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Sample records for mediate transferable suppression

  1. Suppression of gastric cancer growth by adenovirus-mediated transfer of the PTEN gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Hang; Yong-Chen Zheng; Yan Cao; Qing-Shan Li; Yu-Jie Sui

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the tumor-suppressive effect of the phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted from chromosome (PTEN) in human gastric cancer cells th atwere wild type for PTEN.METHODS: Adenoviruses expressing PTEN or luciferase as a control were introduced into gastric cancer cells.The effect of exogenous PTEN gene on the growth and apoptosis of gastric cancer cells that are wtPTEN were examined in vitro and in vivo.RESULTS: Adenovirus-mediated transfer of PTEN (AdPTEN) suppressed cell growth and induced apoptosis significantly in gastric cancer cells (MGC-803, SGC-7901)carrying wtPTEN in comparison with that in normal gastric epithelial cells (GES-1) carrying wtPTEN. This suppression was induced through downregulation of the Akt/PKB pathway, dephosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase and cell-cycle arrest at the G2/M phase but not at the G1 phase. Furthermore,treatment of human gastric tumor xenografts (MGC-803,SGC-7901) with Ad-PTEN resulted in a significant (P<0.01)suppression of tumor growth.CONCLUSION: These results indicate a significant tumorsuppressive effect of Ad-PTEN against human gastric cancer cells. Thus, Ad-PTEN may be used as a potential therapeutic strategy for treatment of gastric cancers.

  2. Suppression of experimental osteoarthritis by adenovirus-mediated double gene transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hai-jun; YU Chang-long; Kishi Hiroyuki; Motoki Kazumi; MAO Ze-bin; Muraguchi Atsushi

    2006-01-01

    (cartilage). The samples were examined by light microscopy and quantitatively evaluated. Results Intra-articular delivery of IL-1Ra resulted in a significant inhibition of cartilage degradation, but did not affect synovial changes. In contrast, rabbit knee joints receiving sTNF-RI alone showed no detectable reduction in cartilage degradation. However, double gene transfer of IL-1Ra and sTNF-RI resulted in a higher suppression of the cartilage degradation and an observable reduction in synovitis. These data add to and confirm that IL-1Ra has good chondroprotective properties, but TNF-α blockade has little effect on joint destruction.Conclusion The enhanced therapeutic effects of both antagonists in combination suggest inhibition of multiple inflammatory cytokines may be more efficaciousthan blockade of either cytokine alone in treating OA.

  3. Adeno-associated virus-mediated human IL-10 gene transfer suppresses the development of experimental autoimmune orchitis.

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    Watanabe, M; Kashiwakura, Y; Kusumi, N; Tamayose, K; Nasu, Y; Nagai, A; Shimada, T; Daida, H; Kumon, H

    2005-07-01

    Testicular germ cell-induced autoimmune orchitis is characterized by inflammatory cell infiltration followed by disturbance of spermatogenesis. Experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO) is an animal model for human immunological male infertility; delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response plays a key role in its induction. Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is a regulatory cytokine that is critical in preventing organ-specific autoimmune inflammation. To determine the effects on EAO of human IL-10 (hIL-10) gene transfer, C3H/He mice immunized by unilateral testicular injury were administered intramuscular (i.m.) injections of adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector-encoding hIL-10 on the day of immunization. Serum hIL-10 was detected beginning at 1 week postinjection, and peaked at 3 weeks. Histological examinations showed a significantly low incidence of orchitis and disturbance of spermatogenesis in AAV hIL-10-treated mice, and the DTH response to autologous testicular cells was significantly suppressed. Immunohistochemical analysis of IFN- and IL-2, T-cell-associated cytokines, in the spleen and testes revealed significantly fewer cytokine-expressing cells after treatment. We conclude that a single i.m. administration of AAV hIL-10 significantly suppresses EAO and hypospermatogenesis by regulating cell-mediated immunity in the testes.

  4. Suppression of gastric cancer growth by baculovirus vector-mediated transfer of normal epithelial cell specific-1 gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Huang; Xiang-Long Tian; Yun-Lin Wu; Jie Zhong; Li-Fen Yu; Sheng-Ping Hu; Biao Li

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To study the inhibitory effect of baculovirus-mediated normal epithelial celt specific-1 (NES1) gene therapy on gastric cancer (GC) in vitro and in vivo.METHODS: We first constructed recombinant baculovirus vectors and then transfected them into gastric cancer cells (SGC-7901). Efficiency of the baculovirus for gene transfer into SGC-7901 cells and cell growth curves were detected by fluorescence microscopy, Western blot and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay in vitro, respectively. The therapeutic effect of this gene therapy on GC was confirmed in xenografted nude mice. Tumor growth was determined by tumor volume, and expression of NES1 in tumor was analyzed by immunohistochemistry.RESULTS: Baculovirus vectors were successfully transfected into SGC-7901 cells. SGC-7901 cells transfected with the NES1 gene inhibited cell growth. In the Bac-NES1 treated group, tumor growth was significantly reduced with a high level of NES1 expression CONCLUSION: Baculovirus-mediated NES1 gene can be used in gene therapy for GC.

  5. Suppressor T cells, distinct from "veto cells," are induced by alloantigen priming and mediate transferable suppression of cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T; Crispe, I N

    1985-01-01

    Primary and secondary cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to minor alloantigens can be suppressed by priming host mice with a high dose (10(8) cells) of alloantigenic donor spleen cells (SC). Such suppression is antigen specific and transferable into secondary hosts with T cells. One interpretation...... of this is that antigen-specific host suppressor T cells (Ts) are activated. Alternatively, donor Lyt-2+ T cells, introduced in the priming inoculum, may inactivate host CTL precursors (CTLp) that recognize the priming (donor) alloantigens. Donor cells that act in this way are termed veto T cells. The experiments...... for the transfer of suppression of a secondary CTL response to B10 minors was of the host Thy-1 allotype, and so originated in the host spleen and was not introduced in the priming inoculum. Secondly, antigen-specific Ts generated in CBA female mice against B10 minors could act on CTL responses to an unequivocally...

  6. Probiotics-mediated suppression of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Stephanie S Y; Wan, Murphy L Y; El-Nezami, Hani

    2017-01-01

    Probiotics can be used as an adjuvant for cancer prevention or/and treatment through their abilities to modulate intestinal microbiota and host immune response. Although most of the recent reviews have focused on the potential role of probiotics against colon cancer, only few of them include the probiotic effect on extraintestinal cancers. The present review covers the most important findings from the literature published during the past 20 months (from January 2015 to August 2016) regarding the probiotics-mediated suppression of both gastrointestinal and extraintestinal cancers and the underlying mechanisms. A comprehensive literature search in Pubmed, Science direct and Google scholar databases was conducted to locate all relevant articles that investigated the effect of probiotics on prevention/treatment of both gastrointestinal and extraintestinal cancers. Different mechanisms for the beneficial effects of probiotics against cancer were also discussed, mainly via modulation of gut microbiota which thereby influences host metabolism and immunity. Despite laboratory-based studies having demonstrated encouraging outcomes that probiotics possess antitumor effects, the benefits should not be exaggerated before we get more results from human clinical trials. These are very important before the medical community can accept the use of probiotics as an alternative therapy for cancer control.

  7. Molecular mechanisms of Treg-mediated T cell suppression

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    Angelika eSchmidt

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available CD4+CD25highFoxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs can suppress other immune cells and, thus, are critical mediators of peripheral self-tolerance. On the one hand, Tregs prevent autoimmune disease and allergies. On the other hand, Tregs can avert immune reactions against tumors and pathogens. Despite the importance of Tregs, the molecular mechanisms of suppression remain incompletely understood and controversial. Proliferation and cytokine production of CD4+CD25− conventional T cells (Tcons can be inhibited directly by Tregs. In addition, Tregs can indirectly suppress Tcon activation via inhibition of the stimulatory capacity of antigen presenting cells (APCs. Direct suppression of Tcons by Tregs can involve immunosuppressive soluble factors or cell contact. Different mechanisms of suppression have been described, so far with no consensus on one universal mechanism. Controversies might be explained by the fact that different mechanisms may operate depending on the site of the immune reaction and on the type and activation state of the suppressed target cell. Further, inhibition of T cell effector function can occur independently of suppression of proliferation. In this review, we summarize the described molecular mechanisms of suppression with a particular focus on suppression of Tcons and rapid suppression of T cell receptor (TCR-induced calcium (Ca2+, NFAT and NF-κB signaling in Tcons by Tregs.

  8. Heat transfer enhancement accompanying Leidenfrost state suppression at ultrahigh temperatures.

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    Shahriari, Arjang; Wurz, Jillian; Bahadur, Vaibhav

    2014-10-14

    The well-known Leidenfrost effect is the formation of a vapor layer between a liquid and an underlying hot surface. This insulating vapor layer severely degrades heat transfer and results in surface dryout. We measure the heat transfer enhancement and dryout prevention benefits accompanying electrostatic suppression of the Leidenfrost state. Interfacial electric fields in the vapor layer can attract liquid toward the surface and promote wetting. This principle can suppress dryout even at ultrahigh temperatures exceeding 500 °C, which is more than 8 times the Leidenfrost superheat for organic solvents. Robust Leidenfrost state suppression is observed for a variety of liquids, ranging from low electrical conductivity organic solvents to electrically conducting salt solutions. Elimination of the vapor layer increases heat dissipation capacity by more than 1 order of magnitude. Heat removal capacities exceeding 500 W/cm(2) are measured, which is 5 times the critical heat flux (CHF) of water on common engineering surfaces. Furthermore, the heat transfer rate can be electrically controlled by the applied voltage. The underlying science is explained via a multiphysics analytical model which captures the coupled electrostatic-fluid-thermal transport phenomena underlying electrostatic Leidenfrost state suppression. Overall, this work uncovers the physics underlying dryout prevention and demonstrates electrically tunable boiling heat transfer with ultralow power consumption.

  9. Mediated Electron Transfer at Redox Active Monolayers

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    Michael E.G. Lyons

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical model describing the transport and kinetic processes involved in heterogeneous redox catalysis of solution phase reactants at electrode surfaces coated with redox active monolayers is presented. Although the analysis presented has quite general applicability, a specific focus of the paper is concerned with the idea that redox active monolayers can be used to model an ensemble of individual molecular nanoelectrodes. Three possible rate determining steps are considered: heterogeneous electron transfer between immobilized mediator and support electrode ; bimolecular chemical reaction between redox mediator and reactant species in the solution phase, and diffusional mass transport of reactant in solution. A general expression for the steady state reaction flux is derived which is valid for any degree of reversibility of both the heterogeneous electron transfer reaction involving immobilized mediator species and of the bimolecular cross exchange reaction between immobilized mediator and solution phase reactant. The influence of reactant transport in solution is also specifically considered. Simplified analytical expressions for the net reaction flux are derived for experimentally reasonable situations and a kinetic case diagram is constructed outlining the relationships between the various approximate solutions. The theory enables simple diagnostic plots to be constructed which can be used to analyse experimental data.

  10. Suppression of autophagy exacerbates Mefloquine-mediated cell death.

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    Shin, Ji Hyun; Park, So Jung; Jo, Yoon Kyung; Kim, Eun Sung; Kang, Hee; Park, Ji-Ho; Lee, Eunjoo H; Cho, Dong-Hyung

    2012-05-02

    Mefloquine is an effective treatment drug for malaria. However, it can cause several adverse side effects, and the precise mechanism associated with the adverse neurological effects of Mefloquine is not clearly understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of Mefloquine on autophagy in neuroblastoma cells. Mefloquine treatment highly induced the formation of autophagosomes and the conversion of LC3I into LC3II. Moreover, Mefloquine-induced autophagy was efficiently suppressed by an autophagy inhibitor and by down regulation of ATG6. The autophagy was also completely blocked in ATG5 deficient mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. Moreover, suppression of autophagy significantly intensified Mefloquine-mediated cytotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. Our findings suggest that suppression of autophagy may exacerbate Mefloquine toxicity in neuroblastoma cells.

  11. Chlorella suppresses methylmercury transfer to the fetus in pregnant mice.

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    Uchikawa, Takuya; Maruyama, Isao; Kumamoto, Shoichiro; Ando, Yotaro; Yasutake, Akira

    2011-10-01

    To investigate the effects of chlorella on methylmercury (MeHg) transfer to the fetus during pregnancy, female C57BL/6N mice (aged 10 weeks) were housed for 7 to 8 weeks, from 4 weeks before mating to birth, with diets containing 0% or 10% chlorella powder (CP) and MeHg-containing drinking water (2 µg Hg/ml). The consumption volume of the MeHg-containing water was limited to 15 ml/mouse/week throughout the experiment. Distilled water and a basal diet (0% CP) was given to control mice. Except for the mating period, during the 5(th) week, mice were housed individually until parturition. Two neonates were randomly selected from each mother mouse within 24 hr after parturition for Hg analysis of the blood, brain, liver, and kidneys. Mother mice were sacrificed on the same day as neonates to obtain tissue samples for Hg analysis. The blood and brain Hg levels of both neonates and mothers in the CP diet group were significantly lower than those in the basal diet group. Although the hepatic and renal Hg levels were not significant in mothers between the two dietary groups, in neonates, the CP diet group showed significantly lower Hg levels in these tissues than the basal diet group. The results obtained here revealed that continuous CP intake suppressed MeHg transfer to the fetus, in addition to effective suppressing MeHg accumulation in brains of the mothers.

  12. In vivo suppression of vein graft disease by nonviral, electroporation-mediated, gene transfer of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 linked to the amino terminal fragment of urokinase (TIMP-1.ATF), a cell-surface directed matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor.

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    Eefting, Daniel; de Vries, Margreet R; Grimbergen, Jos M; Karper, Jacco C; van Bockel, J Hajo; Quax, Paul H A

    2010-02-01

    Smooth muscle cell (SMC) migration and proliferation are important in the development of intimal hyperplasia, the major cause of vein graft failure. Proteases of the plasminogen activator (PA) system and of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) system are pivotal in extracellular matrix degradation and, by that, SMC migration. Previously, we demonstrated that inhibition of both protease systems simultaneously with viral gene delivery of the hybrid protein TIMP-1.ATF, consisting of the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) and the receptor-binding amino terminal fragment (ATF) of urokinase, reduces SMC migration and neointima formation in an in vitro restenosis model using human saphenous vein cultures more efficiently than both protease systems separately. Because use of viral gene delivery is difficult in clinical application, this study used nonviral delivery of TIMP-1.ATF plasmid to reduce vein graft disease in a murine bypass model. Nonviral gene transfer by electroporation was used to avert major disadvantages of viral gene delivery, such as immune responses and short-term expression. Plasmids encoding ATF, TIMP-1, TIMP-1.ATF, or luciferase, as a control, were injected and electroporated in both calf muscles of hypercholesterolemic apolipoprotein E3-Leiden (APOE*3Leiden) mice (n = 8). One day after electroporation, a venous interposition of a donor mouse was placed into the carotid artery of a recipient mouse. In this model, vein graft thickening develops with features of accelerated atherosclerosis. Vein grafts were harvested 4 weeks after electroporation and surgery, and histologic analysis of the vessel wall was performed. Electroporation-mediated overexpression of the plasmid vectors resulted in a prolonged expression of the transgenes and resulted in a significant reduction of vein graft thickening (ATF: 36% +/- 9%, TIMP-1: 49% +/- 5%, TIMP-1.ATF: 58% +/- 5%; P ATF-treated mice. Intramuscular electroporation of TIMP-1.ATF inhibits vein graft

  13. Why expressive suppression does not pay? Cognitive costs of negative emotion suppression: The mediating role of subjective tense-arousal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szczygieł Dorota

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to contribute to a broader understanding of the cognitive consequences of expressive suppression. Specifically, we examined whether the deteriorating effect of expressive suppression on cognitive functioning is caused by tense arousal enhanced by suppression. Two experiments were performed in order to test this prediction. In both studies we tested the effect of expressive suppression on working memory, as measured with a backwards digit-span task (Study 1, N = 43 and anagram problem-solving task (Study 2, N = 60. In addition, in Study 2 we tested whether expressive suppression degrades memory of the events that emerged during the period of expressive suppression. Both studies were conducted in a similar design: Participants watched a film clip which evoked negative emotions (i.e. disgust in Study 1 and a combination of sadness and anxiety in Study 2 under the instruction to suppress those negative emotions or (in the control condition to simply watch the film. The results of these experiments lead to three conclusions. First, the results reveal that expressive suppression degrades memory of the events that emerged during the period of expressive suppression and leads to poorer performance on working memory tasks, as measured with a backwards digit-span task and anagram problem-solving task. Second, the results indicate that expressive suppression leads to a significant increase in subjective tense arousal. Third, the results support our prediction that expressive suppression decreases cognitive performance through its effects on subjective tense arousal. The results of the Study 1 show that tense arousal activated during expressive suppression of disgust fully mediates the negative effect of suppression on working memory as measured with a backwards digit-span task. The results of Study 2 reveal that subjective tense arousal elicited while suppressing sadness and anxiety mediates both the effect of suppression on

  14. Socially mediated induction and suppression of antibiosis during bacterial coexistence

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    Abrudan, Monica I.; Smakman, Fokko; Grimbergen, Ard Jan; Westhoff, Sanne; Miller, Eric L.; van Wezel, Gilles P.; Rozen, Daniel E.

    2015-01-01

    Despite their importance for humans, there is little consensus on the function of antibiotics in nature for the bacteria that produce them. Classical explanations suggest that bacteria use antibiotics as weapons to kill or inhibit competitors, whereas a recent alternative hypothesis states that antibiotics are signals that coordinate cooperative social interactions between coexisting bacteria. Here we distinguish these hypotheses in the prolific antibiotic-producing genus Streptomyces and provide strong evidence that antibiotics are weapons whose expression is significantly influenced by social and competitive interactions between competing strains. We show that cells induce facultative responses to cues produced by competitors by (i) increasing their own antibiotic production, thereby decreasing costs associated with constitutive synthesis of these expensive products, and (ii) by suppressing antibiotic production in competitors, thereby reducing direct threats to themselves. These results thus show that although antibiotic production is profoundly social, it is emphatically not cooperative. Using computer simulations, we next show that these facultative strategies can facilitate the maintenance of biodiversity in a community context by converting lethal interactions between neighboring colonies to neutral interactions where neither strain excludes the other. Thus, just as bacteriocins can lead to increased diversity via rock–paper–scissors dynamics, so too can antibiotics via elicitation and suppression. Our results reveal that social interactions are crucial for understanding antibiosis and bacterial community dynamics, and highlight the potential of interbacterial interactions for novel drug discovery by eliciting pathways that mediate interference competition. PMID:26216986

  15. Parthenolide suppresses pancreatic cell growth by autophagy-mediated apoptosis.

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    Liu, Weifeng; Wang, Xinshuai; Sun, Junjun; Yang, Yanhui; Li, Wensheng; Song, Junxin

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy and is unresponsive to conventional chemotherapies. Parthenolide, a sesquiterpene lactone isolated from feverfew, has exhibited potent anticancer effects against various cancers. The purpose of this report was to investigate the effect and underlying mechanism of parthenolide in human pancreatic cancer Panc-1 and BxPC3 cells. The results demonstrated that parthenolide suppressed the growth and induced apoptosis of Panc-1 and BxPC3 pancreatic cancer cells with the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) ranging between 7 and 9 μM after 24 h of treatment. Significant autophagy was induced by parthenolide treatment in pancreatic cancer cells. Parthenolide treatment concentration-dependently increased the percentage of autophagic cells and significantly increased the expression levels of p62/SQSTM1, Beclin 1, and LC3II in Panc-1 cells. Punctate LC3II staining confirmed autophagy. Furthermore, inhibiting autophagy by chloroquine, 3-methyladenine, or LC3II siRNA significantly blocked parthenolide-induced apoptosis, suggesting that parthenolide induced apoptosis through autophagy in this study. In conclusion, these studies established that parthenolide inhibits pancreatic cell growth by autophagy-mediated apoptosis. Data of the present study suggest that parthenolide can serve as a potential chemotherapeutic agent for pancreatic cancer.

  16. Myxoma virus suppresses proliferation of activated T lymphocytes yet permits oncolytic virus transfer to cancer cells.

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    Villa, Nancy Y; Wasserfall, Clive H; Meacham, Amy M; Wise, Elizabeth; Chan, Winnie; Wingard, John R; McFadden, Grant; Cogle, Christopher R

    2015-06-11

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (allo-HCT) can be curative for certain hematologic malignancies, but the risk of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a major limitation for wider application. Ideally, strategies to improve allo-HCT would involve suppression of T lymphocytes that drive GVHD while sparing those that mediate graft-versus-malignancy (GVM). Recently, using a xenograft model, we serendipitously discovered that myxoma virus (MYXV) prevented GVHD while permitting GVM. In this study, we show that MYXV binds to resting, primary human T lymphocytes but will only proceed into active virus infection after the T cells receive activation signals. MYXV-infected T lymphocytes exhibited impaired proliferation after activation with reduced expression of interferon-γ, interleukin-2 (IL-2), and soluble IL-2Rα, but did not affect expression of IL-4 and IL-10. MYXV suppressed T-cell proliferation in 2 patterns (full vs partial) depending on the donor. In terms of GVM, we show that MYXV-infected activated human T lymphocytes effectively deliver live oncolytic virus to human multiple myeloma cells, thus augmenting GVM by transfer of active oncolytic virus to residual cancer cells. Given this dual capacity of reducing GVHD plus increasing the antineoplastic effectiveness of GVM, ex vivo virotherapy with MYXV may be a promising clinical adjunct to allo-HCT regimens.

  17. Parthenolide suppresses pancreatic cell growth by autophagy-mediated apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu W

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Weifeng Liu,1 Xinshuai Wang,2 Junjun Sun,1 Yanhui Yang,1 Wensheng Li,1 Junxin Song1 1Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, 2Department of Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital, and College of Clinical Medicine of Henan University of Science and Technology, Luo Yang, China Abstract: Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy and is unresponsive to conventional chemotherapies. Parthenolide, a sesquiterpene lactone isolated from feverfew, has exhibited potent anticancer effects against various cancers. The purpose of this report was to investigate the effect and underlying mechanism of parthenolide in human pancreatic cancer Panc-1 and BxPC3 cells. The results demonstrated that parthenolide suppressed the growth and induced apoptosis of Panc-1 and BxPC3 pancreatic cancer cells with the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 ranging between 7 and 9 µM after 24 h of treatment. Significant autophagy was induced by parthenolide treatment in pancreatic cancer cells. Parthenolide treatment concentration-dependently increased the percentage of autophagic cells and significantly increased the expression levels of p62/SQSTM1, Beclin 1, and LC3II in Panc-1 cells. Punctate LC3II staining confirmed autophagy. Furthermore, inhibiting autophagy by chloroquine, 3-methyladenine, or LC3II siRNA significantly blocked parthenolide-induced apoptosis, suggesting that parthenolide induced apoptosis through autophagy in this study. In conclusion, these studies established that parthenolide inhibits pancreatic cell growth by autophagy-mediated apoptosis. Data of the present study suggest that parthenolide can serve as a potential chemotherapeutic agent for pancreatic cancer. Keywords: parthenolide, pancreatic cancer, autophagy, apoptosis, P62, cleaved PAPRP

  18. Cutting edge: Human regulatory T cells require IL-35 to mediate suppression and infectious tolerance.

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    Chaturvedi, Vandana; Collison, Lauren W; Guy, Clifford S; Workman, Creg J; Vignali, Dario A A

    2011-06-15

    Human regulatory T cells (T(reg)) are essential for the maintenance of immune tolerance. However, the mechanisms they use to mediate suppression remain controversial. Although IL-35 has been shown to play an important role in T(reg)-mediated suppression in mice, recent studies have questioned its relevance in human T(reg). In this study, we show that human T(reg) express and require IL-35 for maximal suppressive capacity. Substantial upregulation of EBI3 and IL12A, but not IL10 and TGFB, was observed in activated human T(reg) compared with conventional T cells (T(conv)). Contact-independent T(reg)-mediated suppression was IL-35 dependent and did not require IL-10 or TGF-β. Lastly, human T(reg)-mediated suppression led to the conversion of the suppressed T(conv) into iTr35 cells, an IL-35-induced T(reg) population, in an IL-35-dependent manner. Thus, IL-35 contributes to human T(reg)-mediated suppression, and its conversion of suppressed target T(conv) into IL-35-induced T(reg) may contribute to infectious tolerance.

  19. Impulsivity and Strategy Transfer: Metamemory as Mediator.

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    Borkowski, John G.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Acquisition, maintenance, and generalization of organizational strategies were studied in two experiments as a function of impulsivity-reflectivity and metamemory among primary school students. Findings are in line with the hypothesis that metamemory, rather than cognitive tempo, mediates the effectiveness of an experimenter-trained strategy in…

  20. Plant-Agrobacterium interaction mediated by ethylene and super-Agrobacterium conferring efficient gene transfer ability

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    Satoko eNonaka

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Agrobacterium tumefaciens has a unique ability to transfer genes into plant genomes. This ability has been utilized for plant genetic engineering. However, the efficiency is not sufficient for all plant species. Several studies have shown that ethylene decreased the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation frequency. Thus, A. tumefaciens with an ability to suppress ethylene evolution would increase the efficiency of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Some studies showed that plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR can reduce ethylene levels in plants through 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC deaminase, which cleaves the ethylene precursor ACC into α-ketobutyrate and ammonia, resulting in reduced ethylene production. The whole genome sequence data showed that A. tumefaciens does not possess an ACC deaminase gene in its genome. Therefore, providing ACC deaminase activity to the bacteria would improve gene transfer. As expected, A. tumefaciens with ACC deaminase activity, designated as super-Agrobacterium, could suppress ethylene evolution and increase the gene transfer efficiency in several plant species. In this review, we summarize plant–Agrobacterium interactions and their applications for improving Agrobacterium-mediated genetic engineering techniques via super-Agrobacterium.

  1. Gut Microbiota Promotes Obesity-Associated Liver Cancer through PGE2-Mediated Suppression of Antitumor Immunity.

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    Loo, Tze Mun; Kamachi, Fumitaka; Watanabe, Yoshihiro; Yoshimoto, Shin; Kanda, Hiroaki; Arai, Yuriko; Nakajima-Takagi, Yaeko; Iwama, Atsushi; Koga, Tomoaki; Sugimoto, Yukihiko; Ozawa, Takayuki; Nakamura, Masaru; Kumagai, Miho; Watashi, Koichi; Taketo, Makoto M; Aoki, Tomohiro; Narumiya, Shuh; Oshima, Masanobu; Arita, Makoto; Hara, Eiji; Ohtani, Naoko

    2017-05-01

    Obesity increases the risk of cancers, including hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC). However, the precise molecular mechanisms through which obesity promotes HCC development are still unclear. Recent studies have shown that gut microbiota may influence liver diseases by transferring its metabolites and components. Here, we show that the hepatic translocation of obesity-induced lipoteichoic acid (LTA), a Gram-positive gut microbial component, promotes HCC development by creating a tumor-promoting microenvironment. LTA enhances the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) of hepatic stellate cells (HSC) collaboratively with an obesity-induced gut microbial metabolite, deoxycholic acid, to upregulate the expression of SASP factors and COX2 through Toll-like receptor 2. Interestingly, COX2-mediated prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production suppresses the antitumor immunity through a PTGER4 receptor, thereby contributing to HCC progression. Moreover, COX2 overexpression and excess PGE2 production were detected in HSCs in human HCCs with noncirrhotic, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), indicating that a similar mechanism could function in humans.Significance: We showed the importance of the gut-liver axis in obesity-associated HCC. The gut microbiota-driven COX2 pathway produced the lipid mediator PGE2 in senescent HSCs in the tumor microenvironment, which plays a pivotal role in suppressing antitumor immunity, suggesting that PGE2 and its receptor may be novel therapeutic targets for noncirrhotic NASH-associated HCC. Cancer Discov; 7(5); 522-38. ©2017 AACR.This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 443. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. In vivo particle-mediated gene transfer for cancer therapy.

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    Rakhmilevich, A L; Yang, N S

    2000-01-01

    During the past several years, particle-mediated delivery techniques have been developed as a nonviral technology for gene transfer (1-7). For mammalian somatic tissues, this technology, popularly known as the gene gun method, has been shown effective for transfection of skin, liver, pancreas, muscle, spleen, and other organs in vivo (3,4), brain, mammary, and leukocyte primary cultures or tissue explants ex vivo (2,5-7), and a wide range of cell lines in vitro (3,6,7). In this chapter, we describe the general principles, mechanisms, protocols, and uses of the particle-mediated gene transfer technology for in vivo gene transfer, mainly into skin tissues. Specific applications of this technology to basic studies in molecular biology as well as to gene therapy and genetic immunization against cancer are addressed.

  3. A saponin-detoxifying enzyme mediates suppression of plant defences

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    Bouarab, K.; Melton, R.; Peart, J.; Baulcombe, D.; Osbourn, A.

    2002-08-01

    Plant disease resistance can be conferred by constitutive features such as structural barriers or preformed antimicrobial secondary metabolites. Additional defence mechanisms are activated in response to pathogen attack and include localized cell death (the hypersensitive response). Pathogens use different strategies to counter constitutive and induced plant defences, including degradation of preformed antimicrobial compounds and the production of molecules that suppress induced plant defences. Here we present evidence for a two-component process in which a fungal pathogen subverts the preformed antimicrobial compounds of its host and uses them to interfere with induced defence responses. Antimicrobial saponins are first hydrolysed by a fungal saponin-detoxifying enzyme. The degradation product of this hydrolysis then suppresses induced defence responses by interfering with fundamental signal transduction processes leading to disease resistance.

  4. The anticonvulsant retigabine suppresses neuronal Kv2-mediated currents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stas, Jeroen I; Bocksteins, Elke; Jensen, Camilla S

    2016-01-01

    μM retigabine concentrations had 'off-target' effects on KV2.1 channels which have recently been implicated in apoptosis. Clinical retigabine concentrations (0.3-3 μM) inhibited KV2.1 channel function upon prolonged exposure. The suppression of the KV2.1 conductance was only partially reversible....... Our results identified KV2.1 as a new molecular target for retigabine, thus giving a potential explanation for retigabine's neuroprotective properties....

  5. Syk-Mediated Suppression of Inflammatory Responses by Cordyceps bassiana.

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    Yang, Woo Seok; Nam, Gyeong Sug; Kim, Mi-Yeon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2017-01-01

    The fruit body of artificially cultivated Cordyceps bassiana has been reported to exhibit anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities. Although it has been suggested that the fruit body has neutraceutic and pharmaceutic biomaterial potential, the exact anti-inflammatory molecular mechanism has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated the immunopharmacologic activity of Cordyceps bassiana under in vitro conditions and investigated its anti-inflammatory mechanism. Water extract (Cm-WE) of the fruit body of artificially cultivated Cordyceps bassiana without polysaccharide fractions reduced the expression of the proinflammatory genes cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, interleukin (IL)-12, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and promoted the expression of the anti-inflammatory gene IL-10 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated RAW264.7 cells. In addition, this fraction suppressed proliferation and interferon (IFN)-[Formula: see text] production in splenic T lymphocytes. Cm-WE blocked the activation of nuclear factor (NF)-[Formula: see text]B and activator protein (AP)-1 and their upstream inflammatory signaling cascades, including Syk, MEK, and JNK. Using kinase assays, Syk was identified as the target enzyme most strongly inhibited by Cm-WE. These results strongly suggest that Cm-WE suppresses inflammatory responses by inhibiting Syk kinase activity, with potential implications for novel neutraceutic and pharmaceutic biomaterials.

  6. HIGH EFFICIENCY RETROVIRUS-MEDIATED GENE TRANSFER TO LEUKEMIA CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Jian-xin; CHEN Zi-xing; CEN Jian-nong; WANG Wei; RUAN Chang-geng

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To establish an efficient and safe gene transfer system mediated by retrovirus for gene marking and gene therapy of human leukemia. Method: The retroviral vector LXSN, containing the neomycin resistance (NeoR) gene, was transferred into amphotropic packaging cells GP+envAm12 by liposome transfection or by ecotropic retrovirus transduction. Amphotropic retrovirus in supernatants with higher titer was used to infect human leukemic cell lines NB4, U937, and THP-1.The efficiency of gene transfer was assayed on colonies formed by transduced K562 cells. Results: The titer of DOSPER directly transfected GP+envAm12 cells determined on NIH3T3 cells was 8.0×105 CFU/ml, while that of producer infected with retrovirus was 1.6×107CFU/ml. Integration of NeoR gene into all leukemia cells was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR).Absence of replication-competent virus was proved by both nested PCR for env gene and marker gene rescue assay. Gene transfer with the efficiency as high as 93.3 to 100% in K562 cells was verified by seminested PCR for integrated NeoR gene on colonies after 7 days' culture.Conclusion: The efficiency and safety of retrovirus mediated gene transfer system might provide an optimal system in gene therapy for leukemia or genetic diseases.

  7. Proton Transfer in Nucleobases is Mediated by Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khistyaev, Kirill; Golan, Amir; Bravaya, Ksenia B.; Orms, Natalie; Krylov, Anna I.; Ahmed, Musahid

    2013-08-08

    Water plays a central role in chemistry and biology by mediating the interactions between molecules, altering energy levels of solvated species, modifying potential energy proles along reaction coordinates, and facilitating ecient proton transport through ion channels and interfaces. This study investigates proton transfer in a model system comprising dry and microhydrated clusters of nucleobases. With mass spectrometry and tunable vacuum ultraviolet synchrotron radiation, we show that water shuts down ionization-induced proton transfer between nucleobases, which is very ecient in dry clusters. Instead, a new pathway opens up in which protonated nucleo bases are generated by proton transfer from the ionized water molecule and elimination of a hydroxyl radical. Electronic structure calculations reveal that the shape of the potential energy prole along the proton transfer coordinate depends strongly on the character of the molecular orbital from which the electron is removed, i.e., the proton transfer from water to nucleobases is barrierless when an ionized state localized on water is accessed. The computed energetics of proton transfer is in excellent agreement with the experimental appearance energies. Possible adiabatic passage on the ground electronic state of the ionized system, while energetically accessible at lower energies, is not ecient. Thus, proton transfer is controlled electronically, by the character of the ionized state, rather than statistically, by simple energy considerations.

  8. Suppression of cell-mediated immunity by misonidazole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rockwell, S.; Neaderland, M.H. (Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (USA). School of Medicine)

    1982-08-01

    The data presented in this report demonstrate that single treatments with large doses of misonidazole (l mg/g) produce significant inhibition of delayed hypersensitivity to DNFB. Contact sensitivity to DNFB is generally considered to be a cell-mediated immune response (Asherson and Ptak 1968, Moorhead 1978, Phanuphak et al. 1974, Zembala and Asherson 1973). The authors' histological observations and the lack of ear swelling in the nude mice support this interpretation.

  9. Converting enzyme inhibitor temocaprilat prevents high glucose-mediated suppression of human aortic endothelial cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, Kenichi; Maeda, Kensaku; Watanabe, Takanori; Nakamura, Munehiro; Asada, Akira; Yoshikawa, Junichi

    2003-12-01

    We examined the involvement of the oxidative stress in high glucose-induced suppression of human aortic endothelial cell proliferation. Chronic glucose treatment for 72 h concentration-dependently (5.6-22.2 mol/l) inhibited human coronary endothelial cell proliferation. Temocaprilat, an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, at 10 nmol/l to 1 micromol/l inhibited high glucose (22.2 mmol/l)-mediated suppression of human aortic endothelial cell proliferation. Temocaprilat at 1 micromol/l inhibited high glucose-induced membrane-bound protein kinase C activity in human aortic endothelial cells. The protein kinase C inhibitors calphostin C 100 nmol/l or chelerythrine 1 micromol/l inhibited high glucose-mediated suppression of human aortic endothelial cell proliferation. Chronic high glucose treatment for 72 h increased intracellular oxidative stress, directly measured by flow cytometry using carboxydichlorofluorescein diacetate bis-acetoxymethyl ester, and this increase was significantly suppressed by temocaprilat 10 nmol/l to 1 micromol/l. Bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist icatibant 100 nmol/l significantly reduced the action of temocaprilat; whereas bradykinin B1 receptor antagonist des-Arg9-Leu8-bradykinin 100 nmol/l had no effect. These findings suggest that high glucose inhibits human aortic endothelial cell proliferation and that the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor temocaprilat inhibits high glucose-mediated suppression of human aortic endothelial cell proliferation, possibly through suppression of protein kinase C, bradykinin B2 receptors and oxidative stress.

  10. Ethanol-mediated metal transfer printing on organic films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldakov, Dmitry; Tondelier, Denis; Palacin, Serge; Bonnassieux, Yvan

    2011-03-01

    Ethanol-mediated metal transfer printing (mTP) is a soft method, which allows to efficiently deposit metals onto various organic surfaces for applications in organic electronics. This simple approach in based on the stronger adhesion of the metals to the organic materials in the presence of thin ethanol layer between the metallized PDMS and the substrate due to the capillary action. Patterns with a resolution of at least 20 μm have been obtained on organic polymeric materials and photoresists without heating or applied pressure. Compared to other methods ethanol mediated mTP is considerably faster and has smaller limitations on the stamp depth. Residual silicone layer detected on the metal surface after the transfer by XPS studies has been mostly removed by UV/ozone treatment. Organic field-effect transistors (OTFTs) based on the metal electrodes deposited by mTP have been successfully fabricated and tested.

  11. Nonviral-mediated hepatic expression of IGF-I increases Treg levels and suppresses autoimmune diabetes in mice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anguela, Xavier M; Tafuro, Sabrina; Roca, Carles; Callejas, David; Agudo, Judith; Obach, Mercè; Ribera, Albert; Ruzo, Albert; Mann, Christopher J; Casellas, Alba; Bosch, Fatima

    2013-01-01

    .... The liver has unique immunomodulatory properties and hepatic gene transfer results in tolerance induction and suppression of autoimmune diseases, in part by regulatory T-cell (Treg) activation...

  12. Dopamine agonist suppression of rapid-eye-movement sleep is secondary to sleep suppression mediated via limbic structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miletich, R.S.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of pergolide, a direct dopamine receptor agonist, on sleep and wakefulness, motor behavior and /sup 3/H-spiperone specific binding in limbic structures and striatum in rats was studied. The results show that pergolide induced a biphasic dose effect, with high doses increasing wakefulness and suppressing sleep while low dose decreased wakefulness, but increased sleep. It was shown that pergolide-induced sleep suppression was blocked by ..cap alpha..-glupenthixol and pimozide, two dopamine receptor antagonists. It was further shown that pergolide merely delayed the rebound resulting from rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep deprivation, that dopamine receptors stimulation had no direct effect on the period, phase or amplitude of the circadian rhythm of REM sleep propensity and that there was no alteration in the coupling of REM sleep episodes with S/sub 2/ episodes. Rapid-eye-movement sleep deprivation resulted in increased sensitivity to the pergolide-induced wakefulness stimulation and sleep suppression and pergolide-induced motor behaviors of locomotion and head bobbing. /sup 3/H-spiperone specific binding to dopamine receptors was shown to be altered by REM sleep deprivation in the subcortical limbic structures. It is concluded that the REM sleep suppressing action of dopamine receptor stimulation is secondary to sleep suppression per se and not secondary to a unique effect on the REM sleep. Further, it is suggested that the wakefulness stimulating action of dopamine receptor agonists is mediated by activation of the dopamine receptors in the terminal areas of the mesolimbocortical dopamine projection system.

  13. Stable oncogenic transformation induced by microcell-mediated gene transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕有勇; Donald G.Blair

    1995-01-01

    Oncogenes have been identified using DNA-mediated transfection, but the size of the transferable and unrearranged DNA, gene rearrangement and amplification which occur during the transfection process limit the use of the techniques. We have evaluated microcell-mediated gene transfer techniques for the transfer and analysis of dominant oncogenes. MNNG-HOS, a transformed human cell line which contained the met oncogene mapping to human chromosome 7 was infected with retroviruses carrying drug resistance markers and used to optimize microcell preparation and transfer. Stable and drug-resistant hybrids containing single human chromosomes as well as the foci of the transformed cells containing the activated met oncogene and intact hitman chromosomes were obtained. Hybridization analysis with probes (i.e. collA2, pJ3.11) mapping up to 1 Mb away from met shows that the cells from the individual focr contain different amounts of apparently unrearranged human DNA associated with the oncogene, and the microcell-g

  14. RNAi-mediated stathmin suppression reduces lung metastasis in an orthotopic neuroblastoma mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, F L; Yang, L; Phillips, P A; Hansford, L M; Fletcher, J I; Ormandy, C J; McCarroll, J A; Kavallaris, M

    2014-02-13

    Metastatic neuroblastoma is an aggressive childhood cancer of neural crest origin. Stathmin, a microtubule destabilizing protein, is highly expressed in neuroblastoma although its functional role in this malignancy has not been addressed. Herein, we investigate stathmin's contribution to neuroblastoma tumor growth and metastasis. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated stathmin suppression in two independent neuroblastoma cell lines, BE(2)-C and SH-SY5Y, did not markedly influence cell proliferation, viability or anchorage-independent growth. In contrast, stathmin suppression significantly reduced cell migration and invasion in both the neuroblastoma cell lines. Stathmin suppression altered neuroblastoma cell morphology and this was associated with changes in the cytoskeleton, including increased tubulin polymer levels. Stathmin suppression also modulated phosphorylation of the actin-regulatory proteins, cofilin and myosin light chain (MLC). Treatment of stathmin-suppressed neuroblastoma cells with the ROCKI and ROCKII inhibitor, Y-27632, ablated MLC phosphorylation and returned the level of cofilin phosphorylation and cell invasion back to that of untreated control cells. ROCKII inhibition (H-1152) and siRNA suppression also reduced cofilin phosphorylation in stathmin-suppressed cells, indicating that ROCKII mediates stathmin's regulation of cofilin phosphorylation. This data demonstrates a link between stathmin and the regulation of cofilin and MLC phosphorylation via ROCK. To examine stathmin's role in neuroblastoma metastasis, stathmin short hairpin RNA (shRNA)\\luciferase-expressing neuroblastoma cells were injected orthotopically into severe combined immunodeficiency-Beige mice, and tumor growth monitored by bioluminescent imaging. Stathmin suppression did not influence neuroblastoma cell engraftment or tumor growth. In contrast, stathmin suppression significantly reduced neuroblastoma lung metastases by 71% (Pstathmin in hematogenous spread using a clinically

  15. Beta-catenin relieves I-mfa-mediated suppression of LEF-1 in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Weijun; Jia, Yingying; Huang, Tao; Wang, Jiyong; Tao, Donglei; Gan, Xiaoqing; Li, Lin

    2006-12-01

    We have previously shown that beta-catenin interacts with a transcription suppressor I-mfa and, through this interaction, canonical Wnt signaling could relieve I-mfa-mediated suppression of myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs). In this study, we found that, based on this interaction, I-mfa-mediated suppression of the Wnt transcription factor T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancing factor-1 (TCF/LEF-1) can also be relieved. Our work showed that knocking down endogenous I-mfa expression mimics canonical Wnt treatment by inducing myogenesis and increasing Wnt reporter gene activity, endogenous Wnt target gene expression and expression of MRFs in P19 cells. More importantly, these I-mfa small interfering RNA (siRNA)-induced effects could be blocked by a dominant-negative mutant of LEF-1, confirming the involvement of the TCF/LEF-1 pathway. In addition, we found that beta-catenin could compete with I-mfa for binding to LEF-1 and relieve the inhibitory effects of I-mfa in overexpression systems. Furthermore, canonical Wnt was able to reduce the levels of endogenous I-mfa associated with LEF-1, while increasing that of I-mfa associated with beta-catenin. All of the evidence supports a conclusion that I-mfa can suppress myogenesis by inhibiting TCF/LEF-1 and that canonical Wnt signaling may relieve the suppression through elevating beta-catenin levels, which in turn relieve I-mfa-mediated suppression.

  16. Host plant species determines symbiotic bacterial community mediating suppression of plant defenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Seung Ho; Scully, Erin D.; Peiffer, Michelle; Geib, Scott M.; Rosa, Cristina; Hoover, Kelli; Felton, Gary W.

    2017-01-01

    Herbivore associated bacteria are vital mediators of plant and insect interactions. Host plants play an important role in shaping the gut bacterial community of insects. Colorado potato beetles (CPB; Leptinotarsa decemlineata) use several Solanum plants as hosts in their natural environment. We previously showed that symbiotic gut bacteria from CPB larvae suppressed jasmonate (JA)-induced defenses in tomato. However, little is known about how changes in the bacterial community may be involved in the manipulation of induced defenses in wild and cultivated Solanum plants of CPB. Here, we examined suppression of JA-mediated defense in wild and cultivated hosts of CPB by chemical elicitors and their symbiotic bacteria. Furthermore, we investigated associations between the gut bacterial community and suppression of plant defenses using 16 S rRNA amplicon sequencing. Symbiotic bacteria decreased plant defenses in all Solanum hosts and there were different gut bacterial communities in CPB fed on different host plants. When larvae were reared on different hosts, defense suppression differed among host plants. These results demonstrate that host plants influence herbivore gut bacterial communities and consequently affect the herbivore’s ability to manipulate JA-mediated plant defenses. Thus, the presence of symbiotic bacteria that suppress plant defenses might help CPB adapt to host plants. PMID:28045052

  17. Macrophages play an essential role in antigen-specific immune suppression mediated by T CD8⁺ cell-derived exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazimek, Katarzyna; Ptak, Wlodzimierz; Nowak, Bernadeta; Ptak, Maria; Askenase, Philip W; Bryniarski, Krzysztof

    2015-09-01

    Murine contact sensitivity (CS) reaction could be antigen-specifically regulated by T CD8(+) suppressor (Ts) lymphocytes releasing microRNA-150 in antibody light-chain-coated exosomes that were formerly suggested to suppress CS through action on macrophages (Mφ). The present studies investigated the role of Mφ in Ts cell-exosome-mediated antigen-specific suppression as well as modulation of Mφ antigen-presenting function in humoral and cellular immunity by suppressive exosomes. Mice depleted of Mφ by clodronate liposomes could not be tolerized and did not produce suppressive exosomes. Moreover, isolated T effector lymphocytes transferring CS were suppressed by exosomes only in the presence of Mφ, demonstrating the substantial role of Mφ in the generation and action of Ts cell regulatory exosomes. Further, significant decrease of number of splenic B cells producing trinitrophenyl (TNP) -specific antibodies with the alteration of the ratio of serum titres of IgM to IgG was observed in recipients of exosome-treated, antigen-pulsed Mφ and the significant suppression of CS was demonstrated in recipients of exosome-treated, TNP-conjugated Mφ. Additionally, exosome-pulsed, TNP-conjugated Mφ mediated suppression of CS in mice pre-treated with a low-dose of cyclophosphamide, suggesting de novo induction of T regulatory (Treg) lymphocytes. Treg cell involvement in the effector phase of the studied suppression mechanism was proved by unsuccessful tolerization of DEREG mice depleted of Treg lymphocytes. Furthermore, the inhibition of proliferation of CS effector cells cultured with exosome-treated Mφ in a transmembrane manner was observed. Our results demonstrated the essential role of Mφ in antigen-specific immune suppression mediated by Ts cell-derived exosomes and realized by induction of Treg lymphocytes and inhibition of T effector cell proliferation.

  18. Immunotherapy: Shifting the Balance of Cell-Mediated Immunity and Suppression in Human Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, Jo A.; Jochems, Caroline [Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Gulley, James L. [Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Medical Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Schlom, Jeffrey, E-mail: js141c@nih.gov; Tsang, Kwong Y. [Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2012-12-11

    Active immunotherapy is dependent on the ability of the immune system to recognize and respond to tumors. Despite overwhelming evidence to support a cell-mediated immune response to prostate cancer, it is insufficient to eradicate the disease. This is likely due to a high level of suppression at the tumor site from a variety of sources, including immunosuppressive cells. Immune cells entering the tumor microenvironment may be inhibited directly by the tumor, stromal cells or other immune cells that have been induced to adopt a suppressive phenotype. The resurgence of interest in immunotherapy following the approval of sipuleucel-T and ipilimumab by the Food and Drug Administration has brought about new strategies for overcoming tumor-mediated suppression and bolstering anti-tumor responses. Improved understanding of the immune response to prostate cancer can lead to new combination therapies, such as the use of vaccine with small molecule and checkpoint inhibitors or other immunotherapies.

  19. Cutting edge: regulatory T cells do not mediate suppression via programmed cell death pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymczak-Workman, Andrea L; Delgoffe, Greg M; Green, Douglas R; Vignali, Dario A A

    2011-11-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a critical role in the immune system to regulate peripheral tolerance and prevent autoimmunity. However, the relative importance of different mechanisms of Treg function remains obscure. In this article, we reveal a limited role for programmed cell death pathways in mediating Treg suppression of conventional T cells. We show that Tregs are able to suppress the proliferation of conventional T cells that are resistant to apoptosis (Bim(-/-), Bim(-/-)Puma(-/-), Bcl-2 transgenic) or receptor-interacting serine-threonine kinase-dependent necrosis (also referred to as regulated necrosis or necroptosis) (Ripk3(-/-)) in several in vitro and in vivo assays. These data suggest that programmed cell death pathways, such as apoptosis and receptor-interacting serine-threonine kinase-dependent necrosis, are not required for Treg-mediated suppression.

  20. Immunotherapy: Shifting the Balance of Cell-Mediated Immunity and Suppression in Human Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Schlom

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Active immunotherapy is dependent on the ability of the immune system to recognize and respond to tumors. Despite overwhelming evidence to support a cell-mediated immune response to prostate cancer, it is insufficient to eradicate the disease. This is likely due to a high level of suppression at the tumor site from a variety of sources, including immunosuppressive cells. Immune cells entering the tumor microenvironment may be inhibited directly by the tumor, stromal cells or other immune cells that have been induced to adopt a suppressive phenotype. The resurgence of interest in immunotherapy following the approval of sipuleucel-T and ipilimumab by the Food and Drug Administration has brought about new strategies for overcoming tumor-mediated suppression and bolstering anti-tumor responses. Improved understanding of the immune response to prostate cancer can lead to new combination therapies, such as the use of vaccine with small molecule and checkpoint inhibitors or other immunotherapies.

  1. Methods for particle-mediated gene transfer into skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, N S; McCabe, D E; Swain, W F

    1997-01-01

    During the past 5 yr, particle-mediated delivery techniques have been developed as a physical means for gene transfer into various eukaryotic systems, including plants, insects, fish, and mammals (1-7). For mammalian somatic tissues, this technology, popularly known as the gene gun method, has been shown effective in transfection of skin, liver, pancreas, muscle, spleen, and other organs in vivo (3,4); brain, mammary, and leukocyte pnmary cultures or explants ex vivo (2,5-7); and a wide range of different mammalian cell lines in vitro (3,6,7).

  2. Kidney-specific transposon-mediated gene transfer in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, Lauren E.; Cheng, Jizhong; Welch, Richard C.; Williams, Felisha M.; Luo, Wentian; Gewin, Leslie S.; Wilson, Matthew H.

    2017-01-01

    Methods enabling kidney-specific gene transfer in adult mice are needed to develop new therapies for kidney disease. We attempted kidney-specific gene transfer following hydrodynamic tail vein injection using the kidney-specific podocin and gamma-glutamyl transferase promoters, but found expression primarily in the liver. In order to achieve kidney-specific transgene expression, we tested direct hydrodynamic injection of a DNA solution into the renal pelvis and found that luciferase expression was strong in the kidney and absent from extra-renal tissues. We observed heterogeneous, low-level transfection of the collecting duct, proximal tubule, distal tubule, interstitial cells, and rarely glomerular cells following injection. To assess renal injury, we performed the renal pelvis injections on uninephrectomised mice and found that their blood urea nitrogen was elevated at two days post-transfer but resolved within two weeks. Although luciferase expression quickly decreased following renal pelvis injection, the use of the piggyBac transposon system improved long-term expression. Immunosuppression with cyclophosphamide stabilised luciferase expression, suggesting immune clearance of the transfected cells occurs in immunocompetent animals. Injection of a transposon expressing erythropoietin raised the haematocrit, indicating that the developed injection technique can elicit a biologic effect in vivo. Hydrodynamic renal pelvis injection enables transposon mediated-kidney specific gene transfer in adult mice. PMID:28317878

  3. Asparagine deprivation mediated by Salmonella asparaginase causes suppression of activation-induced T cell metabolic reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, AnnMarie; Luke, Joanna D; Kullas, Amy L; Kapilashrami, Kanishk; Botbol, Yair; Koller, Antonius; Tonge, Peter J; Chen, Emily I; Macian, Fernando; van der Velden, Adrianus W M

    2016-02-01

    Salmonellae are pathogenic bacteria that induce immunosuppression by mechanisms that remain largely unknown. Previously, we showed that a putative type II l-asparaginase produced by Salmonella Typhimurium inhibits T cell responses and mediates virulence in a murine model of infection. Here, we report that this putative L-asparaginase exhibits L-asparagine hydrolase activity required for Salmonella Typhimurium to inhibit T cells. We show that L-asparagine is a nutrient important for T cell activation and that L-asparagine deprivation, such as that mediated by the Salmonella Typhimurium L-asparaginase, causes suppression of activation-induced mammalian target of rapamycin signaling, autophagy, Myc expression, and L-lactate secretion. We also show that L-asparagine deprivation mediated by the Salmonella Typhimurium L-asparaginase causes suppression of cellular processes and pathways involved in protein synthesis, metabolism, and immune response. Our results advance knowledge of a mechanism used by Salmonella Typhimurium to inhibit T cell responses and mediate virulence, and provide new insights into the prerequisites of T cell activation. We propose a model in which l-asparagine deprivation inhibits T cell exit from quiescence by causing suppression of activation-induced metabolic reprogramming.

  4. Schistosoma mansoni-mediated suppression of allergic airway inflammation requires patency and Foxp3+ Treg cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E Layland

    Full Text Available The continual rise of asthma in industrialised countries stands in strong contrast to the situation in developing lands. According to the modified Hygiene Hypothesis, helminths play a major role in suppressing bystander immune responses to allergens, and both epidemiological and experimental studies suggest that the tropical parasitic trematode Schistosoma mansoni elicits such effects. The focus of this study was to investigate which developmental stages of schistosome infection confer suppression of allergic airway inflammation (AAI using ovalbumin (OVA as a model allergen. Moreover, we assessed the functional role and localization of infection-induced CD4(+Foxp3(+ regulatory T cells (Treg in mediating such suppressive effects. Therefore, AAI was elicited using OVA/adjuvant sensitizations with subsequent OVA aerosolic challenge and was induced during various stages of infection, as well as after successful anti-helminthic treatment with praziquantel. The role of Treg was determined by specifically depleting Treg in a genetically modified mouse model (DEREG during schistosome infection. Alterations in AAI were determined by cell infiltration levels into the bronchial system, OVA-specific IgE and Th2 type responses, airway hyper-sensitivity and lung pathology. Our results demonstrate that schistosome infection leads to a suppression of OVA-induced AAI when mice are challenged during the patent phase of infection: production of eggs by fecund female worms. Moreover, this ameliorating effect does not persist after anti-helminthic treatment, and depletion of Treg reverts suppression, resulting in aggravated AAI responses. This is most likely due to a delayed reconstitution of Treg in infected-depleted animals which have strong ongoing immune responses. In summary, we conclude that schistosome-mediated suppression of AAI requires the presence of viable eggs and infection-driven Treg cells. These data provide evidence that helminth derived products

  5. Reappraisal and suppression mediate the contribution of regulatory focus to anxiety in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llewellyn, Nicole; Dolcos, Sanda; Iordan, Alexandru D; Rudolph, Karen D; Dolcos, Florin

    2013-08-01

    Theory and research link regulatory focus (RF) in the form of promotion and prevention goal orientation with internalizing symptoms (e.g., anxiety), but the relevant mechanisms are not well understood. This study investigated the role of two emotion regulation (ER) strategies (cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression) as possible mediators. Path analysis using data from 179 healthy young participants (110 women, 69 men) revealed that stronger promotion orientation was significantly associated with less anxiety, and that the use of reappraisal and suppression partially mediated this association. Prevention was associated with more suppression but was not directly associated with anxiety. There were no gender differences in these effects. Collectively, these findings suggest that effective ER, through heightened use of reappraisal and dampened use of suppression, serves as a mechanism through which promotion confers protection against anxiety. This research provides empirical support to initiatives aimed at promoting healthy psychological adjustment and preventing anxiety, by optimizing ER strategies with respect to RF goal orientations. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  6. Berberine reduces Toll-like receptor-mediated macrophage migration by suppression of Src enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wei-Erh; Ying Chang, Miao; Wei, Jyun-Yan; Chen, Yen-Jen; Maa, Ming-Chei; Leu, Tzeng-Horng

    2015-06-15

    Berberine is an isoquinoline with anti-inflammatory activity. We previously demonstrated that there was a loop of signal amplification between nuclear factor kappa B and Src for macrophage mobility triggered by the engagement of Toll-like receptors (TLRs). The simultaneous suppression of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase 2, and cell mobility in berberine-treated macrophages suggested Src might be a target of berberine. Indeed, th reduced migration, greatly suppressed Src induction in both protein and RNA transcript by berberine were observed in macrophages exposed to LPS, peptidoglycan, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid, and CpG-oligodeoxynucleotides. In addition to Src induction, berberine also inhibited LPS-mediated Src activation in Src overexpressing macrophages and S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (a nitric oxide donor) could partly restore it. Moreover, berberine suppressed Src activity in fibronectin-stimulated macrophages and in v-Src transformed cells. These results implied that by effectively reducing Src expression and activity, berberine inhibited TLR-mediated cell motility in macrophages.

  7. Histamine suppresses regulatory T cells mediated by TGF-β in murine chronic allergic contact dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaka, Kyoko; Seike, Masahiro; Hagiwara, Tamio; Sato, Atsushi; Ohtsu, Hiroshi

    2015-04-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) suppress effector T cells and ameliorate contact hypersensitivity (CH); however, the role of Tregs in chronic allergic contact dermatitis (CACD) has not been assessed. Repeated elicitation of CH has been used to produce CACD models in mice. We previously showed that the presence of histamine facilitates the creation of eczematous lesions in this model using histidine decarboxylase (HDC) (-/-) mice. Therefore, the effects of histamine on Tregs in the CACD model were investigated in this study. CACD was developed by repeated epicutaneous application of 2, 4, 6-trinitro-1-chlorobenzene (TNCB) on HDC (+/+) and HDC (-/-) murine skin to assess the effects of histamine in CACD. Histamine aggravated CACD in the murine model and suppressed the number of Tregs in the skin. Histamine also suppressed the level of TGF-β1 in this model. Recombinant TGF-β1 or anti-TGF-β1 antibody was injected into the dorsal dermis of HDC (+/+) mice daily just before TNCB challenge to determine the effects of histamine-regulated TGF-β on the Treg population in CACD. Recombinant TGF-β1 injection promoted the infiltration of Tregs in the skin and the production of IL-10; however, anti-TGF-β1 antibody injection suppressed the number of Tregs in the skin and the production of IL-10. Histamine suppresses the number of Tregs in CACD, and this effect is mediated by TGF-β.

  8. Adenovirus-mediated transfection with glucose transporter 3 suppresses PC12 cell apoptosis following ischemic injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junliang Li; Xinke Xu; Shanyi Zhang; Meiguang Zheng; Zhonghua Wu; Yinlun Weng; Leping Ouyang; Jian Yu; Fangcheng Li

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of adenovirus-mediated transfection of PC12 cells with glucose transporter 3 after ischemic injury. The results of flow cytometry and TUNEL showed that exogenous glucose transporter 3 significantly suppressed PC12 cell apoptosis induced by ischemic injury. The results of isotopic scintiscan and western blot assays showed that, the glucose uptake rate was significantly increased and nuclear factor kappaB expression was significantly decreased after adenovirus-mediated transfection of ischemic PC12 cells with glucose transporter 3. These results suggest that adenovirus-mediated transfection of cells with glucose transporter 3 elevates the energy metabolism of PC12 cells with ischemic injury, and inhibits cell apoptosis.

  9. Syntrophic Growth via Quinone-Mediated Interspecies Electron Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A Smith

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which microbial species exchange electrons are of interest because interspecies electron transfer can expand the metabolic capabilities of microbial communities. Previous studies with the humic substance analog anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS suggested that quinone-mediated interspecies electron transfer (QUIET is feasible, but it was not determined if sufficient energy is available from QUIET to support the growth of both species. Furthermore, there have been no previous studies on the mechanisms for the oxidation of anthrahydroquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AHQDS. A co-culture of Geobacter metallireducens and Geobacter sulfurreducens metabolized ethanol with the reduction of fumarate much faster in the presence of AQDS, and there was an increase in cell protein. G. sulfurreducens was more abundant, consistent with G. sulfurreducens obtaining electrons from acetate that G. metallireducens produced from ethanol, as well as from AHQDS. Cocultures initiated with a citrate synthase-deficient strain of G. sulfurreducens that was unable to use acetate as an electron donor also metabolized ethanol with the reduction of fumarate and cell growth, but acetate accumulated over time. G. sulfurreducens and G. metallireducens were equally abundant in these co-cultures reflecting the inability of the citrate synthase-deficient strain of G. sulfurreducens to metabolize acetate. Evaluation of the mechanisms by which G. sulfurreducens accepts electrons from AHQDS demonstrated that a strain deficient in outer-surface c-type cytochromes that are required for AQDS reduction was as effective at QUIET as the wild-type strain. Deletion of additional genes previously implicated in extracellular electron transfer also had no impact on QUIET. These results demonstrate that QUIET can yield sufficient energy to support the growth of both syntrophic partners, but that the mechanisms by which electrons are derived from extracellular hydroquinones require

  10. Peripheral and central mediators of lipopolysaccharide induced suppression of defensive rage behavior in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, S; Bhatt, R S; Zalcman, S S; Siegel, A

    2009-11-10

    Based upon recent findings in our laboratory that cytokines microinjected into the medial hypothalamus or periaqueductal gray (PAG) powerfully modulate defensive rage behavior in cat, the present study determined the effects of peripherally released cytokines following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge upon defensive rage. The study involved initial identification of the effects of peripheral administration of LPS upon defensive rage by electrical stimulation from PAG and subsequent determination of the peripheral and central mechanisms governing this process. The results revealed significant elevation in response latencies for defensive rage from 60 to 300 min, post LPS injection, with no detectable signs of sickness behavior present at 60 min. In contrast, head turning behavior elicited by stimulation of adjoining midbrain sites was not affected by LPS administration, suggesting a specificity of the effects of LPS upon defensive rage. Direct administration of LPS into the medial hypothalamus had no effect on defensive rage, suggesting that the effects of LPS were mediated by peripheral cytokines rather than by any direct actions upon hypothalamic neurons. Complete blockade of the suppressive effects of LPS by peripheral pretreatment with an Anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) antibody but not with an anti- interleukin-1 (IL-1) antibody demonstrated that the effects of LPS were mediated through TNF-alpha rather than through an IL-1 mechanism. A determination of the central mechanisms governing LPS suppression revealed that pretreatment of the medial hypothalamus with PGE(2) or 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonists each completely blocked the suppressive effects of LPS, while microinjections of a TNF-alpha antibody into the medial hypothalamus were ineffective. Microinjections of -Iodo-N-[2-[4-(methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl]-N-(2-pyridinyl) benzamide monohydrochloride (p-MPPI) into lateral hypothalamus (to test for anatomical specificity) had no effect upon

  11. Erythropoiesis suppression is associated with anthrax lethal toxin-mediated pathogenic progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Hou Chang

    Full Text Available Anthrax is a disease caused by the bacterium Bacillus anthracis, which results in high mortality in animals and humans. Although some of the mechanisms are already known such as asphyxia, extensive knowledge of molecular pathogenesis of this disease is deficient and remains to be further investigated. Lethal toxin (LT is a major virulence factor of B. anthracis and a specific inhibitor/protease of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases (MAPKKs. Anthrax LT causes lethality and induces certain anthrax-like symptoms, such as anemia and hypoxia, in experimental mice. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs are the downstream pathways of MAPKKs, and are important for erythropoiesis. This prompted us to hypothesize that anemia and hypoxia may in part be exacerbated by erythropoietic dysfunction. As revealed by colony-forming cell assays in this study, LT challenges significantly reduced mouse erythroid progenitor cells. In addition, in a proteolytic activity-dependent manner, LT suppressed cell survival and differentiation of cord blood CD34(+-derived erythroblasts in vitro. Suppression of cell numbers and the percentage of erythroblasts in the bone marrow were detected in LT-challenged C57BL/6J mice. In contrast, erythropoiesis was provoked through treatments of erythropoietin, significantly ameliorating the anemia and reducing the mortality of LT-treated mice. These data suggested that suppressed erythropoiesis is part of the pathophysiology of LT-mediated intoxication. Because specific treatments to overcome LT-mediated pathogenesis are still lacking, these efforts may help the development of effective treatments against anthrax.

  12. Acetylation Is Crucial for p53-Mediated Ferroptosis and Tumor Suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shang-Jui Wang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Although previous studies indicate that loss of p53-mediated cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and senescence does not completely abrogate its tumor suppression function, it is unclear how the remaining activities of p53 are regulated. Here, we have identified an acetylation site at lysine K98 in mouse p53 (or K101 for human p53. Whereas the loss of K98 acetylation (p53K98R alone has very modest effects on p53-mediated transactivation, simultaneous mutations at all four acetylation sites (p534KR: K98R+ 3KR[K117R+K161R+K162R] completely abolish its ability to regulate metabolic targets, such as TIGAR and SLC7A11. Notably, in contrast to p533KR, p534KR is severely defective in suppressing tumor growth in mouse xenograft models. Moreover, p534KR is still capable of inducing the p53-Mdm2 feedback loop, but p53-dependent ferroptotic responses are markedly abrogated. Together, these data indicate the critical role of p53 acetylation in ferroptotic responses and its remaining tumor suppression activity.

  13. Heat shock suppresses mating and sperm transfer in the rice leaf folder Cnaphalocrocis medinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, H J; Qian, Q; Liu, X D

    2014-06-01

    Temperature is a key environmental factor in determining the population size of Cnaphalocrocis medinalis in summer. High temperatures inhibit survival, development and fecundity of this insect. However, biological responses of female and male adults to heat shock, and physiological mechanism of high temperature suppressing population development are still ambiguous. We experimentally tested the impact of heat shock (5 h day-1) on biological traits, spermatogenesis and sperm transfer of adults of C. medinalis. The result showed that heat exposure to 39 and 40 °C for 5 h reduced longevity and copulation frequency of adults, and hatchability of eggs. Immediate survival rate of males was lower than that of females after 3 days of exposure to 41 °C. The oviposition period, copulation frequency, fecundity of adults and hatchability of eggs were significantly lower when male adults were exposed to 40 or 41 °C for 3 days. Heat shock decreased frequency and success rate of mating when males were exposed, and it also resulted in postponement of mating behaviour and prolongation of mating duration as both the female and male adults were exposed. Heat shock did not affect spermatogenesis, but significantly inhibited sperms maturation. Moreover, males could not ejaculate sperm into females during copulation when these male moths received heat shock. Heat shock remarkably suppressed mating behaviour and sperm transfer, which led to a dramatic decline of rice leaf folder populations.

  14. Hetero-cycloreversions mediated by photoinduced electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Ruiz, Raúl; Jiménez, M Consuelo; Miranda, Miguel A

    2014-04-15

    Discovered more than eight decades ago, the Diels-Alder (DA) cycloaddition (CA) remains one of the most versatile tools in synthetic organic chemistry. Hetero-DA processes are powerful methods for the synthesis of densely functionalized six-membered heterocycles, ubiquitous substructures found in natural products and bioactive compounds. These reactions frequently employ azadienes and oxadienes, but only a few groups have reported DA processes with thiadienes. The electron transfer (ET) version of the DA reaction, though less investigated, has emerged as a subject of increasing interest. In the last two decades, researchers have paid closer attention to radical ionic hetero-cycloreversions, mainly in connection with their possible involvement in the repair of pyrimidine(6-4)pyrimidone photolesions in DNA by photolyases. In biological systems, these reactions likely occur through a reductive photosensitization mechanism. In addition, photooxidation can lead to cycloreversion (CR) reactions, and researchers can exploit this strategy for DNA repair therapies. In this Account, we discuss electron-transfer (ET) mediated hetero-CR reactions. We focus on the oxidative and reductive ET splitting of oxetanes, azetidines, and thietanes. Photoinduced electron transfer facilitates the splitting of a variety of four-membered heterocycles. In this context, researchers have commonly examined oxetanes, both experimentally and theoretically. Although a few studies have reported the cycloreversion of azetidines and thietanes carried out under electron transfer conditions, the number of examples remains limited. In general, the cleavage of the ionized four-membered rings appears to occur via a nonconcerted two-step mechanism. The trapping of the intermediate 1,4-radical ions and transient absorption spectroscopy data support this hypothesis, and it explains the observed loss of stereochemistry in the products. In the initial step, either C-C or C-X bond breaking may occur, and the

  15. HILI destabilizes microtubules by suppressing phosphorylation and Gigaxonin-mediated degradation of TBCB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hao; Liao, Hua; Zhao, Lianfang; Lu, Yilu; Jiang, Siyuan; Tao, Dachang; Liu, Yunqiang; Ma, Yongxin

    2017-01-01

    Human PIWIL2, aka HILI, is a member of PIWI protein family and overexpresses in various tumors. However, the underlying mechanisms of HILI in tumorigenesis remain largely unknown. TBCB has a critical role in regulating microtubule dynamics and is overexpressed in many cancers. Here we report that HILI inhibits Gigaxonin-mediated TBCB ubiquitination and degradation by interacting with TBCB, promoting the binding between HSP90 and TBCB, and suppressing the interaction between Gigaxonin and TBCB. Meanwhile, HILI can also reduce phosphorylation level of TBCB induced by PAK1. Our results showed that HILI suppresses microtubule polymerization and promotes cell proliferation, migration and invasion via TBCB for the first time, revealing a novel mechanism for HILI in tumorigenesis. PMID:28393858

  16. Suppressive effects of lysozyme on polyphosphate-mediated vascular inflammatory responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Jiwoo [College of Pharmacy, CMRI, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, BK21 Plus KNU Multi-Omics Based Creative Drug Research Team, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 41566 (Korea, Republic of); Ku, Sae-Kwang [Department of Anatomy and Histology, College of Korean Medicine, Daegu Haany University, Gyeongsan 38610 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Suyeon [College of Pharmacy, CMRI, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, BK21 Plus KNU Multi-Omics Based Creative Drug Research Team, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 41566 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Jong-Sup, E-mail: baejs@knu.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, CMRI, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, BK21 Plus KNU Multi-Omics Based Creative Drug Research Team, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 41566 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-10

    Lysozyme, found in relatively high concentration in blood, saliva, tears, and milk, protects us from the ever-present danger of bacterial infection. Previous studies have reported proinflammatory responses of endothelial cells to the release of polyphosphate(PolyP). In this study, we examined the anti-inflammatory responses and mechanisms of lysozyme and its effects on PolyP-induced septic activities in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and mice. The survival rates, septic biomarker levels, behavior of human neutrophils, and vascular permeability were determined in PolyP-activated HUVECs and mice. Lysozyme suppressed the PolyP-mediated vascular barrier permeability, upregulation of inflammatory biomarkers, adhesion/migration of leukocytes, and activation and/or production of nuclear factor-κB, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-6. Furthermore, lysozyme demonstrated protective effects on PolyP-mediated lethal death and the levels of the related septic biomarkers. Therefore, these results indicated the therapeutic potential of lysozyme on various systemic inflammatory diseases, such as sepsis or septic shock. -- Highlights: •PolyP is shown to be an important mediator of vascular inflammation. •Lysozyme inhibited PolyP-mediated hyperpermeability. •Lysozyme inhibited PolyP-mediated septic response. •Lysozyme reduced PolyP-induced septic mortality.

  17. Modelling of bubble-mediated gas transfer: Fundamental principles and a laboratory test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woolf, D.K.; Leifer, I.S.; Nightingale, P.D.; Rhee, T.S.; Bowyer, P.; Caulliez, G.; Leeuw, G. de; Larsen, S.E.; Liddicoat, M.; Baker, J.; Andreae, M.O.

    2007-01-01

    The air-water exchange of gases can be substantially enhanced by wave breaking and specifically by bubble-mediated transfer. A feature of bubble-mediated transfer is the additional pressure on bubbles resulting from the hydrostatic forces on a submerged bubble and from surface tension and curvature.

