WorldWideScience

Sample records for medical record system

  1. Medical Archive Recording System (MARS)

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Reza Tajvidi

    2007-01-01

    In this talk, one of the most efficient, and reliable integrated tools for CD/DVD production workflow, called Medical Archive Recording System (MARS) by ETIAM Company, France, which is a leader in multimedia connectivity for healthcare in Europe, is going to be introduced. "nThis tool is used to record all patient studies, route the studies to printers and PACS automatically, print key images and associated reports and log all study production for automated post processing/archiving. Its...

  2. Implementation of an Electronic Medical Records System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-07

    Hartman, MAJ Roddex Barlow , CPT Christopher Besser and Capt Michael Emerson...thank you I am truly honored to call each of you my friends. Electronic... abnormal findings are addressed. 18 Electronic Medical Record Implementation Barriers of the Electronic Medical Records System There are several...examination findings • Psychological and social assessment findings N. The system provides a flexible mechanism for retrieval of encounter

  3. Implementation of an Electronic Medical Records System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fletcher, Chadwick B

    2008-01-01

    .... Substantial benefits are realized through routine use of electronic medical records include improved quality, safety, and efficiency, along with the increased ability to conduct education and research...

  4. The design and implementation of online medical record system ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The design and implementation of online medical record system (OMRS) ... PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH. AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) ... International Journal of Natural and Applied Sciences. Journal Home ...

  5. Medical ADP Systems: Automated Medical Records Hold Promise to Improve Patient Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    automated medical records. The report discusses the potential benefits that automation could make to the quality of patient care and the factors that impede...information systems, but no organization has fully automated one of the most critical types of information, patient medical records. The patient medical record...its review of automated medical records. GAO’s objectives in this study were to identify the (1) benefits of automating patient records and (2) factors

  6. Electronic medical records system user acceptance

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Erasmus, L

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available on literature and confirmed in this case study, if adoption of EMR systems is the ultimate goal, the implementation thereof should be properly managed with strong leadership and political backing at the highest level. Adoption is also supported by keeping...

  7. Medical record management systems: criticisms and new perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frénot, S; Laforest, F

    1999-06-01

    The first generation of computerized medical records stored the data as text, but these records did not bring any improvement in information manipulation. The use of a relational database management system (DBMS) has largely solved this problem as it allows for data requests by using SQL. However, this requires data structuring which is not very appropriate to medicine. Moreover, the use of templates and icon user interfaces has introduced a deviation from the paper-based record (still existing). The arrival of hypertext user interfaces has proven to be of interest to fill the gap between the paper-based medical record and its electronic version. We think that further improvement can be accomplished by using a fully document-based system. We present the architecture, advantages and disadvantages of classical DBMS-based and Web/DBMS-based solutions. We also present a document-based solution and explain its advantages, which include communication, security, flexibility and genericity.

  8. National electronic medical records integration on cloud computing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Hebah; El-Masri, Samir

    2013-01-01

    Few Healthcare providers have an advanced level of Electronic Medical Record (EMR) adoption. Others have a low level and most have no EMR at all. Cloud computing technology is a new emerging technology that has been used in other industry and showed a great success. Despite the great features of Cloud computing, they haven't been utilized fairly yet in healthcare industry. This study presents an innovative Healthcare Cloud Computing system for Integrating Electronic Health Record (EHR). The proposed Cloud system applies the Cloud Computing technology on EHR system, to present a comprehensive EHR integrated environment.

  9. Medical Terminology of the Circulatory System. Medical Records. Instructional Unit for the Medical Transcriber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosman, Minna L.

    Developed as a result of an analysis of the task of transcribing as practiced in a health facility, this study guide was designed to teach the knowledge and skills required of a medical transcriber. The medical record department was identified as a major occupational area, and a task inventory for medical records was developed and used as a basis…

  10. Medical Terminology of the Respiratory System. Medical Records. Instructional Unit for the Medical Transcriptionist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosman, Minna L.

    Following an analysis of the task of transcribing as practiced in a health facility, this study guide was designed to teach the knowledge and skills required of a medical transcriber. The medical record department was identified as a major occupational area, and a task inventory for medical records was developed and used as a basis for…

  11. Medical Terminology of the Musculoskeletal System. Medical Records. Instructional Unit for the Medical Transcriber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosman, Minna L.

    Following an analysis of the task of transcribing as practiced in a health facility, this study guide was developed to teach the knowledge and skills required of a medical transcriber. The medical record department was identified as a major occupational area, and a task inventory for medical records was developed and used as a basis for a…

  12. Minimal impact of an electronic medical records system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tall, Jill M; Hurd, Marie; Gifford, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) implementation in hospitals and emergency departments (EDs) is becoming increasingly more common. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of an EMR system on patient-related factors that correlate to ED workflow efficiency. A retrospective chart review assessed monthly census reports of all patients who registered and were treated to disposition during conversion from paper charts to an EMR system. The primary outcome measurement was an analysis of the time of registration to discharge or total ED length of stay as well as rate of those who left without being seen, eloped, or left against medical advice. These data were recorded from 3 periods, for 18 months: before installation of the EMR system (pre-EMR), during acclimation to the EMR, and post acclimation (post-EMR). A total of 61626 individual patient records were collected and analyzed. The total ED length of stay across all patient subtypes was not significantly affected by the installation of the hospital-wide EMR system (P = .481); however, a significant decrease was found for patients who were admitted to the hospital from the ED (P .25). Installation of a hospital-wide EMR system had minimal impact on workflow efficiency parameters in an ED. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Implementing electronic medical record systems in developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamish Fraser

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The developing world faces a series of health crises including HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis that threaten the lives of millions of people. Lack of infrastructure and trained, experienced staff are considered important barriers to scaling up treatment for these diseases. In this paper we explain why information systems are important in many healthcare projects in the developing world. We discuss pilot projects demonstrating that such systems are possible and can expand to manage hundreds of thousands of patients. We also pass on the most important practical lessons in design and implementation from our experience in doing this work. Finally, we discuss the importance of collaboration between projects in the development of electronic medical record systems rather than reinventing systems in isolation, and the use of open standards and open source software.

  14. Evaluation of the medical records system in an upcoming teaching hospital-a project for improvisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, B Deepak; Kumari, C M Vinaya; Sharada, M S; Mangala, M S

    2012-08-01

    The medical records system of an upcoming teaching hospital in a developing nation was evaluated for its accessibility, completeness, physician satisfaction, presence of any lacunae, suggestion of necessary steps for improvisation and to emphasize the importance of Medical records system in education and research work. The salient aspects of the medical records department were evaluated based on a questionnaire which was evaluated by a team of 40 participants-30 doctors, 5 personnel from Medical Records Department and 5 from staff of Hospital administration. Most of the physicians (65%) were partly satisfied with the existing medical record system. 92.5% were of the opinion that upgradation of the present system is necessary. The need of the hour in the present teaching hospital is the implementation of a hospital-wide patient registration and medical records re-engineering process in the form of electronic medical records system and regular review by the audit commission.

  15. Integration of SNOMED CT into the OpenMRS electronic medical record system framework

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gerber, A

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Integrating a mechanism to store, retrieve and use clinical data with a system to manage medical records enables better utilisation of medical data and improved healthcare. This poster introduces a research project that aims to extend Open...

  16. Ethnicity Recording in Primary Care Computerised Medical Record Systems: An Ontological Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zayd Tippu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Ethnicity recording within primary care computerised medical record (CMR systems is suboptimal, exacerbated by tangled taxonomies within current coding systems. Objective To develop a method for extending ethnicity identification using routinely collected data. Methods We used an ontological method to maximise the reliability and prevalence of ethnicity information in the Royal College of General Practitioner’s Research and Surveillance database. Clinical codes were either directly mapped to ethnicity group or utilised as proxy markers (such as language spoken from which ethnicity could be inferred. We compared the performance of our method with the recording rates that would be identified by code lists utilised by the UK pay for the performance system, with the help of the Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF. Results Data from 2,059,453 patients across 110 practices were included. The overall categorisable ethnicity using QOF codes was 36.26% (95% confidence interval (CI: 36.20%–36.33%. This rose to 48.57% (CI:48.50%–48.64% using the described ethnicity mapping process. Mapping increased across all ethnic groups. The largest increase was seen in the white ethnicity category (30.61%; CI: 30.55%–30.67% to 40.24%; CI: 40.17%–40.30%. The highest relative increase was in the ethnic group categorised as the other (0.04%; CI: 0.03%–0.04% to 0.92%; CI: 0.91%–0.93%. Conclusions This mapping method substantially increases the prevalence of known ethnicity in CMR data and may aid future epidemiological research based on routine data.

  17. Reducing and Sustaining Duplicate Medical Record Creation by Usability Testing and System Redesign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khunlertkit, Adjhaporn; Dorissaint, Leonard; Chen, Allen; Paine, Lori; Pronovost, Peter J

    2017-10-25

    Duplicate medical record creation is a common and consequential health care systems error often caused by poor search system usability and inappropriate user training. We conducted two phases of scenario-based usability testing with patient registrars working in areas at risk of generating duplicate medical records. Phase 1 evaluated the existing search system, which led to system redesigns. Phase 2 tested the redesigned system to mitigate potential errors before health system-wide implementation. To evaluate system effectiveness, we compared the monthly potential duplicate medical record rates for preimplementation and postimplementation months. The existing system could not effectively handle a misspelling, which led to failed search and duplicate medical record creation. Using the existing system, 96% of registrars found commonly spelled patient names whereas only 69% successfully found complicated names. Registrars lacked knowledge and usage of a phonetic matching function to assist in misspelling. The new system consistently captured the correct patient regardless of misspelling, but search returned more potential matches, resulting in, on average, 4 seconds longer to select common names. Potential monthly duplicate medical record rate reduced by 38%, from 4% to 2.3% after implementation of the new system, and has sustained at an average of 2.5% for 2 years. Usability testing was an effective method to reveal problems and aid system redesign to deliver a more user friendly system, hence reducing the potential for medical record duplication. Greater standards for usability would ensure that these improvements can be realized before rather than after exposing patients to risks.

  18. Factors affecting the utilisation of electronic medical records system ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Malawi Medical Journal 29 (3): September 2017. Electronic medical ... care, as they enable storage of large amounts of data and ... EMRs. This study assessed factors that affect the use of EMRs in Malawi, particularly at Queen Elizabeth and Kamuzu Central ..... paperless hospitals in Norway : A socio-technical perspective.

  19. Surgical medical record

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bulow, S.

    2008-01-01

    A medical record is presented on the basis of selected linguistic pearls collected over the years from surgical case records Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12/15......A medical record is presented on the basis of selected linguistic pearls collected over the years from surgical case records Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12/15...

  20. A SWOT Analysis of the Various Backup Scenarios Used in Electronic Medical Record Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hwa Jeong; Kim, Hye Hyeon; Kim, Ju Han

    2011-09-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) are increasingly being used by health care services. Currently, if an EMR shutdown occurs, even for a moment, patient safety and care can be seriously impacted. Our goal was to determine the methodology needed to develop an effective and reliable EMR backup system. Our "independent backup system by medical organizations" paradigm implies that individual medical organizations develop their own EMR backup systems within their organizations. A "personal independent backup system" is defined as an individual privately managing his/her own medical records, whereas in a "central backup system by the government" the government controls all the data. A "central backup system by private enterprises" implies that individual companies retain control over their own data. A "cooperative backup system among medical organizations" refers to a networked system established through mutual agreement. The "backup system based on mutual trust between an individual and an organization" means that the medical information backup system at the organizational level is established through mutual trust. Through the use of SWOT analysis it can be shown that cooperative backup among medical organizations is possible to be established through a network composed of various medical agencies and that it can be managed systematically. An owner of medical information only grants data access to the specific person who gave the authorization for backup based on the mutual trust between an individual and an organization. By employing SWOT analysis, we concluded that a linkage among medical organizations or between an individual and an organization can provide an efficient backup system.

  1. A computerised out-patient medical records programme based on the Summary Time-Oriented Record (STOR) System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, P Y; Goh, L G; Ong, R; Wong, P K

    1992-12-01

    Advances in microcomputer hardware and software technology have made computerised outpatient medical records practical. We have developed a programme based on the Summary Time-Oriented Record (STOR) system which complements existing paper-based record keeping. The elements of the Problem Oriented Medical Record (POMR) System are displayed in two windows within one screen, namely, the SOAP (Subjective information, Objective information, Assessments and Plans) elements in the Reason For Encounter (RFE) window and the problem list with outcomes in the Problem List (PL) window. Context sensitive child windows display details of plans of management in the RFE window and clinical notes in the PL window. The benefits of such innovations to clinical decision making and practice based research and its medico-legal implications are discussed.

  2. Building a national electronic medical record exchange system - experiences in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-Chuan Jack; Yen, Ju-Chuan; Chiu, Wen-Ta; Jian, Wen-Shan; Syed-Abdul, Shabbir; Hsu, Min-Huei

    2015-08-01

    There are currently 501 hospitals and about 20,000 clinics in Taiwan. The National Health Insurance (NHI) system, which is operated by the NHI Administration, uses a single-payer system and covers 99.9% of the nation's total population of 23,000,000. Taiwan's NHI provides people with a high degree of freedom in choosing their medical care options. However, there is the potential concern that the available medical resources will be overused. The number of doctor consultations per person per year is about 15. Duplication of laboratory tests and prescriptions are not rare either. Building an electronic medical record exchange system is a good method of solving these problems and of improving continuity in health care. In November 2009, Taiwan's Executive Yuan passed the 'Plan for accelerating the implementation of electronic medical record systems in medical institutions' (2010-2012; a 3-year plan). According to this plan, a patient can, at any hospital in Taiwan, by using his/her health insurance IC card and physician's medical professional IC card, upon signing a written agreement, retrieve all important medical records for the past 6 months from other participating hospitals. The focus of this plan is to establish the National Electronic Medical Record Exchange Centre (EEC). A hospital's information system will be connected to the EEC through an electronic medical record (EMR) gateway. The hospital will convert the medical records for the past 6 months in its EMR system into standardized files and save them on the EMR gateway. The most important functions of the EEC are to generate an index of all the XML files on the EMR gateways of all hospitals, and to provide search and retrieval services for hospitals and clinics. The EEC provides four standard inter-institution EMR retrieval services covering medical imaging reports, laboratory test reports, discharge summaries, and outpatient records. In this system, we adopted the Health Level 7 (HL7) Clinical Document

  3. Your Medical Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hear medical people call these EHRs — short for electronic health records . Electronic records make it easier for all your doctors ... doctor's office is trying to protect a patient's privacy or safety. For example, they may say no ...

  4. Outpatients flow management and ophthalmic electronic medical records system in university hospital using Yahgee Document View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Toshihiko; Gochi, Akira; Hirakawa, Tsuyoshi; Ito, Tadashi; Kohno, Yoshihisa

    2010-10-01

    General electronic medical records systems remain insufficient for ophthalmology outpatient clinics from the viewpoint of dealing with many ophthalmic examinations and images in a large number of patients. Filing systems for documents and images by Yahgee Document View (Yahgee, Inc.) were introduced on the platform of general electronic medical records system (Fujitsu, Inc.). Outpatients flow management system and electronic medical records system for ophthalmology were constructed. All images from ophthalmic appliances were transported to Yahgee Image by the MaxFile gateway system (P4 Medic, Inc.). The flow of outpatients going through examinations such as visual acuity testing were monitored by the list "Ophthalmology Outpatients List" by Yahgee Workflow in addition to the list "Patients Reception List" by Fujitsu. Patients' identification number was scanned with bar code readers attached to ophthalmic appliances. Dual monitors were placed in doctors' rooms to show Fujitsu Medical Records on the left-hand monitor and ophthalmic charts of Yahgee Document on the right-hand monitor. The data of manually-inputted visual acuity, automatically-exported autorefractometry and non-contact tonometry on a new template, MaxFile ED, were again automatically transported to designated boxes on ophthalmic charts of Yahgee Document. Images such as fundus photographs, fluorescein angiograms, optical coherence tomographic and ultrasound scans were viewed by Yahgee Image, and were copy-and-pasted to assigned boxes on the ophthalmic charts. Ordering such as appointments, drug prescription, fees and diagnoses input, central laboratory tests, surgical theater and ward room reservations were placed by functions of the Fujitsu electronic medical records system. The combination of the Fujitsu electronic medical records and Yahgee Document View systems enabled the University Hospital to examine the same number of outpatients as prior to the implementation of the computerized filing system.

  5. [Design and Implementation of a Mobile Operating Room Information Management System Based on Electronic Medical Record].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Baozhen; Liu, Zhiguo; Wang, Xianwen

    2015-06-01

    A mobile operating room information management system with electronic medical record (EMR) is designed to improve work efficiency and to enhance the patient information sharing. In the operating room, this system acquires the information from various medical devices through the Client/Server (C/S) pattern, and automatically generates XML-based EMR. Outside the operating room, this system provides information access service by using the Browser/Server (B/S) pattern. Software test shows that this system can correctly collect medical information from equipment and clearly display the real-time waveform. By achieving surgery records with higher quality and sharing the information among mobile medical units, this system can effectively reduce doctors' workload and promote the information construction of the field hospital.

  6. Architecture of portable electronic medical records system integrated with streaming media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Shih, Chien-Chou

    2012-02-01

    Due to increasing occurrence of accidents and illness during business trips, travel, or overseas studies, the requirement for portable EMR (Electronic Medical Records) has increased. This study proposes integrating streaming media technology into the EMR system to facilitate referrals, contracted laboratories, and disease notification among hospitals. The current study encoded static and dynamic medical images of patients into a streaming video format and stored them in a Flash Media Server (FMS). Based on the Taiwan Electronic Medical Record Template (TMT) standard, EMR records can be converted into XML documents and used to integrate description fields with embedded streaming videos. This investigation implemented a web-based portable EMR interchanging system using streaming media techniques to expedite exchanging medical image information among hospitals. The proposed architecture of the portable EMR retrieval system not only provides local hospital users the ability to acquire EMR text files from a previous hospital, but also helps access static and dynamic medical images as reference for clinical diagnosis and treatment. The proposed method protects property rights of medical images through information security mechanisms of the Medical Record Interchange Service Center and Health Certificate Authorization to facilitate proper, efficient, and continuous treatment of patients.

  7. Capacity Building in Open Medical Record System (OpenMRS) in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Capacity Building in Open Medical Record System (OpenMRS) in Rwanda ... Partners in Health (PIH), an international nongovernmental organization, has demonstrated the usefulness of ... Journal articles ... will fund social science, population and public health, and health systems research relevant to the emerging crisis.

  8. Pervasive Electronic Medical Record

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nafiisah

    independent web service connected to database of medical records or Worldwide. Interoperability ... allows wireless monitoring and tracking of patients and first responders using sensor nodes .... All these network security threats arise mainly ...

  9. Evolution of Medication Administration Workflow in Implementing Electronic Health Record System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuan-Han

    2013-01-01

    This study focused on the clinical workflow evolutions when implementing the health information technology (HIT). The study especially emphasized on administrating medication when the electronic health record (EHR) systems were adopted at rural healthcare facilities. Mixed-mode research methods, such as survey, observation, and focus group, were…

  10. The Use of Hospital Information Systems Data Base with Word Processing and Other Medical Records System Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Rusnak, James E.

    1982-01-01

    The approach frequently used to introduce computer technology into a hospital Medical Records Department is to implement a Word Processing System. Word processing is a form of computer system application that is intended to improve the department's productivity by improving the medical information transcription process. The effectiveness of the Word Processing System may be further enhanced by installing system facilities to provide access to data processing file information in the Hospital's...

  11. A study of general practitioners' perspectives on electronic medical records systems in NHSScotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouamrane, Matt-Mouley; Mair, Frances S

    2013-05-21

    Primary care doctors in NHSScotland have been using electronic medical records within their practices routinely for many years. The Scottish Health Executive eHealth strategy (2008-2011) has recently brought radical changes to the primary care computing landscape in Scotland: an information system (GPASS) which was provided free-of-charge by NHSScotland to a majority of GP practices has now been replaced by systems provided by two approved commercial providers. The transition to new electronic medical records had to be completed nationally across all health-boards by March 2012. We carried out 25 in-depth semi-structured interviews with primary care doctors to elucidate GPs' perspectives on their practice information systems and collect more general information on management processes in the patient surgical pathway in NHSScotland. We undertook a thematic analysis of interviewees' responses, using Normalisation Process Theory as the underpinning conceptual framework. The majority of GPs' interviewed considered that electronic medical records are an integral and essential element of their work during the consultation, playing a key role in facilitating integrated and continuity of care for patients and making clinical information more accessible. However, GPs expressed a number of reservations about various system functionalities - for example: in relation to usability, system navigation and information visualisation. Our study highlights that while electronic information systems are perceived as having important benefits, there remains substantial scope to improve GPs' interaction and overall satisfaction with these systems. Iterative user-centred improvements combined with additional training in the use of technology would promote an increased understanding, familiarity and command of the range of functionalities of electronic medical records among primary care doctors.

  12. Regenstrief Institute's Medical Gopher: a next-generation homegrown electronic medical record system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Jon D; Morea, Justin; Mamlin, Burke; Martin, Douglas K; Simonaitis, Linas; Takesue, Blaine Y; Dixon, Brian E; Dexter, Paul R

    2014-03-01

    Regenstrief Institute developed one of the seminal computerized order entry systems, the Medical Gopher, for implementation at Wishard Hospital nearly three decades ago. Wishard Hospital and Regenstrief remain committed to homegrown software development, and over the past 4 years we have fully rebuilt Gopher with an emphasis on usability, safety, leveraging open source technologies, and the advancement of biomedical informatics research. Our objective in this paper is to summarize the functionality of this new system and highlight its novel features. Applying a user-centered design process, the new Gopher was built upon a rich-internet application framework using an agile development process. The system incorporates order entry, clinical documentation, result viewing, decision support, and clinical workflow. We have customized its use for the outpatient, inpatient, and emergency department settings. The new Gopher is now in use by over 1100 users a day, including an average of 433 physicians caring for over 3600 patients daily. The system includes a wizard-like clinical workflow, dynamic multimedia alerts, and a familiar 'e-commerce'-based interface for order entry. Clinical documentation is enhanced by real-time natural language processing and data review is supported by a rapid chart search feature. As one of the few remaining academically developed order entry systems, the Gopher has been designed both to improve patient care and to support next-generation informatics research. It has achieved rapid adoption within our health system and suggests continued viability for homegrown systems in settings of close collaboration between developers and providers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Towards Standardized Patient Data Exchange: Integrating a FHIR Based API for the Open Medical Record System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasthurirathne, Suranga N; Mamlin, Burke; Grieve, Grahame; Biondich, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Interoperability is essential to address limitations caused by the ad hoc implementation of clinical information systems and the distributed nature of modern medical care. The HL7 V2 and V3 standards have played a significant role in ensuring interoperability for healthcare. FHIR is a next generation standard created to address fundamental limitations in HL7 V2 and V3. FHIR is particularly relevant to OpenMRS, an Open Source Medical Record System widely used across emerging economies. FHIR has the potential to allow OpenMRS to move away from a bespoke, application specific API to a standards based API. We describe efforts to design and implement a FHIR based API for the OpenMRS platform. Lessons learned from this effort were used to define long term plans to transition from the legacy OpenMRS API to a FHIR based API that greatly reduces the learning curve for developers and helps enhance adhernce to standards.

  14. Design challenges for electronic medication administration record systems in residential aged care facilities: a formative evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariq, A; Lehnbom, E; Oliver, K; Georgiou, A; Rowe, C; Osmond, T; Westbrook, J

    2014-01-01

    Electronic medication administration record (eMAR) systems are promoted as a potential intervention to enhance medication safety in residential aged care facilities (RACFs). The purpose of this study was to conduct an in-practice evaluation of an eMAR being piloted in one Australian RACF before its roll out, and to provide recommendations for system improvements. A multidisciplinary team conducted direct observations of workflow (n=34 hours) in the RACF site and the community pharmacy. Semi-structured interviews (n=5) with RACF staff and the community pharmacist were conducted to investigate their views of the eMAR system. Data were analysed using a grounded theory approach to identify challenges associated with the design of the eMAR system. The current eMAR system does not offer an end-to-end solution for medication management. Many steps, including prescribing by doctors and communication with the community pharmacist, are still performed manually using paper charts and fax machines. Five major challenges associated with the design of eMAR system were identified: limited interactivity; inadequate flexibility; problems related to information layout and semantics; the lack of relevant decision support; and system maintenance issues. We suggest recommendations to improve the design of the eMAR system and to optimize existing workflows. Immediate value can be achieved by improving the system interactivity, reducing inconsistencies in data entry design and offering dedicated organisational support to minimise connectivity issues. Longer-term benefits can be achieved by adding decision support features and establishing system interoperability requirements with stakeholder groups (e.g. community pharmacies) prior to system roll out. In-practice evaluations of technologies like eMAR system have great value in identifying design weaknesses which inhibit optimal system use.

  15. Stepwise approach to establishing multiple outreach laboratory information system-electronic medical record interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantanowitz, Liron; Labranche, Wayne; Lareau, William

    2010-05-26

    Clinical laboratory outreach business is changing as more physician practices adopt an electronic medical record (EMR). Physician connectivity with the laboratory information system (LIS) is consequently becoming more important. However, there are no reports available to assist the informatician with establishing and maintaining outreach LIS-EMR connectivity. A four-stage scheme is presented that was successfully employed to establish unidirectional and bidirectional interfaces with multiple physician EMRs. This approach involves planning (step 1), followed by interface building (step 2) with subsequent testing (step 3), and finally ongoing maintenance (step 4). The role of organized project management, software as a service (SAAS), and alternate solutions for outreach connectivity are discussed.

  16. Risk mitigation of shared electronic records system in campus institutions: medical social work practice in singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ow Yong, Lai Meng; Tan, Amanda Wei Li; Loo, Cecilia Lay Keng; Lim, Esther Li Ping

    2014-10-01

    In 2013, the Singapore General Hospital (SGH) Campus initiated a shared electronic system where patient records and documentations were standardized and shared across institutions within the Campus. The project was initiated to enhance quality of health care, improve accessibility, and ensure integrated (as opposed to fragmented) care for best outcomes in our patients. In mitigating the risks of ICT, it was found that familiarity with guiding ethical principles, and ensuring adherence to regulatory and technical competencies in medical social work were important. The need to negotiate and maneuver in a large environment within the Campus to ensure proactive integrative process helped.

  17. A Technology Acceptance Model for Inter-Organisational Electronic Medical Records Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocelyn Handy

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available This article reports the findings of the first stage of an ongoing, longitudinal study into the implementation of an interorganisational electronic medical records (EMR system. The study adapted and expanded Davis' (1993 technology acceptance model (TAM to investigate the attitudes of primary care practitioners towards a proposed system for maternity patients. All doctors and midwives holding maternity care contracts with a large urban hospital in New Zealand were sent a questionnaire soliciting their views on a planned EMR system linking the hospital and the primary care sectors. The results showed that whilst Davis' two key factors of perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness were important to medical professionals, another key factor, perceived system acceptability, which concerns control and management of information is vitally important to the acceptance of the system. The study also showed that the two groups of professionals had differing requirements due to different levels of experience and practice computerisation. Finally, the research highlights a number of wider organisational issues particularly relevant to the use of inter organisational systems in general and healthcare systems in particular.

  18. The effect of electronic medical record system use on communication between pharmacists and prescribers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Alexander; Duarte Fernandez, Roberto

    2015-10-28

    The Electronic Medical Record (EMR) is becoming increasingly common in health care settings. Research shows that EMRs have the potential to reduce instances of medication errors and improve communication between pharmacists and prescribers; however, more research is required to demonstrate whether this is true. This study aims to determine the effect of a newly implemented EMR system on communication between pharmacists and primary care clinicians. A retrospective chart analysis of primary care EMR data comparing faxed pharmacy communications captured before and after the implementation of an EMR system at an academic family medicine clinic. Communication requests were classified into the following various categories: refill accepted, refill denied, clarification, incorrect dose, interaction, drug insurance/coverage application, new prescription request, supplies request, continued care information, duplicate fax substitution, opioid early release request, confirmation by phone call, and other. The number and percentage of clarification requests, interaction notifications, and incorrect dose notifications were lower after the implementation of the EMR system. The number and percentage of refills accepted and new prescription requests increased after the implementation of the EMR system. The implementation of an EMR in an academic family medicine clinic had a significant effect on the volume of communication between pharmacists and prescribers. The amount of clarification requests and incorrect dosing communications decreased after EMR implementation. This suggests that EMRs improve prescribing safety. The increased amount of refills accepted and new prescription requests post EMR implementation suggests that the EMR is capable of changing prescription patterns.

  19. Cost-benefit analysis of electronic medical record system at a tertiary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jong Soo; Lee, Woo Baik; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2013-09-01

    Although Electronic Medical Record (EMR) systems provide various benefits, there are both advantages and disadvantages regarding its cost-effectiveness. This study analyzed the economic effects of EMR systems using a cost-benefit analysis based on the differential costs of managerial accounting. Samsung Medical Center (SMC) is a general hospital in Korea that developed an EMR system for outpatients from 2006 to 2008. This study measured the total costs and benefits during an 8-year period after EMR adoption. The costs include the system costs of building the EMR and the costs incurred in smoothing its adoption. The benefits included cost reductions after its adoption and additional revenues from both remodeling of paper-chart storage areas and medical transcriptionists' contribution. The measured amounts were discounted by SMC's expected interest rate to calculate the net present value (NPV), benefit-cost ratio (BCR), and discounted payback period (DPP). During the analysis period, the cumulative NPV and the BCR were US$3,617 thousand and 1.23, respectively. The DPP was about 6.18 years. Although the adoption of an EMR resulted in overall growth in administrative costs, it is cost-effective since the cumulative NPV was positive. The positive NPV was attributed to both cost reductions and additional revenues. EMR adoption is not so attractive to management in that the DPP is longer than 5 years at 6.18 and the BCR is near 1 at 1.23. However, an EMR is a worthwhile investment, seeing that this study did not include any qualitative benefits and that the paper-chart system was cost-centric.

  20. Development and implementation of a 'Mental Health Finder' software tool within an electronic medical record system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, D; Hannigan, A; Higgins, S; McDonnell, R; Meagher, D; Cullen, W

    2017-02-01

    In Ireland, as in many other healthcare systems, mental health service provision is being reconfigured with a move toward more care in the community, and particularly primary care. Recording and surveillance systems for mental health information and activities in primary care are needed for service planning and quality improvement. We describe the development and initial implementation of a software tool ('mental health finder') within a widely used primary care electronic medical record system (EMR) in Ireland to enable large-scale data collection on the epidemiology and management of mental health and substance use problems among patients attending general practice. In collaboration with the Irish Primary Care Research Network (IPCRN), we developed the 'Mental Health Finder' as a software plug-in to a commonly used primary care EMR system to facilitate data collection on mental health diagnoses and pharmacological treatments among patients. The finder searches for and identifies patients based on diagnostic coding and/or prescribed medicines. It was initially implemented among a convenience sample of six GP practices. Prevalence of mental health and substance use problems across the six practices, as identified by the finder, was 9.4% (range 6.9-12.7%). 61.9% of identified patients were female; 25.8% were private patients. One-third (33.4%) of identified patients were prescribed more than one class of psychotropic medication. Of the patients identified by the finder, 89.9% were identifiable via prescribing data, 23.7% via diagnostic coding. The finder is a feasible and promising methodology for large-scale data collection on mental health problems in primary care.

  1. Stepwise approach to establishing multiple outreach laboratory information system-electronic medical record interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liron Pantanowitz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical laboratory outreach business is changing as more physician practices adopt an electronic medical record (EMR. Physician connectivity with the laboratory information system (LIS is consequently becoming more important. However, there are no reports available to assist the informatician with establishing and maintaining outreach LIS-EMR connectivity. A four-stage scheme is presented that was successfully employed to establish unidirectional and bidirectional interfaces with multiple physician EMRs. This approach involves planning (step 1, followed by interface building (step 2 with subsequent testing (step 3, and finally ongoing maintenance (step 4. The role of organized project management, software as a service (SAAS, and alternate solutions for outreach connectivity are discussed.

  2. A Shared Decision-Making System for Diabetes Medication Choice Utilizing Electronic Health Record Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Li, Peng-Fei; Tian, Yu; Ren, Jing-Jing; Li, Jing-Song

    2017-09-01

    The use of a shared decision-making (SDM) process in antihyperglycemic medication strategy decisions is necessary due to the complexity of the conditions of diabetes patients. Knowledge of guidelines is used as decision aids in clinical situations, and during this process, no patient health conditions are considered. In this paper, we propose an SDM system framework for type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients that not only contains knowledge abstracted from guidelines but also employs a multilabel classification model that uses class-imbalanced electronic health record (EHR) data and that aims to provide a recommended list of available antihyperglycemic medications to help physicians and patients have an SDM conversation. The use of EHR data to serve as a decision-support component in decision aids helps physicians and patients to reach a more intuitive understanding of current health conditions and allows the tailoring of the available knowledge to each patient, leading to a more effective SDM. Real-world data from 2542 T2DM inpatient EHRs were substituted by 77 features and eight output labels, i.e., eight antihyperglycemic medications, and these data were utilized to build and validate the recommendation model. The multilabel recommendation model exhibited stable performance in every single-label classification and showed the ability to predict minority positive cases in which the average recall value of the eight classes was 0.9898. As a whole multilabel classifier, the recommendation model demonstrated outstanding performance, with scores of 0.0941 for Hamming Loss, 0.7611 for Accuracy exam , 0.9664 for Recall exam , and 0.8269 for F exam .

  3. Developing a Systematic Architecture Approach for Designing an Enhanced Electronic Medical Record (EEMR) System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldukheil, Maher A.

    2013-01-01

    The Healthcare industry is characterized by its complexity in delivering care to the patients. Accordingly, healthcare organizations adopt and implement Information Technology (IT) solutions to manage complexity, improve quality of care, and transform to a fully integrated and digitized environment. Electronic Medical Records (EMR), which is…

  4. Estimating morbidity rates from electronic medical records in general practice: evaluation of a grouping system.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biermans, M.C.J.; Verheij, R.A.; Bakker, D.H. de; Zielhuis, G.A.; Vries Robbé, P.F. de

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: In this study, we evaluated the internal validity of EPICON, an application for grouping ICPCcoded diagnoses from electronic medical records into episodes of care. These episodes are used to estimate morbidity rates in general practice. Methods: Morbidity rates based on EPICON were

  5. Controlled dissemination of Electronic Medical Records

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van 't Noordende, G.

    2011-01-01

    Building upon a security analysis of the Dutch electronic patient record system, this paper describes an approach to construct a fully decentralized patient record system, using controlled disclosure of references to medical records. This paper identifies several paths that can be used to disclose

  6. Use of and attitudes to a hospital information system by medical secretaries, nurses and physicians deprived of the paper-based medical record: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlsen Tom H

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most hospitals keep and update their paper-based medical records after introducing an electronic medical record or a hospital information system (HIS. This case report describes a HIS in a hospital where the paper-based medical records are scanned and eliminated. To evaluate the HIS comprehensively, the perspectives of medical secretaries and nurses are described as well as that of physicians. Methods We have used questionnaires and interviews to assess and compare frequency of use of the HIS for essential tasks, task performance and user satisfaction among medical secretaries, nurses and physicians. Results The medical secretaries use the HIS much more than the nurses and the physicians, and they consider that the electronic HIS greatly has simplified their work. The work of nurses and physicians has also become simplified, but they find less satisfaction with the system, particularly with the use of scanned document images. Conclusions Although the basis for reference is limited, the results support the assertion that replacing the paper-based medical record primarily benefits the medical secretaries, and to a lesser degree the nurses and the physicians. The varying results in the different employee groups emphasize the need for a multidisciplinary approach when evaluating a HIS.

  7. Decision Support System for Medical Care Quality Assessment Based on Health Records Analysis in Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taranik, Maksim; Kopanitsa, Georgy

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents developed decision system, oriented for healthcare providers. The system allows healthcare providers to detect and decrease nonconformities in health records and forecast the sum of insurance payments taking into account nonconformities. The components are ISO13606, fuzzy logic and case-based reasoning concept. The result of system implementation allowed to 10% increase insurance payments for healthcare provider.

  8. Modeling antecedents of electronic medical record system implementation success in low-resource setting hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilahun, Binyam; Fritz, Fleur

    2015-08-01

    With the increasing implementation of Electronic Medical Record Systems (EMR) in developing countries, there is a growing need to identify antecedents of EMR success to measure and predict the level of adoption before costly implementation. However, less evidence is available about EMR success in the context of low-resource setting implementations. Therefore, this study aims to fill this gap by examining the constructs and relationships of the widely used DeLone and MacLean (D&M) information system success model to determine whether it can be applied to measure EMR success in those settings. A quantitative cross sectional study design using self-administered questionnaires was used to collect data from 384 health professionals working in five governmental hospitals in Ethiopia. The hospitals use a comprehensive EMR system since three years. Descriptive and structural equation modeling methods were applied to describe and validate the extent of relationship of constructs and mediating effects. The findings of the structural equation modeling shows that system quality has significant influence on EMR use (β = 0.32, P quality has significant influence on EMR use (β = 0.44, P service quality has strong significant influence on EMR use (β = 0.36, P effect of EMR use on user satisfaction was not significant. Both EMR use and user satisfaction have significant influence on perceived net-benefit (β = 0.31, P mediating factor in the relationship between service quality and EMR use (P effect on perceived net-benefit of health professionals. EMR implementers and managers in developing countries are in urgent need of implementation models to design proper implementation strategies. In this study, the constructs and relationships depicted in the updated D&M model were found to be applicable to assess the success of EMR in low resource settings. Additionally, computer literacy was found to be a mediating factor in EMR use and user satisfaction of

  9. Identification and Fibrosis Staging of Hepatitis C Patients Using the Electronic Medical Record System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Vijay; Hyun, Christian; Khan, Qasim M; Hall, Curtis; Hessefort, Norbert; Sonnenberg, Amnon; Fimmel, Claus J

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to noninvasively assess the severity of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) in large patient populations. It would be helpful if fibrosis scores could be calculated solely on the basis of data contained in the patients' electronic medical records (EMR). We performed a pilot study to identify all HCV-infected patients in a large health care system, and predict their fibrosis stage on the basis of demographic and laboratory data using common data from their EMR. HCV-infected patients were identified using the EMR. The liver biopsies of 191 HCV patients were graded using the Ishak and Metavir scoring systems. Demographic and laboratory data were extracted from the EMR and used to calculate the aminotransferase to platelet ratio index, Fib-4, Fibrosis Index, Forns, Göteborg University Cirrhosis Index, Lok Index, and Vira-HepC. In total, 869 HCV-infected patients were identified from a population of over 1 million. In the subgroup of patients with liver biopsies, all 7 algorithms were significantly correlated with the fibrosis stage. The degree of correlation was moderate, with correlation coefficients ranging from 0.22 to 0.60. For the detection of advanced fibrosis (Metavir 3 or 4), the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve ranged from 0.71 to 0.84, with no significant differences between the individual scores. Sensitivities, specificities, and positive and negative predictive values were within the previously reported range. All scores tended to perform better for higher fibrosis stages. Our study demonstrates that HCV-infected patients can be identified and their fibrosis staged using commonly available EMR-based algorithms.

  10. Case Mix Management Systems: An Opportunity to Integrate Medical Records and Financial Management System Data Bases

    OpenAIRE

    Rusnak, James E.

    1987-01-01

    Due to previous systems selections, many hospitals (health care facilities) are faced with the problem of fragmented data bases containing clinical, demographic and financial information. Projects to select and implement a Case Mix Management System (CMMS) provide an opportunity to reduce the number of separate physical files and to migrate towards systems with an integrated data base. The number of CMMS candidate systems is often restricted due to data base and system interface issues. The h...

  11. Case Mix Management Systems: An Opportunity to Integrate Medical Records and Financial Management System Data Bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusnak, James E.

    1987-01-01

    Due to previous systems selections, many hospitals (health care facilities) are faced with the problem of fragmented data bases containing clinical, demographic and financial information. Projects to select and implement a Case Mix Management System (CMMS) provide an opportunity to reduce the number of separate physical files and to migrate towards systems with an integrated data base. The number of CMMS candidate systems is often restricted due to data base and system interface issues. The hospital must insure the CMMS project provides a means to implement an integrated on-line hospital information data base for use by departments in operating under a DRG-based Prospective Payment System. This paper presents guidelines for use in selecting a Case Mix Mangement System to meet the hospital's financial and operations planning, budgeting, marketing, and other management needs, while considering the data base implications of the implementation.

  12. Acceptance and Usage of Electronic Health Record Systems in Small Medical Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannan, Ritu

    2012-01-01

    One of the objectives of the U.S. government has been the development of a nationwide health information infrastructure, including adoption and use of an electronic health records (EHR) system. However, a 2008 survey conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics indicated a 41.5% usage of the EHR system by physicians in office-based…

  13. Multimedia system for creation, transmission and consultation of medical examination records

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Rest, C.; Fortineau, J.; Bernier, M.; Guillo, P.; Cavarec, M.

    1997-01-01

    Achieving an urgency examination requires a rapid transmission of the results to the examiner. An efficient method of their communication could be achieved by producing a multimedia record consisting of images, comments and voiced utterances. We have retained for illustration the case of pulmonary scintigraphy in the diagnosis of pulmonary emboli. Following the acquisition the images are transferred to a PC (under Interfile format). These are displayed on the screen in association with anatomic schemes. In order to present all the elements important for interpretation, a series of tools was developed. Thus, to single out the anomalies the editor is provided with arrows to which verbal comments can be associated. Subsequently, he enters up its record. The interpreted examination is transferred to the examiner's PC via an ATM network. The consultant may then investigate the multimedia record by displaying images and comments and listening to the comments and conclusion of the isotope investigator. A prototype is already operational and its evaluation phase is to start. This stage refers to the quality of transmitted information. A quest among examiners will then allow to evaluate whether the examination reading out and the comprehension of the isotope investigators' conclusions are easier. The speed of transmission will be compared with the current routine (based on manuscript records) and its practical impact in case of urgency circumstances will be assessed. The technical facilities utilized by us allow an easy generalization of the approach to other image-based medical examinations performed in case of urgency

  14. An Efficient Searchable Encryption Against Keyword Guessing Attacks for Sharable Electronic Medical Records in Cloud-based System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yilun; Lu, Xicheng; Su, Jinshu; Chen, Peixin

    2016-12-01

    Preserving the privacy of electronic medical records (EMRs) is extremely important especially when medical systems adopt cloud services to store patients' electronic medical records. Considering both the privacy and the utilization of EMRs, some medical systems apply searchable encryption to encrypt EMRs and enable authorized users to search over these encrypted records. Since individuals would like to share their EMRs with multiple persons, how to design an efficient searchable encryption for sharable EMRs is still a very challenge work. In this paper, we propose a cost-efficient secure channel free searchable encryption (SCF-PEKS) scheme for sharable EMRs. Comparing with existing SCF-PEKS solutions, our scheme reduces the storage overhead and achieves better computation performance. Moreover, our scheme can guard against keyword guessing attack, which is neglected by most of the existing schemes. Finally, we implement both our scheme and a latest medical-based scheme to evaluate the performance. The evaluation results show that our scheme performs much better performance than the latest one for sharable EMRs.

  15. [Cooperation with the electronic medical record and accounting system of an actual dose of drug given by a radiology information system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hideo; Yoneda, Tarou; Satou, Shuji; Ishikawa, Toru; Hara, Misako

    2009-12-20

    By input of the actual dose of a drug given into a radiology information system, the system converting with an accounting system into a cost of the drug from the actual dose in the electronic medical record was built. In the drug master, the first unit was set as the cost of the drug, and we set the second unit as the actual dose. The second unit in the radiology information system was received by the accounting system through electronic medical record. In the accounting system, the actual dose was changed into the cost of the drug using the dose of conversion to the first unit. The actual dose was recorded on a radiology information system and electronic medical record. The actual dose was indicated on the accounting system, and the cost for the drug was calculated. About the actual dose of drug, cooperation of the information in a radiology information system and electronic medical record were completed. It was possible to decide the volume of drug from the correct dose of drug at the previous inspection. If it is necessary for the patient to have another treatment of medicine, it is important to know the actual dose of drug given. Moreover, authenticity of electronic medical record based on a statute has also improved.

  16. Leading change: introducing an electronic medical record system to a paramedic service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Shawn; Boak, George

    2016-05-03

    Purpose Leaders in health-care organizations introducing electronic medical records (EMRs) face implementation challenges. The adoption of EMR by the emergency medical and ambulance setting is expected to provide wide-ranging benefits, but there is little research into the processes of adoption in this sector. The purpose of this study is to examine the introduction of EMR in a small emergency care organization and identify factors that aided adoption. Design/methodology/approach Semi-structured interviews with selected paramedics were followed up with a survey issued to all paramedics in the company. Findings The user interfaces with the EMR, and perceived ease of use, were important factors affecting adoption. Individual paramedics were found to have strong and varied preferences about how and when they integrated the EMR into their practice. As company leadership introduced flexibility of use, this enhanced both individual and collective ability to make sense of the change and removed barriers to acceptance. Research limitations/implications This is a case study of one small organization. However, there may be useful lessons for other emergency care organizations adopting EMR. Practical implications Leaders introducing EMR in similar situations may benefit from considering a sense-making perspective and responding promptly to feedback. Originality/value The study contributes to a wider understanding of issues faced by leaders who seek to implement EMRs in emergency medical services, a sector in which there has been to date very little research on this issue.

  17. Evaluating a Serious Gaming Electronic Medication Administration Record System Among Nursing Students: Protocol for a Pragmatic Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Richard; Sinclair, Barbara; McMurray, Josephine; Strudwick, Gillian; Watson, Gavan; Ladak, Hanif; Zwarenstein, Merrick; McBride, Susan; Chan, Ryan; Brennan, Laura

    2018-05-28

    Although electronic medication administration record systems have been implemented in settings where nurses work, nursing students commonly lack robust learning opportunities to practice the skills and workflow of digitalized medication administration during their formative education. As a result, nursing students' performance in administering medication facilitated by technology is often poor. Serious gaming has been recommended as a possible intervention to improve nursing students' performance with electronic medication administration in nursing education. The objectives of this study are to examine whether the use of a gamified electronic medication administration simulator (1) improves nursing students' attention to medication administration safety within simulated practice, (2) increases student self-efficacy and knowledge of the medication administration process, and (3) improves motivational and cognitive processing attributes related to student learning in a technology-enabled environment. This study comprised the development of a gamified electronic medication administration record simulator and its evaluation in 2 phases. Phase 1 consists of a prospective, pragmatic randomized controlled trial with second-year baccalaureate nursing students at a Canadian university. Phase 2 consists of qualitative focus group interviews with a cross-section of nursing student participants. The gamified medication administration simulator has been developed, and data collection is currently under way. If the gamified electronic medication administration simulator is found to be effective, it could be used to support other health professional simulated education and scaled more widely in nursing education programs. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03219151; https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT03219151 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6yjBROoDt). RR1-10.2196/9601. ©Richard Booth, Barbara Sinclair, Josephine McMurray, Gillian Strudwick, Gavan Watson, Hanif Ladak

  18. Overcoming barriers to electronic medical record (EMR) implementation in the US healthcare system: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sameer; Aldrich, Krista

    2010-12-01

    An EMR system implementation would significantly reduce clinician workload and medical errors while saving the US healthcare system major expense. Yet, compared to other developed nations, the US lags behind. This article examines EMR system efforts, benefits, and barriers, as well as steps needed to move the US closer to a nationwide EMR system. The analysis includes a blueprint for implementation of EMR, industry comparisons to highlight the differences between successful and non-successful EMR ventures, references to costs and benefit information, and identification of root causes. 'Poka-yokes' (avoid (yokeru) mistakes (poka)) will be inserted to provide insight into how to systematically overcome challenges. Implementation will require upfront costs including patient privacy that must be addressed early in the development process. Government structure, incentives and mandates are required for nationwide EMR system in the US.

  19. Medical records and issues in negligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available It is very important for the treating doctor to properly document the management of a patient under his care. Medical record keeping has evolved into a science of itself. This will be the only way for the doctor to prove that the treatment was carried out properly. Moreover, it will also be of immense help in the scientific evaluation and review of patient management issues. Medical records form an important part of the management of a patient. It is important for the doctors and medical establishments to properly maintain the records of patients for two important reasons. The first one is that it will help them in the scientific evaluation of their patient profile, helping in analyzing the treatment results, and to plan treatment protocols. It also helps in planning governmental strategies for future medical care. But of equal importance in the present setting is in the issue of alleged medical negligence. The legal system relies mainly on documentary evidence in a situation where medical negligence is alleged by the patient or the relatives. In an accusation of negligence, this is very often the most important evidence deciding on the sentencing or acquittal of the doctor. With the increasing use of medical insurance for treatment, the insurance companies also require proper record keeping to prove the patient′s demand for medical expenses. Improper record keeping can result in declining medical claims. It is disheartening to note that inspite of knowing the importance of proper record keeping it is still in a nascent stage in India. It is wise to remember that "Poor records mean poor defense, no records mean no defense". Medical records include a variety of documentation of patient′s history, clinical findings, diagnostic test results, preoperative care, operation notes, post operative care, and daily notes of a patient′s progress and medications. A properly obtained consent will go a long way in proving that the procedures were

  20. Electronic medical record systems in critical access hospitals: leadership perspectives on anticipated and realized benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Troy R; Vavroch, Jared; Bahensky, James A; Ward, Marcia M

    2010-04-01

    The growth of electronic medical records (EMRs) is driven by the belief that EMRs will significantly improve healthcare providers' performance and reduce healthcare costs. Evidence supporting these beliefs is limited, especially for small rural hospitals. A survey that focused on health information technology (HIT) capacity was administered to all hospitals in Iowa. Structured interviews were conducted with the leadership at 15 critical access hospitals (CAHs) that had implemented EMRs in order to assess the perceived benefits of operational EMRs. The results indicate that most of the hospitals implemented EMRs to improve efficiency, timely access, and quality. Many CAH leaders also viewed EMR implementation as a necessary business strategy to remain viable and improve financial performance. While some reasons reflect external influences, such as perceived future federal mandates, other reasons suggest that the decision was driven by internal forces, including the hospital's culture and the desires of key leaders to embrace HIT. Anticipated benefits were consistent with goals; however, realized benefits were rarely obvious in terms of quantifiable results. These findings expand the limited research on the rationale for implementing EMRs in critical access hospitals.

