WorldWideScience

Sample records for medical emergency response

  1. Review on emergency medical response against terrorist attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, De-Wen; Liu, Yao; Jiang, Ming-Min

    2014-01-01

    Terrorism is a global issue and a constant international threat. As a result, anti-terrorism and emergency response strategies are tasks of critical importance that have a direct impact on the national security of every country in the world. This paper reviews new characteristics of international anti-terrorism measures and offers an in-depth reflection on emergency medical response countermeasures; additionally, this paper presents the goals of related research, which include: 1) to present a model of a highly efficient medical response command; 2) to introduce the pre-planning phases of the emergency medical response; 3) to establish a response system capable of handling various types of terror attacks; 4) to promote anti-terrorism awareness to the general public and emphasize its prevention; and 5) to continue basic investigations into emergency medical responses for various types of terrorist attacks (for example, the classifications and characteristics of new injuries, pathophysiology, prevention and treatment of the resultant stress disorders, improved high-efficiency medical response measures and equipment, etc.).

  2. Ebola Virus Disease: Ethics and Emergency Medical Response Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jecker, Nancy S; Dudzinski, Denise M; Diekema, Douglas S; Tonelli, Mark

    2015-09-01

    Caring for patients affected with Ebola virus disease (EVD) while simultaneously preventing EVD transmission represents a central ethical challenge of the EVD epidemic. To address this challenge, we propose a model policy for resuscitation and emergent procedure policy of patients with EVD and set forth ethical principles that lend support to this policy. The policy and principles we propose bear relevance beyond the EVD epidemic, offering guidance for the care of patients with other highly contagious, virulent, and lethal diseases. The policy establishes (1) a limited code status for patients with confirmed or suspected EVD. Limited code status means that a code blue will not be called for patients with confirmed or suspected EVD at any stage of the disease; however, properly protected providers (those already in full protective equipment) may initiate resuscitative efforts if, in their clinical assessment, these efforts are likely to benefit the patient. The policy also requires that (2) resuscitation not be attempted for patients with advanced EVD, as resuscitation would be medically futile; (3) providers caring for or having contact with patients with confirmed or suspected EVD be properly protected and trained; (4) the treating team identify and treat in advance likely causes of cardiac and respiratory arrest to minimize the need for emergency response; (5) patients with EVD and their proxies be involved in care discussions; and (6) care team and provider discretion guide the care of patients with EVD. We discuss ethical issues involving medical futility and the duty to avoid harm and propose a utilitarian-based principle of triage to address resource scarcity in the emergency setting.

  3. Advanced airway management--a medical emergency response team perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldane, A G

    2010-09-01

    To determine the number of medical emergency response team (MERT) patients undergoing advanced airway management in the peri-evacuation phase and to determine the indications for airway interventions undertaken in flight. This was a retrospective study. Data was collected from patient report and mission debrief forms completed after each MERT mission during Operation HERRICK 10 (April-October 2009). All patients that received advanced airway interventions before or during evacuation were identified. MERTs were involved in the primary transfer of 534 patients during the period studied, 56 (10.5%) underwent advanced airway management, of which 31 (5.8% of total) were initiated by the MERT in the peri-evacuation phase. Twenty five cases (4.7%) underwent advanced airway management by other pre-hospital providers prior to MERT arrival. Of the 31 advanced airway interventions undertaken in-flight, cardiac arrest was the primary indication in only nine cases. The figure of 56 patients requiring advanced airway management is at the higher end of the range expected from the study of historical military data. This may reflect the doctrine of "intelligent tasking", that is sending this physician-led team to the most seriously injured casualties.

  4. The 2012 derecho: emergency medical services and hospital response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, Randy D; Wigal, Mark S; Fernandez, Antonio; Tucker, March A; Zuidgeest, Ginger R; Mills, Michael R; Cairns, Bruce A; Cairns, Charles B

    2014-10-01

    During the early afternoon of June 29, 2012, a line of destructive thunderstorms producing straight line winds known as a derecho developed near Chicago (Illinois, USA). The storm moved southeast with wind speeds recorded from 100 to 160 kilometers per hour (kph, 60 to 100 miles per hour [mph]). The storm swept across much of West Virginia (USA) later that evening. Power outage was substantial as an estimated 1,300,000 West Virginians (more than half) were without power in the aftermath of the storm and approximately 600,000 citizens were still without power a week later. This was one of the worst storms to strike this area and occurred as residents were enduring a prolonged heat wave. The wind damage left much of the community without electricity and the crippling effect compromised or destroyed critical infrastructure including communications, air conditioning, refrigeration, and water and sewer pumps. This report describes utilization of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and hospital resources in West Virginia in response to the storm. Also reported is a review of the weather phenomena and the findings and discussion of the disaster and implications.

  5. National Training Course. Emergency Medical Technician. Paramedic. Instructor's Lesson Plans. Module I. The Emergency Medical Technician, His Role, Responsibility, and Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This instructor's lesson plan guide is one of fifteen modules designed for use in the training of emergency medical technicians (EMT). Four units are presented: (1) role of the EMT, including the operation of an emerging medical services system; (2) the laws relevant to EMTs functioning in the field; (3) activities and responsibilities of an EMT…

  6. Commercial Airline In-Flight Emergency: Medical Student Response and Review of Medicolegal Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, Josh H; Richards, John R

    2016-01-01

    As the prevalence of air travel increases, in-flight medical emergencies occur more frequently. A significant percentage of these emergencies occur when there is no certified physician, nurse, or paramedic onboard. During these situations, flight crews might enlist the help of noncertified passengers, such as medical students, dentists, or emergency medical technicians in training. Although Good Samaritan laws exist, many health care providers are unfamiliar with the limited legal protections and resources provided to them after responding to an in-flight emergency. A 78-year-old woman lost consciousness and became pulseless onboard a commercial aircraft. No physician was available. A medical student responded and coordinated care with the flight crew, ground support physician, and other passengers. After receiving a packet (4 g) of sublingual sucrose and 1 L i.v. crystalloid, the patient regained pulses and consciousness. The medical student made the decision not to divert the aircraft based on the patient's initial response to therapy and, 45 min later, the patient had normal vital signs. Upon landing, she was met and taken by paramedics to the nearest emergency department for evaluation of her collapse. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Emergency physicians are the most qualified to assist in-flight emergencies, but they might not be aware of the medicolegal risks involved with in-flight care, the resources available, and the role of the flight crew in liability and decision making. This case, which involved a medical student who was not given explicit protection under Good Samaritan laws, illustrates the authority of the flight crew during these events and highlights areas of uncertainty in the legislation for volunteer medical professionals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Utility and assessment of non-technical skills for rapid response systems and medical emergency teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalwin, R P; Flabouris, A

    2013-09-01

    Efforts are ongoing to improve outcomes from cardiac arrest and medical emergencies. A promising quality improvement modality is use of non-technical skills (NTS) that aim to address human factors through improvements in performance of leadership, communication, situational awareness and decision-making. Originating in the airline industry, NTS training has been successfully introduced into anaesthesia, surgery, emergency medicine and other acute medical specialities. Some aspects of NTS have already achieved acceptance for cardiac arrest teams. Leadership skills are emphasised in advanced life support training and have shown favourable results when employed in simulated and clinical resuscitation scenarios. The application of NTS in medical emergency teams as part of a rapid response system attending medical emergencies is less certain; however, observations of simulations have also shown promise. This review highlights the potential benefits of NTS competency for cardiac arrest teams and, more importantly, medical emergency teams because of the diversity of clinical scenarios encountered. Discussion covers methods to assess and refine NTS and NTS training to optimise performance in the clinical environment. Increasing attention should be applied to yielding meaningful patient and organisational outcomes from use of NTS. Similarly, implementation of any training course should receive appropriate scrutiny to refine team and institutional performance. © 2013 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  8. Emergency Medical Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and need help right away, you should use emergency medical services. These services use specially trained people and specially equipped facilities. You may need care in the hospital emergency room (ER). Doctors and nurses there treat emergencies, ...

  9. Medical emergencies in dental practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wilson, M H

    2009-06-01

    Serious medical emergencies are fortunately a rare occurrence in the dental practice environment; however, if an emergency situation is encountered a delay in treatment may result in potentially avoidable consequences. The risk of mortality or serious morbidity can be reduced by ensuring that basic emergency equipment and medications are in place, and that the dental team is appropriately trained in basic life support measures. This article aims to provide an overview of the basic emergency medications and equipment that should be present in dental practices, and to discuss specific responses to some of the more common adverse medical events that can present while providing dental treatment.

  10. [Pediatric emergencies in the emergency medical service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbereisen, C; Hoffmann, F

    2015-01-01

    Out-of-hospital pediatric emergencies occur rarely but are feared among medical personnel. The particular characteristics of pediatric cases, especially the unaccustomed anatomy of the child as well as the necessity to adapt the drug doses to the little patient's body weight, produce high cognitive and emotional pressure. In an emergency standardized algorithms can facilitate a structured diagnostic and therapeutic approach. The aim of this article is to provide standardized procedures for the most common pediatric emergencies. In Germany, respiratory problems, seizures and analgesia due to trauma represent the most common emergency responses. This article provides a practical approach concerning the diagnostics and therapy of emergencies involving children.

  11. Mississippi Medical Reserve Corps: Moving Mississippi From Emergency Planning to Response Ready.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Lisa C; Fifolt, Matthew; Mercer, Caroline; Pevear, Jesse; Wilson, Jonathan

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors that might impact a Medical Reserve Corps (MRC) volunteer's decision to respond to an emergency event. The 2 primary goals of this survey were to (1) establish realistic planning assumptions regarding the use of volunteers in health care emergency responses, and (2) determine whether barriers to volunteer participation could be addressed by MRC units to improve volunteer response rates. An anonymous online survey instrument was made available via Qualtrics through a customized URL. For the purpose of distribution, the Mississippi State Department of Health sent an electronic message that included the survey link to all MRC volunteers who were registered with the Mississippi Responder Management System (MRMS) as of September 2014. Approximately 15% of those surveyed indicated they would be available and able to deploy within 24 hours. The most common factors reported in terms of respondent decisions to deploy included risk to personal health (61.2%), length of deployment (58.8%), and the security of the deployment area (55.3%). In addition, 67% of respondents indicated that extended periods of deployment would have a negative financial impact on their lives. Respondents who have had training or previous deployment experience reported having greater knowledge of potential response roles, increased comfort in their ability to respond with the MRC, and increased confidence in responding to differing public health emergencies. Barriers to MRC volunteers being able to deploy should be addressed by each MRC unit. Issues such as risk to personal safety while on deployment, site security, and length of deployment should be considered by planners and those solutions communicated to MRC members during trainings. Emergency plans utilizing MRC volunteers will require significant evaluation to assess the risk of relying on an expected resource that could be severely limited during an actual emergency.

  12. A 'mixed reality' simulator concept for future Medical Emergency Response Team training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Robert J; Guest, R; Mahoney, P; Lamb, D; Gibson, C

    2017-08-01

    The UK Defence Medical Service's Pre-Hospital Emergency Care (PHEC) capability includes rapid-deployment Medical Emergency Response Teams (MERTs) comprising tri-service trauma consultants, paramedics and specialised nurses, all of whom are qualified to administer emergency care under extreme conditions to improve the survival prospects of combat casualties. The pre-deployment training of MERT personnel is designed to foster individual knowledge, skills and abilities in PHEC and in small team performance and cohesion in 'mission-specific' contexts. Until now, the provision of airborne pre-deployment MERT training had been dependent on either the availability of an operational aircraft (eg, the CH-47 Chinook helicopter) or access to one of only two ground-based facsimiles of the Chinook's rear cargo/passenger cabin. Although MERT training has high priority, there will always be competition with other military taskings for access to helicopter assets (and for other platforms in other branches of the Armed Forces). This paper describes the development of an inexpensive, reconfigurable and transportable MERT training concept based on 'mixed reality' technologies-in effect the 'blending' of real-world objects of training relevance with virtual reality reconstructions of operational contexts. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  13. Physical and digital design of the BlueBio biomonitoring system prototype, to be used in emergency medical response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramp, Gunnar; Kristensen, M; Pedersen, J.F.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the physical and digital design of a wireless biomonitoring system meant to be used especially in the prehospital medical emergency response. Handling of many patients with a minimum of ressources at major incidents is an immense challenge for the emergency personnel on work a...

  14. Physical and Digital Design of the BlueBio Biomonitoring System Prototype, to be used in Emergency Medical Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramp, Gunnar; Kristensen, Margit; Pedersen, Jacob Frølund

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the physical and digital design of a wireless biomonitoring system meant to be used especially in the prehospital medical emergency response. The handling of many patients with a minimum of ressources at major incidents is an immense challenge for the emergency personnel at wo...

  15. Physical and Digital Design of the BlueBio Biomonitoring System Prototype, to be used in Emergency Medical Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramp, Gunnar; Kristensen, Margit; Pedersen, Jacob Frølund

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the physical and digital design of a wireless biomonitoring system meant to be used especially in the prehospital medical emergency response. The handling of many patients with a minimum of ressources at major incidents is an immense challenge for the emergency personnel at work...... of the current prototype....

  16. Medical emergencies in Goa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saddichha Sahoo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Most emergencies in Goa arise due to road traffic accidents and drowning, which have been compounded by the rise in number of recorded accidents in 2007 to be above 4000. It is believed that 11 people meet with an accident on Goa′s roads every day and this is expected to rise by 10% by next year. Similar is the case with drownings and other medical emergencies. We therefore aimed to conduct a cross-sectional survey of medical emergencies and identify various types of emergencies presenting to emergency departments. Materials and Methods: Using a stratified random sampling design, all emergencies presenting to the three government hospitals in Goa, which handle 90% of all emergencies currently, were studied on specially designed data sheets in order to collect data. Emergency medical technicians (ETs were placed in the Casualty Ward of the medical colleges and they recorded all emergencies on the data sheet. The collected data were then analyzed for stratification and mapping of emergencies. Results: GMC Hospital attended to majority of emergencies (62%, which were mainly of the nature of accidents or assaults (17% and fever related (17%. Most emergencies were noncritical and about 1% expired. Maximum emergencies also presented from Salcette and Bardez, and occurred among young males in the age group of 19-45 years. Males were also more prone to accidents while females had pregnancies as emergencies. Conclusion: Potential emergency services need to target young males with higher concentrations required in Salcette in South Goa and Bardez in North Goa.

  17. Utilisation of helicopter emergency medical services in the early medical response to major incidents: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Anne Siri; Fattah, Sabina; Sollid, Stephen J M; Rehn, Marius

    2016-02-09

    This systematic review identifies, describes and appraises the literature describing the utilisation of helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS) in the early medical response to major incidents. Early prehospital phase of a major incident. Systematic literature review performed according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Web of Science, PsycINFO, Scopus, Cinahl, Bibsys Ask, Norart, Svemed and UpToDate were searched using phrases that combined HEMS and 'major incidents' to identify when and how HEMS was utilised. The identified studies were subjected to data extraction and appraisal. The database search identified 4948 articles. Based on the title and abstract, the full text of 96 articles was obtained; of these, 37 articles were included in the review, and an additional five were identified by searching the reference lists of the 37 articles. HEMS was used to transport medical and rescue personnel to the incident and to transport patients to the hospital, especially when the infrastructure was damaged. Insufficient air traffic control, weather conditions, inadequate landing sites and failing communication were described as challenging in some incidents. HEMS was used mainly for patient treatment and to transport patients, personnel and equipment in the early medical management of major incidents, but the optimal utilisation of this specialised resource remains unclear. This review identified operational areas with improvement potential. A lack of systematic indexing, heterogeneous data reporting and weak methodological design, complicated the identification and comparison of incidents, and more systematic reporting is needed. CRD42013004473. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  18. Emergency Medical Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Lewis Research Center helped design the complex EMS Communication System, originating from space operated telemetry, including the telemetry link between ambulances and hospitals for advanced life support services. In emergency medical use telemetry links ambulances and hospitals for advanced life support services and allows transmission of physiological data -- an electrocardiogram from an ambulance to a hospital emergency room where a physician reads the telemetered message and prescribes emergency procedures to ambulance attendants.

  19. Ambulance response time and emergency medical dispatcher program: a study in Kelantan, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, C H Mohd Shaharudin; Ismail, I Mohd; Mohsin, S S J Syed

    2008-11-01

    This study provided data by a simple method of acquiring information related to ambulance response time (ART) and determined whether it met the international standards of ART. Additionally, this paper also compared the duration of ART at this hospital before and after the implementation of an Emergency Medical Dispatcher (EMD) program. The ART, which started when details like phone number of the caller, exact location of the incident and the nature of the main complaint were received and ended when the emergency team arrived at the scene of the incident. The parameters recorded include call processing time, time taken to prepare the team and time taken to travel to the scene. The results of the study revealed that the ART for the university hospital (HUSM) was at 913.2 +/- 276.5 seconds (mean +/- SD) and it was far below the international standard of ART as a benchmark of a good ambulance service. However, the study suggested that the EMD program that was recently implemented at the HUSM gave a significantly improvement to the ART score.

  20. Geographic Discordance Between Patient Residence and Incident Location in Emergency Medical Services Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsia, Renee Y; Dai, Mengtao; Wei, Ran; Sabbagh, Sarah; Mann, N Clay

    2017-01-01

    The location of a patient's residence is often used for emergency medical services (EMS) system planning. Our objective is to evaluate the association between patient residence and emergency incident zip codes for 911 calls. We used data from the 2013 National Emergency Medical Services Information System (NEMSIS) Public-Release Research Dataset. We studied all 911 calls with a valid complaint by dispatch, identifying zip codes for both the residence and incident locations (n=12,376,784). The primary outcomes were geographic and distance discordances between patient residence and incident zip codes. We used a multivariate logistic regression model to determine geographic discordance between residence and incident zip codes by dispatch complaint, age, and sex. We also measured distances between locations with geospatial processing. The overall proportion of geographic discordance for all 911 calls was 27.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 27.7% to 27.8%) and the median distance discordance was 11.5 miles (95% CI 11.5 to 11.5 miles). Lower geographic discordance rates were found among patients aged 65 to 79 years (20.2%; 95% CI 20.1% to 20.2%) and 80 years and older (14.5%; 95% CI 14.5% to 14.6%). Motor vehicle crashes (63.5%; 95% CI 63.5% to 63.6%), industrial accidents (59.3%; 95% CI 58.0% to 60.6%), and mass casualty incidents (50.6%; 95% CI 49.6% to 51.5%) were more likely to occur outside a patient's residence zip code. Median network distance between home and incident zip centroid codes ranged from 8.6 to 23.5 miles. In NEMSIS, there was geographic discordance between patient residence zip code and call location zip code in slightly more than one quarter of EMS responses records. The geographic discordance rates between residence and incident zip codes were associated with dispatch complaints and age. Although a patient's residence might be a valid proxy for incident location for elderly patients, this relationship holds less true for other age groups and among

  1. Designated Medical Directors for Emergency Medical Services: Recruitment and Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slifkin, Rebecca T.; Freeman, Victoria A.; Patterson, P. Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Context: Emergency medical services (EMS) agencies rely on medical oversight to support Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) in the provision of prehospital care. Most states require EMS agencies to have a designated medical director (DMD), who typically is responsible for the many activities of medical oversight. Purpose: To assess rural-urban…

  2. The emergency department medical director.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, T A

    1987-02-01

    This article has presented an overview of the duties, responsibilities, and management roles of the emergency department Medical Director, a position that can be among the most challenging, stimulating, and exciting in medicine. However, prior to accepting a position as an Emergency Department medical director, one should have a clear understanding of what the job entails. Careful discussions with the hospital administration, medical staff, nursing personnel, and staff emergency physicians should be undertaken to learn the perceptions of these people and expectations of the position. Once the job has been accepted, using the roles, responsibilities, and duties detailed herein may be of benefit--but should always be applied with good judgment, tactful cooperation, and common sense. Finally, it should not be surprising to a medical director to find, as Spinoza did many years ago, that the excellent thing he aspires to are as difficult as they are rare.

  3. Rethinking the Response to Emerging Microbes: Vaccines and Therapeutics in the Ebola Era--a Conference at Harvard Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipe, David M; Whelan, Sean P

    2015-08-01

    Harvard Medical School convened a meeting of biomedical and clinical experts on 5 March 2015 on the topic of "Rethinking the Response to Emerging Microbes: Vaccines and Therapeutics in the Ebola Era," with the goals of discussing the lessons from the recent Ebola outbreak and using those lessons as a case study to aid preparations for future emerging infections. The speakers and audience discussed the special challenges in combatting an infectious agent that causes sporadic outbreaks in resource-poor countries. The meeting led to a call for improved basic medical care for all and continued support of basic discovery research to provide the foundation for preparedness for future outbreaks in addition to the targeted emergency response to outbreaks and targeted research programs against Ebola virus and other specific emerging pathogens.

  4. [Medical emergency teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunkenborg, G.; Lund, C.; Petersen, John Asger

    2008-01-01

    The aim of medical emergency teams (MET) is to identify and treat deteriorating patients on general wards, and to avoid cardiac arrest, unplanned intensive care unit admission and death. The effectiveness of METs has yet to be proven, as the only two randomised, controlled trials on the subject...

  5. Emergency response nurse scheduling with medical support robot by multi-agent and fuzzy technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Shinya; Kitamura, Akira

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a new co-operative re-scheduling method corresponding the medical support tasks that the time of occurrence can not be predicted is described, assuming robot can co-operate medical activities with the nurse. Here, Multi-Agent-System (MAS) is used for the co-operative re-scheduling, in which Fuzzy-Contract-Net (FCN) is applied to the robots task assignment for the emergency tasks. As the simulation results, it is confirmed that the re-scheduling results by the proposed method can keep the patients satisfaction and decrease the work load of the nurse.

  6. The impact of a pre-hospital medical response unit on patient care and emergency department attendances.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Deasy, C

    2012-02-03

    A rapid response team was instigated in Cork to improve prehospital care and reduce unnecessary Emergency Department (ED) visits. This consisted of a Specialist Registrar (SpR) in Emergency Medicine and a Paramedic who attended all "999" calls in a designated rapid response vehicle on the allotted study days. Two hundred and sixty-three patients were seen on designated days between Jan 2004 and March 2006. Presentations seen included; road traffic accident (23%) collapse (12%), fall (10%) and seizure (8%). The majority of calls were to houses (36%). The most common medical intervention was intravenous cannulation (25%). Intravenous medications were administered in 21% of these patients--morphine sulphate was the most common drug given. It was possible to safely discharge 31% of patients on scene. In our experience skilled Emergency Medicine doctors attending at scene could provide advanced care and reduce ambulance transportation and patient attendance.

  7. Houston's medical disaster response to Hurricane Katrina: part 2: transitioning from emergency evacuee care to community health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Douglas R; Gavagan, Thomas; Smart, Kieran; Weller, Nancy; Upton, Lori A; Havron, Douglas A; Fishkind, Avrim; Persse, David; Shank, Paul; Shah, Umair A; Mattox, Kenneth

    2009-04-01

    After Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast on August 29, 2005, thousands of ill and injured evacuees were transported to Houston, TX. Houston's regional disaster plan was quickly implemented, leading to the activation of the Regional Hospital Preparedness Council's Catastrophic Medical Operations Center and the rapid construction of a 65-examination-room medical facility within the Reliant Center. A plan for triage of arriving evacuees was quickly developed and the Astrodome/Reliant Center Complex mega-shelter was created. Herein, we discuss major elements of the regional disaster response, including regional coordination, triage and emergency medical service transfers into the region's medical centers, medical care in population shelters, and community health challenges.

  8. Tactical emergency medical support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinnert, Kathy J; Hall, William L

    2002-11-01

    As increases in criminal activity collide with more aggressive law enforcement postures, there is more contact between police officers and violent felons. Civilian law enforcement special operations teams routinely engage suspects in these violent, dynamic, and complex interdiction activities. Along with these activities comes the substantial and foreseeable risk of death or grievous harm to law officers, bystanders, hostages, or perpetrators. Further, law enforcement agencies who attempt to apprehend dangerous, heavily armed criminals with a special operations team that lacks the expertise to treat the medical consequences that may arise from such a confrontation may be negligent of deliberate indifference. Meanwhile, evidence exists within the military, civilian law enforcement, and medical literature that on-scene TEMS serves to improve mission success and team safety and health, while decreasing morbidity and mortality in the event of an injury or illness suffered during operations. National professional organizations within law enforcement and emergency medicine have identified and support the fundamental need for mission safety and the development of a standard model to train and incorporate TEMS into law enforcement special operations. The overall objective of TEMS is to minimize the potential for injury and illness and to promote optimal medical care from the scene of operations to a definitive care facility. The design, staffing, and implementation of a TEMS program that maximally uses the community resources integrates previously disparate law enforcement, EMS, and emergency medical/trauma center functions to form a new continuum of care [55].

  9. Emergency Medical Services Program Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This program guide contains the standard emergency medical services curriculum for technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum encompasses the minimum competencies required for entry-level workers in the emergency medical services field, and includes job skills in six emergency medical services divisions outlined in the national curriculum:…

  10. Privatization and emergency medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reissman, S G

    1997-01-01

    Osborne and Gaebler's Reinventing Government has sparked discussion amongst elected officials, civil servants, the media, and the general public regarding advantages of privatizing government services. Its support stems from an effort to provide services to municipalities while reducing taxpayer expenditure. Many echo the sentiment of former New York Governor Mario Cuomo, who said, "It is not government's obligation to provide services, but to see that they're provided." Even in the area of public safety, privatization has found a "market." In many localities, privatizing Emergency Medical Services (EMS) is a popular and successful method for providing ambulance services. Privately owned ambulance services staff and respond to medical emergencies in a given community as part of the 9-1-1 emergency response system. Regulations for acceptable response times, equipment, and other essential components of EMS systems are specified by contract. This allows the municipality oversight of the service provided, but it does not provide the service directly. As will be discussed, this "contracting-out" model has many benefits. Privatizing EMS services is a decision based not only on cost-savings, but on accountability. A thorough evaluation must be utilized in the selection process. Issues of efficiency, effectiveness, quality, customer service, responsiveness, and equity must be considered by the government, in addition to cost of service. The uncertain future of health care in the United States has led those in EMS to look beyond the field's internal market to explore additional opportunities for expanding and redefining its roles beyond emergency care. It is important, however, to consider how emergency medical care, the original role of EMS, can be best delivered. Responding to emergencies is not just one of the functions involved in this field, it is the principal function from which public perception of EMS is formed, and from which support for entering other markets can

  11. Real-time Medical Emergency Response System: Exploiting IoT and Big Data for Public Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, M Mazhar; Ahmad, Awais; Paul, Anand; Wan, Jiafu; Zhang, Daqiang

    2016-12-01

    Healthy people are important for any nation's development. Use of the Internet of Things (IoT)-based body area networks (BANs) is increasing for continuous monitoring and medical healthcare in order to perform real-time actions in case of emergencies. However, in the case of monitoring the health of all citizens or people in a country, the millions of sensors attached to human bodies generate massive volume of heterogeneous data, called "Big Data." Processing Big Data and performing real-time actions in critical situations is a challenging task. Therefore, in order to address such issues, we propose a Real-time Medical Emergency Response System that involves IoT-based medical sensors deployed on the human body. Moreover, the proposed system consists of the data analysis building, called "Intelligent Building," depicted by the proposed layered architecture and implementation model, and it is responsible for analysis and decision-making. The data collected from millions of body-attached sensors is forwarded to Intelligent Building for processing and for performing necessary actions using various units such as collection, Hadoop Processing (HPU), and analysis and decision. The feasibility and efficiency of the proposed system are evaluated by implementing the system on Hadoop using an UBUNTU 14.04 LTS coreTMi5 machine. Various medical sensory datasets and real-time network traffic are considered for evaluating the efficiency of the system. The results show that the proposed system has the capability of efficiently processing WBAN sensory data from millions of users in order to perform real-time responses in case of emergencies.

  12. The difficult medical emergency call

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Kjærulff, Thora Majlund; Viereck, Søren

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pre-hospital emergency care requires proper categorization of emergency calls and assessment of emergency priority levels by the medical dispatchers. We investigated predictors for emergency call categorization as "unclear problem" in contrast to "symptom-specific" categories and the ......BACKGROUND: Pre-hospital emergency care requires proper categorization of emergency calls and assessment of emergency priority levels by the medical dispatchers. We investigated predictors for emergency call categorization as "unclear problem" in contrast to "symptom-specific" categories...... and the effect of categorization on mortality. METHODS: Register-based study in a 2-year period based on emergency call data from the emergency medical dispatch center in Copenhagen combined with nationwide register data. Logistic regression analysis (N = 78,040 individuals) was used for identification...

  13. The difficult medical emergency call

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Kjærulff, Thora Majlund; Viereck, Søren

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pre-hospital emergency care requires proper categorization of emergency calls and assessment of emergency priority levels by the medical dispatchers. We investigated predictors for emergency call categorization as "unclear problem" in contrast to "symptom-specific" categories and the ......BACKGROUND: Pre-hospital emergency care requires proper categorization of emergency calls and assessment of emergency priority levels by the medical dispatchers. We investigated predictors for emergency call categorization as "unclear problem" in contrast to "symptom-specific" categories...... and the effect of categorization on mortality. METHODS: Register-based study in a 2-year period based on emergency call data from the emergency medical dispatch center in Copenhagen combined with nationwide register data. Logistic regression analysis (N = 78,040 individuals) was used for identification...

  14. Emergency Medical Rescue in a Radiation Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briesmeister, L.; Ellington, Y.; Hollis, R.; Kunzman, J.; McNaughton, M.; Ramsey, G.; Somers, B.; Turner, A.; Finn, J.

    1999-09-14

    Previous experience with emergency medical rescues in the presence of radiation or contamination indicates that the training provided to emergency responders is not always appropriate. A new course developed at Los Alamos includes specific procedures for emergency response in a variety of radiological conditions.

  15. Emergency Medical Technicians and Paramedics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Projected Employment, 2024 Change, 2014-24 Employment by Industry Percent Numeric SOURCE: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Employment Projections program Emergency medical technicians and paramedics ...

  16. Emergency medical services: an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jelenko, C.; Frey, C.F.

    1976-01-01

    The organization and delivery of emergency care are reviewed in a book based on the judgments of 28 national leaders in various fields. It is noted that acute illness has become a major health problem due to the rapid growth of the United States and the increased demands of consumers for improved medical care. Critical needs in the field of emergency care are identified as communications, prompt and proper rescue handling, rapid and careful transportation of victims, and adequate emergency care at hospitals. The long-term solution to the problem of injury is viewed as prevention through efforts made by educators, industrialists, engineers, public health officials, and private citizens. The statement is made that accidents are exceeded only by heart disease, neoplasms, and cerebral vascular disease as a major cause of death in the United States. The dimensions of the accident problem are explored. Other topics addressed are: motor vehicle trauma and emergency medical services; the provision of emergency care to cardiac patients; medicolegal implications of emergency care; and field treatment and transport of emergency victims. The importance of telecommunications, emergency medical technician training, and public education is stressed. Hospital education and training for emergency department personnel are detailed for physicians and nurses. Functional and design aspects of hospital emergency departments are described, and the role of community planning in the provision of emergency health services is considered. A checklist for airport disaster planning and a Michigan law regarding emergency medical services are appended.

  17. Uncertainty analysis of accident notification time and emergency medical service response time in work zone traffic accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qiang; Weng, Jinxian

    2013-01-01

    Taking into account the uncertainty caused by exogenous factors, the accident notification time (ANT) and emergency medical service (EMS) response time were modeled as 2 random variables following the lognormal distribution. Their mean values and standard deviations were respectively formulated as the functions of environmental variables including crash time, road type, weekend, holiday, light condition, weather, and work zone type. Work zone traffic accident data from the Fatality Analysis Report System between 2002 and 2009 were utilized to determine the distributions of the ANT and the EMS arrival time in the United States. A mixed logistic regression model, taking into account the uncertainty associated with the ANT and the EMS response time, was developed to estimate the risk of death. The results showed that the uncertainty of the ANT was primarily influenced by crash time and road type, whereas the uncertainty of EMS response time is greatly affected by road type, weather, and light conditions. In addition, work zone accidents occurring during a holiday and in poor light conditions were found to be statistically associated with a longer mean ANT and longer EMS response time. The results also show that shortening the ANT was a more effective approach in reducing the risk of death than the EMS response time in work zones. To shorten the ANT and the EMS response time, work zone activities are suggested to be undertaken during non-holidays, during the daytime, and in good weather and light conditions.

  18. Training of medical teams on-site for individual and coordinated response in emergency management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Verner

    2003-01-01

    involved in the complete preparedness: fire brigade, police, medical team, civil defence, etc. All these modules will in the end be integrated on a common integration platform, either to a fully-fledged system covering all aspects of training for the complete preparedness, or for creating a dedicated...... system for specific training set-ups for specific groups of trainees. The first module completed as a commercial system, "Training of medical teams on site", will be presented....

  19. In-flight Medical Emergencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Chandra

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Research and data regarding in-flight medical emergencies during commercial air travel are lacking. Although volunteer medical professionals are often called upon to assist, there are no guidelines or best practices to guide their actions. This paper reviews the literature quantifying and categorizing in-flight medical incidents, discusses the unique challenges posed by the in-flight environment, evaluates the legal aspects of volunteering to provide care, and suggests an approach to managing specific conditions at 30,000 feet.Methods: We conducted a MEDLINE search using search terms relevant to aviation medical emergencies and flight physiology. The reference lists of selected articles were reviewed to identify additional studies.Results: While incidence studies were limited by data availability, syncope, gastrointestinal upset, and respiratory complaints were among the most common medical events reported. Chest pain and cardiovascular events were commonly associated with flight diversion.Conclusion: When in-flight medical emergencies occur, volunteer physicians should have knowledge about the most common in-flight medical incidents, know what is available in on-board emergency medical kits, coordinate their therapy with the flight crew and remote resources, and provide care within their scope of practice. [West J Emerg Med. 2013;14(5:499–504.

  20. Emergency Medical Service (EMS) Stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — EMS Locations in Kansas The EMS stations dataset consists of any location where emergency medical services (EMS) personnel are stationed or based out of, or where...

  1. Radiological Emergency Response Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Quality Data Asset includes all current and historical emergency radiological response event and incident of national significance data and surveillance, monitoring,...

  2. OEM Emergency Response Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Office of Emergency Management retains records of all incident responses in which it participates. This data asset includes three major sources of information:...

  3. Fire Department Emergency Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Bell, K.; Kelly, J.; Hudson, J.

    1997-09-01

    In 1995 the SRS Fire Department published the initial Operations Basis Document (OBD). This document was one of the first of its kind in the DOE complex and was widely distributed and reviewed. This plan described a multi-mission Fire Department which provided fire, emergency medical, hazardous material spill, and technical rescue services.

  4. [Emergency medical aid in a paediatrics context].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branchard, Delphine; Tentillier, Éric; Gillet, Stéphane; Naud, Julien

    2016-01-01

    In France, the organisation of aid involves the intervention of the emergency medical services (Samu), which coordinate the medical regulation platforms for site 15 and the mobile emergency and intensive care services (Smur). Since they were created, the Samu have been tirelessly adapting their response to the various characteristics of pre-hospital assignments. Pre- and inter-hospital paediatrics has seen the development of specialised teams with the aim of providing effective aid which is adapted to the youngest and most vulnerable patients.

  5. Training for the medical response in radiological emergency experiences and results; Capacitacion para la respuesta medica en emergencias radiologicas experiencias y resultados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas Herrera, J.; Lopez Forteza, Y.

    2003-07-01

    The use of the nuclear techniques in the social practice confers a special imporatnce to the relative aspects to the safety of the practices and radiationsources, for what the implementation of efficient programs of radiation protection constitutes a priority. However in spite of the will before expressed, regrettably radiological situations happen accidental assocaited to multiple causes taht suggest the creation of response capacities to intervention before these fortuitous facts. The experiences accumulated in the last decades related with accidental exposures have evidenced the convenience of having properly qualified human resources for the Medical Response in Radiological Emergencies. The training in the medical aspects of the radiological emergencies acquires a singular character. In such a sense when valuing the national situation put onof manifest deficiences as for the training in medical aspects of the radiological emergencies that advised the development of training programs in such aspects for the different response groups linked to the topic. After identified the training necessities and the scope of the same ones, the contents of the training program were elaborated. The program has as general purpose the invigoration of the capacity of the medical response in front of accidental radiological situations, by means of actions that they bear to prepare groups of medical response in the handling of people accident victims and to the identification of potentials,accidental scenarios, as well as of the necessary resources to confront them. The program content approaches theoretical and paractical aspects to the medical aspect to radiological emergencies. The program include the different topics about fundamental of physical biological to radiation protection, radiation protection during exposure of radiological accidents, medical care for overexposed or contaminated persons, drill, exercises and concludes with designation of a strategy as preparation and

  6. Medical Journalism and Emergency Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Safari

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, many researches in the field of medicine are conducting all around the world and medical journalism is a way to share the results. In fact, dissemination of the related manuscripts can prevent the repetitive research or may even lead to conducting a better survey. Therefore high quality medical journals are considered as up-to-date resources for further investigations. Medical journals are propagating their papers in various media including television programs, newspapers, internet websites and different social media. So they can influence the government policy makers, health-care professionals and even public. Moreover, most researchers hear about medical discoveries for the first time through medical journals and their related social media. So as well a high quality journal can help to improve medical science, a journal of poor quality can be damaging and distorting. Indeed, popular journals have the power of inventing a “communication storm” to draw attention to a certain topic. Thus they have to respect the accepted international principles to prevent spreading inaccurate and misleading data. This paper aims to review the previous and current situation of medical journalism by focus on field of emergency medicine.

  7. Autonomic dysreflexia: a medical emergency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bycroft, J; Shergill, I; Choong, E; Arya, N; Shah, P

    2005-01-01

    Autonomic dysreflexia is an important clinical diagnosis that requires prompt treatment to avoid devastating complications. The condition may present itself to all members of medical and surgical specialties, who may not be accustomed to treating it. It is the clinician's responsibility to have a basic understanding of the pathophysiology of the condition and the simple steps required to treat it. PMID:15811886

  8. Hanford Emergency Response Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagoner, J.D.

    1994-04-01

    The Hanford Emergency Response Plan for the US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL), incorporates into one document an overview of the emergency management program for the Hanford Site. The program has been developed in accordance with DOE orders, and state and federal regulations to protect worker and public health and safety and the environment in the event of an emergency at or affecting the Hanford Site. This plan provides a description of how the Hanford Site will implement the provisions of DOE 5500 series and other applicable Orders in terms of overall policies and concept of operations. It should be used as the basis, along with DOE Orders, for the development of specific contractor and RL implementing procedures.

  9. The Collaborative Production of Responses and Dispatching on the Radio: Video Analysis in a Medical Emergency Call Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giolo Fele

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available What happens when someone rings an emergency hotline for help? How is the emergency handled? How does the emergency service swing into action? Prompt and competent intervention and assessment of the gravity of the situation in a few crucial seconds: these are the quality standards that regulate the organization of emergency operations centers. For a number of years various groups of social science researchers have carried forward a program for the systematic study of work using ethnographic and naturalistic methods of analysis. An interest in work is certainly nothing new in the social sciences, and in sociology in particular. What is new, though, is the particular analytical viewpoint from which such research is now conducted. This program has dispensed with large-scale theorization and has concentrated on the empirical study of activities and practices, achieving an unprecedented level of detail and analytical fineness. Indeed, only by proceeding at this fine level of detail—made possible by the use of videorecordings—has it been possible to document the extraordinary and subtle collaborative production of work, and to do so at a level which extends well beyond the conscious awareness of people in their everyday routine. This aspect concerns in particular the capacity of the latest generation of studies of work to document the tacit procedures and forms of common-sense reasoning involved in the performance of tasks in concrete work settings. This paper focuses on the ways in which the dispatch is done in a medical emergency operation center. Although we know a great deal about the interaction between caller and call-taker from previous research, we know much less about the social organization that makes the dispatch possible. The data analyzed in this paper derive from a research project in which I have been engaged for a number of years on operation centers for the 118 emergency telephone number in Italy. Contrasting the data obtained

  10. Emergency Victim Care. A Textbook for Emergency Medical Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Trade and Industrial Education Service.

    This textbook for emergency medical personnel should be useful to fire departments, private ambulance companies, industrial emergency and rescue units, police departments, and nurses. The 30 illustrated chapters cover topics such as: (1) Emergency Medical Service Vehicles, (2) Safe Driving Practices, (3) Anatomy and Physiology, (4) Closed Chest…

  11. Pediatric emergency medical services and their drawbacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Foraih Al-Anazi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To survey the literature on Pediatric Emergency Medical Services (PEMS with an aim to focus its drawbacks and emphasize the means of improvement. Materials and Methods: Published articles selected for inclusion were based on the significance and understanding of literature search on different aspects of PEMS. To meet this criterion, PubMed, PubMed Central, Science Direct, Uptodate, Med Line, comprehensive databases, Cochrane library and the Internet (Google, Yahoo were thoroughly searched. Results: PEMS provide out-of-hospital medical care and/or transport the patients to definitive care. The task force represents specialties of ambulance transport, first aid, emergency medical care, life saving, trauma, emergency medicine, water rescue, and extrication. Preliminary care is undertaken to save the patients from different medical exigencies. The techniques and procedures of basic and advanced life-support are employed. A large number of weaknesses are recorded in PEMS system, such as ambulance transport irregularities, deficit equipment, lack of expertise, and ignorance of the pre-hospital care providers. These are discussed with special reference to a few examples of medical exigencies. Conclusions: The appointments in PEMS should be regularized with specific qualifications, experience, and expertise in different areas. Responsibility of PEMS should not be left to pre-hospital care providers, who are non clinicians and lack proper education and training. Pediatricians should be adequately trained to play an active role in PEMS. Meetings should be convened to discuss the lapses and means of improvement. Networks of co-operation between pre-hospital providers and experts in the emergency department should be established.

  12. Distributed virtual environment for emergency medical training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stytz, Martin R.; Banks, Sheila B.; Garcia, Brian W.; Godsell-Stytz, Gayl M.

    1997-07-01

    In many professions where individuals must work in a team in a high stress environment to accomplish a time-critical task, individual and team performance can benefit from joint training using distributed virtual environments (DVEs). One professional field that lacks but needs a high-fidelity team training environment is the field of emergency medicine. Currently, emergency department (ED) medical personnel train by using words to create a metal picture of a situation for the physician and staff, who then cooperate to solve the problems portrayed by the word picture. The need in emergency medicine for realistic virtual team training is critical because ED staff typically encounter rarely occurring but life threatening situations only once in their careers and because ED teams currently have no realistic environment in which to practice their team skills. The resulting lack of experience and teamwork makes diagnosis and treatment more difficult. Virtual environment based training has the potential to redress these shortfalls. The objective of our research is to develop a state-of-the-art virtual environment for emergency medicine team training. The virtual emergency room (VER) allows ED physicians and medical staff to realistically prepare for emergency medical situations by performing triage, diagnosis, and treatment on virtual patients within an environment that provides them with the tools they require and the team environment they need to realistically perform these three tasks. There are several issues that must be addressed before this vision is realized. The key issues deal with distribution of computations; the doctor and staff interface to the virtual patient and ED equipment; the accurate simulation of individual patient organs' response to injury, medication, and treatment; and an accurate modeling of the symptoms and appearance of the patient while maintaining a real-time interaction capability. Our ongoing work addresses all of these issues. In this

  13. Emergency Response Guideline Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary D. Storrick

    2007-09-30

    Task 5 of the collaborative effort between ORNL, Brazil, and Westinghouse for the International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative entitled “Development of Advanced Instrumentation and Control for an Integrated Primary System Reactor” focuses on operator control and protection system interaction, with particular emphasis on developing emergency response guidelines (ERGs). As in the earlier tasks, we will use the IRIS plant as a specific example of an integrated primary system reactor (IPSR) design. The present state of the IRIS plant design – specifically, the lack of a detailed secondary system design – precludes establishing detailed emergency procedures at this time. However, we can create a structure for their eventual development. This report summarizes our progress to date. Section 1.2 describes the scope of this effort. Section 2 compares IPSR ERG development to the recent AP1000 effort, and identifies three key plant differences that affect the ERGs and control room designs. The next three sections investigate these differences in more detail. Section 3 reviews the IRIS Safety-by-Design™ philosophy and its impact on the ERGs. Section 4 looks at differences between the IRIS and traditional loop PWR I&C Systems, and considers their implications for both control room design and ERG development. Section 5 examines the implications of having one operating staff control multiple reactor units. Section 6 provides sample IRIS emergency operating procedures (EOPs). Section 7 summarizes our conclusions.

  14. [Prehospital emergency care of patients with acute heart failure in Spain: the SEMICA study (Emergency Medical Response Systems for Patients with Acute Heart Failure)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miró, Òscar; Llorens, Pere; Escalada, Xavier; Herrero, Pablo; Jacob, Javier; Gil, Víctor; Xipell, Carolina; Sánchez, Carolina; Aguiló, Sira; Martín-Sánchez, Francisco J

    2017-07-01

    To study the means of emergency transport used to bring patients with acute heart failure (AHF) to hospital emergency departments (EDs) and explore associations between factors, type of transport, and prehospital care received. We gathered the following information on patients treated for AHF at 34 Spanish hospital EDs: means of transport used (medicalized ambulance [MA], nonmedicalized ambulance [NMA], or private vehicle) and treatments administered before arrival at the hospital. Twenty-seven independent variables potentially related to type of transport used were also studied. Indicators of AHF severity were triage level assigned in the ED, need for admission, need for intensive care, in-hospital mortality, and 30-day mortality. A total of 6106 patients with a mean (SD) age of 80 years were included; 56.5% were women, 47.2% arrived in PVs, 37.8% in NMAs, and 15.0% in MAs. Use of an ambulance was associated with female sex, age over 80 years, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, a history of AHF, functional dependency, New York Heart Association class III-IV, sphincteral incontinence, labored breathing, orthopnea, cold skin, and sensory depression or restlessness. Assignment of a MA was directly associated with living alone, a history of ischemic heart disease, cold skin, sensory depression or restlessness, and high temperature; it was inversely associated with a history of falls. The rates of receipt of prehospital treatments and AHF severity level increased with use of MAs vs. NMAs vs. PV. Seventy-three percent of patients transported in MAs received oxygen, 29% received a diuretic, 13.5% a vasodilator, and 4.7% noninvasive ventilation. Characteristics of the patient with AHF are associated with the assignment of type of transport to a hospital ED. Assignment appears to be related to severity. Treatment given during MA transport could be increased.

  15. Undergraduate medical education in emergency medical care: a nationwide survey at German medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckers, Stefan K; Timmermann, Arnd; Müller, Michael P; Angstwurm, Matthias; Walcher, Felix

    2009-05-12

    Since June 2002, revised regulations in Germany have required "Emergency Medical Care" as an interdisciplinary subject, and state that emergency treatment should be of increasing importance within the curriculum. A survey of the current status of undergraduate medical education in emergency medical care establishes the basis for further committee work. Using a standardized questionnaire, all medical faculties in Germany were asked to answer questions concerning the structure of their curriculum, representation of disciplines, instructors' qualifications, teaching and assessment methods, as well as evaluation procedures. Data from 35 of the 38 medical schools in Germany were analysed. In 32 of 35 medical faculties, the local Department of Anaesthesiology is responsible for the teaching of emergency medical care; in two faculties, emergency medicine is taught mainly by the Department of Surgery and in another by Internal Medicine. Lectures, seminars and practical training units are scheduled in varying composition at 97% of the locations. Simulation technology is integrated at 60% (n = 21); problem-based learning at 29% (n = 10), e-learning at 3% (n = 1), and internship in ambulance service is mandatory at 11% (n = 4). In terms of assessment methods, multiple-choice exams (15 to 70 questions) are favoured (89%, n = 31), partially supplemented by open questions (31%, n = 11). Some faculties also perform single practical tests (43%, n = 15), objective structured clinical examination (OSCE; 29%, n = 10) or oral examinations (17%, n = 6). Emergency Medical Care in undergraduate medical education in Germany has a practical orientation, but is very inconsistently structured. The innovative options of simulation technology or state-of-the-art assessment methods are not consistently utilized. Therefore, an exchange of experiences and concepts between faculties and disciplines should be promoted to guarantee a standard level of education in emergency medical care.

  16. Undergraduate medical education in emergency medical care: A nationwide survey at German medical schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timmermann Arnd

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since June 2002, revised regulations in Germany have required "Emergency Medical Care" as an interdisciplinary subject, and state that emergency treatment should be of increasing importance within the curriculum. A survey of the current status of undergraduate medical education in emergency medical care establishes the basis for further committee work. Methods Using a standardized questionnaire, all medical faculties in Germany were asked to answer questions concerning the structure of their curriculum, representation of disciplines, instructors' qualifications, teaching and assessment methods, as well as evaluation procedures. Results Data from 35 of the 38 medical schools in Germany were analysed. In 32 of 35 medical faculties, the local Department of Anaesthesiology is responsible for the teaching of emergency medical care; in two faculties, emergency medicine is taught mainly by the Department of Surgery and in another by Internal Medicine. Lectures, seminars and practical training units are scheduled in varying composition at 97% of the locations. Simulation technology is integrated at 60% (n = 21; problem-based learning at 29% (n = 10, e-learning at 3% (n = 1, and internship in ambulance service is mandatory at 11% (n = 4. In terms of assessment methods, multiple-choice exams (15 to 70 questions are favoured (89%, n = 31, partially supplemented by open questions (31%, n = 11. Some faculties also perform single practical tests (43%, n = 15, objective structured clinical examination (OSCE; 29%, n = 10 or oral examinations (17%, n = 6. Conclusion Emergency Medical Care in undergraduate medical education in Germany has a practical orientation, but is very inconsistently structured. The innovative options of simulation technology or state-of-the-art assessment methods are not consistently utilized. Therefore, an exchange of experiences and concepts between faculties and disciplines should be promoted to guarantee a standard

  17. Emergency Medical Service (EMS): Rotorcraft Technology Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauchspies, J. S.; Adams, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    A lead organization on the national level should be designated to establish concepts, locations, and the number of shock trauma air medical services. Medical specialists desire a vehicle which incorporates advances in medical technology trends in health care. Key technology needs for the emergency medical services helicopter of the future include the riding quality of fixed wing aircraft (reduced noise and vibration), no tail rotor, small rotor, small rotor diameter, improved visibility, crashworthy vehicle, IFR capability, more affordability high reliability, fuel efficient, and specialized cabins to hold medical/diagnostic and communications equipment. Approaches to a national emergency medical service are discussed.

  18. Emergency Medical Service Personnel Recognize Pediatric Concussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speirs, Joshua N; Lyons, Matthew I; Johansson, Bert E

    2017-01-01

    Concussions are a major cause of morbidity in pediatrics. Many concussions occur during activities with emergency medical service (EMS) providers present to determine if a higher level of care is needed. Data are limited on how capable these providers are. We assessed the ability of EMS providers to recognize pediatric concussions. Fifty-six total responses were included, 38 from EMS and 18 from our MD/RN (medical doctor/registered nurse) group. No statistical differences were found between the 2 groups when adjusted for age, gender, number of years in practice, and number of pediatric concussions managed. This first of its kind pilot study was designed to assess EMS personnel's ability to recognize and triage pediatric concussions. Our findings show EMS providers are statistically identical in their ability to recognize and triage concussions to physicians. The performance of our MD participants was lower than expected. Larger studies are needed to further investigate EMS providers' ability to recognize a concussion.

  19. Medical responsibility and air transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hédouin, V; Lallemand, M; Révuelta, E; Dreszer, M A; Gosset, D

    1998-01-01

    When a medical emergency occurs during a flight operated by a commercial airline, the assistance of a physician-passenger fortuitously present aboard may be requested. This physician becomes bound by both his professional and civil responsibilities. However, in the case of a serious problem, he would usually ignore the question of the jurisprudence of the country where the emergency occurs. In discussing this issue, this paper analyses different situations and risks that the physician may incur and points out various defects in the law not currently covered by existing international conventions.

  20. Emergency medical epidemiology in Assam, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saddichha Sahoo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Assam, with its capital in Dispur has one of the highest rates of infant and maternal mortality in India. Being under both tribal and hilly regions, it has lacked adequate healthcare and emergency services. We therefore aimed to conduct a cross-sectional survey of medical emergencies and identify various types of emergencies presenting to emergency departments, prior to launching emergency services across the state. Materials and Methods: On a prospective basis and using a stratified random sampling design, all emergencies presenting to the three government hospitals in Guwahati, Assam, which handle 90% of all emergencies currently, were studied on specially designed datasheets in order to collect data. Emergency medical technicians (EMTs were placed in the Casualty of the medical colleges and recorded all emergencies on the datasheet. The collected data was then analysed for stratification and mapping of emergencies. In addition, retrospective data for a period of 15 days was collected from the emergency case registers of all three hospitals and the adjoining district civil hospitals, in order to give a wider perspective of the nature of emergencies. Results: A total of 2169 emergencies were recorded over a seven-day prospective and fifteen-day retrospective period. Guwahati Medical College Hospital attended to majority of emergencies (42%, which were mainly of the nature of pregnancies (22.7%, accidents (12.2% or assaults (15.4% and fever related. Maximum emergencies also presented from the border districts, and occurred among young males in the age group of 19-45 years. Males were also more prone to accidents and assaults, while females presented with pregnancies as emergencies. Conclusion: Potential emergency services need to target young pregnant females. Law and order needs to be also tightened in order to curb accidents and assaults among young males.