  18. Maternal antibody transfer can lead to suppression of humoral immunity in developing zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Loren; Grindstaff, Jennifer L

    2014-01-01

    Maternally transferred antibodies have been documented in a wide range of taxa and are thought to adaptively provide protection against parasites and pathogens while the offspring immune system is developing. In most birds, transfer occurs when females deposit immunoglobulin Y into the egg yolk, and it is proportional to the amount in the female's plasma. Maternal antibodies can provide short-term passive protection as well as specific and nonspecific immunological priming, but high levels of maternal antibody can result in suppression of the offspring's humoral immune response. We injected adult female zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) with one of two antigens (lipopolysaccharide [LPS] or keyhole limpet hemocyanin [KLH]) or a control and then injected offspring with LPS, KLH, or a control on days 5 and 28 posthatch to examine the impact of maternally transferred antibodies on the ontogeny of the offspring's humoral immune system. We found that offspring of females exposed to KLH had elevated levels of KLH-reactive antibody over the first 17-28 days posthatch but reduced KLH-specific antibody production between days 28 and 36. We also found that offspring exposed to either LPS or KLH exhibited reduced total antibody levels, compared to offspring that received a control injection. These results indicate that high levels of maternal antibodies or antigen exposure during development can have negative repercussions on short-term antibody production and may have long-term fitness repercussions for the offspring.

  19. Cooperative electrocatalytic alcohol oxidation with electron-proton-transfer mediators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badalyan, Artavazd; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2016-07-01

    electron-proton-transfer mediators, such as TEMPO, may be used in combination with first-row transition metals, such as copper, to achieve efficient two-electron electrochemical processes, thereby introducing a new concept for the development of non-precious-metal electrocatalysts.

  20. Cooperative electrocatalytic alcohol oxidation with electron-proton-transfer mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badalyan, Artavazd; Stahl, Shannon S

    2016-07-21

    electron-proton-transfer mediators, such as TEMPO, may be used in combination with first-row transition metals, such as copper, to achieve efficient two-electron electrochemical processes, thereby introducing a new concept for the development of non-precious-metal electrocatalysts.

  1. Menin and PRMT5 suppress GLP1 receptor transcript and PKA-mediated phosphorylation of FOXO1 and CREB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Abdul Bari; Xing, Bowen; Liu, Chengyang; Naji, Ali; Ma, Xiaosong; Simmons, Rebecca A; Hua, Xianxin

    2017-08-01

    Menin is a scaffold protein that interacts with several epigenetic mediators to regulate gene transcription, and suppresses pancreatic β-cell proliferation. Tamoxifen-inducible deletion of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) gene, which encodes the protein menin, increases β-cell mass in multiple murine models of diabetes and ameliorates diabetes. Glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP1) is another key physiological modulator of β-cell mass and glucose homeostasis. However, it is not clearly understood whether menin crosstalks with GLP1 signaling. Here, we show that menin and protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) suppress GLP1 receptor (GLP1R) transcript levels. Notably, a GLP1R agonist induces phosphorylation of forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1) at S253, and the phosphorylation is mediated by PKA. Interestingly, menin suppresses GLP1-induced and PKA-mediated phosphorylation of both FOXO1 and cAMP response element binding protein (CREB), likely through a protein arginine methyltransferase. Menin-mediated suppression of FOXO1 and CREB phosphorylation increases FOXO1 levels and suppresses CREB target genes, respectively. A small-molecule menin inhibitor reverses menin-mediated suppression of both FOXO1 and CREB phosphorylation. In addition, ex vivo treatment of both mouse and human pancreatic islets with a menin inhibitor increases levels of proliferation marker Ki67. In conclusion, our results suggest that menin and PRMT5 suppress GLP1R transcript levels and PKA-mediated phosphorylation of FOXO1 and CREB, and a menin inhibitor may reverse this suppression to induce β-cell proliferation. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Alginate Oligosaccharide Prevents Acute Doxorubicin Cardiotoxicity by Suppressing Oxidative Stress and Endoplasmic Reticulum-Mediated Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jun-Jie; Ma, Lei-Lei; Shi, Hong-Tao; Zhu, Jian-Bing; Wu, Jian; Ding, Zhi-Wen; An, Yi; Zou, Yun-Zeng; Ge, Jun-Bo

    2016-12-20

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a highly potent chemotherapeutic agent, but its usage is limited by dose-dependent cardiotoxicity. DOX-induced cardiotoxicity involves increased oxidative stress and activated endoplasmic reticulum-mediated apoptosis. Alginate oligosaccharide (AOS) is a non-immunogenic, non-toxic and biodegradable polymer, with anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory and anti-endoplasmic reticulum stress properties. The present study examined whether AOS pretreatment could protect against acute DOX cardiotoxicity, and the underlying mechanisms focused on oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum-mediated apoptosis. We found that AOS pretreatment markedly increased the survival rate of mice insulted with DOX, improved DOX-induced cardiac dysfunction and attenuated DOX-induced myocardial apoptosis. AOS pretreatment mitigated DOX-induced cardiac oxidative stress, as shown by the decreased expressions of gp91 (phox) and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE). Moreover, AOS pretreatment significantly decreased the expression of Caspase-12, C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) (markers for endoplasmic reticulum-mediated apoptosis) and Bax (a downstream molecule of CHOP), while up-regulating the expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Taken together, these findings identify AOS as a potent compound that prevents acute DOX cardiotoxicity, at least in part, by suppression of oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum-mediated apoptosis.

  3. Metformin Restores Parkin-Mediated Mitophagy, Suppressed by Cytosolic p53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Mi Song

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Metformin is known to alleviate hepatosteatosis by inducing 5’ adenosine monophosphate (AMP-kinase-independent, sirtuin 1 (SIRT1-mediated autophagy. Dysfunctional mitophagy in response to glucolipotoxicities might play an important role in hepatosteatosis. Here, we investigated the mechanism by which metformin induces mitophagy through restoration of the suppressed Parkin-mediated mitophagy. To this end, our ob/ob mice were divided into three groups: (1 ad libitum feeding of a standard chow diet; (2 intraperitoneal injections of metformin 300 mg/kg; and (3 3 g/day caloric restriction (CR. HepG2 cells were treated with palmitate (PA plus high glucose in the absence or presence of metformin. We detected enhanced mitophagy in ob/ob mice treated with metformin or CR, whereas mitochondrial spheroids were observed in mice fed ad libitum. Metabolically stressed ob/ob mice and PA-treated HepG2 cells showed an increase in expression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress markers and cytosolic p53. Cytosolic p53 inhibited mitophagy by disturbing the mitochondrial translocation of Parkin, as demonstrated by immunoprecipitation. However, metformin decreased ER stress and p53 expression, resulting in induction of Parkin-mediated mitophagy. Furthermore, pifithrin-α, a specific inhibitor of p53, increased mitochondrial incorporation into autophagosomes. Taken together, these results indicate that metformin treatment facilitates Parkin-mediated mitophagy rather than mitochondrial spheroid formation by decreasing the inhibitory interaction with cytosolic p53 and increasing degradation of mitofusins.

  4. Metformin Restores Parkin-Mediated Mitophagy, Suppressed by Cytosolic p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Young Mi; Lee, Woo Kyung; Lee, Yong-Ho; Kang, Eun Seok; Cha, Bong-Soo; Lee, Byung-Wan

    2016-01-16

    Metformin is known to alleviate hepatosteatosis by inducing 5' adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-kinase-independent, sirtuin 1 (SIRT1)-mediated autophagy. Dysfunctional mitophagy in response to glucolipotoxicities might play an important role in hepatosteatosis. Here, we investigated the mechanism by which metformin induces mitophagy through restoration of the suppressed Parkin-mediated mitophagy. To this end, our ob/ob mice were divided into three groups: (1) ad libitum feeding of a standard chow diet; (2) intraperitoneal injections of metformin 300 mg/kg; and (3) 3 g/day caloric restriction (CR). HepG2 cells were treated with palmitate (PA) plus high glucose in the absence or presence of metformin. We detected enhanced mitophagy in ob/ob mice treated with metformin or CR, whereas mitochondrial spheroids were observed in mice fed ad libitum. Metabolically stressed ob/ob mice and PA-treated HepG2 cells showed an increase in expression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers and cytosolic p53. Cytosolic p53 inhibited mitophagy by disturbing the mitochondrial translocation of Parkin, as demonstrated by immunoprecipitation. However, metformin decreased ER stress and p53 expression, resulting in induction of Parkin-mediated mitophagy. Furthermore, pifithrin-α, a specific inhibitor of p53, increased mitochondrial incorporation into autophagosomes. Taken together, these results indicate that metformin treatment facilitates Parkin-mediated mitophagy rather than mitochondrial spheroid formation by decreasing the inhibitory interaction with cytosolic p53 and increasing degradation of mitofusins.

  5. AAVrh.10-Mediated Expression of an Anti-Cocaine Antibody Mediates Persistent Passive Immunization That Suppresses Cocaine-Induced Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Jonathan B.; Hicks, Martin J.; De, Bishnu P.; Pagovich, Odelya; Frenk, Esther; Janda, Kim D.; Wee, Sunmee; Koob, George F.; Hackett, Neil R.; Kaminsky, Stephen M.; Worgall, Stefan; Tignor, Nicole; Mezey, Jason G.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Cocaine addiction is a major problem affecting all societal and economic classes for which there is no effective therapy. We hypothesized an effective anti-cocaine vaccine could be developed by using an adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene transfer vector as the delivery vehicle to persistently express an anti-cocaine monoclonal antibody in vivo, which would sequester cocaine in the blood, preventing access to cognate receptors in the brain. To accomplish this, we constructed AAVrh.10antiCoc.Mab, an AAVrh.10 gene transfer vector expressing the heavy and light chains of the high affinity anti-cocaine monoclonal antibody GNC92H2. Intravenous administration of AAVrh.10antiCoc.Mab to mice mediated high, persistent serum levels of high-affinity, cocaine-specific antibodies that sequestered intravenously administered cocaine in the blood. With repeated intravenous cocaine challenge, naive mice exhibited hyperactivity, while the AAVrh.10antiCoc.Mab-vaccinated mice were completely resistant to the cocaine. These observations demonstrate a novel strategy for cocaine addiction by requiring only a single administration of an AAV vector mediating persistent, systemic anti-cocaine passive immunity. PMID:22486244

  6. Modelling microbial fuel cells with suspended cells and added electron transfer mediator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Picoreanu, C.; Katuri, K.P.; Van Loosdrecht, M.C.M.; Head, I.M.; Scott, K.

    2009-01-01

    Derivation of a mathematical model for microbial fuel cells (MFC) with suspended biomass and added electron-transfer mediator is described. The model is based on mass balances for several dissolved chemical species such as substrate, oxidized mediator and reduced mediator. Biological, chemical and e

  7. Arctigenin suppresses unfolded protein response and sensitizes glucose deprivation-mediated cytotoxicity of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shengrong; Wang, Xiong; Wang, Changhua; Nawaz, Ahmed; Wei, Wen; Li, Juanjuan; Wang, Lijun; Yu, De-Hua

    2011-01-01

    The involvement of unfolded protein response (UPR) activation in tumor survival and resistance to chemotherapies suggests a new anticancer strategy targeting UPR pathway. Arctigenin, a natural product, has been recently identified for its antitumor activity with selective toxicity against cancer cells under glucose starvation with unknown mechanism. Here we found that arctigenin specifically blocks the transcriptional induction of two potential anticancer targets, namely glucose-regulated protein-78 (GRP78) and its analog GRP94, under glucose deprivation, but not by tunicamycin. The activation of other UPR pathways, e.g., XBP-1 and ATF4, by glucose deprivation was also suppressed by arctigenin. A further transgene experiment showed that ectopic expression of GRP78 at least partially rescued arctigenin/glucose starvation-mediated cell growth inhibition, suggesting the causal role of UPR suppression in arctigenin-mediated cytotoxicity under glucose starvation. These observations bring a new insight into the mechanism of action of arctigenin and may lead to the design of new anticancer therapeutics.

  8. The Fusarium oxysporum effector Six6 contributes to virulence and suppresses I-2-mediated cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawehns, F; Houterman, P M; Ichou, F Ait; Michielse, C B; Hijdra, M; Cornelissen, B J C; Rep, M; Takken, F L W

    2014-04-01

    Plant pathogens secrete effectors to manipulate their host and facilitate colonization. Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici is the causal agent of Fusarium wilt disease in tomato. Upon infection, F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici secretes numerous small proteins into the xylem sap (Six proteins). Most Six proteins are unique to F. oxysporum, but Six6 is an exception; a homolog is also present in two Colletotrichum spp. SIX6 expression was found to require living host cells and a knockout of SIX6 in F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici compromised virulence, classifying it as a genuine effector. Heterologous expression of SIX6 did not affect growth of Agrobacterium tumefaciens in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves or susceptibility of Arabidopsis thaliana toward Verticillium dahliae, Pseudomonas syringae, or F. oxysporum, suggesting a specific function for F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici Six6 in the F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici- tomato pathosystem. Remarkably, Six6 was found to specifically suppress I-2-mediated cell death (I2CD) upon transient expression in N. benthamiana, whereas it did not compromise the activity of other cell-death-inducing genes. Still, this I2CD suppressing activity of Six6 does not allow the fungus to overcome I-2 resistance in tomato, suggesting that I-2-mediated resistance is independent from cell death.

  9. Suppression of TET1-Dependent DNA Demethylation Is Essential for KRAS-Mediated Transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Kuan Wu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Hypermethylation-mediated tumor suppressor gene (TSG silencing is a central epigenetic alteration in RAS-dependent tumorigenesis. Ten-eleven translocation (TET enzymes can depress DNA methylation by hydroxylation of 5-methylcytosine (5mC bases to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC. Here, we report that suppression of TET1 is required for KRAS-induced DNA hypermethylation and cellular transformation. In distinct nonmalignant cell lines, oncogenic KRAS promotes transformation by inhibiting TET1 expression via the ERK-signaling pathway. This reduces chromatin occupancy of TET1 at TSG promoters, lowers levels of 5hmC, and increases levels of 5mC and 5mC-dependent transcriptional silencing. Restoration of TET1 expression by ERK pathway inhibition or ectopic TET1 reintroduction in KRAS-transformed cells reactivates TSGs and inhibits colony formation. KRAS knockdown increases TET1 expression and diminishes colony-forming ability, whereas KRAS/TET1 double knockdown bypasses the KRAS dependence of KRAS-addicted cancer cells. Thus, suppression of TET1-dependent DNA demethylation is critical for KRAS-mediated transformation.

  10. Interleukin 35: A Key Mediator of Suppression and the Propagation of Infectious Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian M Olson

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The importance of regulatory T cells in balancing the effector arm of the immune system is well documented, playing a central role in preventing autoimmunity, facilitating graft tolerance following organ transplantation, and having a detrimental impact on the development of anti-tumor immunity. These regulatory responses use a variety of mechanisms to mediate suppression, including soluble factors. While IL-10 and TGF-β are the most commonly studied immunosuppressive cytokines, the recently identified IL-35 has been shown to have potent suppressive function in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, not only does IL-35 have the ability to directly suppress effector T cell responses, it is also able to expand regulatory responses by propagating infectious tolerance and generating a potent population of IL-35-expressing inducible regulatory T cells. In this review, we summarize research characterizing the structure and function of IL-35, examine its role in disease, and discuss how it can contribute to the induction of a distinct population of inducible regulatory T cells.

  11. Suppression of E-cadherin mediates gallotannin induced apoptosis in Hep G2 hepatocelluar carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hee Jeong; Kwon, Hee Young; Sohn, Eun Jung; Ko, Hyunsuk; Kim, Bogeun; Jung, Kwon; Lew, Jae Hwan; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Though gallotannin was known to have anti-oxidant and antitumor activity, the underlying antitumor mechanism of gallotannin still remains unclear. Thus, in the present study, antitumor mechanism of gallotannin was elucidated in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Gallotannin significantly exerted cytotoxicity against Hep G2 and Chang hepatocellular carcinoma cells with the accumulation of the sub-G1 population and increase of terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferasedUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) positive cells as an apoptotic feature. Also, gallotannin attenuated the expression of pro-caspase9, pro-caspase3, Bcl2 and integrin β1 and cleaved poly(ADP)-ribose polymerase (PARP) in Hep G2 and Chang cancer cells. Furthermore, gallotannin suppressed cell repair motility by wound healing assay and also inhibited cell adhesion in Hep G2 cells. Of note, gallotannin attenuated the expression of epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) to form cell-cell adhesion from the early stage, and also beta-catenin at late phase in Hep G2 cells. Consistently, Immunofluorescence assay showed that E-cadherin or β-catenin expression was suppressed in a time dependent manner by gallotannin. Furthermore, silencing of E-cadherin by siRNA transfection method enhanced PAPR cleavage, caspase 3 activation and sub G1 population and attenuated the cell adhesion induced by gallotannin in Hep G2 cells. Overall, our findings demonstrate that the disruption of cell adhesion junction by suppression of E-cadherin mediates gallotannin enhanced apoptosis in Hep G2 liver cancer cells.

  12. Cadmium-mediated disruption of cortisol biosynthesis involves suppression of corticosteroidogenic genes in rainbow trout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandhu, Navdeep [Department of Biology, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Vijayan, Mathilakath M., E-mail: mvijayan@uwaterloo.ca [Department of Biology, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2011-05-15

    Cadmium is widely distributed in the aquatic environment and is toxic to fish even at sublethal concentrations. This metal is an endocrine disruptor, and one well established role in teleosts is the suppression of adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH)-stimulated cortisol biosynthesis by the interrenal tissue. However the mechanism(s) leading to this steroid suppression is poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that cadmium targets genes encoding proteins critical for corticosteroid biosynthesis, including melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R), steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). To test this, head kidney slices (containing the interrenal tissues) were incubated in vitro with cadmium chloride (0, 10, 100 and 1000 nM) for 4 h either in the presence or absence of ACTH (0.5 IU/mL). In the unstimulated head kidney slices, cadmium exposure did not affect basal cortisol secretion and the mRNA levels of MC2R and P450scc, while StAR gene expression was significantly reduced. Cadmium exposure significantly suppressed ACTH-stimulated cortisol production in a dose-related fashion. This cadmium-mediated suppression in corticosteroidogenesis corresponded with a significant reduction in MC2R, StAR and P450scc mRNA levels in trout head kidney slices. The inhibition of ACTH-stimulated cortisol production and suppression of genes involved in corticosteroidogenesis by cadmium were completely abolished in the presence of 8-Bromo-cAMP (a cAMP analog). Overall, cadmium disrupts the expression of genes critical for corticosteroid biosynthesis in rainbow trout head kidney slices. However, the rescue of cortisol production as well as StAR and P450scc gene expressions by cAMP analog suggests that cadmium impact occurs upstream of cAMP production. We propose that MC2R signaling, the primary step in ACTH-induced cortocosteroidogenesis, is a key target for cadmium-mediated disruption of

  13. Colesevelam suppresses hepatic glycogenolysis by TGR5-mediated induction of GLP-1 action in DIO mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potthoff, Matthew J; Potts, Austin; He, Tianteng; Duarte, João A G; Taussig, Ronald; Mangelsdorf, David J; Kliewer, Steven A; Burgess, Shawn C

    2013-02-15

    Bile acid sequestrants are nonabsorbable resins designed to treat hypercholesterolemia by preventing ileal uptake of bile acids, thus increasing catabolism of cholesterol into bile acids. However, sequestrants also improve hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia through less characterized metabolic and molecular mechanisms. Here, we demonstrate that the bile acid sequestrant, colesevelam, significantly reduced hepatic glucose production by suppressing hepatic glycogenolysis in diet-induced obese mice and that this was partially mediated by activation of the G protein-coupled bile acid receptor TGR5 and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) release. A GLP-1 receptor antagonist blocked suppression of hepatic glycogenolysis and blunted but did not eliminate the effect of colesevelam on glycemia. The ability of colesevelam to induce GLP-1, lower glycemia, and spare hepatic glycogen content was compromised in mice lacking TGR5. In vitro assays revealed that bile acid activation of TGR5 initiates a prolonged cAMP signaling cascade and that this signaling was maintained even when the bile acid was complexed to colesevelam. Intestinal TGR5 was most abundantly expressed in the colon, and rectal administration of a colesevelam/bile acid complex was sufficient to induce portal GLP-1 concentration but did not activate the nuclear bile acid receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR). The beneficial effects of colesevelam on cholesterol metabolism were mediated by FXR and were independent of TGR5/GLP-1. We conclude that colesevelam administration functions through a dual mechanism, which includes TGR5/GLP-1-dependent suppression of hepatic glycogenolysis and FXR-dependent cholesterol reduction.

  14. Bacteriophage WO Can Mediate Horizontal Gene Transfer in Endosymbiotic Wolbachia Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guan H.; Sun, Bao F.; Xiong, Tuan L.; Wang, Yan K.; Murfin, Kristen E.; Xiao, Jin H.; Huang, Da W.

    2016-01-01

    Phage-mediated horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is common in free-living bacteria, and many transferred genes can play a significant role in their new bacterial hosts. However, there are few reports concerning phage-mediated HGT in endosymbionts (obligate intracellular bacteria within animal or plant hosts), such as Wolbachia. The Wolbachia-infecting temperate phage WO can actively shift among Wolbachia genomes and has the potential to mediate HGT between Wolbachia strains. In the present study, we extend previous findings by validating that the phage WO can mediate transfer of non-phage genes. To do so, we utilized bioinformatic, phylogenetic, and molecular analyses based on all sequenced Wolbachia and phage WO genomes. Our results show that the phage WO can mediate HGT between Wolbachia strains, regardless of whether the transferred genes originate from Wolbachia or other unrelated bacteria. PMID:27965627

  15. Immune tolerance induced by intravenous transfer of immature dendritic cells via up-regulating numbers of suppressive IL-10(+) IFN-γ(+)-producing CD4(+) T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fang; Ciric, Bogoljub; Zhang, Guang-Xian; Rostami, Abdolmohamad

    2013-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) regulate immunity and immune tolerance in vivo. However, the mechanisms of DC-mediated tolerance have not been fully elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that intravenous (i.v.) transfer of bone marrow-derived DCs pulsed with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) peptide blocks the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in C57BL/6J mice. i.v. transfer of MOG-pulsed DCs leads to the down-regulation of the production of IL-17A and IFN-γ and up-regulation of IL-10 secretion. The development of regulatory T cells (Tregs) is facilitated via up-regulation of FoxP3 expression and production of IL-10. The number of suppressive CD4(+)IL-10(+)IFN-γ(+) T cells is also improved. The expression of OX40, CD154, and CD28 is down-regulated, but the expression of CD152, CD80, PD-1, ICOS, and BTLA is up-regulated on CD4(+) T cells after i.v. transfer of immature DCs. The expression of CCR4, CCR5, and CCR7 on CD4(+) T cells is also improved. Our results suggest that immature DCs may induce tolerance via facilitating the development of CD4(+)FoxP3(+) Tregs and suppressive CD4(+)IL-10(+)IFN-γ(+) T cells in vivo.

  16. Calmodulin-mediated suppression of 2-ketoisovalerate reductase in Beauveria bassiana beauvericin biosynthetic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jiyoung; Yoon, Deok-Hyo; Oh, Junsang; Hyun, Min-Woo; Han, Jae-Gu; Sung, Gi-Ho

    2016-11-01

    Ketoisovalerate reductase (KIVR, E.C. 1.2.7.7) mediates the specific reduction of 2-ketoisovalerate (2-Kiv) to d-hydroxyisovalerate (d-Hiv), a precursor for beauvericin biosynthesis. Beauvericin, a famous mycotoxin produced by many fungi, is a cyclooligomer depsipeptide, which has insecticidal, antimicrobial, antiviral, and cytotoxic activities. In this report, we demonstrated that Beauveria bassiana 2-ketoisovalerate reductase (BbKIVR) acts as a typical KIVR enzyme in the entomopathogenic fungus B. bassiana. In addition, we found that BbKIVR interacts with calmodulin (CaM) in vitro and in vivo. The functional role of CaM-binding to BbKIVR was to negatively regulate the BbKIVR activity in B. bassiana. Environmental stimuli such as light and salt stress suppressed BbKIVR activity in B. bassiana. Interestingly, this negative effect of BbKIVR activity by light and salt stress was recovered by CaM inhibitors, suggesting that the inhibitory mechanism is mediated through stimulation of CaM activity. Therefore, this work suggests that BbKIVR plays an important role in the beauvericin biosynthetic pathway mediated by environmental stimuli such as light and salt stress via the CaM signaling pathway.

  17. Polyoxometalate active charge-transfer material for mediated redox flow battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Travis Mark; Hudak, Nicholas; Staiger, Chad; Pratt, Harry

    2017-01-17

    Redox flow batteries including a half-cell electrode chamber coupled to a current collecting electrode are disclosed herein. In a general embodiment, a separator is coupled to the half-cell electrode chamber. The half-cell electrode chamber comprises a first redox-active mediator and a second redox-active mediator. The first redox-active mediator and the second redox-active mediator are circulated through the half-cell electrode chamber into an external container. The container includes an active charge-transfer material. The active charge-transfer material has a redox potential between a redox potential of the first redox-active mediator and a redox potential of the second redox-active mediator. The active charge-transfer material is a polyoxometalate or derivative thereof. The redox flow battery may be particularly useful in energy storage solutions for renewable energy sources and for providing sustained power to an electrical grid.

  18. Ncf1 (p47phox is essential for direct regulatory T cell mediated suppression of CD4+ effector T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Efimova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Multiple mechanisms have been advanced to account for CD4+FOXP3+ regulatory T cell (Treg-mediated suppression of CD4+ effector T cells (Teffs but none appear to completely explain suppression. Previous data indicates that Tregs may affect the microenvironment redox state. Given the inherent redox sensitivity of T cells, we tested the hypothesis that oxidants may mediate the direct suppression of Teffs by Tregs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Tregs and Teffs were isolated from the spleens of wild type (WT C57BL/6 mice or Ncf1(p47phox-deficient C57BL/6 mice which lack NADPH oxidase function. Teffs were labeled with CFSE and co-cultured with unlabeled Tregs at varying Treg:Teff ratios in the presence of anti-CD3/CD28 coated beads for 3 days in suppression assays. Treg-mediated suppression was quantified by flow cytometric analysis of CFSE dilution in Teffs. The presence of the antioxidants n-acetylcysteine (NAC or 2-mercaptoethanol or inhibitors of NADPH oxidase (diphenyleneiodonium and VAS-2870 resulted in reduced WT Treg-mediated suppression. The observed suppression was in part dependent upon TGFβ as it was partially blocked with neutralizing antibodies. The suppression of Teff proliferation induced by exogenous TGFβ treatment could be overcome with NAC. Ncf1-deficient Teff were slightly but significantly less sensitive than WT Teff to suppression by exogenous TGFβ. Ncf1-deficient Tregs suppressed Ncf1-deficient Teff very poorly compared to wild type controls. There was partial but incomplete reconstitution of suppression in assays with WT Tregs and Ncf1-deficient Teff. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We present evidence that NADPH oxidase derived ROS plays a role in the direct Treg mediated suppression of CD4+ effector T cells in a process that is blocked by thiol-containing antioxidants, NADPH oxidase inhibitors or a lack of Ncf1 expression in Tregs and Teffs. Oxidants may represent a potential new target for therapeutic modulation

  19. Cell-mediated immune suppression effect of rocket kerosene through dermal exposure in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing-xin XU

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To study the effect of cell-mediated immune suppression effect of rocket kerosene (RK through dermal application in mice. Methods Skin delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH was used to observe the relation of the RK amount the skin exposed and the cellular immune inhibitory function. Different amount of the undiluted fuel was smeared directly onto the dorsal skin of mice. Mice in negative and positive control groups were treated with acetone. After the last exposure, all the mice except those in negative control group were allergized by evenly smearing with 1% dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB solution on their dorsum. Five days after allergy, 1% DNFB solution was smeared onto right ear of all mice to stimulate the allergic reaction. Twenty-four hours after attack, the auricle swelling, spleen index and thymus index in corresponding mice were determined. In the first series of experiments, different dosages of RK were applied once, and the ICR mice were randomly divided into negative control group, positive control group and experimental group (0.5ml/kg.BW×1, 1ml/kg.BW×1 and 2ml/kg.BW×1 group. In the second series of experiments, the certain and same dosage of RK was applied for different times, and the ICR mice were randomly divided into negative control group, positive control group and experimental group (0.5ml/kg.BW×1, 0.5mL/kg.BW×2, 0.5ml/kg.BW×3, 0.5ml/kg.BW×4 and 0.5mL/kg.BW×5 group. In the third series of experiments, the different dosages of RK were applied more than once, and the ICR mice were randomly divided into negative control group, positive control group and experimental group (0.5ml/kg.BW×5, 1ml/kg.BW×5 and 2ml/kg.BW×5 group. Lymphocyte proliferation experiment in vitrowas conducted to observe the persistent time of the cell-mediated immune suppression in mice by RK dermal exposure. The lymphocyte proliferation induced by concanavalin A (Con A was analyzed by MTT assay, and T lymphocyte subsets (CD3+, CD4+ and CD

  20. Multifaceted effects of synthetic TLR2 ligand and Legionella pneumophilia on Treg-mediated suppression of T cell activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutmuller Roger PM

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regulatory T cells (Treg play a crucial role in maintaining immune homeostasis and self-tolerance. The immune suppressive effects of Tregs should however be limited in case effective immunity is required against pathogens or cancer cells. We previously found that the Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2 agonist, Pam3CysSK4, directly stimulated Tregs to expand and temporarily abrogate their suppressive capabilities. In this study, we evaluate the effect of Pam3CysSK4 and Legionella pneumophila, a natural TLR2 containing infectious agent, on effector T (Teff cells and dendritic cells (DCs individually and in co-cultures with Tregs. Results TLR2 agonists can directly provide a co-stimulatory signal inducing enhanced proliferation and cytokine production of naive CD4+ Teff cells. With respect to cytokine production, DCs appear to be most sensitive to low amounts of TLR agonists. Using wild type and TLR2-deficient cells in Treg suppression assays, we accordingly show that all cells (e.g. Treg, Teff cells and DCs contributed to overcome Treg-mediated suppression of Teff cell proliferation. Furthermore, while TLR2-stimulated Tregs readily lost their ability to suppress Teff cell proliferation, cytokine production by Teff cells was still suppressed. Similar results were obtained upon stimulation with TLR2 ligand containing bacteria, Legionella pneumophila. Conclusions These findings indicate that both synthetic and natural TLR2 agonists affect DCs, Teff cells and Treg directly, resulting in multi-modal modulation of Treg-mediated suppression of Teff cells. Moreover, Treg-mediated suppression of Teff cell proliferation is functionally distinct from suppression of cytokine secretion.

  1. Transfer of plasmid-mediated ampicillin resistance from Haemophilus to Neisseria gonorrhoeae requires an intervening organism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNicol, P J; Albritton, W L; Ronald, A R

    1986-01-01

    Haemophilus species have been implicated as the source of plasmid-mediated ampicillin resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Previous attempts to transfer conjugally the resistance plasmids from Haemophilus species to N. gonorrhoeae have met with limited success. Using both biparental and triparental mating systems, it was found that transfer will occur if the commensal Neisseria species, Neisseria cinerea, is used as a transfer intermediate. This organism stably maintains resistance plasmids of Haemophilus and facilitates transfer of these plasmids to N. gonorrhoeae, in a triparental mating system, at a transfer frequency of 10(-8). Both Haemophilus ducreyi and N. gonorrhoeae carry mobilizing plasmids capable of mediating conjugal transfer of the same resistance plasmids. However, restriction endonuclease mapping and DNA hybridization studies indicate that the mobilizing plasmids are distinctly different molecules. Limited homology is present within the transfer region of these plasmids.

  2. Enduring neurobehavioral effects of early life trauma mediated through learning and corticosterone suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Moriceau

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Early life trauma alters later life emotions, including fear. To better understand mediating mechanisms, we subjected pups to either predictable or unpredictable trauma, in the form of paired or unpaired odor-0.5mA shock conditioning which, during a sensitive period, produces an odor preference and no learning respectively. Fear conditioning and its neural correlates were then assessed after the sensitive period at postnatal day (PN13 or in adulthood, ages when amygdala-dependent fear occurs. Our results revealed that paired odor-shock conditioning starting during the sensitive period (PN8-12 blocked fear conditioning in older infants (PN13 and pups continued to express olfactory bulb-dependent odor preference learning. This PN13 fear learning inhibition was also associated with suppression of shock-induced corticosterone, although the age appropriate amygdala-dependent fear learning was reinstated with systemic corticosterone (3mg/kg during conditioning. On the other hand, sensitive period odor-shock conditioning did not prevent adult fear conditioning, although freezing, amygdala and hippocampal 2-DG uptake and corticosterone levels were attenuated compared to adult conditioning without infant conditioning. Normal levels of freezing, amygdala and hippocampal 2-DG uptake were induced with systemic corticosterone (5mg/kg during adult conditioning. These results suggest that the contingency of early life trauma mediates at least some effects of early life stress through learning and suppression of corticosterone levels. However, developmental differences between infants and adults are expressed with PN13 infants’ learning consistent with the original learned preference, while adult conditioning overrides the original learned preference with attenuated amygdala-dependent fear learning.

  3. Does the histaminergic system mediate bombesin/GRP-induced suppression of food intake?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merali, Z; Banks, K

    1994-12-01

    Bombesin (BN) and its mammalian homologue, gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), are potent satiety agents and have been implicated in the physiological regulation of food intake. The mechanism(s) of action of this effect remains unclear. There is a functional and anatomic overlap between histamine and BN in relationship to feeding, which led us to hypothesize that BN may mediate its satiety effects through activation of the histaminergic system. To assess this contention, we examined the effects of R-alpha-methylhistamine (alpha-MH) and Imetit, selective H3-receptor agonists that inhibit the release and synthesis of histamine, on BN- or cholecystokinin (CCK)-induced satiety. In this report we present the first evidence for the role of histamine H3 receptors in the mediation of BN-elicited satiety. During the first hour of the 4-h daily feeding session, BN reduced food intake by > 50% relative to the control condition; this suppression was blocked by prior treatment with the H3-receptor agonist, alpha-MH. This blockade of BN-induced satiety was dose related and selective to BN as alpha-MH failed to attenuate sulfated CCK-8-induced satiety. When alpha-MH was administered alone, it failed to significantly affect food intake. The specificity of this effect was further supported by the demonstration that another H3 agonist, Imetit, was also able to block the feeding-suppressant effects of BN. Furthermore, thioperamide, an H3-receptor antagonist, blocked these effects of Imetit.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Let-7b-mediated suppression of basigin expression and metastasis in mouse melanoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Tzu-Yen [Department of Animal Science, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chia-Che [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, 91 Hsueh Shih Road, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chun-Ting [Department of Animal Science, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Lai, Cong-Hao [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Department of Life Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Peng, Shao-Yu; Ko, Yi-Ju [Department of Animal Science, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Tang, Pin-Chi, E-mail: pctang@dragon.nchu.edu.tw [Department of Animal Science, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China)

    2011-02-15

    Basigin (Bsg), also called extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN), is highly expressed on the surface of tumor cells and stimulates adjacent fibroblasts or tumor cells to produce matrix metalloproteinases (mmps). It has been shown that Bsg plays an important role in growth, development, cell differentiation, and tumor progression. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of short endogenous non-protein coding RNAs of 20-25 nucleotides (nt) that function as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression by base-pairing to their target mRNAs and thereby mediate cleavage of target mRNAs or translational repression. In this study, let-7b, one of the let-7 family members, was investigated for its effect on the growth and invasiveness of the mouse melanoma cell line B16-F10. We have shown that let-7b can suppress the expression of Bsg in B16-F10 cells and also provided evidence that this suppression could result in the indirect suppression of mmp-9. The ability of B16-F10 cells transfected with let-7b to invade or migrate was significantly reduced. In addition, let-7b transfected B16-F10 cells displayed an inhibition of both cellular proliferation and colony formation. Furthermore, it was shown that the overexpression of let-7b in B16-F10 cells could reduce lung metastasis. Taken together, the present study identifies let-7b as a tumor suppressor that represses cancer cell proliferation and migration as well as tumor metastasis in mouse melanoma cells.

  5. Luteolin inhibits human prostate tumor growth by suppressing vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2-mediated angiogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poyil Pratheeshkumar

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing vascular beds, is essential for tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. Luteolin is a common dietary flavonoid found in fruits and vegetables. We studied the antiangiogenic activity of luteolin using in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo models. In vitro studies using rat aortic ring assay showed that luteolin at non-toxic concentrations significantly inhibited microvessel sprouting and proliferation, migration, invasion and tube formation of endothelial cells, which are key events in the process of angiogenesis. Luteolin also inhibited ex vivo angiogenesis as revealed by chicken egg chorioallantoic membrane assay (CAM and matrigel plug assay. Gelatin zymographic analysis demonstrated the inhibitory effect of luteolin on the activation of matrix metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MMP-9. Western blot analysis showed that luteolin suppressed VEGF induced phosphorylation of VEGF receptor 2 and their downstream protein kinases AKT, ERK, mTOR, P70S6K, MMP-2, and MMP-9 in HUVECs. Proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α level were significantly reduced by the treatment of luteolin in PC-3 cells. Luteolin (10 mg/kg/d significantly reduced the volume and the weight of solid tumors in prostate xenograft mouse model, indicating that luteolin inhibited tumorigenesis by targeting angiogenesis. CD31 and CD34 immunohistochemical staining further revealed that the microvessel density could be remarkably suppressed by luteolin. Moreover, luteolin reduced cell viability and induced apoptosis in prostate cancer cells, which were correlated with the downregulation of AKT, ERK, mTOR, P70S6K, MMP-2, and MMP-9 expressions. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that luteolin inhibits human prostate tumor growth by suppressing vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2-mediated angiogenesis.

  6. Virus-mediated suppression of host non-self recognition facilitates horizontal transmission of heterologous viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Songsong; Cheng, Jiasen; Fu, Yanping; Chen, Tao; Jiang, Daohong; Ghabrial, Said A.

    2017-01-01

    Non-self recognition is a common phenomenon among organisms; it often leads to innate immunity to prevent the invasion of parasites and maintain the genetic polymorphism of organisms. Fungal vegetative incompatibility is a type of non-self recognition which often induces programmed cell death (PCD) and restricts the spread of molecular parasites. It is not clearly known whether virus infection could attenuate non-self recognition among host individuals to facilitate its spread. Here, we report that a hypovirulence-associated mycoreovirus, named Sclerotinia sclerotiorum mycoreovirus 4 (SsMYRV4), could suppress host non-self recognition and facilitate horizontal transmission of heterologous viruses. We found that cell death in intermingled colony regions between SsMYRV4-infected Sclerotinia sclerotiorum strain and other tested vegetatively incompatible strains was markedly reduced and inhibition barrage lines were not clearly observed. Vegetative incompatibility, which involves Heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) signaling pathway, is controlled by specific loci termed het (heterokaryon incompatibility) loci. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) plays a key role in vegetative incompatibility-mediated PCD. The expression of G protein subunit genes, het genes, and ROS-related genes were significantly down-regulated, and cellular production of ROS was suppressed in the presence of SsMYRV4. Furthermore, SsMYRV4-infected strain could easily accept other viruses through hyphal contact and these viruses could be efficiently transmitted from SsMYRV4-infected strain to other vegetatively incompatible individuals. Thus, we concluded that SsMYRV4 is capable of suppressing host non-self recognition and facilitating heterologous viruses transmission among host individuals. These findings may enhance our understanding of virus ecology, and provide a potential strategy to utilize hypovirulence-associated mycoviruses to control fungal diseases. PMID:28334041

  7. Charge transfer mediator based systems for electrocatalytic oxygen reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahl, Shannon S.; Gerken, James B.; Anson, Colin W.

    2017-07-18

    Disclosed are systems for the electrocatalytic reduction of oxygen, having redox mediator/redox catalyst pairs and an electrolyte solution in contact with an electrode. The redox mediator is included in the electrolyte solution, and the redox catalyst may be included in the electrolyte solution, or alternatively, may be in contact with the electrolyte solution. In one form a cobalt redox catalyst is used with a quinone redox mediator. In another form a nitrogen oxide redox catalyst is used with a nitroxyl type redox mediator. The systems can be used in electrochemical cells wherein neither the anode nor the cathode comprise an expensive metal such as platinum.

  8. Suppression of NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity against PRRSV-infected porcine alveolar macrophages in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jun; Grauwet, Korneel; Vermeulen, Ben; Devriendt, Bert; Jiang, Ping; Favoreel, Herman; Nauwynck, Hans

    2013-06-28

    The adaptive immunity against PRRSV has already been studied in depth, but only limited data are available on the innate immune responses against this pathogen. In the present study, we analyzed the interaction between porcine natural killer (NK) cells and PRRSV-infected primary porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs), since NK cells are one of the most important components of innate immunity and PAMs are primary target cells of PRRSV infection. NK cytotoxicity assays were performed using enriched NK cells as effector cells and virus-infected or mock-inoculated PAMs as target cells. The NK cytotoxicity against PRRSV-infected PAMs was decreased starting from 6h post inoculation (hpi) till the end of the experiment (12 hpi) and was significantly lower than that against pseudorabies virus (PrV)-infected PAMs. UV-inactivated PRRSV also suppressed NK activity, but much less than infectious PRRSV. Furthermore, co-incubation with PRRSV-infected PAMs inhibited degranulation of NK cells. Finally, using the supernatant of PRRSV-infected PAMs collected at 12 hpi showed that the suppressive effect of PRRSV on NK cytotoxicity was not mediated by soluble factors. In conclusion, PRRSV-infected PAMs showed a reduced susceptibility toward NK cytotoxicity, which may represent one of the multiple evasion strategies of PRRSV.

  9. Tuberatolide B Suppresses Cancer Progression by Promoting ROS-Mediated Inhibition of STAT3 Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Youn Kyung; Kim, Junseong; Lee, Kang Min; Choi, Yu-Jeong; Ye, Bo-Ram; Kim, Min-Sun; Ko, Seong-Gyu; Lee, Seung-Hong; Kang, Do-Hyung; Heo, Soo-Jin

    2017-02-25

    Tuberatolide B (TTB, C27H34O₄) is a diastereomeric meroterpenoid isolated from the Korean marine algae Sargassum macrocarpum. However, the anticancer effects of TTB remain unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that TTB inhibits tumor growth in breast, lung, colon, prostate, and cervical cancer cells. To examine the mechanism by which TTB suppresses cell growth, we determined the effect of TTB on apoptosis, ROS generation, DNA damage, and signal transduction. TTB induced ROS production in MDA-MB-231, A549, and HCT116 cells. Moreover, TTB enhanced DNA damage by inducing γH2AX foci formation and the phosphorylation of DNA damage-related proteins such as Chk2 and H2AX. Furthermore, TTB selectively inhibited STAT3 activation, which resulted in a reduction in cyclin D1, MMP-9, survivin, VEGF, and IL-6. In addition, TTB-induced ROS generation caused STAT3 inhibition, DNA damage, and apoptotic cell death. Therefore, TTB suppresses cancer progression by promoting ROS-mediated inhibition of STAT3 signaling, suggesting that TTB is useful for the treatment of cancer.

  10. Tuberatolide B Suppresses Cancer Progression by Promoting ROS-Mediated Inhibition of STAT3 Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youn Kyung Choi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Tuberatolide B (TTB, C27H34O4 is a diastereomeric meroterpenoid isolated from the Korean marine algae Sargassum macrocarpum. However, the anticancer effects of TTB remain unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that TTB inhibits tumor growth in breast, lung, colon, prostate, and cervical cancer cells. To examine the mechanism by which TTB suppresses cell growth, we determined the effect of TTB on apoptosis, ROS generation, DNA damage, and signal transduction. TTB induced ROS production in MDA-MB-231, A549, and HCT116 cells. Moreover, TTB enhanced DNA damage by inducing γH2AX foci formation and the phosphorylation of DNA damage-related proteins such as Chk2 and H2AX. Furthermore, TTB selectively inhibited STAT3 activation, which resulted in a reduction in cyclin D1, MMP-9, survivin, VEGF, and IL-6. In addition, TTB-induced ROS generation caused STAT3 inhibition, DNA damage, and apoptotic cell death. Therefore, TTB suppresses cancer progression by promoting ROS-mediated inhibition of STAT3 signaling, suggesting that TTB is useful for the treatment of cancer.

  11. Speeding-up exchange-mediated saturation transfer experiments by Fourier transform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carneiro, Marta G.; Reddy, Jithender G.; Griesinger, Christian; Lee, Donghan, E-mail: dole@nmr.mpibpc.mpg.de [Max-Planck Institute for Biophysical chemistry, Department of NMR-based Structural Biology (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    Protein motions over various time scales are crucial for protein function. NMR relaxation dispersion experiments play a key role in explaining these motions. However, the study of slow conformational changes with lowly populated states remained elusive. The recently developed exchange-mediated saturation transfer experiments allow the detection and characterization of such motions, but require extensive measurement time. Here we show that, by making use of Fourier transform, the total acquisition time required to measure an exchange-mediated saturation transfer profile can be reduced by twofold in case that one applies linear prediction. In addition, we demonstrate that the analytical solution for R{sub 1}ρ experiments can be used for fitting the exchange-mediated saturation transfer profile. Furthermore, we show that simultaneous analysis of exchange-mediated saturation transfer profiles with two different radio-frequency field strengths is required for accurate and precise characterization of the exchange process and the exchanging states.

  12. Transfer of Mediational Strategies in Children: The Role of Activity and Awareness During Strategy Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, John G.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The ability of nursery school and first-grade children to learn and transfer a mediational strategy utilizing prepositional relationships between paired-associate objects was investigated under several strategy training conditions. (Author/JMB)

  13. Suppression of TLR4-mediated inflammatory response by macrophage class A scavenger receptor (CD204)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnishi, Koji; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Fujiwara, Yukio; Takemura, Kenichi [Department of Cell Pathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Lei, XiaoFeng [Department of Cell Pathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Department of Biochemistry, Showa University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Nakagawa, Takenobu [Department of Cell Pathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Sakashita, Naomi [Department of Cell Pathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Department of Human Pathology, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima, Tokushima (Japan); Takeya, Motohiro, E-mail: takeya@kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Cell Pathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} We focused on the interaction between SR-A and TLR4 signaling in this study. {yields} SR-A deletion promoted NF{kappa}B activation in macrophages in septic model mouse. {yields} SR-A suppresses both MyD88-dependent and -independent TLR4 signaling in vitro. {yields} SR-A clears LPS binding to TLR4 which resulting in the suppression of TLR4 signals. -- Abstract: The class A scavenger receptor (SR-A, CD204), one of the principal receptors expressed on macrophages, has been found to regulate inflammatory response and attenuate septic endotoxemia. However, the detailed mechanism of this process has not yet been well characterized. To clarify the regulative mechanisms of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced macrophage activation by SR-A, we evaluated the activation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-mediated signaling molecules in SR-A-deficient (SR-A{sup -/-}) macrophages. In a septic shock model, the blood levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}, interleukin (IL)-6 and interferon (IFN)-{beta} were significantly increased in SR-A{sup -/-} mice compared to wild-type mice, and elevated nuclear factor kappa B (NF{kappa}B) activation was detected in SR-A{sup -/-} macrophages. SR-A deletion increased the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and NF{kappa}B in vitro. SR-A deletion also promoted the nuclear translocation of NF{kappa}B and IFN regulatory factor (IRF)-3. In addition, a competitive binding assay with acetylated low-density lipoprotein, an SR-A-specific ligand, and anti-SR-A antibody induced significant activation of TLR4-mediated signaling molecules in wild-type macrophages but not in SR-A{sup -/-} macrophages. These results suggest that SR-A suppresses the macrophage activation by inhibiting the binding of LPS to TLR4 in a competitive manner and it plays a pivotal role in the regulation of the LPS-induced inflammatory response.

  14. Photon Upconversion Through Tb(3+) -Mediated Interfacial Energy Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bo; Yang, Weifeng; Han, Sanyang; Sun, Qiang; Liu, Xiaogang

    2015-10-28

    A strategy of interfacial energy transfer upconversion is demonstrated through the use of a terbium (Tb(3+) ) dopant as energy donor or energy migrator in core-shell-structured nanocrystals. This mechanistic investigation presents a new pathway for photon upconversion, and, more importantly, contributes to the better control of energy transfer at the nanometer length scale.

  15. Enhanced ionization of embedded clusters by Electron Transfer Mediated Decay in helium nanodroplets

    CERN Document Server

    LaForge, A C; Gokhberg, K; von Vangerow, J; Kryzhevoi, N; O'Keeffe, P; Ciavardini, A; Krishnan, S R; Coreno, M; Prince, K C; Richter, R; Moshammer, R; Pfeifer, T; Cederbaum, L; Stienkemeier, F; Mudrich, M

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the observation of electron transfer mediated decay For Mg clusters embedded in He nanodroplets. The process is mediated by the initial ionization of helium followed by an autoionization process by electron transfer in the Mg clusters. The photoelectron spectrum (PES) reveal a low energy ETMD peak. For Mg clusters larger than 7 atoms, we observe the formation of stable doubly ionized clusters. The process is shown to be the primamry ionization mechanism for embedded clusters.

  16. RNAi technology and lentiviral delivery as a powerful tool to suppress Tpr-Met-mediated tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taulli, Riccardo; Accornero, Paolo; Follenzi, Antonia; Mangano, Tony; Morotti, Alessandro; Scuoppo, Claudio; Forni, Paolo E; Bersani, Francesca; Crepaldi, Tiziana; Chiarle, Roberto; Naldini, Luigi; Ponzetto, Carola

    2005-05-01

    Tpr-Met, the oncogenic counterpart of the Met receptor, has been detected in gastric cancers, as well as in precursor lesions and in the adjacent normal gastric mucosa. This has prompted the suggestion that Tpr-Met may predispose to the development of gastric tumors. Given the sequence specificity of RNA interference, oncogenes activated by point mutation or rearrangements can be targeted while spearing the product of the wild-type allele. In this work, we report specific suppression of Tpr-Met expression and inhibition of Tpr-Met-mediated transformation and tumorigenesis by means of a short interfering RNA (siRNA) directed toward the Tpr-Met junction (anti-TM2). When delivered by a lentiviral vector, anti-TM2 siRNA was effective also in mouse embryonal fibroblasts or epithelial cells expressing high levels of Tpr-Met. Our results suggest that lentiviral-mediated delivery of anti-TM2 siRNA may be developed into a powerful tool to treat Tpr-Met-positive cancers.

  17. Bacterial outer membrane vesicles suppress tumor by interferon-γ-mediated antitumor response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Oh Youn; Park, Hyun Taek; Dinh, Nhung Thi Hong; Choi, Seng Jin; Lee, Jaewook; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Seung-Woo; Gho, Yong Song

    2017-09-20

    Gram-negative bacteria actively secrete outer membrane vesicles, spherical nano-meter-sized proteolipids enriched with outer membrane proteins, to the surroundings. Outer membrane vesicles have gained wide interests as non-living complex vaccines or delivery vehicles. However, no study has used outer membrane vesicles in treating cancer thus far. Here we investigate the potential of bacterial outer membrane vesicles as therapeutic agents to treat cancer via immunotherapy. Our results show remarkable capability of bacterial outer membrane vesicles to effectively induce long-term antitumor immune responses that can fully eradicate established tumors without notable adverse effects. Moreover, systematically administered bacterial outer membrane vesicles specifically target and accumulate in the tumor tissue, and subsequently induce the production of antitumor cytokines CXCL10 and interferon-γ. This antitumor effect is interferon-γ dependent, as interferon-γ-deficient mice could not induce such outer membrane vesicle-mediated immune response. Together, our results herein demonstrate the potential of bacterial outer membrane vesicles as effective immunotherapeutic agent that can treat various cancers without apparent adverse effects.Bacterial outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) contain immunogens but no study has yet examined their potential in treating cancer. Here, the authors demonstrate that OMVs can suppress established tumours and prevent tumour metastasis by an interferon-γ mediated antitumor response.

  18. Stephanthraniline A suppressed CD4(+) T cell-mediated immunological hepatitis through impairing PKCθ function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng-Yang; Zhou, Li-Fei; Li, Xiao-Yu; Zhao, Jia-Wen; Xu, Shi-Fang; Huang, Wen-Hai; Gao, Li-Juan; Hao, Shu-Juan; Ye, Yi-Ping; Sun, Hong-Xiang

    2016-10-15

    Stephanthraniline A (STA), a C21 steroid isolated from Stephanotis mucronata (Blanco) Merr., was previously shown to inhibit T cells activation and proliferation in vitro and in vivo. The purpose of this study was to further evaluate the in vivo immunosuppressive activity of STA and to elucidate its potential mechanisms. The results showed that pretreatment with STA significantly attenuated concanavalin A (Con A)-induced hepatitis and reduced CD4(+) T cells activation and aggregation in hepatic tissue in mice. STA directly suppressed the activation and proliferation of Con A-induced CD4(+) T cells, and inhibited NFAT, NFκB and MAPK signaling cascades in activated CD4(+) T cells in vitro. Moreover, it was proved that STA inhibited T cells activation and proliferation through proximal T cell-receptor (TCR) signaling- and Ca(2+) signaling-independent way. The molecular docking studies predicted that STA could tight bind to PKCθ via five hydrogen. The further findings indicated STA directly inhibited PKCθ kinase activity, and its phosphorylation in activated CD4(+) T cells in vitro. Collectively, the present study indicated that STA could protect against CD4(+) T cell-mediated immunological hepatitis in mice through PKCθ and its downstream NFAT, NFκB and MAPK signaling cascades. These results highlight the potential of STA as an effective leading compound for use in the treatment of CD4(+) T cell-mediated inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  19. Endoglin-mediated suppression of prostate cancer invasion is regulated by activin and bone morphogenetic protein type II receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Breen

    Full Text Available Mortality from prostate cancer (PCa is due to the formation of metastatic disease. Understanding how that process is regulated is therefore critical. We previously demonstrated that endoglin, a type III transforming growth factor β (TGFβ superfamily receptor, suppresses human PCa cell invasion and metastasis. Endoglin-mediated suppression of invasion was also shown by us to be dependent upon the type I TGFβ receptor, activin receptor-like kinase 2 (ALK2, and the downstream effector, Smad1. In this study we demonstrate for the first time that two type II TGFβ receptors are required for endoglin-mediated suppression of invasion: activin A receptor type IIA (ActRIIA and bone morphogenetic protein receptor type II (BMPRII. Downstream signaling through these receptors is predominantly mediated by Smad1. ActRIIA stimulates Smad1 activation in a kinase-dependent manner, and this is required for suppression of invasion. In contrast BMPRII regulates Smad1 in a biphasic manner, promoting Smad1 signaling through its kinase domain but suppressing it through its cytoplasmic tail. BMPRII's Smad1-regulatory effects are dependent upon its expression level. Further, its ability to suppress invasion is independent of either kinase function or tail domain. We demonstrate that ActRIIA and BMPRII physically interact, and that each also interacts with endoglin. The current findings demonstrate that both BMPRII and ActRIIA are necessary for endoglin-mediated suppression of human PCa cell invasion, that they have differential effects on Smad1 signaling, that they make separate contributions to regulation of invasion, and that they functionally and physically interact.

  20. Mechanisms of Subsurface Drip Irrigation-Mediated Suppression of Lettuce Drop Caused by Sclerotinia minor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, A A; Liu, L; Reidy, B; Davis, R M; Subbarao, K V

    1998-03-01

    ABSTRACT Subsurface drip irrigation and associated mandatory minimum tillage practices significantly reduced the incidence of lettuce drop (Sclerotinia minor) and the severity of corky root on lettuce compared with furrow irrigation and conventional tillage. Three possible mechanisms for the drip irrigation-mediated disease suppression were examined in this study: qualitative and quantitative differences in the soil microflora under furrow and subsurface drip irrigation; their antagonism and potential bio-control effects on S. minor; and the physical distribution of soil moisture and temperature relative to the two irrigation methods. To determine if the suppressive effects under subsurface drip irrigation were related to changes in soil microflora, soils were assayed for actinomycetes, bacteria, and fungi during the spring and fall seasons. The effects of the irrigation methods on microbial populations were nearly identical during both seasons. In the spring season, the total number of fungal colonies recovered on potato dextrose agar amended with rose Bengal generally was greater in soils under drip irrigation than under furrow irrigation, but no such differences were observed during the fall. Numbers of actinomycetes and bacteria were not significantly different between irrigation methods during either season. No interaction between sampling time and irrigation methods was observed for any of the microbial populations during both seasons. Thus, the significant effect of sampling time observed for actinomycete and bacterial populations during the spring was most likely not caused by the irrigation treatments. There were also no qualitative differences in the three groups of soil microflora between the irrigation treatments. Even though some fungal, actinomycete, and bacterial isolates suppressed mycelial growth of S. minor in in vitro assays, the isolates came from both subsurface drip- and furrow-irrigated soils. In in planta assays, selected isolates failed to

  1. Integrin αvβ8-Mediated TGF-β Activation by Effector Regulatory T Cells Is Essential for Suppression of T-Cell-Mediated Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthington, John J.; Kelly, Aoife; Smedley, Catherine; Bauché, David; Campbell, Simon; Marie, Julien C.; Travis, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Regulatory T (Treg) cells play a pivotal role in suppressing self-harmful T cell responses, but how Treg cells mediate suppression to maintain immune homeostasis and limit responses during inflammation is unclear. Here we show that effector Treg cells express high amounts of the integrin αvβ8, which enables them to activate latent transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). Treg-cell-specific deletion of integrin αvβ8 did not result in a spontaneous inflammatory phenotype, suggesting that this pathway is not important in Treg-cell-mediated maintenance of immune homeostasis. However, Treg cells lacking expression of integrin αvβ8 were unable to suppress pathogenic T cell responses during active inflammation. Thus, our results identify a mechanism by which Treg cells suppress exuberant immune responses, highlighting a key role for effector Treg-cell-mediated activation of latent TGF-β in suppression of self-harmful T cell responses during active inflammation. PMID:25979421

  2. Mulberroside A suppresses PXR-mediated transactivation and gene expression of P-gp in LS174T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuhua; Huang, Ling; Sun, Jiahong; Wei, Xiaohua; Wen, Jinhua; Zhong, Guoping; Huang, Min; Bi, Huichang

    2016-12-05

    Mulberroside A (Mul A) is the main bioactive constituents of Sangbaipi, which is officially listed in the Chinese Pharmacopoeia. The pregnane X receptor (PXR) has been recognized as the critical mediator of human P-glycoprotein (P-gp) gene transactivation. In this study, the effect of Mul A on PXR-mediated transactivation and gene expression of P-gp was investigated. It was found that Mul A significantly suppressed PXR-mediated P-gp luciferase activity induced by rifampicin (Rif). Furthermore, Rif induced an elevation of P-gp expression and transport activity, which was apparently suppressed by Mul A. However, Mul A did not suppress the P-gp luciferase activity, P-gp expression, and function in the absence of Rif. These findings suggest that Mul A suppresses PXR-mediated transactivation and P-gp expression induced by Rif. This should be taken into consideration to predict any potential herb-drug interactions when Mul A or Sangbaipi are co-administered with Rif or other PXR agonist drugs.

  3. Fcgamma receptor-mediated suppression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication in primary human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Bercoff, Danielle; David, Annie; Sudry, Hugues; Barré-Sinoussi, Françoise; Pancino, Gianfranco

    2003-04-01

    Permissiveness of monocytes and macrophages to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is modulated by various stimuli. In this study we demonstrate that stimulation of primary monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) through the receptors for the Fc portion of immunoglobulin G (IgG) (FcgammaR) inhibits HIV type 1 (HIV-1) replication. Viral p24 production was decreased by 1.5 to 3 log units in MDM infected with both R5 and X4 HIV-1 strains upon stimulation by immobilized IgG but not upon stimulation by soluble IgG or by F(ab')(2) IgG fragments. Although MDM activation by immobilized IgG induced high levels of macrophage-derived chemokine secretion as well as a sustained down-regulation of CD4 and a transient decrease in CCR5 expression, these factors did not appear to play a major role in the suppression of HIV-1 replication. Single-cycle infection of FcgammaR-stimulated MDM with HIV-1 virions pseudotyped with either HIV-1 R5 or vesicular stomatitis virus G envelopes was inhibited, suggesting a postentry restriction of viral replication. PCR analyses of HIV-1 DNA intermediate replication forms suggested that reverse transcription is not affected by stimulation with immobilized human IgG, at least during the first replication cycle. The accumulation of PCR products corresponding to nuclear unintegrated two-long-terminal-repeat circles and the relative decrease of integrated HIV-1 DNA signals suggest an inhibition of proviral integration. Our data, showing that FcgammaR-mediated activation of MDM is a potent mechanism of HIV-1 suppression, raise the possibility that FcgammaR cross-linking by immune complexes may contribute to the control of viral replication in macrophages.

  4. Type I neuregulin1α is a novel local mediator to suppress hepatic gluconeogenesis in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Takatomo; Ono, Yumika; Arimura, Yujiro; Sayama, Keimon; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Shinjo, Satoko; Kanai, Mai; Abe, Shin-ichi; Semba, Kentaro; Goda, Nobuhito

    2017-01-01

    Neuregulin1 is an epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domain-containing protein that has multiple isoforms and functions as a local mediator in the control of various cellular functions. Here we show that type I isoform of neuregulin1 with an α-type EGF-like domain (Nrg1α) is the major isoform in mouse liver and regulates hepatic glucose production. Forced expression of Nrg1α in mouse liver enhanced systemic glucose disposal and decreased hepatic glucose production with reduced fasting blood glucose levels. Nuclear forkhead box protein O1 (FoxO1) and its downstream targets, PEPCK and G6Pase, were suppressed in liver and isolated hepatocytes by Nrg1α overexpression. In contrast, silencing of Nrg1α enhanced glucose production with increased PEPCK and G6Pase expressions in cAMP/dexamethasone-stimulated hepatocytes. Mechanistically, the recombinant α-type EGF-like domain of NRG1α (rNRG1α) stimulated the ERBB3 signalling pathway in hepatocytes, resulting in decreased nuclear FoxO1 accumulation via activation of both the AKT and ERK pathways. In addition, acute treatment with rNRG1α also suppressed elevation of blood glucose levels after both glucose and pyruvate challenge. Although a liver-specific deletion of Nrg1 gene in mice showed little effect on systemic glucose metabolism, these results suggest that NRG1α have a novel regulatory function in hepatic gluconeogenesis by regulating the ERBB3-AKT/ERK-FoxO1 cascade. PMID:28218289

  5. Mechanisms of RhoGDI2 Mediated Lung Cancer Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiyan Niu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the function of RhoGDI2 in lung cancer epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT process and to illustrate the underlying mechanisms that will lead to improvement of lung cancer treatment. Methods: The RhoGDI2 knock-down and overexpressing A549 cell lines were first constructed. The influence of RhoGDI2 on cytoskeleton in A549 cells was studied using two approaches: G-LISA-based Rac1 activity measurement and immunostaining-based F-actin distribution. The expression levels of key EMT genes were analyzed using real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR, western blot and immunostaining in untreated and RhoGDI2 knock-down or overexpressing A549 cells in both in vivo and in vitro experimental settings. Results: Our study showed that the activity of Rac1, a key gene that is crucial for the initiation and metastasis of human lung adenocarcinoma, causing the redistribution of F-actin with partial loss of cell-cell adhesions and stress fibers, was significantly suppressed by RhoGDI2. RhoGDI2 promoted the expression of EMT marker gene E-cadherin and repressed EMT promoting genes Slug, Snail, α-SMA in both A549 cells and lung and liver organs derived from the mouse models. Knocking-down RhoGDI2 induced abnormal morphology for lung organs. Conclusion: These findings indicate that RhoGDI2 repressed the activity of Rac1 and may be involved in the rearrangement of cytoskeleton in lung cancer cells. RhoGDI2 suppresses the metastasis of lung cancer mediated through EMT by regulating the expression of key genes such as E-cadherin, Slug, Snail and α-SMA in both in vivo and in vitro models.

  6. Myo9b is a key player in SLIT/ROBO-mediated lung tumor suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ruirui; Yi, Fengshuang; Wen, Pushuai; Liu, Jianghong; Chen, Xiaoping; Ren, Jinqi; Li, Xiaofei; Shang, Yulong; Nie, Yongzhan; Wu, Kaichun; Fan, Daiming; Zhu, Li; Feng, Wei; Wu, Jane Y

    2015-11-03

    Emerging evidence indicates that the neuronal guidance molecule SLIT plays a role in tumor suppression, as SLIT-encoding genes are inactivated in several types of cancer, including lung cancer; however, it is not clear how SLIT functions in lung cancer. Here, our data show that SLIT inhibits cancer cell migration by activating RhoA and that myosin 9b (Myo9b) is a ROBO-interacting protein that suppresses RhoA activity in lung cancer cells. Structural analyses revealed that the RhoGAP domain of Myo9b contains a unique patch that specifically recognizes RhoA. We also determined that the ROBO intracellular domain interacts with the Myo9b RhoGAP domain and inhibits its activity; therefore, SLIT-dependent activation of RhoA is mediated by ROBO inhibition of Myo9b. In a murine model, compared with control lung cancer cells, SLIT-expressing cells had a decreased capacity for tumor formation and lung metastasis. Evaluation of human lung cancer and adjacent nontumor tissues revealed that Myo9b is upregulated in the cancer tissue. Moreover, elevated Myo9b expression was associated with lung cancer progression and poor prognosis. Together, our data identify Myo9b as a key player in lung cancer and as a ROBO-interacting protein in what is, to the best of our knowledge, a newly defined SLIT/ROBO/Myo9b/RhoA signaling pathway that restricts lung cancer progression and metastasis. Additionally, our work suggests that targeting the SLIT/ROBO/Myo9b/RhoA pathway has potential as a diagnostic and therapeutic strategy for lung cancer.

  7. Obesity Suppresses Estrogen Receptor Beta Expression in Breast Cancer Cells via a HER2-Mediated Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Laura W; Wiese, Megan; Brenner, Andrew J; Rossi, Emily L; Tekmal, Rajeshwar R; Hursting, Stephen D; deGraffenried, Linda A

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is associated with a worse breast cancer prognosis, while greater breast tumor estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) expression is correlated with improved therapy response and survival. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of obesity on breast cancer cell ERβ expression, which is currently unknown. We utilized an in vitro model of obesity in which breast cancer cells were exposed to patient serum pooled by body mass index category (obese (OB): ≥30 kg/m2; normal weight (N): 18.5-24.9 kg/m2). Four human mammary tumor cell lines representing the major breast cancer subtypes (SKBR3, MCF-7, ZR75, MDA-MB-231) and mammary tumor cells from MMTV-neu mice were used. ERβ expression, assessed by qPCR and western blotting, was suppressed in the two HER2-overexpressing cell lines (SKBR3, MMTV-neu) following OB versus N sera exposure, but did not vary in the other cell lines. Expression of Bcl-2 and cyclin D1, two genes negatively regulated by ERβ, was elevated in SKBR3 cells following exposure to OB versus N sera, but this difference was eliminated when the ERβ gene was silenced with siRNA. Herceptin, a HER2 antagonist, and siRNA to HER2 were used to evaluate the role of HER2 in sera-induced ERβ modulation. SKBR3 cell treatment with OB sera plus Herceptin increased ERβ expression three-fold. Similar results were obtained when HER2 expression was silenced with siRNA. OB sera also promoted greater SKBR3 cell viability and growth, but this variance was not present when ERβ was silenced or the cells were modified to overexpress ERβ. Based on this data, we conclude that obesity-associated systemic factors suppress ERβ expression in breast cancer cells via a HER2-mediated pathway, leading to greater cell viability and growth. Elucidation of the mechanism(s) mediating this effect could provide important insights into how ERβ expression is regulated as well as how obesity promotes a more aggressive disease.

  8. Obesity Suppresses Estrogen Receptor Beta Expression in Breast Cancer Cells via a HER2-Mediated Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura W Bowers

    Full Text Available Obesity is associated with a worse breast cancer prognosis, while greater breast tumor estrogen receptor beta (ERβ expression is correlated with improved therapy response and survival. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of obesity on breast cancer cell ERβ expression, which is currently unknown. We utilized an in vitro model of obesity in which breast cancer cells were exposed to patient serum pooled by body mass index category (obese (OB: ≥30 kg/m2; normal weight (N: 18.5-24.9 kg/m2. Four human mammary tumor cell lines representing the major breast cancer subtypes (SKBR3, MCF-7, ZR75, MDA-MB-231 and mammary tumor cells from MMTV-neu mice were used. ERβ expression, assessed by qPCR and western blotting, was suppressed in the two HER2-overexpressing cell lines (SKBR3, MMTV-neu following OB versus N sera exposure, but did not vary in the other cell lines. Expression of Bcl-2 and cyclin D1, two genes negatively regulated by ERβ, was elevated in SKBR3 cells following exposure to OB versus N sera, but this difference was eliminated when the ERβ gene was silenced with siRNA. Herceptin, a HER2 antagonist, and siRNA to HER2 were used to evaluate the role of HER2 in sera-induced ERβ modulation. SKBR3 cell treatment with OB sera plus Herceptin increased ERβ expression three-fold. Similar results were obtained when HER2 expression was silenced with siRNA. OB sera also promoted greater SKBR3 cell viability and growth, but this variance was not present when ERβ was silenced or the cells were modified to overexpress ERβ. Based on this data, we conclude that obesity-associated systemic factors suppress ERβ expression in breast cancer cells via a HER2-mediated pathway, leading to greater cell viability and growth. Elucidation of the mechanism(s mediating this effect could provide important insights into how ERβ expression is regulated as well as how obesity promotes a more aggressive disease.

  9. Suppression of APOBEC3-mediated restriction of HIV-1 by Vif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yuqing; Baig, Tayyba T; Love, Robin P; Chelico, Linda

    2014-01-01

    The APOBEC3 restriction factors are a family of deoxycytidine deaminases that are able to suppress replication of viruses with a single-stranded DNA intermediate by inducing mutagenesis and functional inactivation of the virus. Of the seven human APOBEC3 enzymes, only APOBEC3-D, -F, -G, and -H appear relevant to restriction of HIV-1 in CD4+ T cells and will be the focus of this review. The restriction of HIV-1 occurs most potently in the absence of HIV-1 Vif that induces polyubiquitination and degradation of APOBEC3 enzymes through the proteasome pathway. To restrict HIV-1, APOBEC3 enzymes must be encapsidated into budding virions. Upon infection of the target cell during reverse transcription of the HIV-1 RNA into (-)DNA, APOBEC3 enzymes deaminate cytosines to form uracils in single-stranded (-)DNA regions. Upon replication of the (-)DNA to (+)DNA, the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase incorporates adenines opposite to the uracils thereby inducing C/G to T/A mutations that can functionally inactivate HIV-1. APOBEC3G is the most studied APOBEC3 enzyme and it is known that Vif attempts to thwart APOBEC3 function not only by inducing its proteasomal degradation but also by several degradation-independent mechanisms, such as inhibiting APOBEC3G virion encapsidation, mRNA translation, and for those APOBEC3G molecules that still become virion encapsidated, Vif can inhibit APOBEC3G mutagenic activity. Although most Vif variants can induce efficient degradation of APOBEC3-D, -F, and -G, there appears to be differential sensitivity to Vif-mediated degradation for APOBEC3H. This review examines APOBEC3-mediated HIV restriction mechanisms, how Vif acts as a substrate receptor for a Cullin5 ubiquitin ligase complex to induce degradation of APOBEC3s, and the determinants and functional consequences of the APOBEC3 and Vif interaction from a biological and biochemical perspective.

  10. Suppression of APOBEC3-mediated restriction of HIV-1 by Vif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuqing eFeng

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The APOBEC3 restriction factors are a family of deoxycytidine deaminases that are able to suppress replication of viruses with a single-stranded DNA intermediate by inducing mutagenesis and functional inactivation of the virus. Of the seven human APOBEC3 enzymes, only APOBEC3-D, -F, -G, and -H appear relevant to restriction of HIV-1 in CD4+ T cells and will be the focus of this review. The restriction of HIV-1 occurs most potently in the absence of HIV-1 Vif that induces polyubiquitination and degradation of APOBEC3 enzymes through the proteasome pathway. To restrict HIV-1, APOBEC3 enzymes must be encapsidated into budding virions. Upon infection of the target cell during reverse transcription of the HIV-1 RNA into (-DNA APOBEC3 enzymes deaminate cytosines to forms uracils in single-stranded (- DNA regions. Upon replication of the (-DNA to (+DNA, the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase incorporates adenines opposite the uracils thereby inducing C/G to T/A mutations that can functionally inactivate HIV-1. APOBEC3G is the most studied APOBEC3 enzyme and it is known that Vif attempts to thwart APOBEC3 function not only by inducing its proteasomal degradation but by several degradation-independent mechanisms such as inhibiting APOBEC3G virion encapsidation, mRNA translation, and for those APOBEC3G molecules that still become virion encapsidated, Vif can inhibit APOBEC3G mutagenic activity. Although most Vif variants can induce efficient degradation of APOBEC3-D, -F, and -G, there appears to be differential sensitivity to Vif-mediated degradation for APOBEC3H. This review examines APOBEC3-mediated HIV restriction mechanisms, how Vif acts as a substrate receptor for a Cullin5 ubiquitin ligase complex to induce degradation of APOBEC3s, and the determinants and functional consequences of the APOBEC3 and Vif interaction from a biological and biochemical perspective.