  1. Development, implementation, and evaluation of a hybrid electronic medical record system specifically designed for a developing world surgical service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, G L; Bruce, J L; Skinner, D L; Allorto, N L; Clarke, D L; Aldous, C

    2014-06-01

    The Pietermaritzburg Metropolitan Trauma Service previously successfully constructed and implemented an electronic surgical registry (ESR). This study reports on our attempts to expand and develop this concept into a multi-functional hybrid electronic medical record (HEMR) system for use in a tertiary level surgical service. This HEMR system was designed to incorporate the function and benefits of an ESR, an electronic medical record (EMR) system, and a clinical decision support system (CDSS). Formal ethical approval to maintain the HEMR system was obtained. Appropriate software was sourced to develop the project. The data model was designed as a relational database. Following the design and construction process, the HEMR file was launched on a secure server. This provided the benefits of access security and automated backups. A systematic training program was implemented for client training. The exercise of data capture was integrated into the process of clinical workflow, taking place at multiple points in time. Data were captured at the times of admission, operative intervention, endoscopic intervention, adverse events (morbidity), and the end of patient care (discharge, transfer, or death). A quarterly audit was performed 3 months after implementation of the HEMR system. The data were extracted and audited to assess their quality. A total of 1,114 patient entries were captured in the system. Compliance rates were in the order of 87-100 %, and client satisfaction rates were high. It is possible to construct and implement a unique, simple, cost-effective HEMR system in a developing world surgical service. This information system is unique in that it combines the discrete functions of an EMR system with an ESR and a CDSS. We identified a number of potential limitations and developed interventions to ameliorate them. This HEMR system provides the necessary platform for ongoing quality improvement programs and clinical research.

  2. Scale-up of networked HIV treatment in Nigeria: creation of an integrated electronic medical records system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaplin, Beth; Meloni, Seema; Eisen, Geoffrey; Jolayemi, Toyin; Banigbe, Bolanle; Adeola, Juliette; Wen, Craig; Reyes Nieva, Harry; Chang, Charlotte; Okonkwo, Prosper; Kanki, Phyllis

    2015-01-01

    The implementation of PEPFAR programs in resource-limited settings was accompanied by the need to document patient care on a scale unprecedented in environments where paper-based records were the norm. We describe the development of an electronic medical records system (EMRS) put in place at the beginning of a large HIV/AIDS care and treatment program in Nigeria. Databases were created to record laboratory results, medications prescribed and dispensed, and clinical assessments, using a relational database program. A collection of stand-alone files recorded different elements of patient care, linked together by utilities that aggregated data on national standard indicators and assessed patient care for quality improvement, tracked patients requiring follow-up, generated counts of ART regimens dispensed, and provided 'snapshots' of a patient's response to treatment. A secure server was used to store patient files for backup and transfer. By February 2012, when the program transitioned to local in-country management by APIN, the EMRS was used in 33 hospitals across the country, with 4,947,433 adult, pediatric and PMTCT records that had been created and continued to be available for use in patient care. Ongoing trainings for data managers, along with an iterative process of implementing changes to the databases and forms based on user feedback, were needed. As the program scaled up and the volume of laboratory tests increased, results were produced in a digital format, wherever possible, that could be automatically transferred to the EMRS. Many larger clinics began to link some or all of the databases to local area networks, making them available to a larger group of staff members, or providing the ability to enter information simultaneously where needed. The EMRS improved patient care, enabled efficient reporting to the Government of Nigeria and to U.S. funding agencies, and allowed program managers and staff to conduct quality control audits. Copyright © 2014

  3. Development of prostate cancer research database with the clinical data warehouse technology for direct linkage with electronic medical record system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, In Young; Park, Seungho; Park, Bumjoon; Chung, Byung Ha; Kim, Choung-Soo; Lee, Hyun Moo; Byun, Seok-Soo; Lee, Ji Youl

    2013-01-01

    In spite of increased prostate cancer patients, little is known about the impact of treatments for prostate cancer patients and outcome of different treatments based on nationwide data. In order to obtain more comprehensive information for Korean prostate cancer patients, many professionals urged to have national system to monitor the quality of prostate cancer care. To gain its objective, the prostate cancer database system was planned and cautiously accommodated different views from various professions. This prostate cancer research database system incorporates information about a prostate cancer research including demographics, medical history, operation information, laboratory, and quality of life surveys. And, this system includes three different ways of clinical data collection to produce a comprehensive data base; direct data extraction from electronic medical record (EMR) system, manual data entry after linking EMR documents like magnetic resonance imaging findings and paper-based data collection for survey from patients. We implemented clinical data warehouse technology to test direct EMR link method with St. Mary's Hospital system. Using this method, total number of eligible patients were 2,300 from 1997 until 2012. Among them, 538 patients conducted surgery and others have different treatments. Our database system could provide the infrastructure for collecting error free data to support various retrospective and prospective studies.

  4. Implementation of Indigenous Electronic Medical Record System to Facilitate Care of Sickle Cell Disease Patients in Chhattisgarh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choubey, Mona; Mishra, Hrishikesh; Soni, Khushboo; Patra, Pradeep Kumar

    2016-02-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is prevalent in central India including Chhattisgarh. Screening for SCD is being carried out by Government of Chhattisgarh. Electronic Medical Record (EMR) system was developed and implemented in two phases. Aim was to use informatics techniques and indigenously develop EMR system to improve the care of SCD patients in Chhattisgarh. EMR systems had to be developed to store and manage: i) huge data generated through state wide screening for SCD; ii) clinical data for SCD patients attending the outpatient department (OPD) of institute. 'State Wide Screening Data Interface' (SWSDI) was designed and implemented for storing and managing data generated through screening program. Further, 'Sickle Cell Patients Temporal Data Management System' (SCPTDMS) was developed and implemented for storing, managing and analysing sickle cell disease patients' data at OPD. Both systems were developed using VB.Net and MS SQL Server 2012. Till April 2015, SWSDI has data of 1294558 persons, out of which 121819 and 4087 persons are carriers and patients of sickle cell disease respectively. Similarly till June 2015, SCPTDMS has data of 3760 persons, of which 923 are sickle cell disease patients (SS) and 1355 are sickle cell carriers (AS). Both systems are proving to be useful in efficient storage, management and analysis of data for clinical and research purposes. The systems are an example of beneficial usage of medical informatics solutions for managing large data at community level.

  5. CLAIM (CLinical Accounting InforMation)--an XML-based data exchange standard for connecting electronic medical record systems to patient accounting systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jinqiu; Takada, Akira; Tanaka, Koji; Sato, Junzo; Suzuki, Muneou; Takahashi, Kiwamu; Daimon, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Toshiaki; Nakashima, Yusei; Araki, Kenji; Yoshihara, Hiroyuki

    2005-08-01

    With the evolving and diverse electronic medical record (EMR) systems, there appears to be an ever greater need to link EMR systems and patient accounting systems with a standardized data exchange format. To this end, the CLinical Accounting InforMation (CLAIM) data exchange standard was developed. CLAIM is subordinate to the Medical Markup Language (MML) standard, which allows the exchange of medical data among different medical institutions. CLAIM uses eXtensible Markup Language (XML) as a meta-language. The current version, 2.1, inherited the basic structure of MML 2.x and contains two modules including information related to registration, appointment, procedure and charging. CLAIM 2.1 was implemented successfully in Japan in 2001. Consequently, it was confirmed that CLAIM could be used as an effective data exchange format between EMR systems and patient accounting systems.

  6. [Introduction of computerized anesthesia-recording systems and construction of comprehensive medical information network for patients undergoing surgery in the University of Tokyo Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Takayuki; Hoshimoto, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Yoshitsugu

    2009-10-01

    The computerized anesthesia-recording systems are expensive and the introduction of the systems takes time and requires huge effort. Generally speaking, the efficacy of the computerized anesthesia-recording systems on the anesthetic managements is focused on the ability to automatically input data from the monitors to the anesthetic records, and tends to be underestimated. However, once the computerized anesthesia-recording systems are integrated into the medical information network, several features, which definitely contribute to improve the quality of the anesthetic management, can be developed; for example, to prevent misidentification of patients, to prevent mistakes related to blood transfusion, and to protect patients' personal information. Here we describe our experiences of the introduction of the computerized anesthesia-recording systems and the construction of the comprehensive medical information network for patients undergoing surgery in The University of Tokyo Hospital. We also discuss possible efficacy of the comprehensive medical information network for patients during surgery under anesthetic managements.

  7. 77 FR 65564 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-29

    ... Medical, Health and Billing Records system is the authoritative source of patients' IHS medical records... authoritative records, nor are they considered part of the IHS Medical, Health and Billing Records system of...

  8. Evaluation of a Pilot Asthma Care Program for Electronic Communication between School Health and a Healthcare System's Electronic Medical Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Kelly W; Taylor, Yhenneko; Tapp, Hazel; Ludden, Thomas; Shade, Lindsay E; Burton, Beth; Courtlandt, Cheryl; Dulin, Michael

    2016-10-19

    Asthma is a common childhood chronic lung disease affecting greater than 10% of children in the United States. School nurses are in a unique position to close gaps in care. Indeed, effective asthma management is more likely to result when providers, family, and schools work together to optimize the patient's treatment plan. Currently, effective communication between schools and healthcare systems through electronic medical record (EMR) systems remains a challenge. The goal of this feasibility pilot was to link the school-based care team with primary care providers in the healthcare system network via electronic communication through the EMR, on behalf of pediatric asthma patients who had been hospitalized for an asthma exacerbation. The implementation process and the potential impact of the communication with providers on the reoccurrence of asthma exacerbations with the linked patients were evaluated. By engaging stakeholders from the school system and the healthcare system, we were able to collaboratively design a communication process and implement a pilot which demonstrated the feasibility of electronic communication between school nurses and primary care providers. Outcomes data was collected from the electronic medical record to examine the frequency of asthma exacerbations among patients with a message from their school nurse. The percent of exacerbations in the 12 months before and after electronic communication was compared using McNemar's test. The pilot system successfully established communication between the school nurse and primary care provider for 33 students who had been hospitalized for asthma and a decrease in hospital admissions was observed with students whose school nurse communicated through the EMR with the primary care provider. Findings suggest a collaborative model of care that is enhanced through electronic communication via the EMR could positively impact the health of children with asthma or other chronic illnesses.

  9. Technical Executive Summary in Support of "Can Electronic Medical Record Systems Transform Healthcare?" and "Promoting Health Information Technology"

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bigelow, James H; Fonkych, Kateryna; Girosi, Federico

    2005-01-01

    .... The three sections of this paper summarize these documents in the order listed. Report no. 1 estimates the degree to which hospitals and physician practices have adopted electronic medical records (EMRs...

  10. Minimally disruptive medicine is needed for patients with multimorbidity: time to develop computerised medical record systems to meet this requirement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Schattner

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Minimally disruptive medicine (MDM is proposed as a method for more appropriately managing people with multiple chronic disease. Much clinical management is currently single disease focussed, with people with multimorbidity being managed according to multiple single disease guidelines. Current initiatives to improve care include education about individual conditions and creating an environment where multiple guidelines might be simultaneously supported. The patientcentred medical home (PCMH is an example of the latter. However, educational programmes and PCMH may increase the burden on patients.Problem The cumulative workload for patients in managing the impact of multiple disease-specific guidelines is only relatively recently recognised. There is an intellectual vacuum as to how best to manage multimorbidity and how informatics might support implementing MDM. There is currently no alternative to multiple singlecondition- specific guidelines and a lack of certainty, should the treatment burden need to be reduced, as to which guideline might be ‘dropped’.Action The best information about multimorbidity is recorded in primary care computerised medical record (CMR systems and in an increasing number of integrated care organisations. CMR systems have the potential to flag individuals who might be in greatest need. However, CMR systems may also provide insights into whether there are ameliorating factors that might make it easier for them to be resilient to the burden of care. Data from such CMR systems might be used to develop the evidence base about how to better manage multimorbidity.Conclusions There is potential for these information systems to help reduce the management burden on patients and clinicians. However, substantial investment in research-driven CMR development is needed if we are to achieve this.

  11. A conceptual data model for a primary health care patient-centric electronic medical record system

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kotzé, P

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available regarding continuity of care, typical healthcare protocols, a study of public healthcare district hospital information systems and both public and private primary healthcare information systems....

  12. Collaborative Affordances of Medical Records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind; Houben, Steven

    2017-01-01

    by Sellen and Harper (2003) on the affordances of physical paper. Sellen and Harper describe how the physical properties of paper affords easy reading, navigation, mark-up, and writing, but focuses, we argue, mainly on individual use of paper and digital technology. As an extension to this, Collaborative...... Affordances; being portable across patient wards and the entire hospital, by providing collocated access, by providing a shared overview of medical data, and by giving clinicians ways to maintain mutual awareness. We then discuss how the concept of Collaborative Affordances can be used in the design of new...... technology by providing a design study of a ‘Hybrid Patient Record’ (HyPR), which is designed to seamlessly blend and integrate paper-based with electronic patient records....

  13. Evaluating hospital information systems from the point of view of the medical records section users in Medical-Educational Hospitals of Kermanshah 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, S; Sarmad, A; Mohammadi, M; Cheleie, M; Amiri, S; Zardoei Golanbary, S H

    2015-01-01

    Evaluating hospital information systems leads to the improvement and devotion based on the users' needs, especially the medical records section users in hospitals, which are in contact with this system from the moment the patient enters the hospital until his/ her release and after that. The present research aimed to evaluate the hospital information systems from the point of view of the medical record section employees. Materials and method : The current research was applicative-descriptive analytical and the research society included 70 users of the medical history section in the educational-medical centers of Kermanshah city. The data-gathering tool was the 10th part of 9241/ 10 Isometric standard questionnaire of evaluating hospital information systems, with 75 specific questions in 7 bases, with the five spectra Likertt scale, its conceptual admissibility being confirmed in previous researches. 22 SPSS statistical software analyzed its permanency in the present study, which was also confirmed by Cronbach's's alpha test, which equaled to 0.89, and the data. Findings : The highest level of the employees' satisfaction, based on gained scores median, was respectively the incompatibility with the users' expectations, measuring 3.55, self-description measuring 3.54 and controllability - 3.51, which in total presented the average scores of 3.39, the lowest level of satisfaction being related to useful learning , whose value was 3.19. Discussion and conclusion : Hospital information systems' users believe that it is more desirable that the existing systems are based on the measures and consider them proper for making them non-governmental and useful for undesired learning. Considering the long distance of the existing information systems with the desired performance, it is essential that "these systems pay more attention to a more complete and deeper recognition and awareness of users' opinions and requirements in their road. The movement and development is to

  14. Tolerability of central nervous system symptoms among HIV-1 infected efavirenz users: analysis of patient electronic medical record data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblatt, Lisa; Broder, Michael S; Bentley, Tanya G K; Chang, Eunice; Reddy, Sheila R; Papoyan, Elya; Myers, Joel

    2017-08-01

    Efavirenz (EFV) is a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor indicated for treatment of HIV-1 infection. Despite concern over EFV tolerability in clinical trials and practice, particularly related to central nervous system (CNS) adverse events, some observational studies have shown high rates of EFV continuation at one year and low rates of CNS-related EFV substitution. The objective of this study was to further examine the real-world rate of CNS-related EFV discontinuation in antiretroviral therapy naïve HIV-1 patients. This retrospective cohort study used a nationally representative electronic medical records database to identify HIV-1 patients ≥12 years old, treated with a 1st-line EFV-based regimen (single or combination antiretroviral tablet) from 1 January 2009 to 30 June 2013. Patients without prior record of EFV use during 6-month baseline (i.e., antiretroviral therapy naïve) were followed 12 months post-medication initiation. CNS-related EFV discontinuation was defined as evidence of a switch to a replacement antiretroviral coupled with record of a CNS symptom within 30 days prior, absent lab evidence of virologic failure. We identified 1742 1st-line EFV patients. Mean age was 48 years, 22.7% were female, and 8.1% had a prior report of CNS symptoms. The first year, overall discontinuation rate among new users of EFV was 16.2%. Ten percent of patients (n = 174) reported a CNS symptom and 1.1% (n = 19) discontinued EFV due to CNS symptoms: insomnia (n = 12), headache (n = 5), impaired concentration (n = 1), and somnolence (n = 1). The frequency of CNS symptoms was similar for patients who discontinued EFV compared to those who did not (10.3 vs. 9.9%; P = .86). Our study found that EFV discontinuation due to CNS symptoms was low, consistent with prior reports.

  15. A brief survey on problems and countermeasures of electronic medical record system in basic hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    You-bo JIA; Nan LI

    2014-01-01

    The paper, which took Yanggu People’s hospital’s EPR system in the information construction as a case,analyzed domestic EPR system’s current situation, summarized the problems of the EPR system in its implementation process, and some changes to our hospitals it brought.

  16. Ontology-Based Data Integration of Open Source Electronic Medical Record and Data Capture Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidry, Alicia F.

    2013-01-01

    In low-resource settings, the prioritization of clinical care funding is often determined by immediate health priorities. As a result, investment directed towards the development of standards for clinical data representation and exchange are rare and accordingly, data management systems are often redundant. Open-source systems such as OpenMRS and…

  17. Chief Information Officer's Role in Adopting an Interoperable Electronic Health Record System for Medical Data Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpabio, Akpabio Enebong Ema

    2013-01-01

    Despite huge growth in hospital technology systems, there remains a dearth of literature examining health care administrator's perceptions of the efficacy of interoperable EHR systems. A qualitative research methodology was used in this multiple-case study to investigate the application of diffusion of innovations theory and the technology…

  18. [Nurse's coworking to electronic medical record].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maresca, M; Gavaciuto, D; Cappelli, G

    2007-01-01

    Nephrologists need to register and look at a great number of clinical data. The use of electronic medical records may improve efficiency and reduce errors. Aim of our work is to report the experience of Villa Scassi Hospital in Genoa, where a "patient file" has been performed to improve nephrology practice management. The file contains all clinical records, laboratory and radiology data, therapy, dialysis clinics, in addition to reports of out-patients department. This system allowed a better efficiency in diagnosis and treatment of the patient. Moreover experience of nurses in employing electronic medical records is reported. A reduced number of errors was found in therapy administering, because of a only one data source for physicians and nurses.

  19.  Satisfaction and Perceived Quality of an Electronic Medical Record System in a Tertiary Hospital in Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuradha Ganesh

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available  Objective: To evaluate the knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP of physicians towards the Electronic Medical Record (EMR system.Methods: A cross-sectional survey including physicians from various clinical specialties was conducted. An existing questionnaire was adapted to assess the KAP of physicians towards the EMR system. Information was analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS software.Results: Out of 200 distributed questionnaires, 141 (70.5�20responses were received. Overall, only 22 physicians (15.6�20rated the current EMR system as an effective tool. A substantial proportion (29.4�20of respondents considered EMR not worth the time and effort required to use it. The majority (67.4�20reported increasing difficulty with the performance of work after applying the EMR system. The overall quality of work was perceived not to have changed (41.2�0of the respondents or declined (27.4�0of the respondents. The low satisfaction and underperformance was found to be associated with younger age (p=0.032, junior designation (p=0.041, and low familiarity with computers (p=0.047.Conclusion: We report low satisfaction and perceived quality of work among physicians in our institution with the current EMR system. Inappropriate and inadequate usage of the system was found to be the main cause of the underlying poor satisfaction.

  20. Preferred names, preferred pronouns, and gender identity in the electronic medical record and laboratory information system: Is pathology ready?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine L Imborek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Electronic medical records (EMRs and laboratory information systems (LISs commonly utilize patient identifiers such as legal name, sex, medical record number, and date of birth. There have been recommendations from some EMR working groups (e.g., the World Professional Association for Transgender Health to include preferred name, pronoun preference, assigned sex at birth, and gender identity in the EMR. These practices are currently uncommon in the United States. There has been little published on the potential impact of these changes on pathology and LISs. Methods: We review the available literature and guidelines on the use of preferred name and gender identity on pathology, including data on changes in laboratory testing following gender transition treatments. We also describe pathology and clinical laboratory challenges in the implementation of preferred name at our institution. Results: Preferred name, pronoun preference, and gender identity have the most immediate impact on the areas of pathology with direct patient contact such as phlebotomy and transfusion medicine, both in terms of interaction with patients and policies for patient identification. Gender identity affects the regulation and policies within transfusion medicine including blood donor risk assessment and eligibility. There are limited studies on the impact of gender transition treatments on laboratory tests, but multiple studies have demonstrated complex changes in chemistry and hematology tests. A broader challenge is that, even as EMRs add functionality, pathology computer systems (e.g., LIS, middleware, reference laboratory, and outreach interfaces may not have functionality to store or display preferred name and gender identity. Conclusions: Implementation of preferred name, pronoun preference, and gender identity presents multiple challenges and opportunities for pathology.

  1. A Primer on Endoscopic Electronic Medical Records

    OpenAIRE

    Atreja, Ashish; Rizk, Maged; Gurland, Brooke

    2010-01-01

    Endoscopic electronic medical record systems (EEMRs) are now increasingly utilized in many endoscopy centers. Modern EEMRs not only support endoscopy report generation, but often include features such as practice management tools, image and video clip management, inventory management, e-faxes to referring physicians, and database support to measure quality and patient outcomes. There are many existing software vendors offering EEMRs, and choosing a software vendor can be time consuming and co...

  2. Privacy Impact Assessment for the Wellness Program Medical Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Wellness Program Medical Records System collects contact information and other Personally Identifiable Information (PII). Learn how this data is collected, used, accessed, the purpose of data collection, and record retention policies.

  3. Medical Practitioners Act 2007: the increased medical record burden.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Byrne, D

    2010-03-01

    New medical record keeping obligations are implemented by the Medical Practitioners Act (2007), effective July 2009. This audit, comprising review of 347 medical entries in 257 charts on one day, investigated compliance with the Act together with the general standard of medical record keeping. The Medical Council requirement was absent all but 3 (0.9%) of entries; there was no unique identifier or signature in 28 (8%) and 135 (39%) of entries respectively. The case for change is discussed.

  4. Comprehensive evaluation of electronic medical record system use and user satisfaction at five low-resource setting hospitals in ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilahun, Binyam; Fritz, Fleur

    2015-05-25

    Electronic medical record (EMR) systems are increasingly being implemented in hospitals of developing countries to improve patient care and clinical service. However, only limited evaluation studies are available concerning the level of adoption and determinant factors of success in those settings. The objective of this study was to assess the usage pattern, user satisfaction level, and determinants of health professional's satisfaction towards a comprehensive EMR system implemented in Ethiopia where parallel documentation using the EMR and the paper-based medical records is in practice. A quantitative, cross-sectional study design was used to assess the usage pattern, user satisfaction level, and determinant factors of an EMR system implemented in Ethiopia based on the DeLone and McLean model of information system success. Descriptive statistical methods were applied to analyze the data and a binary logistic regression model was used to identify determinant factors. Health professionals (N=422) from five hospitals were approached and 406 responded to the survey (96.2% response rate). Out of the respondents, 76.1% (309/406) started to use the system immediately after implementation and user training, but only 31.7% (98/309) of the professionals reported using the EMR during the study (after 3 years of implementation). Of the 12 core EMR functions, 3 were never used by most respondents, and they were also unaware of 4 of the core EMR functions. It was found that 61.4% (190/309) of the health professionals reported over all dissatisfaction with the EMR (median=4, interquartile range (IQR)=1) on a 5-level Likert scale. Physicians were more dissatisfied (median=5, IQR=1) when compared to nurses (median=4, IQR=1) and the health management information system (HMIS) staff (median=2, IQR=1). Of all the participants, 64.4% (199/309) believed that the EMR had no positive impact on the quality of care. The participants indicated an agreement with the system and information

  5. Medical record search engines, using pseudonymised patient identity: an alternative to centralised medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quantin, Catherine; Jaquet-Chiffelle, David-Olivier; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Benzenine, Eric; Allaert, François-André

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of our multidisciplinary study was to define a pragmatic and secure alternative to the creation of a national centralised medical record which could gather together the different parts of the medical record of a patient scattered in the different hospitals where he was hospitalised without any risk of breaching confidentiality. We first analyse the reasons for the failure and the dangers of centralisation (i.e. difficulty to define a European patients' identifier, to reach a common standard for the contents of the medical record, for data protection) and then propose an alternative that uses the existing available data on the basis that setting up a safe though imperfect system could be better than continuing a quest for a mythical perfect information system that we have still not found after a search that has lasted two decades. We describe the functioning of Medical Record Search Engines (MRSEs), using pseudonymisation of patients' identity. The MRSE will be able to retrieve and to provide upon an MD's request all the available information concerning a patient who has been hospitalised in different hospitals without ever having access to the patient's identity. The drawback of this system is that the medical practitioner then has to read all of the information and to create his own synthesis and eventually to reject extra data. Faced with the difficulties and the risks of setting up a centralised medical record system, a system that gathers all of the available information concerning a patient could be of great interest. This low-cost pragmatic alternative which could be developed quickly should be taken into consideration by health authorities. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. AVAILABILITY, ACCESSIBILITY, PRIVACY AND SAFETY ISSUES FACING ELECTRONIC MEDICAL RECORDS

    OpenAIRE

    Nisreen Innab

    2018-01-01

    Patient information recorded in electronic medical records is the most significant set of information of the healthcare system. It assists healthcare providers to introduce high quality care for patients. The aim of this study identifies the security threats associated with electronic medical records and gives recommendations to keep them more secured. The study applied the qualitative research method through a case study. The study conducted seven interviews with medical staff and informatio...

  7. Electronic medical records in dermatology: Practical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaliyadan Feroze

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Electronic medical records (EMRs can be of great use in dermatological data recording. Unfortunately, not many studies have been carried out in this specific area. Aims: We attempt to evaluate the use of an EMR system in dermatology, comparing it with a conventional paper-based system. Methods: Two hundred patient records of patients attending the dermatology outpatient department were studied over a 3-month period. Half the reports were entered in the conventional paper-based format while the other half was entered in an EMR system. The time taken for each consultation was recorded and the same was carried out for the first subsequent follow-up visit. Results: The average time taken for the completion of the EMR-based consultation for new cases was 19.15 min (range, 10-30 min; standard deviation, 6.47. The paper-based consultation had an average time of 15.70 min (range, 5-25 min; standard deviation, 6.78. The P-value (T-test was used was 0.002, which was significant. The average time taken for consultations and entering progress notes in the follow-up cases was slightly less than 10 min (9.7 for EMR while it was slightly more than 10 min (10.3 for the paper format. The difference was not statistically significant. The doctors involved also mentioned what they felt were the advantages and disadvantages of the system along with suggestions for improvement. Conclusion: The use of an EMR system in dermatology (or for that matter in any specialty may overawe most users at the beginning, but once a comfort level is established, EMR is likely to outscore conventional paper recording systems. More time-motion-case studies are required to ascertain the optimal usage of EMR systems.

  8. Perspectives on electronic medical records adoption: electronic medical records (EMR in outcomes research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Belletti

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Dan Belletti1, Christopher Zacker1, C Daniel Mullins21Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, NJ, USA; 2University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Baltimore, MD, USAAbstract: Health information technology (HIT is engineered to promote improved quality and efficiency of care, and reduce medical errors. Healthcare organizations have made significant investments in HIT tools and the electronic medical record (EMR is a major technological advance. The Department of Veterans Affairs was one of the first large healthcare systems to fully implement EMR. The Veterans Health Information System and Technology Architecture (VistA began by providing an interface to review and update a patient’s medical record with its computerized patient record system. However, since the implementation of the VistA system there has not been an overall substantial adoption of EMR in the ambulatory or inpatient setting. In fact, only 23.9% of physicians were using EMRs in their office-based practices in 2005. A sample from the American Medical Association revealed that EMRs were available in an office setting to 17% of physicians in late 2007 and early 2008. Of these, 17% of physicians with EMR, only 4% were considered to be fully functional EMR systems. With the exception of some large aggregate EMR databases the slow adoption of EMR has limited its use in outcomes research. This paper reviews the literature and presents the current status of and forces influencing the adoption of EMR in the office-based practice, and identifies the benefits, limitations, and overall value of EMR in the conduct of outcomes research in the US.Keywords: electronic medical records, health information technology, medical errors

  9. [Computerized medical record: deontology and legislation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaert, F A; Dusserre, L

    1996-02-01

    Computerization of medical records is making headway for patients' follow-up, scientific research, and health expenses control, but it must not alter the guarantees provided to the patients by the medical code of ethics and the law of January 6, 1978. This law, modified on July 1, 1994, requires to register all computerized records of personal data and establishes rights to protect privacy against computer misdemeanor. All medical practitioners using computerized medical records must be aware that the infringement of this law may provoke suing in professional, civil or criminal court.

  10. Medical records and radiation exposure cards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigan, C.

    1975-01-01

    Some ideas concerning medical records at the Ispra Centre are exposed. The approved medical practitioner has two main tasks: he must gather enough relevant information to decide on the worker's suitability and also to determine his physical condition, normal or otherwise, and he must record it with enough detail to permit comparison with findings at later examinations. for the purposes of medical records, clinical examinations and complementary investigations, a large proportion of the measurements are of course made on the critical organs. The problems of the container or physical medium receiving the information to be recorded is considered. The possibilities offered by computer techniques are discussed

  11. A Natural Language Processing System That Links Medical Terms in Electronic Health Record Notes to Lay Definitions: System Development Using Physician Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinying; Druhl, Emily; Polepalli Ramesh, Balaji; Houston, Thomas K; Brandt, Cynthia A; Zulman, Donna M; Vimalananda, Varsha G; Malkani, Samir; Yu, Hong

    2018-01-22

    Many health care systems now allow patients to access their electronic health record (EHR) notes online through patient portals. Medical jargon in EHR notes can confuse patients, which may interfere with potential benefits of patient access to EHR notes. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate the usability and content quality of NoteAid, a Web-based natural language processing system that links medical terms in EHR notes to lay definitions, that is, definitions easily understood by lay people. NoteAid incorporates two core components: CoDeMed, a lexical resource of lay definitions for medical terms, and MedLink, a computational unit that links medical terms to lay definitions. We developed innovative computational methods, including an adapted distant supervision algorithm to prioritize medical terms important for EHR comprehension to facilitate the effort of building CoDeMed. Ten physician domain experts evaluated the user interface and content quality of NoteAid. The evaluation protocol included a cognitive walkthrough session and a postsession questionnaire. Physician feedback sessions were audio-recorded. We used standard content analysis methods to analyze qualitative data from these sessions. Physician feedback was mixed. Positive feedback on NoteAid included (1) Easy to use, (2) Good visual display, (3) Satisfactory system speed, and (4) Adequate lay definitions. Opportunities for improvement arising from evaluation sessions and feedback included (1) improving the display of definitions for partially matched terms, (2) including more medical terms in CoDeMed, (3) improving the handling of terms whose definitions vary depending on different contexts, and (4) standardizing the scope of definitions for medicines. On the basis of these results, we have improved NoteAid's user interface and a number of definitions, and added 4502 more definitions in CoDeMed. Physician evaluation yielded useful feedback for content validation and refinement of this

  12. Attitudes of pregnant women towards personally controlled electronic, hospital-held, and patient-held medical record systems: a survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlivan, Julie A; Lyons, Sarah; Petersen, Rodney W

    2014-09-01

    On July 1, 2012 the Australian Government launched the personally controlled electronic health record (PCEHR). This article surveys obstetric patients about their medical record preferences and identifies barriers to adoption of the PCEHR. A survey study was conducted of antenatal patients attending a large Australian metropolitan hospital. Consecutive patients completed questionnaires during the launch phase of the PCEHR system. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected on demographics, computer access and familiarity, preference for medical record system, and perceived benefits and concerns. Of 528 women eligible to participate, 474 completed the survey (89.8%). Respondents had high levels of home access to a computer (90.5%) and the Internet (87.1%) and were familiar with using computers in daily life (median Likert scale of 9 out of 10). Despite this, respondents preferred hospital-held paper records, and only one-third preferred a PCEHR; the remainder preferred patient-held records. Compared with hospital-held paper records, respondents felt a PCEHR would reduce the risk of lost records (padvantages and disadvantages with the PCEHR, although the majority still prefer existing record systems. To increase uptake, confidentiality, privacy, and control concerns need to be addressed.

  13. A primer on endoscopic electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atreja, Ashish; Rizk, Maged; Gurland, Brooke

    2010-02-01

    Endoscopic electronic medical record systems (EEMRs) are now increasingly utilized in many endoscopy centers. Modern EEMRs not only support endoscopy report generation, but often include features such as practice management tools, image and video clip management, inventory management, e-faxes to referring physicians, and database support to measure quality and patient outcomes. There are many existing software vendors offering EEMRs, and choosing a software vendor can be time consuming and confusing. The goal of this article is inform the readers about current functionalities available in modern EEMR and provide them with a framework necessary to find an EEMR that is best fit for their practice.

  14. Electronic medical record systems are associated with appropriate placement of HIV patients on antiretroviral therapy in rural health facilities in Kenya: a retrospective pre-post study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oluoch, Tom; Katana, Abraham; Ssempijja, Victor; Kwaro, Daniel; Langat, Patrick; Kimanga, Davies; Okeyo, Nicky; Abu-Hanna, Ameen; de Keizer, Nicolette

    2014-01-01

    There is little evidence that electronic medical record (EMR) use is associated with better compliance with clinical guidelines on initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) among ART-eligible HIV patients. We assessed the effect of transitioning from paper-based to an EMR-based system on

  15. Implementation of a cloud-based electronic medical record exchange system in compliance with the integrating healthcare enterprise's cross-enterprise document sharing integration profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chien Hua; Chiu, Ruey Kei; Yeh, Hong Mo; Wang, Da Wei

    2017-11-01

    In 2011, the Ministry of Health and Welfare of Taiwan established the National Electronic Medical Record Exchange Center (EEC) to permit the sharing of medical resources among hospitals. This system can presently exchange electronic medical records (EMRs) among hospitals, in the form of medical imaging reports, laboratory test reports, discharge summaries, outpatient records, and outpatient medication records. Hospitals can send or retrieve EMRs over the virtual private network by connecting to the EEC through a gateway. International standards should be adopted in the EEC to allow users with those standards to take advantage of this exchange service. In this study, a cloud-based EMR-exchange prototyping system was implemented on the basis of the Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise's Cross-Enterprise Document Sharing integration profile and the existing EMR exchange system. RESTful services were used to implement the proposed prototyping system on the Microsoft Azure cloud-computing platform. Four scenarios were created in Microsoft Azure to determine the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed system. The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed system successfully completed EMR exchange under the four scenarios created in Microsoft Azure. Additional experiments were conducted to compare the efficiency of the EMR-exchanging mechanisms of the proposed system with those of the existing EEC system. The experimental results suggest that the proposed RESTful service approach is superior to the Simple Object Access Protocol method currently implemented in the EEC system, according to the irrespective response times under the four experimental scenarios. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Prevalence and healthcare costs of obesity-related comorbidities: evidence from an electronic medical records system in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Blume, Steven W; Huang, Joanna C; Hammer, Mette; Ganz, Michael L

    2015-01-01

    This study estimated the economic burden of obesity-related comorbidities (ORCs) in the US, at both the person and population levels. The Geisinger Health System provided electronic medical records and claims between January 2004 and May 2013 for a sample of 153,561 adults (50% males and 97% white). Adults with A total of 21 chronic conditions, with established association with obesity in the literature, were identified by diagnosis codes and/or lab test results. The total healthcare costs were measured in each year. The association between annual costs and ORCs was assessed by a regression, which jointly considered all the ORCs. The per-person incremental costs of a single comorbidity, without any of the other ORCs, were calculated. The population-level economic burden was the product of each ORC's incremental costs and the annual prevalence of the ORC among 100,000 individuals. The prevalence of ORCs was stratified by obesity status to estimate the economic burden among 100,000 individuals with obesity and among those without. This study identified 56,895 adults (mean age = 47 years; mean BMI = 29.6 kg/m(2)). The annual prevalence of ORCs ranged from 0.5% for pulmonary embolism (PE) to 41.8% for dyslipidemia. The per-person annual incremental costs of a single ORC ranged from $120 for angina to $1665 for PE. Hypertensive diseases (HTND), dyslipidemia, and osteoarthritis were the three most expensive ORCs at the population level; each responsible for ≥$18 million annually among 100,000 individuals. HTND and osteoarthritis were much more costly among individuals with obesity than those without obesity. Data were from a small geographic region. ORCs are associated with substantial economic burden, especially for those requiring continuous treatments.

  17. Electronic health records and online medical records: an asset or a liability under current conditions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen-Graham, Judith; Mitchell, Lauren; Heriot, Natalie; Armani, Roksana; Langton, David; Levinson, Michele; Young, Alan; Smith, Julian A; Kotsimbos, Tom; Wilson, John W

    2018-02-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to audit the current use of medical records to determine completeness and concordance with other sources of medical information. Methods Medical records for 40 patients from each of five Melbourne major metropolitan hospitals were randomly selected (n=200). A quantitative audit was performed for detailed patient information and medical record keeping, as well as data collection, storage and utilisation. Using each hospital's current online clinical database, scanned files and paperwork available for each patient audited, the reviewers sourced as much relevant information as possible within a 30-min time allocation from both the record and the discharge summary. Results Of all medical records audited, 82% contained medical and surgical history, allergy information and patient demographics. All audited discharge summaries lacked at least one of the following: demographics, medication allergies, medical and surgical history, medications and adverse drug event information. Only 49% of records audited showed evidence the discharge summary was sent outside the institution. Conclusions The quality of medical data captured and information management is variable across hospitals. It is recommended that medical history documentation guidelines and standardised discharge summaries be implemented in Australian healthcare services. What is known about this topic? Australia has a complex health system, the government has approved funding to develop a universal online electronic medical record system and is currently trialling this in an opt-out style in the Napean Blue Mountains (NSW) and in Northern Queensland. The system was originally named the personally controlled electronic health record but has since been changed to MyHealth Record (2016). In Victoria, there exists a wide range of electronic health records used to varying degrees, with some hospitals still relying on paper-based records and many using scanned medical records

  18. A review of randomized controlled trials of medical record powered clinical decision support system to improve quality of diabetes care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Syed Mustafa; Giordano, Richard; Lakhani, Saima; Walker, Dawn Marie

    2016-03-01

    A gap between current diabetes care practice and recommended diabetes care standards has consistently been reported in the literature. Many IT-based interventions have been developed to improve adherence to the quality of care standards for chronic illness like diabetes. The widespread implementation of electronic medical/health records has catalyzed clinical decision support systems (CDSS) which may improve the quality of diabetes care. Therefore, the objective of the review is to evaluate the effectiveness of CDSS in improving quality of type II diabetes care. Moreover, the review aims to highlight the key indicators of quality improvement to assist policy makers in development of future diabetes care policies through the integration of information technology and system. Setting inclusion criteria, a systematic literature search was conducted using Medline, Web of Science and Science Direct. Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP) tools were used to evaluate the quality of studies. Eight randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were selected for the review. In the selected studies, seventeen clinical markers of diabetes care were discussed. Three quality of care indicators were given more importance in monitoring the progress of diabetes care, which is consistent with National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines. The presence of these indicators in the studies helped to determine which studies were selected for review. Clinical- and process-related improvements are compared between intervention group using CDSS and control group with usual care. Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), low density lipid cholesterol (LDL-C) and blood pressure (BP) were the quality of care indicators studied at the levels of process of care and clinical outcome. The review has found both inconsistent and variable results for quality of diabetes care measures. A significant improvement has been found in the process of care for all three measures of quality of diabetes care

  19. Disturbance recording system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandra, A.K.; Deshpande, S.V.; Mayya, A.; Vaidya, U.W.; Premraj, M.K.; Patil, N.B.

    1994-01-01

    A computerized system for disturbance monitoring, recording and display has been developed for use in nuclear power plants and is versatile enough to be used where ever a large number of parameters need to be recorded, e.g. conventional power plants, chemical industry etc. The Disturbance Recording System (DRS) has been designed to continuously monitor a process plant and record crucial parameters. The DRS provides a centralized facility to monitor and continuously record 64 process parameters scanned every 1 sec for 5 days. The system also provides facility for storage of 64 parameters scanned every 200 msec during 2 minutes prior to and 3 minutes after a disturbance. In addition the system can initiate, on demand, the recording of 8 parameters at a fast rate of every 5 msec for a period of 5 sec. and thus act as a visicorder. All this data is recorded in non-volatile memory and can be displayed, printed/plotted and used for subsequent analysis. Since data can be stored densely on floppy disks, the volume of space required for archival storage is also low. As a disturbance recorder, the DRS allows the operator to view the state of the plant prior to occurrence of the disturbance and helps in identifying the root cause. (author). 10 refs., 7 figs

  20. Ethics of medical records and professional communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recupero, Patricia R

    2008-01-01

    In child and adolescent psychiatry, medical records and professional communications raise important ethical concerns for the treating or consulting clinician. Although a distinction may be drawn between internal records (eg, medical records and psychotherapy notes) and external communications (eg, consultation reports and correspondence with pediatricians), several ethical principles apply to both types of documentation; however, specific considerations may vary, depending upon the context in which the records or communications were produced. Special care is due with regard to thoroughness and honesty, collaboration and cooperation, autonomy and dignity of the patient, confidentiality of the patient and family members, maintaining objectivity and neutrality, electronic communications media, and professional activities (eg, political advocacy). This article reviews relevant ethical concerns for child and adolescent psychiatrists with respect to medical records and professional communications, drawing heavily from forensic and legal sources, and offers additional recommendations for further reading for clarification and direction on ethical dilemmas.

  1. Digital recording system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandra, A.K.; Deshpande, S.V.; Iyer, A.; Vaidya, U.W.

    1987-01-01

    A large number of critical process parameters in nuclear power plants have hitherto been monitored using electromechanical chart recorders. The reducing costs of electronics systems have led to a trend towards modernizing power plant control rooms by computerizing all the panel instrumentation. As a first step, it has been decided to develop a digital recording system to record the values of 48 process parameters. The system as developed and described in this report is more than a replacement for recorders; it offers substantial advantages in terms of lower overall system cost, excellent time resolution, accurate data and absolute synchronization for correlated signals. The system provides high speed recording of 48 process parameters, maintains historical records and permits retrieval and display of archival information on a colour monitor, a plotter and a printer. It is implemented using a front end data acquisition unit connected on a serial link to a PC-XT computer with 20 MB Winchester. The system offers an extremely user friendly man machine interaction, based on a hierarchical paged menu driven scheme. Softwre development for this system has been carried out using the C language. (author). 9 figs

  2. Introduction of an automated medical record at an HMO clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churgin, P G

    1994-01-01

    In May 1993, CIGNA Healthcare of Arizona implemented a comprehensive automated medical record system in a pilot project performed at a primary care clinic in Chandler, Arizona. The system, EpicCare, operates in a client-server environment and completely replaces the paper chart in all phases of medical care. After six months of use by 10 medical providers and a 50-member staff, the system has been approved by clinicians, staff, and patients.

  3. Analytic turnaround time study for integrated reporting of pathology results on electronic medical records using the Illuminate system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tawfik O

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Timely pathology results are critical for appropriate diagnosis and management of patients. Yet workflows in laboratories remain ad hoc and involve accessing multiple systems with no direct linkage between patient history and prior or pending pathology records for the case being analyzed. A major hindrance in timely reporting of pathology results is the need to incorporate/interface with multiple electronic health records (EHRs. We evaluated the Illuminate PatientView software (Illuminate integration into pathologist's workflow. Illuminate is a search engine architecture that has a repository of textual information from many hospital systems. Our goal was to develop a comprehensive, user friendly patient summary display to integrate the current fractionated subspecialty specific systems. An analytical time study noting changes in turnaround time (TAT before and after Illuminate implementation was recorded for reviewers, including pathologists, residents and fellows. Reviewers' TAT for 359 cases was recorded (200 cases before and 159 after implementation. The impact of implementing Illuminate on transcriptionists’ workflow was also studied. Average TAT to retrieve EHRs prior to Illuminate was 5:32 min (range 1:35-10:50. That time was significantly reduced to 35 seconds (range 10 sec-1:10 min using Illuminate. Reviewers were very pleased with the ease in accessing information and in eliminating the draft paper documents of the pathology reports, eliminating up to 65 min/day (25-65 min by transcriptionists matching requisition with paperwork. Utilizing Illuminate improved workflow, decreased TAT and minimized cost. Patient care can be improved through a comprehensive patient management system that facilitates communications between isolated information systems.

  4. Medical record automation at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogle, G.O.; Grier, R.S.

    1979-01-01

    With the increase in population at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory and the growing concern over employee health, especially concerning the effects of the work environment, the Occupational Medicine Group decided to automate its medical record keeping system to meet these growing demands. With this computer system came not only the ability for long-term study of the work environment verses employee health, but other benefits such as more comprehensive records, increased legibility, reduced physician time, and better records management

  5. The impact of electronic medical record systems on outpatient workflows: a longitudinal evaluation of its workflow effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwanath, Arun; Singh, Sandeep Rajan; Winkelstein, Peter

    2010-11-01

    The promise of the electronic medical record (EMR) lies in its ability to reduce the costs of health care delivery and improve the overall quality of care--a promise that is realized through major changes in workflows within the health care organization. Yet little systematic information exists about the workflow effects of EMRs. Moreover, some of the research to-date points to reduced satisfaction among physicians after implementation of the EMR and increased time, i.e., negative workflow effects. A better understanding of the impact of the EMR on workflows is, hence, vital to understanding what the technology really does offer that is new and unique. (i) To empirically develop a physician centric conceptual model of the workflow effects of EMRs; (ii) To use the model to understand the antecedents to the physicians' workflow expectation from the new EMR; (iii) To track physicians' satisfaction overtime, 3 months and 20 months after implementation of the EMR; (iv) To explore the impact of technology learning curves on physicians' reported satisfaction levels. The current research uses the mixed-method technique of concept mapping to empirically develop the conceptual model of an EMR's workflow effects. The model is then used within a controlled study to track physician expectations from a new EMR system as well as their assessments of the EMR's performance 3 months and 20 months after implementation. The research tracks the actual implementation of a new EMR within the outpatient clinics of a large northeastern research hospital. The pre-implementation survey netted 20 physician responses; post-implementation Time 1 survey netted 22 responses, and Time 2 survey netted 26 physician responses. The implementation of the actual EMR served as the intervention. Since the study was conducted within the same setting and tracked a homogenous group of respondents, the overall study design ensured against extraneous influences on the results. Outcome measures were derived

  6. Quality assurance records and records' system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Link, M.; Martinek, J.

    1980-01-01

    For nuclear power plants extensive proof of quality is required which has to be documented reliably by quality records. With respect to the paper volume it is the most comprehensive 'curriculum vitae' of the technique. Traditional methods of information and recording are unsatisfactory for meeting regulatory requirements for maintaining the QA-aspects of status reporting, completeness, traceability and retrieval. Therefore KWU has established a record (documentation) subsystem within the overall component qualification system. Examples of the general documentation requirements, the procedure and handling in accordance with this subsystem for mechanical equipment are to be described examplarily. Topics are: - National and international requirements - Definition of QA records - Modular and product orientated KWU-record subsystem - Criteria for developing records - Record control, distribution, collection, storage - New documentation techniques (microfilm, data processing) - Education and training of personnel. (orig./RW)

  7. Implications of WWW technologies for exchanging medical records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurice Dixon

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses some of the implications for medical record exchange of very recent developments in technology and tools that support the World Wide Web. It argues that XML (Extensible Mark-up Language is a very good enabling technology for medical record exchange. XML provides a much cheaper way of executing the exchange of medical information that circumvents the need for proprietary software. Use of XML can also simplify solutions to the problems associated with coping with the evolution of medical systems in time. However XML on its own does not resolve all the semantic heterogeneities.

  8. Making medical records professional(s).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, A

    1987-07-01

    In 1986 a joint medical records project group was set up by the Institute of Health Services Management, the Association of Health Care Information and Medical Records Officers and the NHS Training Authority, with Mr Vic Peel as chairman. The group was supported by Arthur Andersen & Co, management consultants. The following is a shortened and edited version of an interim report drafted for the group by Dr Alastair Mason. It is intended for discussion and does not yet represent the definitive views of the sponsoring bodies.

  9. Genetic databases and consent for use of medical records

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gevers, J. K. M.

    2004-01-01

    The legislation on the Icelandic genetic database provides for an opting-out system for the collection of encoded medical information from individual medical records. From the beginning this has raised criticism, in Iceland itself and abroad. The Supreme Court has now decided that this approach of

  10. Cognitive Medical Multiagent Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Barna Iantovics

    2010-01-01

    The development of efficient and flexible agent-based medical diagnosis systems represents a recent research direction. Medical multiagent systems may improve the efficiency of traditionally developed medical computational systems, like the medical expert systems. In our previous researches, a novel cooperative medical diagnosis multiagent system called CMDS (Contract Net Based Medical Diagnosis System) was proposed. CMDS system can solve flexibly a large variety of medical diagnosis problems...

  11. [Reliability of Primary Care computerised medication records].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Molina Sáez, Celia; Urbieta Sanz, Elena; Madrigal de Torres, Manuel; Piñera Salmerón, Pascual; Pérez Cárceles, María D

    2016-03-01

    To quantify and to evaluate the reliability of Primary Care (PC) computerised medication records of as an information source of patient chronic medications, and to identify associated factors with the presence of discrepancies. A descriptive cross-sectional study. General Referral Hospital in Murcia. Patients admitted to the cardiology-chest diseases unit, during the months of February to April 2013, on home treatment, who agreed to participate in the study. Evaluation of the reliability of Primary Care computerised medication records by analysing the concordance, by identifying discrepancies, between the active medication in these records and that recorded in pharmacist interview with the patient/caregiver. Identification of associated factors with the presence of discrepancies was analysed using a multivariate logistic regression. The study included a total of 308 patients with a mean of 70.9 years (13.0 SD). The concordance of active ingredients was 83.7%, and this decreased to 34.7% when taking the dosage into account. Discrepancies were found in 97.1% of patients. The most frequent discrepancy was omission of frequency (35.6%), commission (drug added unjustifiably) (14.6%), and drug omission (12.7%). Age older than 65 years (1.98 [1.08 to 3.64]), multiple chronic diseases (1.89 [1.04 to 3.42]), and have a narcotic or psychotropic drug prescribed (2.22 [1.16 to 4.24]), were the factors associated with the presence of discrepancies. Primary Care computerised medication records, although of undoubted interest, are not be reliable enough to be used as the sole source of information on patient chronic medications when admitted to hospital. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation and comparison of medical records department of Iran university of medical sciences teaching hospitals and medical records department of Kermanshah university of medical sciences teaching hospitals according to the international standards ISO 9001-2000 in 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    maryam ahmadi

    2010-04-01

    Conclusion: The rate of final conformity of medical records system by the criteria of the ISO 9001-2000 standards in hospitals related to Iran university of medical sciences was greater than in hospitals related to Kermanshah university of medical sciences. And total conformity rate of medical records system in Kermanshah hospitals was low. So the regulation of medical records department with ISO quality management standards can help to elevate its quality.