  1. Asthma Medication Ratio Predicts Emergency Depart...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — According to findings reported in Asthma Medication Ratio Predicts Emergency Department Visits and Hospitalizations in Children with Asthma, published in Volume 3,...

  2. National Training Course. Emergency Medical Technician. Paramedic. Instructor's Lesson Plans. Module X. Medical Emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This instructor's lesson plan guide on medical emergencies is one of fifteen modules designed for use in the training of emergency medical technicians (paramedics). Ten units of study are presented: (1) diabetic emergencies; (2) anaphylactic reactions; (3) exposure to environmental extremes; (4) alcoholism and drug abuse; (5) poisoning and…

  3. Emergency Medicine for medical students world wide!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perinpam, Larshan; Thi Huynh, Anh-Nhi

    2015-01-01

    A guest blog from Larshan Perinpam (President of ISAEM) and Anh-Nhi Thi Huynh (Vice president of external affairs, ISAEM) - http://blogs.bmj.com/emj/2015/04/17/emergency-medicine-for-medical-students-world-wide/......A guest blog from Larshan Perinpam (President of ISAEM) and Anh-Nhi Thi Huynh (Vice president of external affairs, ISAEM) - http://blogs.bmj.com/emj/2015/04/17/emergency-medicine-for-medical-students-world-wide/...

  4. Medical Emergency Education in Dental Hygiene Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stach, Donna J.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A survey of 169 dental hygiene training programs investigated the curriculum content and instruction concerning medical emergency treatment, related clinical practice, and program policy. Several trends are noted: increased curriculum hours devoted to emergency care; shift in course content to more than life-support care; and increased emergency…

  5. Medical procedures in the event of nuclear power plant accidents. Guidelines for: Medical consultants for emergency response commander; physicians in emergency care centres; physicians in outpatient and inpatient care

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genkel, Simone (ed.)

    2008-07-01

    The author of the contribution under consideration reports on medical procedures in the event of nuclear power plant accidents. This contribution consists of the following sections: protective measures, tasks of radiation protection physicians, emergency care centres. It has been pointed out that differentiation of the hospitals is acquired which accept radiation accident patients. However, only a small number of hospitals will be able to professionally treat patients with suspected gastrointestinal or pronounced (muco)cutaneous type of hospitals with haemotological-oncological departments. Thus they should be able to treat patients who have been exposed to radiation doses between 1 and 6 Gy without any difficulties. Even larger is the number of hospitals which can accept patients who were exposed to a radiation dose of less than 1 Gy, but suffer from other complicating diseases (injuries, general diseases).

  6. NOAA Emergency Response Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The imagery posted on this site is in response to natural disasters. The aerial photography missions were conducted by the NOAA Remote Sensing Division. The majority...

  7. Emergency medical equipment on board German airliners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkelbein, Jochen; Neuhaus, Christopher; Wetsch, Wolfgang A; Spelten, Oliver; Picker, Susanne; Böttiger, Bernd W; Gathof, Birgit S

    2014-01-01

    Medical emergencies often occur on commercial airline flights, but valid data on their causes and consequences are rare. Therefore, it is unclear what emergency medical equipment is necessary. Although a minimum standard for medical equipment is defined in regulations, additional material is not standardized and may vary significantly between different airlines. German airlines operating aircrafts with more than 30 seats were selected and interviewed with a 5-page written questionnaire between August 2011 and January 2012. Besides pre-packed and required emergency medical material, drugs, medical devices, and equipment lists were queried. If no reply was received, airlines were contacted another three times by e-mail and/or phone. Descriptive analysis was used for data presentation and interpretation. From a total of 73 German airlines, 58 were excluded from analysis (eg, those not providing passenger transport). Fifteen airlines were contacted and data of 13 airlines were available for analysis (two airlines did not participate). A first aid kit was available on all airlines. Seven airlines reported having a doctor's kit, and another four provided an "emergency medical kit." Four airlines provided an automated external defibrillator (AED)/electrocardiogram (ECG). While six airlines reported providing anesthesia drugs, a laryngoscope, and endotracheal tubes, another four airlines did not provide even a resuscitator bag. One airline did not provide any material for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Although the minimal material required according to European aviation regulations is provided by all airlines for medical emergencies, there are significant differences in the provision of additional material. The equipment on most airlines is not sufficient for the treatment of specific emergencies according to published medical guidelines (eg, for CPR or acute myocardial infarction). © 2014 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  8. Establishing cytogenetic biodosimetry laboratory in Saudi Arabia and producing preliminary calibration curve of dicentric chromosomes as biomarker for medical dose estimation in response to radiation emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hadyan, Khaled; Elewisy, Sara; Moftah, Belal; Shoukri, Mohamed; Alzahrany, Awad; Alsbeih, Ghazi

    2014-12-01

    In cases of public or occupational radiation overexposure and eventual radiological accidents, it is important to provide dose assessment, medical triage, diagnoses and treatment to victims. Cytogenetic bio-dosimetry based on scoring of dicentric chromosomal aberrations assay (DCA) is the "gold standard" biotechnology technique for estimating medically relevant radiation doses. Under the auspices of the National Science, Technology and Innovation Plan in Saudi Arabia, we have set up a biodosimetry laboratory and produced a national standard dose-response calibration curve for DCA, pre-required to estimate the doses received. For this, the basic cytogenetic DCA technique needed to be established. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were collected from four healthy volunteers and irradiated with radiation doses between 0 and 5 Gy of 320 keV X-rays. Then, lymphocytes were PHA stimulated, Colcemid division arrested and stained cytogenetic slides were prepared. The Metafer4 system (MetaSystem) was used for automatic and manually assisted metaphase finding and scoring of dicentric chromosomes. Results were fit to the linear-quadratic dose-effect model according to the IAEA EPR-Biodosimetry-2011 report. The resulting manually assisted dose-response calibration curve (Y = 0.0017 + 0.026 × D + 0.081 × D(2)) was in the range of those described in other populations. Although the automated scoring over-and-under estimates DCA at low (2 Gy) doses, respectively, it showed potential for use in triage mode to segregate between victims with potential risk to develop acute radiotoxicity syndromes. In conclusion, we have successfully established the first biodosimetry laboratory in the region and have produced a preliminary national dose-response calibration curve. The laboratory can now contribute to the national preparedness plan in response to eventual radiation emergencies in addition to providing information for decision makers and public health officials who assess the

  9. Strategies for reducing medication errors in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weant KA

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Kyle A Weant,1 Abby M Bailey,2 Stephanie N Baker2 1North Carolina Public Health Preparedness and Response, North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, Raleigh, NC, 2University of Kentucky HealthCare, Department of Pharmacy Services, Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science, University of Kentucky College of Pharmacy, Lexington, KY, USA Abstract: Medication errors are an all-too-common occurrence in emergency departments across the nation. This is largely secondary to a multitude of factors that create an almost ideal environment for medication errors to thrive. To limit and mitigate these errors, it is necessary to have a thorough knowledge of the medication-use process in the emergency department and develop strategies targeted at each individual step. Some of these strategies include medication-error analysis, computerized provider-order entry systems, automated dispensing cabinets, bar-coding systems, medication reconciliation, standardizing medication-use processes, education, and emergency-medicine clinical pharmacists. Special consideration also needs to be given to the development of strategies for the pediatric population, as they can be at an elevated risk of harm. Regardless of the strategies implemented, the prevention of medication errors begins and ends with the development of a culture that promotes the reporting of medication errors, and a systematic, nonpunitive approach to their elimination. Keywords: emergency medicine, pharmacy, medication errors, pharmacists, pediatrics

  10. Radiological Emergency Response Health and Safety Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. R. Bowman

    2001-05-01

    This manual was created to provide health and safety (H&S) guidance for emergency response operations. The manual is organized in sections that define each aspect of H and S Management for emergency responses. The sections are as follows: Responsibilities; Health Physics; Industrial Hygiene; Safety; Environmental Compliance; Medical; and Record Maintenance. Each section gives guidance on the types of training expected for managers and responders, safety processes and procedures to be followed when performing work, and what is expected of managers and participants. Also included are generic forms that will be used to facilitate or document activities during an emergency response. These ensure consistency in creating useful real-time and archival records and help to prevent the loss or omission of information.

  11. Medical Geology : a globally emerging discipline

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph E. Bunnell; Robert B. Finkelman; Centeno, Jose A.; Selinus, O. (Olle)

    2007-01-01

    Medical Geology, the study of the impacts of geologic materials and processes on animal and human health, is a dynamic emerging discipline bringing together the geoscience, biomedical, and public health communities to solve a wide range of environmental health problems. Among the Medical Geology described in this review are examples of both deficiency and toxicity of trace element exposure. Goiter is a widespread and potentially serious health problem caused by deficiency of iodine. In many l...

  12. Data modelling for emergency response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dilo, Arta; Zlatanova, Sidi

    2010-01-01

    Emergency response is one of the most demanding phases in disaster management. The fire brigade, paramedics, police and municipality are the organisations involved in the first response to the incident. They coordinate their work based on welldefined policies and procedures, but they also need the m

  13. Emergency Medical Response Capability Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-01

    Hospital Association American Pharmaceutical Association American Hospital Supply Corporation International Marketing Service Information on Disaster...Manufacturers Association o International Marketing Service o The Veterans Administration o The Department of Defense o Pharmaceutical Industry 32 C,, 9...Spain (I Conv) -2- M.inistero dell Interno Direzione Generale della Protezione Civile 00100 Rome, Italy (1 Copy) Directeur de la Protection Civile

  14. Medication errors recovered by emergency department pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Jeffrey M; Churchill, William; Erickson, Abbie; Munz, Kristin; Schuur, Jeremiah D; Salzberg, Claudia A; Lewinski, Daniel; Shane, Rita; Aazami, Roshanak; Patka, John; Jaggers, Rondell; Steffenhagen, Aaron; Rough, Steve; Bates, David W

    2010-06-01

    We assess the impact of emergency department (ED) pharmacists on reducing potentially harmful medication errors. We conducted this observational study in 4 academic EDs. Trained pharmacy residents observed a convenience sample of ED pharmacists' activities. The primary outcome was medication errors recovered by pharmacists, including errors intercepted before reaching the patient (near miss or potential adverse drug event), caught after reaching the patient but before causing harm (mitigated adverse drug event), or caught after some harm but before further or worsening harm (ameliorated adverse drug event). Pairs of physician and pharmacist reviewers confirmed recovered medication errors and assessed their potential for harm. Observers were unblinded and clinical outcomes were not evaluated. We conducted 226 observation sessions spanning 787 hours and observed pharmacists reviewing 17,320 medications ordered or administered to 6,471 patients. We identified 504 recovered medication errors, or 7.8 per 100 patients and 2.9 per 100 medications. Most of the recovered medication errors were intercepted potential adverse drug events (90.3%), with fewer mitigated adverse drug events (3.9%) and ameliorated adverse drug events (0.2%). The potential severities of the recovered errors were most often serious (47.8%) or significant (36.2%). The most common medication classes associated with recovered medication errors were antimicrobial agents (32.1%), central nervous system agents (16.2%), and anticoagulant and thrombolytic agents (14.1%). The most common error types were dosing errors, drug omission, and wrong frequency errors. ED pharmacists can identify and prevent potentially harmful medication errors. Controlled trials are necessary to determine the net costs and benefits of ED pharmacist staffing on safety, quality, and costs, especially important considerations for smaller EDs and pharmacy departments. Copyright (c) 2009 American College of Emergency Physicians

  15. Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Volpentest Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Federal Training Center is a safety and emergency response training center that offers...

  16. 医务人员件应对突发公共卫生事件能力的培养%Training of medical personnel's abilities in response to public health emergencies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庄英杰; 贾红军; 马洪滨; 杨静; 李可萍

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The medical personnel's ability in response to public health emergencies is the important guarantee for solving the emergent public health events properly. METHODS Based on analyzing the general situation of health system, the epidemic situation and the situation of emergent public health event nearly 10 years and the actuality of Beijing medical institution to public health emergencies, the current situation of emergent public health event emergency disposal, problems existing in the medical personnel and deficiency were analyzed, and in view of the above situation, the measures to improve the the medical personnel’s abilities in response to public health emergencies were proposed. RESULTS The medical personnel's ability in response to public health emergencies has been improved. CONCLUSION The medical personnel can thus faithfully perform their duties and properly use the relevant laws and regulations; The health emergency plans have been implemented comprehensively and exactly; The health care emergency work has been developed normatively and orderly.%目的 医务人员应对突发公共卫生事件能力是妥善解决突发公共卫生事件预防控制的重要保障. 方法 通过分析卫生体系概况、近10年传染病疫情态势以及突发卫生公共事件的发生情况以及北京医疗机构卫生应急现状等,剖析突发卫生公共事件应急处置中存在的问题以及医务人员应对突发公共卫生事件的不足之处,提出医务人员应对突发公共卫生事件能力培养措施及方法. 结果 提高了医务人员应对突发公共卫生事件的能力. 结论 通过对医务人员突发公共卫生事件应急能力的培训,使之正确地运用法律法规,忠实地履行其职责;全面、准确地实施卫生应急预案;规范、有序地开展卫生应急工作.

  17. Customer satisfaction measurement in emergency medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuisma, Markku; Määttä, Teuvo; Hakala, Taisto; Sivula, Tommi; Nousila-Wiik, Maria

    2003-07-01

    The annual patient volume in emergency medical services (EMS) systems is high worldwide. However, there are no comprehensive studies on customer satisfaction for EMS. The authors report how a customer satisfaction survey on EMS patients was conducted, the results, and the possible causes for dissatisfaction. Two prospective customer satisfactions surveys were conducted in an urban EMS system. Consecutive patients treated by EMS received a postal questionnaire approximately two weeks after service. Satisfaction was measured in a scale from 1 (very poor) to 5 (excellent). Neither EMS personnel nor patients were made aware prospectively that patient satisfaction would be measured. Response rates to the surveys were 36.8% (432/1,175) in 2000 and 40.0% (464/1,150) in 2002. The mean general grades for the service were 4.6 and 4.5, respectively. Patients reported the highest degree of dissatisfaction when they were not taken to their hospital of choice, when they perceived that the paramedics were not able to meet their needs, and when paramedics did not introduce themselves or communicate directly with the patient's relatives. In high-volume calls (i.e., frequent chief complaints), the general satisfaction was highest in patients with arrhythmias, breathing difficulties, and hypoglycemia. Patients with drug overdose included the highest proportion of unsatisfied patients. None of the background variables (e.g., gender, transport decision, working shift) was statistically related to general patient satisfaction. This study shows that customer satisfaction surveys can be successfully conducted for EMS. EMS systems should consider routinely using customer satisfaction surveys as a tool for quality measurement and improvement.

  18. Emergency Medical Technician-Ambulance: National Standard Curriculum. Student Study Guide (Third Edition).

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This student study guide is one of three documents prepared for the Emergency Medical Technician (EMT), National Standard Curriculum. The course is designed to develop skills in symptom recognition and in all emergency care procedures and techniques currently considered to be within the responsibilities of an EMT providing emergency medical care…

  19. Smartphones and Medical Applications in the Emergency Department Daily Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanshir, Amirhosein; Karimialavijeh, Ehsan; Sheikh, Hojjat; Vahedi, Motahar; Momeni, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    Medical applications help physicians to make more rapid and evidence based decisions that may provide better patient care. This study aimed to determine the extent to which smart phones and medical applications are integrated in the emergency department daily practice. In a cross sectional study, a modified standard questionnaire (Payne et al.) consisting of demographic data and information regarding quality and quantity of smartphone and medical app utilization was sent to emergency-medicine residents and interns twice (two weeks apart), in January 2015. The questionnaire was put online using open access "Web-form Module" and the address of the web page was e-mailed along with a cover letter explaining the survey. Finally, responses were analyzed using descriptive statistics and SPSS 22 software. 65 cases participated (response rate 86%). The mean age of interns and residents were 25.03 ± 1.13 and 30.27 ± 4.68 years, respectively (p UpToDate, respectively. 38 (61.3%) of the respondents were using their apps more than once a day and mostly for drug information. English (83.9%), Persian (12.9%), and other languages (3.2%) were preferred languages for designing a medical software among the participants, respectively. The findings of present study showed that smartphones are very popular among Iranian interns and residents in emergency department and a substantial number of them own a smartphone and are using medical apps regularly in their clinical practice.

  20. [Pediatric emergencies in the Grenoble Medical Center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebrun, E; Bost, M

    1988-01-01

    In the Grenoble Medical Centre, pediatric emergency admissions have been drastically influenced by the opening of an Emergency Unit in May 1983. Our work was carried out one year after the opening in order to study the characteristics of the admitted children. The enquiry was done over 4 months, one month for each season of that year. A total of 1,382 children were included in the study. Thirty-four percent were seen for a medical advice (66% hospitalized). Children seen for medical advice are younger and mostly migrants. They live close to the hospital and are brought most often for fever. Fifty one per cent directly brought to the hospital by their parents for a first pediatric advice (49% were sent by their personal physician). Children directly brought by their parents are in majority infants and migrants. They are mostly admitted at night and morning and during the week-end. They are more frequently followed within the public mother-child health protection system ("Service de Protection Maternelle et Infantile", PMI).

  1. Mammalian synthetic biology: emerging medical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis, Zoltán; Pereira, Hugo Sant'Ana; Homma, Takayuki; Pedrigi, Ryan M; Krams, Rob

    2015-05-06

    In this review, we discuss new emerging medical applications of the rapidly evolving field of mammalian synthetic biology. We start with simple mammalian synthetic biological components and move towards more complex and therapy-oriented gene circuits. A comprehensive list of ON-OFF switches, categorized into transcriptional, post-transcriptional, translational and post-translational, is presented in the first sections. Subsequently, Boolean logic gates, synthetic mammalian oscillators and toggle switches will be described. Several synthetic gene networks are further reviewed in the medical applications section, including cancer therapy gene circuits, immuno-regulatory networks, among others. The final sections focus on the applicability of synthetic gene networks to drug discovery, drug delivery, receptor-activating gene circuits and mammalian biomanufacturing processes. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  2. 32 CFR 1656.20 - Expenses for emergency medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... reasonable expenses for emergency medical care, including hospitalization, of ASWs who suffer illness or... date on which the expense was incurred. (f) Cost of emergency medical care including hospitalization... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Expenses for emergency medical care. 1656.20...

  3. 75 FR 27917 - Emergency Medical Services Week, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-18

    ... medical education, train themselves on the latest life-saving techniques, and maintain vital emergency... Proclamation 8519--Emergency Medical Services Week, 2010 Executive Order 13542--Providing an Order of... President ] Proclamation 8519 of May 13, 2010 Emergency Medical Services Week, 2010 By the President of...

  4. 77 FR 36039 - Federal Interagency Committee on Emergency Medical Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-15

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Federal Interagency Committee on Emergency Medical Services... Interagency Committee on Emergency Medical Services. SUMMARY: NHTSA announces a meeting of the Federal Interagency Committee on Emergency Medical Services (FICEMS) to be held in the Washington, DC area....

  5. 78 FR 30727 - Emergency Medical Services Week, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-22

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8982 of May 17, 2013 Emergency Medical Services Week, 2013 By the President... calm under pressure delivers comfort to neighbors in need. During Emergency Medical Services Week, we... proclaim May 19 through May 25, 2013, as Emergency Medical Services Week. I encourage all Americans...

  6. 31 CFR 544.508 - Authorization of emergency medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Authorization of emergency medical services. The provision of nonscheduled emergency medical services in the... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Authorization of emergency medical services. 544.508 Section 544.508 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and...

  7. 77 FR 31143 - Emergency Medical Services Week, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-24

    ... President Proclamation 8824--Emergency Medical Services Week, 2012 Proclamation 8825--National Safe Boating..., in communities across our country, men and women providing emergency medical services (EMS) stand at... efficiency at a moment's notice. During Emergency Medical Services Week, we honor their...

  8. 48 CFR 1842.7003 - Emergency medical services and evacuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Emergency medical services... NASA Contract Clauses 1842.7003 Emergency medical services and evacuation. The contracting officer must insert the clause at 1852.242-78, Emergency Medical Services and Evacuation, in all solicitations...

  9. 31 CFR 593.508 - Authorization of emergency medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Authorization of emergency medical services. The provision of nonscheduled emergency medical services in the... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Authorization of emergency medical services. 593.508 Section 593.508 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and...

  10. 31 CFR 547.508 - Authorization of emergency medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... of emergency medical services. The provision of nonscheduled emergency medical services in the United... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Authorization of emergency medical services. 547.508 Section 547.508 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and...

  11. Exploring mHealth Participation for Emergency Response Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Schwartz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We explore the challenges of participation by members of emergency response communities who share a similar condition and treatment, and are called upon to participate in emergency events experienced by fellow members. Smartphones and location-based social networking technologies present an opportunity to re-engineer certain aspects of emergency medical response. Life-saving prescription medication extended in an emergency by one individual to another occurs on a micro level, anecdotally documented. We illustrate the issues and our approach through the example of an app to support patients prone to anaphylaxis and prescribed to carry epinephrine auto-injectors. We address unique participation challenges in an mHealth environment in which interventions are primarily short-term interactions which require clear and precise decision-making and constant tracking of potential participants in responding to an emergency medical event. The conflicting effects of diffused responsibility and shared identity are identified as key factors in modeling participation.

  12. Medical Geology: a globally emerging discipline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunnell, J.E.; Finkelman, R.B.; Centeno, J.A.; Selinus, O. [Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, DC (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Medical Geology, the study of the impacts of geologic materials and processes on animal and human health, is a dynamic emerging discipline bringing together the geoscience, biomedical, and public health communities to solve a wide range of environmental health problems. Among the Medical Geology described in this review are examples of both deficiency and toxicity of trace element exposure. Goiter is a widespread and potentially serious health problem caused by deficiency of iodine. In many locations the deficiency is attributable to low concentrations of iodine in the bedrock. Similarly, deficiency of selenium in the soil has been cited as the principal cause of juvenile cardiomyopathy and muscular abnormalities. Overexposure to arsenic is one of the most widespread Medical Geology problems affecting more than one hundred million people in Bangladesh, India, China, Europe, Africa and North and South America. The arsenic exposure is primarily due to naturally high levels in groundwater but combustion of mineralized coal has also caused arsenic poisoning. Dental and skeletal fluorosis also impacts the health of millions of people around the world and, like arsenic, is due to naturally high concentrations in drinking water and, to a lesser extent, coal combustion. Other Medical Geology issues described include geophagia, the deliberate ingestion of soil, exposure to radon, and ingestion of high concentrations of organic compounds in drinking water. Geoscience and biomedical/public health researchers are teaming to help mitigate these health problems as well as various non-traditional issues for geoscientists such as vector-borne diseases.

  13. Medical response in the initial phase of a radiological or nuclear emergency; Respuesta medica en la fase inicial de una emergencia radiologica o nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez, M.; Perez, M.R.; Dubner, D.; Michelin, S.; Malvicini, M. [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Av. Del Libertador 8250, Gobierno Autonomo de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. e-mail: mvazquez@cae.arn.gov.ar

    2006-07-01

    The frequency of radiological and nuclear accidents is low with relationship to another type of have an accident, but the use of radioactive sources has been increased in the finish decades. Additionally, a growing world concern exists by the eventual use of radioactive material with malevolent ends. These facts put in relevance the necessity to have an appropriate preparation for the medical answer in this type of emergencies. The medical answer consists of different phases: Initial: pre-hospital and in local general hospitals; Intermediate: in local general hospitals and central reference hospitals. Late: in central reference hospitals and the pursuit to long term. The presence of conventional injuries (radio combined injuries) modifies in substantial form the assignment in the priority of the attention, the prediction and the evolution. The establishment of an appropriate triage is outstanding in the initial phase. The present communication approaches the early medical answer, sustained in the anamnesis, the chronology and severity of the symptoms and prodromal signs besides the laboratory results and complementary exams arisen during the first ones 24 to 72 hours. (Author)

  14. Emerging medical technologies and emerging conceptions of health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stempsey, William E

    2006-01-01

    Using ideas gleaned from the philosophy of technology of Martin Heidegger and Hans Jonas and the philosophy of health of Georges Canguilhem, I argue that one of the characteristics of emerging medical technologies is that these technologies lead to new conceptions of health. When technologies enable the body to respond to more and more challenges of disease, we thus establish new norms of health. Given the continued development of successful technologies, we come to expect more and more that our bodies should be able to respond to ever-new challenges of environment and disease by establishing ever-new norms of health. Technologies may aim at the prevention and treatment of disease, but they also bring about modifications of what we consider normal for the human being. Thus, new norms of health arise from technological innovation.

  15. Prehospital emergency medical services in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisamuddin, N A R Nik; Hamzah, M Shah; Holliman, C James

    2007-05-01

    Once a very slowly developing country in a Southeast Asia region, Malaysia has undergone considerable change over the last 20 years after the government changed its focus from agriculture to developing more industry and technology. The well-known "Vision 2020," introduced by the late Prime Minister, set a target for the nation to be a developed country in the Asia region by the year 2020. As the economy and standard of living have improved, the demand from the public for a better health care system, in particular, emergency medical services (EMS), has increased. Despite the effort by the government to improve the health care system in Malaysia, EMS within the country are currently limited, best described as being in the "developing" phase. The Ministry of Health, Ministry of Education, Civil Defense, and non-governmental organizations such as Red Crescent and St. John's Ambulance, provide the current ambulance services. At the present time, there are no uniform medical control or treatment protocols, communication systems, system management, training or education, or quality assurance policies. However, the recent development of and interest in an Emergency Medicine training program has gradually led to improved EMS and prehospital care.

  16. Reporting Helicopter Emergency Medical Services in Major Incidents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fattah, Sabina; Johnsen, Anne Siri; Sollid, Stephen J M

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Research on helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS) in major incidents is predominately based on case descriptions reported in a heterogeneous fashion. Uniform data reported with a consensus-based template could facilitate the collection, analysis, and exchange of experiences...... interacted through e-mail. We asked these experts to define data variables and rank which were most important to report during an immediate prehospital medical response to a major incident. Five rounds were conducted. RESULTS: In the first round, the experts suggested 98 variables. After 5 rounds, 21...

  17. Emergency motorcycle: has it a place in a medical emergency system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares-Oliveira, Miguel; Egipto, Paula; Costa, Isabel; Cunha-Ribeiro, Luis Manuel

    2007-07-01

    In an emergency medical service system, response time is an important factor in determining the prognosis of a victim. There are well-documented increases in response time in urban areas, mainly during rush hour. Because prehospital emergency care is required to be efficient and swift, alternative measures to achieve this goal should be addressed. We report our experience with a medical emergency motorcycle (MEM) and propose major criteria for dispatching it. This work presents a prospective analysis of the data relating to MEM calls from July 2004 to December 2005. The analyzed parameters were age, sex, reason for call, action, and need for subsequent transport. A comparison was made of the need to activate more means and, if so, whether the MEM was the first to arrive. There were 1972 calls. The average time of arrival at destination was 4.4 +/- 2.5 minutes. The main action consisted of administration of oxygen (n = 626), immobilization (n = 118), and control of hemorrhage (n = 101). In 63% of cases, MEM arrived before other emergency vehicles. In 355 cases (18%), there was no need for transport. The MEM can intervene in a wide variety of clinical situations and a quick response is guaranteed. Moreover, in specific situations, MEM safely and efficiently permits better management of emergency vehicles. We propose that it should be dispatched mainly in the following situations: true life-threatening cases and uncertain need for an ambulance.

  18. Hazard perception in emergency medical service responders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, K A; Scialfa, C T

    2016-10-01

    The perception of on-road hazards is critically important to emergency medical services (EMS) professionals, the patients they transport and the general public. This study compared hazard perception in EMS and civilian drivers of similar age and personal driving experience. Twenty-nine EMS professionals and 24 non-professional drivers were given a dynamic hazard perception test (HPT). The EMS group demonstrated an advantage in HPT that was independent of simple reaction time, another indication of the validity of the test. These results are also consistent with the view that professional driving experience results in changes in the ability to identify and respond to on-road hazards. Directions for future research include the development of a profession-specific hazard perception tool for both assessment and training purposes.

  19. Work stress in emergency medical technicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, A V

    1991-09-01

    To better understand the dynamics underlying their high turnover rate, emergency medical technicians (EMTs) were asked to participate in a union-sponsored study. Fifty-two percent of 200 EMT union members returned the three mailed questionnaires: the Occupational Stress Index, which assesses stress, strain, and coping; the Staff Burnout Scale for Health Professionals; and a survey that probed areas of job satisfaction. The sample had high stress, strain, and burnout scores. Coping skills were within the normal range. Burnout, stress, strain, and coping (BSS&C) were significantly related to job satisfaction, worry about infectious diseases, and perceptions of being poorly treated by emergency room personnel and fire fighters. BSS&C also were related to being upset by "runs" related to injuries from violence, drug overdoses, and exposure. Job dissatisfaction was related to attitudes that the job adversely affects one's family, that the EMT quarters are uncomfortable, and that administrators are not knowledgeable of the job demands and skills of EMTs. Areas of great discontent were the low salary of the profession and the inadequacy of the equipment.

  20. Achieving Reliable Communication in Dynamic Emergency Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipara, Octav; Plymoth, Anders N.; Liu, Fang; Huang, Ricky; Evans, Brian; Johansson, Per; Rao, Ramesh; Griswold, William G.

    2011-01-01

    Emergency responses require the coordination of first responders to assess the condition of victims, stabilize their condition, and transport them to hospitals based on the severity of their injuries. WIISARD is a system designed to facilitate the collection of medical information and its reliable dissemination during emergency responses. A key challenge in WIISARD is to deliver data with high reliability as first responders move and operate in a dynamic radio environment fraught with frequent network disconnections. The initial WIISARD system employed a client-server architecture and an ad-hoc routing protocol was used to exchange data. The system had low reliability when deployed during emergency drills. In this paper, we identify the underlying causes of unreliability and propose a novel peer-to-peer architecture that in combination with a gossip-based communication protocol achieves high reliability. Empirical studies show that compared to the initial WIISARD system, the redesigned system improves reliability by as much as 37% while reducing the number of transmitted packets by 23%. PMID:22195075

  1. Hand hygiene in emergency medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teter, Jonathan; Millin, Michael G; Bissell, Rick

    2015-01-01

    Hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) affect millions of patients annually (World Health Organization. Guidelines on Hand Hygiene in Healthcare. Geneva: WHO Press; 2009). Hand hygiene compliance of clinical staff has been identified by numerous studies as a major contributing factor to HAIs around the world. Infection control and hand hygiene in the prehospital environment can also contribute to patient harm and spread of infections. Emergency medical services (EMS) practitioners are not monitored as closely as hospital personnel in terms of hand hygiene training and compliance. Their ever-changing work environment is less favorable to traditional hospital-based aseptic techniques and education. This study aimed to determine the current state of hand hygiene practices among EMS providers and to provide recommendations for improving practices in the emergency health services environment. This study was a prospective, observational prevalence study and survey, conducted over a 2-month period. We selected participants from visits to three selected hospital emergency departments in the mid-Atlantic region. There were two data components to the study: a participant survey and hand swabs for pathogenic cultures. This study recruited a total sample of 62 participants. Overall, the study revealed that a significant number of EMS providers (77%) have a heavy bacterial load on their hands after patient care. All levels of providers had a similar distribution of bacterial load. Survey results revealed that few providers perform hand hygiene before (34%) or in between patients (24%), as recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines. This study demonstrates that EMS providers are potential vectors of microorganisms if proper hand hygiene is not performed properly. Since EMS providers treat a variety of patients and operate in a variety of environments, providers may be exposed to potentially pathogenic organisms, serving as vectors for the exposure of

  2. 31 CFR 587.508 - Authorization of emergency medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Licensing Policy § 587.508 Authorization of emergency medical services. The provision of nonscheduled emergency medical services in the United States to persons designated in or pursuant to § 587.201(a) is... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Authorization of emergency...

  3. 31 CFR 588.508 - Authorization of emergency medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... medical services. The provision of nonscheduled emergency medical services in the United States to persons... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Authorization of emergency medical services. 588.508 Section 588.508 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and...

  4. 31 CFR 594.507 - Authorization of emergency medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... medical services. The provision of nonscheduled emergency medical services in the United States to persons... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Authorization of emergency medical services. 594.507 Section 594.507 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and...

  5. 31 CFR 545.517 - Authorization of emergency medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... medical services. The provision of nonscheduled emergency medical services in the United States to persons... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Authorization of emergency medical services. 545.517 Section 545.517 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and...

  6. 31 CFR 536.507 - Authorization of emergency medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... medical services. The provision of nonscheduled emergency medical services to a specially designated... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Authorization of emergency medical services. 536.507 Section 536.507 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and...

  7. Can public health registry data improve Emergency Medical Dispatch?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, M S; Christensen, E F; Jepsen, S B

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Emergency Medical Dispatchers make decisions based on limited information. We aimed to investigate if adding demographic and hospitalization history information to the dispatch process improved precision. METHODS: This 30-day follow-up study evaluated time-critical emergencies...

  8. 3. Medical emergencies in primary schools and school ownership of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RICHY

    Key words:Schools, First Aid Boxes, Medical Emergencies. ABSTRACT ... average school-aged child spends 28% of the day and. 1 ... exercise sessions, break time interaction with friends which on the ... Part of such emergency preparedness by school ought to ... emergency, staff should take emergency action without. 5.

  9. Patients who leave the emergency department against medical advice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choung Ah; Cho, Joon Pil; Choi, Sang Cheon; Kim, Hyuk Hoon; Park, Ju Ok

    2016-01-01

    Objective Discharge against medical advice (DAMA) from the emergency department (ED) accounts for 0.1% to 2.7% of all ED discharges. DAMA carries a risk of increased mortality and readmissions. Our aim was to investigate the general characteristics of DAMA patients and the differences between them and non-DAMA patients. Methods We reviewed data collected by the National Emergency Medical Center between 2010 and 2011. Subjects were categorized into 2 groups, namely, the DAMA group and the non-DAMA group. We compared these groups with respect to age, gender, trauma or non-trauma status, type of hospital, health insurance, level of consciousness on admission, and diagnosis. Results Of 8,000,529 patients, 222,389 (2.78%) left against medical advice. The risk factors for DAMA across all age groups were as follows: no medical insurance (odds ratio [OR], 1.993), initial response to voice (OR, 2.753) or pain (OR, 2.101), trauma admission (OR, 1.126), admission to a local emergency medical center (OR, 1.215), and increased age. A high risk of DAMA was observed among patients with immune, endocrine, psychiatric, neurological, circulatory diseases, and external causes of morbidity and mortality. Conclusion Although DAMA cases account for only a small percentage of hospital discharges, they are important because DAMA patients have high readmission and mortality rates. It is therefore important to understand the general characteristics and predictors of DAMA in order to improve patient outcome and minimize the economic burden on the healthcare system.

  10. Helicopter Emergency Medical Services: effects, costs and benefits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.N. Ringburg (Akkie)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractAdvanced prehospital medical care with air transport was introduced in the Netherlands in May 1995. The fi rst helicopter Mobile Medical Team, also called Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS) was a joint venture initiative of the VU Medical Center in Amsterdam and the Algemene Ned

  11. [Medical emergency teams are activated less than expected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frydshou, Andreas; Gillesberg, Inger

    2013-02-18

    Medical emergency teams (MET) are established at several Danish hospitals. We report experiences from 2010-2011 at a university hospital with 73,360 admissions in 2011. MET is activated less than expected as a systematic track and trigger system is not implemented yet. The most common trigger of MET is respiratory problems. MET have an important role of limitations of therapy or do not resuscitate orders in patients with critical irreversible illness. One in five patients seen by MET were admitted to the intensive care unit. Currently the Capital Region of Denmark covering 12 hospitals is implementing a full rapid response system at all hospitals.

  12. [Geriatric emergencies versus adult emergencies: retrospective analysis of medical emergencies at a general hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Artalejo, F; González Montalvo, J I; Sanz Segovia, F; Jaramillo Gómez, E; Banegas Banegas, J R; Rodríguez Mañas, L; Carbonell Collar, A

    1989-10-14

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the process of the attention to emergencies in patients older than 65 years and to compare it with the same process in adult patients. To this end, 965 clinical records of medical emergencies from the Hospital Central de la Cruz Roja in Madrid were retrospectively evaluated, and data were obtained regarding age, the cause for consultation, the investigations performed and their yield, the administration of drug therapy, the major diagnosis at the time of discharge from the service and the clinical course. It was found that all evaluated diagnostic investigations were carried out with equal or higher frequency in patients older than 65 years and that their mean clinical effectiveness was also higher. In addition, it was found that the patients older than 65 years were more commonly admitted to the hospital through the emergency service than the rest of the population. It was concluded, therefore, that the process of attention to emergencies has differential characteristics in the elderly population, and that if the number and proportion of old people increase as it will presumably happen during the two next decades, the cost of attention to emergencies and the number of emergency hospital admissions will also increase.

  13. Expanding the Role of Emergency Medical Services in Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Medical Services FEMA Federal Emergency Management Agency FBI Federal Bureau of Investigation H1N1 Influenza a Virus HIPAA Health Information...Smyth, William G. Manley, Daniel E. Summers, Nels D. Sanddal, Teri L. Sanddal, et al. “Realities of Rural Emergency Medical Services Disaster

  14. 31 CFR 595.507 - Authorization of emergency medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... services. The provision of nonscheduled emergency medical services to a specially designated terrorist... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Authorization of emergency medical services. 595.507 Section 595.507 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and...

  15. 31 CFR 548.508 - Authorization of emergency medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... services. The provision of nonscheduled emergency medical services in the United States to persons whose... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Authorization of emergency medical services. 548.508 Section 548.508 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and...

  16. 31 CFR 542.508 - Authorization of emergency medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... services. The provision of nonscheduled emergency medical services in the United States to persons whose... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Authorization of emergency medical services. 542.508 Section 542.508 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and...

  17. 31 CFR 543.508 - Authorization of emergency medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... services. The provision of nonscheduled emergency medical services in the United States to persons whose... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Authorization of emergency medical services. 543.508 Section 543.508 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and...

  18. 31 CFR 551.507 - Authorization of emergency medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... services. The provision of nonscheduled emergency medical services in the United States to persons whose... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Authorization of emergency medical services. 551.507 Section 551.507 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and...

  19. 31 CFR 541.508 - Authorization of emergency medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... services. The provision of nonscheduled emergency medical services in the United States to persons whose... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Authorization of emergency medical services. 541.508 Section 541.508 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and...

  20. 31 CFR 546.508 - Authorization of emergency medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... services. The provision of nonscheduled emergency medical services in the United States to persons whose... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Authorization of emergency medical services. 546.508 Section 546.508 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and...

  1. 31 CFR 537.508 - Authorization of emergency medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... services. The provision of nonscheduled emergency medical services in the United States to persons whose... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Authorization of emergency medical services. 537.508 Section 537.508 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and...

  2. Basic Training Program for Emergency Medical Technician Ambulance: Course Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fucigna, Joseph T.; And Others

    In an effort to upgrade or further develop the skills levels of all individuals involved in the emergency medical care service, this training program was developed for the National Highway Safety Bureau. This specific course is an attempt to organize, conduct, and standardize a basic training course for emergency medical technicians (EMTs). The…

  3. Employability Competencies for Entry Level Emergency Medical Aides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Claire

    This document describes competencies needed by persons who complete the Los Angeles Schools' emergency medical aide competency-based program, which is designed to enhance their ability to obtain certification as an Emergency Medical Technician (EMT). The overall competency statement ("goal") of the program heads each page and is defined by one or…

  4. Planning and supporting for medical response exercise to nuclear and radiological emergency%突发核与辐射事件卫生应急演练的策划与保障探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付熙明; 袁龙

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the planning and supporting process for medical response exercise to a nuclear or radiological emergency. Methods Referring to some research achievements from foreign countries, several medical responses exercises conducted earlier were compelled and analyzed for a more suitable solution. Results Strategic designing, respective supporting contents and all the notification items were primarily created for the medical response exercise to the nuclear and radiological emergency. Conclusion The contents and methods created may serve as valuable reference for the exercise in future.%目的:探讨适合我国突发核与辐射事件卫生应急演练策划和保障的内容和方法。方法整理和总结国内几次核与辐射卫生应急演练组织保障工作的经验,并结合国际研究成果,分析适合我国的核与辐射事件卫生应急演练的策划、设计和保障等具体内容和方法。结果初步提出了突发核与辐射卫生应急演练策划设计的方法步骤以及各项保障工作的内容,以及实施中注意事项。结论本文提出的突发核与辐射事件卫生应急演练的策划和保障内容和方法,可作为今后演练活动的参考。

  5. Emerging research trends in medical textiles

    CERN Document Server

    Gokarneshan, N; Rajendran, V; Lavanya, B; Ghoshal, Arundhathi

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive review of the significant researches reported during the recent years in the field of medical textiles. It also highlights the use of new types of fibres in developing medical textile products and their promising role in the respective areas of application. Considerable developments have taken place in the development of medical textiles for varied applications.

  6. 38 CFR 1.485 - Medical emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... §§ 1.460 through 1.499 of this part may be disclosed to medical personnel who have a need for... identifying information may be disclosed to medical personnel of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) who... name and address of the medical personnel to whom disclosure was made and their affiliation with...

  7. 42 CFR 2.51 - Medical emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... identifying information may be disclosed to medical personnel who have a need for information about a patient... information may be disclosed to medical personnel of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) who assert a... forth in writing: (1) The name of the medical personnel to whom disclosure was made and...

  8. Simulation in Medical School Education: Review for Emergency Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Shahram Lotfipour; T. Kent Denmark; Christopher Erik McCoy; Srinidhi Subraya Bhat; Elizabeth ter Haar; Bharath Chakravarthy

    2011-01-01

    Medical education is rapidly evolving. With the paradigm shift to small-group didactic sessions and focus on clinically oriented case-based scenarios, simulation training has provided educators a novel way to deliver medical education in the 21st century. The field continues to expand in scope and practice and is being incorporated into medical school clerkship education, and specifically in emergency medicine (EM). The use of medical simulation in graduate medical education is well documente...

  9. Radiological emergency: Malaysian preparedness and response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Mohd Abd Wahab; Ali, Hamrah Mohd

    2011-07-01

    Planning and preparation in advance for radiological emergencies can help to minimise potential public health and environmental threats if and when an actual emergency occurs. During the planning process, emergency response organisations think through how they would respond to each type of incident and the resources that will be needed. In Malaysia, planning, preparation for and response to radiological emergencies involve many parties. In the event of a radiological emergency and if it is considered a disaster, the National Security Council, the Atomic Energy Licensing Board and the Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) will work together with other federal agencies, state and local governments, first responders and international organisations to monitor the situation, contain the release, and clean up the contaminated site. Throughout the response, these agencies use their protective action guidelines. This paper discusses Malaysian preparedness for, and response to, any potential radiological emergency.

  10. 医用气体中心供应系统及应急安全质量控制%Medical gas central supply system and safety quality control in emergency response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔吉平; 赵玛丽; 种银保; 刘九零; 曹登秀; 罗鑫

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To introduce the components and operation process of the medical gas central supply system of the modern hospital based on the safe operation of the system. Methods: and combine this unit depot center expansion design and application, it was recommended that the expaned medical gas central supply system should be connected with the original system according to the expansion design and application of the system. Results: Both the systems played an important role in emergency response, which complied with the national requirements for emergency response of medical gas and guarantee the safe use of oxygen in emergency situations. Meanwhile, quality and safety control of emergency response should be emphasized in the processes of design, materials, installation as well as the daily inspection and maintenance; systematic training for technical personnel should be strengthened; safety records should be well managed, and emergency measures should be implemented step by step the responsibility to the people. Conclusion: The medical gas system engineering is cheap, safe, and reliable, and the system has achieved the purpose of safety use in emergency response.%目的:针对医院医用气体中心供应系统安全运行实际情况,介绍现代医院医用气体中心供应系统构成和运行流程。方法:结合本单位医用气体中心供应站的扩建设计及运用,推荐扩建系统设计与原中心供气系统链接。结果:两系统互为应急作用,既符合国家对医用气体一用一备一应急标准要求,又有效保证了突发事件出现时医院的安全用氧。同时在应急安全质量控制上从设计、材质、安装以及在日常检查和维护中强化过程质量安全管理;加强工程技术人员的系统培训;做好安全档案管理,逐级落实应急措施,责任到人。结论:提出本单位所运用的设计不但工程量不大,经费不高,且安全可靠,在全院医用气体系统工程的应

  11. Adaptive workflow simulation of emergency response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruinsma, Guido Wybe Jan

    2010-01-01

    Recent incidents and major training exercises in and outside the Netherlands have persistently shown that not having or not sharing information during emergency response are major sources of emergency response inefficiency and error, and affect incident mitigation outcomes through workflow planning

  12. IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-12-15

    Emergency response to oil supply disruptions has remained a core mission of the International Energy Agency since its founding in 1974. This information pamphlet explains the decisionmaking process leading to an IEA collective action, the measures available -- focusing on stockdraw -- and finally, the historical background of major oil supply disruptions and the IEA response to them. It also demonstrates the continuing need for emergency preparedness, including the growing importance of engaging key transition and emerging economies in dialogue about energy security.

  13. IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-15

    Emergency response to oil supply disruptions has remained a core mission of the International Energy Agency since its founding in 1974. This information pamphlet explains the decisionmaking process leading to an IEA collective action, the measures available -- focusing on stockdraw -- and finally, the historical background of major oil supply disruptions and the IEA response to them. It also demonstrates the continuing need for emergency preparedness, including the growing importance of engaging key transition and emerging economies in dialogue about energy security.

  14. Exploring Factors Affecting Emergency Medical Services Staffs' Decision about Transporting Medical Patients to Medical Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimian, Abbasali; Seyedin, Hesam; Jamshidi-Orak, Roohangiz; Masoumi, Gholamreza

    2014-01-01

    Transfer of patients in medical emergency situations is one of the most important missions of emergency medical service (EMS) staffs. So this study was performed to explore affecting factors in EMS staffs' decision during transporting of patients in medical situations to medical facilities. The participants in this qualitative study consisted of 18 EMS staffs working in prehospital care facilities in Tehran, Iran. Data were gathered through semistructured interviews. The data were analyzed using a content analysis approach. The data analysis revealed the following theme: "degree of perceived risk in EMS staffs and their patients." This theme consisted of two main categories: (1) patient's condition' and (2) the context of the EMS mission'. The patent's condition category emerged from "physical health statuses," "socioeconomic statuses," and "cultural background" subcategories. The context of the EMS mission also emerged from two subcategories of "characteristics of the mission" and EMS staffs characteristics'. EMS system managers can consider adequate technical, informational, financial, educational, and emotional supports to facilitate the decision making of their staffs. Also, development of an effective and user-friendly checklist and scoring system was recommended for quick and easy recognition of patients' needs for transportation in a prehospital situation.

  15. Exploring Factors Affecting Emergency Medical Services Staffs’ Decision about Transporting Medical Patients to Medical Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbasali Ebrahimian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Transfer of patients in medical emergency situations is one of the most important missions of emergency medical service (EMS staffs. So this study was performed to explore affecting factors in EMS staffs’ decision during transporting of patients in medical situations to medical facilities. The participants in this qualitative study consisted of 18 EMS staffs working in prehospital care facilities in Tehran, Iran. Data were gathered through semistructured interviews. The data were analyzed using a content analysis approach. The data analysis revealed the following theme: “degree of perceived risk in EMS staffs and their patients.” This theme consisted of two main categories: (1 patient’s condition’ and (2 the context of the EMS mission’. The patent’s condition category emerged from “physical health statuses,” “socioeconomic statuses,” and “cultural background” subcategories. The context of the EMS mission also emerged from two subcategories of “characteristics of the mission” and EMS staffs characteristics’. EMS system managers can consider adequate technical, informational, financial, educational, and emotional supports to facilitate the decision making of their staffs. Also, development of an effective and user-friendly checklist and scoring system was recommended for quick and easy recognition of patients’ needs for transportation in a prehospital situation.

  16. Evaluation of Dutch Helicopter Emergency Medical Services in transporting children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, J.H.; Beekers, C.; Eijk, R.J.R.; Edwards, M.J.; Hoogerwerf, N.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In the Netherlands, helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS) function as an adjunct to paramedic ambulance service delivering hospital-level medical care to a prehospital location. The main goal of Dutch HEMS is to provide on-scene medical expertise and not primarily to serve as trans

  17. Toward Ubiquitous Communication Platform for Emergency Medical Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Kenichi; Morishima, Naoto; Kanbara, Masayuki; Sunahara, Hideki; Imanishi, Masami

    Interaction between emergency medical technicians (EMTs) and doctors is essential in emergency medical care. Doctors require diverse information related to a patient to provide efficient aid. In 2005, we started the Ikoma119 project and have developed a ubiquitous communication platform for emergency medical care called Mobile ER. Our platform, which is based on wireless internet technology, has such desirable properties as low-cost, location-independent service, and ease of service introduction. We provide an overview of our platform and describe the services that we have developed. We also discuss the remaining issues to realize our platform's actual operation.

  18. Understanding Public Responses to Emerging Technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macnaghten, Philip; Davies, S.R.; Kearnes, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies aimed at understanding public responses to emerging technologies have given limited attention to the social and cultural processes through which public concerns emerge. When probed, these have tended to be explained either in cognitive social psychological terms, typically in the

  19. REMINDER: In a medical emergency call 74444

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    What happened? A CERN colleague, complaining of pains that might indicate serious heart problem, went to the ?infirmary' on the Prévessin site for medical aid. He was unaware that the ?infirmary' was in fact no such thing, but the office of the French contractors' medical practitioner, and, on top of that, it was closed. He therefore took his own car and went to the CERN Fire Station on the Meyrin Site (Building 65). The firemen and the CERN medical team took care of him and requested helicopter transport to the Geneva cantonal hospital, where he responded well to medical treatment. What do we learn from this event? You must call the CERN internal number 74444 in the event of serious and acute illness, and do not have to present yourself in person or get somebody to go with you. This number is not reserved exclusively for accident, pollution, fire etc. The Firemen can prodice professional assistance at all times as required: first aid on the spot, amulance transport and medical assistance as necessary. ...

  20. Mobile-Based Medical Emergency Ambulance Scheduling System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassey Isong

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Effective and efficient public service delivery like healthcare services are very important in today's society, especially in the rural areas. People in rural areas are expected to have access to public facilities at all times. However, these services are not always available when they are needed. This paper discusses the problems faced by rural areas of Mafikeng in South Africa (SA when public and basic healthcare facilities like medical ambulance transports are needed during emergency situation. The challenges ranges from poor communication, poor road network and unstructured address to non-arrival of ambulances leading loss of lives that are preventable. This paper designed and implemented a system prototype using mobile application technologies to offer cost-effective services to patients during emergencies. It is intended to reduce long queues in hospitals and long waiting periods for an ambulance via location-based services. By using this application, lives in the rural areas can be made easier and loss of lives prevented by providing timely response from the appropriate healthcare providers during emergencies.

  1. Hand Washing Practices Among Emergency Medical Services Providers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bucher, Joshua; Donovan, Colleen; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; McCoy, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Hand hygiene is an important component of infection control efforts. Our primary and secondary goals were to determine the reported rates of hand washing and stethoscope cleaning in emergency medical services (EMS...

  2. NIOSH Mobile Emergency Medical Service (EMS) Work Environment Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NIOSH Mobile Emergency Medical Service (EMS) Work Environment Laboratory is a 2005 Wheeled Coach Type III ambulance mounted on a Ford E-450 cut-away van chassis....

  3. Preparing for medical emergencies in the dental office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, A D; Goodday, R H

    1999-05-01

    If you discover an unconscious patient in your office, attend to the ABCs while you evaluate the patient's medical history and piece together the events leading up to the emergency. These actions will help you arrive at a diagnosis. Then as the emergency cart and team arrive, you will be able to provide good, safe care to stabilize the patient and get him or her to a medical facility.

  4. A Telematic Support System for Emergency Medical Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Protogerakis

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The presented system is part of the research project Medon-@ ix for the safe application of information technology in preclinical emergency health care. It aims at supporting members of the emergency medical services (EMS at the incident location from a remote Competence Centre. In this paper cases in which a telematic support system can be used will be outlined. This includes the assistance of medical and non-medical staff in emergency incidents. The functional and non-functional requirements for the on site medical devices, the documentation system and the medical decision support system in the Competence Centre will be outlined. This paper also presents a possible hardware and software system architecture approach to a telematic support system.