  11. Conceptualizing knowledge transfer between expatriates and host country nationals: The mediating effect of social capital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maimunah Ismail

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to propose a conceptual model of knowledge transfer by relating two specific personal factors of expatriate and host country national (HCN dyads as antecedents of knowledge transfer, and mediated by social capital factors. An intensive literature review method was employed to identify and analyse relevant literatures. The paper used a dyadic bi-directional approach in theorizing knowledge transfer by integrating the social capital theory, and the anxiety and uncertainty management theory. The paper considers two personal factors (cultural intelligence and knowledge-seeking behaviour and two social capital variables (trust and shared vision as mediators of knowledge transfer. Upon model validation, the paper could offer practical interventions for human resource practitioners and managers to assist multinational corporations towards managing knowledge transfer involving expatriates and HCNs.

  12. Critical Role of Energy Transfer Between Terbium Ions for Suppression of Back Energy Transfer in Nonanuclear Terbium Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omagari, Shun; Nakanishi, Takayuki; Kitagawa, Yuichi; Seki, Tomohiro; Fushimi, Koji; Ito, Hajime; Meijerink, Andries; Hasegawa, Yasuchika

    2016-11-15

    Lanthanide (Ln(III)) complexes form an important class of highly efficient luminescent materials showing characteristic line emission after efficient light absorption by the surrounding ligands. The efficiency is however lowered by back energy transfer from Ln(III) ion to the ligands, especially at higher temperatures. Here we report a new strategy to reduce back energy transfer losses. Nonanuclear lanthanide clusters containing terbium and gadolinium ions, TbnGd9-n clusters ([TbnGd9-n(μ-OH)10(butylsalicylate)16](+)NO3(-), n = 0, 1, 2, 5, 8, 9), were synthesized to investigate the effect of energy transfer between Tb(III) ions on back energy transfer. The photophysical properties of TbnGd9-n clusters were studied by steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic techniques and revealed a longer emission lifetime with increasing number of Tb(III) ions in TbnGd9-n clusters. A kinetic analysis of temperature dependence of the emission lifetime show that the energy transfer between Tb(III) ions competes with back energy transfer. The experimental results are in agreement with a theoretical rate equation model that confirms the role of energy transfer between Tb(III) ions in reducing back energy transfer losses. The results provide a new strategy in molecular design for improving the luminescence efficiency in lanthanide complexes which is important for potential applications as luminescent materials.

  13. Horizontal RNA transfer mediates platelet-induced hepatocyte proliferation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirschbaum, Marc; Karimian, Golnar; Adelmeijer, Jelle; Giepmans, Ben N. G.; Porte, Robert J.; Lisman, Ton

    2015-01-01

    Liver regeneration is stimulated by blood platelets, but the molecular mechanisms involved are largely unexplored. Although platelets are anucleate, they do contain coding or regulatory RNAs that can be functional within the platelet or, after transfer, in other cell types. Here, we show that

  14. Suppression of angular momentum transfer in cold collisions of transition metal atoms in ground States with nonzero orbital angular momentum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancox, Cindy I; Doret, S Charles; Hummon, Matthew T; Krems, Roman V; Doyle, John M

    2005-01-14

    The Zeeman relaxation rate in cold collisions of Ti(3d(2)4s(2) 3F2) with He is measured. We find that collisional transfer of angular momentum is dramatically suppressed due to the presence of the filled 4s(2) shell. The degree of electronic interaction anisotropy, which is responsible for Zeeman relaxation, is estimated to be about 200 times smaller in the Ti-He complex than in He complexes with typical non-S-state atoms.

  15. Protein kinase C theta is dispensable for suppression mediated by CD25+CD4+ regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmund, Kerstin; Thuille, Nikolaus; Wachowicz, Katarzyna; Hermann-Kleiter, Natascha; Baier, Gottfried

    2017-01-01

    The activation of conventional T cells upon T cell receptor stimulation critically depends on protein kinase C theta (PKCθ). However, its role in regulatory T (Treg) cell function has yet to be fully elucidated. Using siRNA or the potent and PKC family-selective pharmacological inhibitor AEB071, we could show that murine Treg-mediated suppression in vitro is independent of PKCθ function. Likewise, Treg cells of PKCθ-deficient mice were fully functional, showing a similar suppressive activity as wild-type CD25+CD4+ T cells in an in vitro suppression assay. Furthermore, in vitro-differentiated wild-type and PKCθ-deficient iTreg cells showed comparable Foxp3 expression as well as suppressive activity. However, we observed a reduced percentage of Foxp3+CD25+ CD4+ T cells in the lymphatic organs of PKCθ-deficient mice. Taken together, our results suggest that while PKCθ is involved in Treg cell differentiation in vivo, it is dispensable for Treg-mediated suppression.

  16. The mediating role of absorptive capacity in knowledge transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adisa, Femi; Rose, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge transfer between consultants and organizational users influences the outcomes of an Enterprise Resource System (ERP) implementation. Configuration and implementation tasks are dependent on generating some level of shared understanding of both business practices and technology. These pro......Knowledge transfer between consultants and organizational users influences the outcomes of an Enterprise Resource System (ERP) implementation. Configuration and implementation tasks are dependent on generating some level of shared understanding of both business practices and technology....... These problems become acute in implementations in small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs). SMEs often operate with non-standard business processes, making an effective interchange of process knowledge between consultants and end-users crucial. Using a multiple case study method and content analysis......-existing related knowledge and consequent difficulties in developing a shared understanding, and by a tendency to operate with lone consultants and lone organizational representatives....

  17. Exploring student engagement and transfer in technology mediated environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Suparna

    Exploring student engagement and transfer of mechanistic reasoning skills in computer-supported learning environments by SUPARNA SINHA Dissertation Director: Cindy Hmelo-Silver Computer-supported environments designed on learning science principles aim to provide a rich learning experience for students. Students are given opportunities to collaborate, model their understanding, have access to real-time data and engage in hypotheses testing to solve authentic problems. That is to say that affordances of technologies make it possible for students to engage in mechanistic reasoning, a complex inquiry-oriented practice (Machamer, Craver & Darden, 2000; Russ et al., 2008). However, we have limited understanding of the quality of engagement fostered in these contexts. This calls for close observations of the activity systems that the students participate in. The situative perspective focuses on analyzing interactions of individuals (students) with other people, tools and materials within activity systems (Greeno, 2006). Importantly, as the central goal of education is to provide learning experiences that are useful beyond the specific conditions of initial learning, analysis of such interactions sheds light on key experiences that lead to transfer of mechanistic reasoning skills. This is made possible, as computer-supported contexts are activity systems that bring forth trends in students' engagement. From a curriculum design perspective, observing student engagement can be a useful tool to identify features of interactions (with technological tools, peers, curriculum materials) that lead to successful learning. Therefore, the purpose of the present studies is to explore the extent to which technological affordances influence students' engagement and subsequent transfer of reasoning skills. Specifically, the goal of this research is to address the following research questions: How do learners generalize understanding of mechanistic reasoning in computer

  18. Hetero-cycloreversions Mediated by Photoinduced Electron Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez Ruiz, Raul; Jiménez Molero, María Consuelo; Miranda Alonso, Miguel Ángel

    2014-01-01

    Discovered more than eight decades ago, the Diels-Alder (DA) cycloaddition (CA) remains one of the most versatile tools in synthetic organic chemistry. Hetero-DA processes are powerful methods for the synthesis of densely functionalized six-membered heterocycles, ubiquitous substructures found in natural products and bioactive compounds. These reactions frequently employ azadienes and oxadienes, but only a few groups have reported DA processes with thiadienes. The electron transfer (ET) versi...

  19. Understanding Pain and Depression in Back Pain: the Role of Catastrophizing, Help-/Hopelessness, and Thought Suppression as Potential Mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hülsebusch, Janina; Hasenbring, Monika I; Rusu, Adina C

    2016-06-01

    The cognitive mediation hypothesis describes the influence of psychological factors on the relationship between pain and depression such as cognitions of catastrophizing and help-/hopelessness. More recent research also emphasizes the role of suppression of negative thoughts and experiences such as pain. However, there is little research investigating direct and indirect effects of these contrasting cognitions. A total of 164 acute and sub-acute non-specific back pain patients participated in this study. Pain intensity, depression, and pain-related cognitions were measured using questionnaires, such as the Beck Depression Inventory and the Kiel Pain Inventory. Data were analyzed using structural equation modeling. The results of the path analysis support the hypothesis that cognitive coping strategies have a mediating effect on pain and depression. Consistent with previous research, we found that pain had no direct relation with depression. Help-/hopelessness had a direct path to depression, whereas catastrophizing had an indirect effect via increased help-/hopelessness. The current results also indicate that thought suppression mediated the relationship between pain and depression via both direct and indirect effects. Cognitive mediators, such as help-/hopelessness, catastrophizing, and thought suppression, have a significant impact on depression in patients with acute and sub-acute back pain. The current results may aid in the optimization of treatments for these patients by focusing attention toward the modification of dysfunctional cognitive pain-coping strategies.

  20. Adenovirus-mediated nitric oxide synthase gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Kathleen G; Shapiro, Richard A; Tzeng, Edith; Kibbe, Melina R

    2004-01-01

    The varied biological effects of nitric oxide (NO) have led to intense research into its diverse physiologic and pathophysiologic roles in multiple disease processes. It has been implicated in the development of altered vasomotor tone, intimal hyperplasia, atherosclerosis, impotence, host defense, and wound healing. Using the modern technologies of recombinant DNA and gene transfer using adenoviral vectors, the effects of NO derived from various NO synthase (NOS) enzymes can be studied in a variety of tissues and the therapeutic applications of NOS is possible. Such uses of NOS gene transfer have been investigated extensively in the vasculature where NO is critical to regulating vascular homeostasis. NOS gene therapy has the theoretical advantage of allowing NO delivery to be localized, thereby limiting potential adverse effects of NO. The benefits of adenoviral vectors in gene transfer include relatively high transduction efficiencies, both replicating and nonreplicating cells may be infected, and the high titers of adenovirus that can be produced. The methods described in this chapter include the cloning of the iNOS cDNA into a recombinant adenoviral vector, large-scale production of that vector AdiNOS preparation, and the use of the vector to transduce tissue in vitro and in vivo.

  1. Macrophage-mediated psoriasis can be suppressed by regulatory T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite Dantas, Rafael; Masemann, Dörthe; Schied, Tanja; Bergmeier, Vera; Vogl, Thomas; Loser, Karin; Brachvogel, Bent; Varga, Georg; Ludwig, Stephan; Wixler, Viktor

    2016-11-01

    We recently described an inducible human TNF transgenic mouse line (ihTNFtg) that develops psoriasis-like arthritis after doxycycline stimulation and analysed the pathogenesis of arthritis in detail. Here, we show that the skin phenotype of these mice is characterized by hyperproliferation and aberrant activation of keratinocytes, induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and infiltration with Th1 and Treg lymphocytes, particularly with macrophage infiltration into lesional skin, thus pointing to a psoriasis-like phenotype. To reveal the contribution of T cells and macrophages to the development of TNF-mediated psoriasis, ihTNFtg mice were crossbred into RAG1(KO) mice lacking mature T and B cells. Surprisingly, the psoriatic phenotype in the double mutants was not reduced; rather, it was enhanced. The skin showed significantly increased inflammation and in particular, increased infiltration by macrophages. Consequently, depletion of macrophages in RAG1(KO) or wild-type mice led to decreased disease severity. On the contrary, depletion of Treg cells in wild-type mice increased both psoriasis and the number of infiltrating macrophages, while adoptive transfer of Foxp3-positive cells into RAG1(KO) or wild-type mice decreased both the development of psoriasis and macrophage infiltration. Thus, we conclude that Treg lymphocytes inhibit the pro-inflammatory activity of macrophages, which are the major immune effector cells in hTNF-mediated psoriasis. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Electroporation-mediated gene transfer directly to the swine heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrave, B; Downey, H; Strange, R; Murray, L; Cinnamond, C; Lundberg, C; Israel, A; Chen, Y-J; Marshall, W; Heller, R

    2013-02-01

    In vivo gene transfer to the ischemic heart via electroporation holds promise as a potential therapeutic approach for the treatment of heart disease. In the current study, we investigated the use of in vivo electroporation for gene transfer using three different penetrating electrodes and one non-penetrating electrode. The hearts of adult male swine were exposed through a sternotomy. Eight electric pulses synchronized to the rising phase of the R wave of the electrocardiogram were administered at varying pulse widths and field strengths following an injection of either a plasmid encoding luciferase or one encoding green fluorescent protein. Four sites on the anterior wall of the left ventricle were treated. Animals were killed 48 h after injection and electroporation and gene expression was determined. Results were compared with sites in the heart that received plasmid injection but no electric pulses or were not treated. Gene expression was higher in all electroporated sites when compared with injection only sites demonstrating the robustness of this approach. Our results provide evidence that in vivo electroporation can be a safe and effective non-viral method for delivering genes to the heart, in vivo.

  3. Doping graphene films via chemically mediated charge transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishikawa Ryousuke

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Transparent conductive films (TCFs are critical components of a myriad of technologies including flat panel displays, light-emitting diodes, and solar cells. Graphene-based TCFs have attracted a lot of attention because of their high electrical conductivity, transparency, and low cost. Carrier doping of graphene would potentially improve the properties of graphene-based TCFs for practical industrial applications. However, controlling the carrier type and concentration of dopants in graphene films is challenging, especially for the synthesis of p-type films. In this article, a new method for doping graphene using the conjugated organic molecule, tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ, is described. Notably, TCNQ is well known as a powerful electron accepter and is expected to favor electron transfer from graphene into TCNQ molecules, thereby leading to p-type doping of graphene films. Small amounts of TCNQ drastically improved the resistivity without degradation of optical transparency. Our carrier doping method based on charge transfer has a huge potential for graphene-based TCFs.

  4. Roscovitine suppresses CD4+ T cells and T cell-mediated experimental uveitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zili Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: T cells are essential for the development of uveitis and other autoimmune diseases. After initial activation, CD4+ lymphocytes express the co-stimulatory molecule OX40 that plays an important role in T cell proliferation. Cyclin dependent kinase 2 (CdK2 plays a pivotal role in the cell cycle transition from G1 to S phase. In addition, recent research has implicated CdK2 in T cell activation. Thus, we sought to test the immunosuppressive effect of roscovitine, a potent CdK2 inhibitor, on CD4+ T cell activation, proliferation, and function. DESIGN AND METHODS: Mouse CD4+ T cells were activated by anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies. The expression of OX40, CD44, and CdK2 were analyzed by flow cytometry. In addition, cell cycle progression and apoptosis of control and roscovitine-treated T lymphocytes were measured by BrdU incorporation and annexin V assay, respectively. Furthermore, the immunoregulatory effect of roscovitine was evaluated in both ovalbumin-induced uveitis and experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU models. RESULTS: In this study, we found that T cell activation induced OX40 expression. Cell cycle analysis showed that more CD4+OX40+ cells entered S phase than OX40- T cells. Concurrently, CD4+OX40+ cells had a higher level of CdK2 expression. Roscovitine treatment blocked activated CD4+ cells from entering S phase. In addition, roscovitine not only reduced the viability of CD4+ lymphocytes but also suppressed T cell activation and cytokine production. Finally, roscovitine significantly attenuated the severity of T cell-dependent, OX40-enhanced uveitis. CONCLUSION: These results implicate CdK2 in OX40-augmented T cell response and expansion. Furthermore, this study suggests that roscovitine is a novel, promising, therapeutic agent for treating T cell-mediated diseases such as uveitis.

  5. Roscovitine suppresses CD4+ T cells and T cell-mediated experimental uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zili; Liu, Qi; Leskov, Konstantin S; Wu, Xiumei; Duan, Jie; Zhang, Gary L; Hall, Mark; Rosenbaum, James T

    2013-01-01

    T cells are essential for the development of uveitis and other autoimmune diseases. After initial activation, CD4+ lymphocytes express the co-stimulatory molecule OX40 that plays an important role in T cell proliferation. Cyclin dependent kinase 2 (CdK2) plays a pivotal role in the cell cycle transition from G1 to S phase. In addition, recent research has implicated CdK2 in T cell activation. Thus, we sought to test the immunosuppressive effect of roscovitine, a potent CdK2 inhibitor, on CD4+ T cell activation, proliferation, and function. Mouse CD4+ T cells were activated by anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies. The expression of OX40, CD44, and CdK2 were analyzed by flow cytometry. In addition, cell cycle progression and apoptosis of control and roscovitine-treated T lymphocytes were measured by BrdU incorporation and annexin V assay, respectively. Furthermore, the immunoregulatory effect of roscovitine was evaluated in both ovalbumin-induced uveitis and experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) models. In this study, we found that T cell activation induced OX40 expression. Cell cycle analysis showed that more CD4+OX40+ cells entered S phase than OX40- T cells. Concurrently, CD4+OX40+ cells had a higher level of CdK2 expression. Roscovitine treatment blocked activated CD4+ cells from entering S phase. In addition, roscovitine not only reduced the viability of CD4+ lymphocytes but also suppressed T cell activation and cytokine production. Finally, roscovitine significantly attenuated the severity of T cell-dependent, OX40-enhanced uveitis. These results implicate CdK2 in OX40-augmented T cell response and expansion. Furthermore, this study suggests that roscovitine is a novel, promising, therapeutic agent for treating T cell-mediated diseases such as uveitis.

  6. Neural evidence for competition-mediated suppression in the perception of a single object.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciamani, Laura; Scalf, Paige E; Peterson, Mary A

    2015-11-01

    Multiple objects compete for representation in visual cortex. Competition may also underlie the perception of a single object. Computational models implement object perception as competition between units on opposite sides of a border. The border is assigned to the winning side, which is perceived as an object (or "figure"), whereas the other side is perceived as a shapeless ground. Behavioral experiments suggest that the ground is inhibited to a degree that depends on the extent to which it competed for object status, and that this inhibition is relayed to low-level brain areas. Here, we used fMRI to assess activation for ground regions of task-irrelevant novel silhouettes presented in the left or right visual field (LVF or RVF) while participants performed a difficult task at fixation. Silhouettes were designed so that the insides would win the competition for object status. The outsides (grounds) suggested portions of familiar objects in half of the silhouettes and novel objects in the other half. Because matches to object memories affect the competition, these two types of silhouettes operationalized, respectively, high competition and low competition from the grounds. The results showed that activation corresponding to ground regions was reduced for high- versus low-competition silhouettes in V4, where receptive fields (RFs) are large enough to encompass the familiar objects in the grounds, and in V1/V2, where RFs are much smaller. These results support a theory of object perception involving competition-mediated ground suppression and feedback from higher to lower levels. This pattern of results was observed in the left hemisphere (RVF), but not in the right hemisphere (LVF). One explanation of the lateralized findings is that task-irrelevant silhouettes in the RVF captured attention, allowing us to observe these effects, whereas those in the LVF did not. Experiment 2 provided preliminary behavioral evidence consistent with this possibility.

  7. Cyclin G2 suppresses estrogen-mediated osteogenesis through inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinlan Gao

    Full Text Available Estrogen plays an important role in the maintenance of bone formation, and deficiency in the production of estrogen is directly linked to postmenopausal osteoporosis. To date, the underlying mechanisms of estrogen-mediated osteogenic differentiation are not well understood. In this study, a pluripotent mesenchymal precursor cell line C2C12 was used to induce osteogenic differentiation and subjected to detection of gene expressions or to manipulation of cyclin G2 expressions. C57BL/6 mice were used to generate bilateral ovariectomized and sham-operated mice for analysis of bone mineral density and protein expression. We identified cyclin G2, an unconventional member of cyclin, is involved in osteoblast differentiation regulated by estrogen in vivo and in vitro. In addition, the data showed that ectopic expression of cyclin G2 suppressed expression of osteoblast transcription factor Runx2 and osteogenic differentiation marker genes, as well as ALP activity and in vitro extracellular matrix mineralization. Mechanistically, Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is essential for cyclin G2 to inhibit osteogenic differentiation. To the best of our knowledge, the current study presents the first evidence that cyclin G2 serves as a negative regulator of both osteogenesis and Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Most importantly, the basal and 17β-estradiol-induced osteogenic differentiation was restored by overexpression of cyclin G2. These results taken together suggest that cyclin G2 may function as an endogenous suppressor of estrogen-induced osteogenic differentiation through inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

  8. Carbamazepine suppresses calpain-mediated autophagy impairment after ischemia/reperfusion in mouse livers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae-Sung, E-mail: Jae.Kim@surgery.ufl.edu; Wang, Jin-Hee, E-mail: jin-hee.wang@surgery.ufl.edu; Biel, Thomas G., E-mail: Thomas.Biel@surgery.ufl.edu; Kim, Do-Sung, E-mail: do-sung.kim@surgery.med.ufl.edu; Flores-Toro, Joseph A., E-mail: Joseph.Flores-Toro@surgery.ufl.edu; Vijayvargiya, Richa, E-mail: rvijayvargiya@ufl.edu; Zendejas, Ivan, E-mail: ivan.zendejas@surgery.ufl.edu; Behrns, Kevin E., E-mail: Kevin.Behrns@surgery.ufl.edu

    2013-12-15

    Onset of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) plays a causative role in ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Current therapeutic strategies for reducing reperfusion injury remain disappointing. Autophagy is a lysosome-mediated, catabolic process that timely eliminates abnormal or damaged cellular constituents and organelles such as dysfunctional mitochondria. I/R induces calcium overloading and calpain activation, leading to degradation of key autophagy-related proteins (Atg). Carbamazepine (CBZ), an FDA-approved anticonvulsant drug, has recently been reported to increase autophagy. We investigated the effects of CBZ on hepatic I/R injury. Hepatocytes and livers from male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to simulated in vitro, as well as in vivo I/R, respectively. Cell death, intracellular calcium, calpain activity, changes in autophagy-related proteins (Atg), autophagic flux, MPT and mitochondrial membrane potential after I/R were analyzed in the presence and absence of 20 μM CBZ. CBZ significantly increased hepatocyte viability after reperfusion. Confocal microscopy revealed that CBZ prevented calcium overloading, the onset of the MPT and mitochondrial depolarization. Immunoblotting and fluorometric analysis showed that CBZ blocked calpain activation, depletion of Atg7 and Beclin-1 and loss of autophagic flux after reperfusion. Intravital multiphoton imaging of anesthetized mice demonstrated that CBZ substantially reversed autophagic defects and mitochondrial dysfunction after I/R in vivo. In conclusion, CBZ prevents calcium overloading and calpain activation, which, in turn, suppresses Atg7 and Beclin-1 depletion, defective autophagy, onset of the MPT and cell death after I/R. - Highlights: • A mechanism of carbamazepine (CBZ)-induced cytoprotection in livers is proposed. • Impaired autophagy is a key event contributing to lethal reperfusion injury. • The importance of autophagy is extended and confirmed in an in vivo model. • CBZ is a potential

  9. Suppression by an RAR-γ Agonist of Collagen Degradation Mediated by Corneal Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Kazuhiro; Zhou, Hongyan; Orita, Tomoko; Kobayashi, Masaaki; Nishida, Teruo; Sonoda, Koh-Hei

    2017-04-01

    To examine the role of retinoic acid receptor (RAR) isoforms in interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-induced collagen degradation by corneal fibroblasts. Primary rabbit corneal fibroblasts embedded in a three-dimensional collagen gel were incubated with or without all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), the RAR-α agonist Am580, the RAR-β agonist AC55649, or the RAR-γ agonist R667. Collagen degradation was determined by measurement of hydroxyproline produced in acid hydrolysates of culture supernatants. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression was evaluated by immunoblot analysis and gelatin zymography. The phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and the endogenous nuclear factor (NF)-κB inhibitor IκB-α was examined by immunoblot analysis. Cell proliferation was measured with a bromodeoxyuridine incorporation assay, and cell viability was determined by measurement of the release of lactate dehydrogenase. Interleukin-1β-induced collagen degradation by corneal fibroblasts was inhibited by ATRA, Am580, and R667 in a concentration-dependent manner but was unaffected by AC55649, with the inhibitory effects of ATRA and R667 being markedly greater than that of Am580. The IL-1β-induced production of MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, and MMP-9 by corneal fibroblasts was also inhibited by R667 in a concentration-dependent manner. R667 inhibited the IL-1β-induced phosphorylation of IκB-α but not that of MAPKs. R667 had no effect on the proliferation or viability of corneal fibroblasts. The RAR-γ agonist R667 suppressed MMP production and thereby inhibited collagen degradation by corneal fibroblasts exposed to the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β. These effects of R667 may be mediated by the NF-κB signaling pathway.

  10. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascalló, Manel; Alemany, Ramon

    2004-01-01

    Cell transduction in vitro is only the first step toward proving that a genetherapy vector can be useful to treat tumors. However, tumor targeting in vivo is now the milestone for gene therapy to succeed against disseminated cancer. Therefore, most valuable information is obtained from studies of vector biodistribution. Owing to the hepatotropism of adenoviral vectors, a particularly important parameter is the tumor/liver ratio. This ratio can be given at the level of gene expression if the amount of transgene expression is measured. To optimize the targeting, however, the levels of viral particles that reach the tumor compared to other organs must be studied. Most of this chapter deals with methods to quantify the virus fate in tumor-bearing animals. We present a radioactive labeling method that can be used to study biodistribution. After a small section dealing with tumor models, we describe methods to quantify different parameters related to adenovirus-mediated tumor targeting.

  11. ELUCIDATING THE ROLE OF ELECTRON TRANSFER MEDIATORS IN REDUCTIVE TRANSFORMATIONS IN NATURAL SEDIMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    To study the identity and reactivity of electron transfer mediators (ETMs) in natural sediments, the reduction kinetics of a glass bead-azo dye complex were measured in abiotic and biotic model systems, as well as in natural sediments. In abiotic model systems, the bead-dye comp...

  12. Psychological Distress and Non-Suicidal Self-Injury: The Mediating Roles of Rumination, Cognitive Reappraisal, and Expressive Suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Sally; Hasking, Penelope; Meaney, Rebecca

    2017-01-02

    This study sought to explore the relationships between depression, anxiety, stress, and non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), and the mediating roles of rumination and emotion regulation in this relationship. The sample comprised 1,586 Australian university students who completed a self-report questionnaire assessing the relevant variables. Of the sample, 8.9% engaged in NSSI in the 4 weeks prior to the survey. Depression, anxiety, and stress each exerted a direct effect on NSSI, and each relationship was mediated by cognitive reappraisal. The relationship between stress and NSSI was also mediated by expressive suppression. The results imply intervention efforts aimed at teaching adaptive emotion regulation strategies for students experiencing high levels of psychological distress may reduce the frequency of NSSI.

  13. Schisandrin B induces an Nrf2-mediated thioredoxin expression and suppresses the activation of inflammasome in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Pou Kuan; Ko, Kam Ming

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated activation of inflammasome is involved in the development of a wide spectrum of diseases. We aimed to investigate whether (-)schisandrin B [(-)Sch B], a phytochemical that can induce cellular antioxidant response, can suppress the inflammasome activation. Results showed that (-)Sch B can induce an nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2-driven thioredoxin expression in primary peritoneal macrophages and cultured RAW264.7 macrophages. A 4-h priming of peritoneal macrophages with LPS followed by a 30-min incubation with ATP caused the activation of caspase 1 and the release of IL-1β, indicative of inflammasome activation. Although LPS/ATP did not activate inflammasome in RAW264.7 macrophages, it caused the ROS-dependent c-Jun N-terminal kinase1/2 (JNK1/2) activation and an associated lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release in RAW264.7 macrophages, an indication of cytotoxicity. (-)Sch B suppressed the LPS/ATP-induced activation of caspase 1 and release of IL-1β in peritoneal macrophages. (-)Sch B also attenuated the LPS/ATP-induced ROS production, JNK1/2 activation and LDH release in RAW264.7 macrophages. The ability of (-)Sch B to suppress LPS/ATP-mediated inflammation in vitro was further confirmed by an animal study, in which schisandrin B treatment (2 mmol/kg p.o.) ameliorated the Imject Alum-induced peritonitis, as indicated by suppressions of caspase1 activation and plasma IL-1β level. The ensemble of results suggests that (-)Sch B may offer a promising prospect for preventing the inflammasome-mediated disorders.

  14. Polyoxometalate-mediated electron transfer-oxygen transfer oxidation of cellulose and hemicellulose to synthesis gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Bidyut Bikash; Neumann, Ronny

    2014-08-01

    Terrestrial plants contain ~70% hemicellulose and cellulose that are a significant renewable bioresource with potential as an alternative to petroleum feedstock for carbon-based fuels. The efficient and selective deconstruction of carbohydrates to their basic components, carbon monoxide and hydrogen, so called synthesis gas, is an important key step towards the realization of this potential, because the formation of liquid hydrocarbon fuels from synthesis gas are known technologies. Here we show that by using a polyoxometalate as an electron transfer-oxygen transfer catalyst, carbon monoxide is formed by cleavage of all the carbon-carbon bonds through dehydration of initially formed formic acid. In this oxidation-reduction reaction, the hydrogen atoms are stored on the polyoxometalate as protons and electrons, and can be electrochemically released from the polyoxometalate as hydrogen. Together, synthesis gas is formed. In a hydrogen economy scenario, this method can also be used to convert carbon monoxide to hydrogen.

  15. Doping suppression and mobility enhancement of graphene transistors fabricated using an adhesion promoting dry transfer process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheol Shin, Woo; Hun Mun, Jeong; Yong Kim, Taek; Choi, Sung-Yool; Jin Cho, Byung, E-mail: bjcho@kaist.edu, E-mail: tskim1@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Electrical Engineering, Graphene Research Center, KAIST, 373-1 Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Taeshik; Kim, Taek-Soo, E-mail: bjcho@kaist.edu, E-mail: tskim1@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Graphene Research Center, KAIST, 373-1 Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-09

    We present the facile dry transfer of graphene synthesized via chemical vapor deposition on copper film to a functional device substrate. High quality uniform dry transfer of graphene to oxidized silicon substrate was achieved by exploiting the beneficial features of a poly(4-vinylphenol) adhesive layer involving a strong adhesion energy to graphene and negligible influence on the electronic and structural properties of graphene. The graphene field effect transistors (FETs) fabricated using the dry transfer process exhibit excellent electrical performance in terms of high FET mobility and low intrinsic doping level, which proves the feasibility of our approach in graphene-based nanoelectronics.

  16. Doping suppression and mobility enhancement of graphene transistors fabricated using an adhesion promoting dry transfer process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheol Shin, Woo; Yoon, Taeshik; Hun Mun, Jeong; Yong Kim, Taek; Choi, Sung-Yool; Kim, Taek-Soo; Jin Cho, Byung

    2013-12-01

    We present the facile dry transfer of graphene synthesized via chemical vapor deposition on copper film to a functional device substrate. High quality uniform dry transfer of graphene to oxidized silicon substrate was achieved by exploiting the beneficial features of a poly(4-vinylphenol) adhesive layer involving a strong adhesion energy to graphene and negligible influence on the electronic and structural properties of graphene. The graphene field effect transistors (FETs) fabricated using the dry transfer process exhibit excellent electrical performance in terms of high FET mobility and low intrinsic doping level, which proves the feasibility of our approach in graphene-based nanoelectronics.

  17. Isolated limb perfusion for local gene delivery: efficient and targeted adenovirus-mediated gene transfer into soft tissue sarcomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.K. de Roos; J.H.W. de Wilt (Johannes); M.E. van der Kaaden; E.R. Manusama (Eric); M.W. de Vries; A. Bout; T.L.M. ten Hagen (Timo); D. Valerio (Dinko); A.M.M. Eggermont (Alexander)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To evaluate the potential of isolated limb perfusion (ILP) for efficient and tumor-specific adenovirus-mediated gene transfer in sarcoma-bearing rats. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: A major concern in adenovirus-mediated gene therapy in cancer is the transfer of ge

  18. Fine tuning inflammation at the front door: macrophage complement receptor 3-mediates phagocytosis and immune suppression for Francisella tularensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shipan Dai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Complement receptor 3 (CR3, CD11b/CD18 is a major macrophage phagocytic receptor. The biochemical pathways through which CR3 regulates immunologic responses have not been fully characterized. Francisella tularensis is a remarkably infectious, facultative intracellular pathogen of macrophages that causes tularemia. Early evasion of the host immune response contributes to the virulence of F. tularensis and CR3 is an important receptor for its phagocytosis. Here we confirm that efficient attachment and uptake of the highly virulent Type A F. tularensis spp. tularensis strain Schu S4 by human monocyte-derived macrophages (hMDMs requires complement C3 opsonization and CR3. However, despite a>40-fold increase in uptake following C3 opsonization, Schu S4 induces limited pro-inflammatory cytokine production compared with non-opsonized Schu S4 and the low virulent F. novicida. This suggests that engagement of CR3 by opsonized Schu S4 contributes specifically to the immune suppression during and shortly following phagocytosis which we demonstrate by CD11b siRNA knockdown in hMDMs. This immune suppression is concomitant with early inhibition of ERK1/2, p38 MAPK and NF-κB activation. Furthermore, TLR2 siRNA knockdown shows that pro-inflammatory cytokine production and MAPK activation in response to non-opsonized Schu S4 depends on TLR2 signaling providing evidence that CR3-TLR2 crosstalk mediates immune suppression for opsonized Schu S4. Deletion of the CD11b cytoplasmic tail reverses the CR3-mediated decrease in ERK and p38 activation during opsonized Schu-S4 infection. The CR3-mediated signaling pathway involved in this immune suppression includes Lyn kinase and Akt activation, and increased MKP-1, which limits TLR2-mediated pro-inflammatory responses. These data indicate that while the highly virulent F. tularensis uses CR3 for efficient uptake, optimal engagement of this receptor down-regulates TLR2-dependent pro-inflammatory responses by inhibiting

  19. Suppression of Wnt signaling by Dkk1 attenuates PTH-mediated stromal cell response and new bone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jun; Liu, Minlin; Yang, Dehong; Bouxsein, Mary L; Saito, Hiroaki; Galvin, R J Sells; Kuhstoss, Stuart A; Thomas, Clare C; Schipani, Ernestina; Baron, Roland; Bringhurst, F Richard; Kronenberg, Henry M

    2010-02-03

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) suppresses Dickkopf 1 (Dkk1) expression in osteoblasts. To determine whether this suppression is essential for PTH-mediated Wnt signaling and bone formation, we examined mice that overexpress Dkk1 in osteoblasts (Dkk1 mice). Dkk1 mice were osteopenic due to abnormal osteoblast and osteoclast activity. When fed a low-calcium diet, and in two other models of hyperparathyroidism, these mice failed to develop the peritrabecular stromal cell response ("osteitis fibrosis") and new bone formation seen in wild-type mice. Despite these effects of Dkk1 overexpression, PTH still activated Wnt signaling in Dkk1 mice and in osteoblastic cells cultured from these mice. In cultured MC3T3E1 preosteoblastic cells, PTH dramatically suppressed Dkk1 expression, induced PKA-mediated phosphorylation of beta-catenin, and significantly enhanced Lef1 expression. Our findings indicate that the full actions of PTH require intact Wnt signaling but that PTH can activate the Wnt pathway despite overexpression of Dkk1.

  20. Androgen Receptor-Mediated Growth Suppression of HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR Prostate Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Chae Kim

    Full Text Available The androgen receptor (AR mediates the developmental, physiologic, and pathologic effects of androgens including 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT. However, the mechanisms whereby AR regulates growth suppression and differentiation of luminal epithelial cells in the prostate gland and proliferation of malignant versions of these cells are not well understood, though they are central to prostate development, homeostasis, and neoplasia. Here, we identify androgen-responsive genes that restrain cell cycle progression and proliferation of human prostate epithelial cell lines (HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR, and we investigate the mechanisms through which AR regulates their expression. DHT inhibited proliferation of HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR, and cell cycle analysis revealed a prolonged G1 interval. In the cell cycle, the G1/S-phase transition is initiated by the activity of cyclin D and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK complexes, which relieve growth suppression. In HPr-1AR, cyclin D1/2 and CDK4/6 mRNAs were androgen-repressed, whereas CDK inhibitor, CDKN1A, mRNA was androgen-induced. The regulation of these transcripts was AR-dependent, and involved multiple mechanisms. Similar AR-mediated down-regulation of CDK4/6 mRNAs and up-regulation of CDKN1A mRNA occurred in PC3-Lenti-AR. Further, CDK4/6 overexpression suppressed DHT-inhibited cell cycle progression and proliferation of HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR, whereas CDKN1A overexpression induced cell cycle arrest. We therefore propose that AR-mediated growth suppression of HPr-1AR involves cyclin D1 mRNA decay, transcriptional repression of cyclin D2 and CDK4/6, and transcriptional activation of CDKN1A, which serve to decrease CDK4/6 activity. AR-mediated inhibition of PC3-Lenti-AR proliferation occurs through a similar mechanism, albeit without down-regulation of cyclin D. Our findings provide insight into AR-mediated regulation of prostate epithelial cell proliferation.

  1. Orexin gene transfer into the amygdala suppresses both spontaneous and emotion-induced cataplexy in orexin-knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meng; Blanco-Centurion, Carlos; Konadhode, Roda Rani; Luan, Liju; Shiromani, Priyattam J

    2016-03-01

    Narcolepsy is a chronic sleep disorder linked to the loss of orexin-producing neurons in the hypothalamus. Cataplexy, a sudden loss of muscle tone during waking, is an important distinguishing symptom of narcolepsy and it is often triggered by strong emotions. The neural circuit underlying cataplexy attacks is not known, but is likely to involve the amygdala, a region implicated in regulating emotions. In mice models of narcolepsy, transfer of the orexin gene into surrogate neurons has been successful in ameliorating narcoleptic symptoms. However, it is not known whether this method also blocks cataplexy triggered by strong emotions. To examine this possibility, the gene encoding mouse prepro-orexin was transferred into amygdala neurons of orexin-knockout (KO) mice (rAAV-orexin; n = 8). Orexin-KO mice that did not receive gene transfer (no-rAAV; n = 7) or received only the reporter gene (rAAV-GFP; n = 7) served as controls. Three weeks later, the animal's sleep and behaviour were recorded at night (no-odour control night), followed by another recording at night in the presence of predator odour (odour night). Orexin-KO mice given the orexin gene transfer into surrogate amygdala neurons had significantly less spontaneous bouts of cataplexy, and predator odour did not induce cataplexy compared with control mice. Moreover, the mice with orexin gene transfer were awake more during the odour night. These results demonstrate that orexin gene transfer into amygdala neurons can suppress both spontaneous and emotion-induced cataplexy attacks in narcoleptic mice. It suggests that manipulating amygdala pathways is a potential strategy for treating cataplexy in narcolepsy.

  2. Genetic Interactions Reveal that Specific Defects of Chloroplast Translation are Associated with the Suppression of var2-Mediated Leaf Variegation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiayan Liu; Mengdi Zheng; Rui Wang; Ruijuan Wang; Lijun An; Steve R. Rodermel; Fei Yu

    2013-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana L. yellow variegated (var2) mutant is defective in a chloroplast FtsH family metalloprotease, AtFtsH2/VAR2, and displays an intriguing green and white leaf variegation. This unique var2-mediated leaf variegation offers a simple yet powerful tool for dissecting the genetic regulation of chloroplast development. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a new var2 suppressor gene, SUPPRESSOR OF VARIEGATION8 (SVR8), which encodes a putative chloroplast ribosomal large subunit protein, L24. Mutations in SVR8 suppress var2 leaf variegation at ambient temperature and partially suppress the cold-induced chlorosis phenotype of var2. Loss of SVR8 causes unique chloroplast rRNA processing defects, particularly the 23S-4.5S dicistronic precursor. The recovery of the major abnormal processing site in svr8 23S-4.5S precursor indicate that it does not lie in the same position where SVR8/L24 binds on the ribosome. Surprisingly, we found that the loss of a chloroplast ribosomal small subunit protein, S21, results in aberrant chloroplast rRNA processing but not suppression of var2 variegation. These findings suggest that the disruption of specific aspects of chloroplast translation, rather than a general impairment in chloroplast translation, suppress var2 variegation and the existence of complex genetic interactions in chloroplast development.

  3. Asialoglycoprotein receptor and liposome synergistically mediate the gene transfer into primary rat hepatocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李崇辉; 温守明; 翟海峰; 孙曼霁

    1999-01-01

    Gene transfer into primary rat hepatocytes was performed by employing cationic liposome as DNA carrier and the specific ligand of hepatic asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR), asialofetuin, as liver-targeting ligand. The resuits showed that asialofetuin, when added to the gene transfer complexes, could significantly increase the hepatocyte transfeetion efficiency, and alleviate the cellular toxicity of Lipofectin. Several synthetic ligands of ASGPR (galactosyl albumin) could also increase the transfection efficiency of hepatocyte like asialofetuin. It was proved that ASGPR and cationic liposome could synergistically mediate the gene transfer into primary rat hepatoeytes. This novel gene delivery system provided a safer, more simple and efficient gene transfer method for primary hepatocytes, and showed prospecting application in hepatic gene therapy.

  4. Color-Tunable Resonant Photoluminescence and Cavity-Mediated Multistep Energy Transfer Cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Daichi; Nakamura, Takashi; Braam, Daniel; Dao, Thang Duy; Ishii, Satoshi; Nagao, Tadaaki; Lorke, Axel; Nabeshima, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Yohei

    2016-07-26

    Color-tunable resonant photoluminescence (PL) was attained from polystyrene microspheres doped with a single polymorphic fluorescent dye, boron-dipyrrin (BODIPY) 1. The color of the resonant PL depends on the assembling morphology of 1 in the microspheres, which can be selectively controlled from green to red by the initial concentration of 1 in the preparation process of the microspheres. Studies on intersphere PL propagation with multicoupled microspheres, prepared by micromanipulation technique, revealed that multistep photon transfer takes place through the microspheres, accompanying energy transfer cascade with stepwise PL color change. The intersphere energy transfer cascade is direction selective, where energy donor-to-acceptor down conversion direction is only allowed. Such cavity-mediated long-distance and multistep energy transfer will be advantageous for polymer photonics device application.

  5. Progesterone Receptor Membrane Component 1 Mediates Progesterone-Induced Suppression of Oocyte Meiotic Prophase I and Primordial Folliculogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Meng; Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Yan; Feng, Lizhao; Wang, Zhengpin; Niu, Wanbo; Du, Xiaoyan; Tang, Wang; Li, Yuna; Wang, Chao; Chen, Zhenwen

    2016-11-16

    Well-timed progression of primordial folliculogenesis is essential for mammalian female fertility. Progesterone (P4) inhibits primordial follicle formation under physiological conditions; however, P4 receptor that mediates this effect and its underlying mechanisms are unclear. In this study, we used an in vitro organ culture system to show that progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1) mediated P4-induced inhibition of oocyte meiotic prophase I and primordial follicle formation. We found that membrane-impermeable BSA-conjugated P4 inhibited primordial follicle formation similar to that by P4. Interestingly, PGRMC1 and its partner serpine1 mRNA-binding protein 1 were highly expressed in oocytes in perinatal ovaries. Inhibition or RNA interference of PGRMC1 abolished the suppressive effect of P4 on follicle formation. Furthermore, P4-PGRMC1 interaction blocked oocyte meiotic progression and decreased intra-oocyte cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels in perinatal ovaries. cAMP analog dibutyryl cAMP reversed P4-PGRMC1 interaction-induced inhibition of meiotic progression and follicle formation. Thus, our results indicated that PGRMC1 mediated P4-induced suppression of oocyte meiotic progression and primordial folliculogenesis by decreasing intra-oocyte cAMP levels.

  6. Beta-catenin regulates myogenesis by relieving I-mfa-mediated suppression of myogenic regulatory factors in P19 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Weijun; Jia, Yingying; Wang, Jiyong; Tao, Donglei; Gan, Xiaoqing; Tsiokas, Leonidas; Jing, Naihe; Wu, Dianqing; Li, Lin

    2005-11-29

    Wnt/beta-catenin signaling plays a critical role in embryonic myogenesis. Here we show that, in P19 embryonic carcinoma stem cells, Wnt/beta-catenin signaling initiates the myogenic process depends on beta-catenin-mediated relief of I-mfa (inhibitor of MyoD Family a) suppression of myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs). We found that beta-catenin interacted with I-mfa and that the interaction was enhanced by Wnt3a. In addition, we found that the interaction between beta-catenin and I-mfa was able to attenuate the interaction of I-mfa with MRFs, relieve I-mfa-mediated suppression of the transcriptional activity and cytosolic sequestration of MRFs, and initiate myogenesis in a P19 myogenic model system that expresses exogenous myogenin. This work reveals a mechanism for the regulation of MRFs during myogenesis by elucidating a beta-catenin-mediated, but lymphoid enhancing factor-1/T cell factor independent, mechanism in regulation of myogenic fate specification and differentiation of P19 mouse stem cells.

  7. Exosome-mediated microRNA transfer plays a role in radiation-induced bystander effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shuai; Wang, Jufang; Ding, Nan; Hu, Wentao; Zhang, Xurui; Wang, Bing; Hua, Junrui; Wei, Wenjun; Zhu, Qiyun

    2015-01-01

    Bystander effects can be induced through cellular communication between irradiated cells and non-irradiated cells. The signals that mediate this cellular communication, such as cytokines, reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide and even microRNAs, can be transferred between cells via gap junctions or extracellular medium. We have previously reported that miR-21, a well described DDR (DNA damage response) microRNA, is involved in radiation-induced bystander effects through a medium-mediated way. However, the mechanisms of the microRNA transfer have not been elucidated in details. In the present study, it was found that exosomes isolated from irradiated conditioned medium could induce bystander effects. Furthermore, we demonstrated plenty of evidences that miR-21, which is up-regulated as a result of mimic transfection or irradiation, can be transferred from donor or irradiated cells into extracellular medium and subsequently get access to the recipient or bystander cells through exosomes to induce bystander effects. Inhibiting the miR-21 expression in advance can offset the bystander effects to some extent. From all of these results, it can be concluded that the exosome-mediated microRNA transfer plays an important role in the radiation-induced bystander effects. These findings provide new insights into the functions of microRNAs and the cellular communication between the directly irradiated cells and the non-irradiated cells.

  8. Proton-transfer mediated quenching of pyrene/indole charge-transfer states in isooctane solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altamirano, Marcela S; Bohorquez, María del Valle; Previtali, Carlos M; Chesta, Carlos A

    2008-01-31

    The fluorescence quenching of pyrene (Py) by a series of N-methyl and N-H substituted indoles was studied in isooctane at 298 K. The fluorescence quenching rate constants were evaluated by mean of steady-state and time-resolved measurements. In all cases, the quenching process involves a charge-transfer (CT) mechanism. The I(o)/I and tau(o)/tau Stern-Volmer plots obtained for the N-H indoles show a very unusual upward deviation with increasing concentration of the quenchers. This behavior is attributed to the self-quenching of the CT intermediates by the free indoles in solution. The efficiency of quenching of the polyaromatic by the N-H indoles increases abruptly in the presence of small amount of added pyridine (or propanol). A detailed analysis of the experimental data obtained in the presence of pyridine provides unambiguous evidence that the self-quenching process involves proton transfer from the CT states to indoles.

  9. Does suppression of oscillatory synchronisation mediate some of the therapeutic effects of DBS in patients with Parkinson’s disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre eEusebio

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence for exaggerated oscillatory neuronal synchronisation in patients with Parkinson’s disease. In particular, oscillations at around 20 Hz, in the so-called beta frequency band, relate to the cardinal symptoms of bradykinesia and rigidity. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus can significantly improve these motor impairments. Recent evidence has demonstrated reduction of beta oscillations concurrent with alleviation of PD motor symptoms, raising the possibility that suppression of aberrant activity may mediate the effects of DBS. Here we review the evidence supporting suppression of pathological oscillations during stimulation and discuss how this might underlie the efficacy of DBS. We also consider how beta activity may provide a feedback signal suitable for next generation closed loop and intelligent stimulators.

  10. Suppression of sustained and transient ON signals of amacrine cells by GABA is mediated by different receptor subtypes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张道启; 杨如; 杨雄里

    1999-01-01

    Intracellular recordings were made from amacrine cells in the isolated, superfused carp retina, and the effects of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on sustained and transient ON signals of these cells were studied. Exogenous GABA application partially suppressed the sustained response of ON amacrine cells, which could be completely reversed by picrotoxin (PTX), a chloride channel blocker, and by bicuculline (BCC), a specific GABA_A receptor antagonist. On the other hand, suppression by GABA of the ON response which was predominantly driven by rod signals in a certain portion of transient ON-OFF amacrine cells was completely blocked by PTX, but not by BCC, indicating that GABA_C receptors may be involved in the effect. These results suggest that GABA_A and GABA_C receptors may be respectively involved in mediating the transmission of sustained and transient signals in the carp inner retina.

  11. N-Nicotinoyl dopamine inhibits skin pigmentation by suppressing of melanosome transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bora; Hwang, Jae Sung; Kim, Hyun-Soo

    2015-12-15

    We investigated the inhibitory effects of a niacinamide derivative, N-Nicotinoyl dopamine (NND) on melanogenesis. NND inhibits melanosome transfer in a normal human melanocyte-keratinocyte co-culture system and through phagocytic ability without affecting viability of cells while it did not show inhibitory effects of tyrosinase and melanin synthesis in B16F10 mouse melanoma cells. In addition, safety of NND was verified through performing neural stem cell morphology assay. Our findings indicate that NND may potentially be used for cosmetic industry for improvement of skin whitening and therapies related with several skin disorders, and the effect of NND may be acquired via reduction of melanosome transfer.

  12. TcpM: a novel relaxase that mediates transfer of large conjugative plasmids from Clostridium perfringens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski, Jessica A; Traore, Daouda A; Bannam, Trudi L; Lyras, Dena; Whisstock, James C; Rood, Julian I

    2016-03-01

    Conjugative transfer of toxin and antibiotic resistance plasmids in Clostridium perfringens is mediated by the tcp conjugation locus. Surprisingly, neither a relaxase gene nor an origin of transfer (oriT) has been identified on these plasmids, which are typified by the 47 kb tetracycline resistance plasmid pCW3. The tcpM gene (previously called intP) encodes a potential tyrosine recombinase that was postulated to be an atypical relaxase. Mutagenesis and complementation studies showed that TcpM was required for wild-type transfer of pCW3 and that a tyrosine residue, Y259, was essential for TcpM activity, which was consistent with the need for a relaxase-mediated hydrophilic attack at the oriT site. Other catalytic residues conserved in tyrosine recombinases were not required for TcpM activity, suggesting that TcpM was not a site-specific recombinase. Mobilization studies led to the identification of the oriT site, which was located in the 391 bp intergenic region upstream of tcpM. The oriT site was localized to a 150 bp region, and gel mobility shift studies showed that TcpM could bind to this region. Based on these studies we postulate that conjugative transfer of pCW3 involves the atypical relaxase TcpM binding to and processing the oriT site to initiate plasmid transfer.

  13. Concurrent inhibition of kit- and FcepsilonRI-mediated signaling: coordinated suppression of mast cell activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bettina M; Beaven, Michael A; Iwaki, Shoko

    2008-01-01

    Although primarily required for the growth, differentiation, and survival of mast cells, Kit ligand (stem cell factor) is also required for optimal antigen-mediated mast cell activation. Therefore, concurrent inhibition of Kit- and FcepsilonRI-mediated signaling would be an attractive approach fo...

  14. Electron Transfer Mediators for Photoelectrochemical Cells Based on Cu(I Metal Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Brugnati

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The preparation and the photoelectrochemical characterization of a series of bipyridine and pyridyl-quinoline Cu(I complexes, used as electron transfer mediators in regenerative photoelectrochemical cells, are reported. The best performing mediators produced maximum IPCEs of the order of 35–40%. The J-V curves recorded under monochromatic light showed that the selected Cu(I/(II couples generated higher Vocs and fill factors compared to an equivalent I-/I3- cell, due to a decreased dark current.

  15. The reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) miniemulsion polymerization of vinyl acetate mediated by xanthate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Jiang; Qing Hua Zhang; Xiao Li Zhan; Feng Qiu Chen

    2009-01-01

    The reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) miniemulsion polymerization of vinyl acetate (VAt) mediated by methyl (methoxycarbonothioyl) sulfanyl acetate (MMSA) was carried out. The results showed that polymerizations initiated by AIBN and KPS proceeded in a controlled way. The RAFT miniemulsion polymerization of VAc initiated by KPS showed the shorter inhibition period, higher propagation rate coefficient and final conversion than those in experiment initiated by AIBN. When the monomer conversion reached 25%, the polydispersity index (PDI) of polymer became broad, which was related to chain transfer reaction in RAFT miniemulsion of VAc.

  16. Electron Transfer and Solvent-Mediated Electronic Localization in Molecular Photocatalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dohn, Asmus Ougaard; Kjær, Kasper Skov; Harlang, Tobias B.

    2016-01-01

    This work provides a detailed mechanism for electron transfer in a heterodinuclear complex designed as a model system in which to study homogeneous molecular photocatalysis. With efficient Born–Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations, we show how intermediate, charge-separated states can mediate...... the electron transfer. We observe how Jahn–Teller distortion effects play out in solution, when the molecule has energetically close-lying states, and how this distortion is averaged out in the thermal sampling. Finally, we demonstrate how the solvent helps stabilize and localize the separated charge...

  17. Electron Transfer and Solvent-Mediated Electronic Localization in Molecular Photocatalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dohn, Asmus Ougaard; Kjær, Kasper Skov; Harlang, Tobias B.

    2016-01-01

    This work provides a detailed mechanism for electron transfer in a heterodinuclear complex designed as a model system in which to study homogeneous molecular photocatalysis. With efficient Born–Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations, we show how intermediate, charge-separated states can mediate...... the electron transfer. We observe how Jahn–Teller distortion effects play out in solution, when the molecule has energetically close-lying states, and how this distortion is averaged out in the thermal sampling. Finally, we demonstrate how the solvent helps stabilize and localize the separated charge....... The information on the electronic configuration and separate states is of key importance for designing next-generation photocatalysts....

  18. Glucocorticoids Suppress CCR9-Mediated Chemotaxis, Calcium Flux, and Adhesion to MAdCAM-1 in Human T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Emily; White, Gemma E; Ferry, Helen; Huhn, Michael; Greaves, David R; Keshav, Satish

    2016-05-01

    CCR9 expressed on T lymphocytes mediates migration to the small intestine in response to a gradient of CCL25. CCL25-stimulated activation of α4β7 integrin promotes cell adherence to mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule-1 (MAdCAM-1) expressed by vascular endothelial cells of the intestine, further mediating gut-specific homing. Inflammatory bowel disease is a chronic inflammatory condition that primarily affects the gastrointestinal tract and is characterized by leukocyte infiltration. Glucocorticoids (GCs) are widely used to treat inflammatory bowel disease but their effect on intestinal leukocyte homing is not well understood. We investigated the effect of GCs on the gut-specific chemokine receptor pair, CCR9 and CCL25. Using human peripheral blood-derived T lymphocytes enriched for CCR9 by cell sorting or culturing with all-trans retinoic acid, we measured chemotaxis, intracellular calcium flux, and α4β7-mediated cell adhesion to plate-bound MAdCAM-1. Dexamethasone (DEX), a specific GC receptor agonist, significantly reduced CCR9-mediated chemotaxis and adhesion to MAdCAM-1 without affecting CCR9 surface expression. In contrast, in the same cells, DEX increased CXCR4 surface expression and CXCL12-mediated signaling and downstream functions. The effects of DEX on human primary T cells were reversed by the GC receptor antagonist mifepristone. These results demonstrate that GCs suppress CCR9-mediated chemotaxis, intracellular calcium flux, and α4β7-mediated cell adhesion in vitro, and these effects could contribute to the efficacy of GCs in treating intestinal inflammation in vivo.

  19. Suppression of human colon tumor growth by adenoviral vector-mediated NK4 expression in an athymic mouse model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Zheng Jie; Jian-Wei Wang; Jian-Guo Qu; Tao Hung

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the suppressive effects of adenoviral vector-mediated expression of NK4, an antagonist of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), on human colon cancer in an athymic mouse model to explore the possibility of applying NK4 to cancer gene therapy.METHODS: A human colon tumor model was developed by subcutaneous implantation of tumor tissue formed by LS174T cells grown in athymic mice. Fifteen tumorbearing mice were randomized into three groups (n = 5in each group) at d 3 after tumor implantation and mice were injected intratumorally with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or with recombinant adenovirus expressing β-galactosidase (Ad-LacZ) or NK4 (rvAdCMV/NK4) at a 6-d interval for total 5 injections in each mouse. Tumor sizes were measured during treatment to draw a tumor growth curve. At d 26 after the first treatment, all animals were sacrificed and the tumors were removed to immunohistochemically examine proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), microvessel density (represented by CD31), and apoptotic cells. In a separate experiment,15 additional athymic mice were employed to develop a tumor metastasis model by intraperitoneal injection(ip) of LS174T cells. These mice were randomized into 3 groups (n = 5 in each group) at d 1 after injection and were treated by ip injection of PBS, or Ad-LacZ, or rvAdCMV/NK4 at a 6-d interval for total two injections in each mouse. All animals were sacrificed at d 14 and the numbers and weights of disseminated tumors within the abdominal cavity were measured.RESULTS: Growth of human colon tumors were significantly suppressed in the athymic mice treated with rvAdCMV/NK4 (2537.4±892.3 mm3) compared to those treated by either PBS (5175.2±1228.6 mm3)or Ad-LacZ (5578.8±1955.7 mm3) (P<0.05). The tumor growth inhibition rate was as high as 51%.Immunohistochemical staining revealed a similar PCNA labeling index (75.1%±11.2% in PBS group vs 72.8%±7.6% in Ad-LacZ group vs 69.3%±9.4% in rvAdCMV/NK4 group) in all groups, but

  20. Complementary Information Derived from CRISPR Cas9 Mediated Gene Deletion and Suppression. | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    CRISPR-Cas9 provides the means to perform genome editing and facilitates loss-of-function screens. However, we and others demonstrated that expression of the Cas9 endonuclease induces a gene-independent response that correlates with the number of target sequences in the genome. An alternative approach to suppressing gene expression is to block transcription using a catalytically inactive Cas9 (dCas9). Here we directly compare genome editing by CRISPR-Cas9 (cutting, CRISPRc) and gene suppression using KRAB-dCas9 (CRISPRi) in loss-of-function screens to identify cell essential genes.

  1. The Agricultural Antibiotic Carbadox Induces Phage-mediated Gene Transfer in Salmonella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley L. Bearson

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are used for disease therapeutic or preventative effects in humans and animals, as well as for enhanced feed conversion efficiency in livestock. Antibiotics can also cause undesirable effects in microbial populations, including selection for antibiotic resistance, enhanced pathogen invasion, and stimulation of horizontal gene transfer. Carbadox is a veterinary antibiotic used in the U.S. during the starter phase of swine production for improved feed efficiency and control of swine dysentery and bacterial swine enteritis. Carbadox has been shown in vitro to induce phage-encoded Shiga toxin in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli and a phage-like element transferring antibiotic resistance genes in Brachyspira hyodysenteriae, but the effect of carbadox on prophages in other bacteria is unknown. This study examined carbadox exposure on prophage induction and genetic transfer in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, a human foodborne pathogen that frequently colonizes swine without causing disease. S. Typhimurium LT2 exposed to carbadox induced prophage production, resulting in bacterial cell lysis and release of virions that were visible by electron microscopy. Carbadox induction of phage-mediated gene transfer was confirmed by monitoring the transduction of a sodCIII::neo cassette in the Fels-1 prophage from LT2 to a recipient Salmonella strain. Furthermore, carbadox frequently induced generalized transducing phages in multidrug-resistant phage type DT104 and DT120 isolates, resulting in the transfer of chromosomal and plasmid DNA that included antibiotic resistance genes. Our research indicates that exposure of Salmonella to carbadox induces prophages that can transfer virulence and antibiotic resistance genes to susceptible bacterial hosts. Carbadox-induced, phage-mediated gene transfer could serve as a contributing factor in bacterial evolution during animal production, with prophages being a reservoir for bacterial fitness

  2. Myosin Specific-T Lymphocytes Mediated Myocardial Inflammation in Adoptive Transferred Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Zhang; Yuhua Liao; Xiang Cheng; Jing Chen; Peng Chen; Xiang Gao; Zhengjenny Zhang

    2006-01-01

    Myosin specific-T lymphocytes might mediate myocardial inflammation and remodeling after AMI. Myosinactivated or unactivated T lymphocytes in vitro were transferred into naǐve syngeneic rats, respectively. T lymphocyte infiltration and myocyte apoptosis were explored by the H&E and TUNNEL. Proteins and mRNA levels of cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α) in myocardium were determined by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. T lymphocyte infiltration was evidently observed after one week of activated T cell transfer. The expressions of cytokines were elevated markedly one week later. The myocyte apoptosis occurred after T lymphocyte infiltration in myocardium. Our findings suggest that cardiac myosin activated-T lymphocytes may mediate myocardial inflammation and remodeling.

  3. Alliance entrepreneurship and entrepreneurial orientation: the mediating effect of knowledge transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Rezazadeh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Today’s rapidly changing business environment has impelled companies to cooperate with their competitors gaining more competitive advantages by achieving win-win situation. Thereby, building alliances as one of the cooperative strategies has been adopted by many enterprises, consequently attracting great attention of numerous scholars. Nevertheless, the alliance literature seems to lack studies in the domain of entrepreneurship. Accordingly, this paper aims to extend entrepreneurship into the field of alliances highlighting two phenomenal concepts: alliance entrepreneurship and entrepreneurial orientation. Hence, the relationship between these two constructs together with the mediating role of knowledge transfer between alliance partners are investigated. We used Structural Equation Modeling with Partial Least Squares (PLS-SEM technique under two sections of measurement model and structural model assessment in order to analyze data. The results gathered from Iran’s automotive industry confirmed the positive significant impact of alliance entrepreneurship on partners’ entrepreneurial orientation and the mediating effect of knowledge transfer

  4. RGS6 Suppresses Ras-induced Cellular Transformation by Facilitating Tip60-mediated Dnmt1 Degradation and Promoting Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jie; Stewart, Adele; Maity, Biswanath; Hagen, Jussara; Fagan, Rebecca L.; Yang, Jianqi; Quelle, Dawn E.; Brenner, Charles; Fisher, Rory A.

    2014-01-01

    The RAS protooncogene plays a central role in regulation of cell proliferation, and point mutations leading to oncogenic activation of Ras occur in a large number of human cancers. Silencing of tumor suppressor genes by DNA methyltransferase 1 (Dnmt1) is essential for oncogenic cellular transformation by Ras, and Dnmt1 is over-expressed in numerous human cancers. Here we provide new evidence that the pleiotropic Regulator of G protein Signaling (RGS) family member RGS6 suppresses Ras-induced cellular transformation by facilitating Tip60-mediated degradation of Dmnt1 and promoting apoptosis. Employing mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from wild type (WT) and RGS6−/− mice, we found that oncogenic Ras induced up-regulation of RGS6, which in turn blocked Ras-induced cellular transformation. RGS6 functions to suppress cellular transformation in response to oncogenic Ras by down regulating Dnmt1 protein expression leading to inhibition of Dnmt1-mediated anti-apoptotic activity. Further experiments showed that RGS6 functions as a scaffolding protein for both Dnmt1 and Tip60 and is required for Tip60-mediated acetylation of Dnmt1 and subsequent Dnmt1 ubiquitylation and degradation. The RGS domain of RGS6, known only for its GAP activity toward Gα subunits, was sufficient to mediate Tip60 association with RGS6. This work demonstrates a novel signaling action for RGS6 in negative regulation of oncogene-induced transformation and provides new insights into our understanding of the mechanisms underlying Ras-induced oncogenic transformation and regulation of Dnmt1 expression. Importantly, these findings identify RGS6 as an essential cellular defender against oncogenic stress and a potential therapeutic target for developing new cancer treatments. PMID:23995786

  5. A PGC1α-mediated transcriptional axis suppresses melanoma metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Chi; Lim, Ji-Hong; Lee, Yoonjin; Granter, Scott R; Thomas, Ajith; Vazquez, Francisca; Widlund, Hans R; Puigserver, Pere

    2016-09-15

    Melanoma is the deadliest form of commonly encountered skin cancer because of its rapid progression towards metastasis. Although metabolic reprogramming is tightly associated with tumour progression, the effect of metabolic regulatory circuits on metastatic processes is poorly understood. PGC1α is a transcriptional coactivator that promotes mitochondrial biogenesis, protects against oxidative stress and reprograms melanoma metabolism to influence drug sensitivity and survival. Here, we provide data indicating that PGC1α suppresses melanoma metastasis, acting through a pathway distinct from that of its bioenergetic functions. Elevated PGC1α expression inversely correlates with vertical growth in human melanoma specimens. PGC1α silencing makes poorly metastatic melanoma cells highly invasive and, conversely, PGC1α reconstitution suppresses metastasis. Within populations of melanoma cells, there is a marked heterogeneity in PGC1α levels, which predicts their inherent high or low metastatic capacity. Mechanistically, PGC1α directly increases transcription of ID2, which in turn binds to and inactivates the transcription factor TCF4. Inactive TCF4 causes downregulation of metastasis-related genes, including integrins that are known to influence invasion and metastasis. Inhibition of BRAF(V600E) using vemurafenib, independently of its cytostatic effects, suppresses metastasis by acting on the PGC1α-ID2-TCF4-integrin axis. Together, our findings reveal that PGC1α maintains mitochondrial energetic metabolism and suppresses metastasis through direct regulation of parallel acting transcriptional programs. Consequently, components of these circuits define new therapeutic opportunities that may help to curb melanoma metastasis.

  6. Activated T cells sustain myeloid-derived suppressor cell-mediated immune suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinton, Laura; Solito, Samantha; Damuzzo, Vera; Francescato, Samuela; Pozzuoli, Assunta; Berizzi, Antonio; Mocellin, Simone; Rossi, Carlo Riccardo; Bronte, Vincenzo; Mandruzzato, Susanna

    2016-01-12

    The expansion of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), a suppressive population able to hamper the immune response against cancer, correlates with tumor progression and overall survival in several cancer types. We have previously shown that MDSCs can be induced in vitro from precursors present in the bone marrow and observed that these cells are able to actively proliferate in the presence of activated T cells, whose activation level is critical to drive the suppressive activity of MDSCs. Here we investigated at molecular level the mechanisms involved in the interplay between MDSCs and activated T cells. We found that activated T cells secrete IL-10 following interaction with MDSCs which, in turn, activates STAT3 phosphorylation on MDSCs then leading to B7-H1 expression. We also demonstrated that B7-H1+ MDSCs are responsible for immune suppression through a mechanism involving ARG-1 and IDO expression. Finally, we show that the expression of ligands B7-H1 and MHC class II both on in vitro-induced MDSCs and on MDSCs in the tumor microenvironment of cancer patients is paralleled by an increased expression of their respective receptors PD-1 and LAG-3 on T cells, two inhibitory molecules associated with T cell dysfunction. These findings highlight key molecules and interactions responsible for the extensive cross-talk between MDSCs and activated T cells that are at the basis of immune suppression.

  7. Genetic analysis of transgenome structure and size of chromosome—mediated gene transfer lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUWeIMING

    1992-01-01

    The TK-selected chromosome-mediate gene transfer lines were analysed using DNA dot blot method G-11 banding and in situ hybridization.The results showed that CMGT can provide a wide variety of intermediate size of the transgenome from greater than 80,000kb to less than 2,000kb,Some of transfectants are intergrated into mouse chromosome which can be detected by G-11 banding and in situ hybridization.

  8. Trichostatin A Modulates Thiazolidinedione-Mediated Suppression of Tumor Necrosis Factor α-Induced Lipolysis in 3T3-L1 Adipocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Juu-Chin; Chang, Yu-Tzu; Wang, Chih-Tien; Lin, Yu-Chun; Lin, Chun-Ken; Wu, Zhong-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    In obesity, high levels of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) stimulate lipolysis in adipocytes, leading to hyperlipidemia and insulin resistance. Thiazolidinediones (TZDs), the insulin-sensitizing drugs, antagonize TNFα-induced lipolysis in adipocytes, thereby increasing insulin sensitivity in diabetes patients. The cellular target of TZDs is peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), a nuclear receptor that controls many adipocyte functions. As a transcription factor, PPARγ is closely modulated by coregulators, which include coactivators and corepressors. Previous studies have revealed that in macrophages, the insulin-sensitizing effect of PPARγ may involve suppression of proinflammatory gene expression by recruiting the corepressor complex that contains corepressors and histone deacetylases (HDACs). Therefore, we investigated whether the corepressor complex is involved in TZD-mediated suppression of TNFα-induced lipolysis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Trichostatin A (TSA), a pan HDAC inhibitor (HDACI) that inhibits class I and II HDACs, was used to examine the involvement of HDACs in the actions of TZDs. TSA alone increased basal lipolysis and attenuated TZD-mediated suppression of TNFα-induced lipolysis. Increased basal lipolysis may in part result from class I HDAC inhibition because selective class I HDACI treatment had similar results. However, attenuation of TZD-mediated TNFα antagonism may be specific to TSA and related hydroxamate-based HDACI rather than to HDAC inhibition. Consistently, corepressor depletion did not affect TZD-mediated suppression. Interestingly, TSA treatment greatly reduced PPARγ levels in differentiated adipocytes. Finally, extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) mediated TNFα-induced lipolysis, and TZDs suppressed TNFα-induced ERK phosphorylation. We determined that TSA increased basal ERK phosphorylation, and attenuated TZD-mediated suppression of TNFα-induced ERK phosphorylation, consistent with TSA

  9. Trichostatin A modulates thiazolidinedione-mediated suppression of tumor necrosis factor α-induced lipolysis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Juu-Chin; Chang, Yu-Tzu; Wang, Chih-Tien; Lin, Yu-Chun; Lin, Chun-Ken; Wu, Zhong-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    In obesity, high levels of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) stimulate lipolysis in adipocytes, leading to hyperlipidemia and insulin resistance. Thiazolidinediones (TZDs), the insulin-sensitizing drugs, antagonize TNFα-induced lipolysis in adipocytes, thereby increasing insulin sensitivity in diabetes patients. The cellular target of TZDs is peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), a nuclear receptor that controls many adipocyte functions. As a transcription factor, PPARγ is closely modulated by coregulators, which include coactivators and corepressors. Previous studies have revealed that in macrophages, the insulin-sensitizing effect of PPARγ may involve suppression of proinflammatory gene expression by recruiting the corepressor complex that contains corepressors and histone deacetylases (HDACs). Therefore, we investigated whether the corepressor complex is involved in TZD-mediated suppression of TNFα-induced lipolysis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Trichostatin A (TSA), a pan HDAC inhibitor (HDACI) that inhibits class I and II HDACs, was used to examine the involvement of HDACs in the actions of TZDs. TSA alone increased basal lipolysis and attenuated TZD-mediated suppression of TNFα-induced lipolysis. Increased basal lipolysis may in part result from class I HDAC inhibition because selective class I HDACI treatment had similar results. However, attenuation of TZD-mediated TNFα antagonism may be specific to TSA and related hydroxamate-based HDACI rather than to HDAC inhibition. Consistently, corepressor depletion did not affect TZD-mediated suppression. Interestingly, TSA treatment greatly reduced PPARγ levels in differentiated adipocytes. Finally, extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) mediated TNFα-induced lipolysis, and TZDs suppressed TNFα-induced ERK phosphorylation. We determined that TSA increased basal ERK phosphorylation, and attenuated TZD-mediated suppression of TNFα-induced ERK phosphorylation, consistent with TSA's effects

  10. Trichostatin A modulates thiazolidinedione-mediated suppression of tumor necrosis factor α-induced lipolysis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juu-Chin Lu

    Full Text Available In obesity, high levels of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα stimulate lipolysis in adipocytes, leading to hyperlipidemia and insulin resistance. Thiazolidinediones (TZDs, the insulin-sensitizing drugs, antagonize TNFα-induced lipolysis in adipocytes, thereby increasing insulin sensitivity in diabetes patients. The cellular target of TZDs is peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ, a nuclear receptor that controls many adipocyte functions. As a transcription factor, PPARγ is closely modulated by coregulators, which include coactivators and corepressors. Previous studies have revealed that in macrophages, the insulin-sensitizing effect of PPARγ may involve suppression of proinflammatory gene expression by recruiting the corepressor complex that contains corepressors and histone deacetylases (HDACs. Therefore, we investigated whether the corepressor complex is involved in TZD-mediated suppression of TNFα-induced lipolysis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Trichostatin A (TSA, a pan HDAC inhibitor (HDACI that inhibits class I and II HDACs, was used to examine the involvement of HDACs in the actions of TZDs. TSA alone increased basal lipolysis and attenuated TZD-mediated suppression of TNFα-induced lipolysis. Increased basal lipolysis may in part result from class I HDAC inhibition because selective class I HDACI treatment had similar results. However, attenuation of TZD-mediated TNFα antagonism may be specific to TSA and related hydroxamate-based HDACI rather than to HDAC inhibition. Consistently, corepressor depletion did not affect TZD-mediated suppression. Interestingly, TSA treatment greatly reduced PPARγ levels in differentiated adipocytes. Finally, extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 mediated TNFα-induced lipolysis, and TZDs suppressed TNFα-induced ERK phosphorylation. We determined that TSA increased basal ERK phosphorylation, and attenuated TZD-mediated suppression of TNFα-induced ERK phosphorylation, consistent with

  11. Sleeping Beauty-Mediated Drug Resistance Gene Transfer in Human Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, Kendra A.; Olson, Erik R.; McIvor, R. Scott

    2015-01-01

    The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system can insert sequences into mammalian chromosomes, supporting long-term expression of both reporter and therapeutic genes. Hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) are an ideal therapeutic gene transfer target as they are used in therapy for a variety of hematologic and metabolic conditions. As successful SB-mediated gene transfer into human CD34+ HPCs has been reported by several laboratories, we sought to extend these studies to the introduction of a therapeutic gene conferring resistance to methotrexate (MTX), potentially providing a chemoprotective effect after engraftment. SB-mediated transposition of hematopoietic progenitors, using a transposon encoding an L22Y variant dihydrofolate reductase fused to green fluorescent protein, conferred resistance to methotrexate and dipyridamole, a nucleoside transport inhibitor that tightens MTX selection conditions, as assessed by in vitro hematopoietic colony formation. Transposition of individual transgenes was confirmed by sequence analysis of transposon–chromosome junctions recovered by linear amplification-mediated PCR. These studies demonstrate the potential of SB-mediated transposition of HPCs for expression of drug resistance genes for selective and chemoprotective applications. PMID:26176276

  12. Focal Adhesion Kinase-mediated Phosphorylation of Beclin1 Protein Suppresses Cardiomyocyte Autophagy and Initiates Hypertrophic Growth*♦

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhaokang; Zhu, Qiang; Dee, Rachel; Opheim, Zachary; Mack, Christopher P.; Cyr, Douglas M.; Taylor, Joan M.