  13. [Automated anesthesia record systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrichs, W; Mönk, S; Eberle, B

    1997-07-01

    The introduction of electronic anaesthesia documentation systems was attempted as early as in 1979, although their efficient application has become reality only in the past few years. The advantages of the electronic protocol are apparent: Continuous high quality documentation, comparability of data due to the availability of a data bank, reduction in the workload of the anaesthetist and availability of additional data. Disadvantages of the electronic protocol have also been discussed in the literature. By going through the process of entering data on the course of the anaesthetic procedure on the protocol sheet, the information is mentally absorbed and evaluated by the anaesthetist. This information may, however, be lost when the data are recorded fully automatically-without active involvement on the part of the anaesthetist. Recent publications state that by using intelligent alarms and/or integrated displays manual record keeping is no longer necessary for anaesthesia vigilance. The technical design of automated anaesthesia records depends on an integration of network technology into the hospital. It will be appropriate to connect the systems to the internet, but safety requirements have to be followed strictly. Concerning the database, client server architecture as well as language standards like SQL should be used. Object oriented databases will be available in the near future. Another future goal of automated anaesthesia record systems will be using knowledge based technologies within these systems. Drug interactions, disease related anaesthetic techniques and other information sources can be integrated. At this time, almost none of the commercially available systems has matured to a point where their purchase can be recommended without reservation. There is still a lack of standards for the subsequent exchange of data and a solution to a number of ergonomic problems still remains to be found. Nevertheless, electronic anaesthesia protocols will be required in

  14. Towards Semantic Search and Inference in Electronic Medical Records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bevan Koopman

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background This paper presents a novel approach to searching electronic medical records that is based on concept matching rather than keyword matching. Aims The concept-based approach is intended to overcome specific challenges we identified in searching medical records. Method Queries and documents were transformed from their term-based originals into medical concepts as defined by the SNOMED-CT ontology. Results Evaluation on a real-world collection of medical records showed our concept-based approach outperformed a keyword baseline by 25% in Mean Average Precision. Conclusion The concept-based approach provides a framework for further development of inference based search systems for dealing with medical data.

  15. Electronic medical records: a developing and developed country analysis

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sikhondze, NC

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available of Electronic Medical Records (EMR) systems in developed and developing countries. There is a direct relationship between the income of the country and the use of electronic information and communication systems as part of healthcare systems hence the division...

  16. Medical Records and Correspondence Demand Respect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Benamer

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available To The Editor: I was amazed recently to see a patient from Libya who came to the UK for treatment based on the advice of his Libyan physicians. The patient carried with him no referral letter whatsoever. Not one physician familiar with his case bothered to write a few lines for the poor patient, although each of those doctors saw the patient at least twice and prescribed one or more treatment. The patient carried with him different medications that had been prescribed, and a few empty containers of other medicines he had used. I mention the above short tale to bring to light what I feel is a major ethical problem with the way medicine is practiced in Libya [1]. The keeping of good medical records together with clear and concise correspondence between physicians is imperative for several reasons. Not only does it avoid duplication of services and unnecessary costs, it decreases the time invested by both the patient and physician, and it fosters a collegial relationship among healthcare providers. Many times, referring physicians may not know each other. It provides a channel for them to learn from each other as well as a method for them to form professional relationships. It occurred to me that colleagues in Libya may be shy of writing referral letters or may even be phobic about disclosing their practice habits. Patient information can best be written as referral letters which summaries the patient presentation, testing, response to treatment, possible consultation, and reason for referral. The referral may be because the physician(s initially treating the patient simply have tried all treatments known to them, or they may need to refer if they lack certain diagnostic equipment necessary to continue the care. To refer the patient to colleagues simply says “we think more can be done for this patient but we may not be able to do it here; please evaluate.” It shows respect for the patient and for the colleague. No physician knows everything

  17. Solving the interoperability challenge of a distributed complex patient guidance system: a data integrator based on HL7's Virtual Medical Record standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, Carlos; González-Ferrer, Arturo; Peleg, Mor; Cavero, Carlos

    2015-05-01

    We show how the HL7 Virtual Medical Record (vMR) standard can be used to design and implement a data integrator (DI) component that collects patient information from heterogeneous sources and stores it into a personal health record, from which it can then retrieve data. Our working hypothesis is that the HL7 vMR standard in its release 1 version can properly capture the semantics needed to drive evidence-based clinical decision support systems. To achieve seamless communication between the personal health record and heterogeneous data consumers, we used a three-pronged approach. First, the choice of the HL7 vMR as a message model for all components accompanied by the use of medical vocabularies eases their semantic interoperability. Second, the DI follows a service-oriented approach to provide access to system components. Third, an XML database provides the data layer.Results The DI supports requirements of a guideline-based clinical decision support system implemented in two clinical domains and settings, ensuring reliable and secure access, high performance, and simplicity of integration, while complying with standards for the storage and processing of patient information needed for decision support and analytics. This was tested within the framework of a multinational project (www.mobiguide-project.eu) aimed at developing a ubiquitous patient guidance system (PGS). The vMR model with its extension mechanism is demonstrated to be effective for data integration and communication within a distributed PGS implemented for two clinical domains across different healthcare settings in two nations. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Medical records department and balanced scorecard approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajami, Sima; Ebadsichani, Afsaneh; Tofighi, Shahram; Tavakoli, Nahid

    2013-01-01

    The Medical Records Department (MRD) is an important source for evaluating and planning of healthcare services; therefore, hospital managers should improve their performance not only in the short-term but also in the long-term plans. The Balanced Scorecard (BSC) is a tool in the management system that enables organizations to correct operational functions and provides feedback around both the internal processes and the external outcomes, in order to improve strategic performance and outcomes continuously. The main goal of this study was to assess the MRD performance with BSC approach in a hospital. This research was an analytical cross-sectional study in which data was collected by questionnaires, forms and observation. The population was the staff of the MRD in a hospital in Najafabad, Isfahan, Iran. To analyze data, first, objectives of the MRD, according to the mission and perspectives of the hospital, were redefined and, second, indicators were measured. Subsequently, findings from the performance were compared with the expected score. In order to achieve the final target, the programs, activities, and plans were reformed. The MRD was successful in absorbing customer satisfaction. From a customer perspective, score in customer satisfaction of admission and statistics sections were 82% and 83%, respectively. The comprehensive nature of the strategy map makes the MRD especially useful as a consensus building and communication tool in the hospital.

  19. The use of shared medication record as part of medication reconciliation at hospital admission is feasible

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munck, Lars K; Hansen, Karina R; Mølbak, Anne Grethe

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Medication reconciliation improves congruence in cross sectional patient courses. Our regional electronic medical record (EMR) integrates the shared medication record (SMR) which provides full access to current medication and medication prescriptions for all citizens in Denmark. We...

  20. Applications for detection of acute kidney injury using electronic medical records and clinical information systems: workgroup statements from the 15(th) ADQI Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Matthew T; Hobson, Charles E; Darmon, Michael; Mohan, Sumit; Hudson, Darren; Goldstein, Stuart L; Ronco, Claudio; Kellum, John A; Bagshaw, Sean M

    2016-01-01

    Electronic medical records and clinical information systems are increasingly used in hospitals and can be leveraged to improve recognition and care for acute kidney injury. This Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI) workgroup was convened to develop consensus around principles for the design of automated AKI detection systems to produce real-time AKI alerts using electronic systems. AKI alerts were recognized by the workgroup as an opportunity to prompt earlier clinical evaluation, further testing and ultimately intervention, rather than as a diagnostic label. Workgroup members agreed with designing AKI alert systems to align with the existing KDIGO classification system, but recommended future work to further refine the appropriateness of AKI alerts and to link these alerts to actionable recommendations for AKI care. The consensus statements developed in this review can be used as a roadmap for development of future electronic applications for automated detection and reporting of AKI.

  1. Cognitive Medical Multiagent Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barna Iantovics

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of efficient and flexible agent-based medical diagnosis systems represents a recent research direction. Medical multiagent systems may improve the efficiency of traditionally developed medical computational systems, like the medical expert systems. In our previous researches, a novel cooperative medical diagnosis multiagent system called CMDS (Contract Net Based Medical Diagnosis System was proposed. CMDS system can solve flexibly a large variety of medical diagnosis problems. This paper analyses the increased intelligence of the CMDS system, which motivates its use for different medical problem’s solving.

  2. Privacy, confidentiality, and electronic medical records.

    OpenAIRE

    Barrows, R C; Clayton, P D

    1996-01-01

    The enhanced availability of health information in an electronic format is strategic for industry-wide efforts to improve the quality and reduce the cost of health care, yet it brings a concomitant concern of greater risk for loss of privacy among health care participants. The authors review the conflicting goals of accessibility and security for electronic medical records and discuss nontechnical and technical aspects that constitute a reasonable security solution. It is argued that with gui...

  3. Quality assurance records system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This Safety Guide was prepared as part of the Agency's programme, referred to as the NUSS programme, for establishing Codes of Practice and Safety Guides relating to nuclear power plants. It supplements the IAEA Code of Practice on Quality Assurance for Safety in Nuclear Power Plants (IAEA Safety Series No.50-C-QA), which requires that for each nuclear power plant a system for the generation, identification, collection, indexing, filing, storing, maintenance and disposition of quality assurance records shall be established and executed in accordance with written procedures and instructions. The purpose of this Safety Guide is to provide assistance in the establishment and operation of such a system. An orderly established and maintained records system is considered to be part of the means of providing a basis for an appropriate level of confidence that the activities which affect the quality of a nuclear power plant have been performed in accordance with the specific requirements and that the required quality has been achieved and is maintained

  4. Creating a foundation for implementing an electronic health records (EHR)-integrated Social Knowledge Networking (SKN) system on medication reconciliation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangachari, P; Dellsperger, K C; Fallaw, D; Davis, I; Sumner, M; Ray, W; Fiedler, S; Nguyen, T; Rethemeyer, R

    2018-04-01

    In fall 2016, Augusta University received a two-year grant from AHRQ, to implement a Social Knowledge Networking (SKN) system for enabling its health system, AU-Health, to progress from "limited use" of EHR Medication Reconciliation (MedRec) Technology, to "meaningful use." Phase 1 sought to identify a comprehensive set of issues related to EHR MedRec encountered by practitioners at AU-Health. These efforts helped develop a Reporting Tool , which, along with a Discussion Tool , was incorporated into the AU-Health EHR, at the end of Phase 1. Phase 2 (currently underway), comprises a 52-week pilot of the EHR-integrated SKN system in outpatient and inpatient medicine units. The purpose of this paper is to describe the methods and results of Phase 1. Phase 1 utilized an exploratory mixed-method approach, involving two rounds of data collection. This included 15 individual interviews followed by a survey of 200 practitioners, i.e., physicians, nurses, and pharmacists, based in the outpatient and inpatient medicine service at AU Health. Thematic analysis of interviews identified 55 issue-items related to EHR MedRec under 9 issue-categories. The survey sought practitioners' importance-rating of all issue-items identified from interviews. A total of 127 (63%) survey responses were received. Factor analysis served to validate the following 6 of the 9 issue-categories, all of which, were rated "Important" or higher (on average), by over 70% of all respondents: 1) Care-Coordination (CCI); 2) Patient-Education (PEI); 3) Ownership-and-Accountability (OAI); 4) Processes-of-Care (PCI); 5) IT-Related (ITRI); and 6) Workforce-Training (WTI). Significance-testing of importance-rating by professional affiliation revealed no statistically significant differences for CCI and PEI; and some statistically significant differences for OAI, PCI, ITRI, and WTI. There were two key gleanings from the issues related to EHR MedRec unearthed by this study: 1) there was an absence of shared

  5. Moving electronic medical records upstream: incorporating social determinants of health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Laura M; Tirozzi, Karen J; Manchanda, Rishi; Burns, Abby R; Sandel, Megan T

    2015-02-01

    Knowledge of the biological pathways and mechanisms connecting social factors with health has increased exponentially over the past 25 years, yet in most clinical settings, screening and intervention around social determinants of health are not part of standard clinical care. Electronic medical records provide new opportunities for assessing and managing social needs in clinical settings, particularly those serving vulnerable populations. To illustrate the feasibility of capturing information and promoting interventions related to social determinants of health in electronic medical records. Three case studies were examined in which electronic medical records have been used to collect data and address social determinants of health in clinical settings. From these case studies, we identified multiple functions that electronic medical records can perform to facilitate the integration of social determinants of health into clinical systems, including screening, triaging, referring, tracking, and data sharing. If barriers related to incentives, training, and privacy can be overcome, electronic medical record systems can improve the integration of social determinants of health into healthcare delivery systems. More evidence is needed to evaluate the impact of such integration on health care outcomes before widespread adoption can be recommended. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Adaptation of a web-based, open source electronic medical record system platform to support a large study of tuberculosis epidemiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fraser Hamish SF

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2006, we were funded by the US National Institutes of Health to implement a study of tuberculosis epidemiology in Peru. The study required a secure information system to manage data from a target goal of 16,000 subjects who needed to be followed for at least one year. With previous experience in the development and deployment of web-based medical record systems for TB treatment in Peru, we chose to use the OpenMRS open source electronic medical record system platform to develop the study information system. Supported by a core technical and management team and a large and growing worldwide community, OpenMRS is now being used in more than 40 developing countries. We adapted the OpenMRS platform to better support foreign languages. We added a new module to support double data entry, linkage to an existing laboratory information system, automatic upload of GPS data from handheld devices, and better security and auditing of data changes. We added new reports for study managers, and developed data extraction tools for research staff and statisticians. Further adaptation to handle direct entry of laboratory data occurred after the study was launched. Results Data collection in the OpenMRS system began in September 2009. By August 2011 a total of 9,256 participants had been enrolled, 102,274 forms and 13,829 laboratory results had been entered, and there were 208 users. The system is now entirely supported by the Peruvian study staff and programmers. Conclusions The information system served the study objectives well despite requiring some significant adaptations mid-stream. OpenMRS has more tools and capabilities than it did in 2008, and requires less adaptations for future projects. OpenMRS can be an effective research data system in resource poor environments, especially for organizations using or considering it for clinical care as well as research.

  7. Electronic medical records for otolaryngology office-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernobilsky, Boris; Boruk, Marina

    2008-02-01

    Pressure is mounting on physicians to adopt electronic medical records. The field of health information technology is evolving rapidly with innovations and policies often outpacing science. We sought to review research and discussions about electronic medical records from the past year to keep abreast of these changes. Original scientific research, especially from otolaryngologists, is lacking in this field. Adoption rates are slowly increasing, but more of the burden is shouldered by physicians despite policy efforts and the clear benefits to third-party payers. Scientific research from the past year suggests lack of improvements and even decreasing quality of healthcare with electronic medical record adoption in the ambulatory care setting. The increasing prevalence and standardization of electronic medical record systems results in a new set of problems including rising costs, audits, difficulties in transition and public concerns about security of information. As major players in healthcare continue to push for adoption, increased effort must be made to demonstrate actual improvements in patient care in the ambulatory care setting. More scientific studies are needed to demonstrate what features of electronic medical records actually improve patient care. Otolaryngologists should help each other by disseminating research about improvement in patient outcomes with their systems since current adoption and outcomes policies do not apply to specialists.

  8. [Analysis on regularity of prescriptions in "a guide to clinical practice with medical record" for diarrhoea based on traditional Chinese medicine inheritance support system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lan-Juan; Zhu, Xiang-Dong

    2016-06-01

    To analyze the regularities of prescriptions in "a guide to clinical practice with medical record" (Ye Tianshi) for diarrhoea based on traditional Chinese medicine inheritance support system(V2.5), and provide a reference for further research and development of new traditional Chinese medicines in treating diarrhoea. Traditional Chinese medicine inheritance support system was used to build a prescription database of Chinese medicines for diarrhoea. The software integration data mining method was used to analyze the prescriptions according to "four natures", "five flavors" and "meridians" in the database and achieve frequency statistics, syndrome distribution, prescription regularity and new prescription analysis. An analysis on 94 prescriptions for diarrhoea was used to determine the frequencies of medicines in prescriptions, commonly used medicine pairs and combinations, and achieve 13 new prescriptions. This study indicated that the prescriptions for diarrhoea in "a guide to clinical practice with medical record" are mostly of eliminating dampness and tonifying deficienccy, with neutral drug property, sweet, bitter or hot in flavor, and reflecting the treatment principle of "activating spleen-energy and resolving dampness". Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  9. Personal health records as portal to the electronic medical record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Jennifer E; Gilbert, Mark R; Armstrong, Terri S

    2014-03-01

    This topic review discusses the evolving clinical challenges associated with the implementation of electronic personal health records (PHR) that are fully integrated with electronic medical records (EMR). The benefits of facilitating patient access to the EMR through web-based, PHR-portals may be substantial; foremost is the potential to enhance the flow of information between patient and healthcare practitioner. The benefits of improved communication and transparency of care are presumed to be a reduction in clinical errors, increased quality of care, better patient-management of disease, and better disease and symptom comprehension. Yet PHR databases allow patients open access to newly-acquired clinical data without the benefit of concurrent expert clinical interpretation, and therefore may create the potential for greater patient distress and uncertainty. With specific attention to neuro-oncology patients, this review focuses on the developing conflicts and consequences associated with the use of a PHR that parallels data acquisition of the EMR in real-time. We conclude with a discussion of recommendations for implementing fully-integrated PHR for neuro-oncology patients.

  10. Health Care Consumer's Perception of the Electronic Medical Record

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method: A structured questionnaire was developed, validated and utilized in this quantitative research project. Quantitative data were collected ... Electronic Medical Records (EMR), as a health information technology innovation, has ... EMR will provide a highly effective, reliable, secure, and innovative information system.

  11. Multimedia system for creation, transmission and consultation of medical examination records; Systeme multimedia de creation, transmission and compte-rendu d`examens medicaux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Rest, C. [Service de Medecine Nucleaire, CHU 29609 Brest (France); Fortineau, J.; Bernier, M. [SEI IRESTE 44087 Nantes (France); Guillo, P.; Cavarec, M. [Service de Medecine Nucleaire, CHU 29609 Brest (France)

    1997-12-31

    Achieving an urgency examination requires a rapid transmission of the results to the examiner. An efficient method of their communication could be achieved by producing a multimedia record consisting of images, comments and voiced utterances. We have retained for illustration the case of pulmonary scintigraphy in the diagnosis of pulmonary emboli. Following the acquisition the images are transferred to a PC (under Interfile format). These are displayed on the screen in association with anatomic schemes. In order to present all the elements important for interpretation, a series of tools was developed. Thus, to single out the anomalies the editor is provided with arrows to which verbal comments can be associated. Subsequently, he enters up its record. The interpreted examination is transferred to the examiner`s PC via an ATM network. The consultant may then investigate the multimedia record by displaying images and comments and listening to the comments and conclusion of the isotope investigator. A prototype is already operational and its evaluation phase is to start. This stage refers to the quality of transmitted information. A quest among examiners will then allow to evaluate whether the examination reading out and the comprehension of the isotope investigators` conclusions are easier. The speed of transmission will be compared with the current routine (based on manuscript records) and its practical impact in case of urgency circumstances will be assessed. The technical facilities utilized by us allow an easy generalization of the approach to other image-based medical examinations performed in case of urgency

  12. Electronic medical records in humanitarian emergencies - the development of an Ebola clinical information and patient management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobanputra, Kiran; Greig, Jane; Shankar, Ganesh; Perakslis, Eric; Kremer, Ronald; Achar, Jay; Gayton, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    By November 2015, the West Africa Ebola epidemic had caused 28598 infections and 11299 deaths in the three countries most affected. The outbreak required rapid innovation and adaptation. Médecins sans Frontières (MSF) scaled up its usual 20-30 bed Ebola management centres (EMCs) to 100-300 beds with over 300 workers in some settings. This brought challenges in patient and clinical data management resulting from the difficulties of working safely with high numbers of Ebola patients. We describe a project MSF established with software developers and the Google Social Impact Team to develop context-adapted tools to address the challenges of recording Ebola clinical information. We share the outcomes and key lessons learned in innovating rapidly under pressure in difficult environmental conditions. Information on adoption, maintenance, and data quality was gathered through review of project documentation, discussions with field staff and key project stakeholders, and analysis of tablet data. In March 2015, a full prototype was deployed in Magburaka EMC, Sierra Leone. Inpatient data were captured on 204 clinical interactions with 34 patients from 5 March until 10 April 2015. Data continued to also be recorded on paper charts, creating theoretically identical record "pairs" on paper and tablet. 83 record pairs for 33 patients with 22 data items (temperature and symptoms) per pair were analysed. The overall Kappa coefficient for agreement between sources was 0.62, but reduced to 0.59 when rare bleeding symptoms were excluded, indicating moderate to good agreement. The time taken to deliver the product was more than that anticipated by MSF (7 months versus 6 weeks). Deployment of the tablet coincided with a dramatic drop in patient numbers and thus had little impact on patient care. We have identified lessons specific to humanitarian-technology collaborative projects and propose a framework for emergency humanitarian innovation. Time and effort is required to bridge

  13. Joint development of evidence-based medical record by doctors and patients through integrated Chinese and Western medicine on digestive system diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Gao, Hong-yang; Gao, Rui; Zhao, Ying-pan; Li, Qing-na; Zhao, Yang; Tang, Xu-dong; Shang, Hong-cai

    2016-02-01

    Building the clinical therapeutic evaluation system by combing the evaluation given by doctors and patients can form a more comprehensive and objective evaluation system. A literature search on the practice of evidence-based evaluation was conducted in key biomedical databases, i.e. PubMed, Excerpt Medica Database, China Biology Medicine disc and China National Knowledge Infrastructure. However, no relevant study on the subjects of interest was identified. Therefore, drawing on the principles of narrative medicine and expert opinion from systems of Chinese medicine and Western medicine, we propose to develop and pilot-test a novel evidence-based medical record format that captures the perspectives of both patients and doctors in a clinical trial. Further, we seek to evaluate a strategic therapeutic approach that integrates the wisdom of Chinese medicine with the scientific basis of Western medicine in the treatment of digestive system disorders. Evaluation of therapeutic efficacy of remedies under the system of Chinese medicine is an imperative ongoing research. The present study intends to identify a novel approach to assess the synergistic benefits achievable from an integrated therapeutic approach combining Chinese and Western system of medicine to treat digestive system disorders.

  14. Implementation of an electronic medical record system in previously computer-naïve primary care centres: a pilot study from Cyprus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoutis, George; Soteriades, Elpidoforos S; Kounalakis, Dimitris K; Zachariadou, Theodora; Philalithis, Anastasios; Lionis, Christos

    2007-01-01

    The computer-based electronic medical record (EMR) is an essential new technology in health care, contributing to high-quality patient care and efficient patient management. The majority of southern European countries, however, have not yet implemented universal EMR systems and many efforts are still ongoing. We describe the development of an EMR system and its pilot implementation and evaluation in two previously computer-naïve public primary care centres in Cyprus. One urban and one rural primary care centre along with their personnel (physicians and nurses) were selected to participate. Both qualitative and quantitative evaluation tools were used during the implementation phase. Qualitative data analysis was based on the framework approach, whereas quantitative assessment was based on a nine-item questionnaire and EMR usage parameters. Two public primary care centres participated, and a total often health professionals served as EMR system evaluators. Physicians and nurses rated EMR relatively highly, while patients were the most enthusiastic supporters for the new information system. Major implementation impediments were the physicians' perceptions that EMR usage negatively affected their workflow, physicians' legal concerns, lack of incentives, system breakdowns, software design problems, transition difficulties and lack of familiarity with electronic equipment. The importance of combining qualitative and quantitative evaluation tools is highlighted. More efforts are needed for the universal adoption and routine use of EMR in the primary care system of Cyprus as several barriers to adoption exist; however, none is insurmountable. Computerised systems could improve efficiency and quality of care in Cyprus, benefiting the entire population.

  15. [Security specifications for electronic medical records on the Internet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocanu, Mihai; Mocanu, Carmen

    2007-01-01

    The extension for the Web applications of the Electronic Medical Record seems both interesting and promising. Correlated with the expansion of Internet in our country, it allows the interconnection of physicians of different specialties and their collaboration for better treatment of patients. In this respect, the ophthalmologic medical applications consider the increased possibilities for monitoring chronic ocular diseases and for the identification of some elements for early diagnosis and risk factors supervision. We emphasize in this survey some possible solutions to the problems of interconnecting medical information systems to the Internet: the achievement of interoperability within medical organizations through the use of open standards, the automated input and processing for ocular imaging, the use of data reduction techniques in order to increase the speed of image retrieval in large databases, and, last but not least, the resolution of security and confidentiality problems in medical databases.

  16. How patients can improve the accuracy of their medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dullabh, Prashila M; Sondheimer, Norman K; Katsh, Ethan; Evans, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Assess (1) if patients can improve their medical records' accuracy if effectively engaged using a networked Personal Health Record; (2) workflow efficiency and reliability for receiving and processing patient feedback; and (3) patient feedback's impact on medical record accuracy. Improving medical record' accuracy and associated challenges have been documented extensively. Providing patients with useful access to their records through information technology gives them new opportunities to improve their records' accuracy and completeness. A new approach supporting online contributions to their medication lists by patients of Geisinger Health Systems, an online patient-engagement advocate, revealed this can be done successfully. In late 2011, Geisinger launched an online process for patients to provide electronic feedback on their medication lists' accuracy before a doctor visit. Patient feedback was routed to a Geisinger pharmacist, who reviewed it and followed up with the patient before changing the medication list shared by the patient and the clinicians. The evaluation employed mixed methods and consisted of patient focus groups (users, nonusers, and partial users of the feedback form), semi structured interviews with providers and pharmacists, user observations with patients, and quantitative analysis of patient feedback data and pharmacists' medication reconciliation logs. (1) Patients were eager to provide feedback on their medications and saw numerous advantages. Thirty percent of patient feedback forms (457 of 1,500) were completed and submitted to Geisinger. Patients requested changes to the shared medication lists in 89 percent of cases (369 of 414 forms). These included frequency-or dosage changes to existing prescriptions and requests for new medications (prescriptions and over-the counter). (2) Patients provided useful and accurate online feedback. In a subsample of 107 forms, pharmacists responded positively to 68 percent of patient requests for

  17. NEED ANALYSIS FOR IDENTIFYING ESP MATERIALS FOR MEDICAL RECORD STUDENTS IN APIKES CITRA MEDIKA SURAKARTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beta Setiawati

    2016-06-01

    and quantitative methods. The outcomesof this study showed the real necessities of students in learning English to prepare their future at the field of medical record and health information. Findings of the need analysis demonstrate that all four of the language skills were necessary for their academic studies and their target career. There are certain topics related to English for medical record such as medical record staff’ duties, ethical and legal issues in medical record, Hospital statistics, Medical record filling system, Health information system, and so on. Accordingly, this study proposes new ESP materials based on the stakeholders’ needs.It is suggested that textbook or handout of English for Medical Record will be made based on the Need Analysis by ESP designers and ESP lecturers involve actively recognizing the progressive needs of medical record students.

  18. Decision support using anesthesia information management system records and accreditation council for graduate medical education case logs for resident operating room assignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanderer, Jonathan P; Charnin, Jonathan; Driscoll, William D; Bailin, Michael T; Baker, Keith

    2013-08-01

    Our goal in this study was to develop decision support systems for resident operating room (OR) assignments using anesthesia information management system (AIMS) records and Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) case logs and evaluate the implementations. We developed 2 Web-based systems: an ACGME case-log visualization tool, and Residents Helping in Navigating OR Scheduling (Rhinos), an interactive system that solicits OR assignment requests from residents and creates resident profiles. Resident profiles are snapshots of the cases and procedures each resident has done and were derived from AIMS records and ACGME case logs. A Rhinos pilot was performed for 6 weeks on 2 clinical services. One hundred sixty-five requests were entered and used in OR assignment decisions by a single attending anesthesiologist. Each request consisted of a rank ordered list of up to 3 ORs. Residents had access to detailed information about these cases including surgeon and patient name, age, procedure type, and admission status. Success rates at matching resident requests were determined by comparing requests with AIMS records. Of the 165 requests, 87 first-choice matches (52.7%), 27 second-choice matches (16.4%), and 8 third-choice matches (4.8%) were made. Forty-three requests were unmatched (26.1%). Thirty-nine first-choice requests overlapped (23.6%). Full implementation followed on 8 clinical services for 8 weeks. Seven hundred fifty-four requests were reviewed by 15 attending anesthesiologists, with 339 first-choice matches (45.0%), 122 second-choice matches (16.2%), 55 third-choice matches (7.3%), and 238 unmatched (31.5%). There were 279 overlapping first-choice requests (37.0%). The overall combined match success rate was 69.4%. Separately, we developed an ACGME case-log visualization tool that allows individual resident experiences to be compared against case minimums as well as resident peer groups. We conclude that it is feasible to use ACGME case

  19. Automating occupational protection records systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, M.; Martin, J.B.

    1991-10-01

    Occupational protection records have traditionally been generated by field and laboratory personnel, assembled into files in the safety office, and eventually stored in a warehouse or other facility. Until recently, these records have been primarily paper copies, often handwritten. Sometimes, the paper is microfilmed for storage. However, electronic records are beginning to replace these traditional methods. The purpose of this paper is to provide guidance for making the transition to automated record keeping and retrieval using modern computer equipment. This paper describes the types of records most readily converted to electronic record keeping and a methodology for implementing an automated record system. The process of conversion is based on a requirements analysis to assess program needs and a high level of user involvement during the development. The importance of indexing the hard copy records for easy retrieval is also discussed. The concept of linkage between related records and its importance relative to reporting, research, and litigation will be addressed. 2 figs

  20. Patients prefer electronic medical records - fact or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiza, Melissa; Mostert-Phipps, Nicky; Pottasa, Dalenca

    2013-01-01

    Incomplete patient medical history compromises the quality of care provided to a patient while well-kept, adequate patient medical records are central to the provision of good quality of care. According to research, patients have the right to contribute to decision-making affecting their health. Hence, the researchers investigated their views regarding a paper-based system and an electronic medical record (EMR). An explorative approach was used in conducting a survey within selected general practices in the Nelson Mandela Metropole. The majority of participants thought that the use of a paper-based system had no negative impact on their health. Participants expressed concerns relating to the confidentiality of their medical records with both storage mediums. The majority of participants indicated they prefer their GP to computerise their consultation details. The main objective of the research on which this poster is based was to investigate the storage medium of preference for patients and the reasons for their preference. Overall, 48% of the 85 participants selected EMRs as their preferred storage medium and the reasons for their preference were also uncovered.

  1. 77 FR 15360 - Privacy Act of 1974; Systems of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-15

    ... a System of Records. SUMMARY: The National Security Agency (NSA) is amending a system of records... Officer, Department of Defense. GNSA 06 System Name: NSA/CSS Health, Medical and Safety Files (February 10... of the NSA/CSS compilation of system of records notices apply to this system.'' * * * * * Storage...

  2. The effect of the electronic medical record on nurses' work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, Jane

    2009-01-01

    The electronic medical record (EMR) is a workplace reality for most nurses. Its advantages include a single consolidated record for each person; capacity for data interfaces and alerts; improved interdisciplinary communication; and evidence-based decision support. EMRs can add to work complexity, by forcing better documentation of previously unrecorded data and/or because of poor design. Well-designed and well-implemented computerized provider order entry (CPOE) systems can streamline nurses' work. Generational differences in acceptance of and facility with EMRs can be addressed through open, healthy communication.

  3. Benefits and Risks of Electronic Medical Record (EMR): An Interpretive Analysis of Healthcare Consumers' Perceptions of an Evolving Health Information Systems Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Chester D.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore healthcare consumers' perceptions of their Electronic Medical Records (EMRs). Although there have been numerous studies regarding EMRs, there have been minimal, if any, research that explores healthcare consumers' awareness of this technology and the social implications that result. As consumers' health…

  4. Secure and Trustable Electronic Medical Records Sharing using Blockchain

    OpenAIRE

    Dubovitskaya, Alevtina; Xu, Zhigang; Ryu, Samuel; Schumacher, Michael; Wang, Fusheng

    2017-01-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) are critical, highly sensitive private information in healthcare, and need to be frequently shared among peers. Blockchain provides a shared, immutable and transparent history of all the transactions to build applications with trust, accountability and transparency. This provides a unique opportunity to develop a secure and trustable EMR data management and sharing system using blockchain. In this paper, we present our perspectives on blockchain based healthc...

  5. An inventory of publications on electronic medical records revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorman, P W; Schuemie, M J; van der Lei, J

    2009-01-01

    In this short review we provide an update of our earlier inventories of publications indexed in MedLine with the MeSH term 'Medical Records Systems, Computerized'. We retrieved and analyzed all references to English articles published before January 1, 2008, and indexed in PubMed with the MeSH term 'Medical Records Systems, Computerized'. We retrieved a total of 11,924 publications, of which 3937 (33%) appeared in a journal with an impact factor. Since 2002 the number of yearly publications, and the number of journals in which those publications appeared, increased. A cluster analysis revealed three clusters: an organizational issues cluster, a technically oriented cluster and a cluster about order-entry and research. Although our previous inventory in 2003 suggested a constant yearly production of publications on electronic medical records since 1998, the current inventory shows another rise in production since 2002. In addition, many new journals and countries have shown interest during the last five years. In the last 15 years, interest in organizational issues remained fairly constant, order entry and research with systems gained attention, while interest in technical issues relatively decreased.

  6. Proposed Electronic Medical Record with Emphasis on Hepatitis Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Skapetis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Medical domain is characterized, like many other domains, by an exponential evolution of the knowledge. There are a lot of tools which try to reduce the risk of error apparition in medical life. Medical decision becomes a very hard activity because the human experts, who have to make decisions, can hardly process the huge amounts of data. Diagnosis has a very important role here. It is the first step from a set of therapeutic actions, an error at this level can have dramatic consequences.The aim of this paper is to present a new electronic medical system for using it on patients with hepatitis virusinfection.Results: Hepatitis is a very complicated disease with numerous different types many of them can lead to serious diseases like cirrhosis and liver cancer. An early correct diagnosis and an adequate treatment could reduce the risks of liver cancer apparition or other severe diseases. The main goal of the system is to use artificial intelligence in order to offer predictions about patients infected with hepatitis virus and also to follow the healthcondition of the patient reevaluating at every time the initial diagnosis and suggesting tests and treatment. Our effort is to present a new electronic medical record that will “borrow” data from the standard health record of the patient and other resources where information is saved and will process it and give suggestions for the diagnosis and treatment of the patient and at the same time will use a simple operating environment, such as the internet, thus making it easy to use.Conclusions The medical record is a big step in improving health services in public hospitals. The proposed EMR with the use of artificial intelligence is the next logical step that will help in the diagnosis and early treatment of disease.

  7. Privacy Impact Assessment for the Medical and Research Study Records of Human Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Medical & Research Study Records of Human Volunteers System collects demographic and medical information on subjects who participate in research. Learn how this data is collected, used, access to the data, and the purpose of data collection.

  8. Medical guidelines presentation and comparing with Electronic Health Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselý, Arnost; Zvárová, Jana; Peleska, Jan; Buchtela, David; Anger, Zdenek

    2006-01-01

    Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems are now being developed in many places. More advanced systems provide also reminder facilities, usually based on if-then rules. In this paper we propose a method how to build the reminder facility directly upon the guideline interchange format (GLIF) model of medical guidelines. The method compares data items on the input of EHR system with medical guidelines GLIF model and is able to reveal if the input data item, that represents patient diagnosis or proposed patient treatment, contradicts with medical guidelines or not. The reminder facility can be part of EHR system itself or it can be realized by a stand-alone reminder system (SRS). The possible architecture of stand-alone reminder system is described in this paper and the advantages of stand-alone solution are discussed. The part of the EHR system could be also a browser that would present graphical GLIF model in easy to understand manner on the user screen. This browser can be data driven and focus attention of user to the relevant part of medical guidelines GLIF model.

  9. Reflecting on the ethical administration of computerized medical records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collmann, Jeff R.

    1995-05-01

    This presentation examines the ethical issues raised by computerized image management and communication systems (IMAC), the ethical principals that should guide development of policies, procedures and practices for IMACS systems, and who should be involved in developing a hospital's approach to these issues. The ready access of computerized records creates special hazards of which hospitals must beware. Hospitals must maintain confidentiality of patient's records while making records available to authorized users as efficiently as possible. The general conditions of contemporary health care undermine protecting the confidentiality of patient record. Patients may not provide health care institutions with information about themselves under conditions of informed consent. The field of information science must design sophisticated systems of computer security that stratify access, create audit trails on data changes and system use, safeguard patient data from corruption, and protect the databases from outside invasion. Radiology professionals must both work with information science experts in their own hospitals to create institutional safeguards and include the adequacy of security measures as a criterion for evaluating PACS systems. New policies and procedures on maintaining computerized patient records must be developed that obligate all members of the health care staff, not just care givers. Patients must be informed about the existence of computerized medical records, the rules and practices that govern their dissemination and given the opportunity to give or withhold consent for their use. Departmental and hospital policies on confidentiality should be reviewed to determine if revisions are necessary to manage computer-based records. Well developed discussions of the ethical principles and administrative policies on confidentiality and informed consent and of the risks posed by computer-based patient records systems should be included in initial and continuing

  10. Building clinical data groups for electronic medical record in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Haibo; Yu, Yingtao; Yang, Peng; Tang, Xuejun; Hu, Jianping; Rao, Keqin; Pan, Feng; Xu, Yongyong; Liu, Danhong

    2012-04-01

    This article aims at building clinical data groups for Electronic Medical Records (EMR) in China. These data groups can be reused as basic information units in building the medical sheets of Electronic Medical Record Systems (EMRS) and serve as part of its implementation guideline. The results were based on medical sheets, the forms that are used in hospitals, which were collected from hospitals. To categorize the information in these sheets into data groups, we adopted the Health Level 7 Clinical Document Architecture Release 2 Model (HL7 CDA R2 Model). The regulations and legal documents concerning health informatics and related standards in China were implemented. A set of 75 data groups with 452 data elements was created. These data elements were atomic items that comprised the data groups. Medical sheet items contained clinical records information and could be described by standard data elements that exist in current health document protocols. These data groups match different units of the CDA model. Twelve data groups with 87 standardized data elements described EMR headers, and 63 data groups with 405 standardized data elements constituted the body. The later 63 data groups in fact formed the sections of the model. The data groups had two levels. Those at the first level contained both the second level data groups and the standardized data elements. The data groups were basically reusable information units that served as guidelines for building EMRS and that were used to rebuild a medical sheet and serve as templates for the clinical records. As a pilot study of health information standards in China, the development of EMR data groups combined international standards with Chinese national regulations and standards, and this was the most critical part of the research. The original medical sheets from hospitals contain first hand medical information, and some of their items reveal the data types characteristic of the Chinese socialist national health system

  11. Collaborative Affordances of Hybrid Patient Record Technologies in Medical Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houben, Steven; Frost, Mads; Bardram, Jakob E

    2015-01-01

    explored the integration of paper and digital technology, there are still a wide range of open issues in the design of technologies that integrate digital and paper-based medical records. This paper studies the use of one such novel technology, called the Hybrid Patient Record (HyPR), that is designed......The medical record is a central artifact used to organize, communicate and coordinate information related to patient care. Despite recent deployments of electronic health records (EHR), paper medical records are still widely used because of the affordances of paper. Although a number of approaches...... to digitally augment a paper medical record. We report on two studies: a field study in which we describe the benefits and challenges of using a combination of electronic and paper-based medical records in a large university hospital and a deployment study in which we analyze how 8 clinicians used the Hy...

  12. Design of an electronic medical record (EMR-based clinical decision support system to alert clinicians to the onset of severe sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fountain S

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of our study was to design an electronic medical record ­based alert system to detect the onset of severe sepsis with sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV above 50%. Methods: The PPV for each of seven potential criteria for suspected infection (white blood cell count (WBCC >12 or 0.1 K/uL or immature granulocyte % >1%, temperature >38 C. or 50%, the charts of sixty consecutive patients who met CMS criteria for severe sepsis were reviewed to calculate the sensitivity of organ dysfunction plus any one of the suspected infection criteria. Results: Four proposed criteria for suspected infection had PPV >50%: WBCC >12 x 10 9 /L (69%; 95%CI:53­84%, Temperature >38C. (84%; 95%CI:68­100%, Temperature <36C. (57% 95%CI:36­78%, and initiation of antibiotics (70% 95%CI:56­84%. These four criteria were present in 53/60 of the patients with severe sepsis by CMS criteria, yielding a sensitivity of 88.3% (95%CI: 80.2­96.4%. Alert criteria were satisfied before the onset of severe sepsis in 25/53 cases, and within 90 minutes afterwards in 28/53 cases. Conclusions: Our criteria for suspected infection plus organ dysfunction yields reasonable sensitivity and PPV for the detection of severe sepsis in real­time.

  13. Market factors and electronic medical record adoption in medical practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menachemi, Nir; Mazurenko, Olena; Kazley, Abby Swanson; Diana, Mark L; Ford, Eric W

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies identified individual or practice factors that influence practice-based physicians' electronic medical record (EMR) adoption. Less is known about the market factors that influence physicians' EMR adoption. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between environmental market characteristics and physicians' EMR adoption. The Health Tracking Physician Survey 2008 and Area Resource File (2008) were combined and analyzed. Binary logistic regression was used to examine the relationship between three dimensions of the market environment (munificence, dynamism, and complexity) and EMR adoption controlling for several physician and practice characteristics. In a nationally representative sample of 4,720 physicians, measures of market dynamism including increases in unemployment, odds ratio (OR) = 0.95, 95% confidence interval (CI) [0.91, 0.99], or poverty rates, OR = 0.93, 95% CI [0.89, 0.96], were negatively associated with EMR adoption. Health maintenance organization penetration, OR = 3.01, 95% CI [1.49, 6.05], another measure of dynamism, was positively associated with EMR adoption. Physicians practicing in areas with a malpractice crisis, OR = 0.82, 95% CI [0.71, 0.94], representing environmental complexity, had lower EMR adoption rates. Understanding how market factors relate to practice-based physicians' EMR adoption can assist policymakers to better target limited resources as they work to realize the national goal of universal EMR adoption and meaningful use.

  14. Use of electronic medical records in oncology outcomes research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gena Kanas

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Gena Kanas1, Libby Morimoto1, Fionna Mowat1, Cynthia O’Malley2, Jon Fryzek3, Robert Nordyke21Exponent, Inc., Menlo Park, CA, USA; 2Amgen, Inc., Thousand Oaks, CA, USA; 3MedImmune, Gaithersburg, MD, USAAbstract: Oncology outcomes research could benefit from the use of an oncology-specific electronic medical record (EMR network. The benefits and challenges of using EMR in general health research have been investigated; however, the utility of EMR for oncology outcomes research has not been explored. Compared to current available oncology databases and registries, an oncology-specific EMR could provide comprehensive and accurate information on clinical diagnoses, personal and medical histories, planned and actual treatment regimens, and post-treatment outcomes, to address research questions from patients, policy makers, the pharmaceutical industry, and clinicians/researchers. Specific challenges related to structural (eg, interoperability, data format/entry, clinical (eg, maintenance and continuity of records, variety of coding schemes, and research-related (eg, missing data, generalizability, privacy issues must be addressed when building an oncology-specific EMR system. Researchers should engage with medical professional groups to guide development of EMR systems that would ultimately help improve the quality of cancer care through oncology outcomes research.Keywords: medical informatics, health care, policy, outcomes

  15. Visualization index for image-enabled medical records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wenjie; Zheng, Weilin; Sun, Jianyong; Zhang, Jianguo

    2011-03-01

    With the widely use of healthcare information technology in hospitals, the patients' medical records are more and more complex. To transform the text- or image-based medical information into easily understandable and acceptable form for human, we designed and developed an innovation indexing method which can be used to assign an anatomical 3D structure object to every patient visually to store indexes of the patients' basic information, historical examined image information and RIS report information. When a doctor wants to review patient historical records, he or she can first load the anatomical structure object and the view the 3D index of this object using a digital human model tool kit. This prototype system helps doctors to easily and visually obtain the complete historical healthcare status of patients, including large amounts of medical data, and quickly locate detailed information, including both reports and images, from medical information systems. In this way, doctors can save time that may be better used to understand information, obtain a more comprehensive understanding of their patients' situations, and provide better healthcare services to patients.

  16. The Importance of the Medical Record: A Critical Professional Responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Elizabeth; Patel, Nachiket; Chandrasekaran, Krishnaswamy; Tajik, A Jamil; Paterick, Timothy E

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive, detailed documentation in the medical record is critical to patient care and to a physician when allegations of negligence arise. Physicians, therefore, would be prudent to have a clear understanding of this documentation. It is important to understand who is responsible for documentation, what is important to document, when to document, and how to document. Additionally, it should be understood who owns the medical record, the significance of the transition to the electronic medical record, problems and pitfalls when using the electronic medical record, and how the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act affects healthcare providers and health information technology.

  17. Request for medical records or medical records in Brazil (Justice, Public Prosecution and Police x Medical Confidentiality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Fernandes Remédio Marques

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The request medical records for the instruction of criminal investigations, administrative and judicial proceedings is a reality in Brazil and arouses many questions. This article aims, in the light of the legislation and case law, bring some clarification on the subject, with no claim to exhaust it.

  18. Learning a Health Knowledge Graph from Electronic Medical Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotmensch, Maya; Halpern, Yoni; Tlimat, Abdulhakim; Horng, Steven; Sontag, David

    2017-07-20

    Demand for clinical decision support systems in medicine and self-diagnostic symptom checkers has substantially increased in recent years. Existing platforms rely on knowledge bases manually compiled through a labor-intensive process or automatically derived using simple pairwise statistics. This study explored an automated process to learn high quality knowledge bases linking diseases and symptoms directly from electronic medical records. Medical concepts were extracted from 273,174 de-identified patient records and maximum likelihood estimation of three probabilistic models was used to automatically construct knowledge graphs: logistic regression, naive Bayes classifier and a Bayesian network using noisy OR gates. A graph of disease-symptom relationships was elicited from the learned parameters and the constructed knowledge graphs were evaluated and validated, with permission, against Google's manually-constructed knowledge graph and against expert physician opinions. Our study shows that direct and automated construction of high quality health knowledge graphs from medical records using rudimentary concept extraction is feasible. The noisy OR model produces a high quality knowledge graph reaching precision of 0.85 for a recall of 0.6 in the clinical evaluation. Noisy OR significantly outperforms all tested models across evaluation frameworks (p < 0.01).

  19. Practical fulltext search in medical records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vít Volšička

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Performing a search through previously existing documents, including medical reports, is an integral part of acquiring new information and educational processes. Unfortunately, finding relevant information is not always easy, since many documents are saved in free text formats, thereby making it difficult to search through them. A full-text search is a viable solution for searching through documents. The full-text search makes it possible to efficiently search through large numbers of documents and to find those that contain specific search phrases in a short time. All leading database systems currently offer full-text search, but some do not support the complex morphology of the Czech language. Apache Solr provides full support options and some full-text libraries. This programme provides the good support of the Czech language in the basic installation, and a wide range of settings and options for its deployment over any platform. The library had been satisfactorily tested using real data from the hospitals. Solr provided useful, fast, and accurate searches. However, there is still a need to make adjustments in order to receive effective search results, particularly by correcting typographical errors made not only in the text, but also when entering words in the search box and creating a list of frequently used abbreviations and synonyms for more accurate results.

  20. Patients' thoughts on patient- retained medical records

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    was also thought to motivate the patients to act on the advice given, and the records also served as a reminder to take their ... to use it and to standardise the information that is recorded; and health planners should be motivated to implement .... Table I: Combined list of themes identified and quotations supporting them.

  1. Technology Acceptance of Electronic Medical Records by Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Technology Acceptance Model's (TAM) relevance of the intention of nurses to use electronic medical records in acute health care settings. The basic technology acceptance research of Davis (1989) was applied to the specific technology tool of electronic medical records (EMR) in a specific setting…

  2. Medical imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frangioni, John V

    2013-06-25

    A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and diagnostic or functional images. The system may be portable, and may include adapters for connecting various light sources and cameras in open surgical environments or laparascopic or endoscopic environments. A user interface provides control over the functionality of the integrated imaging system. In one embodiment, the system provides a tool for surgical pathology.

  3. Electronic medical record in cardiology: a 10-year Italian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpeggiani, Clara; Macerata, Alberto; Morales, Maria Aurora

    2015-08-01

    the aim of this study was to report a ten years experience in the electronic medical record (EMR) use. An estimated 80% of healthcare transactions are still paper-based. an EMR system was built at the end of 1998 in an Italian tertiary care center to achieve total integration among different human and instrumental sources, eliminating paper-based medical records. Physicians and nurses who used EMR system reported their opinions. In particular the hospital activity supported electronically, regarding 4,911 adult patients hospitalized in the 2004- 2008 period, was examined. the final EMR product integrated multimedia document (text, images, signals). EMR presented for the most part advantages and was well adopted by the personnel. Appropriateness evaluation was also possible for some procedures. Some disadvantages were encountered, such as start-up costs, long time required to learn how to use the tool, little to no standardization between systems and the EMR technology. the EMR is a strategic goal for clinical system integration to allow a better health care quality. The advantages of the EMR overcome the disadvantages, yielding a positive return on investment to health care organization.

  4. Electronic medical record in cardiology: a 10-year Italian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Carpeggiani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available SummaryObjectives:the aim of this study was to report a ten years experience in the electronic medical record (EMR use. An estimated 80% of healthcare transactions are still paper-based.Methods:an EMR system was built at the end of 1998 in an Italian tertiary care center to achieve total integration among different human and instrumental sources, eliminating paper-based medical records. Physicians and nurses who used EMR system reported their opinions. In particular the hospital activity supported electronically, regarding 4,911 adult patients hospitalized in the 2004- 2008 period, was examined.Results:the final EMR product integrated multimedia document (text, images, signals. EMR presented for the most part advantages and was well adopted by the personnel. Appropriateness evaluation was also possible for some procedures. Some disadvantages were encountered, such as start-up costs, long time required to learn how to use the tool, little to no standardization between systems and the EMR technology.Conclusion:the EMR is a strategic goal for clinical system integration to allow a better health care quality. The advantages of the EMR overcome the disadvantages, yielding a positive return on investment to health care organization.