  5. Reforming Disaster and Emergency Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    events ranging from the contamination of the Love Canal, the Cuban refugee crisis, the accident at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant, the Loma ... Prieta Earthquake, and Hurricane Andrew. In 1993, during the Clinton Administration, FEMA initiated reforms that both streamlined disaster and relief...deploy teams and resources to maximize the speed and effectiveness of the anticipated federal response and, when necessary, performs preparedness and

  6. Variation in emergency medical services workplace safety culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, P Daniel; Huang, David T; Fairbanks, Rollin J; Simeone, Scott; Weaver, Matthew; Wang, Henry E

    2010-01-01

    Workplace attitude, beliefs, and culture may impact the safety of patient care. This study characterized perceptions of safety culture in a nationwide sample of emergency medical services (EMS) agencies. We conducted a cross-sectional survey involving 61 advanced life support EMS agencies in North America. We administered a modified version of the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ), a survey instrument measuring dimensions of workplace safety culture (Safety Climate, Teamwork Climate, Perceptions of Management, Job Satisfaction, Working Conditions, and Stress Recognition). We included full-time and part-time paramedics and emergency medical technicians. We determined the variation in safety culture scores across EMS agencies. Using hierarchical linear models, we determined associations between safety culture scores and individual and EMS agency characteristics. We received 1,715 completed surveys from 61 EMS agencies (mean agency response rate 47%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 10%, 83%). There was wide variation in safety culture scores across EMS agencies [mean (minimum, maximum)]: Safety Climate 74.5 (min 49.9, max 89.7), Teamwork Climate 71.2 (min 45.1, max 90.1), Perceptions of Management 67.2 (min 31.1, max 92.2), Job Satisfaction 75.4 (min 47.5, max 93.8), Working Conditions 66.9 (min 36.6, max 91.4), and Stress Recognition 55.1 (min 31.3, max 70.6). Air medical EMS agencies tended to score higher across all safety culture domains. Lower safety culture scores were associated with increased annual patient contacts. Safety Climate domain scores were not associated with other individual or EMS agency characteristics. In this sample, workplace safety culture varies between EMS agencies.

  7. Crisis resource management, simulation training and the medical emergency team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillon, Stuart; Radford, Sam; Chalwin, Richard; Devita, Michael; Endacott, Ruth; Jones, Daryl

    2012-09-01

    Recently there has been increased focus on improved detection and management of deteriorating patients in Australian hospitals. Since the introduction of the medical emergency team (MET) model there has been an increased role for intensive care unit staff in responding to deterioration of patients in hospital wards. Review and management of MET patients differs from the traditional model of ward patient review, as ICU staff may not know the patient. Furthermore, assessment and intervention is often time-critical and must occur simultaneously. Finally, about 10% of MET patients require intensive care-level interventions to be commenced on the ward, and this requires participation of non-ICU-trained ward staff. • To date, the interventions performed by MET staff and approaches to training responders have been relatively under investigated, particularly in the Australian and New Zealand context. In this article we briefly review the principles of the MET and contend that activation of the MET by ward staff represents a response to a medical crisis. We then outline why MET intervention differs from traditional ward-based doctor-patient encounters, and emphasise the importance of non-technical skills during the MET response. Finally, we suggest ways in which the skills required for crisis resource management within the MET can be taught to ICU staff, and the potential benefits, barriers and difficulties associated with the delivery of such training in New Zealand and Australia.

  8. Simulation and optimization models for emergency medical systems planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettinelli, Andrea; Cordone, Roberto; Ficarelli, Federico; Righini, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    The authors address strategic planning problems for emergency medical systems (EMS). In particular, the three following critical decisions are considered: i) how many ambulances to deploy in a given territory at any given point in time, to meet the forecasted demand, yielding an appropriate response time; ii) when ambulances should be used for serving nonurgent requests and when they should better be kept idle for possible incoming urgent requests; iii) how to define an optimal mix of contracts for renting ambulances from private associations to meet the forecasted demand at minimum cost. In particular, analytical models for decision support, based on queuing theory, discrete-event simulation, and integer linear programming were presented. Computational experiments have been done on real data from the city of Milan, Italy.

  9. Emergency department response to SARS, Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Kung; Wu, Hong-Dar Isaac; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Cheng, Yi-Chang

    2005-07-01

    How emergency departments of different levels and types cope with a large-scale contagious infectious disease is unclear. We retrospectively analyzed the response of 100 emergency departments regarding use of personal protective equipment (PPE) and implementation of infection control measures (ICMs) during the severe acute respiratory syndrome outbreak in Taiwan. Emergency department workers in large hospitals were more severely affected by the epidemic. Large hospitals or public hospitals were more likely to use respirators. Small hospitals implemented more restrictive ICMs. Most emergency departments provided PPE (80%) and implemented ICMs (66%) at late stages of the outbreak. Instructions to use PPE or ICMs more frequently originated by emergency department administrators. The difficulty of implementing ICMs was significantly negatively correlated with their effectiveness. Because ability to prepare for and respond to emerging infectious diseases varies among hospitals, grouping infectious patients in a centralized location in an early stage of infection may reduce the extent of epidemics.

  10. Emergency Response Communications and Associated Security Challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Channa, Muhammad Ibrahim

    2010-01-01

    The natural or man-made disaster demands an efficient communication and coordination among first responders to save life and other community resources. Normally, the traditional communication infrastructures such as land line or cellular networks are damaged and don't provide adequate communication services to first responders for exchanging emergency related information. Wireless ad hoc networks such as mobile ad hoc networks, wireless sensor networks and wireless mesh networks are the promising alternatives in such type of situations. The security requirements for emergency response communications include privacy, data integrity, authentication, key management, access control and availability. Various ad hoc communication frameworks have been proposed for emergency response situations. The majority of the proposed frameworks don't provide adequate security services for reliable and secure information exchange. This paper presents a survey of the proposed emergency response communication frameworks and the p...

  11. Designing emergency-medical-service helicopter interiors using virtual manikins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, Rafal; Grobelny, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    Researchers employed digital manikins to determine the space necessary in an emergency-medical-service helicopter to effectively and efficiently conduct life-saving medical procedures. To simulate resuscitation with appropriate digital human models, they used Anthropos ErgoMAX modeling software in the 3D Studio Max environment.

  12. Advanced medical life support procedures in vitally compromised children by a helicopter emergency medical service.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritse, B.M.; Schalkwijk, A.; Pelzer, B.J.; Scheffer, G.J.; Draaisma, J.M.T.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To determine the advanced life support procedures provided by an Emergency Medical Service (EMS) and a Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS) for vitally compromised children. Incidence and success rate of several procedures were studied, with a distinction made between procedures

  13. Advanced medical life support procedures in vitally compromised children by a helicopter emergency medical service.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritse, B.M.; Schalkwijk, A.; Pelzer, B.J.; Scheffer, G.J.; Draaisma, J.M.T.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To determine the advanced life support procedures provided by an Emergency Medical Service (EMS) and a Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS) for vitally compromised children. Incidence and success rate of several procedures were studied, with a distinction made between procedures r

  14. Relief for maritime medical emergencies through telematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anogianakis, G; Maglavera, S; Pomportsis, A

    1998-12-01

    MERMAID is a European Union (EU)-financed maritime telemedicine project with global reach and 24-h multilingual capability, so as to serve multinational crews working in the isolation of the world's oceans. It provides a model for the provision of healthcare services based on the electronic transmission of medical information via ISDN-based video conferencing. This model is not limited to medical diagnostics, but it encompasses all cases in which the actual delivery of healthcare services involves a patient who is not located where the provider is. Its implementation requires the commissioning of an extensive telecommunications infrastructure that includes both satellite transmission for ship to shore communication and an extensive ground-based network for summoning expert medical help from around the world so as to meet the project's multilinguality requirements and, therefore, the exploration of a number of solutions. In fact, all categories of telemedical applications (audio and video conferencing, multimedia communications, flat file and image transfer with low-, medium-, and high-bandwidth data requirements) are considered, while the full range of network choices (digital land lines, cellular/wireless, satellite, and broadband) are being tested in terms of cost/performance tradeoffs that are inherent to them and the developmental stage each of these options occupies in their lifecycle. Finally, out of that, MERMAID utilizes advanced land-based line transmission technologies to aid the remote patient by making available the specialist care that is best suited in the particular case.

  15. The Danish quality database for prehospital emergency medical services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frischknecht Christensen, Erika; Berlac, Peter Anthony; Nielsen, Henrik;

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of the Danish quality database for prehospital emergency medical services (QEMS) is to assess, monitor, and improve the quality of prehospital emergency medical service care in the entire prehospital patient pathway. The aim of this review is to describe the design......: Descriptive data included age, region, and Danish Index for Emergency Care including urgency level. CONCLUSION: QEMS is a new database under establishment and is expected to provide the basis for quality improvement in the prehospital setting and in the entire patient care pathway, for example, by providing...

  16. 76 FR 4151 - National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council Teleconference Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-24

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council... Transportation (DOT). Title: National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council Teleconference Meeting. ACTION: National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC); notice of Teleconference Meeting....

  17. 76 FR 15043 - National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC); Notice of Federal Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-18

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC... (NHTSA), Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Meeting Notice--National Emergency Medical Services... public. The purpose of NEMSAC is to provide a nationally recognized council of emergency medical...

  18. 76 FR 15044 - Federal Interagency Committee on Emergency Medical Service (FICEMS) Teleconference Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-18

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Federal Interagency Committee on Emergency Medical Service.... ACTION: Meeting Notice--Federal Interagency Committee on Emergency Medical Services. SUMMARY: NHTSA announces a teleconference meeting of the Federal Interagency Committee on Emergency Medical...

  19. 77 FR 46802 - National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC); Notice of Federal Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-06

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC... medical services representatives and consumers to provide advice and recommendations regarding Emergency... of Emergency Medical Services, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., NTI-140, Washington, DC 20590,...

  20. 77 FR 27278 - National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC); Notice of Federal Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-09

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC... services representatives and consumers to provide advice and recommendations regarding Emergency Medical... Transportation, Office of Emergency Medical Services, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., NTI-140, Washington, DC...

  1. 75 FR 71791 - National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council Meeting Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-24

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council Meeting...). ACTION: National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC); Notice of Federal Advisory... public. The purpose of NEMSAC is to provide a nationally recognized council of emergency medical...

  2. 78 FR 67463 - National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC) and Federal Interagency Committee...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-12

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC) and Federal Interagency Committee on Emergency Medical Services (FICEMS); Notice of Federal Advisory... Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Meeting Notice--National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council and...

  3. 78 FR 801 - National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC); Notice of Federal Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-04

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC... to the public. The purpose of NEMSAC, a nationally recognized council of emergency medical services representatives and consumers, is to provide advice and recommendations regarding Emergency Medical Services...

  4. 77 FR 9297 - National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC); Notice of Federal Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-16

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC... council of emergency medical services (EMS) representatives and consumers to provide advice and..., Director, U.S. Department of Transportation, Office of Emergency Medical Services, 1200 New Jersey...

  5. 76 FR 64174 - National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC); Notice of Federal Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ... TRANSPORTATION National Highway Traffic Safety Administration National Emergency Medical Services Advisory... emergency medical services representatives and consumers to provide advice and recommendations regarding Emergency Medical Services (EMS) to DOT's NHTSA. DATES: The meeting will be held on December 13, 2011,...

  6. 77 FR 12908 - Appointment/Reappointment to the National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-02

    ... the National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC). SUMMARY: NHTSA is soliciting... nationally recognized council of emergency medical services (EMS) representatives and consumers to provide..., Office of Emergency Medical Services, Attn: NEMSAC, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., NTI-140, Washington,...

  7. Changing the Paradigm: Implementation of Combined Law Enforcement, Fire, and Emergency Medical Service (EMS) Cross-Disciplinary Response to Hostile Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    workers, the nature of the work, their hierarchical status, the intrinsic and extrinsic rewards they receive, and the organizational culture to which...These include reward systems, communication systems, physical space, organizational environment and organizational structure.153 Figure 1. Team...include member personality, culture, language or jargon, as well as organizational responsibilities, reward systems and physical barriers.162 These

  8. Emergency Response Virtual Environment for Safe Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasfy, Ayman; Walker, Teresa

    2008-01-01

    An intelligent emergency response virtual environment (ERVE) that provides emergency first responders, response planners, and managers with situational awareness as well as training and support for safe schools is presented. ERVE incorporates an intelligent agent facility for guiding and assisting the user in the context of the emergency response operations. Response information folders capture key information about the school. The system enables interactive 3D visualization of schools and academic campuses, including the terrain and the buildings' exteriors and interiors in an easy to use Web..based interface. ERVE incorporates live camera and sensors feeds and can be integrated with other simulations such as chemical plume simulation. The system is integrated with a Geographical Information System (GIS) to enable situational awareness of emergency events and assessment of their effect on schools in a geographic area. ERVE can also be integrated with emergency text messaging notification systems. Using ERVE, it is now possible to address safe schools' emergency management needs with a scaleable, seamlessly integrated and fully interactive intelligent and visually compelling solution.

  9. System of acute medical support to emergency during dental treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, M; Takeshita, T; Akita, S

    1986-01-01

    The Resuscitation Committee of Hiroshima City Dental Association was established in 1983 in order to provide acute medical support in case of emergency during dental treatment at private dental clinics. This Committee is composed of representatives from the Hiroshima City Dental Association, Hiroshima University School of Dentistry, Hiroshima University School of Medicine, Hiroshima City Health Bureau, and Hiroshima City Fire and Ambulance Department. A portable ECG monitor with defibrillator and a resuscitation kit are held in readiness at the Hiroshima University Hospital. In case of emergency during dental treatment at a private dental clinic, we hurry to the clinic with the resuscitation set and give emergency treatment. We have been involved in two cases of emergency since this system started. Both of them recovered without any sequelae. Besides these activities, we give lectures annually to dentists and dental hygienists on the treatment of medical emergencies.

  10. 3 CFR 8383 - Proclamation 8383 of May 20, 2009. Emergency Medical Services Week, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... responders, emergency medical technicians, paramedics, nurses, physicians, and many others. These highly... skills. All share a common aspiration to help those in need, and during Emergency Medical Services...

  11. Simulation in Medical School Education: Review for Emergency Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahram Lotfipour

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Medical education is rapidly evolving. With the paradigm shift to small-group didactic sessions and focus on clinically oriented case-based scenarios, simulation training has provided educators a novel way to deliver medical education in the 21st century. The field continues to expand in scope and practice and is being incorporated into medical school clerkship education, and specifically in emergency medicine (EM. The use of medical simulation in graduate medical education is well documented. Our aim in this article is to perform a retrospective review of the current literature, studying simulation use in EM medical student clerkships. Studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of simulation in teaching basic science, clinical knowledge, procedural skills, teamwork, and communication skills. As simulation becomes increasingly prevalent in medical school curricula, more studies are needed to assess whether simulation training improves patient-related outcomes.

  12. Simulation in medical school education: review for emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthy, Bharath; Ter Haar, Elizabeth; Bhat, Srinidhi Subraya; McCoy, Christopher Eric; Denmark, T Kent; Lotfipour, Shahram

    2011-11-01

    Medical education is rapidly evolving. With the paradigm shift to small-group didactic sessions and focus on clinically oriented case-based scenarios, simulation training has provided educators a novel way to deliver medical education in the 21st century. The field continues to expand in scope and practice and is being incorporated into medical school clerkship education, and specifically in emergency medicine (EM). The use of medical simulation in graduate medical education is well documented. Our aim in this article is to perform a retrospective review of the current literature, studying simulation use in EM medical student clerkships. Studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of simulation in teaching basic science, clinical knowledge, procedural skills, teamwork, and communication skills. As simulation becomes increasingly prevalent in medical school curricula, more studies are needed to assess whether simulation training improves patient-related outcomes.

  13. Medical emergencies on board commercial airlines: is documentation as expected?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sand, Michael; Morrosch, Stephan; Sand, Daniel; Altmeyer, Peter; Bechara, Falk G

    2012-12-12

    The purpose of this study was to perform a descriptive, content-based analysis on the different forms of documentation for in-flight medical emergencies that are currently provided in the emergency medical kits on board commercial airlines. Passenger airlines in the World Airline Directory were contacted between March and May 2011. For each participating airline, sample in-flight medical emergency documentation forms were obtained. All items in the sample documentation forms were subjected to a descriptive analysis and compared to a sample "medical incident report" form published by the International Air Transport Association (IATA). A total of 1,318 airlines were contacted. Ten airlines agreed to participate in the study and provided a copy of their documentation forms. A descriptive analysis revealed a total of 199 different items, which were summarized into five sub-categories: non-medical data (63), signs and symptoms (68), diagnosis (26), treatment (22) and outcome (20). The data in this study illustrate a large variation in the documentation of in-flight medical emergencies by different airlines. A higher degree of standardization is preferable to increase the data quality in epidemiologic aeromedical research in the future.

  14. Risks to emergency medical responders at terrorist incidents: a narrative review of the medical literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Julian; Rehn, Marius; Lossius, Hans Morten; Lockey, David

    2014-09-24

    As the threat of international terrorism rises, there is an increasing requirement to provide evidence-based information and training for the emergency personnel who will respond to terrorist incidents. Current major incident training advises that emergency responders prioritize their own personal safety above that of the 'scene and survivors'. However, there is limited information available on the nature of these threats and how they may be accurately evaluated. This study reviews the published medical literature to identify the hazards experienced by emergency responders who have attended previous terrorist incidents. A PubMed literature search identified 10,894 articles on the subject of 'terrorism', and there was a dramatic increase in publications after the 9/11 attacks in 2001. There is heterogeneity in the focus and quality of this literature, and 307 articles addressing the subject of scene safety were assessed for information regarding the threats encountered at terrorist incidents. These articles demonstrate that emergency responders have been exposed to both direct terrorist threats and environmental scene hazards, including airborne particles, structural collapse, fire, and psychological stress. The emphasis of training and preparedness for terrorist incidents has been primarily on the direct threats, but the published literature suggests that the dominant causes of mortality and morbidity in responders after such incidents are the indirect environmental hazards. If the medical response to terrorist incidents is to be based on evidence rather than anecdote, analysis of the current literature should be incorporated into major incident training, and consistent collection of key data from future incidents is required.

  15. Healthcare utilization in older patients using personal emergency response systems: an analysis of electronic health records and medical alert data : Brief Description: A Longitudinal Retrospective Analyses of healthcare utilization rates in older patients using Personal Emergency Response Systems from 2011 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agboola, Stephen; Golas, Sara; Fischer, Nils; Nikolova-Simons, Mariana; Op den Buijs, Jorn; Schertzer, Linda; Kvedar, Joseph; Jethwani, Kamal

    2017-04-18

    Personal Emergency Response Systems (PERS) are traditionally used as fall alert systems for older adults, a population that contributes an overwhelming proportion of healthcare costs in the United States. Previous studies focused mainly on qualitative evaluations of PERS without a longitudinal quantitative evaluation of healthcare utilization in users. To address this gap and better understand the needs of older patients on PERS, we analyzed longitudinal healthcare utilization trends in patients using PERS through the home care management service of a large healthcare organization. Retrospective, longitudinal analyses of healthcare and PERS utilization records of older patients over a 5-years period from 2011-2015. The primary outcome was to characterize the healthcare utilization of PERS patients. This outcome was assessed by 30-, 90-, and 180-day readmission rates, frequency of principal admitting diagnoses, and prevalence of conditions leading to potentially avoidable admissions based on Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services classification criteria. The overall 30-day readmission rate was 14.2%, 90-days readmission rate was 34.4%, and 180-days readmission rate was 42.2%. While 30-day readmission rates did not increase significantly (p = 0.16) over the study period, 90-days (p = 0.03) and 180-days (p = 0.04) readmission rates did increase significantly. The top 5 most frequent principal diagnoses for inpatient admissions included congestive heart failure (5.7%), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (4.6%), dysrhythmias (4.3%), septicemia (4.1%), and pneumonia (4.1%). Additionally, 21% of all admissions were due to conditions leading to potentially avoidable admissions in either institutional or non-institutional settings (16% in institutional settings only). Chronic medical conditions account for the majority of healthcare utilization in older patients using PERS. Results suggest that PERS data combined with electronic medical records data can

  16. National Training Course. Emergency Medical Technician. Paramedic. Instructor's Lesson Plans. Module XI. Obstetric/Gynecologic Emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This instructor's lesson plan guide on obstetric/gynecologic emergencies is one of fifteen modules designed for use in the training of emergency medical technicians (paramedics). Six units of study are presented: (1) anatomy and physiology of the female reproductive system; (2) patient assessment; (3) pathophysiology and management of gynecologic…

  17. Epidemiology of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Utilization in Four Indian Emergency Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijesekera, Olindi; Reed, Amanda; Chastain, Parker S; Biggs, Shauna; Clark, Elizabeth G; Kole, Tamorish; Chakrapani, Anoop T; Ashish, Nandy; Rajhans, Prasad; Breaud, Alan H; Jacquet, Gabrielle A

    2016-12-01

    Introduction Without a universal Emergency Medical Services (EMS) system in India, data on the epidemiology of patients who utilize EMS are limited. This retrospective chart review aimed to quantify and describe the burden of disease and patient demographics of patients who arrived by EMS to four Indian emergency departments (EDs) in order to inform a national EMS curriculum.

  18. Incidence of emergency contacts (red responses to Norwegian emergency primary healthcare services in 2007 – a prospective observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansen Elisabeth

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The municipalities are responsible for the emergency primary health care services in Norway. These services include casualty clinics, primary doctors on-call and local emergency medical communication centres (LEMC. The National centre for emergency primary health care has initiated an enterprise called "The Watchtowers", comprising emergency primary health care districts, to provide routine information (patients' way of contact, level of urgency and first action taken by the out-of-hours services over several years based on a minimal dataset. This will enable monitoring, evaluation and comparison of the respective activities in the emergency primary health care services. The aim of this study was to assess incidence of emergency contacts (potential life-threatening situations, red responses to the emergency primary health care service. Methods A representative sample of Norwegian emergency primary health care districts, "The Watchtowers" recorded all contacts and first action taken during the year of 2007. All the variables were continuously registered in a data program by the attending nurses and sent by email to the National Centre for Emergency Primary Health Care at a monthly basis. Results During 2007 the Watchtowers registered 85 288 contacts, of which 1 946 (2.3% were defined as emergency contacts (red responses, corresponding to a rate of 9 per 1 000 inhabitants per year. 65% of the instances were initiated by patient, next of kin or health personnel by calling local emergency medical communication centres or meeting directly at the casualty clinics. In 48% of the red responses, the first action taken was a call-out of doctor and ambulance. On a national basis we can estimate approximately 42 500 red responses per year in the EPH in Norway. Conclusion The emergency primary health care services constitute an important part of the emergency system in Norway. Patients call the LEMC or meet directly at casualty clinics

  19. Exploratory analysis of real personal emergency response call conversations: considerations for personal emergency response spoken dialogue systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Victoria; Rochon, Elizabeth; Mihailidis, Alex

    2016-11-14

    The purpose of this study was to derive data from real, recorded, personal emergency response call conversations to help improve the artificial intelligence and decision making capability of a spoken dialogue system in a smart personal emergency response system. The main study objectives were to: develop a model of personal emergency response; determine categories for the model's features; identify and calculate measures from call conversations (verbal ability, conversational structure, timing); and examine conversational patterns and relationships between measures and model features applicable for improving the system's ability to automatically identify call model categories and predict a target response. This study was exploratory and used mixed methods. Personal emergency response calls were pre-classified according to call model categories identified qualitatively from response call transcripts. The relationships between six verbal ability measures, three conversational structure measures, two timing measures and three independent factors: caller type, risk level, and speaker type, were examined statistically. Emergency medical response services were the preferred response for the majority of medium and high risk calls for both caller types. Older adult callers mainly requested non-emergency medical service responders during medium risk situations. By measuring the number of spoken words-per-minute and turn-length-in-words for the first spoken utterance of a call, older adult and care provider callers could be identified with moderate accuracy. Average call taker response time was calculated using the number-of-speaker-turns and time-in-seconds measures. Care providers and older adults used different conversational strategies when responding to call takers. The words 'ambulance' and 'paramedic' may hold different latent connotations for different callers. The data derived from the real personal emergency response recordings may help a spoken dialogue system

  20. Hand Washing Practices Among Emergency Medical Services Providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Bucher

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hand hygiene is an important component of infection control efforts. Our primary and secondary goals were to determine the reported rates of hand washing and stethoscope cleaning in emergency medical services (EMS workers, respectively. Methods: We designed a survey about hand hygiene practices. The survey was distributed to various national EMS organizations through e-mail. Descriptive statistics were calculated for survey items (responses on a Likert scale and subpopulations of survey respondents to identify relationships between variables. We used analysis of variance to test differences in means between the subgroups. Results: There were 1,494 responses. Overall, reported hand hygiene practices were poor among pre-hospital providers in all clinical situations. Women reported that they washed their hands more frequently than men overall, although the differences were unlikely to be clinically significant. Hygiene after invasive procedures was reported to be poor. The presence of available hand sanitizer in the ambulance did not improve reported hygiene rates but improved reported rates of cleaning the stethoscope (absolute difference 0.4, p=0.0003. Providers who brought their own sanitizer were more likely to clean their hands. Conclusion: Reported hand hygiene is poor amongst pre-hospital providers. There is a need for future intervention to improve reported performance in pre-hospital provider hand washing.

  1. Medical Identity Theft in the Emergency Department: Awareness is Crucial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelino Mancini

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Medical Identity theft in the emergency department (ED can harm numerous individuals, and many frontline healthcare providers are unaware of this growing concern. The two cases described began as typical ED encounters until red flags were discovered upon validating the patient’s identity. Educating all healthcare personnel within and outside the ED regarding the subtle signs of medical identity theft and implementing institutional policies to identify these criminals will discourage further fraudulent behavior. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(7:–0.

  2. Radiation dose from medical imaging: a primer for emergency physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jesse G A; Mills, Christopher N; Mogensen, Monique A; Lee, Christoph I

    2012-05-01

    Medical imaging now accounts for most of the US population's exposure to ionizing radiation. A substantial proportion of this medical imaging is ordered in the emergency setting. We aim to provide a general overview of radiation dose from medical imaging with a focus on computed tomography, as well as a literature review of recent efforts to decrease unnecessary radiation exposure to patients in the emergency department setting. We conducted a literature review through calendar year 2010 for all published articles pertaining to the emergency department and radiation exposure. The benefits of imaging usually outweigh the risks of eventual radiation-induced cancer in most clinical scenarios encountered by emergency physicians. However, our literature review identified 3 specific clinical situations in the general adult population in which the lifetime risks of cancer may outweigh the benefits to the patient: rule out pulmonary embolism, flank pain, and recurrent abdominal pain in inflammatory bowel disease. For these specific clinical scenarios, a physician-patient discussion about such risks and benefits may be warranted. Emergency physicians, now at the front line of patients' exposure to ionizing radiation, should have a general understanding of the magnitude of radiation dose from advanced medical imaging procedures and their associated risks. Future areas of research should include the development of protocols and guidelines that limit unnecessary patient radiation exposure.

  3. Media Spaces, Emergency Response and Palpable Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyng, Morten; Kristensen, Margit

    2009-01-01

    for technological support of emergency responders and outline important design issues and principles regarding the design. We finally reflect upon our findings in relation to Media Spaces, and describe a number of possibilities and related challenges, by the use of examples. We suggest that moving from symmetry......In this chapter we present and discuss a case on the development and use of technologies for emergency response, which shares important aspects with Media Spaces. We first describe the characteristics of emergency response, based on field and literature studies. We then present visions...... to asymmetry and from static to non-static spaces and more generally from closed to open-ended use situations and technological setups can bring Media Space research to bear on a large spectrum of future technology, which is outside traditional Media Spaces....

  4. Medical identity theft in the emergency department: awareness is crucial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Michelino

    2014-11-01

    Medical identity theft in the emergency department (ED) can harm numerous individuals, and many frontline healthcare providers are unaware of this growing concern. The two cases described began as typical ED encounters until red flags were discovered upon validating the patient's identity. Educating all healthcare personnel within and outside the ED regarding the subtle signs of medical identity theft and implementing institutional policies to identify these criminals will discourage further fraudulent behavior.

  5. Emergency Response: Elearning for Paramedics and Firefighters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taber, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This article is based on an innovative research project with academics, software developers, and organizational pilot sites to design and develop elearning software for an emergency response simulation with supporting collaborative tools. In particular, this article focuses on the research that the author has conducted to provide the theoretical…

  6. Retrospective on the construction and practice of a state-level emergency medical rescue team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Zhang; Haitao, Guo; Xin, Wang; Yundou, Wang

    2014-10-01

    For the past few years, disasters like earthquakes, landslides, mudslides, tsunamis, and traffic accidents have occurred with an ever-growing frequency, coverage, and intensity greatly beyond the expectation of the public. In order to respond effectively to disasters and to reduce casualties and property damage, countries around the world have invested more efforts in the theoretical study of emergency medicine and the construction of emergency medical rescue forces. Consequently, emergency medical rescue teams of all scales and types have come into being and have played significant roles in disaster response work. As the only state-level emergency medical rescue force from the Chinese People's Armed Police Forces, the force described here has developed, through continuous learning and practice, a characteristic mode in terms of grouping methods, equipment system construction, and training.

  7. Opperational Systems for Emergency Preparedness and Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, G; Nasstrom, J S; Baskett, R

    2003-11-10

    Operational systems predict the consequences of atmospheric releases of hazardous materials for real-time emergency response, pre-event planning, and post-incident assessment. Such systems provide federal, state, and local agencies, emergency planners and responders, public health officials, military personnel, and other users with critical information on which to base life-and-death decisions on safe zones for siting of incident command posts, sheltering-in-place or evacuation advisories, the need for protective equipment, and the utilization of hospital and health care resources. A range of operational modeling capabilities is required to support different types of release events, distance scales, and response times. Fast-response deployable models are used to perform hazard assessments and initial response functions, and can serve as a backup when connections to a reach-back center are not available. Higher-fidelity three-dimensional dispersion models, coupled to real-time observational data and numerical weather prediction model output, are used for real-time response and support expert quality-assured predictions and refined assessments. Computational fluid dynamics models, which explicitly resolve urban structures, are used for high fidelity applications including vulnerability analyses and planning studies. This paper will briefly discuss the types and capabilities of models used or under development for emergency response systems, customer products, supporting data, and a few representative examples of operational systems. Some selected research priorities are summarized in the final sections.

  8. Medication errors of nurses in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehsani, Seyyedeh Roghayeh; Cheraghi, Mohammad Ali; Nejati, Amir; Salari, Amir; Esmaeilpoor, Ayeshe Haji; Nejad, Esmaeil Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Patient safety is one of the main concepts in the field of healthcare provision and a major component of health services quality. One of the important stages in promotion of the safety level of patients is identification of medication errors and their causes. Medical errors such as medication errors are the most prevalent errors that threaten health and are a global problem. Execution of medication orders is an important part of the treatment and care process and is regarded as the main part of the nurses' performance. The purpose of this study was to explore the medication error reporting rate, error types and their causes among nurses in the emergency department. In this descriptive study, 94 nurses of the emergency department of Imam Khomeini Hospital Complex were selected based on census in 2010-2011. Data collection tool was a researcher-made questionnaire consisting of two parts: demographic information, and types and causes of medication errors. After confirming content-face validity, reliability of the questionnaire was determined to be 0.91 using Cronbach's alpha test. Data analyses were performed by descriptive statistics and inferential statistics. SPSS-16 software was used in this study and P values less than 0.05 were considered significant. The mean age of the nurses was 27.7 ± 3.4 years, and their working experience was 7.3 ± 3.4 years. Of participants 46.8% had committed medication errors in the past year, and the majority (69.04%) had committed the errors only once. Thirty two nurses (72.7%) had not reported medication errors to head nurses or the nursing office. The most prevalent types of medication errors were related to infusion rates (33.3%) and administering two doses of medicine instead of one (23.8%). The most important causes of medication errors were shortage of nurses (47.6%) and lack of sufficient pharmacological information (30.9%). This study showed that the risk of medication errors among nurses is high and medication errors are a

  9. Emergency Department Patients' Perceptions of Radiation From Medical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repplinger, Michael D; Li, Annabel J; Svenson, James E; Ehlenbach, William J; Westergaard, Ryan P; Reeder, Scott B; Jacobs, Elizabeth A

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate emergency department patients' knowledge of radiation exposure and subsequent risks from computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. This is a cross-sectional survey study of adult, English-speaking patients from June to August 2011 at 2 emergency departments--1 academic and 1 community-based--in the upper Midwest. The survey consisted of 2 sets of 3 questions evaluating patients' knowledge of radiation exposure from medical imaging and subsequent radiation-induced malignancies and was based on a previously published survey. The question sets paralleled each other, but one pertained to CT and the other to MRI. Questions in the survey ascertained patients' understanding of (1) the relative amount of radiation exposed from CT/MRI compared with a single chest x-ray; (2) the relative amount of radiation exposed from CT/MRI compared with a nuclear power plant accident; and (3) the possibility of radiation-induced malignancies from CT/MRl. Sociodemographic data also were gathered. The primary outcome measure was the proportion of correct answers to each survey question. Multiple logistic regression then was used to examine the relationship between the percentage correct for each question and sociodemographic variables, using odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals. P-values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. There were 500 participants in this study, 315 from the academic center and 185 from the community hospital. Overall, 14.1% (95% CI, 11.0%-17.2%) of participants understood the relative radiation exposure of a CT scan compared with a chest x-ray, while 22.8% (95% CI, 18.9%-26.7%) of respondents understood the lack of ionizing radiation use with MRI. At the same time, 25.6% (95% CI, 21.8%- 29.4%) believed that there was an increased risk of developing cancer from repeated abdominal CTs, while 55.6% (95% CI, 51.1%-60.1%) believed this to be true of abdominal MRI. Higher educational level and identification

  10. A Pilot Project Demonstrating that Combat Medics Can Safely Administer Parenteral Medications in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, Steven G; Cunningham, Cord W; Fisher, Andrew D; DeLorenzo, Robert A

    2017-08-15

    Introduction Select units in the military have improved combat medic training by integrating their functions into routine clinical care activities with measurable improvements in battlefield care. This level of integration is currently limited to special operations units. It is unknown if regular Army units and combat medics can emulate these successes. The goal of this project was to determine whether US Army combat medics can be integrated into routine emergency department (ED) clinical care, specifically medication administration. Project Design This was a quality assurance project that monitored training of combat medics to administer parenteral medications and to ensure patient safety. Combat medics were provided training that included direct supervision during medication administration. Once proficiency was demonstrated, combat medics would prepare the medications under direct supervision, followed by indirect supervision during administration. As part of the quality assurance and safety processes, combat medics were required to document all medication administrations, supervising provider, and unexpected adverse events. Additional quality assurance follow-up occurred via complete chart review by the project lead. Data During the project period, the combat medics administered the following medications: ketamine (n=13), morphine (n=8), ketorolac (n=7), fentanyl (n=5), ondansetron (n=4), and other (n=6). No adverse events or patient safety events were reported by the combat medics or discovered during the quality assurance process. In this limited case series, combat medics safely administered parenteral medications under indirect provider supervision. Future research is needed to further develop this training model for both the military and civilian setting. Schauer SG , Cunningham C W, Fisher AD , DeLorenzo RA . A pilot project demonstrating that combat medics can safely administer parenteral medications in the emergency department.

  11. Emerging programmed aging mechanisms and their medical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Theodore C

    2016-01-01

    For many generations programmed aging in humans was considered theoretically impossible and medical attempts to treat or delay age-related diseases were based on non-programmed aging theories. However, there is now an extensive theoretical basis for programmed mammal aging and substantially funded medical research efforts based on programmed aging theories are underway. This article describes the very different disease mechanism concepts that logically result from the theories and the impacts emerging programmed aging mechanisms will have on funding and performing medical research on age-related conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. 重大化学灾害事件医学应急救援预案的准备%Preparation of contingency plan of emergency medical response team for catastrophic chemical disasters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵建; 丁日高

    2016-01-01

    在各类灾害事件处置和救援过程中,应急救援预案是一切行动的核心,是各种具体行动有序、高效展开,以及减少事故影响和损失最为有效的保证。本文拟以“天津港8·12特大爆炸事故”为背景,分析重大化学灾害事件医学应急救援预案准备过程中应关注的重要因素,并对预案内容提出具体建议。%In the management of disasters of any kinds,including the catastrophic chemical disasters,the contingency plan is,definitely,a saga for the efficient practice of the detailed and technically sophisticated rescue work,which is a guarantee for mini⁃mizing the negative impacts and loses of various kinds induced by the disaster. Backgrounded on the“Tianjin Port 8 · 12 Catastrophic Explosion Accident”,which was heavily involved with large amounts of chemicals of many kinds,key planning factors to be consid⁃ered in making the contingency plan for the emergency medical response team are discussed,and suggestions for some of the details within a certain kind of a plan are also provided.

  13. Personal networks enabling remote assistance for medical emergency team

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, F.T.H. den; Schmidt, J.R.; Vries, A. de

    2005-01-01

    Personal Networks provide the technology that is needed to interconnect the various private networks of a single user (home network, office network, Personal Area Network, and others) seamlessly, at any time and in any place. This can be useful in healthcare. In case of medical emergencies, it can

  14. Personal networks enabling remote assistance for medical emergency team

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, F.T.H. den; Schmidt, J.R.; Vries, A. de

    2005-01-01

    Personal Networks provide the technology that is needed to interconnect the various private networks of a single user (home network, office network, Personal Area Network, and others) seamlessly, at any time and in any place. This can be useful in healthcare. In case of medical emergencies, it can p

  15. Knowledge and use of emergency contraception by medical doctors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knowledge and use of emergency contraception by medical doctors on internship in ... while about a quarter (26.9%) routinely counsel women about ECP use. ... We recommend that in.service training should focus more on EC to improve the ...

  16. Three Types of Memory in Emergency Medical Services Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeli, Elizabeth L.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines memory and distributed cognition involved in the writing practices of emergency medical services (EMS) professionals. Results from a 16-month study indicate that EMS professionals rely on distributed cognition and three kinds of memory: individual, collaborative, and professional. Distributed cognition and the three types of…

  17. On the Alert: Preparing for Medical Emergencies in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Medical emergencies can happen in any school at any time. They can be the result of preexisting health problems, accidents, violence, unintentional actions, natural disasters, and toxins. Premature deaths in schools from sudden cardiac arrest, blunt trauma to the chest, firearm injuries, asthma, head injuries, drug overdose, allergic reactions,…

  18. [The nurse within emergency medical-psychological units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbon, Rémy; Dalphin, Catherine; Prieto, Nathalie; Cheucle, Éric

    2017-04-01

    The growing recognition of post-traumatic stress disorders and the need to intervene early justifies the creation of emergency medical-psychological units. The nurse has a major role to play within these teams. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Constructing Common Information Space across Distributed Emergency Medical Teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhan; Sarcevic, Aleksandra; Bossen, Claus

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines coordination and real-time information sharing across four emergency medical teams in a high-risk and distributed setting as they provide care to critically injured patients within the first hour after injury. Through multiple field studies we explored how common understanding...

  20. Three Types of Memory in Emergency Medical Services Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeli, Elizabeth L.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines memory and distributed cognition involved in the writing practices of emergency medical services (EMS) professionals. Results from a 16-month study indicate that EMS professionals rely on distributed cognition and three kinds of memory: individual, collaborative, and professional. Distributed cognition and the three types of…

  1. Emergency Medical Technician. Competency Based Education Curriculum. Student Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spotts, Sue Ann

    Beginning with an introductory handbook, this competency-based curriculum contains 13 modules for an 81-hour secondary- or postsecondary-level course for Emergency Medical Technician (EMT). Introductory materials include module component descriptions and information for administering an EMT training program, such as an instructor's schedule, list…

  2. National Apprenticeship and Training Standards for Emergency Medical Technicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Employment and Training Administration (DOL), Washington, DC.

    Developed jointly by several professional organizations and government agencies, these national standards depict the essential skills, knowledge, and ability required of certified emergency medical technicians (EMT) to provide optimal prehospital care and transportation to the sick and injured. Topics covered include definitions of terms EMT's…

  3. Training Program for Emergency Medical Technician: Dispatcher. 1--Course Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    The material presented in this course guide is designed to aid administrators in setting up and administering the emergency medical technician (EMT) dispatcher course. Descriptions of the overall objectives and scope of the course are presented, including behavioral objectives for eleven units of instruction covering the following emergency…

  4. Emergency medical services in India: the present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mohit; Brandler, Ethan S

    2014-06-01

    India is the second most populous country in the world. Currently, India does not have a centralized body which provides guidelines for training and operation of Emergency Medical Services (EMS). Emergency Medical Services are fragmented and not accessible throughout the country. Most people do not know the number to call in case of an emergency; services such as Dial 108/102/1298 Ambulances, Centralized Accident and Trauma Service (CATS), and private ambulance models exist with wide variability in their dispatch and transport capabilities. Variability also exists in EMS education standards with the recent establishment of courses like Emergency Medical Technician-Basic/Advanced, Paramedic, Prehospital Trauma Technician, Diploma Trauma Technician, and Postgraduate Diploma in EMS. This report highlights recommendations that have been put forth to help optimize the Indian prehospital emergency care system, including regionalization of EMS, better training opportunities, budgetary provisions, and improving awareness among the general community. The importance of public and private partnerships in implementing an organized prehospital care system in India discussed in the report may be a reasonable solution for improved EMS in other developing countries.

  5. AN OVERVIEW OF ELASTOGRAPHY - AN EMERGING BRANCH OF MEDICAL IMAGING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarvazyan, Armen; Hall, Timothy J; Urban, Matthew W; Fatemi, Mostafa; Aglyamov, Salavat R; Garra, Brian S

    2011-11-01

    From times immemorial manual palpation served as a source of information on the state of soft tissues and allowed detection of various diseases accompanied by changes in tissue elasticity. During the last two decades, the ancient art of palpation gained new life due to numerous emerging elasticity imaging (EI) methods. Areas of applications of EI in medical diagnostics and treatment monitoring are steadily expanding. Elasticity imaging methods are emerging as commercial applications, a true testament to the progress and importance of the field.In this paper we present a brief history and theoretical basis of EI, describe various techniques of EI and, analyze their advantages and limitations, and overview main clinical applications. We present a classification of elasticity measurement and imaging techniques based on the methods used for generating a stress in the tissue (external mechanical force, internal ultrasound radiation force, or an internal endogenous force), and measurement of the tissue response. The measurement method can be performed using differing physical principles including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound imaging, X-ray imaging, optical and acoustic signals.Until recently, EI was largely a research method used by a few select institutions having the special equipment needed to perform the studies. Since 2005 however, increasing numbers of mainstream manufacturers have added EI to their ultrasound systems so that today the majority of manufacturers offer some sort of Elastography or tissue stiffness imaging on their clinical systems. Now it is safe to say that some sort of elasticity imaging may be performed on virtually all types of focal and diffuse disease. Most of the new applications are still in the early stages of research, but a few are becoming common applications in clinical practice.

  6. 78 FR 24802 - National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC); Notice of Federal Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-26

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC... nationally recognized council of emergency medical services representatives and consumers, is to advise and... (NHTSA), U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Meeting Notice--National Emergency...

  7. 76 FR 22166 - Renewal of Charter for the National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-20

    ... of the National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council to provide advice and recommendations regarding emergency medical services (EMS) matters to the U.S. Department of Transportation, National... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Renewal of Charter for the National Emergency...

  8. 76 FR 39977 - National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council Teleconference Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-07

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council... nationally recognized council of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) representatives and consumers to provide... proper arrangements. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Drew Dawson, Director, Office of Emergency...

  9. A Secure Cloud-Assisted Wireless Body Area Network in Mobile Emergency Medical Care System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun-Ta; Lee, Cheng-Chi; Weng, Chi-Yao

    2016-05-01

    Recent advances in medical treatment and emergency applications, the need of integrating wireless body area network (WBAN) with cloud computing can be motivated by providing useful and real time information about patients' health state to the doctors and emergency staffs. WBAN is a set of body sensors carried by the patient to collect and transmit numerous health items to medical clouds via wireless and public communication channels. Therefore, a cloud-assisted WBAN facilitates response in case of emergency which can save patients' lives. Since the patient's data is sensitive and private, it is important to provide strong security and protection on the patient's medical data over public and insecure communication channels. In this paper, we address the challenge of participant authentication in mobile emergency medical care systems for patients supervision and propose a secure cloud-assisted architecture for accessing and monitoring health items collected by WBAN. For ensuring a high level of security and providing a mutual authentication property, chaotic maps based authentication and key agreement mechanisms are designed according to the concept of Diffie-Hellman key exchange, which depends on the CMBDLP and CMBDHP problems. Security and performance analyses show how the proposed system guaranteed the patient privacy and the system confidentiality of sensitive medical data while preserving the low computation property in medical treatment and remote medical monitoring.

  10. Do emergency physicians attribute drug-related emergency department visits to medication-related problems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohl, Corinne M; Zed, Peter J; Brubacher, Jeffrey R; Abu-Laban, Riyad B; Loewen, Peter S; Purssell, Roy A

    2010-06-01

    Adverse drug events represent the most common cause of preventable nonsurgical adverse events in medicine but may remain undetected. Our objective is to determine the proportion of drug-related visits emergency physicians attribute to medication-related problems. This prospective observational study enrolled adults presenting to a tertiary care emergency department (ED) during 12 weeks. Drug-related visits were defined as ED visits caused by adverse drug events. The definition of adverse drug event was varied to examine both narrow and broad adverse drug event classification systems. Clinical pharmacists evaluated all patients for drug-related visits, using standardized assessment algorithms, and then followed patients until hospital discharge. Interrater agreement for the clinical pharmacist diagnosis of drug-related visit was assessed. Emergency physicians, blinded to the clinical pharmacist opinion, were interviewed at the end of each shift to determine whether they attributed the visit to a medication-related problem. An independent committee reviewed and adjudicated all cases in which the emergency physicians' and clinical pharmacists' assessments were discordant, or either the emergency physician or clinical pharmacist was uncertain. The primary outcome was the proportion of drug-related visits attributed to a medication-related problem by emergency physicians. Nine hundred forty-four patients were enrolled, of whom 44 patients received a diagnosis of the narrowest definition of an adverse drug event, an adverse drug reaction (4.7%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.5% to 6.2%). Twenty-seven of these were categorized as medication-related by emergency physicians (61.4%; 95% CI 46.5% to 74.3%), 10 were categorized as uncertain (22.7%; 95% CI 12.9% to 37.1%), and 7 categorized as a non-medication-related problem (15.9%; 95% CI 8.0% to 29.5%). Seventy-eight patients (8.3%; 95% CI 6.7% to 10.2%) received a diagnosis of an adverse drug event caused by an adverse drug

  11. Value of the internet in emergency response.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herzenberg, C. L.; Newsom, D. E.; Swietlik, C. E.

    1999-05-26

    Can the Internet be of value in emergency response? The answer is yes, judging by its use in the Kobe earthquake in Japan in 1995, ice storms in the US and Canada in 1998, and other disasters. Current and future areas of application are numerous, including exchanging messages, documents, and data files via e-mail; accessing operational data on-line; visualizing events via photos and maps; providing backup communications in lieu of broadcast media, exchanging information between crisis managers and responders; and providing information to media and the public. However, the Internet has some drawbacks, such as hardware/software requirements, computer literacy requirements, traffic jams, dependence on power and communication networks, and risks to information integrity and security. This paper examines some of the advantages, drawbacks, concerns, and potential uses of the Internet for emergency response.

  12. PHMC post-NPH emergency response training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conrads, T.J.

    1997-04-08

    This document describes post-Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) emergency response training that was provided to two teams of Project Hanford Management Contractors (PHMC) staff that will be used to assess potential structural damage that may occur as a result of a significant natural phenomena event. This training supports recent plans and procedures to use trained staff to inspect structures following an NPH event on the Hanford Site.

  13. Sacramento Regional Response Guide to Radiation Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    heat, radio waves, and microwaves which are low level radiation energy which is referred to as non- ionizing radiation. High energy radiation is...Response Plan" (California Office of Emergency Services, Updated February 2001), 5. 41 • Department of Fish and Game-lead agency for petroleum spills...radiation-binding and radiation-ridding gels, foam products, films and emulsions . The goal of radiation decontamination is to be sensitive to the

  14. Social Media: Portrait of an Emerging Tool in Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Durga; Taylor, Jacob; Cheston, Christine C; Flickinger, Tabor E; Chisolm, Margaret S

    2016-02-01

    The authors compare the prevalence of challenges and opportunities in commentaries and descriptive accounts versus evaluative studies of social media use in medical education. A previously published report of social media use in medical education provided an in-depth discussion of 14 evaluative studies, a small subset of the total number of 99 articles on this topic. This study used the full set of articles identified by that review, including the 58 commentaries and 27 descriptive accounts which had not been previously reported, to provide a glimpse into how emerging tools in medical education are initially perceived. Each commentary, descriptive account, and evaluative study was identified and compared on various characteristics, including discussion themes regarding the challenges and opportunities of social media use in medical education. Themes related to the challenges of social media use in medical education were more prevalent in commentaries and descriptive accounts than in evaluative studies. The potential of social media to affect medical professionalism adversely was the most commonly discussed challenge in the commentaries (53%) and descriptive accounts (63%) in comparison to technical issues related to implementation in the evaluative studies (50%). Results suggest that the early body of literature on social media use in medical education-like that of previous innovative education tools-comprises primarily commentaries and descriptive accounts that focus more on the challenges of social media than on potential opportunities. These results place social media tools in historical context and lay the groundwork for expanding on this novel approach to medical education.

  15. Administration Medication Errors in Emergency Department in Level III Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia González Gómez

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available • Objective: To determine the prevalence of medication errors associated with the administration in the emergency room of University Hospital Marques de Valdecilla. • Introduction: Adverse events related to health care, are increasingly common, it is estimated that between 44000 and 98000 people served in U.S. hospitals die from adverse events related to health care. In 7000 these deaths are caused by medication errors. In Spain the studies speak of similar figures. The emergency services are excluded usually in these studies because of its particular characteristics, but also are well known that these are characteristics (speed of decision-making, not having systems in unit dose dispensing ... what is expected that mistakes can be produced in larger numbers in emergency services in the areas of Spain hospitalization. • Method: This is a descriptive study in which cross-examine a sample of 627 administrations made in different areas of attention of the Emergency Department Valdecilla Hospital, in different time slots, months of the year and days a week. Between the months of January and December 2009.• Results: Have detected 119 errors in 627 observations, the most common error is log.• Conclusions: We have found a lower incidence of error 2.7%, comparing with other work (10%. While most of the studies reviewed speak of medication errors in general, including prescription, transcription, and administration.

  16. [Cirurgia Taurina--emergency medical treatment of bullfighters in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, V; Lehmann, J

    2003-08-01

    A considerable risk of life-threatening injury is inherent to bullfighting. Thus, a unique form of emergency treatment has evolved over recent decades of organized bull-fighting. Today bullfight arenas in larger cities are equipped with emergency facilities including fully furnished operating rooms. During a fiesta these facilities are run by a medical team consisting of three surgeons, one intensive care specialist, and one anesthesiologist with their supporting medical personnel. In smaller arenas or villages immediate care units consist of emergency vehicles, and a mobile container equipped with a fully functional operating room. Of all toreros the matadores including the novilleros are most often injured in 56 % of cases. This rate decreases for banderillos (30 %), and for picadores (14 %). Parts of the body that are most frequently affected are thighs, and the inguinal region (54 %). Head and neck injuries are seen in 19 %, and 12 % of cases present with open abdominal wounds including liver or gastrointestinal tract traumas. 10 % of injuries affect the thorax, and 4 % the pelvic floor. The particular form of organised medical treatment for bullfighters in Spain has only developed since the nineteen-thirties. In 1972 a scientific society for bullfight surgery was founded in Spain by specialized surgeons, and immediate care specialists holding a first convention that year. The society is continuously striving to improve technical and logistical aspects of immediate medical care for injured bullfighters.

  17. Recruitment and retention of emergency medical technicians: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, P Daniel; Probst, Janice C; Leith, Katherine H; Corwin, Sara J; Powell, M Paige

    2005-01-01

    Emergency medical technicians (EMTs) are critical to out-of-hospital care, but maintaining staff can be difficult. The study objective was to identify factors that contribute to recruitment and retention of EMTs and paramedics. Information was drawn from three focus groups of EMT-Basic, EMT-Intermediate, and EMT-Paramedic personnel recruited from participants at an annual conference. Thoughts and feelings of EMTs and paramedics were investigated using eight questions designed to explore entry into emergency medical services, what it is like to be an EMT or paramedic, and the EMT educational process. Data were analyzed at the group level for common themes using NVivo. For a majority of respondents, emergency medical services was not a primary career path. Most respondents entered the industry as an alternate or replacement for a nursing career or as a second career following military medic service. The majority of respondents believed the job was stressful yet rewarding, and although it negatively affected their personal lives, the occupation gave them a sense of accomplishment and belonging. Respondents expressed a preference for EMT education resulting in college credit or licensure versus professional certification. Job-related stress produced by numerous factors appears to be a likely contributor to low employee retention. Recruitment and retention efforts should address study findings, incorporating key findings into educational, evaluation, and job enhancement programs.