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved intracellular degradation/recycling system that is essential for cellular homeostasis but is dysregulated in a number of diseases, including myocardial hypertrophy. Although it is clear that limiting or accelerating autophagic flux can result in pathological cardiac remodeling, the physiological signaling pathways that fine-tune cardiac autophagy are poorly understood. Herein, we demonstrated that stimulation of cardiomyocytes with phenylephrine (PE), a well known hypertrophic agonist, suppresses autophagy and that activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is necessary for PE-stimulated autophagy suppression and subsequent initiation of hypertrophic growth. Mechanistically, we showed that FAK phosphorylates Beclin1, a core autophagy protein, on Tyr-233 and that this post-translational modification limits Beclin1 association with Atg14L and reduces Beclin1-dependent autophagosome formation. Remarkably, although ectopic expression of wild-type Beclin1 promoted cardiomyocyte atrophy, expression of a Y233E phosphomimetic variant of Beclin1 failed to affect cardiomyocyte size. Moreover, genetic depletion of Beclin1 attenuated PE-mediated/FAK-dependent initiation of myocyte hypertrophy in vivo. Collectively, these findings identify FAK as a novel negative regulator of Beclin1-mediated autophagy and indicate that this pathway can facilitate the promotion of compensatory hypertrophic growth. This novel mechanism to limit Beclin1 activity has important implications for treating a variety of pathologies associated with altered autophagic flux. PMID:27994061

  13. DC-SIGN plays a stronger role than DCIR in mediating HIV-1 capture and transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Wei; Li, Chang; Du, Tao; Hu, Kai; Huang, Xin; Hu, Qinxue

    2014-06-01

    The C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) expressed on dendritic cells (DCs), in particular DC-SIGN and DCIR, likely play an important role in HIV-1 early infection. Here, we systematically compared the capture and transfer capability of DC-SIGN and DCIR using a wide range of HIV-1 isolates. Our results indicated that DC-SIGN plays a stronger role than DCIR in DC-mediated HIV-1 capture and transfer. This was further strengthened by the data from transient and stable transfectants, showing that DC-SIGN had better capability, compared with DCIR in HIV-1 capture and transfer. Following constructing and analyzing a series of soluble DC-SIGN and DCIR truncates and chimeras, we demonstrated that the neck domain, but not the CRD, renders DC-SIGN higher binding affinity to gp120 likely via the formation of tetramerization. Our findings provide insights into CLR-mediated HIV-1 capture and transfer, highlighting potential targets for intervention strategies against gp120-CLR interactions.

  14. Visible Light Sensitized Production of Hydroxyl Radicals Using Fullerol as an Electron-Transfer Mediator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jonghun; Kim, Hyejin; Alvarez, Pedro J J; Lee, Jaesang; Choi, Wonyong

    2016-10-04

    Fullerenes and their derivatives are known to photosensitize the production of singlet oxygen ((1)O2), but their role in generating hydroxyl radical ((•)OH) under visible light has not been reported. Here, we demonstrate that fullerol can mediate the electron transfer from Rhodamine B dye to O2 under visible light irradiation, achieving simultaneous dye decolorization and (•)OH-induced degradation of 4-chlorophenol. The hydroxyl radical is proposed to be produced via a consecutive reduction of molecular oxygen by fullerol anion radical, which is formed through the electron transfer from the dye to the triplet state of fullerol. Mechanistic investigations using various probe reagents such as superoxide dismutase (superoxide quencher), t-butanol ((•)OH quencher), and coumarin ((•)OH probe) provided indirect evidence for the generation of (•)OH under visible light. Furthermore, spin trapping technique directly detected the oxidizing species such as (•)OH, HO2(•), and (1)O2 in the visible light irradiated solution of RhB/fullerol mixture. It was proposed that the photochemical oxidation mechanism depends on pH: (•)OH production is favored at acidic pH through fullerol-mediated sequential electron transfer while (1)O2 is generated as a main oxidant at neutral and alkaline condition through the energy-transfer process. Therefore, the photochemical oxidation can be switchable between (•)OH-driven and (1)O2-driven mechanism by a simple pH adjustment.

  15. Xanthohumol-Mediated Suppression of Notch1 Signaling Is Associated with Antitumor Activity in Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunnimalaiyaan, Selvi; Trevino, Jose; Tsai, Susan; Gamblin, T Clark; Kunnimalaiyaan, Muthusamy

    2015-06-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains a lethal disease with limited treatment options. At the time of diagnosis, approximately 80% of these patients present with unresectable tumors caused by either locally advanced lesions or progressive metastatic growth. Therefore, development of novel treatment strategies and new therapeutics is needed. Xanthohumol (XN) has emerged as a potential compound that inhibits various types of cancer, but the molecular mechanism underlying the effects of XN remains unclear. In the present study, we have assessed the efficacy of XN on pancreatic cancer cell lines (AsPC-1, PANC-1, L3.6pl, MiaPaCa-2, 512, and 651) against cell growth in real time and using colony-forming assays. Treatment with XN resulted in reduction in cellular proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The growth suppression effect of XN in pancreatic cancer cell lines is due to increased apoptosis via the inhibition of the Notch1 signaling pathway, as evidenced by reduction in Notch1, HES-1, and survivin both at mRNA as well as protein levels. Notch1 promoter reporter analysis after XN treatment indicated that XN downregulates Notch promoter activity. Importantly, overexpression of active Notch1 in XN-treated pancreatic cancer cells resulted in negation of growth suppression. Taken together, these findings demonstrate, for the first time, that the growth suppressive effect of XN in pancreatic cancer cells is mainly mediated by Notch1 reduction.

  16. Laricitrin ameliorates lung cancer-mediated dendritic cell suppression by inhibiting signal transducer and activator of transcription 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wei-An; Hung, Jen-Yu; Jian, Shu-Fang; Lin, Yi-Shiuan; Wu, Cheng-Ying; Hsu, Ya-Ling; Kuo, Po-Lin

    2016-12-20

    Natural polyphenolic compounds of grapes and their seeds are thought to be therapeutic adjuvants in a variety of diseases, including cancer prevention. This study was carried out to investigate the effect of grape phenolic compounds on the regulation of cancer-mediated immune suppression. Laricitrin exhibits the greatest potential to ameliorate the suppressive effects of lung cancer on dendritic cells' (DCs') differentiation, maturation and function. Human lung cancer A549 and CL1-5 cells change the phenotype of DCs that express to high levels of IL-10 and prime T cells towards an immune suppression type-2 response (Th2). Laricitrin treatment stimulated DC differentiation and maturation in the condition media of cancer cells, a finding supported by monocyte marker CD14's disappearance and DC marker CD1a's upregulation. Laricitrin decreases expression of IL-10 in cancer-conditioned DCs, and subsequently switches CD4+ T cell response from Th2 to Th1 in vitro and in vivo. Reversal of laricitrin on lung cancer-induced DCs' paralysis was via inhibiting the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). Laricitrin also potentiated the anticancer activity of cisplatin in mouse models. Thus, laricitrin could be an efficacious immunoadjuvant and have a synergistic effect when combined with chemotherapy.

  17. Amber suppression in Escherichia coli by unusual mitochondria-like transfer RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdeau, V; Steinberg, S V; Ferbeyre, G; Emond, R; Cermakian, N; Cedergren, R

    1998-02-17

    The "cloverleaf" base-pairing pattern was established as the structural paradigm of active tRNA species some 30 years ago. Nevertheless, this pattern does not accommodate the folding of certain mitochondrial tRNAs. For these recalcitrant tRNAs, we have proposed structures having from 5 to 10 base pairs in the anticodon stem rather than the canonical 6. The absence of these types of tRNAs in cytoplasmic translation systems, however, raises the possibility that they may not be bona fide alternate folding patterns for active tRNA molecules. For this reason, we have designed new tRNA genes based on our model of unusual mitochondrial tRNAs, having 7, 8, 9, and 10 base pairs in the anticodon stem with other modifications to the D-stem and connector regions. We show here that these synthetic genes produce tRNAs that actively suppress amber codons in vivo.

  18. Internal Stark effect mediates intramolecular excited-state proton transfer in 3-hydroxyflavone derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klymchenko, Andriy S.; Demchenko, Alexander P.

    2002-12-01

    Internal Stark effect in electronic spectra is the effect that is observed when the electronic bands shift udner the influence of promixal charges. In order to study the possible involvement of this effect in modulating the intramolecular proton transfer reactions in the excited state, we designed and studied several derivatives of 3-hydroxyflavone. They include the species containing neutral and positively charged substituents in 6 position of chromone ring. These compounds were studied in solvents of different polarities. In these experiments the shifts of both normal and tautomer flurosence bands are clearly observed in a manner predicted by Stark effect theory. In addition, a dramatic effect of suppression by introduced charge of intramolecular excited-state proton transfer was observed.

  19. Protocatechuic aldehyde attenuates cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury by suppressing Nox-mediated oxidative stress and renal inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Gao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is a classic chemotherapeutic agent widely used to treat different types of cancers including ovarian, head and neck, testicular and uterine cervical carcinomas. However, cisplatin induces acute kidney injury by directly triggering an excessive inflammatory response, oxidative stress and programmed cell death of renal tubular epithelial cells. All of which lead to higher mortality rates in patients. In this study we examined the protective effect of protocatechuic aldehyde (PA in vitro in cisplatin-treated tubular epithelial cells and in vivo in cisplatin nephropathy. PA is a monomer of Traditional Chinese Medicine isolated from the root of S. miltiorrhiza. Results show that PA prevented cisplatin-induced decline of renal function and histological damage, which was confirmed by attenuation of KIM1 in both mRNA and protein levels. Moreover, PA reduced renal inflammation by suppressing oxidative stress and programmed cell death in response to cisplatin, which was further evidenced by in vitro data. Of note, PA suppressed NAPDH oxidases, including Nox2 and Nox4, in a dosage-dependent manner. Moreover, silencing Nox4, but not Nox2, removed the inhibitory effect of PA on cisplatin-induced renal injury, indicating that Nox4 may play a pivotal role in mediating the protective effect of PA in cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury. Collectively, our data indicate that PA largely blocked cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury by suppressing Nox-mediated oxidative stress and renal inflammation without compromising anti-tumor activity of cisplatin. These findings suggest that PA and its derivatives may serve as potential protective agents for cancer patients with cisplatin treatment.

  20. Hotair mediates hepatocarcinogenesis through suppressing miRNA-218 expression and activating P14 and P16 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Wei-Ming; Zhu, Xiao; Wang, Wei-Mao; Lu, Ying-Fei; Hu, Bao-Guang; Wang, Hua; Liang, Wei-Cheng; Wang, Shan-Shan; Ko, Chun-Hay; Waye, Mary Miu-Yee; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Li, Gang; Zhang, Jin-Fang

    2015-10-01

    Long non-coding RNA Hotair has been considered as a pro-oncogene in multiple cancers. Although there is emerging evidence that reveals its biological function and the association with clinical prognosis, the precise mechanism remains largely elusive. We investigated the function and mechanism of Hotair in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell models and a xenograft mouse model. The regulatory network between miR-218 and Hotair was elucidated by RNA immunoprecipitation and luciferase reporter assays. Finally, the correlation between Hotair, miR-218 and the target gene Bmi-1 were evaluated in 52 paired HCC specimens. In this study, we reported that Hotair negatively regulated miR-218 expression in HCC, which might be mediated through an EZH2-targeting-miR-218-2 promoter regulatory axis. Further investigation revealed that Hotair knockdown dramatically inhibited cell viability and induced G1-phase arrest in vitro and suppressed tumorigenicity in vivo by promoting miR-218 expression. Oncogene Bmi-1 was shown to be a functional target of miR-218, and the main downstream targets signaling, P16(Ink4a) and P14(ARF), were activated in Hotair-suppressed tumorigenesis. In primary human HCC specimens, Hotair and Bmi-1 were concordantly upregulated whereas miR-218 was downregulated in these tissues. Furthermore, Hotair was inversely associated with miR-218 expression and positively correlated with Bmi-1 expression in these clinical tissues. Hotair silence activates P16(Ink4a) and P14(ARF) signaling by enhancing miR-218 expression and suppressing Bmi-1 expression, resulting in the suppression of tumorigenesis in HCC. Copyright © 2015 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The effect of niacinamide on reducing cutaneous pigmentation and suppression of melanosome transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakozaki, T; Minwalla, L; Zhuang, J; Chhoa, M; Matsubara, A; Miyamoto, K; Greatens, A; Hillebrand, G G; Bissett, D L; Boissy, R E

    2002-07-01

    Cutaneous hyperpigmentation occurs in multiple conditions. In addition, many Asian women desire a lighter skin colour. Thus, there is a need for the development of skin lightening agents. Niacinamide is a possible candidate. To investigate the effects of niacinamide on melanogenesis in vitro and on facial hyperpigmentation and skin colour in vivo in Japanese women. Melanin production was measured in a purified mushroom tyrosinase assay, cultured melanocytes, a keratinocyte/melanocyte coculture model, and a pigmented reconstructed epidermis (PREP) model. The clinical trials included 18 subjects with hyperpigmentation who used 5% niacinamide moisturizer and vehicle moisturizer in a paired design, and 120 subjects with facial tanning who were assigned to two of three treatments: vehicle, sunscreen and 2% niacinamide + sunscreen. Changes in facial hyperpigmentation and skin colour were objectively quantified by computer analysis and visual grading of high-resolution digital images of the face. Niacinamide had no effect on the catalytic activity of mushroom tyrosinase or on melanogenesis in cultured melanocytes. However, niacinamide gave 35-68% inhibition of melanosome transfer in the coculture model and reduced cutaneous pigmentation in the PREP model. In the clinical studies, niacinamide significantly decreased hyperpigmentation and increased skin lightness compared with vehicle alone after 4 weeks of use. The data suggest niacinamide is an effective skin lightening compound that works by inhibiting melanosome transfer from melanocytes to keratinocytes.

  2. Biofuel Cells Select for Microbial Consortia That Self-Mediate Electron Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabaey, Korneel; Boon, Nico; Siciliano, Steven D.; Verhaege, Marc; Verstraete, Willy

    2004-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells hold great promise as a sustainable biotechnological solution to future energy needs. Current efforts to improve the efficiency of such fuel cells are limited by the lack of knowledge about the microbial ecology of these systems. The purposes of this study were (i) to elucidate whether a bacterial community, either suspended or attached to an electrode, can evolve in a microbial fuel cell to bring about higher power output, and (ii) to identify species responsible for the electricity generation. Enrichment by repeated transfer of a bacterial consortium harvested from the anode compartment of a biofuel cell in which glucose was used increased the output from an initial level of 0.6 W m−2 of electrode surface to a maximal level of 4.31 W m−2 (664 mV, 30.9 mA) when plain graphite electrodes were used. This result was obtained with an average loading rate of 1 g of glucose liter−1 day−1 and corresponded to 81% efficiency for electron transfer from glucose to electricity. Cyclic voltammetry indicated that the enhanced microbial consortium had either membrane-bound or excreted redox components that were not initially detected in the community. Dominant species of the enhanced culture were identified by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and culturing. The community consisted mainly of facultative anaerobic bacteria, such as Alcaligenes faecalis and Enterococcus gallinarum, which are capable of hydrogen production. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other Pseudomonas species were also isolated. For several isolates, electrochemical activity was mainly due to excreted redox mediators, and one of these mediators, pyocyanin produced by P. aeruginosa, could be characterized. Overall, the enrichment procedure, irrespective of whether only attached or suspended bacteria were examined, selected for organisms capable of mediating the electron transfer either by direct bacterial transfer or by excretion of redox components. PMID:15345423

  3. Retrovirus-Mediated Gene Transfer in Immortalization of Progenitor Hair Cell Lines in Newborn Rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yuan; ZHAI Suo-qiang; SONG Wei; GUO Wei; ZHENG Gui-liang; HU Yin-yan

    2008-01-01

    Objective To present an experimental method that allows isolation of greater epithelial ridge (GER) and lesser epithelial ridge(LER) cells from postnatal rat cochleae using a combinatorial approach of enzymatic digestion and mechanical separation and to investigate a retrovirus-mediated gene transfer technique for its possibl utility in immortalization of the GER and LER cell lines, in an effort to establish an in vitro model system of hair cell differentiation. Methods GER and LER cells were dissected from postnatal rat cochleae and immortalized by transferring the SV40 large T antigen using a retrovirus. The established cell lines were confirmed through morphology observation, immunnocytochemical staining and RT-PCR analysis. The Hathl gene was transferred into the cell lines using adenovirus-mediated techniques to explore their potential to differentiate into hair cells. Results The established cell lines were stably maintained for more than 20 passages and displayed many features similar to primary GER and LER cells. They grew in patches and assumed a polygonal morphology. Immunostaining showed labeling by SV40 large T antigen and Islet1 (a specific marker for GER and LER). All passages of the cell lines expressed SV40 large T antigen on RT-PCR analysis. The cells also showed the capability to differenti-ate into hair cell-like cells when forced to express Hathl. Conclusion Retrovirus-mediated gene transfer can be used in establishing immortalized progenitor hair cell lines in newborn rat, which may provide an invaluable system for studying hair cell differentiation and regeneration for new treatment of sensory hearing loss caused by hair cell loss.

  4. IL-4 confers resistance to IL-27-mediated suppression on CD4+ T cells by impairing STAT1 signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhihong; Wang, Shanze; Erekosima, Nkiruka; Li, Yapeng; Hong, Jessie; Qi, Xiaopeng; Merkel, Patricia; Nagabhushanam, Vijaya; Choo, Eugene; Katial, Rohit; Alam, Rafeul; Trikha, Anita; Chu, HongWei; Zhuang, Yonghua; Jin, Meiling; Bai, Chunxue; Huang, Hua

    2013-01-01

    Background Th2 cells play a critical role in the pathogenesis of allergic asthma. Established Th2 cells have been shown to resist reprogramming into Th1 cells. The inherent stability of Th2 cells poses a significant barrier to treating allergic diseases. Objective We sought to understand the mechanisms by which CD4+ T cells from asthmatic patients resist the IL-27-mediated inhibition. Methods We isolated and cultured CD4+ T cells from both healthy individuals and allergic asthmatic patients in order to test whether IL-27 can inhibit IL-4 production by the cultured CD4+ T cells using ELISA. Culturing conditions that resulted in resistance to IL-27 were determined using both murine and human CD4+ T cell culture systems. STAT1 phosphorylation was analyzed by Western blot and flow cytometry. Suppressor of cytokine signaling (Socs) mRNA expression was measured by quantitative PCR. The small interfering RNA method was used to knockdown the expression of Socs3 mRNA. Main Results We demonstrated that CD4+ T cells from asthmatic patients resisted the suppression of IL-4 production mediated by IL-27. We observed that repeated exposure to Th2-inducing conditions rendered healthy human CD4+ T cells resistant to IL-27-mediated inhibition. Using an in vitro murine culture system, we further demonstrated that repeated or higher doses of IL-4 stimulation, but not IL-2 stimulation, upregulated Socs3 mRNA expression and impaired IL-27-induced STAT1 phosphorylation. The Knockdown of Socs3 mRNA expression restored IL-27-induced STAT1 phosphorylation and IL-27-mediated inhibition of IL-4-production. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that differentiated Th2 cells can resist IL-27-induced reprogramming toward Th1 cells by downregulating STAT1 phosphorylation and likely explain why the CD4+ T cells of asthmatic patients are resistant to IL-27-mediated inhibition. PMID:23958647

  5. Gene specificity of suppression of transgene-mediated insertional transcriptional activation by the chicken HS4 insulator.

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    Romain Desprat

    Full Text Available Insertional mutagenesis has emerged as a major obstacle for gene therapy based on vectors that integrate randomly in the genome. Reducing the genotoxicity of genomic viral integration can, in first approximation, be equated with reducing the risk of oncogene activation, at least in the case of therapeutic payloads that have no known oncogenic potential, such as the globin genes. An attractive solution to the problem of oncogene activation is the inclusion of insulators/enhancer-blockers in the viral vectors. In this study we have used Recombinase-Mediated Cassette Exchange to characterize the effect of integration of globin therapeutic cassettes in the presence or absence of the chicken HS4 and three other putative insulators inserted near Stil, Tal1 and MAP17, three well-known cellular proto-oncogenes in the SCL/Tal1 locus. We show that insertion of a Locus Control Region-driven globin therapeutic globin transgene had a dramatic activating effect on Tal1 and Map17, the two closest genes, a minor effect on Stil, and no effect on Cyp4x1, a non-expressed gene. Of the four element tested, cHS4 was the only one that was able to suppress this transgene-mediated insertional transcriptional activation. cHS4 had a strong suppressive effect on the activation expression of Map17 but has little or no effect on expression of Tal1. The suppressive activity of cHS4 is therefore promoter specific. Importantly, the observed suppressive effect of cHS4 on Map17 activation did not depend on its intercalation between the LCR and the Map 17 promoter. Rather, presence of one or two copies of cHS4 anywhere within the transgene was sufficient to almost completely block the activation of Map17. Therefore, at this complex locus, suppression of transgene-mediated insertional transcriptional activation by cHS4 could not be adequately explained by models that predict that cHS4 can only suppress expression through an enhancer-blocking activity that requires intercalation

  6. Host plant species determines symbiotic bacterial community mediating suppression of plant defenses

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    Herbivore associated bacteria are vital mediators of plant and insect interactions. Host plants play an important role in shaping the gut bacterial community of insects. Colorado potato beetles (CPB; Leptinotarsa decemlineata) use several Solanum plants as hosts in their natural environment. We prev...

  7. E2f8 mediates tumor suppression in postnatal liver development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kent, Lindsey N.; Rakijas, Jessica B.; Pandit, Shusil K.; Westendorp, Bart; Chen, Hui Zi; Huntington, Justin T.; Tang, Xing; Bae, Sooin; Srivastava, Arunima; Senapati, Shantibhusan; Koivisto, Christopher; Martin, Chelsea K.; Cuitino, Maria C.; Perez, Miguel; Clouse, Julian M.; Chokshi, Veda; Shinde, Neelam; Kladney, Raleigh; Sun, Daokun; Perez-Castro, Antonio; Matondo, Ramadhan B.; Nantasanti, Sathidpak; Mokry, Michal; Huang, Kun; Machiraju, Raghu; Fernandez, Soledad; Rosol, Thomas J.; Coppola, Vincenzo; Pohar, Kamal S.; Pipas, James M.; Schmidt, Carl R.; De Bruin, Alain; Leone, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    E2F-mediated transcriptional repression of cell cycle-dependent gene expression is critical for the control of cellular proliferation, survival, and development. E2F signaling also interacts with transcriptional programs that are downstream of genetic predictors for cancer development, including hep

  8. E2f8 mediates tumor suppression in postnatal liver development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kent, Lindsey N.; Rakijas, Jessica B.; Pandit, Shusil K.; Westendorp, Bart; Chen, Hui Zi; Huntington, Justin T.; Tang, Xing; Bae, Sooin; Srivastava, Arunima; Senapati, Shantibhusan; Koivisto, Christopher; Martin, Chelsea K.; Cuitino, Maria C.; Perez, Miguel; Clouse, Julian M.; Chokshi, Veda; Shinde, Neelam; Kladney, Raleigh; Sun, Daokun; Perez-Castro, Antonio; Matondo, Ramadhan B.; Nantasanti, Sathidpak; Mokry, Michal; Huang, Kun; Machiraju, Raghu; Fernandez, Soledad; Rosol, Thomas J.; Coppola, Vincenzo; Pohar, Kamal S.; Pipas, James M.; Schmidt, Carl R.; De Bruin, Alain; Leone, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    E2F-mediated transcriptional repression of cell cycle–dependent gene expression is critical for the control of cellular proliferation, survival, and development. E2F signaling also interacts with transcriptional programs that are downstream of genetic predictors for cancer development, including hep

  9. A novel role for ATM in regulating proteasome-mediated protein degradation through suppression of the ISG15 conjugation pathway.

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    Laurence M Wood

    Full Text Available Ataxia Telangiectasia (A-T is an inherited immunodeficiency disorder wherein mutation of the ATM kinase is responsible for the A-T pathogenesis. Although the precise role of ATM in A-T pathogenesis is still unclear, its function in responding to DNA damage has been well established. Here we demonstrate that in addition to its role in DNA repair, ATM also regulates proteasome-mediated protein turnover through suppression of the ISG15 pathway. This conclusion is based on three major pieces of evidence: First, we demonstrate that proteasome-mediated protein degradation is impaired in A-T cells. Second, we show that the reduced protein turnover is causally linked to the elevated expression of the ubiquitin-like protein ISG15 in A-T cells. Third, we show that expression of the ISG15 is elevated in A-T cells derived from various A-T patients, as well as in brain tissues derived from the ATM knockout mice and A-T patients, suggesting that ATM negatively regulates the ISG15 pathway. Our current findings suggest for the first time that proteasome-mediated protein degradation is impaired in A-T cells due to elevated expression of the ISG15 conjugation pathway, which could contribute to progressive neurodegeneration in A-T patients.

  10. Suppression of FOXQ1 in benzyl isothiocyanate-mediated inhibition of epithelial-mesenchymal transition in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehrawat, Anuradha; Kim, Su-Hyeong; Vogt, Andreas; Singh, Shivendra V

    2013-04-01

    We showed previously that breast cancer chemoprevention with benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) in MMTV-neu mice was associated with induction of E-cadherin protein in vivo. Loss of E-cadherin expression and induction of mesenchymal markers (e.g. vimentin) are biochemical hallmarks of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a developmental process implicated in progression of cancer to aggressive state. This study offers novel insights into the mechanism by which BITC inhibits EMT. Exposure of MDA-MB-231, SUM159 and MDA-MB-468 human breast cancer cells to BITC (2.5 and 5 µM) resulted in transcriptional repression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) as well as its receptor (uPAR). However, ectopic expression of uPAR in MDA-MB-468 cells failed to confer protection against induction of E-cadherin and inhibition of cell invasion/migration resulting from BITC treatment. The BITC-mediated induction of E-cadherin and inhibition of cell migration was sustained in MDA-MB-231 and SUM159 cells transiently transfected with an uPAR-targeted small interfering RNA. Overexpression of Forkhead Box Q1 (FOXQ1), whose protein and messenger RNA levels were decreased by BITC treatment in cells and MDA-MB-231 xenografts, conferred marked protection against BITC-mediated inhibition of EMT and cell migration. In conclusion, this study implicates FOXQ1 suppression in BITC-mediated inhibition of EMT in human breast cancer cells.

  11. Combination of Nexrutine and docetaxel suppresses NFκB-mediated activation of c-FLIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yangang; Li, Li; Wang, Jingyu; Cheng, Wei; Zhang, Jiandong; Li, Xueting; Zhang, Zhenhua; Gong, Jingjing; Ghosh, Rita; Kumar, Addanki P; Xie, Jianping

    2017-10-01

    Lack of effective options following failure to conventional chemotherapeutic agent such as Docetaxel (DX) is a major clinical challenge in the management of prostate cancer. These observations underscore the need for deciphering the underlying mechanism of DX resistance to enable the development of effective therapeutic approaches. We observed up regulation of the anti-apoptotic protein c-FLIP and its up stream regulators including receptor tyrosine kinase RON and transcription factor NFκB (p65) in tumors obtained from metastatic prostate cancer patients. We also observed significant downregulation of these molecules in prostate tumors isolated from patients treated with DX as first line therapy. Further, we identified the over the counter anti-inflammatory agent, Nexrutine (NX) suppresses c-FLIP protein levels, and expression in androgen-independent prostate cancer cells (PC-3). Remarkably, the observed decreased levels of c-FLIP were further reduced in combination with DX. Transient expression assays coupled with electrophoretic mobility shift and DNA affinity protein assay revealed that NX and DX suppresses c-FLIP promoter activity by preventing p65 binding. Notably, NX in combination with DX abolished binding of p65 to the c-FLIP promoter sequence containing NFκB binding sites. Biologically, these alterations resulted in reduced growth of PC-3 cells. Taken together, these observations suggest the utility of RON, p65, and c-FLIP as potential markers to predict response to DX treatment. Furthermore, our results also identified NX as an agent to potentiate the therapeutic response of DX by suppressing activation of c-FLIP and its upstream regulators. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Fluoroquinolone induction of phage-mediated gene transfer in multidrug-resistant Salmonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearson, Bradley L; Brunelle, Brian W

    2015-08-01

    Fluoroquinolones are broad-spectrum antibiotics that inhibit bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase activity, which can cause DNA damage and result in bacterial cell death. In response to DNA damage, bacteria induce an SOS response to stimulate DNA repair. However, the SOS response may also induce prophage with production of infectious virions. Salmonella strains typically contain multiple prophages, and certain strains including phage types DT120 and DT104 contain prophage that upon induction are capable of generalised transduction. In this study, strains of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT120 and DT104 were exposed to fluoroquinolones important for use in human and veterinary disease therapy to determine whether prophage(s) are induced that could facilitate phage-mediated gene transfer. Cultures of MDR S. Typhimurium DT120 and DT104 containing a kanamycin resistance plasmid were lysed after exposure to fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin and danofloxacin). Bacterial cell lysates were able to transfer the plasmid to a recipient kanamycin-susceptible Salmonella strain by generalised transduction. In addition, exposure of DT120 to ciprofloxacin induced the recA gene of the bacterial SOS response and genes encoded in a P22-like generalised transducing prophage. This research indicates that fluoroquinolone exposure of MDR Salmonella can facilitate horizontal gene transfer, suggesting that fluoroquinolone usage in human and veterinary medicine may have unintended consequences, including the induction of phage-mediated gene transfer from MDR Salmonella. Stimulation of gene transfer following bacterial exposure to fluoroquinolones should be considered an adverse effect, and clinical decisions regarding antibiotic selection for infectious disease therapy should include this potential risk. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Suppression of adenylyl cyclase-mediated cAMP production by plasma membrane associated cytoskeletal protein 4.1G.

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    Goto, Toshihiro; Chiba, Ayano; Sukegawa, Jun; Yanagisawa, Teruyuki; Saito, Masaki; Nakahata, Norimichi

    2013-03-01

    It has been shown lately that activity of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is regulated by an array of proteins binding to carboxy (C)-terminus of GPCRs. Proteins of 4.1 family are subsets of subcortical cytoskeletal proteins and are known to stabilize cellular structures and proteins at the plasma membrane. One of the 4.1 family proteins, 4.1G has been shown to interact with the C-terminus of GPCRs and regulate intracellular distribution of the receptors, including parathyroid hormone (PTH)/PTH-related protein receptor (PTHR). PTHR is coupled to trimeric G proteins G(s) and G(q), which activate the adenylyl cyclase/cyclic AMP (cAMP) pathway and phospholipase C pathway, respectively. During the course of investigation of the role of 4.1G on adenylyl cyclase/cAMP signaling pathway, we found that 4.1G suppressed forskolin-induced cAMP production in cells. The cAMP accumulation induced by forskolin was decreased in HEK293 cells overexpressing 4.1G or increased in 4.1G-knockdown cells. Furthermore, PTH -(1-34)-stimulated cAMP production was also suppressed in the presence of exogenously expressed 4.1G despite its activity to increase the distribution of PTHR to the cell surface. In cells overexpressing FERM domain-deleted 4.1G, a mutant form of the protein deficient in plasma membrane distribution, neither forskolin-induced nor PTH -(1-34)-stimulated cAMP production was not altered. The suppression of the forskolin-induced cAMP production was observed even in membrane preparations of 4.1G-overexpressing cells. In 4.1G-knockdown HEK293 cells, plasma membrane distribution of adenylyl cyclase 6, one of the major subtypes of the enzyme in the cells, showed a slight decrease, in spite of the increased production of cAMP in those cells when stimulated by forskolin. Also, cytochalasin D treatment did not cause any influence on forskolin-induced cAMP production in HEK293 cells. These data indicate that plasma membrane-associated 4.1G regulates GPCR-mediated G(s) signaling

  14. Suppression of Salicylic Acid-Mediated Plant Defense Responses During Initial Infection of Dyer's Woad by Puccinia thlaspeos

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    Elizabeth Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Puccinia thlaspeos is a microcyclic rust pathogen that is being investigated as a potential biocontrol agent of the noxious weed, dyer’s woad (Isatis tinctoria. Although, the initial events in the colonization of dyer’s woad by the rust pathogen has been elucidated using scanning electron microscopy and PCR, little is known regarding the susceptibility response of this plant to its rust pathogen. Approach: The induction kinetics and amplitude of the Salicylic Acid (SA-responsive Pathogenesis-Related (PR genes, PR-1, â-1, 3-glucanase and ChiA in the compatible interaction between the rust pathogen Puccinia thlaspeos and dyer’s woad were examined during the first 72 h of the infection process. Furthermore SA, an inducer of plant defense response was applied to infected plants in order to reprogram the host defense response at periods that coincided with key events of the infection process. Results: PR genes were upregulated following host penetration by the pathogen. A subsequent pathogen-mediated suppression of PR genes was seen that corresponded with haustorium formation. This was followed by a second up-regulation of these genes that was, in turn, followed by a second long-term pathogen-induced suppression of the defense response that appears to allow successful infections in dyer’s woad. Exogenous application of SA to uninoculated plants led to activation of defense responses by 8 h after treatment. In treatments where inoculated plants were treated with SA, responses differed depending on the timing of SA application. Application of SA at times corresponding to the pre-haustorial and posthaustorial phases of infection triggered an up-regulation of defense genes and increased protection against the pathogen. However, the application of SA during haustorium formation could not override the pathogen-mediated suppression of defense responses and consequently, did not offer the host increased protection. Conclusion

  15. Comparison of lentiviral and sleeping beauty mediated αβ T cell receptor gene transfer.

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    Anne-Christine Field

    Full Text Available Transfer of tumour antigen-specific receptors to T cells requires efficient delivery and integration of transgenes, and currently most clinical studies are using gamma retroviral or lentiviral systems. Whilst important proof-of-principle data has been generated for both chimeric antigen receptors and αβ T cell receptors, the current platforms are costly, time-consuming and relatively inflexible. Alternative, more cost-effective, Sleeping Beauty transposon-based plasmid systems could offer a pathway to accelerated clinical testing of a more diverse repertoire of recombinant high affinity T cell receptors. Nucleofection of hyperactive SB100X transposase-mediated stable transposition of an optimised murine-human chimeric T cell receptor specific for Wilm's tumour antigen from a Sleeping Beauty transposon plasmid. Whilst transfer efficiency was lower than that mediated by lentiviral transduction, cells could be readily enriched and expanded, and mediated effective target cells lysis in vitro and in vivo. Integration sites of transposed TCR genes in primary T cells were almost randomly distributed, contrasting the predilection of lentiviral vectors for transcriptionally active sites. The results support exploitation of the Sleeping Beauty plasmid based system as a flexible and adaptable platform for accelerated, early-phase assessment of T cell receptor gene therapies.

  16. Optimal design of implants for magnetically mediated hyperthermia: A wireless power transfer approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Hans-Dieter; Sarris, Costas D.

    2017-09-01

    In magnetically mediated hyperthermia (MMH), an externally applied alternating magnetic field interacts with a mediator (such as a magnetic nanoparticle or an implant) inside the body to heat up the tissue in its proximity. Producing heat via induced currents in this manner is strikingly similar to wireless power transfer (WPT) for implants, where power is transferred from a transmitter outside of the body to an implanted receiver, in most cases via magnetic fields as well. Leveraging this analogy, a systematic method to design MMH implants for optimal heating efficiency is introduced, akin to the design of WPT systems for optimal power transfer efficiency. This paper provides analytical formulas for the achievable heating efficiency bounds as well as the optimal operating frequency and the implant material. Multiphysics simulations validate the approach and further demonstrate that optimization with respect to maximum heating efficiency is accompanied by minimizing heat delivery to healthy tissue. This is a property that is highly desirable when considering MMH as a key component or complementary method of cancer treatment and other applications.

  17. Nuclear overhauser enhancement mediated chemical exchange saturation transfer imaging at 7 Tesla in glioblastoma patients.

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    Daniel Paech

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Nuclear Overhauser Enhancement (NOE mediated chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST is a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI technique on the basis of saturation transfer between exchanging protons of tissue proteins and bulk water. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the information provided by three dimensional NOE mediated CEST at 7 Tesla (7T and standard MRI in glioblastoma patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Twelve patients with newly diagnosed histologically proven glioblastoma were enrolled in this prospective ethics committee-approved study. NOE mediated CEST contrast was acquired with a modified three-dimensional gradient-echo sequence and asymmetry analysis was conducted at 3.3 ppm (B1 = 0.7 µT to calculate the magnetization transfer ratio asymmetry (MTR(asym. Contrast enhanced T1 (CE-T1 and T2-weighted images were acquired at 3T and used for data co-registration and comparison. RESULTS: Mean NOE mediated CEST signal based on MTR(asym values over all patients was significantly increased (p<0.001 in CE-T1 tumor (-1.99 ± 1.22%, tumor necrosis (-1.36 ± 1.30% and peritumoral CEST hyperintensities (PTCH within T2 edema margins (-3.56 ± 1.24% compared to contralateral normal appearing white matter (-8.38 ± 1.19%. In CE-T1 tumor (p = 0.015 and tumor necrosis (p<0.001 mean MTR(asym values were significantly higher than in PTCH. Extent of the surrounding tumor hyperintensity was smaller in eight out of 12 patients on CEST than on T2-weighted images, while four displayed at equal size. In all patients, isolated high intensity regions (0.40 ± 2.21% displayed on CEST within the CE-T1 tumor that were not discernible on CE-T1 or T2-weighted images. CONCLUSION: NOE mediated CEST Imaging at 7 T provides additional information on the structure of peritumoral hyperintensities in glioblastoma and displays isolated high intensity regions within the CE-T1 tumor that cannot be acquired on CE-T1 or T2

  18. Slug promotes survival during metastasis through suppression of Puma-mediated apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seaho; Yao, Jiahong; Suyama, Kimita; Qian, Xia; Qian, Bin-Zhi; Bandyopadhyay, Sanmay; Loudig, Olivier; De Leon-Rodriguez, Carlos; Zhou, Zhen Ni; Segall, Jeffrey; Macian, Fernando; Norton, Larry; Hazan, Rachel B

    2014-07-15

    Tumor cells must overcome apoptosis to survive throughout metastatic dissemination and distal organ colonization. Here, we show in the Polyoma Middle T mammary tumor model that N-cadherin (Cdh2) expression causes Slug (Snai2) upregulation, which in turn promotes carcinoma cell survival. Slug was dramatically upregulated in metastases relative to primary tumors. Consistent with a role in metastasis, Slug knockdown in carcinoma cells suppressed lung colonization by decreasing cell survival at metastatic sites, but had no effect on tumor cell invasion or extravasation. In support of this idea, Slug inhibition by shRNA sensitized tumor cells to apoptosis by DNA damage, resulting in caspase-3 and PARP cleavage. The prosurvival effect of Slug was found to be caused by direct repression of the proapoptotic gene, Puma (Bbc3), by Slug. Consistent with a pivotal role for a Slug-Puma axis in metastasis, inhibition of Puma by RNA interference in Slug-knockdown cells rescued lung colonization, whereas Puma overexpression in control tumor cells suppressed lung metastasis. The survival function of the Slug-Puma axis was confirmed in human breast cancer cells, where Slug knockdown increased Puma expression and inhibited lung colonization. This study demonstrates a pivotal role for Slug in carcinoma cell survival, implying that disruption of the Slug-Puma axis may impinge on the survival of metastatic cells.

  19. Trigonella foenum-graecum (fenugreek-mediated suppression of Meloidogyne javanica in mungbean

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    Tayyaba Zia

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Soil amendments with powdered seeds of Trigonella foenum - graecum (fenugreek caused soil suppressiveness against Meloidogyne javanica. Decomposed seeds of fenugreek caused marked reduction in nematode population densities and subsequent root-knot development as compared to the aqueous extract of the seeds indicating that some indirect factors are involved in the suppression of root-knot nematode. Both decomposed seeds and aqueous extracts enhanced plant height and fresh weights of shoot whereas root growth remained uninfluenced. Changes in fungal communities associated with nematode control were studied by comparing population numbers of fungi in the soil and in internal root tissues (endorhiza in non-amended and fenugreekamended soils. Acremonium sp., Chaetomium globosum, Fusarium solani, Macrophomina phaseolina and Rhizoctonia solani were found to colonize inner root tissues of mungbean. Acremonium sp., C. globosum and F.solani were isolated in a relatively higher frequency from roots growing in the amended soils while M. phaseolina and R. solani colonized greatly in roots growing in non-amended soil. Of the fungi isolated from soils, Penicillium brefaldianum caused maximum juvenile mortality of M.javanica whereas F.solani caused greatest inhibition of egg hatch.

  20. CXCR2 inhibition enhances sulindac-mediated suppression of colon cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Suk; Choi, Dongwon; Kim, Nam Yoon; Yang, Sara; Jung, Eunson; Hong, Mingu; Yang, Dongyun; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Hong, Young-Kwon

    2014-07-01

    Small chemical compound sulindac has been approved as a preventive approach against colon cancer for its effectiveness in treatment of precancerous adenoma. Due to its severe toxicities in the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and renal systems, however, a combination of low-dose sulindac with other chemopreventive agents has been sought after as an alternative therapeutic strategy that could increase its effectiveness, while minimizing its adverse effects. To identify the promising alternative approach, we investigated the therapeutic potential of targeting the interleukin (IL)-8/CXCR2 pathway in colon cancer treatment using both loss-of-function (CXCR2 knockout) and gain-of-function (IL-8 overexpression) mouse models, as the IL-8/CXCR2 pathway has been shown to be activated in intestinal tumors of both human and experimental animals. We found that deletion of CXCR2 gene and ectopic expression of IL-8 suppresses and enhances, respectively, intestinal tumor development caused by a mutation in the APC gene. Moreover, a single copy deletion of CXCR2 gene resulted in abrogation of COX-2 and Gro-α upregulation in intestinal tumors caused by the APC mutation. Moreover, a single copy (heterozygote) deletion of CXCR2 gene was sufficient to synergize with a low-dose sulindac treatment in suppressing APCmin-induced intestinal polyposis. Together, our study provides a therapeutic justification of combined inhibition of CXCR2 and sulindac treatment in colon cancer prevention.

  1. Micro RNA-17-92 cluster mediates interleukin-4-suppressed IL-10 expression in B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Yang, Gui; Geng, Xiao-Rui; Liu, Jiang-Qi; Mo, Li-Hua; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of allergen-related inflammation in the intestine is to be further understood. Micro RNA (miR) can regulate immune responses. This study aims to investigate the role of miR-17-92 cluster in the induction of food allergen-related inflammation in the intestine. In this study, a mouse model of food allergen-related intestinal inflammation was developed. Expression of miR-17-92 cluster in B cells of the intestinal mucosa was analyzed by real time quantitative RT-PCR. The results showed that the levels of miR-19a, one of the members of the miR-17-92 cluster, were detected in the B cells of the intestine of mice sensitized to ovalbumin, which was significantly higher than that in naïve control mice. The expression of IL-10 by B cells was significantly lower in the sensitized mice as compared with naive control mice. Exposure to IL-4 in the culture increased the expression of miR-19a as well as suppression the expression of IL-10 in B cells via remolding DNA structure at the IL-10 promoter locus. We conclude that B cells from sensitized mice show higher levels of miR-19a, which plays an important role in the suppression of IL-10 in the B cells.

  2. Dietary selenium protect against redox-mediated immune suppression induced by methylmercury exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuan; Yin, Daqiang; Yin, Jiaoyang; Chen, Qiqing; Wang, Rui

    2014-10-01

    The antagonism between selenium (Se) and mercury (Hg) has been widely recognized, however, the protective role of Se against methylmercury (MeHg) induced immunotoxicity and the underlying mechanism is still unclear. In the current study, MeHg exposure (0.01 mM via drinking water) significantly inhibited the lymphoproliferation and NK cells functions of the female Balb/c mice, while dietary Se supplementation (as Se-rich yeast) partly or fully recovered the observed immunotoxicity, indicating the protective role of Se against MeHg-induced immune suppression in mice. Besides, MeHg exposure promoted the generation of the reactive oxygen species (ROS), reduced the levels of nonenzymic and enzymic antioxidants in target organs, while dietary Se administration significantly diminished the MeHg-induced oxidative stress and subsequent cellular dysfunctions (lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation). Two possible mechanisms of Se's protective effects were further revealed. Firstly, the reduction of mercury concentrations (less than 25%, modulated by Se supplementation) in the target organs might contribute, but not fully explain the alleviated immune suppression. Secondly and more importantly, Se could help to maintain/or elevate the activities of several key antioxidants, therefore protect the immune cells against MeHg-induced oxidative damage.

  3. Inhibition of autophagy suppresses sertraline-mediated primary ciliogenesis in retinal pigment epithelium cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Sung; Shin, Ji Hyun; Park, So Jung; Jo, Yoon Kyung; Kim, Jae-Sung; Kang, Il-Hwan; Nam, Jung-Bum; Chung, Doo-Young; Cho, Yoonchul; Lee, EunJoo H; Chang, Jong Wook; Cho, Dong-Hyung

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are conserved cellular organelles that regulate diverse signaling pathways. Autophagy is a complex process of cellular degradation and recycling of cytoplasmic proteins and organelles, and plays an important role in cellular homeostasis. Despite its potential importance, the role of autophagy in ciliogenesis is largely unknown. In this study, we identified sertraline as a regulator of autophagy and ciliogenesis. Sertraline, a known antidepressant, induced the growth of cilia and blocked the disassembly of cilia in htRPE cells. Following treatment of sertraline, there was an increase in the number of cells with autophagic puncta and LC3 protein conversion. In addition, both a decrease of ATG5 expression and the treatment of an autophagy inhibitor resulted in the suppression of the sertraline-induced activation of autophagy in htRPE cells. Interestingly, we found that genetic and chemical inhibition of autophagy attenuated the growth of primary cilia in htRPE cells. Taken together, our results suggest that the inhibition of autophagy suppresses sertraline-induced ciliogenesis.

  4. Chromene suppresses the activation of inflammatory mediators in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Soo-Jin; Jang, Jiyi; Ye, Bo-Ram; Kim, Min-Sun; Yoon, Weon-Jong; Oh, Chulhong; Kang, Do-Hyung; Lee, Ji-Hyeok; Kang, Min-Cheol; Jeon, You-Jin; Kang, Sung-Myung; Kim, Daekyung; Kim, Kil-Nam

    2014-05-01

    Inflammation is complex process involving a variety of immune cells that defend the body from harmful stimuli. However, pro-inflammatory cytokines and inflammatory mediators can also exacerbate diseases such as cancer. The aim of this study was to identify a natural effective remedy for inflammation. We isolated a functional algal chromene compound from Sargassum siliquastrum, named sargachromanol D (SD). We evaluated the anti-inflammatory effect of SD on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-exposed RAW 264.7 cells by measuring cell viability, cytotoxicity, and production of inflammatory mediators such as nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), inducible NO synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6. SD inhibited production of NO and PGE2 from LPS-induced cells by preventing the expression of inflammatory mediators such as iNOS and COX-2 in a dose-dependent manner. Concurrently, levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 were reduced with increasing concentrations of SD. In addition, SD inhibited the activation of NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) pathways in a concentration-dependent manner. These results indicate that SD inhibits LPS-stimulated inflammation by inhibition of the NF-κB and MAPKs pathways in macrophages. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A novel posttranscriptional mechanism for dietary cholesterol-mediated suppression of liver LDL receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amar Bahadur; Kan, Chin Fung Kelvin; Shende, Vikram; Dong, Bin; Liu, Jingwen

    2014-07-01

    It is well-established that over-accumulation of dietary cholesterol in the liver inhibits sterol-regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-mediated LDL receptor (LDLR) gene transcription leading to a reduced hepatic LDLR mRNA level in hypercholesterolemic animals. However, it is unknown whether elevated cholesterol levels can elicit a cellular response to increase LDLR mRNA turnover to further repress LDLR expression in liver tissue. In the current study, we examined the effect of a high cholesterol diet on the hepatic expression of LDLR mRNA binding proteins in three different animal models and in cultured hepatic cells. Our results demonstrate that high cholesterol feeding specifically elevates the hepatic expression of LDLR mRNA decay promoting factor heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (HNRNP)D without affecting expressions of other LDLR mRNA binding proteins in vivo and in vitro. Employing the approach of adenovirus-mediated gene knockdown, we further show that depletion of HNRNPD in the liver results in a marked reduction of serum LDL-cholesterol and a substantial increase in liver LDLR expression in hyperlipidemic mice. Additional studies of gene knockdown in albumin-luciferase-untranslated region (UTR) transgenic mice provide strong evidence supporting the essential role of 3'UTR in HNRNPD-mediated LDLR mRNA degradation in liver tissue. Altogether, this work identifies a novel posttranscriptional regulatory mechanism by which dietary cholesterol inhibits liver LDLR expression via inducing HNRNPD to accelerate LDLR mRNA degradation.

  6. Exploration of new perspectives and limitations in Agrobacterium mediated gene transfer technology. Progress report, [June 1, 1992-- May 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marton, L.

    1994-12-31

    This report describes progress aimed at constructing gene-transfer technology for Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. Most actual effort as described herein has so far been directed at exploring new perspectives and limitations in Agrobacterium mediated gene transfer. Accomplishments are described using a core homologous gene targeting vector.

  7. Mechanisms maintaining antibody-induced enhancement of allografts. II. Mediation of specific suppression by short lived CD4+ T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearce, N.W.; Spinelli, A.; Gurley, K.E.; Dorsch, S.E.; Hall, B.M.

    1989-07-15

    In DA rats grafted with PVG hearts, the injection of 1 ml of Wistar-Furth (x DA)F1 anti-PVG serum on the day of grafting prevents rejection and induces a state of specific unresponsiveness. An adoptive transfer assay was used to test the capacity of T cell subsets, taken from rats given enhancing serum, to either restore rejection or to transfer unresponsiveness to syngeneic hosts irradiated with 9 Gy and grafted with donor (PVG) or third party (Wistar-Furth) hearts. W3/25+ (CD4+) cells from these animals retained some capacity to restore rejection until 50 days posttransplant, after which they invariably failed to restore PVG graft rejection but retained the capacity to effect Wistar-Furth rejection. At this time CD4+ cells were also capable of inhibiting naive but not specifically sensitized CD4+ cells capacity to restore PVG graft rejection in irradiated hosts. The development of CD4+ suppressor cells was concurrent with the appearance of clinically evident unresponsiveness in the host. MRC Ox8+ (CD8+) cells from enhanced rats when mixed with naive CD4+ cells delayed rejection in adoptive recipients but did not reestablish unresponsiveness. Paradoxically, the CD4+ cells that transfer unresponsiveness to the adoptive host proliferate such as normal cells in MLC to both donor and third party alloantigen. Unfractionated cells, CD4+ or CD8+ cells did not proliferate to relevant idiotype in vitro. The CD4+ cells after 3 days in culture, with either alloantigen or idiotype-bearing stimulator cells, lost their capacity to suppress in the adoptive transfer assay. The maintenance of specific unresponsiveness was thus shown to be due to a CD4+ suppressor T cell whose function was lost in culture, and therefore could not be detected in MLC or idiotype assays.

  8. Ionizing and ultraviolet radiation enhances the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, C.F.

    1984-08-01

    The enhancement effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation on the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer were studied. Confluent Rat-2 cells were transfected with purified SV40 viral DNA, irradiated with either X-rays or ultraviolet, trypsinized, plated, and assayed for the formation of foci on Rat-2 monolayers. Both ionizing and ultraviolet radiation enhanced the frequency of A-gene transformants/survivor compared to unirradiated transfected cells. These enhancements were non-linear and dose dependent. A recombinant plasmid, pOT-TK5, was constructed that contained the SV40 virus A-gene and the Herpes Simplex virus (HSV) thymidine kinase (TK) gene. Confluent Rat-2 cells transfected with pOT-TK5 DNA and then immediately irradiated with either X-rays or 330 MeV/amu argon particles at the Berkeley Bevalac showed a higher frequency of HAT/sup +/ colonies/survivor than unirradiated transfected cells. Rat-2 cells transfected with the plasmid, pTK2, containing only the HSV TK-gene were enhanced for TK-transformation by both X-rays and ultraviolet radiation. The results demonstrate that radiation enhancement of the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer is not explained by increased nuclear uptake of the transfected DNA. Radiation increases the competence of the transfected cell population for genetic transformation. Three models for this increased competence are presented. The targeted integration model, the inducible recombination model, the partition model, and the utilization of DNA mediated gene transfer for DNA repair studies are discussed. 465 references.

  9. Data on sulforaphane treatment mediated suppression of autoreactive, inflammatory M1 macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjima Pal

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Any chronic, inflammatory, autoimmune disease (e.g. arthritis associated pathogenesis directs uncontrolled accumulation of both soluble forms of collagens in the synovial fluids and M1 macrophages around inflamed tissues. Despite of few studies demonstrating efficiency of Sulforaphane (SFN in suppressing arthritis associated collagen restricted T cells or fibroblasts, its effects on macrophage polarity and plasticity are less understood. Recently, we reported regulation of phenotypic and functional switching by SFN in induced and spontaneously differentiating human monocytes [1]. Here, flow cytometry, western blot and ELISA derived data demonstrated that SFN inhibited in vitro inflammatory responses developed by soluble human collagens (I–IV induced auto-reactive M1 type monocyte/macrophage model.

  10. ADENOVIRUS-MEDIATED WILD-TYPE P53 EXPRESSION SUPPRESSES GROWTH OF LUNG ADENOCARCINOMA CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jian; Xia Yongjing; Jiang Lei; Li Hongxia; Hu Yajun; Yi Lin; Hu Shixue; Xu Hongji

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To study the growth suppression of lung adenocarcinoma cell by the introduction of wild-type P53gene and explore a gene therapy approach for lung adenocarcinoma. Methods: A replication-deficient adenovirus vector encoding a wild-type P53 was constructed and transfected into the cultured human lung adenocarcinoma cell line GLC-82. The efficiency of gene transfection and expression was detected by immunochemical staining and polymerase chain reaction. The cell growth rate and cell cycle were analysed by cell-counting and flow cytometry. Results: Wild-type P53 gene could be quickly and effectively transfected into the cells by adenovirus vector. Wild-type P53 expression could inhibit GLC-82 cell proliferation and induce apoptosis.Conclusion: The results indicated that recombinant adenovirus expressing wild-type P53 might be useful vector for gene therapy of human lung adenocarcinoma.

  11. First Observation of Electron Transfer Mediated Decay in Aqueous Solutions: A Novel Probe of Ion Pairing

    CERN Document Server

    Unger, I; Thürmer, S; Aziz, E F; Cederbaum, L S; Muchová, E; Slavíček, P; Winter, B; Kryzhevoi, N V

    2016-01-01

    A major goal of many spectroscopic techniques is to provide comprehensive information on the local chemical environment. Electron transfer mediated decay (ETMD) is a sensitive probe of the environment since it is actively involved in this non-local radiationless decay process through electron and energy transfer steps. We report the first experimental observation of ETMD in the liquid phase. Using liquid-jet X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy we explore LiCl aqueous solution, and detect low-energy electrons unambiguously emerging from the ETMD processes of core-ionized Li+. We interpret the experimental results with molecular dynamics and high-level ab initio calculations. By considering various solvation-structure models we show that both water molecules and Cl- anions can participate in ETMD, with each process having its characteristic spectral fingerprint. Different ion associations lead to different spectral shapes. The potential application of the unique sensitivity of the ETMD spectroscopy to the local hy...

  12. Phosphate mediated adsorption and electron transfer of cytochrome c. A time-resolved SERR spectroelectrochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capdevila, Daiana A; Marmisollé, Waldemar A; Williams, Federico J; Murgida, Daniel H

    2013-04-21

    The study of proteins immobilized on biomimetic or biocompatible electrodes represents an active field of research as it pursues both fundamental and technological interests. In this context, adsorption and redox properties of cytochrome c (Cyt) on different electrode surfaces have been extensively reported, although in some cases with contradictory results. Here we report a SERR spectroelectrochemical study of the adsorption and electron transfer behaviour of the basic protein Cyt on electrodes coated with amino-terminated monolayers. The obtained results show that inorganic phosphate (Pi) and ATP anions are able to mediate high affinity binding of the protein with preservation of the native structure and rendering an average orientation that guarantees efficient pathways for direct electron transfer. These findings aid the design of Cyt-based bioelectronic devices and understanding the modulation by Pi and ATP of physiological functions of Cyt.

  13. [Advances in research on radioiodine therapy of carcinoma mediated by gene transfer technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Da; Kuang, Anren

    2010-10-01

    Radioiodine therapy of carcinoma could be mediated by transferring the genes which participate in the process of iodine metabolism in thyroid. The correlative genes are sodium/iodine symporter gene, thyroid peroxidase gene and the specific thyroid transcription factors, and others. The objective gene can specifically express in carcinoma by inserting the tissue-specific promoter/enhancer upstream of them, so radioiodine could be used to treat varied carcinomas. The radioiodine uptake in carcinoma cells was obviously increased and the radioiodine therapy of carcinoma was effective after those genes had expressed in carcinoma cells. The main problem was that the effective half-time of radioiodine in cells was too short to produce the ideal effect of radioiodine therapy. Moreover, 211At and 188Re could be transferred by sodium/iodine symporter and they could be used to treat the carcinoma that is capable of radioiodine uptake.

  14. Horizontal Transfer of Plasmid-Mediated Cephalosporin Resistance Genes in the Intestine of Houseflies (Musca domestica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Akira; Usui, Masaru; Okubo, Torahiko; Tamura, Yutaka

    2016-06-01

    Houseflies are a mechanical vector for various types of bacteria, including antimicrobial-resistant bacteria (ARB). If the intestine of houseflies is a suitable site for the transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs), houseflies could also serve as a biological vector for ARB. To clarify whether cephalosporin resistance genes are transferred efficiently in the housefly intestine, we compared with conjugation experiments in vivo (in the intestine) and in vitro by using Escherichia coli with eight combinations of four donor and two recipient strains harboring plasmid-mediated cephalosporin resistance genes and chromosomal-encoded rifampicin resistance genes, respectively. In the in vivo conjugation experiment, houseflies ingested donor strains for 6 hr and then recipient strains for 3 hr, and 24 hr later, the houseflies were surface sterilized and analyzed. In vitro conjugation experiments were conducted using the broth-mating method. In 3/8 combinations, the in vitro transfer frequency (Transconjugants/Donor) was ≥1.3 × 10(-4); the in vivo transfer rates of cephalosporin resistance genes ranged from 2.0 × 10(-4) to 5.7 × 10(-5). Moreover, cephalosporin resistance genes were transferred to other species of enteric bacteria of houseflies such as Achromobacter sp. and Pseudomonas fluorescens. These results suggest that houseflies are not only a mechanical vector for ARB but also a biological vector for the occurrence of new ARB through the horizontal transfer of ARGs in their intestine.

  15. Curcumin suppresses gelatinase B mediated norepinephrine induced stress in H9c2 cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrey Kohli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Extracellular matrix (ECM remodeling facilitates biomechanical signals in response to abnormal physiological conditions. This process is witnessed as one of the major effects of the stress imposed by catecholamines, such as epinephrine and norepinephrine (NE, on cardiac muscle cells. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs are the key proteases involved in degradation of the ECM in heart. OBJECTIVES: The present study focuses on studying the effect of curcumin on Gelatinase B (MMP-9, an ECM remodeling regulatory enzyme, in NE-induced cardiac stress. Curcumin, a bioactive polyphenol found in the spice turmeric, has been studied for its multi-fold beneficial properties. This study focuses on investigating the role of curcumin as a cardio-protectant. METHODS: H9c2 cardiomyocytes were subjected to NE and curcumin treatments to study the response in stress conditions. Effect on total collagen content was studied using Picrosirus red staining. Gelatinase B activity was assessed through Gel-Diffusion Assay and Zymographic techniques. RT-PCR, Western Blotting and Immunocytochemistry were performed to study effect on expression of gelatinase B. Further, the effect of curcumin on the localization of NF-κB, known to regulate gelatinase B, was also examined. RESULTS: Curcumin suppressed the increase in the total collagen content under hypertrophic stress and was found to inhibit the in-gel and in-situ gelatinolytic activity of gelatinase B. Moreover, it was found to suppress the mRNA and protein expression of gelatinase B. CONCLUSIONS: The study provides an evidence for an overall inhibitory effect of curcumin on Gelatinase B in NE-induced hypertrophic stress in H9c2 cardiomyocytes which may contribute in the prevention of ECM remodeling.

  16. Bordetella pertussis infection exacerbates influenza virus infection through pertussis toxin-mediated suppression of innate immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor I Ayala

    Full Text Available Pertussis (whooping cough is frequently complicated by concomitant infections with respiratory viruses. Here we report the effect of Bordetella pertussis infection on subsequent influenza virus (PR8 infection in mouse models and the role of pertussis toxin (PT in this effect. BALB/c mice infected with a wild-type strain of B. pertussis (WT and subsequently (up to 14 days later infected with PR8 had significantly increased pulmonary viral titers, lung pathology and mortality compared to mice similarly infected with a PT-deficient mutant strain (ΔPT and PR8. Substitution of WT infection by intranasal treatment with purified active PT was sufficient to replicate the exacerbating effects on PR8 infection in BALB/c and C57/BL6 mice, but the effects of PT were lost when toxin was administered 24 h after virus inoculation. PT had no effect on virus titers in primary cultures of murine tracheal epithelial cells (mTECs in vitro, suggesting the toxin targets an early immune response to increase viral titers in the mouse model. However, type I interferon responses were not affected by PT. Whole genome microarray analysis of gene expression in lung tissue from PT-treated and control PR8-infected mice at 12 and 36 h post-virus inoculation revealed that PT treatment suppressed numerous genes associated with communication between innate and adaptive immune responses. In mice depleted of alveolar macrophages, increase of pulmonary viral titers by PT treatment was lost. PT also suppressed levels of IL-1β, IL-12, IFN-γ, IL-6, KC, MCP-1 and TNF-α in the airways after PR8 infection. Furthermore PT treatment inhibited early recruitment of neutrophils and NK cells to the airways. Together these findings demonstrate that infection with B. pertussis through PT activity predisposes the host to exacerbated influenza infection by countering protective innate immune responses that control virus titers.

  17. Focused ultrasound-mediated suppression of chemically-induced acute epileptic EEG activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung Yong-An

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder, which is attributed to uncontrollable abnormal hyper-excitability of neurons. We investigated the feasibility of using low-intensity, pulsed radiation of focused ultrasound (FUS to non-invasively suppress epileptic activity in an animal model (rat, which was induced by the intraperitonial injection of pentylenetetrazol (PTZ. Results After the onset of induced seizures, FUS was transcranially administered to the brain twice for three minutes each while undergoing electroencephalographic (EEG monitoring. An air-backed, spherical segment ultrasound transducer (diameter: 6 cm; radius-of-curvature: 7 cm operating at a fundamental frequency of 690 KHz was used to deliver a train of 0.5 msec-long pulses of sonication at a repetitive rate of 100 Hz to the thalamic areas of the brain. The acoustic intensity (130 mW/cm2 used in the experiment was sufficiently within the range of safety guidelines for the clinical ultrasound imaging. The occurrence of epileptic EEG bursts from epilepsy-induced rats significantly decreased after sonication when it was compared to the pre-sonication epileptic state. The PTZ-induced control group that did not receive any sonication showed a sustained number of epileptic EEG signal bursts. The animals that underwent sonication also showed less severe epileptic behavior, as assessed by the Racine score. Histological analysis confirmed that the sonication did not cause any damage to the brain tissue. Conclusions These results revealed that low-intensity, pulsed FUS sonication suppressed the number of epileptic signal bursts using acute epilepsy model in animal. Due to its non-invasiveness and spatial selectivity, FUS may offer new perspectives for a possible non-invasive treatment of epilepsy.

  18. MicroRNA-mediated suppression of oncolytic adenovirus replication in human liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylösmäki, Erkko; Lavilla-Alonso, Sergio; Jäämaa, Sari; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; af Hällström, Taija; Hemminki, Akseli; Arola, Johanna; Mäkisalo, Heikki; Saksela, Kalle

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important and ubiquitous regulators of gene expression that can suppress their target genes by translational inhibition as well as mRNA destruction. Cell type-specific miRNA expression patterns have been successfully exploited for targeting the expression of experimental and therapeutic gene constructs, for example to reduce pathogenic effects of cancer virotherapy in normal tissues. In order to avoid liver damage associated with systemic or intrahepatic delivery of oncolytic adenoviruses we have introduced the concept of suppressing adenovirus replication in hepatic cells by inserting target elements for the liver-specific miR122 into the viral genome. Here we show using ex vivo cultured tissue specimens that six perfectly complementary miR122 target sites in the 3' untranslated region of the viral E1A gene are sufficient in the absence of any other genetic modifications to prevent productive replication of serotype 5 adenovirus (Ad5) in normal human liver. This modification did not compromise the replicative capacity of the modified virus in cancer tissue derived from a colon carcinoma liver metastasis or its oncolytic potency in a human lung cancer xenograft mouse model. Unlike wild-type Ad5, the modified virus did not result in increased serum levels of liver enzymes in infected mice. These results provide a strong preclinical proof of concept for the use of miR122 target sites for reducing the risk of liver damage caused by oncolytic adenoviruses, and suggest that ectopic miR122 target elements should be considered as an additional safety measure included in any therapeutic virus or viral vector posing potential hazard to the liver.

  19. MicroRNA-mediated suppression of oncolytic adenovirus replication in human liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkko Ylösmäki

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are important and ubiquitous regulators of gene expression that can suppress their target genes by translational inhibition as well as mRNA destruction. Cell type-specific miRNA expression patterns have been successfully exploited for targeting the expression of experimental and therapeutic gene constructs, for example to reduce pathogenic effects of cancer virotherapy in normal tissues. In order to avoid liver damage associated with systemic or intrahepatic delivery of oncolytic adenoviruses we have introduced the concept of suppressing adenovirus replication in hepatic cells by inserting target elements for the liver-specific miR122 into the viral genome. Here we show using ex vivo cultured tissue specimens that six perfectly complementary miR122 target sites in the 3' untranslated region of the viral E1A gene are sufficient in the absence of any other genetic modifications to prevent productive replication of serotype 5 adenovirus (Ad5 in normal human liver. This modification did not compromise the replicative capacity of the modified virus in cancer tissue derived from a colon carcinoma liver metastasis or its oncolytic potency in a human lung cancer xenograft mouse model. Unlike wild-type Ad5, the modified virus did not result in increased serum levels of liver enzymes in infected mice. These results provide a strong preclinical proof of concept for the use of miR122 target sites for reducing the risk of liver damage caused by oncolytic adenoviruses, and suggest that ectopic miR122 target elements should be considered as an additional safety measure included in any therapeutic virus or viral vector posing potential hazard to the liver.

  20. Antibody-mediated immunotherapy of macaques chronically infected with SHIV suppresses viraemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shingai, Masashi; Nishimura, Yoshiaki; Klein, Florian; Mouquet, Hugo; Donau, Olivia K.; Plishka, Ronald; Buckler-White, Alicia; Seaman, Michael; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Dimitrov, Dimiter; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Martin, Malcolm A.

    2013-11-01

    Neutralizing antibodies can confer immunity to primate lentiviruses by blocking infection in macaque models of AIDS. However, earlier studies of anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) neutralizing antibodies administered to infected individuals or humanized mice reported poor control of virus replication and the rapid emergence of resistant variants. A new generation of anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibodies, possessing extraordinary potency and breadth of neutralizing activity, has recently been isolated from infected individuals. These neutralizing antibodies target different regions of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein including the CD4-binding site, glycans located in the V1/V2, V3 and V4 regions, and the membrane proximal external region of gp41 (refs 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14). Here we have examined two of the new antibodies, directed to the CD4-binding site and the V3 region (3BNC117 and 10-1074, respectively), for their ability to block infection and suppress viraemia in macaques infected with the R5 tropic simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-AD8, which emulates many of the pathogenic and immunogenic properties of HIV-1 during infections of rhesus macaques. Either antibody alone can potently block virus acquisition. When administered individually to recently infected macaques, the 10-1074 antibody caused a rapid decline in virus load to undetectable levels for 4-7days, followed by virus rebound during which neutralization-resistant variants became detectable. When administered together, a single treatment rapidly suppressed plasma viraemia for 3-5weeks in some long-term chronically SHIV-infected animals with low CD4+ T-cell levels. A second cycle of anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibody therapy, administered to two previously treated animals, successfully controlled virus rebound. These results indicate that immunotherapy or a combination of immunotherapy plus conventional antiretroviral drugs might be useful as a treatment for chronically HIV-1-infected

  1. Curcumin Suppresses Gelatinase B Mediated Norepinephrine Induced Stress in H9c2 Cardiomyocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, Shrey; Chhabra, Aastha; Jaiswal, Astha; Rustagi, Yashika; Sharma, Manish; Rani, Vibha

    2013-01-01

    Background Extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling facilitates biomechanical signals in response to abnormal physiological conditions. This process is witnessed as one of the major effects of the stress imposed by catecholamines, such as epinephrine and norepinephrine (NE), on cardiac muscle cells. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are the key proteases involved in degradation of the ECM in heart. Objectives The present study focuses on studying the effect of curcumin on Gelatinase B (MMP-9), an ECM remodeling regulatory enzyme, in NE-induced cardiac stress. Curcumin, a bioactive polyphenol found in the spice turmeric, has been studied for its multi-fold beneficial properties. This study focuses on investigating the role of curcumin as a cardio-protectant. Methods H9c2 cardiomyocytes were subjected to NE and curcumin treatments to study the response in stress conditions. Effect on total collagen content was studied using Picrosirus red staining. Gelatinase B activity was assessed through Gel-Diffusion Assay and Zymographic techniques. RT-PCR, Western Blotting and Immunocytochemistry were performed to study effect on expression of gelatinase B. Further, the effect of curcumin on the localization of NF-κB, known to regulate gelatinase B, was also examined. Results Curcumin suppressed the increase in the total collagen content under hypertrophic stress and was found to inhibit the in-gel and in-situ gelatinolytic activity of gelatinase B. Moreover, it was found to suppress the mRNA and protein expression of gelatinase B. Conclusions The study provides an evidence for an overall inhibitory effect of curcumin on Gelatinase B in NE-induced hypertrophic stress in H9c2 cardiomyocytes which may contribute in the prevention of ECM remodeling. PMID:24116115

  2. A crucial role of activin A-mediated growth hormone suppression in mouse and human heart failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noritoshi Fukushima

    Full Text Available Infusion of bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BMMNC has been reported to ameliorate cardiac dysfunction after acute myocardial infarction. In this study, we investigated whether infusion of BMMNC is also effective for non-ischemic heart failure model mice and the underlying mechanisms. Intravenous infusion of BMMNC showed transient cardioprotective effects on animal models with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM without their engraftment in heart, suggesting that BMMNC infusion improves cardiac function via humoral factors rather than their differentiation into cardiomyocytes. Using conditioned media from sorted BMMNC, we found that the cardioprotective effects were mediated by growth hormone (GH secreted from myeloid (Gr-1(+ cells and the effects was partially mediated by signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 in cardiomyocytes. On the other hand, the GH expression in Gr-1(+ cells was significantly downregulated in DCM mice compared with that in healthy control, suggesting that the environmental cue in heart failure might suppress the Gr-1(+ cells function. Activin A was upregulated in the serum of DCM models and induced downregulation of GH levels in Gr-1(+ cells and serum. Furthermore, humoral factors upregulated in heart failure including angiotensin II upregulated activin A in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC via activation of NFκB. Similarly, serum activin A levels were also significantly higher in DCM patients with heart failure than in healthy subjects and the GH levels in conditioned medium from PBMNC of DCM patients were lower than that in healthy subjects. Inhibition of activin A increased serum GH levels and improved cardiac function of DCM model mice. These results suggest that activin A causes heart failure by suppressing GH activity and that inhibition of activin A might become a novel strategy for the treatment of heart failure.