  5. Incidence and cost of medications dispensed despite electronic medical record discontinuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranowski, Patrick J; Peterson, Kristin L; Statz-Paynter, Jamie L; Zorek, Joseph A

    2015-01-01

    To determine the incidence and cost of medications dispensed despite discontinuation (MDDD) of the medications in the electronic medical record within an integrated health care organization. Dean Health System, with medical clinics and pharmacies linked by an electronic medical record, and a shared health plan and pharmacy benefits management company. Pharmacist-led quality improvement project using retrospective chart review. Electronic medical records, pharmacy records, and prescription claims data from patients 18 years of age or older who had a prescription filled for a chronic condition from June 2012 to August 2013 and submitted a claim through the Dean Health Plan were aggregated and cross-referenced to identify MDDD. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize demographics and MDDD incidence. Fisher's exact test and independent samples t tests were used to compare MDDD and non-MDDD groups. Wholesale acquisition cost was applied to each MDDD event. 7,406 patients met inclusion criteria. For 223 (3%) patients with MDDD, 253 independent events were identified. In terms of frequency per category, antihypertensive agents topped the list, followed, in descending order, by anticonvulsants, antilipemics, antidiabetics, and anticoagulants. Nine medications accounted for 59% (150 of 253) of all MDDD events; these included (again in descending order): gabapentin, atorvastatin, simvastatin, hydrochlorothiazide, lisinopril, warfarin, furosemide, metformin, and metoprolol. Mail-service pharmacies accounted for the highest incidence (5.3%) of MDDD, followed by mass merchandisers (4.6%) and small chains (3.9%). The total cost attributable to MDDD was $9,397.74. Development of a technology-based intervention to decrease the incidence of MDDD may be warranted to improve patient safety and decrease health care costs.

  6. Medical Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    The MD Image System, a true-color image processing system that serves as a diagnostic aid and tool for storage and distribution of images, was developed by Medical Image Management Systems, Huntsville, AL, as a "spinoff from a spinoff." The original spinoff, Geostar 8800, developed by Crystal Image Technologies, Huntsville, incorporates advanced UNIX versions of ELAS (developed by NASA's Earth Resources Laboratory for analysis of Landsat images) for general purpose image processing. The MD Image System is an application of this technology to a medical system that aids in the diagnosis of cancer, and can accept, store and analyze images from other sources such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

  7. Paper versus computer: Feasibility of an electronic medical record in general pediatrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Roukema (Jolt); R.K. Los (Renske); S.E. Bleeker (Sacha); A.M. van Ginneken (Astrid); J. van der Lei (Johan); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND. Implementation of electronic medical record systems promises significant advances in patient care, because such systems enhance readability, availability, and data quality. Structured data entry (SDE) applications can prompt for completeness, provide greater accuracy and

  8. 42 CFR 416.47 - Condition for coverage-Medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... accurate medical records to ensure adequate patient care. (a) Standard: Organization. The ASC must develop and maintain a system for the proper collection, storage, and use of patient records. (b) Standard...) Patient identification. (2) Significant medical history and results of physical examination. (3) Pre...

  9. 32 CFR 701.122 - Medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... have an adverse effect on the mental or physical health of the individual. Normally, this determination... practitioner. If it is medically indicated that access could have an adverse mental or physical effect on the... Bureau of Medicine and Surgery's Web site at http://navymedicine.med.navy.mil and from DOD at http://www...

  10. Automated de-identification of free-text medical records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long William J

    2008-07-01

    corpus. Conclusion We have developed a pattern-matching de-identification system based on dictionary look-ups, regular expressions, and heuristics. Evaluation based on two different sets of nursing notes collected from a U.S. hospital suggests that, in terms of recall, the software out-performs a single human de-identifier (0.81 and performs at least as well as a consensus of two human de-identifiers (0.94. The system is currently tuned to de-identify PHI in nursing notes and discharge summaries but is sufficiently generalized and can be customized to handle text files of any format. Although the accuracy of the algorithm is high, it is probably insufficient to be used to publicly disseminate medical data. The open-source de-identification software and the gold standard re-identified corpus of medical records have therefore been made available to researchers via the PhysioNet website to encourage improvements in the algorithm.

  11. Secure and Trustable Electronic Medical Records Sharing using Blockchain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubovitskaya, Alevtina; Xu, Zhigang; Ryu, Samuel; Schumacher, Michael; Wang, Fusheng

    2017-01-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) are critical, highly sensitive private information in healthcare, and need to be frequently shared among peers. Blockchain provides a shared, immutable and transparent history of all the transactions to build applications with trust, accountability and transparency. This provides a unique opportunity to develop a secure and trustable EMR data management and sharing system using blockchain. In this paper, we present our perspectives on blockchain based healthcare data management, in particular, for EMR data sharing between healthcare providers and for research studies. We propose a framework on managing and sharing EMR data for cancer patient care. In collaboration with Stony Brook University Hospital, we implemented our framework in a prototype that ensures privacy, security, availability, and fine-grained access control over EMR data. The proposed work can significantly reduce the turnaround time for EMR sharing, improve decision making for medical care, and reduce the overall cost.

  12. Medical Information Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alterescu, S.; Hipkins, K. R.; Friedman, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    On-line interactive information processing system easily and rapidly handles all aspects of data management related to patient care. General purpose system is flexible enough to be applied to other data management situations found in areas such as occupational safety data, judicial information, or personnel records.

  13. MIMS - MEDICAL INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankowski, J. W.

    1994-01-01

    MIMS, Medical Information Management System is an interactive, general purpose information storage and retrieval system. It was first designed to be used in medical data management, and can be used to handle all aspects of data related to patient care. Other areas of application for MIMS include: managing occupational safety data in the public and private sectors; handling judicial information where speed and accuracy are high priorities; systemizing purchasing and procurement systems; and analyzing organizational cost structures. Because of its free format design, MIMS can offer immediate assistance where manipulation of large data bases is required. File structures, data categories, field lengths and formats, including alphabetic and/or numeric, are all user defined. The user can quickly and efficiently extract, display, and analyze the data. Three means of extracting data are provided: certain short items of information, such as social security numbers, can be used to uniquely identify each record for quick access; records can be selected which match conditions defined by the user; and specific categories of data can be selected. Data may be displayed and analyzed in several ways which include: generating tabular information assembled from comparison of all the records on the system; generating statistical information on numeric data such as means, standard deviations and standard errors; and displaying formatted listings of output data. The MIMS program is written in Microsoft FORTRAN-77. It was designed to operate on IBM Personal Computers and compatibles running under PC or MS DOS 2.00 or higher. MIMS was developed in 1987.

  14. Exploration Medical System Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, D. A.; Watkins, S. D.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exploration class missions will present significant new challenges and hazards to the health of the astronauts. Regardless of the intended destination, beyond low Earth orbit a greater degree of crew autonomy will be required to diagnose medical conditions, develop treatment plans, and implement procedures due to limited communications with ground-based personnel. SCOPE: The Exploration Medical System Demonstration (EMSD) project will act as a test bed on the International Space Station (ISS) to demonstrate to crew and ground personnel that an end-to-end medical system can assist clinician and non-clinician crew members in optimizing medical care delivery and data management during an exploration mission. Challenges facing exploration mission medical care include limited resources, inability to evacuate to Earth during many mission phases, and potential rendering of medical care by non-clinicians. This system demonstrates the integration of medical devices and informatics tools for managing evidence and decision making and can be designed to assist crewmembers in nominal, non-emergent situations and in emergent situations when they may be suffering from performance decrements due to environmental, physiological or other factors. PROJECT OBJECTIVES: The objectives of the EMSD project are to: a. Reduce or eliminate the time required of an on-orbit crew and ground personnel to access, transfer, and manipulate medical data. b. Demonstrate that the on-orbit crew has the ability to access medical data/information via an intuitive and crew-friendly solution to aid in the treatment of a medical condition. c. Develop a common data management framework that can be ubiquitously used to automate repetitive data collection, management, and communications tasks for all activities pertaining to crew health and life sciences. d. Ensure crew access to medical data during periods of restricted ground communication. e. Develop a common data management framework that

  15. Perspectives for medical informatics. Reusing the electronic medical record for clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokosch, H U; Ganslandt, T

    2009-01-01

    Even though today most university hospitals have already implemented commercial hospital information systems and started to build up comprehensive electronic medical records, reuse of such data for data warehousing and research purposes is still very rare. Given this situation, the focus of this paper is to present an overview on exemplary projects, which have already tackled this challenge, reflect on current initiatives within the United States of America and the European Union to establish IT infrastructures for clinical and translational research, and draw attention to new challenges in this area. This paper does not intend to provide a fully comprehensive review on all the issues of clinical routine data reuse. It is based, however, on a presentation of a large variety of historical, but also most recent activities in data warehousing, data retrieval and linking medical informatics with translational research. The article presents an overview of the various international approaches to this issue and illustrates concepts and solutions which have been published, thus giving an impression of activities pursued in this field of medical informatics. Further, problems and open questions, which have also been named in the literature, are presented and three challenges (to establish comprehensive clinical data warehouses, to establish professional IT infrastructure applications supporting clinical trial data capture and to integrate medical record systems and clinical trial databases) related to this area of medical informatics are identified and presented. Translational biomedical research with the aim "to integrate bedside and biology" and to bridge the gap between clinical care and medical research today and in the years to come, provides a large and interesting field for medical informatics researchers. Especially the need for integrating clinical research projects with data repositories built up during documentation of routine clinical care, today still leaves

  16. The New World of Interaction Recording for Medical Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Today's medical practice staff communicates remotely with patients, pharmacies, and other medical providers in new ways that go far beyond telephone calls. Patient care and communication are now being provided via telecommunications technologies, including chat/IM, screen, Skype, and other video applications. This new paradigm in patient care, known as "telehealth" or "telemedicine," could put medical practices at risk for noncompliance with strict HIPAA and other regulations. Interaction recording encompasses these new means of communication and can help medical practice staff achieve compliance and reduce financial and liability risks while improving operations and patient care. This article explores what medical practices need to know about interaction recording, what to look for in an interaction recording solution, and how to best utilize that solution to meet compliance, manage liability, and improve patient care.

  17. Consistency in performance evaluation reports and medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Mingshan; Ma, Ching-to Albert

    2002-12-01

    In the health care market managed care has become the latest innovation for the delivery of services. For efficient implementation, the managed care organization relies on accurate information. So clinicians are often asked to report on patients before referrals are approved, treatments authorized, or insurance claims processed. What are clinicians responses to solicitation for information by managed care organizations? The existing health literature has already pointed out the importance of provider gaming, sincere reporting, nudging, and dodging the rules. We assess the consistency of clinicians reports on clients across administrative data and clinical records. For about 1,000 alcohol abuse treatment episodes, we compare clinicians reports across two data sets. The first one, the Maine Addiction Treatment System (MATS), was an administrative data set; the state government used it for program performance monitoring and evaluation. The second was a set of medical record abstracts, taken directly from the clinical records of treatment episodes. A clinician s reporting practice exhibits an inconsistency if the information reported in MATS differs from the information reported in the medical record in a statistically significant way. We look for evidence of inconsistencies in five categories: admission alcohol use frequency, discharge alcohol use frequency, termination status, admission employment status, and discharge employment status. Chi-square tests, Kappa statistics, and sensitivity and specificity tests are used for hypothesis testing. Multiple imputation methods are employed to address the problem of missing values in the record abstract data set. For admission and discharge alcohol use frequency measures, we find, respectively, strong and supporting evidence for inconsistencies. We find equally strong evidence for consistency in reports of admission and discharge employment status, and mixed evidence on report consistency on termination status. Patterns of

  18. Medical Services: Medical Record Administration and Health Care Documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-05-03

    medical condition caused by it. Explain conditions, such as traumatic bursitis, traumatic neuritis, traumatic myositis , or traumatic synovitis, by... histopathologic findings have a direct bearing on diagnosis and treatment (AR 40-31/BUMEDINST 6510.2F/AFR 160-55). In such cases, the attending physician...Armed Forces Institute of Pathology and Armed Forces Histopathology Centers AR 40–35 Preventive Dentistry AR 40–48 Nonphysician Health Care Providers

  19. Medical impacts of anthropometric records. | Adebisi | Annals of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anthropology is now one of the inter-disciplinary scientific fields that is gaining much attention in forensic, socio-cultural, industrial and bio-medical applications. There is a need for a better awareness of some of the impacts - past and present, in the medical practice, of the records that were obtained by workers in this field in ...

  20. The realization of the storage of XML and middleware-based data of electronic medical records

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shuzhen; Gu Peidi; Luo Yanlin

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, using the technology of XML and middleware to design and implement a unified electronic medical records storage archive management system and giving a common storage management model. Using XML to describe the structure of electronic medical records, transform the medical data from traditional 'business-centered' medical information into a unified 'patient-centered' XML document and using middleware technology to shield the types of the databases at different departments of the hospital and to complete the information integration of the medical data which scattered in different databases, conducive to information sharing between different hospitals. (authors)

  1. Medical Record Clerk Training Program, Course of Study; Student Manual: For Medical Record Personnel in Small Rural Hospitals in Colorado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Community Health Service (DHEW/PHS), Arlington, VA. Div. of Health Resources.

    The manual provides major topics, objectives, activities and, procedures, references and materials, and assignments for the training program. The topics covered are hospital organization and community role, organization and management of a medical records department, international classification of diseases and operations, medical terminology,…

  2. Electronic medical records and efficiency and productivity during office visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Michael F

    2011-04-01

    To estimate the relationship between electronic medical record (EMR) use and efficiency of utilization and provider productivity during visits to US office-based physicians. Cross-sectional analysis of the 2006-2007 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. The sample included 62,710 patient visits to 2625 physicians. EMR systems included demographics, clinical notes, prescription orders, and laboratory and imaging results. Efficiency was measured as utilization of examinations, laboratory tests, radiology procedures, health education, nonmedication treatments, and medications. Productivity was measured as total services provided per 20-minute period. Survey-weighted regressions estimated association of EMR use with services provided, visit intensity/duration, and productivity. Marginal effects were estimated by averaging across all visits and by major reason for visit. EMR use was associated with higher probability of any examination (7.7%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.4%, 13.1%); any laboratory test (5.7%, 95% CI = 2.6%, 8.8%); any health education (4.9%, 95% CI = 0.2%, 9.6%); and fewer laboratory tests (-7.1%, 95% CI = -14.2%, -0.1%). During pre/post surgery visits, EMR use was associated with 7.3% (95% CI= -12.9%, -1.8%) fewer radiology procedures. EMR use was not associated with utilization of nonmedication treatments and medications, or visit duration. During routine visits for a chronic problem, EMR use was associated with 11.2% (95% CI = 5.7%, 16.8%) more diagnostic/screening services provided per 20-minute period. EMR use had a mixed association with efficiency and productivity during office visits. EMRs may improve provider productivity, especially during visits for a new problem and routine chronic care.

  3. Role of information systems in controlling costs: the electronic medical record (EMR) and the high-performance computing and communications (HPCC) efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kun, Luis G.

    1994-12-01

    On October 18, 1991, the IEEE-USA produced an entity statement which endorsed the vital importance of the High Performance Computer and Communications Act of 1991 (HPCC) and called for the rapid implementation of all its elements. Efforts are now underway to develop a Computer Based Patient Record (CBPR), the National Information Infrastructure (NII) as part of the HPCC, and the so-called `Patient Card'. Multiple legislative initiatives which address these and related information technology issues are pending in Congress. Clearly, a national information system will greatly affect the way health care delivery is provided to the United States public. Timely and reliable information represents a critical element in any initiative to reform the health care system as well as to protect and improve the health of every person. Appropriately used, information technologies offer a vital means of improving the quality of patient care, increasing access to universal care and lowering overall costs within a national health care program. Health care reform legislation should reflect increased budgetary support and a legal mandate for the creation of a national health care information system by: (1) constructing a National Information Infrastructure; (2) building a Computer Based Patient Record System; (3) bringing the collective resources of our National Laboratories to bear in developing and implementing the NII and CBPR, as well as a security system with which to safeguard the privacy rights of patients and the physician-patient privilege; and (4) utilizing Government (e.g. DOD, DOE) capabilities (technology and human resources) to maximize resource utilization, create new jobs and accelerate technology transfer to address health care issues.

  4. Spatial distribution of clinical computer systems in primary care in England in 2016 and implications for primary care electronic medical record databases: a cross-sectional population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontopantelis, Evangelos; Stevens, Richard John; Helms, Peter J; Edwards, Duncan; Doran, Tim; Ashcroft, Darren M

    2018-02-28

    UK primary care databases (PCDs) are used by researchers worldwide to inform clinical practice. These databases have been primarily tied to single clinical computer systems, but little is known about the adoption of these systems by primary care practices or their geographical representativeness. We explore the spatial distribution of clinical computing systems and discuss the implications for the longevity and regional representativeness of these resources. Cross-sectional study. English primary care clinical computer systems. 7526 general practices in August 2016. Spatial mapping of family practices in England in 2016 by clinical computer system at two geographical levels, the lower Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG, 209 units) and the higher National Health Service regions (14 units). Data for practices included numbers of doctors, nurses and patients, and area deprivation. Of 7526 practices, Egton Medical Information Systems (EMIS) was used in 4199 (56%), SystmOne in 2552 (34%) and Vision in 636 (9%). Great regional variability was observed for all systems, with EMIS having a stronger presence in the West of England, London and the South; SystmOne in the East and some regions in the South; and Vision in London, the South, Greater Manchester and Birmingham. PCDs based on single clinical computer systems are geographically clustered in England. For example, Clinical Practice Research Datalink and The Health Improvement Network, the most popular primary care databases in terms of research outputs, are based on the Vision clinical computer system, used by <10% of practices and heavily concentrated in three major conurbations and the South. Researchers need to be aware of the analytical challenges posed by clustering, and barriers to accessing alternative PCDs need to be removed. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. Records Center Program Billing System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Archives and Records Administration — RCPBS supports the Records center programs (RCP) in producing invoices for the storage (NARS-5) and servicing of National Archives and Records Administration’s...

  6. The medical record entrepreneur: a future of opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, M S; Nath, D D

    1989-06-01

    In summary, medical record practitioners can become successful entrepreneurs with the right motivation. It will be important to overcome the fear and inertia inherent in any bold new venture, to find our "niche," to assume the roles of explorer, artist, judge, and champion, as well as to encourage and promote our development within an organization or in a business of our own. Medical record entrepreneurs need to evaluate and understand current and potential consumers, their current needs, perceptions, and future needs. Entrepreneurs should capitalize on strengths, develop innovative marketing approaches, and apply them. In the current climate of the health care industry, there is a myriad of entrepreneurial opportunities available to the medical record profession. It all begins with the individual.

  7. A review of electronic medical record keeping on mobile medical service trips in austere settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dainton, Christopher; Chu, Charlene H

    2017-02-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) may address the need for decision and language support for Western clinicians on mobile medical service trips (MSTs) in low resource settings abroad, while providing improved access to records and data management. However, there has yet to be a review of this emerging technology used by MSTs in low-resource settings. The aim of this study is to describe EMR systems designed specifically for use by mobile MSTs in remote settings, and accordingly, determine new opportunities for this technology to improve quality of healthcare provided by MSTs. A MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Scopus/IEEE search and supplementary Google search were performed for EMR systems specific to mobile MSTs. Information was extracted regarding EMR name, organization, scope of use, platform, open source coding, commercial availability, data integration, and capacity for linguistic and decision support. Missing information was requested by email. After screening of 122 abstracts, two articles remained that discussed deployment of EMR systems in MST settings (iChart, SmartList To Go), and thirteen additional EMR systems were found through the Google search. Of these, three systems (Project Buendia, TEBOW, and University of Central Florida's internally developed EMR) are based on modified versions of Open MRS software, while three are smartphone apps (QuickChart EMR, iChart, NotesFirst). Most of the systems use a local network to manage data, while the remaining systems use opportunistic cloud synchronization. Three (TimmyCare, Basil, and Backpack EMR) contain multilingual user interfaces, and only one (QuickChart EMR) contained MST-specific clinical decision support. There have been limited attempts to tailor EMRs to mobile MSTs. Only Open MRS has a broad user base, and other EMR systems should consider interoperability and data sharing with larger systems as a priority. Several systems include tablet compatibility, or are specifically designed for smartphone, which may be

  8. Medical Record Keeping in the Summer Camp Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Laura; Holland, Jaycelyn; Weinberg, Stuart; Rosenbloom, S Trent

    2016-12-14

    Approximately one fifth of school-aged children spend a significant portion of their year at residential summer camp, and a growing number have chronic medical conditions. Camp health records are essential for safe, efficient care and for transitions between camp and home providers, yet little research exists regarding these systems. To survey residential summer camps for children to determine how camps create, store, and use camper health records. To raise awareness in the informatics community of the issues experienced by health providers working in a special pediatric care setting. We designed a web-based electronic survey concerning medical recordkeeping and healthcare practices at summer camps. 953 camps accredited by the American Camp Association received the survey. Responses were consolidated and evaluated for trends and conclusions. Of 953 camps contacted, 298 (31%) responded to the survey. Among respondents, 49.3% stated that there was no computer available at the health center, and 14.8% of camps stated that there was not any computer available to health staff at all. 41.1% of camps stated that internet access was not available. The most common complaints concerning recordkeeping practices were time burden, adequate completion, and consistency. Summer camps in the United States make efforts to appropriately document healthcare given to campers, but inconsistency and inefficiency may be barriers to staff productivity, staff satisfaction, and quality of care. Survey responses suggest that the current methods used by camps to document healthcare cause limitations in consistency, efficiency, and communications between providers, camp staff, and parents. As of 2012, survey respondents articulated need for a standard software to document summer camp healthcare practices that accounts for camp-specific needs. Improvement may be achieved if documentation software offers the networking capability, simplicity, pediatrics-specific features, and avoidance of

  9. Identification of Units and Other Terms in Czech Medical Records

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zvára Jr., Karel; Kašpar, Václav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 1 (2010), s. 78-82 ISSN 1801-5603 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : natural language processing * healthcare documentation * medical reports * EHR * finite-state machine * regular expression Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science http://www.ejbi.org/en/ejbi/article/61-en-identification-of-units-and-other-terms-in-czech-medical-records.html

  10. Do Electronic Health Records Help or Hinder Medical Education?

    OpenAIRE

    Peled, Jonathan U.; Sagher, Oren; Morrow, Jay B.; Dobbie, Alison E.

    2009-01-01

    Background to the Debate Background to the debate: Many countries worldwide are digitizing patients' medical records. In the United States, the recent economic stimulus package (?the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009?), signed into law by President Obama, includes $US17 billion in incentives for health providers to switch to electronic health records (EHRs). The package also includes $US2 billion for the development of EHR standards and best-practice guidelines. What impact will ...

  11. User Manuals for a Primary Care Electronic Medical Record System: A Mixed Methods Study of User- and Vendor-Generated Documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shachak, Aviv; Dow, Rustam; Barnsley, Jan; Tu, Karen; Domb, Sharon; Jadad, Alejandro R; Lemieux-Charles, Louise

    2013-06-04

    Tutorials and user manuals are important forms of impersonal support for using software applications including electronic medical records (EMRs). Differences between user- and vendor documentation may indicate support needs, which are not sufficiently addressed by the official documentation, and reveal new elements that may inform the design of tutorials and user manuals. What are the differences between user-generated tutorials and manuals for an EMR and the official user manual from the software vendor? Effective design of tutorials and user manuals requires careful packaging of information, balance between declarative and procedural texts, an action and task-oriented approach, support for error recognition and recovery, and effective use of visual elements. No previous research compared these elements between formal and informal documents. We conducted an mixed methods study. Seven tutorials and two manuals for an EMR were collected from three family health teams and compared with the official user manual from the software vendor. Documents were qualitatively analyzed using a framework analysis approach in relation to the principles of technical documentation described above. Subsets of the data were quantitatively analyzed using cross-tabulation to compare the types of error information and visual cues in screen captures between user- and vendor-generated manuals. The user-developed tutorials and manuals differed from the vendor-developed manual in that they contained mostly procedural and not declarative information; were customized to the specific workflow, user roles, and patient characteristics; contained more error information related to work processes than to software usage; and used explicit visual cues on screen captures to help users identify window elements. These findings imply that to support EMR implementation, tutorials and manuals need to be customized and adapted to specific organizational contexts and workflows. The main limitation of the study

  12. User Manuals for a Primary Care Electronic Medical Record System: A Mixed Methods Study of User- and Vendor-Generated Documents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, Rustam; Barnsley, Jan; Tu, Karen; Domb, Sharon; Jadad, Alejandro R.; Lemieux-Charles, Louise

    2015-01-01

    Research problem Tutorials and user manuals are important forms of impersonal support for using software applications including electronic medical records (EMRs). Differences between user- and vendor documentation may indicate support needs, which are not sufficiently addressed by the official documentation, and reveal new elements that may inform the design of tutorials and user manuals. Research question What are the differences between user-generated tutorials and manuals for an EMR and the official user manual from the software vendor? Literature review Effective design of tutorials and user manuals requires careful packaging of information, balance between declarative and procedural texts, an action and task-oriented approach, support for error recognition and recovery, and effective use of visual elements. No previous research compared these elements between formal and informal documents. Methodology We conducted an mixed methods study. Seven tutorials and two manuals for an EMR were collected from three family health teams and compared with the official user manual from the software vendor. Documents were qualitatively analyzed using a framework analysis approach in relation to the principles of technical documentation described above. Subsets of the data were quantitatively analyzed using cross-tabulation to compare the types of error information and visual cues in screen captures between user- and vendor-generated manuals. Results and discussion The user-developed tutorials and manuals differed from the vendor-developed manual in that they contained mostly procedural and not declarative information; were customized to the specific workflow, user roles, and patient characteristics; contained more error information related to work processes than to software usage; and used explicit visual cues on screen captures to help users identify window elements. These findings imply that to support EMR implementation, tutorials and manuals need to be customized and

  13. A cloud-based framework for large-scale traditional Chinese medical record retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lijun; Liu, Li; Fu, Xiaodong; Huang, Qingsong; Zhang, Xianwen; Zhang, Yin

    2018-01-01

    Electronic medical records are increasingly common in medical practice. The secondary use of medical records has become increasingly important. It relies on the ability to retrieve the complete information about desired patient populations. How to effectively and accurately retrieve relevant medical records from large- scale medical big data is becoming a big challenge. Therefore, we propose an efficient and robust framework based on cloud for large-scale Traditional Chinese Medical Records (TCMRs) retrieval. We propose a parallel index building method and build a distributed search cluster, the former is used to improve the performance of index building, and the latter is used to provide high concurrent online TCMRs retrieval. Then, a real-time multi-indexing model is proposed to ensure the latest relevant TCMRs are indexed and retrieved in real-time, and a semantics-based query expansion method and a multi- factor ranking model are proposed to improve retrieval quality. Third, we implement a template-based visualization method for displaying medical reports. The proposed parallel indexing method and distributed search cluster can improve the performance of index building and provide high concurrent online TCMRs retrieval. The multi-indexing model can ensure the latest relevant TCMRs are indexed and retrieved in real-time. The semantics expansion method and the multi-factor ranking model can enhance retrieval quality. The template-based visualization method can enhance the availability and universality, where the medical reports are displayed via friendly web interface. In conclusion, compared with the current medical record retrieval systems, our system provides some advantages that are useful in improving the secondary use of large-scale traditional Chinese medical records in cloud environment. The proposed system is more easily integrated with existing clinical systems and be used in various scenarios. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Stereoscopic medical imaging collaboration system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, Fumio; Hirano, Takenori; Nakabayasi, Yuusuke; Minoura, Hirohito; Tsuruoka, Shinji

    2007-02-01

    The computerization of the clinical record and the realization of the multimedia have brought improvement of the medical service in medical facilities. It is very important for the patients to obtain comprehensible informed consent. Therefore, the doctor should plainly explain the purpose and the content of the diagnoses and treatments for the patient. We propose and design a Telemedicine Imaging Collaboration System which presents a three dimensional medical image as X-ray CT, MRI with stereoscopic image by using virtual common information space and operating the image from a remote location. This system is composed of two personal computers, two 15 inches stereoscopic parallax barrier type LCD display (LL-151D, Sharp), one 1Gbps router and 1000base LAN cables. The software is composed of a DICOM format data transfer program, an operation program of the images, the communication program between two personal computers and a real time rendering program. Two identical images of 512×768 pixcels are displayed on two stereoscopic LCD display, and both images show an expansion, reduction by mouse operation. This system can offer a comprehensible three-dimensional image of the diseased part. Therefore, the doctor and the patient can easily understand it, depending on their needs.

  15. Anonymization of Electronic Medical Records to Support Clinical Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Gkoulalas-Divanis, Aris

    2013-01-01

    Anonymization of Electronic Medical Records to Support Clinical Analysis closely examines the privacy threats that may arise from medical data sharing, and surveys the state-of-the-art methods developed to safeguard data against these threats. To motivate the need for computational methods, the book first explores the main challenges facing the privacy-protection of medical data using the existing policies, practices and regulations. Then, it takes an in-depth look at the popular computational privacy-preserving methods that have been developed for demographic, clinical and genomic data sharing, and closely analyzes the privacy principles behind these methods, as well as the optimization and algorithmic strategies that they employ. Finally, through a series of in-depth case studies that highlight data from the US Census as well as the Vanderbilt University Medical Center, the book outlines a new, innovative class of privacy-preserving methods designed to ensure the integrity of transferred medical data for su...

  16. Is There Evidence of Cost Benefits of Electronic Medical Records, Standards, or Interoperability in Hospital Information Systems? Overview of Systematic Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Zilma Silveira Nogueira; Maia, Thais Abreu; Marcolino, Milena Soriano; Becerra-Posada, Francisco; Novillo-Ortiz, David; Ribeiro, Antonio Luiz Pinho

    2017-08-29

    Electronic health (eHealth) interventions may improve the quality of care by providing timely, accessible information about one patient or an entire population. Electronic patient care information forms the nucleus of computerized health information systems. However, interoperability among systems depends on the adoption of information standards. Additionally, investing in technology systems requires cost-effectiveness studies to ensure the sustainability of processes for stakeholders. The objective of this study was to assess cost-effectiveness of the use of electronically available inpatient data systems, health information exchange, or standards to support interoperability among systems. An overview of systematic reviews was conducted, assessing the MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, LILACS, and IEEE Library databases to identify relevant studies published through February 2016. The search was supplemented by citations from the selected papers. The primary outcome sought the cost-effectiveness, and the secondary outcome was the impact on quality of care. Independent reviewers selected studies, and disagreement was resolved by consensus. The quality of the included studies was evaluated using a measurement tool to assess systematic reviews (AMSTAR). The primary search identified 286 papers, and two papers were manually included. A total of 211 were systematic reviews. From the 20 studies that were selected after screening the title and abstract, 14 were deemed ineligible, and six met the inclusion criteria. The interventions did not show a measurable effect on cost-effectiveness. Despite the limited number of studies, the heterogeneity of electronic systems reported, and the types of intervention in hospital routines, it was possible to identify some preliminary benefits in quality of care. Hospital information systems, along with information sharing, had the potential to improve clinical practice by reducing staff errors or incidents, improving automated harm detection

  17. Digital Sport Medical Record: Sigh or a blessing?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stege, J.P.; Fleuren, M.A.H.; van der Knaap, E.T.W.; Stubbe, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    Since 2004, there have been several initiatives regarding the development of a digital Sport Medical Record (SMD). Interviews with the Netherlands Association of Sports Medicine (VSG) show that there are particular problems with commissioning of the digital SMD. During spring 2012, two focus group

  18. Medical Guidelines Presentation and Comparing with Electronic Health Record

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Veselý, Arnošt; Zvárová, Jana; Peleška, Jan; Buchtela, David; Anger, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 75, č. 3-4 (2006), s. 240-245 ISSN 1386-5056 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET200300413 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : medical guidelines * electronic health record * GLIF model * reminder facility Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science Impact factor: 1.726, year: 2006

  19. Medical imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frangioni, John V [Wayland, MA

    2012-07-24

    A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and fluorescent images. The system may employ dyes in a small-molecule form that remains in a subject's blood stream for several minutes, allowing real-time imaging of the subject's circulatory system superimposed upon a conventional, visible light image of the subject. The system may also employ dyes or other fluorescent substances associated with antibodies, antibody fragments, or ligands that accumulate within a region of diagnostic significance. In one embodiment, the system provides an excitation light source to excite the fluorescent substance and a visible light source for general illumination within the same optical guide that is used to capture images. In another embodiment, the system is configured for use in open surgical procedures by providing an operating area that is closed to ambient light. More broadly, the systems described herein may be used in imaging applications where a visible light image may be usefully supplemented by an image formed from fluorescent emissions from a fluorescent substance that marks areas of functional interest.

  20. Data-driven approach for creating synthetic electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buczak, Anna L; Babin, Steven; Moniz, Linda

    2010-10-14

    New algorithms for disease outbreak detection are being developed to take advantage of full electronic medical records (EMRs) that contain a wealth of patient information. However, due to privacy concerns, even anonymized EMRs cannot be shared among researchers, resulting in great difficulty in comparing the effectiveness of these algorithms. To bridge the gap between novel bio-surveillance algorithms operating on full EMRs and the lack of non-identifiable EMR data, a method for generating complete and synthetic EMRs was developed. This paper describes a novel methodology for generating complete synthetic EMRs both for an outbreak illness of interest (tularemia) and for background records. The method developed has three major steps: 1) synthetic patient identity and basic information generation; 2) identification of care patterns that the synthetic patients would receive based on the information present in real EMR data for similar health problems; 3) adaptation of these care patterns to the synthetic patient population. We generated EMRs, including visit records, clinical activity, laboratory orders/results and radiology orders/results for 203 synthetic tularemia outbreak patients. Validation of the records by a medical expert revealed problems in 19% of the records; these were subsequently corrected. We also generated background EMRs for over 3000 patients in the 4-11 yr age group. Validation of those records by a medical expert revealed problems in fewer than 3% of these background patient EMRs and the errors were subsequently rectified. A data-driven method was developed for generating fully synthetic EMRs. The method is general and can be applied to any data set that has similar data elements (such as laboratory and radiology orders and results, clinical activity, prescription orders). The pilot synthetic outbreak records were for tularemia but our approach may be adapted to other infectious diseases. The pilot synthetic background records were in the 4

  1. Predicting healthcare trajectories from medical records: A deep learning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Trang; Tran, Truyen; Phung, Dinh; Venkatesh, Svetha

    2017-05-01

    Personalized predictive medicine necessitates the modeling of patient illness and care processes, which inherently have long-term temporal dependencies. Healthcare observations, stored in electronic medical records are episodic and irregular in time. We introduce DeepCare, an end-to-end deep dynamic neural network that reads medical records, stores previous illness history, infers current illness states and predicts future medical outcomes. At the data level, DeepCare represents care episodes as vectors and models patient health state trajectories by the memory of historical records. Built on Long Short-Term Memory (LSTM), DeepCare introduces methods to handle irregularly timed events by moderating the forgetting and consolidation of memory. DeepCare also explicitly models medical interventions that change the course of illness and shape future medical risk. Moving up to the health state level, historical and present health states are then aggregated through multiscale temporal pooling, before passing through a neural network that estimates future outcomes. We demonstrate the efficacy of DeepCare for disease progression modeling, intervention recommendation, and future risk prediction. On two important cohorts with heavy social and economic burden - diabetes and mental health - the results show improved prediction accuracy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Development of mobile platform integrated with existing electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, YoungAh; Kim, Sung Soo; Kang, Simon; Kim, Kyungduk; Kim, Jun

    2014-07-01

    This paper describes a mobile Electronic Medical Record (EMR) platform designed to manage and utilize the existing EMR and mobile application with optimized resources. We structured the mEMR to reuse services of retrieval and storage in mobile app environments that have already proven to have no problem working with EMRs. A new mobile architecture-based mobile solution was developed in four steps: the construction of a server and its architecture; screen layout and storyboard making; screen user interface design and development; and a pilot test and step-by-step deployment. This mobile architecture consists of two parts, the server-side area and the client-side area. In the server-side area, it performs the roles of service management for EMR and documents and for information exchange. Furthermore, it performs menu allocation depending on user permission and automatic clinical document architecture document conversion. Currently, Severance Hospital operates an iOS-compatible mobile solution based on this mobile architecture and provides stable service without additional resources, dealing with dynamic changes of EMR templates. The proposed mobile solution should go hand in hand with the existing EMR system, and it can be a cost-effective solution if a quality EMR system is operated steadily with this solution. Thus, we expect this example to be shared with hospitals that currently plan to deploy mobile solutions.

  3. Deficiencies in radiation protection record systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.B.; Lyon, M.

    1991-01-01

    Radiation protection records are a fundamental part of any program for protecting radiation workers. Records are essential to epidemiological studies of radiation workers and are becoming increasingly important as the number of radiation exposure litigation cases increases. Ready retrievability of comprehensive records is also essential to the adequate defense of a radiation protection program. Appraisals of numerous radiation protection programs have revealed that few record-keeping systems comply with American National Standards Institute, Standard Practice N13.6-1972. Record-keeping requirements and types of deficiencies in radiation protection records systems are presented in this paper, followed by general recommendations for implementing a comprehensive radiation protection records system

  4. Deficiencies in radiation protection record systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.B.; Lyon, M.

    1991-01-01

    Radiation protection records are a fundamental part of any program for protecting radiation workers. Records are essential to epidemiological studies of radiation workers and are becoming increasingly important as the number of radiation exposure litigation cases increases. Ready retrievability of comprehensive records is also essential to the adequate defense of a radiation protection program. Appraisals of numerous radiation protection programs have revealed that few record-keeping systems comply with American National Standards Institute, Standard Practice N13.6-1972. Record-keeping requirements and types of deficiencies in radiation protection records systems are presented in this paper, followed by general recommendations for implementing a comprehensive radiation protection records system. 8 refs

  5. Design and implementation of an affordable, public sector electronic medical record in rural Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raut, Anant; Yarbrough, Chase; Singh, Vivek; Gauchan, Bikash; Citrin, David; Verma, Varun; Hawley, Jessica; Schwarz, Dan; Harsha Bangura, Alex; Shrestha, Biplav; Schwarz, Ryan; Adhikari, Mukesh; Maru, Duncan

    2017-06-23

    Globally, electronic medical records are central to the infrastructure of modern healthcare systems. Yet the vast majority of electronic medical records have been designed for resource-rich environments and are not feasible in settings of poverty. Here we describe the design and implementation of an electronic medical record at a public sector district hospital in rural Nepal, and its subsequent expansion to an additional public sector facility.DevelopmentThe electronic medical record was designed to solve for the following elements of public sector healthcare delivery: 1) integration of the systems across inpatient, surgical, outpatient, emergency, laboratory, radiology, and pharmacy sites of care; 2) effective data extraction for impact evaluation and government regulation; 3) optimization for longitudinal care provision and patient tracking; and 4) effectiveness for quality improvement initiatives. For these purposes, we adapted Bahmni, a product built with open-source components for patient tracking, clinical protocols, pharmacy, laboratory, imaging, financial management, and supply logistics. In close partnership with government officials, we deployed the system in February of 2015, added on additional functionality, and iteratively improved the system over the following year. This experience enabled us then to deploy the system at an additional district-level hospital in a different part of the country in under four weeks. We discuss the implementation challenges and the strategies we pursued to build an electronic medical record for the public sector in rural Nepal.DiscussionOver the course of 18 months, we were able to develop, deploy and iterate upon the electronic medical record, and then deploy the refined product at an additional facility within only four weeks. Our experience suggests the feasibility of an integrated electronic medical record for public sector care delivery even in settings of rural poverty.

  6. Recognition and pseudonymisation of medical records for secondary use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heurix, Johannes; Fenz, Stefan; Rella, Antonio; Neubauer, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Health records rank among the most sensitive personal information existing today. An unwanted disclosure to unauthorised parties usually results in significant negative consequences for an individual. Therefore, health records must be adequately protected in order to ensure the individual's privacy. However, health records are also valuable resources for clinical studies and research activities. In order to make the records available for privacy-preserving secondary use, thorough de-personalisation is a crucial prerequisite to prevent re-identification. This paper introduces MEDSEC, a system which automatically converts paper-based health records into de-personalised and pseudonymised documents which can be accessed by secondary users without compromising the patients' privacy. The system converts the paper-based records into a standardised structure that facilitates automated processing and the search for useful information.

  7. Progress in electronic medical record adoption in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    To determine the rate of adoption of electronic medical records (EMRs) by physicians across Canada, provincial incentives, and perceived benefits of and barriers to EMR adoption. Data on EMR adoption in Canada were collected from CINAHL, MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, the Health Council of Canada, Canada Health Infoway, government websites, regional EMR associations, and health professional association websites. After removal of duplicate articles, 236 documents were found matching the original search. After using the filter Canada, 12 documents remained. Additional documents were obtained from each province's EMR website and from the Canada Health Infoway website. Since 2006, Canadian EMR adoption rates have increased from about 20% of practitioners to an estimated 62% of practitioners in 2013, with substantial regional disparities ranging from roughly 40% of physicians in New Brunswick and Quebec to more than 75% of physicians in Alberta. Provincial incentives vary widely but appear to have only a weak relationship with the rate of adoption. Many adopters use only a fraction of their software's available functions. User-cited benefits to adoption include time savings, improved record keeping, heightened patient safety, and confidence in retrieved data when EMRs are used efficiently. Barriers to adoption include financial and time constraints, lack of knowledgeable support personnel, and lack of interoperability with hospital and pharmacy systems. Canadian physicians remain at the stage of EMR adoption. Progression in EMR use requires experienced, knowledgeable technical support during implementation, and financial support for the transcription of patient data from paper to electronic media. The interoperability of EMR offerings for hospitals, pharmacies, and clinics is the rate-limiting factor in achieving a unified EMR solution for Canada.

  8. Improving the medical records department processes by lean management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajami, Sima; Ketabi, Saeedeh; Sadeghian, Akram; Saghaeinnejad-Isfahani, Sakine

    2015-01-01

    Lean management is a process improvement technique to identify waste actions and processes to eliminate them. The benefits of Lean for healthcare organizations are that first, the quality of the outcomes in terms of mistakes and errors improves. The second is that the amount of time taken through the whole process significantly improves. The purpose of this paper is to improve the Medical Records Department (MRD) processes at Ayatolah-Kashani Hospital in Isfahan, Iran by utilizing Lean management. This research was applied and an interventional study. The data have been collected by brainstorming, observation, interview, and workflow review. The study population included MRD staff and other expert staff within the hospital who were stakeholders and users of the MRD. The MRD were initially taught the concepts of Lean management and then formed into the MRD Lean team. The team then identified and reviewed the current processes subsequently; they identified wastes and values, and proposed solutions. The findings showed that the MRD units (Archive, Coding, Statistics, and Admission) had 17 current processes, 28 wastes, and 11 values were identified. In addition, they offered 27 comments for eliminating the wastes. The MRD is the critical department for the hospital information system and, therefore, the continuous improvement of its services and processes, through scientific methods such as Lean management, are essential. The study represents one of the few attempts trying to eliminate wastes in the MRD.

  9. Prevalence of Sharing Access Credentials in Electronic Medical Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korach, Tzfania; Shreberk-Hassidim, Rony; Thomaidou, Elena; Uzefovsky, Florina; Ayal, Shahar; Ariely, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Confidentiality of health information is an important aspect of the physician patient relationship. The use of digital medical records has made data much more accessible. To prevent data leakage, many countries have created regulations regarding medical data accessibility. These regulations require a unique user ID for each medical staff member, and this must be protected by a password, which should be kept undisclosed by all means. Methods We performed a four-question Google Forms-based survey of medical staff. In the survey, each participant was asked if he/she ever obtained the password of another medical staff member. Then, we asked how many times such an episode occurred and the reason for it. Results A total of 299 surveys were gathered. The responses showed that 220 (73.6%) participants reported that they had obtained the password of another medical staff member. Only 171 (57.2%) estimated how many time it happened, with an average estimation of 4.75 episodes. All the residents that took part in the study (45, 15%) had obtained the password of another medical staff member, while only 57.5% (38/66) of the nurses reported this. Conclusions The use of unique user IDs and passwords to defend the privacy of medical data is a common requirement in medical organizations. Unfortunately, the use of passwords is doomed because medical staff members share their passwords with one another. Strict regulations requiring each staff member to have it's a unique user ID might lead to password sharing and to a decrease in data safety. PMID:28875052

  10. 76 FR 9849 - Privacy Act of 1974: System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-22

    ... system of records has been sent to the U.S. Congress and the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). V... Classification: Unclassified, Sensitive. System Location: Medical Exemption Program databases reside at the..., encryption, firewalls, and secured operating systems and to which only authorized personnel with a specific...

  11. Brief review: dangers of the electronic medical record

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available EMRs represent a potential boon to patient care and providers, but to date that potential has been unfulfilled. Data suggest that in some instances EMRs may even produce adverse outcomes. This result probably has occurred because lack of provider input and familiarity with EMRs resulting in the medical records becoming less a tool for patient care and more of a tool for documentation and reimbursement.

  12. Formalized Medical Guidelines and a Structured Electronic Health Record.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Peleška, Jan; Anger, Z.; Buchtela, David; Šebesta, K.; Tomečková, Marie; Veselý, Arnošt; Zvára, K.; Zvárová, Jana

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 11, - (2005), s. 4652-4656 ISSN 1727-1983. [EMBEC'05. European Medical and Biomedical Conference /3./. Prague, 20.11.2005-25.11.2005] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET200300413 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : formalization of guidelines in cardilogy * GLIF model * structure electronic health record * algorithm in cardiovascular diagnostics and treatment Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information

  13. Data-mining of medication records to improve asthma management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereznicki, Bonnie J; Peterson, Gregory M; Jackson, Shane L; Walters, E Haydn; Fitzmaurice, Kimbra D; Gee, Peter R

    2008-07-07

    To use community pharmacy medication records to identify patients whose asthma may not be well managed and then implement and evaluate a multidisciplinary educational intervention to improve asthma management. We used a multisite controlled study design. Forty-two pharmacies throughout Tasmania ran a software application that "data-mined" medication records, generating a list of patients who had received three or more canisters of inhaled short-acting beta(2)-agonists in the preceding 6 months. The patients identified were allocated to an intervention or control group. Pre-intervention data were collected for the period May to November 2006 and post-intervention data for the period December 2006 to May 2007. Intervention patients were contacted by the community pharmacist via mail, and were sent educational material and a letter encouraging them to see their general practitioner for an asthma management review. Pharmacists were blinded to the control patients' identities until the end of the post-intervention period. Dispensing ratio of preventer medication (inhaled corticosteroids [ICSs]) to reliever medication (inhaled short-acting beta(2)-agonists). Thirty-five pharmacies completed the study, providing 702 intervention and 849 control patients. The intervention resulted in a threefold increase in the preventer-to-reliever ratio in the intervention group compared with the control group (P < 0.01) and a higher proportion of patients in the intervention group using ICS therapy than in the control group (P < 0.01). Community pharmacy medication records can be effectively used to identify patients with suboptimal asthma management, who can then be referred to their GP for review. The intervention should be trialled on a national scale to determine the effects on clinical, social, emotional and economic outcomes for people in the Australian community, with a longer follow-up to determine sustainability of the improvements noted.

  14. Consumers' Perceptions of Patient-Accessible Electronic Medical Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughon, Wendy L; Czaja, Sara J; Levy, Joslyn; Rockoff, Maxine L

    2013-01-01

    Background Electronic health information (eHealth) tools for patients, including patient-accessible electronic medical records (patient portals), are proliferating in health care delivery systems nationally. However, there has been very limited study of the perceived utility and functionality of portals, as well as limited assessment of these systems by vulnerable (low education level, racial/ethnic minority) consumers. Objective The objective of the study was to identify vulnerable consumers’ response to patient portals, their perceived utility and value, as well as their reactions to specific portal functions. Methods This qualitative study used 4 focus groups with 28 low education level, English-speaking consumers in June and July 2010, in New York City. Results Participants included 10 males and 18 females, ranging in age from 21-63 years; 19 non-Hispanic black, 7 Hispanic, 1 non-Hispanic White and 1 Other. None of the participants had higher than a high school level education, and 13 had less than a high school education. All participants had experience with computers and 26 used the Internet. Major themes were enhanced consumer engagement/patient empowerment, extending the doctor’s visit/enhancing communication with health care providers, literacy and health literacy factors, improved prevention and health maintenance, and privacy and security concerns. Consumers were also asked to comment on a number of key portal features. Consumers were most positive about features that increased convenience, such as making appointments and refilling prescriptions. Consumers raised concerns about a number of potential barriers to usage, such as complex language, complex visual layouts, and poor usability features. Conclusions Most consumers were enthusiastic about patient portals and perceived that they had great utility and value. Study findings suggest that for patient portals to be effective for all consumers, portals must be designed to be easy to read, visually

  15. Hospital electronic medical record enterprise application strategies: do they matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fareed, Naleef; Ozcan, Yasar A; DeShazo, Jonathan P

    2012-01-01

    Successful implementations and the ability to reap the benefits of electronic medical record (EMR) systems may be correlated with the type of enterprise application strategy that an administrator chooses when acquiring an EMR system. Moreover, identifying the most optimal enterprise application strategy is a task that may have important linkages with hospital performance. This study explored whether hospitals that have adopted differential EMR enterprise application strategies concomitantly differ in their overall efficiency. Specifically, the study examined whether hospitals with a single-vendor strategy had a higher likelihood of being efficient than those with a best-of-breed strategy and whether hospitals with a best-of-suite strategy had a higher probability of being efficient than those with best-of-breed or single-vendor strategies. A conceptual framework was used to formulate testable hypotheses. A retrospective cross-sectional approach using data envelopment analysis was used to obtain efficiency scores of hospitals by EMR enterprise application strategy. A Tobit regression analysis was then used to determine the probability of a hospital being inefficient as related to its EMR enterprise application strategy, while moderating for the hospital's EMR "implementation status" and controlling for hospital and market characteristics. The data envelopment analysis of hospitals suggested that only 32 hospitals were efficient in the study's sample of 2,171 hospitals. The results from the post hoc analysis showed partial support for the hypothesis that hospitals with a best-of-suite strategy were more likely to be efficient than those with a single-vendor strategy. This study underscores the importance of understanding the differences between the three strategies discussed in this article. On the basis of the findings, hospital administrators should consider the efficiency associations that a specific strategy may have compared with another prior to moving toward

  16. Recording and podcasting of lectures for students of medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet, Pierre; Cuggia, Marc; Le Beux, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Information and communication technology (ICT) becomes an important way for the knowledge transmission, especially in the field of medicine. Podcasting (mobile broadcast content) has recently emerged as an efficient tool for distributing information towards professionals, especially for e-learning contents.The goal of this work is to implement software and hardware tools for collecting medical lectures at its source by direct recording (halls and classrooms) and provide the automatic delivery of these resources for students on different type of devices (computer, smartphone or videogames console). We describe the overall architecture and the methods used by medical students to master this technology in their daily activities. We highlight the benefits and the limits of the Podcast technologies for medical education.