  18. Participatory Design in Emergency Medical Service: Designing for Future Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Margit; Kyng, Morten; Palen, Leysia Ann

    2006-01-01

    address challenges identified by disaster sociologists when designing for major incidents. Through qualitative research and participatory design, we have ex-amined the features of EMS work and technology use in different emergency situations from the perspective of mul-tiple actors. We conceptualize......We describe our research—its approach, results and prod-ucts—on Danish emergency medical service (EMS) field or “pre-hospital” work in minor and major incidents. We dis-cuss how commitments to participatory design and attention to the qualitative differences between minor and major incidents...

  19. International Federation for Emergency Medicine Model curriculum for medical student education in emergency medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherri Hobgood

    2011-09-01

    The curriculum is designed with a focus on the basic minimum emergency medicine educational content that any medical school should be delivering to its students during their undergraduate years of training. It is designed, not to be prescriptive, but to assist educators and emergency medicine leadership in advancing physician education in basic emergency medicine content. The content would be relevant, not just for communities with mature emergency medicine systems, but also for developing nations or for nations seeking to expand emergency medicine within current educational structures. We anticipate that there will be wide variability in how this curriculum is implemented and taught, reflecting the existing educational milieu, the resources available, and the goals of the institutions’ educational leadership.

  20. Readiness for Radiological and Nuclear Events among Emergency Medical Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallas, Cham E; Klein, Kelly R; Lehman, Thomas; Kodama, Takamitsu; Harris, Curtis Andrew; Swienton, Raymond E

    2017-01-01

    Among medical providers, even though radiological and nuclear events are recognized as credible threats, there is a lack of knowledge and fear about the medical consequences among medical personnel which could significantly affect the treatment of patients injured and/or contaminated in such scenarios. This study was conducted to evaluate the relative knowledge, willingness to respond, and familiarity with nuclear/radiological contamination risks among U.S. and Japanese emergency medical personnel. An institutional review board-approved anonymous paper survey was distributed at various medical and disaster conferences and medicine courses in Japan and in the U.S. The surveys were written in Japanese and English and collected information on the following four categories: generalized demographics, willingness to manage, knowledge of disaster systems, and contamination risks. A total of 418 surveys were completed and collected. Demographics showed that physicians and prehospital responders were the prevalent survey responders. The majority of responders, despite self-professed disaster training, were still very uncomfortable with and unaware how to respond to a radiological/nuclear event. Despite some educational coverage in courses and a limited number of disaster events, it is concluded that there is a lack of comfort and knowledge regarding nuclear and radiological events among the medical community. It is recommended that considerable development and subsequent distribution is needed to better educate and prepare the medical community for inevitable upcoming radiological/nuclear events.

  1. Information Products Laboratory for Emergency Response - IPLER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodacek, A.; Boyd, D. L.; van Aardt, J.; Renschler, C. S.; McKeown, D. M.; Collins, H.; Duvvuri, S.; Pillai, A. H.

    2009-12-01

    The three-tiered disaster management approach, disaster planning, disaster response and disaster recovery, is ripe for innovation through integrated knowledge and technology transfer efforts between university researchers, technology companies, and public sector responders. We have formed a partnership, the Information Products Laboratory for Emergency Response or IPLER, dedicated to innovation in disaster management by the appropriate application of remote sensing and geospatial technologies. The mission of the IPLER is to create a technology, policy, and business development incubator to facilitate interaction and innovation among university researchers, private sector service and product providers, and public sector emergency response decision makers. Our initial demonstration projects involve flood and wildland fire mapping. The initial results highlight the utility of integrated multispectral imaging and lidar sensing with terrain and hydrologic modeling for managing areas affected by the 2009 flooding of Cattaraugus Creek, NY, USA. Additionally, our processing flow for multispectral (mid- and longwave IR) remote sensing data of wildfire is an example of near realtime transformation of imaging data into simplified information products for use in wildland fire response.

  2. Advanced medical life support procedures in vitally compromised children by a helicopter emergency medical service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheffer Gert J

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine the advanced life support procedures provided by an Emergency Medical Service (EMS and a Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS for vitally compromised children. Incidence and success rate of several procedures were studied, with a distinction made between procedures restricted to the HEMS-physician and procedures for which the HEMS is more experienced than the EMS. Methods Prospective study of a consecutive group of children examined and treated by the HEMS of the eastern region of the Netherlands. Data regarding type of emergency, physiological parameters, NACA scores, treatment, and 24-hour survival were collected and subsequently analysed. Results Of the 558 children examined and treated by the HEMS on scene, 79% had a NACA score of IV-VII. 65% of the children had one or more advanced life support procedures restricted to the HEMS and 78% of the children had one or more procedures for which the HEMS is more experienced than the EMS. The HEMS intubated 38% of all children, and 23% of the children intubated and ventilated by the EMS needed emergency correction because of potentially lethal complications. The HEMS provided the greater part of intraosseous access, as the EMS paramedics almost exclusively reserved this procedure for children in cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The EMS provided pain management only to children older than four years of age, but a larger group was in need of analgesia upon arrival of the HEMS, and was subsequently treated by the HEMS. Conclusions The Helicopter Emergency Medical Service of the eastern region of the Netherlands brings essential medical expertise in the field not provided by the emergency medical service. The Emergency Medical Service does not provide a significant quantity of procedures obviously needed by the paediatric patient.

  3. Expected Annual Emergency Miles per Ambulance: An Indicator for Measuring Availability of Emergency Medical Services Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, P. Daniel; Probst, Janice C.; Moore, Charity G.

    2006-01-01

    Context: To ensure equitable access to prehospital care, as recommended by the Rural and Frontier Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Agenda for the Future, policymakers will need a uniform measure of EMS infrastructure. Purpose and Methods: This paper proposes a county-level indicator of EMS resource availability that takes into consideration…

  4. Emergency Victim Care. A Training Manual for Emergency Medical Technicians. Module 3--Anatomy and Physiology. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This student manual, the third in a set of 14 modules, is designed to train emergency medical technicians (EMTs) in Ohio. The module contains one section covering the following topics: general anatomical terms, the body cavities and contents, the integumentary system, the skeletal system, the muscular system, the nervous system, the respiratory…

  5. Emergency Victim Care. A Training Manual for Emergency Medical Technicians. Module 5. CPR, Oxygen Therapy. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This student manual, the fifth in a set of 14 modules, is designed to train emergency medical technicians (EMTs) in Ohio. The module contains two sections covering the following course content; cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) (including artificial ventilation, foreign body obstructions, adjunctive equipment and special techniques, artificial…

  6. Automated electronic medical record sepsis detection in the emergency department

    OpenAIRE

    Su Q. Nguyen; Edwin Mwakalindile; Booth, James S.; Vicki Hogan; Jordan Morgan; Prickett, Charles T; Donnelly, John P; Wang, Henry E.

    2014-01-01

    Background. While often first treated in the emergency department (ED), identification of sepsis is difficult. Electronic medical record (EMR) clinical decision tools offer a novel strategy for identifying patients with sepsis. The objective of this study was to test the accuracy of an EMR-based, automated sepsis identification system. Methods. We tested an EMR-based sepsis identification tool at a major academic, urban ED with 64,000 annual visits. The EMR system collected vital sign and lab...

  7. Emergency Medical Services Capacity for Prehospital Stroke Care

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-09-05

    In this audio podcast, lead author and Preventing Chronic Disease’s 2013 Student Research Contest Winner, Mehul D. Patel, talks about his article on stroke care and emergency medical services.  Created: 9/5/2013 by Preventing Chronic Disease (PCD), National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 9/5/2013.

  8. The experience of linking Victorian emergency medical service trauma data

    OpenAIRE

    Boyle Malcolm J

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The linking of a large Emergency Medical Service (EMS) dataset with the Victorian Department of Human Services (DHS) hospital datasets and Victorian State Trauma Outcome Registry and Monitoring (VSTORM) dataset to determine patient outcomes has not previously been undertaken in Victoria. The objective of this study was to identify the linkage rate of a large EMS trauma dataset with the Department of Human Services hospital datasets and VSTORM dataset. Methods The linking o...

  9. Automated electronic medical record sepsis detection in the emergency department

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Su Q.; Edwin Mwakalindile; Booth, James S.; Vicki Hogan; Jordan Morgan; Prickett, Charles T; Donnelly, John P.; Wang, Henry E.

    2014-01-01

    Background. While often first treated in the emergency department (ED), identification of sepsis is difficult. Electronic medical record (EMR) clinical decision tools offer a novel strategy for identifying patients with sepsis. The objective of this study was to test the accuracy of an EMR-based, automated sepsis identification system. Methods. We tested an EMR-based sepsis identification tool at a major academic, urban ED with 64,000 annual visits. The EMR system collected vital sign and lab...

  10. Automated electronic medical record sepsis detection in the Emergency Department

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Su; Mwakalindile, Edwin; Booth, James S.; Hogan, Vicki; Morgan, Jordan; Prickett, Charles T; Donnelly, John P.; Wang, Henry E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: While often first treated in the Emergency Department (ED), identification of sepsis is difficult. Electronic medical record (EMR) clinical decision tools offer a novel strategy for identifying patients with sepsis. The objective of this study was to test the accuracy of an EMR-based, automated sepsis identification system. Methods : We tested an EMR-based sepsis identification tool at a major academic, urban ED with 64,000 annual visits. The EMR system collected vital sign and la...

  11. Terrorism and the ethics of emergency medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesik, N; Keim, M E; Iserson, K V

    2001-06-01

    The threat of domestic and international terrorism involving weapons of mass destruction-terrorism (WMD-T) has become an increasing public health concern for US citizens. WMD-T events may have a major effect on many societal sectors but particularly on the health care delivery system. Anticipated medical problems might include the need for large quantities of medical equipment and supplies, as well as capable and unaffected health care providers. In the setting of WMD-T, triage may bear little resemblance to the standard approach to civilian triage. To address these issues to the maximum benefit of our patients, we must first develop collective forethought and a broad-based consensus that these decisions must reach beyond the hospital emergency department. Critical decisions like these should not be made on an individual case-by-case basis. Physicians should never be placed in a position of individually deciding to deny treatment to patients without the guidance of a policy or protocol. Emergency physicians, however, may easily find themselves in a situation in which the demand for resources clearly exceeds supply. It is for this reason that emergency care providers, personnel, hospital administrators, religious leaders, and medical ethics committees need to engage in bioethical decision making before an acute bioterrorist event.

  12. [Helicopter emergency medical service missions at night: 2 years of experience in the Dutch Regional Emergency Healthcare Network East].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogerwerf, Nico; Heijne, Amon; Geeraedts, Leo M G; van Riessen, Christine; Scheffer, Gert-Jan

    2010-01-01

    To study whether there are differences between day and night in the dispatch of helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS) and in their response and travelling times, medical treatment and transport of patients. Retrospective, descriptive study. All data on helicopter emergency medical service (HEMS) missions available 24/7 from Nijmegen, the Netherlands, during 2007 and 2008 were collected. All missions in this period were divided into daytime and night-time missions. Next, the reason for dispatch, the duration of distinct times during the mission, the method of transport of the HEMS team, medical treatments and patient transport were compared. In 2007 and 2008 the HEMS team was dispatched 2891 times. 1107 patients were treated during daytime and 479 during the night. The mean distance to the incident scene was longer for night missions. During night-time the HEMS team was dispatched more often for road traffic accidents and violence-related accidents but less often for falls, drowning, horse riding accidents and people becoming trapped (non-traffic-related). There were no differences in medical treatment given by the HEMS physician between day and night, but fewer patients were transported by helicopter at night. Travelling times and on-scene times were only slightly different. The number of dispatches of the HEMS team at night was higher than expected, but night missions were cancelled more often due to weather conditions than missions by day. Prehospital times and operations of the Netherlands HEMS differed slightly between day and night.

  13. NNSA/NV Consequence Management Capabilities for Radiological Emergency Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. R. Bowman

    2002-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) provides an integrated Consequence Management (CM) response capability for the (NNSA) in the event of a radiological emergency. This encompasses planning, technical operations, and home team support. As the lead organization for CM planning and operations, NNSA/NV coordinates the response of the following assets during the planning and operational phases of a radiological accident or incident: (1) Predictive dispersion modeling through the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the High Consequence Assessment Group at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); (2) Regional radiological emergency assistance through the eight Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) regional response centers; (3) Medical advice and assistance through the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; (4) Aerial radiological mapping using the fixed-wing and rotor-wing aircraft of the Aerial Measuring System (AMS); (5) Consequence Management Planning Teams (CMPT) and Consequence Management Response Teams (CMRT) to provide CM field operations and command and control. Descriptions of the technical capabilities employed during planning and operations are given below for each of the elements comprising the integrated CM capability.

  14. Factors associated with stress of conscience among emergency medical technicians in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Wang, Kang; Liu, Yu; Chan, Darius K-S

    2013-09-01

    The current study was designed to investigate factors related to stress of conscience among emergency medical technicians in China. One hundred and seventy-five doctors and nurses from emergency departments completed questionnaires measuring demographic information, two personality traits (i.e. responsibility and logical-affective orientation), stress of conscience and colleagues' stress of conscience. Important findings include the following: (i) Stress of conscience varied as a function of age, years of work, and marital status; (ii) Participants' stress of conscience was highly associated with colleagues' stress of conscience; and (iii) Both responsibility and a logical orientation were negatively associated with stress of conscience.

  15. Policies for managing emergency medical services in mass casualty incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adini, B; Bodas, M; Nilsson, H; Peleg, K

    2017-09-01

    Diverse decision-making is needed in managing mass casualty incidents (MCIs), by emergency medical services (EMS). The aim of the study was to review consensus among international experts concerning policies of EMS management during MCIs. Applicability of 21 EMS policies was tested through a 2-cycle modified e-Delphi process, in which 38 multi-disciplinary experts from 10 countries participated. Threshold for approving proposed solutions was defined as consensus of >80%. Policies that did not achieve the targeted consensus were reviewed to detect variability according to respondents' origin country. 16 policies were endorsed in the first cycle including collaboration between ambulance service providers; implementing a unified mode of operation; preparing criteria for ground versus aerial evacuation; and, developing support systems for caregivers exposed to violence. An additional policy which proposed that senior EMS officers should not necessarily act as on-site MCI commanders was endorsed in the second cycle. Demographic breakdown of views concerning non-consensual policies revealed differences according to countries of origin. Assigning ambulances to off-duty team members was highly endorsed by experts from Israel and South Africa and strongly rejected by European respondents. Avoiding entry to risk areas until declared safe was endorsed by European, Asian and Oceanic experts, but rejected by Israeli, South African and North American experts. Despite uniqueness of countries and EMS agencies, solutions to most dilemmas were applicable to all organizations, regardless of location or affiliation. Cultural diversity was found concerning readiness to implement military-civilian collaboration in MCIs and a rigid separation between work-leisure responsibilities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Emerging applications of fluorescence spectroscopy in medical microbiology field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzad, Aamir; Köhler, Gottfried; Knapp, Martin; Gaubitzer, Erwin; Puchinger, Martin; Edetsberger, Michael

    2009-11-26

    There are many diagnostic techniques and methods available for diagnosis of medically important microorganisms like bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites. But, almost all these techniques and methods have some limitations or inconvenience. Most of these techniques are laborious, time consuming and with chances of false positive or false negative results. It warrants the need of a diagnostic technique which can overcome these limitations and problems. At present, there is emerging trend to use Fluorescence spectroscopy as a diagnostic as well as research tool in many fields of medical sciences. Here, we will critically discuss research studies which propose that Fluorescence spectroscopy may be an excellent diagnostic as well as excellent research tool in medical microbiology field with high sensitivity and specificity.

  17. Emerging applications of fluorescence spectroscopy in medical microbiology field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaubitzer Erwin

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There are many diagnostic techniques and methods available for diagnosis of medically important microorganisms like bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites. But, almost all these techniques and methods have some limitations or inconvenience. Most of these techniques are laborious, time consuming and with chances of false positive or false negative results. It warrants the need of a diagnostic technique which can overcome these limitations and problems. At present, there is emerging trend to use Fluorescence spectroscopy as a diagnostic as well as research tool in many fields of medical sciences. Here, we will critically discuss research studies which propose that Fluorescence spectroscopy may be an excellent diagnostic as well as excellent research tool in medical microbiology field with high sensitivity and specificity.

  18. 3D medical collaboration technology to enhance emergency healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welch, Gregory F; Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Fuchs, Henry

    2009-01-01

    of the dynamic reconstructions. We call this idea remote 3D medical collaboration. In this article we motivate and explain the vision for 3D medical collaboration technology; we describe the relevant computer vision, computer graphics, display, and networking research; we present a proof-of-concept prototype...... these problems, we are exploring the use of a small array of cameras to reconstruct dynamic three-dimensional (3D) views of a remote environment and of events taking place within. The 3D views could be sent across wired or wireless networks to remote healthcare professionals equipped with fixed displays...... system; and we present evaluation results supporting the general hypothesis that 3D remote medical collaboration technology could offer benefits over conventional 2D videoconferencing in emergency healthcare....

  19. Emergency medical rescue efforts after a major earthquake: lessons from the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lulu; Liu, Xu; Li, Youping; Liu, Yuan; Liu, Zhipeng; Lin, Juncong; Shen, Ji; Tang, Xuefeng; Zhang, Yi; Liang, Wannian

    2012-03-01

    Major earthquakes often result in incalculable environmental damage, loss of life, and threats to health. Tremendous progress has been made in response to many medical challenges resulting from earthquakes. However, emergency medical rescue is complicated, and great emphasis should be placed on its organisation to achieve the best results. The 2008 Wenchuan earthquake was one of the most devastating disasters in the past 10 years and caused more than 370,000 casualties. The lessons learnt from the medical disaster relief effort and the subsequent knowledge gained about the regulation and capabilities of medical and military back-up teams should be widely disseminated. In this Review we summarise and analyse the emergency medical rescue efforts after the Wenchuan earthquake. Establishment of a national disaster medical response system, an active and effective commanding system, successful coordination between rescue forces and government agencies, effective treatment, a moderate, timely and correct public health response, and long-term psychological support are all crucial to reduce mortality and morbidity and promote overall effectiveness of rescue efforts after a major earthquake.

  20. The epidemiology of medical emergency contacts outside hospitals in Norway - a prospective population based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Introduction There is a lack of epidemiological knowledge on medical emergencies outside hospitals in Norway. The aim of the present study was to obtain representative data on the epidemiology of medical emergencies classified as "red responses" in Norway. Method Three emergency medical dispatch centres (EMCCs) were chosen as catchment areas, covering 816 000 inhabitants. During a three month period in 2007 the EMCCs gathered information on every situation that was triaged as a red response, according to The Norwegian Index of Medical Emergencies (Index). Records from ground ambulances, air ambulances, and the primary care doctors were subsequently collected. International Classification of Primary Care - 2 symptom codes (ICPC-2) and The National Committee on Aeronautics (NACA) Score System were given retrospectively. Results Total incidence of red response situations was 5 105 during the three month period. 394 patients were involved in 138 accidents, and 181 situations were without patients, resulting in a total of 5 180 patients. The patients' age ranged from 0 to 107 years, with a median age of 57, and 55% were male. 90% of the red responses were medical problems with a large variation of symptoms, the remainder being accidents. 70% of the patients were in a non-life-threatening situation. Within the accident group, males accounted for 61%, and 35% were aged between 10 and 29 years, with a median age of 37 years. Few of the 39 chapters in the Index were used, A10 "Chest pain" was the most common one (22% of all situations). ICPC-2 symptom codes showed that cardiovascular, syncope/coma, respiratory and neurological problems were most common. 50% of all patients in a sever situation (NACA score 4-7) were > 70 years of age. Conclusions The results show that emergency medicine based on 816 000 Norwegians mainly consists of medical problems, where the majority of the patients have a non-life-threatening situation. More focus on the emergency system outside hospitals

  1. The San Bernardino, California, Terror Attack: Two Emergency Departments’ Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Lee, MD

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available On December 2, 2015, a terror attack in the city of San Bernardino, California killed 14 Americans and injured 22 in the deadliest attack on U.S. soil since September 11, 2001. Although emergency personnel and law enforcement officials frequently deal with multi-casualty incidents (MCIs, what occurred that day required an unprecedented response. Most of the severely injured victims were transported to either Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC or Arrowhead Regional Medical Center (ARMC. These two hospitals operate two designated trauma centers in the region and played crucial roles during the massive response that followed this attack. In an effort to shed a light on our response to others, we provide an account of how these two teaching hospitals prepared for and coordinated the medical care of these victims. In general, both centers were able to quickly mobilize large number of staff and resources. Prior disaster drills proved to be invaluable. Both centers witnessed excellent teamwork and coordination involving first responders, law enforcement, administration, and medical personnel from multiple specialty services. Those of us working that day felt safe and protected. Although we did identify areas we could have improved upon, including patchy communication and crowd-control, they were minor in nature and did not affect patient care. MCIs pose major challenges to emergency departments and trauma centers across the country. Responding to such incidents requires an ever-evolving approach as no two incidents will present exactly alike. It is our hope that this article will foster discussion and lead to improvements in management of future MCIs.

  2. The San Bernardino, California, Terror Attack: Two Emergency Departments' Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Carol; Walters, Elizabeth; Borger, Rodney; Clem, Kathleen; Fenati, Gregory; Kiemeney, Michael; Seng, Sakona; Yuen, Ho-Wang; Neeki, Michael; Smith, Dustin

    2016-01-01

    On December 2, 2015, a terror attack in the city of San Bernardino, California killed 14 Americans and injured 22 in the deadliest attack on U.S. soil since September 11, 2001. Although emergency personnel and law enforcement officials frequently deal with multi-casualty incidents (MCIs), what occurred that day required an unprecedented response. Most of the severely injured victims were transported to either Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) or Arrowhead Regional Medical Center (ARMC). These two hospitals operate two designated trauma centers in the region and played crucial roles during the massive response that followed this attack. In an effort to shed a light on our response to others, we provide an account of how these two teaching hospitals prepared for and coordinated the medical care of these victims. In general, both centers were able to quickly mobilize large number of staff and resources. Prior disaster drills proved to be invaluable. Both centers witnessed excellent teamwork and coordination involving first responders, law enforcement, administration, and medical personnel from multiple specialty services. Those of us working that day felt safe and protected. Although we did identify areas we could have improved upon, including patchy communication and crowd-control, they were minor in nature and did not affect patient care. MCIs pose major challenges to emergency departments and trauma centers across the country. Responding to such incidents requires an ever-evolving approach as no two incidents will present exactly alike. It is our hope that this article will foster discussion and lead to improvements in management of future MCIs.

  3. Houston's medical disaster response to Hurricane Katrina: part 1: the initial medical response from Trauma Service Area Q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Douglas R; Gavagan, Thomas F; Smart, Kieran T; Upton, Lori A; Havron, Douglas A; Weller, Nancy F; Shah, Umair A; Fishkind, Avrim; Persse, David; Shank, Paul; Mattox, Kenneth

    2009-04-01

    After Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast on August 29, 2005, thousands of ill and injured evacuees were transported to Houston, TX. Houston's regional disaster plan was quickly implemented, leading to the activation of the Regional Hospital Preparedness Council's Catastrophic Medical Operations Center and the rapid construction of a 65-examination-room medical facility within the Reliant Center. A plan for triage of arriving evacuees was quickly developed and the Astrodome/Reliant Center Complex mega-shelter was created. Herein, we discuss major elements of the regional disaster response, including regional coordination, triage and emergency medical service transfers into the region's medical centers, medical care in population shelters, and community health challenges.

  4. Frequency and risk factors associated with emergency medical readmissions in Galway University Hospitals.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gorman, J

    2010-06-01

    Unplanned readmissions of medical hospital patients have been increasing in recent years. We examined the frequency and associates of emergency medical readmissions to Galway University Hospitals (GUH).

  5. Medical clearance of the psychiatric patient in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janiak, Bruce D; Atteberry, Suzanne

    2012-11-01

    As part of the emergency department (ED) evaluation of patients with psychiatric complaints, emergency physicians are often asked to perform screening laboratory tests prior to admitting psychiatric patients, the value of which is questionable. To determine if routine screening laboratory studies performed in the ED on patients with a psychiatric chief complaint would alter ED medical clearance (evaluation, management or disposition) of such patients. In this retrospective chart review, the patient charts were reviewed for triage notes, history and physical examination, laboratory study results, and patient disposition. The study investigators subjectively determined if any of the laboratory abnormalities identified after admission would have changed ED management or disposition of the patient had they been identified in the ED. Subjects were 519 consecutive adult patients (18 years of age and older) admitted to the Medical College of Georgia's inpatient psychiatric ward through the ED. There were 502 patients who met inclusion criteria, and 50 of them had completely normal laboratory studies. Laboratory studies were performed in the ED for 148 patients. The most common abnormalities identified were positive urine drug screen (n = 221), anemia (n = 136), and hyperglycemia (n = 139). There was one case (0.19%) identified in which an abnormal laboratory value would have changed ED management or disposition of the patient had it been found during the patient's ED visit. Patients presenting to the ED with a psychiatric chief complaint can be medically cleared for admission to a psychiatric facility by qualified emergency physicians using an appropriate history and physical examination. There is no need for routine medical screening laboratory tests. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Medical Requirements for Ambulance Design and Equipment. Emergency Health Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Div. of Medical Sciences.

    A vehicle must meet certain specific requirements to be classified as an ambulance if it is to satisfy the demands of the physician in terms of emergency care for which properly trained ambulance attendants can be held responsible. Developed by professional and lay experts for use by automotive designers and manufacturing, this publication would…

  7. Knowledge and use of emergency contraception by medical doctors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-12-09

    Dec 9, 2013 ... Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice • Jul-Aug 2014 • Vol 17 • Issue 4. Abstract ... use is within 12 h of sexual intercourse but research evidence .... Islam. 32. 15.6. Others. 4. 2.0. Missing/no response. 3. 1.5. Table 2: Opinions concerning emergency .... young women in Anambra State, south east Nigeria.

  8. Contemporary management of uterine fibroids: focus on emerging medical treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sukhbir Sony; Belland, Liane

    2015-01-01

    This review provides an overview of therapeutic options, with a specific focus on the emerging role of medical options for UF management. PubMed, Google Scholar, and Cochrane Systematic Reviews were searched for articles published between 1980 and 2013. Relevant articles were identified using the following terms: 'uterine fibroids', 'leiomyoma', 'heavy menstrual bleeding', and 'menorrhagia'. The reference lists of articles identified were also searched for other relevant publications. Because of the largely benign nature of UFs, the most conservative options that minimize morbidity/risk and optimize outcomes should be considered. Watchful waiting, or no immediate intervention combined with regular follow-up, is an appropriate option for the majority of UF patients who experience no symptoms. For women with symptomatic UFs, the optimal treatment should restore quality of life through rapid relief of UF signs and symptoms, reduce tumor size for a sustained period, and maintain or improve fertility. Invasive surgical treatments, such as hysterectomy, have historically been the mainstay of UF treatment. Less invasive surgical and interventional techniques, such as myomectomy, uterine artery embolization, endometrial ablation, and myolysis provide alternatives to hysterectomy. Until recently, medical management of UFs was characterized by short-term treatments and therapies that provided symptomatic control. In addition to controlling abnormal uterine bleeding, newer medical therapies, including the recently Health-Canada-approved ulipristal acetate, act directly to shrink the tumor. Although no agent is currently approved for such use, emerging evidence suggests the potential for long-term medical management of UFs. The advent of novel medical therapies may diminish the long-held reliance on more invasive surgical UF treatment options.

  9. Bystander Intervention Prior to The Arrival of Emergency Medical Services: Comparing Assistance across Types of Medical Emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faul, Mark; Aikman, Shelley N; Sasser, Scott M

    2016-01-01

    To determine the situational circumstances associated with bystander interventions to render aid during a medical emergency. This study examined 16.2 million Emergency Medical Service (EMS) events contained within the National Emergency Medical Services Information System. The records of patients following a 9-1-1 call for emergency medical assistance were analyzed using logistic regression to determine what factors influenced bystander interventions. The dependent variable of the model was whether or not a bystander intervened. EMS providers recorded bystander assistance 11% of the time. The logistic regression model correctly predicted bystander intervention occurrence 71.4% of the time. Bystanders were more likely to intervene when the patient was male (aOR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1.12-1.3) and if the patient was older (progressive aOR = 1.10, 1.46 age group 20-29 through age group 60-99). Bystanders were less likely to intervene in rural areas compared to urban areas (aOR = 0.58, 95% CI = 0.58-0.59). The highest likelihood of bystander intervention occurred in a residential institution (aOR = 1.86, 95% CI = 1.85-1.86) and the lowest occurred on a street or a highway (aOR = 0.96, 95% CI = 0.95-0.96). Using death as a reference group, bystanders were most likely to intervene when the patient had cardiac distress/chest pain (aOR = 11.38, 95% CI = 10.93-11.86), followed by allergic reaction (aOR = 7.63, 95% CI = 7.30-7.99), smoke inhalation (aOR = 6.65, 95% CI = 5.98-7.39), and respiration arrest/distress (aOR = 6.43, 95% CI = 6.17-6.70). A traumatic injury was the most commonly recorded known event, and it was also associated with a relatively high level of bystander intervention (aOR = 5.81, 95% CI = 5.58-6.05). The type of injury/illness that prompted the lowest likelihood of bystander assistance was Sexual Assault/Rape (aOR = 1.57, 95% CI = 1.32-1.84) followed by behavioral/psychiatric disorder (aOR = 1.64, 95% CI = 1.57-1.71). Bystander intervention varies greatly on

  10. Emergency Physician Awareness of Prehospital Procedures and Medications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Waldron

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Maintaining patient safety during transition from prehospital to emergency department (ED care depends on effective handoff communication between providers. We sought to determine emergency physicians’ (EP knowledge of the care provided by paramedics in terms of both procedures and medications, and whether the use of a verbal report improved physician accuracy. Methods: We conducted a 2-phase observational survey of a convenience sample of EPs in an urban, academic ED. In this large ED paramedics have no direct contact with physicians for non-critical patients, giving their report instead to the triage nurse. In Phase 1, paramedics gave verbal report to the triage nurse only. In Phase 2, a research assistant (RA stationed in triage listened to this report and then repeated it back verbatim to the EPs caring for the patient. The RA then queried the EPs 90 minutes later regarding their patients’ prehospital procedures and medications. We compared the accuracy of these 2 reporting methods. Results: There were 163 surveys completed in Phase 1 and 116 in Phase 2. The oral report had no effect on EP awareness that the patient had been brought in by ambulance (86% in Phase 1 and 85% in Phase 2. The oral report did improve EP awareness of prehospital procedures, from 16% in Phase 1 to 45% in Phase 2, OR=4.28 (2.5-7.5. EPs were able to correctly identify all oral medications in 18% of Phase 1 cases and 47% of Phase 2 cases, and all IV medications in 42% of Phase 1 cases and 50% of Phase 2 cases. The verbal report led to a mild improvement in physician awareness of oral medications given, OR=4.0 (1.09-14.5, and no improvement in physician awareness of IV medications given, OR=1.33 (0.15-11.35. Using a composite score of procedures plus oral plus IV medications, physicians had all three categories correct in 15% of Phase 1 and 39% of Phase 2 cases (p<0.0001. Conclusion: EPs in our ED were unaware of many prehospital procedures and

  11. Emerging Security Mechanisms for Medical Cyber Physical Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocabas, Ovunc; Soyata, Tolga; Aktas, Mehmet K

    2016-01-01

    The following decade will witness a surge in remote health-monitoring systems that are based on body-worn monitoring devices. These Medical Cyber Physical Systems (MCPS) will be capable of transmitting the acquired data to a private or public cloud for storage and processing. Machine learning algorithms running in the cloud and processing this data can provide decision support to healthcare professionals. There is no doubt that the security and privacy of the medical data is one of the most important concerns in designing an MCPS. In this paper, we depict the general architecture of an MCPS consisting of four layers: data acquisition, data aggregation, cloud processing, and action. Due to the differences in hardware and communication capabilities of each layer, different encryption schemes must be used to guarantee data privacy within that layer. We survey conventional and emerging encryption schemes based on their ability to provide secure storage, data sharing, and secure computation. Our detailed experimental evaluation of each scheme shows that while the emerging encryption schemes enable exciting new features such as secure sharing and secure computation, they introduce several orders-of-magnitude computational and storage overhead. We conclude our paper by outlining future research directions to improve the usability of the emerging encryption schemes in an MCPS.

  12. A seamless ubiquitous emergency medical service for crisis situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bor-Shing

    2016-04-01

    In crisis situations, a seamless ubiquitous communication is necessary to provide emergency medical service to save people's lives. An excellent prehospital emergency medicine provides immediate medical care to increase the survival rate of patients. On their way to the hospital, ambulance personnel must transmit real-time and uninterrupted patient information to the hospital to apprise the physician of the situation and provide options to the ambulance personnel. In emergency and crisis situations, many communication channels can be unserviceable because of damage to equipment or loss of power. Thus, data transmission over wireless communication to achieve uninterrupted network services is a major obstacle. This study proposes a mobile middleware for cognitive radio (CR) for improving the wireless communication link. CRs can sense their operating environment and optimize the spectrum usage so that the mobile middleware can integrate the existing wireless communication systems with a seamless communication service in heterogeneous network environments. Eventually, the proposed seamless mobile communication middleware was ported into an embedded system, which is compatible with the actual network environment without the need for changing the original system architecture.

  13. Radiation emergency response in Illinois, Alabama, and Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, D.K.; Chester, R.O.

    1978-03-01

    The objective of this study was to examine state radiation emergency response and to locate any areas of emergency planning in need of improvement. This report briefly presents a summary of laws and defining documents governing radiation emergency response, describes the existing and projected need for such response, and presents the authors' analyses of the evolution of state response plans and their application to radiation incidents. Three states' programs are discussed in detail: Illinois, Alabama, and Texas. These states were selected because they have quite different emergency-response programs. Therefore, these state programs provide a wide variety of approaches to state radiation emergency response.

  14. Medical responsibility in the United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benomran, Fawzi

    2010-05-01

    Medical responsibility in the United Arab Emirates was formerly defined and governed according to Law 7 of 1975 for the practice of medical professions, which had been a part of civil law. The passing of Law 10 of 2008, namely the "Law on Medical Responsibility in UAE", enacted on 16th December 2008 created a new framework to deal with this issue. One of its provisions required medical practitioners to hold insurance policies, so that insurance companies pays damages to the plaintiff (patient) injured as a result of a physicians' negligence. This paper outlines the issue of medical responsibility and medical negligence. The author's translation of the new law into English is included so that its full text is available for the readers, especially expatriate doctors working in the UAE. Where appropriate, a brief comparison between the old law and new laws is also presented. The objective of this paper is to provide medical practitioners with basic information about the subject in general and to this legislation in particular. It is mandatory for doctors to realize inherent risks involved in the course of their practice. A basic knowledge of the law is required to avoid pitfalls and to safeguard oneself against errors arising from ignorance of the duties and rights of the professional person.

  15. 76 FR 72750 - Meeting Notice-Federal Interagency Committee on Emergency Medical Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-25

    ..., Director, Office of Emergency Medical Services, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 1200 New... of several officials from Federal agencies as well as a State emergency medical services director... and Human Services and the Director of the Preparedness Division, Directorate of...

  16. Effect of emergency medicine pharmacists on medication-error reporting in an emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weant, Kyle A; Humphries, Roger L; Hite, Kimberly; Armitstead, John A

    2010-11-01

    The effect of an emergency medicine (EM) clinical pharmacist on medication-error reporting in an emergency department (ED) was studied. The medication-error reports for patients seen at a university's ED between September 1, 2005, and February 28, 2009, were retrospectively reviewed. Errors reported before the addition of an EM pharmacist (from September 1, 2005, through February 28, 2006) were compared with those reported after the addition of two EM pharmacists (from September 1, 2008, through February 28, 2009). The severity of errors and the provider who reported the errors were characterized. A total of 402 medication errors were reported over the two time periods. Pharmacy personnel captured significantly more errors than did other health care personnel (94.5% versus 5.7%, p pharmacists resulted in 14.8 times as many medication-error reports as were made when no EM pharmacist was in the ED. More errors that actually occurred were captured with two pharmacists providing care (95.7% versus 4.3%, p errors documented were ordering errors (79.8%). Of these, 73.7% were captured after the addition of two EM pharmacists. Performance (40.0%) and knowledge (27.9%) deficits were the most common contributing factors to medication errors. During the study period after the addition of two EM pharmacists in the ED, 371 medication-error reports were completed, compared with 31 reports during the study period before the addition of the pharmacists. Pharmacy personnel reported the majority of medication errors during both study periods.

  17. The GP as first responder in a major medical emergency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, G T; Drinkwater, E J; Torcello, N

    1997-12-01

    While there have been many articles and seminars on the Ash Wednesday bushfire and Port Arthur shooting disasters, the role, responsibility and support structure of general practitioners (GPs) and the effect of the disaster on them, have received little attention. This paper looks at the role of the GP as the first responder in a disaster in rural and semi-rural Australia. Hopefully, a structured involvement, with adequate preparation and recovery, will minimise harm to these respondents. This article was written after a local GP response to disasters had been incorporated into the local Displan of one region. This response was successfully activated by Victorian State Displan during the Dandenong Ranges bushfire disaster of January, 1997. A disaster is said to have occurred when normal community and organisational arrangements are overwhelmed by an event, and extraordinary responses need to be instituted. First responder has become the generic term for those who arrive at the scene during the early phase of the response, that is, before centralised coordination is in place. Displan is the abbreviation for the State Emergency Response Plan. The phases of emergency management consist of: prevention; preparation; response; and recovery.

  18. Compensation of Emergency Medical Technician (EMT)-Basics and Paramedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studnek, Jonathan R

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to identify factors associated with compensation for Emergency Medical Technician (EMT)-Basics and Paramedics and assess whether these associations have changed over the period 1999-2008. Data obtained from the Longitudinal EMT Attributes and Demographic Study (LEADS) surveys, a mail survey of a random, stratified sample of nationally certified EMT-Basics and Paramedics, were analyzed. For the 1999-2003 period, analyses included all respondents providing Emergency Medical Services (EMS). With the addition of a survey in 2004 about volunteers, it was possible to exclude volunteers from these analyses. Over 60% of EMT-Basics reported being either compensated or noncompensated volunteers in the 2004-2008 period. This was substantially and significantly greater than the proportion of EMT-Paramedic volunteers (EMT-Paramedics earned significantly more than EMT-Basics, with differentials of $11,000-$18,000 over the course of the study. The major source of earnings disparity was type of organization: respondents employed by fire-based EMS agencies reported significantly higher earnings than other respondents, at both the EMT-Basic and EMT-Paramedic levels. Males also earned significantly more than females, with annual earnings differentials ranging from $7,000 to $15,000. There are a number of factors associated with compensation disparities within the EMS profession. These include type of service (ie, fire-based vs. other types of agencies) and gender. The reasons for these disparities warrant further investigation. Studnek JR . Compensation of Emergency Medical Technician (EMT)-Basics and Paramedics. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2016;31(Suppl. 1):s87-s95.

  19. Sexual rape in children and adolescents: a medical emergency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García Piña Corina Araceli

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sexual rape is defined as vaginal, anal or oral sex with violent and forceful penetration of the penis or of any other object. Patients who have been raped are a medical emergency which requires immediate attention, if possible, within 24 to 72 hours, since there is the risk of sustaining external and internal injuries and of acquiring a sexually transmitted infection (STI. Detection and Centers for Disease Control (CDC have reported that the maximum effective- ness of HIV prophylaxis is obtained when given within the first 24 to 72 hours post exposure.

  20. Facilities and regionalization--emergency medical services systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, R D

    1990-02-01

    Advanced life support and the modern EMS system were born out of the hope that by extending hospital emergency facilities outside the bounds of the hospital, earlier and more intensive care could be provided to those patients requiring it. EMS systems have since left the nest and only recently, following a turbulent adolescence, is prehospital care returning as a partner with the medical facilities and physicians that presided over their modern origins. The next decade will see the continuing trend toward hospitals and practitioners regaining some influence in the design and direction of prehospital care.

  1. 76 FR 17485 - Meeting Notice Correction-Federal Interagency Committee on Emergency Medical Services; Correction...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-29

    ... Emergency Medical Services; Correction to Meeting Notice To Clarify Time Zone AGENCY: National Highway... on Emergency Medical Services; Correction to Meeting Notice to clarify time zone. SUMMARY: NHTSA is... on Emergency Medical Services (FICEMS) to be held as a stakeholder input call-in session to...

  2. 78 FR 49332 - National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC); Notice of Federal Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-13

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC... nationally recognized council of emergency medical services representatives and consumers, is to advise and... Transportation, Office of Emergency Medical Services, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., NTI-140, Washington, DC...

  3. 48 CFR 1852.242-78 - Emergency Medical Services and Evacuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Emergency Medical Services... Provisions and Clauses 1852.242-78 Emergency Medical Services and Evacuation. As prescribed in 1842.7003, insert the following clause: Emergency Medical Services and Evacuation—April 2001 The Contractor...

  4. 78 FR 36300 - Federal Interagency Committee on Emergency Medical Services; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Federal Interagency Committee on Emergency Medical Services...--Federal Interagency Committee on Emergency Medical Services. SUMMARY: NHTSA announces a meeting of the Federal Interagency Committee on Emergency Medical Services (FICEMS) to be held in the Washington, DC...

  5. 76 FR 36174 - Federal Interagency Committee on Emergency Medical Services; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-21

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Federal Interagency Committee on Emergency Medical Services...--Federal Interagency Committee on Emergency Medical Services. SUMMARY: NHTSA announces a meeting of the Federal Interagency Committee on Emergency Medical Services (FICEMS) to be held in the Washington, DC...

  6. 75 FR 71792 - Federal Interagency Committee on Emergency Medical Services Meeting Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-24

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Federal Interagency Committee on Emergency Medical Services...--Federal Interagency Committee on Emergency Medical Services. SUMMARY: NHTSA announces a meeting of the Federal Interagency Committee on Emergency Medical Services (FICEMS) to be held in Washington, DC...

  7. 75 FR 34201 - Meeting Notice-Federal Interagency Committee on Emergency Medical Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-16

    ... Notice--Federal Interagency Committee on Emergency Medical Services. SUMMARY: NHTSA announces a meeting of the Federal Interagency Committee on Emergency Medical Services (FICEMS) to be held in Washington... INFORMATION CONTACT: Drew Dawson, Director, Office of Emergency Medical Services, National Highway...

  8. 77 FR 14590 - National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC); Correction to the Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-12

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC... Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council Meeting on March 29, 2012, to alter the start time from 1 p.m... recognized council of emergency medical services (EMS) representatives and consumers to provide advice...

  9. Emergency intraosseous access in a helicopter emergency medical service: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heradstveit Bård E

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intraosseous access (IO is a method for providing vascular access in out-of-hospital resuscitation of critically ill and injured patients when traditional intravenous access is difficult or impossible. Different intraosseous techniques have been used by our Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS since 2003. Few articles document IO use by HEMS physicians. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of intraosseous access in pre-hospital emergency situations handled by our HEMS. Methods We reviewed all medical records from the period May 2003 to April 2010, and compared three different techniques: Bone Injection Gun (B.I.G® - Waismed, manual bone marrow aspiration needle (Inter V - Medical Device Technologies and EZ-IO® (Vidacare, used on both adults and paediatric patients. Results During this seven-year period, 78 insertion attempts were made on 70 patients. Overall success rates were 50% using the manual needle, 55% using the Bone Injection Gun, and 96% using the EZ-IO®. Rates of success on first attempt were significantly higher using the EZ-IO® compared to the manual needle/Bone Injection Gun (p Conclusions Newer intraosseous techniques may enable faster and more reliable vascular access, and this can lower the threshold for intraosseous access on both adult and paediatric patients in critical situations. We believe that all emergency services that handle critically ill or injured paediatric and adult patients should be familiar with intraosseous techniques.

  10. Gap Assessment in the Emergency Response Community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barr, Jonathan L.; Burtner, Edwin R.; Pike, William A.; Peddicord, Annie M Boe; Minsk, Brian S.

    2010-09-27

    This report describes a gap analysis of the emergency response and management (EM) community, performed during the fall of 2009. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) undertook this effort to identify potential improvements to the functional domains in EM that could be provided by the application of current or future technology. To perform this domain-based gap analysis, PNNL personnel interviewed subject matter experts (SMEs) across the EM domain; to make certain that the analyses reflected a representative view of the community, the SMEs were from a variety of geographic areas and from various sized communities (urban, suburban, and rural). PNNL personnel also examined recent and relevant after-action reports and U.S. Government Accountability Office reports.

  11. Educational assessment of medical student rotation in emergency ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, J Christian; Cusick, Seric; Scruggs, William; Henson, Travis W; Anderson, Craig L; Barajas, Graciela; Zlidenny, Alexander; McDonough, Joanne; Langdorf, Mark I

    2007-08-01

    Medical student ultrasound education is sparse. In 2002, we began the first medical student rotation in emergency ultrasound. To evaluate if medical students can learn and retain sonographic skills during a two- or four-week elective. We gave students an exam on the first and last days of the rotation. Six months later, students took the exam a third time. A control group was used for comparison. Over a 19-month period, we enrolled 45 students (25 on the two-week and 20 on the four-week elective). The four-week student post-test score was significantly better than the two- week post-test score (81% vs 72%, p=0.003). On the six-month exam, the four-week student post-test score was significantly better than the two-week post-test score (77% vs 69%, p=0.008). The control group did not statistically improve. Medical students can learn bedside ultrasound interpretation with clinical integration and retain the knowledge six months later.

  12. Educational Assessment of Medical Student Rotation in Emergency Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fox, J Christian

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical student ultrasound education is sparse. In 2002, we began the first medical student rotation in emergency ultrasound. Objective: To evaluate if medical students can learn and retain sonographic skills during a two- or four-week elective. Methods: We gave students an exam on the first and last days of the rotation. Six months later, students took the exam a third time. A control group was used for comparison. Results: Over a 19-month period, we enrolled 45 students (25 on the two-week and 20 on the four-week elective. The four-week student post-test score was significantly better than the two- week posttest score (81% vs. 72%, p=0.003. On the six-month exam, the four-week student post-test score was significantly better than the two-week post-test score (77% vs 69%, p=0.008. The control group did not statistically improve. Conclusion: Medical students can learn bedside ultrasound interpretation with clinical integration and retain the knowledge six months later.

  13. IMPORTANT REMINDER - In a Medical Emergency Call 74444

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    What happened? A CERN employee, complaining of pains that might indicate a serious heart problem, went to building 57 for medical assistance1). He went to the first floor and found the reception desk temporarily unoccupied. He then went to the CERN Fire Station. The firemen and the CERN medical team took care of him and requested helicopter transport to the Geneva cantonal hospital, where he responded well to medical treatment. What do we learn from this event? Although in this case the patient is doing well, precious time was lost. In the event of serious and acute illness, you must call the CERN internal number 74444 and avoid going in person, even accompanied by someone else. This number is available for all types of emergency. The firemen can provide professional assistance at all times as required: first aid on the spot, ambulance transport and medical assistance as necessary. The CERN Fire Station is located in building 65, on ‘Route Einstein', the first road on your right when you enter CERN Ent...

  14. Emerging paradigms of cognition in medical decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vimla L; Kaufman, David R; Arocha, Jose F

    2002-02-01

    The limitations of the classical or traditional paradigm of decision research are increasingly apparent, even though there has been a substantial body of empirical research on medical decision-making over the past 40 years. As decision-support technology continues to proliferate in medical settings, it is imperative that "basic science" decision research develop a broader-based and more valid foundation for the study of medical decision-making as it occurs in the natural setting. This paper critically reviews both traditional and recent approaches to medical decision making, considering the integration of problem-solving and decision-making research paradigms, the role of conceptual knowledge in decision-making, and the emerging paradigm of naturalistic decision-making. We also provide an examination of technology-mediated decision-making. Expanding the scope of decision research will better enable us to understand optimal decision processes, suitable coping mechanisms under suboptimal conditions, the development of expertise in decision-making, and ways in which decision-support technology can successfully mediate decision processes.

  15. The Potential Linkage between Emergency Medical Services Systems and Health Systems Agencies to Civil Defense Related Health and Medical Care Plans and Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-01

    Objective 10 B. Study Methodology 10 IV. E 7SS/HSA LINKAGE TO CIVIL DEFEN SE 13 V. HEALTH AND MEDICAL PLANNING FUNCIONS 31 A. Primarily Non-Health...Department Responsibilities 31 B. Primarily Health Department Responsibilities 41 VI. DISASTER MEDICAL PLANNING IN THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA 62 VII...Agency B-i APPENDIX C - State Emergency Health Service Planning Functions: Potential Agency Input C-i APPENDIX D - San Francisco Bay Area Planning D

  16. The Emergence of Genetic Counseling in Sweden: Examples from Eugenics and Medical Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkman, Maria

    2015-09-01

    This paper examines the intertwined relations between eugenics and medical genetics from a Swedish perspective in the 1940s and 1950s. The Swedish case shows that a rudimentary form of genetic counseling emerged within eugenic practices in the applications of the Swedish Sterilization Act of 1941, here analyzed from the phenomenon of "heredophobia" (ärftlighetsskräck). At the same time genetic counseling also existed outside eugenic practices, within the discipline of medical genetics. The paper argues that a demand for genetic counseling increased in the 1940s and 1950s in response to a sense of reproductive responsibility engendered by earlier eugenic discourse. The paper also questions the claim made by theoreticians of biopolitics that biological citizens have emerged only during the last decades, especially in neoliberal societies. From the Swedish case it is possible to argue that this had already happened earlier in relation to the proliferation of various aspects of eugenics to the public.

  17. Does medical emergency team intervention reduce the prevalence of emergency endotracheal intubation complications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Go-Woon; Koh, Younsuck; Lim, Chae-Man; Han, Myongja; An, Jiyoung; Hong, Sang-Bum

    2014-01-01

    Emergency endotracheal intubation (EEI) is a complex process that leads to various complications. Previous studies mainly demonstrated that the Medical Emergency Team (MET) intervention reduced the incidence of cardiac arrest, however, the impact of a MET on airway management has not been investigated in detail. Our purpose was to confirm the impact of a MET on airway management and compare the incidence of complications of EEI before and after MET intervention in a general ward. We performed an observational study and reviewed 318 patients intubated by a MET in a general ward. The patients enrolled during the control (2007) and study (2009) periods were 103 and 215, respectively. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation requiring emergency intubation in a general ward was reduced after MET intervention at the Asan Medical Center (39.8% vs. 19.1%, p<0.001). Pre-intubation and post-intubation oxygen saturation levels were higher after MET intervention (pre-intubation, 80% before vs. 92% after MET, p<0.001; post-intubation, 95% before vs. 99% after MET, p<0.001). The use of vasopressors after intubation decreased as a result of MET intervention (62.1% before vs. 36.7% after MET, p<0.001). Hypotension was also reduced (34% before vs. 8.8% after MET, p<0.001). Early interventions of a MET changed the causes of emergency intubation in a general ward from cardiopulmonary resuscitation to respiratory distress or shock and improved hypoxemia and hypotension related to emergency intubation. The MET intervention is safe and effective system for emergency intubation in a general ward.

  18. Assessing emergency medical care in low income countries: A pilot study from Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhtar Tasleem

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emergency Medical Care is an important component of health care system. Unfortunately it is however, ignored in many low income countries. We assessed the availability and quality of facility-based emergency medical care in the government health care system at district level in a low income country – Pakistan. Methods We did a quantitative pilot study of a convenience sample of 22 rural and 20 urban health facilities in 2 districts – Faisalabad and Peshawar – in Pakistan. The study consisted of three separate cross-sectional assessments of selected community leaders, health care providers, and health care facilities. Three data collection instruments were created with input from existing models for facility assessment such as those used by the Joint Commission of Accreditation of Hospitals and the National Center for Health Statistics in USA and the Medical Research Council in Pakistan. Results The majority of respondents 43/44(98%, in community survey were not satisfied with the emergency care provided. Most participants 36/44(82% mentioned that they will not call an ambulance in health related emergency because it does not function properly in the government system. The expenses on emergency care for the last experience were reported to be less than 5,000 Pakistani Rupees (equivalent to US$ 83 for 19/29(66% respondents. Most health care providers 43/44(98% were of the opinion that their facilities were inadequately equipped to treat emergencies. The majority of facilities 31/42(74% had no budget allocated for emergency care. A review of medications and equipment available showed that many critical supplies needed in an emergency were not found in these facilities. Conclusion Assessment of emergency care should be part of health systems analysis in Pakistan. Multiple deficiencies in emergency care at the district level in Pakistan were noted in our study. Priority should be given to make emergency care responsive to

  19. Emergency/disaster medical support in the restoration project for the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimura, Naoto; Asari, Yasushi; Yamaguchi, Yoshihiro; Asanuma, Kazunari; Tase, Choichiro; Sakamoto, Tetsuya; Aruga, Tohru

    2013-12-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (1F) suffered a series of radiation accidents after the Great East Japan Earthquake on 11 March 2011. In a situation where halting or delaying restoration work was thought to translate directly into a very serious risk for the entire country, it was of the utmost importance to strengthen the emergency and disaster medical system in addition to radiation emergency medical care for staff at the frontlines working in an environment that posed a risk of radiation exposure and a large-scale secondary disaster. The Japanese Association for Acute Medicine (JAAM) launched the 'Emergency Task Force on the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Accident' and sent physicians to the local response headquarters. Thirty-four physicians were dispatched as disaster medical advisors, response guidelines in the event of multitudinous injury victims were created and revised and, along with execution of drills, coordination and advice was given on transport of patients. Forty-nine physicians acted as directing physicians, taking on the tasks of triage, initial treatment and decontamination. A total of 261 patients were attended to by the dispatched physicians. None of the eight patients with external contamination developed acute radiation syndrome. In an environment where the collaboration between organisations in the framework of a vertically bound government and multiple agencies and institutions was certainly not seamless, the participation of the JAAM as the medical academic organisation in the local system presented the opportunity to laterally integrate the physicians affiliated with the respective organisations from the perspective of specialisation.

