Lixiscope - Low Intensity X-Ray Imaging Scope -- a self-contained, battery-powered fluoroscope that produces an instant image through use of a small amount of radioactive isotope. Originally developed by Goddard Space Flight Center, Lixiscope is now being produced by Lixi, Inc. which has an exclusive NASA license for one version of the device.

  7. X-ray holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faigel, G.; Tegze, M.; Belakhovsky, M.; Marchesini, S.; Bortel, G.

    2003-01-01

    In the last decade holographic methods using hard X-rays were developed. They are able to resolve atomic distances, and can give the 3D arrangement of atoms around a selected element. Therefore, hard X-ray holography has potential applications in chemistry, biology and physics. In this article we give a general description of these methods and discuss the developments in the experimental technique. The capabilities of hard X-ray holography are demonstrated by examples

  8. X-ray examination apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, S.; Griswa, P.J.; Halter, P. Jr.; Kidd, H.J.

    1980-01-01

    Apparatus for x-ray cardiovascular examination and which can also be used for general purpose examination is described. An advantage of the system is that there is no mechanical connection between the image intensifier and source to interfere with the medical examiner or emergency procedures. (U.K.)

  9. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... the equipment look like? How does the procedure work? How is the procedure ... diagnose and treat medical conditions. Imaging with x-rays involves exposing a part ...

  10. Localized cortical thickening of the femoral diaphysis captured on an X-ray before alendronate therapy in two cases of atypical femoral fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iizuka, Yoichi [Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Shibukawa General Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Shibukawa, Gunma (Japan); Takechi, Rumi [Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Gunma Cardiovascular Center, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Iizuka, Haku; Takagishi, Kenji [Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Omodaka, Takuya [Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Gunma Central Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan)

    2016-10-15

    We herein report two cases of atypical femoral fracture (AFF). X-ray examinations at the first visit of these two female patients showed a complete fracture of the femoral diaphysis diagnosed as an atypical femoral fracture (AFF). X-rays of these two cases also showed localized cortical thickening of the femoral diaphysis. Both patients had been taking alendronate for more than 3 years because of postmenopausal osteoporosis. We assumed that both of the fractures were associated with the long-term use of alendronate. However, we retrospectively identified localized cortical thickening of the femoral diaphysis on an X-ray taken before the alendronate therapy in both of these cases. Therefore, we suspected a pathogenesis of AFFs in which preexisting stress or an insufficient fracture unrelated to bisphosphonate (BP) therapy and subsequent suppression of bone turnover due to BP administration led to the occurrence of an AFF. The patient underwent surgery using intramedullary nails in both of these cases, followed by the administration of teriparatide, and they were able to walk without any support at the final follow-up examination. (orig.)

  11. Providing x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallozzi, P.J.; Epstein, H.M.

    1985-01-01

    This invention provides an apparatus for providing x-rays to an object that may be in an ordinary environment such as air at approximately atmospheric pressure. The apparatus comprises: means (typically a laser beam) for directing energy onto a target to produce x-rays of a selected spectrum and intensity at the target; a fluid-tight enclosure around the target; means for maintaining the pressure in the first enclosure substantially below atmospheric pressure; a fluid-tight second enclosure adjoining the first enclosure, the common wall portion having an opening large enough to permit x-rays to pass through but small enough to allow the pressure reducing means to evacuate gas from the first enclosure at least as fast as it enters through the opening; the second enclosure filled with a gas that is highly transparent to x-rays; the wall of the second enclosure to which the x-rays travel having a portion that is highly transparent to x-rays (usually a beryllium or plastic foil), so that the object to which the x-rays are to be provided may be located outside the second enclosure and adjacent thereto and thus receive the x-rays substantially unimpeded by air or other intervening matter. The apparatus is particularly suited to obtaining EXAFS (extended x-ray fine structure spectroscopy) data on a material

  12. Measurement of the noise components in the medical x-ray intensity pattern due to overlaying nonrecognizable structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischenko, Oleg; Hoeschen, Christoph; Effenberger, Olaf; Reissberg, Steffen; Buhr, Egbert; Doehring, Wilfried

    2003-06-01

    There are many aspects that influence and deteriorate the detection of pathologies in X-ray images. Some of those are due to effects taking place in the stage of forming the X-ray intensity pattern in front of the x-ray detector. These can be described as motion blurring, depth blurring, anatomical background, scatter noise and structural noise. Structural noise results from an overlapping of fine irrelevant anatomical structures. A method for measuring the combined effect of structural noise and scatter noise was developed and will be presented in this paper. This method is based on the consideration that within a pair of projections created after rotation of the object with a small angle (which is within the typical uncertainty in positioning the patient) both images would show the same relevant structures whereas the projection of the fine overlapping structures will appear quite differently in the two images. To demonstrate the method two X-ray radiographs of a lung phantom were produced. The second radiograph was achieved after rotating the lung by an angle of about 3. Dyadic wavelet representations of both images were regarded. For each value of the wavelet scale parameter the corresponding pair of approximations was matched using the cross correlation matching technique. The homologous regions of approximations were extracted. The image containing only those structures that appear in both images simultaneously was then reconstructed from the wavelet coefficients corresponding to the homologous regions. The difference between one of the original images and the noise-reduced image contains the structural noise and the scatter noise.

  13. Shielding chalculations in x-rays installations for medical diagnosis. description of the method and computational solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borroto Valdes, M.; Saez, D.G.

    1992-01-01

    Shielding requirements for x-rays diagnostic installations are investigated. The description of an entirely analytical method for calculation of thickness, based in the papers of Simpkin and NCRP49, is presented. Considerations described in specialized method to solving this problem. A program for microcomputer IBM and compatibles ones is available for estimation of minimum shielding requirements in lead, concrete and steel. Similar results were obtained from comparing with others authors

  14. Noise analysis of a novel hybrid active-passive pixel sensor for medical X-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safavian, N.; Izadi, M.H.; Sultana, A.; Wu, D.; Karim, K.S.; Nathan, A.; Rowlands, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Passive pixel sensor (PPS) is one of the most widely used architectures in large area amorphous silicon (a-Si) flat panel imagers. It consists of a detector and a thin film transistor (TFT) acting as a readout switch. While the PPS is advantageous in terms of providing a simple and small architecture suitable for high-resolution imaging, it directly exposes the signal to the noise of data line and external readout electronics, causing significant increase in the minimum readable sensor input signal. In this work we present the operation and noise performance of a hybrid 3-TFT current programmed, current output active pixel sensor (APS) suitable for real-time X-ray imaging. The pixel circuit extends the application of a-Si TFT from conventional switching element to on-pixel amplifier for enhanced signal-to-noise ratio and higher imager dynamic range. The capability of operation in both passive and active modes as well as being able to compensate for inherent instabilities of the TFTs makes the architecture a good candidate for X-ray imaging modalities with a wide range of incoming X-ray intensities. Measurement and theoretical calculations reveal a value for input refferd noise below the 1000 electron noise limit for real-time fluoroscopy. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  15. Determination of gold accumulation in human tissues caused by gold therapy using x-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacso, J.; Uzonyi, I.; Dezsoe, B.

    1986-08-01

    Human autopsy tissues from five patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated earlier with aqueous solution of gold and those from untreated control with the same disease were analyzed by x-ray fluorescence spectrometry using a conventional Si(Li) detection system. The gold and zinc concentrations of tissues were determined and compared with literature data. Correlation was found between Zn and Au concentrations in heart, lung, kidney and liver tissues. (author)

  16. The new X-ray ordinance: what's new?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichow, H.

    2000-01-01

    The augmented requirements for the minimisation of the radiation dose in medical exposure and the experiences gained from the implementation of the ordinance in force call for more extensive measures for reducing radiation, for quality assurance and expertise in radiological protection. In future physicians, dentists, veterinarians and other people using X-rays will have to bring their necessary expert knowledge regarding radiological protection up to date at regular intervals, and prove that they have done so. To protect the public against radiation exposure from targeted use, the limit value of the effective dose is reduced to 1 mSv in the calendar year. The dose level for the protection of people professionally exposed to radiation is reduced to 20 mSv. The further development of information technology and digital imaging demands that appropriate framework conditions be laid down in response to the changing requirements for radiation protection such as those in telemedicine and in digital recording and documentation possibilities in radiology. The draft further clarifies the distinction between the Radiological Protection Ordinance and the X-Ray Ordinance in relation to accelerators, in which electrons are accelerated with the aim of producing ionizing radiation, and reduces the limit energy from 3 MeV to 1 MeV. It is discussed to remove the X-ray therapy from the X-ray Ordinance and to insert it into the Radiological Protection Ordinance, in order to conform to the higher protection requirements in X-ray therapy. (orig.) [de

  17. X-ray interferometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franks, A.

    1980-01-01

    An improved type of amplitude-division x-ray interferometer is described. The wavelength at which the interferometer can operate is variable, allowing the instrument to be used to measure x-ray wavelength, and the angle of inclination is variable for sample investigation. (U.K.)

  18. Extremity x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003461.htm Extremity x-ray To use the sharing features on this page, ... in the body Risks There is low-level radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored and regulated to provide the ...

  19. X-rays utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebigan, F.

    1979-03-01

    The modality of X-ray utilization in different activities and economy is given. One presents firstly quantities and units used in radiation dosimetry and other fields. One gives the generation of X-rays, their properties as well as the elements of radiation protection. The utilization characteristics of these radiations in different fields are finally given. (author)

  20. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... d like to talk with you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x- ...

  1. Clinical step onward with X-ray dark-field imaging and perspective view of medical applications of synchrotron radiation in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, M.; Hashimoto, E.; Hashizume, H.; Hyodo, K.; Inoue, H.; Kunisada, T.; Maksimenko, A.; Mori, K.; Rubenstein, E.; Roberson, J.; Shimao, D.; Sugiyama, H.; Takeda, K.; Toyofuku, F.; Ueno, E.; Umetani, K.; Wada, H.; Pattanasiriwisawa, W.

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports, the application of synchrotron radiation to basic medicine at SPring-8 involving instrumentation and medical application of imaging and scattering. Emphasis should be laid on X-ray dark-field imaging (DFI) whose goal is clinical diagnosis of organs that have been invisible by ordinary techniques. Development of this technique is under way both at SPring-8 and KEK. The X-ray optics of DFI comprises a Bragg asymmetric monochro-collimator and a Laue case analyzer with a diffraction index of 440 using the X-ray energy of 35keV (λ=0.0354nm) in a parallel position. This analyzer that can provide with 80mmx80mm view size has 2.15mm thickness. At present the spatial resolution is around 5-10μm. Visibility of some organs such as soft bone tissue at excised human femoral head and breast cancer tissue is under test. This preliminary test shows that the DFI seems feasible in clinical diagnosis. Furthermore, a perspective view of application of synchrotron radiation to clinical medicine in Japan will be given

  2. Study of CdTe:Cl and CdZnTe detectors for medical multi-slices X-ray Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricq, St.

    1999-01-01

    The application of CdTe and CdZnTe detectors to medical X-ray Computed Tomography have been investigated. Different electrodes (Au, Pt, In) have been deposited on CdZnTe HPBM and on CdTe:ClTHM. Their injection properties have been determined with Current-Voltage characteristics. Under X-ray in CT conditions, injection currents measurements reveal trapped carriers space-charges formation. The same way, the comparisons of the responses to X-beam cut-off with various injection possibilities enable to follow the space-charges evolutions and then to determine the predominant traps types. Nevertheless, both hole and electron traps are responsible for the memory effect e.g. the currents levels dependence with irradiation history. This effect is noticed in particular on responses to fast flux variations that simulate scanner's conditions. Trap levels probably corresponding to native defects are responsible for these limitations. In order to make such detectors suitable for X-ray Computed Tomography, significant progresses in CdTe for CdZnTe crystal growth with an important defects densities reduction (factor 10), or possibly counting mode operation, seem necessary. (author)

  3. Verification of radiodynamic therapy by medical linear accelerator using a mouse melanoma tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Junko; Murakami, Mami; Mori, Takashi; Iwahashi, Hitoshi

    2018-02-09

    Combined treatment with 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) and X-rays improves tumor suppression in vivo. This is because the accumulated protoporphyrin IX from 5-ALA enhances the generation of ROS by the X-ray irradiation. In the present study, a high-energy medical linear accelerator was used instead of a non-medical low energy X-ray irradiator, which had been previously used. Tumor-bearing mice implanted with B16-BL6 melanoma cells were treated with fractionated doses of irradiation (in total, 20 or 30 Gy), using two types of X-ray irradiator after 5-ALA administration. Suppression of tumor growth was enhanced with X-ray irradiation in combination with 5-ALA treatment compared with X-ray treatment alone, using both medical and non-medical X-ray irradiators. 5-ALA has been used clinically for photodynamic therapy. Thus, "radiodynamic therapy", using radiation from medical linacs as a physical driving force, rather than the light used in photodynamic therapy, may have potential clinical applications.

  4. The Medical Exposure to Ionizing Radiation and Protection of the Patient in Medical Imaging Procedures for Diagnostic and Therapeutic Purposes (Excluding Radiotherapy) using X-Rays in Israel - Risk - Cost and Benefit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Shlomo, A.

    1998-10-01

    Diagnostic and therapeutic radiology is playing a major role in modern medicine. The utilization of devices emitting ionizing radiation for medical diagnostic and therapeutic purposes is classified into three categories: a. Radiotherapy procedures for the treatment of malignant and benign tumors. b. Nuclear medicine procedures using radiopharmaceuticals that are introduced into the patient's body for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. c. Diagnostic and therapeutic x-ray imaging procedures. This group includes conventional radiography, conventional fluoroscopy, cardiac catheterization, angiography, CT, mammography, dental, and fluoroscopy operation procedures. A survey was carried out on a sample of three major Israeli hospitals in order to: 1. Determine the status of radiation protection of patients in Israel with regard to the use of x-rays in medical imaging and interventional radiology. 2. Assess the extent of exposure of the population to medical x-rays, and assess the collective risk in Israel in this relation (based on Icr-60). 3. Carry out a cost-benefit optimization procedure related to the means that should be used to reduce the exposure of Israeli patients under x-ray procedures. 4. Establish a of practical recommendations to reduce the x-ray radiation exposure of patients and to increase the image quality. 5. Establish a number of basic rules to be utilized by health policy makers in Israel

  5. The Medical Exposure to Ionizing Radiation and Protection of the Patient in Medical Imaging Procedures for Diagnostic and Therapeutic Purposes (Excluding Radiotherapy) using X-Rays in Israel - Risk - Cost and Benefit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Shlomo, A

    1998-10-01

    Diagnostic and therapeutic radiology is playing a major role in modern medicine. The utilization of devices emitting ionizing radiation for medical diagnostic and therapeutic purposes is classified into three categories: a. Radiotherapy procedures for the treatment of malignant and benign tumors. b. Nuclear medicine procedures using radiopharmaceuticals that are introduced into the patient's body for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. c. Diagnostic and therapeutic x-ray imaging procedures. This group includes conventional radiography, conventional fluoroscopy, cardiac catheterization, angiography, CT, mammography, dental, and fluoroscopy operation procedures. A survey was carried out on a sample of three major Israeli hospitals in order to: 1. Determine the status of radiation protection of patients in Israel with regard to the use of x-rays in medical imaging and interventional radiology. 2. Assess the extent of exposure of the population to medical x-rays, and assess the collective risk in Israel in this relation (based on Icr-60). 3. Carry out a cost-benefit optimization procedure related to the means that should be used to reduce the exposure of Israeli patients under x-ray procedures. 4. Establish a of practical recommendations to reduce the x-ray radiation exposure of patients and to increase the image quality. 5. Establish a number of basic rules to be utilized by health policy makers in Israel.