  17. Data-driven approach for creating synthetic electronic medical records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moniz Linda

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background New algorithms for disease outbreak detection are being developed to take advantage of full electronic medical records (EMRs that contain a wealth of patient information. However, due to privacy concerns, even anonymized EMRs cannot be shared among researchers, resulting in great difficulty in comparing the effectiveness of these algorithms. To bridge the gap between novel bio-surveillance algorithms operating on full EMRs and the lack of non-identifiable EMR data, a method for generating complete and synthetic EMRs was developed. Methods This paper describes a novel methodology for generating complete synthetic EMRs both for an outbreak illness of interest (tularemia and for background records. The method developed has three major steps: 1 synthetic patient identity and basic information generation; 2 identification of care patterns that the synthetic patients would receive based on the information present in real EMR data for similar health problems; 3 adaptation of these care patterns to the synthetic patient population. Results We generated EMRs, including visit records, clinical activity, laboratory orders/results and radiology orders/results for 203 synthetic tularemia outbreak patients. Validation of the records by a medical expert revealed problems in 19% of the records; these were subsequently corrected. We also generated background EMRs for over 3000 patients in the 4-11 yr age group. Validation of those records by a medical expert revealed problems in fewer than 3% of these background patient EMRs and the errors were subsequently rectified. Conclusions A data-driven method was developed for generating fully synthetic EMRs. The method is general and can be applied to any data set that has similar data elements (such as laboratory and radiology orders and results, clinical activity, prescription orders. The pilot synthetic outbreak records were for tularemia but our approach may be adapted to other infectious

  18. 5 CFR 293.504 - Composition of, and access to, the Employee Medical File System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Employee Medical File System. 293.504 Section 293.504 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PERSONNEL RECORDS Employee Medical File System Records § 293.504 Composition of, and access to, the Employee Medical File System. (a) All employee occupational medical records...

  19. Medical Certification System -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Provides automated risk-based decision making capability in support of medical certification and clearances processing associated fees and supporting surveillance of...

  20. The Next Generation Precision Medical Record - A Framework for Integrating Genomes and Wearable Sensors with Medical Records

    OpenAIRE

    Batra, Prag; Singh, Enakshi; Bog, Anja; Wright, Mark; Ashley, Euan; Waggott, Daryl

    2016-01-01

    Current medical records are rigid with regards to emerging big biomedical data. Examples of poorly integrated big data that already exist in clinical practice include whole genome sequencing and wearable sensors for real time monitoring. Genome sequencing enables conventional diagnostic interrogation and forms the fundamental baseline for precision health throughout a patients lifetime. Mobile sensors enable tailored monitoring regimes for both reducing risk through precision health intervent...

  1. Corridor consultations and the medical microbiological record: is patient safety at risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heard, S R; Roberts, C; Furrows, S J; Kelsey, M; Southgate, L

    2003-01-01

    The performance procedures of the General Medical Council are aimed at identifying seriously deficient performance in a doctor. The performance procedures require the medical record to be of a standard that enables the next doctor seeing the patient to give adequate care based on the available information. Setting standards for microbiological record keeping has proved difficult. Over one fifth of practising medical microbiologists (including virologists) in the UK (139 of 676) responded to a survey undertaken by the working group developing the performance procedures for microbiology, to identify current practice and to develop recommendations for agreement within the profession about the standards of the microbiological record. The cumulative frequency for the surveyed recording methods used indicated that at various times 65% (90 of 139) of respondents used a daybook, 62% (86 of 139) used the back of the clinical request card, 57% (79 of 139) used a computer record, and 22% (30 of 139) used an index card system to record microbiological advice, suggesting wide variability in relation to how medical microbiologists maintain clinical records. PMID:12499432

  2. Electronic Health Record-Related Events in Medical Malpractice Claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graber, Mark L; Siegal, Dana; Riah, Heather; Johnston, Doug; Kenyon, Kathy

    2015-11-06

    There is widespread agreement that the full potential of health information technology (health IT) has not yet been realized and of particular concern are the examples of unintended consequences of health IT that detract from the safety of health care or from the use of health IT itself. The goal of this project was to obtain additional information on these health IT-related problems, using a mixed methods (qualitative and quantitative) analysis of electronic health record-related harm in cases submitted to a large database of malpractice suits and claims. Cases submitted to the CRICO claims database and coded during 2012 and 2013 were analyzed. A total of 248 cases (<1%) involving health IT were identified and coded using a proprietary taxonomy that identifies user- and system-related sociotechnical factors. Ambulatory care accounted for most of the cases (146 cases). Cases were most typically filed as a result of an error involving medications (31%), diagnosis (28%), or a complication of treatment (31%). More than 80% of cases involved moderate or severe harm, although lethal cases were less likely in cases from ambulatory settings. Etiologic factors spanned all of the sociotechnical dimensions, and many recurring patterns of error were identified. Adverse events associated with health IT vulnerabilities can cause extensive harm and are encountered across the continuum of health care settings and sociotechnical factors. The recurring patterns provide valuable lessons that both practicing clinicians and health IT developers could use to reduce the risk of harm in the future. The likelihood of harm seems to relate more to a patient's particular situation than to any one class of error.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share thework provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used

  3. 78 FR 5792 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-28

    ..., Marine Corps; BUMED Note 6110, Tracking and Reporting Individual Medical Readiness Data; SECNAVINST 6120... persons that are properly screened, cleared, and trained. Access to this system of records and personal... available only to authorized personnel having a need-to-know.'' * * * * * System manager(s) and address...

  4. Occupational Health Record-keeping System (OHRS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Occupational Health Record-keeping System (OHRS) is part of the Clinical Information Support System (CISS) portal framework and the initial CISS partner system. OHRS...

  5. Electronic medical records in humanitarian emergencies – the development of an Ebola clinical information and patient management system [version 3; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Jobanputra

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available By November 2015, the West Africa Ebola epidemic had caused 28598 infections and 11299 deaths in the three countries most affected. The outbreak required rapid innovation and adaptation. Médecins sans Frontières (MSF scaled up its usual 20-30 bed Ebola management centres (EMCs to 100-300 beds with over 300 workers in some settings. This brought challenges in patient and clinical data management resulting from the difficulties of working safely with high numbers of Ebola patients. We describe a project MSF established with software developers and the Google Social Impact Team to develop context-adapted tools to address the challenges of recording Ebola clinical information. We share the outcomes and key lessons learned in innovating rapidly under pressure in difficult environmental conditions. Information on adoption, maintenance, and data quality was gathered through review of project documentation, discussions with field staff and key project stakeholders, and analysis of tablet data. In March 2015, a full prototype was deployed in Magburaka EMC, Sierra Leone. Inpatient data were captured on 204 clinical interactions with 34 patients from 5 March until 10 April 2015. Data continued to also be recorded on paper charts, creating theoretically identical record “pairs” on paper and tablet. 83 record pairs for 33 patients with 22 data items (temperature and symptoms per pair were analysed. The overall Kappa coefficient for agreement between sources was 0.62, but reduced to 0.59 when rare bleeding symptoms were excluded, indicating moderate to good agreement. The time taken to deliver the product was more than that anticipated by MSF (7 months versus 6 weeks. Deployment of the tablet coincided with a dramatic drop in patient numbers and thus had little impact on patient care. We have identified lessons specific to humanitarian-technology collaborative projects and propose a framework for emergency humanitarian innovation. Time and effort is

  6. Infant feeding practices within a large electronic medical record database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Emily; Park, Alison L; Young, Jacqueline; Ray, Joel G; Tu, Karen

    2018-01-02

    The emerging adoption of the electronic medical record (EMR) in primary care enables clinicians and researchers to efficiently examine epidemiological trends in child health, including infant feeding practices. We completed a population-based retrospective cohort study of 8815 singleton infants born at term in Ontario, Canada, April 2002 to March 2013. Newborn records were linked to the Electronic Medical Record Administrative data Linked Database (EMRALD™), which uses patient-level information from participating family practice EMRs across Ontario. We assessed exclusive breastfeeding patterns using an automated electronic search algorithm, with manual review of EMRs when the latter was not possible. We examined the rate of breastfeeding at visits corresponding to 2, 4 and 6 months of age, as well as sociodemographic factors associated with exclusive breastfeeding. Of the 8815 newborns, 1044 (11.8%) lacked breastfeeding information in their EMR. Rates of exclusive breastfeeding were 39.5% at 2 months, 32.4% at 4 months and 25.1% at 6 months. At age 6 months, exclusive breastfeeding rates were highest among mothers aged ≥40 vs. database.

  7. Admission medical records made at night time have the same quality as day and evening time records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirian, Ilda; Mortensen, Jacob F; Rosenberg, Jacob; Gögenur, Ismail

    2014-07-01

    A thorough and accurate admission medical record is an important tool in ensuring patient safety during the hospital stay. Surgeons' performance might be affected during night shifts due to sleep deprivation. The aim of the study was to assess the quality of admission medical records during day, evening and night time. A total of 1,000 admission medical records were collected from 2009 to 2013 based equally on four diagnoses: mechanical bowel obstruction, appendicitis, gallstone disease and gastrointestinal bleeding. The records were reviewed for errors by a pre-defined checklist based on Danish standards for admission medical records. The time of dictation for the medical record was registered. A total of 1,183 errors were found in 778 admission medical records made during day- and evening time, and 322 errors in 222 admission medical records from night time shifts. No significant overall difference in error was found in the admission medical records when day and evening values were compared to night values. Subgroup analyses made for all four diagnoses showed no difference in day and evening values compared with night time values. Night time deterioration was not seen in the quality of the medical records.

  8. Invite yourself to the table: librarian contributions to the electronic medical record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandes, Susan; Wells, Karen; Bandy, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Librarians from Exempla Healthcare hospitals initiated contact with the chief medical information officer regarding evidence-based medicine activities related to the development of the system's Electronic Medical Record (EMR). This column reviews the librarians' involvement in specific initiatives that included providing comparative information on point-of-care resources to integrate into the EMR, providing evidence as needed for the order sets being developed, and participating with clinicians on an evidence-based advisory committee.

  9. Customization of electronic medical record templates to improve end-user satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Carrie Lee; Pearce, Patricia F

    2013-03-01

    Since 2004, increasing importance has been placed on the adoption of electronic medical records by healthcare providers for documentation of patient care. Recent federal regulations have shifted the focus from adoption alone to meaningful use of an electronic medical record system. As proposed by the Technology Acceptance Model, the behavioral intention to use technology is determined by the person's attitude toward usage. The purpose of this quality improvement project was to devise and implement customized templates into an existent electronic medical record system in a single clinic and measure the satisfaction of the clinic providers with the system before and after implementation. Provider satisfaction with the electronic medical record system was evaluated prior to and following template implementation using the current version 7.0 of the Questionnaire for User Interaction Satisfaction tool. Provider comments and improvement in the Questionnaire for User Interaction Satisfaction levels of rankings following template implementation indicated a positive perspective by the providers in regard to the templates and customization of the system.

  10. Audit of Medical Records of Shahid Madani Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad farough-khosravi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Evaluation of the quality of services and provided cares through comparing them with existing standards in order to identify and prioritize problems and trying to fix them are important steps in the audit of clinical functions. This study aimed to improve the quality of performance of medical records registrations about patients admitted to hospital Shahid Madani and deals with the audit of records listed them. Material and Methods: To perform this study, data were collected using researcher checklist. Target data of 30 medical records were gathered. We used software package of Mini Tab and SPSS to develop process statistical control charts and for statistical analysis of data, respectively. Results: By plotting control charts, we determined three specific reasons in the ADMISSION AND DISCHARGE SUMMARY SHEET, four specific reasons in the SUMMARY SHEET, and three specific reasons in CONSULTATION REQUEST SHEET. The lack of the standard form (on-delivered copies of a summary form “with 90%”, lack of the main form in patient's clinical record “with 83.3%”, lack of the patient's procedure “with 73.3%”are ranked as the most defects in SUMMARY SHEET. In the CONSULTATION REQUEST SHEET, failure to comply with doctor's stamp and signature standard with “20%” has highest percentage of defects. In the ADMISSION AND DISCHARGE SUMMARY SHEET nonconformity of standard records, patient's duration of stay “100%”, coding of diseases based on ICD"100%", recording of patient number based on signs and symptoms "93.3%", usingthe abbreviations to record the recognitions "93.3%" have highest percentage of defects respectively. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study and noting that studied standards of process statistical control charts are in the range of control, the quality of standards and the documentations of  the records

  11. Development of the electronic patient record system based on problem oriented system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uto, Yumiko; Iwaanakuchi, Takashi; Muranaga, Fuminori; Kumamoto, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    In Japan, POS (problem oriented system) is recommended in the clinical guideline. Therefore, the records are mainly made by SOAP. We developed a system mainly with a function which enabled our staff members of all kinds of professions including doctors to enter the patients' clinical information as an identical record, regardless if they were outpatients or inpatients, and to observe the contents chronologically. This electric patient record system is called "e-kanja recording system". On this system, all staff members in the medical team can now share the same information. Moreover, the contents can be reviewed by colleagues; the quality of records has been improved as it is evaluated by the others.

  12. Building a Privacy, Ethics, and Data Access Framework for Real World Computerised Medical Record System Data: A Delphi Study. Contribution of the Primary Health Care Informatics Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liyanage, H; Liaw, S-T; Di Iorio, C T; Kuziemsky, C; Schreiber, R; Terry, A L; de Lusignan, S

    2016-11-10

    Privacy, ethics, and data access issues pose significant challenges to the timely delivery of health research. Whilst the fundamental drivers to ensure that data access is ethical and satisfies privacy requirements are similar, they are often dealt with in varying ways by different approval processes. To achieve a consensus across an international panel of health care and informatics professionals on an integrated set of privacy and ethics principles that could accelerate health data access in data-driven health research projects. A three-round consensus development process was used. In round one, we developed a baseline framework for privacy, ethics, and data access based on a review of existing literature in the health, informatics, and policy domains. This was further developed using a two-round Delphi consensus building process involving 20 experts who were members of the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA) and European Federation of Medical Informatics (EFMI) Primary Health Care Informatics Working Groups. To achieve consensus we required an extended Delphi process. The first round involved feedback on and development of the baseline framework. This consisted of four components: (1) ethical principles, (2) ethical guidance questions, (3) privacy and data access principles, and (4) privacy and data access guidance questions. Round two developed consensus in key areas of the revised framework, allowing the building of a newly, more detailed and descriptive framework. In the final round panel experts expressed their opinions, either as agreements or disagreements, on the ethics and privacy statements of the framework finding some of the previous round disagreements to be surprising in view of established ethical principles. This study develops a framework for an integrated approach to ethics and privacy. Privacy breech risk should not be considered in isolation but instead balanced by potential ethical benefit.

  13. Bidirectional RNN for Medical Event Detection in Electronic Health Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannatha, Abhyuday N; Yu, Hong

    2016-06-01

    Sequence labeling for extraction of medical events and their attributes from unstructured text in Electronic Health Record (EHR) notes is a key step towards semantic understanding of EHRs. It has important applications in health informatics including pharmacovigilance and drug surveillance. The state of the art supervised machine learning models in this domain are based on Conditional Random Fields (CRFs) with features calculated from fixed context windows. In this application, we explored recurrent neural network frameworks and show that they significantly out-performed the CRF models.

  14. System integration for radiation records

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, B.J.; Farrell, L.; Meacham, C.; Tapio, J.

    1994-01-01

    System integration is the process where through networking and/or software development, necessary business information is available in a common computing environment. System integration is becoming an important objective for many businesses. System integration can improve productivity and efficiency, reduce redundant stored information and errors, and improve availability of information. This paper will discuss the information flow in a radiation health environment, and how system integration can help. Information handled includes external dosimetry and internal dosimetry. The paper will focus on an ORACLE based system integration software product

  15. Automating payroll, billing, and medical records. Using technology to do more with less.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, E

    1995-08-01

    As home care agencies grow, so does the need to streamline the paperwork involved in running an agency. One agency found a way to reduce its payroll, billing, and medical records paperwork by implementing an automated, image-based data collection system that saves time, money, and paper.

  16. 76 FR 53921 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security ALL-034 Emergency Care Medical Records...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-30

    ... AGENCY: Privacy Office, DHS. ACTION: Notice of Privacy Act system of records. SUMMARY: In accordance with... Security Office of Health Affairs to collect and maintain records on individuals who receive emergency care... consistent, quality medical care. To support MQM, OHA operates the electronic Patient Care Record (ePCR), an...

  17. The work practice of medical secretaries and the implementation of electronic health records in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Pernille; Nøhr, Christian

    2005-01-01

    The introduction of electronic health records will entail substantial organisational changes to the clinical and administrative staff in hospitals. Hospital owners in Denmark have predicted that these changes will render up to half of medical secretaries redundant. The present study however shows...... that medical secretaries have a great variety of duties, and often act as the organisational ‘glue’ or connecting thread between other professional groups at the hospital. The aim of this study is to obtain a detailed understanding of the pluralism of work tasks the medical secretaries perform. It is concluded...... that clinicians as well as nurses depend on medical secretaries, and therefore to reduce the number of secretaries because electronic health record systems are implemented needs very careful thinking, planning and discussion with the other professions involved....

  18. Adaptations of Personal Health Record Platform for Medical Research on Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Krukowski

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The article reports on experiences in e-Health platforms and services for supporting medical research into the causes and relationships among physiological parameters and health problems concerning different chronic diseases. The Personal Health Record (PHR is a way of standardizing electronic management of medical information between patients and their physicians, including medical bodies collaborating in providing integrated medical care services. We describe roles and aims behind electronic health records, follow with applicable legal and standardizations frameworks and relevant European activities, leading to the presentation of common commercial and open-source implementations of such systems, concluding with the indication of specific adaptations enabling a use of stored personal health data for scientific research into causes and evaluation of chronic illnesses. We describe ethical and privacy concerns that are relevant to using and exchanging electronic health information.

  19. Applying the theory of constraints to the logistics service of medical records of a hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor-G. Aguilar-Escobar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Management of patient records in a hospital is of major importance, for its impact both on the quality of care and on the associated costs. Since this process is circular, the prevention of the building up of bottlenecks is especially important. Thus, the objective of this paper was to analyze whether the Theory of Constraints (TOC can be useful to the logistics of medical records in hospitals. The paper is based on a case study conducted about the 2007-2011 period in the Medical Records Logistics Service at the Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena in Seville (Spain. From April 2008, a set of actions in the clinical record logistics system were implemented based on the application of TOC principles. The results obtained show a significant increase in the level of service and employee productivity, as well as a reduction of cost and the number of patients’ complaints.

  20. Exploration Medical System Demonstration Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, D. A.; McGrath, T. L.; Reyna, B.; Watkins, S. D.

    2011-01-01

    A near-Earth Asteroid (NEA) mission will present significant new challenges including hazards to crew health created by exploring a beyond low earth orbit destination, traversing the terrain of asteroid surfaces, and the effects of variable gravity environments. Limited communications with ground-based personnel for diagnosis and consultation of medical events require increased crew autonomy when diagnosing conditions, creating treatment plans, and executing procedures. Scope: The Exploration Medical System Demonstration (EMSD) project will be a test bed on the International Space Station (ISS) to show an end-to-end medical system assisting the Crew Medical Officers (CMO) in optimizing medical care delivery and medical data management during a mission. NEA medical care challenges include resource and resupply constraints limiting the extent to which medical conditions can be treated, inability to evacuate to Earth during many mission phases, and rendering of medical care by a non-clinician. The system demonstrates the integration of medical technologies and medical informatics tools for managing evidence and decision making. Project Objectives: The objectives of the EMSD project are to: a) Reduce and possibly eliminate the time required for a crewmember and ground personnel to manage medical data from one application to another. b) Demonstrate crewmember's ability to access medical data/information via a software solution to assist/aid in the treatment of a medical condition. c) Develop a common data management architecture that can be ubiquitously used to automate repetitive data collection, management, and communications tasks for all crew health and life sciences activities. d) Develop a common data management architecture that allows for scalability, extensibility, and interoperability of data sources and data users. e) Lower total cost of ownership for development and sustainment of peripheral hardware and software that use EMSD for data management f) Provide

  1. Overcoming Structural Constraints to Patient Utilization of Electronic Medical Records: A Critical Review and Proposal for an Evaluation Framework

    OpenAIRE

    Winkelman, Warren J.; Leonard, Kevin J.

    2004-01-01

    There are constraints embedded in medical record structure that limit use by patients in self-directed disease management. Through systematic review of the literature from a critical perspective, four characteristics that either enhance or mitigate the influence of medical record structure on patient utilization of an electronic patient record (EPR) system have been identified: environmental pressures, physician centeredness, collaborative organizational culture, and patient centeredness. An ...

  2. Attitudes toward inter-hospital electronic patient record exchange: discrepancies among physicians, medical record staff, and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jong-Yi; Ho, Hsiao-Yun; Chen, Jen-De; Chai, Sinkuo; Tai, Chih-Jaan; Chen, Yung-Fu

    2015-07-12

    In this era of ubiquitous information, patient record exchange among hospitals still has technological and individual barriers including resistance to information sharing. Most research on user attitudes has been limited to one type of user or aspect. Because few analyses of attitudes toward electronic patient records (EPRs) have been conducted, understanding the attitudes among different users in multiple aspects is crucial to user acceptance. This proof-of-concept study investigated the attitudes of users toward the inter-hospital EPR exchange system implemented nationwide and focused on discrepant behavioral intentions among three user groups. The system was designed by combining a Health Level 7-based protocol, object-relational mapping, and other medical informatics techniques to ensure interoperability in realizing patient-centered practices. After implementation, three user-specific questionnaires for physicians, medical record staff, and patients were administered, with a 70 % response rate. The instrument showed favorable convergent construct validity and internal consistency reliability. Two dependent variables were applied: the attitudes toward privacy and support. Independent variables comprised personal characteristics, work characteristics, human aspects, and technology aspects. Major statistical methods included exploratory factor analysis and general linear model. The results from 379 respondents indicated that the patients highly agreed with privacy protection by their consent and support for EPRs, whereas the physicians remained conservative toward both. Medical record staff was ranked in the middle among the three groups. The three user groups demonstrated discrepant intentions toward privacy protection and support. Experience of computer use, level of concerns, usefulness of functions, and specifically, reason to use electronic medical records and number of outpatient visits were significantly associated with the perceptions. Overall, four

  3. Implementation of a Big Data Accessing and Processing Platform for Medical Records in Cloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao-Tung; Liu, Jung-Chun; Chen, Shuo-Tsung; Lu, Hsin-Wen

    2017-08-18

    Big Data analysis has become a key factor of being innovative and competitive. Along with population growth worldwide and the trend aging of population in developed countries, the rate of the national medical care usage has been increasing. Due to the fact that individual medical data are usually scattered in different institutions and their data formats are varied, to integrate those data that continue increasing is challenging. In order to have scalable load capacity for these data platforms, we must build them in good platform architecture. Some issues must be considered in order to use the cloud computing to quickly integrate big medical data into database for easy analyzing, searching, and filtering big data to obtain valuable information.This work builds a cloud storage system with HBase of Hadoop for storing and analyzing big data of medical records and improves the performance of importing data into database. The data of medical records are stored in HBase database platform for big data analysis. This system performs distributed computing on medical records data processing through Hadoop MapReduce programming, and to provide functions, including keyword search, data filtering, and basic statistics for HBase database. This system uses the Put with the single-threaded method and the CompleteBulkload mechanism to import medical data. From the experimental results, we find that when the file size is less than 300MB, the Put with single-threaded method is used and when the file size is larger than 300MB, the CompleteBulkload mechanism is used to improve the performance of data import into database. This system provides a web interface that allows users to search data, filter out meaningful information through the web, and analyze and convert data in suitable forms that will be helpful for medical staff and institutions.

  4. Electronic Health Record Systems and Intent to Apply for Meaningful Use Incentives among Office-based Physician ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Order from the National Technical Information Service NCHS Electronic Health Record Systems and Intent to Apply for ... In 2011, 57% of office-based physicians used electronic medical record/electronic health record (EMR/EHR) systems, ...

  5. A security analysis of the Dutch electronic patient record system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van 't Noordende, G.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we analyze the security architecture of the Dutch Electronic Patient Dossier (EPD) system. Intended as a national infrastructure for exchanging medical patient records among authorized parties (particularly, physicians), the EPD has to address a number of requirements, ranging from

  6. Security in the Dutch electronic patient record system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van 't Noordende, G.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we analyze the security architecture of the Dutch Electronic Patient Dossier (EPD) system. Intended as a mandatory infrastructure for exchanging medical records of most if not all patients in the Netherlands among authorized parties (particularly, physicians), the EPD has to address

  7. 76 FR 6767 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-08

    ... of birth, personal address, personal home and cell phone numbers, personal e-mail address, occupation...; existence of medical conditions or history such as asthma, diabetes, stroke, etc.; and consent to treatment..., Ships, and Submarines. Categories of records in the system: Name, date and place of birth, personal...

  8. 76 FR 51002 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ... of 1974 training. Retention and disposal: Disposition pending (treat records as permanent until the... Vision Registry (DVEIVR). System location: Primary location: Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense, Force..., Treatment, and Rehabilitation of Military Eye Injuries; 10 U.S.C. chapter 55, Medical and Dental Care; 45...

  9. Medical Expert Systems Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Abu-Nasser, Bassem S.

    2017-01-01

    International audience; There is an increased interest in the area of Artificial Intelligence in general and expert systems in particular. Expert systems are rapidly growing technology. Expert systems are a branch of Artificial Intelligence which is having a great impact on many fields of human life. Expert systems use human expert knowledge to solve complex problems in many fields such as Health, science, engineering, business, and weather forecasting. Organizations employing the technology ...

  10. Admission medical records made at night time have the same quality as day and evening time records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amirian, Ilda; Mortensen, Jacob F; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: A thorough and accurate admission medical record is an important tool in ensuring patient safety during the hospital stay. Surgeons' performance might be affected during night shifts due to sleep deprivation. The aim of the study was to assess the quality of admission medical records...

  11. Evaluation of medical records maintenance quality in dental medical organizations of Kazan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A K Lapina

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Improvement of the quality control of dental medical organizations when diagnosing dentoalveolar anomalies and deformities. Methods. A retrospective analysis of an orthodontic patient’s medical record maintenance at the dental clinics of Kazan. Results. Only 30.7% of all the verified documentation were established to be most thoroughly and correctly filled. Information about the obligatory medical insurance policy was indicated only in 2 cards out of all the verified documentation. In all orthodontic patient medical records the fringe benefit category code was absent. The name of the insurance organization in which a patient was unsured, was available only in 2.3% of the cards. Patient’s passport data were available only in 14 (15.9% cards, and the type of payment for services was registered only in 38 (43.2%. The diagnosis established by a referring medical organization was indicated only in 7 (8% of the records. When examining the dental rows of patients, their dimensions and apical bases of the jaws, the shape of the dentition were indicated in 40.9% of the documentation. The contact of adjacent teeth was described in 36.4% of all cases, presence of diastema between the upper jaw incisors was represented in 30.7% of the medical charts of orthodontic patients. The diastema between the lower jaw incisors was reflected in 25 (28.4% medical charts of orthodontic patients. Based on the doctor’s notes in the medical records, it is difficult to understand whether the whole necessary list of diagnostic measures had been performed to the patient in order to confirm this or that orthodontic pathology. Such filling of the medical chart of orthodontic patient at times makes the experts doubt in the correctness of diagnosis of a certain patient. Conclusion. Doctors-orthodontists do not pay enough attention to the collection of anamnesis of the disease, evaluation of the nature of complaints, as well as use of basic and additional methods of

  12. Beneficial Effects of Two Types of Personal Health Record Services Connected With Electronic Medical Records Within the Hospital Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jisan; Kim, James G Boram; Jin, Meiling; Ahn, Kiwhan; Kim, Byungjun; Kim, Sukwha; Kim, Jeongeun

    2017-11-01

    Healthcare consumers must be able to make decisions based on accurate health information. To assist with this, we designed and developed an integrated system connected with electronic medical records in hospitals to ensure delivery of accurate health information. The system-called the Consumer-centered Open Personal Health Record platform-is composed of two services: a portal for users with any disease and a mobile application for users with cleft lip/palate. To assess the benefits of these services, we used a quasi-experimental, pretest-posttest design, assigning participants to the portal (n = 50) and application (n = 52) groups. Both groups showed significantly increased knowledge, both objective (actual knowledge of health information) and subjective (perceived knowledge of health information), after the intervention. Furthermore, while both groups showed higher information needs satisfaction after the intervention, the application group was significantly more satisfied. Knowledge changes were more affected by participant characteristics in the application group. Our results may be due to the application's provision of specific disease information and a personalized treatment plan based on the participant and other users' data. We recommend that services connected with electronic medical records target specific diseases to provide personalized health management to patients in a hospital setting.

  13. Barriers to retrieving patient information from electronic health record data: failure analysis from the TREC Medical Records Track.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edinger, Tracy; Cohen, Aaron M; Bedrick, Steven; Ambert, Kyle; Hersh, William

    2012-01-01

    Secondary use of electronic health record (EHR) data relies on the ability to retrieve accurate and complete information about desired patient populations. The Text Retrieval Conference (TREC) 2011 Medical Records Track was a challenge evaluation allowing comparison of systems and algorithms to retrieve patients eligible for clinical studies from a corpus of de-identified medical records, grouped by patient visit. Participants retrieved cohorts of patients relevant to 35 different clinical topics, and visits were judged for relevance to each topic. This study identified the most common barriers to identifying specific clinic populations in the test collection. Using the runs from track participants and judged visits, we analyzed the five non-relevant visits most often retrieved and the five relevant visits most often overlooked. Categories were developed iteratively to group the reasons for incorrect retrieval for each of the 35 topics. Reasons fell into nine categories for non-relevant visits and five categories for relevant visits. Non-relevant visits were most often retrieved because they contained a non-relevant reference to the topic terms. Relevant visits were most often infrequently retrieved because they used a synonym for a topic term. This failure analysis provides insight into areas for future improvement in EHR-based retrieval with techniques such as more widespread and complete use of standardized terminology in retrieval and data entry systems.

  14. BRAIN Journal - Cognitive Medical Multiagent Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Barna Iantovics

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The development of efficient and flexible agent-based medical diagnosis systems represents a recent research direction. Medical multiagent systems may improve the efficiency of traditionally developed medical computational systems, like the medical expert systems. In our previous researches, a novel cooperative medical diagnosis multiagent system called CMDS (Contract Net Based Medical Diagnosis System) was proposed. CMDS system can solve flexibly a large variety of medical diagn...

  15. HOSPITAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS: A STUDY OF ELECTRONIC PATIENT RECORDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Luiz Cortês

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The importance of patient records, also known as medical records, is related to different needs and objectives, as they constitute permanent documents on the health of patients. With the advancement of information technologies and systems, patient records can be stored in databases, resulting in a positive impact on patient care. Based on these considerations, a research question that arises is “what are the benefits and problems that can be seen with the use of electronic versions of medical records?” This question leads to the formulation of the following hypothesis: although problems can be identified during the process of using electronic record systems, the benefits outweigh the difficulties, thereby justifying their use. To respond to the question and test the presented hypothesis, a research study was developed with users of the same electronic record system, consisting of doctors, nurses, and administrative personnel in three hospitals located in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. The results show that, despite some problems in their usage, the benefits of electronic patient records outweigh possible disadvantages.

  16. Management of stinging insect hypersensitivity: a 5-year retrospective medical record review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Thomas; Dietrich, Jeffrey; Hagan, Larry

    2006-08-01

    The Joint Task Force on Practice Parameters for Allergy and Immunology recommends that patients with a history of a systemic reaction to an insect sting be educated on ways to avoid insect stings, carry injectable epinephrine for emergency self-treatment, undergo specific IgE testing for stinging insect sensitivity, and be considered for immunotherapy. To review frontline providers' documented care and recommendations for imported fire ant and flying insect hypersensitivity reactions. A retrospective medical record review was performed of emergency department and primary care clinic visits between November 1, 1999, and November 30, 2004. Using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, codes, medical records were selected for review to identify patients with potential insect hypersensitivity. A total of 769 medical records from patients who experienced an insect sting were reviewed. Of 120 patients with a systemic reaction, 66 (55.0%) received a prescription for injectable epinephrine, and 14 (11.7%) were given information regarding avoidance of the offending insect. Forty-seven patients with systemic reactions (39.2%) were referred to an allergist. Of 28 patients who kept their appointments and underwent skin testing, 3 had negative results and 25 (89%) had positive results and were advised to start immunotherapy. Adherence to the stinging insect hypersensitivity practice parameter recommendations is poor. Many patients who have experienced a systemic reaction after an insect sting and have sought medical care are not afforded an opportunity for potentially lifesaving therapy.

  17. Disease Heritability Inferred from Familial Relationships Reported in Medical Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polubriaginof, Fernanda C G; Vanguri, Rami; Quinnies, Kayla; Belbin, Gillian M; Yahi, Alexandre; Salmasian, Hojjat; Lorberbaum, Tal; Nwankwo, Victor; Li, Li; Shervey, Mark M; Glowe, Patricia; Ionita-Laza, Iuliana; Simmerling, Mary; Hripcsak, George; Bakken, Suzanne; Goldstein, David; Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Kenny, Eimear E; Dudley, Joel; Vawdrey, David K; Tatonetti, Nicholas P

    2018-05-15

    Heritability is essential for understanding the biological causes of disease but requires laborious patient recruitment and phenotype ascertainment. Electronic health records (EHRs) passively capture a wide range of clinically relevant data and provide a resource for studying the heritability of traits that are not typically accessible. EHRs contain next-of-kin information collected via patient emergency contact forms, but until now, these data have gone unused in research. We mined emergency contact data at three academic medical centers and identified 7.4 million familial relationships while maintaining patient privacy. Identified relationships were consistent with genetically derived relatedness. We used EHR data to compute heritability estimates for 500 disease phenotypes. Overall, estimates were consistent with the literature and between sites. Inconsistencies were indicative of limitations and opportunities unique to EHR research. These analyses provide a validation of the use of EHRs for genetics and disease research. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Patients want granular privacy control over health information in electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caine, Kelly; Hanania, Rima

    2013-01-01

    To assess patients' desire for granular level privacy control over which personal health information should be shared, with whom, and for what purpose; and whether these preferences vary based on sensitivity of health information. A card task for matching health information with providers, questionnaire, and interview with 30 patients whose health information is stored in an electronic medical record system. Most patients' records contained sensitive health information. No patients reported that they would prefer to share all information stored in an electronic medical record (EMR) with all potential recipients. Sharing preferences varied by type of information (EMR data element) and recipient (eg, primary care provider), and overall sharing preferences varied by participant. Patients with and without sensitive records preferred less sharing of sensitive versus less-sensitive information. Patients expressed sharing preferences consistent with a desire for granular privacy control over which health information should be shared with whom and expressed differences in sharing preferences for sensitive versus less-sensitive EMR data. The pattern of results may be used by designers to generate privacy-preserving EMR systems including interfaces for patients to express privacy and sharing preferences. To maintain the level of privacy afforded by medical records and to achieve alignment with patients' preferences, patients should have granular privacy control over information contained in their EMR.

  19. Blue laser phase change recording system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, Holger; Dambach, S.Soeren; Richter, Hartmut

    2002-01-01

    The migration paths from DVD phase change recording with red laser to the next generation optical disk formats with blue laser and high NA optics are discussed with respect to optical aberration margins and disc capacities. A test system for the evaluation of phase change disks with more than 20 GB capacity is presented and first results of the recording performance are shown

  20. Knowledge and attitudes of nurses in community health centres about electronic medical records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Don O'Mahony

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nurses in primary healthcare record data for the monitoring and evaluation of diseases and services. Information and communications technology (ICT can improve quality in healthcare by providing quality medical records. However, worldwide, the majority of health ICT projects have failed. Individual user acceptance is a crucial factor in successful ICT implementation. Objectives: The aim of this study is to explore nurses’ knowledge, attitudes and perceptions regarding ICT so as to inform the future implementation of electronic medical record (EMR systems. Methods: A qualitative design was used. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with nurses at three community health centres (CHCs in the King Sabata Dalyindyebo Local Municipality. The interview guide was informed by the literature on user acceptance of ICT. Interviews were recorded and analysed using content analysis. Results: Many nurses knew about health ICT and articulated clearly the potential benefits of an EMR such as fewer errors, more complete records, easier reporting and access to information. They thought that an EMR system would solve the challenges they identified with the current paper-based record system, including duplication of data, misfiling, lack of a chronological patient record, excessive time in recording and reduced time for patient care. For personal ICT needs, approximately half used cellphone Internet-based services and computers. Conclusions: In this study, nurses identified many challenges with the current recording methods. They thought that an EMR should be installed at CHCs. Their knowledge about EMR, positive attitudes to ICT and personal use of ICT devices increase the likelihood of successful EMR implementation at CHCs.

  1. Knowledge and attitudes of nurses in community health centres about electronic medical records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Don O’Mahony

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nurses in primary healthcare record data for the monitoring and evaluation of diseases and services. Information and communications technology (ICT can improve quality in healthcare by providing quality medical records. However, worldwide, the majority of health ICT projects have failed. Individual user acceptance is a crucial factor in successful ICT implementation. Objectives: The aim of this study is to explore nurses’ knowledge, attitudes and perceptions regarding ICT so as to inform the future implementation of electronic medical record (EMR systems. Methods: A qualitative design was used. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with nurses at three community health centres (CHCs in the King Sabata Dalyindyebo Local Municipality. The interview guide was informed by the literature on user acceptance of ICT. Interviews were recorded and analysed using content analysis. Results: Many nurses knew about health ICT and articulated clearly the potential benefits of an EMR such as fewer errors, more complete records, easier reporting and access to information. They thought that an EMR system would solve the challenges they identified with the current paper-based record system, including duplication of data, misfiling, lack of a chronological patient record, excessive time in recording and reduced time for patient care. For personal ICT needs, approximately half used cellphone Internet-based services and computers. Conclusions: In this study, nurses identified many challenges with the current recording methods. They thought that an EMR should be installed at CHCs. Their knowledge about EMR, positive attitudes to ICT and personal use of ICT devices increase the likelihood of successful EMR implementation at CHCs.

  2. Design of Electronic Medical Record User Interfaces: A Matrix-Based Method for Improving Usability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kushtrim Kuqi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines a new approach of using the Design Structure Matrix (DSM modeling technique to improve the design of Electronic Medical Record (EMR user interfaces. The usability of an EMR medication dosage calculator used for placing orders in an academic hospital setting was investigated. The proposed method captures and analyzes the interactions between user interface elements of the EMR system and groups elements based on information exchange, spatial adjacency, and similarity to improve screen density and time-on-task. Medication dose adjustment task time was recorded for the existing and new designs using a cognitive simulation model that predicts user performance. We estimate that the design improvement could reduce time-on-task by saving an average of 21 hours of hospital physicians’ time over the course of a month. The study suggests that the application of DSM can improve the usability of an EMR user interface.

  3. Medical-Information-Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alterescu, Sidney; Friedman, Carl A.; Frankowski, James W.

    1989-01-01

    Medical Information Management System (MIMS) computer program interactive, general-purpose software system for storage and retrieval of information. Offers immediate assistance where manipulation of large data bases required. User quickly and efficiently extracts, displays, and analyzes data. Used in management of medical data and handling all aspects of data related to care of patients. Other applications include management of data on occupational safety in public and private sectors, handling judicial information, systemizing purchasing and procurement systems, and analyses of cost structures of organizations. Written in Microsoft FORTRAN 77.

  4. Clinical Assistant Diagnosis for Electronic Medical Record Based on Convolutional Neural Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhongliang; Huang, Yongfeng; Jiang, Yiran; Sun, Yuxi; Zhang, Yu-Jin; Luo, Pengcheng

    2018-04-20

    Automatically extracting useful information from electronic medical records along with conducting disease diagnoses is a promising task for both clinical decision support(CDS) and neural language processing(NLP). Most of the existing systems are based on artificially constructed knowledge bases, and then auxiliary diagnosis is done by rule matching. In this study, we present a clinical intelligent decision approach based on Convolutional Neural Networks(CNN), which can automatically extract high-level semantic information of electronic medical records and then perform automatic diagnosis without artificial construction of rules or knowledge bases. We use collected 18,590 copies of the real-world clinical electronic medical records to train and test the proposed model. Experimental results show that the proposed model can achieve 98.67% accuracy and 96.02% recall, which strongly supports that using convolutional neural network to automatically learn high-level semantic features of electronic medical records and then conduct assist diagnosis is feasible and effective.

  5. History of the Rochester Epidemiology Project: half a century of medical records linkage in a US population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, Walter A; Yawn, Barbara P; St Sauver, Jennifer L; Grossardt, Brandon R; Melton, L Joseph

    2012-12-01

    The Rochester Epidemiology Project (REP) has maintained a comprehensive medical records linkage system for nearly half a century for almost all persons residing in Olmsted County, Minnesota. Herein, we provide a brief history of the REP before and after 1966, the year in which the REP was officially established. The key protagonists before 1966 were Henry Plummer, Mabel Root, and Joseph Berkson, who developed a medical records linkage system at Mayo Clinic. In 1966, Leonard Kurland established collaborative agreements with other local health care providers (hospitals, physician groups, and clinics [primarily Olmsted Medical Center]) to develop a medical records linkage system that covered the entire population of Olmsted County, and he obtained funding from the National Institutes of Health to support the new system. In 1997, L. Joseph Melton III addressed emerging concerns about the confidentiality of medical record information by introducing a broad patient research authorization as per Minnesota state law. We describe how the key protagonists of the REP have responded to challenges posed by evolving medical knowledge, information technology, and public expectation and policy. In addition, we provide a general description of the system; discuss issues of data quality, reliability, and validity; describe the research team structure; provide information about funding; and compare the REP with other medical information systems. The REP can serve as a model for the development of similar research infrastructures in the United States and worldwide. Copyright © 2012 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of scanning and eliminating paper-based medical records on hospital physicians' clinical work practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laerum, Hallvard; Karlsen, Tom H; Faxvaag, Arild

    2003-01-01

    It is not automatically given that the paper-based medical record can be eliminated after the introduction of an electronic medical record (EMR) in a hospital. Many keep and update the paper-based counterpart, and this limits the use of the EMR system. The authors have evaluated the physicians' clinical work practices and attitudes toward a system in a hospital that has eliminated the paper-based counterpart using scanning technology. Combined open-ended interviews (8 physicians) and cross-sectional survey (70 physicians) were conducted and compared with reference data from a previous national survey (69 physicians from six hospitals). The hospitals in the reference group were using the same EMR system without the scanning module. The questionnaire (English translation available as an online data supplement at ) covered frequency of use of the EMR system for 19 defined tasks, ease of performing them, and user satisfaction. The interviews were open-ended. The physicians routinely used the system for nine of 11 tasks regarding retrieval of patient data, which the majority of the physicians found more easily performed than before. However, 22% to 25% of the physicians found retrieval of patient data more difficult, particularly among internists (33%). Overall, the physicians were equally satisfied with the part of the system handling the regular electronic data as that of the physicians in the reference group. They were, however, much less satisfied with the use of scanned document images than that of regular electronic data, using the former less frequently than the latter. Scanning and elimination of the paper-based medical record is feasible, but the scanned document images should be considered an intermediate stage toward fully electronic medical records. To our knowledge, this is the first assessment from a hospital in the process of completing such a scanning project.

  7. Evaluation of medication errors with implementation of electronic health record technology in the medical intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liao TV

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available T Vivian Liao,1 Marina Rabinovich,2 Prasad Abraham,2 Sebastian Perez,3 Christiana DiPlotti,4 Jenny E Han,5 Greg S Martin,5 Eric Honig5 1Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmacy, Mercer Health Sciences Center, 2Department of Pharmacy and Clinical Nutrition, Grady Health System, 3Department of Surgery, Emory University, 4Pharmacy, Ingles Markets, 5Department of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA Purpose: Patients in the intensive care unit (ICU are at an increased risk for medication errors (MEs and adverse drug events from multifactorial causes. ME rate ranges from 1.2 to 947 per 1,000 patient days in the medical ICU (MICU. Studies with the implementation of electronic health records (EHR have concluded that it significantly reduced overall prescribing errors and the number of errors that caused patient harm decreased. However, other types of errors, such as wrong dose and omission of required medications increased after EHR implementation. We sought to compare the number of MEs before and after EHR implementation in the MICU, with additional evaluation of error severity.Patients and methods: Prospective, observational, quality improvement study of all patients admitted to a single MICU service at an academic medical center. Patients were evaluated during four periods over 2 years: August–September 2010 (preimplementation; period I, January–February 2011 (2 months postimplementation; period II, August–September 2012 (21 months postimplementation; period III, and January–February 2013 (25 months postimplementation; period IV. All medication orders and administration records were reviewed by an ICU clinical pharmacist and ME was defined as a deviation from established standards for prescribing, dispensing, administering, or documenting medication. The frequency and classification of MEs were compared between groups by chi square; p<0.05 was considered significant.Results: There was a statistically significant increase

  8. Quality of Co-Prescribing NSAID and Gastroprotective Medications for Elders in The Netherlands and Its Association with the Electronic Medical Record

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opondo, Dedan; Visscher, Stefan; Eslami, Saeid; Verheij, Robert A.; Korevaar, Joke C.; Abu-Hanna, Ameen

    2015-01-01

    To assess guideline adherence of co-prescribing NSAID and gastroprotective medications for elders in general practice over time, and investigate its potential association with the electronic medical record (EMR) system brand used. We included patients 65 years and older who received NSAIDs between

  9. Quality of co-prescribing NSAID and gastroprotective medications for elders in The Netherlands and its association with the electronic medical record.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opondo, D.; Visscher, S.; Eslami, S.; Verheij, R.A.; Korevaar, J.C.; Abu-Hanna, A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess guideline adherence of co-prescribing NSAID and gastroprotective medications for elders in general practice over time, and investigate its potential association with the electronic medical record (EMR) system brand used. Methods: We included patients 65 years and older who

  10. 77 FR 9902 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-21

    ... by the transferring medical facility which includes, patient identity, service affiliation and grade or status, name, Social Security Number (SSN), gender, medical diagnosis, medical condition, special...: Delete entry and replace with ``Paper records in file folders and electronic storage media...

  11. Impact of patients' access to medical records in occupational medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakov, A; Kabaha, N; Azuri, J; Moshe, S

    2018-04-14

    Information technologies offer new ways to engage with patients regarding their health, but no studies have been done in occupational health services (OHS). To examine the advantages and disadvantages of providing written and oral medical information to patients in OHS. In this cross-sectional study, data were retrieved from patients visiting four different OHS during 2014-15 for a fitness for work evaluation. We built a semi-quantitative satisfaction questionnaire, with responses ranging on a Likert scale of 1-5 from very dissatisfied (1) to very satisfied (5). There were 287 questionnaires available for analysis. The number of patients who received detailed oral and written information, which included an explanation of their health condition and of the occupational physician's (OP's) decision, was higher in clinics 1 and 3 compared to clinics 2 and 4 (48 and 38% compared to 21 and 31% respectively, P < 0.05). When patients were provided with detailed oral and written information, they declared having a better understanding (4.3 and 4.4 compared to 3.8 respectively, P < 0.001), a higher level of confidence in their OP (4.4 and 4.3 compared to 3.7 and 4 respectively, P < 0.001), a higher level of satisfaction (4.3 and 4.4 compared to 3.8 respectively, P < 0.001) and a higher sense of control and ability to correct the record (1.8 compared to 1.4 respectively, P < 0.01), compared to patients who received partial information. We recommend sharing detailed oral and written medical information with patients in OHS.

  12. A Way to Understand Inpatients Based on the Electronic Medical Records in the Big Data Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyi Mao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, information technology in healthcare, such as Electronic Medical Record (EMR system, is potential to improve service quality and cost efficiency of the hospital. The continuous use of EMR systems has generated a great amount of data. However, hospitals tend to use these data to report their operational efficiency rather than to understand their patients. Base on a dataset of inpatients’ medical records from a Chinese general public hospital, this study applies a configuration analysis from a managerial perspective and explains inpatients management in a different way. Four inpatient configurations (valued patients, managed patients, normal patients, and potential patients are identified by the measure of the length of stay and the total hospital cost. The implications of the finding are discussed.

  13. Image-based electronic patient records for secured collaborative medical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianguo; Sun, Jianyong; Yang, Yuanyuan; Liang, Chenwen; Yao, Yihong; Cai, Weihua; Jin, Jin; Zhang, Guozhen; Sun, Kun

    2005-01-01

    We developed a Web-based system to interactively display image-based electronic patient records (EPR) for secured intranet and Internet collaborative medical applications. The system consists of four major components: EPR DICOM gateway (EPR-GW), Image-based EPR repository server (EPR-Server), Web Server and EPR DICOM viewer (EPR-Viewer). In the EPR-GW and EPR-Viewer, the security modules of Digital Signature and Authentication are integrated to perform the security processing on the EPR data with integrity and authenticity. The privacy of EPR in data communication and exchanging is provided by SSL/TLS-based secure communication. This presentation gave a new approach to create and manage image-based EPR from actual patient records, and also presented a way to use Web technology and DICOM standard to build an open architecture for collaborative medical applications.

  14. A new radiation exposure record system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, M.; Berndt, V.L.; Trevino, G.W.; Oakley, B.M.

    1993-04-01

    The Hanford Radiological Records Program (HRRP) serves all Hanford contractors as the single repository for radiological exposure for all Hanford employees, subcontractors, and visitors. The program administers and preserves all Hanford radiation exposure records. The program also maintains a Radiation Protection Historical File which is a historical file of Hanford radiation protection and dosimetry procedures and practices. Several years ago DOE declared the existing UNIVAC mainframe computer obsolete and the existing Occupational Radiation Exposure (ORE) system was slated to be redeveloped. The new system named the Radiological Exposure (REX) System is described in this document

  15. Auditing Medical Records Accesses via Healthcare Interaction Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, You; Nyemba, Steve; Malin, Bradley

    2012-01-01

    Healthcare organizations are deploying increasingly complex clinical information systems to support patient care. Traditional information security practices (e.g., role-based access control) are embedded in enterprise-level systems, but are insufficient to ensure patient privacy. This is due, in part, to the dynamic nature of healthcare, which makes it difficult to predict which care providers need access to what and when. In this paper, we show that modeling operations at a higher level of granularity (e.g., the departmental level) are stable in the context of a relational network, which may enable more effective auditing strategies. We study three months of access logs from a large academic medical center to illustrate that departmental interaction networks exhibit certain invariants, such as the number, strength, and reciprocity of relationships. We further show that the relations extracted from the network can be leveraged to assess the extent to which a patient’s care satisfies expected organizational behavior. PMID:23304277

  16. National Recordal System IK holder catalogue process

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pretorius, R

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this poster is to illustrate the South African National Recordal Systems (NRS) process whereby Indigenous Knowledge (IK) holder’s information is captured in a registry, as specified in South Africa’s Indigenous Knowledge Systems Policy...