  20. Usage of emergency contraception between medical related and non-medical related students.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Khalid, A K

    2009-04-01

    Teenagers and young adultshave the most risk of unplanned pregnancy, due to lack of awareness to see a family planning provider after unprotected sexual intercourse. In addition, nearly one in five physicians is reluctant to provide information regarding Emergency Contraception (EC) to women and this may contribute to their lack of awareness. This study was conducted to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding the use of EC between medical related students compared to non-medical related students. Data collection was done using questionnaires distributed among students in University College Cork (UCC). 93% of medically related students were aware of EC compared to only 73.5% of non-medically related students. Medical related students also were more aware about the mechanism of action and detailed knowledge of EC compared to the non-medical students. This study has proven that medically related students have more detailed knowledge regarding EC compared to non-medical related students. However, there was no significant difference noted regarding the attitude and practice between the two groups.

  1. 24 CFR 291.530 - Eligible firefighter/emergency medical technicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... medical technicians. A person qualifies as a firefighter/emergency medical technician for the purposes of... technician by a fire department or emergency medical services responder unit of the federal government, a... medical technicians. 291.530 Section 291.530 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to......

  2. Simulation of Emergency Medical Services Delivery Performance Based on Real Map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Hafiz Azizan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Performance of Emergency Medical Services (EMS delivery is normally measured via ambulance response time. Quick ambulance response can effectively reduce the disability, morbidity and mortality of the emergency patients. Ambulance dispatch policy and ambulance location model both have a significant impact on the ambulance response time. In this paper, we present a prototype of simulation framework to study the performance of local EMS delivery in terms of a simulation model that consists of both ambulance dispatch policy and ambulance location model. Several real-life dispatch policies are simulated in a real map to evaluate the efficiency of local EMS delivery in Johor Bahru. By using a suitable dispatch policy, the results show an improvement in average response time for higher priority call. The total calls covered are also found to increase significantly with the application of Maximal Covering Location Problem (MCLP, especially at a bigger fleet size.

  3. Emergency Department Wounds Managed by Combat Medics: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, Steven G; Pfaff, James A

    2017-03-01

    Combat medics are an integral part of their unit helping to conserve the fighting strength. Minor wounds are a common problem in the deployed settings that affect a soldier's ability to partake in operations. While the medics often manage wound care, there is very little data on the outcomes. Cases were acquired as part of a quality assurance project providing training feedback to medics on wound management. Laceration management is delegated to the medic at the direction of the provider. Follow-up included a series of short questions regarding wound outcomes: infection, revision, and cosmetic outcome (extremely satisfied = 1, unsatisfied = 5). Chart review was used when direct follow-up with the patient was not available for the remainder of the wounds. The project period was from May 2014 to June 2015. During this time there were 30 wound repairs documented. Direct contact follow-up was available for 57% of the encounters, the remainder was via chart review. The location of the wounds were as follows: facial 5, head/neck 0, upper extremity (excluding hand) 3, hand 16, lower extremity 5, and trunk 1. The average wound length was 2.98 cm (range, 0.8-8.0 cm). No wounds became infected. No wounds required revision. The average cosmetic rating was 1.8 (95% confidence interval = 1.48-2.12). In this series of wounds closed by medics in the emergency department no complications or revisions were necessary. Further research is needed to determine if this can be extrapolated to other military settings. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  4. Evaluation of preparedness for medical emergencies among dental practitioners in Khammam town: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Surya Chandra Varma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Medical emergencies can occur frequently in the dental setting. Effective management of an emergency situation in the dental office is ultimately the dentist responsibility. The assessment of preparedness of dental practitioners would help to bring about required changes in the teaching aspects of dental institutions, which would ultimately help dental graduates to improve knowledge regarding management of medical emergencies. This would also make dental offices available with required emergency drugs. Aim: To evaluate the preparedness for medical emergencies among the dental practitioners in Khammam town. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire-based study with a sample of 301 was conducted among dental clinicians at Khammam to evaluate their knowledge regarding medical emergencies. The questionnaire consisted of nineteen questions. First nine questions are objective questions, requiring a simple yes or no reply. Next ten questions are multiple choice questions regarding Emergency Medical Services and basic life support. Chi-square test was used to analyze the data. A P < 0.05 is considered significant. Results: The results of this study showed that almost all the participants (94.02% enquired about medical and drug history, but only 67.11% of them obtained a complete health history proforma of the patient. About 83.06% record vital signs, 74.09% of members report about attending workshops on emergency training and management, and 50.5% of members were either not sure or not in a position to handle the emergency condition. Conclusion: The results of this study reflect an alarming situation of the capability of dentists to deal with medical emergencies at dental offices and make available all the emergency drugs at their offices.

  5. [Elemental status of the medical personnel of the emergency medical services in the city of Khanty-Mansiysk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korchina, T Ya; Kuzmenko, A P; Korchina, I V

    2014-01-01

    Spectrometric analysis of hair from 110 medical workers (54--from the Emergency medical services and 56--from polyclinics) was performed with the use of atomic emission spectrometry and mass spectrometry, inductively coupled argon plasma spectrometry (AES-ISP) methods. There were revealed features of the elemental status of the medical personnel of the Emergency medical services: a deficiency of Mg, K and Li was typical for this group (presented more then in half of cases).

  6. [Medical civil responsibility in the year 2000].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rougé-Maillart, C; Pessaux, P; Gosset, D; Penneau, M

    2001-10-01

    In France, during the last year, important jurisprudence was established by the French Supreme Court of Appeal concerning the physician's civil responsibility. On october 7, 1998, the Court decided that "the physician is not exempted for the obligation to provide information by the simple fact that these risks only materialize exceptionally". This means that from now, the physician must inform the patient of all risks that might influence the patient's decision, particularly information concerning life-threatening or severe consequences, but also, as in the past, concerning frequent even benign consequences. The limits of this jurisprudence and the completeness of the information, as established in 1998, are emergency, patient refusal and impossibility to inform the patient. In the decree of May 23, 2000, the Court gave its definition of impossibility to inform the patient, thus establishing the "therapeutic limits". But the judges recognized that the requirement for information delivery is independent of the necessary or unnecessary nature of the therapeutic act. However, in the decree of June 20, 2000, the Court established the conditions for awarding indemnities for defective information delivery. Defective information delivery is not sufficient in itself to constitute a civil offense. Real damage is also necessary. To be awarded with an indemnity, the patient must prove that the lack of information affected his/her decision to consent. If it appears that even if he/she had been well informed, the patient had consented to the care given, the physician would not be obliged to provide the patient with an indemnity. The judges want to find a compensation and make the proof easier for the patient. They accept the potential fault when an organ was injured in the course of an operation. But, these decisions concern the proof and they don't modify the medical responsibility. The physicians have got a duty to use reasonable skill and care and they don't have any

  7. Improving acute medical management: Junior Doctor Emergency Prescription Cards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, Joe; Gingell, Megan; Hutchinson, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Doctors commencing Foundation Year (FY) training face many stresses and challenges. FY doctors are often the first point of contact for acutely unwell and deteriorating patients. Trust guidelines are used to aid acute medical management. Accessing guidelines is often fraught with barriers. Evidence suggests aide-memoire cards can provide easier access to guidelines and management pathways. We aimed to improve prescribing accuracy and efficiency of FY doctors for acute medical conditions within Gloucestershire trust by improving access to and usability of trust guidelines. Questionnaires were distributed to FY doctors to identify acute medical conditions to include on the emergency prescription cards (EPCs). Two small double-sided cards were created containing bullet pointed trust guidelines for: hyper/hypokalaemia, status epilepticus, diabetic emergencies, arrhythmias, myocardial infarction, acute asthma, pulmonary oedema, anaphylaxis and a ward-round checklist. Feedback was used to improve EPCs prior to distribution. Pre (N=53) and post-intervention (N=46) written questionnaires were completed by FY doctors. These assessed acute clinical management including use of guidance, confidence in management, speed of prescribing and EPC "usability". To assess prescribing accuracy, prescriptions for acute medical conditions were reviewed pre (N=8) and post-intervention (N=12). The EPCs were well received (80% quite/very useful) and found "easy to use" (83%). The introduction of EPCs increased guidance use (pre-intervention 58.8%, post-intervention 71.7%), increased confidence (pre-intervention 79%, post-intervention 89%) and significantly improved prescribing speed (p=0.05). There was a significant correlation with confidence and prescribing speed (p = 0.023). The accuracy of prescribed doses improved (pre-intervention 62.5%, post-intervention 87.5% accurate) as did details regarding route / additional required information (pre-intervention 75%, post-intervention 97

  8. Emergency department crowding and risk of preventable medical errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Stephen K; Huckins, David S; Liu, Shan W; Pallin, Daniel J; Sullivan, Ashley F; Lipton, Robert I; Camargo, Carlos A

    2012-04-01

    The objective of the study is to determine the association between emergency department (ED) crowding and preventable medical errors (PME). This was a retrospective cohort study of 533 ED patients enrolled in the National ED Safety Study (NEDSS) in four Massachusetts EDs. Individual patients' average exposure to ED crowding during their ED visit was compared with the occurrence of a PME (yes/no) for the three diagnostic categories in NEDSS: acute myocardial infarction, asthma exacerbation, and dislocation requiring procedural sedation. To accommodate site-to-site differences in available administrative data, ED crowding was measured using one of three previously validated crowding metrics (ED Work Index, ED Workscore, and ED Occupancy). At each site, the continuous measure was placed into site-specific quartiles, and these quartiles then were combined across sites. We found that 46 (8.6%; 95% confidence interval, 6.4-11.3%) of the 533 patients experienced a PME. For those seen during higher levels of ED crowding (quartile 4 vs. quartile 1), the occurrence of PMEs was more than twofold higher, both on unadjusted analysis and adjusting for two potential confounders (diagnosis, site). The association appeared non-linear, with most PMEs occurring at the highest crowding level. We identified a direct association between high levels of ED crowding and risk of preventable medical errors. Further study is needed to determine the generalizability of these results. Should such research confirm our findings, we would suggest that mitigating ED crowding may reduce the occurrence of preventable medical errors.

  9. On emergencies and emigration: how (not) to justify compulsory medical service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Michael

    2016-04-20

    I have argued that the best way to understand the supposed right to restrict emigration is with reference to the concept of an emergency; restrictions on emigration are permitted, if at all, only as responses to an emergency situation, and must be judged with reference to the ethics of responding to such an emergency. Eszter Kollar argues, against this, that the concept of 'emergency' fails to describe the actual situation in low/middle-income countries, in which shortages of medical personnel are long-standing problems; she also argues that there is no need to invoke the concept of an emergency, when we might simply discuss these restrictions with reference to the relative importance of the human goods and interests involved. I argue, against Kollar, that we have no reason to think that an emergency must involve novelty; if the moral stakes are significant enough, we have reason to think of a situation as an emergency, regardless of when that situation began. I argue, too, that we have reason to differentiate between restrictions of liberties undertaken as part of the process of specifying liberal freedoms and emergency restrictions of those liberties defended by liberalism itself. The latter, I suggest, ought to be recognised and defended as a distinct moral category, if only to recognise the continuing moral remainder when a liberal right is temporarily suspended under emergency circumstances. I conclude that a permission to restrict emigration is, if at all, only justifiable as an emergency response to unfavourable circumstances, and ought not to be analysed in the more conventional liberal terms Kollar deploys.

  10. [The notion of medical responsibility. Current evolution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, J

    1998-01-01

    Medical responsibility can be evaluated from a penal or a civil standpoint. In the first case it is referable to common law or other specific provisions, notably those included in the laws voted on July 29 1994. In the second case it is viewed within the contractual relationship, since the physician's obligation is theoretically one of means and not of results. The circumstances under which medical responsibility is questioned have evolved under the influence of three factors affecting the medical art: it is now characterized by techniques that have often become scientific; team practice; an increase in patients' demands. Nonetheless it is most important to maintain a genuine relationship of trust between physician and patient.

  11. The Longitudinal Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) Attributes and Demographics Study (LEADS): The First 10 Years and a Look at Public Perception of Emergency Medical Services (EMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Remle P; Bentley, Melissa A; Levine, Roger

    2016-12-01

    Crowe RP , Bentley MA , Levine R . The Longitudinal Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) Attributes and Demographics Study (LEADS): the first 10 years and a look at public perception of Emergency Medical Services (EMS). Prehosp Disaster Med. 2016;31(Suppl. 1):s1-s6.

  12. Smartphones and Medical Apps in the Practice of Emergency Medicine in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirhosein Jahanshir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Medical applications help physicians to make more rapid and evidence based decisions that may provide better patient care. This study aimed to determine the extent to which smart phones and medical applications are integrated in the emergency department daily practice.Method: In a cross sectional study, a modified standard questionnaire (Payne et al. consisting of demographic data and information regarding quality and quantity of smartphone and medical app utilization was sent to emergency-medicine residents and interns twice (two weeks apart, in January 2015. The questionnaire was put online using open access "Web-form Module" and the address of the web page was e-mailed along with a cover letter explaining the survey. Finally, responses were analyzed using descriptive statistics and SPSS 22 software.Results: 65 cases participated (response rate 86%. The mean age of interns and residents were 25.03 ± 1.13 and 30.27 ± 4.68 years, respectively (p < 0.001. There was no significant difference between interns and residents in owning a smartphone (p = 0.5. Android was more popular than IOS (67.7% against 25.8% and the most popular medical apps were Medscape and UpToDate, respectively. 38 (61.3% of the respondents were using their apps more than once a day and mostly for drug information. English (83.9%, Persian (12.9%, and other languages (3.2% were preferred languages for designing a medical software among the participants, respectively.Conclusion: The findings of present study showed that smartphones are very popular among Iranian interns and residents in emergency department and a substantial number of them own a smartphone and are using medical apps regularly in their clinical practice. 

  13. The Impact of Medical Student Participation in Emergency Medicine Patient Care on Departmental Press Ganey Scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron W. Bernard

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Press Ganey (PG scores are used by public entities to gauge the quality of patient care from medical facilities in the United States. Academic health centers (AHCs are charged with educating the new generation of doctors, but rely heavily on PG scores for their business operation. AHCs need to know what impact medical student involvement has on patient care and their PG scores. Purpose: We sought to identify the impact students have on emergency department (ED PG scores related to overall visit and the treating physician’s performance. Methods: This was a retrospective, observational cohort study of discharged ED patients who completed PG satisfaction surveys at one academic, and one community-based ED. Outcomes were responses to questions about the overall visit assessment and doctor’s care, measured on a five-point scale. We compared the distribution of responses for each question through proportions with 95% confidence intervals (CIs stratified by medical student participation. For each question, we constructed a multivariable ordinal logistic regression model including medical student involvement and other independent variables known to affect PG scores. Results: We analyzed 2,753 encounters, of which 259 (9.4% had medical student involvement. For all questions, there were no appreciable differences in patient responses when stratifying by medical student involvement. In regression models, medical student involvement was not associated with PG score for any outcome, including overall rating of care (odds ratio [OR] 1.10, 95% CI [0.90-1.34] or likelihood of recommending our EDs (OR 1.07, 95% CI [0.86-1.32]. Findings were similar when each ED was analyzed individually. Conclusion: We found that medical student involvement in patient care did not adversely impact ED PG scores in discharged patients. Neither overall scores nor physician-specific scores were impacted. Results were similar at both the academic medical center and

  14. The Impact of Medical Student Participation in Emergency Medicine Patient Care on Departmental Press Ganey Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Aaron W.; Martin, Daniel R.; Moseley, Mark G.; Kman, Nicholas E.; Khandelwal, Sorabh; Carpenter, Daniel; Way, David P.; Caterino, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Press Ganey (PG) scores are used by public entities to gauge the quality of patient care from medical facilities in the United States. Academic health centers (AHCs) are charged with educating the new generation of doctors, but rely heavily on PG scores for their business operation. AHCs need to know what impact medical student involvement has on patient care and their PG scores. Purpose We sought to identify the impact students have on emergency department (ED) PG scores related to overall visit and the treating physician’s performance. Methods This was a retrospective, observational cohort study of discharged ED patients who completed PG satisfaction surveys at one academic, and one community-based ED. Outcomes were responses to questions about the overall visit assessment and doctor’s care, measured on a five-point scale. We compared the distribution of responses for each question through proportions with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) stratified by medical student participation. For each question, we constructed a multivariable ordinal logistic regression model including medical student involvement and other independent variables known to affect PG scores. Results We analyzed 2,753 encounters, of which 259 (9.4%) had medical student involvement. For all questions, there were no appreciable differences in patient responses when stratifying by medical student involvement. In regression models, medical student involvement was not associated with PG score for any outcome, including overall rating of care (odds ratio [OR] 1.10, 95% CI [0.90–1.34]) or likelihood of recommending our EDs (OR 1.07, 95% CI [0.86–1.32]). Findings were similar when each ED was analyzed individually. Conclusion We found that medical student involvement in patient care did not adversely impact ED PG scores in discharged patients. Neither overall scores nor physician-specific scores were impacted. Results were similar at both the academic medical center and the community

  15. Challenges implementing bar-coded medication administration in the emergency room in comparison to medical surgical units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Nancy

    2013-03-01

    Bar-coded medication administration has been successfully implemented and utilized to decrease medication errors at a number of hospitals in recent years. The purpose of this article was to discuss the varying success in utilization of bar-coded medication administration on medical-surgical units and in the emergency department. Utilization reports were analyzed to better understand the challenges between the units. Many factors negatively impacted utilization in the emergency department, including the inability to use bar-coded medication administration for verbal orders or to document medications distributed by the prescribing providers, unique aspects of emergency department nursing workflow, additional steps to chart when using bar-coded medication administration, and alert fatigue. Hardware problems affected all users. Bar-coded medication administration in its current form is more suitable for use on medical-surgical floors than in the emergency department. New solutions should be developed for bar-coded medication administration in the emergency department, keeping in mind requirements to chart medications when there is no order in the system, document medications distributed by prescribing providers, adapt to unpredictable nursing workflow, minimize steps to chart with bar-coded medication administration, limit alerts to those that are clinically meaningful, and choose reliable hardware with adequate bar-code scanning capability.

  16. Disparities in Feedback Provision to Emergency Medical Services Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cash, Rebecca E; Crowe, Remle P; Rodriguez, Severo A; Panchal, Ashish R

    2017-06-16

    Feedback to EMS professionals is a critical component for optimizing patient care and outcomes in the prehospital setting. There is a paucity of data concerning the feedback received by prehospital providers. The objective of this study was to describe the prevalence of feedback received by EMS professionals in the past 30 days including the types, sources, modes, and utility of feedback. The secondary objective was to identify factors associated with receiving any feedback and, specifically, feedback regarding medical care provided. This was a cross-sectional survey examining currently practicing nationally certified EMS patient care providers (EMT or higher) in non-military and non-tribal settings. Data were collected on provider characteristics along with feedback received. Descriptive statistics were calculated, and multivariable logistic regression models were constructed to assess the relationship between EMS provider characteristics and receiving feedback. A non-respondent survey was administered to assess for non-response bias. Responses from 32,314 EMS providers were received (response rate = 10.4%) with 15,766 meeting inclusion criteria. In the 30 days preceding the survey, 69.4% (n = 10,924) of respondents received at least one type of feedback with 54.7% (n = 8,592) reporting receiving medical care feedback. Multivariable logistic regression modeling indicated that higher certification level, fewer years of experience in EMS, working for a hospital-based agency, air medical service, and higher weekly call volumes were significantly associated with increased odds of having received at least one type of feedback, and specifically medical care feedback. Additionally, providing primarily medical/convalescent transport and more years of EMS experience were significantly associated with decreased odds of receiving feedback. Feedback to EMS providers is critical to improving prehospital care. In this study, nearly a third of providers did not receive any

  17. Emergency Department Crowding and Loss of Medical Licensure: A New Risk of Patient Care in Hallways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W. Derlet

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 32-year-old male recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes treated at an urban university emergency department (ED crowded to 250% over capacity. His initial symptoms of shortness of breath and feeling ill for several days were evaluated with chest radiograph, electrocardiogram (EKG, and laboratory studies, which suggested mild diabetic ketoacidosis. His medical care in the ED was conducted in a crowded hallway. After correction of his metabolic abnormalities he felt improved and was discharged with arrangements made for outpatient follow-up. Two days later he returned in cardiac arrest, and resuscitation efforts failed. The autopsy was significant for multiple acute and chronic pulmonary emboli but no coronary artery disease. The hospital settled the case for $1 million and allocated major responsibility to the treating emergency physician (EP. As a result the state medical board named the EP in a disciplinary action, claiming negligence because the EKG had not been personally interpreted by that physician. A formal hearing was conducted with the EP’s medical license placed in jeopardy. This case illustrates the risk to EPs who treat patients in crowded hallways, where it is difficult to provide the highest level of care. This case also demonstrates the failure of hospital administration to accept responsibility and provide resources to the ED to ensure patient safety. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(2:137–141.

  18. [Antenatal emergency call. Indications. Role of the SAMU (Medical Emergency Care Services)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallemand, E; Drouet, N; Faudemay, C; Lacroute, J M; Menthonnex, P

    1989-01-01

    The increased incidence of antenatal distress calls to the SAMU (emergency medical squad) by pediatric obstetricians in maternity departments (6 times in 5 years) poses the problem of recognizing their indications. Based on case reports of 128 newborns who profited from antenatal assistance, the authors attempt to define the indications. The elimination of student physicians in training for anesthesiology-intensive care, additional participants during SAMU transportation of patients, makes it even more necessary to define these indications accurately so that a single language of communication and procedure may be instituted for all who are involved in this effort.

  19. Naegleria fowleri: a free living amoeba of emerging medical importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parija, S C; Jayakeerthee, S R

    1999-09-01

    Naegleria fowleri, a free-living amoeba is ubiquitous and word-wide in distribution. Infection is due to inhalation or aspiration of aerosols containing cysts found in the environment. Of late, the amoeba is emerging as a pathogen of medical importance causing primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) in humans. The diagnosis of the condition is mainly parasitic which depends on the detection and identification of Naegleria trophozoites in the cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) or biopsied brain tissue. Serological tests are not useful in the diagnosis of PAM. Most cases are fatal and various amoebicidal agents have been tried unsuccessfully. The present paper provides a review of the recent information on the biology and epidemiology of the disease caused by the amoeba Approaches in the diagnosis, pathophysiology and treatment of the condition are also discussed.

  20. Simulation of medical emergencies in dental practice: development and evaluation of an undergraduate training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newby, J P; Keast, J; Adam, W R

    2010-12-01

    The evidence available suggests that many dentists on graduation do not feel competent managing medical emergencies; a problem requiring improved undergraduate training. This study developed a comprehensive simulation based training programme for final year undergraduate dental students and assessed student attitudes towards training. Final year dental students (n = 52) from The University of Melbourne were required to complete simulation training incorporating an interactive tutorial and realistic, simulated emergency scenarios conducted in the students' real clinical environment. A post-participation questionnaire utilizing a 5-point Likert scale (1 = strongly disagree, 5 = strongly agree) assessed student attitudes. Student responses supported simulation training, evidenced by the following selected questionnaire responses: achieved greater confidence in managing emergencies 4.65 ± 0.48 (n = 52); prefer lecture to simulation 1.46 ± 0.74 (n = 52); simulation training is important in undergraduate teaching 4.86 ± 0.35 (n = 43). Realistic simulation training in management of medical emergencies for dental students is an effective adjunct to traditional lecture style teaching. Given the importance of this subject, this mode of training would benefit students if incorporated into undergraduate dental courses. © 2010 Australian Dental Association.

  1. An academic medical center's response to widespread computer failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genes, Nicholas; Chary, Michael; Chason, Kevin W

    2013-01-01

    As hospitals incorporate information technology (IT), their operations become increasingly vulnerable to technological breakdowns and attacks. Proper emergency management and business continuity planning require an approach to identify, mitigate, and work through IT downtime. Hospitals can prepare for these disasters by reviewing case studies. This case study details the disruption of computer operations at Mount Sinai Medical Center (MSMC), an urban academic teaching hospital. The events, and MSMC's response, are narrated and the impact on hospital operations is analyzed. MSMC's disaster management strategy prevented computer failure from compromising patient care, although walkouts and time-to-disposition in the emergency department (ED) notably increased. This incident highlights the importance of disaster preparedness and mitigation. It also demonstrates the value of using operational data to evaluate hospital responses to disasters. Quantifying normal hospital functions, just as with a patient's vital signs, may help quantitatively evaluate and improve disaster management and business continuity planning.

  2. Emergency Medicine: On the Frontlines of Medical Education Transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric S. Holmboe

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Emergency medicine (EM has always been on the frontlines of healthcare in the United States. I experienced this reality first hand as a young general medical officer assigned to an emergency department (ED in a small naval hospital in the 1980s. For decades the ED has been the only site where patients could not be legally denied care. Despite increased insurance coverage for millions of Americans as a result of the Affordable Care Act, ED directors report an increase in patient volumes in a recent survey.1 EDs care for patients from across the socioeconomic spectrum suffering from a wide range of clinical conditions. As a result, the ED is still one of few components of the American healthcare system where social justice is enacted on a regular basis. Constant turbulence in the healthcare system, major changes in healthcare delivery, technological advances and shifting demographic trends necessitate that EM constantly adapt and evolve as a discipline in this complex environment.

  3. Use of emergency medical identification in the paediatric haemophilia population: a national study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorlin, J B; Hooke, M C; Leonard, N

    2011-03-01

    The use of emergency medical identification (EMI) such as MedicAlert(®) has been recommended for use in a variety of medical conditions; however, there is no consensus as to what form should be used and where they should be placed. There are also no uniform guidelines to direct first responders to where they should look for EMI in an emergency. The aim of this study was to identify current paediatric haemophilia nursing practice in educating families about EMI and their perceptions of patient/family adherence to using EMI. US haemophilia nurses listed on the Center for Disease Control's website received an email invitation to participate in a 30-item questionnaire posted on Survey-Monkey. Survey responses showed a wide variety of responses concerning recommendations about the form and location of EMI, particularly in the infant population. Nurses also reported that EMI was often not worn on the body and had low overall adherence. In the infant and preschool population, this was due to safety concerns, sizing, cost and parents not seeing the need for EMI. In school age and adolescents, the barrier to wearing EMI included stigma, cost and sizing. Collaboration is needed among nursing and medical staff, first responders, emergency room staff and manufacturers of EMI to develop standardized EMI which address these issues. Standard educational guidelines are needed to teach nurses and patient/families about the forms and location of EMI. Additionally, national guidelines are needed for the identification of paediatric EMI by first responders and emergency room staff. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. [The place, role and importance of emergency medical care in the Serbian health care system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikić-Sovilj, Ljiljana

    2009-01-01

    Emergency medical assistance is immediate, the current medical support that is provided hurted person to avoid any possible harmful consequences for his life and health. Emergency medical aid is part of the health care system that is rarely thought, but is still expected to be available always and continuously in case of need. Emergency medical assistance should always be available throughout the territory where people live, because there is no adequate replacement. Emergency Medical Services and emergency medical transportation services are health care that is provided in terms of all persons in the state of medical urgency. In urgent or emergency conditions, health care can be provided on the site of injuries and disease or health institution. Cases of medical urgency are ranked by degrees. The first and most difficult level of medical urgency indicate all urgent pathological conditions, diseases, injuries and poisoning, which occur in the workplace and public places. To expect medical team of emergency medical assistance at the scene intervened medical urgency, it is necessary to make call it. Call the phone number refers to the 94. Call sent to this number to receive orderly dispatcher. Dispatchers are employees who perform their work in the dispatching center. They appear in the phone number 94, made the assessment and screening calls, worry about the degree of urgency, and the absorption team, which team is the nearest place of the event. After received calls they send expert medical teams to the place of accident. In the dispatching center work always doctor and medical technician. Emergency medical care cases is a great professional and educational challenge and imposes a constant need in education of doctors and the whole emergency medical teams. Education of all employees in the state of emergency care is required continualy and for students too to receive new knowledge in the field of medical urgency by various professional purposes.

  5. Current trends in gamma radiation detection for radiological emergency response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Guss, Paul; Maurer, Richard

    2011-09-01

    Passive and active detection of gamma rays from shielded radioactive materials, including special nuclear materials, is an important task for any radiological emergency response organization. This article reports on the current trends and status of gamma radiation detection objectives and measurement techniques as applied to nonproliferation and radiological emergencies. In recent years, since the establishment of the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office by the Department of Homeland Security, a tremendous amount of progress has been made in detection materials (scintillators, semiconductors), imaging techniques (Compton imaging, use of active masking and hybrid imaging), data acquisition systems with digital signal processing, field programmable gate arrays and embedded isotopic analysis software (viz. gamma detector response and analysis software [GADRAS]1), fast template matching, and data fusion (merging radiological data with geo-referenced maps, digital imagery to provide better situational awareness). In this stride to progress, a significant amount of inter-disciplinary research and development has taken place-techniques and spin-offs from medical science (such as x-ray radiography and tomography), materials engineering (systematic planned studies on scintillators to optimize several qualities of a good scintillator, nanoparticle applications, quantum dots, and photonic crystals, just to name a few). No trend analysis of radiation detection systems would be complete without mentioning the unprecedented strategic position taken by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to deter, detect, and interdict illicit trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive materials across international borders and through the global maritime transportation-the so-called second line of defense.

  6. Perception of stroke symptoms and utilization of emergency medical services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximiliano A. Hawkes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Lack of stroke awareness and slow activation of emergency medical services (EMS are frequently reported reasons for delayed arrival to the hospital. We evaluated these variables in our population. Methods Review of hospital records and structured telephone interviews of 100 consecutive stroke patients. Forward stepwise logistic regression was used for the statistical analysis. Results Seventy patients (75% arrived at the hospital 4.5 hours after stroke symptoms onset. The use of EMS did not improve arrival times. Most patients who recognized their symptoms did not use EMS (p < 0.02. Nineteen patients (20% were initially misdiagnosed. Eighteen of them were first assessed by non-neurologist physicians (p < 0.001. Conclusions Our population showed a low level of stroke awareness. The use of EMS did not improve arrival times at the hospital and the non-utilization of the EMS was associated with the recognition of stroke symptoms. There was a concerning rate of misdiagnosis, mostly by non-neurologist medical providers.

  7. Telehealth-Enabled Emergency Medical Services Program Reduces Ambulance Transport to Urban Emergency Departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R. Langabeer II

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Emergency medical services (EMS agencies transport a significant majority of patients with low acuity and non-emergent conditions to local emergency departments (ED, affecting the entire emergency care system’s capacity and performance. Opportunities exist for alternative models that integrate technology, telehealth, and more appropriately aligned patient navigation. While a limited number of programs have evolved recently, no empirical evidence exists for their efficacy. This research describes the development and comparative effectiveness of one large urban program. Methods: The Houston Fire Department initiated the Emergency Telehealth and Navigation (ETHAN program in 2014. ETHAN combines telehealth, social services, and alternative transportation to navigate primary care-related patients away from the ED where possible. Using a case-control study design, we describe the program and compare differences in effectiveness measures relative to the control group. Results: During the first 12 months, 5,570 patients participated in the telehealth-enabled program, which were compared against the same size control group. We found a 56% absolute reduction in ambulance transports to the ED with the intervention compared to the control group (18% vs. 74%, P<.001. EMS productivity (median time from EMS notification to unit back in service was 44 minutes faster for the ETHAN group (39 vs. 83 minutes, median. There were no statistically significant differences in mortality or patient satisfaction. Conclusion: We found that mobile technology-driven delivery models are effective at reducing unnecessary ED ambulance transports and increasing EMS unit productivity. This provides support for broader EMS mobile integrated health programs in other regions.

  8. Medical Emergency Team syndromes and an approach to their management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Daryl; Duke, Graeme; Green, John; Briedis, Juris; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Casamento, Andrew; Kattula, Andrea; Way, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Most literature on the medical emergency team (MET) relates to its effects on patient outcome. Less information exists on the most common causes of MET calls or on possible approaches to their management. Methods We reviewed the calling criteria and clinical causes of 400 MET calls in a teaching hospital. We propose a set of minimum standards for managing a MET review and developed an approach for managing common problems encountered during MET calls. Results The underlying reasons for initiating MET calls were hypoxia (41%), hypotension (28%), altered conscious state (23%), tachycardia (19%), increased respiratory rate (14%) and oliguria (8%). Infection, pulmonary oedema, and arrhythmias featured as prominent causes of all triggers for MET calls. The proposed minimum requirements for managing a MET review included determining the cause of the deterioration, documenting the events surrounding the MET, establishing a medical plan and ongoing medical follow-up, and discussing the case with the intensivist if certain criteria were fulfilled. A systematic approach to managing episodes of MET review was developed based on the acronym 'A to G': ask and assess; begin basic investigations and resuscitation, call for help if needed, discuss, decide, and document, explain aetiology and management, follow-up, and graciously thank staff. This approach was then adapted to provide a management plan for episodes of tachycardia, hypotension, hypoxia and dyspnoea, reduced urinary output, and altered conscious state. Conclusion A suggested approach permits audit and standardization of the management of MET calls and provides an educational framework for the management of acutely unwell ward patients. Further evaluation and validation of the approach are required. PMID:16507153

  9. 14 CFR 135.271 - Helicopter hospital emergency medical evacuation service (HEMES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ....271 Helicopter hospital emergency medical evacuation service (HEMES). (a) No certificate holder may... assignment, for hospital emergency medical evacuation service helicopter operations unless that assignment... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Helicopter hospital emergency...

  10. Examining Career Success of Minority and Women Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs): A LEADS Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ-Eft, Darlene F.; Dickison, Philip D.; Levine, Roger

    2008-01-01

    Emergency medical technicians (EMTs) are a critical segment in prehospital medical care. This study examined EMT-paramedic career success focused on minorities and women, as part of the Longitudinal Emergency Medical Technician Attributes and Demographics Study (LEADS). The LEADS data come from a representative sampling of EMTs throughout the…

  11. Short radiological emergency response training program. [Radiological emergency response training program outline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, R.D.; Greenhouse, N.A.

    1977-01-01

    This paper presents an outline of a radiological emergency response training program conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory by the health physics and safety training staff. This course is given to groups from local, county, state, and federal agencies and industrial organizations. It is normally three days in length, although the structure is flexible to accommodate individual needs and prior training. An important feature of the course is an emergency exercise utilizing a short lived radionuclide to better simulate real accident conditions. Groups are encouraged to use their own instruments to gain better familiarity with their operating characteristics under field conditions. Immediately following the exercise, a critical review of the students' performance is conducted.

  12. The knowledge about diagnostic imaging methods among primary care and medical emergency physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Mendes Araujo Borem

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the knowledge about diagnostic imaging methods among primary care and medical emergency physicians. Materials and Methods Study developed with 119 primary care and medical emergency physicians in Montes Claros, MG, Brazil, by means of a structured questionnaire about general knowledge and indications of imaging methods in common clinical settings. A rate of correct responses corresponding to ≥ 80% was considered as satisfactory. The Poisson regression (PR model was utilized in the data analysis. Results Among the 81 individuals who responded the questionnaire, 65% (n = 53 demonstrated to have satisfactory general knowledge and 44% (n = 36 gave correct responses regarding indications of imaging methods. Respectively, 65% (n = 53 and 51% (n = 41 of the respondents consider that radiography and computed tomography do not use ionizing radiation. The prevalence of a satisfactory general knowledge about imaging methods was associated with medical residency in the respondents' work field (PR = 4.55; IC 95%: 1.18-16.67; p-value: 0.03, while the prevalence of correct responses regarding indication of imaging methods was associated with the professional practice in primary health care (PR = 1.79; IC 95%: 1.16-2.70; p-value: 0.01. Conclusion Major deficiencies were observed as regards the knowledge about imaging methods among physicians, with better results obtained by those involved in primary health care and by residents.

  13. [The medical responsibility of an allergist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilanova, J

    1998-02-01

    The professional civil responsibility of an allergy physician should be restored to the more general framework of medical responsibility. This is at present the objective of considerable public debate. From now on it is known that the developments at present and to come for the most part go beyond the strict requirement of the juridical process. They take up fully a real choice of society. What place do we wish to give to physicians in the future? What new outlines relating to care should be adopted? What must be done for the victims of medical accidents? These are the fundamental questions that we ask ourselves today. The choices that apply, influence, must persuade our society, its made of action and the relationships between the various' components. It must be said that the stakes are enormous. It must also be said that all of this will not be achieved without clashes.

  14. Fight or flight: the ethics of emergency physician disaster response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iserson, Kenneth V; Heine, Carlton E; Larkin, Gregory Luke; Moskop, John C; Baruch, Jay; Aswegan, Andrew L

    2008-04-01

    Most disaster plans depend on using emergency physicians, nurses, emergency department support staff, and out-of-hospital personnel to maintain the health care system's front line during crises that involve personal risk to themselves or their families. Planners automatically assume that emergency health care workers will respond. However, we need to ask: Should they, and will they, work rather than flee? The answer involves basic moral and personal issues. This article identifies and examines the factors that influence health care workers' decisions in these situations. After reviewing physicians' response to past disasters and epidemics, we evaluate how much danger they actually faced. Next, we examine guidelines from medical professional organizations about physicians' duty to provide care despite personal risks, although we acknowledge that individuals will interpret and apply professional expectations and norms according to their own situation and values. The article goes on to articulate moral arguments for a duty to treat during disasters and social crises, as well as moral reasons that may limit or override such a duty. How fear influences behavior is examined, as are the institutional and social measures that can be taken to control fear and to encourage health professionals to provide treatment in crisis situations. Finally, the article emphasizes the importance of effective risk communication in enabling health care professionals and the public to make informed and defensible decisions during disasters. We conclude that the decision to stay or leave will ultimately depend on individuals' risk assessment and their value systems. Preparations for the next pandemic or disaster should include policies that encourage emergency physicians, who are inevitably among those at highest risk, to "stay and fight."

  15. [Oil and Hazardous Substance Spill Response Emergencies

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A major oil or hazardous substance spill may constitute an emergency situation requiring prompt actions by the Service to protect threatened natural resources. This...

  16. Bearing response-ability: theater, ethics and medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossiter, Kate

    2012-03-01

    This paper addresses a growing concern within the medical humanities community regarding the perceived need for a more empathically-focused medical curricula, and advocates for the use of creative pedagogical forms as a means to attend to issues of suffering and relationality. Drawing from the ethical philosophy of Emmanuel Levinas, I critique the notion of empathy on the basis that it erases difference and disregards otherness. Rather, I propose that the concept of empathy may be usefully replaced with that of ethical responsibility, which suggests a shared sense of humanity outside the boundaries of presumed knowledge of the other. To illustrate this argument, I theorize the importance of theater within medical education. Theater, I argue, may engender ethical responsibility in the Levinasian sense, and thus may allow learners to differently engage with the experience of the suffering other. As such, I examine Margaret Edson's widely used play Wit as a platform for such an ethical encounter to occur. Thus, rather than working to understand the value of theater in medical education in terms of knowledge and skill acquisition, I theorize that its primacy within medical curricula arises from its ethical/relational potential, or potential to engender new forms of inter-human relationality.

  17. Patients crash more than airlines: a medical emergency at 35,000 ft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Talha

    2014-01-01

    An estimated 1 in 600 commercial flights will have an onboard medical emergency and approximately half of the time a passenger physician will provide medical assistance. A medical emergency on an aircraft can be a daunting task for even the most seasoned physician. This article is a narrative case report from a physician passenger who found himself in the midst of such an emergency on a 15-hour international flight.

  18. 30 CFR 75.1507 - Emergency Response Plan; refuge alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....1507 Emergency Response Plan; refuge alternatives. (a) The Emergency Response Plan (ERP) shall include... request and the District Manager may approve an alternative location in the ERP if mining involves two-entry systems or yield pillars in a longwall that would prohibit locating the refuge alternative out...

  19. 78 FR 44523 - Burned Area Emergency Response, Forest Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-24

    ... Forest Service RIN 0596-AC73 Burned Area Emergency Response, Forest Service AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA... Service is correcting a notice of interim directive that appeared in the Federal Register of June 6, 2013... Area Emergency Response revisions. This correction lists the Web site for the interim directive and...

  20. IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies (2012 update)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-09-05

    Emergency response to oil supply disruptions has remained a core mission of the International Energy Agency since its founding in 1974. This information pamphlet explains the decisionmaking process leading to an IEA collective action, the measures available -- focusing on stockdraw -- and finally, the historical background of major oil supply disruptions and the IEA response to them. It also demonstrates the continuing need for emergency preparedness, including the growing importance of engaging key transition and emerging economies in dialogue about energy security.

  1. Medical identity theft: an emerging problem for informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillette, William; Patrick, Timothy B

    2007-10-11

    This poster reports a preliminary review of medical identity theft. Financial identity theft has received a great deal of media attention. Medical identity theft is a particular kind of identity theft that has received little attention. There are two main subtypes of medical identity theft. In the first type the stolen medical identity is used to receive medical services, and in the second type the stolen medical identity is used to commit healthcare fraud.

  2. Why and when citizens call for emergency help: an observational study of 211,193 medical emergency calls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær; Tolstrup, Janne Schurmann; Østergaard, Doris; Viereck, Søren; Overton, Jerry; Folke, Fredrik; Lippert, Freddy

    2015-11-04

    A medical emergency call is citizens' access to pre-hospital emergency care and ambulance services. Emergency medical dispatchers are gatekeepers to provision of pre-hospital resources and possibly hospital admissions. We explored causes for access, emergency priority levels, and temporal variation within seasons, weekdays, and time of day for emergency calls to the emergency medical dispatch center in Copenhagen in a two-year study period (December 1(st), 2011 to November 30(th), 2013). Descriptive analysis was performed for causes for access and emergency priority levels. A Poisson regression model was used to calculate adjusted ratio estimates for the association between seasons, weekdays, and time of day overall and stratified by emergency priority levels. We analyzed 211,193 emergency calls for temporal variation. Of those, 167,635 calls were eligible for analysis of causes and emergency priority level. "Unclear problem" was the most frequent category (19%). The five most common causes with known origin were categorized as "Wounds, fractures, minor injuries" (13%), "Chest pain/heart disease" (11%), "Accidents" (9%), "Intoxication, poisoning, drug overdose" (8%), and "Breathing difficulties" (7%). The highest emergency priority levels (Emergency priority level A and B) were assigned in 81% of calls. In the analysis of temporal variation, the total number of calls peaked at wintertime (26%), Saturdays (16%), and during daytime (39%). The pattern of citizens' contact causes fell into four overall categories: unclear problems, medical problems, intoxication and accidents. The majority of calls were urgent. The magnitude of unclear problems represents a modifiable factor and highlights the potential for further improvement of supportive dispatch priority tools or educational interventions at dispatch centers. Temporal variation was identified within seasons, weekdays and time of day and reflects both system load and disease occurrence. Data on contact patterns

  3. Health utility after emergency medical admission: a cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodacre Steve W

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives Health utility combines health related quality of life and mortality to produce a generic outcome measure reflecting both morbidity and mortality. It has not been widely used as an outcome measure in evaluations of emergency care and little is known about the feasibility of measurement, typical values obtained or baseline factors that predict health utility. We aimed to measure health utility after emergency medical admission, to compare health utility to age, gender and regional population norms, and identify independent predictors of health utility. Methods We selected 5760 patients across three hospitals who were admitted to hospital by ambulance as a medical emergency. The EQ-5D questionnaire was mailed to all who were still alive 30 days after admission. Health utility was estimated by applying tariff values to the EQ-5D responses or imputing a value of zero for those who had died. Multivariable analysis was used to identify independent predictors of health utility at 30 days. Results Responses were received from 2488 (47.7% patients, while 541 (9.4% had died. Most respondents reported some or severe problems with each aspect of health. Mean health utility was 0.49 (standard deviation 0.35 in survivors and 0.45 (0.36 including non-survivors. Some 75% had health utility below their expected value (mean loss 0.32, 95% confidence interval 0.31 to 0.33 and 11% had health utility below zero (worse than death. On multivariable modelling, reduced health utility was associated with increased age and lower GCS, varied according to ICD10 code and was lower among females, patients with recent hospital admission, steroid therapy, or history of chronic respiratory disease, malignancy, diabetes or epilepsy. Conclusions Health utility can be measured after emergency medical admission, although responder bias may be significant. Health utility after emergency medical admission is poor compared to population norms. We have identified

  4. Emergency response to nuclear, biological and chemical incidents:challenges and countermeasures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Long Li; Wen-Jun Tang; Ya-Kun Ma; Ji-Min Jia; Rong-Li Dang; Er-Chen Qiu

    2015-01-01

    Given the multiple terrorist attacks that have occurred in recent years in China, medical rescue teams and specialized incident assessment teams have been established by the government; however, medical rescue after nuclear, biological, and chemical incidents remains challenging and is often inefficient. In the present article, problems were analyzed regarding the assessment of responder countermeasures, training of professionals and the management of emergency medical incidents related to nuclear, biological and chemical attacks. Countermeasures, the establishment of response coordination, public education, practical training and exercise, and a professional consultant team or system should be the focus of emergency medical response facilities. Moreover, the government was offered professionals who are involved in managing nuclear, biological and chemical incidents.

  5. Outcome accuracy of the Emergency Medical Dispatcher's initial selection of a diabetic problems protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clawson, Jeff; Scott, Greg; Lloyd, Weston; Patterson, Brett; Barron, Tracey; Gardett, Isabel; Olola, Christopher

    2014-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus, although a chronic disease, also can cause acute, sudden symptoms requiring emergency intervention. In these cases, Emergency Medical Dispatchers (EMDs) must identify true diabetic complaints in order to determine the correct care. In 911 systems utilizing the Medical Priority Dispatch System (MPDS), International Academies of Emergency Dispatch-certified EMDs determine a patient's chief complaint by matching the caller's response to an initial pre-scripted question to one of 37 possible chief complaints protocols. The ability of EMDs to identify true diabetic-triggered events reported through 911 has not been studied. The primary objective of this study was to determine the percentage of EMD-recorded patient cases (using the Diabetic Problems protocol in the MPDS) that were confirmed by either attending paramedics or the hospital as experiencing a diabetic-triggered event. This was a retrospective study involving six hospitals, one fire department, and one ambulance service in Salt Lake City, Utah USA. Dispatch data for one year recorded under the Diabetic Problems protocol, along with the associated paramedic and hospital outcome data, were reviewed/analyzed. The outcome measures were: the percentage of cases that had diabetic history, percentage of EMD-identified diabetic problems cases that were confirmed by Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and/or hospital records as true diabetic-triggered events, and percentage of EMD-identified diabetic patients who also had other medical conditions. A diabetic-triggered event was defined as one in which the patient's emergency was directly caused by diabetes or its medical management. Descriptive statistics were used for categorical measures and parametric statistical methods assessed the differences between study groups, for continuous measures. Three-hundred ninety-three patient cases were assigned to the Diabetic Problems Chief Complaint protocol. Of the 367 (93.4%) patients who had a documented

  6. Downtime after Critical Incidents in Emergency Medical Technicians/Paramedics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice Halpern

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective workplace-based interventions after critical incidents (CIs are needed for emergency medical technicians (EMT/paramedics. The evidence for a period out of service post-CI (downtime is sparse; however it may prevent posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD and burnout symptoms. We examined the hypothesis that downtime post-CI is associated with fewer symptoms of four long-term emotional sequelae in EMT/paramedics: depression, PTSD, burnout, and stress-related emotional symptoms (accepted cut-offs defined high scores. Two hundred and one paramedics completed questionnaires concerning an index CI including downtime experience, acute distress, and current emotional symptoms. Nearly 75% received downtime; 59% found it helpful; 84% spent it with peers. Downtime was associated only with lower depression symptoms, not with other outcomes. The optimal period for downtime was between 1 day being less effective. Planned testing of mediation of the association between downtime and depression by either calming acute post-CI distress or feeling helped by others was not performed because post-CI distress was not associated with downtime and perceived helpfulness was not associated with depression. These results suggest that outcomes of CIs follow different pathways and may require different interventions. A brief downtime is a relatively simple and effective strategy in preventing later depression symptoms.

  7. Downtime after critical incidents in emergency medical technicians/paramedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Janice; Maunder, Robert G; Schwartz, Brian; Gurevich, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Effective workplace-based interventions after critical incidents (CIs) are needed for emergency medical technicians (EMT)/paramedics. The evidence for a period out of service post-CI (downtime) is sparse; however it may prevent posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and burnout symptoms. We examined the hypothesis that downtime post-CI is associated with fewer symptoms of four long-term emotional sequelae in EMT/paramedics: depression, PTSD, burnout, and stress-related emotional symptoms (accepted cut-offs defined high scores). Two hundred and one paramedics completed questionnaires concerning an index CI including downtime experience, acute distress, and current emotional symptoms. Nearly 75% received downtime; 59% found it helpful; 84% spent it with peers. Downtime was associated only with lower depression symptoms, not with other outcomes. The optimal period for downtime was between 1 day being less effective. Planned testing of mediation of the association between downtime and depression by either calming acute post-CI distress or feeling helped by others was not performed because post-CI distress was not associated with downtime and perceived helpfulness was not associated with depression. These results suggest that outcomes of CIs follow different pathways and may require different interventions. A brief downtime is a relatively simple and effective strategy in preventing later depression symptoms.

  8. 3D medical collaboration technology to enhance emergency healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welch, Gregory F; Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Fuchs, Henry

    2009-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) videoconferencing has been explored widely in the past 15-20 years to support collaboration in healthcare. Two issues that arise in most evaluations of 2D videoconferencing in telemedicine are the difficulty obtaining optimal camera views and poor depth perception. To address...... system; and we present evaluation results supporting the general hypothesis that 3D remote medical collaboration technology could offer benefits over conventional 2D videoconferencing in emergency healthcare.......Two-dimensional (2D) videoconferencing has been explored widely in the past 15-20 years to support collaboration in healthcare. Two issues that arise in most evaluations of 2D videoconferencing in telemedicine are the difficulty obtaining optimal camera views and poor depth perception. To address...... these problems, we are exploring the use of a small array of cameras to reconstruct dynamic three-dimensional (3D) views of a remote environment and of events taking place within. The 3D views could be sent across wired or wireless networks to remote healthcare professionals equipped with fixed displays...

  9. The emerging trend in the epidemiology of gunshot injuries in the emergency department of a Nigerian tertiary hospital in a State without formal prehospital emergency medical services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Uche Pascal Iloh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Gunshot injuries (GSIs though a rarity in Nigeria before the Nigerian civil war have now become rampant with variable epidemiology. It is emerging as a common cause of trauma-related emergency hospitalizations. Aim: The study was aimed at reviewing the epidemiology of gunshot injuries in the emergency department (ED of a Nigerian tertiary hospital over a 5-year period. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study of GSIs seen at the ED of Federal Medical Centre, Umuahia, Nigeria using data from medical records, patients′ case notes, ED admission registers, and nurses′ report books. The data collected included age, sex, place of the incidence, time of the incidence, time of presentation to the hospital, anatomic sites, and etiology of the injury. Results : The age ranged from 14 years to 80 years with mean age of 47 ± 8.1 years. There were 95 males and 22 females with a male to female ratio of 4.3:1. The three most common causes were armed robbery (31.6%, kidnapping (21.3%, and police brutality (17.9%. The incident predominantly affected the middle age group (57.3%, occurred mostly during the day time (72.6%, affecting mainly the lower limbs (65.8% and majority (84.6% of the victims presented 1 hour after the injury. None of the victims received prehospital care. Conclusion: There was variability in the epidemiology of GSIs with kidnapping and police brutality emerging among preeminent contributors and downward trend of armed robbery-related GSIs. The incident occurred predominantly during the day time and most victims presented late to the ED. Interventional strategies including the responsible security apparatus system are advocated.