  6. Estimation of the collective effective dose to the population from medical X-ray examinations in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenkanen-Rautakoskia, Petra; Jaervinen, Hannu; Bly, Ritva

    2008-01-01

    The collective effective dose to the population from all X-ray examinations in Finland in 2005 was estimated. The numbers of X-ray examinations were collected by a questionnaire to the health care units (response rate 100 %). The effective doses in plain radiography were calculated using a Monte Carlo based program (PCXMC), as average values for selected health care units. For computed tomography (CT), weighted dose length product (DLP w ) in a standard phantom was measured for routine CT protocols of four body regions, for 80 % of CT scanners including all types. The effective doses were calculated from DPL w values using published conversion factors. For contrast-enhanced radiology and interventional radiology, the effective dose was estimated mainly by using published DAP values and conversion factors for given body regions. About 733 examinations per 1000 inhabitants (excluding dental) were made in 2005, slightly less than in 2000. The proportions of plain radiography, computed tomography, contrast-enhanced radiography and interventional procedures were about 92, 7, 1 and 1 %, respectively. From 2000, the frequencies (number of examinations per 1000 inhabitants) of plain radiography and contrast-enhanced radiography have decreased about 8 and 33 %, respectively, while the frequencies of CT and interventional radiology have increased about 28 and 38 %, respectively. The population dose from all X-ray examinations is about 0.43 mSv per person (in 1997 0.5 mSv). About half of this is caused by CT (in 1997 only 20 %) although the relative number of CT examinations is only 7 %. The contribution by plain radiography is 19 %, interventional radiology 17 %, and contrast-enhanced radiology 14 %. It is concluded that CT examinations are the major source of the population dose, while interventional radiology gives about the same population dose as plain radiography. For plain radiography, body examinations cause the highest effective dose. (author)

  7. Sindbad: a multi-purpose and scalable X-ray simulation tool for NDE and medical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillemaud, R.; Tabary, J.; Hugonnard, P.; Mathy, F.; Koenig, A.; Gliere, A

    2003-07-01

    In a unified framework, S.i.n.d.b.a.d. is a multipurpose X-ray simulation software which provides scalable approach of computation and very efficient results by combining analytical and monte Carlo simulations. The software has been validated experimentally. it is also a easy to use software with a strong emphasize on user friendly GUI, simple description of object (CAD or volume) and visualization tools. The next developments will be focused on acceleration of Monte Carlo simulation for scatter fraction computation and the addition of new types of detector. (N.C.)

  8. Phase-contrast X-ray CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momose, Atsushi [Hitachi Ltd., Saitama (Japan). Advanced Research Laboratory; Takeda, Tohoru; Itai, Yuji

    1995-12-01

    Phase-contrast X-ray computed tomography (CT) enabling the observation of biological soft tissues without contrast enhancement has been developed. The X-ray phase shift caused by an object is measured and input to a standard CT reconstruction algorithm. A thousand times increase in the image sensitivity to soft tissues is achieved compared with the conventional CT using absorption contrast. This is because the X-ray phase shift cross section of light elements is about a thousand times larger than the absorption cross section. The phase shift is detected using an X-ray interferometer and computer analyses of interference patterns. Experiments were performed using a synchrotron X-ray source. Excellent image sensitivity is demonstrated in the observation of cancerous rabbit liver. The CT images distinguish cancer lesion from normal liver tissue and, moreover, visualize the pathological condition in the lesion. Although the X-ray energy employed and the present observation area size are not suitable for medical applications as they are, phase-contrast X-ray CT is promising for investigating the internal structure of soft tissue which is almost transparent for X-rays. The high sensitivity also provides the advantage of reducing X-ray doses. (author).

  9. A platform for Image Reconstruction in X-ray Imaging: Medical Applications using CBCT and DTS algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zacharias Kamarianakis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the architecture of a software platform implemented in C++, for the purpose of testing and evaluation of reconstruction algorithms in X-ray imaging. The fundamental elements of the platform are classes, tightened together in a logical hierarchy. Real world objects as an X-ray source or a flat detector can be defined and implemented as instances of corresponding classes. Various operations (e.g. 3D transformations, loading, saving, filtering of images, creation of planar or curved objects of various dimensions have been incorporated in the software tool as class methods, as well. The user can easily set up any arrangement of the imaging chain objects in 3D space and experiment with many different trajectories and configurations. Selected 3D volume reconstructions using simulated data acquired in specific scanning trajectories are used as a demonstration of the tool. The platform is considered as a basic tool for future investigations of new reconstruction methods in combination with various scanning configurations.

  10. The status of Tsukuba BNCT trial: BPA-based boron neutron capture therapy combined with X-ray irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, T., E-mail: tetsu_tsukuba@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Science, University of Tsukuba, Tennodai 1-1-1, Tsukuba (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Science, University of Tsukuba, Tennodai 1-1-1, Tsukuba (Japan); Nakai, K. [Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Science, University of Tsukuba, Tennodai 1-1-1, Tsukuba (Japan); Nariai, T. [Department of Neurosurgery, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Yushima 1-5-45, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Kumada, H.; Okumura, T.; Mizumoto, M.; Tsuboi, K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Science, University of Tsukuba, Tennodai 1-1-1, Tsukuba (Japan); Zaboronok, A.; Ishikawa, E.; Aiyama, H.; Endo, K.; Takada, T.; Yoshida, F.; Shibata, Y.; Matsumura, A. [Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Science, University of Tsukuba, Tennodai 1-1-1, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2011-12-15

    The phase II trial has been prepared to assess the effectiveness of BPA (250 mg/kg)-based NCT combined with X-ray irradiation and temozolomide (75 mg/m{sup 2}) for the treatment of newly diagnosed GBM. BPA uptake is determined by {sup 18}F-BPA-PET and/or {sup 11}C-MET-PET, and a tumor with the lesion to normal ratio of 2 or more is indicated for BNCT. The maximum normal brain point dose prescribed was limited to 13.0 Gy or less. Primary end point is overall survival.

  11. X-ray crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    X-rays diffracted from a well-ordered protein crystal create sharp patterns of scattered light on film. A computer can use these patterns to generate a model of a protein molecule. To analyze the selected crystal, an X-ray crystallographer shines X-rays through the crystal. Unlike a single dental X-ray, which produces a shadow image of a tooth, these X-rays have to be taken many times from different angles to produce a pattern from the scattered light, a map of the intensity of the X-rays after they diffract through the crystal. The X-rays bounce off the electron clouds that form the outer structure of each atom. A flawed crystal will yield a blurry pattern; a well-ordered protein crystal yields a series of sharp diffraction patterns. From these patterns, researchers build an electron density map. With powerful computers and a lot of calculations, scientists can use the electron density patterns to determine the structure of the protein and make a computer-generated model of the structure. The models let researchers improve their understanding of how the protein functions. They also allow scientists to look for receptor sites and active areas that control a protein's function and role in the progress of diseases. From there, pharmaceutical researchers can design molecules that fit the active site, much like a key and lock, so that the protein is locked without affecting the rest of the body. This is called structure-based drug design.

  12. X-ray lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Elton, Raymond C

    2012-01-01

    The first in its field, this book is both an introduction to x-ray lasers and a how-to guide for specialists. It provides new entrants and others interested in the field with a comprehensive overview and describes useful examples of analysis and experiments as background and guidance for researchers undertaking new laser designs. In one succinct volume, X-Ray Lasers collects the knowledge and experience gained in two decades of x-ray laser development and conveys the exciting challenges and possibilities still to come._Add on for longer version of blurb_M>The reader is first introduced

  13. X-ray apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, S.; Stagg, L.; Lambert, T.W.; Griswa, P.J.

    1976-01-01

    A patient support system for X-ray equipment in arteriographic studies of the heart is described in detail. The support system has been designed to overcome many of the practical problems encountered in using previous types of arteriographic X-ray equipment. The support system is capable of horizontal movement and, by a series of shafts attached to the main support system, the X-ray source and image intensifier or detector may be rotated through the same angle. The system is highly flexible and details are given of several possible operational modes. (U.K.)

  14. X-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whetten, N.R.; Houston, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    An ionization chamber for use in determining the spatial distribution of x-ray photons in tomography systems comprises a plurality of substantially parallel, planar anodes separated by parallel, planar cathodes and enclosed in a gas of high atomic weight at a pressure from approximately 10 atmospheres to approximately 50 atmospheres. The cathode and anode structures comprise metals which are substantially opaque to x-ray radiation and thereby tend to reduce the resolution limiting effects of x-ray fluoresence in the gas. In another embodiment of the invention the anodes comprise parallel conductive bars disposed between two planar cathodes. Guard rings eliminate surface leakage currents between adjacent electrodes. 8 figures

  15. X-ray apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grady, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    X-ray apparatus is described which has a shutter between the X-ray source and the patient. The shutter controls the level of radiation to which the patient is exposed instead of merely discontinuing the electric power supplied to the source. When the shutter is opened a radiation sensor senses the level of X-radiation. When a preset quantity of X-radiation has been measured an exposure control closes the shutter. Instead of using the radiation sensor, the integrated power supplied to the anode of the X-ray source may be measured. (author)

  16. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very small dose ... limitations of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is ...

  17. X-ray examination apparatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2000-01-01

    The invention relates to an X-ray apparatus which includes an adjustable X-ray filter. In order to adjust an intensity profile of the X-ray beam, an X-ray absorbing liquid is transported to filter elements of the X-ray filter. Such transport is susceptible to gravitational forces which lead to an

  18. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very ... of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive ...

  19. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very small ... of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive ...

  20. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very small ... of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive ...

  1. APTES-Terminated ultrasmall and iron-doped silicon nanoparticles as X-Ray dose enhancer for radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Stefanie; Wegmann, Marc; Distel, Luitpold V R; Neuhuber, Winfried; Kryschi, Carola

    2018-04-15

    Silicon nanoparticles with sizes between were synthesized through wet-chemistry procedures using diverse phase transfer reagents. On the other hand, the preparation of iron-doped silicon nanoparticles was carried out using the precursor Na 4 Si 4 containing 5% Fe. Biocompatibility of all silicon nanoparticle samples was achieved by surface-stabilizing with (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane. These surface structures provided positive surface charges which facilitated electrostatic binding to the negatively charged biological membranes. The mode of interaction with membranes, being either incorporation or just attachment, was found to depend on the nanoparticle size. The smallest silicon nanoparticles (ca. 1.5 nm) were embedded in the mitochondrial membrane in MCF-7 cells. When interacting with X-rays these silicon nanoparticles were observed to enhance the superoxide formation upon depolarizing the mitochondrial membrane. X-ray irradiation of MCF-7 cells loaded with the larger silicon nanoparticles was shown to increase the intracellular singlet oxygen generation. The doping of the silicon nanoparticles with iron led to additional production of hydroxyl radicals via the Fenton reaction. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Dose Matters: FDA's Guidance on Children's X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumer Updates Dose Matters: FDA's Guidance on Children's X-rays Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... exposure during medical procedures. The level of ionizing radiation from X-ray imaging is generally very low, but can ...

  3. Characterization of continuous and pulsed emission modes of a hybrid micro focus x-ray source for medical imaging applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghani, Muhammad U.; Wong, Molly D.; Ren, Liqiang; Wu, Di; Zheng, Bin [Center for Biomedical Engineering and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Rong, John X. [Department of Imaging Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Wu, Xizeng [Department of Radiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35249 (United States); Liu, Hong, E-mail: liu@ou.edu [Center for Biomedical Engineering and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States)

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively characterize a micro focus x-ray tube that can operate in both continuous and pulsed emission modes. The micro focus x-ray source (Model L9181-06, Hamamatsu Photonics, Japan) has a varying focal spot size ranging from 16 µm to 50 µm as the source output power changes from 10 to 39 W. We measured the source output, beam quality, focal spot sizes, kV accuracy, spectra shapes and spatial resolution. Source output was measured using an ionization chamber for various tube voltages (kVs) with varying current (µA) and distances. The beam quality was measured in terms of half value layer (HVL), kV accuracy was measured with a non-invasive kV meter, and the spectra was measured using a compact integrated spectrometer system. The focal spot sizes were measured using a slit method with a CCD detector with a pixel pitch of 22 µm. The spatial resolution was quantitatively measured using the slit method with a CMOS flat panel detector with a 50 µm pixel pitch, and compared to the qualitative results obtained by imaging a contrast bar pattern. The focal spot sizes in the vertical direction were smaller than that of the horizontal direction, the impact of which was visible when comparing the spatial resolution values. Our analyses revealed that both emission modes yield comparable imaging performances in terms of beam quality, spectra shape and spatial resolution effects. There were no significantly large differences, thus providing the motivation for future studies to design and develop stable and robust cone beam imaging systems for various diagnostic applications. - Highlights: • A micro focus x-ray source that operates in both continuous and pulse emission modes was quantitatively characterized. • The source output, beam quality, focal spot measurements, kV accuracy, spectra analyses and spatial resolution were measured. • Our analyses revealed that both emission modes yield comparable imaging performances in terms of beam

  4. Characterization of continuous and pulsed emission modes of a hybrid micro focus x-ray source for medical imaging applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghani, Muhammad U.; Wong, Molly D.; Ren, Liqiang; Wu, Di; Zheng, Bin; Rong, John X.; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively characterize a micro focus x-ray tube that can operate in both continuous and pulsed emission modes. The micro focus x-ray source (Model L9181-06, Hamamatsu Photonics, Japan) has a varying focal spot size ranging from 16 µm to 50 µm as the source output power changes from 10 to 39 W. We measured the source output, beam quality, focal spot sizes, kV accuracy, spectra shapes and spatial resolution. Source output was measured using an ionization chamber for various tube voltages (kVs) with varying current (µA) and distances. The beam quality was measured in terms of half value layer (HVL), kV accuracy was measured with a non-invasive kV meter, and the spectra was measured using a compact integrated spectrometer system. The focal spot sizes were measured using a slit method with a CCD detector with a pixel pitch of 22 µm. The spatial resolution was quantitatively measured using the slit method with a CMOS flat panel detector with a 50 µm pixel pitch, and compared to the qualitative results obtained by imaging a contrast bar pattern. The focal spot sizes in the vertical direction were smaller than that of the horizontal direction, the impact of which was visible when comparing the spatial resolution values. Our analyses revealed that both emission modes yield comparable imaging performances in terms of beam quality, spectra shape and spatial resolution effects. There were no significantly large differences, thus providing the motivation for future studies to design and develop stable and robust cone beam imaging systems for various diagnostic applications. - Highlights: • A micro focus x-ray source that operates in both continuous and pulse emission modes was quantitatively characterized. • The source output, beam quality, focal spot measurements, kV accuracy, spectra analyses and spatial resolution were measured. • Our analyses revealed that both emission modes yield comparable imaging performances in terms of beam

  5. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Disorders Video: The Basketball Game: An MRI Story Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, I’m Dr. Geoffrey ...