  17. Roles of Medical Record and Statistic Staff on Research at the Tawanchai Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattaranit, Rumpan; Chantachum, Vasana; Lekboonyasin, Orathai; Pradubwong, Suteera

    2015-08-01

    The medical record and statistic staffs play a crucial role behind the achievements of treatment and research of physicians, nurses and other health care professionals. The medical record and statistic staff are in charge of keeping patient medical records; creating databases; presenting information; sorting patient's information; providing patient medical records and related information for various medical teams and researchers; Besides, the medical record and statistic staff have collaboration with the Center of Cleft Lip-Palate, Khon Kaen University in association with the Tawanchai Project. The Tawanchai Center is an organization, involving multidisciplinary team which aims to continuing provide care for patients with cleft lip and palate and craniofacial deformities who need a long term of treatment since newborns until the age of 19 years. With support and encouragement from the Tawanchai team, the medical record and statistic staff have involved in research under the Tawanchai Centre since then and produced a number of publications locally and internationally.

  18. A clinically useful diabetes electronic medical record: lessons from the past; pointers toward the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, C; Looker, J; Fisk, T; Oelke, W; Erickson, D; Smith, S; Zimmerman, B

    1996-01-01

    We have analysed the deficiencies of paper medical records in facilitating the care of patients with diabetes and have developed an electronic medical record that corrects some of them. The diabetes electronic medical record (DEMR) is designed to facilitate the work of a busy diabetes clinic. Design principles include heavy reliance on graphic displays of laboratory and clinical data, consistent color coding and aggregation of data needed to facilitate the different types of clinical encounter (initial consultation, continuing care visit, insulin adjustment visit, dietitian encounter, nurse educator encounter, obstetric patient, transplant patient, visits for problems unrelated to diabetes). Data input is by autoflow from the institutional laboratories, by desk attendants or on-line by all users. Careful attention has been paid to making data entry a point and click process wherever possible. Opportunity for free text comment is provided on every screen. On completion of the encounter a narrative text summary of the visit is generated by the computer and is annotated by the care giver. Currently there are about 7800 patients in the system. Remaining challenges include the adaptation of the system to accommodate the occasional user, development of portable laptop derivatives that remain compatible with the parent system and improvements in the screen structure and graphic display formats.

  19. Health record systems that meet clinical needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Negrini

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Increased attention has recently been focused on health record systems as a result of accreditation programs, a growing emphasis on patient safety, and the increase in lawsuits involving allegations of malpractice. Health-care professionals frequently express dissatisfaction with the health record systems and complain that the data included are neither informative nor useful for clinical decision making. This article reviews the main objectives of a hospital health record system, with emphasis on its roles in communication and exchange among clinicians, patient safety, and continuity of care, and asks whether current systems have responded to the recent changes in the Italian health-care system.Discussion If health records are to meet the expectations of all health professionals, the overall information need must be carefully analyzed, a common data set must be created, and essential specialist contributions must be defined. Working with health-care professionals, the hospital management should define how clinical information is to be displayed and organized, identify a functionally optimal layout, define the characteristics of ongoing patient assessment in terms of who will be responsible for these activities and how often they will be performed. Internet technology can facilitate data retrieval and meet the general requirements of a paper-based health record system, but it must also ensure focus on clinical information, business continuity, integrity, security, and privacy.Conclusions The current health records system needs to be thoroughly revised to increase its accessibility, streamline the work of health-care professionals who consult it, and render it more useful for clinical decision making—a challenging task that will require the active involvement of the many professional classes involved.

  20. Patients Reading Their Medical Records: Differences in Experiences and Attitudes between Regular and Inexperienced Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huvila, Isto; Daniels, Mats; Cajander, Åsa; Åhlfeldt, Rose-Mharie

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: We report results of a study of how ordering and reading of printouts of medical records by regular and inexperienced readers relate to how the records are used, to the health information practices of patients, and to their expectations of the usefulness of new e-Health services and online access to medical records. Method: The study…

  1. 78 FR 43258 - Privacy Act; System of Records: Human Resources Records, State-31

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice 8384] Privacy Act; System of Records: Human Resources Records... system of records, Human Resources Records, State- 31, pursuant to the provisions of the Privacy Act of... State proposes that the current system will retain the name ``Human Resources Records'' (previously...

  2. Contribution of Electronic Medical Records to the Management of Rare Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Bremond-Gignac

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Electronic health record systems provide great opportunity to study most diseases. Objective of this study was to determine whether electronic medical records (EMR in ophthalmology contribute to management of rare eye diseases, isolated or in syndromes. Study was designed to identify and collect patients’ data with ophthalmology-specific EMR. Methods. Ophthalmology-specific EMR software (Softalmo software Corilus was used to acquire ophthalmological ocular consultation data from patients with five rare eye diseases. The rare eye diseases and data were selected and collected regarding expertise of eye center. Results. A total of 135,206 outpatient consultations were performed between 2011 and 2014 in our medical center specialized in rare eye diseases. The search software identified 29 congenital aniridia, 6 Axenfeld/Rieger syndrome, 11 BEPS, 3 Nanophthalmos, and 3 Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome. Discussion. EMR provides advantages for medical care. The use of ophthalmology-specific EMR is reliable and can contribute to a comprehensive ocular visual phenotype useful for clinical research. Conclusion. Routinely EMR acquired with specific software dedicated to ophthalmology provides sufficient detail for rare diseases. These software-collected data appear useful for creating patient cohorts and recording ocular examination, avoiding the time-consuming analysis of paper records and investigation, in a University Hospital linked to a National Reference Rare Center Disease.

  3. Contribution of Electronic Medical Records to the Management of Rare Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremond-Gignac, Dominique; Lewandowski, Elisabeth; Copin, Henri

    2015-01-01

    Electronic health record systems provide great opportunity to study most diseases. Objective of this study was to determine whether electronic medical records (EMR) in ophthalmology contribute to management of rare eye diseases, isolated or in syndromes. Study was designed to identify and collect patients' data with ophthalmology-specific EMR. Ophthalmology-specific EMR software (Softalmo software Corilus) was used to acquire ophthalmological ocular consultation data from patients with five rare eye diseases. The rare eye diseases and data were selected and collected regarding expertise of eye center. A total of 135,206 outpatient consultations were performed between 2011 and 2014 in our medical center specialized in rare eye diseases. The search software identified 29 congenital aniridia, 6 Axenfeld/Rieger syndrome, 11 BEPS, 3 Nanophthalmos, and 3 Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome. EMR provides advantages for medical care. The use of ophthalmology-specific EMR is reliable and can contribute to a comprehensive ocular visual phenotype useful for clinical research. Routinely EMR acquired with specific software dedicated to ophthalmology provides sufficient detail for rare diseases. These software-collected data appear useful for creating patient cohorts and recording ocular examination, avoiding the time-consuming analysis of paper records and investigation, in a University Hospital linked to a National Reference Rare Center Disease.

  4. National Recordal System IK holder catalogue process

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pretorius, R

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available good, based on IK.? Subsequently, the South African Department of Science and Technology (DST) created a National Indigenous Knowledge Systems Office (NIKSO) that is taking the lead on interfacing IKS with other recognised knowledge holders... is to illustrate the South African National Recordal Systems (NRS) process whereby Indigenous Knowledge (IK) holder?s information is captured in a registry, as specified in South Africa?s Indigenous Knowledge Systems (IKS) Policy, through an IK cataloguing...

  5. 77 FR 65370 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-26

    ... respective personnel management and finance systems.'' Routine uses of records maintained in the system...; System of Records AGENCY: Defense Logistics Agency, DoD. ACTION: Notice to Alter a System of Records. SUMMARY: The Defense Logistics Agency proposes to alter a system of records in its inventory of record...

  6. Development of a clinical information tool for the electronic medical record: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Barbara A; Tannery, Nancy H; Wessel, Charles B; Yarger, Frances; LaDue, John; Fiorillo, Anthony B

    2010-07-01

    What is the process of developing a clinical information tool to be embedded in the electronic health record of a very large and diverse academic medical center? The development took place at the University of Pittsburgh Health Sciences Library System. The clinical information tool developed is a search box with subject tabs to provide quick access to designated full-text information resources. Each subject tab offers a federated search of a different pool of resources. Search results are organized "on the fly" into meaningful categories using clustering technology and are directly accessible from the results page. After more than a year of discussion and planning, a clinical information tool was embedded in the academic medical center's electronic health record. The library successfully developed a clinical information tool, called Clinical-e, for use at the point of care. Future development will refine the tool and evaluate its impact and effectiveness.

  7. Natural Language Processing Based Instrument for Classification of Free Text Medical Records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manana Khachidze

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the Ministry of Labor, Health and Social Affairs of Georgia a new health management system has to be introduced in the nearest future. In this context arises the problem of structuring and classifying documents containing all the history of medical services provided. The present work introduces the instrument for classification of medical records based on the Georgian language. It is the first attempt of such classification of the Georgian language based medical records. On the whole 24.855 examination records have been studied. The documents were classified into three main groups (ultrasonography, endoscopy, and X-ray and 13 subgroups using two well-known methods: Support Vector Machine (SVM and K-Nearest Neighbor (KNN. The results obtained demonstrated that both machine learning methods performed successfully, with a little supremacy of SVM. In the process of classification a “shrink” method, based on features selection, was introduced and applied. At the first stage of classification the results of the “shrink” case were better; however, on the second stage of classification into subclasses 23% of all documents could not be linked to only one definite individual subclass (liver or binary system due to common features characterizing these subclasses. The overall results of the study were successful.

  8. Constraints on Biological Mechanism from Disease Comorbidity Using Electronic Medical Records and Database of Genetic Variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven C Bagley

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Patterns of disease co-occurrence that deviate from statistical independence may represent important constraints on biological mechanism, which sometimes can be explained by shared genetics. In this work we study the relationship between disease co-occurrence and commonly shared genetic architecture of disease. Records of pairs of diseases were combined from two different electronic medical systems (Columbia, Stanford, and compared to a large database of published disease-associated genetic variants (VARIMED; data on 35 disorders were available across all three sources, which include medical records for over 1.2 million patients and variants from over 17,000 publications. Based on the sources in which they appeared, disease pairs were categorized as having predominant clinical, genetic, or both kinds of manifestations. Confounding effects of age on disease incidence were controlled for by only comparing diseases when they fall in the same cluster of similarly shaped incidence patterns. We find that disease pairs that are overrepresented in both electronic medical record systems and in VARIMED come from two main disease classes, autoimmune and neuropsychiatric. We furthermore identify specific genes that are shared within these disease groups.

  9. Evaluation Existential of Medical Record Laboratory at the Diploma 3 Program for Medical Record & Health Information, Mathematics and Natural Science Faculty, Gadjah Mada University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savitri Citra Budi

    2009-06-01

    Evaluation on the existence of laboratory was presumably exploited to consider future development and management as expected that this Laboratory could be taken as example for medical record management in hospitals.

  10. 42 CFR 482.24 - Condition of participation: Medical record services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... anesthesia services. (B) An updated examination of the patient, including any changes in the patient's... practitioners' orders, nursing notes, reports of treatment, medication records, radiology, and laboratory...

  11. A Web Browsing Behavior Recording System

    OpenAIRE

    Ohmura, Hayato; Kitasuka, Teruaki; Aritsugi, Masayoshi; オオムラ, ハヤト; キタスカ, テルアキ; アリツギ, マサヨシ; 大村, 勇人; 北須賀, 輝明; 有次, 正義

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a Web browsing behavior recording system for research. Web browsing behavior data can help us to providesophisticated services for human activities, because the data must indicate characteristics ofWeb users.We discuss the necessity of the data with potential benefits, and develop a system for collecting the data as an add-on for Firefox. We also report some results of preliminary experiments to test its usefulness in analyses on human activities in this paper.

  12. Robust record preservation system on geological repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohuchi, J.; Torata, S.; Tsuboya, T.

    2004-01-01

    Long-term record preservation system on geological disposal of High Level Radioactive Wastes (HLW) has been investigated as the institutional control by RWMC, Japan. Geological disposal of HLW, being based on the passive safe concept, has been considered not to necessitate the human controls to maintain its long-term safety. However how to complement the safety case on geological disposal is an important issue in each countries to progress the repository program with the step-wise decisions process during the long-term period up to several hundreds years. Although we cannot predict the future society, we need to realize the robust and redundant system for preserving records, which should be accessible, retrievable and understandable for the unpredicted future generations. First of all, we held a Rome workshop in January 2003 to exchange views on the matter, resulted in the suggestion directing the discussion on the record management and long-term preservation and retrieval of information regarding radioactive waste. Second, we considered the balance of active and passive system to strengthen the robustness. Another significance of long-term record preservation is to send current generation an implicit message, 'doing our best for future generations', in addition to aiming at both warning and their own decision-making. We call it 'meta-signal' to current generation. Thirdly, we demonstrated the laser-engraving technology to have converted five hundreds pages of an A4 sized report with human readable font sizes to 42 square silicon carbide plates, 10cm x10cm and 1mm in thickness. Silicon carbide would be an alternative to paper and might be possible to be an alternative to microfilm utilized as digital recording media. Another case study is the future generations' accessibility to the preserved records. (author)

  13. Implementing and Integrating a Clinically-Driven Electronic Medical Record (EMR for Radiation Oncology in a Large Medical Enterprise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Paxton Kirkpatrick

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose/Objective: While our department is heavily invested in computer-based treatment planning, we historically relied on paper-based charts for management of Radiation Oncology patients. In early 2009, we initiated the process of conversion to an electronic medical record (EMR eliminating the need for paper charts. Key goals included the ability to readily access information wherever and whenever needed, without compromising safety, treatment quality, confidentiality or productivity.Methodology: In February, 2009, we formed a multi-disciplinary team of Radiation Oncology physicians, nurses, therapists, administrators, physicists/dosimetrists, and information technology (IT specialists, along with staff from the Duke Health System IT department. The team identified all existing processes and associated information/reports, established the framework for the EMR system and generated, tested and implemented specific EMR processes.Results: Two broad classes of information were identified: information which must be readily accessed by anyone in the health system versus that used solely within the Radiation Oncology department. Examples of the former are consultation reports, weekly treatment check notes and treatment summaries; the latter includes treatment plans, daily therapy records and quality assurance reports. To manage the former, we utilized the enterprise-wide system , which required an intensive effort to design and implement procedures to export information from Radiation Oncology into that system. To manage "Radiation Oncology" data, we used our existing system (ARIA, Varian Medical Systems. The ability to access both systems simultaneously from a single workstation (WS was essential, requiring new WS and modified software. As of January, 2010, all new treatments were managed solely with an EMR. We find that an EMR makes information more widely accessible and does not compromise patient safety, treatment quality or confidentiality

  14. Evaluation of Electronic Medical Record (EMR at large urban primary care sexual health centre.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher K Fairley

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Despite substantial investment in Electronic Medical Record (EMR systems there has been little research to evaluate them. Our aim was to evaluate changes in efficiency and quality of services after the introduction of a purpose built EMR system, and to assess its acceptability by the doctors, nurses and patients using it. METHODS: We compared a nine month period before and after the introduction of an EMR system in a large sexual health service, audited a sample of records in both periods and undertook anonymous surveys of both staff and patients. RESULTS: There were 9,752 doctor consultations (in 5,512 consulting hours in the Paper Medical Record (PMR period and 9,145 doctor consultations (in 5,176 consulting hours in the EMR period eligible for inclusion in the analysis. There were 5% more consultations per hour seen by doctors in the EMR period compared to the PMR period (rate ratio = 1.05; 95% confidence interval, 1.02, 1.08 after adjusting for type of consultation. The qualitative evaluation of 300 records for each period showed no difference in quality (P>0.17. A survey of clinicians demonstrated that doctors and nurses preferred the EMR system (P<0.01 and a patient survey in each period showed no difference in satisfaction of their care (97% for PMR, 95% for EMR, P = 0.61. CONCLUSION: The introduction of an integrated EMR improved efficiency while maintaining the quality of the patient record. The EMR was popular with staff and was not associated with a decline in patient satisfaction in the clinical care provided.

  15. 77 FR 16569 - Privacy Act of 1974: Systems of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-21

    ... two existing systems of records. The two existing systems of records are ``Administrative Audit System... existing systems of records, ``Administrative Audit System (SEC-14)'' and ``Fitness Center Membership... Audit System (SEC-14) records are used to ensure that all obligations and expenditures other than those...

  16. 78 FR 14288 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-05

    ... OMB Circular No. A-130, ``Federal Agency Responsibilities for Maintaining Records About Individuals... evaluation board findings; medical reports from Department of Veterans Affairs and civilian medical..., civilian, and Department of Veteran's Affairs); Department of Veterans Affairs Rating Boards; Department of...

  17. Privacy Act System of Records: EPA Telecommunications Detail Records, EPA-32

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn more about the EPA Telecommunications Detail Records System, including who is covered in the system, the purpose of data collection, routine uses for the system's records, and other security procedures.

  18. Privacy Act System of Records: Employee Counseling and Assistance Program Records, EPA-27

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about the Employee Counseling and Assistance Program Records System, including who is covered in the system, the purpose of data collection, routine uses for the system's records, and other security procedures.

  19. Automatic prediction of rheumatoid arthritis disease activity from the electronic medical records.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Lin

    Full Text Available We aimed to mine the data in the Electronic Medical Record to automatically discover patients' Rheumatoid Arthritis disease activity at discrete rheumatology clinic visits. We cast the problem as a document classification task where the feature space includes concepts from the clinical narrative and lab values as stored in the Electronic Medical Record.The Training Set consisted of 2792 clinical notes and associated lab values. Test Set 1 included 1749 clinical notes and associated lab values. Test Set 2 included 344 clinical notes for which there were no associated lab values. The Apache clinical Text Analysis and Knowledge Extraction System was used to analyze the text and transform it into informative features to be combined with relevant lab values.Experiments over a range of machine learning algorithms and features were conducted. The best performing combination was linear kernel Support Vector Machines with Unified Medical Language System Concept Unique Identifier features with feature selection and lab values. The Area Under the Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve (AUC is 0.831 (σ = 0.0317, statistically significant as compared to two baselines (AUC = 0.758, σ = 0.0291. Algorithms demonstrated superior performance on cases clinically defined as extreme categories of disease activity (Remission and High compared to those defined as intermediate categories (Moderate and Low and included laboratory data on inflammatory markers.Automatic Rheumatoid Arthritis disease activity discovery from Electronic Medical Record data is a learnable task approximating human performance. As a result, this approach might have several research applications, such as the identification of patients for genome-wide pharmacogenetic studies that require large sample sizes with precise definitions of disease activity and response to therapies.

  20. Overcoming structural constraints to patient utilization of electronic medical records: a critical review and proposal for an evaluation framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelman, Warren J; Leonard, Kevin J

    2004-01-01

    There are constraints embedded in medical record structure that limit use by patients in self-directed disease management. Through systematic review of the literature from a critical perspective, four characteristics that either enhance or mitigate the influence of medical record structure on patient utilization of an electronic patient record (EPR) system have been identified: environmental pressures, physician centeredness, collaborative organizational culture, and patient centeredness. An evaluation framework is proposed for use when considering adaptation of existing EPR systems for online patient access. Exemplars of patient-accessible EPR systems from the literature are evaluated utilizing the framework. From this study, it appears that traditional information system research and development methods may not wholly capture many pertinent social issues that arise when expanding access of EPR systems to patients. Critically rooted methods such as action research can directly inform development strategies so that these systems may positively influence health outcomes.

  1. Patient-centred care: using online personal medical records in IVF practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuil, W.S.; Hoopen, A.J. ten; Braat, D.D.M.; Vries Robbé, P.F. de; Kremer, J.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Generic patient-accessible medical records have shown promise in enhancing patient-centred care for patients with chronic diseases. We sought to design, implement and evaluate a patient-accessible medical record specifically for patients undergoing a course of assisted reproduction (IVF

  2. Design and implementation of an affordable, public sector electronic medical record in rural Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anant Raut

    2017-06-01

    Over the course of 18 months, we were able to develop, deploy and iterate upon the electronic medical record, and then deploy the refined product at an additional facility within only four weeks. Our experience suggests the feasibility of an integrated electronic medical record for public sector care delivery even in settings of rural poverty.

  3. Admission medical records made at night time have the same quality as day and evening time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amirian, Ilda; Mortensen, Jacob F; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: A thorough and accurate admission medical record is an important tool in ensuring patient safety during the hospital stay. Surgeons' performance might be affected during night shifts due to sleep deprivation. The aim of the study was to assess the quality of admission medical records...

  4. Cancer patients' attitudes and experiences of online access to their electronic medical records: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rexhepi, Hanife; Åhlfeldt, Rose-Mharie; Cajander, Åsa; Huvila, Isto

    2018-06-01

    Patients' access to their online medical records serves as one of the cornerstones in the efforts to increase patient engagement and improve healthcare outcomes. The aim of this article is to provide in-depth understanding of cancer patients' attitudes and experiences of online medical records, as well as an increased understanding of the complexities of developing and launching e-Health services. The study result confirms that online access can help patients prepare for doctor visits and to understand their medical issues. In contrast to the fears of many physicians, the study shows that online access to medical records did not generate substantial anxiety, concerns or increased phone calls to the hospital.

  5. EMRlog method for computer security for electronic medical records with logic and data mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Monterrubio, Sergio Mauricio; Frausto Solis, Juan; Monroy Borja, Raúl

    2015-01-01

    The proper functioning of a hospital computer system is an arduous work for managers and staff. However, inconsistent policies are frequent and can produce enormous problems, such as stolen information, frequent failures, and loss of the entire or part of the hospital data. This paper presents a new method named EMRlog for computer security systems in hospitals. EMRlog is focused on two kinds of security policies: directive and implemented policies. Security policies are applied to computer systems that handle huge amounts of information such as databases, applications, and medical records. Firstly, a syntactic verification step is applied by using predicate logic. Then data mining techniques are used to detect which security policies have really been implemented by the computer systems staff. Subsequently, consistency is verified in both kinds of policies; in addition these subsets are contrasted and validated. This is performed by an automatic theorem prover. Thus, many kinds of vulnerabilities can be removed for achieving a safer computer system.

  6. EMRlog Method for Computer Security for Electronic Medical Records with Logic and Data Mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Mauricio Martínez Monterrubio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The proper functioning of a hospital computer system is an arduous work for managers and staff. However, inconsistent policies are frequent and can produce enormous problems, such as stolen information, frequent failures, and loss of the entire or part of the hospital data. This paper presents a new method named EMRlog for computer security systems in hospitals. EMRlog is focused on two kinds of security policies: directive and implemented policies. Security policies are applied to computer systems that handle huge amounts of information such as databases, applications, and medical records. Firstly, a syntactic verification step is applied by using predicate logic. Then data mining techniques are used to detect which security policies have really been implemented by the computer systems staff. Subsequently, consistency is verified in both kinds of policies; in addition these subsets are contrasted and validated. This is performed by an automatic theorem prover. Thus, many kinds of vulnerabilities can be removed for achieving a safer computer system.

  7. Army medical imaging system: ARMIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siedband, M.P.; Kramp, D.C.

    1987-01-01

    Recent advances of stimulable phosphor screens, data cards using optical storage means, and new personal computers with image processing capability have made possible the design of economical filmless medical imaging systems. The addition of communication links means that remote interpretation of images is also possible. The Army Medical Imaging System uses stimulable phosphor screens, digital readout, a small computer, an optical digital data card device, and a DIN/PACS link. Up to 200 images can be stored in the computer hard disk for rapid recall and reading by the radiologist. The computer permits image processing, annotation, insertion of text, and control of the system. Each device contains an image storage RAM and communicates with the computer via the small computer systems interface. Data compression is used to reduce the required storage capacity and transmission times of the 1-mB images. The credit card-size optical data cards replace film and can store 12 or more images. The data cards can be read on an independent viewer. The research is supported by the U.S. Army Biomedical Research and Development Laboratory

  8. Medical records documentation of constipation preceding Parkinson disease: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savica, R; Carlin, J M; Grossardt, B R; Bower, J H; Ahlskog, J E; Maraganore, D M; Bharucha, A E; Rocca, W A

    2009-11-24

    Parkinson disease (PD) may affect the autonomic nervous system and may cause constipation; however, few studies have explored constipation preceding the motor onset of PD. We investigated constipation preceding PD using a case-control study design in a population-based sample. Using the medical records-linkage system of the Rochester Epidemiology Project, we identified 196 subjects who developed PD in Olmsted County, MN, from 1976 through 1995. Each incident case was matched by age (+/-1 year) and sex to a general population control. We reviewed the complete medical records of cases and controls in the medical records-linkage system to ascertain the occurrence of constipation preceding the onset of PD (or index year). Constipation preceding PD or the index year was more common in cases than in controls (odds ratio [OR] 2.48; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.49 to 4.11; p = 0.0005). This association remained significant after adjusting for smoking and coffee consumption (ever vs never), and after excluding constipation possibly induced by drugs. In addition, the association remained significant in analyses restricted to constipation documented 20 or more years before the onset of motor symptoms of PD. Although the association was stronger in women than in men and in patients with PD with rest tremor compared with patients with PD without rest tremor, these differences were not significant. Our findings suggest that constipation occurring as early as 20 or more years before the onset of motor symptoms is associated with an increased risk of Parkinson disease.

  9. Quality system for Medical laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiva Raj K.C.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available According to William Edwards Deming “Good quality does not necessarily mean high quality. Instead it means a predicable degree of uniformity and dependability at low cost with a quality suited to the market.” Whereas according to famous engineer and management consultant Joseph M. Juran quality is “fitness for purpose”. It should meet the customers’ expectations and requirements, should be cost effective.ISO began in 1926 as the International Federation of the National Standardizing Associations (ISA. The name, "ISO" was derived from the Greek word "isos" meaning "equal". (The relation to standards is that if two objects meet the same standard, they should be equal. This name eliminates any confusion that could result from the translation of "International Organization for Standardization" into different languages which would lead to different acronyms.In health sector, quality plays pivotal role, as it is directly related to patient’s care. Earlier time, health service was simple, quite safe but ineffective. Now health care system is an organizational system with more complex processes to deliver care. Medical laboratory service is an integral part in patient’s management system. So, for everyone involved in the treatment of the patient, the accuracy, reliability and safety of those services must be the primary concerns. Accreditation is a significant enabler of quality, thereby delivering confidence to healthcare providers, clinicians, the medical laboratories and the patients themselves.ISO announced meeting in Philadelphia to form a technical committee to develop a new standard for medical laboratory quality. It took 7 years for the creation of a new Quality standard for medical laboratories. It was named as “ISO 15189” and was first published in 2003. The ISO has released three versions of the standard. The first two were released in 2003 and 2007. In 2012, a revised and updated version of the standard, ISO 15189

  10. 76 FR 52378 - Privacy Act; System of Records: State-76, Personal Services Contractor Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-22

    ... Services Contractor Records SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the Department of State proposes to create a new system of records, Personal Services Contractor Records, State-76, pursuant to the provisions... July 20, 2011. It is proposed that the new system be named ``Personal Services Contractor Records.'' It...

  11. Company project: "Evaluation of the quality of medical records as a tool of clinical risk management"

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Santa Guzzo; Mario Tecca; Enrico Marinelli; Claudio Bontempi; Caterina Palazzo; Paolo Ursillo; Giuseppe Ferro; Anna Miani; Annunziata Salvati; Stefania Catanzaro; Massimiliano Chiarini; Domenica Vittoria Colamesta; Domenico Cacchio; Patrizia Sposato; Anna Maria Lombardi

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The medical record was defined by the Italian Ministry of Health in 1992 as "the information tool designed to record all relevant demographic and clinical information on a patient during a single hospitalization episode". Retrospective analysis of medical records is a tool for selecting direct and indirect indicators of critical issues (organizational, management, technical and professional issues). The project’s purpose being the promotion of an evaluation and self-evaluation ...

  12. Object-orientated DBMS techniques for time-oriented medical record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinciroli, F; Combi, C; Pozzi, G

    1992-01-01

    In implementing time-orientated medical record (TOMR) management systems, use of a relational model played a big role. Many applications have been developed to extend query and data manipulation languages to temporal aspects of information. Our experience in developing TOMR revealed some deficiencies inside the relational model, such as: (a) abstract data type definition; (b) unified view of data, at a programming level; (c) management of temporal data; (d) management of signals and images. We identified some first topics to face by an object-orientated approach to database design. This paper describes the first steps in designing and implementing a TOMR by an object-orientated DBMS.

  13. 7 CFR 110.5 - Availability of records to facilitate medical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... pesticide required to be maintained under § 110.3 is necessary to provide medical treatment or first aid to... care professional, to be a medical emergency, the record information of the restricted use pesticide, relating to the medical emergency, shall be provided immediately. (b)(1) The attending licensed health care...

  14. 77 FR 27756 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-11

    ...) deletes one system of records from its existing inventory of systems of records subject to the Privacy Act... inventory of record systems subject to the Privacy Act of 1974 (5 U.S.C. 552a), as amended. The deletion is... following system of records is deleted: 1. (18-04-03) ED Web Personalization Pilot Data Collection, 66 FR...

  15. 76 FR 114 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-03

    ...; System of Records AGENCY: Defense Contract Audit Agency, DoD. ACTION: Notice to amend a system of records. SUMMARY: The Defense Contract Audit Agency is proposing to amend a system of records notice in its... INFORMATION: The Defense Contract Audit Agency systems of records notices subject to the Privacy Act of 1974...

  16. 78 FR 14284 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-05

    ...; System of Records AGENCY: Defense Contract Audit Agency, DoD. ACTION: Notice to alter a System of Records. SUMMARY: The Defense Contract Audit Agency proposes to alter a system of records in its inventory of.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Defense Contract Audit Agency notices for systems of records subject to the...

  17. 77 FR 75621 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-21

    ...; System of Records AGENCY: Defense Contract Audit Agency, DoD. ACTION: Notice to amend a System of Records. SUMMARY: The Defense Contract Audit Agency is amending a system of records notice in its existing.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Defense Contract Audit Agency systems of records notices subject to the Privacy...

  18. 76 FR 115 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-03

    ...; System of Records AGENCY: Defense Contract Audit Agency, DoD. ACTION: Notice to amend a system of records. SUMMARY: The Defense Contract Audit Agency is proposing to amend a system of records notice in its... INFORMATION: The Defense Contract Audit Agency systems of records notices subject to the Privacy Act of 1974...

  19. 77 FR 77048 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-31

    ...; System of Records AGENCY: Defense Contract Audit Agency, DoD. ACTION: Notice to amend a System of Records. SUMMARY: The Defense Contract Audit Agency is amending a system of records notice in its existing.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Defense Contract Audit Agency systems of records notices subject to the Privacy...

  20. 78 FR 14282 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-05

    ...; System of Records AGENCY: Defense Contract Audit Agency, DoD. ACTION: Notice to alter a System of Records. SUMMARY: The Defense Contract Audit Agency proposes to alter a system of records in its inventory of.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Defense Contract Audit Agency notices for systems of records subject to the...

  1. 77 FR 65939 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-31

    ...) is amending the system of records currently entitled ``Veterans Health Information Systems and... Health Information Systems and Technology Architecture (VistA) Records-VA ROUTINE USES OF RECORDS... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records AGENCY: Department of...

  2. 77 FR 3238 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-23

    ... Logistics Agency Primary Level Field Activities. Addresses may be obtained from the System manager below...; System of Records AGENCY: Defense Logistics Agency, DoD. ACTION: Notice To Amend a System of Records. SUMMARY: The Defense Logistics Agency is proposing to amend a system of records in its inventory of record...

  3. 78 FR 6078 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-29

    ...; System of Records AGENCY: Defense Finance and Accounting Service, DoD. ACTION: Notice to delete a system of records. SUMMARY: The Defense Finance and Accounting Service is deleting a system of records.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Defense Finance and Accounting Service systems of records notices subject to the...

  4. 77 FR 65370 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-26

    ...; System of Records AGENCY: Defense Finance and Accounting Service, DoD. ACTION: Notice to delete a Systems of Records. SUMMARY: The Defense Finance and Accounting Service is deleting a system of records.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Defense Finance and Accounting Service systems of records notices subject to the...

  5. 78 FR 27195 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-09

    ...; System of Records AGENCY: Defense Finance and Accounting Service, DoD. ACTION: Notice to delete two Systems of Records. SUMMARY: The Defense Finance and Accounting Service is deleting two systems of records...: The Defense Finance and Accounting Service systems of records notices subject to the Privacy Act of...

  6. 78 FR 27194 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-09

    ...; System of Records AGENCY: Defense Finance and Accounting Service, DoD. ACTION: Notice to delete two Systems of Records. SUMMARY: The Defense Finance and Accounting Service is deleting two systems of records...: The Defense Finance and Accounting Service systems of records notices subject to the Privacy Act of...

  7. 78 FR 69392 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-19

    ...; System of Records AGENCY: Defense Finance and Accounting Service, DoD. ACTION: Notice to delete a system of records. SUMMARY: The Defense Finance and Accounting Service is deleting a system of records... INFORMATION: The Defense Finance and Accounting Service systems of records notices subject to the Privacy Act...

  8. 77 FR 60400 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-03

    ...; System of Records AGENCY: Defense Finance and Accounting Service. ACTION: Notice to delete two systems of records. SUMMARY: The Defense Finance and Accounting Service is deleting two systems of records notices in.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Defense Finance and Accounting Service systems of records notices subject to the...

  9. 78 FR 47309 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-05

    ...; System of Records AGENCY: Defense Finance and Accounting Service, DoD. ACTION: Notice to amend a System of Records. SUMMARY: The Defense Finance and Accounting Service proposes to alter a system of records... Defense Finance and Accounting Service systems of records notices subject to the Privacy Act of 1974 (5 U...

  10. Imaging systems for medical diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krestel, E.

    1990-01-01

    This book provides physicians and clinical physicists with detailed information on today's imaging modalities and assists them in selecting the optimal system for each clinical application. Physicists, engineers and computer specialists engaged in research and development and sales departments will also find this book to be of considerable use. It may also be employed at universities, training centers and in technical seminars. The physiological and physical fundamentals are explained in part 1. The technical solutions contained in part 2 illustrate the numerous possibilities available in X-ray diagnostics, computed tomography, nuclear medical diagnostics, magnetic resonance imaging, sonography and biomagnetic diagnostics. (orig.)

  11. 75 FR 81247 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-27

    ... Control Records system of records is also covered by the Defense Finance and Accounting System T7330a... Defense Finance and Accounting System T7332, Defense Debt Management System (February 17, 2009, 74 FR 7665...

  12. 76 FR 49455 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-10

    ... medical institutions; and open source information, such as property tax records. Exemptions claimed for... Information Number (RIN) and title, by any of the following methods: * Federal Rulemaking Portal: http://www...; financial, educational and medical institutions; and open source information, such as property tax records...

  13. Evaluation of Randomly Selected Completed Medical Records Sheets in Teaching Hospitals of Jahrom University of Medical Sciences, 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Parsa Mahjob

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Medical record documentation, often use to protect the patients legal rights, also providing information for medical researchers, general studies, education of health care staff and qualitative surveys is used. There is a need to control the amount of data entered in the medical record sheets of patients, considering the completion of these sheets is often carried out after completion of service delivery to the patients. Therefore, in this study the prevalence of completeness of medical history, operation reports, and physician order sheets by different documentaries in Jahrom teaching hospitals during year 2009 was analyzed. Methods and Materials: In this descriptive / retrospective study, the 400 medical record sheets of the patients from two teaching hospitals affiliated to Jahrom medical university was randomly selected. The tool of data collection was a checklist based on the content of medical history sheet, operation report and physician order sheets. The data were analyzed by SPSS (Version10 software and Microsoft Office Excel 2003. Results: Average of personal (Demography data entered in medical history, physician order and operation report sheets which is done by department's secretaries were 32.9, 35.8 and 40.18 percent. Average of clinical data entered by physician in medical history sheet is 38 percent. Surgical data entered by the surgeon in operation report sheet was 94.77 percent. Average of data entered by operation room's nurse in operation report sheet was 36.78 percent; Average of physician order data in physician order sheet entered by physician was 99.3 percent. Conclusion: According to this study, the rate of completed record papers reviewed by documentary in Jahrom teaching hospitals were not desirable and in some cases were very weak and incomplete. This deficiency was due to different reason such as medical record documentaries negligence, lack of adequate education for documentaries, High work

  14. Quality and correlates of medical record documentation in the ambulatory care setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Steven R

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Documentation in the medical record facilitates the diagnosis and treatment of patients. Few studies have assessed the quality of outpatient medical record documentation, and to the authors' knowledge, none has conclusively determined the correlates of chart documentation. We therefore undertook the present study to measure the rates of documentation of quality of care measures in an outpatient primary care practice setting that utilizes an electronic medical record. Methods We reviewed electronic medical records from 834 patients receiving care from 167 physicians (117 internists and 50 pediatricians at 14 sites of a multi-specialty medical group in Massachusetts. We abstracted information for five measures of medical record documentation quality: smoking history, medications, drug allergies, compliance with screening guidelines, and immunizations. From other sources we determined physicians' specialty, gender, year of medical school graduation, and self-reported time spent teaching and in patient care. Results Among internists, unadjusted rates of documentation were 96.2% for immunizations, 91.6% for medications, 88% for compliance with screening guidelines, 61.6% for drug allergies, 37.8% for smoking history. Among pediatricians, rates were 100% for immunizations, 84.8% for medications, 90.8% for compliance with screening guidelines, 50.4% for drug allergies, and 20.4% for smoking history. While certain physician and patient characteristics correlated with some measures of documentation quality, documentation varied depending on the measure. For example, female internists were more likely than male internists to document smoking history (odds ratio [OR], 1.90; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.27 – 2.83 but were less likely to document drug allergies (OR, 0.51; 95% CI, 0.35 – 0.75. Conclusions Medical record documentation varied depending on the measure, with room for improvement in most domains. A variety of

  15. Med-records: an ADD database of AAEC medical records since 1966

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barry, J.M.; Pollard, J.P.; Tucker, A.D.

    1986-08-01

    Since its inception in 1958 most of the staff of the AAEC Research Establishment at Lucas Heights have had annual medical examinations. Medical information accrued since 1966 has been collected as an ADD database to allow ad hoc enquiries to be made against the data. Details are given of the database schema and numerous support routines ranging from the integrity checking of input data to analysis and plotting of the summary results

  16. 77 FR 65049 - Privacy Act; System of Records: Translator and Interpreter Records, State-37

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice 8066] Privacy Act; System of Records: Translator and... an existing system of records, Translator and Interpreter Records, State-37, pursuant to the... INFORMATION: The Department of State proposes that the current system will retain the name ``Translator and...

  17. 77 FR 11063 - Privacy Act of 1974, System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    ... signature and encryption certificates for documents and email and to add biometric authentication... National Archives Records Administration--Schedules for the type of record being maintained. System manager...

  18. Data-driven approach for assessing utility of medical tests using electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrøvseth, Stein Olav; Augestad, Knut Magne; Ebadollahi, Shahram

    2015-02-01

    To precisely define the utility of tests in a clinical pathway through data-driven analysis of the electronic medical record (EMR). The information content was defined in terms of the entropy of the expected value of the test related to a given outcome. A kernel density classifier was used to estimate the necessary distributions. To validate the method, we used data from the EMR of the gastrointestinal department at a university hospital. Blood tests from patients undergoing surgery for gastrointestinal surgery were analyzed with respect to second surgery within 30 days of the index surgery. The information content is clearly reflected in the patient pathway for certain combinations of tests and outcomes. C-reactive protein tests coupled to anastomosis leakage, a severe complication show a clear pattern of information gain through the patient trajectory, where the greatest gain from the test is 3-4 days post index surgery. We have defined the information content in a data-driven and information theoretic way such that the utility of a test can be precisely defined. The results reflect clinical knowledge. In the case we used the tests carry little negative impact. The general approach can be expanded to cases that carry a substantial negative impact, such as in certain radiological techniques. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Realization of a universal patient identifier for electronic medical records through biometric technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, D C; Pons, Alexander P; Asfour, Shihab S

    2009-07-01

    The technology exists for the migration of healthcare data from its archaic paper-based system to an electronic one, and, once in digital form, to be transported anywhere in the world in a matter of seconds. The advent of universally accessible healthcare data has benefited all participants, but one of the outstanding problems that must be addressed is how the creation of a standardized nationwide electronic healthcare record system in the United States would uniquely identify and match a composite of an individual's recorded healthcare information to an identified individual patients out of approximately 300 million people to a 1:1 match. To date, a few solutions to this problem have been proposed that are limited in their effectiveness. We propose the use of biometric technology within our fingerprint, iris, retina scan, and DNA (FIRD) framework, which is a multiphase system whose primary phase is a multilayer consisting of these four types of biometric identifiers: 1) fingerprint; 2) iris; 3) retina scan; and 4) DNA. In addition, it also consists of additional phases of integration, consolidation, and data discrepancy functions to solve the unique association of a patient to their medical data distinctively. This would allow a patient to have real-time access to all of their recorded healthcare information electronically whenever it is necessary, securely with minimal effort, greater effectiveness, and ease.

  20. 28 CFR 16.51 - Security of systems of records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Security of systems of records. 16.51... Security of systems of records. (a) Each component shall establish administrative and physical controls to prevent unauthorized access to its systems of records, to prevent unauthorized disclosure of records, and...

  1. 8 CFR 103.34 - Security of records systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Security of records systems. 103.34 Section 103.34 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS POWERS AND DUTIES; AVAILABILITY OF RECORDS § 103.34 Security of records systems. The security of records systems...

  2. [The global medical record + (DMG+), tool for prevention in first line care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schetgen, M

    2012-09-01

    The "global medical record +" can be offered to all 45 to 75 year-old patients in the form of a prevention module within the global medical record and which the general practitioner and the patient will regularly update. It will include in particular an assessment of cardiovascular risk, cervical, breast and colon cancer screening, a check of main adult vaccinations, as well as a primary prevention section focused on smoking, alcohol consumption and various hygiene and dietary measures. The inclusion of this module in a computerized medical record will make it more efficient and will lighten the practitioner's workload.

  3. RIMS [Records Inventory Management System] Handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-03-01

    The Records Inventory Management System (RIMS) is a computer library of abstracted documents relating to low-level radioactive waste. The documents are of interest to state governments, regional compacts, and the Department of Energy, especially as they relate to the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act requiring states or compacts of states to establish and operate waste disposal facilities. RIMS documents are primarily regulatory, policy, or technical documents, published by the various states and compacts of the United States; however, RIMS contains key international publications as well. The system has two sections: a document retrieval section and a document update section. The RIMS mainframe can be accessed through a PC or modem. Also, each state and compact may request a PC version of RIMS, which allows a user to enter documents off line and then upload the documents to the mainframe data base

  4. Stretchable bioelectronics for medical devices and systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Kim, Dae-Hyeong

    2016-01-01

    This book highlights recent advances in soft and stretchable biointegrated electronics. A renowned group of authors address key ideas in the materials, processes, mechanics, and devices of soft and stretchable electronics; the wearable electronics systems; and bioinspired and implantable biomedical electronics. Among the topics discussed are liquid metals, stretchable and flexible energy sources, skin-like devices, in vitro neural recording, and more. Special focus is given to recent advances in extremely soft and stretchable bio-inspired electronics with real-world clinical studies that validate the technology. Foundational theoretical and experimental aspects are also covered in relation to the design and application of these biointegrated electronics systems. This is an ideal book for researchers, engineers, and industry professionals involved in developing healthcare devices, medical tools and related instruments relevant to various clinical practices.

  5. Paper-Based Medical Records: the Challenges and Lessons Learned from Studying Obstetrics and Gynaecological Post-Operation Records in a Nigerian Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adekunle Yisau Abdulkadir

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM: With the background knowledge that auditing of Medical Records (MR for adequacy and completeness is necessary if it is to be useful and reliable in continuing patient care; protection of the legal interest of the patient, physicians, and the Hospital; and meeting requirements for researches, we scrutinized theatre records of our hospital to identify routine omissions or deficiencies, and correctable errors in our MR system. METHOD: Obstetrics and Gynaecological post operation theatre records between January 2006 and December 2008 were quantitatively and qualitatively analyzed for details that included: hospital number; Patients age; diagnosis; surgery performed; types and modes of anesthesia; date of surgery; patients’ ward; Anesthetists names; surgeons and attending nurses names, and abbreviations used with SPSS 15.0 for Windows. RESULTS: Hardly were any of the 1270 surgeries during the study period documented without an omission or an abbreviation. Hospital numbers and patients’ age were not documented in 21.8% (n=277 and 59.1% (n=750 respectively. Diagnoses and surgeries were recorded with varying abbreviations in about 96% of instances. Surgical team names were mostly abbreviated or initials only given. CONCLUSION: To improve the quality of Paper-based Medical Record, regular auditing, training and good orientation of medical personnel for good record practices, and discouraging large volume record book to reduce paper damages and sheet loss from handling are necessary else what we record toady may neither be useful nor available tomorrow. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(5.000: 427-432

  6. Brief review: Adoption of electronic medical records to enhance acute pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, David H; Phelan, Rachel; Wilson, Rosemary; Ross-White, Amanda; VanDenKerkhof, Elizabeth G; Penning, John P; Jaeger, Melanie

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine physician barriers to adopting electronic medical records (EMRs) as well as anesthesiologists' experiences with the EMRs used by the acute pain management service at two tertiary care centres in Canada. We first review the recent literature to determine if physician barriers to adoption are changing given the exponential growth of information technology and the evolving healthcare environment. We next report on institutional experience from two academic health sciences centres regarding the challenges they encountered over the past ten years in developing and implementing an electronic medical record system for acute pain management. The key identified barriers to adoption of EMRs are financial, technological, and time constraints. These barriers are identical to those reported in a systematic review performed prior to 2009 and remain significant factors challenging implementation. These challenges were encountered during our institution's process of adopting EMRs specific to acute pain management. In addition, our findings emphasize the importance of physician participation in the development and implementation stages of EMRs in order to incorporate their feedback and ensure the EMR system is in keeping with their workflow. Use of EMRs will inevitably become the standard of care; however, many barriers persist to impede their implementation and adoption. These challenges to implementation can be facilitated by a corporate strategy for change that acknowledges the barriers and provides the resources for implementation. Adoption will facilitate benefits in communication, patient management, research, and improved patient safety.

  7. Barriers to the Adoption and Use of an Electronic Medication Record

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granlien, Maren Sander; Hertzum, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Clinicians’ adoption of the information systems deployed at hospitals is crucial to achieving the intended effects of the systems, yet many systems face substantial adoption barriers. In this study we analyse the adoption and use of an electronic medication record (EMR) 2-4 years after its...... deployment. We investigate mid-and-lower-level managers’ perception of (a) the extent to which clinicians have adopted the EMR and the work procedures associated with its use and (b) possible barriers toward adopting the EMR and work procedures, including the managers’ perception of the usefulness and ease...... obtained. Eleven categories of barrier are identified with uncertainty about what the barriers concretely are as the prime barrier. This prime barrier is particularly noteworthy because the respondents are formally responsible for the adoption of the EMR. It is apparent that time alone has not led...

  8. Use of an electronic medical record improves the quality of urban pediatric primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, William G; Mann, Adriana M; Bauchner, Howard

    2003-03-01

    To evaluate the quality of pediatric primary care, including preventive services, before and after the introduction of an electronic medical record (EMR) developed for use in an urban pediatric primary care center. A pre-postintervention analysis was used in the study. The intervention was a pediatric EMR. Routine health care maintenance visits for children eye-to-eye contact with patients was reduced, and 4 of 7 reported that use of the system increased the duration of visits (mean: 9.3 minutes longer). All users recommended continued use of the system. Use of the EMR in this study was associated with improved quality of care. This experience suggests that EMRs can be successfully used in busy urban pediatric primary care centers and, as recommended by the Institute of Medicine, must play a central role in the redesign of the US health care system.

  9. Web tools for effective retrieval, visualization, and evaluation of cardiology medical images and records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masseroli, Marco; Pinciroli, Francesco

    2000-12-01

    To provide easy retrieval, integration and evaluation of multimodal cardiology images and data in a web browser environment, distributed application technologies and java programming were used to implement a client-server architecture based on software agents. The server side manages secure connections and queries to heterogeneous remote databases and file systems containing patient personal and clinical data. The client side is a Java applet running in a web browser and providing a friendly medical user interface to perform queries on patient and medical test dat and integrate and visualize properly the various query results. A set of tools based on Java Advanced Imaging API enables to process and analyze the retrieved cardiology images, and quantify their features in different regions of interest. The platform-independence Java technology makes the developed prototype easy to be managed in a centralized form and provided in each site where an intranet or internet connection can be located. Giving the healthcare providers effective tools for querying, visualizing and evaluating comprehensively cardiology medical images and records in all locations where they can need them- i.e. emergency, operating theaters, ward, or even outpatient clinics- the developed prototype represents an important aid in providing more efficient diagnoses and medical treatments.

  10. Views on health information sharing and privacy from primary care practices using electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Gihan; Holbrook, Anne; Thabane, Lehana; Foster, Gary; Willison, Donald J

    2011-02-01

    To determine how patients and physicians balance the perceived benefits and harms of sharing electronic health data for patient care and for secondary purposes. Before-after survey of patients and providers in practices using electronic medical records (EMRs) enrolled in a clinical trial in Ontario, Canada. Outcomes were measured using the Health Information Privacy Questionnaire (HIPQ) at baseline and end of study. Thirteen questions in 4 general domains investigated attitudes towards the privacy of EMRs, outsider's use of patient's health information, the sharing of patient's information within the health care system, and the overall perception of benefits versus harms of computerization in health care. 511 patients (mean age 60.3 years, 49.6% female) and 46 physicians (mean age 47.2 years, 37.0% female) participated. Most (>90%) supported the computerized sharing of the patient's health records among their health care professionals and to provide clinical advice. Fewer agreed that the patient's de-identified information should be shared outside of the health care circle (records can be keep more private than paper records (38-50%). Overall, a majority (58% patients, 70% physicians) believed that the benefits of computerization were greater than the risks of confidentiality loss. This was especially true for patients who were frequent computer users. While these primary care physicians and their patients valued the clinical features of EMRs, a substantial minority have concerns about the secondary use of de-identified information. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. 75 FR 21260 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-23

    ... records in the system: Storage: Paper records and electronic storage media. Retrievability: Name, Social... include name, Social Security Number (SSN), enlisted service number, date of birth, rate, rank, record... and motivation, and other career related matters to meet [[Page 21261

  12. 75 FR 78688 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ... automated records maintained by Space and Warfare Systems Center Atlantic.'' * * * * * Retention and... Education and Training Records.'' * * * * * N07220-1 System name: Navy Standard Integrated Personnel System...), date of birth, education, training and qualifications, professional history, assignments, performance...