  10. Effective Knowledge Integration in Emergency Response Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudi, Arvind

    2009-01-01

    Natural and man-made disasters have gained attention at all levels of policy-making in recent years. Emergency management tasks are inherently complex and unpredictable, and often require coordination among multiple organizations across different levels and locations. Effectively managing various knowledge areas and the organizations involved has…

  11. Collegiate-Based Emergency Medical Service: Impact on Alcohol-Related Emergency Department Transports at a Small Liberal Arts College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Joshua B.; Olson, Mark H.; Kelly, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors examined the impact of a collegiate-based emergency medical service (CBEMS) on the frequency of emergency department (ED) transports. Participants: Students transported to the ED for acute alcohol intoxication during the Fall 2008 and the Fall 2009 semesters (N = 50). Methods: The frequency of students receiving…

  12. Emergency Victim Care. A Training Manual for Emergency Medical Technicians. Module 4. Vital Signs, Patient Assessment. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This student manual, the fourth in a set of 14 modules, is designed to train emergency medical technicians (EMTs) in Ohio. The module contains two sections covering the following course content: vital signs (temperature, pulse, respirations, and blood pressure) and patient assessment at the scene of an emergency. Each section contains objectives,…

  13. Collective response of human populations to large-scale emergencies

    CERN Document Server

    Bagrow, James P; Barabási, Albert-László; 10.1371/journal.pone.0017680

    2011-01-01

    Despite recent advances in uncovering the quantitative features of stationary human activity patterns, many applications, from pandemic prediction to emergency response, require an understanding of how these patterns change when the population encounters unfamiliar conditions. To explore societal response to external perturbations we identified real-time changes in communication and mobility patterns in the vicinity of eight emergencies, such as bomb attacks and earthquakes, comparing these with eight non-emergencies, like concerts and sporting events. We find that communication spikes accompanying emergencies are both spatially and temporally localized, but information about emergencies spreads globally, resulting in communication avalanches that engage in a significant manner the social network of eyewitnesses. These results offer a quantitative view of behavioral changes in human activity under extreme conditions, with potential long-term impact on emergency detection and response.

  14. Collective response of human populations to large-scale emergencies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P Bagrow

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances in uncovering the quantitative features of stationary human activity patterns, many applications, from pandemic prediction to emergency response, require an understanding of how these patterns change when the population encounters unfamiliar conditions. To explore societal response to external perturbations we identified real-time changes in communication and mobility patterns in the vicinity of eight emergencies, such as bomb attacks and earthquakes, comparing these with eight non-emergencies, like concerts and sporting events. We find that communication spikes accompanying emergencies are both spatially and temporally localized, but information about emergencies spreads globally, resulting in communication avalanches that engage in a significant manner the social network of eyewitnesses. These results offer a quantitative view of behavioral changes in human activity under extreme conditions, with potential long-term impact on emergency detection and response.

  15. National Characteristics of Emergency Medical Services in Frontier and Remote Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Landon R; Donnelly, John P; Jacobson, Karen E; Carlson, Jestin N; Mann, N Clay; Wang, Henry E

    2016-01-01

    Although much is known about EMS care in urban, suburban, and rural settings, only limited national data describe EMS care in isolated and sparsely populated frontier regions. We sought to describe the national characteristics and outcomes of EMS care provided in frontier and remote (FAR) areas in the continental United States (US). We performed a cross-sectional analysis of the 2012 National Emergency Medical Services Information System (NEMSIS) data set, encompassing EMS response data from 40 States. We linked the NEMSIS dataset with Economic Research Service-identified FAR areas, defined as a ZIP Code >60 minutes driving time to an urban center with >50,000 persons. We excluded EMS responses resulting in intercepts, standbys, inter-facility transports, and medical transports. Using odds ratios, t-tests and the Wilcoxon rank-sum test, we compared patient demographics, response characteristics (location type, level of care), clinical impressions, and on-scene death between EMS responses in FAR and non-FAR areas. There were 15,005,588 EMS responses, including 983,286 (7.0%) in FAR and 14,025,302 (93.0%) in non-FAR areas. FAR and non-FAR EMS events exhibited similar median response 5 [IQR 3-10] vs. 5 [3-8] min), scene (14 [10-20] vs. 14 [10-20] min), and transport times (11 [5.,24] vs. 12 [7,19] min). Air medical (1.51% vs. 0.42%; OR 4.15 [95% CI: 4.03-4.27]) and Advanced Life Support care (62.4% vs. 57.9%; OR 1.25 [1.24-1.26]) were more common in FAR responses. FAR responses were more likely to be of American Indian or Alaska Native race (3.99% vs. 0.70%; OR 5.04, 95% CI: 4.97-5.11). Age, ethnicity, location type, and clinical impressions were similar between FAR and non-FAR responses. On-scene death was more likely in FAR than non-FAR responses (12.2 vs. 9.6 deaths/1,000 responses; OR 1.28, 95% CI: 1.25-1.30). Approximately 1 in 15 EMS responses in the continental US occur in FAR areas. FAR EMS responses are more likely to involve air medical or ALS care as well

  16. Leader effectiveness and leadership conferral as determinants of helping in a medical emergency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firestone, I J; Lichtman, C M

    1975-02-01

    This study investigated the contribution of an individual's qualification for discussion group leadership (LGD) and the method of leadership conferral, election versus appointment, upon his group's response to a medical emergency. Five-person, face-to-face groups with high LGD leaders responded more frequently and more rapidly to a confederate member's diabetic reaction than did groups with low LGD leaders. Low LGD leaders were frequently overthrown, while groups with high LGD leaders experienced continuity of leadership. Conferral process had no discernible effect on helping or overthrows. It was concluded that a victim is the more fortunate if his group's leader is assertive.

  17. Experience, awareness, and perceptions about medical emergencies among dental interns of Chennai city, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Leelavathi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Every dental health professional should have the essential knowledge to identify, assess and manage a potentially life-threatening situation. Aim: To assess the experience, awareness, and perceptions about medical emergencies among dental interns in Chennai city, India. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study carried out in four randomly selected dental colleges of Chennai city. Data were collected using a self-administered, structured, closed-ended 20-item questionnaire. It consists of questions on experience of medical emergencies encountered by interns during their graduation, awareness of the essential drugs and equipment, the amount of medical emergencies training undertaken by participants, preparedness of interns in handling medical emergencies. Descriptive statistics, independent sample t-test, were used. Results: Out of 335 interns, 157 (47% said that syncope was the most common medical emergency event encountered by the interns. Regarding awareness about essential drugs, about 161 (48% study participants answered oxygen, epinephrine, nitroglycerin, antihistamine, salbutamol, and aspirin as emergency drugs. About half of the study participants, 187 (56% were aware that pressure should be given to the affected site, with or without suturing if the greater palatine artery is inadvertently cut. The majority of the interns (93% preferred to have a specified training on the handling of medical emergencies in dental practice. Conclusions: Syncope was the most common medical emergency event. Awareness about the essential drugs, equipment, and preparedness of dental interns in handling medical emergencies was low.

  18. In-flight medical emergencies during airline operations: a survey of physicians on the incidence, nature, and available medical equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkelbein, Jochen; Neuhaus, Christopher; Böhm, Lennert; Kalina, Steffen; Braunecker, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Data on the incidence of in-flight medical emergencies on-board civil aircraft are uncommon and rarely published. Such data could provide information regarding required medical equipment on-board aircraft and requisite training for cabin crew. The aim of the present study was to gather data on the incidences, nature, and medical equipment for in-flight medical emergencies by way of a survey of physician members of a German aerospace medical society. Using unipark.de (QuestBack GmbH, Cologne, Germany), an online survey was developed and used to gather specific information. Members of the German Society for Aviation and Space Medicine (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Luft- und Raumfahrtmedizin e.V.; DGLRM) were invited to participate in the survey during a 4-week period (21 March 2015 to 20 April 2015). Chi-square test was used for statistical analysis (pairline flights per year (median). Cardiovascular (40.0%) and neurological disorders (17.8%) were the most frequent diagnoses. The medical equipment (78.7%) provided was sufficient. An emergency diversion was undertaken in 10.6% of the cases. Although using a different method of data acquisition, this survey confirms previous data on the nature of emergencies and gives plausible numbers. Our data strongly argue for the establishment of a standardized database for recording the incidence and nature of in-flight medical emergencies. Such a database could inform on required medical equipment and cabin crew training.

  19. Preventable deaths following emergency medical dispatch--an audit study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Mikkel S; Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Hansen, Andreas Ernst; Skjaerseth, Eivinn; Hansen, Christian Muff; Sørensen, Jan Nørtved; Jepsen, Søren Bruun; Hansen, Jesper Bjerring; Christensen, Erika Frischknecht

    2014-12-19

    Call taker triage of calls to the 112 emergency number, can be error prone because rapid decisions must be made based on limited information. Here we investigated the preventability and common characteristics of same-day deaths among patients who called 112 and were not assigned an ambulance with lights and sirens by the Emergency Medical Communication Centre (EMCC). An audit was performed by an external panel of experienced prehospital consultant anaesthesiologists. The panel focused exclusively on the role of the EMCC, assessing whether same-day deaths among 112 callers could have been prevented if the EMCC had assessed the situations as highly urgent. The panels' assessments were based on review of patient charts and voice-log recordings of 112 calls. All patient related material was reviewed by the audit panel and all cases where then scored as preventable, potentially preventable or non-preventable during a two day meeting. The study setting was three of five regions in Denmark with a combined population of 4,182,613 inhabitants, which equals 75% of the Danish population. The study period was 18 months, from mid-2011 to the end of 2012. Linkage of prospectively collected EMCC data with population-based registries resulted in the identification of 94,488 non-high-acuity 112 callers. Among these callers, 152 (0.16% of all) died on the same day as the corresponding 112 call, and were included in this study. The mean age of included patients was 74.4 years (range, 31-100 years) and 45.4% were female. The audit panel found no definitively preventable deaths; however, 18 (11.8%) of the analysed same-day deaths (0.02% of all non-high-acuity callers) were found to be potentially preventable. In 13 of these 18 cases, the dispatch protocol was either not used or not used correctly. Same-day death rarely occurred among 112 callers whose situations were assessed as not highly urgent. No same-day deaths were found to be definitively preventable by a different EMCC call

  20. Medication Overdoses at a Public Emergency Department in Santiago, Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Aguilera, MD

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: While a nationwide poison control registry exists in Chile, reporting to the center is sporadic and happens at the discretion of the treating physician or by patients’ self-report. Moreover, individual hospitals do not monitor accidental or intentional poisoning in a systematic manner. The goal of this study was to identify all cases of intentional medication overdose (MO that occurred over two years at a large public hospital in Santiago, Chile, and examine its epidemiologic profile. Methods: This study is a retrospective, explicit chart review conducted at Hospital Sótero del Rio from July 2008 until June 2010. We included all cases of identified intentional MO. Alcohol and recreational drugs were included only when they were ingested with other medications. Results: We identified 1,557 cases of intentional MO and analyzed a total of 1,197 cases, corresponding to 0.51% of all emergency department (ED presentations between July 2008 and June 2010. The median patient age was 25 years. The majority was female (67.6%. Two peaks were identified, corresponding to the spring of each year sampled. The rate of hospital admission was 22.2%. Benzodiazepines, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and tricyclic antidepressants (TCA were the causative agents most commonly found, comprising 1,044 (87.2% of all analyzed cases. Acetaminophen was involved in 81 (6.8% cases. More than one active substance was involved in 35% of cases. In 7.3% there was ethanol co-ingestion and in 1.0% co-ingestion of some other recreational drug (primarily cocaine. Of 1,557 cases, six (0.39% patients died. TCA were involved in two of these deaths. Conclusion: Similar to other developed and developing nations, intentional MO accounts for a significant number of ED presentations in Chile. Chile is unique in the region, however, in that its spectrum of intentional overdoses includes an excess burden of tricyclic antidepressant and benzodiazepine overdoses, a

  1. Improving emergency department flow through Rapid Medical Evaluation unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, Lucas; Josephson, Timothy; Bates, Kathy; Kuipers, Meredith

    2015-01-01

    The Toronto Western Hospital is an academic hospital in Toronto, Canada, with an annual Emergency Department (ED) volume of 64,000 patients. Despite increases in patient volumes of almost six percent per annum over the last decade, there have been no commensurate increases in resources, infrastructure, and staffing. This has led to substantial increase in patient wait times, most specifically for those patients with lower acuity presentations. Despite requiring only minimal care, these patients contribute disproportionately to ED congestion, which can adversely impact resource utilization and quality of care for all patients. We undertook a retrospective evaluation of a quality improvement initiative aimed at improving wait times experienced by patients with lower acuity presentations. A rapid improvement event was organized by frontline workers to rapidly overhaul processes of care, leading to the creation of the Rapid Medical Evaluation (RME) unit - a new pathway of care for patients with lower acuity presentations. The RME unit was designed by re-purposing existing resources and re-assigning one physician and one nurse towards the specific care of these patients. We evaluated the performance of the RME unit through measurement of physician initial assessment (PIA) times and total length of stay (LOS) times for multiple groups of patients assigned to various ED care pathways, during three periods lasting three months each. Weekly measurements of mean and 90th percentile of PIA and LOS times showed special cause variation in all targeted patient groups. Of note, the patients seen in the RME unit saw their median PIA and LOS times decrease from 98min to 70min and from 165min to 130min, respectively, from baseline. Despite ever-growing numbers of patient visits, wait times for all patients with lower acuity presentations remained low, and wait times of patients with higher acuity presentations assigned to other ED care pathways were not adversely affected. By

  2. [The Israeli medical response plan for an unusual biological event].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poles, Lion

    2002-05-01

    Lack of national preparedness for biological warfare or a bioterrorism event as well as for a natural outbreak of a dangerous agent may lead to grave consequences (large-scale morbidity and mortality) in the short and long term. Threat assessment and its consequences are the basis for the contingency for such an event, with the medical community playing the leading role. In this article we present the principles of the Israeli medical response plan for an unusual biological event--whether of natural origin or a deliberate attack. The primary goals of the preparedness program are reducing mortality and morbidity, preventing a disaster, decreasing the irrational public response and inducing the resumption of the normal course of life. The program presented and its phases are universal, with the proper modifications needed to be implemented according to the specific etiology and the circumstances of the event. In order to successfully deal with the incident, national-level coordination of many non-medical organizations is required. An integration body in the Ministry of Health is a prerequisite for the early detection of the outbreak and for the rapid and proper identification of the etiologic agent. An effective triage system which screens the truly-exposed, the sick and their contacts among the many worried-well engorging the medical organizations, should be the spearhead for an integrated health system dealing with disease prevention and treatment. Public relations and recruitment of the media for transferring relevant information are a vital part of the response. In this rare and unfamiliar emergency situation the basic principle is to use existing response systems, implementing most of the routine procedures and functions, modified according to guidelines from central governmental bodies.

  3. Repeatability of Response to Asthma Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ann; Tantisira, Kelan; Li, Lingling; Schuemann, Brooke; Weiss, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Background Pharmacogenetic studies of drug response in asthma assume that patients respond consistently to a treatment but that treatment response varies across patients, however, no formal studies have demonstrated this. Objective To determine the repeatability of commonly used outcomes for treatment response to asthma medications: bronchodilator response, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), and provocative concentration of methacholine producing a 20% decline in FEV1 (PC20). Methods The Childhood Asthma Management Program (CAMP) was a multi-center clinical trial of children randomized to receiving budesonide, nedocromil, or placebo. We determined the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for each outcome over repeated visits over four years in CAMP using mixed effects regression models. We adjusted for the covariates: age, race/ethnicity, height, family income, parental education, and symptom score. We incorporated each outcome for each child as repeated outcome measurements and stratified by treatment group. Results The ICC for bronchodilator response was 0.31 in the budesonide group, 0.35 in the nedocromil group, and 0.40 in the placebo group, after adjusting for covariates. The ICC for FEV1 was 0.71 in the budesonide group, 0.60 in the nedocromil group, and 0.69 in the placebo group, after adjusting for covariates. The ICC for PC20 was 0.67 in the budesonide and placebo groups and 0.73 in the nedocromil group, after adjusting for covariates. Conclusion The within treatment group repeatability of FEV1 and PC20 are high; thus these phenotypes are heritable. FEV1 and PC20 may be better phenotypes than bronchodilator response for studies of treatment response in asthma. PMID:19064281

  4. Measuring teamwork and conflict among Emergency Medical Technician personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, P. Daniel; Weaver, Matthew D.; Weaver, Sallie J.; Rosen, Michael A.; Todorova, Gergana; Weingart, Laurie R.; Krackhardt, David; Lave, Judith R.; Arnold, Robert M.; Yealy, Donald M.; Salas, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    Objective We sought to develop a reliable and valid tool for measuring teamwork among Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) partnerships. Methods We adapted existing scales and developed new items to measure components of teamwork. After recruiting a convenience sample of 39 agencies, we tested a 122-item draft survey tool. We performed a series of Exploratory Factor Analyses (EFA) and Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) to test reliability and construct validity, describing variation in domain and global scores using descriptive statistics. Results We received 687 completed surveys. The EFA analyses identified a 9-factor solution. We labeled these factors [1] Team Orientation, [2] Team Structure & Leadership, [3] Partner Communication, Team Support, & Monitoring, [4] Partner Trust and Shared Mental Models, [5] Partner Adaptability & Back-Up Behavior, [6] Process Conflict, [7] Strong Task Conflict, [8] Mild Task Conflict, and [9] Interpersonal Conflict. We tested a short form (30-item SF) and long form (45-item LF) version. The CFA analyses determined that both the SF and LF versions possess positive psychometric properties of reliability and construct validity. The EMT-TEAMWORK-SF has positive internal consistency properties with a mean Cronbach’s alpha coefficient ≥0.70 across all 9-factors (mean=0.84; min=0.78, max=0.94). The mean Cronbach’s alpha coefficient for the EMT-TEAMWORK-LF version was 0.87 (min=0.79, max=0.94). There was wide variation in weighted scores across all 9 factors and the global score for the SF and LF versions. Mean scores were lowest for the Team Orientation factor (48.1, SD 21.5 SF; 49.3 SD 19.8 LF) and highest (more positive) for the Interpersonal Conflict factor (87.7 SD 18.1 for both SF and LF). Conclusions We developed a reliable and valid survey to evaluate teamwork between EMT partners. PMID:22128909

  5. The experience of linking Victorian emergency medical service trauma data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyle Malcolm J

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The linking of a large Emergency Medical Service (EMS dataset with the Victorian Department of Human Services (DHS hospital datasets and Victorian State Trauma Outcome Registry and Monitoring (VSTORM dataset to determine patient outcomes has not previously been undertaken in Victoria. The objective of this study was to identify the linkage rate of a large EMS trauma dataset with the Department of Human Services hospital datasets and VSTORM dataset. Methods The linking of an EMS trauma dataset to the hospital datasets utilised deterministic and probabilistic matching. The linking of three EMS trauma datasets to the VSTORM dataset utilised deterministic, probabilistic and manual matching. Results There were 66.7% of patients from the EMS dataset located in the VEMD. There were 96% of patients located in the VAED who were defined in the VEMD as being admitted to hospital. 3.7% of patients located in the VAED could not be found in the VEMD due to hospitals not reporting to the VEMD. For the EMS datasets, there was a 146% increase in successful links with the trauma profile dataset, a 221% increase in successful links with the mechanism of injury only dataset, and a 46% increase with sudden deterioration dataset, to VSTORM when using manual compared to deterministic matching. Conclusion This study has demonstrated that EMS data can be successfully linked to other health related datasets using deterministic and probabilistic matching with varying levels of success. The quality of EMS data needs to be improved to ensure better linkage success rates with other health related datasets.

  6. Fit testing respirators for public health medical emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseau, Lisa M

    2010-11-01

    Concerns about limiting pandemic infectious disease transmission when vaccines are not yet available prompted the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to develop guidance for marketing respirators for use in public health medical emergencies. This project describes the results of filtering facepiece fit tests using 35 untrained, inexperienced subjects meeting the face size criteria of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health bivariate panel, in preparation for an FDA 510(k) application. Quantitative fit factors were measured for each subject on two replicates of each of two N95 filtering facepiece respirators (A and B) using the TSI Portacount Plus with N95 Companion. Subjects received no training or assistance with donning and had no prior experience with wearing respirators. The panel consisted of 20 females and 15 males; 80% were between 18 and 34 years of age. Almost all subjects properly placed the respirator on the face and formed the nose clip. Straps were improperly placed 25% of the time. Users reviewed the donning instructions 73% of the time and performed a seal check 80% of the time. Leaks were observed during 80% of the fit tests, most frequently at the chin during the head up and down exercise. For Respirator A, all but one subject had a 95% fit factor greater than 2 (the minimum required by FDA); one subject had a 95% fit factor of 1.5. All subjects had a 95% fit factor greater than 2.5 for Respirator B. Geometric mean fit factors ranged from 19-28 for these two respirators, and a majority of subjects were able to achieve a fit factor of 10 most of the time. However, fewer than 25% of subjects received the fit factor of 100 expected in workplace settings.

  7. Partnered medication review and charting between the pharmacist and medical officer in the Emergency Short Stay and General Medicine Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Erica Y; Roman, Cristina P; Smit, De Villiers; Newnham, Harvey; Galbraith, Kirsten; Dooley, Michael J

    2015-08-01

    A partnered medication review and charting model involving a pharmacist and medical officer was implemented in the Emergency Short Stay Unit and General Medicine Unit of a major tertiary hospital. The aim of the study was to describe the safety and effectiveness of partnered medication charting in this setting. A partnered medication review and charting model was developed. Credentialed pharmacists charted pre-admission medications and venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in collaboration with the admitting medical officer. The pharmacist subsequently had a clinical discussion with the treating nurse regarding the medication management plan for the patient. A prospective audit was undertaken of all patients from the initiation of the service. A total of 549 patients had medications charted by a pharmacist from the 14th of November 2012 to the 30th of April 2013. A total of 4765 medications were charted by pharmacists with 7 identified errors, corresponding to an error rate of 1.47 per 1000 medications charted. Partnered medication review and charting by a pharmacist in the Emergency Short Stay and General Medicine unit is achievable, safe and effective. Benefits from the model extend beyond the pharmacist charting the medications, with clinical value added to the admission process through early collaboration with the medical officer. Further research is required to provide evidence to further support this collaborative model. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. In-flight medical emergencies during airline operations: a survey of physicians on the incidence, nature, and available medical equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinkelbein J

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Jochen Hinkelbein,1,2 Christopher Neuhaus,2,3 Lennert Böhm,1 Steffen Kalina,1 Stefan Braunecker1,2 1Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, 2Working group “Emergency Medicine and Air Rescue”, German Society for Aviation and Space Medicine (DGLRM, Munich, 3Department of Anesthesiology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany Background: Data on the incidence of in-flight medical emergencies on-board civil aircraft are uncommon and rarely published. Such data could provide information regarding required medical equipment on-board aircraft and requisite training for cabin crew. The aim of the present study was to gather data on the incidences, nature, and medical equipment for in-flight medical emergencies by way of a survey of physician members of a German aerospace medical society.Materials and methods: Using unipark.de (QuestBack GmbH, Cologne, Germany, an online survey was developed and used to gather specific information. Members of the German Society for Aviation and Space Medicine (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Luft- und Raumfahrtmedizin e.V.; DGLRM were invited to participate in the survey during a 4-week period (21 March 2015 to 20 April 2015. Chi-square test was used for statistical analysis (p<0.05 was considered significant.Results: Altogether, 121 members of the society responded to the survey (n=335 sent out. Of the 121 respondents, n=54 (44.6% of the participants (89.9% male and 10.1% female; mean age, 54.1 years; n=121 were involved in at least one in-flight medical emergency. Demographic parameters in this survey were in concordance with the society members’ demographics. The mean duration of flights was 5.7 hours and the respondents performed 7.1 airline flights per year (median. Cardiovascular (40.0% and neurological disorders (17.8% were the most frequent diagnoses. The medical equipment (78.7% provided was sufficient. An emergency diversion was

  9. Development of an accommodative smartphone app for medical guidelines in pediatric emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmucker, Michael; Heid, Jörn; Haag, Martin

    2014-01-01

    One of the outcomes of a training concept for physicians and nurses concerning pediatric emergencies at the Heidelberg University Hospital was that the work and procedures in childhood emergencies could be simplified by replacing the existing paper-based guidelines with a smartphone app. Since the project funds for this were already used up, a group of students from the master program "Medical Informatics" of Heidelberg and Heilbronn Universities took over the development of the app. Particular attention was given to the need for compatibility with the variety of devices (device size and screen resolution) and platform independence. The guidelines themselves were scripted in HTML5, JavaScript and CSS (responsive web design); managed by a container programmed in Sencha Touch. Even though the app is not yet available in the App-Store due to the limited timeframe, the students gained a great deal of valuable experience in developing platform independent software for mobile devices.

  10. Effectiveness of the Medical Emergency Team: the importance of dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Daryl; Bellomo, Rinaldo; DeVita, Michael A

    2009-01-01

    Up to 17% of hospital admissions are complicated by serious adverse events unrelated to the patients presenting medical condition. Rapid Response Teams (RRTs) review patients during early phase of deterioration to reduce patient morbidity and mortality. However, reports of the efficacy of these teams are varied. The aims of this article were to explore the concept of RRT dose, to assess whether RRT dose improves patient outcomes, and to assess whether there is evidence that inclusion of a physician in the team impacts on the effectiveness of the team. A review of available literature suggested that the method of reporting RRT utilization rate, (RRT dose) is calls per 1,000 admissions. Hospitals with mature RRTs that report improved patient outcome following RRT introduction have a RRT dose between 25.8 and 56.4 calls per 1,000 admissions. Four studies report an association between increasing RRT dose and reduced in-hospital cardiac arrest rates. Another reported that increasing RRT dose reduced in-hospital mortality for surgical but not medical patients. The MERIT study investigators reported a negative relationship between MET-like activity and the incidence of serious adverse events. Fourteen studies reported improved patient outcome in association with the introduction of a RRT, and 13/14 involved a Physician-led MET. These findings suggest that if the RRT is the major method for reviewing serious adverse events, the dose of RRT activation must be sufficient for the frequency and severity of the problem it is intended to treat. If the RRT dose is too low then it is unlikely to improve patient outcomes. Increasing RRT dose appears to be associated with reduction in cardiac arrests. The majority of studies reporting improved patient outcome in association with the introduction of an RRT involve a MET, suggesting that inclusion of a physician in the team is an important determinant of its effectiveness.

  11. Updating Dosimetry for Emergency Response Dose Projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCair, Sara

    2016-02-01

    In 2013, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed an update to the 1992 Protective Action Guides (PAG) Manual. The PAG Manual provides guidance to state and local officials planning for radiological emergencies. EPA requested public comment on the proposed revisions, while making them available for interim use by officials faced with an emergency situation. Developed with interagency partners, EPA's proposal incorporates newer dosimetric methods, identifies tools and guidelines developed since the current document was issued, and extends the scope of the PAGs to all significant radiological incidents, including radiological dispersal devices or improvised nuclear devices. In order to best serve the emergency management community, scientific policy direction had to be set on how to use International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 60 age groups in dose assessment when implementing emergency guidelines. Certain guidelines that lend themselves to different PAGs for different subpopulations are the PAGs for potassium iodide (KI), food, and water. These guidelines provide age-specific recommendations because of the radiosensitivity of the thyroid and young children with respect to ingestion and inhalation doses in particular. Taking protective actions like using KI, avoiding certain foods or using alternative sources of drinking water can be relatively simple to implement by the parents of young children. Clear public messages can convey which age groups should take which action, unlike how an evacuation or relocation order should apply to entire households or neighborhoods. New in the PAG Manual is planning guidance for the late phase of an incident, after the situation is stabilized and efforts turn toward recovery. Because the late phase can take years to complete, decision makers are faced with managing public exposures in areas not fully remediated. The proposal includes quick-reference operational guidelines to inform re-entry to

  12. Emergency Medical Care. A Manual for the Paramedic in the Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This document is a textbook of emergency medical procedures to be used for training emergency medical technicians. The book is organized into 15 modules, each containing 1 to 10 units. Each module contains information illustrated with line drawings, a glossary, and references. The modules cover the following topics: the role of the emergency…

  13. The overall concordance of triage level between emergency medical technicians, triage nurses and instructor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabzevari S

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective : Triage is essential for classification of patients in order to providing the best treatment and their transport to medical centers. The concordance of triage level between emergency medical technicians and triage nurses increases the accuracy and reduce of delivery time of patients, however the results of some studies demonstrated the poor triage of patients. This study was conducted aimed to determine the overall concordance of triage level between emergency medical technicians, triage nurses and instructor. Materials and Method: In this descriptive study, one instructor, 5 triage nurses and 30 emergency medical technicians participated through census in Iranshahr in 2014. Data collection tools were the demographic information form and “Emergency Severity Index" triage form. 78 patients were triaged separately by emergency medical technicians, triage nurses and instructor (as criteria. The overall concordance was assessed by kappa coefficient using SPSS 16. Results: The Kappa coefficient about the overall concordance of triage between emergency medical technicians and triage nurses was 0.20, between emergency medical technicians and instructor was 0.10 and between triage nurse and instructor was 0.19 Conclusion: According to the results, the overall concordance in triage level between triage nurse, emergency medical technicians and instructor was poor. Therefore, triage training courses and implementation of common triage is suggested for increase the agreement rate and reduce the time of patient transfer.

  14. National Training Course. Emergency Medical Technician. Paramedic. Instructor's Lesson Plans. Module XV. Telemetry and Communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This instructor's lesson plan guide on telemetry and communications is one of fifteen modules designed for use in the training of emergency medical technicians (paramedics). Two units of study are presented: (1) emergency medical services communications systems (items of equipment and such radio communications concepts as frequency allocation,…

  15. Correlates of Intent to Leave Job and Profession for Emergency Medical Technicians and Paramedics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Susan A.; Blau, Gary; Pred, Robert; Lopez, Andrea B.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: A very limited number of studies have explored factors related to emergency medical services (EMS) workers leaving their jobs and the profession. This paper aims to investigate the correlates of intent to leave EMS jobs and the profession and compared two types of workers: emergency medical technicians (EMTs) and paramedics.…

  16. 30 CFR 75.1713 - Emergency medical assistance; first-aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emergency medical assistance; first-aid. 75... Emergency medical assistance; first-aid. Each operator shall make arrangements in advance for obtaining... provided to the nearest point of assistance. Selected agents of the operator shall be trained in...

  17. Emergency Medical Technician-Ambulance: National Standard Curriculum. Instructor's Lesson Plans (Third Edition).

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This set of instructor's lesson plans is one of three documents prepared for the Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) National Standard Curriculum. It contains detailed outlines of course content and guidance for teaching each course lesson. The training course contains 33 lessons covering all emergency medical techniques currently considered to be…

  18. Course Guide and Course Coordinator Orientation Program. Basic Training Program for Emergency Medical Technician. Ambulance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap and Associates, Inc., Darien, CT.

    To assist the States in implementing Federal standards for emergency medical services (under the Highway Safety Act of 1966), this guide has been prepared to aid in organizing, conducting, and standardizing a basic training course for emergency medical technicians (EMT's). Part I is a guide for a course designed to develop or upgrade the skill…

  19. Instructor Quality Affecting Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) Preparedness: A LEADS Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ-Eft, Darlene F.; Dickison, Philip D.; Levine, Roger

    2005-01-01

    This represents one of a series of studies of the Longitudinal Emergency Medical Technician Attributes and Demographics Study (LEADS) being undertaken by the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). This secondary analysis of the LEADS database, which provides a…

  20. Work-Stress Burnout in Emergency Medical Technicians and the Use of Early Recollections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vettor, Susan M.; Kosinski, Frederick A., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Numerous studies have indicated a high work-stress burnout rate of emergency medical technicians, although none have used techniques predicting work-stress burnout. Discusses early memories that are representative of emergency medical technicians who may be susceptible to burnout, and memories that may indicate an individual's resistance to…

  1. Emergency Medical Science (T-139). Curriculum Models, Guidelines, and Outcome-Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovin, Barbara Keelor

    Developed for use by curriculum planners in Emergency Medical Science (EMS) programs throughout the North Carolina Community College System (NCCCS), and by evaluators in their reviews of existing programs, this manual provides a model set of guidelines for the education and training of the Emergency Medical Technician-Paramedic (EMT-P) in…

  2. National Training Course. Emergency Medical Technician. Paramedic. Instructor's Lesson Plans. Module Course Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    Designed to help administrators plan and implement an emergency medical technician (EMT) training program, this course guide is intended for use with a series of fifteen instructor lesson plan modules. (The EMT-Paramedic is described as a professional in emergency medical care who has successfully completed a training program that includes formal…

  3. Basic Training Course/Emergency Medical Technician (Second Edition). Instructor's Lesson Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This document containing instructor lesson plans is one of three prepared to update a basic training program for emergency medical technicians (EMTs). (A course guide containing planning and management information and a study guide are available separately.) Material covers all emergency medical techniques currently considered to be within the…

  4. Recruitment and Retention of New Emergency Medical Technician (EMT)-Basics and Paramedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Susan A; Crowe, Remle P; Bentley, Melissa A

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe factors important for the recruitment and retention of Emergency Medical Technician (EMT)-Basics and EMT-Paramedics new to the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) field (defined as two years or less of EMS employment) through an analysis of 10 years of Longitudinal EMT Attributes and Demographic Study (LEADS) data. Data were obtained from 10 years of LEADS surveys (1999-2008). Individuals new to the profession were identified through responses to a survey item. Their responses were analyzed using weights reflecting each individual's probability of selection. Means, proportions, and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were determined and used to identify statistically significant differences. There were few changes in the demographic characteristics of new EMT-Basics and Paramedics across survey years. New EMT-Basics tended to be older and less likely to have a college degree than new EMT-Paramedics. More new EMT-Basics than EMT-Paramedics worked in rural areas and small towns and reported that they were working as a volunteer. There were differences between new EMT-Basics and EMT-Paramedics in several of the reasons for entering the profession and in facets of job satisfaction. The findings provide guidance for recruiters, educators, employers, and governmental EMS policy organizations and will provide better insight into how to attract and retain new entrants to the field. Chapman SA , Crowe RP , Bentley MA . Recruitment and retention of new Emergency Medical Technician (EMT)-Basics and Paramedics. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2016;31(Suppl. 1):s70-s86.

  5. A twenty-year follow-up survey of medical emergency education in U.S. dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Morris S; Wall, Benjamin E; Tholström, Tad C; Christensen, Edward H; Payne, Brandon C

    2006-12-01

    This article reports the results of a 2003 survey of medical emergency education taught in U.S. dental schools and compares the results to findings from surveys conducted in 1983 and 1992. A questionnaire was sent to the deans of all U.S. dental schools, requesting completion of the survey by the faculty member responsible for medical emergency education. Forty-three of fifty-four U.S. dental schools responded, and the data were compared to similar surveys conducted in 1983 and 1992. Special attention was given to changes in technology (pulse oximetry and automated external defibrillators), teaching methods (audiovisual, role-playing, and simulation), and subject matter (CPR, venipuncture, and endotracheal intubation) that affect medical emergency education. The study found a large disparity in number of hours dedicated to medical emergency training among dental schools. Surprisingly, CPR certification/recertification for both students and faculty was not provided at three of the reporting U.S. dental schools. Most schools included venipuncture and endotracheal intubation in their curriculum. Routine monitoring of vital signs remained fairly consistent over the past twenty years with a slight dip in the 1992 survey. A standardization of medical emergency education needs to take place to ensure an appropriate level of training for all dental students.

  6. Disaster management: Emergency nursing and medical personnel's knowledge, attitude and practices of the East Coast region hospitals of Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahayalimudin, Nurul'Ain; Osman, Nor Naimah Saidah

    2016-11-01

    Disaster management is critical, as its insight could diminish the impact of a disaster, and participation of emergency medical personnel is crucial. This study explores emergency medical personnel's knowledge, attitude and practice towards disaster management. This study utilised a cross-sectional study design, and the data collected from 194 emergency nursing and medical personnel (staff nurses, doctors and assistant medical officers), using a questionnaire. Majority of the personnel had an adequate knowledge and practices, and portrayed a positive attitude towards disaster management. Amongst the sociodemographic factors studied, gender and education level were significantly associated with increased knowledge and practice scores. Working experience, involvement in disaster response and attended disaster training had a significant association with higher practice scores. None of the sociodemographic factors studied had an effect on attitude scores. Despite the diversity of their backgrounds, respondents exhibited their adequate knowledge and practice, and had positive attitudes towards disaster management. It is substantial for emergency nursing and medical personnel, to inhibit the severity of the impacts of the disasters. Their knowledge, attitude and practice studies could assist in the implementation of programmes relevant to disaster management to ensure their preparedness to assist the affected communities. Copyright © 2016 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The influence of the workplace-related biological agents on the immune systems of emergency medical personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewczyńska, Aleksandra; Depczyńska, Daria; Borecka, Anna; Winnicka, Izabela; Kubiak, Leszek; Skopińska-Różewska, Ewa; Niemcewicz, Marcin; Kocik, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    Emergency medical services workers' (EMSWs) acute exposures to many biological agents are frequent and well recognised in their workplaces, as well as occupational diseases resulting from some of these exposures. At the same time, there is only scant information on the adverse effects of chronic exposure to biological hazard factors on the immune systems of EMSWs. In the Polish legislation system, the Ordinance of the Minister of Health about harmful biological agents in the workplace and ways of protecting workers from exposure to those agents is an implement of Directive 2000/54/EC, which deals thoroughly with those issues in European Union Countries. Emergency medical services workers play an essential role as primary providers of pre-hospital emergency medical care, and they are part of the integral components of disaster response. Traumatic experiences can affect emergency medical staff immune systems negatively, by functioning as a chronic stressor. Conscious use of biological agents in workplaces such as microbial laboratories can be easily controlled and monitored. However, risk assessment is more difficult for workers when they are exposed unintentionally to biological agents. Exposure to bio-aerosols is considered especially harmful. This review summarises available information about biological risk factors for emergency medical services workers, and some information about the influence of these factors on their immune systems.

  8. Evolutionary emergence of responsive and unresponsive personalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, M.; Van Doorn, G.S.; Weissing, F.J.

    2008-01-01

    In many animal species, individuals differ consistently in suites of correlated behaviors, comparable with human personalities. Increasing evidence suggests that one of the fundamental factors structuring personality differences is the responsiveness of individuals to environmental stimuli. Whereas

  9. Unmanned Mobile Monitoring for Nuclear Emergency Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, YoungSoo; Park, JongWon; Kim, TaeWon; Jeong, KyungMin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Severe accidents at nuclear power plant have led to significant consequences to the people, the environment or the facility. Therefore, the appropriate response is required for the mitigation of the accidents. In the past, most of responses were performed by human beings, but it was dangerous and risky. In this paper, we proposed unmanned mobile system for the monitoring of nuclear accident in order to response effectively. For the integrity of reactor cooling and containment building, reactor cooling pipe and hydrogen distribution monitoring with unmanned ground vehicle was designed. And, for the safety of workers, radiation distribution monitoring with unmanned aerial vehicle was designed. Unmanned mobile monitoring system was proposed to respond nuclear accidents effectively. Concept of reinforcing the integrity of RCS and containment building, and radiation distribution monitoring were described. RCS flow measuring, hydrogen distribution measuring and radiation monitoring deployed at unmanned vehicle were proposed. These systems could be a method for the preparedness of effective response of nuclear accidents.

  10. Improving medical emergency services system by evaluating patient satisfaction: means for health management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MR Peyravi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the important aspects in high quality health care system is delivering health services in an appropriate way which can lead to development of the systems. Patient satisfaction is a quality indicator that has the potential to provide valuable information about the care delivered by an Emergency Medical Services system (EMS. This indicator is considered as an important marker of quality by paramedics. Method: This is a descriptive- analytical study on 1096 patient satisfaction of emergency services suffering from cardiovascular, dyspnea, low level of consciousness and cerebral problems. Variables such as the type of diseases, technicians’ and operators’ behavior, time of response and outcome of the missions were measured with a valid checklist. ANOVA and correlation Pearson were employed as analytical tests. Results: Considering different types of diseases, 4 categories of diseases had positive correlation with satisfaction of the patients and also there was a meaningful correlation between factors which were measured and satisfied patients.( P<0.001 Conclusion: Developing some instructions for technicians and operators focusing on interpersonal skills and enhanced sensitivities and behaviors not only toward patients but also toward bystanders and family members is recommended to improve patient satisfaction and thought quality of delivered care in the prehospital emergency medical systems.

  11. Developing an active emergency medical service system based on WiMAX technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shing-Han; Cheng, Kai-An; Lu, Wen-Hui; Lin, Te-Chang

    2012-10-01

    The population structure has changed with the aging of population. In the present, elders account for 10.63% of the domestic population and the percentage is still gradually climbing. In other words, the demand for emergency services among elders in home environment is expected to grow in the future. In order to improve the efficiency and quality of emergency care, information technology should be effectively utilized to integrate medical systems and facilities, strengthen human-centered operation designs, and maximize the overall performance. The improvement in the quality and survival rate of emergency care is an important basis for better life and health of all people. Through integrated application of medical information systems and information communication technology, this study proposes a WiMAX-based emergency care system addressing the public demands for convenience, speed, safety, and human-centered operation of emergency care. This system consists of a healthcare service center, emergency medical service hospitals, and emergency ambulances. Using the wireless transmission capability of WiMAX, patients' physiological data can be transmitted from medical measurement facilities to the emergency room and emergency room doctors can provide immediate online instructions on emergency treatment via video and audio transmission. WiMAX technology enables the establishment of active emergency medical services.

  12. Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment - Requirements Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharry, J A

    2016-10-04

    This document was prepared by John A. Sharry, LLNL Fire Marshal and LLNL Division Leader for Fire Protection and reviewed by LLNL Emergency Management Department Head James Colson. The document follows and expands upon the format and contents of the DOE Model Fire Protection Baseline Capabilities Assessment document contained on the DOE Fire Protection Web Site, but only addresses emergency response.

  13. Pediatric сlinic of Odessa National Medical University: the quality of emergency medical care for children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Starets

    2017-06-01

    guidelines of the United States, Great Britain, Canada, Australia; Ukrainian National Formulary; British National Formulary for Children. All medicines included in these local guidelines are presented in the WHO Model List of Essential Medicines (April 2015. In the Pediatric Clinic the medical care is patient-centred, responsive to and respectful of the patient’s values and choices to promote patient satisfaction and fulfillment of human rights. We use the patient-centred technologies: mothers and infants to remain together 24 hours a day; the preference is given to oral rehydration, rather than intravenous fluid administration; the minimization of pain for all manipulations, to refuse any intramuscular injections; to usage of screening test systems for the diagnosis of Beta-hemolytic streptococcus, rotavirus, influenza, bacteriuria; the humidification of air around the patient. The average period of staying in the ICU is 2 days. The culture of patient safety is a priority in the Pediatric Clinic. The culture of patient’s safety includes: the changing of the attitudes of medical staffs towards the safety of medical care; the identification of triggers and risks of medical care; the identification of all medi-cal errors/“no harm events”/“near miss events”; the implementation of safe technologies, simple algorithms; learning of medical staff. There were more than 40 lectures and practices for medical staff of the Pediatric Clinic, including the training courses CODE BLUE. Conclusions. The measures aimed at improving the quality of emergency medical care for children in the Pediatric Clinic of the Odessa National Medical University are: 1 the organization of ICU and equipping it with mo-dern equipment for diagnose and treatment of children; 2 the triage of patients according to the condition severity by the objective criteria; 3 the reducing of terms of hospitalization due to optimization of treatment in ICU; 4 standardization of medical care by developing local

  14. EMERGENCY RESPONSE FOR PUBLIC WATER SUPPLIES AFTER HURRICANE KATRINA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurricane Katrina resulted in damage and destruction to local water supplies in Mississippi and Louisiana affecting millions of people. Immediately following the devastation, a multidisciplinary team of 30 EPA emergency response, research, and water program personnel joined force...

  15. Medical emergencies in the dental surgery. Part 1: Preparation of the office and basic management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamed, Stanley F

    2015-12-01

    Medical emergencies can and do happen in the dental surgery. In the 20- to 30-year practice lifetime of the typical dentist, he/she will encounter between five and seven emergency situations. Being prepared in advance of the emergency increases the likelihood of a successful outcome. PURPOSE OF THE PAPER: To prepare members of the dental office staff to be able to promptly recognize and efficiently manage those medical emergency situations that can occur in the dental office environment. Preparation of the dental office to promptly recognize and efficiently manage medical emergencies is predicated on successful implementation of the following four steps: basic life support for ALL members of the dental office staff; creation of a dental office emergency team; activation of emergency medial services (EMS) when indicated; and basic emergency drugs and equipment. The basic emergency algorithm (P->C->A->B->D) is designed for implementation in all emergency situations. Prompt implementation of the basic emergency management protocol can significantly increase the likelihood of a successful result when medical emergencies occur in the dental office environment.

  16. 78 FR 68774 - Onsite Emergency Response Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Preliminary proposed rule language. SUMMARY: The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is making available preliminary proposed rule language that would...-0137, ``Prioritization of Recommended Actions to be Taken in Response to Fukushima Lessons Learned...

  17. Simulation of Operators' Response in Emergencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens

    1986-01-01

    For the simulation of the accidental course of events in industrial process plants, a model is needed of operators' response to the cues presented by the system. A model is proposed, based on the simplifications which can be made when restricting attention to the operator functions having...

  18. ANALYSIS OF LEGAL ASPECTS OF STORAGE OF MEDICAL PRODUCTS APPOINTED FOR MEDICAL AND SANITARY CONSEQUENCES OF EMERGENCIES MITIGATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ya. Ibragimova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes principal legal aspects of medical products storage, appointed for medical and sanitary consequences of emergencies mitigation. We have revealed that nowadays there is a whole range of legal gaps and uncertainties in the regulation of medical products storage. We have also offered the ways for their solution

  19. Teammate familiarity and risk of injury in emergency medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, P Daniel; Weaver, Matthew D; Landsittel, Douglas P; Krackhardt, David; Hostler, David; Vena, John E; Hughes, Ashley M; Salas, Eduardo; Yealy, Donald M

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the association between teammate familiarity and workplace injury in the emergency medical services (EMS) setting. From January 2011 to November 2013, we abstracted a mean of 29 months of shift records and Occupational Safety Health Administration injury logs from 14 EMS organisations with 37 total bases located in four US Census regions. Total teammate familiarity was calculated for each dyad as the total number of times a clinician dyad worked together over the study period. We used negative binomial regression to examine differences in injury incidence rate ratios (IRRs) by familiarity. We analysed 715 826 shift records, representing 4197 EMS clinicians and 60 701 unique dyads. We determined the mean shifts per dyad was (5.9, SD 19.7), and quartiles of familiarity were 1 shift worked together over the study period, 2-3 shifts, 4-9 shifts and ≥10 shifts worked together. More than half of all dyads worked one shift together (53.9%, n=32 739), 24.8% of dyads 2-3 shifts, 11.8% worked 4-9 shifts and 9.6% worked ≥10 shifts. The overall incidence rate of injury across all organisations was 17.5 per 100 full-time equivalent (FTE), range 4.7-85.6 per 100 FTE. The raw injury rate was 33.5 per 100 FTEs for dyads with one shift of total familiarity, 14.2 for 2-3 shifts, 8.3 for 4-9 shifts and 0.3 for ≥10 shifts. Negative binomial regression confirmed that dyads with ≥10 shifts had the lowest incidence of injury (IRR 0.03; 95% CI 0.02 to 0.04). Familiarity between teammates varies in the EMS setting, and less familiarity is associated with greater incidence of workplace injury. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  20. Recognition of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest by medical dispatchers in emergency medical dispatch centres in two countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Andréll, Cecilia; Viereck, Søren

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) remains low. Early recognition by emergency medical dispatchers is essential for an effective chain of actions, leading to early cardiopulmonary resuscitation, use of an automated external defibrillator and rapid dispatching...... of the emergency medical services. AIM: To analyse and compare the accuracy of OHCA recognition by medical dispatchers in two countries. METHOD: An observational register-based study collecting data from national cardiac arrest registers in Denmark and Sweden during a six-month period in 2013. Data were analysed...

  1. Tattoos: ancient body art may assist in medical emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Sarah; Shah, Mamta

    2013-07-01

    Tattooing, like medicine, is an ancient art form. However, in the UK, tattooing of minors is illegal except when performed for medical reasons. We present a 15-year-old type I diabetic, who being prone to hypoglycaemic attacks, had a permanent medical alert tattoo on his forearm, with his parents' consent, whilst on holiday abroad. Tattooing to convey a medical message is employed by many adults for reasons as diverse as anaphylaxis to do not resuscitate orders. We present the patient and propose that clinicians may wish to consider supporting tattooing to convey a medical alert in young people, particularly those at risk of life-threatening complications, such as hypoglycaemia.

  2. Challenges in designing interactive systems for emergency response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Margit; Kyng, Morten; Nielsen, Esben Toftdahl

    2007-01-01

    and visions as ways to bridge between fieldwork and literature studies on the one hand and the emerging computer based prototypes on the other. Our case concerns design of innovative interactive systems for support in emergency response, including patient identification and monitoring as well as construction......This paper presents research on participatory design of interactive systems for emergency response. We present the work by going through the design method with a focus on the new elements that we developed for the participatory design toolkit, in particular we emphasize the use of challenges...

  3. The Demographics and Education of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Professionals: A National Longitudinal Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Melissa A; Shoben, Abigail; Levine, Roger

    2016-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess longitudinal and cross-sectional changes in Emergency Medical Technician (EMT)-Basics and Paramedics: (1) demographics, (2) employment characteristics, and (3) initial Emergency Medical Services (EMS) education. These data were collected between 1999 and 2008 employing survey techniques aimed at collecting valid data. A random, stratified sample was utilized to allow results to be generalizable to the nationally certified EMS population. Survey weights that were adjusted for each stratum's response were estimated. Weighted percentages, averages for continuous variables, and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Significant changes over time were noted when the CIs did not overlap. In all 10 years of data collection, the proportion of EMT-Paramedics who were male was greater than the proportion of EMT-Basics who were male. A substantial proportion of respondents performed EMS services for more than one agency: between 39.8% and 43.5% of EMT-Paramedics and 18.4% and 22.4% of EMT-Basic respondents reported this. The most common type of employer for both EMT-Basics and EMT-Paramedics was fire-based organizations. About one-third of EMT-Basics (32.3%-40.1%) and almost one-half of EMT-Paramedics (43.1%-45.3%) reported that these organizations were their main EMS employer. Rural areas (education changes over time. Bentley MA , Shoben A , Levine R . The demographics and education of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) professionals: a national longitudinal investigation. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2016;31(Suppl. 1):s18-s29.

  4. Medicine for Somewhere: The Emergence of Place in Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Brian M.; Daynard, Kim; Greenwood, David

    2014-01-01

    Until recently medical education has been largely silent on those aspects of the physician's life, both professional and unprofessional, that differ from place to place. This has contributed to health inequity through an undersupply of health care workers to many communities. A growing movement for social accountability in medical education…

  5. Real-time multimedia communications in medical emergency - the CONCERTO project solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Maria G; Iacobelli, Lorenzo; Bergeron, Cyril; Hewage, Chaminda T; Panza, Gianmarco; Piri, Esa; Vehkapera, Janne; Amon, Peter; Mazzotti, Matteo; Savino, Ketty; Bokor, Laszlo

    2015-01-01

    The management of medical emergency, in particular cardiac emergency, requests prompt intervention and the possibility to communicate in real time from the emergency area / ambulance to the hospital as much diagnostic information as possible about the patient. This would enable a prompt emergency diagnosis and operation and the possibility to prepare the appropriate actions in the suitable hospital department. To address this scenario, the CONCERTO European project proposed a wireless communication system based on a novel cross-layer architecture, including the integration of building blocks for medical media content fusion, delivery and access. This paper describes the proposed system architecture, outlining the developed components and mechanisms, and the evaluation of the proposed system, carried out in a hospital with the support of medical staff. The technical results and the feedback received highlight the impact of the CONCERTO approach in the healthcare domain, in particular in enabling a prompt and reliable diagnosis in challenging medical emergency scenarios.

  6. Enabling Communication in Emergency Response Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oriel Herrera

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Effective communication among first responders during response to natural and human-made large-scale catastrophes has increased tremendously during the last decade. However, most efforts to achieve a higher degree of effectiveness in communication lack synergy between the environment and the technology involved to support first responders operations. This article presents a natural and intuitive interface to support Stigmergy; or communication through the environment, based on intuitively marking and retrieving information from the environment with a pointer. A prototype of the system was built and tested in the field, however the pointing activity revealed challenges regarding accuracy due to limitations of the sensors used. The results obtained from these field tests were the basis for this research effort and will have the potential to enable communication through the environment for first responders operating in highly dynamical and inhospitable disaster relief environments.