  6. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also be useful to help diagnose and monitor treatment for a variety of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray requires no special preparation. ...

  7. X-ray tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    A form of x-ray tube is described which provides satisfactory focussing of the electron beam when the beam extends for several feet from gun to target. Such a tube can be used for computerised tomographic scanning. (UK)

  8. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... breath, persistent cough, fever, chest pain or injury. It may also be useful to help diagnose and ... have some concerns about chest x-rays. However, it’s important to consider the likelihood of benefit to ...

  9. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... accurate diagnosis far outweighs any risk. For more information about chest x-rays, visit Radiology Info dot ... Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not permit copying but encourage linking ...

  10. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Site Index A-Z Spotlight Recently posted: Pancreatic Cancer The Limitations of Online Dose Calculators Video: The ... of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray requires no special preparation. ...

  11. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... exams and use a very small dose of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of the inside of the ... chest x-ray use a tiny dose of ionizing radiation, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs ...

  12. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... However, it’s important to consider the likelihood of benefit to your health. While a chest x-ray use a tiny dose of ionizing radiation, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs any risk. ...

  13. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... June is Men's Health Month Recently posted: Pancreatic Cancer The Limitations of Online Dose Calculators Video: The ... of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray requires no special preparation. ...

  14. Evaluation of the occupational X-rays dose of the medical staff in a cardiac catheterization laboratory using an acrylic phantom and semiconductor dosimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Lung Fa; Kittipayak, Samrit; Yen, Shan Lin; Pan, Lung Kwang; Lin, Cheng Hsun

    2016-01-01

    The occupational X-rays doses of medical staff in a cardiac catheterization laboratory were evaluated. Four customized acrylic phantoms were used to simulate a patient, medical doctor, assistant, and radiologist to evaluate the in-situ X-rays exposure dose using semiconductor dosimeters. The exposure dose was measured under three scenarios that were preset to imply: no shielding, moderate shielding and complete shielding for the medical staff in the laboratory. The doses were applied by changing the dose area product (DAP) from 11,000 to 500,000mGy·cm(2) in 14 increments. The estimated annual occupational doses for doctors, assistants and radiologists in scenarios I, II, and III were: I) 35.03, 7.78, 1.95; II) 1.95, 0.78, 0.06; and III) 0.19, 0.10, 0.05cSv, respectively. The derived linear regression line of the exposure dose with respect to the DAP were extrapolated to obtain the minimum detectable level (MDL) of DAP for triggering the staff dosimeters. Accordingly, the minimum annual dose was estimated as 0.05cSv. Additional shielding provided measurable protection to the staff. The protective clothing used in scenarios II and III can reduce the original dose from scenario I to ∼3% (scenario II) and ∼0.5% (scenario III). The annual occupational dose also changed with the various X-rays energy settings. The annual dose increased to 126% when the preset X-rays energy was changed from 70 to 100kVp. The semiconductor dosimeter proved to be an adequate tool for measuring low doses and low dose rates under these circumstances. The dose can be reduce of I) 35.03, 7.78, 1.95; to II) 1.95, 0.78, 0.06 (∼3%); or III) 0.19, 0.10, 0.05 (∼0.5%)cSv, respectively according to different protective scenarios.

  15. The implementation of modern digital technology in x-ray medical diagnosis in Republic of Moldova - a stringent necessity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosca, Andrei

    2011-01-01

    The study includes analyses of current technical state of radiodiagnostic equipment from the Public Medico-Sanitary Institution of Ministry of Health of Republic of Moldova (IMSP MS RM). The traditional radiodiagnostic apparatuses were morally and physically outrun at 96,6% (in regional MSPI - 93,5%), inclusive the dental one - 92,0% (in raional MSPI - 97,2%), X-Ray exam -100%, mobile - 84,1% etc. The exploitation of the traditional radiodiagnostic apparatuses with high degree of physical and moral wear essentially diminished the quality of profile investigation, creates premises for diagnostic error perpetrating, increase the collective ionizing irradiation of population etc. In recent years the subvention of MSPI HM RM with digital radiodiagnostic equipment was started. This process is very hard unfold because of grave socio-economic crises in Republic of Moldova. Despite these obstacles the subvention of MSPI HM RM with digital equipment represents a stringent necessity and a time request.

  16. Development of (Cd,Zn)Te X-ray and gamma ray radiation detectors for medical and security applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franc, J.; Hoeschl, P.; Belas, E.; Grill, V.; Fauler, A.; Dambacher, M.; Procz, S.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: There is a growing need for large area X-and Gamma radiation detectors for penetrating radiations in various fields of application e.g. astronomy, detectors for nuclear medicine, biosensor materials, security, non-proliferation of hazardous materials, and environmental applications etc. Direct X-rays conversion into electric charges in a semiconductor is envisaged with better spectroscopic characteristics to improve contrast and quantitative measurements compared to indirect detection using scintillators. The family of II-VI semiconductor materials combine a range of excellent properties such as their high sensitivity due to the high mobility-lifetime products, their high energy resolution as a consequence of the electron-hole pair formation energy, their reasonable maturity in terms of microelectronic technologies required for commercial detector fabrication, wide range of stopping power and band-gaps available. In particular, CdTe and Cd x Zn 1-x Te (CZT) with Zn=0.1 offer a favorable combination of physical and chemical properties that makes it attractive as a room temperature X-ray detector material of choice for many applications involving photon energies up to several hundreds of keV. From the scientific experience accumulated in the past years, the detector properties are strongly dependent on a series of parameters which must be strictly controlled during crystal growth, such as the homogeneity, stoichiometry and the related intrinsic defects which appear during the material growth, a high mobility-lifetime for electron and holes is mandatory etc. Production of detector-grade CdTe and CdZnTe on industrial scale is still a challenge and optimal growth methods and growth conditions have been under intensive investigation. Progress in crystal growth and characterization achieved in a project of Institute partnership between Charles University in Prague and University of Freiburg, Germany which was sponsored by Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, will

  17. Synchrotrons and their applications in medical imaging and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, R.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Australasia's first synchrotron is being built on the campus of Monash University near Melbourne. Is it of any relevance to the medical imaging and radiation therapy communities? The answer is an unequivocal yes. Synchrotrons overcome many of the problems with conventional X-ray sources and as a result make it possible to demonstrate extraordinary advances in both X-ray imaging and indeed in radio-therapy. Synchrotron imaging offers us a window into what is possible and the results are spectacular. Specific examples include lung images that reveal alveolar structure and computed tomography of single cells. For therapy treatments are being pioneered that seem to be effective on high grade gliomas. An overview of the status of medical applications using synchrotrons will be given and the proposed Australian medical imaging and therapy facilities will be described and some of the proposed research highlighted. Copyright (2004) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  18. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of knee x-rays. A portable x-ray machine is a compact apparatus that can be taken ... of the body being examined, an x-ray machine produces a small burst of radiation that passes ...

  19. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... that might interfere with the x-ray images. Women should always inform their physician and x-ray ... Safety page for more information about radiation dose. Women should always inform their physician or x-ray ...

  20. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ray examination. X-rays usually have no side effects in the typical diagnostic range for this exam. ... x-rays. A Word About Minimizing Radiation Exposure Special care is taken during x-ray examinations to ...

  1. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... drawer under the table holds the x-ray film or image recording plate . Sometimes the x-ray ... extended over the patient while an x-ray film holder or image recording plate is placed beneath ...

  2. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray ( ... leg (shin), ankle or foot. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A ...

  3. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very controlled x-ray beams and dose ...

  4. Problems of radiation protection and their solution in afterloading therapy performed in a X-ray deep therapy chamber of the Radiological Clinic of the Martin-Luther-University Halle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauh, G.

    1982-01-01

    The Radiological Clinic of the Martin-Luther-University Halle got the first afterloading therapy unit DECATRON in December 1973. After preceding physical measurements the first patient was irradiated in August 1974. At this time there was no experience with the afterloading therapy in the GDR. The afterloading therapy was performed in a former X-ray deep therapy chamber. The occuring problems of radiation protection are considered and the ways of solution are described. Radiation protection calculations were carried out, values of local dose measurements are given, interpreted and compared with the values of personal dosimetry. Also the terms 'incorporated activity' and 'threading out activity' ('effective activity') are discussed, which led to differences in dose measurements formerly. The special situation required to discuss radiation protection problems of X-ray deep therapy simultaneously. (author)

  5. Pulmonary complications of induction therapy for acute myeloid leukemia in adults. Findings of chest X-rays and computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, J.; Huettmann, C.; Jacobi, V.; Boehme, A.

    1998-01-01

    To exclude pulmonary complications, 359 chest radiographs and 50 computed tomographs of the lung were performed in 95 patients suffering from acute myeloid leukemia. The radiological findings were registered, described and correlated with clinical findings in the present study on 2395 days of observation. Results: In summary, 52 patients showed alterations of the lung. Pulmonary hyperhydration was seen in 21 cases, bacterial pneumonia was found in 18 cases, invasive pulmonary aspergillosis was documented in 14 cases, and 5 cases of severe haemorrhage were seen. An unexplained pulmonary edema in 13 patients with interstitial and alveolar infiltrates is considered to be a complication of treatment with cytosine-arabinoside. Conclusion: The results demonstrate that chest X-ray and computed tomography have a high impact in detection and treatment of pulmonary complications following intensive chemotherapy. We may expect the development of diffuse opacity following administration of cytosine-arabinoside in medium-sized doses. (orig.) [de

  6. A feasibility study of X-ray phase-contrast mammographic tomography at the Imaging and Medical beamline of the Australian Synchrotron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesterets, Yakov I; Gureyev, Timur E; Mayo, Sheridan C; Stevenson, Andrew W; Thompson, Darren; Brown, Jeremy M C; Kitchen, Marcus J; Pavlov, Konstantin M; Lockie, Darren; Brun, Francesco; Tromba, Giuliana

    2015-11-01

    Results are presented of a recent experiment at the Imaging and Medical beamline of the Australian Synchrotron intended to contribute to the implementation of low-dose high-sensitivity three-dimensional mammographic phase-contrast imaging, initially at synchrotrons and subsequently in hospitals and medical imaging clinics. The effect of such imaging parameters as X-ray energy, source size, detector resolution, sample-to-detector distance, scanning and data processing strategies in the case of propagation-based phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) have been tested, quantified, evaluated and optimized using a plastic phantom simulating relevant breast-tissue characteristics. Analysis of the data collected using a Hamamatsu CMOS Flat Panel Sensor, with a pixel size of 100 µm, revealed the presence of propagation-based phase contrast and demonstrated significant improvement of the quality of phase-contrast CT imaging compared with conventional (absorption-based) CT, at medically acceptable radiation doses.

  7. Characteristics of kilovoltage x-ray beams used for cone-beam computed tomography in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, George X; Duggan, Dennis M; Coffey, Charles W

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to characterize the beams produced by a kilovoltage (kV) imager integrated into a linear accelerator (Varian on-board imager integrated into the Trilogy accelerator) for acquiring high resolution volumetric cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images of the patient on the treatment table. The x-ray tube is capable of generating photon spectra with kVp values between 40 and 125 kV. The Monte Carlo simulations were used to study the characteristics of kV beams and the properties of imaged target scatters. The Monte Carlo results were benchmarked against measurements, and excellent agreements were obtained. We also studied the effect of including the electron impact ionization (EII), and the simulation showed that the characteristic radiation is increased significantly in the energy spectra when EII is included. Although only slight beam hardening is observed in the spectra of all photons after passing through the phantom target, there is a significant difference in the spectra and angular distributions between scattered and primary photons. The results also show that the photon fluence distributions are significantly altered by adding bow tie filters. The results indicate that a combination of large cone-beam field size and large imaged target significantly increases scatter-to-primary ratios for photons that reach the detector panel. For phantoms 10 cm, 20 cm and 30 cm thick of water placed at the isocentre, the scatter-to-primary ratios are 0.94, 3.0 and 7.6 respectively for an open 125 kVp CBCT beam. The Monte Carlo simulations show that the increase of the scatter is proportional to the increase of the imaged volume, and this also applies to scatter-to-primary ratios. This study shows both the magnitude and the characteristics of scattered x-rays. The knowledge obtained from this investigation may be useful in the future design of the image detector to improve the image quality

  8. SU-C-204-06: Monte Carlo Dose Calculation for Kilovoltage X-Ray-Psoralen Activated Cancer Therapy (X-PACT): Preliminary Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mein, S [Duke University Medical Physics Graduate Program (United States); Gunasingha, R [Department of Radiation Safety, Duke University Medical Center (United States); Nolan, M [Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University (United States); Oldham, M; Adamson, J [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: X-PACT is an experimental cancer therapy where kV x-rays are used to photo-activate anti-cancer therapeutics through phosphor intermediaries (phosphors that absorb x-rays and re-radiate as UV light). Clinical trials in pet dogs are currently underway (NC State College of Veterinary Medicine) and an essential component is the ability to model the kV dose in these dogs. Here we report the commissioning and characterization of a Monte Carlo (MC) treatment planning simulation tool to calculate X-PACT radiation doses in canine trials. Methods: FLUKA multi-particle MC simulation package was used to simulate a standard X-PACT radiation treatment beam of 80kVp with the Varian OBI x-ray source geometry. The beam quality was verified by comparing measured and simulated attenuation of the beam by various thicknesses of aluminum (2–4.6 mm) under narrow beam conditions (HVL). The beam parameters at commissioning were then corroborated using MC, characterized and verified with empirically collected commissioning data, including: percent depth dose curves (PDD), back-scatter factors (BSF), collimator scatter factor(s), and heel effect, etc. All simulations were conducted for N=30M histories at M=100 iterations. Results: HVL and PDD simulation data agreed with an average percent error of 2.42%±0.33 and 6.03%±1.58, respectively. The mean square error (MSE) values for HVL and PDD (0.07% and 0.50%) were low, as expected; however, longer simulations are required to validate convergence to the expected values. Qualitatively, pre- and post-filtration source spectra matched well with 80kVp references generated via SPEKTR software. Further validation of commissioning data simulation is underway in preparation for first-time 3D dose calculations with canine CBCT data. Conclusion: We have prepared a Monte Carlo simulation capable of accurate dose calculation for use with ongoing X-PACT canine clinical trials. Preliminary results show good agreement with measured data and hold

  9. Evaluation of medical exposure and exposure by the public in a typical scenario of examinations using mobile X-ray equipment through the Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Felipe A.; Galeano, Diego C.; Santos, William S.; Carvalho Júnior, Albérico B.