  3. Fbxw5 suppresses nuclear c-Myb activity via DDB1-Cul4-Rbx1 ligase-mediated sumoylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanei-Ishii, Chie; Nomura, Teruaki; Egoh, Ayako [Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, RIKEN Tsukuba Institute, 3-1-1 Koyadai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0074 (Japan); Ishii, Shunsuke, E-mail: sishii@rtc.riken.jp [Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, RIKEN Tsukuba Institute, 3-1-1 Koyadai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0074 (Japan)

    2012-09-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fbxw5 enhances sumoylation of c-Myb. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The DDB1-Cul4A-Rbx1 complex mediates c-Myb sumoylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Fbxw5-DDB1-Cul4A-Rdx1 complex is a dual SUMO/ubiquitin ligase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fbxw5 suppresses the c-Myb trans-activating capacity. -- Abstract: The c-myb proto-oncogene product (c-Myb) is degraded in response to Wnt-1 signaling. In this process, Fbxw7{alpha}, the F-box protein of the SCF complex, binds to c-Myb via its C-terminal WD40 domain, and induces the ubiquitination of c-Myb. Here, we report that Fbxw5, another F-box protein, enhances sumoylation of nuclear c-Myb. Fbxw5 enhanced c-Myb sumoylation via the DDB1-Cul4A-Rbx1 complex. Since the Fbxw5-DDB1-Cul4A-Rbx1 complex was shown to act as a ubiquitin ligase for tumor suppressor TSC2, our results suggest that this complex can function as a dual SUMO/ubiquitin ligase. Fbxw5, which is localized to both nucleus and cytosol, enhanced sumoylation of nuclear c-Myb and induced the localization of c-Myb to nuclear dot-like domains. Co-expression of Fbxw5 suppressed the trans-activation of c-myc promoter by wild-type c-Myb, but not by v-Myb, which lacks the sumoylation sites. These results suggest that multiple E3 ligases suppress c-Myb activity through sumoylation or ubiquitination, and that v-Myb is no longer subject to these negative regulations.

  4. Adenovirus-mediated Gene Transfer of MMP-2 into Cultured Porcine Trabecular Meshwork Cells

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to use adenoviral gene transfer to express matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 in cultured porcine trabecular meshwork cells and to evaluate the duration of adenovirus-mediated MMP-2 expression and its enzymatic activity. MMP-2 cDNA was synthesized by ligating three segments of MMP-2 cDNA obtained by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with mRNA extracted from mouse lungs. MMP-2 cDNA was inserted into replication-deficient adenoviral vectors. Western blottin...

  5. Baculovirus vector-mediated transfer of NIS gene into colon tumor cells for radionuclide therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the feasibility of radionuclide therapy of colon tumor cells by baculovirus vector-mediated transfer of the sodium/iodide symporter(NIS) gene.METHODS:A recombinant baculovirus plasmid carrying the NIS gene was constructed,and the viruses(BacNIS) were prepared using the Bac-to-Bac system.The infection efficiency in the colon cancer cell line SW1116 of a green fluorescent protein(GFP) expressing baculovirus(Bac-GFP) at different multiplicities of infection(MOI) with various concentrations o...

  6. Fasting induced kisspeptin signaling suppression is regulated by glutamate mediated cues in adult male rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamas, Shazia; Khan, Saeed-Ul-Hassan; Khan, Muhammad Yousaf; Shabbir, Nadia; Zubair, Hira; Shafqat, Saira; Wahab, Fazal; Shahab, Muhammad

    2015-08-01

    Kisspeptin signaling is suppressed by short term fasting. It has been reported that hypothalamic Kiss1 and Kiss1r mRNA expression decreased after 48h of fasting in male rhesus monkey. But the mechanism involved in the reduction of kisspeptin signaling after 48h of fasting is unknown. Recent studies have suggested the role of afferent excitatory and inhibitory pathways in the regulation of kisspeptin neurons. Therefore, this study was designed to observe the changes in the glutamate and GABA signaling during fed and 48h fasting states by performing immunofluorescence to examine the interaction of kisspeptin neurons with NR1 subunit of NMDA receptors and by performing SYBR green qRT-PCR to measure and quantify the levels of Kiss1, Kiss1r, NR1 and GAD67 mRNA in the POA and MBH of adult male rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) during 48h of fasting (n=2) and fed ad libitum (n=2). Plasma testosterone (pfasting. Our results clearly showed that expression of hypothalamic Kiss1, Kiss1r and NR1 mRNA was significantly (pfasting. These observations suggest that decreased kisspeptin signaling during fasting may occur due to reduction in glutamatergic inputs to kisspeptin neurons. Our results also suggest that fasting induced suppression of kisspeptin signaling is not mediated through GABAergic neurons.

  7. Suppression of Inflammatory Mediators by Cruciferous Vegetable-Derived Indole-3-Carbinol and Phenylethyl Isothiocyanate in Lipopolysaccharide-Activated Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo-Ting Tsai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to examine the effects of indole-3-carbinol (I3C and β-phenylethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC, bioactive components present in cruciferous vegetable, on the production of inflammatory mediators, including nitric oxide (NO, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and interleukin-10 (IL-10, in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. Possible mechanisms of the NO-inhibitory effects were also explored. The results indicated that I3C and PEITC inhibited NO production, and this suppression was associated with decreased production of TNF-α and IL-10 by activated macrophages. In addition, I3C suppressed NO production even after the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS protein had been produced, but such an inhibitory effect was not observed in cells treated with PEITC. Furthermore, both compounds reduced the NO contents generated from an NO donor in a cell-free condition, suggesting that the increased NO clearance may have contributed to the NO-inhibitory effects. In summary, both I3C and PEITC possessed antiinflammatory effects by inhibiting the productions of NO, TNF-α, and IL-10, although the NO-inhibitory effects may have involved in different mechanisms.

  8. Suppression of polymorphonuclear (PMN) and monocyte-mediated inhibition of Candida albicans growth by delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djeu, J.Y.; Parapanios, A.; Halkias, D.; Friedman, H.

    1986-03-05

    This study was an in vitro attempt to identify the effector cells responsible for growth inhibition of the opportunistic fungus, candida albicans, and to determine if THC or another marijuana derivatives, 11-hydroxyTHC, would adversely affect their function. Using a 24h radiolabel assay, the authors found that growth inhibition of C. albicans was primarily mediated by PMN and monocytes that could be isolated normal human peripheral blood. Both effector cell types caused almost complete inhibition of Candida growth at effector/target ratio of 300/1 and inhibition was often still seen at 30/1-. Incubation of PMN, PBL, or monocytes for 1 hr at 37C with THC or 11-hydroxyTHC caused a marked suppression of function in all 3 cell populations. Maximal suppression was obtained with 7.5-10..mu..g/ml of the drugs in medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) or with 2-4..mu..g/ml in 1% FBS. These drug concentrations did not affect lymphoid cell viability or candida growth in the absence of lymphoid effector cells. Marijuana derivatives, therefore, are doubly dangerous in that opportunistic fungi such as C. albicans can grow in their presence while the effector cells that control fungal growth are readily inactivated.

  9. mTOR signaling promotes stem cell activation via counterbalancing BMP-mediated suppression during hair regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhili; Lei, Xiaohua; Zhang, Xudong; Zhang, Huishan; Liu, Shuang; Chen, Qi; Hu, Huimin; Wang, Xinyue; Ning, Lina; Cao, Yujing; Zhao, Tongbiao; Zhou, Jiaxi; Chen, Ting; Duan, Enkui

    2015-02-01

    Hair follicles (HFs) undergo cycles of degeneration (catagen), rest (telogen), and regeneration (anagen) phases. Anagen begins when the hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) obtain sufficient activation cues to overcome suppressive signals, mainly the BMP pathway, from their niche cells. Here, we unveil that mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling is activated in HFSCs, which coincides with the HFSC activation at the telogen-to-anagen transition. By using both an inducible conditional gene targeting strategy and a pharmacological inhibition method to ablate or inhibit mTOR signaling in adult skin epithelium before anagen initiation, we demonstrate that HFs that cannot respond to mTOR signaling display significantly delayed HFSC activation and extended telogen. Unexpectedly, BMP signaling activity is dramatically prolonged in mTOR signaling-deficient HFs. Through both gain- and loss-of-function studies in vitro, we show that mTORC1 signaling negatively affects BMP signaling, which serves as a main mechanism whereby mTORC1 signaling facilitates HFSC activation. Indeed, in vivo suppression of BMP by its antagonist Noggin rescues the HFSC activation defect in mTORC1-null skin. Our findings reveal a critical role for mTOR signaling in regulating stem cell activation through counterbalancing BMP-mediated repression during hair regeneration.

  10. Biocontrol agents-mediated suppression of oxalic acid induced cell death during Sclerotinia sclerotiorum-pea interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Akansha; Singh, Akanksha; Singh, Surendra; Sarma, Birinchi Kumar; Singh, Harikesh Bahadur

    2015-05-01

    Oxalic acid (OA) is an important pathogenic factor during early Sclerotinia sclerotiorum-host interaction and might work by reducing hydrogen peroxide production (H2 O2 ). In the present investigation, oxalic acid-induced cell death in pea was studied. Pea plants treated with biocontrol agents (BCAs) viz., Pseudomonas aeruginosa PJHU15, Bacillus subtilis BHHU100, and Trichoderma harzianum TNHU27 either singly and/or in consortium acted on S. sclerotiorum indirectly by enabling plants to inhibit the OA-mediated suppression of oxidative burst via induction of H2 O2 . Our results showed that BCA treated plants upon treatment with culture filtrate of the pathogen, conferred the resistance via. significantly decreasing relative cell death of pea against S. sclerotiorum compared to control plants without BCA treatment but treated with the culture filtrate of the pathogen. The results obtained from the present study indicate that the microbes especially in consortia play significant role in protection against S. sclerotiorum by modulating oxidative burst and partially enhancing tolerance by increasing the H2 O2 generation, which is otherwise suppressed by OA produced by the pathogen.

  11. Bacteriophage Mediates Efficient Gene Transfer in Combination with Conventional Transfection Reagents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Donnelly

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of commercially available transfection reagents for gene transfer applications has revolutionized the field of molecular biology and scientific research. However, the challenge remains in ensuring that they are efficient, safe, reproducible and cost effective. Bacteriophage (phage-based viral vectors have the potential to be utilized for general gene transfer applications within research and industry. Yet, they require adaptations in order to enable them to efficiently enter cells and overcome mammalian cellular barriers, as they infect bacteria only; furthermore, limited progress has been made at increasing their efficiency. The production of a novel hybrid nanocomplex system consisting of two different nanomaterial systems, phage vectors and conventional transfection reagents, could overcome these limitations. Here we demonstrate that the combination of cationic lipids, cationic polymers or calcium phosphate with M13 bacteriophage-derived vectors, engineered to carry a mammalian transgene cassette, resulted in increased cellular attachment, entry and improved transgene expression in human cells. Moreover, addition of a targeting ligand into the nanocomplex system, through genetic engineering of the phage capsid further increased gene expression and was effective in a stable cell line generation application. Overall, this new hybrid nanocomplex system (i provides enhanced phage-mediated gene transfer; (ii is applicable for laboratory transfection processes and (iii shows promise within industry for large-scale gene transfer applications.

  12. Comparative Effects of Electron Transfer Mediators on the Bioreduction of Fe(III) Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Loughlin, E. J.

    2007-12-01

    The transfer of electrons from microbes to sparingly-soluble, extracellular electron acceptors such as Fe(III) oxides can occur via direct contact with the mineral surface, by dissolution of the mineral facilitated by exogenous or endogenous ligands and subsequent reduction of the dissolved Fe(III) ligand complex, and by facilitated electron transfer involving endogenous or exogenous electron transfer mediators (ETMs, also commonly referred to as electron shuttles) that are reduced by the microbes and then subsequently diffuse away from the cell and transfer electrons to the Fe(III) mineral surface, regenerating the oxidized form of the ETM. This study examines the effects of a series of compounds representing major classes of natural and synthetic organic ETMs (including low molecular-mass quinones, humic substances, phenazines, phenoxazines, phenothiazines, and indigo derivatives) on the bioreduction of lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) by the dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens CN32. S. putrefaciens CN32 was able to reduce lepidocrocite in the absence of exogenous ETMs; however, relative to the control, all of the synthetic ETMs examined in this study enhanced the bioreduction of lepidocrocite. The extent of the enhanced bioreduction increased with decreasing reduction potential of the given ETM redox couple. However, the addition of Suwannee River fulvic acid, humic acid, or unfractionated NOM (10 mg organic C L-1) resulted in, at best, a minimal enhancement of lepidocrocite bioreduction relative to the control that did not contain any added exdogenous ETM. These results suggest that the relative contribution of humic substances to microbially mediated Fe(III) reduction may be minimal in low-carbon environments such as oligotrophic lakes and typical groundwaters.

  13. Suppression of GLI sensitizes medulloblastoma cells to mitochondria-mediated apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhongxiao; Li, Sisi; Sheng, Hansong; Cai, Ming; Ma, Lin Yuan Si; Hu, Liuxun; Xu, Shangyu; Yu, Li Sheng; Zhang, Nu

    2016-12-01

    The sonic hedgehog (SHH) signalling pathway plays the important role in medulloblastoma (MB). Altered GLI expression plays a key role in these processes, and the inhibition of GLI may be a good cancer-targeted therapy. This study aimed to investigate whether GANT61, a GLI inhibitor, may inhibit the SHH signalling pathway promoting cell mitochondria-mediated apoptosis and enhance cisplatin apoptosis antineoplastic therapy. In our study, we determined the effect of GANT61-mediated inhibition of GLI in Daoy MB cells. Cells were treated with different concentrations of GANT61 alone or in combination with cisplatin. Cell proliferation was assessed with CCK-8 assays, and cell invasion and migration were performed using 8-µm transwell inserts. Cell apoptosis was assessed with flow cytometric analysis and rhodamine 123. qPCR was used to complete RNA experiments. Protein expression was assessed with Western blotting. The GANT61 significantly inhibited cell proliferation. GANT61 decreased the cell migration and invasion, impairing these crucial steps in tumour progression. Cell apoptosis was significantly increased in Daoy cells. Rhodamine 123 assay showed that GANT61 could decrease the mitochondrial membrane potential promoting cell mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. GANT61 inhibited the expression of GLI and Bcl-2 at both the mRNA and protein levels and might affect the expression of Bax, caspase-3 and caspase-9 to promote cell intrinsic apoptosis. Furthermore, GANT61 could enhance cisplatin-induced apoptosis to decrease the IC50 value of cisplatin. Finally, data suggest that GANT61 could enhance cisplatin-induced apoptosis through promoting the expression of Bax, caspase-3 and caspase-9 protein levels. Our data suggest that the SHH signalling pathway plays an important role in MB. GLI is an oncogenic transcription factor in the SHH pathway, and targeting GLI with GANT61 results in favourable antitumour activity and targeted therapy.

  14. RAS signaling promotes resistance to JAK inhibitors by suppressing BAD-mediated apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Peter S; Sarosiek, Kristopher A; Lin, Kevin H; Meggendorfer, Manja; Schnittger, Susanne; Letai, Anthony; Wood, Kris C

    2014-12-23

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) frequently have an activating mutation in the gene encoding Janus kinase 2 (JAK2). Thus, targeting the pathway mediated by JAK and its downstream substrate, signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT), may yield clinical benefit for patients with MPNs containing the JAK2(V617F) mutation. Although JAK inhibitor therapy reduces splenomegaly and improves systemic symptoms in patients, this treatment does not appreciably reduce the number of neoplastic cells. To identify potential mechanisms underlying this inherent resistance phenomenon, we performed pathway-centric, gain-of-function screens in JAK2(V617F) hematopoietic cells and found that the activation of the guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) RAS or its effector pathways [mediated by the kinases AKT and ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase)] renders cells insensitive to JAK inhibition. Resistant MPN cells became sensitized to JAK inhibitors when also exposed to inhibitors of the AKT or ERK pathways. Mechanistically, in JAK2(V617F) cells, a JAK2-mediated inactivating phosphorylation of the proapoptotic protein BAD [B cell lymphoma 2 (BCL-2)-associated death promoter] promoted cell survival. In sensitive cells, exposure to a JAK inhibitor resulted in dephosphorylation of BAD, enabling BAD to bind and sequester the prosurvival protein BCL-XL (BCL-2-like 1), thereby triggering apoptosis. In resistant cells, RAS effector pathways maintained BAD phosphorylation in the presence of JAK inhibitors, yielding a specific dependence on BCL-XL for survival. In patients with MPNs, activating mutations in RAS co-occur with the JAK2(V617F) mutation in the malignant cells, suggesting that RAS effector pathways likely play an important role in clinically observed resistance.

  15. IL-1β suppresses TGF-β-mediated myofibroblast differentiation in cardiac fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønnum, Hasse; Eskildsen, Tilde; Andersen, Ditte Caroline;

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac fibrosis is a maladaptive response of the injured myocardium and is mediated through a complex interplay between molecular triggers and cellular responses. Interleukin (IL)-1β is a key inflammatory inducer in cardiac disease and promotes cell invasion and cardiomyocyte injury, but little...... a differentiation model of ventricular fibroblasts, we found that IL-1β instigated substantial anti-fibrogenic effects. In specific, IL-1β reduced proliferation, matrix activity, cell motility and α-smooth muscle actin expression, which are all hallmarks of myoFb differentiation. These findings suggest that IL-1β...

  16. Suppression of Human Tenon Fibroblast Cell Proliferation by Lentivirus-Mediated VEGF Small Hairpin RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongqiu Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The functions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF in scar formation after trabeculectomy were investigated in a human Tenon fibroblast cell line from glaucoma patients using lentivirus-mediated VEGF shRNA. Methods. Human Tenon fibroblast (HTF cells were isolated from scar tissue of glaucoma patients during secondary surgery. Lentivirus-VEGF-shRNA was constructed and transfected into HTF cells. Subsequently, VEGF mRNA and protein expression were analyzed using quantitative RT-PCR and western blotting, respectively, and the effects of VEGF knockdown were analyzed. The inhibition of HTF proliferation was monitored according to total cell numbers using ScanArray. Results. Both mRNA and protein levels of VEGF were reduced by lentivirus-mediated VEGF-shRNA, and proliferation of HTF cells was inhibited. Conclusions. Primary cultures of human Tenon fibroblast (HTF were established, and proliferation was decreased following inhibition of VEGF. VEGF may be a suitable therapeutic target for reducing scar tissue formation in glaucoma patients after filtration surgery.

  17. Suppression of Human Tenon Fibroblast Cell Proliferation by Lentivirus-Mediated VEGF Small Hairpin RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhongqiu; Hua, Wen; Li, Xuedong; Wang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. The functions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in scar formation after trabeculectomy were investigated in a human Tenon fibroblast cell line from glaucoma patients using lentivirus-mediated VEGF shRNA. Methods. Human Tenon fibroblast (HTF) cells were isolated from scar tissue of glaucoma patients during secondary surgery. Lentivirus-VEGF-shRNA was constructed and transfected into HTF cells. Subsequently, VEGF mRNA and protein expression were analyzed using quantitative RT-PCR and western blotting, respectively, and the effects of VEGF knockdown were analyzed. The inhibition of HTF proliferation was monitored according to total cell numbers using ScanArray. Results. Both mRNA and protein levels of VEGF were reduced by lentivirus-mediated VEGF-shRNA, and proliferation of HTF cells was inhibited. Conclusions. Primary cultures of human Tenon fibroblast (HTF) were established, and proliferation was decreased following inhibition of VEGF. VEGF may be a suitable therapeutic target for reducing scar tissue formation in glaucoma patients after filtration surgery.

  18. Autophagy and cellular senescence mediated by Sox2 suppress malignancy of cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Yeon Cho

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a critical cellular process required for maintaining cellular homeostasis in health and disease states, but the molecular mechanisms and impact of autophagy on cancer is not fully understood. Here, we found that Sox2, a key transcription factor in the regulation of the "stemness" of embryonic stem cells and induced-pluripotent stem cells, strongly induced autophagic phenomena, including intracellular vacuole formation and lysosomal activation in colon cancer cells. The activation occurred through Sox2-mediated ATG10 gene expression and resulted in the inhibition of cell proliferation and anchorage-independent colony growth ex vivo and tumor growth in vivo. Further, we found that Sox2-induced-autophagy enhanced cellular senescence by up-regulating tumor suppressors or senescence factors, including p16(INK4a, p21 and phosphorylated p53 (Ser15. Notably, knockdown of ATG10 in Sox2-expressing colon cancer cells restored cancer cell properties. Taken together, our results demonstrated that regulation of autophagy mediated by Sox2 is a mechanism-driven novel strategy to treat human colon cancers.

  19. si-RNA-mediated knockdown of PDLIM5 suppresses gastric cancer cell proliferation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanliang; Gao, Yongsheng; Xu, Yue; Sun, Xianjun; Song, Xilin; Ma, Heng; Yang, Mingshan

    2015-04-01

    Gastric cancer is the second most prominent cause of cancer mortality in the world. This study was designed to identify the possible use of si-RNA-mediated PDLIM5 gene silencing as a therapeutic tool for gastric cancer. Expression levels of PDLIM5 were detected in several gastric cancer cell lines using Western blot and qRT-PCR. We found PDLIM5 is highly expressed in all cultured gastric cancer cell lines. Small interfering RNA (si-RNA) was then employed to knock down PDLIM5 expression in MGC80-3 gastric cancer cells. Knockdown of PDLIM5 significantly inhibited cell proliferation and colony formation. Moreover, the absence of PDLIM5 in MGC80-3 cells led to S phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. This study highlights the critical role of PDLIM5 in gastric cancer cell growth and suggests that si-RNA-mediated silencing of PDLIM5 might serve as a potential therapeutic approach for the treatment of gastric cancer.

  20. Coordinated regulation of endocannabinoid-mediated retrograde synaptic suppression in the cerebellum by neuronal and astrocytic monoacylglycerol lipase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaojie; Chen, Yao; Vickstrom, Casey R.; Li, Yan; Viader, Andreu; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Liu, Qing-song

    2016-01-01

    The endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) mediates retrograde synaptic depression including depolarization-induced suppression of excitation (DSE) and inhibition (DSI). 2-AG is degraded primarily by monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), which is expressed in neurons and astrocytes. Using knockout mice in which MAGL is deleted globally or selectively in neurons or astrocytes, we investigated the relative contribution of neuronal and astrocytic MAGL to the termination of DSE and DSI in Purkinje cells (PCs) in cerebellar slices. We report that neuronal MAGL plays a predominant role in terminating DSE at climbing fiber (CF) to PC synapses, while both neuronal and astrocytic MAGL significantly contributes to the termination of DSE at parallel fiber (PF) to PC synapses and DSI at putative Stellate cell to PC synapses. Thus, DSE and DSI at different synapses is not uniformly affected by global and cell type-specific knockout of MAGL. Additionally, MAGL global knockout, but not cell type-specific knockout, caused tonic activation and partial desensitization of the CB1 receptor at PF-PC synapses. This tonic CB1 activation is mediated by 2-AG since it was blocked by the diacylglycerol lipase inhibitor DO34. Together, these results suggest that both neuronal and astrocytic MAGL contribute to 2-AG clearance and prevent CB1 receptor over-stimulation in the cerebellum. PMID:27775008

  1. Exponential enhancement of oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus potency by vector-mediated suppression of inflammatory responses in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altomonte, Jennifer; Wu, Lan; Chen, Li; Meseck, Marcia; Ebert, Oliver; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Fallon, John; Woo, Savio L C

    2008-01-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy is a promising strategy for treatment of malignancy, although its effectiveness is hampered by host antiviral inflammatory responses. The efficacy of treatment of oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) in rats bearing multifocal hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) can be substantially elevated by antibody-mediated depletion of natural killer (NK) cells. In order to test the hypothesis that the oncotyic potency of VSV can be exponentially elevated by evasion of inflammatory responses in vivo, we constructed a recombinant VSV vector expressing equine herpes virus-1 glycoprotein G, which is a broad-spectrum viral chemokine binding protein (rVSV-gG). Infusion of rVSV-gG via the hepatic artery into immune-competent rats bearing syngeneic and multifocal HCC in their livers, resulted in a reduction of NK and NKT cells in the tumors and a 1-log enhancement in intratumoral virus titer in comparison with a reference rVSV vector. The treatment led to increased tumor necrosis and substantially prolonged animal survival without toxicities. These results indicate that rVSV-gG has the potential to be developed as an effective and safe oncolytic agent to treat patients with advanced HCC. Furthermore, the novel concept that oncolytic potency can be substantially enhanced by vector-mediated suppression of host antiviral inflammatory responses could have general applicability in the field of oncolytic virotherapy for cancer.

  2. Anti-HMGB1 Neutralizing Antibody Ameliorates Neutrophilic Airway Inflammation by Suppressing Dendritic Cell-Mediated Th17 Polarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate that high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1 directs Th17 skewing by regulating dendritic cell (DC function. First, our in vitro studies reveal that recombinant HMGB1 (rHMGB1 activates myeloid DCs to produce IL-23 in vitro, and rHMGB1-activated DCs prime naïve lymphocytes to produce the Th17 cytokine IL-17A. Second, we demonstrate that anti-HMGB1 neutralizing antibody attenuates HMGB1 expression, neutrophilic inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness, and Th17-related cytokine secretion in vivo by using a murine model of neutrophilic asthma induced by ovalbumin (OVA plus lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Furthermore, anti-HMGB1 neutralizing antibody decreases the number of Th17 cells in lung cells and suppresses the production of IL-23 by lung CD11C+ APCs. Finally, we show that intranasal adoptive transfer of rHMGB1-activated DCs was sufficient to restore lung neutrophilic inflammation and the Th17 response in a DC-driven model of asthma, whereas the transfer of rHMGB1 plus anti-HMGB1-treated mDCs significantly reduced these inflammation phenotypes. These data suggest, for the first time, that HMGB1 drives the DC-polarized Th17-type response in allergic lung inflammation and that blocking HMGB1 may benefit the attenuation of neutrophilic airway inflammation in asthma.

  3. Surfactant protein-A suppresses eosinophil-mediated killing of Mycoplasma pneumoniae in allergic lungs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie G Ledford

    Full Text Available Surfactant protein-A (SP-A has well-established functions in reducing bacterial and viral infections but its role in chronic lung diseases such as asthma is unclear. Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Mp frequently colonizes the airways of chronic asthmatics and is thought to contribute to exacerbations of asthma. Our lab has previously reported that during Mp infection of non-allergic airways, SP-A aides in maintaining airway homeostasis by inhibiting an overzealous TNF-alpha mediated response and, in allergic mice, SP-A regulates eosinophilic infiltration and inflammation of the airway. In the current study, we used an in vivo model with wild type (WT and SP-A(-/- allergic mice challenged with the model antigen ovalbumin (Ova that were concurrently infected with Mp (Ova+Mp to test the hypothesis that SP-A ameliorates Mp-induced stimulation of eosinophils. Thus, SP-A could protect allergic airways from injury due to release of eosinophil inflammatory products. SP-A deficient mice exhibit significant increases in inflammatory cells, mucus production and lung damage during concurrent allergic airway disease and infection (Ova+Mp as compared to the WT mice of the same treatment group. In contrast, SP-A deficient mice have significantly decreased Mp burden compared to WT mice. The eosinophil specific factor, eosinophil peroxidase (EPO, which has been implicated in pathogen killing and also in epithelial dysfunction due to oxidative damage of resident lung proteins, is enhanced in samples from allergic/infected SP-A(-/- mice as compared to WT mice. In vitro experiments using purified eosinophils and human SP-A suggest that SP-A limits the release of EPO from Mp-stimulated eosinophils thereby reducing their killing capacity. These findings are the first to demonstrate that although SP-A interferes with eosinophil-mediated biologic clearance of Mp by mediating the interaction of Mp with eosinophils, SP-A simultaneously benefits the airway by limiting inflammation

  4. p53 mediates the suppression of cancer cell invasion by inducing LIMA1/EPLIN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Tomoko; Idogawa, Masashi; Sasaki, Yasushi; Tokino, Takashi

    2017-04-01

    The tumor suppressor gene p53 is frequently mutated in human cancer. p53 executes various functions, such as apoptosis induction and cell cycle arrest, by modulating transcriptional regulation. In this study, LIM domain and Actin-binding protein 1 (LIMA1) was identified as a target of the p53 family using a cDNA microarray. We also evaluated genome-wide occupancy of the p53 protein by performing chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-seq) and identified two p53 response elements in the LIMA1 gene. LIMA1 protein levels were increased by treatment with nutlin-3a, a small molecule that activates endogenous p53. In addition, LIMA1 expression was significantly downregulated in cancers compared with normal tissues. Knockdown of LIMA1 significantly enhanced cancer cell invasion and partially inhibited p53-induced suppression of cell invasion. Furthermore, low expression of LIMA1 in cancer patients correlated with decreased survival and poor prognosis. Thus, p53-induced LIMA1 inhibits cell invasion, and the downregulation of LIMA1 caused by p53 mutation results in decreased survival in cancer patients. Collectively, this study reveals the molecular mechanism of LIMA1 downregulation in various cancers and suggests that LIMA1 may be a novel prognostic predictor and a therapeutic target for cancer.

  5. Fisetin Suppresses Macrophage-Mediated Inflammatory Responses by Blockade of Src and Syk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jun Ho; Kim, Mi-Yeon; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2015-09-01

    Flavonoids, such as fisetin (3,7,3',4'-tetrahydroxyflavone), are plant secondary metabolites. It has been reported that fisetin is able to perform numerous pharmacological roles including anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial, and anti-cancer activities; however, the exact anti-inflammatory mechanism of fisetin is not understood. In this study, the pharmacological action modes of fisetin in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophage-like cells were elucidated by using immunoblotting analysis, kinase assays, and an overexpression strategy. Fisetin diminished the release of nitric oxide (NO) and reduced the mRNA levels of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells without displaying cytotoxicity. This compound also blocked the nuclear translocation of p65/nuclear factor (NF)-κB. In agreement, the upstream phosphorylation events for NF-κB activation, composed of Src, Syk, and IκBα, were also reduced by fisetin. The phospho-Src level, triggered by overexpression of wild-type Src, was also inhibited by fisetin. Therefore, these results strongly suggest that fisetin can be considered a bioactive immunomodulatory compound with anti-inflammatory properties through suppression of Src and Syk activities.

  6. Internal structure-mediated ultrafast energy transfer in self-assembled polymer-blend dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Wu, Chang-Feng; Wang, Hai-Yu; Wang, Ya-Feng; Chen, Qi-Dai; Han, Wei; Qin, Wei-Ping; McNeill, Jason; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2013-07-01

    Applications of polymeric semiconductors in organic electronics and biosensors depend critically on the nature of energy transfer in these materials. Important questions arise as to how this long-range transport degrades in amorphous condensed solids which are most amenable to low-cost optoelectronic devices and how fast energy transfer could occur. Here, we address these in disordered, densely packed nanoparticles made from green-light-harvesting host polymers (PFBT) and deep-red-emitting dopant polymers (PF-DBT5). By femtosecond selective excitation of donor (BT) units, we study in detail the internal structure-mediated energy transfer to uniformly distributed, seldom acceptor (DBT) units. It has been unambiguously demonstrated that the creation of interchain species is responsible for the limitation of bulk exciton diffusion length in polymer materials. This interchain Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) becomes a preferred and dominant channel, and near 100% energy transfer efficiency could be achieved at high acceptor concentrations (>10 wt%). Side-chain carboxylic acid groups in functionalized polymer-blend dots slightly slow down the FRET rate, but it could not affect the Förster radius and FRET efficiency. These findings imply that a greater understanding of the role of interchain species could be an efficient approach to improve the cell efficiency.Applications of polymeric semiconductors in organic electronics and biosensors depend critically on the nature of energy transfer in these materials. Important questions arise as to how this long-range transport degrades in amorphous condensed solids which are most amenable to low-cost optoelectronic devices and how fast energy transfer could occur. Here, we address these in disordered, densely packed nanoparticles made from green-light-harvesting host polymers (PFBT) and deep-red-emitting dopant polymers (PF-DBT5). By femtosecond selective excitation of donor (BT) units, we study in detail the internal

  7. The microRNA miR-181c controls microglia-mediated neuronal apoptosis by suppressing tumor necrosis factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Li

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Post-ischemic microglial activation may contribute to neuronal damage through the release of large amounts of pro-inflammatory cytokines and neurotoxic factors. The involvement of microRNAs (miRNAs in the pathogenesis of disorders related to the brain and central nervous system has been previously studied, but it remains unknown whether the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines is regulated by miRNAs. Methods BV-2 and primary rat microglial cells were activated by exposure to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD. Global cerebral ischemia was induced using the four-vessel occlusion (4-VO model in rats. Induction of pro-inflammatory and neurotoxic factors, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, interleukin (IL-1β, and nitric oxide (NO, were assessed by ELISA, immunofluorescence, and the Griess assay, respectively. The miRNA expression profiles of OGD-activated BV-2 cells were subsequently compared with the profiles of resting cells in a miRNA microarray. BV-2 and primary rat microglial cells were transfected with miR-181c to evaluate its effects on TNF-α production after OGD. In addition, a luciferase reporter assay was conducted to confirm whether TNF-α is a direct target of miR-181c. Results OGD induced BV-2 microglial activation in vitro, as indicated by the overproduction of TNF-α, IL-1β, and NO. Global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury induced microglial activation and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the hippocampus. OGD also downregulated miR-181c expression and upregulated TNF-α expression. Overproduction of TNF-α after OGD-induced microglial activation provoked neuronal apoptosis, whereas the ectopic expression of miR-181c partially protected neurons from cell death caused by OGD-activated microglia. RNAinterference-mediated knockdown of TNF-α phenocopied the effect of miR-181c-mediated neuronal protection, whereas overexpression of TNF-α blocked the miR-181c-dependent suppression of apoptosis

  8. Caffeine suppresses homologous recombination through interference with RAD51-mediated joint molecule formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelensky, Alex N.; Sanchez, Humberto; Ristic, Dejan; Vidic, Iztok; van Rossum-Fikkert, Sari E.; Essers, Jeroen; Wyman, Claire; Kanaar, Roland

    2013-01-01

    Caffeine is a widely used inhibitor of the protein kinases that play a central role in the DNA damage response. We used chemical inhibitors and genetically deficient mouse embryonic stem cell lines to study the role of DNA damage response in stable integration of the transfected DNA and found that caffeine rapidly, efficiently and reversibly inhibited homologous integration of the transfected DNA as measured by several homologous recombination-mediated gene-targeting assays. Biochemical and structural biology experiments revealed that caffeine interfered with a pivotal step in homologous recombination, homologous joint molecule formation, through increasing interactions of the RAD51 nucleoprotein filament with non-homologous DNA. Our results suggest that recombination pathways dependent on extensive homology search are caffeine-sensitive and stress the importance of considering direct checkpoint-independent mechanisms in the interpretation of the effects of caffeine on DNA repair. PMID:23666627

  9. Exogenous electron shuttle-mediated extracellular electron transfer of Shewanella putrefaciens 200: electrochemical parameters and thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yundang; Liu, Tongxu; Li, Xiaomin; Li, Fangbai

    2014-08-19

    Despite the importance of exogenous electron shuttles (ESs) in extracellular electron transfer (EET), a lack of understanding of the key properties of ESs is a concern given their different influences on EET processes. Here, the ES-mediated EET capacity of Shewanella putrefaciens 200 (SP200) was evaluated by examining the electricity generated in a microbial fuel cell. The results indicated that all the ESs substantially accelerated the current generation compared to only SP200. The current and polarization parameters were linearly correlated with both the standard redox potential (E(ES)(0)) and the electron accepting capacity (EAC) of the ESs. A thermodynamic analysis of the electron transfer from the electron donor to the electrode suggested that the EET from c-type cytochromes (c-Cyts) to ESs is a crucial step causing the differences in EET capacities among various ESs. Based on the derived equations, both E(ES)(0) and EAC can quantitatively determine potential losses (ΔE) that reflect the potential loss of the ES-mediated EET. In situ spectral kinetic analysis of ES reduction by c-Cyts in a living SP200 suspension was first investigated with the E(ES), E(c-Cyt), and ΔE values being calculated. This study can provide a comprehensive understanding of the role of ESs in EET.

  10. Fibronectin matrix-mediated cohesion suppresses invasion of prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Dongxuan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Invasion is an important early step in the metastatic cascade and is the primary cause of death of prostate cancer patients. In order to invade, cells must detach from the primary tumor. Cell-cell and cell-ECM interactions are important regulators of cohesion - a property previously demonstrated to mediate cell detachment and invasion. The studies reported here propose a novel role for α5β1 integrin - the principle mediator of fibronectin matrix assembly (FNMA - as an invasion suppressor of prostate cancer cells. Methods Using a combination of biophysical and cell biological methods, and well-characterized prostate cancer cell lines of varying invasiveness, we explore the relationship between cohesion, invasiveness, and FNMA. Results We show that cohesion is inversely proportional to invasive capacity. We also show that more invasive cells express lower levels of α5β1 integrin and lack the capacity for FNMA. Cells were generated to over-express either wild-type α5 integrin or an integrin in which the cytoplasmic domain of α5 was replaced with that of α2. The α2 construct does not promote FNMA. We show that only wild-type α5 integrin promotes aggregate compaction, increases cohesion, and reduces invasion of the more aggressive cells, and that these effects can be blocked by the 70-kDa fibronectin fragment. Conclusions We propose that restoring capacity for FNMA in deficient cells can increase tumor intercellular cohesion to a point that significantly reduces cell detachment and subsequent invasion. In prostate cancer, this could be of therapeutic benefit by blocking an early key step in the metastatic cascade.

  11. Triptolide T10 enhances AAV-mediated gene transfer in mice striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xinmiao; Zhang, Ting; Hu, Jing; Ding, Wei; Wang, Xiaomin

    2010-08-02

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) mediated gene transfer has been demonstrated to be an effective approach for treating Parkinson's disease (PD). Triptolide T10 is a monomeric compound isolated from tripterygium wilfordii Hook.f. (Thunder God vine), a traditional Chinese herb for anti-inflammatory medications. In the present study, we co-administered T10 with recombinant AAV2 in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells and in the striatum of C57BL/6 mice, and then evaluated the AAV-mediated gene expression levels. The results have shown that T10 significantly augmented the expression of AAV-mediated gene in a dose-dependent fashion without detectable cytotoxicity. As growing evidence indicated that inflammation contributed to the progression of PD, and the anti-inflammatory effect of T10 was shown in our previous studies, our data of T10 to enhance AAV transduction suggest that T10 might be potentially used as a facilitating reagent for the AAV gene therapy applications in neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. Cellular restriction of retrovirus particle-mediated mRNA transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galla, Melanie; Schambach, Axel; Towers, Greg J; Baum, Christopher

    2008-03-01

    Analyzing cellular restriction mechanisms provides insight into viral replication strategies, identifies targets for antiviral drug design, and is crucial for the development of novel tools for experimental or therapeutic delivery of genetic information. We have previously shown that retroviral vector mutants that are unable to initiate reverse transcription mediate a transient expression of any sequence which replaces the gag-pol transcription unit, a process we call retrovirus particle-mediated mRNA transfer (RMT). Here, we further examined the mechanism of RMT by testing its sensitivity to cellular restriction factors and short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs). We found that both human TRIM5alpha and, to a lesser extent, Fv1 effectively restrict RMT if the RNA is delivered by a restriction-sensitive capsid. While TRIM5alpha restriction of RMT led to reduced levels of retroviral mRNA in target cells, restriction by Fv1 did not. Treatment with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 partially relieved TRIM5alpha-mediated restriction of RMT. Finally, cells expressing shRNAs specifically targeting the retroviral mRNA inhibited RMT particles, but not reverse-transcribing particles. Retroviral mRNA may thus serve as a translation template if not used as a template for reverse transcription. Our data imply that retroviral nucleic acids become accessible to host factors, including ribosomes, as a result of particle remodeling during cytoplasmic trafficking.

  13. RETROVIRAL MEDIATED EFFICIENT TRANSFER ANDEXPRESSION OF MULTIPLE DRUG RESISTANCE GENE TO HUMAN LEUKEMIC CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate retroviral-mediated transfer and expression of human multidrug resistance (MDR) gene MDR1 in leukemic cells. Methods: Human myeloid cells, K562 and NB4, were infected by MDR retrovirus from the producer PA317/HaMDR, and the resistant cells were selected with cytotoxic drug. The transfer and expression of MDR1 gene was analyzed by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), flow cytometry (FCM) and semisolid colonies cultivation. Results: The resistant cells, K562/MDR and NB4/MDR, in which integration of the exogenous MDR1 gene was confirmed by PCR analysis, displayed a typical MDR phenotype. The expression of MDR1 transgene was detected on truncated as well as full-length transcripts. Moreover, the resistant cells were P-glycoprotein postiive at 78.0% to 98.7% analyzed with FCM. The transduction efficieny in K562 cells was studied on suspension cultures and single-cell colonies. The transduction was more efficient in coculture system (67.9%~ 72.5%) than in supernatant system (33.1%~ 46.8%), while growth factors may improve the efficiency. Conclusion: Retrovirus could allow a functional transfer and expression of MDR1 gene in human leukemia cells, and MDR1 might act as a dominant selectable gene for coexpression with the genes of interest in gene therapy.

  14. Effective generation of transgenic pigs and mice by linker based sperm-mediated gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih Ping Yao

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transgenic animals have become valuable tools for both research and applied purposes. The current method of gene transfer, microinjection, which is widely used in transgenic mouse production, has only had limited success in producing transgenic animals of larger or higher species. Here, we report a linker based sperm-mediated gene transfer method (LB-SMGT that greatly improves the production efficiency of large transgenic animals. Results The linker protein, a monoclonal antibody (mAb C, is reactive to a surface antigen on sperm of all tested species including pig, mouse, chicken, cow, goat, sheep, and human. mAb C is a basic protein that binds to DNA through ionic interaction allowing exogenous DNA to be linked specifically to sperm. After fertilization of the egg, the DNA is shown to be successfully integrated into the genome of viable pig and mouse offspring with germ-line transfer to the F1 generation at a highly efficient rate: 37.5% of pigs and 33% of mice. The integration is demonstrated again by FISH analysis and F2 transmission in pigs. Furthermore, expression of the transgene is demonstrated in 61% (35/57 of transgenic pigs (F0 generation. Conclusions Our data suggests that LB-SMGT could be used to generate transgenic animals efficiently in many different species.

  15. Stimulation of allergen-loaded macrophages by TLR9-ligand potentiates IL-10-mediated suppression of allergic airway inflammation in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, JLM; van Esch, BCAM; Jeurink, PV; Hofman, GA; van Oosterhout, AJM

    2004-01-01

    Background: Previously, we demonstrated that OVA-loaded macrophages (OVA-M) partially suppress OVA-induced airway manifestations of asthma in BALB/c mice. In vitro studies showed that OVA-M start to produce IL-10 upon interaction with allergen-specific T cells, which might mediate their immunosuppre

  16. Specific Btk inhibition suppresses B cell- and myeloid cell-mediated arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Paolo, Julie A.; Huang, Tao; Balazs, Mercedesz; Barbosa, James; Barck, Kai H.; Bravo, Brandon J.; Carano, Richard A.D.; Darrow, James; Davies, Douglas R.; DeForge, Laura E.; Diehl, Lauri; Ferrando, Ronald; Gallion, Steven L.; Giannetti, Anthony M.; Gribling, Peter; Hurez, Vincent; Hymowitz, Sarah G.; Jones, Randall; Kropf, Jeffrey E.; Lee, Wyne P.; Maciejewski, Patricia M.; Mitchell, Scott A.; Rong, Hong; Staker, Bart L.; Whitney, J. Andrew; Yeh, Sherry; Young, Wendy B.; Yu, Christine; Zhang, Juan; Reif, Karin; Currie, Kevin S. (CGI); (Emerald); (Genentech)

    2011-09-20

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which Btk mediates inflammation are poorly understood. Here we describe the discovery of CGI1746, a small-molecule Btk inhibitor chemotype with a new binding mode that stabilizes an inactive nonphosphorylated enzyme conformation. CGI1746 has exquisite selectivity for Btk and inhibits both auto- and transphosphorylation steps necessary for enzyme activation. Using CGI1746, we demonstrate that Btk regulates inflammatory arthritis by two distinct mechanisms. CGI1746 blocks B cell receptor-dependent B cell proliferation and in prophylactic regimens reduces autoantibody levels in collagen-induced arthritis. In macrophages, Btk inhibition abolishes Fc{gamma}RIII-induced TNF{alpha}, IL-1{beta} and IL-6 production. Accordingly, in myeloid- and Fc{gamma}R-dependent autoantibody-induced arthritis, CGI1746 decreases cytokine levels within joints and ameliorates disease. These results provide new understanding of the function of Btk in both B cell- or myeloid cell-driven disease processes and provide a compelling rationale for targeting Btk in rheumatoid arthritis.

  17. Specific Btk inhibition suppresses B cell- and myeloid cell-mediated arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Paolo, Julie A; Huang, Tao; Balazs, Mercedesz; Barbosa, James; Barck, Kai H; Bravo, Brandon J; Carano, Richard A.D.; Darrow, James; Davies, Douglas R; DeForge, Laura E; Diehl, Lauri; Ferrando, Ronald; Gallion, Steven L; Giannetti, Anthony M; Gribling, Peter; Hurez, Vincent; Hymowitz, Sarah G; Jones, Randall; Kropf, Jeffrey E; Lee, Wyne P; Maciejewski, Patricia M; Mitchell, Scott A; Rong, Hong; Staker, Bart L; Whitney, J Andrew; Yeh, Sherry; Young, Wendy B; Yu, Christine; Zhang, Juan; Reif, Karin; Currie, Kevin S [CGI; (Emerald); (Genentech)

    2011-08-29

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which Btk mediates inflammation are poorly understood. Here we describe the discovery of CGI1746, a small-molecule Btk inhibitor chemotype with a new binding mode that stabilizes an inactive nonphosphorylated enzyme conformation. CGI1746 has exquisite selectivity for Btk and inhibits both auto- and transphosphorylation steps necessary for enzyme activation. Using CGI1746, we demonstrate that Btk regulates inflammatory arthritis by two distinct mechanisms. CGI1746 blocks B cell receptor–dependent B cell proliferation and in prophylactic regimens reduces autoantibody levels in collagen-induced arthritis. In macrophages, Btk inhibition abolishes FcγRIII-induced TNFα, IL-1β and IL-6 production. Accordingly, in myeloid- and FcγR-dependent autoantibody-induced arthritis, CGI1746 decreases cytokine levels within joints and ameliorates disease. These results provide new understanding of the function of Btk in both B cell– or myeloid cell–driven disease processes and provide a compelling rationale for targeting Btk in rheumatoid arthritis.

  18. Curcumin Suppresses Intestinal Fibrosis by Inhibition of PPARγ-Mediated Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bin; Wang, Hui; Shen, Cunsi; Chen, Hao

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal fibrotic stricture is a major complication of Crohn's disease (CD) and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is considered as an important contributor to the formation of intestinal fibrosis by increasing extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Curcumin, a compound derived from rhizomes of Curcuma, has been demonstrated with a potent antifibrotic effect. However, its effect on intestinal fibrosis and the potential mechanism is not completely understood. Here we found that curcumin pretreatment significantly represses TGF-β1-induced Smad pathway and decreases its downstream α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) gene expression in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6); in contrast, curcumin increases expression of E-cadherin and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) in IEC-6. Moreover, curcumin promotes nuclear translocation of PPARγ and the inhibitory effect of curcumin on EMT could be reversed by PPARγ antagonist GW9662. Consistently, in the rat model of intestinal fibrosis induced by 2,4,5-trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS), oral curcumin attenuates intestinal fibrosis by increasing the expression of PPARγ and E-cadherin and decreasing the expression of α-SMA, FN, and CTGF in colon tissue. Collectively, these results indicated that curcumin is able to prevent EMT progress in intestinal fibrosis by PPARγ-mediated repression of TGF-β1/Smad pathway. PMID:28203261

  19. Blockade of microglial KATP -channel abrogates suppression of inflammatory-mediated inhibition of neural precursor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Francisco J; Vukovic, Jana; Rodríguez, Manuel J; Bartlett, Perry F

    2014-02-01

    Microglia positively affect neural progenitor cell physiology through the release of inflammatory mediators or trophic factors. We demonstrated previously that reactive microglia foster K(ATP) -channel expression and that blocking this channel using glibenclamide administration enhances striatal neurogenesis after stroke. In this study, we investigated whether the microglial K(ATP) -channel directly influences the activation of neural precursor cells (NPCs) from the subventricular zone using transgenic Csf1r-GFP mice. In vitro exposure of NPCs to lipopolysaccharide and interferon-gamma resulted in a significant decrease in precursor cell number. The complete removal of microglia from the culture or exposure to enriched microglia culture also decreased the precursor cell number. The addition of glibenclamide rescued the negative effects of enriched microglia on neurosphere formation and promoted a ∼20% improvement in precursor cell number. Similar results were found using microglial-conditioned media from isolated microglia. Using primary mixed glial and pure microglial cultures, glibenclamide specifically targeted reactive microglia to restore neurogenesis and increased the microglial production of the chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). These findings provide the first direct evidence that the microglial K(ATP) -channel is a regulator of the proliferation of NPCs under inflammatory conditions.

  20. SCFSlimb ubiquitin ligase suppresses condensin II–mediated nuclear reorganization by degrading Cap-H2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buster, Daniel W.; Daniel, Scott G.; Nguyen, Huy Q.; Windler, Sarah L.; Skwarek, Lara C.; Peterson, Maureen; Roberts, Meredith; Meserve, Joy H.; Hartl, Tom; Klebba, Joseph E.; Bilder, David; Bosco, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Condensin complexes play vital roles in chromosome condensation during mitosis and meiosis. Condensin II uniquely localizes to chromatin throughout the cell cycle and, in addition to its mitotic duties, modulates chromosome organization and gene expression during interphase. Mitotic condensin activity is regulated by phosphorylation, but mechanisms that regulate condensin II during interphase are unclear. Here, we report that condensin II is inactivated when its subunit Cap-H2 is targeted for degradation by the SCFSlimb ubiquitin ligase complex and that disruption of this process dramatically changed interphase chromatin organization. Inhibition of SCFSlimb function reorganized interphase chromosomes into dense, compact domains and disrupted homologue pairing in both cultured Drosophila cells and in vivo, but these effects were rescued by condensin II inactivation. Furthermore, Cap-H2 stabilization distorted nuclear envelopes and dispersed Cid/CENP-A on interphase chromosomes. Therefore, SCFSlimb-mediated down-regulation of condensin II is required to maintain proper organization and morphology of the interphase nucleus. PMID:23530065

  1. Suppression of gyrase-mediated resistance by C7 aryl fluoroquinolones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Muhammad; Mustaev, Arkady; Schwanz, Heidi A.; Luan, Gan; Shah, Nirali; Oppegard, Lisa M.; de Souza, Ernane C.; Hiasa, Hiroshi; Zhao, Xilin; Kerns, Robert J.; Drlica, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Fluoroquinolones form drug-topoisomerase-DNA complexes that rapidly block transcription and replication. Crystallographic and biochemical studies show that quinolone binding involves a water/metal-ion bridge between the quinolone C3-C4 keto-acid and amino acids in helix-4 of the target proteins, GyrA (gyrase) and ParC (topoisomerase IV). A recent cross-linking study revealed a second drug-binding mode in which the other end of the quinolone, the C7 ring system, interacts with GyrA. We report that addition of a dinitrophenyl (DNP) moiety to the C7 end of ciprofloxacin (Cip-DNP) reduced protection due to resistance substitutions in Escherichia coli GyrA helix-4, consistent with the existence of a second drug-binding mode not evident in X-ray structures of drug-topoisomerase-DNA complexes. Several other C7 aryl fluoroquinolones behaved in a similar manner with particular GyrA mutants. Treatment of E. coli cultures with Cip-DNP selectively enriched an uncommon variant, GyrA-A119E, a change that may impede binding of the dinitrophenyl group at or near the GyrA-GyrA interface. Collectively the data support the existence of a secondary quinolone-binding mode in which the quinolone C7 ring system interacts with GyrA; the data also identify C7 aryl derivatives as a new way to obtain fluoroquinolones that overcome existing GyrA-mediated quinolone resistance. PMID:26984528

  2. Suppression of gyrase-mediated resistance by C7 aryl fluoroquinolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Muhammad; Mustaev, Arkady; Schwanz, Heidi A; Luan, Gan; Shah, Nirali; Oppegard, Lisa M; de Souza, Ernane C; Hiasa, Hiroshi; Zhao, Xilin; Kerns, Robert J; Drlica, Karl

    2016-04-20

    Fluoroquinolones form drug-topoisomerase-DNA complexes that rapidly block transcription and replication. Crystallographic and biochemical studies show that quinolone binding involves a water/metal-ion bridge between the quinolone C3-C4 keto-acid and amino acids in helix-4 of the target proteins, GyrA (gyrase) and ParC (topoisomerase IV). A recent cross-linking study revealed a second drug-binding mode in which the other end of the quinolone, the C7 ring system, interacts with GyrA. We report that addition of a dinitrophenyl (DNP) moiety to the C7 end of ciprofloxacin (Cip-DNP) reduced protection due to resistance substitutions in Escherichia coli GyrA helix-4, consistent with the existence of a second drug-binding mode not evident in X-ray structures of drug-topoisomerase-DNA complexes. Several other C7 aryl fluoroquinolones behaved in a similar manner with particular GyrA mutants. Treatment of E. coli cultures with Cip-DNP selectively enriched an uncommon variant, GyrA-A119E, a change that may impede binding of the dinitrophenyl group at or near the GyrA-GyrA interface. Collectively the data support the existence of a secondary quinolone-binding mode in which the quinolone C7 ring system interacts with GyrA; the data also identify C7 aryl derivatives as a new way to obtain fluoroquinolones that overcome existing GyrA-mediated quinolone resistance.

  3. Molecular hydrogen suppresses FcepsilonRI-mediated signal transduction and prevents degranulation of mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Tomohiro; Fujita, Yasunori; Ito, Mikako; Masuda, Akio; Ohno, Kinji; Ichihara, Masatoshi; Kojima, Toshio; Nozawa, Yoshinori; Ito, Masafumi

    2009-11-27

    Molecular hydrogen ameliorates oxidative stress-associated diseases in animal models. We found that oral intake of hydrogen-rich water abolishes an immediate-type allergic reaction in mice. Using rat RBL-2H3 mast cells, we demonstrated that hydrogen attenuates phosphorylation of the FcepsilonRI-associated Lyn and its downstream signal transduction, which subsequently inhibits the NADPH oxidase activity and reduces the generation of hydrogen peroxide. We also found that inhibition of NADPH oxidase attenuates phosphorylation of Lyn in mast cells, indicating the presence of a feed-forward loop that potentiates the allergic responses. Hydrogen accordingly inhibits all tested signaling molecule(s) in the loop. Hydrogen effects have been solely ascribed to exclusive removal of hydroxyl radical. In the immediate-type allergic reaction, hydrogen exerts its beneficial effect not by its radical scavenging activity but by modulating a specific signaling pathway. Effects of hydrogen in other diseases are possibly mediated by modulation of yet unidentified signaling pathways. Our studies also suggest that hydrogen is a gaseous signaling molecule like nitric oxide.

  4. Suppression of ceramide-mediated programmed cell death by sphingosine-1-phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuvillier, O; Pirianov, G; Kleuser, B; Vanek, P G; Coso, O A; Gutkind, S; Spiegel, S

    1996-06-27

    Ceramide is an important regulatory participant of programmed cell death (apoptosis) induced by tumour-necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and Fas ligand, members of the TNF superfamily. Conversely, sphingosine and sphingosine-1-phosphate, which are metabolites of ceramide, induce mitogenesis and have been implicated as second messengers in cellular proliferation induced by platelet-derived growth factor and serum. Here we report that sphingosine-1-phosphate prevents the appearance of the key features of apoptosis, namely intranucleosomal DNA fragmentation and morphological changes, which result from increased concentrations of ceramide. Furthermore, inhibition of ceramide-mediated apoptosis by activation of protein kinase C results from stimulation of sphingosine kinase and the concomitant increase in intracellular sphingosine-1-phosphate. Finally sphingosine-1-phosphate not only stimulates the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway, it counteracts the ceramide-induced activation of stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK/JNK). Thus, the balance between the intracellular levels of ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate and their regulatory effects on different family members of mitogen-activated protein kinases determines the fate of the cell.

  5. Regulator of G protein signaling 1 suppresses CXCL12-mediated migration and AKT activation in RPMI 8226 human plasmacytoma cells and plasmablasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Hyo-Kyung; Gil, Minchan; Lee, Yoonkyung; Lee, Hyunji; Lee, A-Neum; Roh, Jin; Park, Chan-Sik

    2015-01-01

    Migration of plasma cells to the bone marrow is critical factor to humoral immunity and controlled by chemokines. Regulator of G protein signaling 1 (RGS1) is a GTPase-activating protein that controls various crucial functions such as migration. Here, we show that RGS1 controls the chemotactic migration of RPMI 8226 human plasmacytoma cells and human plasmablasts. LPS strongly increased RGS1 expression and retarded the migration of RPMI 8226 cells by suppressing CXCL12-mediated AKT activation. RGS1 knockdown by siRNA abolished the retardation of migration and AKT suppression by LPS. RGS1-dependent regulation of migration via AKT is also observed in cultured plasmablasts. We propose novel functions of RGS1 that suppress AKT activation and the migration of RPMI 8226 cells and plasmablasts in CXCL12-mediated chemotaxis.

  6. Suppression of edr2-mediated powdery mildew resistance, cell death and ethylene-induced senescence by mutations in ALD1 in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haozhen Nie; Yingying Wu; Chunpeng Yao; Dingzhong Tang

    2011-01-01

    EDR2 is a negative regulator of the defense response and cell death in Arabidopsis. Loss-of-function of EDR2 leads to enhanced resistance to powdery mildew. To identify new components in the EDR2 signal transduction pathway, mutations that suppress edr2 resistant phenotypes were screened. Three mutants, edts5-1, edts5-2 and edts5-3 (edr (t)wo (s)uppressor 5), were identified. The EDTS5 gene was identified by map-based cloning and previously was shown to encode an aminotransferase (ALD1). Therefore we renamed these three alleles ald1-10, ald1-11 and ald1-12, respectively. Mutations in ALD1 suppressed all edr2-mediated phenotypes, including powdery mildew resistance, programmed cell death and ethylene-induced senescence. Accumulation of hydrogen peroxide in edr2 was also suppressed by ald1 mutation. The expression of defense-related genes was up-regulated in the edr2 mutant, and the up-regulation of those genes in edr2 was suppressed in the edr2/ald1 double mutant. The ald1 single mutant displayed delayed ethylene-induced senescence. In addition, ald1 mutation suppressed edr1-mediated powdery mildew resistance, but could not suppress the edr1/edr2 double-mutant phenotype. These data demonstrate that ALD1 plays important roles in edr2-mediated defense responses and senescence, and revealed a crosstalk between ethylene and salicylic acid signaling mediated by ALD1 and EDR2.

  7. Vismodegib suppresses TRAIL-mediated liver injury in a mouse model of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsova, Petra; Ibrahim, Samar H; Bronk, Steven F; Yagita, Hideo; Gores, Gregory J

    2013-01-01

    Hedgehog signaling pathway activation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of NASH. Despite this concept, hedgehog pathway inhibitors have not been explored. Thus, we examined the effect of vismodegib, a hedgehog signaling pathway inhibitor, in a diet-induced model of NASH. C57BL/6 mice were placed on 3-month chow or FFC (high saturated fats, fructose, and cholesterol) diet. One week prior to sacrifice, mice were treated with vismodegib or vehicle. Mice fed the FFC diet developed significant steatosis, which was unchanged by vismodegib therapy. In contrast, vismodegib significantly attenuated FFC-induced liver injury as manifested by reduced serum ALT and hepatic TUNEL-positive cells. In line with the decreased apoptosis, vismodegib prevented FFC-induced strong upregulation of death receptor DR5 and its ligand TRAIL. In addition, FFC-fed mice, but not chow-fed animals, underwent significant liver injury and apoptosis following treatment with a DR5 agonist; however, this injury was prevented by pre-treatment with vismodegib. Consistent with a reduction in liver injury, vismodegib normalized FFC-induced markers of inflammation including mRNA for TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and a variety of macrophage markers. Furthermore, vismodegib in FFC-fed mice abrogated indices of hepatic fibrogenesis. In conclusion, inhibition of hedgehog signaling with vismodegib appears to reduce TRAIL-mediated liver injury in a nutrient excess model of NASH, thereby attenuating hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. We speculate that hedgehog signaling inhibition may be salutary in human NASH.

  8. Vismodegib suppresses TRAIL-mediated liver injury in a mouse model of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Hirsova

    Full Text Available Hedgehog signaling pathway activation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of NASH. Despite this concept, hedgehog pathway inhibitors have not been explored. Thus, we examined the effect of vismodegib, a hedgehog signaling pathway inhibitor, in a diet-induced model of NASH. C57BL/6 mice were placed on 3-month chow or FFC (high saturated fats, fructose, and cholesterol diet. One week prior to sacrifice, mice were treated with vismodegib or vehicle. Mice fed the FFC diet developed significant steatosis, which was unchanged by vismodegib therapy. In contrast, vismodegib significantly attenuated FFC-induced liver injury as manifested by reduced serum ALT and hepatic TUNEL-positive cells. In line with the decreased apoptosis, vismodegib prevented FFC-induced strong upregulation of death receptor DR5 and its ligand TRAIL. In addition, FFC-fed mice, but not chow-fed animals, underwent significant liver injury and apoptosis following treatment with a DR5 agonist; however, this injury was prevented by pre-treatment with vismodegib. Consistent with a reduction in liver injury, vismodegib normalized FFC-induced markers of inflammation including mRNA for TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and a variety of macrophage markers. Furthermore, vismodegib in FFC-fed mice abrogated indices of hepatic fibrogenesis. In conclusion, inhibition of hedgehog signaling with vismodegib appears to reduce TRAIL-mediated liver injury in a nutrient excess model of NASH, thereby attenuating hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. We speculate that hedgehog signaling inhibition may be salutary in human NASH.

  9. Nicotine Suppressed Fetal Adrenal StAR Expression via YY1 Mediated-Histone Deacetylation Modification Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lian; Wang, Jian-Fei; Fan, Jie; Rao, Yi-Song; Liu, Fang; Yan, You-E; Wang, Hui

    2016-09-03

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein plays a pivotal role in steroidogenesis. Previously, we have demonstrated that prenatal nicotine exposure suppressed fetal adrenal steroidogenesis via steroidogenic factor 1 deacetylation. This study further explored the potential role of the transcriptional repressor Yin Yang 1 (YY1) in nicotine-mediated StAR inhibition. Nicotine was subcutaneously administered (1.0 mg/kg) to pregnant rats twice per day and NCI-H295A cells were treated with nicotine. StAR and YY1 expression were analyzed by real-time PCR, immunohistochemistry, and Western blotting. Histone modifications and the interactions between the YY1 and StAR promoter were assessed using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Prenatal nicotine exposure increased YY1 expression and suppressed StAR expression. ChIP assay showed that there was a decreasing trend for histone acetylation at the StAR promoter in fetal adrenal glands, whereas H3 acetyl-K14 at the YY1 promoter presented an increasing trend following nicotine exposure. Furthermore, in nicotine-treated NCI-H295A cells, nicotine enhanced YY1 expression and inhibited StAR expression. ChIP assay showed that histone acetylation decreased at the StAR promoter in NCI-H295A cells and that the interaction between the YY1 and StAR promoter increased. These data indicated that YY1-medicated histone deacetylation modification in StAR promoters might play an important role in the inhibitory effect of nicotine on StAR expression.

  10. Natural suppression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication is mediated by transitional memory CD8+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killian, M Scott; Johnson, Carl; Teque, Fernando; Fujimura, Sue; Levy, Jay A

    2011-02-01

    HIV replication is suppressed in vitro by a CD8(+) cell noncytotoxic antiviral response (CNAR). This activity directly correlates with an asymptomatic clinical state. The objective of this study was to identify the phenotype of CD8(+) cell subsets having strong CNAR activity. CD8(+) cell subset frequencies and CNAR levels were measured for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-uninfected individuals and three groups of HIV type 1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals: asymptomatic individuals with low-level viremia (vHIV), antiretroviral-drug-treated subjects with undetectable virus levels (TxHIV), and therapy-naïve aviremic elite controllers (EC). CD8(+) cells from the vHIV individuals exhibited the highest HIV-suppressing activity and had elevated frequencies of CD45RA(-) CD27(+) and PD-1(+) (CD279(+)) cells. Functional assessments of CD8(+) cells sorted into distinct subsets established that maximal CNAR activity was mediated by CD45RA(-) CCR7(-) CD27(+) and PD-1(+) CD8(+) cells. T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire profiles of CD8(+) cell subsets having strong CNAR activity exhibited increased perturbations in comparison to those of inactive subsets. Together, these studies suggest that CNAR is driven by HIV replication and that this antiviral activity is associated with oligoclonally expanded activated CD8(+) cells expressing PD-1 and having a transitional memory cell phenotype. The findings better describe the identity of CD8(+) cells showing CNAR and should facilitate the evaluation of this important immune response in studies of HIV pathogenesis, resistance to infection, and vaccine development.

  11. Adeno-associated virus-mediated doxycycline-regulatable TRAIL expression suppresses growth of human breast carcinoma in nude mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Liu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL functions as a cytokine to selectively kill various cancer cells without toxicity to most normal cells. Numerous studies have demonstrated the potential use of recombinant soluble TRAIL as a cancer therapeutic agent. We have showed previous administration of a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV vector expressing soluble TRAIL results in an efficient suppression of human tumor growth in nude mice. In the present study, we introduced Tet-On gene expression system into the rAAV vector to control the soluble TRAIL expression and evaluate the efficiency of the system in cancer gene therapy. Methods Controllability of the Tet-On system was determined by luciferase activity assay, and Western blotting and enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay. Cell viability was determined by MTT assay. The breast cancer xenograft animal model was established and recombinant virus was administrated through tail vein injection to evaluate the tumoricidal activity. Results The expression of soluble TRAIL could be strictly controlled by the Tet-On system in both normal and cancer cells. Transduction of human cancer cell lines with rAAV-TRE-TRAIL&rAAV-Tet-On under the presence of inducer doxycycline resulted in a considerable cell death by apoptosis. Intravenous injection of the recombinant virus efficiently suppressed the growth of human breast carcinoma in nude mice when activated by doxycycline. Conclusion These data suggest that rAAV-mediated soluble TRAIL expression under the control of the Tet-On system is a promising strategy for breast cancer therapy.

  12. Eukaryotic initiation factor 4G suppresses nonsense-mediated mRNA decay by two genetically separable mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joncourt, Raphael; Eberle, Andrea B; Rufener, Simone C; Mühlemann, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), which is best known for degrading mRNAs with premature termination codons (PTCs), is thought to be triggered by aberrant translation termination at stop codons located in an environment of the mRNP that is devoid of signals necessary for proper termination. In mammals, the cytoplasmic poly(A)-binding protein 1 (PABPC1) has been reported to promote correct termination and therewith antagonize NMD by interacting with the eukaryotic release factors 1 (eRF1) and 3 (eRF3). Using tethering assays in which proteins of interest are recruited as MS2 fusions to a NMD reporter transcript, we show that the three N-terminal RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) of PABPC1 are sufficient to antagonize NMD, while the eRF3-interacting C-terminal domain is dispensable. The RRM1-3 portion of PABPC1 interacts with eukaryotic initiation factor 4G (eIF4G) and tethering of eIF4G to the NMD reporter also suppresses NMD. We identified the interactions of the eIF4G N-terminus with PABPC1 and the eIF4G core domain with eIF3 as two genetically separable features that independently enable tethered eIF4G to inhibit NMD. Collectively, our results reveal a function of PABPC1, eIF4G and eIF3 in translation termination and NMD suppression, and they provide additional evidence for a tight coupling between translation termination and initiation.

  13. Antibody responses to allergen Lol pIV are suppressed following adoptive transfer of B lymphocytes from the internal image anti-idiotypic antibody-treated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, E M; Kisil, F T

    1995-10-01

    An internal image anti-idiotypic antibody, designated B1/1, was generated against an idiotope (Id91) of the monoclonal antibody (mAb91) specific for Lol pIV. The administration of B1/1 in PBS, at doses ranging from 100 ng to 100 micrograms/mouse, to syngeneic Balb/c mice resulted in the suppression of the formation of anti-Lol pIV antibodies that possessed the Id91. Spleen cells obtained from the mice 2 weeks after the treatment with B1/1 (25 micrograms/mouse) were adoptively transferred intravenously into the syngeneic recipients which were challenged intraperitoneally with Lol pIV in alum 2 hr after the transfer. The recipients were boosted with Lol pIV 14 days later. It was demonstrated that the transfer of splenic B cells (but not of T cells) from B1/1-treated donors induced a significant suppression of not only the level of IgE and IgG antibodies to Lol pIV, but also the level of antibodies possessing the Id91. Treatment of the B cells with mAb91 plus complement abrogated their ability to transfer the suppression. This study indicates that the treatment with the anti-Id B1/1 generated B cells that were characterized, serologically, as possessing the anti-Id-like antibodies on their surface and were responsible for transferring the suppression of the formation of antibodies to allergen Lol pIV and the expression of Id91.

  14. Homologous recombination mediates functional recovery of dysferlin deficiency following AAV5 gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William E Grose

    Full Text Available The dysferlinopathies comprise a group of untreatable muscle disorders including limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B, Miyoshi myopathy, distal anterior compartment syndrome, and rigid spine syndrome. As with other forms of muscular dystrophy, adeno-associated virus (AAV gene transfer is a particularly auspicious treatment strategy, however the size of the DYSF cDNA (6.5 kb negates packaging into traditional AAV serotypes known to express well in muscle (i.e. rAAV1, 2, 6, 8, 9. Potential advantages of a full cDNA versus a mini-gene include: maintaining structural-functional protein domains, evading protein misfolding, and avoiding novel epitopes that could be immunogenic. AAV5 has demonstrated unique plasticity with regards to packaging capacity and recombination of virions containing homologous regions of cDNA inserts has been implicated in the generation of full-length transcripts. Herein we show for the first time in vivo that homologous recombination following AAV5.DYSF gene transfer leads to the production of full length transcript and protein. Moreover, gene transfer of full-length dysferlin protein in dysferlin deficient mice resulted in expression levels sufficient to correct functional deficits in the diaphragm and importantly in skeletal muscle membrane repair. Intravascular regional gene transfer through the femoral artery produced high levels of transduction and enabled targeting of specific muscle groups affected by the dysferlinopathies setting the stage for potential translation to clinical trials. We provide proof of principle that AAV5 mediated delivery of dysferlin is a highly promising strategy for treatment of dysferlinopathies and has far-reaching implications for the therapeutic delivery of other large genes.

  15. HELZ2 Is an IFN Effector Mediating Suppression of Dengue Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco, Dahlene N.; Pratt, Henry; Kandilas, Stephen; Cheon, Scarlett Se Yun; Lin, Wenyu; Cronkite, D. Alex; Basavappa, Megha; Jeffrey, Kate L.; Anselmo, Anthony; Sadreyev, Ruslan; Yapp, Clarence; Shi, Xu; O'Sullivan, John F.; Gerszten, Robert E.; Tomaru, Takuya; Yoshino, Satoshi; Satoh, Tetsurou; Chung, Raymond T.

    2017-01-01

    response is mediated by HELZ2 transcriptional upregulation, enrichment of HELZ2 protein levels in the nucleus, and activation of a transcriptional program that appears to modulate intracellular lipid state. IEGs identified in this study may serve as both (1) potential targets for host directed antiviral design, downstream of the common flaviviral subversion point, as well as (2) possible biomarkers, whose variation, natural, or iatrogenic, could affect host response to viral infections.