  7. Emergency Response to Earthquake in Chile: Experience of a Cuban Field Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Carlos R

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents the author's experiences in deploying and later establishing a Cuban field hospital in response to the major earthquake that struck Chile in February 2010. It also reveals the initial difficulties the medical team faced and how collaboration with local social, medical and military partners contributed to response efficiency, and highlights the importance of Cuba's international health cooperation, especially in emergency situations. Over 254 days, Cuban health professionals had 50,048 patient encounters (outpatient visits and hospitalizations), a daily average of 197. They performed 1778 surgeries (1427 major, 80.2% of total) and accumulated valuable experience in managing a field hospital in a disaster situation. KEYWORDS Earthquake, humanitarian aid, health care, emergency response, disaster medicine, logistics, Chile, Cuba.

  8. ["Meet the AIX-PERTs." Emergency medical care at the beginning of the medical reform curriculum in Aachen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckers, S; Bickenbach, J; Fries, M; Hoffmann, N; Classen-Linke, I; Killersreiter, B; Wainwright, U; Kuhlen, R; Rossaint, R

    2004-06-01

    Extensive knowledge and skills in the basics of emergency medical care are of paramount importance for every physician and should therefore be an integral part of medical education. Regulations for medical licensure in Germany were revised by the administrative authorities in 2002 and as a consequence the Medical Faculty of the University of Aachen (Germany) decided to start the Medical Reform Curriculum Aachen. A multidisciplinary, problem-oriented and organ-related approach to medical education replaces the classical discrimination between basic and clinical sciences. With AIX-PERT (AIX-la-Chapelle Program for Emergency medical care and Resuscitation Training), a program consisting of problem-based learning sessions was developed for introduction to the first year students. Defined teaching objectives in emergency medicine are now incorporated in undergraduate medical education. The extremely positive evaluation of the new approach encouraged us to promote AIX-PERT further. In the future the effects of success of this approach will be assessed by longitudinal studies of skills and knowledge during the continuing curriculum.

  9. Proposal for the conclusion of a partnership agreement, without competitive tendering, for the management of medical emergencies on the CERN site and the training of CERN's medical staff and firefighters in emergency situations

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    Proposal for the conclusion of a partnership agreement, without competitive tendering, for the management of medical emergencies on the CERN site and the training of CERN's medical staff and firefighters in emergency situations

  10. Emergency medical triage decisions are swayed by computer-manipulated cues of physical dominance in caller’s voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boidron, Laurent; Boudenia, Karim; Avena, Christophe; Boucheix, Jean-Michel; Aucouturier, Jean-Julien

    2016-01-01

    In humans as well as other animals, displays of body strength such as power postures or deep masculine voices are associated with prevalence in conflicts of interest and facilitated access to resources. We conduct here an ecological and highly critical test of this hypothesis in a domain that, on first thought, would appear to be shielded from such influences: access to emergency medical care. Using acoustic manipulations of vocal masculinity, we systematically varied the perceived level of physical dominance of mock patients calling a medical call center simulator. Callers whose voice were perceived as indicative of physical dominance (i.e. those with low fundamental and formant frequency voices) obtained a higher grade of response, a higher evaluation of medical emergency and longer attention from physicians than callers with strictly identical medical needs whose voice signaled lower physical dominance. Strikingly, while the effect was important for physician participants, it was virtually non-existent when calls were processed by non-medically-trained phone operators. This finding demonstrates an unprecedented degree of vulnerability of telephone-based medical decisions to extra-medical factors carried by vocal cues, and shows that it may not simply be assumed that more medical training will shield decisions from such influences. PMID:27456205

  11. Why people do, or do not, immediately contact emergency medical services following the onset of acute stroke: qualitative interview study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan E Mackintosh

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To identify the reasons why individuals contact, or delay contacting, emergency medical services in response to stroke symptoms. DESIGN: Qualitative interview study with a purposive sample of stroke patients and witnesses, selected according to method of accessing medical care and the time taken to do so. Data were analysed using the Framework approach. SETTING: Area covered by three acute stroke units in the north east of England. PARTICIPANTS: Nineteen stroke patients and 26 witnesses who had called for help following the onset of stroke symptoms. RESULTS: Factors influencing who called emergency medical services and when they called included stroke severity, how people made sense of symptoms and their level of motivation to seek help. Fear of the consequences of stroke, including future dependence or disruption to family life, previous negative experience of hospitals, or involving a friend or relations in the decision to access medical services, all resulted in delayed admission. Lack of knowledge of stroke symptoms was also an important determinant. Perceptions of the remit of medical services were a major cause of delays in admission, with many people believing the most appropriate action was to telephone their GP. Variations in the response of primary care teams to acute stroke symptoms were also evident. CONCLUSIONS: The factors influencing help-seeking decisions are complex. There remains a need to improve recognition by patients, witnesses and health care staff of the need to treat stroke as a medical emergency by calling emergency medical services, as well as increasing knowledge of symptoms of stroke among patients and potential witnesses. Fear, denial and reticence to impose on others hinders the process of seeking help and will need addressing specifically with appropriate interventions. Variability in how primary care services respond to stroke needs further investigation to inform interventions to promote best

  12. The Emerging Therapeutic Role of Medical Foods for Gastrointestinal Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciampa, Brian P; Reyes Ramos, Emmanuel; Borum, Marie; Doman, David B

    2017-02-01

    In addition to drugs approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that treat, cure, or mitigate disease, medical foods are a tool to help manage chronic conditions and diseases. A medical food, according to the FDA, is a food that is developed to be eaten or administered enterally under the guidance of a physician and that is meant for the specific dietary management of a condition or disease for which distinctive nutritional requirements, based upon known scientific principles, are established by medical evaluation. A variety of medical foods exist to help manage a wide range of medical conditions, from Alzheimer disease to HIV-associated enteropathy. EnteraGam contains serum-derived bovine immunoglobulin/protein isolate, which has been studied extensively in diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and HIV-associated enteropathy. VSL#3 is a probiotic that is used in pouchitis for patients with ulcerative colitis as well as irritable bowel syndrome. Modulen IBD is a whole-protein, sole-nutrition formulation used to manage the active phase of Crohn's disease. Vivonex is an elemental diet that is used in a variety of diseases associated with severe gastrointestinal dysfunction. Medical foods are safe and must have proven efficacy in helping to manage a variety of gastrointestinal conditions and diseases. These therapies represent tools that can be used prior or in addition to traditional medical therapies. This article discusses the history and development of medical foods under the FDA and concentrates specifically on medical foods used to help manage diseases of the gastrointestinal tract.

  13. Emergency medical kit for commercial airlines: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibeault, Claude; Evans, Anthony

    2007-12-01

    In 1998, the Air Transport Medicine (ATM) Committee of the Aerospace Medical Association (AsMA) made its first recommendations concerning medical kits for commercial airlines. These were updated in 2002 and the ATM has continued to monitor medical kit usage, as well as pharmaceutical developments, and a further revision is now needed. This has taken into account ongoing work of the International Civil Aviation Organization and recommendations of the International Air Transport Association in the field of passenger and crew health. Based on the above, the Committee proposes the following update to its 2002 recommendations.

  14. The Status of Knowledge Related to the Emergency Management of Avulsed Tooth amongst the Medical Practitioners of Nagpur, Central India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Suryakant; Sajjanar, Arunkumar B; Athulkar, Milind; Sajjanar, Jayashree; Shewale, Akhilesh; Wasnik, Milind; Dhongde, Pali; Moon, Ankita

    2017-05-01

    Tooth avulsion is a frequently reported traumatic injury amongst young children and whenever it occurs, the parents or teachers of those children often seek the help of Medical Practitioners to provide the first line of treatment. Therefore, the general physician's knowledge regarding the same is an important issue to be taken into consideration. To assess the knowledge, attitude and practice of general medical practitioners of Nagpur city of Central India regarding emergency management of avulsed tooth and highlight the importance of avulsed tooth education in schools and medical colleges in order to increase the knowledge of the same among teachers, parents and general physicians. A cross-sectional survey was carried out amongst 1045 medical doctors after a comprehensive search made in Google database using the keywords "Medical", "doctors" "Nagpur". Data regarding the emergency management of avulsed tooth was collected using a self administered close ended questionnaire. A total of 1045 medical practitioners (718 males, 327 females) voluntarily participated in this survey. It was observed that 56.8% of the medical practitioners had no prior knowledge of management of an avulsed tooth. A 81.6% of practitioners were unaware of transport medium for an avulsed tooth whereas, more than half practitioners (64.7%) were naive about an ideal time for replantation of an avulsed tooth. A little more than one third of the practitioners (26.5%) were unacquainted about the method of holding an avulsed tooth. Regardless of the level of education, the general medical practitioners of Nagpur lack most of the knowledge required for the emergency management of an avulsed teeth. Keeping the in mind the present scenario, it was recommended that education regarding avulsed tooth should be incorporated in school and medical curriculum to increase awareness among parents, teachers and medical practitioners. Also, it is the responsibility of the dentist to make the society aware of this

  15. Theatre and emergency services rendered by generalist medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sterilization was the most frequently performed surgical procedure, and secondly ... surgery, anaesthetics and orthopaedics. 3,4,5 ... profile of medical practitioners in ..... was carried out of the186 nurses who completed the Diploma in Clinical ...

  16. 76 FR 29131 - Emergency Medical Services Week, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-19

    ...--Peace Officers Memorial Day and Police Week, 2011 Proclamation 8677--World Trade Week, 2011 Notice of... World Trade Center disaster, have access to the medical monitoring and treatment they need and deserve...

  17. Emerging trends in the outsourcing of medical and surgical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Jennifer B; McGrath, Mary H; Maa, John

    2011-01-01

    As total health care expenditures are expected to constitute an increasing portion of the US gross domestic product during the coming years, the US health care system is anticipating a historic spike in the need for care. Outsourcing medical and surgical care to other nations has expanded rapidly, and several ethical, legal, and financial considerations require careful evaluation. Ultimately, the balance between cost savings, quality, and patient satisfaction will be the key determinant in the future of medical outsourcing.

  18. Factors influencing the suicide intervention skills of emergency medical services providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lygnugaryte-Griksiene, Aidana; Leskauskas, Darius; Jasinskas, Nedas; Masiukiene, Agne

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Lithuania currently has the highest suicide rate in Europe and the fifth highest worldwide. Aims: To identify the factors that influence the suicide intervention skills of emergency medical services (EMS) providers (doctors, nurses, paramedics). Method: Two hundred and sixty-eight EMS providers participated in the research. The EMS providers were surveyed both prior to their training in suicide intervention and six months later. The questionnaire used for the survey assessed their socio-demographic characteristics, suicide intervention skills, attitudes towards suicide prevention, general mental health, strategies for coping with stress, and likelihood of burnout. Results: Better suicide intervention skills were more prevalent among EMS providers with a higher level of education, heavier workload, more positive attitudes towards suicide prevention, better methods of coping with stress, and those of a younger age. Six months after the non-continuous training in suicide intervention, the providers’ ability to assess suicide risk factors had improved, although there was no change in their suicide intervention skills. Conclusions: In order to improve the suicide intervention skills of EMS providers, particular attention should be paid to attitudes towards suicide prevention, skills for coping with stress, and continuous training in suicide intervention. Abbreviations: EMS: Emergency medical services; SIRI: Suicide intervention response inventory PMID:28235388

  19. [The characteristics of the organization of emergency medical care in the Republic of Dagestan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magomedova, S A; Edinarova, I E

    2010-01-01

    The analysis is presented relating the organization of emergency medical care in the Republic of Dagestan. The analysis of official statistic data revealed that from 2005 and until the present time there is a sustained increase of resourcing to this form of service by the population both in the republic in general and in urban areas. The increase of appealability among urban population is significantly higher than in the republic. This characteristic trait can be explained by the fact that the rural areas of the Republic continue to significantly log behind in the provision with main types of medical services. According the official statistic data, in 2005 the difference in appealability between urban and rural areas consisted 133, in 2006 ? 128, in 2007 ? 115, in 2008 ? 102 per 1000 of population. In the structure of emergency calls from rural and urban population the cases of sudden diseases. The portion of emergency calls by chronic patients has a clear tendency to decrease both among rural and urban population. The mentioned trends need the adjustment of organization of emergency medical care in rural areas, including intensive development of material technical and manpower of rural substations of emergency medical care. It is timely to consider the issue of development in the Republic of Dagestan the twenty-four-hour integrated consultative control board of emergency medical care to advice by phone the medical emergency teams, the personnel of district hospitals and feldsher obsteritian stations and general practitioners.

  20. Description of Medication Administration by Emergency Medical Services during Mass-casualty Incidents in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sayed, Mazen; Tamim, Hani; Mann, N Clay

    2016-04-01

    Emergency Medical Services (EMS) preparedness and availability of essential medications are important to reduce morbidity and mortality from mass-casualty incidents (MCIs). This study describes prehospital medication administration during MCIs by different EMS service levels. The US National EMS Public-Release Research Dataset maintained by the National Emergency Medical Services Information System (NEMSIS) was used to carry out the study. Emergency Medical Services activations coded as MCI at dispatch, or by EMS personnel, were included. The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) service level was used for the level of service provided. A descriptive analysis of medication administration by EMS service level was carried out. Among the 19,831,189 EMS activations, 53,334 activations had an MCI code, of which 26,110 activations were included. There were 8,179 (31.3%) Advanced Life Support (ALS), 5,811 (22.3%) Basic Life Support (BLS), 399 (1.5%) Air Medical Transport (AMT; fixed or rotary), and 38 (0.2%) Specialty Care Transport (SCT) activations. More than 80 different medications from 18 groups were reported. Seven thousand twenty-one activations (26.9%) had at least one medication administered. Oxygen was most common (16.3%), followed by crystalloids (6.9%), unknown (5.2%), analgesics (3.2%) mainly narcotics, antiemetics (1.5%), cardiac/vasopressors/inotropes (0.9%), bronchodilators (0.9%), sedatives (0.8%), and vasodilators/antihypertensives (0.7%). Overall, medication administration rates and frequencies of medications groups significantly varied between EMS service levels (Psystems can use the findings of this study to better prepare their stockpiles for MCIs.

  1. Voluntary Medical Incident Reporting Tool to Improve Physician Reporting of Medical Errors in an Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nnaemeka G. Okafor

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Medical errors are frequently under-reported, yet their appropriate analysis, coupled with remediation, is essential for continuous quality improvement. The emergency department (ED is recognized as a complex and chaotic environment prone to errors. In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of a web-based ED-specific incident reporting system using an iterative process. Methods: A web-based, password-protected tool was developed by members of a quality assurance committee for ED providers to report incidents that they believe could impact patient safety. Results: The utilization of this system in one residency program with two academic sites resulted in an increase from 81 reported incidents in 2009, the first year of use, to 561 reported incidents in 2012. This is an increase in rate of reported events from 0.07% of all ED visits to 0.44% of all ED visits. In 2012, faculty reported 60% of all incidents, while residents and midlevel providers reported 24% and 16% respectively. The most commonly reported incidents were delays in care and management concerns. Conclusion: Error reporting frequency can be dramatically improved by using a web-based, userfriendly, voluntary, and non-punitive reporting system.

  2. Emergency Victim Care. A Training Manual for Emergency Medical Technicians. Module 6. Bleeding Control, Wounds and Bandaging, Shock. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This student manual, the sixth in a set of 14 modules, is designed to train emergency medical technicians (EMTs) in Ohio. The module contains three sections covering the following course content: control of bleeding, caring for wounds and bandaging various body parts, and caring for shock victims. Each section contains objectives, an introduction,…

  3. Emergency Victim Care. A Training Manual for Emergency Medical Technicians. Module 6. Bleeding Control, Wounds and Bandaging, Shock. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This student manual, the sixth in a set of 14 modules, is designed to train emergency medical technicians (EMTs) in Ohio. The module contains three sections covering the following course content: control of bleeding, caring for wounds and bandaging various body parts, and caring for shock victims. Each section contains objectives, an introduction,…

  4. Promoting social responsibility amongst health care users: medical tourists’ perspectives on an information sheet regarding ethical concerns in medical tourism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Medical tourists, persons that travel across international borders with the intention to access non-emergency medical care, may not be adequately informed of safety and ethical concerns related to the practice of medical tourism. Researchers indicate that the sources of information frequently used by medical tourists during their decision-making process may be biased and/or lack comprehensive information regarding individual safety and treatment outcomes, as well as potential impacts of the medical tourism industry on third parties. This paper explores the feedback from former Canadian medical tourists regarding the use of an information sheet to address this knowledge gap and raise awareness of the safety and ethical concerns related to medical tourism. Results According to feedback provided in interviews with former Canadian medical tourists, the majority of participants responded positively to the information sheet and indicated that this document prompted them to engage in further consideration of these issues. Participants indicated some frustration after reading the information sheet regarding a lack of know-how in terms of learning more about the concerns discussed in the document and changing their decision-making. This frustration was due to participants’ desperation for medical care, a topic which participants frequently discussed regarding ethical concerns related to health care provision. Conclusions The overall perceptions of former medical tourists indicate that an information sheet may promote further consideration of ethical concerns of medical tourism. However, given that these interviews were performed with former medical tourists, it remains unknown whether such a document might impact upon the decision-making of prospective medical tourists. Furthermore, participants indicated a need for an additional tool such as a website for continued discussion about these concerns. As such, along with dissemination of the information sheet

  5. Promoting social responsibility amongst health care users: medical tourists' perspectives on an information sheet regarding ethical concerns in medical tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Krystyna; Snyder, Jeremy; Crooks, Valorie A; Johnston, Rory

    2013-12-06

    Medical tourists, persons that travel across international borders with the intention to access non-emergency medical care, may not be adequately informed of safety and ethical concerns related to the practice of medical tourism. Researchers indicate that the sources of information frequently used by medical tourists during their decision-making process may be biased and/or lack comprehensive information regarding individual safety and treatment outcomes, as well as potential impacts of the medical tourism industry on third parties. This paper explores the feedback from former Canadian medical tourists regarding the use of an information sheet to address this knowledge gap and raise awareness of the safety and ethical concerns related to medical tourism. According to feedback provided in interviews with former Canadian medical tourists, the majority of participants responded positively to the information sheet and indicated that this document prompted them to engage in further consideration of these issues. Participants indicated some frustration after reading the information sheet regarding a lack of know-how in terms of learning more about the concerns discussed in the document and changing their decision-making. This frustration was due to participants' desperation for medical care, a topic which participants frequently discussed regarding ethical concerns related to health care provision. The overall perceptions of former medical tourists indicate that an information sheet may promote further consideration of ethical concerns of medical tourism. However, given that these interviews were performed with former medical tourists, it remains unknown whether such a document might impact upon the decision-making of prospective medical tourists. Furthermore, participants indicated a need for an additional tool such as a website for continued discussion about these concerns. As such, along with dissemination of the information sheet, future research implications should

  6. Woods and Russell, Hill, and the emergence of medical statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farewell, Vern; Johnson, Tony

    2010-01-01

    In 1937, Austin Bradford Hill wrote Principles of Medical Statistics (Lancet: London, 1937) that became renowned throughout the world and is widely associated with the birth of modern medical statistics. Some 6 years earlier Hilda Mary Woods and William Thomas Russell, colleagues of Hill at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, wrote a similar book An Introduction to Medical Statistics (PS King and Son: London, 1931) that is little known today. We trace the origins of these two books from the foundations of early demography and vital statistics, and make a detailed examination of some of their chapters. It is clear that these texts mark a watershed in the history of medical statistics that demarcates the vital statistics of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries from the modern discipline. Moreover, we consider that the book by Woods and Russell is of some importance in the development of medical statistics and we describe and acknowledge their place in the history of this discipline. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:20535761

  7. A Comparison of Medical and Psychobehavioral Emergency Department Visits Made by Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yona Lunsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Study Objective. We describe and contrast medical to psychobehavioral emergency visits made by a cohort of adults with intellectual disabilities. Methods. This was a study of 221 patients with intellectual disabilities who visited the emergency department because of a psychobehavioral or medical emergency. Patient profiles are described and logistic regression was used to assess predictors of psychobehavioral emergencies in this group, including age, residence, psychiatric diagnosis, cognitive level, and life events. Results. Ninety-eight individuals had medical emergencies and 123 individuals presented with psychobehavioral emergencies. The most common medical issue was injury and the most common psychobehavioral issue was aggression. In the multivariate analysis, life events (odds ratio (OR 0.28; 95% confidence interval (CI 0.10 to 0.75, psychiatric diagnosis (OR 2.35; 95% CI 1.12 to 4.95, and age group (OR 4.97; 95% CI 1.28 to 19.38 were associated with psychobehavioral emergencies. Psychobehavioral emergencies were more likely to result in admission and caregivers reported lower rates of satisfaction with these visits. Conclusion. Emergency departments would benefit from greater understanding of the different types of presentations made by adults with intellectual disabilities, given the unique presentations and outcomes associated with them.

  8. Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment Compliance Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharry, John A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-09-16

    This document is the second of a two-part analysis of Emergency Response Capabilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The first part, 2013 Baseline Needs Assessment Requirements Document established the minimum performance criteria necessary to meet mandatory requirements. This second part analyses the performance of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Emergency Management Department to the contents of the Requirements Document. The document was prepared based on an extensive review of information contained in the 2009 BNA, the 2012 BNA document, a review of Emergency Planning Hazards Assessments, a review of building construction, occupancy, fire protection features, dispatch records, LLNL alarm system records, fire department training records, and fire department policies and procedures.

  9. [Consciousness and abilities on health emergency and the roles of emergency response among public at the communities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Dong, Xao-mei; Wang, Sheng-yong; Tian, Jun-zhang; Ye, Ze-bing; Yang, Jian; Li, Guan-ming; Peng, Lin; Zhang, Si-heng

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the consciousness of health emergency and the abilities on self- and mutual medical aids among the public at the community level, as well as the community responses on health-related emergencies and other factors. Random equidistant sampling method was used to extract 617 households before choosing a family member sampled by Kish Grid method. All the members were investigated face to face on a questionnaire-"Health emergency and related ability regarding self and mutual medical aids of the residents". Data were entered into computer database by using software Epi Data 3.1 and were analyzed by SPSS 21.0. Among the 617 households under survey, 47.84% of the public had general awareness on health-related emergencies. Regarding the following items as:prevention and isolation strategies of infectious disease, on safely procedures of earthquake and fires, on prevention of food poisoning, on prevention and first aid of emerging infectious diseases etc., the rates of awareness were 65.04%, 62.92%, 43.62% and 18.79% respectively. Proportions of households which had the first aid supplies were:first aid medicine box as 56.08%; fire extinguisher as 43.60%; spare water and food as 39.40%; having facilities as ropes, whistles and smoke masks for escape were all less than 15%. Rates of awareness on the following items as: correct use of gas switch as 81.52%, knowing the location of the circuit with gear and the fire hydrant as 74.39% and 35.98% , respectively. The correct disposal rates of the residents on the following items were:electric shock and falls (89.63%), patients of infectious diseases (83.31%), gas poisoning (82.98%), suspected symptoms on infectious diseases(82.66%), explosion and burns (66.78%), scald (62.72%)and sprain (57.05%). Scores on the related abilities were as follows: emergency(7.65, out of 10 points), escape(3.55, out of 5 points), self- and mutual medical aids (10.71, out of 16 points). Proportions of having learned and applied of first aid

  10. Emergency response preparedness: the French experience of large scale exercises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chanson, D.; Desnoyers, B. [COGEMA Logistics (AREVA Group) (France); Chabane, J.M. [Autorite de Surete Nucleaire (Direction Generale de la Surete Nucleaire et de la Radioprotection) (France)

    2004-07-01

    In compliance with the IAEA regulations for the transport of radioactive material in the event of accidents during transport of radioactive material, emergency provisions to protect persons, property and environment have to be established and developed by the relevant national organisations. In France, the prefect of the department where the accident occurs is responsible for decisions and measures required to ensure the protection of both population and property at risk owing to the accident. During an accident, the ministers concerned provide the prefect with recommendations and information, in order to help him take the requisite decisions. On their side, the nuclear industry and transport companies also have to be prepared to intervene and to support the authorities at their request, depending on their capacities and their specialities. To prepare the emergency teams properly and acquire effective emergency plans, training exercises have to be conducted regularly with every ministerial department involved, the nuclear industry and transport companies, members of the public and the media. Then, the feedback from such exercises shall be taken into account to improve the emergency procedures. This paper will introduce: - emergency response preparedness: what is required by the relevant regulations? - emergency response preparedness: how is France organised? - the French experience of conducting large training exercises simulating accidents involving the transport of radioactive material; - the main difficulties and lessons learned; - the perspectives.

  11. Biomaterials and medical devices a perspective from an emerging country

    CERN Document Server

    Hermawan, Hendra

    2016-01-01

    This book presents an introduction to biomaterials with the focus on the current development and future direction of biomaterials and medical devices research and development in Indonesia. It is the first biomaterials book written by selected academic and clinical experts experts on biomaterials and medical devices from various institutions and industries in Indonesia. It serves as a reference source for researchers starting new projects, for companies developing and marketing products and for governments setting new policies. Chapter one covers the fundamentals of biomaterials, types of biomaterials, their structures and properties and the relationship between them. Chapter two discusses unconventional processing of biomaterials including nano-hybrid organic-inorganic biomaterials. Chapter three addresses biocompatibility issues including in vitro cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, in vitro cell models, biocompatibility data and its related failure. Chapter four describes degradable biomaterial for medical implants...

  12. Emergency Medical Services Utilization in EMS Priority Conditions in Beirut, Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sayed, Mazen; Tamim, Hani; Chehadeh, Ahel Al-Hajj; Kazzi, Amin A

    2016-12-01

    Early activation and use of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) are associated with improved patient outcomes in EMS priority conditions in developed EMS systems. This study describes patterns of EMS use and identifies predictors of EMS utilization in EMS priority conditions in Lebanon METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study of a random sample of adult patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) of a tertiary care center in Beirut with the following EMS priority conditions: chest pain, major trauma, respiratory distress, cardiac arrest, respiratory arrest, and airway obstruction. Patient/proxy survey (20 questions) and chart review were completed. The responses to survey questions were "disagree," "neutral," or "agree" and were scored as one, two, or three with three corresponding to higher likelihood of EMS use. A total scale score ranging from 20 to 60 was created and transformed from 0% to 100%. Data were analyzed based on mode of presentation (EMS vs other). Among the 481 patients enrolled, only 112 (23.3%) used EMS. Mean age for study population was 63.7 years (SD=18.8 years) with 56.5% males. Mean clinical severity score (Emergency Severity Index [ESI]) was 2.5 (SD=0.7) and mean pain score was 3.1 (SD=3.5) at ED presentation. Over one-half (58.8%) needed admission to hospital with 21.8% to an intensive care unit care level and with a mortality rate of 7.3%. Significant associations were found between EMS use and the following variables: severity of illness, degree of pain, familiarity with EMS activation, previous EMS use, perceived EMS benefit, availability of EMS services, trust in EMS response times and treatment, advice from family, and unavailability of immediate private mode of transport (P≤.05). Functional screening, or requiring full assistance (OR=4.77; 95% CI, 1.85-12.29); acute symptoms onset ≤ one hour (OR=2.14; 95% CI, 1.08-4.26); and higher scale scores (OR=2.99; 95% CI, 2.20-4.07) were significant predictors of EMS use. Patients

  13. FAKTOR PENYEBAB MEDICATION ERROR DI INSTALASI RAWAT DARURAT FACTORS AFFECTING MEDICATION ERRORS AT EMERGENCY UNIT

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background: Incident of medication errors is an importantindicator in patient safety and medication error is most commonmedical errors. However, most of medication errors can beprevented and efforts to reduce such errors are available.Due to high number of medications errors in the emergencyunit, understanding of the causes is important for designingsuccessful intervention. This research aims to identify typesand causes of medication errors.Method: Qualitative study was used and data were col...

  14. An insight into the emerging role of regional medical advisor in the pharmaceutical industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kumar Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The position of regional medical advisor (RMA is relatively new in the pharmaceutical industry and its roles and responsibility are still evolving. The RMA is a field based position whose main mission is to foster collaborative relationships with the key opinion leaders (KOLs and to facilitate the exchange of unbiased scientific information between the medical community and the company. Field-based medical liaison teams are expanding world-wide as part of the pharmaceutical industry′s increased focus on global operations including emerging markets. Now, the position of the RMA has evolved into comprehensive, complex, highly interactive, targeted, highly strategic, innovative, and independent role since its inception by the Upjohn Company in 1967. The major objective of the RMA is to develop the professional relationships with the health-care community, particularly KOLs, through peer-to-peer contact. The RMA can facilitate investigator-initiated clinical research proposals from approval until completion, presentation, and publication. It is possible for a RMA to have valuable access to KOLs through his expertise in the clinical research. The RMA can assist in the development, review, and follow-up of the clinical studies initiated within the relevant therapeutic area at the regional/local level. The RMA can lead regional/local clinical projects to ensure that all clinical trials are conducted in compliance with the International Conference of Harmonisation Good Clinical Practice (ICH GCP guidelines.

  15. Integrating Social Media Monitoring Into Public Health Emergency Response Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, Tamer A; Fleshler, Keren

    2016-10-01

    Social media monitoring for public health emergency response and recovery is an essential response capability for any health department. The value of social media for emergency response lies not only in the capacity to rapidly communicate official and critical incident information, but as a rich source of incoming data that can be gathered to inform leadership decision-making. Social media monitoring is a function that can be formally integrated into the Incident Command System of any response agency. The approach to planning and required resources, such as staffing, logistics, and technology, is flexible and adaptable based on the needs of the agency and size and scope of the emergency. The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene has successfully used its Social Media Monitoring Team during public health emergency responses and planned events including major Ebola and Legionnaires' disease responses. The concepts and implementations described can be applied by any agency, large or small, interested in building a social media monitoring capacity. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2016;page 1 of 6).

  16. Severe hypercortisolism : A medical emergency requiring urgent intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutgers, Helen L.; Vergragt, Joris; Dong, Phi-Vu; de Vries, Jakob; Dullaart, Robin P. F.; van den Berg, Gerrit; Ligtenberg, Jack J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To illustrate the importance of recognizing symptoms of severe hypercortisolism in the intensive care unit and key emergency measures to reduce this extreme hypercortisolism. Design: Case report. Setting: Intensive care unit in a university hospital. Patient: A 55-yr-old woman was admitt

  17. A Statewide Plan to Train Emergency Medical Technicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South Carolina Hospital Association, Columbia.

    The final report outlines a statewide project which provided basic emergency technicians (EMT) training. The use of videotaped instruction, development of testing materials, and the development of cooperative voluntary structures on the State and community level are discussed. Objectives emphasize: (1) uniform training throughout the State, (2)…

  18. Evaluation of emergency medical technicians intermediate prediction about their transported patients final disposition in emergency department of Imam Khomeini Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzalimoghadam, Mohammad; Mozafari, Javad; Talebian, Mohammad Taghi; Mohammadnejad, Esmaeil; Kasaeian, Amir

    2013-08-07

    This was a prospective cross-sectional study of consecutive transported patients by emergency medical service (EMS) to a referral hospital. The goal of this study was the evaluation of emergency medical technician intermediate prediction about their transported patients disposition in Emergency Department of Imam Khomeini Hospital. 2950 patients were transported to this hospital, Questionnaires were submitted in 300 of consecutive patient transports and completed data were obtained and available upon arrival at hospital for 267 of these cases. Emergency medical technicians intermediate (EMT-I) were asked to predict whether the transported patient would require admission to the hospital, and if so, what will be their prediction of patient actual disposition. Their predictions were compared with emergency specialist physicians. EMT-I predicted that 208 (78%) transports would lead to admission to the hospital, after actual disposition, 232 (%87) patients became admitted. The sensitivity of predicting any admission was 65%, with positive predictive value (PPV) of 39% and specificity of 86% with negative predictive value (NPV) of 94%. The sensitivity of predicting trauma patients (56.2% of total patients) was 55% with PPV of 38%, specificity of 86% and for Non-trauma patients' sensitivity was 80% with PPV of 40% and specificity of 82%. EMT-I in our emergency medical system have very limited ability in prediction of admission and disposition in transported patients and their prediction were better in Non-trauma patients. So in our EMS, the pre-hospital diversion and necessity of transporting policies should not be based on EMS personnel disposition.

  19. Evaluation of emergency medical technicians intermediate prediction about their transported patients final disposition in emergency department of Imam Khomeini Hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Afzalimoghadam

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This was a prospective cross-sectional study of consecutive transported patients by emergency medical service (EMS to a referral hospital. The goal of this study was the evaluation of emergency medical technician intermediate prediction about their transported patients disposition in Emergency Department of Imam Khomeini Hospital. 2950 patients were transported to this hospital, Questionnaires were submitted in 300 of consecutive patient transports and completed data were obtained and available upon arrival at hospital for 267 of these cases. Emergency medical technicians intermediate (EMT-I were asked to predict whether the transported patient would require admission to the hospital, and if so, what will be their prediction of patient actual disposition. Their predictions were compared with emergency specialist physicians. EMT-I predicted that 208 (78% transports would lead to admission to the hospital, after actual disposition, 232 (%87 patients became admitted. The sensitivity of predicting any admission was 65%, with positive predictive value (PPV of 39% and specificity of 86% with negative predictive value (NPV of 94%. The sensitivity of predicting trauma patients (56.2% of total patients was 55% with PPV of 38%, specificity of 86% and for Non-trauma patients' sensitivity was 80% with PPV of 40% and specificity of 82%. EMT-I in our emergency medical system have very limited ability in prediction of admission and disposition in transported patients and their prediction were better in Non-trauma patients. So in our EMS, the pre-hospital diversion and necessity of transporting policies should not be based on EMS personnel disposition.

  20. Attitude of interns towards implementation and contribution of undergraduate Emergency Medicine training: Experience of an Ethiopian Medical School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Temesgen Beyene

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: An Emergency Medicine rotation during the final year of medical school provides opportunities to learn about undifferentiated medical emergencies and it should be included for other medical schools in the country. Participants suggest that leadership aspects of Emergency Medicine need more emphasis as the curriculum is further developed in the future.

  1. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Emergency Medical Technology--Basic (Program CIP: 51.0904). Emergency Medical Technology--Paramedic (Program CIP: 51.0904). Postsecondary Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the emergency medical technology (EMT) programs cluster. Presented in the introductory section are a description of the program and suggested course sequence. Section I lists baseline…

  2. Medical emergencies in the imaging department of a university hospital: event and imaging characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tonder, F C; Sutherland, T; Smith, R J; Chock, J M E; Santamaria, J D

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to describe the characteristics of medical emergencies that occurred in the medical imaging department (MID) of a university hospital in Melbourne, Australia. A database of 'Respond Medical Emergency Team (MET)' and 'Respond Blue' calls was retrospectively examined for the period June 2003 to November 2010 in relation to events that occurred in the MID. The hospital medical imaging database was also examined in relation to these events and, where necessary, patients' notes were reviewed. Ethics approval was granted by the hospital ethics review board. There were 124 medical emergency calls in the MID during the study period, 28% Respond Blue and 72% Respond MET. Of these 124 calls, 26% occurred outside of usual work hours and 12% involved cardiac arrest. The most common reasons for the emergency calls were seizures (14%) and altered conscious state (13%). Contrast anaphylaxis precipitated the emergency in 4% of cases. In 83% of cases the emergency calls were for patients attending the MID for diagnostic imaging, the remainder being for a procedure. Of the scheduled imaging techniques, 45% were for computed tomography. The scheduled imaging was abandoned due to the emergency in 12% of cases. When performed, imaging informed patient management in 34% of cases in diagnostic imaging and in all cases in the context of image-guided procedures. Medical emergency calls in the MID often occurred outside usual work hours and were attributed to a range of medical problems. The emergencies occurred in relation to all imaging techniques and imaging informed patient management in many cases. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Hospital preparedness and response in CBRN emergencies: TIER assessment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivieri, Carlo; Ingrassia, Pier L; Della Corte, Francesco; Carenzo, Luca; Sapori, Jean-Marc; Gabilly, Laurent; Segond, Fredrique; Grieger, Fiene; Arnod-Prin, Philippe; Larrucea, Xabier; Violi, Chrisitan; Lopez, Cédric; Djalali, Ahmadreza

    2017-10-01

    Chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) emergencies need particular hospital preparedness and resources availability. Also, specific skills and capabilities are required for efficient response to these types of events. The aim of this study was to develop an assessment tool to evaluate hospital preparedness and response performance with respect to CBRN emergencies. An evaluation tool was developed using the Delphi technique. A panel of experts from 10 countries, both European and non-European, with more than 5 years of experience in research or practice in CBRN emergency management was involved in this study. The study was run online, and the experts were asked to evaluate a list of items on hospital preparedness and response in CBRN emergencies. A threshold of 85% agreement level was defined as the consensus of experts in this study. The first-round questionnaire was answered by 13 experts. Consensus on the preparedness section was reached for all 29 items during the first round and one item was also added by the experts. Consensus on the response performance indicators were reached in 51 out of the 59 items, during the first round, and eight items were modified and then approved in the second round by the experts. Hospitals need a specific level of preparedness to enable an effective response to CBRN emergencies. The assessment tool, developed through experts' consensus in this study, provides a standardized method for the evaluation of hospital preparedness and response performance with respect to CBRN emergencies. The feasibility and reliability of this assessment tool could be evaluated before and during simulated exercises in a standardized manner.

  4. Down the Rabbit Hole: Emergency Department Medical Clearance of Patients with Psychiatric or Behavioral Emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucci, Veronica; Siever, Kaylin; Matorin, Anu; Moukaddam, Nidal

    2015-11-01

    Patients presenting with behavior or psychiatric complaints may have an underlying medical disorder causing or worsening their symptoms. Misdiagnosing a medical illness as psychiatric can lead to increased morbidity and mortality. A thorough history and physical examination, including mental status, are important to identify these causes and guide further testing. Laboratory and ancillary testing should be guided by what is indicated based on clinical assessment. Certain patient populations and signs and symptoms have a higher association with organic causes of behavioral complaints. Many medical problems can present with or exacerbate psychiatric symptoms, and a thorough medical assessment is imperative.

  5. Emergency Medical Technicians Are Often Consulted on Termination of Resuscitation, and Will Terminate Resuscitation Based on Controversial Single Factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind-Klausen, Troels; Glerup Lauridsen, Kasper; Bødtker, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Many out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) attempts have to be terminated. Previous studies have investigated knowledge on abandoning resuscitation among physicians. In the prehospital setting emergency medical technicians (EMTs) may be involved in the decision...... on abandoning CPR but this is sparsely investigated. Aim: To investigate if EMTs are involved in termination of CPR, their self-assessed competence and knowledge of guidelines on termination of CPR according to European Resuscitation Council guidelines 2015. In addition, to evaluate single factors...... that according to an EMT should lead to termination of CPR. Methods: This was a pilot-study including EMTs from a Danish Emergency Medical Service. Data was collected using a structured questionnaire. All responses were collected anonymously. Results: In total, 50 EMTs (male: 88%, median age: 38, response rate...

  6. Reminder: call 74444 also in case of a medical emergency

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    What happened? A CERN colleague, suffering from heart trouble, went to the ‘infirmary' on the Prévessin site for medical aid. He was unaware that the ‘infirmary' was in fact no such thing, but the office of the French medical officer, and, on top of that, it was closed. He therefore took his own car and went to the CERN Fire Station on the Meyrin site (building 65). The firemen and the CERN infirmary took care of him and requested a helicopter transport to the Geneva cantonal hospital, where he received medical treatment.   What do we learn from this event?   You can call the CERN internal number 74444 also in case of serious and acute illness, not only in the event of an accident, pollution, fire, etc.   Professional aid (ambulance firemen and medical assistance, if needed) will be provided.   The CERN Fire station is located in building 65, on ‘Route Einstein', the first road on your right when you enter CERN entrance B on the Meyrin site. It is open permanently, 24 hours per day, 7 days per we...

  7. Technical Considerations in Emerging Medical Body Area Network Spectrum Regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, D.; Smith, D.; Ghosh, M.

    2011-01-01

    Medical Body Area Network (MBAN) technology provides a promising solution to improve patient care outcomes and lower healthcare costs. However, the current spectrum allocation cannot cater to increasing MBAN applications. Therefore, U.S., as well as other regions, have already been considering allo

  8. History and Guideline of Emergency Medicine Residency Discipline in Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Iran; Review of 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Shojaee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Since many years ago several problems have been felt in emergency departments (ED of hospitals. In fact, none of physicians in the hospital have accepted the direct responsibility of patients’ management in the EDs and emergency wards of University centers have been managed by residents of various disciplines. Thus, the first line of therapy does not have guardian and several consultants with various specialists have been performed regarding patient’s management. The necessity of physician training was noticed for the first time in 1950 and after 24 years in 1974, the academic emergency medicine was established in United States of America (USA in response to people expectations for overnight accessibility to specialized and quality medical cares. It was performed with foundation of the first period of resident’s training in emergency medicine discipline at University of Cincinnati, Ohio. At beginning, specialists of different fields such as internal medicine, surgery, anesthesia, orthopedics, and neurosurgery initiated the training of emergency medicine residents together which could be responsible to most of referees. Finally, with formal accepting the specialty board in 1978, this field has been officially identified as the 23th discipline in USA. Today the EDs of most hospitals in European and American countries has been managing by emergency medicine specialists which leads to improve the quality of education and treatment, significantly. Also in Iran the request of establishing this major has been presented in the secretariat of the council for graduate medical education for the first time in 1996. This request was approved and principles of its initiating recognized officially by the ministry of health. But, considering to lack of an appropriate infrastructure, it postponed until 2000 that again this discipline was missioned for initiating to the council for graduate medical education by the minister and its outcome was

  9. Old age and chronic disease: is the emergency medical system the appropriate provider for the elderly?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochmann, Hans-Christian; Arntz, Hans-Richard; Dincklage, Falk V; Rauch, Ursula; Schultheiss, Heinz P; Bobbert, Peter

    2014-04-01

    The use of emergency medical services increases with the age of patients. Some care providers hold on to the prejudice that these alarms are unnecessary or of a lower importance. We assessed the relation of age and age-dependent emergency characteristics, taking into consideration the ratings of emergency physicians on whether or not emergency cases were considered truly in need of emergency physician attendance. Emergency physicians dispatched by the Berlin Fire Department evaluated for each case the necessity of emergency physician attendance. Case characteristics such as the day of the week and location of the emergency as well as patient characteristics such as age, sex, prior status, and care dependency were recorded. In addition, whether or not the physician accompanied the patient to the hospital was recorded as a parameter for emergency severity. Analysis was performed using multiple logistic regression modeling. During the 6-month prospective study period, 2702 cases were evaluated. Emergency medical services are used more frequently by older individuals, especially octogenarians. Emergency cases in older individuals were significantly more often rated as in need of emergency physician attendance; however, the rate of patients accompanied by the emergency physician to the hospital did not differ between the age groups. The age of patients, the primary diagnosis, the day and location of the emergency, and the presence of pre-existing dementia showed a significant impact on the necessity of physician-attended emergency missions. Despite common prejudices, emergency cases in elder patients are rated more often as in need of emergency physician attendance compared with those involving younger patients.

  10. Challenges ahead of emergency medical technician graduates in the workplace in Iran: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydari, Abbas; Rad, Mojtaba; Ghasemi, Mohammad Reza; Sabzevari, Marzie Torkmannejad; Rad, Mostafa

    2014-01-01

    Emergency medical technicians (EMTs) in Iran enter the workplace after a short academic education. Their workplace has high emotional fluctuations and imposes high pressure. The aim of this study was to assess the challenges faced by EMT graduates in Iran. This applied study was conducted using qualitative content analysis. Twelve paramedics and graduates with 2 to 3 years of service were interviewed and their responses were analyzed by content analysis. Findings were presented in five themes: organizational pressure, educational style, professional communication, emotional load, and misunderstanding of others. Several problems confront EMTs in Iran. Educators and educational planners in this discipline could help resolve these problems by revising problematic points in the education and management of EMT graduates and by revising educational methods and human resource management to provide better services and save lives.

  11. Psychiatry and Emergency Medicine: Medical Student and Physician Attitudes toward Homeless Persons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Ann; Roman, Brenda; Borges, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to explore changes in medical students' attitudes toward homeless persons during the Psychiatry and Emergency Medicine clerkships. Simultaneously, this study explored attitudes toward homeless persons held by Psychiatry and Emergency Medicine residents and faculty in an attempt to uncover the "hidden…

  12. Psychiatry and Emergency Medicine: Medical Student and Physician Attitudes toward Homeless Persons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Ann; Roman, Brenda; Borges, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to explore changes in medical students' attitudes toward homeless persons during the Psychiatry and Emergency Medicine clerkships. Simultaneously, this study explored attitudes toward homeless persons held by Psychiatry and Emergency Medicine residents and faculty in an attempt to uncover the "hidden…

  13. Longitudinal Emergency Medical Technician Attributes and Demographic Study (LEADS) Design and Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Roger

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this study is to describe the Longitudinal Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) Attributes and Demographic Study (LEADS) design, instrument development, pilot testing, sampling procedures, and data collection methodology. Response rates are provided, along with results of follow-up surveys of non-responders (NRs) and a special survey of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) professionals who were not nationally certified. Annual surveys from 1999 to 2008 were mailed out to a random, stratified sample of nationally registered EMT-Basics and Paramedics. Survey weights were developed to reflect each respondent's probability of selection. A special survey of NRs was mailed out to individuals who did not respond to the annual survey to estimate the probable extent and direction of response bias. Individuals who indicated they were no longer in the profession were mailed a special exit survey to determine their reasons for leaving EMS. Given the large number of comparisons between NR and regular (annual) survey respondents, it is not surprising that some statistically significant differences were found. In general, there were few differences. However, NRs tended to report higher annual EMS incomes, were younger, healthier, more physically fit, and were more likely to report that they were not practicing EMS. Comparisons of the nationally certified EMS professionals with EMS professionals who were not nationally certified indicated that nationally certified EMS providers were younger, had less EMS experiences, earned less, were more likely to be female and work for private EMS services, and less likely to work for fire-based services. These differences may reflect state and local policy and practice, since many states and local agencies do not require maintenance of national certification as a requirement to practice. When these differences were controlled for statistically, there were few systematic differences between non-nationally certified and nationally

  14. Reconstruction of the Radiation Emergency Medical System From the Acute to the Sub-acute Phases After the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojino, Mayo; Ishii, Masami

    2014-02-01

    The radiation emergency medical system in Japan ceased to function as a result of the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, which has commonly become known as the "Fukushima Accident." In this paper, we review the reconstruction processes of the radiation emergency medical system in order of events and examine the ongoing challenges to overcoming deficiencies and reinforcing the system by reviewing relevant literature, including the official documents of the investigation committees of the National Diet of Japan, the Japanese government, and the Tokyo Electric Power Company, as well as technical papers written by the doctors involved in radiation emergency medical activities in Fukushima. Our review has revealed that the reconstruction was achieved in 6 stages from March 11 to July 1, 2011: (1) Re-establishment of an off-site center (March 13), (2) Re-establishment of a secondary radiation emergency hospital (March 14), (3) Reconstruction of the initial response system for radiation emergency care (April 2), (4) Reinforcement of the off-site center and stationing of disaster medical advisors at the off-site center (April 4), (5) Reinforcement of the medical care system and an increase in the number of hospitals for non-contaminated patients (From April 2 to June 23), and (6) Enhancement of the medical care system in the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant and the construction of a new medical care system, involving both industrial medicine and emergency medicine (July 1). Medical resources such as voluntary efforts, academic societies, a local community medical system and university hospitals involved in medical care activities on 6 stages originally had not planned. In the future, radiation emergency medical systems should be evaluated with these 6 stages as a basis, in order to reinforce and enrich both the existing and backup systems so that minimal harm will come to nuclear power plant workers or evacuees and that they will receive proper care. This

  15. [Delegation of medical responsibilities to non-medical personnel. Options and limits from a legal viewpoint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulsenheimer, K

    2009-11-01

    Increasing specialization and growing mechanization in medicine have strongly supported the transfer of originally medical responsibilities to non-medical personnel. The enormous pressure of costs as a result of limited financial resources in the health system make the delegation of previously medical functions to cheaper non-medical ancillary staff expedient and the sometimes obvious lack of physicians also gains importance by the delegation of many activities away from medical staff. In the German health system there is no legal norm which clearly and definitively describes the field of activity of a medical doctor. Fundamental for a reform of the areas of responsibility between physicians and non-medical personnel is a terminological differentiation between instruction-dependent, subordinate, non-independent assistance and the delegation of medical responsibilities which are transferred to non-medical personnel for independent and self-determined completion under the supervision and control of a physician. The inclination towards risk of medical activities, the need of protection of the patient and the intellectual prerequisites required for carrying out the necessary measures define the limitations for the delegation of medical responsibilities to non-medical ancillary staff. These criteria demarcate by expert assessment the exclusively medical field of activity in a sufficiently exact and convincing manner.

  16. Evaluation of EMERGE, a Medical Decision Making Aid for Analysis of Chest Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Donna L.; Cohen, Moses E.; Deedwania, Prakash C.; Watson, Patricia E.

    1983-01-01

    EMERGE, a rule-based medical decision making aid for analysis of chest pain in the emergency room, was evaluated using retrospective patient data. The analysis consisted of two phases. In the initial phase, patient cases were run in order to make minor modifications and adjustments in the criteria used for determination of admission. In the second phase, patient cases were analyzed to determine the effectiveness of the EMERGE system in arriving at the proper conclusion.

  17. Stakeholder Attitudes Toward and Values Embedded in a Sensor-Enhanced Personal Emergency Response System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Yngve; Farshchian, Babak; Vilarinho, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an empirical understanding of concerns that the application of a sensor-enhanced medical alert system, or personal emergency response (PER) system, raises from the perspective of care receivers (users) and care providers. Data were gathered in the context of a field trial...... emerging concerns: (i) form factor and ergonomics, (ii) system feedback and user control and (iii) sensor precision and trust. Based on feedback from stakeholder groups, we discuss potential value biases, or discriminating factors, embedded in the evaluated PER system. We also discuss the implications...... of our findings for a value-driven design agenda for future PER systems....

  18. 42 CFR 483.372 - Medical treatment for injuries resulting from an emergency safety intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Medical treatment for injuries resulting from an... Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facilities Providing Inpatient Psychiatric Services for Individuals Under Age 21 § 483.372 Medical treatment for injuries resulting from an emergency safety intervention....

  19. Survival benefit of physician-staffed Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS) assistance for severely injured patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. den Hartog (Dennis); J. Romeo (Jamie); A.N. Ringburg (Akkie); M.H.J. Verhofstad (Michiel); E.M.M. van Lieshout (Esther)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractBackground: Physician-staffed Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS) provide specialist medical care to the accident scene and aim to improve survival of severely injured patients. Previous studies were often underpowered and showed heterogeneous results, leaving the subject at

  20. Using the MDRD value as an outcome predictor in emergency medical admissions.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chin, Jun Liong

    2011-10-01

    Both physiological- and laboratory-derived variables, alone or in combination, have been used to predict mortality among acute medical admissions. Using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) not as an estimate of glomerular filtration rate but as an outcome predictor for hospital mortality, we examined the relationship between the MDRD value and in-hospital death during an emergency medical admission.

  1. Does Spanish instruction for emergency medicine resident physicians improve patient satisfaction in the emergency department and adherence to medical recommendations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoneking LR

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available LR Stoneking,1 AL Waterbrook,1 J Garst Orozco,2 D Johnston,1 A Bellafiore,1 C Davies,3 T Nuño,1 J Fatás-Cabeza,4 O Beita,5 V Ng,1 KH Grall,6 W Adamas-Rappaport7 1Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, 2Department of Emergency Medicine, Sinai Health System, Chicago, IL, 3Department of Emergency Medicine, Maricopa Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ, 4Department of Spanish and Portuguese, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, 5Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, 6Department of Emergency Medicine, Regions Hospital, St Paul, MN, 7Department of Surgery, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA Background: After emergency department (ED discharge, Spanish-speaking patients with limited English proficiency are less likely than English-proficient patients to be adherent to medical recommendations and are more likely to be dissatisfied with their visit.Objectives: To determine if integrating a longitudinal medical Spanish and cultural competency curriculum into emergency medicine residency didactics improves patient satisfaction and adherence to medical recommendations in Spanish-speaking patients with limited English proficiency.Methods: Our ED has two Emergency Medicine Residency Programs, University Campus (UC and South Campus (SC. SC program incorporates a medical Spanish and cultural competency curriculum into their didactics. Real-time Spanish surveys were collected at SC ED on patients who self-identified as primarily Spanish-speaking during registration and who were treated by resident physicians from both residency programs. Surveys assessed whether the treating resident physician communicated in the patient’s native Spanish language. Follow-up phone calls assessed patient satisfaction and adherence to discharge instructions.Results: Sixty-three patients self-identified as primarily Spanish-speaking from August 2014 to July 2015 and were initially included in this pilot study

  2. Oil supply security -- Emergency response of IEA countries 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-11-29

    When Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf of Mexico in 2005, the region's oil production and refining infrastructure was devastated and world energy markets were disrupted. The International Energy Agency decided in a matter of days to bring 60 million barrels of additional oil to the market. The emergency response system worked - the collective action helped to stabilise global markets. Since its founding in 1974, oil supply security has been a core mission of the IEA and the Agency has improved its mechanisms to respond to short-term oil supply disruptions. Nevertheless, numerous factors will continue to test the delicate balance of supply and demand. Oil demand growth will continue to accelerate in Asia; oil will be increasingly produced by a shrinking number of countries; and capacities in the supply chain will need to expand. These are just a few of the challenges facing an already tight market. What are the emergency response systems of IEA countries? How are their emergency structures organised? How prepared is the IEA to deal with an oil supply disruption? This publication addresses these questions. It presents another cycle of rigorous reviews of the emergency response mechanisms of IEA member countries. The goal of these reviews is to ensure that the IEA stays ready to respond effectively to oil supply disruptions. This publication also includes overviews of how China, India and countries of Southeast Asia are progressing with domestic policies to improve oil supply security, based on emergency stocks.