    2016-01-01

    In this work irradiation scenarios that simulated chest and abdomen examinations involving mobile X-ray equipment in hospitals were modeled with the purpose of calculating conversion coefficient for effective dose (CC E ), normalized to entrance surface dose (ESD), applied to patients and public individuals. These coefficients can easily be used in this practice. Patients and public individuals were represented by a pair of anthropomorphic phantoms inserted in the MCNPX 2.7.0 radiation transport code. One of the phantoms (patient) was irradiated with the direct beam simulating examinations of the chest and abdomen, each with two fields of irradiation, ideal (IF) and extrapolated (EF). Using the software SPECGEN X-ray spectra from 60 to 100 kVp at 10 kVp intervals were generated and used in this work. The other phantom (public individual) was positioned 50–200 cm from the patient. In relation to the CC E calculated in the patient, the average increase obtained between the irradiation fields was 62.4% for the chest examinations, and for the same conditions the CC E was calculated for abdomen examinations and found to be 8.0%. Increasing the distance between public individual and patient, reductions of up to 81.7% in the CC E in abdomen examinations and 83.4% in chest examinations were observed. Through the assessment of CC E of these scenarios, it is possible to measure the damages relating to this practice for both patients and public individuals. - Highlights: • A computational scenario involving mobile X-ray equipment in hospitals were modeled. • Evaluation of medical exposure and exposure by the public was made by CC E (E/ESD). • A pair of the anthropomorphic simulators was inserted into the input file MCNPX. • Analyze the influence in CC E for the different types of fields used in examinations. • Monitoring the reduction of CC E 's with increasing distance between the beds.

  10. Characterization of relative biological effectiveness for conventional radiation therapy: a comparison of clinical 6 MV X-rays and 137Cs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Michelle; Beltran, Chris; Sarkaria, Jann; Herman, Michael G

    2017-09-01

    Various types of radiation are utilized in the treatment of cancer. Equal physical doses of different radiation types do not always result in the same amount of biological damage. In order to account for these differences, a scaling factor known as the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) can be used. 137Cesium (137Cs) has been used as a source of radiation in a significant body of radiation therapy research. However, high-energy X-rays, such as 6 MV X-rays, are currently used clinically to treat patients. To date, there is a gap in the literature regarding the RBE comparison of these two types of radiation. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the RBE of 137Cs relative to that of 6 MV X-rays. To determine the RBE, five cell lines were irradiated [Chinese hamster ovary (CHO); human lung adenocarcinoma (A549); human glioma (U251); human glioma (T98); and human osteosarcoma (U2OS)] by both types of radiation and assessed for cell survival using a clonogenic assay. Three of the five cell lines resulted in RBE values of ~1.00 to within 11% for all survival fractions, showing the physical and biological dose for these two types of radiation were equivalent. The other two cell lines gave RBE values differing from 1.00 by up to 36%. In conclusion, the results show the range in biological effect seen between cell lines, and therefore cell type must be considered when characterizing RBE. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  11. Comparative study of radiation dose between digital panoramic X-ray unit and general panoramic X-ray unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qingshan; Duan Tao; Wang Xiaoyun; Zhao Li; Dong Jian; Wei Lei

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To compare the actual dose of patients who receive the same medical practice by either digital panoramic X-ray unit and general panoramic X-ray unit and give evidence for better selection of oral X-ray examination method. Methods: Round sheet lithium fluoride (LiF) thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) were used. The experiment was divided into natural background contrast group, general panoramic X-ray children group, general panoramic X-ray adults group, digital panoramic X-ray children group and digital panoramic X-ray adults group. The dosimeter of natural background radiation was placed at the office of the doctor, the dosimeters of general panoramic X-ray children group and general panoramic X-ray adults group were irradiated by different conditions according to the clinical application of panoramic X-ray to children and adults, the dosimeters of digital panoramic X-ray children group and digital panoramic X-ray adults group were irradiated by different conditions according to the clinical application of digital panoramic X-ray to children and adults. The thermoluminescent dosimeter was used to count and calculate the exposure doses in various groups. Results: The dose of children exposed in general panoramic X-ray unit was 1.28 times of that in digital panoramic X-ray unit, there was significant difference (t=6.904, P<0.01). The dose of adults exposed in general panoramic X-ray unit was 1.55 times of that in the digital panoramic X-ray unit, there also was significant difference (t=-11.514. P< 0.01). Conclusion: The digital panoramic X-ray unit can reduce the dose of patients, so the digital panoramic X-ray unit should be used as far as possible. (authors)

  12. Nordic working group on x-ray diagnostics - Practical implementation of the directive on medical exposures in the Nordic EU countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waltenburg, H.N.; Groen, P. [National Institute of Radiation Hygiene, Herlev (Denmark); Leitz, W. [Swedish Radiation Protection Authority, Stockholm (Sweden); Servomaa, A. [Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, Helsinki (Finland); Einarsson, G. [Icelandic Radiation Protection Institute, Reykjavik (Iceland); Olerud, H. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Oslo (Norway)

    2003-06-01

    . We will not cover all aspects of MED, instead we have chosen specific points that we think are the most interesting. The scope is limited to diagnostic applications of x-rays, excluding dental, therapy and nuclear medicine applications. (orig.)

  13. Nordic working group on x-ray diagnostics - Practical implementation of the directive on medical exposures in the Nordic EU countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waltenburg, H.N.; Groen, P.; Leitz, W.; Servomaa, A.; Einarsson, G.; Olerud, H.

    2003-01-01

    . We will not cover all aspects of MED, instead we have chosen specific points that we think are the most interesting. The scope is limited to diagnostic applications of x-rays, excluding dental, therapy and nuclear medicine applications. (orig.)

  14. X-Ray Absorption with Transmission X-Ray Microscopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, F.M.F.

    2016-01-01

    In this section we focus on the use of transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) to measure the XAS spectra. In the last decade a range of soft X-ray and hard X-ray TXM microscopes have been developed, allowing the measurement of XAS spectra with 10–100 nm resolution. In the hard X-ray range the TXM

  15. The Medical Case for a Positron Emission Tomography and X-ray Computed Tomography Combined Service in Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bulushi, Naima K; Bailey, Dale; Mariani, Giuliano

    2013-11-01

    The value of a positron emission tomography and X-ray computed tomography (PET/CT) combined service in terms of diagnostic accuracy, cost-effectiveness and impact on clinical decision-making is well-documented in the literature. Its role in the management of patients presenting with cancer is shifting from early staging and restaging to the early assessment of the treatment response. Currently, the application of PET/CT has extended to non-oncological specialties-mainly neurology, cardiology and rheumatology. A further emerging application for PET/CT is the imaging of infection/inflammation. This article illustrates some of the PET/CT applications in both oncological and non-oncological disorders. In view of the absence of this modality in Oman, this article aims to increase the awareness of the importance of these imaging modalities and their significant impact on diagnosis and management in both oncological and non-oncological specialties for patients of all age groups as well as the decision-makers.

  16. Image quality evaluation and patient dose assessment of medical fluoroscopic X-ray systems: A national study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Economides, S.; Hourdakis, C. J.; Kalivas, N.; Kalathaki, M.; Simantirakis, G.; Tritakis, P.; Manousaridis, G.; Vogiatzi, S.; Kipouros, P.; Boziari, A.; Kamenopoulou, V.

    2008-01-01

    This study presents the results from a survey conducted by the Greek Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC), during the period 1998-2003, in 530 public and private owned fluoroscopic X-ray systems in Greece. Certain operational parameters for conventional and remote control systems were assessed, according to a quality control protocol developed by GAEC on the basis of the current literature. Public (91.5%) and private (81.5%) owned fluoroscopic units exhibit high-contrast resolution values over 1 lp mm -1 . Moreover, 88.5 and 87.1% of the fluoroscopic units installed in the public and private sector, respectively, present Maximum Patient Entrance Kerma Rate values lower than 100 mGy min -1 . Additionally, 68.3% of the units assessed were found to perform within the acceptance limits. Finally, the third quartile of the Entrance Surface Dose Rate distribution was estimated according to the Dose Reference Level definition and found equal to 35 mGy min -1 . (authors)

  17. 171 ROYAL DECREE 1891/1991 of 30 December 1991 on the installation and use of X-ray equipment for the purposes of medical diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Decree lays down the rules enabling government authorities to monitor the proper functioning of such appliances. It takes account of the Council of European Communities' Directive 80/836/Euratom amended by Directive 84/466/Euratom on basic safety standards for the health protection of the general public and workers against the dangers of ionization and Directive 84/467/Euratom laying down basic measures for the radiation protection of persons undergoing medical examination or treatment. The Decree provides for a register of firms authorised to sell and maintain medical X-ray equipment, and a register of the equipment installed. It also sets out requirements relating to third party liability insurance, and to the qualifications and training of personnel operating the equipment. (NEA)

  18. X-ray hazards - diagnostic and therapeutic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putney, R.G.; Garvie, N.W.

    1985-01-01

    The subject is covered in sections, entitled: introduction; nature of X-rays; X-rays - effect on biological materials; X-ray measurement; radiation dosages to exposed groups; organizational structure of radiological protection; duties of the Radiological Safety Officer; general measures for radiological protection; protection of staff; protection of patients; safety measures in radiotherapy work - sealed sources laboratory -general safety rules; radiotherapy - duties of the Radiological Safety Officer (Radiotherapy); the custodian of sealed sources -duties and relevant radiological protection information; external beam therapy - radionuclide source unit - emergency procedure in the event of technical failure; safety aspects of brachytherapy in the patient's vicinity; diagnostic radiology; conclusion. (U.K.)

  19. Phosphor Scanner For Imaging X-Ray Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Hecht, Diana L.; Witherow, William K.

    1992-01-01

    Improved optoelectronic scanning apparatus generates digitized image of x-ray image recorded in phosphor. Scanning fiber-optic probe supplies laser light stimulating luminescence in areas of phosphor exposed to x rays. Luminescence passes through probe and fiber to integrating sphere and photomultiplier. Sensitivity and resolution exceed previously available scanners. Intended for use in x-ray crystallography, medical radiography, and molecular biology.

  20. X-ray tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webley, R.S.

    1975-01-01

    The object of the invention described is to provide an X-ray tube providing a scanned X-ray output which does not require a scanned electron beam. This is obtained by an X-ray tube including an anode which is rotatable about an axis, and a source of a beam of energy, for example an electron beam, arranged to impinge on a surface of the anode to generate X-radiation substantially at the region of incidence on the anode surface. The anode is rotatable about the axis to move the region of incidence over the surface. The anode is so shaped that the rotation causes the region of incidence to move in a predetermined manner relative to fixed parts of the tube so that the generated X-radiation is scanned in a predetermined manner relative to the tube. (UK)

  1. X-ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giacconi, R.; Setti, G.

    1980-01-01

    This book contains the lectures, and the most important seminars held at the NATO meeting on X-Ray astronomy in Erice, July 1979. The meeting was an opportune forum to discuss the results of the first 8-months of operation of the X-ray satellite, HEAO-2 (Einstein Observatory) which was launched at the end of 1978. Besides surveying these results, the meeting covered extragalactic astronomy, including the relevant observations obtained in other portions of the electromagnetic spectrum (ultra-violet, optical, infrared and radio). The discussion on galactic X-ray sources essentially covered classical binaries, globular clusters and bursters and its significance to extragalactic sources and to high energy astrophysics was borne in mind. (orig.)

  2. High-energy X-ray detection using organic luminescent materials: a novel application for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schimitberger, Thiago; Ferreira, Giovana Ribeiro; Silva, Mariana de Melo; Saraiva, M.F.; Bianchi, Rodrigo Fernando

    2010-01-01

    In this work, it is presented the characterization and fabrication of a novel ionizing radiation sensor for high energy X-ray (6 MeV). It is used organic luminescent materials usually applied in light-emitting and nanostructure device, but still few explored in radiation dosimetry. Organic solutions of tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato) aluminum - Alq_3 and poly[2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethylhexyloxy)-p-phenylene vinylene] - MEH-PPV were prepared to better study the impact of spectral overlap between the Alq_3 emission and MEH-PPV absorption. It is observed a blue-shift on the photoluminescence of the MEH-PPV/Alq_3 solution system from red-orange (λ_m_a_x = 598 nm) to green (λ_m_a_x = 545 nm) when the radiation dose changes from 0 to 100 Gy. This effect is attributed to the photooxidation process of MEH-PPV and was employed to design dose accumulation sensors in order to represent easily the radiation dose for cancer treatment. (author)

  3. Photon activated therapy (PAT) using monochromatic synchrotron X-rays and iron oxide nanoparticles in a mouse tumor model: feasibility study of PAT for the treatment of superficial malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Gi-Hwan; Seo, Seung-Jun; Kim, Ki-Hong; Kim, Hong-Tae; Park, Sung-Hwan; Lim, Jae-Hong; Kim, Jong-Ki

    2012-10-31

    X-rays are known to interact with metallic nanoparticles, producing photoelectric species as radiosensitizing effects, and have been exploited in vivo mainly with gold nanoparticles. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of sensitizing effect of iron oxide nanoparticles for photon activated therapy. X-rays photon activated therapy (PAT) was studied by treating CT26 tumor cells and CT26 tumor-bearing mice loaded with 13-nm diameter FeO NP, and irradiating them at 7.1 keV near the Fe K-edge using synchrotron x-rays radiation. Survival of cells was determined by MTT assay, and tumor regression assay was performed for in vivo model experiment. The results of PAT treated groups were compared with x-rays alone control groups. A more significant reduction in viability and damage was observed in the FeO NP-treated irradiated cells, compared to the radiation alone group (p X-rays. Since 7.1 keV X-rays is attenuated very sharply in the tissue, FeO NP-PAT may have promise as a potent treatment option for superficial malignancies in the skin, like chest wall recurrence of breast cancer.

  4. 21 CFR 892.1720 - Mobile x-ray system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1720 Mobile x-ray system. (a) Identification. A mobile x-ray system is a transportable device system intended to be used to generate and control x-ray... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mobile x-ray system. 892.1720 Section 892.1720...

  5. Flash x-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Q.; Pellinen, D.

    1976-01-01

    The complementary techniques of flash x-ray radiography (FXR) and flash x-ray diffraction (FXD) provide access to a unique domain in nondestructive materials testing. FXR is useful in studies of macroscopic properties during extremely short time intervals, and FXD, the newer technique, is used in studies of microscopic properties. Although these techniques are similar in many respects, there are some substantial differences. FXD generally requires low-voltage, line-radiation sources and extremely accurate timing; FXR is usually less demanding. Phenomena which can be profitably studied by FXR often can also be studied by FXD to permit a complete materials characterization

  6. X-ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayanan, M.S.

    1976-01-01

    The deployment of detectors outside the deleterious effects of the atmosphere by sending them in space vehicles, has been explained. This has thrown open the entire spectrum of the electromagnetic and particle radiation to direct observations, thus enlarging the vistas of the field of astronomy and astrophysics. The discovery of strong emitters of X-rays such as SCO X-1, NorX-2, transient sources such as Cen X-2, Cen X-4, Cen X-1, Supernova remnants Tan X-1, etc., are reported. The background of the X-ray spectrum as measured during two rocket flights over Thumba, India is presented. (K.B.)