  13. Bringing science to medicine: an interview with Larry Weed, inventor of the problem-oriented medical record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Adam; Sittig, Dean F; McGowan, Julie; Ash, Joan S; Weed, Lawrence L

    2014-01-01

    Larry Weed, MD is widely known as the father of the problem-oriented medical record and inventor of the now-ubiquitous SOAP (subjective/objective/assessment/plan) note, for developing an electronic health record system (Problem-Oriented Medical Information System, PROMIS), and for founding a company (since acquired), which developed problem-knowledge couplers. However, Dr Weed's vision for medicine goes far beyond software--over the course of his storied career, he has relentlessly sought to bring the scientific method to medical practice and, where necessary, to point out shortcomings in the system and advocate for change. In this oral history, Dr Weed describes, in his own words, the arcs of his long career and the work that remains to be done. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  14. Using an electronic prescribing system to ensure accurate medication lists in a large multidisciplinary medical group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Ron; Scott, Jim; Gurtel, Sharon

    2009-05-01

    Although medication safety has largely focused on reducing medication errors in hospitals, the scope of adverse drug events in the outpatient setting is immense. A fundamental problem occurs when a clinician lacks immediate access to an accurate list of the medications that a patient is taking. Since 2001, PeaceHealth Medical Group (PHMG), a multispecialty physician group, has been using an electronic prescribing system that includes medication-interaction warnings and allergy checks. Yet, most practitioners recognized the remaining potential for error, especially because there was no assurance regarding the accuracy of information on the electronic medical record (EMR)-generated medication list. PeaceHealth developed and implemented a standardized approach to (1) review and reconcile the medication list for every patient at each office visit and (2) report on the results obtained within the PHMG clinics. In 2005, PeaceHealth established the ambulatory medication reconciliation project to develop a reliable, efficient process for maintaining accurate patient medication lists. Each of PeaceHealth's five regions created a medication reconciliation task force to redesign its clinical practice, incorporating the systemwide aims and agreed-on key process components for every ambulatory visit. Implementation of the medication reconciliation process at the PHMG clinics resulted in a substantial increase in the number of accurate medication lists, with fewer discrepancies between what the patient is actually taking and what is recorded in the EMR. The PeaceHealth focus on patient safety, and particularly the reduction of medication errors, has involved a standardized approach for reviewing and reconciling medication lists for every patient visiting a physician office. The standardized processes can be replicated at other ambulatory clinics-whether or not electronic tools are available.

  15. Charging for hospital pharmaceutical services: flat free based on the medication record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, B K

    1979-03-01

    A 200-bed hospital's change in pricing drug products from a cost-plus-fee system to a flat fee per dose based on the medication administration record (MAR) is described. With the flat-fee system, drug charges are not recorded when the drug is dispensed by the pharmacy; data for charging doses are obtained directly from the MAR forms generated by the nursing staff. Charges are 55 cents per oral or suppository dose and $3.00 per injection dose. Drugs administered intravenously, topical drugs, injections costing more than $10.00 per dose, and miscellaneous nondrug items are still charged on a cost-plus-fee basis. Man-hours are saved in the pharmacy department because of the elimination of the pricing function and maintenance of price lists. The need for nursing staff to charge for any doses administered from emergency or Schedule II floor-stock supplies is eliminated. The workload for business office personnel is reduced because the number of individual charges is less than with the cost-plus charging system. The system is accepted by patients and third-party payers and has made a complete unit dose drug distribution system possible at lower cost.

  16. Performance evaluation of medical records departments by analytical hierarchy process (AHP) approach in the selected hospitals in Isfahan : medical records dep. & AHP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajami, Sima; Ketabi, Saeedeh

    2012-06-01

    Medical Records Department (MRD) is an important unit for evaluating and planning of care services. The goal of this study is evaluating the performance of the Medical Records Departments (MRDs) of the selected hospitals in Isfahan, Iran by using Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP). This was an analytic of cross-sectional study that was done in spring 2008 in Isfahan, Iran. The statistical population consisted of MRDs of Alzahra, Kashani and Khorshid Hospitals in Isfahan. Data were collected by forms and through brainstorm technique. To analyze and perform AHP, Expert Choice software was used by researchers. Results were showed archiving unit has received the largest importance weight with respect to information management. However, on customer aspect admission unit has received the largest weight. Ordering weights of Medical Records Departments' Alzahra, Kashani and Khorshid Hospitals in Isfahan were with 0.394, 0.342 and 0.264 respectively. It is useful for managers to allocate and prioritize resources according to AHP technique for ranking at the Medical Records Departments.

  17. Electronic Medical Record and Quality Ratings of Long Term Care Facilities Long-Term Care Facility Characteristics and Reasons and Barriers for Adoption of Electronic Medical Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Cheryl Andrea

    2013-01-01

    With the growing elderly population, compounded by the retirement of the babyboomers, the need for long-term care (LTC) facilities is expected to grow. An area of great concern for those that are seeking a home for their family member is the quality of care provided by the nursing home to the residents. Electronic medical records (EMR) are often…

  18. [An experience with implementation of electronic medical records in Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revoredo Iparraguirre, José Francisco; Cavalcanti Oscátegui, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Analyze the process for implementation of health provider information systems in Peru. A qualitative study was conducted on implementation of a health provider information system in coastal, mountain, and jungle regions of Peru. Factors were identified that hinder and that facilitate the implementation process. Critical success factors included planning of implementation, executive commitment, commitment of the implementation leader, organizational culture, and human resources capacity. Implementation processes for provider information systems demonstrate various difficulties associated primarily with human barriers.

  19. Meeting the security requirements of electronic medical records in the ERA of high-speed computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanazi, H O; Zaidan, A A; Zaidan, B B; Kiah, M L Mat; Al-Bakri, S H

    2015-01-01

    This study has two objectives. First, it aims to develop a system with a highly secured approach to transmitting electronic medical records (EMRs), and second, it aims to identify entities that transmit private patient information without permission. The NTRU and the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) cryptosystems are secured encryption methods. The AES is a tested technology that has already been utilized in several systems to secure sensitive data. The United States government has been using AES since June 2003 to protect sensitive and essential information. Meanwhile, NTRU protects sensitive data against attacks through the use of quantum computers, which can break the RSA cryptosystem and elliptic curve cryptography algorithms. A hybrid of AES and NTRU is developed in this work to improve EMR security. The proposed hybrid cryptography technique is implemented to secure the data transmission process of EMRs. The proposed security solution can provide protection for over 40 years and is resistant to quantum computers. Moreover, the technique provides the necessary evidence required by law to identify disclosure or misuse of patient records. The proposed solution can effectively secure EMR transmission and protect patient rights. It also identifies the source responsible for disclosing confidential patient records. The proposed hybrid technique for securing data managed by institutional websites must be improved in the future.

  20. Training and development needs of medical record staff at the Korle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ghana Library Journal ... Though the medical record services play an important role in health care delivery, indications are that the ... This neglect has far reaching implications for the quality of service required from the Ghana Health Service.

  1. Health Care Professionals’ Pain Narratives in Hospitalized Children’s Medical Records. Part 1: Pain Descriptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judy Rashotte

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although documentation of children’s pain by health care professionals is frequently undertaken, few studies have explored the nature of the language used to describe pain in the medical records of hospitalized children.

  2. 76 FR 76215 - Privacy Act; System of Records: State-78, Risk Analysis and Management Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-06

    ... a system of records, Risk Analysis and Management Records, State-78, pursuant to the provisions of... INFORMATION: The Department of State proposes that the new system will be ``Risk Analysis and Management.... These standard routine uses apply to State-78, Risk Analysis and Management Records. POLICIES AND...

  3. 77 FR 15086 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-14

    ... Defense Intelligence Information System (DoDIIS) Customer Relationship Management System. The records will... instructions for submitting comments. * Mail: Federal Docket Management System Office, 4800 Mark Center Drive...

  4. Development of Markup Language for Medical Record Charting: A Charting Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Won-Mo; Chae, Younbyoung; Jang, Bo-Hyoung

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays a lot of trials for collecting electronic medical records (EMRs) exist. However, structuring data format for EMR is an especially labour-intensive task for practitioners. Here we propose a new mark-up language for medical record charting (called Charting Language), which borrows useful properties from programming languages. Thus, with Charting Language, the text data described in dynamic situation can be easily used to extract information.

  5. Perception of electronic medical records (EMRs by nursing staff in a teaching hospital in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Kumar Pera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Currently, in India, many healthcare organizations and their managements appreciate the advantages of electronic medical records, but they often use them. The current push for universal health coverage in India with National Rural Health Mission (NRHM and National Urban Health Mission (NUHM helping toward healthcare reforms highlights the importance of implementing information technology as a means of cutting costs and improving efficiency in healthcare field. The quality of documentation of patient care rendered at healthcare destinations is very important to showcase the growing stature of healthcare in India. Aims: As maintaining the medical records is very important, storage and retrieval of the information is also important for future patient care. In this regard, implementation of electronic medical records in hospitals is essential. Through this study, we wanted to highlight the perceptions of healthcare personnel, who are in the core team of delivering healthcare, toward implementation of electronic medical records. Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out among doctors (post-graduates and staff nurses. The sample size for post-graduate students and nurses was 164 and 296, respectively, in this study. The study was carried out during the period from January to June 2013, and a survey was conducted with the help of a validated, pre-tested questionnaire in a tertiary care medical college hospital in India. Results: The results showed that 75% of the study population are comfortable working with electronic medical records. They mentioned that display of diagnosis, medications, and allergies of patients on the records was most important. Their perception was that electronic medical records improve timely decision-making and patient care due to immediate access to the patient′s disease history. Conclusion: The major problems faced by nurses, as per our study, are delay in services due to dispersion of records

  6. IMASIS computer-based medical record project: dealing with the human factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Baranera, M; Planas, I; Palau, J; Sanz, F

    1995-01-01

    The Institut Municipal d'Assistència Sanitària (IMAS) is a health care organization in Barcelona, comprising two general hospitals, a psychiatric hospital, a surgical clinic, a geriatric center, some primary care clinics, and a research institute. Since 1984, IMAS has been engaged in creating a multicenter integrated hospital information system (IMASIS). Currently, IMASIS offers the possibility to manage administrative data, laboratory results, pathology and cytology reports, radiology reports, and pharmacy inpatient orders; it also shares this information on-line among IMAS centers. IMASIS users may also work with a word processor, a spreadsheet, a database, or a statistical package and have access to MEDLINE. A second phase of IMASIS development began in December 1993 focused on clinical information management. The goal was to move towards an integrated multimedia medical record [1]. As a first step, the implementation experiences of the most advanced hospital information systems around the world were studied. Some of these experiences detected behavioral, cultural, and organizational factors [2] as the main sources of delay, or even failure, in HIS projects. A preliminary analysis to define such factors, assess their potential impact, and introduce adequate measures to deal with them seemed unavoidable before structuring of the project. In our approach to physician attitudes analysis, two survey techniques were applied. First, every hospital service head was contacted to schedule an interview, with either a service representative or a group of staff physicians and residents. The aim was to provide detailed information about project objectives and collect personal opinions, problems encountered in the current HIS, and specific needs of every medical and surgical specialty (including imaging needs). Every service head was asked to distribute a questionnaire among all clinicians, which assessed frequency of use of IMASIS current applications, user's satisfaction

  7. Identifying digital records in business systems: the definition of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Before digital records can be preserved or managed, they need to be identified first. However, records identification is not a clearly defined process. Given the multi-faceted information system environment in organisations, large quantities of potential records are created and stored in systems not designed for records ...

  8. 75 FR 52513 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-26

    ... practices data, and employee health hazard educational data. Records include the name, Social Security... system of records notice. Note 2: Personal identity, diagnosis, prognosis of any patient maintained in... Records in the System: Storage: Paper records and electronic storage media. Retrievability: By individual...

  9. 75 FR 42719 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-22

    ... characteristics (such as name, last four digits of Social Security Number (SSN), grade, Unit Identification Code...) organization. CATEGORIES OF RECORDS IN THE SYSTEM: Name, last four digits of Social Security Number (SSN), duty... RECORDS IN THE SYSTEM: STORAGE: Records are stored on electronic storage media. RETRIEVABILITY: Records...

  10. 77 FR 58816 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-24

    ... obsolete. The records are now covered by the Defense Finance and Accounting Service system of records... Defense Finance and Accounting Service system of records notice, T-7206, Non-appropriated Funds Central... Cards (February 22, 1993, 58 FR 10562). Reason: These records are now covered by the Defense Finance and...

  11. 75 FR 65457 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-25

    ... number.'' CONTESTING RECORD PROCEDURES: Delete entry and replace with ``The NSA/CSS rules for contesting...' published at the beginning of the NSA/CSS's compilation of record systems also apply to this record system... number. CONTESTING RECORD PROCEDURES: The NSA/CSS rules for contesting contents and appealing initial...

  12. [Development of Diagrammatic Recording System for Choledochoscope and Its Clinical Application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zhao; Hu, Liangshuo; Tang, Bo; Zhang, Xiaogang; Lyu, Yi

    2017-11-30

    To develop a diagrammatic recording system for choledochoscopy and evaluate the system with clinical application. To match the real-time image and procedure illustration during choledochoscopy examination, we combined video-image capture and speech recognition technology to quickly generate personalized choledochoscopy images and texts records. The new system could be used in sharing territorial electronic medical records, telecommuting, scientific research and education, et al. In the clinical application of 32 patients, the choledochoscopy diagrammatic recording system could significantly improve the surgeons' working efficiency and patients' satisfaction. It could also meet the design requirement of remote information interaction. The choledochoscopy diagrammatic recording system which is recommended could elevate the quality of medical service and promote academic exchange and training.

  13. 75 FR 70342 - Privacy Act; System of Records: Equal Employment Opportunity Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-17

    ... users are given cyber security awareness training which covers the procedures for handling Sensitive but.... State-09 SYSTEM NAME: Equal Employment Opportunity Records. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION: Unclassified... apply to the Equal Employment Opportunity Records, State-09. DISCLOSURE TO CONSUMER REPORTING AGENCIES...

  14. 29 CFR 1611.3 - Procedures for requests pertaining to individual records in a record system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... or be supplied with copies by mail. (b) Requests pertaining to records contained in a system of... Financial Disclosure Reports and Other Ethics Program Records), OGE/GOVT-2 (Confidential Statements of...

  15. 77 FR 77047 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-31

    ...; System of Records AGENCY: Defense Contract Audit Agency, DoD. ACTION: Notice to delete a Systems of Records. SUMMARY: The Defense Contract Audit Agency (DCAA) is deleting a system of records in its existing... at (703) 767-1022. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Defense Contract Audit Agency (DCAA) systems of...

  16. 75 FR 10473 - Privacy Act of 1974; Systems of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... testing, or permanent implementation, as applicable. System manager(s) and address: Defense Logistics...; Systems of Records AGENCY: Defense Logistics Agency, DoD. ACTION: Notice to amend a system of records. SUMMARY: The Defense Logistics Agency proposes to amend a system of records notice in its existing...

  17. 76 FR 28002 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... determination is made. System manager(s) and address: Personnel Security Specialists, Defense Logistics Agency...; System of Records AGENCY: Defense Logistics Agency, DoD. ACTION: Notice to Amend Two Systems of Records. SUMMARY: The Defense Logistics Agency is proposing to amend two systems of records notices in its existing...

  18. 76 FR 39390 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-06

    .... System manager(s) and address: Director, DLA Human Resources, Headquarters, Defense Logistics Agency...; System of Records AGENCY: Defense Logistics Agency, DoD. ACTION: Notice to amend a system of records. SUMMARY: The Defense Logistics Agency is proposing to amend a system of records notice in its existing...

  19. 76 FR 73602 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ....'' * * * * * System manager(s) and address: Delete entry and replace with ``Director, Defense Logistics Agency Human...; System of Records AGENCY: Defense Logistics Agency, Department of Defense (DoD). ACTION: Notice to amend a system of records. SUMMARY: The Defense Logistics Agency is proposing to amend a system of records...

  20. 78 FR 33807 - Privacy Act New System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE [Docket No. 130520483-3483-01] Privacy Act New System of Records AGENCY... Department's proposal for a new system of records under the Privacy Act. The system is entitled ``Information... Department is creating a new system of records that will enable electronic registration, via the Internet...

  1. 77 FR 5313 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-02

    ... Affairs (VA) is amending the system of records entitled ``Alternative Dispute Resolution Tracking System... records entitled ``Alternative Dispute Resolution Tracking System-VA'' (116VA09) in 67 FR 49392-49395 (July 30, 2002). The system of records tracked alternative dispute resolution (ADR) activity within VA...

  2. Beyond information retrieval and electronic health record use: competencies in clinical informatics for medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hersh WR

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available William R Hersh,1 Paul N Gorman,1 Frances E Biagioli,2 Vishnu Mohan,1 Jeffrey A Gold,3 George C Mejicano4 1Department of Medical Informatics and Clinical Epidemiology, 2Department of Family Medicine, 3Department of Medicine, 4School of Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA Abstract: Physicians in the 21st century will increasingly interact in diverse ways with information systems, requiring competence in many aspects of clinical informatics. In recent years, many medical school curricula have added content in information retrieval (search and basic use of the electronic health record. However, this omits the growing number of other ways that physicians are interacting with information that includes activities such as clinical decision support, quality measurement and improvement, personal health records, telemedicine, and personalized medicine. We describe a process whereby six faculty members representing different perspectives came together to define competencies in clinical informatics for a curriculum transformation process occurring at Oregon Health & Science University. From the broad competencies, we also developed specific learning objectives and milestones, an implementation schedule, and mapping to general competency domains. We present our work to encourage debate and refinement as well as facilitate evaluation in this area. Keywords: curriculum transformation, clinical decision support, patient safety, health care quality, patient engagement

  3. Electronic medical records and communication with patients and other clinicians: are we talking less?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Ann S; Cohen, Genna R; Grossman, Joy M

    2010-04-01

    Commercial electronic medical records (EMRs) both help and hinder physician interpersonal communication--real-time, face-to-face or phone conversations--with patients and other clinicians, according to a new Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC) study based on in-depth interviews with clinicians in 26 physician practices. EMRs assist real-time communication with patients during office visits, primarily through immediate access to patient information, allowing clinicians to talk with patients rather than search for information from paper records. For some clinicians, however, aspects of EMRs pose a distraction during visits. Moreover, some indicated that clinicians may rely on EMRs for information gathering and transfer at the expense of real-time communication with patients and other clinicians. Given time pressures already present in many physician practices, EMR and office-work flow modifications could help ensure that EMRs advance care without compromising interpersonal communication. In particular, policies promoting EMR adoption should consider incorporating communication-skills training for medical trainees and clinicians using EMRs.

  4. A National Medical Information System for Senegal: Architecture and Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camara, Gaoussou; Diallo, Al Hassim; Lo, Moussa; Tendeng, Jacques-Noël; Lo, Seynabou

    2016-01-01

    In Senegal, great amounts of data are daily generated by medical activities such as consultation, hospitalization, blood test, x-ray, birth, death, etc. These data are still recorded in register, printed images, audios and movies which are manually processed. However, some medical organizations have their own software for non-standardized patient record management, appointment, wages, etc. without any possibility of sharing these data or communicating with other medical structures. This leads to lots of limitations in reusing or sharing these data because of their possible structural and semantic heterogeneity. To overcome these problems we have proposed a National Medical Information System for Senegal (SIMENS). As an integrated platform, SIMENS provides an EHR system that supports healthcare activities, a mobile version and a web portal. The SIMENS architecture proposes also a data and application integration services for supporting interoperability and decision making.

  5. Electronic patient record and archive of records in Cardio.net system for telecardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierdziński, Janusz; Karpiński, Grzegorz

    2003-01-01

    In modern medicine the well structured patient data set, fast access to it and reporting capability become an important question. With the dynamic development of information technology (IT) such question is solved via building electronic patient record (EPR) archives. We then obtain fast access to patient data, diagnostic and treatment protocols etc. It results in more efficient, better and cheaper treatment. The aim of the work was to design a uniform Electronic Patient Record, implemented in cardio.net system for telecardiology allowing the co-operation among regional hospitals and reference centers. It includes questionnaires for demographic data and questionnaires supporting doctor's work (initial diagnosis, final diagnosis, history and physical, ECG at the discharge, applied treatment, additional tests, drugs, daily and periodical reports). The browser is implemented in EPR archive to facilitate data retrieval. Several tools for creating EPR and EPR archive were used such as: XML, PHP, Java Script and MySQL. The separate question is the security of data on WWW server. The security is ensured via Security Socket Layer (SSL) protocols and other tools. EPR in Cardio.net system is a module enabling the co-work of many physicians and the communication among different medical centers.

  6. A retrospective cohort study on lifestyle habits of cardiovascular patients: how informative are medical records?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fouwels, Annemarie J.; Bredie, Sebastiaan J. H.; Wollersheim, Hub; Schippers, Gerard M.

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: To evaluate the vigilance of medical specialists as to the lifestyle of their cardiovascular outpatients by comparing lifestyle screening as registered in medical records versus a lifestyle questionnaire (LSQ), a study was carried out at the cardiovascular outpatient clinic of

  7. A retrospective cohort study on lifestyle habits of cardiovascular patients: how informative are medical records?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fouwels, A.J.; Bredie, S.J.H.; Wollersheim, H.C.H.; Schippers, G.M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To evaluate the vigilance of medical specialists as to the lifestyle of their cardiovascular outpatients by comparing lifestyle screening as registered in medical records versus a lifestyle questionnaire (LSQ), a study was carried out at the cardiovascular outpatient clinic of the

  8. 29 CFR 1904.9 - Recording criteria for cases involving medical removal under OSHA standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... surveillance requirements of an OSHA standard, you must record the case on the OSHA 300 Log. (b) Implementation—(1) How do I classify medical removal cases on the OSHA 300 Log? You must enter each medical removal case on the OSHA 300 Log as either a case involving days away from work or a case involving restricted...

  9. The EMR-scan: assessing the quality of Electronic Medical Records in general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheij, R.; Jabaaij, L.; Njoo, K.; Hoogen, H. van den; Bakker, D. de

    2008-01-01

    Background: The use of electronic medical records (EMR) in general practice has spread rapidly in the last decade (more than 90% today). Traditionally, these records are primarily used for direct patient care and for administrative purposes by the practice involved. In recent years, further

  10. A Qualitative Study of Social Barriers to Digitizing Medical Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, Kenneth L., II

    2012-01-01

    The cost of the American healthcare system has escalated to the point that the United States spends more per patient than any other country. Based on the cost controls and increase in efficiency seen in other industries, many agree that information technology solutions should be adopted by the American healthcare industry. However, healthcare…

  11. 75 FR 60763 - Privacy Act of 1974; Report of an Altered System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... clinical privilege actions, disciplinary actions taken by Boards of Medical Examiners, and professional... licensure and clinical privilege actions, disciplinary actions taken by Boards of Medical Examiners, and...), Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA). ACTION: Notice of an Altered System of Records (SOR...

  12. A small-scale computerized isotope record monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, L.

    1979-01-01

    A system in use at Queen Elizabeth College for monitoring the isotopes used by radiation workers and the precautionary medical screening of the workers is described. It consists of a PDP-11 minicomputer and flexible disk storage system. The machine is run under a single-user, real-time operating system and is linked on-line to a teleprinter and a VDU. Data is stored as a series of files, each relating to an individual worker, which can be updated individually from the VDU. The files contain information on the worker's project and medical screening records, and his holdings of isotopes and their use and disposal. A warning is printed automatically if a worker's holding exceeds the allowed maximum. The total quantity of isotopes held and their distribution in an institution such as a university can easily be monitored so that legal limits can be adhered to. The system is inexpensive and can be used by personnel not familiar with computer systems. (author)

  13. Small-scale computerized isotope record monitoring system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, L [Queen Elizabeth Coll., London (UK)

    1979-05-01

    A system in use at Queen Elizabeth College for monitoring the isotopes used by radiation workers and the precautionary medical screening of the workers is described. It consists of a PDP-11 minicomputer and flexible disk storage system. The machine is run under a single-user, real-time operating system and is linked on-line to a teleprinter and a VDU. Data is stored as a series of files, each relating to an individual worker, which can be updated individually from the VDU. The files contain information on the worker's project and medical screening records, and his holdings of isotopes and their use and disposal. A warning is printed automatically if a worker's holding exceeds the allowed maximum. The total quantity of isotopes held and their distribution in an institution such as a university can easily be monitored so that legal limits can be adhered to. The system is inexpensive and can be used by personnel not familiar with computer systems.

  14. Comparison of birth weight between school health records and medical birth records in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Camilla Bjørn; Gamborg, Michael; Heitmann, Berit

    2015-01-01

    performed using t tests, Pearson's correlation coefficients, Bland-Altman plots and κ coefficients. Odds of BW discrepancies >100 g were examined by logistic regressions. RESULTS: The study population included 47 534 children. From 1973 to 1979 when BW was grouped in 500 g intervals in the MBR, mean BW...... differed significantly between the registers. During 1979-1991 when BW was recorded in 10 and 1 g intervals, mean BW did not significantly differ between the two registers. BW from both registers was highly correlated (0.93-0.97). Odds of a BW discrepancy significantly increased with parity, the child...

  15. 75 FR 26201 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-11

    ... National Defense Intelligence College. Categories of records in the system: Name, date of birth and Social... States Commission on Higher Education Association Characteristics of Excellence in Higher Education... system: Storage: Electronic storage media. Retrievability: By last name. Safeguards: Records are...

  16. 78 FR 14287 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-05

    ... by Defense Finance and Accounting Service (DFAS) and is covered by DFAS Systems of Records Notice T5500b, Integrated Garnishment System (IGS) (September 19, 2012, 77 FR 58106). Paper records previously...

  17. Medical Robots: Current Systems and Research Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan A. Beasley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available First used medically in 1985, robots now make an impact in laparoscopy, neurosurgery, orthopedic surgery, emergency response, and various other medical disciplines. This paper provides a review of medical robot history and surveys the capabilities of current medical robot systems, primarily focusing on commercially available systems while covering a few prominent research projects. By examining robotic systems across time and disciplines, trends are discernible that imply future capabilities of medical robots, for example, increased usage of intraoperative images, improved robot arm design, and haptic feedback to guide the surgeon.

  18. UCare navigator: A dynamic guide to the hybrid electronic and paper medical record in transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokser, Seth J; Cucina, Russell J; Love, Jeffrey S; Blum, Michael S

    2007-10-11

    During the phased transition from a paper-based record to an electronic health record (EHR), we found that clinicians had difficulty remembering where to find important clinical documents. We describe our experience with the design and use of a web-based map of the hybrid medical record. With between 50 to 75 unique visits per day, the UCare Navigator has served as an important aid to clinicians practicing in the transitional environment of a large EHR implementation.

  19. Discordant Documentation of Obesity Body Mass Index and Obesity Diagnosis in Electronic Medical Records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer T. Fink

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study examined concordance between presence of obesity body mass index (BMI, defined as BMI ≥ 30, in the patient’s electronic medical record (EMR and a documented diagnosis of obesity. Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of the EMR in a large health care system for a 1-year period (2012. A total of 397,313 patients met the study criteria of having at least one physician visit, being at least 18 years of age, and not being pregnant. Of those, 158,327 (40% had a recorded BMI ≥ 30. We examined the EMR of these obese patients to determine whether a diagnosis of obesity was recorded, and whether demographics or comorbid diagnoses impacted the likelihood of a recorded obesity diagnosis. Results: Obesity appeared on the EMR problem list for only 35% of patients with BMI ≥ 30. Obesity diagnosis was documented more frequently in women, middle-aged patients and blacks. The presence of some comorbidities (e.g. sleep apnea, hypertension, diabetes led to significantly more frequent diagnosis of obesity. There was a significant positive association between the number of comorbid diagnoses per patient and an obesity diagnosis appearing on the problem list. Conclusions: Obesity remains underrecorded in the EMR problem list despite the presence of obesity BMI in the EMR. Patient demographics and comorbidities should be considered when identifying best practices for weight management. New practices should be patient-centered and consider cultural context as well as the social and physical resources available to patients – all crucial for enacting systems change in a true accountable care environment.

  20. 77 FR 26256 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-03

    ..., by any of the following methods: * Federal Rulemaking Portal: http://www.regulations.gov . Follow the..., educational and medical institutions; and open source information, such as property tax records.'' [[Page 26258

  1. Patients, privacy and trust: patients' willingness to allow researchers to access their medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damschroder, Laura J; Pritts, Joy L; Neblo, Michael A; Kalarickal, Rosemarie J; Creswell, John W; Hayward, Rodney A

    2007-01-01

    The federal Privacy Rule, implemented in the United States in 2003, as part of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA), created new restrictions on the release of medical information for research. Many believe that its restrictions have fallen disproportionately on researchers prompting some to call for changes to the Rule. Here we ask what patients think about researchers' access to medical records, and what influences these opinions. A sample of 217 patients from 4 Veteran Affairs (VA) facilities deliberated in small groups at each location with the opportunity to question experts and inform themselves about privacy issues related to medical records research. After extensive deliberation, these patients were united in their inclination to share their medical records for research. Yet they were also united in their recommendations to institute procedures that would give them more control over whether and how their medical records are used for research. We integrated qualitative and quantitative results to derive a better understanding of this apparent paradox. Our findings can best be presented as answers to questions related to five dimensions of trust: Patients' trust in VA researchers was the most powerful determinant of the kind of control they want over their medical records. More specifically, those who had lower trust in VA researchers were more likely to recommend a more stringent process for obtaining individual consent. Insights on the critical role of trust suggest actions that researchers and others can take to more fully engage patients in research.

  2. Characteristics of registration of medical records in a hospital in southern Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cender Udai Quispe-Juli

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the characteristics of registration of medical records of hospitalization in the Hospital III Yanahuara in Arequipa, Peru. Material and methods: The study was observational, cross-sectional and retrospective. 225 medical records of hospitalization were evaluated in November 2015. A tab consisting of 15 items was used; each item was assessed using a scale: "very bad", "bad", "acceptable", "good" and "very good". Adescriptive analysis was done by calculating frequency. Results: Items with a higher proportion of acceptable registration data were: clear therapeutic indication (84%, clinical evolution (74.7%, diagnosis (70.7%, complete and orderly therapeutic indication (54.2%, medical history taking (50.2% and physical examination (43.1%. The very well recorded items were: indication of tests and procedures (97.3%, medical identification (91.1% and allergies (67.1%. Very bad recorded items were: reason for admission (91.1%, life habits (72.9% and prior treatment (38.2%. Conclusions: Most medical records of hospitalization are characterized by an acceptable record of most evaluated items; however they have notable deficiencies in some items.

  3. 75 FR 35028 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-21

    ... FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY [No. 2010-N-07] Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records AGENCY: Federal Housing Finance Agency. ACTION: Notice of the establishment of a new system of records. SUMMARY: The Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) is revising the proposed system of records notice that was...

  4. 28 CFR 700.24 - Security of systems of records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Security of systems of records. 700.24... Records Under the Privacy Act of 1974 § 700.24 Security of systems of records. (a) The Office Administrator or Security Officer shall be responsible for issuing regulations governing the security of systems...

  5. 13 CFR 102.33 - Security of systems of records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Security of systems of records....33 Security of systems of records. (a) Each Program/Support Office Head or designee shall establish administrative and physical controls to prevent unauthorized access to its systems of records, to prevent...

  6. 10 CFR 1705.03 - Systems of records notification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Energy DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD PRIVACY ACT § 1705.03 Systems of records notification. (a) Public notice. The Board has published in the Federal Register its systems of records. The Office of the Federal Register biennially compiles and publishes all systems of records maintained by all Federal...

  7. 75 FR 34709 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-18

    ... government and the public. When not considered mandatory, patient identification data shall be eliminated...; System of Records AGENCY: Department of the Air Force, DoD. ACTION: Notice to amend a system of records. SUMMARY: The Department of the Air Force is proposing to amend a system of records notice in its existing...

  8. 78 FR 41916 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-12

    ... Defense Finance and Accounting Service, Freedom of Information/Privacy Act Program Manager, Corporate...; System of Records AGENCY: Defense Finance and Accounting Service, DoD. ACTION: Notice to alter a System of Records. SUMMARY: The Defense Finance and Accounting Service proposes to alter a system of records...

  9. 78 FR 37799 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-24

    ... Finance and Accounting Service, Freedom of Information/Privacy Act Program Manager, Corporate...; System of Records AGENCY: Defense Finance and Accounting Service, DoD. ACTION: Notice to amend a System of Records. SUMMARY: The Defense Finance and Accounting Service is amending a system of records...

  10. 77 FR 58106 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-19

    ... Finance and Accounting Service, Freedom of Information/Privacy Act Program Manager, Corporate...; System of Records AGENCY: Defense Finance and Accounting Service, DoD. ACTION: Notice to amend two Systems of Records. SUMMARY: The Defense Finance and Accounting Service is amending two systems of records...

  11. 78 FR 52518 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-23

    ... Finance and Accounting Service, Freedom of Information/Privacy Act Program Manager, Corporate...; System of Records AGENCY: Defense Finance and Accounting Service, DoD. ACTION: Notice to amend a System of Records. SUMMARY: The Defense Finance and Accounting Service is amending a system of records...

  12. 77 FR 69444 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-19

    ..., Defense Finance and Accounting Service, Freedom of Information/Privacy Act Program Manager, Corporate...; System of Records AGENCY: Defense Finance and Accounting Service, DoD. ACTION: Notice to amend a system of records. SUMMARY: The Defense Finance and Accounting Service is amending a system of records...

  13. 76 FR 46756 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-03

    ...; System of Records AGENCY: Missile Defense Agency, Department of Defense (DoD). ACTION: Notice to Delete a System of Records. SUMMARY: The Missile Defense Agency proposes to delete a system of records notice in.... Peter Shearston, Missile Defense Agency, MDA/DXCM, 730 Irwin Ave, Schriever AFB, CO 80912-2101, or by...

  14. 78 FR 41917 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-12

    ...; System of Records AGENCY: Defense Finance and Accounting Service, DoD. ACTION: Notice to amend a System of Records. SUMMARY: The Defense Finance and Accounting Service is amending a system of records...: Mr. Gregory Outlaw, (317) 510-4591. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Defense Finance and Accounting...

  15. 77 FR 72336 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-05

    ....regulations.gov . Follow the instructions for submitting comments. Mail: Federal Docket Management System... CFSC System name: Army Club Membership Files (June 21, 2001, 66 FR 33239). Reason: The records were..., Army Club Membership Files system of records notice can be deleted. Records have met the required...

  16. 76 FR 35483 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-17

    ... Records: 500.050 HSPD-12: Identity Management System is being established to support implementation of...: USPS 500.050 SYSTEM NAME: HSPD-12: Identity Management System (IDMS). Accordingly, the Postal Service... Management System (IDMS). SYSTEM LOCATION: Records relating to the Identity Management System are maintained...

  17. Assessing explicit error reporting in the narrative electronic medical record using keyword searching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hui; Stetson, Peter; Hripcsak, George

    2003-01-01

    Many types of medical errors occur in and outside of hospitals, some of which have very serious consequences and increase cost. Identifying errors is a critical step for managing and preventing them. In this study, we assessed the explicit reporting of medical errors in the electronic record. We used five search terms "mistake," "error," "incorrect," "inadvertent," and "iatrogenic" to survey several sets of narrative reports including discharge summaries, sign-out notes, and outpatient notes from 1991 to 2000. We manually reviewed all the positive cases and identified them based on the reporting of physicians. We identified 222 explicitly reported medical errors. The positive predictive value varied with different keywords. In general, the positive predictive value for each keyword was low, ranging from 3.4 to 24.4%. Therapeutic-related errors were the most common reported errors and these reported therapeutic-related errors were mainly medication errors. Keyword searches combined with manual review indicated some medical errors that were reported in medical records. It had a low sensitivity and a moderate positive predictive value, which varied by search term. Physicians were most likely to record errors in the Hospital Course and History of Present Illness sections of discharge summaries. The reported errors in medical records covered a broad range and were related to several types of care providers as well as non-health care professionals.

  18. Antidepressant medication use for primary care patients with and without medical comorbidities: a national electronic health record (EHR) network study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, James M; Klinkman, Michael S; Chen, Ying Xia

    2010-01-01

    Because comorbid depression can complicate medical conditions (eg, diabetes), physicians may treat depression more aggressively in patients who have these conditions. This study examined whether primary care physicians prescribe antidepressant medications more often and in higher doses for persons with medical comorbidities. This secondary data analysis of electronic health record data was conducted in the Centricity Health Care User Research Network (CHURN), a national network of ambulatory practices that use a common outpatient electronic health record. Participants included 209 family medicine and general internal medicine providers in 40 primary care CHURN offices in 17 US states. Patients included adults with a new episode of depression that had been diagnosed during the period October 2006 through July 2007 (n = 1513). Prescription of antidepressant medication and doses of antidepressant medication were compared for patients with and without 6 comorbid conditions: diabetes, coronary heart disease, congestive heart failure, cerebrovascular disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cancer. 20.7% of patients had at least one medical comorbidity whereas 5.8% had multiple comorbidities. Overall, 77% of depressed patients were prescribed antidepressant medication. After controlling for age and sex, patients with multiple comorbidities were less likely to be prescribed medication (adjusted odds ratio, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.35-0.96), but there was no significant difference by individual comorbidities. Patients with cerebrovascular disease were less likely to be prescribed a full dose of medication (adjusted odds ratio, 0.26; 95% CI, 0.08-0.88), but there were no differences for other comorbidities or for multiple comorbidities, and there was no difference for any comorbidities in the prescription of minimally effective doses. Patients with new episodes of depression who present to a primary care practice are not treated more aggressively if they have medical

  19. Personalized Information Service for Clinicians: Users Like It. A Review of: Jerome, Rebecca N., Nunzia Bettinsoli Giuse, S. Trent Rosenbloom, and Patrick G. Arbogast. “Exploring Clinician Adoption of a Novel Evidence Request Feature in an Electronic Medical Record System.” Journal of the Medical Library Association 96.1 (Jan. 2008: 34-41, with online appendices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gale G. Hannigan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To examine physician use of an Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM literature request service available to clinicians through the institution’s electronic medical record system (EMR. Specifically, the authors posed the following questions: 1 Did newly implemented marketing and communication strategies increase physicians’ use of the service? 2 How did clinicians rate the relevance of the information provided? 3 How was the information provided used and shared? Design – Ten-month, prospective, observational study employing a questionnaire, statistics, a focus group, and a “before and after marketing intervention” analysis.Setting – Adult primary care outpatient clinic in an academic medical centre.Subjects – Forty-eight attending and 89 resident physicians.Methods – In 2003, a new service was introduced that allowed physicians in the Adult Primary Care Center clinic to request evidence summaries from the library regarding complex clinical questions. Contact with the library was through the secure messaging feature of the institution’s electronic medical record (EMR. From March through July 2005, the librarian employed “standard” publicity methods (email, flyers, posters, demonstrations to promote the service. A focus group in July 2005 provided feedback about the service as well as recommendations about communicating its availability and utility. New communication methods were implemented, including a monthly electronic “current awareness” newsletter, more frequent visits by the librarian during resident clinic hours, and collaborations between the librarian and residents preparing for morning report presentations. At the end of the study period, a 25-item Web-based questionnaire was sent to the 137 physicians with access to the service. Main Results – During the 10-month study period, 23 unique users submitted a total of 45 questions to the EBM Literature RequestService. More questions were from attending

  20. On standardization of basic datasets of electronic medical records in traditional Chinese medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Ni, Wandong; Li, Jing; Jiang, Youlin; Liu, Kunjing; Ma, Zhaohui

    2017-12-24

    Standardization of electronic medical record, so as to enable resource-sharing and information exchange among medical institutions has become inevitable in view of the ever increasing medical information. The current research is an effort towards the standardization of basic dataset of electronic medical records in traditional Chinese medicine. In this work, an outpatient clinical information model and an inpatient clinical information model are created to adequately depict the diagnosis processes and treatment procedures of traditional Chinese medicine. To be backward compatible with the existing dataset standard created for western medicine, the new standard shall be a superset of the existing standard. Thus, the two models are checked against the existing standard in conjunction with 170,000 medical record cases. If a case cannot be covered by the existing standard due to the particularity of Chinese medicine, then either an existing data element is expanded with some Chinese medicine contents or a new data element is created. Some dataset subsets are also created to group and record Chinese medicine special diagnoses and treatments such as acupuncture. The outcome of this research is a proposal of standardized traditional Chinese medicine medical records datasets. The proposal has been verified successfully in three medical institutions with hundreds of thousands of medical records. A new dataset standard for traditional Chinese medicine is proposed in this paper. The proposed standard, covering traditional Chinese medicine as well as western medicine, is expected to be soon approved by the authority. A widespread adoption of this proposal will enable traditional Chinese medicine hospitals and institutions to easily exchange information and share resources. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. 75 FR 67700 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-03

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army [Docket ID USA-2010-0023] Privacy Act of 1974; System... Medical Examination with supporting documentation, the Report of Medical History, and any other reporting... Report of Medical Examination with supporting documentation, the Report of Medical History, and any other...

  2. The concordance between self-reported medication use and pharmacy records in pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, K; El Marroun, H; Elfrink, M E; Jaddoe, V W V; Visser, L E; Stricker, B H Ch

    2017-09-01

    Several studies have been conducted to assess determinants affecting the performance or accuracy of self-reports. These studies are often not focused on pregnant women, or medical records were used as a data source where it is unclear if medications have been dispensed. Therefore, our objective was to evaluate the concordance between self-reported medication data and pharmacy records among pregnant women and its determinants. We conducted a population-based cohort study within the Generation R study, in 2637 pregnant women. The concordance between self-reported medication data and pharmacy records was calculated for different therapeutic classes using Yule's Y. We evaluated a number of variables as determinant of discordance between both sources through univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. The concordance between self-reports and pharmacy records was moderate to good for medications used for chronic conditions, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or anti-asthmatic medications (0.88 and 0.68, respectively). Medications that are used occasionally, such as antibiotics, had a lower concordance (0.51). Women with a Turkish or other non-Western background were more likely to demonstrate discordance between pharmacy records and self-reported data compared with women with a Dutch background (Turkish: odds ratio, 1.63; 95% confidence interval, 1.16-2.29; other non-Western: odds ratio, 1.33; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-1.71). Further research is needed to assess how the cultural or ethnic differences may affect the concordance or discordance between both medication sources. The results of this study showed that the use of multiple sources is needed to have a good estimation of the medication use during pregnancy. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. 76 FR 43278 - Privacy Act; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-20

    ... the Privacy Act of 1974, 5 U.S.C. 552a, to publish a description of the systems of records containing... locked file cabinets, and electronic records are maintained on a password-protected desktop personal...'' published by the National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, DC. Paper records are shredded...

  4. Integrating phenotypic data from electronic patient records with molecular level systems biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunak, Søren

    2011-01-01

    Electronic patient records remain a rather unexplored, but potentially rich data source for discovering correlations between diseases. We describe a general approach for gathering phenotypic descriptions of patients from medical records in a systematic and non-cohort dependent manner. By extracti...... Classification of Disease ontology and is therefore in principle language independent. As a use case we show how records from a Danish psychiatric hospital lead to the identification of disease correlations, which subsequently are mapped to systems biology frameworks....

  5. 77 FR 65913 - Privacy Act of 1974: Systems of Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-31

    ... follows: SEC-66 SYSTEM NAME: Backup Care Employee and Family Records. SYSTEM LOCATION: Bright Horizons... Securities Rulemaking Board; the Securities Investor Protection Corporation; the Public Company Accounting...

  6. 78 FR 73512 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-06

    ... litigation support to the Department of Justice. DATES: This proposed action will be effective on January 7..., file number, ship name and hull number, military records, educational certificate and degree, medical... provide litigation support to the Department of Justice.'' Routine Uses of Records Maintained in the...

  7. 76 FR 72391 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-23

    ...; military hospitalization and medical treatment, immunization, and pharmaceutical dosage records; home and... individuals. To detect fraud, waste and abuse pursuant to the authority contained in the Inspector General Act..., immunization, and pharmaceutical dosage records; home and work addresses; and identities of individuals...

  8. Exploration Medical Cap Ability System Engineering Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, K.; Mindock, J.

    2018-01-01

    Deep Space Gateway and Transport missions will change the way NASA currently practices medicine. The missions will require more autonomous capability compared to current low Earth orbit operations. For the medical system, lack of consumable resupply, evacuation opportunities, and real-time ground support are key drivers toward greater autonomy. Recognition of the limited mission and vehicle resources available to carry out exploration missions motivates the Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) Element's approach to enabling the necessary autonomy. The ExMC Systems Engineering team's mission is to "Define, develop, validate, and manage the technical system design needed to implement exploration medical capabilities for Mars and test the design in a progression of proving grounds." The Element's work must integrate with the overall exploration mission and vehicle design efforts to successfully provide exploration medical capabilities. ExMC is using Model-Based System Engineering (MBSE) to accomplish its integrative goals. The MBSE approach to medical system design offers a paradigm shift toward greater integration between vehicle and the medical system, and directly supports the transition of Earth-reliant ISS operations to the Earth-independent operations envisioned for Mars. This talk will discuss how ExMC is using MBSE to define operational needs, decompose requirements and architecture, and identify medical capabilities needed to support human exploration. How MBSE is being used to integrate across disciplines and NASA Centers will also be described. The medical system being discussed in this talk is one system within larger habitat systems. Data generated within the medical system will be inputs to other systems and vice versa. This talk will also describe the next steps in model development that include: modeling the different systems that comprise the larger system and interact with the medical system, understanding how the various systems work together, and

  9. Asan medical information system for healthcare quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Hyeon Jeong; Kim, Woo Sung; Lee, Jae Ho; Min, Sung Woo; Kim, Sun Ja; Lee, Yong Su; Lee, Young Ha; Nam, Sang Woo; Eo, Gi Seung; Seo, Sook Gyoung; Nam, Mi Hyun

    2010-09-01

    This purpose of this paper is to introduce the status of the Asan Medical Center (AMC) medical information system with respect to healthcare quality improvement. Asan Medical Information System (AMIS) is projected to become a completely electronic and digital information hospital. AMIS has played a role in improving the health care quality based on the following measures: safety, effectiveness, patient-centeredness, timeliness, efficiency, privacy, and security. AMIS CONSISTED OF SEVERAL DISTINCTIVE SYSTEMS: order communication system, electronic medical record, picture archiving communication system, clinical research information system, data warehouse, enterprise resource planning, IT service management system, and disaster recovery system. The most distinctive features of AMIS were the high alert-medication recognition & management system, the integrated and severity stratified alert system, the integrated patient monitoring system, the perioperative diabetic care monitoring and support system, and the clinical indicator management system. AMIS provides IT services for AMC, 7 affiliated hospitals and over 5,000 partners clinics, and was developed to improve healthcare services. The current challenge of AMIS is standard and interoperability. A global health IT strategy is needed to get through the current challenges and to provide new services as needed.

  10. Developing an electronic system to manage and track emergency medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Mark W; Calabrese, Samuel V; Knoer, Scott J; Duty, Ashley M

    2018-03-01

    The development of a Web-based program to track and manage emergency medications with radio frequency identification (RFID) is described. At the Cleveland Clinic, medication kit restocking records and dispense locations were historically documented using a paper record-keeping system. The Cleveland Clinic investigated options to replace the paper-based tracking logs with a Web-based program that could track the real-time location and inventory of emergency medication kits. Vendor collaboration with a board of pharmacy (BOP) compliance inspector and pharmacy personnel resulted in the creation of a dual barcoding system using medication and pocket labels. The Web-based program was integrated with a Cleveland Clinic-developed asset tracking system using active RFID tags to give the real-time location of the medication kit. The Web-based program and the asset tracking system allowed identification of kits nearing expiration or containing recalled medications. Conversion from a paper-based system to a Web-based program began in October 2013. After 119 days, data were evaluated to assess the success of the conversion. Pharmacists spent an average of 27 minutes per day approving medication kits during the postimplementation period versus 102 minutes daily using the paper-based system, representing a 74% decrease in pharmacist time spent on this task. Prospective reports are generated monthly to allow the manager to assess the expected workload and adjust staffing for the next month. Implementation of a BOP-approved Web-based system for managing and tracking emergency medications with RFID integration decreased pharmacist review time, minimized compliance risk, and increased access to real-time data. Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Medical device integration: CIOs must bridge the digital divide between devices and electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raths, David

    2009-02-01

    To get funding approved for medical device integration, ClOs suggest focusing on specific patient safety or staff efficiency pain points. Organizations that make clinical engineering part of their IT team report fewer chain-of-command issues. It also helps IT people understand the clinical goals because the engineering people have been working closely with clinicians for years. A new organization has formed to work on collaboration between clinical engineers and IT professionals. For more information, go to www.ceitcollaboration.org. ECRI Institute has written a guide to handling the convergence of medical technology and hospital networks. Its "Medical Technology for the IT Professional: An Essential Guide for Working in Today's Healthcare Setting" also details how IT professionals can assist hospital technology planning and acquisition, and provide ongoing support for IT-based medical technologies. For more information, visit www.ecri.org/ITresource.

  12. 78 FR 14276 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-05

    ...; System of Records AGENCY: United States Marine Corps, DoD. ACTION: Notice to delete twenty-three Systems... Management Information System Records, NM01560-2 Department of Defense Voluntary Education System, and...; NM01560-2 Department of Defense Voluntary Education System, and NM01500-2 Department of the Navy Education...

  13. Effect of teaching and checklist implementation on accuracy of medication history recording at hospital admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, Marianne; Barstad, Ingeborg; Mathiesen, Liv; Mowe, Morten; Molden, Espen

    2016-02-01

    Medication discrepancies at hospital admission is an extensive problem and knowledge is limited regarding improvement strategies. To investigate the effect of teaching and checklist implementation on accuracy of medication history recording during hospitalization. Patients admitted to an internal medicine ward were prospectively included in two consecutive periods. Between the periods, non-mandatory teaching lessons were provided and a checklist assisting medication history recording implemented. Discrepancies between the recorded medications at admission and the patient's actual drug use, as revealed by pharmacist-conducted medication reconciliation, were compared between the periods. The primary endpoint was difference between the periods in proportion of patients with minimum one discrepancy. Difference in median number of discrepancies was included as a secondary endpoint. 56 and 119 patients were included in period 1 (P1) and period 2 (P2), respectively. There was no significant difference in proportion of patients with minimum one discrepancy in P2 (68.9 %) versus P1 (76.8 %, p = 0.36), but a tendency of lower median number of discrepancies was observed in P2 than P1, i.e. 1 and 2, respectively (p = 0.087). More powerful strategies than non-mandatory teaching activities and checklist implementation are required to achieve sufficient improvements in medication history recording during hospitalization.