  3. Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment - Compliance Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharry, John A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This document was prepared by John A. Sharry, LLNL Fire Marshal and Division Leader for Fire Protection and was reviewed by LLNL Emergency Management Department Head, James Colson. This document is the second of a two-part analysis on Emergency Response Capabilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The first part, 2016 Baseline Needs Assessment Requirements Document established the minimum performance criteria necessary to meet mandatory requirements. This second part analyses the performance of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Emergency Management Department to the contents of the Requirements Document. The document was prepared based on an extensive review of information contained in the 2016 BNA, a review of Emergency Planning Hazards Assessments, a review of building construction, occupancy, fire protection features, dispatch records, LLNL alarm system records, fire department training records, and fire department policies and procedures. The 2013 BNA was approved by NNSA’s Livermore Field Office on January 22, 2014.

  4. Expanded access to naloxone among firefighters, police officers, and emergency medical technicians in Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Corey S; Ruiz, Sarah; Glynn, Patrick; Picariello, Gerald; Walley, Alexander Y

    2014-08-01

    Naloxone is a medication that reverses respiratory depression from opioid overdose if given in time. Paramedics routinely administer naloxone to opioid overdose victims in the prehospital setting, and many states are moving to increase access to the medication. Several jurisdictions have expanded naloxone administration authority to nonparamedic first responders, and others are considering that step. We report here on policy change in Massachusetts, where several communities have equipped emergency medical technicians, law enforcement officers, and firefighters with naloxone.

  5. Emergency medical service, nursing, and physician providers' perspectives on delirium identification and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMantia, Michael A; Messina, Frank C; Jhanji, Shola; Nazir, Arif; Maina, Mungai; McGuire, Siobhan; Hobgood, Cherri D; Miller, Douglas K

    2017-04-01

    Purpose of the study The study objective was to understand providers' perceptions regarding identifying and treating older adults with delirium, a common complication of acute illness in persons with dementia, in the pre-hospital and emergency department environments. Design and methods The authors conducted structured focus group interviews with separate groups of emergency medical services staff, emergency nurses, and emergency physicians. Recordings of each session were transcribed, coded, and analyzed for themes with representative supporting quotations identified. Results Providers shared that the busy emergency department environment was the largest challenge to delirium recognition and treatment. When describing delirium, participants frequently detailed hyperactive features of delirium, rather than hypoactive features. Participants shared that they employed no clear diagnostic strategy for identifying the condition and that they used heterogeneous approaches to treat the condition. To improve care for older adults with delirium, emergency nurses identified the need for more training around the management of the condition. Emergency medical services providers identified the need for more support in managing agitated patients when in transport to the hospital and more guidance from emergency physicians on what information to collect from the patient's home environment. Emergency physicians felt that delirium care would be improved if they could have baseline mental status data on their patients and if they had access to a simple, accurate diagnostic tool for the condition. Implications Emergency medical services providers, emergency nurses, and emergency physicians frequently encounter delirious patients, but do not employ clear diagnostic strategies for identifying the condition and have varying levels of comfort in managing the condition. Clear steps should be taken to improve delirium care in the emergency department including the development of mechanisms

  6. Consumer response to food labels in an emerging market

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Festila, Alexandra Florina; Chrysochou, Polymeros; Krystallis Krontalis, Athanasios

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates consumer response to food labels in an emerging market. More specifically, it measures the levels of awareness, objective and perceived understanding, perceived usefulness and perceived trustworthiness of the most prominent food labels found in the Romanian market. An onli...

  7. Radiation Response of Emerging High Gain, Low Noise Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Heidi N.; Farr, William H; Zhu, David Q.

    2007-01-01

    Data illustrating the radiation response of emerging high gain, low noise detectors are presented. Ionizing dose testing of silicon internal discrete avalanche photodiodes, and 51-MeV proton testing of InGaAs/InAlAs avalanche photodiodes operated in Geiger mode are discussed.

  8. 78 FR 34031 - Burned Area Emergency Response, Forest Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-06

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service RIN 0596-AC73 Burned Area Emergency Response, Forest Service AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of interim directive; request for public comment. SUMMARY: The Forest Service is issuing an interim directive to guide its employees in revised procedures for...

  9. 49 CFR 172.602 - Emergency response information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... material as required by §§ 172.202 and 172.203(k), the ICAO Technical Instructions, the IMDG Code, or the... and technical name of the hazardous material as required by §§ 172.202 and 172.203(k), the ICAO... in the document. Aboard aircraft, the ICAO “Emergency Response Guidance for Aircraft...

  10. Field exercises are useful for improving public health emergency responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsty Hope

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Problem: Emergencies resulting from disease outbreaks and extreme environmental events present significant challenges for health services.Context: Preparing to effectively manage emergencies is a core activity in public health units. Field exercises support consolidation of biopreparedness by testing plans, identifying weaknesses, providing training opportunities and developing surge capacity.Action: An extended field exercise to test response to a novel influenza strain was conducted in New South Wales, Australia in September 2008, eight months before the influenza A(H1N1 2009 pandemic emerged. Lasting four days and involving over 300 participants, the exercise was set in the early response phase with the staggered presentation of 41 cases to 36 emergency departments in the health area. An additional 150 contacts were written into a complex scenario to test the public health response.Outcome: The subsequent pandemic emergence in mid-2009 offered a unique opportunity to assess the field exercise format for disaster preparedness. Most roles were adequately tested with recognized benefit during the actual pandemic response. However, the exercise did not adequately challenge the public health planning team that synthesizes surveillance data and forecasts risk, nor did it identify planning issues that became evident during the subsequent pandemic. Discussion: Field exercises offer the opportunity to rigorously test public health emergency preparedness but can be expensive and labour-intensive. Our exercise provided effective and timely preparation for the influenza A(H1N1 2009 pandemic but showed that more emphasis needs to be placed on the role and training of the public health planning team.

  11. Who killed Rambhor?: The state of emergency medical services in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh H Garg

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In India, the healthcare delivery system starts up from the sub-center at the village level and reaches up to super specialty medical centers providing state of the art emergency medical services (EMS. These highest centers, located in big cities, are considered the last referral points for the patients from nearby cities and states. As the incidents of rail and road accidents have increased in recent years, the role of EMS becomes critical in saving precious lives. But when the facilities and management of these emergency centers succumbs before the patient, then the question arises regarding the adequate availability and quality of EMS. The death of an unknown common man, Rambhor, for want of EMS in three big hospitals in the national capital of India put a big question on the "health" of the emergency health services in India. The emergency services infrastructure seems inadequate and quality and timely provision of EMS to critical patients appears unsatisfactory. There is lack of emergency medicine (EM specialists in India and also the postgraduation courses in EM have not gained foot in our medical education system. Creation of a Centralized Medical Emergency Body, implementation of management techniques, modification of medical curriculum, and fixing accountability are some of the few steps which are required to improve the EMS in India.

  12. [The expertise evaluation of organization of rendering of acute, emergency and urgent medical care in rural regions of Novosibirsk oblast'].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivaninskiĭ, O I; Sharapov, I V; Sadovoĭ, M A

    2013-01-01

    The most problematic spheres in the resource support of emergency medical care to rural residents are the completeness of staff of physicians in rural medical surgeries, community hospitals and departments of emergency medical care in central district hospitals. The provision of feldsher obstetrics posts with sanitary motor transport and medical equipment is yet another problematic sphere. The main troubles during provision of emergency medical care at feldsher obstetrics posts are related to surgery treatment. The organization of emergency and urgent medical care suffers of many unresolved problems related to informational program support at feldsher obstetrics posts, polyclinics of central district hospitals.

  13. In-plant emergency response training: Technical matters and technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wray, T.K.

    1997-02-01

    There are four key elements to any effective training program: knowledge, skill, attitude and behavior. Prior to commencement of any learning experience, there must be a knowledge objective. It is the responsibility of the trainer to provide students with the information needed to properly implement a specific task. All training can be boiled down to one thing -- behavior modification. Emergency response training is no exception. To have a well-trained team, all four elements must be present. Improving a training program`s effectiveness is the primary focus of this article. The emergency response provisions of the HAZWOPER legislation provide all companies that may be required to respond to hazardous materials emergencies with two options: train their own team or call in a qualified outside response team. There are advantages and disadvantages in either case. Training and equipping one`s own team is an expensive, time-consuming option, but it can decrease the response time and enhance the probability that a standard response procedure will be implemented.

  14. Medical intervention in radiological emergencies, formation and training; Intervencion medica en emergencias radiologicas, formacion y adiestramiento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas H, J. [CPHR, Calle 20 No. 4113, e/41 y 47 Playa, CP 11300, La Habana (Cuba)]. e-mail: cardenas@cphr.edu.cu

    2006-07-01

    The work exposes the national experience in the development of training programs in medical aspects of the radiological emergencies. Implemented after valuing the existent situation, identified the necessities and the reach of the training, additionally it was elaborated the content of the training program whose purpose is guided to the invigoration of the medical answer capacity in radiological emergencies The content of the modular program it approaches theoretical- practical aspects on preparation and medical answer in radiological emergencies. The program includes an exercise that simulates a radiological accident, to evaluate during the same one, the answer capacity before this situation. The training concludes with the design of a strategy for the preparation and answer in radiological emergencies in correspondence with the potential accidental scenarios that the participants can face. (Author)

  15. Barriers to recognition of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest during emergency medical calls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alfsen, David; Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Egerod, Ingrid;

    2015-01-01

    as influential factors. Though many of these factors are included in the algorithms used by medical dispatchers, many OHCA still remain not recognised. Qualitative studies investigating the communication between the caller and dispatcher are very scarce. There is a lack of knowledge about what influences...... the dispatchers' recognition of OHCA, focusing on the communication during the emergency call. The purpose of this study is to identify factors affecting medical dispatchers' recognition of OHCA during emergency calls in a qualitative analysis of calls. METHODS: An investigator triangulated inductive thematic...... analysis of recordings of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest emergency calls from December 2012. Participants were the callers (bystanders) and the emergency medical dispatchers. Data were analysed using a hermeneutic approach. RESULTS: Based on the concept of data saturation, 13 recordings of not recognised...

  16. Application of Robotic System for Emergency Response in NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Kyung Min; Seo, Yong Chil; Shin, Ho Chul; Lee, Sung Uk; Cho, Jae Wan; Choi, Young Soo; Kim, Chang Hoi; Kim, Seung Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Increasing energy demand and concerns over climate change make increasing use of nuclear power plant in worldwide. Even though the probability of accident is greatly reduced, safety is the highest priority issue in the nuclear energy industry. Applying highly reliable and conservative 'defense in depth' concepts with the design and construction of NPP, there are very little possibilities with which accidents are occur and radioactive materials are released to environments in NPP. But NPP have prepared with the emergency response procedures and conduct exercises for post-accident circumstance according to the procedures. The application of robots for emergency response task for post-accident in nuclear facilities is not a new concept. Robots have been sent to recover the damaged reactor at Chernobyl where human workers could receive a lifetime dose of radiation in minutes. Based on NRC's TMI-2 Cleanup Program, several robots were built in the 1980s to help gather information and remove debris from a reactor at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant that partially melted down in 1979. The first robot was lowered into the basement through a hatch and human operators monitoring in a control room drove it through mud, water and debris, capturing the initial post-accident images of the reactor's basement. It was used for several years equipped with various tools allowing it to scour surfaces, scoop samples and vacuum sludge. A second version carried a core sampler to determine the intensity and depth of the radiation that had permeated into the walls. To perform cleanup tasks, they built Workhorse that featured system redundancy and had a boom extendable to reach high places, but it was never used because it had too many complexities and to clean and fix. While remote robotics technology has proven to remove the human from the radioactive environment, it is also difficult to make it useful because it may requires skill about remote control and

  17. The Medical Response to Sex Trafficking of Minors in Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbitt, Angela

    2015-04-01

    Medical professionals are in a unique position to identify and assist pediatric victims of sex trafficking, who experience a high prevalence of physical, mental, and sexual health problems. However, providers report a need for education and guidelines for medical care of this population. A literature review was conducted on the nature and scope of pediatric sex trafficking in Wisconsin, the medical and mental health needs of victims, and existing guidelines for medical management. Few existing medical guidelines for the care of trafficking victims are specific to pediatrics or include specific recommendations for the forensic medical evaluation. Because of legislation and resources specific to Wisconsin, national guidelines may not apply locally. Based on the literature review, as well as input from community partners and medical professionals who frequently provide services to victims, guidelines for the medical care of pediatric sex trafficking victims in Wisconsin were developed. Additional community barriers that may prevent an effective medical response also are discussed.

  18. Emergency medical systems in low- and middle-income countries: recommendations for action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobusingye, Olive C; Hyder, Adnan A; Bishai, David; Hicks, Eduardo Romero; Mock, Charles; Joshipura, Manjul

    2005-08-01

    Emergency medical care is not a luxury for rich countries or rich individuals in poor countries. This paper makes the point that emergency care can make an important contribution to reducing avoidable death and disability in low- and middle-income countries. But emergency care needs to be planned well and supported at all levels--at the national, provincial and community levels--and take into account the entire spectrum of care, from the occurrence of an acute medical event in the community to the provision of appropriate care at the hospital. The mix of personnel, materials, and health-system infrastructure can be tailored to optimize the provision of emergency care in settings with different levels of resource availability. The misconception that emergency care cannot be cost effective in low-income settings is demonstrably inaccurate. Emergencies occur everywhere, and each day they consume resources regardless of whether there are systems capable of achieving good outcomes. With better planning, the ongoing costs of emergency care can result in better outcomes and better cost-effectiveness. Every country and community can and should provide emergency care regardless of their place in the ratings of developmental indices. We make the case for universal access to emergency care and lay out a research agenda to fill the gaps in knowledge in emergency care.

  19. Quantifying Response of Chickpea Emergence to Air Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Torabi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to evaluate the response of emergence to temperature in 4 chickpea cultivars (Beauvanij, Arman, Hashem and Jam using 12 sowing dates (one per month under Gorgan environmental conditions (northern Iran in 2001-2002 and 2002-2003. A dent-like function was used to quantify the response of emergence to temperature. Using this function, the cardinal temperatures (base, lower optimum and higher optimum and biological day requirement for emergence were determined for different percentiles. Ceiling temperature was taken constantly as 39 ˚C. There was no significant difference between cultivars for cardinal temperatures of 50% population and they were estimated as 4.5, 20.2 and 29.0 ˚C, respectively. Base temperature of 3.4 and 3.0 ˚C, lower optimum of 23.8 and 20 ˚C and higher optimum of 30.3 and 30.0 ˚C were estimated for 10 and 90% populations without significant difference between cultivars. Cultivar differences for biological day requirement of emergence were not significant for 10, 50 and 90% populations. Biological day requirement was estimated as 4.4, 6.1 and 7.9 days for 10, 50 and 90% populations, respectively. Chickpea emergence could be predicted for different percentiles using estimated parameters of this study and weather data.

  20. Developing Physiologic Models for Emergency Medical Procedures Under Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Nigel; O'Quinn, Veronica

    2012-01-01

    Several technological enhancements have been made to METI's commercial Emergency Care Simulator (ECS) with regard to how microgravity affects human physiology. The ECS uses both a software-only lung simulation, and an integrated mannequin lung that uses a physical lung bag for creating chest excursions, and a digital simulation of lung mechanics and gas exchange. METI s patient simulators incorporate models of human physiology that simulate lung and chest wall mechanics, as well as pulmonary gas exchange. Microgravity affects how O2 and CO2 are exchanged in the lungs. Procedures were also developed to take into affect the Glasgow Coma Scale for determining levels of consciousness by varying the ECS eye-blinking function to partially indicate the level of consciousness of the patient. In addition, the ECS was modified to provide various levels of pulses from weak and thready to hyper-dynamic to assist in assessing patient conditions from the femoral, carotid, brachial, and pedal pulse locations.

  1. Heat Stroke: A Medical Emergency Appearing in New Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofie Søndergaard Mørch

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat stroke is an acute, life-threatening emergency characterized clinically by elevated body temperature and central nervous system dysfunction. Early recognition and treatment including aggressive cooling and management of life-threatening systemic complications are essential to reduce morbidity and mortality. This case report describes two Danish patients diagnosed with heat stroke syndrome during a heat wave in the summer of 2014. Both patients were morbidly obese and had several predisposing illnesses. However since heat stroke is a rare condition in areas with temperate climate, they were not diagnosed until several days after admittance; hence treatment with cooling was delayed. Both patients were admitted to the intensive care unit, where they were treated with an external cooling device and received treatment for complications. Both cases ended fatally. As global warming continues, more heat waves will occur in previously cooler regions. Therefore it is important to raise awareness of heat stroke since outcome depends on early recognition and rapid cooling.

  2. Medical dispatchers recognise substantial amount of acute stroke during emergency calls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viereck, Søren; Iversen, Helle Klingenberg; Christensen, Hanne Krarup

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Immediate recognition of stroke symptoms is crucial to ensure timely access to revascularisation therapy. Medical dispatchers ensure fast admission to stroke facilities by prioritising the appropriate medical response. Data on medical dispatchers' ability to recognise symptoms of acute...... step in ensuring fast-track stroke treatment, which would promote timely acute therapy. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Unique identifier: NCT02191514 ....

  3. [A guide to successful public relations for hospitals and emergency medical services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausserer, J; Schwamberger, J; Preloznik, R; Klimek, M; Paal, P; Wenzel, V

    2014-04-01

    Tragic accidents, e.g. involving celebrity patients or severe incidents in hospital occur suddenly without any advance warning, often produce substantial interest by the media and quickly overburden management personnel involved in both hospitals and emergency medical services. While doctors, hospitals and emergency medical services desire objective media reports, the media promote emotionalized and dramatized reports to ensure maximum attention and circulation. When briefing the media, the scales may quickly tilt from professional, well-deliberated information to unfortunate, often unintended disinformation. Such phenomena may result in continuing exaggerated reports in the tabloid press, which in the presence of aggressive lawyers and a competitive hospital environment can turn into image and legal problems. In this article, several aspects are discussed in order to achieve successful public relations.Interviews should be given only after consultation with the responsible press officer and the director of the respective department or hospital director. Requests for information by the media should always be answered as otherwise one-sided, unintentional publications can result that are extremely difficult to correct later. One should be available to be contacted easily by journalists, regular press conferences should be held and critics should be taken seriously and not be brushed off. Questions by journalists should be answered in a timely manner as journalists are continuously under time pressure and do not understand unnecessary delays. Information for the media should always be provided at the same time, no publication should be given preference and an absolutely current list of E-mail contacts is required. When facing big events a press conference is preferred as many questions can be answered at once. Always be well prepared for an interview or even for just a statement. Each interview should be regarded as an opportunity to put a story forward which you

  4. Methodology for Estimating Ingestion Dose for Emergency Response at SRS

    CERN Document Server

    Simpkins, A A

    2002-01-01

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), emergency response models estimate dose for inhalation and ground shine pathways. A methodology has been developed to incorporate ingestion doses into the emergency response models. The methodology follows a two-phase approach. The first phase estimates site-specific derived response levels (DRLs) which can be compared with predicted ground-level concentrations to determine if intervention is needed to protect the public. This phase uses accepted methods with little deviation from recommended guidance. The second phase uses site-specific data to estimate a 'best estimate' dose to offsite individuals from ingestion of foodstuffs. While this method deviates from recommended guidance, it is technically defensibly and more realistic. As guidance is updated, these methods also will need to be updated.

  5. Emergency contraception: Knowledge and attitude toward its use among medical students of a medical college in North-West India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rajiv Kumar; Raina, Sunil Kumar; Verma, Aruna Kumari; Shora, Tejali

    2016-01-01

    Context: Emergency contraception (EC) is use of drug or device to prevent pregnancy after unprotected sexual intercourse. Unlike other regular methods of contraception which are taken prior to the sexual act, EC is used after the unprotected sex. Aim: To assess the knowledge and attitude toward use of emergency contraceptives among medical students. Setting and Design: A cross-sectional questionnaire based study was conducted among all the medical students in the Government Medical College in North-West India. Subjects and Methods: A questionnaire seeking information on knowledge and attitude of undergraduate medical students was administered over a period of 4 weeks in the month of February and March 2014. Statistical Analysis: The data were entered in MS excel and expressed using percentages. Chi-square test was used as a test of statistical significance. Results: About 61.6% (247/401) of the participants were aware about the timing of use of EC. Audio visual media (76.6%; 307/401) was the most common source of information for of these medical students. Conclusions: The lack of appropriate in-depth knowledge of EC among future health care professional should alarm the medical teaching system as EC is the only method that can be used to prevent pregnancy after unprotected sex or contraceptive accident. PMID:27413353

  6. Physical evaluation and the prevention of medical emergencies: vital signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamed, S F

    1993-01-01

    It was assumed that dentists employ a complete system of physical evaluation for all new patients in their dental practices. Results of a survey of 1,588 dentists demonstrated that the use of a written medical history questionnaire was commonplace; however, recording of blood pressure and heart rate and rhythm on all new patients was quite limited. A greater percentage of dentists monitored blood pressure when there was a history of cardiovascular disease or high blood pressure. Monitoring of the heart rate and rhythm, even in patients with cardiovascular disease or high blood pressure, was severely limited in scope. A significant number of dentists still employ racemic epinephrine impregnated gingival retraction cord, and of these, 40% had observed "epinephrine-reactions."

  7. Developing a third-year emergency medicine medical student curriculum: a syllabus of content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tews, Matthew C; Wyte, Collette Marie Ditz; Coltman, Marion; Grekin, Peter A; Hiller, Kathy; Oyama, Leslie C; Pandit, Kiran; Manthey, David E

    2011-10-01

    Emergency medicine (EM) educators have published several curricular guides designed for medical student rotations and experiences. These guides primarily provided brief overviews of opportunities to incorporate EM into all 4 years of the medical student curriculum, with one specific to the fourth year. However, there are no published guidelines specific to third-year medical students rotating in EM. Given the differences between third-year and fourth-year students in terms of clinical experience, knowledge, and skills, the Clerkship Directors in Emergency Medicine (CDEM) established the Third-year EM Medical Student Curriculum Work Group to create a third-year curriculum. The work group began this process by developing consensus-based recommendations for the content of a third-year medical student EM rotation, which are presented in this syllabus.

  8. Research on Sensor Cooperation for Distributed Emergency Response System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haoming Guo

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available With advantages of IOT (internet of things and sensor technique, a new communication mechanism between sensors is enhanced upon which distributed emergency response systems are built. This mechanism enables sensors to cooperate with each other in a decentralized way to improve efficiency in case of emergencies. During the process, the alert messages are exchanged among sensors cooperatively to prepare and implement monitoring activities. The system center won’t be overloaded by flooding messages. However, due to the lack of centralized information processing, there will be message loops and identity confusions, which would affect system’s reliability and credibility. For this problem, an approach called Decentralized Message Broadcasting Process is introduced to address the issue. In the approach, a message protocol is developed. The sensors are wrapped as device node services and work as message relay stations when they receive messages from others. Messages are utilized not only as information about event but also as reference to identify and filter. The requirement of reliability and credibility over the distributed emergency response system is achieved. Upon the approach, a platform is built for CEA’ SPON to support the decentralized earthquake emergency response research applications.

  9. Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response training Center needs assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGinnis, K.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Bolton, P.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Robinson, R.K. [RKR, Inc. (United States)

    1993-09-01

    For the Hanford Site to provide high-quality training using simulated job-site situations to prepare the 4,000 Site workers and 500 emergency responders for known and unknown hazards a Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center is needed. The center will focus on providing classroom lecture as well as hands-on, realistic training. The establishment of the center will create a partnership among the US Department of Energy; its contractors; labor; local, state, and tribal governments; and Xavier and Tulane Universities of Louisiana. This report presents the background, history, need, benefits, and associated costs of the proposed center.

  10. 核事故的公众医学心理学影响与应急%Medical Psychology Impact and Emergency Response of Nuclear Disasters for the Public

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宏; 刘强; 杜利清; 王彦; 樊飞跃

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear accident could bing physical and psychological effects for the public. Besides some casualties of radiation disease, after math sequelae could be intense and of long duration which represent stress ,full syndrome disorder , depression, anxiety, excessive alcohol use and some physical symptom of high blood pressure,somatic complaints and cardiovascular disease. These two aspects could affect and transmit with each other in the perspertive of medical psychology. This article discussed on the puhlic health impact of nuclear disaster and analyzed how to control and depress it.%核事故给公众带来的健康问题包括身体危害和心理影响.除少数事故伤员为放射性疾病外,核事故的灾后综合征对公众影响更为持久.包括紧张、情绪紊乱、压抑、焦虑、酗酒等精神方面的表现,也包括高血压、全身不适、心血管疾病等临床表现症状.从医学心理学的角度看,这两方面的表现症状是相互影响、相互转化的结果.现讨论国内外一些核事故对公众健康的影响,并分析如何控制和降低核事故给公众带来的健康影响.

  11. Medical radiation countermeasures for nuclear and radiological emergencies: Current status and future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Arora

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear and radiological emergencies (NREs occurred globally and recent incidences in India are indicating toward the need for comprehensive medical preparedness required both at incident site and hospitals. The enhanced threat attributed toward insurgency is another causative factor of worry. The response capabilities and operational readiness of responders (both health and non-health service providers in contaminated environment need to be supported by advancement in R & D and technological efforts to develop prophylactics and radiation mitigators. It is essential to develop phase 1 alternatives of such drugs for unseen threats as a part of initial preparedness. At the incident site and hospital level, external decontamination procedures need to be standardized and supported by protective clothing and Shudika kits developed by INMAS. The medical management of exposure requires systematic approach to perform triage, resuscitation and curative care. The internal contamination requires decorporation agents to be administered based on procedural diagnostics. Various key issues pertaining to policy decisions, R & D promotion, community awareness, specialized infrastructure for NREs preparedness has been discussed. The present review is an attempt to provide vital information about the current status of various radiation countermeasures and future perspective(s ahead.

  12. Facilitating The Medical Response Into An Active Shooter Hot Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    diagram from Figure 5 from Snowden, this time (see Figure 18) in a more relaxed format. The response to an active shooter incident falls into the left...THE MEDICAL RESPONSE INTO AN ACTIVE SHOOTER HOT ZONE by Martin T. Tierney June 2016 Thesis Co-Advisors: Nadav Morag Patrick Miller...Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE FACILITATING THE MEDICAL RESPONSE INTO AN ACTIVE SHOOTER HOT ZONE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Martin

  13. The New Mexico School Nurse and Emergency Medical Services Emergency Preparedness Course: Program Description and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgie, Robert; Sapien, Robert E.; Fullerton-Gleason, Lynne

    2005-01-01

    Illness and injuries are common among students and school staff. Therefore, school nurses must be prepared. In this study, a 16-hour scenario-based emergency preparedness course for school nurses was evaluated for its effectiveness. Effectiveness was measured by (a) traditional methods (written exams and confidence surveys) and (b) skills and…

  14. Improving Emergency Response and Human-Robotic Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David I. Gertman; David J. Bruemmer; R. Scott Hartley

    2007-08-01

    Preparedness for chemical, biological, and radiological/nuclear incidents at nuclear power plants (NPPs) includes the deployment of well trained emergency response teams. While teams are expected to do well, data from other domains suggests that the timeliness and accuracy associated with incident response can be improved through collaborative human-robotic interaction. Many incident response scenarios call for multiple, complex procedure-based activities performed by personnel wearing cumbersome personal protective equipment (PPE) and operating under high levels of stress and workload. While robotic assistance is postulated to reduce workload and exposure, limitations associated with communications and the robot’s ability to act independently have served to limit reliability and reduce our potential to exploit human –robotic interaction and efficacy of response. Recent work at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) on expanding robot capability has the potential to improve human-system response during disaster management and recovery. Specifically, increasing the range of higher level robot behaviors such as autonomous navigation and mapping, evolving new abstractions for sensor and control data, and developing metaphors for operator control have the potential to improve state-of-the-art in incident response. This paper discusses these issues and reports on experiments underway intelligence residing on the robot to enhance emergency response.

  15. The relationship betweenmanagers’ leadership styles and emergency medical technicians’ job satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azimeh Ghorbanian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/AimsLeadership plays a crucial role in many professions, especially in challenging positions such as emergency medical service jobs. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between managers’ leadership styles and emergency medical technicians’ job satisfaction.MethodThis is a descriptive and cross-sectional study that was carried out in 2010. The research population included 21 managers and 87 emergency medical technicians working in 23 stations in Isfahan city, Iran. The main tools used for data accumulation were the Multiple Leadership Questionnaire for evaluating leadership styles and the Job Descriptive Index for measuring job satisfaction levels. Also, the Pearson correlation analysis test was used to evaluate the relationship between leadership style and job satisfaction.ResultsAmong both managers and technicians, the highest mean score related to the transformational management style, whereas the lowest mean score related to the laissez-faire management style. Moreover, a significant relationship (P<0.01 was found between the transformational and transactional leadership styles and job satisfaction. However, no significant relationship was observed between the laissez-faire management style and job satisfaction.ConclusionConsidering the importance of job satisfaction in medical emergencies, it is recommended that health sector policy makers should provide the groundwork for implementing the transformational leadership style to enhance job satisfaction of the medical emergency staff.

  16. Eliciting comprehensive medication histories in the emergency department: the role of the pharmacist.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crook M

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The Australian Pharmaceutical Advisory Committee guidelines call for a detailed medication history to be taken at the first point of admission to hospital. Accurate medication histories are vital in optimising health outcomes and have been shown to reduce mortality rates. This study aimed to examine the accuracy of medication histories taken in the Emergency Department of the Royal Adelaide Hospital. Medication histories recorded by medical staff were compared to those elicited by a pharmacy researcher. The study, conducted over a six-week period, included 100 patients over the age of 70, who took five or more regular medications, had three or more clinical co-morbidities and/or had been discharged from hospital in three months prior to the study. Following patient interviews, the researcher contacted the patient’s pharmacist and GP for confirmation and completion of the medication history. Out of the 1152 medications recorded as being used by the 100 patients, discrepancies were found for 966 medications (83.9%. There were 563 (48.9% complete omissions of medications. The most common discrepancies were incomplete or omitted dosage and frequency information. Discrepancies were mostly medications that treated dermatological and ear, nose and throat disorders but approximately 29% were used to treat cardiovascular disorders. This study provides support for the presence of an Emergency Department pharmacist who can compile a comprehensive and accurate medication history to enhance medication management along the continuum of care. It is recommended that the patient’s community pharmacy and GP be contacted for clarification and confirmation of the medication history.

  17. Medical Student Performance on the National Board of Medical Examiners Emergency Medicine Advanced Clinical Examination and the National Emergency Medicine M4 Exams

    OpenAIRE

    Hiller, Katherine; House, Joseph; Lawson, Luan; Poznanski, Stacey; Morrissey, Thomas K.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In April 2013, the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) released an Advanced Clinical Examination (ACE) in emergency medicine (EM). In addition to this new resource, CDEM (Clerkship Directors in EM) provides two online, high-quality, internally validated examinations. National usage statistics are available for all three examinations, however, it is currently unknown how students entering an EM residency perform as compared to the entire national cohort. This information m...

  18. Skylab IMSS checklist application study for emergency medical care. [emergency medical care operations involving the use and operation of the portable ambulance module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl, J. G.; Furukawa, S.

    1975-01-01

    A manual is presented that provides basic technical documentation to support the operation and utilization of the Portable Ambulance Module (PAM) in the field. The PAM is designed to be used for emergency resuscitation and victim monitoring. The functions of all the controls, displays, and stowed equipment of the unit are defined. Supportive medical and physiological data in those areas directly related to the uses of the PAM unit are presented.

  19. Kingella kingae: from medical rarity to an emerging paediatric pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagupsky, Pablo

    2004-06-01

    In recent years, Kingella kingae has emerged as an important cause of invasive infections in young children, especially septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, spondylodiscitis, bacteraemia, and endocarditis, and less frequently lower respiratory tract infections and meningitis. The organism is part of the pharyngeal flora of young children and is transmitted from child-to-child. The clinical presentation of invasive K kingae disease is often subtle and laboratory tests are frequently normal. A substantial fraction of children with invasive K kingae infections have a recent history of stomatitis or symptoms of upper-respiratory-tract infection. The organism is susceptible to a wide array of antibiotics that are usually given empirically to young children including beta lactams, and with the exception of cases of endocarditis, the disease runs a benign clinical course. Although isolation and recognition of the organism is not difficult, clinicians and microbiologists should be aware of its fastidious nature. To optimise the recovery of K kingae, inoculation of synovial fluid specimens into blood culture vials is strongly recommended.

  20. Headache in the pediatric emergency service: a medical center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Hsiang-Ju; Huang, Jing-Long; Hsia, Shao-Hsuan; Lin, Jainn-Jim; Huang, I-Anne; Wu, Chang-Teng

    2014-06-01

    Headache is a common complaint in children and is one of the most common reasons for presentation at a pediatric emergency department (PED). This study described the etiologies of patients with headache seen in the PED and determined predictors of intracranial pathology (ICP) requiring urgent intervention. A secondary objective was to develop rapid, practical tools for screening headache in the PED. We conducted a retrospective chart review of children who presented with a chief complaint of headache at the PED during 2008. First, we identified possible red flags in the patients' history or physical examination and neurological examination findings. Then, we recorded the brain computed tomography results. During the study period, 43,913 visits were made to the PED; in 409 (0.9%) patients, the chief complaint was headache. Acute viral, respiratory, and febrile illnesses comprised the most frequent cause of headache (59.9%). Six children (1.5%) had life-threatening ICP findings. In comparison with the group without ICP, the group with ICP had a significantly higher percentage of blurred vision (p = 0.008) and ataxia (p = 0.002). Blurred vision and ataxia are the best clinical parameters to predict ICP findings. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Medical student self-assessment narratives: perceived educational needs during fourth-year emergency medicine clerkship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Aaron W; Balodis, Amanda; Kman, Nicholas E; Caterino, Jeffrey M; Khandelwal, Sorabh

    2013-01-01

    The educational needs of medical students in the 4th-year of training are not well defined in the literature. The specific aim of this investigation is to characterize the perceived educational needs of 4th-year medical students during an Emergency Medicine clerkship. This was a thematic analysis of informed self-assessment narratives. The writings were performed by medical students during an Emergency Medicine clerkship from July 2010 through May 2011. Themes and subthemes that emerged were assessed for frequency of occurrence. Qualitative analysis of 203 narratives revealed 13 themes and 55 subthemes. Patient care (50%), history taking (44%), and physical examination (29%) were the themes most commonly noted as strengths. Medical decision making/plan of care (44%), differential diagnosis (37%), presentation skills (32%), and knowledge base (27%) were the themes most commonly noted as weaknesses. All themes were described as strengths by some students and weaknesses by others; however, trends were apparent in the analysis. Fourth-year medical students rotating on an Emergency Medicine clerkship perceive an educational need to improve medical decision making/plan of care. Self-assessment narratives reveal trends in strengths and weaknesses but also highlight the importance of recognizing students as unique learners with individualized needs.

  2. Medicalization of HIV and the African Response

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    major advancements in the management of the disease. Africa, despite its ... Despite the high rates of HIV, most countries in ... prevention of mother-to-child transmission. (PMTCT) ..... to the special issue on the medicalization of sex. Journal of ...

  3. [Responsibility in medical collaborations and care establishments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarda, F

    1998-01-01

    Criminal Law and Civil Law--that have a general application require personnel misconduct. However, the criminal liability of legal entities is now provided by the law. Public law only deals with the liability of the establishment as a consequence of a fault of the administrative service or of a personnel misconduct. The liability of the closest collaboration of the surgical team (Surgeon, Anaesthesist...) used to be transferred onto the surgeon. The liability of the surgeon is now autonomous but the latter still have a general duty of supervision. There is a wider application of collaboration. One is still liable for his faults but their is a duty of vigilance on partners together with a duty of mutual information of the medical practitioners who successively intervene. There is also a new liability for the lack of mobilisation of adequate skills. Curing Establishments are now considered as partners of the medical agreement and are often sued in case of deficiency of the organisation of medical attendance. The nursing homes shall have now to control the quality of the medical activity.

  4. Learning from Japan: strengthening US emergency care and disaster response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Parveen; Arii, Maya; Kayden, Stephanie

    2013-12-01

    As Hurricane Katrina demonstrated in 2005, US health response systems for disasters-typically designed to handle only short-term mass-casualty events-are inadequately prepared for disasters that result in large-scale population displacements. Similarly, after the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake, Japan found that many of its disaster shelters failed to meet international standards for long-term provision of basic needs and health care for the vulnerable populations that sought refuge in the shelters. Hospital disaster plans had not been tested and turned out to be inadequate, and emergency communication equipment did not function. We make policy recommendations that aim to improve US responses to mass-displacement disasters based on Japan's 2011 experience. First, response systems must provide for the extended care of large populations of chronically ill and vulnerable people. Second, policies should ensure that shelters meet or exceed international standards for the provision of food, water, sanitation, and privacy. Third, hospital disaster plans should include redundant communication systems and sufficient emergency provisions for both staff and patients. Finally, there must be routine drills for responses to mass-displacement disasters so that areas needing improvement can be uncovered before an emergency occurs.

  5. ['See and Treat' in the Emergency Department: legal aspects and professional nursing responsibility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radice, Cristiano; Ghinaglia, Monica; Doneda, Renzo; Bollini, Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    The article aim to analyze the legal aspects of professional responsibility in the autonomous nursing care of a patient with a minor health problem treated in a See and Treat area of the Emergency Department through a literature review and an analyses of the Italian legislation about professional exercise. Recent studies have shown that the treatment of the emergency patients affected by minor health problems in separated areas of the A&E by skilled nurses proved to be effective in reducing time to medical examination and the overall time spent in the Emergency Department. Several studies have shown the positive effects of the Emergency Nurse Practitioner (ENP) in terms of reduction of time to medical examination with an increase in patient satisfaction, maintaining an adequate level of quality in the care of patients with minor health problems. The introduction of a See and Treat area, together with the institution of advanced post-triage protocols, represents a possible answer to the overcrowding of the Emergency Department. The aim is the reduction of waiting times and proper allocation of both material and professional resources. The "See and Treat" nurse represents an expert nurse, with an adequate level of competence, who acts in respect to the clinical protocols shared between physicians and nurses. The Italian legislation is not in contrast with the introduction of the See and Treat nurse, on the contrary it offers opportunities for further professional development.

  6. The Emergence of the Dose–Response Concept in Biology and Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward J. Calabrese

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A historical assessment of the origin of the dose–response in modern toxicology and its integration as a central concept in biology and medicine is presented. This article provides an overview of how the threshold, linear and biphasic (i.e., hormetic dose–response models emerged in the late 19th and early 20th centuries and competed for acceptance and dominance. Particular attention is directed to the hormetic model for which a general description and evaluation is provided, including its historical basis, and how it was marginalized by the medical and pharmacology communities in the early decades of the 20th century.

  7. The Emergence of the Dose–Response Concept in Biology and Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    A historical assessment of the origin of the dose–response in modern toxicology and its integration as a central concept in biology and medicine is presented. This article provides an overview of how the threshold, linear and biphasic (i.e., hormetic) dose–response models emerged in the late 19th and early 20th centuries and competed for acceptance and dominance. Particular attention is directed to the hormetic model for which a general description and evaluation is provided, including its historical basis, and how it was marginalized by the medical and pharmacology communities in the early decades of the 20th century. PMID:27929392

  8. Emergency medical service (EMS): A unique flight environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shively, R. Jay

    1993-01-01

    The EMS flight environment is unique in today's aviation. The pilots must respond quickly to emergency events and often fly to landing zones where they have never been before . The time from initially receiving a call to being airborne can be as little as two to three minutes. Often the EMS pilot is the only aviation professional on site, they have no operations people or other pilots to aid them in making decisons. Further, since they are often flying to accident scenes, not airports, there is often complete weather and condition information. Therefore, the initial decision that the pilot must make, accepting or declining a flight, can become very difficult. The accident rate of EMS helicopters has been relatively high over the past years. NASA-Ames research center has taken several steps in an attempt to aid EMS pilots in their decision making and situational awareness. A preflight risk assessment system (SAFE) was developed to aid pilots in their decision making, and was tested at an EMS service. The resutls of the study were promising and a second version incorporating the lessons learned is under development. A second line of research was the development of a low cost electronic chart display (ECD). This is a digital map display to help pilots maintain geographical orientation. Another thrust was undertaken in conjunction with the Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS). This involved publicizing the ASRS to EMS pilots and personnel, and calling each of the reporters back to gather additional information. This paper will discuss these efforts and how they may positively impact the safety of EMS operations.

  9. Facilitators and obstacles in pre-hospital medical response to earthquakes: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castrén Maaret

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Earthquakes are renowned as being amongst the most dangerous and destructive types of natural disasters. Iran, a developing country in Asia, is prone to earthquakes and is ranked as one of the most vulnerable countries in the world in this respect. The medical response in disasters is accompanied by managerial, logistic, technical, and medical challenges being also the case in the Bam earthquake in Iran. Our objective was to explore the medical response to the Bam earthquake with specific emphasis on pre-hospital medical management during the first days. Methods The study was performed in 2008; an interview based qualitative study using content analysis. We conducted nineteen interviews with experts and managers responsible for responding to the Bam earthquake, including pre-hospital emergency medical services, the Red Crescent, and Universities of Medical Sciences. The selection of participants was determined by using a purposeful sampling method. Sample size was given by data saturation. Results The pre-hospital medical service was divided into three categories; triage, emergency medical care and transportation, each category in turn was identified into facilitators and obstacles. The obstacles identified were absence of a structured disaster plan, absence of standardized medical teams, and shortage of resources. The army and skilled medical volunteers were identified as facilitators. Conclusions The most compelling, and at the same time amenable obstacle, was the lack of a disaster management plan. It was evident that implementing a comprehensive plan would not only save lives but decrease suffering and enable an effective praxis of the available resources at pre-hospital and hospital levels.

  10. Using off-the-shelf medical devices for biomedical signal monitoring in a telemedicine system for emergency medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelen, Sebastian; Czaplik, Michael; Meisen, Philipp; Schilberg, Daniel; Jeschke, Sabina

    2015-01-01

    In order to study new methods of telemedicine usage in the context of emergency medical services, researchers need to prototype integrated telemedicine systems. To conduct a one-year trial phase-intended to study a new application of telemedicine in German emergency medical services-we used off-the-shelf medical devices and software to realize real-time patient monitoring within an integrated telemedicine system prototype. We demonstrate its feasibility by presenting the integrated real-time patient monitoring solution, by studying signal delay and transmission robustness regarding changing communication channel characteristics, and by evaluating issues reported by the physicians during the trial phase. Where standards like HL7 and the IEEE 11073 family are intended to enable interoperability of product grade medical devices, we show that research prototypes benefit from the use of web technologies and simple device interfaces, as they simplify product development for a manufacturer and ease integration efforts for research teams. Embracing this approach for the development of new medical devices eases the constraint to use off-the-shelf products for research trials investigating innovative use of telemedicine.

  11. 41 CFR 102-36.460 - Do we report excess medical shelf-life items held for national emergency purposes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... items held for national emergency purposes? When the remaining shelf life of any medical materials or supplies held for national emergency purposes is of too short a period to justify their continued retention... medical shelf-life items held for national emergency purposes? 102-36.460 Section 102-36.460...

  12. Does Spanish instruction for emergency medicine resident physicians improve patient satisfaction in the emergency department and adherence to medical recommendations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoneking, L R; Waterbrook, A L; Garst Orozco, J; Johnston, D; Bellafiore, A; Davies, C; Nuño, T; Fatás-Cabeza, J; Beita, O; Ng, V; Grall, K H; Adamas-Rappaport, W

    2016-01-01

    After emergency department (ED) discharge, Spanish-speaking patients with limited English proficiency are less likely than English-proficient patients to be adherent to medical recommendations and are more likely to be dissatisfied with their visit. To determine if integrating a longitudinal medical Spanish and cultural competency curriculum into emergency medicine residency didactics improves patient satisfaction and adherence to medical recommendations in Spanish-speaking patients with limited English proficiency. Our ED has two Emergency Medicine Residency Programs, University Campus (UC) and South Campus (SC). SC program incorporates a medical Spanish and cultural competency curriculum into their didactics. Real-time Spanish surveys were collected at SC ED on patients who self-identified as primarily Spanish-speaking during registration and who were treated by resident physicians from both residency programs. Surveys assessed whether the treating resident physician communicated in the patient's native Spanish language. Follow-up phone calls assessed patient satisfaction and adherence to discharge instructions. Sixty-three patients self-identified as primarily Spanish-speaking from August 2014 to July 2015 and were initially included in this pilot study. Complete outcome data were available for 55 patients. Overall, resident physicians spoke Spanish 58% of the time. SC resident physicians spoke Spanish with 66% of the patients versus 45% for UC resident physicians. Patients rated resident physician Spanish ability as very good in 13% of encounters - 17% for SC versus 5% for UC. Patient satisfaction with their ED visit was rated as very good in 35% of encounters - 40% for SC resident physicians versus 25% for UC resident physicians. Of the 13 patients for whom Spanish was the language used during the medical encounter who followed medical recommendations, ten (77%) of these encounters were with SC resident physicians and three (23%) encounters were with UC

  13. Satellite image collection modeling for large area hazard emergency response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shufan; Hodgson, Michael E.

    2016-08-01

    Timely collection of critical hazard information is the key to intelligent and effective hazard emergency response decisions. Satellite remote sensing imagery provides an effective way to collect critical information. Natural hazards, however, often have large impact areas - larger than a single satellite scene. Additionally, the hazard impact area may be discontinuous, particularly in flooding or tornado hazard events. In this paper, a spatial optimization model is proposed to solve the large area satellite image acquisition planning problem in the context of hazard emergency response. In the model, a large hazard impact area is represented as multiple polygons and image collection priorities for different portion of impact area are addressed. The optimization problem is solved with an exact algorithm. Application results demonstrate that the proposed method can address the satellite image acquisition planning problem. A spatial decision support system supporting the optimization model was developed. Several examples of image acquisition problems are used to demonstrate the complexity of the problem and derive optimized solutions.

  14. Broadband Macroscopic Cortical Oscillations Emerge from Intrinsic Neuronal Response Failures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir eGoldental

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Broadband spontaneous macroscopic neural oscillations are rhythmic cortical firing which was extensively examined during the last century, however, their possible origination is still controversial. In this work we show how macroscopic oscillations emerge in solely excitatory random networks and without topological constraints. We experimentally and theoretically show that these oscillations stem from the counterintuitive underlying mechanism - the intrinsic stochastic neuronal response failures. These neuronal response failures, which are characterized by short-term memory, lead to cooperation among neurons, resulting in sub- or several- Hertz macroscopic oscillations which coexist with high frequency gamma oscillations. A quantitative interplay between the statistical network properties and the emerging oscillations is supported by simulations of large networks based on single-neuron in-vitro experiments and a Langevin equation describing the network dynamics. Results call for the examination of these oscillations in the presence of inhibition and external drives.

  15. Ebola in West Africa:an international medical emergency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yasir; Waheed

    2014-01-01

    West Africa is facing the worst Ebola outbreak with 3685 cases and 1841 deaths reported from Liberia,Cuinea,Senegal,Sierra Leona and Nigeria.There is no vaccine or direct treatment available to treat the patients with Ebola.World Health Organization(WHO) has approved the use of experimental drugs for Ebola patients.Health workers are at high risk.The governments and WHO are responsible to provide necessary protective equipment to health workers dealing with Ebola.There is a strong need to identify the invisible chains of virus transmission.World Bank pledges $200 million to fight against Ebola,while WHO said $430 million are needed to control the Ebola outbreak.Ebola can be contained by early detection and isolation of case,contact tracing,monitoring of contacts and adaptation of rigorous procedures for virus control.

  16. Ebola in West Africa:an international medical emergency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yasir Waheed

    2014-01-01

    West Africa is facing the worst Ebola outbreak with 3 685 cases and 1 841 deaths reported from Liberia, Guinea, Senegal, Sierra Leona and Nigeria. There is no vaccine or direct treatment available to treat the patients with Ebola. World Health Organization (WHO) has approved the use of experimental drugs for Ebola patients. Health workers are at high risk. The governments and WHO are responsible to provide necessary protective equipment to health workers dealing with Ebola. There is a strong need to identify the invisible chains of virus transmission. World Bank pledges$200 million to fight against Ebola, while WHO said$430 million are needed to control the Ebola outbreak. Ebola can be contained by early detection and isolation of case, contact tracing, monitoring of contacts and adaptation of rigorous procedures for virus control.

  17. Ebola in West Africa: an international medical emergency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasir Waheed

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available West Africa is facing the worst Ebola outbreak with 3 685 cases and 1 841 deaths reported from Liberia, Guinea, Senegal, Sierra Leona and Nigeria. There is no vaccine or direct treatment available to treat the patients with Ebola. World Health Organization (WHO has approved the use of experimental drugs for Ebola patients. Health workers are at high risk. The governments and WHO are responsible to provide necessary protective equipment to health workers dealing with Ebola. There is a strong need to identify the invisible chains of virus transmission. World Bank pledges $200 million to fight against Ebola, while WHO said $430 million are needed to control the Ebola outbreak. Ebola can be contained by early detection and isolation of case, contact tracing, monitoring of contacts and adaptation of rigorous procedures for virus control.

  18. Teaching medical students social responsibility: the right thing to do.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, L R; McCurdy, R L

    2000-04-01

    As academic medicine has become more focused on the economic pressures of the marketplace, some educators have expressed concern about whether appropriate attention is being given to the character development and moral education of medical students. The authors conclude that medical schools do indeed have a duty to teach their medical students to be socially responsible. They define a socially responsible individual as a person who takes part in activities that contribute to the happiness, health, and prosperity of a community and its members. They suggest that medical students should participate in carefully designed, socially responsible activities in order to (1) practice and have reinforced such qualities as reliability, trustworthiness, dependability, altruism, and compassion; (2) partially reimburse society for the cost of their medical education; (3) increase their exposure to a population-based approach to health care; and (4) help medical schools fulfill their social contract with the public. The authors outline the process for developing a curriculum to teach social responsibility to medical students and list some of the key questions faculty and administrators must address in the processes of development and implementation. They conclude that while faculty responsible for implementing a curriculum in social responsibility must be highly committed and prepared to address numerous difficult questions concerning the curriculum's philosophy, structure, and function, the potential benefits of such a curriculum are well worth the effort.

  19. Medical Countermeasures for Children in Public Health Emergencies, Disasters, or Terrorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Significant strides have been made over the past 10 to 15 years to develop medical countermeasures (MCMs) to address potential disaster hazards, including chemical, biological, radiologic, and nuclear threats. Significant and effective collaboration between the pediatric health community, including the American Academy of Pediatrics, and federal partners, such as the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Federal Emergency Management Agency, National Institutes of Health, Food and Drug Administration, and other federal agencies, over the past 5 years has resulted in substantial gains in addressing the needs of children related to disaster preparedness in general and MCMs in particular. Yet, major gaps still remain related to MCMs for children, a population highly vulnerable to the effects of exposure to such threats, because many vaccines and pharmaceuticals approved for use by adults as MCMs do not yet have pediatric formulations, dosing information, or safety information. As a result, the nation's stockpiles and other caches (designated supply of MCMs) where pharmacotherapeutic and other MCMs are stored are less prepared to address the needs of children compared with those of adults in the event of a disaster. This policy statement provides recommendations to close the remaining gaps for the development and use of MCMs in children during public health emergencies or disasters. The progress made by federal agencies to date to address the needs of children and the shared commitment of collaboration that characterizes the current relationship between the pediatric health community and the federal agencies responsible for MCMs should encourage all child advocates to invest the necessary energy and resources now to complete the process of remedying the remaining significant gaps in preparedness.

  20. Corporate Social Responsibility: Transparency, Ethics and Governance in Emerging Markets

    OpenAIRE

    Stephanie Jones; Taghreed Badawoud; Mohammad Reza

    2012-01-01

    In managing business in emerging markets, Corporate Social Responsibility [CSR] is an issue of growing worldwide concern. It adds to the complexity of the management task in this environment, contributing to risks faced in all business transactions – although it may not be seen in this precise terminology. Indeed, the concepts of CSR, Business Ethics and Corporate Governance – as discussed by Western governments, donor agencies and MBA students, for example – may be almost unknown in some of ...