  7. X-ray masks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenwood, J.C.; Satchell, D.W.

    1984-01-01

    In semiconductor manufacture, where X-ray irradiation is used, a thin silicon membrane can be used as an X-ray mask. This membrane has areas on which are patterns to define the regions to be irradiated. These regions are of antireflection material. With the thin, in the order of 3 microns, membranes used, fragility is a problem. Hence a number of ribs of silicon are formed integral with the membrane, and which are relatively thick, 5 to 10 microns. The ribs may be formed by localised deeper boron deposition followed by a selective etch. (author)

  8. X-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houston, J.M.; Whetten, N.R.

    1981-01-01

    An ionization chamber for use in determining the spatial distribution of x-ray photons in tomography systems comprises a plurality of substantially parallel, planar anodes separated by parallel, planar cathodes and enclosed in a gas of high atomic weight at a pressure from approximately 10 atmospheres to approximately 50 atmospheres. The cathode and anode structures comprise metals which are substantially opaque to x-ray radiation and thereby tend to reduce the resolution limiting effects of xray fluoresence in the gas. In another embodiment of the invention the anodes comprise parallel conductive bars disposed between two planar cathodes. Guard rings eliminate surface leakage currents between adjacent electrodes

  9. Panoramic Dental X-Ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Panoramic Dental X-ray Panoramic dental x-ray uses a very small dose of ... x-ray , is a two-dimensional (2-D) dental x-ray examination that captures the entire mouth ...

  10. Subluminous X-ray binaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Armas Padilla, M.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of the first X-ray binary, Scorpius X-1, by Giacconi et al. (1962), marked the birth of X-ray astronomy. Following that discovery, many additional X-ray sources where found with the first generation of X-ray rockets and observatories (e.g., UHURU and Einstein). The short-timescale

  11. X-Ray Exam: Pelvis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Pelvis KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: ... Ray Exam: Hip Broken Bones Getting an X-ray (Video) X-Ray (Video) View more Partner Message About Us ...

  12. X-Ray Exam: Forearm

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Forearm KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: ... Muscles, and Joints Broken Bones Getting an X-ray (Video) X-Ray (Video) View more Partner Message About Us ...

  13. X-Ray Exam: Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Foot KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: ... Muscles, and Joints Broken Bones Getting an X-ray (Video) X-Ray (Video) View more Partner Message About Us ...

  14. X-Ray Exam: Wrist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Wrist KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: ... Muscles, and Joints Broken Bones Getting an X-ray (Video) X-Ray (Video) View more Partner Message About Us ...

  15. Thoracic spine x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored and regulated to provide the minimum amount of radiation exposure needed to produce the image. Most ...

  16. X-Ray Exam: Finger

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Finger KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: ... Muscles, and Joints Broken Bones Getting an X-ray (Video) X-Ray (Video) View more Partner Message About Us ...

  17. The application of accelerator for medical therapy in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yunasfi; Mudjiono; Irwati, Dwi; Hanifa

    2003-01-01

    The study of the application of accelerator for medical therapy in Indonesia was carried out. Accelerator that used for therapy is an electron lintier accelerator (Linac) which can radiate electron beam and X-ray. This study shows that there are 8 unit of Linac distributed at 6 big hospitals in Indonesia, especially in Jakarta. This study also shows that radiotherapy facilities in Indonesia is un sufficient of. Therefore, providing radiotherapy facilities for hospitals, especially the big hospitals in Indonesia is necessary

  18. CRL X-ray tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolchevsky, N.N.; Petrov, P.V.

    2015-01-01

    A novel types of X-ray tubes with refractive lenses are proposed. CRL-R X-ray tube consists of Compound Refractive Lens- CRL and Reflection X-ray tube. CRL acts as X-ray window. CRL-T X-ray consists of CRL and Transmission X-ray tube. CRL acts as target for electron beam. CRL refractive lens acts as filter, collimator, waveguide and focusing lens. Properties and construction of the CRL X-ray tube are discussed. (authors)

  19. X rays and condensed matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daillant, J.

    1997-01-01

    After a historical review of the discovery and study of X rays, the various interaction processes between X rays and matter are described: Thomson scattering, Compton scattering, X-photon absorption through photoelectric effect, and magnetic scattering. X ray sources such as the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) are described. The various X-ray applications are presented: imagery such as X tomography, X microscopy, phase contrast; X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy; X-ray scattering and diffraction techniques

  20. X-ray area monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nintrakit, N.

    1983-01-01

    The X-ray area monitor is a nuclear electronic device that is essential in radiation protection in high radiation laboratories, e.g. in medical diagnosis using X-rays and in industrial X-radiography. Accidentally the level of X-radiator may arise above the safe permissible level and in such a case the alarm system of the area monitor will work and disconnect the ac power supply form the X-ray unit. Principally the device is a radiation counter using G.M.tube as radiation detector with high voltage supply variable form 200 to 2,000 volts. The maximum count rate of the scaler is 1.5 MHz and the total count is displayed on 4 digit LED's. A time base is used to control the counting time, the frequency multiplier, radiation safety limit, comparator and the radiation hazard warning signal. The reliability of the instrument is further enhanced through the addition of the random correction circuit, and it is applicable both in X- and γ -radiation

  1. X-ray beam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koller, T.J.; Randmer, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    A method of minimizing the preferential angular absorption of the divergent beam from an X-ray generator is described. The generator consists of an X-ray shielded housing with an X-ray transmissive window symmetrically placed in radial alignment with a focal spot area on a sloped target surface of an X-ray tube in the housing. The X-ray tube may be of the stationary anode type or of the rotating anode type. (U.K.)

  2. Contact X-ray Therapy for Rectal Cancer: Experience in Centre Antoine-Lacassagne, Nice, 2002-2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerard, Jean-Pierre; Ortholan, Cecile; Benezery, Karene; Ginot, Aurelie; Hannoun-Levi, Jean-Michel; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Benchimol, Daniel; Francois, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To report the results of using contact X-ray (CXR), which has been used in the Centre-Lacassagne since 2002 for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 44 patients were treated between 2002 and 2006 using four distinct clinical approaches. Patients with Stage T1N0 tumors were treated with transanal local excision (TLE) and adjuvant CXR (45 Gy in three fractions) (n = 7). The 11 inoperable (or who had refused surgery) patients with Stage T2-T3 disease were treated with CXR plus external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Those with Stage T3N0-N2 tumors were treated with preoperative CXR plus EBRT (with or without concurrent chemotherapy) followed by surgery (n = 21). Finally, the patients with Stage T2 disease were treated with CXR plus EBRT followed by TLE (n = 5). Results: The median follow-up was 25 months. In the 7 patients who underwent TLE first, no local failure was observed, and their anorectal function was good. Of the 11 inoperable patients who underwent CXR plus EBRT alone, 10 achieved local control. In the third group (preoperative CXR plus EBRT), anterior resection was performed in 16 of 21 patients. Complete sterilization of the operative specimen was seen in 4 cases (19%). No local recurrence occurred. Finally, of the 5 patients treated with CXR plus EBRT followed by TLE, a complete or near complete clinical response was observed in all. TLE with a R0 resection margin was performed in all cases. The rectum was preserved with good function in all 5 patients. Conclusion: These early results have confirmed that CXR combined with surgery (or alone with EBRT) can play a major role in the conservative and curative treatment of rectal cancer

  3. Photons-based medical imaging - Radiology, X-ray tomography, gamma and positrons tomography, optical imaging; Imagerie medicale a base de photons - Radiologie, tomographie X, tomographie gamma et positons, imagerie optique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanet, H.; Dinten, J.M.; Moy, J.P.; Rinkel, J. [CEA Leti, Grenoble (France); Buvat, I. [IMNC - CNRS, Orsay (France); Da Silva, A. [Institut Fresnel, Marseille (France); Douek, P.; Peyrin, F. [INSA Lyon, Lyon Univ. (France); Frija, G. [Hopital Europeen George Pompidou, Paris (France); Trebossen, R. [CEA-Service hospitalier Frederic Joliot, Orsay (France)

    2010-07-01

    This book describes the different principles used in medical imaging. The detection aspects, the processing electronics and algorithms are detailed for the different techniques. This first tome analyses the photons-based techniques (X-rays, gamma rays and visible light). Content: 1 - physical background: radiation-matter interaction, consequences on detection and medical imaging; 2 - detectors for medical imaging; 3 - processing of numerical radiography images for quantization; 4 - X-ray tomography; 5 - positrons emission tomography: principles and applications; 6 - mono-photonic imaging; 7 - optical imaging; Index. (J.S.)

  4. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos ... x-ray is used to evaluate the lungs, heart and chest wall and may be used to ...

  5. X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonse, U.

    1979-11-01

    The author describes several possibilities for the production of X-radiation. Especially he discusses the use of bremsstrahlung at electron impact on solid targets and the synchrotron radiation. He presents some equations for the calculation of X-ray intensities. Especially the X-radiation from the DORIS storage ring is discussed. (HSI)

  6. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... change into a gown. You may have some concerns about chest x-rays. However, it’s important to ... You Sponsored by About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2018 ...

  7. Evaluation of 137Cs and 90Sr effect on the industrial and medical X-ray films for autoradiography using the OSIRIS software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabbagh, R.; Ghafourian, H.; Baghvand, A.; Nabi, G.R.; Riahi, H.

    2006-01-01

    Autoradiography is one of the techniques developed for screening and isolating suitable radionuclide bioaccumulator microorganisms such as cyanobacteria, algae and bacteria. In this research autoradiography is developed for a kind of industrial film and a medical X-ray film. Irradiation time estimation according to radiotracer activity and suitable film selection are the most important aims in this research. These parameters are estimated for 137 Cs and 90 Sr on the basis of the appearances of the dark black spots on the developed films. Selected film and estimated irradiation time could be used to screen the needed microorganisms in the laboratory studies. The micro-organisms isolated by this method could be used to remove radioactive pollution in environmental engineering

  8. Fast estimation of first-order scattering in a medical x-ray computed tomography scanner using a ray-tracing technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin

    2014-01-01

    This study describes a deterministic method for simulating the first-order scattering in a medical computed tomography scanner. The method was developed based on a physics model of x-ray photon interactions with matter and a ray tracing technique. The results from simulated scattering were compared to the ones from an actual scattering measurement. Two phantoms with homogeneous and heterogeneous material distributions were used in the scattering simulation and measurement. It was found that the simulated scatter profile was in agreement with the measurement result, with an average difference of 25% or less. Finally, tomographic images with artifacts caused by scatter were corrected based on the simulated scatter profiles. The image quality improved significantly.

  9. Scattered X-ray beam nondestructive testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harding, G.; Kosanetzky, J.

    1988-01-01

    X-ray scatter interactions generally dominate the linear attenuation coefficient at the photon energies typical of medical and industrial radiography. Specific advantages of X-ray scatter imaging, including a flexible choice of measurement geometry, direct 3D-imaging capability (tomography) and improved information for material characterization, are illustrated with results from Compton and coherent scatter devices. Applications of a Compton backscatter scanner (ComScan) in the aerospace industry and coherent scatter imaging in security screening are briefly considered [pt

  10. X-ray calibration qualities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    Since the recent publication of IAEA Technical Reports Series No. 374 ''Calibration of Dosimeters Used in Radiotheraphy'', there have been a number of queries about the origin of, and the rationale behind, the X-ray qualities recommended for calibration purposes. The simple answer is that these are the qualities derived at the UK National Physical Laboratory (NPL) in 1971 for calibration of therapy-level dosimeters and which are still in use for that purpose. As some SSDLs may have difficulties in adopting these exact combinations of kV and filtration. This paper discusses the basic ideas involved, and how to go about deriving a different series of qualities

  11. X-ray photographic apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The X-ray photographic system is designed for medical applications. Two detectors are used for surveys in different planes, and produce electrical signals which are supplied to a comparator. The electron beams are examined according to a system of reference time steps. The apparatus includes a light source and a photo-detector and enables a reference signal to be produced against which the detected signals are compared. The beam source is formed from an electron gun, an extractor electrode and an anode; beam then passes through a collimator. (G.C.)

  12. X-ray image intensifier photography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, K.; Angerstein, W.; Steinhardt, L.

    1980-01-01

    The present treatise on X-ray image intensifier photography starts with introductory remarks on the history of X-ray imaging and image intensifiers. In the physical-technological part especially the quality of image and the methods of its measurement are discussed in detail. The relevant equipment such as image intensifier cameras, X-ray television, video recorder and devices of display and evaluation of images are presented as well as problems of radiation doses and radiation protection. Based on 25,000 examinations of the digestive, the biliary and the urinary tract, resp., as well as of the blood vessels the applicability of the X-ray image intensifier photography and its diagnostic value are demonstrated in the medical part of the book

  13. X ray Production. Chapter 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowotny, R. [Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-09-15

    The differential absorption of X rays in tissues and organs, owing to their atomic composition, is the basis for the various imaging methods used in diagnostic radiology. The principles in the production of X rays have remained the same since their discovery. However, much refinement has gone into the design of X ray tubes to achieve the performance required for today’s radiological examinations. In this chapter, an outline of the principles of X ray production and a characterization of the radiation output of X ray tubes will be given. The basic processes producing X rays are dealt with in Section 1.4.

  14. X-ray filter for x-ray powder diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinsheimer, John Jay; Conley, Raymond P.; Bouet, Nathalie C. D.; Dooryhee, Eric; Ghose, Sanjit

    2018-01-23

    Technologies are described for apparatus, methods and systems effective for filtering. The filters may comprise a first plate. The first plate may include an x-ray absorbing material and walls defining first slits. The first slits may include arc shaped openings through the first plate. The walls of the first plate may be configured to absorb at least some of first x-rays when the first x-rays are incident on the x-ray absorbing material, and to output second x-rays. The filters may comprise a second plate spaced from the first plate. The second plate may include the x-ray absorbing material and walls defining second slits. The second slits may include arc shaped openings through the second plate. The walls of the second plate may be configured to absorb at least some of second x-rays and to output third x-rays.

  15. Abstract ID: 176 Geant4 implementation of inter-atomic interference effect in small-angle coherent X-ray scattering for materials of medical interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paternò, Gianfranco; Cardarelli, Paolo; Contillo, Adriano; Gambaccini, Mauro; Taibi, Angelo

    2018-01-01

    Advanced applications of digital mammography such as dual-energy and tomosynthesis require multiple exposures and thus deliver higher dose compared to standard mammograms. A straightforward manner to reduce patient dose without affecting image quality would be removal of the anti-scatter grid, provided that the involved reconstruction algorithms are able to take the scatter figure into account [1]. Monte Carlo simulations are very well suited for the calculation of X-ray scatter distribution and can be used to integrate such information within the reconstruction software. Geant4 is an open source C++ particle tracking code widely used in several physical fields, including medical physics [2,3]. However, the coherent scattering cross section used by the standard Geant4 code does not take into account the influence of molecular interference. According to the independent atomic scattering approximation (the so-called free-atom model), coherent radiation is indistinguishable from primary radiation because its angular distribution is peaked in the forward direction. Since interference effects occur between x-rays scattered by neighbouring atoms in matter, it was shown experimentally that the scatter distribution is affected by the molecular structure of the target, even in amorphous materials. The most important consequence is that the coherent scatter distribution is not peaked in the forward direction, and the position of the maximum is strongly material-dependent [4]. In this contribution, we present the implementation of a method to take into account inter-atomic interference in small-angle coherent scattering in Geant4, including a dedicated data set of suitable molecular form factor values for several materials of clinical interest. Furthermore, we present scatter images of simple geometric phantoms in which the Rayleigh contribution is rigorously evaluated. Copyright © 2017.