  14. Assessing electronic health record systems in emergency departments: Using a decision analytic Bayesian model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Assuli, Ofir; Leshno, Moshe

    2016-09-01

    In the last decade, health providers have implemented information systems to improve accuracy in medical diagnosis and decision-making. This article evaluates the impact of an electronic health record on emergency department physicians' diagnosis and admission decisions. A decision analytic approach using a decision tree was constructed to model the admission decision process to assess the added value of medical information retrieved from the electronic health record. Using a Bayesian statistical model, this method was evaluated on two coronary artery disease scenarios. The results show that the cases of coronary artery disease were better diagnosed when the electronic health record was consulted and led to more informed admission decisions. Furthermore, the value of medical information required for a specific admission decision in emergency departments could be quantified. The findings support the notion that physicians and patient healthcare can benefit from implementing electronic health record systems in emergency departments. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. 6 CFR 5.31 - Security of systems of records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Security of systems of records. 5.31 Section 5.31 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY DISCLOSURE OF RECORDS AND INFORMATION Privacy Act § 5.31 Security of systems of records. (a) In general. Each component...

  16. Implementing change in primary care practices using electronic medical records: a conceptual framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Lynne S; Feifer, Chris; Stuart, Gail W; Ornstein, Steven M

    2008-01-16

    Implementing change in primary care is difficult, and little practical guidance is available to assist small primary care practices. Methods to structure care and develop new roles are often needed to implement an evidence-based practice that improves care. This study explored the process of change used to implement clinical guidelines for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease in primary care practices that used a common electronic medical record (EMR). Multiple conceptual frameworks informed the design of this study designed to explain the complex phenomena of implementing change in primary care practice. Qualitative methods were used to examine the processes of change that practice members used to implement the guidelines. Purposive sampling in eight primary care practices within the Practice Partner Research Network-Translating Researching into Practice (PPRNet-TRIP II) clinical trial yielded 28 staff members and clinicians who were interviewed regarding how change in practice occurred while implementing clinical guidelines for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease and strokes. A conceptual framework for implementing clinical guidelines into primary care practice was developed through this research. Seven concepts and their relationships were modelled within this framework: leaders setting a vision with clear goals for staff to embrace; involving the team to enable the goals and vision for the practice to be achieved; enhancing communication systems to reinforce goals for patient care; developing the team to enable the staff to contribute toward practice improvement; taking small steps, encouraging practices' tests of small changes in practice; assimilating the electronic medical record to maximize clinical effectiveness, enhancing practices' use of the electronic tool they have invested in for patient care improvement; and providing feedback within a culture of improvement, leading to an iterative cycle of goal setting

  17. A Cloud Computing Based Patient Centric Medical Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Ankur; Henehan, Nathan; Somashekarappa, Vivek; Pandya, A. S.; Kalva, Hari; Furht, Borko

    This chapter discusses an emerging concept of a cloud computing based Patient Centric Medical Information System framework that will allow various authorized users to securely access patient records from various Care Delivery Organizations (CDOs) such as hospitals, urgent care centers, doctors, laboratories, imaging centers among others, from any location. Such a system must seamlessly integrate all patient records including images such as CT-SCANS and MRI'S which can easily be accessed from any location and reviewed by any authorized user. In such a scenario the storage and transmission of medical records will have be conducted in a totally secure and safe environment with a very high standard of data integrity, protecting patient privacy and complying with all Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) regulations.

  18. On-the-job training of health professionals for electronic health record and electronic medical record use: A scoping review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina L. Younge

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of electronic health records (EHRs or electronic medical records (EMRs is well documented in health informatics literature yet, very few studies focus primarily on how health professionals in direct clinical care are trained for EHR or EMR use. Purpose: To investigate how health professionals in direct clinical care are trained to prepare them for EHR or EMR use. Methods: Systematic searches were conducted in CINAHL, EMBASE, Ovid MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PubMed and ISI WoS and, the Arksey and O’Malley scoping methodological framework was used to collect the data and analyze the results. Results: Training was done at implementation, orientation and post-implementation. Implementation and orientation training had a broader scope while post-implementation training focused on proficiency, efficiency and improvement. The multiplicity of training methods, types and levels of training identified appear to suggest that training is more effective when a combination of training methods are used.

  19. A Delphi study among internal medicine clinicians to determine which therapeutic information is essential to record in a medical record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Unen, Robert J; Tichelaar, Jelle; Nanayakkara, Prabath W B; van Agtmael, Michiel A; Richir, Milan C; de Vries, Theo P G M

    2015-12-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that using a template for recording general and diagnostic information in the medical record (MR) improves the completeness of MR documentation, communication between doctors, and performance of doctors. However, little is known about how therapeutic information should be structured in the MR. The aim of this study was to investigate which specific therapeutic information registrars and consultants in internal medicine consider essential to record in the MR. Therefore, we carried out a 2-round Internet Delphi study. Fifty-nine items were assessed on a 5-point scale; an item was considered important if ≥ 80% of the respondents awarded it a score of 4 or 5. In total, 26 registrars and 30 consultants in internal medicine completed both rounds of the study. Overall, they considered it essential to include information about 11 items in the MR. Subgroup analyses revealed that the registrars considered 8 additional items essential, whereas the consultants considered 1 additional item essential to record. Study findings can be used as a starting point to develop a structured section of the MR for therapeutic information for both paper and electronic MRs. This section should contain at least 11 items considered essential by registrars and clinical consultants in internal medicine. © 2015, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  20. 76 FR 76956 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-09

    ... manager. Record source categories: Individual, social workers, rehabilitation counselors, and/or health... mental impairments and applicants for employment with Washington Headquarters Services/Human Resources... of records in the system: Storage: Paper file folders and electronic storage media. Retrievability...

  1. 75 FR 43494 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    ... Register Liaison Officer, Department of Defense. GNSA 01 System name: NSA/CSS Access, Authority and Release... records are covered by GNSA 11, NSA/CSS Key Accountability Records, GNSA 10, NSA/CSS Personnel Security...

  2. Coding and signal processing for magnetic recording systems

    CERN Document Server

    Vasic, Bane

    2004-01-01

    RECORDING SYSTEMSA BriefHistory of Magnetic Storage, Dean PalmerPhysics of Longitudinal and Perpendicular Recording, Hong Zhou, Tom Roscamp, Roy Gustafson, Eric Boernern, and Roy ChantrellThe Physics of Optical Recording, William A. Challener and Terry W. McDanielHead Design Techniques for Recording Devices, Robert E. RottmayerCOMMUNICATION AND INFORMATION THEORY OF MAGNETIC RECORDING CHANNELSModeling the Recording Channel, Jaekyun MoonSignal and Noise Generation for Magnetic Recording Channel Simulations, Xueshi Yang and Erozan M. KurtasStatistical Analysis of Digital Signals and Systems, Dra

  3. MINDS - Medical Information Network Decision Support System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Armenian, H. K

    2008-01-01

    .... The increase in and complexity of medical data at various levels of resolution has increased the need for system level advancements in clinical decision support systems that provide computer-aided...

  4. Detecting inpatient falls by using natural language processing of electronic medical records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toyabe Shin-ichi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Incident reporting is the most common method for detecting adverse events in a hospital. However, under-reporting or non-reporting and delay in submission of reports are problems that prevent early detection of serious adverse events. The aim of this study was to determine whether it is possible to promptly detect serious injuries after inpatient falls by using a natural language processing method and to determine which data source is the most suitable for this purpose. Methods We tried to detect adverse events from narrative text data of electronic medical records by using a natural language processing method. We made syntactic category decision rules to detect inpatient falls from text data in electronic medical records. We compared how often the true fall events were recorded in various sources of data including progress notes, discharge summaries, image order entries and incident reports. We applied the rules to these data sources and compared F-measures to detect falls between these data sources with reference to the results of a manual chart review. The lag time between event occurrence and data submission and the degree of injury were compared. Results We made 170 syntactic rules to detect inpatient falls by using a natural language processing method. Information on true fall events was most frequently recorded in progress notes (100%, incident reports (65.0% and image order entries (12.5%. However, F-measure to detect falls using the rules was poor when using progress notes (0.12 and discharge summaries (0.24 compared with that when using incident reports (1.00 and image order entries (0.91. Since the results suggested that incident reports and image order entries were possible data sources for prompt detection of serious falls, we focused on a comparison of falls found by incident reports and image order entries. Injury caused by falls found by image order entries was significantly more severe than falls detected by

  5. Integration of the enterprise electronic health record and anesthesia information management systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springman, Scott R

    2011-09-01

    Fewer than 5% of anesthesia departments use an electronic medical record (EMR) that is anesthesia specific. Many anesthesia information management systems (AIMS) have been developed with a focus only on the unique needs of anesthesia providers, without being fully integrated into other electronic health record components of the entire enterprise medical system. To understand why anesthesia providers should embrace health information technology (HIT) on a health system-wide basis, this article reviews recent HIT history and reviews HIT concepts. The author explores current developments in efforts to expand enterprise HIT, and the pros and cons of full enterprise integration with an AIMS. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Medical record weight (MRW): a new reliable predictor of hospital stay, morbidity and mortality in the hip fracture population?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Calpin, P

    2016-11-01

    We sought to compare the weight of patient’s medical records (MRW) to that of standardised surgical risk scoring systems in predicting postoperative hospital stay, morbidity, and mortality in patients with hip fracture. Patients admitted for surgical treatment of a newly diagnosed hip fracture over a 3-month period were enrolled. Patients with documented morbidity or mortality had significantly heavier medical records. The MRW was equivalent to the age-adjusted Charlson co-morbidity index and better than the American Society of Anaesthesiologists physical status score (ASA), the Physiological and Operative Severity Score for the enUmeration of Mortality and Morbidity (POSSUM,) and Portsmouth-POSSUM score (P-POSSUM) in correlation with length of hospital admission, p = .003, 95% CI [.15 to .65]. Using logistic regression analysis MRW was as good as, if not better, than the other scoring systems at predicting postoperative morbidity and 90-day mortality. Medical record weight is as good as, or better than, validated surgical risk scoring methods. Larger, multicentre studies are required to validate its use as a surgical risk prediction tool, and it may in future be supplanted by a digital measure of electronic record size. Given its ease of use and low cost, it could easily be used in trauma units globally.

  7. Systems Engineering for Space Exploration Medical Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindock, Jennifer; Reilly, Jeffrey; Rubin, David; Urbina, Michelle; Hailey, Melinda; Hanson, Andrea; Burba, Tyler; McGuire, Kerry; Cerro, Jeffrey; Middour, Chris; hide

    2017-01-01

    Human exploration missions that reach destinations beyond low Earth orbit, such as Mars, will present significant new challenges to crew health management. For the medical system, lack of consumable resupply, evacuation opportunities, and real-time ground support are key drivers toward greater autonomy. Recognition of the limited mission and vehicle resources available to carry out exploration missions motivates the Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) Element's approach to enabling the necessary autonomy. The Element's work must integrate with the overall exploration mission and vehicle design efforts to successfully provide exploration medical capabilities. ExMC is applying systems engineering principles and practices to accomplish its goals. This paper discusses the structured and integrative approach that is guiding the medical system technical development. Assumptions for the required levels of care on exploration missions, medical system goals, and a Concept of Operations are early products that capture and clarify stakeholder expectations. Model-Based Systems Engineering techniques are then applied to define medical system behavior and architecture. Interfaces to other flight and ground systems, and within the medical system are identified and defined. Initial requirements and traceability are established, which sets the stage for identification of future technology development needs. An early approach for verification and validation, taking advantage of terrestrial and near-Earth exploration system analogs, is also defined to further guide system planning and development.

  8. 76 FR 3115 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-19

    ... Integrated Results and Statistical Tracking.'' System Location: Delete entry and replace with ``Headquarters... replace with ``Records are accessed by person(s) responsible for servicing the record system in... need-to-know. The system additionally incorporates integrated system security features to protect data...

  9. 77 FR 41774 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records AGENCY: Office of Management...-19176 (April 12, 2004). Electronic Access to This Document: The official version of this document is the... Assistant Secretary of the Office of Management deletes the following system of records: System No. System...

  10. 76 FR 46767 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-03

    ...: The Department of the Army proposes to add a system of records to its inventory of record systems... provides a student management system that integrates Web-enabled courseware to support online certification... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army [Docket ID USA-2011-0019] Privacy Act of 1974; System...

  11. 75 FR 21248 - Privacy Act of 1974; Systems of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-23

    ...; Systems of Records AGENCY: Defense Finance and Accounting Service, DoD. ACTION: Notice to alter a system of records. SUMMARY: The Defense Finance and Accounting Service (DFAS) is proposing to alter a system...) 522-5225. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Defense Finance and Accounting Service notices for systems of...

  12. 77 FR 60401 - Privacy Act of 1974; Systems of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-03

    ... computer password protection.'' * * * * * System manager(s) and address: Delete entry and replace with...; Systems of Records AGENCY: National Security Agency/Central Security Service, DoD. ACTION: Notice to amend a system of records. SUMMARY: The National Security Agency (NSA) is proposing to amend a system of...

  13. 75 FR 36642 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-28

    ... Defense. GNSA 11 System name: NSA/CSS Key Accountability Records System location: National Security Agency... system: NSA/CSS civilian employees, personnel under contract or appointment and military assignees... `Blanket Routine Uses' set forth at the beginning of the NSA/CSS' compilation of systems of records notices...

  14. Impact of immediate access to the electronic medical record on anatomic pathology performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renshaw, Andrew A; Gould, Edwin W

    2013-07-01

    To assess the overall impact of access to the electronic medical record (EMR) on anatomic pathology performance. We reviewed the results of all use of the EMR by 1 pathologist over an 18-month period. Of the 10,107 cases (913 cytology and 9,194 surgical pathology) reviewed, the EMR (excluding anatomic pathology records) was accessed in 222 (2.2% of all cases, 6.5% of all cytology cases, and 1.8% of all surgical pathology cases). The EMR was used to evaluate a critical value in 20 (9.0%) cases and make a more specific diagnosis in 77 (34.7%) cases, a less specific diagnosis in 4 (1.8%) cases, and a systemic rather than localized diagnosis in 4 (1.8%) cases. The percentage of cases in which the physician was contacted decreased from 7.3% for the prior 18 months to 6.7%, but this change was not significant (P = .13). Twelve cases were subsequently sent for interinstitutional consultation, and no disagreements were identified. The EMR was accessed in 2.2% of all surgical pathology and cytology cases and affected the diagnosis in 48% of these cases.

  15. Validity of a hospital-based obstetric register using medical records as reference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brixval, Carina Sjöberg; Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Johansen, Nanna Roed

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data from hospital-based registers and medical records offer valuable sources of information for clinical and epidemiological research purposes. However, conducting high-quality epidemiological research requires valid and complete data sources. OBJECTIVE: To assess completeness...... and validity of a hospital-based clinical register - the Obstetric Database - using a national register and medical records as references. METHODS: We assessed completeness of a hospital-based clinical register - the Obstetric Database - by linking data from all women registered in the Obstetric Database...... Database therefore offers a valuable source for examining clinical, administrative, and research questions....

  16. Role of Health Information Technology (HIT) in disability determinations: when medical records become medical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulu, Bengisu; Daniels, Susan; Feldman, Sue; Horan, Thomas A

    2008-11-06

    This exploratory study investigated the impact of incomplete medical evidence on the SSA disability determination process and the role of HIT as a solution. We collected qualitative data from nineteen expert-interviews. Findings indicate that HIT can lead to innovative solutions that can significantly improve the determination process.

  17. Supporting information retrieval from electronic health records: A report of University of Michigan's nine-year experience in developing and using the Electronic Medical Record Search Engine (EMERSE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanauer, David A; Mei, Qiaozhu; Law, James; Khanna, Ritu; Zheng, Kai

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes the University of Michigan's nine-year experience in developing and using a full-text search engine designed to facilitate information retrieval (IR) from narrative documents stored in electronic health records (EHRs). The system, called the Electronic Medical Record Search Engine (EMERSE), functions similar to Google but is equipped with special functionalities for handling challenges unique to retrieving information from medical text. Key features that distinguish EMERSE from general-purpose search engines are discussed, with an emphasis on functions crucial to (1) improving medical IR performance and (2) assuring search quality and results consistency regardless of users' medical background, stage of training, or level of technical expertise. Since its initial deployment, EMERSE has been enthusiastically embraced by clinicians, administrators, and clinical and translational researchers. To date, the system has been used in supporting more than 750 research projects yielding 80 peer-reviewed publications. In several evaluation studies, EMERSE demonstrated very high levels of sensitivity and specificity in addition to greatly improved chart review efficiency. Increased availability of electronic data in healthcare does not automatically warrant increased availability of information. The success of EMERSE at our institution illustrates that free-text EHR search engines can be a valuable tool to help practitioners and researchers retrieve information from EHRs more effectively and efficiently, enabling critical tasks such as patient case synthesis and research data abstraction. EMERSE, available free of charge for academic use, represents a state-of-the-art medical IR tool with proven effectiveness and user acceptance. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Perspectives of healthcare practitioners: An exploration of interprofessional communication using electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardach, Shoshana H; Real, Kevin; Bardach, David R

    2017-05-01

    Contemporary state-of-the-art healthcare facilities are incorporating technology into their building design to improve communication and patient care. However, technological innovations may also have unintended consequences. This study seeks to better understand how technology influences interprofessional communication within a hospital setting based in the United States. Nine focus groups were conducted including a range of healthcare professions. The focus groups explored practitioners' experiences working on two floors of a newly designed hospital and included questions about the ways in which technology shaped communication with other healthcare professionals. All focus groups were recorded, transcribed, and coded to identify themes. Participant responses focused on the electronic medical record, and while some benefits of the electronic medical record were discussed, participants indicated use of the electronic medical record has resulted in a reduction of in-person communication. Different charting approaches resulted in barriers to communication between specialties and reduced confidence that other practitioners had received one's notes. Limitations in technology-including limited computer availability, documentation complexity, and sluggish sign-in processes-also were identified as barriers to effective and timely communication between practitioners. Given the ways in which technology shapes interprofessional communication, future research should explore how to create standardised electronic medical record use across professions at the optimal level to support communication and patient care.

  19. Identification of a potential fibromyalgia diagnosis using random forest modeling applied to electronic medical records

    OpenAIRE

    Masters, Elizabeth T.; Emir,Birol; Mardekian,Jack; Clair,Andrew; Kuhn,Max; Silverman,Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Birol Emir,1 Elizabeth T Masters,1 Jack Mardekian,1 Andrew Clair,1 Max Kuhn,2 Stuart L Silverman,3 1Pfizer Inc., New York, NY, 2Pfizer Inc., Groton, CT, 3Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA Background: Diagnosis of fibromyalgia (FM), a chronic musculoskeletal condition characterized by widespread pain and a constellation of symptoms, remains challenging and is often delayed. Methods: Random forest modeling of electronic medical records was used to identify variables that may fa...

  20. [A medical consumable material management information system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Guoping; Hu, Liang

    2014-05-01

    Medical consumables material is essential supplies to carry out medical work, which has a wide range of varieties and a large amount of usage. How to manage it feasibly and efficiently that has been a topic of concern to everyone. This article discussed about how to design a medical consumable material management information system that has a set of standardized processes, bring together medical supplies administrator, suppliers and clinical departments. Advanced management mode, enterprise resource planning (ERP) applied to the whole system design process.

  1. Conceptual Drivers for an Exploration Medical System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonsen, Erik; Hanson, Andrea; Shah, Ronak; Reed, Rebekah; Canga, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Interplanetary spaceflight, such as NASA's proposed three-year mission to Mars, provides unique and novel challenges when compared with human spaceflight to date. Extended distance and multi-year missions introduce new elements of operational complexity and additional risk. These elements include: inability to resupply medications and consumables, inability to evacuate injured or ill crew, uncharted psychosocial conditions, and communication delays that create a requirement for some level of autonomous medical capability. Because of these unique challenges, the approaches used in prior programs have limited application to a Mars mission. On a Mars mission, resource limitations will significantly constrain available medical capabilities, and require a paradigm shift in the approach to medical system design and risk mitigation for crew health. To respond to this need for a new paradigm, the Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) Element is assessing each Mars mission phase-transit, surface stay, rendezvous, extravehicular activity, and return-to identify and prioritize medical needs for the journey beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). ExMC is addressing both planned medical operations, and unplanned contingency medical operations that meld clinical needs and research needs into a single system. This assessment is being used to derive a gap analysis and studies to support meaningful medical capabilities trades. These trades, in turn, allow the exploration medical system design to proceed from both a mission centric and ethics-based approach, and to manage the risks associated with the medical limitations inherent in an exploration class mission. This paper outlines the conceptual drivers used to derive medical system and vehicle needs from an integrated vision of how medical care will be provided within this paradigm. Keywords: (Max 6 keywords: exploration, medicine, spaceflight, Mars, research, NASA)

  2. FRR: fair remote retrieval of outsourced private medical records in electronic health networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huaqun; Wu, Qianhong; Qin, Bo; Domingo-Ferrer, Josep

    2014-08-01

    Cloud computing is emerging as the next-generation IT architecture. However, cloud computing also raises security and privacy concerns since the users have no physical control over the outsourced data. This paper focuses on fairly retrieving encrypted private medical records outsourced to remote untrusted cloud servers in the case of medical accidents and disputes. Our goal is to enable an independent committee to fairly recover the original private medical records so that medical investigation can be carried out in a convincing way. We achieve this goal with a fair remote retrieval (FRR) model in which either t investigation committee members cooperatively retrieve the original medical data or none of them can get any information on the medical records. We realize the first FRR scheme by exploiting fair multi-member key exchange and homomorphic privately verifiable tags. Based on the standard computational Diffie-Hellman (CDH) assumption, our scheme is provably secure in the random oracle model (ROM). A detailed performance analysis and experimental results show that our scheme is efficient in terms of communication and computation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The PHARMS (Patient Held Active Record of Medication Status) feasibility study: a research proposal.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Elaine

    2018-01-08

    Medication errors are a major source of preventable morbidity, mortality and cost and many occur at the times of hospital admission and discharge. Novel interventions (such as new methods of recording medication information and conducting medication reconciliation) are required to facilitate accurate transfer of medication information. With existing evidence supporting the use of information technology and the patient representing the one constant in the care process, an electronic patient held medication record may provide a solution. This study will assess the feasibility of introducing a patient held electronic medication record in primary and secondary care using the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR).This feasibility study is a mixed method study of community dwelling older adult patients admitted to an urban secondary care facility comprising a non-randomised intervention and qualitative interviews with key stakeholders. Outcomes of interest include clinical outcomes and process evaluation.This study will yield insights pertaining to feasibility, acceptability and participation for a more definitive evaluation of the intervention. The study also has the potential to contribute to knowledge of implementation of technology in a healthcare context and to the broader area of implementation science.

  4. Language of Czech Medical Reports and Classification Systems in Medicine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Přečková, Petra

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 1 (2010), s. 58-65 ISSN 1801-5603 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : terminology, * synonyms * classification systems * thesaurus * nomenclature * electronic health record * interoperability * semantic interoperability * cardiology * atherosclerosis Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science http://www.ejbi.org/en/ejbi/article/53-en-language-of-czech-medical-reports- and -classification-systems-in-medicine.html

  5. Increased patient communication using a process supplementing an electronic medical record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Thomas D; Evensen, Ann E

    2015-02-01

    Importance: Patients with cervical cytology abnormalities may require surveillance for many years, which increases the risk of management error, especially in clinics with multiple managing clinicians. National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) certification requires tracking of abnormal results and communicating effectively with patients. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a computer-based tracking system that is not embedded in the electronic medical record improves (1) accurate and timely communication of results and (2) patient adherence to follow-up recommendations. Design: Pre/post study using data from 2005-2012. Intervention implemented in 2008. Data collected via chart review for at least 18 months after index result. Participants: Pre-intervention: all women (N = 72) with first abnormal cytology result from 2005-2007. Post-intervention: all women (N = 128) with first abnormal cytology result from 2008-2010. Patients were seen at a suburban, university-affiliated, family medicine residency clinic. Intervention: Tracking spreadsheet reviewed monthly with reminders generated for patients not in compliance with recommendations. Main Outcome and Measures: (1) rates of accurate and timely communication of results and (2) rates of patient adherence to follow-up recommendations. Intervention decreased absent or erroneous communication from clinician to patient (6.4% pre- vs 1.6% post-intervention [P = 0.04]), but did not increase patient adherence to follow-up recommendations (76.1% pre- vs 78.0% post-intervention [ P= 0.78]). Use of a spreadsheet tracking system improved communication of abnormal results to patients, but did not significantly improve patient adherence to recommended care. Although the tracking system complies with NCQA PCMH requirements, it was insufficient to make meaningful improvements in patient-oriented outcomes.

  6. Exploration Medical System Trade Study Tools Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindock, J.; Myers, J.; Latorella, K.; Cerro, J.; Hanson, A.; Hailey, M.; Middour, C.

    2018-01-01

    ExMC is creating an ecosystem of tools to enable well-informed medical system trade studies. The suite of tools address important system implementation aspects of the space medical capabilities trade space and are being built using knowledge from the medical community regarding the unique aspects of space flight. Two integrating models, a systems engineering model and a medical risk analysis model, tie the tools together to produce an integrated assessment of the medical system and its ability to achieve medical system target requirements. This presentation will provide an overview of the various tools that are a part of the tool ecosystem. Initially, the presentation's focus will address the tools that supply the foundational information to the ecosystem. Specifically, the talk will describe how information that describes how medicine will be practiced is captured and categorized for efficient utilization in the tool suite. For example, the talk will include capturing what conditions will be planned for in-mission treatment, planned medical activities (e.g., periodic physical exam), required medical capabilities (e.g., provide imaging), and options to implement the capabilities (e.g., an ultrasound device). Database storage and configuration management will also be discussed. The presentation will include an overview of how these information tools will be tied to parameters in a Systems Modeling Language (SysML) model, allowing traceability to system behavioral, structural, and requirements content. The discussion will also describe an HRP-led enhanced risk assessment model developed to provide quantitative insight into each capability's contribution to mission success. Key outputs from these various tools, to be shared with the space medical and exploration mission development communities, will be assessments of medical system implementation option satisfaction of requirements and per-capability contributions toward achieving requirements.

  7. The Value of Electronic Medical Record Implementation in Mental Health Care: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riahi, Sanaz; Fischler, Ilan; Stuckey, Melanie I; Klassen, Philip E; Chen, John

    2017-01-05

    Electronic medical records (EMR) have been implemented in many organizations to improve the quality of care. Evidence supporting the value added to a recovery-oriented mental health facility is lacking. The goal of this project was to implement and customize a fully integrated EMR system in a specialized, recovery-oriented mental health care facility. This evaluation examined the outcomes of quality improvement initiatives driven by the EMR to determine the value that the EMR brought to the organization. The setting was a tertiary-level mental health facility in Ontario, Canada. Clinical informatics and decision support worked closely with point-of-care staff to develop workflows and documentation tools in the EMR. The primary initiatives were implementation of modules for closed loop medication administration, collaborative plan of care, clinical practice guidelines for schizophrenia, restraint minimization, the infection prevention and control surveillance status board, drug of abuse screening, and business intelligence. Medication and patient scan rates have been greater than 95% since April 2014, mitigating the adverse effects of medication errors. Specifically, between April 2014 and March 2015, only 1 moderately severe and 0 severe adverse drug events occurred. The number of restraint incidents decreased 19.7%, which resulted in cost savings of more than Can $1.4 million (US $1.0 million) over 2 years. Implementation of clinical practice guidelines for schizophrenia increased adherence to evidence-based practices, standardizing care across the facility. Improved infection prevention and control surveillance reduced the number of outbreak days from 47 in the year preceding implementation of the status board to 7 days in the year following. Decision support to encourage preferential use of the cost-effective drug of abuse screen when clinically indicated resulted in organizational cost savings. EMR implementation allowed Ontario Shores Centre for Mental Health

  8. Diagnostic information management system for the evaluation of medical images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higa, Toshiaki; Torizuka, Kanji; Minato, Kotaro; Komori, Masaru; Hirakawa, Akina

    1985-04-01

    A practical, small and low-cost diagnostic information management system has been developed for a comparative study of various medical imaging procedures, including ordinary radiography, X-ray computed tomography, emission computed tomography, and so forth. The purpose of the system is to effectively manage the original image data files and diagnostic descriptions during the various imaging procedures. A diagnostic description of each imaging procedure for each patient is made on a hand-sort punched-card with line-drawings and ordinary medical terminology and then coded and computerized using Index for Roentgen Diagnoses (American College of Radiology). A database management software (DB Master) on a personal computer (Apple II) is used for searching for patients' records on hand-sort punched-cards and finally original medical images. Discussed are realistic use of medical images and an effective form of diagnostic descriptions.

  9. Diagnostic information management system for the evaluation of medical images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higa, Toshiaki; Torizuka, Kanji; Minato, Kotaro; Komori, Masaru; Hirakawa, Akina.

    1985-01-01

    A practical, small and low-cost diagnostic information management system has been developed for a comparative study of various medical imaging procedures, including ordinary radiography, X-ray computed tomography, emission computed tomography, and so forth. The purpose of the system is to effectively manage the original image data files and diagnostic descriptions during the various imaging procedures. A diagnostic description of each imaging procedure for each patient is made on a hand-sort punched-card with line-drawings and ordinary medical terminology and then coded and computerized using Index for Roentgen Diagnoses (American College of Radiology). A database management software (DB Master) on a personal computer (Apple II) is used for searching for patients' records on hand-sort punched-cards and finally original medical images. Discussed are realistic use of medical images and an effective form of diagnostic descriptions. (author)

  10. Radiation scanning system for data recording media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gucza, E.

    1975-01-01

    The scanner of an encoded record support operates by the reflection principle. The record support has tracks brocken down into individual fields which are assigned light-dark markers for encoding purposes.The support consists of a light, non-transparent card which can be pulled over a slot by a guide attached to the scanner. The slot is arranged at an oblique angle relative to the card and emits radiation, for instance, light. This radiation is reflected by the tracks, the empty fields reflecting more radiation than the blackend ones, and then after having been transformed into signals, impinges upon phototransistors through openings. The number of openings corresponds to the number of tracks. The light can be made diffuse prior to exposure of the card by means of a red transparent plastic foil. (DG/RF) [de

  11. Taiwan's perspective on electronic medical records' security and privacy protection: lessons learned from HIPAA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Che-Ming; Lin, Herng-Ching; Chang, Polun; Jian, Wen-Shan

    2006-06-01

    The protection of patients' health information is a very important concern in the information age. The purpose of this study is to ascertain what constitutes an effective legal framework in protecting both the security and privacy of health information, especially electronic medical records. All sorts of bills regarding electronic medical data protection have been proposed around the world including Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) of the U.S. The trend of a centralized bill that focuses on managing computerized health information is the part that needs our further attention. Under the sponsor of Taiwan's Department of Health (DOH), our expert panel drafted the "Medical Information Security and Privacy Protection Guidelines", which identifies nine principles and entails 12 articles, in the hope that medical organizations will have an effective reference in how to manage their medical information in a confidential and secured fashion especially in electronic transactions.

  12. 78 FR 14295 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-05

    ... in the system: Storage: Delete entry and replace with ``Paper records maintained in file folders, binders, and electronic storage media.'' Retrievability: Delete entry and replace with ``Name, SSN and/or... Personnel Record Group for permanent retention. Paper records are destroyed after electronic copy has been...

  13. 78 FR 35610 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-13

    ... Defense. NM05720-1 System name: FOIA Request/Appeal Files and Tracking System (April 2, 2008, 73 FR 17961...: Delete entry and replace with ``Records are accessed by custodian of the record system and by persons... cabinets or rooms, which are not viewable by individuals who do not have a need to know. Computerized...

  14. 12 CFR 792.67 - Security of systems of records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Security of systems of records. 792.67 Section... AND PRIVACY ACT, AND BY SUBPOENA; SECURITY PROCEDURES FOR CLASSIFIED INFORMATION The Privacy Act § 792.67 Security of systems of records. (a) Each system manager, with the approval of the head of that...

  15. 76 FR 11465 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-02

    ... separate systems of records: ``FHFA-OIG Audit Files Database,'' ``FHFA-OIG Investigative & Evaluative Files...-OIG-1 system name: FHFA-OIG Audit Files Database. security classification: Sensitive but unclassified.... categories of records in the system: (1) Audit reports; and (2) working papers, which may include copies of...

  16. 78 FR 19244 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    .... This system of records maintains information related to recordation of assignments of property rights.... Categories of individuals covered by the system: Persons who have given or received property rights under an... system: Assignments, grants, mortgages, liens, encumbrances, licenses, and other instruments affecting...

  17. 32 CFR 505.3 - Privacy Act systems of records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... anticipated threats or hazards to the security or integrity of data, which could result in substantial harm... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Privacy Act systems of records. 505.3 Section 505... AND PUBLIC RELATIONS ARMY PRIVACY ACT PROGRAM § 505.3 Privacy Act systems of records. (a) Systems of...

  18. 76 FR 12076 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-04

    .... For a list of system managers at the Defense Logistics Agency Primary Level Field Activities write to... managers at the Defense Logistics Agency Primary Level Field Activities, write to the Project Manager...; System of Records AGENCY: Defense Logistics Agency, DoD. ACTION: Notice to amend a system of records...

  19. 77 FR 31606 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records AGENCY: Office of English Language Acquisition, Language Enhancement and Academic Achievement for Limited English Proficient Students, Department... Secretary of the Office of English Language Acquisition deletes the following system of records: System...

  20. 75 FR 3899 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-25

    ... media. Retrievability: Records are retrieved in the system by name, Social Security Number (SSN), NGA.... DATES: The system will be effective on February 24, 2010, unless comments are received that would result..., or badge to an NGA facility. Categories of records in the system: Names, Social Security Number (SSN...

  1. 76 FR 77846 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-14

    ... terrorism and national security threat screening, system back-up, and continuity of operations purposes... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE [CPCLO Order No. 004-2011] Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records AGENCY: Federal Bureau of Investigation, Department of Justice. ACTION: Notice to amend system of records. SUMMARY...

  2. 75 FR 61450 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-05

    ..., Corporate Communications, Defense Finance and Accounting Service, DFAS-HKC/IN, 8899 E. 56th Avenue...; System of Records AGENCY: Defense Finance and Accounting Service; DoD. ACTION: Notice to add a system of records. SUMMARY: The Defense Finance and Accounting Service (DFAS) is proposing to add a system of...

  3. Finding Trapped Miners by Using a Prototype Seismic Recording System Made from Music-Recording Hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Thomas L.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this project was to use off-the-shelf music recording equipment to build and test a prototype seismic system to listen for people trapped in underground chambers (mines, caves, collapsed buildings). Previous workers found that an array of geophones is effective in locating trapped miners; displaying the data graphically, as well as playing it back into an audio device (headphones) at high speeds, was found to be effective for locating underground tapping. The desired system should record the data digitally to allow for further analysis, be capable of displaying the data graphically, allow for rudimentary analysis (bandpass filter, deconvolution), and allow the user to listen to the data at varying speeds. Although existing seismic reflection systems are adequate to record, display and analyze the data, they are relatively expensive and difficult to use and do not have an audio playback option. This makes it difficult for individual mines to have a system waiting on the shelf for an emergency. In contrast, music recording systems, like the one I used to construct the prototype system, can be purchased for about 20 percent of the cost of a seismic reflection system and are designed to be much easier to use. The prototype system makes use of an ~$3,000, 16-channel music recording system made by Presonus, Inc., of Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Other manufacturers make competitive systems that would serve equally well. Connecting the geophones to the recording system required the only custom part of this system - a connector that takes the output from the geophone cable and breaks it into 16 microphone inputs to be connected to the music recording system. The connector took about 1 day of technician time to build, using about $300 in off-the-shelf parts. Comparisons of the music recording system and a standard seismic reflection system (A 24-channel 'Geode' system manufactured by Geometrics, Inc., of San Jose, California) were carried out at two locations. Initial

  4. Exploration Medical System Technical Architecture Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerro, J.; Rubin, D.; Mindock, J.; Middour, C.; McGuire, K.; Hanson, A.; Reilly, J.; Burba, T.; Urbina, M.

    2018-01-01

    The Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) Element Systems Engineering (SE) goals include defining the technical system needed to support medical capabilities for a Mars exploration mission. A draft medical system architecture was developed based on stakeholder needs, system goals, and system behaviors, as captured in an ExMC concept of operations document and a system model. This talk will discuss a high-level view of the medical system, as part of a larger crew health and performance system, both of which will support crew during Deep Space Transport missions. Other mission components, such as the flight system, ground system, caregiver, and patient, will be discussed as aspects of the context because the medical system will have important interactions with each. Additionally, important interactions with other aspects of the crew health and performance system are anticipated, such as health & wellness, mission task performance support, and environmental protection. This talk will highlight areas in which we are working with other disciplines to understand these interactions.

  5. Robust Medical Isotope Production System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Steven Karl [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kimpland, Robert Herbert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The success of this theoretical undertaking provided confidence that the behavior of new and evolving designs of fissile solution systems may be accurately estimated. Scaled up versions of SUPO, subcritical acceleratordriven systems, and other evolutionary designs have been examined.

  6. Understanding key factors affecting electronic medical record implementation: a sociotechnical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucciniello, Maria; Lapsley, Irvine; Nasi, Greta; Pagliari, Claudia

    2015-07-17

    Recent health care policies have supported the adoption of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) but examples of failed ICT projects in this sector have highlighted the need for a greater understanding of the processes used to implement such innovations in complex organizations. This study examined the interaction of sociological and technological factors in the implementation of an Electronic Medical Record (EMR) system by a major national hospital. It aimed to obtain insights for managers planning such projects in the future and to examine the usefulness of Actor Network Theory (ANT) as a research tool in this context. Case study using documentary analysis, interviews and observations. Qualitative thematic analysis drawing on ANT. Qualitative analyses revealed a complex network of interactions between organizational stakeholders and technology that helped to shape the system and influence its acceptance and adoption. The EMR clearly emerged as a central 'actor' within this network. The results illustrate how important it is to plan innovative and complex information systems with reference to (i) the expressed needs and involvement of different actors, starting from the initial introductory phase; (ii) promoting commitment to the system and adopting a participative approach; (iii) defining and resourcing new roles within the organization capable of supporting and sustaining the change and (iv) assessing system impacts in order to mobilize the network around a common goal. The paper highlights the organizational, cultural, technological, and financial considerations that should be taken into account when planning strategies for the implementation of EMR systems in hospital settings. It also demonstrates how ANT may be usefully deployed in evaluating such projects.

  7. Enhanced identification of eligibility for depression research using an electronic medical record search engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfried, Lisa; Hanauer, David A; Nease, Donald; Albeiruti, Rashad; Kavanagh, Janet; Kales, Helen C

    2009-12-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) have become part of daily practice for many physicians. Attempts have been made to apply electronic search engine technology to speed EMR review. This was a prospective, observational study to compare the speed and clinical accuracy of a medical record search engine vs. manual review of the EMR. Three raters reviewed 49 cases in the EMR to screen for eligibility in a depression study using the electronic medical record search engine (EMERSE). One week later raters received a scrambled set of the same patients including 9 distractor cases, and used manual EMR review to determine eligibility. For both methods, accuracy was assessed for the original 49 cases by comparison with a gold standard rater. Use of EMERSE resulted in considerable time savings; chart reviews using EMERSE were significantly faster than traditional manual review (p=0.03). The percent agreement of raters with the gold standard (e.g. concurrent validity) using either EMERSE or manual review was not significantly different. Using a search engine optimized for finding clinical information in the free-text sections of the EMR can provide significant time savings while preserving clinical accuracy. The major power of this search engine is not from a more advanced and sophisticated search algorithm, but rather from a user interface designed explicitly to help users search the entire medical record in a way that protects health information.

  8. OSHA Final Rule Gives Employees the Right to See Their Exposure and Medical Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Mary

    1982-01-01

    Provides details pertaining to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) ruling that gives employees, their designated representatives, and OSHA the right to examine their on-the-job medical records. Discusses the effects the ruling may have on organizations. (Author/MLF)

  9. 29 CFR 1910.1020 - Access to employee exposure and medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... concerning the protection of trade secret information. (b) Scope and application. (1) This section applies to... using exposure or medical records means any compilation of data or any statistical study based at least... methodology (sampling plan), a description of the analytical and mathematical methods used, and a summary of...

  10. Does the HIPAA Privacy Rule Allow Parents the Right to See Their Children's Medical Records?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Does the HIPAA Privacy Rule allow parents the right to see their children’s medical records? Answer: Yes, the Privacy Rule generally ... as the child’s personal representative could endanger the child. Date Created: 12/19/2002 Content ... last reviewed on July 26, 2013 ...

  11. Identifying Risk of Future Asthma Attacks Using UK Medical Record Data : A Respiratory Effectiveness Group Initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blakey, John D.; Price, David B.; Pizzichini, Emilio; Popov, Todor A.; Dimitrov, Borislav D.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Josephs, Lynn K.; Kaplan, Alan; Papi, Alberto; Kerkhof, Marjan; Hillyer, Elizabeth V.; Chisholm, Alison; Thomas, Mike

    BACKGROUND: Asthma attacks are common, serious, and costly. Individual factors associated with attacks, such as poor symptom control, are not robust predictors. OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether the rich data available in UK electronic medical records could identify patients at risk of recurrent

  12. Integrating traditional nursing service orientation content with electronic medical record orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harton, Brenda B; Borrelli, Larry; Knupp, Ann; Rogers, Necolen; West, Vickie R

    2009-01-01

    Traditional nursing service orientation classes at an acute care hospital were integrated with orientation to the electronic medical record to blend the two components in a user-friendly format so that the learner is introduced to the culture, processes, and documentation methods of the organization, with an opportunity to document online in a practice domain while lecture and discussion information is fresh.

  13. Agreement between questionnaire and medical records on some health and socioeconomic problems among poisoning cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fathelrahman Ahmed I

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The main objective of the present study was to evaluate the agreement between questionnaire and medical records on some health and socioeconomic problems among poisoning cases. Methods Cross-sectional sample of 100 poisoning cases consecutively admitted to the Hospital Pulau Pinang, Malaysia during the period from September 2003 to February 2004 were studied. Data on health and socioeconomic problems were collected both by self-administered questionnaire and from medical records. Agreement between the two sets of data was assessed by calculating the concordance rate, Kappa (k and PABAK. McNemar statistic was used to test differences between categories. Results Data collected by questionnaire and medical records showed excellent agreement on the "marital status"; good agreements on "chronic illness", "psychiatric illness", and "previous history of poisoning"; and fair agreements on "at least one health problem", and "boy-girl friends problem". PABAK values suggest better agreements' measures. Conclusion There were excellent to good agreements between questionnaire and medical records on the marital status and most of the health problems and fair to poor agreements on the majority of socioeconomic problems. The implications of those findings were discussed.

  14. Perception and adoption of an electronic medication record three years after deployment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Granlien, Maren Fich

    2007-01-01

    Region Zealand's electronic medication record is generally perceived by hospital staff as useful but not that easy to use. Neither perceived usefulness nor perceived ease of use is more than weakly correlated with actual adoption. The complex work domain with interdependent staff groups and many...

  15. 21 CFR 21.71 - Disclosure of records in Privacy Act Record Systems; accounting required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... accounting shall be made, in accordance with paragraph (e) of this section, of any disclosure under paragraph (a) of this section of a record that is not a disclosure under § 21.70. (e) Where an accounting is... of the disclosure. The accounting shall not be considered a Privacy Act Record System. (2) Retain the...

  16. Success criteria for electronic medical record implementations in low-resource settings: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Fleur; Tilahun, Binyam; Dugas, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Electronic medical record (EMR) systems have the potential of supporting clinical work by providing the right information at the right time to the right people and thus make efficient use of resources. This is especially important in low-resource settings where reliable data are also needed to support public health and local supporting organizations. In this systematic literature review, our objectives are to identify and collect literature about success criteria of EMR implementations in low-resource settings and to summarize them into recommendations. Our search strategy relied on PubMed queries and manual bibliography reviews. Studies were included if EMR implementations in low-resource settings were described. The extracted success criteria and measurements were summarized into 7 categories: ethical, financial, functionality, organizational, political, technical, and training. We collected 381 success criteria with 229 measurements from 47 articles out of 223 articles. Most papers were evaluations or lessons learned from African countries, published from 1999 to 2013. Almost half of the EMR systems served a specific disease area like human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The majority of criteria that were reported dealt with the functionality, followed by organizational issues, and technical infrastructures. Sufficient training and skilled personnel were mentioned in roughly 10%. Political, ethical, and financial considerations did not play a predominant role. More evaluations based on reliable frameworks are needed. Highly reliable data handling methods, human resources and effective project management, as well as technical architecture and infrastructure are all key factors for successful EMR implementation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Using Electronic Health Record Data to Measure Care Quality for Individuals with Multiple Chronic Medical Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliss, Elizabeth A; McQuillan, Deanna B; Ellis, Jennifer L; Maciejewski, Matthew L; Zeng, Chan; Barton, Mary B; Boyd, Cynthia M; Fortin, Martin; Ling, Shari M; Tai-Seale, Ming; Ralston, James D; Ritchie, Christine S; Zulman, Donna M

    2016-09-01

    To inform the development of a data-driven measure of quality care for individuals with multiple chronic conditions (MCCs) derived from an electronic health record (EHR). Qualitative study using focus groups, interactive webinars, and a modified Delphi process. Research department within an integrated delivery system. The webinars and Delphi process included 17 experts in clinical geriatrics and primary care, health policy, quality assessment, health technology, and health system operations. The focus group included 10 individuals aged 70-87 with three to six chronic conditions selected from a random sample of individuals aged 65 and older with three or more chronic medical conditions. Through webinars and the focus group, input was solicited on constructs representing high-quality care for individuals with MCCs. A working list was created of potential measures representing these constructs. Using a modified Delphi process, experts rated the importance of each possible measure and the feasibility of implementing each measure using EHR data. High-priority constructs reflected processes rather than outcomes of care. High-priority constructs that were potentially feasible to measure included assessing physical function, depression screening, medication reconciliation, annual influenza vaccination, outreach after hospital admission, and documented advance directives. High-priority constructs that were less feasible to measure included goal setting and shared decision-making, identifying drug-drug interactions, assessing social support, timely communication with patients, and other aspects of good customer service. Lower-priority domains included pain assessment, continuity of care, and overuse of screening or laboratory testing. High-quality MCC care should be measured using meaningful process measures rather than outcomes. Although some care processes are currently extractable from electronic data, capturing others will require adapting and applying technology to

  18. Julius – a template based supplementary electronic health record system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klein Gunnar O

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background EHR systems are widely used in hospitals and primary care centres but it is usually difficult to share information and to collect patient data for clinical research. This is partly due to the different proprietary information models and inconsistent data quality. Our objective was to provide a more flexible solution enabling the clinicians to define which data to be recorded and shared for both routine documentation and clinical studies. The data should be possible to reuse through a common set of variable definitions providing a consistent nomenclature and validation of data. Another objective was that the templates used for the data entry and presentation should be possible to use in combination with the existing EHR systems. Methods We have designed and developed a template based system (called Julius that was integrated with existing EHR systems. The system is driven by the medical domain knowledge defined by clinicians in the form of templates and variable definitions stored in a common data repository. The system architecture consists of three layers. The presentation layer is purely web-based, which facilitates integration with existing EHR products. The domain layer consists of the template design system, a variable/clinical concept definition system, the transformation and validation logic all implemented in Java. The data source layer utilizes an object relational mapping tool and a relational database. Results The Julius system has been implemented, tested and deployed to three health care units in Stockholm, Sweden. The initial responses from the pilot users were positive. The template system facilitates patient data collection in many ways. The experience of using the template system suggests that enabling the clinicians to be in control of the system, is a good way to add supplementary functionality to the present EHR systems. Conclusion The approach of the template system in combination with various local EHR

  19. Automated Detection of Sepsis Using Electronic Medical Record Data: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despins, Laurel A

    Severe sepsis and septic shock are global issues with high mortality rates. Early recognition and intervention are essential to optimize patient outcomes. Automated detection using electronic medical record (EMR) data can assist this process. This review describes automated sepsis detection using EMR data. PubMed retrieved publications between January 1, 2005 and January 31, 2015. Thirteen studies met study criteria: described an automated detection approach with the potential to detect sepsis or sepsis-related deterioration in real or near-real time; focused on emergency department and hospitalized neonatal, pediatric, or adult patients; and provided performance measures or results indicating the impact of automated sepsis detection. Detection algorithms incorporated systemic inflammatory response and organ dysfunction criteria. Systems in nine studies generated study or care team alerts. Care team alerts did not consistently lead to earlier interventions. Earlier interventions did not consistently translate to improved patient outcomes. Performance measures were inconsistent. Automated sepsis detection is potentially a means to enable early sepsis-related therapy but current performance variability highlights the need for further research.

  20. Identifying risk factors for healthcare-associated infections from electronic medical record home address data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenman Marc B

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Residential address is a common element in patient electronic medical records. Guidelines from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention specify that residence in a nursing home, skilled nursing facility, or hospice within a year prior to a positive culture date is among the criteria for differentiating healthcare-acquired from community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infections. Residential addresses may be useful for identifying patients residing in healthcare-associated settings, but methods for categorizing residence type based on electronic medical records have not been widely documented. The aim of this study was to develop a process to assist in differentiating healthcare-associated from community-associated MRSA infections by analyzing patient addresses to determine if residence reported at the time of positive culture was associated with a healthcare facility or other institutional location. Results We identified 1,232 of the patients (8.24% of the sample with positive cultures as probable cases of healthcare-associated MRSA based on residential addresses contained in electronic medical records. Combining manual review with linking to institutional address databases improved geocoding rates from 11,870 records (79.37% to 12,549 records (83.91%. Standardization of patient home address through geocoding increased the number of matches to institutional facilities from 545 (3.64% to 1,379 (9.22%. Conclusions Linking patient home address data from electronic medical records to institutional residential databases provides useful information for epidemiologic researchers, infection control practitioners, and clinicians. This information, coupled with other clinical and laboratory data, can be used to inform differentiation of healthcare-acquired from community-acquired infections. The process presented should be extensible with little or no added data costs.