  16. Transposase-Mediated Excision, Conjugative Transfer, and Diversity of ICE6013 Elements in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansevere, Emily A; Luo, Xiao; Park, Joo Youn; Yoon, Sunghyun; Seo, Keun Seok; Robinson, D Ashley

    2017-04-15

    ICE6013 represents one of two families of integrative conjugative elements (ICEs) identified in the pan-genome of the human and animal pathogen Staphylococcus aureus Here we investigated the excision and conjugation functions of ICE6013 and further characterized the diversity of this element. ICE6013 excision was not significantly affected by growth, temperature, pH, or UV exposure and did not depend on recA The IS30-like DDE transposase (Tpase; encoded by orf1 and orf2) of ICE6013 must be uninterrupted for excision to occur, whereas disrupting three of the other open reading frames (ORFs) on the element significantly affects the level of excision. We demonstrate that ICE6013 conjugatively transfers to different S. aureus backgrounds at frequencies approaching that of the conjugative plasmid pGO1. We found that excision is required for conjugation, that not all S. aureus backgrounds are successful recipients, and that transconjugants acquire the ability to transfer ICE6013 Sequencing of chromosomal integration sites in serially passaged transconjugants revealed a significant integration site preference for a 15-bp AT-rich palindromic consensus sequence, which surrounds the 3-bp target site that is duplicated upon integration. A sequence analysis of ICE6013 from different host strains of S. aureus and from eight other species of staphylococci identified seven divergent subfamilies of ICE6013 that include sequences previously classified as a transposon, a plasmid, and various ICEs. In summary, these results indicate that the IS30-like Tpase functions as the ICE6013 recombinase and that ICE6013 represents a diverse family of mobile genetic elements that mediate conjugation in staphylococci.IMPORTANCE Integrative conjugative elements (ICEs) encode the abilities to integrate into and excise from bacterial chromosomes and plasmids and mediate conjugation between bacteria. As agents of horizontal gene transfer, ICEs may affect bacterial evolution. ICE6013 represents one

  17. Construction of a genetic map of human chromosome 17 by use of chromosome-mediated gene transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Weiming; Gorman, P.A.; Rider, S.H.; Hedge, P.J.; Moore, G.; Prichard, C.; Sheer, D.; Solomon, E. (Imperial Cancer Research Fund, London (England))

    1988-11-01

    The authors used somatic-cell hybrids, containing as their only human genetic contribution part or all of chromosome 17, as donors for chromosome-mediated gene transfer. A total of 54 independent transfectant clones were isolated and analyzed by use of probes or isoenzymes for >20 loci located on chromosome 17. By combining the data from this chromosome-mediated gene transfer transfectant panel, conventional somatic-cell hybrids containing well-defined breaks on chromosome 17, and in situ hybridization they propose the following order for these loci; pter-(TP53-RNP2-D17S1)-(MYH2-MYH1)-D17Z1-CRYB1-(ERBA1-GCSF-NGL)-acute promyelocytic leukemia breakpoint-RNU2-HOX2-(NGFR-COLIAI-MPO)-GAA-UMPH-GHC-TK1-GALK-qter. Using chromosome-mediated gene transfer, they have also regionally localized the random probes D17S6 to D17S19 on chromosome 17.

  18. Lactose inhibits regulatory T-cell-mediated suppression of effector T-cell interferon-γ and IL-17 production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paasela, Monika; Kolho, Kaija-Leena; Vaarala, Outi; Honkanen, Jarno

    2014-12-14

    Our interest in lactose as an immunomodulatory molecule results from studies showing that lactose binds to galectin-9, which has been shown to have various regulatory functions in the immune system including regulation of T-cell responses. Impaired regulation of T helper (Th)1 and Th17 type immune responses and dysfunction of regulatory T cells (Treg) have been implicated in many human immune-mediated diseases. In the present study, we investigated the effects of lactose on immune regulation using co-cultures of human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-derived Treg and effector T cells (Teff) obtained from twenty healthy adults. Treg, i.e. CD4+CD25+CD127-, were isolated from PBMC by immunomagnetic separation. The fraction of CD4+CD127- cells that was depleted of CD25+ cells was used as Teff. Treg and Teff at a ratio 1:5 were activated and the effects of lactose on the secretion of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and IL-17 were analysed using ELISA for protein and quantitative RT-PCR for mRNA. Treg down-regulated the secretion of both IFN-γ (8.8-3.9 ng/ml, n 20, P= 0.003) and IL-17 (0.83-0.64 ng/ml, n 15, P= 0.04) in co-cultures, while in the presence of lactose the levels of secreted IFN-γ and IL-17 remained high and no down-regulation was observed (16.4 v. 3.99 ng/ml, n 20, Plactose inhibits human Treg-mediated suppression of Th1 and Th17 immune responses in vitro.

  19. Pharmacological inhibition of microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 suppresses epidermal growth factor receptor-mediated tumor growth and angiogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Finetti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Blockade of Prostaglandin (PG E(2 production via deletion of microsomal Prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1 gene reduces tumor cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo on xenograft tumors. So far the therapeutic potential of the pharmacological inhibition of mPGES-1 has not been elucidated. PGE(2 promotes epithelial tumor progression via multiple signaling pathways including the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR signaling pathway. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we evaluated the antitumor activity of AF3485, a compound of a novel family of human mPGES-1 inhibitors, in vitro and in vivo, in mice bearing human A431 xenografts overexpressing EGFR. Treatment of the human cell line A431 with interleukin-1beta (IL-1β increased mPGES-1 expression, PGE(2 production and induced EGFR phosphorylation, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2 expression. AF3485 reduced PGE(2 production, both in quiescent and in cells stimulated by IL-1β. AF3485 abolished IL-1β-induced activation of the EGFR, decreasing VEGF and FGF-2 expression, and tumor-mediated endothelial tube formation. In vivo, in A431 xenograft, AF3485, administered sub-chronically, decreased tumor growth, an effect related to inhibition of EGFR signalling, and to tumor microvessel rarefaction. In fact, we observed a decrease of EGFR phosphorylation, and VEGF and FGF-2 expression in tumours explanted from treated mice. CONCLUSION: Our work demonstrates that the pharmacological inhibition of mPGES-1 reduces squamous carcinoma growth by suppressing PGE(2 mediated-EGFR signalling and by impairing tumor associated angiogenesis. These results underscore the potential of mPGES-1 inhibitors as agents capable of controlling tumor growth.

  20. Beyond Vibrationally Mediated Electron Transfer: Coherent Phenomena Induced by Ultrafast Charge Separation

    CERN Document Server

    Huber, Robert; Moser, Jacques E; Grätzel, Michael; Wachtveitl, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Wave packet propagation succeeding electron transfer (ET) from alizarin dye molecules into the nanocrystalline TiO2 semiconductor has been studied by ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy. Due to the ultrafast time scale of the ET reaction of about 6 fs the system shows substantial differences to molecular ET systems. We show that the ET process is not mediated by molecular vibrations and therefore classical ET theories lose their applicability. Here the ET reaction itself prepares a vibrational wave packet and not the electromagnetic excitation by the laser pulse. Furthermore, the generation of phonons during polaron formation in the TiO2 lattice is observed in real time for this system. The presented investigations enable an unambiguous assignment of the involved photoinduced mechanisms and can contribute to a corresponding extension of molecular ET theories to ultrafast ET systems like alizarin/TiO2.

  1. Mapping of metastasis suppressor genes for prostate cancer by microcell-mediated chromosome transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TomohikoICHIKAWA; ShigeruHOSOKI; HiroyoshiSUZUKI; KoichiroAKAKURA; TatsuoIGARASHI; YuzoFURUYA; MitsuoOSHIMURA; CarrieW.RINKER-SCHAEFFER; NaokiNIHEI; JohnT.ISAACS; HaruoITO

    2000-01-01

    Aim: To identify the metastasis suppressor genes for prostate cancer. Methods: A copy of human chromosomes was introduced into the highly metastatic Dunning R-3327 rat prostate cancer cells by the use of microcell-mediated chromosome transfer. Relationships between the size of human chromosomes introduced into microcell hybrid clones and the number of lung metastases produced by the clones were analyzed to determine which part of human chromosomes contained the metastasis suppressor gene (s) for prostate cancer. To determine portions of human chromosomes introduced, G-banding chromosomal analysis, fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis, and polymerase chain reaction analysis were performed. Results: Each of microcell hybrid clones containing human chromosomes 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, or 17 showed decreased ability to metastasize to the lung without any loss of ttmaorigenicity. This demonstrates that these human chromosomes contain metastasis suppressor genes for prostate cancer. Spontaneous deletion of portions of human chromosomes was observed in the human chromosome 7, 10, 11, 12, and 17 studies. In the human chromosome 8 study, irradiated microcell-mediated chromosome transfer was performed to enrich chromosomal ann deletions of human chromosome 8. Molecular and cytogenetic analyses of microcell hybrid clones demonstrated that metastasis suppressor genes on human chromosomes were located on 7q21-22, 7q31.2-32, 8p21-12, 10q11-22, 11p13-11.2, 12p11-q13, 12q24-ter, and 17pter-q23. KAI1 and MKK4/SEKI were identified as metastasis suppressor genes from 11p11.2 and 17p12, respectively. Conclusion: This assay system is useful to identify metastasis suppressor gene (s) for prostate cancer.

  2. AAV5-mediated gene transfer to the parotid glands of non-human primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voutetakis, A; Zheng, C; Cotrim, AP; Mineshiba, F; Afione, S; Roescher, N; Swaim, WD; Metzger, M; Eckhaus, MA; Donahue, RE; Dunbar, CE; Chiorini, JA; Baum, BJ

    2010-01-01

    Salivary glands are potentially useful target sites for multiple clinical applications of gene transfer. Previously, we have shown that serotype 2 adeno-associated viral (AAV2) vectors lead to stable gene transfer in the parotid glands of rhesus macaques. As AAV5 vectors result in considerably greater transgene expression in murine salivary glands than do AAV2 vectors, herein we have examined the use of AAV5 vectors in macaques at two different doses (n = 3 per group; 1010 or 3 × 1011 particles per gland). AAV5 vector delivery, as with AAV2 vectors, led to no untoward clinical, hematological or serum chemistry responses in macaques. The extent of AAV5-mediated expression of rhesus erythropoietin (RhEpo) was dose-dependent and similar to that seen with an AAV2 vector. However, unlike results with the AAV2 vector, AAV5 vector-mediated RhEpo expression was transient. Maximal expression peaked at day 56, was reduced by ~80% on day 84 and thereafter remained near background levels until day 182 (end of experiment). Quantitative PCR studies of high-dose vector biodistribution at this last time point showed much lower AAV5 copy numbers in the targeted parotid gland (~1.7%) than found with the same AAV2 vector dose. Molecular analysis of the conformation of vector DNA indicated a markedly lower level of concatamerization for the AAV5 vector compared with that of a similar AAV2 vector. In addition, cellular immunological studies suggest that host response differences may occur with AAV2 and AAV5 vector delivery at this mucosal site. The aggregate data indicate that results with AAV5 vectors in murine salivary glands apparently do not extend to macaque glands. PMID:19759566

  3. Lipid-mediated glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor gene transfer to cultured porcine ventral mesencephalic tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer, Matthias; Meyer, Morten; Brevig, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    -mediated transfer of the gene for human glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) to embryonic (E27/28) porcine VM tissue kept as organotypic explant cultures. Treatment of the developing VM with two mitogens, basic fibroblast growth factor and epidermal growth factor, prior to transfection significantly...... numbers of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive neurons in the cultured VM tissue. We conclude that lipid-mediated gene transfer employed on embryonic pig VM explant cultures is a safe and effective method to improve survival of dopaminergic neurons and may become a valuable tool to improve allo...

  4. Suppression of prostaglandin E(2)-mediated c-fos mRNA induction by interleukin-4 in murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, D; Kawajiri, H; Takahashi, Y; Yoshimoto, T

    2000-03-01

    When murine peritoneal macrophages were stimulated for 30 min with arachidonic acid, the growth-associated immediate early gene c-fos was induced in a concentration-dependent manner as assessed by Northern blot analysis. The arachidonic acid-induced c-fos mRNA expression was inhibited by a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin, but not by a lipoxygenase inhibitor, nordihydroguaiaretic acid. Macrophages produced prostaglandin (PG) E(2) from arachidonic acid as determined by an enzyme immunoassay. Northern blot analysis revealed the expression of PGE receptor EP2 and EP4 subtypes, but not EP1 and EP3 in murine macrophages. PGE(2) brought about a marked elevation of cAMP, and c-fos mRNA expression was increased by PGE(2) and dibutyryl cAMP in these cells. These results suggest that arachidonic acid is transformed to PGE(2), which then binds to EP2 and EP4 receptors to increase intracellular cAMP and c-fos mRNA expression. Furthermore, the induction of c-fos by arachidonic acid, PGE(2), and cAMP was suppressed by pretreatment with interleukin (IL)-4. We also showed that the tyrosine phosphorylation of a Janus kinase, JAK3, is enhanced by IL-4 treatment, suggesting that the PGE(2)-mediated c-fos mRNA induction is inhibited by IL-4 through the tyrosine phosphorylation of JAK3.

  5. Zinc Prevents Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Formation by Induction of A20-Mediated Suppression of NF-κB Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Wei Yan

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation and degradation of elastin are the main processes in the development of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA. Recent studies show that zinc has an anti-inflammatory effect. Based on these, zinc may render effective therapy for the treatment of the AAA. Currently, we want to investigate the effects of zinc on AAA progression and its related molecular mechanism. Rat AAA models were induced by periaortic application of CaCl2. AAA rats were treated by daily intraperitoneal injection of ZnSO4 or vehicle alone. The aorta segments were collected at 4 weeks after surgery. The primary rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs were stimulated with TNF-α alone or with ZnSO4 for 3 weeks. The results showed that zinc supplementation significantly suppressed the CaCl2-induced expansion of the abdominal aortic diameter, as well as a preservation of medial elastin fibers in the aortas. Zinc supplementation also obviously attenuated infiltration of the macrophages and lymphocytes in the aortas. In addition, zinc reduced MMP-2 and MMP-9 production in the aortas. Most importantly, zinc treatment significantly induced A20 expression, along with inhibition of the NF-κB canonical signaling pathway in vitro in VSMCs and in vivo in rat AAA. This study demonstrated, for the first time, that zinc supplementation could prevent the development of rat experimental AAA by induction of A20-mediated inhibition of the NF-κB canonical signaling pathway.

  6. Therapeutic AAV9-mediated suppression of mutant SOD1 slows disease progression and extends survival in models of inherited ALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foust, Kevin D; Salazar, Desirée L; Likhite, Shibi; Ferraiuolo, Laura; Ditsworth, Dara; Ilieva, Hristelina; Meyer, Kathrin; Schmelzer, Leah; Braun, Lyndsey; Cleveland, Don W; Kaspar, Brian K

    2013-12-01

    Mutations in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) are linked to familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) resulting in progressive motor neuron death through one or more acquired toxicities. Involvement of wild-type SOD1 has been linked to sporadic ALS, as misfolded SOD1 has been reported in affected tissues of sporadic patients and toxicity of astrocytes derived from sporadic ALS patients to motor neurons has been reported to be reduced by lowering the synthesis of SOD1. We now report slowed disease onset and progression in two mouse models following therapeutic delivery using a single peripheral injection of an adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) encoding an shRNA to reduce the synthesis of ALS-causing human SOD1 mutants. Delivery to young mice that develop aggressive, fatal paralysis extended survival by delaying both disease onset and slowing progression. In a later-onset model, AAV9 delivery after onset markedly slowed disease progression and significantly extended survival. Moreover, AAV9 delivered intrathecally to nonhuman primates is demonstrated to yield robust SOD1 suppression in motor neurons and glia throughout the spinal cord and therefore, setting the stage for AAV9-mediated therapy in human clinical trials.

  7. [Preparation of polyclonal antibody against sAPRIL and analysis of function in suppressing sAPRIL-mediated lymphocyte proliferation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ben-Jun; Gao, Quan-Sheng; Lan, Zhi; Fan, Jun-Wen; Ding, Lu-Jing; Li, Min; Qi, Yuan-Yuan; Kong, Wei

    2011-08-01

    This study was aimed to prepare the polyclonal antibody against the soluble proliferation-inducing ligand (sAPRIL) antigen and to investigate its effects in suppressing sAPRIL mediated lymphocyte proliferation. Mutated recombinant sAPRIL protein, which lacks biological activity but maintains immunogenicity, was used as antigen to immunize humanized SCID mice. Sera were obtained at 6 weeks after immunization. Indirect ELISA and Western blot were used to detect the antibody titer and specificity. The inhibition of polyclonal antibodies on Raji and Jurkat cell proliferation stimulated by sAPRIL was assessed by the MTT assay. The results showed that the mutant of sAPRIL could induce the production of polyclonal antibodies against human sAPRIL. Western blot and indirect ELISA analyses indicated that the anti-serum had higher specificity with a titer of 1:640. Functional analysis revealed that these polyclonal antibodies significantly inhibited the proliferation of Raji and Jurkat cell stimulated by sAPRIL (p polyclonal antibody against human sAPRIL is successfully prepared, which can inhibit the proliferation of Raji and Jurkat cells stimulated by sAPRIL in vitro.

  8. Zinc Prevents Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Formation by Induction of A20-Mediated Suppression of NF-κB Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ya-Wei; Fan, Jun; Bai, Shu-Ling; Hou, Wei-Jian; Li, Xiang; Tong, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation and degradation of elastin are the main processes in the development of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Recent studies show that zinc has an anti-inflammatory effect. Based on these, zinc may render effective therapy for the treatment of the AAA. Currently, we want to investigate the effects of zinc on AAA progression and its related molecular mechanism. Rat AAA models were induced by periaortic application of CaCl2. AAA rats were treated by daily intraperitoneal injection of ZnSO4 or vehicle alone. The aorta segments were collected at 4 weeks after surgery. The primary rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were stimulated with TNF-α alone or with ZnSO4 for 3 weeks. The results showed that zinc supplementation significantly suppressed the CaCl2-induced expansion of the abdominal aortic diameter, as well as a preservation of medial elastin fibers in the aortas. Zinc supplementation also obviously attenuated infiltration of the macrophages and lymphocytes in the aortas. In addition, zinc reduced MMP-2 and MMP-9 production in the aortas. Most importantly, zinc treatment significantly induced A20 expression, along with inhibition of the NF-κB canonical signaling pathway in vitro in VSMCs and in vivo in rat AAA. This study demonstrated, for the first time, that zinc supplementation could prevent the development of rat experimental AAA by induction of A20-mediated inhibition of the NF-κB canonical signaling pathway.

  9. Synthesis of 2'(3')-O-DL-alanyl hexainosinic acid using T4 RNA ligase: suppression of the enzymic reverse transfer reaction by alkaline phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Profy, A T; Lo, K M; Usher, D A

    1983-03-11

    2'(3')-O-DL-Alanyl (Ip)5I was synthesized by a new method. An alanine ortho ester of inosine 5'-phosphate was added to (Ip)4I using the ATP-independent reaction of T4 RNA ligase, and the product was converted smoothly to the desired ester. The enzymic reverse transfer reaction was conveniently suppressed by the dephosphorylation of the adenosine 5'-phosphate coproduct, catalyzed in situ by alkaline phosphatase.

  10. Cancer progression mediated by horizontal gene transfer in an in vivo model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Trejo-Becerril

    Full Text Available It is known that cancer progresses by vertical gene transfer, but this paradigm ignores that DNA circulates in higher organisms and that it is biologically active upon its uptake by recipient cells. Here we confirm previous observations on the ability of cell-free DNA to induce in vitro cell transformation and tumorigenesis by treating NIH3T3 recipient murine cells with serum of colon cancer patients and supernatant of SW480 human cancer cells. Cell transformation and tumorigenesis of recipient cells did not occur if serum and supernatants were depleted of DNA. It is also demonstrated that horizontal cancer progression mediated by circulating DNA occurs via its uptake by recipient cells in an in vivo model where immunocompetent rats subjected to colon carcinogenesis with 1,2-dimethylhydrazine had increased rate of colonic tumors when injected in the dorsum with human SW480 colon carcinoma cells as a source of circulating oncogenic DNA, which could be offset by treating these animals with DNAse I and proteases. Though the contribution of biologically active molecules other than DNA for this phenomenon to occur cannot be ruled out, our results support the fact that cancer cells emit into the circulation biologically active DNA to foster tumor progression. Further exploration of the horizontal tumor progression phenomenon mediated by circulating DNA is clearly needed to determine whether its manipulation could have a role in cancer therapy.

  11. Cancer Progression Mediated by Horizontal Gene Transfer in an In Vivo Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trejo-Becerril, Catalina; Pérez-Cárdenas, Enrique; Taja-Chayeb, Lucía; Anker, Philippe; Herrera-Goepfert, Roberto; Medina-Velázquez, Luis A.; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Pérez-Montiel, Delia; Chávez-Blanco, Alma; Cruz-Velázquez, Judith; Díaz-Chávez, José; Gaxiola, Miguel; Dueñas-González, Alfonso

    2012-01-01

    It is known that cancer progresses by vertical gene transfer, but this paradigm ignores that DNA circulates in higher organisms and that it is biologically active upon its uptake by recipient cells. Here we confirm previous observations on the ability of cell-free DNA to induce in vitro cell transformation and tumorigenesis by treating NIH3T3 recipient murine cells with serum of colon cancer patients and supernatant of SW480 human cancer cells. Cell transformation and tumorigenesis of recipient cells did not occur if serum and supernatants were depleted of DNA. It is also demonstrated that horizontal cancer progression mediated by circulating DNA occurs via its uptake by recipient cells in an in vivo model where immunocompetent rats subjected to colon carcinogenesis with 1,2-dimethylhydrazine had increased rate of colonic tumors when injected in the dorsum with human SW480 colon carcinoma cells as a source of circulating oncogenic DNA, which could be offset by treating these animals with DNAse I and proteases. Though the contribution of biologically active molecules other than DNA for this phenomenon to occur cannot be ruled out, our results support the fact that cancer cells emit into the circulation biologically active DNA to foster tumor progression. Further exploration of the horizontal tumor progression phenomenon mediated by circulating DNA is clearly needed to determine whether its manipulation could have a role in cancer therapy. PMID:23285175

  12. The intergenerational transfer of psychosocial risk: mediators of vulnerability and resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serbin, Lisa A; Karp, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    The recurrence of social, behavioral, and health problems in successive generations of families is a prevalent theme in both the scientific and popular literatures. This review discusses recent conceptual models and findings from longitudinal studies concerning the intergenerational transfer of psychosocial risk, including intergenerational continuity, and the processes whereby a generation of parents may place their offspring at elevated risk for social, behavioral, and health problems. Key findings include the mediational effects of parenting and environmental factors in the transfer of risk. In both girls and boys, childhood aggression and antisocial behavior appear to predict long-term trajectories that place offspring at risk. Sequelae of childhood aggression that may threaten the well-being of offspring include school failure, adolescent risk-taking behavior, early and single parenthood, and family poverty. These childhood and adolescent behavioral styles also predict harsh, aggressive, neglectful, and unstimulating parenting behavior toward offspring. Buffering factors within at-risk families include maternal educational attainment and constructive parenting practices (e.g., emotional warmth, consistent disciplinary practices, and cognitive scaffolding). These findings highlight the potential application and relevance of intergenerational studies for social, educational, and health policy.

  13. Adenovirus Mediated BIMS Transfer Induces Growth Supression and Apoptosis in Raji Lymphoma Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Ya Ning; LI Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Objective To transfer pro-apoptotic BIM directly into tumor cells bypass the complicated biological processes of BIM activation so as to reverse the chemoresistance of cancer cells. Methods BIMS was specifically amplified from HL-60 cells by RT-PCR, confirmed to be correct by sequencing and cloned into shuttle vector pAdTrack-CMV carrying a green fluorescence protein gene to generate a recombinant plasmid pAdTrack-CMV-BIMS. This plasmid and adenovirus backbone plasmid pAdEasy-1 were linearized and electroporated into E.coli BJ5183 host bacteria to mediate homologous recombination. The positive clone was identified by restrict endonuclease digestion. The recombinant pAdEasy-CMV-BIMS was transferred into HEK293 cells for packaging and amplification. The successful construction of recombinant human BIMS adenovirus (Ad-BIMS) was demonstrated by Western blot. To test whether Ad-BIMS has the capability of inducing apoptosis of tumor cells, Ad-BIMS was used to infect GC resistant Burkitt lymphoma Raji cells. Results After infected for 2-5 days, BIMS expression in Raji cells was detected by RT-PCR and Western blot. The significant growth retardation and apoptosis of Raji cells were also observed by MTT and flow cytometry. Conclusion These results indicated that BIMS might be a potential candidate of gene therapy for chemoresistant tumor cells.

  14. Adenovirus mediated BIMS transfer induces growth supression and apoptosis in Raji lymphoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ya Ning; Li, Qiang

    2014-09-01

    To transfer pro-apoptotic BIM directly into tumor cells bypass the complicated biological processes of BIM activation so as to reverse the chemoresistance of cancer cells. BIMS was specifically amplified from HL-60 cells by RT-PCR, confirmed to be correct by sequencing and cloned into shuttle vector pAdTrack-CMV carrying a green fluorescence protein gene to generate a recombinant plasmid pAdTrack-CMV-BIMS. This plasmid and adenovirus backbone plasmid pAdEasy-1 were linearized and electroporated into E.coli BJ5183 host bacteria to mediate homologous recombination. The positive clone was identified by restrict endonuclease digestion. The recombinant pAdEasy-CMV-BIMS was transferred into HEK293 cells for packaging and amplification. The successful construction of recombinant human BIMS adenovirus (Ad-BIMS) was demonstrated by Western blot. To test whether Ad-BIMS has the capability of inducing apoptosis of tumor cells, Ad-BIMS was used to infect GC resistant Burkitt lymphoma Raji cells. After infected for 2-5 days, BIMS expression in Raji cells was detected by RT-PCR and Western blot. The significant growth retardation and apoptosis of Raji cells were also observed by MTT and flow cytometry. These results indicated that BIMS might be a potential candidate of gene therapy for chemoresistant tumor cells. Copyright © 2014 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  15. Insulin mediated hemodynamic responses in spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHRs): effect of chromosome 4 gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Sumangala P; McRae, Crystal; Lapanowski, Karen; Churchill, Monique; Kurtz, Theodore W; Dunbar, Joseph C

    2003-02-01

    The spontaneous hypertensive rat (SHR) is a widely studied model of essential hypertension and has been reported to exhibit alterations in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Genetic linkage studies implicated that SHR carries deletion variant of Cd36 gene of chromosome 4, the gene that encodes fatty acid transporter. Thus it could be possible that primary genetic defect in SHR is compromised tissue utilization of fatty acid that would form the basis for the pathogenesis of hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance and insulin-mediated responses. We measured both the hemodynamic and metabolic responses to insulin in SHR in comparison with the chromosome congenic spontaneous hypertensive rats (cSHRs) (rats in which piece of chromosome 4 containing wild type Cd36 was integrated into the SHR genome). A bolus infusion of insulin increased iliac conductance and decreased blood pressure in Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. However, in SHR insulin did not reduce blood pressure as in WKY but after about 15 min it significantly enhanced blood pressure and reduced iliac conductance. Whereas in cSHR insulin did not reduce blood pressure as in WKY rats. However, pressor responses to insulin were eliminated by chromosome 4 gene transfer. Glucose clearance was significantly slower in both SHR and cSHR. Glucose tolerance test revealed that SHR are hyperinsulinemic and insulin resistant. These findings indicate that transfer of segment of chromosome 4 from Brown Norway rats onto spontaneous hypertensive background eliminates hyperinsulinemia and pressor effects of insulin.

  16. Efficient Gene Transfer Mediated by HIV-1-based Defective Lentivector and Inhibition of HIV-1 Replication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors have drawn considerable attention recently and show great promise to become important delivery vehicles for future gene transfer manipulation. In the present study we have optimized a protocol for preparation of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1)-based defective lentiviral vectors (DLV) and characterized these vectors in terms of their transduction of different cells. Transient co-transfection of 293T packaging cells with DNA plasmids encoding lentiviral vector constituents resulted in production of high-titer DLV (0.5-1.2 × 107IU/mL), which can be further concentrated over 100-fold through a single step ultracentrifugation. These vectors were capable of transducing a variety of cells from both primate and non-primate sources and high transduction efficiency was achieved using concentrated vectors. Assessment of potential generation of RCV revealed no detection of infection by infectious particles in DLV-transduced CEM, SupT-1 and MT-2 cells. Long-term culture of transduced cells showed a stable expression of transgenes without apparent alteration in cellular morphology and growth kinetics. Vector mobilization to untransduced cells mediated by wild-type HIV-1 infection was confirmed in this test. Challenge of transduced human T-lymphocytes with wild-type HIV-1 showed these cells are totally resistant to the viral infection. Considering the effective gene transfer and stable gene expression, safety and anti-HIV activity, these DLV vectors warrant further exploration for their potential use as a gene transfer vehicle in the development of gene therapy protocols.

  17. In vivo evolution of HIV-1 co-receptor usage and sensitivity to chemokine-mediated suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlatti, G; Tresoldi, E; Björndal, A; Fredriksson, R; Colognesi, C; Deng, H K; Malnati, M S; Plebani, A; Siccardi, A G; Littman, D R; Fenyö, E M; Lusso, P

    1997-11-01

    Following the identification of the C-C chemokines RANTES, MIP-1alpha and MIP-1beta as major human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-suppressive factors produced by CD8+ T cells, several chemokine receptors were found to serve as membrane co-receptors for primate immunodeficiency lentiretroviruses. The two most widely used co-receptors thus far recognized, CCR5 and CXCR4, are expressed by both activated T lymphocytes and mononuclear phagocytes. CCR5, a specific RANTES, MIP-1alpha and MIP-1 receptor, is used preferentially by non-MT2-tropic HIV-1 and HIV-2 strains and by simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), whereas CXCR4, a receptor for the C-X-C chemokine SDF-1, is used by MT2-tropic HIV-1 and HIV-2, but not by SIV. Other receptors with a more restricted cellular distribution, such as CCR2b, CCR3 and STRL33, can also function as co-receptors for selected viral isolates. The third variable region (V3) of the gp120 envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1 has been fingered as a critical determinant of the co-receptor choice. Here, we document a consistent pattern of evolution of viral co-receptor usage and sensitivity to chemokine-mediated suppression in a longitudinal follow-up of children with progressive HIV-1 infection. Viral isolates obtained during the asymptomatic stages generally used only CCR5 as a co-receptor and were inhibited by RANTES, MIP-1alpha and MIP-1beta, but not by SDF-1. By contrast, the majority of the isolates derived after the progression of the disease were resistant to C-C chemokines, having acquired the ability to use CXCR4 and, in some cases, CCR3, while gradually losing CCR5 usage. Surprisingly, most of these isolates were also insensitive to SDF-1, even when used in combination with RANTES. An early acquisition of CXCR4 usage predicted a poor prognosis. In children who progressed to AIDS without a shift to CXCR4 usage, all the sequential isolates were CCR5-dependent but showed a reduced sensitivity to C-C chemokines. Discrete changes in the V3 domain

  18. Enhancing the Electron Transfer Capacity and Subsequent Color Removal in Bioreactors by Applying Thermophilic Anaerobic Treatment and Redox Mediators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, dos A.B.; Traverse, J.; Cervantes, F.J.; Lier, van J.B.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of temperature, hydraulic retention time (HRT) and the redox mediator anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), on electron transfer and subsequent color removal from textile wastewater was assessed in mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic bioreactors. The results clearly show that compared w

  19. Enhancing the Electron Transfer Capacity and Subsequent Color Removal in Bioreactors by Applying Thermophilic Anaerobic Treatment and Redox Mediators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, dos A.B.; Traverse, J.; Cervantes, F.J.; Lier, van J.B.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of temperature, hydraulic retention time (HRT) and the redox mediator anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), on electron transfer and subsequent color removal from textile wastewater was assessed in mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic bioreactors. The results clearly show that compared

  20. Peptide-based antibodies against glutathione-binding domains suppress superoxide production mediated by mitochondrial complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jingfeng; Chen, Chwen-Lih; Rawale, Sharad; Chen, Chun-An; Zweier, Jay L; Kaumaya, Pravin T P; Chen, Yeong-Renn

    2010-01-29

    Complex I (NQR) is a critical site of superoxide (O2-*) production and the major host of redox protein thiols in mitochondria. In response to oxidative stress, NQR-derived protein thiols at the 51- and 75-kDa subunits are known to be reversibly S-glutathionylated. Although several glutathionylated domains from NQR 51 and 75 kDa have been identified, their roles in the regulatory functions remain to be explored. To gain further insights into protein S-glutathionylation of complex I, we used two peptides of S-glutathionylated domain ((200)GAGAYICGEETALIESIEGK(219) of 51-kDa protein and (361)VDSDTLCTEEVFPTAGAGTDLR(382) of 75-kDa protein) as chimeric epitopes incorporating a "promiscuous" T-cell epitope to generate two polyclonal antibodies, AbGSCA206 and AbGSCB367. Binding of AbGSCA206 and AbGSCB367 inhibited NQR-mediated O2-* generation by 37 and 57%, as measured by EPR spin-trapping. To further provide an appropriate control, two peptides of non-glutathionylated domain ((21)SGDTTAPKKTSFGSLKDFDR(40) of 51-kDa peptide and (100)WNILTNSEKTKKAREGVMEFL(120) of 75-kDa peptide) were synthesized as chimeric epitopes to generate two polyclonal antibodies, Ab51 and Ab75. Binding of A51 did not affect NQR-mediated generation to a significant level. However, binding of Ab75 inhibited NQR-mediated O2-*generation by 35%. None of AbGSCA206, AbGSCB367, Ab51, or Ab75 showed an inhibitory effect on the electron transfer activity of NQR, suggesting that antibody binding to the glutathione-binding domain decreased electron leakage from the hydrophilic domain of NQR. When heart tissue homogenates were immunoprecipitated with Ab51 or Ab75 and probed with an antibody against glutathione, protein S-glutathionylation was enhanced in post-ischemic myocardium at the NQR 51-kDa subunit, but not at the 75-kDa subunit, indicating that the 51-kDa subunit of flavin subcomplex is more sensitive to oxidative stress resulting from myocardial infarction.

  1. Paeoniflorin suppresses TGF-β mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition in pulmonary fibrosis through a Smad-dependent pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yu; Dou, Yan-nong; Zhao, Qian-wen; Zhang, Ji-zhou; Yang, Yan; Wang, Ting; Xia, Yu-feng; Dai, Yue; Wei, Zhi-feng

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Paeoniflorin has shown to attenuate bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis (PF) in mice. Because the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in type 2 lung endothelial cells contributes to excessive fibroblasts and myofibroblasts during multiple fibrosis of tissues, we investigated the effects of paeoniflorin on TGF-β mediated pulmonary EMT in bleomycin-induced PF mice. Methods: PF was induced in mice by intratracheal instillation of bleomycin (5 mg/kg). The mice were orally treated with paeoniflorin or prednisone for 21 d. After the mice were sacrificed, lung tissues were collected for analysis. An in vitro EMT model was established in alveolar epithelial cells (A549 cells) incubated with TGF-β1 (2 ng/mL). EMT identification and the expression of related proteins were performed using immunohistochemistry, transwell assay, ELISA, Western blot and RT-qPCR. Results: In PF mice, paeoniflorin (50, 100 mg·kg−1·d−1) or prednisone (6 mg·kg−1·d−1) significantly decreased the expression of FSP-1 and α-SMA, and increased the expression of E-cadherin in lung tissues. In A549 cells, TGF-β1 stimulation induced EMT, as shown by the changes in cell morphology, the increased cell migration, and the increased vimentin and α-SMA expression as well as type I and type III collagen levels, and by the decreased E-cadherin expression. In contrast, effects of paeoniflorin on EMT disappeared when the A549 cells were pretreated with TGF-β1 for 24 h. TGF-β1 stimulation markedly increased the expression of Snail and activated Smad2/3, Akt, ERK, JNK and p38 MAPK in A549 cells. Co-incubation with paeoniflorin (1–30 μmol/L) dose-dependently attenuated TGF-β1-induced expression of Snail and activation of Smad2/3, but slightly affected TGF-β1-induced activation of Akt, ERK, JNK and p38 MAPK. Moreover, paeoniflorin markedly increased Smad7 level, and decreased ALK5 level in A549 cells. Conclusion: Paeoniflorin suppresses the early stages of TGF-β mediated EMT in alveolar

  2. MicroRNA-146a suppresses IL-17-mediated skin inflammation and is genetically associated with psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Ankit; Nikamo, Pernilla; Lohcharoenkal, Warangkana; Li, Dongqing; Meisgen, Florian; Xu Landén, Ning; Ståhle, Mona; Pivarcsi, Andor; Sonkoly, Enikö

    2017-02-01

    Psoriasis is an immune-mediated inflammatory skin disease with a strong genetic background in which activation of IL-17 signaling is central in the pathogenesis. Little has been known about the role of noncoding RNAs, including microRNAs (miRNAs), in predisposition to the disease. We sought to investigate the genetic association of single nucleotide polymorphisms in microRNA-146a (miR-146a) to psoriasis and to explore its function in the initiation and resolution of the disease. Analysis of the genetic association of miR-146a rs2910164 and psoriasis was carried out on 1546 patients with psoriasis and 1526 control subjects. The role of miR-146a in patients with psoriasis was assessed by using miR-146a(-/-) mice in conjunction with the imiquimod-induced mouse model of psoriasis. The severity of psoriasis-like skin inflammation was evaluated at morphologic, histologic, and molecular levels. miR-146a was ectopically overexpressed and inhibited in keratinocytes treated with IL-17. Synthetic miR-146a was injected intradermally into mice. Here we report protective association of a functional polymorphism in the miR-146a precursor (rs2910164). Genetic deficiency in miR-146a leads to earlier onset and exacerbated pathology of skin inflammation, with increased expression of IL-17-induced keratinocyte-derived inflammatory mediators, epidermal hyperproliferation, and increased neutrophil infiltration. Moreover, miR-146a-deficient mice do not resolve inflammation after discontinuation of imiquimod challenge. The overexpression of miR-146a suppressed, whereas its inhibition enhanced, IL-17-driven inflammation in keratinocytes. Functionally, miR-146a impairs the neutrophil chemoattractant capacity of keratinocytes. Finally, delivery of miR-146a mimics into the skin leads to amelioration of psoriasiform skin inflammation, decreased epidermal proliferation, and neutrophil infiltration. Our results define a crucial role for miR-146a in modulating IL-17-driven inflammation in the

  3. Electron transfer mediators accelerated the microbiologically influence corrosion against carbon steel by nitrate reducing Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ru; Yang, Dongqing; Xu, Dake; Gu, Tingyue

    2017-12-01

    Electron transfer is a rate-limiting step in microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) caused by microbes that utilize extracellular electrons. Cross-cell wall electron transfer is necessary to transport the electrons released from extracellular iron oxidation into the cytoplasm of cells. Electron transfer mediators were found to accelerate the MIC caused by sulfate reducing bacteria. However, there is no publication in the literature showing the effect of electron transfer mediators on MIC caused by nitrate reducing bacteria (NRB). This work demonstrated that the corrosion of anaerobic Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1) grown as a nitrate reducing bacterium biofilm on C1018 carbon steel was enhanced by two electron transfer mediators, riboflavin and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) separately during a 7-day incubation period. The addition of either 10ppm (w/w) (26.6μM) riboflavin or 10ppm (12.7μM) FAD did not increase planktonic cell counts, but they increased the maximum pit depth on carbon steel coupons considerably from 17.5μm to 24.4μm and 25.0μm, respectively. Riboflavin and FAD also increased the specific weight loss of carbon steel from 2.06mg/cm(2) to 2.34mg/cm(2) and 2.61mg/cm(2), respectively. Linear polarization resistance, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization curves all corroborated the pitting and weight loss data. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Suppression of self-heating effect in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors by substrate-transfer technology using h-BN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiroki, Masanobu, E-mail: hiroki.masanobu@lab.ntt.co.jp; Kumakura, Kazuhide; Kobayashi, Yasuyuki; Akasaka, Tetsuya; Makimoto, Toshiki; Yamamoto, Hideki [NTT Basic Research Laboratories, NTT Corporation 3-1 Morinosato Wakamiya, Atsugi-shi 243-0198 (Japan)

    2014-11-10

    We fabricated AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) on h-BN/sapphire substrates and transferred them from the host substrates to copper plates using h-BN as a release layer. In current–voltage characteristics, the saturation drain current decreased by about 30% under a high-bias condition before release by self-heating effect. In contrast, after transfer, the current decrement was as small as 8% owing to improved heat dissipation: the device temperature increased to 50 °C in the as-prepared HEMT, but only by several degrees in the transferred HEMT. An effective way to improve AlGaN/GaN HEMT performance by a suppression of self-heating effect has been demonstrated.

  5. ETS2 mediated tumor suppressive function and MET oncogene inhibition in human non-small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabbout, Mohamed; Garcia, Melinda M.; Fujimoto, Junya; Liu, Diane D.; Woods, Denise; Chow, Chi-Wan; Mendoza, Gabriela; Momin, Amin A.; James, Brian P.; Solis, Luisa; Behrens, Carmen; Lee, J. Jack

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The ETS2 transcription factor is an evolutionarily conserved gene that is deregulated in cancer. We analyzed the transcriptome of lung adenocarcinomas and normal lung tissue by expression profiling and found that ETS2 was significantly down-regulated in adenocarcinomas. In this study, we probed the yet unknown functional role of ETS2 in lung cancer pathogenesis. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN Lung adenocarcinomas (n=80) and normal lung tissues (n=30) were profiled using the Affymetrix Human Gene 1.0 ST platform. Immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis was performed to determine ETS2 protein expression in NSCLC histological tissue specimens (n=201). Patient clinical outcome, based on ETS2 IHC expression, was statistically assessed using the log-rank and Kaplan-Meier tests. RNA interference and over-expression strategies were employed to assess effects of ETS2 expression on the transcriptome and on various malignant phenotypes. RESULTS ETS2 expression was significantly reduced in lung adenocarcinomas compared to normal lung (precurrence in NSCLC (p=0.009, HR=1.89) and adenocarcinoma (p=0.03, HR=1.86). Moreover, ETS2 was found to significantly inhibit lung cancer cell growth, migration and invasion (p<0.05), and microarray and pathways analysis revealed significant (p<0.001) activation of the HGF pathway following ETS2 knockdown. In addition, ETS2 was found to suppress MET phosphorylation and knockdown of MET expression significantly attenuated (p<0.05) cell invasion mediated by ETS2-specific siRNA. Furthermore, knockdown of ETS2 augmented HGF-induced MET phosphorylation, cell migration and invasion. CONCLUSION(S) Our findings point to a tumor suppressor role for ETS2 in human NSCLC pathogenesis through inhibition of the MET proto-oncogene. PMID:23659968

  6. Suppressive effect of CORM-2 on LPS-induced platelet activation by glycoprotein mediated HS1 phosphorylation interference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dadong Liu

    Full Text Available In recent years, it has been discovered that septic patients display coagulation abnormalities. Platelets play a major role in the coagulation system. Studies have confirmed that carbon monoxide (CO has important cytoprotective and anti-inflammatory function. However, whether CO could alter abnormal activation of platelets and coagulation and thereby reduce the incidence of mortality during sepsis has not been defined. In this report, we have used CO-releasing molecules (CORM-2 to determine whether CO inhibits LPS-induced abnormal activation of platelets and have explored the potential mechanisms. LPS was used to induce activation of platelets in vitro, which were purified from the peripheral venous blood of healthy adult donors. CORM-2 was applied as a potential therapeutic agent. CORM-2 preconditioning and delayed treatment were also studied. We found that in the LPS groups, the function of platelets such as spreading, aggregation, and release were enhanced abnormally. By contrast, the platelets in the CORM-2 group were gently activated. Further studies showed that the expression of platelet membrane glycoproteins increased in the LPS group. Coincidently, both hematopoietic lineage cell-specific protein 1 and its phosphorylated form also increased dramatically. These phenomena were less dramatically seen in the CORM-2 groups. Taken together, we conclude that during LPS stimulation, platelets were abnormally activated, and this functional state may be associated with the signal that is transmitted between membrane glycoproteins and HS1. CORM-released CO suppresses the abnormal activation of platelets by interfering with glycoprotein-mediated HS1 phosphorylation.

  7. Akt inhibition promotes ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux to ApoA-I through suppressing mTORC1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumin Dong

    Full Text Available ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1 plays an essential role in mediating cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I, a major housekeeping mechanism for cellular cholesterol homeostasis. After initial engagement with ABCA1, apoA-I directly interacts with the plasma membrane to acquire cholesterol. This apoA-I lipidation process is also known to require cellular signaling processes, presumably to support cholesterol trafficking to the plasma membrane. We report here that one of major signaling pathways in mammalian cells, Akt, is also involved. In several cell models that express ABCA1 including macrophages, pancreatic beta cells and hepatocytes, inhibition of Akt increases cholesterol efflux to apoA-I. Importantly, Akt inhibition has little effect on cells expressing non-functional mutant of ABCA1, implicating a specific role of Akt in ABCA1 function. Furthermore, we provide evidence that mTORC1, a major downstream target of Akt, is also a negative regulator of cholesterol efflux. In cells where mTORC1 is constitutively activated due to tuberous sclerosis complex 2 deletion, cholesterol efflux to apoA-I is no longer sensitive to Akt activity. This suggests that Akt suppresses cholesterol efflux through mTORC1 activation. Indeed, inhibition of mTORC1 by rapamycin or Torin-1 promotes cholesterol efflux. On the other hand, autophagy, one of the major pathways of cholesterol trafficking, is increased upon Akt inhibition. Furthermore, Akt inhibition disrupts lipid rafts, which is known to promote cholesterol efflux to apoA-I. We therefore conclude that Akt, through its downstream targets, mTORC1 and hence autophagy, negatively regulates cholesterol efflux to apoA-I.

  8. The Chicken β-Globin 5′HS4 Boundary Element Blocks Enhancer-Mediated Suppression of Silencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Mark C.; Fiering, Steven; Bouhassira, Eric E.; Scalzo, David; Goeke, Scott; Magis, Wendy; Garrick, David; Whitelaw, Emma; Martin, David I. K.

    1999-01-01

    A constitutive DNase I-hypersensitive site 5′ of the chicken β-globin locus, termed 5′HS4 or cHS4, has been shown to insulate a promoter from the effect of an upstream enhancer and to reduce position effects on mini-white expression in Drosophila cells; on the basis of these findings, it has been designated a chromatin insulator. We have examined the effect of the cHS4 insulator in a system that assays both the level of gene expression and the rate of transcriptional silencing. Because transgenes flanked by insulator elements are shielded from position effects in Drosophila cells, we tested the ability of cHS4 to protect transgenes from position effects in mammalian cells. Flanking of an expression vector with the cHS4 insulator in a colony assay did not increase the number of G418-resistant colonies. Using lox/cre-based recombinase-mediated cassette exchange to control integration position, we studied the effect of cHS4 on the silencing of an integrated β-geo reporter at three genomic sites in K562 erythroleukemia cells. In this assay, enhancers act to suppress silencing but do not increase expression levels. While cHS4 blocked enhancement at each integration site, the strength of the effect varied from site to site. Furthermore, at some sites, cHS4 inhibited the enhancer effect either when placed between the enhancer and the promoter or when placed upstream of the enhancer. These results suggest that the activity of cHS4 is not dominant in all contexts and is unlikely to prevent silencing at all genomic integration sites. PMID:10207095

  9. The chicken beta-globin 5'HS4 boundary element blocks enhancer-mediated suppression of silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, M C; Fiering, S; Bouhassira, E E; Scalzo, D; Goeke, S; Magis, W; Garrick, D; Whitelaw, E; Martin, D I

    1999-05-01

    A constitutive DNase I-hypersensitive site 5' of the chicken beta-globin locus, termed 5'HS4 or cHS4, has been shown to insulate a promoter from the effect of an upstream enhancer and to reduce position effects on mini-white expression in Drosophila cells; on the basis of these findings, it has been designated a chromatin insulator. We have examined the effect of the cHS4 insulator in a system that assays both the level of gene expression and the rate of transcriptional silencing. Because transgenes flanked by insulator elements are shielded from position effects in Drosophila cells, we tested the ability of cHS4 to protect transgenes from position effects in mammalian cells. Flanking of an expression vector with the cHS4 insulator in a colony assay did not increase the number of G418-resistant colonies. Using lox/cre-based recombinase-mediated cassette exchange to control integration position, we studied the effect of cHS4 on the silencing of an integrated beta-geo reporter at three genomic sites in K562 erythroleukemia cells. In this assay, enhancers act to suppress silencing but do not increase expression levels. While cHS4 blocked enhancement at each integration site, the strength of the effect varied from site to site. Furthermore, at some sites, cHS4 inhibited the enhancer effect either when placed between the enhancer and the promoter or when placed upstream of the enhancer. These results suggest that the activity of cHS4 is not dominant in all contexts and is unlikely to prevent silencing at all genomic integration sites.

  10. Stable suppression of myostatin gene expression in goat fetal fibroblast cells by lentiviral vector-mediated RNAi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Utsav A; Patel, Amrutlal K; Joshi, Chaitanya G

    2015-01-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) is a secreted growth factor that negatively regulates skeletal muscle mass, and therefore, strategies to block myostatin-signaling pathway have been extensively pursued to increase the muscle mass in livestock. Here, we report a lentiviral vector-based delivery of shRNA to disrupt myostatin expression into goat fetal fibroblasts (GFFs) that were commonly used as karyoplast donors in somatic-cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) studies. Sh-RNA positive cells were screened by puromycin selection. Using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), we demonstrated efficient knockdown of endogenous myostatin mRNA with 64% down-regulation in sh2 shRNA-treated GFF cells compared to GFF cells treated by control lentivirus without shRNA. Moreover, we have also demonstrated both the induction of interferon response and the expression of genes regulating myogenesis in GFF cells. The results indicate that myostatin-targeting siRNA produced endogenously could efficiently down-regulate myostatin expression. Therefore, targeted knockdown of the MSTN gene using lentivirus-mediated shRNA transgenics would facilitate customized cell engineering, allowing potential use in the establishment of stable cell lines to produce genetically engineered animals.

  11. HIV-Specific CD8+ T Cell-Mediated Viral Suppression Correlates With the Expression of CD57

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Sanne S; Tingstedt, Jeanette Linnea; Larsen, Tine Kochendorf

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Virus-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses are believed to play an important role in the control of HIV-1 infection; however, what constitutes an effective HIV-1 CD8(+) T-cell response remains a topic of debate. The ex vivo viral suppressive capacity was measured of CD8(+) T cells from 44....... METHOD: Ex vivo suppression assay was used to evaluate the ability of CD8(+) T cells to suppress HIV-1 replication in autologous CD4(+) T cells. The CD107a, interferon-γ, interleukin-2, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and macrophage inflammatory protein-1β (MIP-1β) responses to HIV-1 were evaluated...... significantly higher in individuals with ex vivo suppressive activity compared with individuals without suppressive activity. CONCLUSIONS: Standard in vitro assays measuring one or several cytokines do not correlate with the functional viral suppressive capacity of CD8(+) T cells from HIV-1-positive individuals...

  12. Immunomodulatory activity of xanthohumol: inhibition of T cell proliferation, cell-mediated cytotoxicity and Th1 cytokine production through suppression of NF-κB

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Xiaohua; Deeb, Dorrah; Liu, Yongbo; DULCHAVSKY, SCOTT A.; Gautam, Subhash C.

    2009-01-01

    Xanthohumol (XN), a prenylated chalcone present in hops (Humulus lupus L.) and beer, exhibits anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antiproliferative activity, but has not been studied for effects on T cell-mediated immune responses. Here we demonstrate that XN has profound immunosuppressive effects on T cell proliferation, development of IL-2 activated killer (LAK) cells, cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), and production of Th1 cytokines (IL-2, IFN-γ and TNF-α). The suppression of these cell-media...

  13. Pure Red Cell Aplasia After Chemotherapy for Hodgkin’s Lymphoma: In Vitro Evidence for T Cell Mediated Suppression of Erythropoiesis and Response to Sequential Cyclosporin and Erythropoietin

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Oris R. Fillet G: Circulating erythropoietin 19. Totterman TH. Bengtsson M: Treatment of pure red cell aplasia with levels after bone marrow ...bilateral hilar and massive retroperi- with T cell mediated suppression of erythropoiesis. toneal and pelvic adenopathy. An initial bone marrow The response...Erythropoi- were discontinued. A bone marrow aspirate and biopsy etin was continued for 10 months and then discontinued revealed a cellular marrow with normal

  14. Hypochlorous acid-mediated protein oxidation: how important are chloramine transfer reactions and protein tertiary structure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattison, David I; Hawkins, Clare L; Davies, Michael J

    2007-08-28

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is a powerful oxidant generated from H2O2 and Cl- by the heme enzyme myeloperoxidase, which is released from activated leukocytes. HOCl possesses potent antibacterial properties, but excessive production can lead to host tissue damage that occurs in numerous human pathologies. As proteins and amino acids are highly abundant in vivo and react rapidly with HOCl, they are likely to be major targets for HOCl. In this study, two small globular proteins, lysozyme and insulin, have been oxidized with increasing excesses of HOCl to determine whether the pattern of HOCl-mediated amino acid consumption is consistent with reported kinetic data for isolated amino acids and model compounds. Identical experiments have been carried out with mixtures of N-acetyl amino acids (to prevent reaction at the alpha-amino groups) that mimic the protein composition to examine the role of protein structure on reactivity. The results indicate that tertiary structure facilitates secondary chlorine transfer reactions of chloramines formed on His and Lys side chains. In light of these data, second-order rate constants for reactions of Lys side chain and Gly chloramines with Trp side chains and disulfide bonds have been determined, together with those for further oxidation of Met sulfoxide by HOCl and His side chain chloramines. Computational kinetic models incorporating these additional rate constants closely predict the experimentally observed amino acid consumption. These studies provide insight into the roles of chloramine formation and three-dimensional structure on the reactions of HOCl with isolated proteins and demonstrate that kinetic models can predict the outcome of HOCl-mediated protein oxidation.

  15. Human lactoferrin transgenic rabbits produced efficiently using dimethylsulfoxide-sperm-mediated gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lan; Shen, Wei; Min, Lingjiang; Dong, Huansheng; Sun, Yujiang; Pan, Qingjie

    2006-01-01

    Transgenic animal mammary gland bioreactors are used to produce recombinant proteins. However, it is difficult to validate whether these transgenic domestic animals are able to express the recombinant protein efficiently in their mammary glands before the birth of transgenic offspring. In the present study, a simple and efficient method was established to evaluate the functionality of animal mammary gland tissue-expressed cassettes. The gene transfer vector pGBC2LF was constructed, and the expression of human lactoferrin (LF) gene was controlled by the goat beta-casein gene 5' flanking sequence. To obtain the most efficient transfection, the influence of DNA concentration, dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) concentration, and the ratio of linear-to-circular DNA required for associating DNA with spermatozoa were evaluated. Transfection of exogenous DNA into rabbit spermatozoa was found to be efficient using 30 microg mL(-1) DNA, DMSO at a final concentration of 3%, and a 3 : 1 ratio of linear-to-circular DNA, with 29 of 85 (34.1%) in vitro-fertilised embryos being transgenic. Using DMSO-sperm-mediated gene transfer (DMSO-SMGT), 89 rabbit offspring were produced, with 46 of these (57.1%) being transgenic. As mammary gland bioreactor models, 17 of 21 (81%) transgenic female rabbits could express human LF protein in their glands. During lactation of the transgenic rabbits, the highest level of human LF protein expressed was 153 +/- 31 microg mL(-1), and the mean expression level in all of the transgenic rabbits was 103 +/- 20 microg mL(-1) in the third week, declining gradually after this time. Our results demonstrate that transgenic rabbits produced by DMSO-SMGT were able to express human LF protein in the correct tissue.

  16. Factors enhancing Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated gene transfer in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egnin, M.; Mora, A.; Prakash, C. S.; Mortley, D. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Parameters enhancing Agrobacterium-mediated transfer of foreign genes to peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) cells were investigated. An intron-containing beta-glucuronidase uidA (gusA) gene under the transcriptional control of CaMV 35S promoter served as a reporter. Transformation frequency was evaluated by scoring the number of sectors expressing GUS activity on leaf and epicotyl explants. The 'Valencia Select' market type cv. New Mexico was more amenable to Agrobacterium transformation than the 'runner' market type cultivars tested (Florunner, Georgia Runner, Sunrunner, or South Runner). The disarmed Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA101 was superior in facilitating the transfer of uidA gene to peanut cells compared to the disarmed strain C58. Rinsing of explants in half-strength Murashige-Skoog (MS) media prior to infection by Agrobacterium significantly increased the transformation efficiency. The use of cocultivation media containing high auxin [1.0 or 2.5 mg/l (4.53 micromolar or 11.31 micromolar) 2,4-D] and low cytokinin [0.25 or 0.5 mg/l (1.0 micromolar or 2.0 micromolar) BA] promoted higher transformation than either hormone-free or thidiazuron-containing medium. The polarity of the epicotyl during cocultivation was important; explants incubated in an inverted (vertically) manner followed by a vertically upright position resulted in improved transformation and shoot regeneration frequencies. Preculture of explants in MS basal medium or with 2.5 mg thidiazuron per l prior to infection drastically decreased the number of transformed zones. The optimized protocol was used to obtain transient transformation frequencies ranging from 12% to 36% for leaf explants, 15% to 42% for epicotyls. Initial evidence of transformation was obtained by polymerase chain reaction and subsequently confirmed by Southern analysis of regenerated plants.

  17. Factors enhancing Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated gene transfer in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egnin, M.; Mora, A.; Prakash, C. S.; Mortley, D. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Parameters enhancing Agrobacterium-mediated transfer of foreign genes to peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) cells were investigated. An intron-containing beta-glucuronidase uidA (gusA) gene under the transcriptional control of CaMV 35S promoter served as a reporter. Transformation frequency was evaluated by scoring the number of sectors expressing GUS activity on leaf and epicotyl explants. The 'Valencia Select' market type cv. New Mexico was more amenable to Agrobacterium transformation than the 'runner' market type cultivars tested (Florunner, Georgia Runner, Sunrunner, or South Runner). The disarmed Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA101 was superior in facilitating the transfer of uidA gene to peanut cells compared to the disarmed strain C58. Rinsing of explants in half-strength Murashige-Skoog (MS) media prior to infection by Agrobacterium significantly increased the transformation efficiency. The use of cocultivation media containing high auxin [1.0 or 2.5 mg/l (4.53 micromolar or 11.31 micromolar) 2,4-D] and low cytokinin [0.25 or 0.5 mg/l (1.0 micromolar or 2.0 micromolar) BA] promoted higher transformation than either hormone-free or thidiazuron-containing medium. The polarity of the epicotyl during cocultivation was important; explants incubated in an inverted (vertically) manner followed by a vertically upright position resulted in improved transformation and shoot regeneration frequencies. Preculture of explants in MS basal medium or with 2.5 mg thidiazuron per l prior to infection drastically decreased the number of transformed zones. The optimized protocol was used to obtain transient transformation frequencies ranging from 12% to 36% for leaf explants, 15% to 42% for epicotyls. Initial evidence of transformation was obtained by polymerase chain reaction and subsequently confirmed by Southern analysis of regenerated plants.

  18. Transgene transmission in South American catfish (Rhamdia quelen) larvae by sperm-mediated gene transfer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tiago Collares; Vinicius Farias Campos; Fabiana Kömmling Seixas; Paulo V Cavalcanti; Odir A Dellagostin; Heden Luiz M Moreira; João Carlos Deschamps

    2010-03-01

    The silver catfish (Rhamdia quelen) is an endemic American fish species. The sperm of each species has its own peculiarities and biological characteristics, which influence the success of mass DNA transfer methods. Our objective in this study was to evaluate different sperm-mediated gene transfer (SMGT) methods to obtain transgenic silver catfish. Different treatments for the incorporation of a foreign pEGFP plasmid group were used: (1) dehydrated/rehydrated (DR), (2) dehydrated/rehydrated/electroporated (DRE), (3) electroporated (E), (4) incubated with seminal plasma (INC); and (5) incubated in the absence of seminal plasma (INCSP). Sperm motility, time of activity duration (TAD), fertilization rate (FR), hatching rate (HR) and sperm morphology were also evaluated. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) positivity rates for the presence of the transgene were: DRE 60%; DR 40%; E 25%; INC 5% and INCSP 25%. The rates of embryo EGFP expression were: DRE 63%; DR 44%; E 34%; INC 8% and INCSP 38%. The fertilization rate in the control and DRE treatments groups were higher than in the DR group, but the E, INC and INCSP treatment groups had the lowest rate. The hatching rates of the DRE, DR and control groups were higher than in the INCSP, INC and E treatment groups ( > 0.05). There were no differences among the DRE and DR, E and DR, E and INCSP groups in expression and PCR positivity rates of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in embryos. Scanning electron microscopy also did not show any change in sperm morphology among treatment groups. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on transgene transmission of exogenous DNA into silver catfish larvae through SMGT technology

  19. A cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) RNA 1 transgene mediates suppression of the homologous viral RNA 1 constitutively and prevents CMV entry into the phloem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canto, T; Palukaitis, P

    2001-10-01

    Resistance to Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) in tobacco lines transformed with CMV RNA 1 is characterized by reduced virus accumulation in the inoculated leaf, with specific suppression of accumulation of the homologous viral RNA 1, and by the absence of systemic infection. We show that the suppression of viral RNA 1 occurs in protoplasts from resistant transgenic plants and therefore is not due to a host response activated by the cell-to-cell spread of virus. In contrast, suppression of Tobacco rattle virus vectors carrying CMV RNA 1 sequences did not occur in protoplasts from resistant plants. Furthermore, steady-state levels of transgene mRNA 1 were higher in resistant than in susceptible lines. Thus, the data indicate that sequence homology is not sufficient to induce suppression. Grafting experiments using transgenic resistant or susceptible rootstocks and scions demonstrated that the resistance mechanism exhibited an additional barrier to phloem entry, preventing CMV from moving a long distance in resistant plants. On the other hand, virus from susceptible rootstocks could systemically infect grafted resistant scions via the phloem. Analysis of viral RNA accumulation in the infected scions showed that the mechanism that suppresses the accumulation of viral RNA 1 at the single-cell level was overcome. The data indicate that this transgene-mediated systemic resistance probably is not based on a posttranscriptional gene-silencing mechanism.

  20. Delayed neutralization of interleukin 6 reduces organ injury, selectively suppresses inflammatory mediator, and partially normalizes immune dysfunction following trauma and hemorrhagic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Jinxiang; Korff, Sebastian; Ayoob, Faez; Vodovotz, Yoram; Billiar, Timothy R

    2014-09-01

    An excessive and uncontrolled systemic inflammatory response is associated with organ failure, immunodepression, and increased susceptibility to nosocomial infection following trauma. Interleukin 6 (IL-6) plays a particularly prominent role in the host immune response after trauma with hemorrhage. However, as a result of its pleiotropic functions, the effect of IL-6 in trauma and hemorrhage is still controversial. It remains unclear whether suppression of IL-6 after hemorrhagic shock and trauma will attenuate organ injury and immunosuppression. In this study, C57BL/6 mice were treated with anti-mouse IL-6 monoclonal antibody immediately prior to resuscitation in an experimental model combining hemorrhagic shock and lower-extremity injury. Interleukin 6 levels and signaling were transiently suppressed following administrations of anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibody following hemorrhagic shock and lower-extremity injury. This resulted in reduced lung and liver injury, as well as suppression in the levels of key inflammatory mediators including IL-10, keratinocyte-derived chemokine, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, and macrophage inhibitory protein 1α at both 6 and 24 h. Furthermore, the shift to TH2 cytokine production and suppressed lymphocyte response were partly prevented. These results demonstrate that IL-6 is not only a biomarker but also an important driver of injury-induced inflammation and immune suppression in mice. Rapid measurement of IL-6 levels in the early phase of postinjury care could be used to guide IL-6-based interventions.

  1. Cobamide-mediated enzymatic reductive dehalogenation via long-range electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunze, Cindy; Bommer, Martin; Hagen, Wilfred R; Uksa, Marie; Dobbek, Holger; Schubert, Torsten; Diekert, Gabriele

    2017-07-03

    The capacity of metal-containing porphyrinoids to mediate reductive dehalogenation is implemented in cobamide-containing reductive dehalogenases (RDases), which serve as terminal reductases in organohalide-respiring microbes. RDases allow for the exploitation of halogenated compounds as electron acceptors. Their reaction mechanism is under debate. Here we report on substrate-enzyme interactions in a tetrachloroethene RDase (PceA) that also converts aryl halides. The shape of PceA's highly apolar active site directs binding of bromophenols at some distance from the cobalt and with the hydroxyl substituent towards the metal. A close cobalt-substrate interaction is not observed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Nonetheless, a halogen substituent para to the hydroxyl group is reductively eliminated and the path of the leaving halide is traced in the structure. Based on these findings, an enzymatic mechanism relying on a long-range electron transfer is concluded, which is without parallel in vitamin B12-dependent biochemistry and represents an effective mode of RDase catalysis.

  2. Effects of electron transfer mediators on the bioreduction of lepidocrocite ({gamma}-FeOOH).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Loughlin, E. J.; Biosciences Division

    2008-08-20

    Electron transfer mediators (ETMs) such as low-molecular-mass quinones (e.g., juglone and lawsone) and humic substances are believed to play a role in many redox reactions involved in contaminant transformations and the biogeochemical cycling of many redox-active elements (e.g., Fe and Mn) in aquatic and terrestrial environments. This study examines the effects of a series of compounds representing major classes of natural and synthetic organic ETMs, including low-molecular-mass quinones, humic substances, phenazines, phenoxazines, phenothiazines, and indigo derivatives, on the bioreduction of lepidocrocite ({gamma}-FeOOH) by the dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens CN32. Although S. putrefaciens CN32 was able to reduce lepidocrocite in the absence of exogenous ETMs, the addition of exogenous ETMs enhanced the bioreduction of lepidocrocite. In general, the rate of Fe(II) production correlated well with the reduction potentials of the ETMs. The addition of humic acids or unfractionated natural organic matter at concentrations of 10 mg organic C L{sup -1} resulted in, at best, a minimal enhancement of lepidocrocite bioreduction. This observation suggests that electron shuttling by humic substances is not likely to play a major role in Fe(III) bioreduction in oligotrophic environments such as subsurface sediments with low organic C contents.

  3. IMPROVEMENT OF HUMAN ISLET FUNCTION BY ADENOVIRUS MEDIATED HO-1 GENE TRANSFER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective To investigate in vitro heme oxygenase-1 gene (HO-1) delivery to human pancreatic islets by adenovirus vectors. Methods Recombinant adenovirus containing HO-1 or enhanced green fluorescent protein gene(EGFP) was generated by using the AdEasy System. The purified human pancreatic islets were infected with recombinant adenovirus vectors at various multiplicity of infection (MOI). Transduction was confirmed by fluorescence photographs and Western blot. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was detected by using Human insulin radioimmunoassay kits and was used to assess the function of human islets infected by recombinant adenovirus.Results Viral titers of Ad-hHO-1 and Ad-EGFP were 1.96×109 and 1.99×109 pfu/mL, respectively. Human pancreatic islets were efficiently infected by recombinant adenovirus vectors in vitro. Transfection of human islets at an MOI of 20 did not inhibit islet function. Recombinant adenovirus mediated HO-1gene transfer significantly improved the islet function of insulin release when simulated by high level glucose. Conclusion Recombinant adenovirus is efficient to deliver exogenous gene into human pancreatic islets in vitro. HO-1 gene transfection can improve human islet function.

  4. Angiogenesis effects of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer of VEGF-B on chronic ischemic myocardium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Shu-qiang; ZHANG Bao-ren; MEI Ju; XU Zhi-yun; ZOU Liang-jian; HUANG Sheng-dong

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the angiogenesis effects of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer of VEGF-B on chronic ischemic myocardium. Methods: Domestic pigs underwent thoracotomy and placement of an ameroid constrictor on the circumflex coronary artery. Four weeks later, Ad. VEGF-B, Ad. LacZ or PBS were administrated directly into the myocardium at 10 sites in the circumflex distribution (109 PFU or 100 μl) according to groups. Echocardiography and ex vivo coronary angiography were performed. The injection sites around myocardium were harvested and subjected to histological analysis and immunochemical staining. Results: Echocardiography assessment 4 weeks after vector administration demonstrated significant improvement of regional wall systolic function. Collateral vesseldevelopment assessed by angiography was also significantly greater in Ad. VEGF-B animals than that in control animals. Vascular density analysis revealed a mean of 43±5 neovessels per high-power field in Ad.VEGF-B group versus 19±4 and 17±6 in Ad.LacZ and PBS group. Conclusion:Direct intramyocardial administration of Ad.VEGF-B can induce focal angiogenesis and result in improvement in regional myocardial function, which may be useful in patients with ischemic heart disease who are not eligible for conventional therapies.

  5. Arctigenin suppresses receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL)-mediated osteoclast differentiation in bone marrow-derived macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, A-Ram; Kim, Hyuk Soon; Lee, Jeong Min; Choi, Jung Ho; Kim, Se Na; Kim, Do Kyun; Kim, Ji Hyung; Mun, Se Hwan; Kim, Jie Wan; Jeon, Hyun Soo; Kim, Young Mi; Choi, Wahn Soo

    2012-05-05

    Osteoclasts, multinucleated bone-resorbing cells, are closely associated with bone diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and osteoporosis. Osteoclasts are derived from hematopoietic precursor cells, and their differentiation is mediated by two cytokines, including macrophage colony stimulating factor and receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL). Previous studies have shown that arctigenin exhibits an anti-inflammatory effect. However, the effect of arctigenin on osteoclast differentiation is yet to be elucidated. In this study, we found that arctigenin inhibited RANKL-mediated osteoclast differentiation in bone marrow macrophages in a dose-dependent manner and suppressed RANKL-mediated bone resorption. Additionally, the expression of typical marker proteins, such as NFATc1, c-Fos, TRAF6, c-Src, and cathepsin K, were significantly inhibited. Arctigenin inhibited the phosphorylation of Erk1/2, but not p38 and JNK, in a dose-dependent manner. Arctigenin also dramatically suppressed immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-mediated costimulatory signaling molecules, including Syk and PLCγ2, and Gab2. Notably, arctigenin inhibited the activation of Syk through RANKL stimulation. Furthermore, arctigenin prevented osteoclast differentiation in the calvarial bone of mice following stimulation with lipopolysaccharide. Our results show that arctigenin inhibits osteoclast differentiation in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, arctigenin may be useful for treating rheumatoid arthritis and osteoporosis.

  6. Stimulation of allergen-loaded macrophages by TLR9-ligand potentiates IL-10-mediated suppression of allergic airway inflammation in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hofman Gerard A

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previously, we demonstrated that OVA-loaded macrophages (OVA-Mφ partially suppress OVA-induced airway manifestations of asthma in BALB/c mice. In vitro studies showed that OVA-Mφ start to produce IL-10 upon interaction with allergen-specific T cells, which might mediate their immunosuppressive effects. Herein, we examined whether IL-10 is essential for the immunosuppressive effects of OVA-Mφ in vivo, and whether ex vivo stimulation of the IL-10 production by OVA-Mφ could enhance these effects. Methods Peritoneal Mφ were loaded with OVA and stimulated with LPS or immunostimulatory sequence oligodeoxynucleotide (ISS-ODN in vitro. The increase of IL-10 production was examined and, subsequently, ex vivo stimulated OVA-Mφ were used to treat (i.v. OVA-sensitized mice. To further explore whether Mφ-derived IL-10 mediates the immunosuppressive effects, Mφ isolated from IL-10-/- mice were used for treatment. Results We found that stimulation with LPS or ISS-ODN highly increased the IL-10 production by OVA-Mφ (2.5-fold and 4.5-fold increase, respectively. ISS-ODN stimulation of OVA-Mφ significantly potentiated the suppressive effects on allergic airway inflammation. Compared to sham-treatment, ISS-ODN-stimulated OVA-Mφ suppressed the airway eosinophilia by 85% (vs. 30% by unstimulated OVA-Mφ, IL-5 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid by 80% (vs. 50% and serum OVA-specific IgE levels by 60% (vs. 30%. Importantly, IL-10-/-Mφ that were loaded with OVA and stimulated with ISS-ODN ex vivo, failed to suppress OVA-induced airway inflammation. Conclusions These results demonstrate that Mφ-derived IL-10 mediates anti-inflammatory responses in a mouse model of allergic asthma, which both can be potentiated by stimulation with ISS-ODN.