  16. X-ray refractometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tur'yanskij, A.G.; Pirshin, I.V.

    2001-01-01

    Paper introduces a new circuit of X-ray refractometer to study angular and spectral features of refracted radiation within hard X-ray range. Refractometer incorporates two goniometers, two crystal-analyzers and three radiation detectors. The maximum distance between radiation source focal point and a receiving slit of the second goniometer is equal to 1.4 m. For the first time one obtained refraction patterns of fine-film specimens including C/Si stressed structure. Paper describes a new technique of refractometry via specimen oscillation at fixed position of a detecting device. Paper presents the measurement results of oscillation refraction patterns for specimens of melted quartz and ZnSe single crystal [ru

  17. X-ray generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zucarias, A; Shepherd, J W

    1982-09-08

    An X-ray tube has a tubular envelope with a cathode for directing an electron beam onto a focal spot area of a spaced anode target to generate X-rays. The target is mounted for axial rotation on one end of a rotor disposed in an end portion of the envelope and encircled by a stator of an alternating current induction motor. An annular shield of high permeability magnetic material extends transversely between the electron beam and the stator of the induction motor for shunting stray or fringe electromagnetic fields established by the stator away from the electron beam to avoid consequent lateral deflections of the electron and corresponding lateral movements of the focal spot area.

  18. X-ray microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunsmuir, J.H.; Ferguson, S.R.; D'Amico, K.L.; Stokes, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the authors describe the application of a new high-resolution X-ray tomographic microscope to the study of porous media. The microscope was designed to exploit the properties of a synchrotron X-ray source to perform three dimensional tomography on millimeter sized objects with micron resolution and has been used in materials science studies with both synchrotron and conventional and synchrotron sources will be compared. In this work the authors have applied the microscope to measure the three dimensional structure of fused bead packs and berea sandstones with micron resolution and have performed preliminary studies of flow in these media with the microscope operated in a digital subtraction radiography mode. Computer graphics techniques have been applied to the data to visually display the structure of the pore body system. Tomographic imaging after flow experiments should detect the structure of the oil-water interface in the pore network and this work is ongoing

  19. X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einstein, J.R.; Wei, C.H.

    1982-01-01

    We have been interested in structural elucidation by x-ray diffraction of compounds of biological interest. Understanding exactly how atoms are arranged in three-dimensional arrays as molecules can help explain the relationship between structure and functions. The species investigated may vary in size and shape; our recent studies included such diverse substances as antischistosomal drugs, a complex of cadmium with nucleic acid base, nitrate salts of adenine, and proteins

  20. X-ray apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Chuji.

    1980-01-01

    A principal object of the present invention is to provide an X-ray apparatus which is such that the distance between the surface of the patient's table and the floor on which the apparatus is installed is sufficiently small in the horizontal position of the patient's table of the roentgenographical pedestal and that the rotation of the pedestal from the horizontal position to a tilted position and further to the vertical position of the table can be carried out smoothly. (auth)

  1. Producing x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallozzi, P.J.; Epstein, H.M.; Jung, R.G.; Applebaum, D.C.; Fairand, B.P.; Gallagher, W.J.

    1977-01-01

    A method of producing x-rays by directing radiant energy from a laser onto a target is described. Conversion efficiency of at least about 3 percent is obtained by providing the radiant energy in a low-power precursor pulse of approximately uniform effective intensity focused onto the surface of the target for about 1 to 30 nanoseconds so as to generate an expanding unconfined coronal plasma having less than normal solid density throughout and comprising a low-density (underdense) region wherein the plasma frequency is less than the laser radiation frequency and a higher-density (overdense) region wherein the plasma frequency is greater than the laser radiation frequency and, about 1 to 30 nanoseconds after the precursor pulse strikes the target, a higher-power main pulse focused onto the plasma for about 10 -3 to 30 nanoseconds and having such power density and total energy that the radiant energy is absorbed in the underdense region and conducted into the overdense region to heat it and thus to produce x-rays therefrom with the plasma remaining substantially below normal solid density and thus facilitating the substantial emission of x-rays in the form of spectral lines arising from nonequilibrium ionization states

  2. X-ray beam qualities for dental radiology purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Marcus Aurelio P. dos; Fragoso, Maria da Conceicao de F.; Lima, Ricardo de A.; Hazim, Clovis A.

    2009-01-01

    In order to establish characteristics or properties of equipment for diagnostic radiology, e.g. ion chambers and semiconductor detectors, calibration laboratories offer a set of well-defined radiation conditions, called X-ray qualities, which can be used for many Physics studies and medical purposes. The standardization of radiation qualities has been carried out in several fields of study, but little attention has been given to the area of dental radiology, mainly for medical and physical applications using single-phase units with half-wave rectification. For this reason, a single-phase dental unit with adjustable peak voltage and tube current, called 'variable potential X-ray equipment', was developed aiming to define X-ray beam qualities for test and calibrations purposes. X-ray spectra at 50, 60 and 70 kVp were determined by using a CdTe detector and compared with those obtained for ten commercial X-ray dental units. As a result of this study, a set of X-ray qualities for the variable potential X-ray equipment was determined. The X-ray qualities spectra were utilized as reference for determination of a new set of X-ray qualities characterized for a constant potential X-ray equipment. Thus, sets of X-ray qualities were standardized and implemented in two X-ray laboratories: one with the variable potential X-ray equipment and other with constant potential X-ray equipment. These reference X-ray beam qualities should be used for test and calibration purposes involving scientific studies and services. (author)

  3. Radiation therapy for angiosarcoma of the scalp: treatment outcomes of total scalp irradiation with X-rays and electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Masaharu; Wada, Hidefumi; Ogino, Ichiro; Omura, Motoko; Koike, Izumi; Tayama, Yoshibumi; Odagiri, Kazumasa; Kasuya, Takeo; Inoue, Tomio

    2014-10-01

    Wide surgical excision is the standard treatment for angiosarcoma of the scalp, but many patients are inoperable. Therefore, we investigated the outcome of radiation therapy for angiosarcoma of the scalp. Seventeen patients with angiosarcoma of the scalp underwent radiation therapy with total scalp irradiation. Four patients had cervical lymph node metastases, but none had distant metastases. A median initial dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions was delivered to the entire scalp. Subsequently, local radiation boost to the tumor sites achieved a median total dose of 70 Gy in 35 fractions. Fourteen of the 17 patients developed recurrences during the median follow-up period of 14 months after radiation therapy; 7 had recurrences in the scalp, including primary tumor progression in 2 patients and new disease in 5, and 12 patients developed distant metastases. The primary progression-free, scalp relapse-free, and distant metastasis-free rates were 86, 67, and 38 % at 1 year and 86, 38, and 16 % at 3 years, respectively. Thirteen patients died; the overall and cause-specific survival rates were both 73 % at 1 year and 23 and 44 % at 3 years, respectively. The median survival time was 16 months. There were no therapy-related toxicities ≥ grade 3. Total scalp irradiation is safe and effective for local tumor control, but a dose of ≤ 50 Gy in conventional fractions may be insufficient to eradicate microscopic tumors. For gross tumors, a total dose of 70 Gy, and > 70 Gy for tumors with deep invasion, is recommended.

  4. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... evaluation. National and international radiology protection organizations continually review and update the technique standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very controlled x-ray beams and dose ...

  5. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can be taken to the patient in a hospital bed or the emergency room. The x-ray ... position possible that still ensures x-ray image quality. top of page Who interprets the results and ...

  6. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... position possible that still ensures x-ray image quality. top of page Who interprets the results and ...

  7. X-ray detector array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houston, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    The object of the invention (an ionization chamber X-ray detector array for use with high speed computerised tomographic imaging apparatus) is to reduce the time required to produce a tomographic image. The detector array described determines the distribution of X-ray intensities in one or more flat, coplanar X-ray beams. It comprises three flat anode sheets parallel to the X-ray beam, a plurality of rod-like cathodes between the anodes, a detector gas between the electrodes and a means for applying a potential between the electrodes. Each of the X-ray sources is collimated to give a narrow, planar section of X-ray photons. Sets of X-ray sources in the array are pulsed simultaneously to obtain X-ray transmission data for tomographic image reconstruction. (U.K.)

  8. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tissue shows up in shades of gray and air appears black. Until recently, x-ray images were ... position possible that still ensures x-ray image quality. top of page Who interprets the results and ...

  9. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... changes seen in metabolic conditions. assist in the detection and diagnosis of bone cancer . locate foreign objects ... standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very controlled x-ray beams and dose ...

  10. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very controlled x-ray beams and dose control methods to minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures that ...

  11. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... up in shades of gray and air appears black. Until recently, x-ray images were maintained on ... Safety page for more information about radiation dose. Women should always inform their physician or x-ray ...

  12. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... wrist, arm, elbow, shoulder, spine, pelvis, hip, thigh, knee, leg (shin), ankle or foot. top of page ... the patient standing upright, as in cases of knee x-rays. A portable x-ray machine is ...

  13. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... have very controlled x-ray beams and dose control methods to minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures ...

  14. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... conditions. Imaging with x-rays involves exposing a part of the body to a small dose of ... body. Once it is carefully aimed at the part of the body being examined, an x-ray ...

  15. Report of a randomized trial of d(15)+Be neutrons compared with megavoltage X ray therapy of bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, W.; Arnott, S.J.; Jack, W.J.; MacDougall, R.H.; Quilty, P.M.; Rodger, A.; Kerr, G.R.; Williams, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    The results of a randomized trial of d(15)+Be neutrons compared with 4 or 6 MV photons for the treatment of transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. Between December 1978 and December 1981, 113 patients were accrued, 53 allocated to be treated by neutrons and 60 by photons. Complete local tumor regression was observed in 64% of patients treated by neutrons and 62% treated by photons. Recurrent cancer was subsequently confirmed in 31% of patients, similar in both treatment groups. There was no significant difference in the control rates by T stage between the two treatment groups. Late morbidity was significantly worse in patients treated by neutrons. Following neutron therapy, 78% of patients had serious late morbidity in at least one tissue compared with 38% in the group treated by photons. Survival was significantly better in the photon treated group 45.3% (+/- 11%) at 5 years compared with 12% (+/- 6%) after neutron therapy

  16. X-Ray Exam: Hip

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Hip KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: Hip What's in this article? What It Is Why ... You Have Questions Print What It Is A hip X-ray is a safe and painless test ...

  17. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... X-rays are a form of radiation like light or radio waves. X-rays pass through most objects, including the body. Once it is carefully aimed at the part of the body being examined, an x-ray machine produces a small ...

  18. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... x-rays. top of page What does the equipment look like? The equipment typically used for bone x-rays consists of ... and joint abnormalities, such as arthritis. X-ray equipment is relatively inexpensive and widely available in emergency ...

  19. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The x-ray tube is connected to a flexible arm that is extended over the patient while an x-ray film holder or image recording plate is placed beneath the patient. top of page How does the procedure work? X-rays are a form of radiation like ...

  20. X-Ray Exam: Ankle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Ankle KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: Ankle What's in this article? What It Is Why ... You Have Questions Print What It Is An ankle X-ray is a safe and painless test ...

  1. Dose inspection and risk assessment on radiation safety for the use of non-medical X-ray machines in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Fang-Yuh; Hsu, Shih-Ming; Chao, Jiunn-Hsing

    2017-11-01

    The subject of this study is the on-site visits and inspections of facilities commissioned by the Atomic Energy Council (AEC) in Taiwan. This research was conducted to evaluate the possible dose and dose rate of cabinet-type X-ray equipment with nominal voltages of 30-150 kV and open-beam (portable or handheld) equipment, taking both normal operation and possibly abnormal operation conditions into account. Doses and dose rates were measured using a plastic scintillation survey meter and an electronic personal dosimeter. In total, 401 X-ray machines were inspected, including 139 units with nominal voltages of 30-50 kV X-ray equipment, 140 units with nominal voltages of 50-150 kV, and 122 open-beam (portable or handheld) X-ray equipment. The investigated doses for radiation workers and non-radiation workers operating cabinet-type X-ray equipment under normal safety conditions were all at the background dose level. Several investigated dose rates at the position of 10 cm away from the surface of open-beam (portable or handheld) X-ray equipment were very high, such X-ray machines are used by aeronautical police for the detection of suspected explosives, radiation workers are far away (at least 10 m away) from the X-ray machine during its operation. The doses per operation in X-ray equipment with a 30-50 kV nominal voltage were less than 1 mSv in all cases of abnormal use. Some doses were higher than 1 mSv per operation for X-ray equipment of 50-150 kV nominal voltage X-ray. The maximum dose rates at the beam exit have a very wide range, mostly less than 100 μSv/s and the largest value is about 3.92 mSv/s for open-beam (portable or handheld) X-ray devices. The risk induced by operating X-ray devices with nominal voltages of 30-50 kV is extremely low. The 11.5 mSv dose due to one operation at nominal voltage of 50-150 kV X-ray device is equivalent to the exposure of taking 575 chest X-rays. In the abnormal use of open-beam (portable or handheld) X-ray equipment, the

  2. Medical Imaging Teacher: A program to simulate X-ray images of the body by considering kVp, mAs and FFD values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umit Kara

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Teaching styles and methods have been constantly changing in the recent years. In the 1980s and 90s, the world was introduced to various developed devices, such as smart boards and early generation smart phones that had an immediate innovative effect on education. These advancements has resulted in a considerable improvement in the current educational techniques. The innovations in medical techniques and their quality is of paramount importance. The aim of this study was to provide an innovative and useful software on radiological applications and contribute to the related literature. Materials and Methods: The Medical Imaging Teacher (MIT program was created and the prototype application was implemented on the Android platform for free use. The programing and testing of the usability of the application were performed by the users of the Google Play Store. Results: In this program, we have developed new software to simulate the X-ray images of the body by considering the peak kilovoltage (kVp, milliamperage per second (mAs, and film focus distance (FFD values. The application has been downloaded more than 1,000 times without paid advertising. We enrolled 131 participants, who made comments and gave 4.8 points on average. Conclusion: It can be concluded that with innovative digital programs, such as the MIT, the medical machine-based learning and medical applications have risen to new levels. The software on medical testing and examination is gaining increasing popularity among the health-related applications for smart phones.

  3. Sequential hemi-body radiotherapy in advanced multiple myeloma. [Side effects of indicated x-ray therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaffe, J.P.; Bosch, A.; Raich, P.C.

    1979-01-01

    Eleven patients with advanced multiple myeloma refractory to standard chemotherapy were treated with a regimen of sequential hemi-body radiotherapy consisting of 800 rad midplane in a single dose to each half. 9/10 patients experienced significant relief of skeletal pain and there were 5/11 objective tumor responses with one complete remission. Treatment-related morbidity was significant and consisted primarily of nausea and emesis, bone marrow suppression, and pneumonitis. This therapy is helpful in the management of advanced myeloma, and should be studied earlier in the course of the disease.

  4. Medical Therapy of Acromegaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Plöckinger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines the present status of medical therapy of acromegaly. Indications for permanent postoperative treatment, postirradiation treamtent to bridge the interval until remission as well as primary medical therapy are elaborated. Therapeutic efficacy of the different available drugs—somatostatin receptor ligands (SRLs, dopamine agonists, and the GH antagonist Pegvisomant—is discussed, as are the indications for and efficacy of their respective combinations. Information on their mechanism of action, and some pharmakokinetic data are included. Special emphasis is given to the difficulties to define remission criteria of acromegaly due to technical assay problems. An algorithm for medical therapy in acromegaly is provided.

  5. X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy analyses on the crystallinity of engineered biological hydroxyapatite for medical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poralan, G. M., Jr.; Gambe, J. E.; Alcantara, E. M.; Vequizo, R. M.

    2015-06-01

    Biological hydroxyapatite (BHAp) derived from thermally-treated fish bones was successfully produced. However, the obtained biological HAp was amorphous and thus making it unfavorable for medical application. Consequently, this research exploits and engineers the crystallinity of BHAp powders by addition of CaCO3 and investigates its degree of crystallinity using XRD and IR spectroscopy. On XRD, the HAp powders with [Ca]/[P] ratios 1.42, 1.46, 1.61 and 1.93 have degree of crystallinity equal to 58.08, 72.13, 85.79, 75.85% and crystal size equal to 0.67, 0.74, 0.75, 0.72 nm, respectively. The degree of crystallinity and crystal size of the obtained calcium deficient biological HAp powders increase as their [Ca]/[P] ratio approaches the stoichiometric ratio by addition of CaCO3 as source of Ca2+ ions. These results show the possibility of engineering the crystallinity and crystal size of biological HAp by addition of CaCO3. Moreover, the splitting factor of PO4 vibration matches the result with % crystallinity on XRD. Also, the area of phosphate-substitution site of PO4 vibration shows linear relationship (R2 = 0.994) with crystal size calculated from XRD. It is worth noting that the crystallinity of the biological HAp with [Ca]/[P] ratios 1.42 and 1.48 fall near the range 60-70% for highly resorbable HAp used in the medical application.

  6. Research on the radiation doses to adults receiving from main types of medical X-ray CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Linfeng; Wang Bin; Yao Jie; Qian Aijun; Zheng Junzheng; Zhuo Weihai; Qu Liangyong

    2013-01-01

    To study and master the doses to examinees receiving from the wide spread X-CT examinations, is a key issue for strengthening the medical radiation protection. In the studies of the medical exposure levels during the Eleventh Five-Year Plan period in Shanghai, based on the brands of X-CT scanners and their distributions in different levels of hospitals, a total of 45 sets (about 30% of all) of scanners were selected for the field study. Among the 8 commonly performed examinations, the scan parameters and their relevant dosimetry information for 500 adults were collected, and their typical effective doses were estimated with the dose conversion factors. The results showed that the averages of weighted CT dose index (CTDI w ) were 55.4, 12.5 and 18.4 mGy, and the dose length products (DLP) were averaged to be 603, 294 and 415 mGy·cm, for the skull, chest and abdomen X-CT scans, respectively. The typical effective doses were estimated to be 1.4, 5.3, and 7.5 mSv for adults in the head, chest and abdomen X-CT scans, respectively. The values of CTDI w for skull scans were generally higher than those for the ear canal, eye, or sinus examinations. It is clear that the optimization between the image quality and the radiation dose should be further strengthened. Particular attentions should be paid in selecting the scanning parameters for various types of X-CT scans, and the diagnostic reference levels for X-CT examinations should be continuously improved. (authors)

  7. Optimisation of positron emission tomography in heavy ion therapy on the basis of X-ray tomograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poenisch, F.

    2003-05-01

    The main goal of the present study was to develop a correction method for the Compton scatter of annihilation quanta. This scatter impairs image quality as well as the imaging accuracy of the detector system, making it difficult to perform a comparison between measured and predictively calculated activity distribution. Applying the scatter correction methods known from nuclear medicine to PET in heavy ion therapy is not possible without limitations. For this reason a BASTEI system adapted to the scatter correction method was developed and implemented in clinical practice. The selected method is a combination of the Monte Carlo method and the use of the simple scatter algorithm. It supplies reliable results, in a manner adapted to the requirements of the therapy, both when applied to experimental and simulated data. The present scatter correction method has been in routine use since 2002. This has been possible through porting the program code to a current PC system and using a time-efficient algorithm for reconstruction

  8. SMM x ray polychromator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saba, J. L. R.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the X-ray Polychromator (XRP) experiment was to study the physical properties of solar flare plasma and its relation to the parent active region to understand better the flare mechanism and related solar activity. Observations were made to determine the temperature, density, and dynamic structure of the pre-flare and flare plasma as a function of wavelength, space and time, the extent to which the flare plasma departs from thermal equilibrium, and the variation of this departure with time. The experiment also determines the temperature and density structure of active regions and flare-induced changes in the regions.

  9. Obstetric X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mwachi, M.K.

    2006-01-01

    Radiography of the pelvis should never be taken to diagnose early pregnancy, because of potential hazards of radiation damage to the growing foetus. the only indication occurs in the last week of pregnancy (37 weeks). Obstetric X-ray will help you answer like confirmation of malposition,multiple pregnancies; fetal abnormalities e.g. hydrocephalus, foetal disposition. The choice of radiographic projection will help give foetal presentation, disposition as well as foetal maturity. The search pattern helps you determine maternal and spine deformity, foetal spine and head , foetal presentation and any other anomalies

  10. X-ray film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arndt, U.W.; Gilmore, D.J.; Wonacott, A.J.

    1977-01-01

    The performance of film as an X-ray detector is discussed and its behaviour is compared with that of a perfect Poissonian detector. The efficiency of microdensitometry as a method of extracting the information recorded on the film is discussed. More emphasis is placed in the precision of microdensitometric measurements than on the more obvious characteristic of film speed. The effects of chemical fog and background on the precision of the measurements is considered and it is concluded that the final limit to precision is set by the chemical fog. (B.D.)

  11. X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vries, J.L. de.

    1976-01-01

    The seventh edition of Philips' Review of literature on X-ray diffraction begins with a list of conference proceedings on the subject, organised by the Philips' organisation at regular intervals in various European countries. This is followed by a list of bulletins. The bibliography is divided according to the equipment (cameras, diffractometers, monochromators) and its applications. The applications are subdivided into sections for high/low temperature and pressure, effects due to the equipment, small angle scattering and a part for stress, texture and phase analyses of metals and quantitative analysis of minerals

  12. The tendency of medical electrical equipment - IEC 60601-2-54: Particular requirements for the basic safety and essential performance of x-ray equipment for radiography and radioscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roh, Young Hoon; Kim, Jung Min

    2015-01-01

    Medical electrical equipment - Part 1: General requirement for basic safety and essential performance of MFDS was revised as 3th edition and Medical electrical equipment Part 2-54: Particular requirements for the basic safety and essential performance of X-ray equipment will be expected to be announced as notification. Therefore this technical report was written to introduce provision of the particular requirements, replacement, addition, amendment. The purpose of this particular requirements is to secure requirements for basic safety and essential performance of X-ray equipment for radiography and radioscopy. X-ray high voltage generator, mechanical protective device, protection against radiation is included in this particular requirements. Medical electrical equipment - Part 1, Part 1-2, Part 1-3 is applied to this particular requirements. If the requirements is announced as notification, It is expected to widen understanding for basic safety and essential performance of X-ray equipment for radiography and radioscopy and play a part to internationalize of medical equipment

  13. The physics of radiotherapy X-rays and electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Metcalfe, Peter; Hoban, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Physics of Radiotherapy X-Rays and Electrons is an updated successor to The Physics of Radiotherapy X-Rays from Linear Accelerators published in 1997. This new volume includes a significant amount of new material, including new chapters on electrons in radiotherapy and IMRT, IGRT, and tomotherapy, which have become key developments in radiation therapy. Also updated from the earlier edition are the physics beam modeling chapters, including Monte Carlo methods, adding those mysterious electrons, as well as discourse on radiobiological modeling including TCP, NTCP, and EUD and the impact of these concepts on plan analysis and inverse planning. This book is intended as a standard reference text for postgraduate radiation oncology medical physics students. It will also be of interest to radiation oncology registrars and residents, dosimetrists, and radiation therapists. The new text contains review questions at the end of each chapter and full bibliographic entries. Fully indexed. Selected questions and ans...

  14. Radiation therapy for angiosarcoma of the scalp. Treatment outcomes of total scalp irradiation with X-rays and electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hata, Masaharu; Koike, Izumi; Kasuya, Takeo; Inoue, Tomio [Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Wada, Hidefumi [Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Dermatology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Ogino, Ichiro [Yokohama City University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Omura, Motoko [Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Shonankamakura General Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Kamakura, Kanagawa (Japan); Tayama, Yoshibumi [Yokohama Minami Kyousai Hospital, Department of Radiology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Odagiri, Kazumasa [Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Yokohama Municipal Citizen' s Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    Wide surgical excision is the standard treatment for angiosarcoma of the scalp, but many patients are inoperable. Therefore, we investigated the outcome of radiation therapy for angiosarcoma of the scalp. Seventeen patients with angiosarcoma of the scalp underwent radiation therapy with total scalp irradiation. Four patients had cervical lymph node metastases, but none had distant metastases. A median initial dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions was delivered to the entire scalp. Subsequently, local radiation boost to the tumor sites achieved a median total dose of 70 Gy in 35 fractions. Fourteen of the 17 patients developed recurrences during the median follow-up period of 14 months after radiation therapy; 7 had recurrences in the scalp, including primary tumor progression in 2 patients and new disease in 5, and 12 patients developed distant metastases. The primary progression-free, scalp relapse-free, and distant metastasis-free rates were 86, 67, and 38 % at 1 year and 86, 38, and 16 % at 3 years, respectively. Thirteen patients died; the overall and cause-specific survival rates were both 73 % at 1 year and 23 and 44 % at 3 years, respectively. The median survival time was 16 months. There were no therapy-related toxicities ≥ grade 3. Total scalp irradiation is safe and effective for local tumor control, but a dose of ≤ 50 Gy in conventional fractions may be insufficient to eradicate microscopic tumors. For gross tumors, a total dose of 70 Gy, and > 70 Gy for tumors with deep invasion, is recommended. (orig.) [German] Umfangreiche chirurgische Exzision ist die Standardbehandlung fuer Angiosarkome der Kopfhaut, aber viele Patienten sind nicht operierbar. Daher haben wir die Ergebnisse einer Strahlenbehandlung fuer Angiosarkome der Kopfhaut untersucht. Insgesamt 17 Patienten mit Angiosarkom der Kopfhaut erhielten eine Strahlenbehandlung der gesamten Kopfhaut. Vier Patienten hatten zervikale Lymphknotenmetastasen, aber keine Fernmetastasen. Die gesamte Kopfhaut

  15. In vivo study on influence of the heterogeneity of tissues in the dose distribution in high energy X ray therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldred, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    Several authors investigated the effect of the heterogeneity of tissue in the dose distribution in a radiation-therapy. Practically all of them carried out ''in vitro'' measurements using a solid body immersed in a water phantom, in order to simulate the inhomogeneity, such as bone, air cavity, etc. In the present work, ''in vivo'' measurements were performed utilizing thermoluminescent dosimeters, whose appropriateness and convenience are well known. Eight patients at Instituto de Radioterapia Oswaldo Cruz were selected, that were under irradiation treatments in their pelvic region. The ratio between body entry radiation dose and the corresponding exit dose, when compared to the same ratio for a homogeneous phantom, gives the influence of the heterogeneity of the tissue the radiation crosses. The results found in those eight patients have shown that ''in vivo'' measurements present a ratio about 8% smaller that in homogeneous phantom case. (author) [pt

  16. Medical Art Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgul Aydin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Art therapy is a form of expressive therapy that uses art materials. Art therapy combines traditional psychotherapeutic theories and techniques with an understanding of the psychological aspects of the creative process, especially the affective properties of the different art materials. Medical art therapy has been defined as the clinical application of art expression and imagery with individuals who are physically ill, experiencing physical trauma or undergoing invasive or aggressive medical procedures such as surgery or chemotherapy and is considered as a form of complementary or integrative medicine. Several studies have shown that patients with physical illness benefit from medical art therapy in different aspects. Unlike other therapies, art therapy can take the patients away from their illness for a while by means of creative activities during sessions, can make them forget the illness or lost abilities. Art therapy leads to re-experiencing normality and personal power even with short creative activity sessions. In this article definition, influence and necessity of medical art therapy are briefly reviewed.

  17. Results of high energy x-ray therapy of gastric carcinoma, 3. Early gastric carcinoma (Tl carcinoma)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, S; Asakawa, H; Otawa, H; Matsumoto, K [Miyagi Seijinbyo Center (Japan)

    1981-11-01

    A total of 25 cases with early gastric carcinoma, of which 10 cases were followed by gastrectomy, were given a combined radiotherapy with 5-Fu, Ft 207 or MFC at Miyagi Seijinbyo Center. Histologic examinations of biopsy specimens revealed the disappearance of cancer cells in five (42%) of 12 cases and those of serial specimens of the resected stomach showed the complete disappearance of cancer cells in three (27%) of 11 lesions (10 cases). Five year survival rate in 15 non-resected cases was only 30%. From these results, it was suggested that a combined radiotherapy of early gastric carcinoma should not be chosen as a curative treatment procedure but it might be valuable, if early carcinoma was thought to be inoperable because of other medical reasons.