  7. The interaction of cytoplasmic poly(A)-binding protein with eukaryotic initiation factor 4G suppresses nonsense-mediated mRNA decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatscher, Tobias; Boehm, Volker; Weiche, Benjamin; Gehring, Niels H

    2014-10-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) eliminates different classes of mRNA substrates including transcripts with long 3' UTRs. Current models of NMD suggest that the long physical distance between the poly(A) tail and the termination codon reduces the interaction between cytoplasmic poly(A)-binding protein (PABPC1) and the eukaryotic release factor 3a (eRF3a) during translation termination. In the absence of PABPC1 binding, eRF3a recruits the NMD factor UPF1 to the terminating ribosome, triggering mRNA degradation. Here, we have used the MS2 tethering system to investigate the suppression of NMD by PABPC1. We show that tethering of PABPC1 between the termination codon and a long 3' UTR specifically inhibits NMD-mediated mRNA degradation. Contrary to the current model, tethered PABPC1 mutants unable to interact with eRF3a still efficiently suppress NMD. We find that the interaction of PABPC1 with eukaryotic initiation factor 4G (eIF4G), which mediates the circularization of mRNAs, is essential for NMD inhibition by tethered PABPC1. Furthermore, recruiting either eRF3a or eIF4G in proximity to an upstream termination codon antagonizes NMD. While tethering of an eRF3a mutant unable to interact with PABPC1 fails to suppress NMD, tethered eIF4G inhibits NMD in a PABPC1-independent manner, indicating a sequential arrangement of NMD antagonizing factors. In conclusion, our results establish a previously unrecognized link between translation termination, mRNA circularization, and NMD suppression, thereby suggesting a revised model for the activation of NMD at termination codons upstream of long 3' UTR. © 2014 Fatscher et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  8. Rho kinase mediates Porphyromonas gingivalis outer membrane vesicle-induced suppression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase through ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yue; Guo, Bin; Yang, WenWei; Zhao, Qiang; Jia, WenYuan; Wu, Yafei

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the effect of Rho kinase (ROCK) on Porphyromonas gingivalis outer membrane vesicles (OMVs)-induced suppression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and explore the potential mechanism. Firstly, we investigated the effect of OMVs on total eNOS expression and eNOS activity in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVECs) and if ROCK activation is involved. Furthermore, we estimated the effect of ROCK in regulating eNOS expression and the possible underlying mechanism in vitro. At last we confirmed the results by immunohisochemisty for eNOS expression in mouse aorta endothelium exposed to OMVs and inhibitors. We found that OMVs suppressed eNOS expression both at RNA and protein levels in a time- and dose-dependent manner. ROCK activity was observed in this process by detecting phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC) and myosin-associated phosphatase type 1 (MYPT-1), which lead to reduced eNOS expression. The suppression of eNOS was significantly reversed by ROCK inhibitor Y-27632. Moreover, Y-27632 pretreatment obviously inhibited the activation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPKs induced by OMVs, whereas that of JNK was not affected. In addition, blocking ERK1/2 or p38 MAPK by PD98059 and SB203580, respectively attenuated the OMVs-induced eNOS phosphorylation. Ex vivo study shows that OMVs reduced eNOS expression in mouse aorta endothelium. Co-treatment with OMVs and inhibitors could significantly reverse the eNOS suppression. Taken together, these results demonstrate that ROCK mediated OMVs-induced eNOS suppression through ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK. These data suggest that ROCK may mediate OMVs-induced eNOS expression through ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Genetic analysis of ectopic growth suppression during planar growth of integuments mediated by the Arabidopsis AGC protein kinase UNICORN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enugutti Balaji

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The coordination of growth within a tissue layer is of critical importance for tissue morphogenesis. For example, cells within the epidermis undergo stereotypic cell divisions that are oriented along the plane of the layer (planar growth, thereby propagating the layered epidermal structure. Little is known about the developmental control that regulates such planar growth in plants. Recent evidence suggested that the Arabidopsis AGC VIII protein kinase UNICORN (UCN maintains planar growth by suppressing the formation of ectopic multicellular protrusions in several floral tissues including integuments. In the current model UCN controls this process during integument development by directly interacting with the ABERRANT TESTA SHAPE (ATS protein, a member of the KANADI (KAN family of transcription factors, thereby repressing its activity. Here we report on the further characterization of the UCN mechanism. Results Phenotypic analysis of flowers of ucn-1 plants impaired in floral homeotic gene activity revealed that any of the four floral whorls could produce organs carrying ucn-1 protrusions. The ectopic outgrowths of ucn integuments did not accumulate detectable signals of the auxin and cytokinin reporters DR5rev::GFP and ARR5::GUS, respectively. Furthermore, wild-type and ucn-1 seedlings showed similarly strong callus formation upon in vitro culture on callus-inducing medium. We also show that ovules of ucn-1 plants carrying the dominant ats allele sk21-D exhibited more pronounced protrusion formation. Finally ovules of ucn-1 ett-1 double mutants and ucn-1 ett-1 arf4-1 triple mutants displayed an additive phenotype. Conclusions These data deepen the molecular insight into the UCN-mediated control of planar growth during integument development. The presented evidence indicates that UCN downstream signaling does not involve the control of auxin or cytokinin homeostasis. The results also reveal that UCN interacts with ATS

  10. Cardiac Sirt1 mediates the cardioprotective effect of caloric restriction by suppressing local complement system activation after ischemia-reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tsunehisa; Tamaki, Kayoko; Shirakawa, Kohsuke; Ito, Kentaro; Yan, Xiaoxiang; Katsumata, Yoshinori; Anzai, Atsushi; Matsuhashi, Tomohiro; Endo, Jin; Inaba, Takaaki; Tsubota, Kazuo; Sano, Motoaki; Fukuda, Keiichi; Shinmura, Ken

    2016-04-15

    Caloric restriction (CR) confers cardioprotection against ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. We previously found the essential roles of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in the development of CR-induced cardioprotection and Sirt1 activation during CR (Shinmura K, Tamaki K, Ito K, Yan X, Yamamoto T, Katsumata Y, Matsuhashi T, Sano M, Fukuda K, Suematsu M, Ishii I. Indispensable role of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in caloric restriction-induced cardioprotection against ischemia-reperfusion injury.Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 308: H894-H903, 2015). However, the exact mechanism by which Sirt1 in cardiomyocytes mediates the cardioprotective effect of CR remains undetermined. We subjected cardiomyocyte-specific Sirt1 knockout (CM-Sirt1(-/-)) mice and the corresponding control mice to either 3-mo ad libitum feeding or CR (-40%). Isolated perfused hearts were subjected to 25-min global ischemia, followed by 60-min reperfusion. The recovery of left ventricle function after I/R was improved, and total lactate dehydrogenase release into the perfusate during reperfusion was attenuated in the control mice treated with CR, but a similar cardioprotective effect of CR was not observed in the CM-Sirt1(-/-)mice. The expression levels of cardiac complement component 3 (C3) at baseline and the accumulation of C3 and its fragments in the ischemia-reperfused myocardium were attenuated by CR in the control mice, but not in the CM-Sirt1(-/-)mice. Resveratrol treatment also attenuated the expression levels of C3 protein in cultured neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes. Moreover, the degree of myocardial I/R injury in conventional C3 knockout (C3(-/-)) mice treated with CR was similar to that in the ad libitum-fed C3(-/-)mice, although the expression levels of Sirt1 were enhanced by CR. These results demonstrate that cardiac Sirt1 plays an essential role in CR-induced cardioprotection against I/R injury by suppressing cardiac C3 expression. This is the first report suggesting

  11. Ultrasound-mediated gene transfer (sonoporation) in fibrin-based matrices: potential for use in tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomikou, Nikolitsa; Feichtinger, Georg A; Redl, Heinz; McHale, Anthony P

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that gene transfer into donor cells is an efficient and practical means of locally supplying requisite growth factors for applications in tissue regeneration. Here we describe, for the first time, an ultrasound-mediated system that can non-invasively facilitate gene transfer into cells entrapped within fibrin-based matrices. Since ultrasound-mediated gene transfer is enhanced using microbubbles, we compared the efficacy of neutral and cationic forms of these reagents on the ultrasound-stimulated gene transfer process in gel matrices. In doing so we demonstrated the beneficial effects associated with the use of cationic microbubble preparations that interact directly with cells and nucleic acid within matrices. In some cases, gene expression was increased two-fold in gel matrices when cationic microbubbles were compared with neutral microbubbles. In addition, incorporating collagen into fibrin gels yielded a 25-fold increase in gene expression after application of ultrasound to microbubble-containing matrices. We suggest that this novel system may facilitate non-invasive temporal and spatial control of gene transfer in gel-based matrices for the purposes of tissue regeneration.

  12. Downregulation of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) utilizing adenovirus-mediated transfer of small interfering RNA (siRNA) in a novel spinal metastatic melanoma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsung, Andrew J; Kargiotis, Odysseas; Chetty, Chandramu; Lakka, Sajani S; Gujrati, Meena; Spomar, Daniel G; Dinh, Dzung H; Rao, Jasti S

    2008-03-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) comprise a class of secreted zinc-dependent endopeptidases implicated in the metastatic potential of tumor cells due to their ability to degrade the extracellular matrix (ECM) and basement membrane. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) has been detected in high levels and correlates with invasiveness in human melanoma. We have studied the effect of adenovirus-mediated transfer of small interfering RNA (siRNA) against MMP-2 in the human melanoma cell line A2058. The delivery of these double-stranded RNA molecules represents an efficient technology in silencing disease-causing genes with known sequences at the post-transcriptional level. siRNA against MMP-2 mRNA (Ad-MMP-2) was found to decrease MMP-2 protein expression and activity in melanoma cells as demonstrated by western blotting and gelatin zymography. Furthermore, infection of cells with Ad-MMP-2 inhibited cellular migration and invasion as indicated by spheroid and matrigel assays. We also observed dose-dependent suppression of vascular network formation in an angiogenesis assay. Finally, we developed a nude mouse spinal metastatic model to investigate the local effects of tumor metastasis. Intravenous tail vein injection with Ad-MMP-2 on days 5, 9 and 11 after tumor implantation resulted in complete retention of neurological function as compared to control and scrambled vector (Ad-SV)-treated groups that showed complete paraplegia by day 14+/-2 days. Hematoxylin and eosin staining revealed decreased tumor size in the Ad-MMP-2-treated animals. This novel experimental model revealed that adenoviral-mediated transfer of RNA interference against MMP-2 results in the retention of neurological function and significantly inhibited tumor growth.

  13. Chlorin e6-Mediated Photodynamic Therapy Suppresses P. acnes-Induced Inflammatory Response via NFκB and MAPKs Signaling Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yoon-Young; Ryu, A-Reum; Jin, Solee; Jeon, Yu-Mi; Lee, Mi-Young

    2017-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT), consisting of photosensitizer, light, and oxygen has been used for the treatment of various diseases including cancers, microbial infections and skin disorders. In this study, we examined the anti-inflammatory effect of chlorin e6-mediated PDT in P. acnes-infected HaCaT cells using photosensitizer chlorin e6 (Ce6) and halogen light. The live and heat-killed P. acnes triggered an upregulation of inflammatory molecules such as iNOS, NO, and inflammatory cytokine in HaCaT cells and mouse model. Ce6-mediated PDT notably downregulated the expression of these inflammatory molecules in vitro and in vivo. Similarly, chlorin e6-mediated PDT was capable of regulating inflammatory response in both live and heat killed S. epidermidis exposed HaCaT cells. Moreover, phosphorylation of p38, JNK, and ERK were reduced by Ce6-mediated PDT. Ce6-mediated PDT also reduced the phosphorylation of IKKα/β, IĸBα and NFκB p65 in P. acnes-stimulated HaCaT cells. In addition, the dramatic increase in the nuclear translocation of NFκB p65 observed upon stimulation with P. acnes was markedly impaired by Ce6-based PDT. This is the first suggestion that Ce6-mediated PDT suppresses P. acnes-induced inflammation through modulating NFκB and MAPKs signaling pathways. PMID:28118375

  14. Apocynin inhibits Toll-like receptor-4-mediated activation of NF-κB by suppressing the Akt and mTOR pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Yoon Jeong; Kim, Arum; Sohn, Dong Suep; Lee, Chung Soo

    2016-12-01

    Microbial product lipopolysaccharide has been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory skin diseases. Apocynin has demonstrated to have an anti-inflammatory effect. However, the effect of apocynin on the Toll-like receptor-4-dependent activation of Akt, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and nuclear factor (NF)-κB pathway, which is involved in productions of inflammatory mediators in keratinocytes, has not been studied. Using human keratinocytes, we investigated the effect of apocynin on the inflammatory mediator production in relation to the Toll-like receptor-4-mediated-Akt/mTOR and NF-κB pathways, which regulates the transcription genes involved in immune and inflammatory responses. Apocynin, Akt inhibitor SH-5, Bay 11-7085 and N-acetylcysteine each attenuated the lipopolysaccharide-induced production of cytokines, PGE2, and chemokines, changes in the levels of Toll-like receptor-4, p-Akt, mTOR, and NF-κB, and production of reactive oxygen species in keratinocytes. The results show that apocynin appears to attenuate the lipopolysaccharide-stimulated production of inflammatory mediators in keratinocytes by suppressing the Toll-like receptor-4-mediated activation of the Akt, mTOR, and NF-κB pathways. The effect of apocynin appears to be attributed to its inhibitory effect on the production of reactive oxygen species. Apocynin appears to attenuate the microbial product-mediated inflammatory skin diseases.

  15. Mediated Electron Transfer at Redox Active Monolayers. Part 4: Kinetics of Redox Enzymes Coupled With Electron Mediators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E.G. Lyons

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A detailed kinetic analysis of the pertinent physical processes underlying the operation of enzyme electrodes immobilized within alkane thiol self assembled monolayers is developed. These electrodes utilize a soluble mediator, which partitions into the monolayer, regenerates the active catalytic form of the enzyme and is re-oxidized at the underlying support electrode surface giving rise to a current which reflects kinetic events at the enzyme surface. Both the enzyme/substrate and enzyme mediator kinetics have been quantified fully in terms of a ping-pong mechanism for the former and Michaelis-Menten kinetics for the latter. The effect of substrate and mediator diffusion in solution have also been specifically considered and the latter processes have been shown to result in a complex expression for the reaction flux. Four limiting kinetic cases have been enumerated and simple expressions for the reaction flux in each of these rate limiting situations have been developed. Kinetic case diagrams have been presented as an aid to mechanistic diagnosis. The complicating effects of diffusive loss of reduced mediator from the enzyme layer have also been examined and the relation between the observed flux corresponding to reduced mediator oxidation at the support electrode and the substrate reaction flux in the enzyme layer have been quantified in terms of an efficiency factor. Results extracted from recently published practical realizations of immobilized monolayer enzyme systems have been discussed in the context of the proposed model analysis.

  16. Stable genetic transformation of Jatropha curcas via Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated gene transfer using leaf explants

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Nitish

    2010-07-01

    Jatropha curcas is an oil bearing species with multiple uses and considerable economic potential as a biofuel crop. A simple and reproducible protocol was developed for Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated stable genetic transformation of J. curcas using leaf explains. Agrobacterium strain LBA 4404 harbouring the binary vector pCAMBIA 1304 having sense-dehydration responsive element binding (S-DREB2A), beta-glucuronidase (gus), and hygromycin-phosphotransferase (hpt) genes were used for gene transfer. A number of parameters such as preculture of explains, wounding of leaf explants, Agrobacterium growth phase (OD), infection duration, co-cultivation period, co-cultivation medium pH, and acetosyringone, were studied to optimized transformation efficiency. The highest transformation efficiency was achieved using 4-day precultured, non-wounded leaf explants infected with Agrobacterium culture corresponding to OD(600)=0.6 for 20 min, followed by co-cultivation for 4 days in a co-cultivation medium containing 100 mu M acetosyringone, pH 5.7. Co-cultivated leaf explants were initially cultured on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with 2.27 mu M thidiazuron (TDZ) for regeneration of shoot buds, followed by selection on same medium with 5 mu g ml(-1) hygromycin. Selected shoot buds were transferred to MS medium containing 10 mu M kinetin (Kn), 4.5 mu M 6-benzyl aminopurine (BA), and 5.5 mu M alpha-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) for proliferation. The proliferated shoots were elongated on MS medium supplemented with 2.25 mu M BA and 8.5 mu M indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). The elongated shoots were rooted on half strength MS medium supplemented with 15 mu M indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), 5.7 mu M IAA, 5.5 mu M NAA, and 0.25 mg l(-1) activated charcoal. GUS histochemical analysis of the transgenic tissues further confirmed the transformation event. PCR and DNA gel blot hybridization were performed to confirm the presence of transgene. A transformation efficiency of 29% was

  17. Suppression of PAI-1 expression through inhibition of the EGFR-mediated signaling cascade in rat kidney fibroblast by ascofuranone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyun-Ji; Kang, Jeong-Han; Kim, Teoan; Park, Kwang-Kyun; Kim, Cheorl-Ho; Lee, In-Seon; Min, Kwan-Sik; Magae, Junji; Nakajima, Hiroo; Bae, Young-Seuk; Chang, Young-Chae

    2009-05-15

    Fibrosis in glomerulosclerosis causes progressive loss of renal function. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta, one of the major profibrotic cytokines, induces the synthesis of plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1, a factor that plays a crucial role in the development of fibrosis. Here, we found that an isoprenoid antibiotic, ascofuranone, suppresses expression of profibrotic factors including matrix proteins and PAI-1 induced by TGF-beta in renal fibroblasts. Ascofuranone selectively inhibits phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and downstream kinases such as Raf-1, MEK-1/2, and ERK-1/2. PAI-1 transcription also is suppressed by treatment with kinase inhibitors for MEK-1/2 or EGFR, and with small interfering RNA for EGFR. Ascofuranone inhibits cellular metalloproteinase activity, and an inhibitor of metalloproteinases suppresses EGFR phosphorylation and PAI-1 transcription. These results suggest that ascofuranone suppresses expression of profibrotic factors through the inhibition of an EGFR-dependent signal transduction pathway activated by metalloproteinases.

  18. Interleukin-10 Signaling in Regulatory T Cells Is Required for Suppression of Th17 Cell-Mediated Inflammation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chaudhry, Ashutosh; Samstein, Robert M; Treuting, Piper; Liang, Yuqiong; Pils, Marina C; Heinrich, Jan-Michael; Jack, Robert S; Wunderlich, F. Thomas; Brüning, Jens C; Müller, Werner; Rudensky, Alexander Y

    2011-01-01

    .... Here, we showed that anti-inflammatory interleukin-10 (IL-10), and not proinflammatory IL-6 and IL-23 cytokine signaling, endowed Treg cells with the ability to suppress pathogenic Th17 cell responses...

  19. TRAF6 mediates IL-1β/LPS-induced suppression of TGF-β signaling through its interaction with the type III TGF-β receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seunghwan Lim

    Full Text Available Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1 is an important anti-inflammatory cytokine that modulates and resolves inflammatory responses. Recent studies have demonstrated that inflammation enhances neoplastic risk and potentiates tumor progression. In the evolution of cancer, pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β must overcome the anti-inflammatory effects of TGF-β to boost pro-inflammatory responses in epithelial cells. Here we show that IL-1β or Lipopolysaccharide (LPS suppresses TGF-β-induced anti-inflammatory signaling in a NF-κB-independent manner. TRAF6, a key molecule in IL-1β signaling, mediates this suppressive effect through interaction with the type III TGF-β receptor (TβRIII, which is TGF-β-dependent and requires type I TGF-β receptor (TβRI kinase activity. TβRI phosphorylates TβRIII at residue S829, which promotes the TRAF6/TβRIII interaction and consequent sequestration of TβRIII from the TβRII/TβRI complex. Our data indicate that IL-1β enhances the pro-inflammatory response by suppressing TGF-β signaling through TRAF6-mediated sequestration of TβRIII, which may be an important contributor to the early stages of tumor progression.

  20. Latency-associated peptide identifies a novel CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cell subset with TGFbeta-mediated function and enhanced suppression of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mei-Ling; Yan, Bo-Shiun; Bando, Yoshio; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Weiner, Howard L

    2008-06-01

    CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) are essential for maintaining self-tolerance and immune homeostasis. Here we characterize a novel subset of CD4(+)CD25(+) Tregs that express latency-associated peptide (LAP) on their cell surface (CD4(+)CD25(+)LAP(+) cells). CD4(+)CD25(+)LAP(+) cells express elevated levels of Foxp3 and Treg-associated molecules (CTLA4, glucocorticoid-induced TNFR-related gene), secrete TGFbeta, and express both cell surface TGFbeta and surface receptors for TGFbeta. In vitro, the suppressive function of CD4(+)CD25(+)LAP(+) cells is both cell contact and soluble factor dependent; this contrasts with CD4(+)CD25(+)LAP(-) cells, which are mainly cell contact dependent. In a model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, CD4(+)CD25(+)LAP(+) cells exhibit more potent suppressive activity than CD4(+)CD25(+)LAP(-) cells, and the suppression is TGFbeta dependent. We further show that CD4(+)CD25(+)LAP(+) cells suppress myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-specific immune responses by inducing Foxp3 and by inhibiting IL-17 production. Our findings demonstrate that CD4(+)CD25(+) Tregs are a heterogeneous population and that the CD4(+)CD25(+) subset that expresses LAP functions in a TGFbeta-dependent manner and has greater in vivo suppressive properties. Our work helps elucidate the ambiguity concerning the role of TGFbeta in CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg-mediated suppression and indicates that LAP is an authentic marker able to identify a TGFbeta-expressing CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg subset.

  1. Hepatitis C Virus Frameshift/Alternate Reading Frame Protein Suppresses Interferon Responses Mediated by Pattern Recognition Receptor Retinoic-Acid-Inducible Gene-I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Bum Park

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV actively evades host interferon (IFN responses but the mechanisms of how it does so are not completely understood. In this study, we present evidence for an HCV factor that contributes to the suppression of retinoic-acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I-mediated IFN induction. Expression of frameshift/alternate reading frame protein (F/ARFP from HCV -2/+1 frame in Huh7 hepatoma cells suppressed type I IFN responses stimulated by HCV RNA pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP and poly(IC. The suppression occurred independently of other HCV factors; and activation of interferon stimulated genes, TNFα, IFN-λ1, and IFN-λ2/3 was likewise suppressed by HCV F/ARFP. Point mutations in the full-length HCV sequence (JFH1 genotype 2a strain were made to introduce premature termination codons in the -2/+1 reading frame coding for F/ARFP while preserving the original reading frame, which enhanced IFNα and IFNβ induction by HCV. The potentiation of IFN response by the F/ARFP mutations was diminished in Huh7.5 cells, which already have a defective RIG-I, and by decreasing RIG-I expression in Huh7 cells. Furthermore, adding F/ARFP back via trans-complementation suppressed IFN induction in the F/ARFP mutant. The F/ARFP mutants, on the other hand, were not resistant to exogenous IFNα. Finally, HCV-infected human liver samples showed significant F/ARFP antibody reactivity, compared to HCV-uninfected control livers. Therefore, HCV F/ARFP likely cooperates with other viral factors to suppress type I and III IFN induction occurring through the RIG-I signaling pathway. This study identifies a novel mechanism of pattern recognition receptor modulation by HCV and suggests a biological function of the HCV alternate reading frame in the modulation of host innate immunity.

  2. Neuropeptide-mediated regulation of hapten-specific IgE responses in mice. II. Mechanisms of substance P-mediated isotype-specific suppression of BPO-specific IgE antibody-forming cell responses induced in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carucci, J A; Herrick, C A; Durkin, H G

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that substance P (SP), injected into benzylpenicilloyl-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (BPO-KLH) sensitized mice at the peak of the benzylpenicilloyl (BPO)-specific IgE response, suppressed these responses in isotype-specific fashion within 48 h. These studies also showed that SP, but not neurotensin (NT), serotonin (5-HT), somatostatin (SOM) or gastrin, suppressed BPO-specific memory IgE antibody-forming cell (AFC) responses induced in vitro, also in isotype-specific fashion. To investigate the mechanisms by which SP suppressed BPO-specific IgE AFC responses were induced in vitro, these responses were induced by culturing spleen cells from BPO-KLH sensitized mice for 5 days with BPO-KLH with or without whole SP, amino terminal SP (SP 1-4: Arg-Lys-Pro-Lys), or carboxy terminal SP (SP 8-11: Phe-Gly-Leu-Met). In some experiments, the SP receptor antagonist (D-Pro2, D-Phe7, D-Trp9)-SP (D-SP) was included in culture. In other experiments anti-interferon monoclonal antibody (anti-IFN gamma mAb) was in culture. Whole SP and SP 8-11, but not SP 1-4, suppressed BPO-specific IgE AFC responses induced in vitro. The suppression obtained was IgE isotype-specific and dose-dependent. Inclusion of SP receptor antagonist (D-Pro2, D-Phe7, D-Trp9)-SP inhibited suppression of BPO-specific memory IgE AFC responses by SP or SP 8-11. The SP-mediated suppression of BPO-specific memory IgE responses appeared to involve interferon gamma (IFN gamma).

  3. Reciprocal Trust Mediates Deep Transfer of Learning between Games of Strategic Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvina, Ion; Saleem, Muniba; Martin, Jolie M.; Gonzalez, Cleotilde; Lebiere, Christian

    2013-01-01

    We studied transfer of learning across two games of strategic interaction. We found that the interpersonal relation between two players during and across two games influence development of reciprocal trust and transfer of learning from one game to another. We show that two types of similarities between the games affect transfer: (1) deep…

  4. Quercetin-3-O-(2″-galloyl)-α-l-rhamnopyranoside inhibits TNF-α-activated NF-κB-induced inflammatory mediator production by suppressing ERK activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chung Soo; Jeong, Eun Byul; Kim, Yun Jeong; Lee, Min Sung; Seo, Seong Jun; Park, Kwan Hee; Lee, Min Won

    2013-08-01

    Quercetin and its derivatives have anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects. However, the effect of quercetin-3-O-(2″-galloyl)-α-l-rhamnopyranoside (QGR), a new quercetin derivative, on the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-stimulated production of inflammatory mediators in keratinocytes is unclear. In addition, the effect of QGR on the ERK and NF-κB-mediated inflammatory process has not been studied. In human keratinocyte HaCat cells, we investigated the effect of QGR on the TNF-α-stimulated production of inflammatory mediators in relation to the nuclear factor (NF)-κB, which regulates the transcription genes involved in immune and inflammatory responses. QGR inhibited the TNF-α-stimulated production of cytokines and chemokines in HaCaT cells. QGR, dexamethasone, cyclosporine A, Bay 11-7085 (an inhibitor of NF-κB activation) and cell signaling ERK inhibitor attenuated the TNF-α-induced formation of inflammatory mediators and activation of the NF-κB and ERK. Unlike other compounds, dexamethasone and cyclosporine A did not reduce formation of reactive oxygen species. The results show that QGR may attenuate TNF-α-stimulated inflammatory mediator production in HaCaT cells by suppressing the activation of the ERK-mediated NF-κB pathway that is mediated by reactive oxygen species. Additionally, QGR may exhibit a preventive effect against the proinflammatory mediator-induced skin diseases by inhibiting the activation of the ERK and NF-κB pathways.

  5. Malignant transformation of mature T cells after gammaretrovirus mediated transfer of nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase oncogene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gene therapy has been in use to cure hereditary and acquired diseases by incorporating the desired gene into the cells with the help of gammaretroviral vectors. Despite the success of this therapy in X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome, few patients developed leukemia as a major adverse event due to retroviral insertional mutagenesis within stem cells. In experimental animals also, retroviral-mediated gene transfer technique resulted in the development of leukemia. On the other hand, evidence suggests that mature T cells (TC are relatively resistant to transformation even after retroviral-mediated transfer of potent oncogenes Tcl1, ΔTrkA and LMO2 with no reported side effects yet. Aims: To further address the safety issue for TC use in gene therapy, this study investigated susceptibility of mature polyclonal TC to malignant transformation by the retroviral-mediated transfer of nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM-ALK oncogene. Materials and Methods: Wild-type mature TC, isolated from C57BL/6 donor mice (genetic background Ly5.1 were transduced with gamma-retroviral vectors encoding the potent TC oncogene NPM-ALK or the control vector enhanced green fluorescent protein eGFP. The cells were then transplanted into RAG-1 deficient recipient mice (genetic background Ly5.2. Results: Two out of five mice from NPM-ALK oncogene group developed leukemia/lymphoma after latency periods (153 and 250 days, respectively. None of the mice from the control group developed any malignancy throughout the observational period. Conclusion: Mature polyclonal TC are relatively susceptible to malignant transformation after gamma-retroviral mediated transfer of NPM-ALK oncogene; hence safety of TC use in gene therapy should be further investigated to avoid the possible side-effect of development of leukemia/lymphoma.

  6. Interleukin-25 Mediates Transcriptional Control of PD-L1 via STAT3 in Multipotent Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (hMSCs to Suppress Th17 Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Bei Wang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Multipotent human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs harbor immunomodulatory properties that are therapeutically relevant. One of the most clinically important populations of leukocytes is the interleukin-17A (IL-17A-secreting T (Th17 lymphocytes. However, mechanisms of hMSC and Th17 cell interactions are incompletely resolved. We found that, along with Th1 responses, hMSCs strongly suppressed Th17 responses and this required both IL-25—also known as IL-17E—as well as programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1, a potent cell surface ligand for tolerance induction. Knockdown of IL-25 expression in hMSCs abrogated Th17 suppression in vitro and in vivo. However, IL-25 alone was insufficient to significantly suppress Th17 responses, which also required surface PD-L1 expression. Critically, IL-25 upregulated PD-L1 surface expression through the signaling pathways of JNK and STAT3, with STAT3 found to constitutively occupy the proximal region of the PD-L1 promoter. Our findings demonstrate the complexities of hMSC-mediated Th17 suppression, and highlight the IL-25/STAT3/PD-L1 axis as a candidate therapeutic target.

  7. Area-Specific Cell Stimulation via Surface-Mediated Gene Transfer Using Apatite-Based Composite Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yushin Yazaki

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Surface-mediated gene transfer systems using biocompatible calcium phosphate (CaP-based composite layers have attracted attention as a tool for controlling cell behaviors. In the present study we aimed to demonstrate the potential of CaP-based composite layers to mediate area-specific dual gene transfer and to stimulate cells on an area-by-area basis in the same well. For this purpose we prepared two pairs of DNA–fibronectin–apatite composite (DF-Ap layers using a pair of reporter genes and pair of differentiation factor genes. The results of the area-specific dual gene transfer successfully demonstrated that the cells cultured on a pair of DF-Ap layers that were adjacently placed in the same well showed specific gene expression patterns depending on the gene that was immobilized in theunderlying layer. Moreover, preliminary real-time PCR results indicated that multipotential C3H10T1/2 cells may have a potential to change into different types of cells depending on the differentiation factor gene that was immobilized in the underlying layer, even in the same well. Because DF-Ap layers have a potential to mediate area-specific cell stimulation on their surfaces, they could be useful in tissue engineering applications.

  8. Novel benzoxazole derivatives DCPAB and HPAB attenuate Th1 cell-mediated inflammation through T-bet suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Yeon Ji; Kim, Darong; Oh, Sera; Jang, Eun Jung; Won, Hee Yeon; Jeong, Hana; Jeong, Mi Gyeong; Choo, Hea-Young Park; Hwang, Eun Sook

    2017-01-01

    Interferon-γ (IFN-γ), a critical inflammatory cytokine, is primarily produced by T helper 1 (Th1) cells and accelerates the pathogenesis of inflammatory colitis. Pharmacological suppression of IFN-γ production attenuates dysregulated inflammatory responses and may be beneficial for treating inflammatory disease. In this study, we aimed to discover potent anti-inflammatory compounds that suppress IFN-γ production and found that the novel benzoxazole derivatives, 2-((3,4-dichlorophenyl) amino) benzo[d]xazol-5-ol (DCPAB) and 2-((3,4-hydroxyphenyl) amino) benzo[d]xazol-5-ol (HPAB), suppressed IFN-γ production by T cells. Treatment of CD4+ T cells with DCPAB and HPAB selectively inhibited Th1 cell development, and DCPAB more potently suppressed IFN-γ than HPAB did. Interestingly, DCPAB and HPAB significantly suppressed the expression of T-box containing protein expressed in T cells (T-bet) that activates IFN-γ gene transcription. DCPAB additionally suppressed transcriptional activity of T-bet on IFN-γ gene promoter, whereas HPAB had no effect on T-bet activity. IFN-γ suppressive activity of DCPAB and HPAB was impaired in the absence of T-bet but was retrieved by the restoration of T-bet in T-bet-deficient T cells. Furthermore, DCPAB and HPAB attenuated inflammatory colitis development that was induced by CD4+ T cells in vivo. We suggest that the novel benzoxazole derivatives, DCPAB and HPAB, may have therapeutic effects on inflammatory colitis. PMID:28169371

  9. Flavonoid myricetin inhibits TNF-α-stimulated production of inflammatory mediators by suppressing the Akt, mTOR and NF-κB pathways in human keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Da Hee; Lee, Chung Soo

    2016-08-05

    Flavonoid myricetin has been shown to exhibit anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects. Nevertheless, the effect of myricetin on the TNF-α-stimulated production of inflammatory mediators in keratinocytes has not been studied. Using human keratinocytes, we examined the effect of myricetin on the TNF-α-stimulated production of inflammatory mediators in relation to the Akt, mTOR and NF-κB pathways, which regulate the transcription genes involved in immune and inflammatory responses. TNF-α stimulated production of the inflammatory mediators and reactive oxygen species in keratinocytes, and activation of the Akt, mTOR and NF-κB pathways in HaCaT cells and primary keratinocytes. Myricetin, Akt inhibitor, Bay 11-7085 (an inhibitor of NF-κB activation), rapamycin (mTOR inhibitor) and N-acetylcysteine attenuated TNF-α-induced activation of Akt, mTOR and NF-κB. Myricetin and N-acetylcysteine attenuated the TNF-α-stimulated production of cytokines and chemokines, and production of reactive oxygen species in keratinocytes. The results show that myricetin may reduce TNF-α-stimulated inflammatory mediator production in keratinocytes by suppressing the activation of the Akt, mTOR and NF-κB pathways. The effect of myricetin appears to be associated with inhibition of the production of reactive oxygen species. Further, myricetin appears to attenuate the proinflammatory mediator-induced inflammatory skin diseases.

  10. Role of Quinones in Electron Transfer of PQQ–Glucose Dehydrogenase Anodes—Mediation or Orientation Effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babanova, Sofia; Matanovic, Ivana; Chavez, Madelaine Seow; Atanassov, Plamen

    2015-06-24

    In this study, the influence of two quinones (1,2- and 1,4-benzoquinone) on the operation and mechanism of electron transfer in PQQ-dependent glucose dehydrogenase (PQQ–sGDH) anodes has been determined. Benzoquinones were experimentally explored as mediators present in the electrolyte. The electrochemical performance of the PQQ–sGDH anodes with and without the mediators was examined and for the first time molecular docking simulations were used to gain a fundamental understanding to explain the role of the mediator molecules in the design and operation of the enzymatic electrodes. It was proposed that the higher performance of the PQQ–sGDH anodes in the presence of 1,2- and 1,4-benzoquinones introduced in the solution is due to the shorter distance between these molecules and PQQ in the enzymatic molecule. It was also hypothesized that when 1,4-benzoquinone is adsorbed on a carbon support, it would play the dual role of a mediator and an orienting agent. At the same time, when 1,2-benzoquinone and ubiquinone are adsorbed on the electrode surface, the enzyme would transfer the electrons directly to the support, and these molecules would primarily play the role of an orienting agent.

  11. An Examination of Mediators of the Transfer of Cognitive Speed of Processing Training to Everyday Functional Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Jerri D.; Ruva, Christine L.; O’Brien, Jennifer L.; Haley, Christine B.; Lister, Jennifer J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of these analyses was to examine mediators of the transfer of cognitive speed of processing training to improved everyday functional performance (Edwards, Wadley, Vance, Roenker, & Ball, 2005). Cognitive speed of processing and visual attention (as measured by the Useful Field of View Test; UFOV) were examined as mediators of training transfer. Secondary data analyses were conducted from the Staying Keen in Later Life (SKILL) study, a randomized cohort study including 126 community dwelling adults 63 to 87 years of age. In the SKILL study, participants were randomized to an active control group or cognitive speed of processing training (SOPT), a non-verbal, computerized intervention involving perceptual practice of visual tasks. Prior analyses found significant effects of training as measured by the UFOV and Timed Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (TIADL) Tests. Results from the present analyses indicate that speed of processing for a divided attention task significantly mediated the effect of SOPT on everyday performance (e.g., TIADL) in a multiple mediation model accounting for 91% of the variance. These findings suggest that everyday functional improvements found from SOPT are directly attributable to improved UFOV performance, speed of processing for divided attention in particular. Targeting divided attention in cognitive interventions may be important to positively affect everyday functioning among older adults. PMID:23066808

  12. Toxicity and SidJ-Mediated Suppression of Toxicity Require Distinct Regions in the SidE Family of Legionella pneumophila Effectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havey, James C; Roy, Craig R

    2015-09-01

    Intracellular bacteria use a variety of strategies to evade degradation and create a replicative niche. Legionella pneumophila is an intravacuolar pathogen that establishes a replicative niche through the secretion of more than 300 effector proteins. The function of most effectors remains to be determined. Toxicity in yeast has been used to identify functional domains and elucidate the biochemical function of effectors. A library of L. pneumophila effectors was screened using an expression plasmid that produces low levels of each protein. This screen identified the effector SdeA as a protein that confers a strong toxic phenotype that inhibits yeast replication. The toxicity of SdeA was suppressed in cells producing the effector SidJ. The effector SdeA is a member of the SidE family of L. pneumophila effector proteins. All SidE orthologs encoded by the Philadelphia isolate of Legionella pneumophila were toxic to yeast, and SidJ suppressed the toxicity of each. We identified a conserved central region in the SidE proteins that was sufficient to mediate yeast toxicity. Surprisingly, SidJ did not suppress toxicity when this central region was produced in yeast. We determined that the amino-terminal region of SidE was essential for SidJ-mediated suppression of toxicity. Thus, there is a genetic interaction that links the activity of SidJ and the amino-terminal region of SidE, which is required to modulate the toxic activity displayed by the central region of the SidE protein. This suggests a complex mechanism by which the L. pneumophila effector SidJ modulates the function of the SidE proteins after translocation into host cells.

  13. Borrelia burgdorferi elicited-IL-10 suppresses the production of inflammatory mediators, phagocytosis, and expression of co-stimulatory receptors by murine macrophages and/or dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutein Chung

    Full Text Available Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb is a tick-borne spirochete that is the causative agent for Lyme disease. Our previous studies indicate that virulent Bb can potently enhance IL-10 production by macrophages (MØs and that blocking IL-10 production significantly enhances bacterial clearance. We hypothesize that skin-associated APC types, such as MØs and dendritic cells (DCs are potent producers of IL-10 in response to Bb, which may act in autocrine fashion to suppress APC responses critical for efficient Bb clearance. Our goal is to delineate which APC immune functions are dysregulated by Bb-elicited IL-10 using a murine model of Lyme disease. Our in vitro studies indicated that both APCs rapidly produce IL-10 upon exposure to Bb, that these levels inversely correlate with the production of many Lyme-relevant proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and that APCs derived from IL-10(-/- mice produced greater amounts of these proinflammatory mediators than wild-type APCs. Phagocytosis assays determined that Bb-elicited IL-10 levels can diminish Bb uptake and trafficking by MØs, suppresses ROS production, but does not affect NO production; Bb-elicited IL-10 had little effect on phagocytosis, ROS, and NO production by DCs. In general, Bb exposure caused little-to-no upregulation of several critical surface co-stimulatory markers by MØs and DCs, however eliminating Bb-elicited IL-10 allowed a significant upregulation in many of these co-stimulatory receptors. These data indicate that IL-10 elicited from Bb-stimulated MØs and DCs results in decreased production of proinflammatory mediators and co-stimulatory molecules, and suppress phagocytosis-associated events that are important for mediating both innate and adaptive immune responses by APCs.

  14. Suppressing sub-bandgap phonon-polariton heat transfer in near-field thermophotovoltaic devices for waste heat recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kaifeng; Santhanam, Parthiban; Fan, Shanhui

    2015-08-01

    We consider a near-field thermophotovoltaic device with metal as the emitter and semiconductor as the photovoltaic cell. We show that when the cell is a III-V semiconductor, such as GaSb, parasitic phonon-polariton heat transfer reduces efficiency in the near-field regime, especially when the temperature of the emitter is not high enough. We further propose ways to avoid the phonon-polariton heat transfer by replacing the III-V semiconductor with a non-polar semiconductor such as Ge. Our work provides practical guidance on the design of near-field thermophotovoltaic systems for efficient harvesting of low-quality waste heat.

  15. Tolerogenic dendritic cells pulsed with enterobacterial extract suppress development of colitis in the severe combined immunodeficiency transfer model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Elm; Gad, M; Kristensen, N N

    2007-01-01

    Immunomodulatory dendritic cells (DCs) that induce antigen-specific T-cell tolerance upon in vivo adoptive transfer are promising candidates for immunotherapy of autoimmune diseases. The feasibility of such a strategy has recently proved its efficacy in animal models of allotransplantation and ex...

  16. THzf and hCAS/CSE1L:making the right choice in p53-mediated tumour suppression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Katherine E Ewings; Kevin M Ryan

    2007-01-01

    @@ Preventing the propagation of damaged cells is a centralcomponent of tumour suppression.A key factor in thisprocess is the transcription factor p53-a fact exemplifiedby its frequent inactivation in human cancer.Since itsdiscovery,over forty thousand reports have been publishedinvestigating p53 function and regulation.

  17. Multifaceted effects of synthetic TLR2 ligand and Legionella pneumophilia on Treg-mediated suppression of T cell activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maren, W.W.C. van; Nierkens, S.; Toonen, L.W.J.; Bolscher, J.M.; Sutmuller, R.P.M.; Adema, G.J.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Regulatory T cells (Treg) play a crucial role in maintaining immune homeostasis and self-tolerance. The immune suppressive effects of Tregs should however be limited in case effective immunity is required against pathogens or cancer cells. We previously found that the Toll-like receptor

  18. The novel GrCEP12 peptide from the plant-parasitic nematode Globodera rostochiensis suppresses flg22-mediated PTI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shiyan; Chronis, Demosthenis; Wang, Xiaohong

    2013-09-01

    The potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis is a biotrophic pathogen that secretes effector proteins into host root cells to promote successful plant parasitism. In addition to the role in generating within root tissue the feeding cells essential for nematode development, (1) nematode secreted effectors are becoming recognized as suppressors of plant immunity. (2)(-) (4) Recently we reported that the effector ubiquitin carboxyl extension protein (GrUBCEP12) from G. rostochiensis is processed into free ubiquitin and a 12-amino acid GrCEP12 peptide in planta. Transgenic potato lines overexpressing the derived GrCEP12 peptide showed increased susceptibility to G. rostochiensis and to an unrelated bacterial pathogen Streptomyces scabies, suggesting that GrCEP12 has a role in suppressing host basal defense or possibly pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity (PTI) during the parasitic interaction. (3) To determine if GrCEP12 functions as a PTI suppressor we evaluated whether GrCEP12 suppresses flg22-induced PTI responses in Nicotiana benthamiana. Interestingly, we found that transient expression of GrCEP12 in N. benthamiana leaves suppressed reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and the induction of two PTI marker genes triggered by the bacterial PAMP flg22, providing direct evidence that GrCEP12 indeed has an activity in PTI suppression.

  19. MELATONIN-INDUCED SUPPRESSION OF PC12 CELL GROWTH IS MEDIATED BY ITS GI COUPLED TRANSMEMBRANE RECEPTORS. (R826248)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of pertussis toxin, an uncoupler of Gi protein from adenylate cyclase, and luzindole, a competitive inhibitor of melatonin receptor binding, were examined for their ability to inhibit melatonin-induced suppression of PC12 cell growth. Both agents inhibited the mela...

  20. Effect of neutralizing sera on factor X-mediated adenovirus serotype 5 gene transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parker, A.L.; Waddington, S.N.; Buckley, S.M.K.; Custers, J.; Havenga, M.J.E.; Rooijen, N. van; Goudsmit, J.; McVey, J.H.; Nicklin, S.A.; Baker, A.H.

    2009-01-01

    The deployment of adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5)-based vectors is hampered by preexisting immunity. When such vectors are delivered intravenously, hepatocyte transduction is mediated by the hexon-coagulation factor X (FX) interaction. Here, we demonstrate that human sera efficiently block FX-mediated

  1. Marked detergents effects on safranine T-mediated photo-induced electron transfer in cytochrome P-450 1A2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, R; Konami, H; Sato, H; Ito, O; Shimizu, T

    1995-10-25

    Cytochrome P-450 accepts electrons from electron transfer proteins to facilitate monooxidation reactions. It is suggested that basic amino acids such as Lys and Arg on the P-450 molecular surface interact with acidic amino acids such as Glu and Asp of the electron transfer protein. Safranine T is a basic compound which mediates electron transfer with illumination. It was found with flash photolysis that an electron from photo-reduced safranine T quickly reaches the heme iron of cytochrome P-450 1A2 (P-450 1A2). The photo-induced reduction kinetics of P-450 1A2 were analyzed by the Runge-Kutta method on the second order assumption. The electron-transfer rate constant from safranine T to P-450 1A2 was 2.1 x 10(6) M-1s-1. The rate constant was remarkably increased up to 3.1 x 10(8) M-1s-1 by adding cholic acid, while that was drastically reduced down to 3.5 x 10(4) M-1s-1 by adding Emulgen 913. The electron-transfer rate of a His163-Glu mutant, which has a 40 mV lower redox potential than that of the wild type, was the same as that of the wild type in the absence of the detergents, although the reduced fraction of the mutant was 30% lower than that of the wild type. The electron-transfer rate of the mutant also changed significantly by adding the detergents in the same way as the wild type. Based on these results, together with optical absorbance and fluorescence data, we discuss the inter- and intramolecular electron-transfer mechanism of P-450 1A2.

  2. Transfer of T-cell mediated immunity to Hymenolepis nana from mother mice to their neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, K; Okamoto, K

    1992-01-15

    Administration of lymph node cells from Hymenolepis nana-infected mice into lactating mothers, or directly suckling neonates successfully transferred immunity to the neonates. The capacity of lymph node cells to transfer immunity was completely abrogated by pretreatment with anti-Thy-1.2 monoclonal antibody and complement.

  3. Radiative heat transfer at nanoscale mediated by surface plasmons for highly doped silicon.

    OpenAIRE

    Rousseau, Emmanuel; Laroche, Marine; Greffet, Jean-Jacques

    2009-01-01

    International audience; In this letter, we revisit the role of surface plasmons for nanoscale radiative heat transfer between doped silicon surfaces. We derive a new accurate and closed-form expression of the radiative near-field heat transfer. We also analyse the flux and find that there is a doping level that maximizes the heat flux.

  4. The Mediating Effect of Context Variation in Mixed Practice for Transfer of Basic Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulasegaram, Kulamakan; Min, Cynthia; Howey, Elizabeth; Neville, Alan; Woods, Nicole; Dore, Kelly; Norman, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    Applying a previously learned concept to a novel problem is an important but difficult process called transfer. Practicing multiple concepts together (mixed practice mode) has been shown superior to practicing concepts separately (blocked practice mode) for transfer. This study examined the effect of single and multiple practice contexts for both…

  5. Non-Radiative Energy Transfer Mediated by Hybrid Light-Matter States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xiaolan; Chervy, Thibault; Wang, Shaojun; George, Jino; Thomas, Anoop; Hutchison, James A; Devaux, Eloise; Genet, Cyriaque; Ebbesen, Thomas W

    2016-05-17

    We present direct evidence of enhanced non-radiative energy transfer between two J-aggregated cyanine dyes strongly coupled to the vacuum field of a cavity. Excitation spectroscopy and femtosecond pump-probe measurements show that the energy transfer is highly efficient when both the donor and acceptor form light-matter hybrid states with the vacuum field. The rate of energy transfer is increased by a factor of seven under those conditions as compared to the normal situation outside the cavity, with a corresponding effect on the energy transfer efficiency. The delocalized hybrid states connect the donor and acceptor molecules and clearly play the role of a bridge to enhance the rate of energy transfer. This finding has fundamental implications for coherent energy transport and light-energy harvesting.

  6. TRANSFER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    “Chemistry Department, Kenyatta University, P. 0. Box 43844 ... harvester (X) [L 2] in a manner consistent with the following Forster equation for long range energy transfer [3-7]. .... sensitive foods, chemical reactors and essences. Recently we ...

  7. CD9-positive microvesicles mediate the transfer of molecules to Bovine Spermatozoa during epididymal maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, Julieta N; Frenette, Gilles; Belleannée, Clémence; Sullivan, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Acquisition of fertilization ability by spermatozoa during epididymal transit occurs in part by the transfer of molecules from membranous vesicles called epididymosomes. Epididymosomes are heterogeneous in terms of both size and molecular composition. Exosomes and other related small membranous vesicles (30-120 nm) containing tetraspanin proteins on their surface are found in many biological fluids. In this study, we demonstrate that these vesicles are present in bovine cauda epididymal fluid as a subpopulation of epididymosomes. They contain tetraspanin CD9 in addition to other proteins involved in sperm maturation such as P25b, GliPr1L1, and MIF. In order to study the mechanism of protein transfer to sperm, DilC12-labeled unfractionated epididymosomes or CD9-positive microvesicles were coincubated with epididymal spermatozoa, and their transfer was evaluated by flow cytometry. CD9-positive microvesicles from epididymal fluid specifically transferred molecules to spermatozoa, whereas those prepared from blood were unable to do so. The CD9-positive microvesicles transferred molecules to the same sperm regions (acrosome and midpiece) as epididymosomes, with the same kinetics; however, the molecules were preferentially transferred to live sperm and, in contrast to epididymosomes, Zn(2+) did not demonstrate potentiated transfer. Tetraspanin CD9 was associated with other proteins on the membrane surface of CD9-positive microvesicles according to coimmunoprecipitation experiments. CD26 cooperated with CD9 in the molecular transfer to sperm since the amount of molecules transferred was significantly reduced in the presence of specific antibodies. In conclusion, CD9-positive microvesicles are present in bovine cauda epididymal fluid and transfer molecules to live maturing sperm in a tissue-specific manner that involves CD9 and CD26.

  8. CD9-positive microvesicles mediate the transfer of molecules to Bovine Spermatozoa during epididymal maturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julieta N Caballero

    Full Text Available Acquisition of fertilization ability by spermatozoa during epididymal transit occurs in part by the transfer of molecules from membranous vesicles called epididymosomes. Epididymosomes are heterogeneous in terms of both size and molecular composition. Exosomes and other related small membranous vesicles (30-120 nm containing tetraspanin proteins on their surface are found in many biological fluids. In this study, we demonstrate that these vesicles are present in bovine cauda epididymal fluid as a subpopulation of epididymosomes. They contain tetraspanin CD9 in addition to other proteins involved in sperm maturation such as P25b, GliPr1L1, and MIF. In order to study the mechanism of protein transfer to sperm, DilC12-labeled unfractionated epididymosomes or CD9-positive microvesicles were coincubated with epididymal spermatozoa, and their transfer was evaluated by flow cytometry. CD9-positive microvesicles from epididymal fluid specifically transferred molecules to spermatozoa, whereas those prepared from blood were unable to do so. The CD9-positive microvesicles transferred molecules to the same sperm regions (acrosome and midpiece as epididymosomes, with the same kinetics; however, the molecules were preferentially transferred to live sperm and, in contrast to epididymosomes, Zn(2+ did not demonstrate potentiated transfer. Tetraspanin CD9 was associated with other proteins on the membrane surface of CD9-positive microvesicles according to coimmunoprecipitation experiments. CD26 cooperated with CD9 in the molecular transfer to sperm since the amount of molecules transferred was significantly reduced in the presence of specific antibodies. In conclusion, CD9-positive microvesicles are present in bovine cauda epididymal fluid and transfer molecules to live maturing sperm in a tissue-specific manner that involves CD9 and CD26.

  9. Pentabromophenol suppresses TGF-β signaling by accelerating degradation of type II TGF-β receptors via caveolae-mediated endocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Lin; Yang, Pei-Hua; Kao, Yu-Chen; Chen, Pei-Yu; Chung, Chih-Ling; Wang, Shih-Wei

    2017-01-01

    Pentabromophenol (PBP), a brominated flame retardant (BFR), is widely used in various consumer products. BFRs exert adverse health effects such as neurotoxic and endocrine-disrupting effects. In this study, we found that PBP suppressed TGF-β response by accelerating the turnover rate of TGF-β receptors. PBP suppressed TGF-β-mediated cell migration, PAI-1 promoter-driven reporter gene activation, and Smad2/3 phosphorylation in various cell types. Furthermore, PBP abolished TGF-β-mediated repression of E-cadherin expression, in addition to the induction of vimentin expression and N-cadherin and fibronectin upregulation, thus blocking TGF-β-induced epithelial–mesenchymal transition in A549 and NMuMG cells. However, this inhibition was not observed with other congeners such as tribromophenol and triiodophenol. TGF-β superfamily members play key roles in regulating various biological processes including cell proliferation and migration as well as cancer development and progression. The results of this in vitro study provide a basis for studies on the detailed relationship between PBP and modulation of TGF-β signalling. Because PBP is similar to other BFRs such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), additional laboratory and mechanistic studies should be performed to examine BFRs as potential risk factors for tumorigenesis and other TGF-β-related diseases. PMID:28230093

  10. 3-bromopyruvate and sodium citrate target glycolysis, suppress survivin, and induce mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in gastric cancer cells and inhibit gastric orthotopic transplantation tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting-An; Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Guo, Xing-Yu; Xian, Shu-Lin; Lu, Yun-Fei

    2016-03-01

    Glycolysis is the primary method utilized by cancer cells to produce the energy (adenosine triphosphate, ATP) required for cell proliferation. Therefore, inhibition of glycolysis may inhibit tumor growth. We previously found that both 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA) and sodium citrate (SCT) can inhibit glycolysis in vitro; however, the underlying inhibitory mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we used a human gastric cancer cell line (SGC-7901) and an orthotopic transplantation tumor model in nude mice to explore the specific mechanisms of 3-BrPA and SCT. We found that both 3-BrPA and SCT effectively suppressed cancer cell proliferation, arrested the cell cycle, induced apoptosis, and decreased the production of lactate and ATP. 3-BrPA significantly reduced the glycolytic enzyme hexokinase activity, while SCT selectively inhibited phosphofructokinase-1 activity. Furthermore, 3-BrPA and SCT upregulated the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins (Bax, cytochrome c, and cleaved caspase-3) and downregulated the expression of anti-apoptotic proteins (Bcl-2 and survivin). Finally, our animal model of gastric cancer indicated that intraperitoneal injection of 3-BrPA and SCT suppressed orthotopic transplantation tumor growth and induced tumor apoptosis. Taken together, these results suggest that 3-BrPA and SCT selectively suppress glycolytic enzymes, decrease ATP production, induce mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis, downregulate survivin, and inhibit tumor growth. Moreover, an intraperitoneal injection is an effective form of administration of 3-BrPA and SCT.

  11. TLR2 ligation protects effector T cells from regulatory T-cell mediated suppression and repolarizes T helper responses following MVA-based cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiset, Laurent; Fend, Laetitia; Gatard-Scheikl, Tania; Rittner, Karola; Duong, Vanessa; Rooke, Ronald; Muller, Sylviane; Bonnefoy, Jean-Yves; Préville, Xavier; Haegel, Hélène

    2012-11-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is hampered by the immunosuppression maintained by regulatory T cells (Tregs) in tumor-bearing hosts. Stimulation of the Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) by Pam3Cys is known to affect Treg-mediated suppression. We found that Pam3Cys increases the proliferation of both CD4(+) effector T cells (Teffs) and Tregs co-cultured in vitro, but did not induce the proliferation of Tregs alone upon CD3 and CD28 stimulation. In a mouse model of RMA-MUC1 tumors, Pam3Cys was administered either alone or in combination with a modified vaccinia ankara (MVA)-based mucin 1 (MUC1) therapeutic vaccine. The combination of Pam3Cys with MVA-MUC1 (1) diminished splenic Treg/CD4(+) T-cell ratios to those found in tumor-free mice, (2) stimulated a specific anti-MUC1 interferon γ (IFNγ) response and (3) had a significant therapeutic effect on tumor growth and mouse survival. When CD4(+) Teffs and Tregs were isolated from Pam3Cys-treated mice, Teffs had become resistant to Treg-mediated suppression while upregulating the expression of BclL-x(L). Tregs from Pam3Cys-treated mice were fully suppressive for Teffs from naïve mice. Bcl-x(L) was induced by Pam3Cys with different kinetics in Tregs and Teffs. Teff from Pam3Cys-treated mice produced increased levels of Th1 and Th2-type cytokines and an interleukin (IL)-6-dependent secretion of IL-17 was observed in Teff:Treg co-cultures, suggesting that TLR2 stimulation had skewed the immune response toward a Th17 profile. Our results show for the first time that in a tumor-bearing host, TLR2 stimulation with Pam3Cys affects both Tregs and Teffs, protects Teff from Treg-mediated suppression and has strong therapeutic effects when combined with an MVA-based antitumor vaccine.

  12. T-cell vaccination leads to suppression of intrapancreatic Th17 cells through Stat3-mediated RORγt inhibition in autoimmune diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Wang; Liu Yang; Xiaoyan Sheng; Weilei Chen; Haiqing Tang; Hongguang Sheng; Beili Xi

    2011-01-01

    Immunization with inactivated autoreactive T cells is an effective therapeutic approach to ameliorating autoimmune diseases,while the underlying mechanisms that regulate autoreactive T cells are not completely understood.This study tested the hypothesis that T-cell vaccination (TCV) inhibits autoimmune diabetes in mice through the suppression of Th17 cells.The results showed that TCV treatment decreased hyperglycemia in type 1 diabetes (T1D) induced by multiple low-dose streptozotocin (MLD-STZ) as compared with the controls,preserved the number of healthy pancreatic islets and increased the production of insulin in the islets.Further study revealed that TCV significantly decreased the production of both interleukin (IL)-17 and IL-23 in intrapancreatic infiltrating lymphocytes (IPL) through marked inhibition of mRNA level of retinoic acid-related orphan receptor γt (RORγt) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) phosphorylation.The role of TCV-induced Th17 suppression was further validated in adoptive transfer experiments with polarized Th17 cells in subdiabetogenic mice,which was similar to the effect of anti-IL-17 antibody treatment.Collectively our study shows that intrapancreatic Th17 cell suppression and healthy islet preservation play an important role in the treatment of T1D by TCV.

  13. Attenuation of TGF-β signaling suppresses premature senescence in a p21-dependent manner and promotes oncogenic Ras-mediated metastatic transformation in human mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shu; Yang, Junhua; Elkahloun, Abdel G; Bandyopadhyay, Abhik; Wang, Long; Cornell, John E; Yeh, I-Tien; Agyin, Joseph; Tomlinson, Gail; Sun, Lu-Zhe

    2012-04-01

    The molecular mechanisms that drive triple-negative, basal-like breast cancer progression are elusive. Few molecular targets have been identified for the prevention or treatment of this disease. Here we developed a series of isogenic basal-like human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs) with altered transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) sensitivity and different malignancy, resembling a full spectrum of basal-like breast carcinogenesis, and determined the molecular mechanisms that contribute to oncogene-induced transformation of basal-like HMECs when TGF-β signaling is attenuated. We found that expression of a dominant-negative type II receptor (DNRII) of TGF-β abrogated autocrine TGF-β signaling in telomerase-immortalized HMECs and suppressed H-Ras-V12-induced senescence-like growth arrest (SLGA). Furthermore, coexpression of DNRII and H-Ras-V12 rendered HMECs highly tumorigenic and metastatic in vivo in comparison with H-Ras-V12-transformed HMECs that spontaneously escaped H-Ras-V12-induced SLGA. Microarray analysis revealed that p21 was the major player mediating Ras-induced SLGA, and attenuated or loss of p21 expression contributed to the escape from SLGA when autocrine TGF-β signaling was blocked in HMECs. Furthermore, knockdown of p21 also suppressed H-Ras-V12-induced SLGA. Our results identify that autocrine TGF-β signaling is an integral part of the cellular anti-transformation network by suppressing the expression of a host of genes, including p21-regulated genes, that mediate oncogene-induced transformation in basal-like breast cancer.

  14. Sex Chromosome-wide Transcriptional Suppression and Compensatory Cis-Regulatory Evolution Mediate Gene Expression in the Drosophila Male Germline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily L Landeen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of heteromorphic sex chromosomes has repeatedly resulted in the evolution of sex chromosome-specific forms of regulation, including sex chromosome dosage compensation in the soma and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in the germline. In the male germline of Drosophila melanogaster, a novel but poorly understood form of sex chromosome-specific transcriptional regulation occurs that is distinct from canonical sex chromosome dosage compensation or meiotic inactivation. Previous work shows that expression of reporter genes driven by testis-specific promoters is considerably lower-approximately 3-fold or more-for transgenes inserted into X chromosome versus autosome locations. Here we characterize this transcriptional suppression of X-linked genes in the male germline and its evolutionary consequences. Using transgenes and transpositions, we show that most endogenous X-linked genes, not just testis-specific ones, are transcriptionally suppressed several-fold specifically in the Drosophila male germline. In wild-type testes, this sex chromosome-wide transcriptional suppression is generally undetectable, being effectively compensated by the gene-by-gene evolutionary recruitment of strong promoters on the X chromosome. We identify and experimentally validate a promoter element sequence motif that is enriched upstream of the transcription start sites of hundreds of testis-expressed genes; evolutionarily conserved across species; associated with strong gene expression levels in testes; and overrepresented on the X chromosome. These findings show that the expression of X-linked genes in the Drosophila testes reflects a balance between chromosome-wide epigenetic transcriptional suppression and long-term compensatory adaptation by sex-linked genes. Our results have broad implications for the evolution of gene expression in the Drosophila male germline and for genome evolution.

  15. Sex Chromosome-wide Transcriptional Suppression and Compensatory Cis-Regulatory Evolution Mediate Gene Expression in the Drosophila Male Germline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landeen, Emily L; Muirhead, Christina A; Wright, Lori; Meiklejohn, Colin D; Presgraves, Daven C

    2016-07-01

    The evolution of heteromorphic sex chromosomes has repeatedly resulted in the evolution of sex chromosome-specific forms of regulation, including sex chromosome dosage compensation in the soma and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in the germline. In the male germline of Drosophila melanogaster, a novel but poorly understood form of sex chromosome-specific transcriptional regulation occurs that is distinct from canonical sex chromosome dosage compensation or meiotic inactivation. Previous work shows that expression of reporter genes driven by testis-specific promoters is considerably lower-approximately 3-fold or more-for transgenes inserted into X chromosome versus autosome locations. Here we characterize this transcriptional suppression of X-linked genes in the male germline and its evolutionary consequences. Using transgenes and transpositions, we show that most endogenous X-linked genes, not just testis-specific ones, are transcriptionally suppressed several-fold specifically in the Drosophila male germline. In wild-type testes, this sex chromosome-wide transcriptional suppression is generally undetectable, being effectively compensated by the gene-by-gene evolutionary recruitment of strong promoters on the X chromosome. We identify and experimentally validate a promoter element sequence motif that is enriched upstream of the transcription start sites of hundreds of testis-expressed genes; evolutionarily conserved across species; associated with strong gene expression levels in testes; and overrepresented on the X chromosome. These findings show that the expression of X-linked genes in the Drosophila testes reflects a balance between chromosome-wide epigenetic transcriptional suppression and long-term compensatory adaptation by sex-linked genes. Our results have broad implications for the evolution of gene expression in the Drosophila male germline and for genome evolution.

  16. Claudin-5, -7, and -18 suppress proliferation mediated by inhibition of phosphorylation of Akt in human lung squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akizuki, Risa; Shimobaba, Shun; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Endo, Satoshi; Ikari, Akira

    2017-02-01

    Abnormal expression of claudin (CLDN) subtypes has been reported in various solid cancers. However, it is unknown which subtype plays a key role in the regulation of proliferation in cancer cells. The expression of CLDN3-5, 7, and 18 in human lung squamous carcinoma tissues was lower than that in normal tissue. Here, we examined which combination of exogenous CLDNs expression inhibits proliferation and the molecular mechanism using human lung squamous RERF-LC-AI cells. Real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting showed that CLDN3-5, 7, and 18 are little expressed in RERF-LC-AI cells. In the exogenously transfected cells, CLDN5, 7, and 18 were distributed in the cell-cell contact areas concomitant with ZO-1, a tight junctional scaffolding protein, whereas CLDN3 and 4 were not. Cell proliferation was individually and additively suppressed by CLDN5, 7, and 18. The expression of these CLDNs showed no cytotoxicity compared with mock cells. CLDN5, 7, and 18 increased p21 and decreased cyclin D1, resulting in the suppression of cell cycle G1-S transition. The expression of these CLDNs inhibited phosphorylation of Akt without affecting phosphorylated ERK1/2. Furthermore, these CLDNs inhibited the nuclear localization of Akt and its association with 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1). The suppression of G1-S transition caused by CLDN5, 7, and 18 was rescued by the expression of constitutively active-Akt. We suggest that the reduction of CLDN5, 7, and 18 expression loses the suppressive ability of interaction between PDK1 and Akt and causes sustained phosphorylation of Akt, resulting in the disordered proliferation in lung squamous carcinoma cells.

  17. TAT-mediated intracellular delivery of NPM-derived peptide induces apoptosis in leukemic cells and suppresses leukemogenesis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yun; Du, Wei; Koretsky, Tara; Bagby, Grover C; Pang, Qishen

    2008-09-15

    Nucleophosmin (NPM) is frequently overexpressed in leukemias and other tumors. NPM has been reported to suppress oncogene-induced senescence and apoptosis and may represent a therapeutic target for cancer. We fused a NPM-derived peptide to the HIV-TAT (TAT-NPMDeltaC) and found that the fusion peptide inhibited proliferation and induced apoptotic death of primary fibroblasts and preleukemic stem cells. TAT-NPMDeltaC down-regulated several NF-kappaB-controlled survival and inflammatory proteins and suppressed NF-kappaB-driven reporter gene activities. Using an inflammation-associated leukemia model, we demonstrate that TAT-NPMDeltaC induced proliferative suppression and apoptosis of preleukemic stem cells and significantly delayed leukemic development in mice. Mechanistically, TAT-NPMDeltaC associated with wild-type NPM proteins and formed complexes with endogenous NPM and p65 at promoters of several antiapoptotic and inflammatory genes and abrogated their transactivation by NF-kappaB in leu-kemic cells. Thus, TAT-delivered NPM peptide may provide a novel therapy for inflammation-associated tumors that require NF-kappaB signaling for survival.

  18. Membrane-bound Dickkopf-1 in Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells suppresses T-cell-mediated autoimmune colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Wook-Jin; Park, Jong-Hyun; Henegariu, Octavian; Yilmaz, Saliha; Hao, Liming; Bothwell, Alfred L M

    2017-10-01

    Induction of tolerance is a key mechanism to maintain or to restore immunological homeostasis. Here we show that Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells use Dickkopf-1 (DKK-1) to regulate T-cell-mediated tolerance in the T-cell-mediated autoimmune colitis model. Treg cells from DKK-1 hypomorphic doubleridge mice failed to control CD4(+) T-cell proliferation, resulting in CD4 T-cell-mediated autoimmune colitis. Thymus-derived Treg cells showed a robust expression of DKK-1 but not in naive or effector CD4 T cells. DKK-1 expression in Foxp3(+) Treg cells was further increased upon T-cell receptor stimulation in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, Foxp3(+) Treg cells expressed DKK-1 in the cell membrane and the functional inhibition of DKK-1 using DKK-1 monoclonal antibody abrogated the suppressor function of Foxp3(+) Treg cells. DKK-1 expression was dependent on de novo protein synthesis and regulated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway but not by the canonical Wnt pathway. Taken together, our results highlight membrane-bound DKK-1 as a novel Treg-derived mediator to maintain immunological tolerance in T-cell-mediated autoimmune colitis. © 2017 The Authors. Immunology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Cysteine protease antigens cleave CD123, the α subunit of murine IL-3 receptor, on basophils and suppress IL-3-mediated basophil expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikado, Hideto [Atopy (Allergy) Research Center, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Fujimura, Tsutomu; Taka, Hikari; Mineki, Reiko [Laboratory of Proteomics and Biomolecular Science, BioMedical Research Center, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko [Atopy (Allergy) Research Center, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Takai, Toshiro, E-mail: t-takai@juntendo.ac.jp [Atopy (Allergy) Research Center, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-05-01

    Th2 type immune responses are essential for protective immunity against parasites and play crucial roles in allergic disorders. Helminth parasites secrete a variety of proteases for their infectious cycles including for host entry, tissue migration, and suppression of host immune effector cell function. Furthermore, a number of pathogen-derived antigens, as well as allergens such as papain, belong to the family of cysteine proteases. Although the link between protease activity and Th2 type immunity is well documented, the mechanisms by which proteases regulate host immune responses are largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the cysteine proteases papain and bromelain selectively cleave the α subunit of the IL-3 receptor (IL-3Rα/CD123) on the surface of murine basophils. The decrease in CD123 expression on the cell surface, and the degradation of the extracellular domain of recombinant CD123 were dependent on the protease activity of papain and bromelain. Pre-treatment of murine basophils with papain resulted in inhibition of IL-3-IL-3R signaling and suppressed IL-3- but not thymic stromal lymphopoietin-induced expansion of basophils in vitro. Our unexpected findings illuminate a novel mechanism for the regulation of basophil functions by protease antigens. Because IL-3 plays pivotal roles in the activation and proliferation of basophils and in protective immunity against helminth parasites, pathogen-derived proteases might contribute to the pathogenesis of infections by regulating IL-3-mediated functions in basophils. - Highlights: • We identified the murine IL3R as a novel target of papain-family cysteine proteases. • Papain-family cysteine proteases cleaved IL3Rα/CD123 on murine basophils. • Papain suppressed IL3- but not TSLP-induced expansion of murine basophils. • The inactivation of IL3R might be a strategy for pathogens to suppress host immunity.

  20. Dexamethasone/1alpha-25-dihydroxyvitamin D3-treated dendritic cells suppress colitis in the SCID T-cell transfer model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Elm; Schmidt, Esben Gjerløff Wedebye; Gad, Monika

    2008-01-01

    severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice adoptively transferred with CD4(+) CD25(-) T cells from the development of wasting disease and colitis. We therefore established an in vitro test that could predict the in vivo function of DCs and improve strategies for the preparation of immunomodulatory DCs...... in this model. Based on these in vitro findings, we here evaluate three methods for DC generation including short-term and long-term IL-10 exposure or DC exposure to dexamethasone in combination with vitamin D3 (Dex/D3). All DCs resulted in lower CD4(+) CD25(-) T-cell enteroantigen-specific responses in vitro...

  1. Does cortisol acting via the type II glucocorticoid receptor mediate suppression of pulsatile luteinizing hormone secretion in response to psychosocial stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Kellie M; Oakley, Amy E; Pytiak, Andrew V; Tilbrook, Alan J; Wagenmaker, Elizabeth R; Karsch, Fred J

    2007-04-01

    This study assessed the importance of cortisol in mediating inhibition of pulsatile LH secretion in sheep exposed to a psychosocial stress. First, we developed an acute psychosocial stress model that involves sequential layering of novel stressors over 3-4 h. This layered-stress paradigm robustly activated the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and unambiguously inhibited pulsatile LH secretion. We next used this paradigm to test the hypothesis that cortisol, acting via the type II glucocorticoid receptor (GR), mediates stress-induced suppression of pulsatile LH secretion. Our approach was to determine whether an antagonist of the type II GR (RU486) reverses inhibition of LH pulsatility in response to the layered stress. We used two animal models to assess different aspects of LH pulse regulation. With the first model (ovariectomized ewe), LH pulse characteristics could vary as a function of both altered GnRH pulses and pituitary responsiveness to GnRH. In this case, antagonism of the type II GR did not prevent stress-induced inhibition of pulsatile LH secretion. With the second model (pituitary-clamped ovariectomized ewe), pulsatile GnRH input to the pituitary was fixed to enable assessment of stress effects specifically at the pituitary level. In this case, the layered stress inhibited pituitary responsiveness to GnRH and antagonism of the type II GR reversed the effect. Collectively, these findings indicate acute psychosocial stress inhibits pulsatile LH secretion, at least in part, by reducing pituitary responsiveness to GnRH. Cortisol, acting via the type II GR, is an obligatory mediator of this effect. However, under conditions in which GnRH input to the pituitary is not clamped, antagonism of the type II GR does not prevent stress-induced inhibition of LH pulsatility, implicating an additional pathway of suppression that is independent of cortisol acting via this receptor.

  2. DNA-mediated electron transfer in DNA duplexes tethered to gold electrodes via phosphorothioated dA tags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Rui; Kotlyar, Alexander; Ferapontova, Elena E

    2014-10-14

    The efficiency of DNA-based bioelectronic devices strongly depends on the way DNA molecules are linked to the electronic component. Commonly, DNA is tethered to metal electrodes via an alkanethiol linker representing an additional barrier for electron transport. Here we demonstrate that the replacement of the alkanethiol linker for a phosphorothioated adenosine tag increases the rate of DNA-mediated electron transfer (ET) up to 259 s(-1), representing the highest hitherto reported rate of electrochemically-modulated ET, and improves the stability of DNA-electrode surface binding. Both results offer pronounced technological and scientific benefits for DNA-based electronics.