  18. Soft x-ray lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, D.L.; Rosen, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    One of the elusive dreams of laser physicists has been the development of an x-ray laser. After 25 years of waiting, the x-ray laser has at last entered the scientific scene, although those now in operation are still laboratory prototypes. They produce soft x rays down to about five nanometers. X-ray lasers retain the usual characteristics of their optical counterparts: a very tight beam, spatial and temporal coherence, and extreme brightness. Present x-ray lasers are nearly 100 times brighter that the next most powerful x-ray source in the world: the electron synchrotron. Although Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is widely known for its hard-x-ray laser program which has potential applications in the Strategic Defense Initiative, the soft x-ray lasers have no direct military applications. These lasers, and the scientific tools that result from their development, may one day have a place in the design and diagnosis of both laser fusion and hard x-ray lasers. The soft x-ray lasers now in operation at the LLNL have shown great promise but are still in the primitive state. Once x-ray lasers become reliable, efficient, and economical, they will have several important applications. Chief among them might be the creation of holograms of microscopic biological structures too small to be investigated with visible light. 5 figs

  19. X-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markowicz, A.A.; Van Grieken, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    In the period under review, i.e, through 1984 and 1985, some 600 articles on XRS (X-ray spectrometry) were published; most of these have been scanned and the most fundamental ones are discussed. All references will refer to English-language articles, unless states otherwise. Also general books have appeared on quantitative EPXMA (electron-probe X-ray microanalysis) and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) as well as an extensive review on the application of XRS to trace analysis of environmental samples. In the period under review no radically new developments have been seen in XRS. However, significant improvements have been made. Gain in intensities has been achieved by more efficient excitation, higher reflectivity of dispersing media, and better geometry. Better understanding of the physical process of photon- and electron-specimen interactions led to complex but more accurate equations for correction of various interelement effects. Extensive use of micro- and minicomputers now enables fully automatic operation, including qualitative analysis. However, sample preparation and presentation still put a limit to further progress. Although some authors find XRS in the phase of stabilization or even stagnation, further gradual developments are expected, particularly toward more dedicated equipment, advanced automation, and image analysis systems. Ways are outlined in which XRS has been improved in the 2 last years by excitation, detection, instrumental, methodological, and theoretical advances. 340 references

  20. X-ray spectral meter of high voltages for X-ray apparatuses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubkov, I.P.; Larchikov, Yu.V.

    1993-01-01

    Design of the X-ray spectral meter of high voltages (XRSMHV) for medical X-ray apparatuses permitting to conduct the voltage measurements without connection to current circuits. The XRSMHV consists of two main units: the detector unit based on semiconductor detector and the LP4900B multichannel analyzer (Afora, Finland). The XRSMYV was tested using the pilot plant based on RUM-20 X-ray diagnostic apparatus with high-voltage regulator. It was shown that the developed XRSMHV could be certify in the range of high constant voltages form 40 up to 120 kV with the basic relative error limits ±0.15%. The XRSMHV is used at present as the reference means for calibration of high-voltage medical X-ray equipment

  1. Study of x-ray CCD image sensor and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuyun; Li, Tianze

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, we expounded the composing, specialty, parameter, its working process, key techniques and methods for charge coupled devices (CCD) twice value treatment. Disposal process for CCD video signal quantification was expatiated; X-ray image intensifier's constitutes, function of constitutes, coupling technique of X-ray image intensifier and CCD were analyzed. We analyzed two effective methods to reduce the harm to human beings when X-ray was used in the medical image. One was to reduce X-ray's radiation and adopt to intensify the image penetrated by X-ray to gain the same effect. The other was to use the image sensor to transfer the images to the safe area for observation. On this base, a new method was presented that CCD image sensor and X-ray image intensifier were combined organically. A practical medical X-ray photo electricity system was designed which can be used in the records and time of the human's penetrating images. The system was mainly made up with the medical X-ray, X-ray image intensifier, CCD vidicon with high resolution, image processor, display and so on. Its characteristics are: change the invisible X-ray into the visible light image; output the vivid images; short image recording time etc. At the same time we analyzed the main aspects which affect the system's resolution. Medical photo electricity system using X-ray image sensor can reduce the X-ray harm to human sharply when it is used in the medical diagnoses. At last we analyzed and looked forward the system's application in medical engineering and the related fields.

  2. 21 CFR 892.1750 - Computed tomography x-ray system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Computed tomography x-ray system. 892.1750 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1750 Computed tomography x-ray system. (a) Identification. A computed tomography x-ray system is a diagnostic x-ray system intended to...

  3. The results of a series of 963 patients with transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder primarily treated by radical megavoltage X-ray therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, W.; Quilty, P.M.

    1986-01-01

    The results are reported of a large series of patients with transitional cell cancer of the bladder, treated in Edinburgh between 1971 and 1982. Analysis of pre-treatment characteristics for patients with transitional cell bladder cancer showed that tumour category was significantly associated with grade and tumour size. Complete local tumour regression at follow-up cystoscopy was achieved in 45.9% of patients who completed radical megavoltage X-ray therapy. Patients with grade 2 or 3 cancer, a solid cancer or a tumour of less than 8 cm in size had significantly improved complete regression rates. Lasting local tumour control after initial complete regression was better in patients with grade 3 cancer. Complete regression was associated with improved survival for all but patients with T1 cancer. The poorest survival rates were seen in patients over 79 years of age, those with T4 cancer, an ulcerated cancer, a grade 3 cancer or a tumour of more than 7 cm in size. Metastases were more often seen in patients with grade 3 or T3/T4 cancer. Severe late radiation-related complications were seen in 14.8% of patients. (Auth.)

  4. X-ray table

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, J.R.; Otto, G.W.

    1980-01-01

    An X-ray radiographic or fluoroscopic table is described which includes a film holder with a frame attached to a cable running over end pulleys for positioning the holder longitudinally as desired under the table top. The holder has a front opening to receive a cassette-supporting tray which can be slid out on tracks to change the cassette. A reed switch on the frame is opened by a permanent magnet on the tray only when the tray is half-way out. When the switch is closed, an electromagnet locks the pulley and the holder in place. The holder is thus automatically locked in place not only during exposure (tray in) but when the tray is out for changing the cassette. To re-position the holder, the operator pulls the tray half-out and, using the tray itself, pushes the holder along the table, the holder being counterbalanced by a weight. (author)

  5. X-ray equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redmayne, I.G.B.

    1988-01-01

    The patent concerns a warning and protection system for mobile x-ray equipment used for 'on site' radiography, so that workers in the vicinity of such a working unit can be alerted to its presence. The invention is a local repeater warning system which gives a preliminary warning that energisation of the tubehead is imminent, as well as a switch near the tubehead to abort or inhibit energisation. The latter switch allows personnel caught in the vicinity of the tubehead to prevent energisation. The preliminary warning may be flashing lamps or by a klaxon. The control unit for the equipment may include a monitoring circuit to detect failure of the warning light or klaxon. (U.K.)

  6. X-ray equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redmayne, I.G.B.

    1988-01-06

    The patent concerns a warning and protection system for mobile x-ray equipment used for 'on site' radiography, so that workers in the vicinity of such a working unit can be alerted to its presence. The invention is a local repeater warning system which gives a preliminary warning that energisation of the tubehead is imminent, as well as a switch near the tubehead to abort or inhibit energisation. The latter switch allows personnel caught in the vicinity of the tubehead to prevent energisation. The preliminary warning may be flashing lamps or by a klaxon. The control unit for the equipment may include a monitoring circuit to detect failure of the warning light or klaxon. (U.K.).

  7. Medical therapy in acromegaly.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sherlock, Mark

    2011-05-01

    Acromegaly is a rare disease characterized by excess secretion of growth hormone (GH) and increased circulating insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) concentrations. The disease is associated with increased morbidity and premature mortality, but these effects can be reduced if GH levels are decreased to <2.5 μg\\/l and IGF-1 levels are normalized. Therapy for acromegaly is targeted at decreasing GH and IGF-1 levels, ameliorating patients\\' symptoms and decreasing any local compressive effects of the pituitary adenoma. The therapeutic options for acromegaly include surgery, radiotherapy and medical therapies, such as dopamine agonists, somatostatin receptor ligands and the GH receptor antagonist pegvisomant. Medical therapy is currently most widely used as secondary treatment for persistent or recurrent acromegaly following noncurative surgery, although it is increasingly used as primary therapy. This Review provides an overview of current and future pharmacological therapies for patients with acromegaly.

  8. X-Ray Lasers 2016

    CERN Document Server

    Bulanov, Sergei; Daido, Hiroyuki; Kato, Yoshiaki

    2018-01-01

    These proceedings comprise a selection of invited and contributed papers presented at the 15th International Conference on X-Ray Lasers (ICXRL 2016), held at the Nara Kasugano International Forum, Japan, from May 22 to 27, 2016. This conference was part of an ongoing series dedicated to recent developments in the science and technology of x-ray lasers and other coherent x-ray sources with additional focus on supporting technologies, instrumentation and applications.   The book showcases recent advances in the generation of intense, coherent x-rays, the development of practical devices and their applications across a wide variety of fields. It also discusses emerging topics such as plasma-based x-ray lasers, 4th generation accelerator-based sources and higher harmonic generations, as well as other x-ray generation schemes.

  9. X-ray instrumentation in astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuhlane, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the proceedings of a conference devoted to x-ray instrumentation in astronomy. Special sections are: AXAF X-Ray Optical Systems; Specialized X-Ray Systems; X-Ray Optical Systems I; X-Ray Optical Systems II; Gas Filled X-Ray Detectors II; The NASA Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility; X-Ray and EUV Spectrometers; Microchannel Plates; and Solid State Detectors

  10. Capacity of X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wobrauschek, P.; Kregsamer, P.

    1997-01-01

    X-Ray fluorescence analysis (XRF) is a powerful analytical tool for the qualitative and quantitative determination of chemical elements in a sample. Two different detection principles are accepted widely: wavelength dispersive and energy dispersive. Various sources for XRF are discussed: X-ray tubes, accelerators for particle induced XRF, radioactive isotopes, and the use of synchrotron radiation. Applications include environmental, technical, medical, fine art, and forensic studies. Due to the demands of research and application special techniques like total reflection XRF (TXRF) were developed with ultimately achievable detection limits in the femtogram region. The elements detectable by XRF range from Be to U. (author)

  11. Diffraction enhanced x-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomlinson, W.; Zhong, Z.; Johnston, R.E.; Sayers, D.

    1997-09-01

    Diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) is a new x-ray radiographic imaging modality using synchrotron x-rays which produces images of thick absorbing objects that are almost completely free of scatter. They show dramatically improved contrast over standard imaging applied to the same phantoms. The contrast is based not only on attenuation but also the refraction and diffraction properties of the sample. The diffraction component and the apparent absorption component (absorption plus extinction contrast) can each be determined independently. This imaging method may improve the image quality for medical applications such as mammography

  12. Topological X-Rays Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Mark

    2012-01-01

    We continue our study of topological X-rays begun in Lynch ["Topological X-rays and MRI's," iJMEST 33(3) (2002), pp. 389-392]. We modify our definition of a topological magnetic resonance imaging and give an affirmative answer to the question posed there: Can we identify a closed set in a box by defining X-rays to probe the interior and without…

  13. Contribution to industrial X-ray tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huet, J.; Thomas, G.

    1983-06-01

    Based on the previous experience on medical scanner, a prototype of industrial X-Ray scanner has been studied and realized by the CEA. This apparatus uses a 420 kVolts generator as a beam source. The results obtained are shown. The characteristics of a flexible and polyvalent system well adapted to industrial testing are defined [fr

  14. Diagnostic X-ray sources-present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behling, Rolf; Grüner, Florian

    2018-01-01

    This paper compares very different physical principles of X-ray production to spur ideation. Since more than 120 years, bremsstrahlung from X-ray tubes has been the workhorse of medical diagnostics. Generated by X-ray segments comprised of X-ray tubes and high-voltage generators in the various medical systems, X-ray photons in the spectral range between about 16 keV and 150 keV deliver information about anatomy and function of human patients and in pre-clinical animal studies. Despite of strides to employ the wave nature of X-rays as phase sensitive means, commercial diagnostic X-ray systems available until the time of writing still rely exclusively on measuring the attenuation and scattering of X-rays by matter. Significant activities in research aim at building highly brilliant short pulse X-ray sources, based on e.g. synchrotron radiation, free electron lasers and/or laser wake-field acceleration of electrons followed by wiggling with magnetic structures or Thomson scattering in bunches of light. While both approaches, non-brilliant and brilliant sources, have different scope of application, we speculate that a combination may expand the efficacy in medical application. At this point, however, severe technical and commercial difficulties hinder closing this gap. This article may inspire further development and spark innovation in this important field.

  15. Detector unit for X-ray diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svobodova, B.; Hamouz, J.; Pavlicek, Z.; Jursova, L.; Pohanka, J.

    1983-01-01

    The detector unit is applied in the medical and industrial X-ray diagnosis and analysis. It controls the X-ray dosing by exposure and brightness automation. The detector field is generated from a carrier, in which detector elements with light quides are situated, tapped on optical detectors with level converters outside the detector field. The detector field and the optical detectors with level converters are located in a light-resistent shell. This arrangement of the detector unit allows to use the impulse skiascopy instead of permanent X-ray examinations or the skiagraphy with multienergy levels which considerably improves the diagnostic value of the exposures and the working conditions. 1 cl., 1 fig

  16. Teratogenic effects of x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faisal, Arif

    1981-01-01

    The application of x-rays in the medical field has positive and negative effects. The effects of x-ray radiation to the intrauterine embryo and foetus depend on the period of gestation. In the first trimester the embryo may be resorbed and aborted and may also be born with serious defects. In the late trimester radiation may cause less serious defects and it may disturb the function of organs. Many defects involve nerve tissues and are associated with symptoms of mental retardation. To prevent radiation exposure to embryo and foetus, it is necessary to observe the ''ten-day rule'', when x-ray examination is performed. The threshold doses for embryo and foetus are still unknown. (author)

  17. 120 YEARS SINCE THE DISCOVERY OF X-RAYS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babic, Rade R; Stankovic Babic, Gordana; Babic, Strahinja R; Babic, Nevena R

    2016-09-01

    This paper is intended to celebrate the 120th anniversary of the discovery of X-rays. X-rays (Roentgen-rays) were discovered on the 8th ofNovember, 1895 by the German physicist Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen. Fifty days after the discovery of X-ray, on December 28, 1895. Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen published a paper about the discovery of X-rays - "On a new kind of rays" (Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen: Ober eine neue Art von Strahlen. In: Sitzungsberichte der Wurzburger Physik.-Medic.- Gesellschaft. 1895.). Therefore, the date of 28th ofDecember, 1895 was taken as the date of X-rays discovery. This paper describes the work of Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen, Nikola Tesla, Mihajlo Pupin and Maria Sklodowska-Curie about the nature of X-rays . The fantastic four - Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen, NikolaTesla, Mihajlo ldvorski Pupin and Maria Sklodowska-Curie set the foundation of radiology with their discovery and study of X-rays. Five years after the discovery of X-rays, in 1900, Dr Avram Vinaver had the first X-ray machine installed in abac, in Serbia at the time when many developed countries did not have an X-ray machine and thus set the foundation of radiology in Serbia.

  18. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  19. X-ray filtration apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, G.

    1992-01-01

    This invention relates to an X-ray shielding support device. In spite of considerable development in X-ray taking techniques, a need still exists for effective shielding, inter alia, to compensate for variations in the thickness, density and the absorption properties of the object being studied. By appropriate shielding, the X-ray image produced is of sufficient detail, contrast and intensity over its entire area to constitute a useful diagnostic aid. It is also desirable to subject the patient to the smallest possible X-ray dosage. 4 figs

  20. X-ray emission spectroscopy. X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despujols, J.

    1992-01-01

    Principles of X-ray emission spectrometry are first recalled, then wave-length dispersive and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer are described. They are essentially designed for qualitative and quantitative analysis of elements (Z>10). Sample preparation, calibration, corrections, interferences, accuracy are reviewed. Examples of use in different industries are given. (71 refs.)