  3. SYNERGISTIC EFFICACY OF ADENOVIRUS-MEDIATED BCL-XS GENE TRANSFER AND TOPOTECAN IN OVARIAN CANCER CELL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    To observe the synergistic efficacy between Adenovirus-mediated bcl-Xs(Adv-bcl-Xs) gene transfer and chemotherapy on ovarian cancer cell growth. Methods: NuTu-19 cells were infected by different titers of Adv-bcl-Xs and treated with topotecan in the meantime. Cell proliferation was measured 3 days later by MTT. Graphical representations and statistical analyses for their interaction in tumor cells were done. Results: The statistical result and Graphical representations of the statistical modeling showed synergy effect on cell growth inhibition (P<0.01). Conclusion: There were synergistic efficacies between Adv-bcl-Xs gene therapy and Topotecan in ovarian cancer cell growth.

  4. Rab11b mediates melanin transfer between donor melanocytes and acceptor keratinocytes via coupled exo/endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarafder, Abul K; Bolasco, Giulia; Correia, Maria S; Pereira, Francisco J C; Iannone, Lucio; Hume, Alistair N; Kirkpatrick, Niall; Picardo, Mauro; Torrisi, Maria R; Rodrigues, Inês P; Ramalho, José S; Futter, Clare E; Barral, Duarte C; Seabra, Miguel C

    2014-04-01

    The transfer of melanin from melanocytes to keratinocytes is a crucial process underlying maintenance of skin pigmentation and photoprotection against UV damage. Here, we present evidence supporting coupled exocytosis of the melanin core, or melanocore, by melanocytes and subsequent endocytosis by keratinocytes as a predominant mechanism of melanin transfer. Electron microscopy analysis of human skin samples revealed three lines of evidence supporting this: (1) the presence of melanocores in the extracellular space; (2) within keratinocytes, melanin was surrounded by a single membrane; and (3) this membrane lacked the melanosomal membrane protein tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TYRP1). Moreover, co-culture of melanocytes and keratinocytes suggests that melanin exocytosis is specifically induced by keratinocytes. Furthermore, depletion of Rab11b, but not Rab27a, caused a marked decrease in both keratinocyte-stimulated melanin exocytosis and transfer to keratinocytes. Thus, we propose that the predominant mechanism of melanin transfer is keratinocyte-induced exocytosis, mediated by Rab11b through remodeling of the melanosome membrane, followed by subsequent endocytosis by keratinocytes.

  5. Organotypic tissue culture of adult rodent retina followed by particle-mediated acute gene transfer in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Moritoh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Organotypic tissue culture of adult rodent retina with an acute gene transfer that enables the efficient introduction of variable transgenes would greatly facilitate studies into retinas of adult rodents as animal models. However, it has been a difficult challenge to culture adult rodent retina. The purpose of this present study was to develop organotypic tissue culture of adult rodent retina followed by particle-mediated acute gene transfer in vitro. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We established an interphase organotypic tissue culture for adult rat retinas (>P35 of age which was optimized from that used for adult rabbit retinas. We implemented three optimizations: a greater volume of Ames' medium (>26 mL per retina, a higher speed (constant 55 rpm of agitation by rotary shaker, and a greater concentration (10% of horse serum in the medium. We also successfully applied this method to adult mouse retina (>P35 of age. The organotypic tissue culture allowed us to keep adult rodent retina morphologically and structurally intact for at least 4 days. However, mouse retinas showed less viability after 4-day culture. Electrophysiologically, ganglion cells in cultured rat retina were able to generate action potentials, but exhibited less reliable light responses. After transfection of EGFP plasmids by particle-mediated acute gene transfer, we observed EGFP-expressing retinal ganglion cells as early as 1 day of culture. We also introduced polarized-targeting fusion proteins such as PSD95-GFP and melanopsin-EYFP (hOPN4-EYFP into rat retinal ganglion cells. These fusion proteins were successfully transferred into appropriate locations on individual retinal neurons. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This organotypic culture method is largely applicable to rat retinas, but it can be also applied to mouse retinas with a caveat regarding cell viability. This method is quite flexible for use in acute gene transfection in adult rodent retina, replacing

  6. Interleukin-10 and prostaglandin E2 have complementary but distinct suppressive effects on Toll-like receptor-mediated dendritic cell activation in ovarian carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brencicova, Eva; Jagger, Ann L; Evans, Hayley G; Georgouli, Mirella; Laios, Alex; Attard Montalto, Steve; Mehra, Gautam; Spencer, Jo; Ahmed, Ahmed A; Raju-Kankipati, Shanti; Taams, Leonie S; Diebold, Sandra S

    2017-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) have the potential to instigate a tumour-specific immune response, but their ability to prime naïve lymphocytes depends on their activation status. Thus, for tumour immunotherapy to be effective, the provision of appropriate DC activation stimuli such as Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists is crucial in order to overcome immunosuppression associated with the tumour microenvironment. To address this, we investigated how ovarian carcinoma (OC)-associated ascites impedes activation of DC by TLR agonists. Our results show that ascites reduces the TLR-mediated up-regulation of CD86 and partially inhibits the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin 6 (IL-6), IL-12 and tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) in monocyte-derived DC from healthy controls. We further observe an impaired T cell stimulatory capacity of DC upon activation with TLR agonists in the presence of ascites, indicating that their functionality is affected by the immunosuppressive factors. We identify IL-10 and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) as the pivotal immunosuppressive components in OC-associated ascites compromising TLR-mediated DC activation. Interestingly, IL-10 is present in both ascites from patients with malignant OC and in peritoneal fluid from patients with benign ovarian conditions and both fluids have similar ability to reduce TLR-mediated DC activation. However, depletion of IL-10 from ascites revealed that the presence of paracrine IL-10 is not crucial for ascites-mediated suppression of DC activation in response to TLR activation. Unlike IL-10, PGE2 is absent from peritoneal fluid of patients with benign conditions and selectively reduces TNFα induction in response to TLR-mediated activation in the presence of OC-associated ascites. Our study highlights PGE2 as an immunosuppressive component of the malignant OC microenvironment rendering PGE2 a potentially important target for immunotherapy in OC.

  7. Suppression of the inflammatory response in experimental arthritis is mediated via estrogen receptor alpha but not estrogen receptor beta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dulos, John; Vijn, Peter; van Doorn, Cindy; Hofstra, Claudia L.; Veening-Griffioen, Desiree; de Graaf, Jan; Dijcks, Fred A.; Boots, Annemieke M. H.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The immune modulatory role of estrogens in inflammation is complex. Both pro- and anti-inflammatory effects of estrogens have been described. Estrogens bind both estrogen receptor (ER)alpha and beta. The contribution of ER alpha and ER beta to ER-mediated immune modulation was studied

  8. Mediatization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjarvard, Stig

    2017-01-01

    Mediatization research shares media effects studies' ambition of answering the difficult questions with regard to whether and how media matter and influence contemporary culture and society. The two approaches nevertheless differ fundamentally in that mediatization research seeks answers...... to these general questions by distinguishing between two concepts: mediation and mediatization. The media effects tradition generally considers the effects of the media to be a result of individuals being exposed to media content, i.e. effects are seen as an outcome of mediated communication. Mediatization...... research is concerned with long-term structural changes involving media, culture, and society, i.e. the influences of the media are understood in relation to how media are implicated in social and cultural changes and how these processes come to create new conditions for human communication and interaction...

  9. A critical role of IFNγ in priming MSC-mediated suppression of T cell proliferation through up-regulation of B7-H1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been shown to possess immunosuppressive properties, e.g., by inhibiting T cell proliferation. Activated T cells can also enhance the immunosuppression ability of MSCs. The precise mechanisms underlying MSC-mediated immunosuppression remain largely undefined, although both cell-cell contact and soluble factors have been implicated; nor is it clear how the immunosuppressive property of MSCs is modulated by T cells. Using MSCs isolated from mouse bone marrow, we show here that interferon gamma (IFNγ), a well-known proinflammatory cytokine produced by activated T cells, plays an important role in priming the immunosuppressive property of MSCs. Mechanistically, IFNγ acts directly on MSCs and leads to up-regulation of B7-H1, an inhibitory surface molecule in these stem cells. MSCs primed by activated T cells derived from IFNγ-/- mouse exhibited dramatically reduced ability to suppress T cell proliferation, a defect that can be rescued by supplying exogenous IFNy. Moreover, siRNA-mediated knockdown of B7-H1 in MSCs abolished immunosuppression by these cells. Taken together, our results suggest that IFNy plays a critical role in triggering the immunosuppresion by MSCs through upregulating B7-H1 in these cells, and provide evidence supporting the cell-cell contact mechanism in MSC-mediated immunosuppression.

  10. Cyanidin suppresses amyloid beta-induced neurotoxicity by inhibiting reactive oxygen species-mediated DNA damage and apoptosis in PC12 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Wang; Nam Chun Cho; Xiao-ting Fu; Da-wei Li; Kun Wang; Xin-zhi Wang; Yuan Li; Bao-liang Sun; Xiao-yi Yang; Zun-cheng Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ)-induced oxidative stress is a major pathologic hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease. Cyan-idin, a natural lfavonoid compound, is neuroprotective against oxidative damage-mediated degeneration. However, its molecular mechanism remains unclear. Here, we investigated the effects of cyanidin pretreat-ment against Aβ-induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells, and explored the underlying mechanisms. Cyanidin pretreatment signiifcantly attenuated Aβ-induced cell mortality and morphological changes in PC12 cells. Mechanistically, cyanidin effectively blocked apoptosis induced by Aβ, by restoring the mitochondrial mem-brane potentialvia upregulation of Bcl-2 protein expression. Moreover, cyanidin markedly protected PC12 cells from Aβ-induced DNA damage by blocking reactive oxide species and superoxide accumulation. These results provide evidence that cyanidin suppresses Aβ-induced cytotoxicity, by preventing oxidative damage mediated by reactive oxide species, which in turn inhibits mitochondrial apoptosis. Our study demonstrates the therapeutic potential of cyanidin in the prevention of oxidative stress-mediated Aβ neurotoxicity.

  11. Auto-acetylation on K289 is not essential for HopZ1a-mediated plant defense suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Sebastian Rufian

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Pseudomonas syringae type III-secreted effector HopZ1a is a member of the HopZ / YopJ superfamily of effectors that triggers immunity in Arabidopsis. We have previously shown that HopZ1a suppresses both local (effector-triggered immunity, ETI and systemic immunity (systemic acquired resistance, SAR triggered by the heterologous effector AvrRpt2. HopZ1a has been shown to possess acetyltransferase activity, and this activity is essential to trigger immunity in Arabidopsis. HopZ1a acetyltransferase activity has been reported to require the auto-acetylation of the effector on a specific lysine (K289 residue. In this paper we analyze the relevance of autoacetylation of lysine residue 289 in HopZ1a ability to suppress plant defenses, and on the light of the results obtained, we also revise its relevance for HopZ1a avirulence activity. Our results indicate that, while the HopZ1aK289R mutant is impaired to some degree in its virulence and avirulence activities, is by no means phenotypically equivalent to the catalytically inactive HopZ1aC216A, since it is still able to trigger a defense response that induces detectable macroscopic HR and effectively protects Arabidopsis from infection, reducing growth of P. syringae within the plant. We also present evidence that the HopZ1aK289R mutant still displays virulence activities, partially suppressing both ETI and SAR.

  12. Mechanisms of bridge-mediated electron transfer: a TDDFT electronic dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Feizhi; Chapman, Craig T; Liang, Wenkel; Li, Xiaosong

    2012-12-14

    We present a time-dependent density functional theory approach for probing the dynamics of electron transfer on a donor-bridge-acceptor polyene dye scaffold. Two kinds of mechanisms, namely, the superexchange mechanism and the sequential mechanism, may be involved in the electron transfer process. In this work, we have focused on the crossover between these two charge transfer mechanisms on a series of donor-bridge-acceptor polyene dye systems with varying lengths of conjugated bridges. A number of methods and quantities are used to assist in the analysis, including the phase relationship of charge evolution and frequency domain spectra of the time-dependent dipole. Our simulations show that the superexchange mechanism plays a dominant role in the electron transfer from donor to acceptor when the bridge length is small, and the sequential mechanism becomes more important as the polyene bridge is lengthened. Full Ehrenfest dynamics with nuclear motion show that molecular vibrations play a very small role in such ultrafast charge transfer processes.

  13. Herpes simplex virus-mediated human hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene transfer into neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palella, T D; Silverman, L J; Schroll, C T; Homa, F L; Levine, M; Kelley, W N

    1988-01-01

    The virtually complete deficiency of the purine salvage enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) results in a devastating neurological disease, Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. Transfer of the HPRT gene into fibroblasts and lymphoblasts in vitro and into hematopoietic cells in vivo has been accomplished by other groups with retroviral-derived vectors. It appears to be necessary, however, to transfer the HPRT gene into neuronal cells to correct the neurological dysfunction of this disorder. The neurotropic virus herpes simplex virus type 1 has features that make it suitable for use as a vector to transfer the HPRT gene into neuronal tissue. This report describes the isolation of an HPRT-deficient rat neuroma cell line, designated B103-4C, and the construction of a recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 that contained human HPRT cDNA. These recombinant viruses were used to infect B103-4C cells. Infected cells expressed HPRT activity which was human in origin.

  14. Herpes simplex virus-mediated human hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene transfer into neuronal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palella, T.D.; Silverman, L.J.; Schroll, C.T.; Homa, F.L.; Levine, M.; Kelley, W.N.

    1988-01-01

    The virtually complete deficiency of the purine salvage enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) results in a devastating neurological disease, Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. Transfer of the HPRT gene into fibroblasts and lymphoblasts in vitro and into hematopoietic cells in vivo has been accomplished by other groups with retroviral-derived vectors. It appears to be necessary, however, to transfer the HPRT gene into neuronal cells to correct the neurological dysfunction of this disorder. The neurotropic virus herpes simplex virus type 1 has features that make it suitable for use as a vector to transfer the HPRT gene into neuronal tissue. This report describes the isolation of an HPRT-deficient rat neuroma cell line, designated B103-4C, and the construction of a recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 that contained human HPRT cDNA. These recombinant viruses were used to infect B103-4C cells. Infected cells expressed HPRT activity which was human in origin.

  15. Solvent-mediated electron hopping: long-range charge transfer in IBr-(CO2) photodissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheps, Leonid; Miller, Elisa M; Horvath, Samantha; Thompson, Matthew A; Parson, Robert; McCoy, Anne B; Lineberger, W Carl

    2010-04-09

    Chemical bond breaking involves coupled electronic and nuclear dynamics that can take place on multiple electronic surfaces. Here we report a time-resolved experimental and theoretical investigation of nonadiabatic dynamics during photodissociation of a complex of iodine monobromide anion with carbon dioxide [IBr-(CO2)] on the second excited (A') electronic state. Previous experimental work showed that the dissociation of bare IBr- yields only I- + Br products. However, in IBr-(CO2), time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that a subset of the dissociating molecules undergoes an electron transfer from iodine to bromine 350 femtoseconds after the initial excitation. Ab initio calculations and molecular dynamics simulations elucidate the mechanism for this charge hop and highlight the crucial role of the carbon dioxide molecule. The charge transfer between two recoiling atoms, assisted by a single solvent-like molecule, provides a notable limiting case of solvent-driven electron transfer over a distance of 7 angstroms.

  16. Transfer of plasmid-mediated resistance to tetracycline in pathogenic bacteria from fish and aquaculture environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglielmetti, Elena; Korhonen, Jenni M; Heikkinen, Jouni; Morelli, Lorenzo; von Wright, Atte

    2009-04-01

    The transferability of a large plasmid that harbors a tetracycline resistance gene tet(S), to fish and human pathogens was assessed using electrotransformation and conjugation. The plasmid, originally isolated from fish intestinal Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis KYA-7, has potent antagonistic activity against the selected recipients (Lactococcus garvieae and Listeria monocytogenes), preventing conjugation. Therefore the tetracycline resistance determinant was transferred via electroporation to L. garvieae. A transformant clone was used as the donor in conjugation experiments with three different L. monocytogenes strains. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing the transfer of an antibiotic resistance plasmid from fish-associated lactic bacteria to L. monocytogenes, even if the donor L. garvieae was not the original host of the tetracycline resistance but experimentally created by electroporation. These results demonstrate that the antibiotic resistance genes in the fish intestinal bacteria have the potential to spread both to fish and human pathogens, posing a risk to aquaculture and consumer safety.

  17. Chaperone-rich tumor cell lysate-mediated activation of antigen-presenting cells resists regulatory T cell suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larmonier, Nicolas; Cantrell, Jessica; Lacasse, Collin; Li, Gang; Janikashvili, Nona; Situ, Elaine; Sepassi, Marjan; Andreansky, Samita; Katsanis, Emmanuel

    2008-04-01

    CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs) critically contribute to the mechanisms of cancer-induced tolerance. These cells suppress anti-tumoral CD8(+) and CD4(+) T lymphocytes and can also restrain the function of APCs. We have previously documented the immunostimulatory effects of a chaperone-rich cell lysate (CRCL) anti-cancer vaccine. Tumor-derived CRCL induces tumor immunity in vivo, partly by promoting dendritic cell (DC) and macrophage activation. In the current study, we evaluated the effects of CD4(+)CD25(+)forkhead box P3(+) Tregs isolated from mice bearing 12B1 bcr-abl(+) leukemia on DC and macrophages that had been activated by 12B1-derived CRCL. CRCL-activated DC and macrophages resisted Treg suppression, as the production of proinflammatory cytokines, the activation of transcription factor NF-kappaB, and their immunostimulatory potential was unaffected by Tregs. Our results thus highlight CRCL as a powerful adjuvant endowed with the capacity to overcome tumor-induced Treg-inhibitory effects on APCs.

  18. Afatinib induces apoptosis in NSCLC without EGFR mutation through Elk-1-mediated suppression of CIP2A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Ting-Ting; Wang, Cheng-Yi; Chen, Yen-Lin; Lai, Chih-Cheng; Chang, Fang-Yu; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Chao, Chung-Hao H; Shiau, Chung-Wai; Huang, Yuh-Chin T; Yu, Chong-Jen; Chen, Kuen-Feng

    2015-02-10

    Afatinib has anti-tumor effect in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation. We found afatinib can also induce apoptosis in NSCLC cells without EGFR mutation through CIP2A pathway. Four NSCLC cell lines (H358 H441 H460 and A549) were treated with afatinib to determine their sensitivity to afatinib-induced cell death and apoptosis. The effects of CIP2A on afatinib-induced apoptosis were confirmed by overexpression and knockdown of CIP2A expression in the sensitive and resistant cells, respectively. Reduction of Elk-1 binding to the CIP2A promoter and suppression of CIP2A transcription were analyzed. In vivo efficacy of afatinib against H358 and H460 xenografts tumors were also determined in nude mice. Afatinib induced significant cell death and apoptosis in H358 and H441 cells, but not in H460 or A549 cells. The apoptotic effect of afatinib in sensitive cells was associated with downregulation of CIP2A, promotion of PP2A activity and decrease in AKT phosphorylation. Afatinib suppressed CIP2A at the gene transcription level by reducing the promoter binding activity of Elk-1. Clinical samples showed that higher CIP2A expression predicted a poor prognosis and Elk-1 and CIP2A expressions were highly correlated. In conclusion, afatinib induces apoptosis in NSCLC without EGFR mutations through Elk-1/CIP2A/PP2A/AKT pathway.

  19. Enhancement of gene transfer activity mediated by mannosylated dendrimer/alpha-cyclodextrin conjugate (generation 3, G3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arima, Hidetoshi; Chihara, Yuko; Arizono, Masayo; Yamashita, Shogo; Wada, Koki; Hirayama, Fumitoshi; Uekama, Kaneto

    2006-11-01

    To enhance gene transfer activity of dendrimers, we prepared its conjugate (generation 3, G3) with alpha-cyclodextrin bearing mannose (Man-alpha-CDE conjugates) with various degrees of substitution of the mannose moiety (DSM5, 10, 13, 20) and compared their cytotoxicity and gene transfer activity, and elucidated the enhancing mechanism for the activity. Of the various carriers used here, Man-alpha-CDE conjugate (G3, DSM10) provided the highest gene transfer activity in NR8383, A549, NIH3T3 and HepG2 cells, being independent of the expression of mannose receptors. Gene transfer activity of Man-alpha-CDE conjugate (G3, DSM10) was not decreased by the addition of 10% serum in A549 cells. Cytotoxicity of the polyplex with Man-alpha-CDE conjugates (G3, DSM10) was not observed in A549 and NIH3T3 cells up to the charge ratio of 200/1 (carrier/pDNA). The gel mobility and particle size of polyplex with Man-alpha-CDE conjugate (G3, DSM10) were relevant to those with alpha-CDE conjugate (G3), but zeta-potential, DNase I stability, pDNA condensation of the former polyplex were somewhat different from those of the latter one. Cellular association of polyplex with Man-alpha-CDE conjugate (G3, DSM10) was almost comparable to that with dendrimer (G3) complex and alpha-CDE conjugate (G3). The addition of mannan and mannose attenuated gene transfer activity of Man-alpha-CDE conjugate (G3, DSM10) in A549 cells. Alexa-pDNA complex with TRITC-Man-alpha-CDE conjugate (G3, DSM10), but not the complex with TRITC-alpha-CDE conjugate (G3), was found to translocate to nucleus at 24 h after incubation in A549 cells. HVJ-E vector including mannan, but neither the vector alone nor the vector including dextran, suppressed the nuclear localization of TRITC-Man-alpha-CDE conjugate (G3, DSM10) to a striking degree after 24 h incubation in A549 cells. These results suggest that Man-alpha-CDE conjugate (G3, DSM10) has less cytotoxicity and prominent gene transfer activity through not only its serum

  20. Suppression of Ultraviolet B Exposure-Mediated Activation of NF-κB in Normal Human Keratinocytes by Resveratrol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaqar Mustafa Adhami

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemoprevention by naturally occurring agents is a newer dimension in the management of neoplasia, including skin cancer. Solar ultraviolet (UV radiation is the major cause of skin cancer. We recently demonstrated that resveratrol (3,5,4'-trihydroxystilbene, a polyphenolic antioxidant found in grapes and red wine, imparts protection from UVB-mediated cutaneous damages in SKH-1 hairless mice. The mechanism of action of resveratrol is not clearly understood. Here, we investigated the involvement of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB, which is known to play a critical role in skin biology and the development of skin cancer, as the mechanism of chemoprevention of UV damage by resveratrol. In the normal human epidermal keratinocytes, resveratrol blocked UVB-mediated (40 mJ/cm2 activation of NF-κB in a dose-dependent (5, 10, and 25μM resveratrol for 24 hours as well as time-dependent (5μ/M resveratrol for 12, 24, and 48 hours fashion. Resveratrol treatment of keratinocytes also inhibited UVB-mediated 1 phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα, and 2 activation of IKKα. We suggest that NF-κB pathway plays a critical role in the chemopreventive effects of resveratrol against the adverse effects of UV radiation including photocarcinogenesis.

  1. A novel posttranscriptional mechanism for dietary cholesterol-mediated suppression of liver LDL receptor expression[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amar Bahadur; Kan, Chin Fung Kelvin; Shende, Vikram; Dong, Bin; Liu, Jingwen

    2014-01-01

    It is well-established that over-accumulation of dietary cholesterol in the liver inhibits sterol-regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-mediated LDL receptor (LDLR) gene transcription leading to a reduced hepatic LDLR mRNA level in hypercholesterolemic animals. However, it is unknown whether elevated cholesterol levels can elicit a cellular response to increase LDLR mRNA turnover to further repress LDLR expression in liver tissue. In the current study, we examined the effect of a high cholesterol diet on the hepatic expression of LDLR mRNA binding proteins in three different animal models and in cultured hepatic cells. Our results demonstrate that high cholesterol feeding specifically elevates the hepatic expression of LDLR mRNA decay promoting factor heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (HNRNP)D without affecting expressions of other LDLR mRNA binding proteins in vivo and in vitro. Employing the approach of adenovirus-mediated gene knockdown, we further show that depletion of HNRNPD in the liver results in a marked reduction of serum LDL-cholesterol and a substantial increase in liver LDLR expression in hyperlipidemic mice. Additional studies of gene knockdown in albumin-luciferase-untranslated region (UTR) transgenic mice provide strong evidence supporting the essential role of 3′UTR in HNRNPD-mediated LDLR mRNA degradation in liver tissue. Altogether, this work identifies a novel posttranscriptional regulatory mechanism by which dietary cholesterol inhibits liver LDLR expression via inducing HNRNPD to accelerate LDLR mRNA degradation. PMID:24792925

  2. Suppression of c-Myc enhances p21(WAF1/CIP1) -mediated G1 cell cycle arrest through the modulation of ERK phosphorylation by ascochlorin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Yun-Jeong; Hoe, Hyang-Sook; Cho, Hyun-Ji; Park, Kwan-Kyu; Kim, Dae-Dong; Kim, Cheorl-Ho; Magae, Junji; Kang, Dong Wook; Lee, Sang-Rae; Chang, Young-Chae

    2017-08-18

    Numerous anti-cancer agents inhibit cell cycle progression via a p53-dependent mechanism; however, other genes such as the proto-oncogene c-Myc are promising targets for anticancer therapy. In the present study, we provide evidence that ascochlorin, an isoprenoid antibiotic, is a non-toxic anti-cancer agent that induces G1 cell cycle arrest and p21(WAF1/CIP1) expression by downregulating of c-Myc protein expression. Ascochlorin promoted the G1 arrest, upregulated p53 and p21(WAF1/CIP1) , and downregulated c-Myc in HCT116 cells. In p53-deficient cells, ascochlorin enhanced the expression of G1 arrest-related genes except p53. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) mediated c-Myc silencing indicated that the transcriptional repression of c-Myc was related to ascochlorin-mediated modulation of p21(WAF1/CIP1) expression. Ascochlorin suppressed the stabilization of the c-Myc protein by inhibiting ERK and P70S6K/4EBP1 phosphorylation, whereas it had no effect on c-Myc degradation mediated by PI3K/Akt/GSK3β. The ERK inhibitor PD98059 and siRNA-mediated ERK silencing induced G1 arrest and p21(WAF1/CIP1) expression by downregulating c-Myc in p53-deficient cells. These results indicated that ascochlorin-induced G1 arrest is associated with the repression of ERK phosphorylation and c-Myc expression. Thus, we reveal a role for ascochlorin in inhibiting tumor growth via G1 arrest, and identify a novel regulatory mechanism for ERK /c-Myc. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Induction and characterization of micronuclei in plant cells. Perspectives for micronucleus-mediated chromosome transfer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, H.A.

    1989-01-01

    In this thesis, micronucleation in plant cells has been investigated and systems for isolation and transfer of organelles have been established.The discovery, described in chapter two, that the phosphoric amide herbicide amiprophos-methyl induced micronuclei at a high frequency in cell suspensions o

  4. Flavins mediate extracellular electron transfer in Gram-positive Bacillus megaterium strain LLD-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Yong; Liu, Lidan; You, Lexing;

    electrochemically active strain of Bacillus megatherium strain LLD-1, and its extracellular electron transfer mechanism was demonstrated by cyclic voltammetry (CV), differential pulse voltammetry (DPV), HPLC, and chronoamperometric. The CV and DPV showed that a redox peaks ascribing to membrane proteins was found...

  5. Cascaded plasmon-plasmon coupling mediated energy transfer across stratified metal-dielectric nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golmakaniyoon, Sepideh; Hernandez-Martinez, Pedro Ludwig; Demir, Hilmi Volkan; Sun, Xiao Wei

    2016-01-01

    Surface plasmon (SP) coupling has been successfully applied to nonradiative energy transfer via exciton-plasmon-exciton coupling in conventionally sandwiched donor-metal film-acceptor configurations. However, these structures lack the desired efficiency and suffer poor photoemission due to the high energy loss. Here, we show that the cascaded exciton-plasmon-plasmon-exciton coupling in stratified architecture enables an efficient energy transfer mechanism. The overlaps of the surface plasmon modes at the metal-dielectric and dielectric-metal interfaces allow for strong cross-coupling in comparison with the single metal film configuration. The proposed architecture has been demonstrated through the analytical modeling and numerical simulation of an oscillating dipole near the stratified nanostructure of metal-dielectric-metal-acceptor. Consistent with theoretical and numerical results, experimental measurements confirm at least 50% plasmon resonance energy transfer enhancement in the donor-metal-dielectric-metal-acceptor compared to the donor-metal-acceptor structure. Cascaded plasmon-plasmon coupling enables record high efficiency for exciton transfer through metallic structures. PMID:27698422

  6. Cell-mediated transgenesis in rabbits: chimeric and nuclear transfer animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakhartchenko, V; Flisikowska, T; Li, S; Richter, T; Wieland, H; Durkovic, M; Rottmann, O; Kessler, B; Gungor, T; Brem, G; Kind, A; Wolf, E; Schnieke, A

    2011-02-01

    The ability to perform precise genetic engineering such as gene targeting in rabbits would benefit biomedical research by enabling, for example, the generation of genetically defined rabbit models of human diseases. This has so far not been possible because of the lack of functional rabbit embryonic stem cells and the high fetal and perinatal mortality associated with rabbit somatic cell nuclear transfer. We examined cultured pluripotent and multipotent cells for their ability to support the production of viable animals. Rabbit putative embryonic stem (ES) cells were derived and shown capable of in vitro and in vivo pluripotent differentiation. We report the first live born ES-derived rabbit chimera. Rabbit mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were derived from bone marrow, and multipotent differentiation was demonstrated in vitro. Nuclear transfer was carried out with both cell types, and embryo development was assessed in vitro and in vivo. Rabbit MSCs were markedly more successful than ES cells as nuclear donors. MSCs were transfected with fluorescent reporter gene constructs and assessed for nuclear transfer competence. Transfected MSCs supported development with similar efficiency as normal MSCs and resulted in the first live cloned rabbits from genetically manipulated MSCs. Reactivation of fluorescence reporter gene expression in reconstructed embryos was investigated as a means of identifying viable embryos in vitro but was not a reliable predictor. We also examined serial nuclear transfer as a means of rescuing dead animals.

  7. Avian influenza A virus H5N1 causes autophagy-mediated cell death through suppression of mTOR signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianhui Ma; Qian Sun; Ruifang Mi; Hongbing Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Of the few avian influenza viruses that have crossed the species barrier to infect humans,the highly pathogenic influenza A (H5N1) strain has claimed the lives of more than half of the infected patients.With largely unknown mechanism of lung injury by H5N1 infection,acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is the major cause of death among the victims.Here we present the fact that H5N1 caused autophagic cell death through suppression of mTOR signaling.Inhibition of autophagy,either by depletion of autophagy gene Beclinl or by autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA),significantly reduced H5N1 mediated cell death.We suggest that autophagic cell death may contribute to the development of ARDS in H5N1 influenza patients and inhibition of autophagy could therefore become a novel strategy for the treatment of H5N1 infection.

  8. Both p53-PUMA/NOXA-Bax-mitochondrion and p53-p21cip1 pathways are involved in the CDglyTK-mediated tumor cell suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Zhendong, E-mail: zdyu@hotmail.com [Department of Clinical laboratory, Peking University Shenzhen Hospital, Guangdong (China); Wang, Hao [Department of pathology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Zhang, Libin; Tang, Aifa; Zhai, Qinna; Wen, Jianxiang; Yao, Li [Department of Clinical laboratory, Peking University Shenzhen Hospital, Guangdong (China); Li, Pengfei, E-mail: lipengfei@cuhk.edu.hk [Department of pathology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China)

    2009-09-04

    CDglyTK fusion suicide gene has been well characterized to effectively kill tumor cells. However, the exact mechanism and downstream target genes are not fully understood. In our study, we found that CDglyTK/prodrug treatment works more efficiently in p53 wild-type (HONE1) cells than in p53 mutant (CNE1) cells. We then used adenovirus-mediated gene delivery system to either knockdown or overexpress p53 and its target genes in these cells. Consistent results showed that both p53-PUMA/NOXA/Bcl2-Bax and p53-p21 pathways contribute to the CDglyTK induced tumor cell suppression. Our work for the first time addressed the role of p53 related genes in the CDglyTK/prodrug system.

  9. Antisense-mediated suppression of C-hordein biosynthesis in the barley grain results in correlated changes in the transcriptome, protein profile, and amino acid composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mette; Lange, Marianne; Friis, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    C-hordein. The production of the S-rich B/gamma- and D-hordeins was increased and significantly higher steady-state expression levels of the corresponding genes were observed. The increased synthesis of S-rich hordeins appeared to increase the demand for sulphur and the S-rich amino acids (cysteine......Antisense- or RNAi-mediated suppression of the biosynthesis of nutritionally inferior storage proteins is a promising strategy for improving the amino acid profile of seeds. However, the potential pleiotropic effects of this on interconnected pathways and the agronomic quality traits need...... to be addressed. In the current study, a transcriptomic analysis of an antisense C-hordein line of barley was performed, using a grain-specific cDNA array. The C-hordein antisense line is characterized by marked changes in storage protein and amino acid profiles, while the seed weight is within the normal range...

  10. Metal Ion-dependent Heavy Chain Transfer Activity of TSG-6 Mediates Assembly of the Cumulus-Oocyte Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, David C; Birchenough, Holly L; Ali, Tariq; Rugg, Marilyn S; Waltho, Jon P; Ievoli, Elena; Jowitt, Thomas A; Enghild, Jan J; Richter, Ralf P; Salustri, Antonietta; Milner, Caroline M; Day, Anthony J

    2015-11-27

    The matrix polysaccharide hyaluronan (HA) has a critical role in the expansion of the cumulus cell-oocyte complex (COC), a process that is necessary for ovulation and fertilization in most mammals. Hyaluronan is organized into a cross-linked network by the cooperative action of three proteins, inter-α-inhibitor (IαI), pentraxin-3, and TNF-stimulated gene-6 (TSG-6), driving the expansion of the COC and providing the cumulus matrix with its required viscoelastic properties. Although it is known that matrix stabilization involves the TSG-6-mediated transfer of IαI heavy chains (HCs) onto hyaluronan (to form covalent HC·HA complexes that are cross-linked by pentraxin-3) and that this occurs via the formation of covalent HC·TSG-6 intermediates, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well understood. Here, we have determined the tertiary structure of the CUB module from human TSG-6, identifying a calcium ion-binding site and chelating glutamic acid residue that mediate the formation of HC·TSG-6. This occurs via an initial metal ion-dependent, non-covalent, interaction between TSG-6 and HCs that also requires the presence of an HC-associated magnesium ion. In addition, we have found that the well characterized hyaluronan-binding site in the TSG-6 Link module is not used for recognition during transfer of HCs onto HA. Analysis of TSG-6 mutants (with impaired transferase and/or hyaluronan-binding functions) revealed that although the TSG-6-mediated formation of HC·HA complexes is essential for the expansion of mouse COCs in vitro, the hyaluronan-binding function of TSG-6 does not play a major role in the stabilization of the murine cumulus matrix.

  11. A novel murine model of Cooley anemia and its rescue by lentiviral-mediated human beta-globin gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivella, Stefano; May, Chad; Chadburn, Amy; Rivière, Isabelle; Sadelain, Michel

    2003-04-15

    Patients affected by beta-thalassemia major require lifelong transfusions because of insufficient or absent production of the beta chain of hemoglobin (Hb). A minority of patients are cured by allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. In the most severe of the hitherto available mouse models of beta-thalassemia, a model for human beta-thalassemia intermedia, we previously demonstrated that globin gene transfer in bone marrow cells is curative, stably raising Hb levels from 8.0-8.5 to 11.0-12.0 g/dL in long-term chimeras. To fully assess the therapeutic potential of gene therapy in the context of a lethal anemia, we now have created an adult model of beta(0)-thalassemia major. In this novel model, mice engrafted with beta-globin-null (Hbb(th3/th3)) fetal liver cells succumb to ineffective erythropoiesis within 60 days. These mice rapidly develop severe anemia (2-4 g/dL), massive splenomegaly, extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH), and hepatic iron overload. Remarkably, most mice (11 of 13) treated by lentivirus-mediated globin gene transfer were rescued. Long-term chimeras with an average 1.0-2.4 copies of the TNS9 vector in their hematopoietic and blood cells stably produced up to 12 g/dL chimeric Hb consisting of mu alpha(2):hu beta(2) tetramers. Pathologic analyses indicated that erythroid maturation was restored, while EMH and iron overload dramatically decreased. Thus, we have established an adult animal model for the most severe of the hemoglobinopathies, Cooley anemia, which should prove useful to investigate both genetic and pharmacologic treatments. Our findings demonstrate the remarkable efficacy of lentivirus-mediated globin gene transfer in treating a fulminant blood disorder and strongly support the efficacy of gene therapy in the severe hemoglobinopathies.

  12. Electron transfer capacity dependence of quinone-mediated Fe(III) reduction and current generation by Klebsiella pneumoniae L17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaomin; Liu, Liang; Liu, Tongxu; Yuan, Tian; Zhang, Wei; Li, Fangbai; Zhou, Shungui; Li, Yongtao

    2013-06-01

    Quinone groups in exogenous electron shuttles can accelerate extracellular electron transfer (EET) from bacteria to insoluble terminal electron acceptors, such as Fe(III) oxides and electrodes, which are important in biogeochemical redox processes and microbial electricity generation. However, the relationship between quinone-mediated EET performance and electron-shuttling properties of the quinones remains incompletely characterized. This study investigates the effects of a series of synthetic quinones (SQs) on goethite reduction and current generation by a fermenting bacterium Klebsiella pneumoniae L17. In addition, the voltammetric behavior and electron transfer capacities (ETCs) of SQ, including electron accepting (EAC) and donating (EDC) capacities, is also examined using electrochemical methods. The results showed that SQ can significantly increase both the Fe(III) reduction rates and current outputs of L17. Each tested SQ reversibly accepted and donated electrons as indicated by the cyclic voltammograms. The EAC and EDC results showed that Carmine and Alizarin had low relative capacities of electron transfer, whereas 9,10-anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonic acid (AQDS), 2-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (2-HNQ), and 5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (5-HNQ) showed stronger relative ETC, and 9,10-anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid (AQC) and 9,10-anthraquinone-2-sulfonic acid (AQS) had high relative ETC. Enhancement of microbial goethite reduction kinetics and current outputs by SQ had a good linear relationship with their ETC, indicating that the effectiveness of quinone-mediated EET may be strongly dependent on the ETC of the quinones. Therefore, the presence of quinone compounds and fermenting microorganisms may increase the diversity of microbial populations that contribute to element transformation in natural environments. Moreover, ETC determination of different SQ would help to evaluate their performance for microbial EET under anoxic conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier

  13. Fruit-specific RNAi-mediated suppression of DET1 enhances carotenoid and flavonoid content in tomatoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davuluri, Ganga Rao; van Tuinen, Ageeth; Fraser, Paul D; Manfredonia, Alessandro; Newman, Robert; Burgess, Diane; Brummell, David A; King, Stephen R; Palys, Joe; Uhlig, John; Bramley, Peter M; Pennings, Henk M J; Bowler, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Tomatoes are a principal dietary source of carotenoids and flavonoids, both of which are highly beneficial for human health1,2. Overexpression of genes encoding biosynthetic enzymes or transcription factors have resulted in tomatoes with improved carotenoid or flavonoid content, but never with both3–7. We attempted to increase tomato fruit nutritional value by suppressing an endogenous photomorphogenesis regulatory gene, DET1, using fruit-specific promoters combined with RNA interference (RNAi) technology. Molecular analysis indicated that DET1 transcripts were indeed specifically degraded in transgenic fruits. Both carotenoid and flavonoid contents were increased significantly, whereas other parameters of fruit quality were largely unchanged. These results demonstrate that manipulation of a plant regulatory gene can simultaneously influence the production of several phytonutrients generated from independent biosynthetic pathways, and provide a novel example of the use of organ-specific gene silencing to improve the nutritional value of plant-derived products. PMID:15951803

  14. A Phytophthora sojae effector suppresses endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated immunity by stabilizing plant Binding immunoglobulin Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Maofeng; Guo, Baodian; Li, Haiyang; Yang, Bo; Wang, Haonan; Kong, Guanghui; Zhao, Yao; Xu, Huawei; Wang, Yan; Ye, Wenwu; Dong, Suomeng; Qiao, Yongli; Tyler, Brett M.; Ma, Wenbo; Wang, Yuanchao

    2016-01-01

    Phytophthora pathogens secrete an array of specific effector proteins to manipulate host innate immunity to promote pathogen colonization. However, little is known about the host targets of effectors and the specific mechanisms by which effectors increase susceptibility. Here we report that the soybean pathogen Phytophthora sojae uses an essential effector PsAvh262 to stabilize endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-luminal binding immunoglobulin proteins (BiPs), which act as negative regulators of plant resistance to Phytophthora. By stabilizing BiPs, PsAvh262 suppresses ER stress-triggered cell death and facilitates Phytophthora infection. The direct targeting of ER stress regulators may represent a common mechanism of host manipulation by microbes. PMID:27256489

  15. Cardiotoxin III suppresses MDA-MB-231 cell metastasis through the inhibition of EGF/EGFR-mediated signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Pei-Chien; Hsieh, Chi-Ying; Chiu, Chien-Chih; Wang, Chih-Kuang; Chang, Long-Sen; Lin, Shinne-Ren

    2012-10-01

    Cardiotoxin III (CTX III), a basic polypeptide isolated from Naja naja atra venom, has been shown to exhibit anticancer activity. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) and its receptor, EGFR, play roles in cancer metastasis in various tumors. We use EGF as a metastatic inducer of MDA-MB-231 cells to investigate the effect of CTX III on cell migration. CTX III inhibited the EGF-induced activation of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), and further suppressed cell invasion and migration without obvious cellular cytotoxicity. CTX III suppressed EGF-induced nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) nuclear translocation and also abrogated the EGF-induced phosphorylation of EGFR, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt, and extracellular regulated kinase (ERK)1/2. In addition, CTX III similar to wortmannin (a PI3K inhibitor) and U0126 (an up-stream kinase regulating ERK1/2 inhibitor) attenuated cell migration and invasion induced by EGF. Furthermore, the EGFR inhibitor AG1478 inhibited EGF-induced MMP-9 expression, cell migration and invasion, as well as the activation of ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt, suggesting that ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt activation occur downstream of EGFR activation. These findings suggest that CTX III inhibited the EGF-induced invasion and migration of MDA-MB-231 cells via EGFR-dependent PI3K/Akt, ERK1/2, and NF-κB signaling, leading to the down-regulation of MMP-9 expression. These results provide a novel mechanism to explain the role of CTX III as a potent anti-metastatic agent in MDA-MB-231 cells.

  16. Amentoflavone protects against psoriasis-like skin lesion through suppression of NF-κB-mediated inflammation and keratinocyte proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jingang; Li, Zhengxiao; Dong, Yingying; Ren, Jianwen; Huo, Jia

    2016-02-01

    Psoriasis is a one of the most common chronic skin diseases, which affects 0.6-4.8% of the general population. Amentoflavone (AMF) belongs to the biflavonoid class of flavonoids, possessing various biological effects, such as anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anti-apoptotic effects. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effect of AMF on psoriasis in imiquimod (IMQ) psoriasis-like lesions in mice and keratinocyte proliferation in HaCaT cells. We showed that AMF reduced skinfold thickening, and improved erythema and scaling scores and histological lesions in IMQ-treated mice. AMF exerted potent anti-inflammatory effect via influencing a variety of proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin (IL)-17A, IL-22, and IL-23 in local skin lesions and the whole body. In M5 (a cocktail of cytokines)-treated HaCaT cells, AMF significantly inhibited cell proliferation, promoted apoptosis, and inhibited the increase of expression of cyclin D1, cyclin E, IL-17A, and IL-22. In addition, AMF inhibited the upregulation of p65 NF-κB under psoriatic condition. Moreover, overexpression of p65 NF-κB significantly suppressed the effect of AMF on keratinocyte proliferation, apoptosis, and expression of cyclin D1, cyclin E, IL-17A, and IL-22. These results demonstrated that suppression of NF-κB was involved in AMF-resulted anti-proliferative, apoptosis-promoting, anti-inflammatory effects in keratinocytes. The data demonstrate that AMF may serve as potential therapeutic option for patients with psoriasis.

  17. Soybean nodule-enhanced CLE peptides in roots act as signals in GmNARK-mediated nodulation suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chae Woo; Lee, Young Woo; Hwang, Cheol Ho

    2011-09-01

    The number of nodules formed in the roots of leguminous plants is systemically controlled by autoregulation of nodulation (AON). This study characterized two of the CLAVATA3/endosperm-surrounding region (CLE) genes involved in AON signal transduction. The GmRIC1 and GmRIC2 genes initiated expression solely in the roots at approximately 3 days after inoculation (DAI) with Nod factor-producing rhizobia, corresponding to the time point of AON, and the expression was up-regulated by cytokinins. Levels of GmRIC1 and GmRIC2 gene expression were much higher in the supernodulation mutant, SS2-2, than in wild-type (WT) soybeans during nodule development, even after initiation of nitrogen fixation. At 3 DAI, GmRIC2 was induced in the cells of the pericycle and the outer cortex, which undergo cell division to form nodule primordia and spreads from the central region to the whole nodule as it develops. Overexpression of GmRIC1 and GmRIC2 strongly suppressed the nodulation of WT roots as well as transgenic hairy roots in a GmNARK-dependent manner. This systemic suppression of nodulation was caused by the secretion of two CLE proteins into the extracellular space. Double grafting between WT and SS2-2 soybeans showed that signal Q is larger in SS2-2 than in WT roots during nodulation. The results of this study suggest that GmRIC1 and GmRIC2 are good candidates for root-derived signal Q in AON signal transduction.

  18. Insulin-mediated suppression of lipolysis in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle of obese type 2 diabetic men and men with normal glucose tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jocken, Johan W E; Goossens, Gijs H; Boon, Hanneke; Mason, Rachael R; Essers, Yvonne; Havekes, Bas; Watt, Matthew J; van Loon, Luc J; Blaak, Ellen E

    2013-10-01

    Impaired regulation of lipolysis and accumulation of lipid intermediates may contribute to obesity-related insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. We investigated insulin-mediated suppression of lipolysis in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue (AT) and skeletal muscle (SM) of obese men with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) and obese type 2 diabetic men. Eleven NGT men and nine long-term diagnosed type 2 diabetic men (7 ± 1 years), matched for age (58 ± 2 vs 62 ± 2 years), BMI (31.4 ± 0.6 vs 30.5 ± 0.6 kg/m(2)) and [Formula: see text] (28.9 ± 1.5 vs 29.5 ± 2.4 ml kg(-1) min(-1)) participated in this study. Interstitial glycerol concentrations in AT and SM were assessed using microdialysis during a 1 h basal period and a 6 h stepwise hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp (8, 20 and 40 mU m(-2) min(-1)). AT and SM biopsies were collected to investigate underlying mechanisms. Hyperinsulinaemia suppressed interstitial SM glycerol concentrations less in men with type 2 diabetes (-7 ± 6%, -13 ± 9% and -27 ± 9%) compared with men with NGT (-21 ± 7%, -38 ± 8% and -53 ± 8%) (p = 0.014). This was accompanied by increased circulating fatty acid and glycerol concentrations, a lower glucose infusion rate (21.8 ± 3.1 vs 30.5 ± 2.0 μmol kg body weight(-1) min(-1); p lipolysis may promote the accumulation of membrane saturated DAG, aggravating insulin resistance, at least partly mediated by PKC. This may represent an important mechanism involved in the progression of insulin resistance towards type 2 diabetes. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01680133.

  19. HBV-specific CD4+ cytotoxic T cells in hepatocellular carcinoma are less cytolytic toward tumor cells and suppress CD8+ T cell-mediated antitumor immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fanzhi; Zhen, Shoumei; Song, Bin

    2017-08-01

    In East Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, chronic infection is the main cause of the development of hepatocellular carcinoma, an aggressive cancer with low survival rate. Cytotoxic T cell-based immunotherapy is a promising treatment strategy. Here, we investigated the possibility of using HBV-specific CD4(+) cytotoxic T cells to eliminate tumor cells. The naturally occurring HBV-specific cytotoxic CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were identified by HBV peptide pool stimulation. We found that in HBV-induced hepatocellular carcinoma patients, the HBV-specific cytotoxic CD4(+) T cells and cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells were present at similar numbers. But compared to the CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells, the CD4(+) cytotoxic T cells secreted less cytolytic factors granzyme A (GzmA) and granzyme B (GzmB), and were less effective at eliminating tumor cells. In addition, despite being able to secrete cytolytic factors, CD4(+) T cells suppressed the cytotoxicity mediated by CD8(+) T cells, even when CD4(+) CD25(+) regulator T cells were absent. Interestingly, we found that interleukin 10 (IL-10)-secreting Tr1 cells were enriched in the cytotoxic CD4(+) T cells. Neutralization of IL-10 abrogated the suppression of CD8(+) T cells by CD4(+) CD25(-) T cells. Neither the frequency nor the absolute number of HBV-specific CD4(+) cytotoxic T cells were correlated with the clinical outcome of advanced stage hepatocellular carcinoma patients. Together, this study demonstrated that in HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma, CD4(+) T cell-mediated cytotoxicity was present naturally in the host and had the potential to exert antitumor immunity, but its capacity was limited and was associated with immunoregulatory properties. © 2017 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. RUNX3-mediated up-regulation of miR-29b suppresses the proliferation and migration of gastric cancer cells by targeting KDM2A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ye; Zou, Shuiyan; Yang, Fenghua; Xu, Xia; Bu, Wenhong; Jia, Jihui; Liu, Zhifang

    2016-10-10

    RUNX3 is a transcriptional factor that has been shown to regulate protein-coding gene expression at the transcriptional level. However, the regulation of RUNX3 on miRNAs is not fully understood. In this study, we used miRNA microarray to identify the miRNAs that are regulated by RUNX3 and found that miR-29b showed the most up-regulation in RUNX3 over-expressed cells compared with the control cells. We used qRT-PCR to confirm the miRNA microarray results in several gastric cancer cells and found that RUNX3 could bind to the miR-29b promoter directly and cooperate with Smad3 to increase the promoter activity of miR-29b. In the clinical setting, both RUNX3 and miR-29b are down-regulated significantly in human gastric cancer tissues. A positive correlation between miR-29b and RUNX3 was found in the gastric cancer tissues. Additionally, we found that miR-29b suppressed the proliferation and metastasis of gastric cancer cells by directly targeting KDM2A. The miR-29b/KDM2A axis was involved in the RUNX3-mediated inhibition of gastric cancer cell proliferation and metastasis. Taken together, our results suggested that RUNX3-mediated up-regulation of miR-29b inhibited the proliferation and migration of gastric cancer cells by targeting KDM2A, representing a novel molecular mechanism for the tumor suppression action of RUNX3.

  1. The aggregation-mediated conjugation system of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis: host range and kinetics of transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, G B; Andrup, L; Wilcks, A; Smidt, L; Poulsen, O M

    1996-10-01

    The aggregation-mediated conjugation system in Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis encoded on the plasmid pXO16 is characterized by the formation of aggregates when Agr+ and Agr- cells are socialized in exponential growth. Using the aggregation phenotypes, we have identified potential recipients of the aggregation-plasmid pXO16 among Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus sphaericus, and 24 subspecies of B. thuringiensis. We found 14 Agr- strains, i.e., potential recipients of the aggregation system encoded by plasmid pXO16. Five strains contained a conjugative apparatus of their own and were excluded from further examinations. To monitor the transfer of plasmid pXO16, we constructed a transposon insertion of the plasmid with Tn5401. The study of the plasmid transfer of pXO16::Tn5401 indicated the secretion of bacteriocins from both donor strain and recipient strains. Only one out of the nine strains examined was unable to receive the aggregation-plasmid pXO16 and express the aggregation phenotype and the conjugative abilities. It was found that the transfer of plasmid pXO16 to Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis Agr- strains was 100%. All recipients had acquired the aggregation-plasmid pXO16 and converted to the Agr+ phenotype.

  2. Dissolved gas dynamics in wetland soils: Root-mediated gas transfer kinetics determined via push-pull tracer tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Matthew C.; Pal, David S.; Jaffé, Peter R.

    2015-09-01

    Gas transfer processes are fundamental to the biogeochemical and water quality functions of wetlands, yet there is limited knowledge of the rates and pathways of soil-atmosphere exchange for gases other than oxygen and methane (CH4). In this study, we use a novel push-pull technique with sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and helium (He) as dissolved gas tracers to quantify the kinetics of root-mediated gas transfer, which is a critical efflux pathway for gases from wetland soils. This tracer approach disentangles the effects of physical transport from simultaneous reaction in saturated, vegetated wetland soils. We measured significant seasonal variation in first-order gas exchange rate constants, with smaller spatial variations between different soil depths and vegetation zones in a New Jersey tidal marsh. Gas transfer rates for most biogeochemical trace gases are expected to be bracketed by the rate constants for SF6 and He, which ranged from ˜10-2 to 2 × 10-1 h-1 at our site. A modified Damköhler number analysis is used to evaluate the balance between biochemical reaction and root-driven gas exchange in governing the fate of environmental trace gases in rooted, anaerobic soils. This approach confirmed the importance of plant gas transport for CH4, and showed that root-driven transport may affect nitrous oxide (N2O) balances in settings where N2O reduction rates are slow.

  3. Revealing the effect of plasmon transmutation on charge transfer plasmons in substrate-mediated metallodielectric aluminum clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nooshnab, Vida; Golmohammadi, Saeed

    2017-01-01

    Aluminum nanoparticle nanocomplexes have extensively been utilized for sustaining ultrastrong plasmonic bonding and antibonding resonant modes across the ultraviolet to visible spectrum. In this study, we analyze the plasmon response for two conventional symmetric heptamer and antisymmetric octamer antennas mediated by conductive film as a substrate to induce very sharp Fano-resonant mode at the high energy states. Besides, presence of an underlying conductive film in touching regime with the plasmonic nanoantennas leads to formation of charge transfer plasmons (CTPs) across the deep-UV band. It is also shown that presence of dielectric carbon nanospheres in the gap spots between proximal nanodisks gives rise to breaking the symmetry of the assemblies, while the new magnetic multipolar modes are induced and divided the Fano dip in two parts as well as formation of a couple of charge transfer plasmon resonant shoulders. The compactness and geometries of the clusters allow for inducing substantially strong resonant modes across the deep-UV domain. Our investigations provide new pathways and features for designing multifunctional molecular probes, biochemical sensors, and cathodoluminescence antennas across the UV spectrum. The proposed analysis were done using a blend of Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) calculations and transfer of plasmonic charges in nanoscale systems.

  4. EFFECT OF ADENOVIRUS-MEDIATED p53 GENE TRANSFER ON APOPTOSIS AND RADIOSENSITIVITY OF HUMAN GASTRIC CARCINOMA CELL LINES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张珊文; 肖绍文; 吕有勇

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of adenovirus- mediated p53 gene (Adp53) on apoptosis and radiosensitivity of human gastric carcinoma cell lines. Methods: Recombinant adenovirus expressing wild-type p53 gene was transferred into four human gastric carcinoma cell lines with different p53 genetic status. p53 protein expression was detected by immunohistochemistry assay and western blot assay. Cell survival was assessed using a clonogenic assay. TUNEL assay was used in determination of apoptosis. Four human gastric carcinoma cells infected with Adp53 were irradiated with 4Gy and cell cycle distribution and Sub-G1 peak were assayed by flow cytometry. Results: G2/M arrest, apoptosis and inhibition of tumor cell proliferation were induced by infection at Adp53 at 100 MOI which caused high transfer rate of wild-type p53 and strong expression of p53 protein in four human gastric carcinoma cells. The radio-enhancement ratio of Adp53 at 4Gy were 3.0 for W cell, 3.6 for M cell, 2.2 for neo cell and 2.5 for 823 cell in vitro. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that Adp53 transfer increased cellular apoptosis and radiosensitivity of human gastric carcinoma cell lines in vitro independently on cellular intrinsic p53 status thus supporting the combination of p53 gene therapy with radiotherapy in clinical trials.

  5. Caffeine, Through Adenosine A3 Receptor-Mediated Actions, Suppresses Amyloid-β Protein Precursor Internalization and Amyloid-β Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shanshan; Geiger, Nicholas H; Soliman, Mahmoud L; Hui, Liang; Geiger, Jonathan D; Chen, Xuesong

    2015-01-01

    Intraneuronal accumulation and extracellular deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) protein continues to be implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), be it familial in origin or sporadic in nature. Aβ is generated intracellularly following endocytosis of amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP), and, consequently, factors that suppress AβPP internalization may decrease amyloidogenic processing of AβPP. Here we tested the hypothesis that caffeine decreases Aβ generation by suppressing AβPP internalization in primary cultured neurons. Caffeine concentration-dependently blocked low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol internalization and a specific adenosine A3 receptor (A3R) antagonist as well as siRNA knockdown of A3Rs mimicked the effects of caffeine on neuronal internalization of LDL cholesterol. Further implicating A3Rs were findings that a specific A3R agonist increased neuronal internalization of LDL cholesterol. In addition, caffeine as well as siRNA knockdown of A3Rs blocked the ability of LDL cholesterol to increase Aβ levels. Furthermore, caffeine blocked LDL cholesterol-induced decreases in AβPP protein levels in neuronal plasma membranes, increased surface expression of AβPP on neurons, and the A3R antagonist as well as siRNA knockdown of A3Rs mimicked the effects of caffeine on AβPP surface expression. Moreover, the A3R agonist decreased neuronal surface expression of AβPP. Our findings suggest that caffeine exerts protective effects against amyloidogenic processing of AβPP at least in part by suppressing A3R-mediated internalization of AβPP.

  6. Suppression of tumor growth in lung cancer xenograft model mice by poly(sorbitol-co-PEI)-mediated delivery of osteopontin siRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Won-Young; Hong, Seong-Ho; Singh, Bijay; Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Lee, Somin; Lee, Ah Young; Gankhuyag, Nomundelger; Kim, Ji-Eun; Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Kim, Kwang-Ho; Park, Young-Chan; Cho, Chong-Su; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2015-08-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated gene silencing represents a promising strategy for treating diseases such as cancer; however, specific gene silencing requires an effective delivery system to overcome the instability and low transfection efficiency of siRNAs. To address this issue, a polysorbitol-based transporter (PSOT) was prepared by low molecular weight branched polyethylenimine (bPEI) crosslinked with sorbitol diacrylate (SDA). Osteopontin (OPN) gene, which is highly associated with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was targeted by siRNA therapy using siRNA targeting OPN (siOPN). Characterization study confirmed that PSOT formed compact complexes with siOPN and protected siOPN against degradation by RNase. PSOT/siOPN complexes demonstrated low cytotoxicity and enhanced transfection efficiency in vitro, suggesting that this carrier may be suitable for gene silencing. In the A549 and H460 lung cancer cell lines, PSOT/siOPN complexes demonstrated significant silencing efficiency at both RNA and protein levels. To study in vivo tumor growth suppression, two lung cancer cell-xenograft mouse models were prepared and PSOT/siOPN complexes were delivered into the mice through intravenous injection. The siOPN-treated groups demonstrated significantly reduced OPN expression at both the RNA and protein levels as well as suppression of tumor volume and weight. Taken together, siOPN delivery using PSOT may present an effective and novel therapeutic system for lung cancer treatment.

  7. Veronicastrum axillare Alleviates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury via Suppression of Proinflammatory Mediators and Downregulation of the NF-κB Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quanxin Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Veronicastrum axillare is a traditional medical plant in China which is widely used in folk medicine due to its versatile biological activities, especially for its anti-inflammatory effects. However, the detailed mechanism underlying this action is not clear. Here, we studied the protective effects of V. axillare against acute lung injury (ALI, and we further explored the pharmacological mechanisms of this action. We found that pretreatment with V. axillare suppressed the release of proinflammatory cytokines in the serum of ALI mice. Histological analysis of lung tissue demonstrated that V. axillare inhibited LPS-induced lung injury, improved lung morphology, and reduced the activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB in the lungs. Furthermore, the anti-inflammatory actions of V. axillare were investigated in vitro. We observed that V. axillare suppressed the mRNA expression of interleukin-1β (IL-1β, IL-6, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α in RAW264.7 cells challenged with LPS. Furthermore, pretreatment of V. axillare in vitro reduced the phosphorylation of p65 and IκB-α which is activated by LPS. In conclusion, our data firstly demonstrated that the anti-inflammatory effects of V. axillare against ALI were achieved through downregulation of the NF-κB signaling pathway, thereby reducing the production of inflammatory mediators.

  8. Ubiquitin carboxyl terminal hydrolase L1 negatively regulates TNF{alpha}-mediated vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation via suppressing ERK activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichikawa, Tomonaga; Li, Jinqing; Dong, Xiaoyu; Potts, Jay D. [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Tang, Dong-Qi [Department of Pathology, Immunology, and Laboratory Medicine, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL 32610-0275 (United States); Li, Dong-Sheng, E-mail: dsli@yymc.edu.cn [Hubei Key Laboratory of Embryonic Stem Cell Research, Tai He Hospital, Yunyang Medical College, 32 S. Renmin Rd., Shiyan, Hubei 442000 (China); Cui, Taixing, E-mail: taixing.cui@uscmed.sc.edu [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) appear to be critical regulators of a multitude of processes such as proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, and inflammation. We have recently demonstrated that a DUB of ubiquitin carboxyl terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) inhibits vascular lesion formation via suppressing inflammatory responses in vasculature. However, the precise underlying mechanism remains to be defined. Herein, we report that a posttranscriptional up-regulation of UCH-L1 provides a negative feedback to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF{alpha})-mediated activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) and proliferation in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). In rat adult VSMCs, adenoviral over-expression of UCH-L1 inhibited TNF{alpha}-induced activation of ERK and DNA synthesis. In contrast, over-expression of UCH-L1 did not affect platelet derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced VSMC proliferation and activation of growth stimulating cascades including ERK. TNF{alpha} hardly altered UCH-L1 mRNA expression and stability; however, up-regulated UCH-L1 protein expression via increasing UCH-L1 translation. These results uncover a novel mechanism by which UCH-L1 suppresses vascular inflammation.

  9. RNAi-mediated suppression of isoprene emission in poplar transiently impacts phenolic metabolism under high temperature and high light intensities: a transcriptomic and metabolomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnke, Katja; Kaiser, Andreas; Zimmer, Ina; Brüggemann, Nicolas; Janz, Dennis; Polle, Andrea; Hampp, Rüdiger; Hänsch, Robert; Popko, Jennifer; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Ehlting, Barbara; Rennenberg, Heinz; Barta, Csengele; Loreto, Francesco; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter

    2010-09-01

    In plants, isoprene plays a dual role: (a) as thermo-protective agent proposed to prevent degradation of enzymes/membrane structures involved in photosynthesis, and (b) as reactive molecule reducing abiotic oxidative stress. The present work addresses the question whether suppression of isoprene emission interferes with genome wide transcription rates and metabolite fluxes in grey poplar (Populus x canescens) throughout the growing season. Gene expression and metabolite profiles of isoprene emitting wild type plants and RNAi-mediated non-isoprene emitting poplars were compared by using poplar Affymetrix microarrays and non-targeted FT-ICR-MS (Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry). We observed a transcriptional down-regulation of genes encoding enzymes of phenylpropanoid regulatory and biosynthetic pathways, as well as distinct metabolic down-regulation of condensed tannins and anthocyanins, in non-isoprene emitting genotypes during July, when high temperature and light intensities possibly caused transient drought stress, as indicated by stomatal closure. Under these conditions leaves of non-isoprene emitting plants accumulated hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), a signaling molecule in stress response and negative regulator of anthocyanin biosynthesis. The absence of isoprene emission under high temperature and light stress resulted transiently in a new chemo(pheno)type with suppressed production of phenolic compounds. This may compromise inducible defenses and may render non-isoprene emitting poplars more susceptible to environmental stress.

  10. Punicalagin inhibits inflammation in LPS-induced RAW264.7 macrophages via the suppression of TLR4-mediated MAPKs and NF-κB activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaolong; Yin, Peng; Wan, Changrong; Chong, Xinlu; Liu, Mingjiang; Cheng, Peng; Chen, Jiajia; Liu, Fenghua; Xu, Jianqin

    2014-06-01

    Punicalagin (2,3,hexahydroxydiphenoyl-gallagyl-D-glucose and referred to as PUN) is a bioactive ellagitannin isolated from pomegranate, which is widely used for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), diarrhea, and ulcers in Chinese traditional medicine. In this study, we detected the anti-inflammation potentials of PUN in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced macrophages and tried to uncover the underlying mechanism. Results demonstrated that PUN (25, 50, or 100 μM) treatment could significantly decrease the LPS-induced production of nitric oxide), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in RAW264.7 cells. Molecular research showed that PUN inhibited the activation of upstream mediator nuclear factor-κB by suppressing the phosphorylation of IκBα and p65. Results also indicated that PUN could suppress the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase including p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase. In conclusion, we observed that PUN could inhibit LPS-induced inflammation, and it may be a potential choice for the treatment of inflammation diseases.

  11. Taiwan cobra cardiotoxin III suppresses EGF/EGFR-mediated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and invasion of human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Pei-Chien; Fu, Yaw-Syan; Chang, Long-Sen; Lin, Shinne-Ren

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer is a highly malignant carcinoma and most deaths of breast cancer are caused by metastasis. The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) has emerged as a pivotal event in the development of the invasive and metastatic potentials of cancer progression. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) and its receptor, EGFR, play roles in cancer metastasis. CTX III, a basic polypeptide isolated from Naja naja atra venom, has been shown to exhibit anticancer activity; however, the effect of CTX III on the EMT of cancer cells remains elusive. CTX III treatment resulted in morphological changes from elongated and spindle shape to rounded and epithelial-like shape, induced upregulation of E-cadherin and concurrent downregulation of N-cadherin and Vimentin protein levels, corresponding to observed decreases in cell migration and invasion. CTX III treatment also decreased the expression of Snail and Twist in EGF-induced MDA-MB-231 cells. Concurrently, CTX III efficiently inhibited the EGFR phosphorylation and downstream activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and ERK1/2. The EGFR specific inhibitor AG1478 significantly suppressed ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation, cell migration and invasion, as well as the expressional changes associated with EMT markers in EGF-induced MDA-MB-231 cells. CTX III inhibitory effect on EGF-evoked invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells is mediated through suppressing EGF/EGFR activation and EMT process.

  12. SacB-SacR gene cassette as the negative selection marker to suppress Agrobacterium overgrowth in Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiming Liu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Agrobacterium overgrowth is a common problem in Agrobacterium-mediated plant transfor-mation. To suppress the Agrobacterium overgrowth, various antibiotics have been used during plant tissue culture steps. The antibiotics are expensive and may adversely affect plant cell differentiation and reduce plant transformation efficiency. The SacB-SacR proteins are toxic to most Agrobacterium tumefaciens strains when they are grown on culture medium sup¬plemented with sucrose. Therefore, SacB-SacR genes can be used as negative selection markers to suppress the overgrowth of Agrobacterium tumefaciens in the plant tissue culture process. We generated a mutant Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain GV2260 (recA-SacB/R that has the SacB-SacR cassette inserted into the bacterial genome at the recA gene locus. The mutant Agrobacterium strain is sensitive to sucrose but maintains its ability to transform plant cells in both transient and stable transformation assays. We demonstrated that the mutant strain GV2260 (recA-SacB/R can be inhibited by sucrose that reduces the overgrowth of Agrobacterium and therefore improves the plant transformation efficiency. We employed GV2260 (recA-SacB/R to generate stable transgenic N. benthamiana plants expressing a CRISPR-Cas9 for knocking out a WRKY transcrip¬tion factor.

  13. Non-mutagenic Suppression of Enterocyte Ferroportin 1 by Chemical Ribosomal Inactivation via p38 Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase (MAPK)-mediated Regulation: EVIDENCE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL HEMOCHROMATOSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Chang-Kyu; Park, Seong-Hwan; Kim, Juil; Moon, Yuseok

    2016-09-16

    Iron transfer across the basolateral membrane of an enterocyte into the circulation is the rate-limiting step in iron absorption and is regulated by various pathophysiological factors. Ferroportin (FPN), the only known mammalian iron exporter, transports iron from the basolateral surface of enterocytes, macrophages, and hepatocytes into the blood. Patients with genetic mutations in FPN or repeated blood transfusion develop hemochromatosis. In this study, non-mutagenic ribosomal inactivation was assessed as an etiological factor of FPN-associated hemochromatosis in enterocytes. Non-mutagenic chemical ribosomal inactivation disrupted iron homeostasis by regulating expression of the iron exporter FPN-1, leading to intracellular accumulation in enterocytes. Mechanistically, a xenobiotic insult stimulated the intracellular sentinel p38 MAPK signaling pathway, which was positively involved in FPN-1 suppression by ribosomal dysfunction. Moreover, ribosomal inactivation-induced iron accumulation in Caenorhabditis elegans as a simplified in vivo model for gut nutrition uptake was dependent on SEK-1, a p38 kinase activator, leading to suppression of FPN-1.1 expression and iron accumulation. In terms of gene regulation, ribosomal stress-activated p38 signaling down-regulated NRF2 and NF-κB, both of which were positive transcriptional regulators of FPN-1 transcription. This study provides molecular evidence for the modulation of iron bioavailability by ribosomal dysfunction as a potent etiological factor of non-mutagenic environmental hemochromatosis in the gut-to-blood axis. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Lentivirus-mediated gene transfer of uroporphyrinogen III synthase fully corrects the porphyric phenotype in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Géronimi, F; Richard, E; Lamrissi-Garcia, I; Lalanne, M; Ged, C; Redonnet-Vernhet, I; Moreau-Gaudry, F; de Verneuil, H

    2003-05-01

    Congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP) is an inherited disease due to a deficiency in the uroporphyrinogen III synthase, the fourth enzyme of the heme biosynthesis pathway. It is characterized by accumulation of uroporphyrin I in the bone marrow, peripheral blood and other organs. The prognosis of CEP is poor, with death often occurring early in adult life. For severe transfusion-dependent cases, when allogeneic cell transplantation cannot be performed, the autografting of genetically modified primitive/stem cells may be the only alternative. In vitro gene transfer experiments have documented the feasibility of gene therapy via hematopoietic cells to treat this disease. In the present study lentiviral transduction of porphyric cell lines and primary CD34(+) cells with the therapeutic human uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS) cDNA resulted in both enzymatic and metabolic correction, as demonstrated by the increase in UROS activity and the suppression of porphyrin accumulation in transduced cells. Very high gene transfer efficiency (up to 90%) was achieved in both cell lines and CD34(+) cells without any selection. Expression of the transgene remained stable over long-term liquid culture. Furthermore, gene expression was maintained during in vitro erythroid differentiation of CD34(+) cells. Therefore the use of lentiviral vectors is promising for the future treatment of CEP patients by gene therapy.

  15. Anti-inflammatory effect of honokiol is mediated by PI3K/Akt pathway suppression1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Byung Hun KIM; Jae Youl CHO

    2008-01-01

    Aim: In this study, we investigated the regulatory effects of honokiol on various inflammatory events mediated by monocytes/macrophages (U937/RAW264.7 cells)and lymphocytes (splenic lymphocytes and CTLL-2 cells) and their putative ac-tion mechanism. Methods: In order to investigate the regulatory effects, various cell lines and primary cells (U937, RAW264.7, CTLL-2 cells, and splenic lymphocytes) were employed and various inflammatory events, such as the pro-duction of inflammatory mediators, cell adhesion, cell proliferation, and the early signaling cascade, were chosen. Results: Honokiol strongly inhibited various inflammatory responses, such as: (ⅰ) the upregulation of nitric oxide (NO), pros-taglandin.E2 and TNF-α production and costimulatory molecule CD80 induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS); (ⅱ) the functional activation of β1-integrin (CD29) as-sessed by U937 cell-cell and cell-fibronectin adhesions; (ⅲ) the enhancement of lymphocytes and CD8+CTLL-2 cell proliferation stimulated by LPS, phytohemaglutinin A (PHA), and concanavalin A or interleukin (IL)-2; and (ⅳ) the transcriptional upregulation of inducible NO synthase, TNF-α, cyclooxygenase-2, IL-12, and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1. These anti-inflammatory effects of honokiol seem to be mediated by interrupting the early activated intra-cellular signaling molecule phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt, but not Src, the extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and p38, according to pharmacological, biochemical, and functional analyses. Conclusion: These results suggest that honokiol may act as a potent anti-inflammatory agent with multipotential activities due to an inhibitory effect on the PI3K/Akt pathway.

  16. Tunneling nanotube (TNT)-mediated neuron-to neuron transfer of pathological Tau protein assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardivel, Meryem; Bégard, Séverine; Bousset, Luc; Dujardin, Simon; Coens, Audrey; Melki, Ronald; Buée, Luc; Colin, Morvane

    2016-11-04

    A given cell makes exchanges with its neighbors through a variety of means ranging from diffusible factors to vesicles. Cells use also tunneling nanotubes (TNTs), filamentous-actin-containing membranous structures that bridge and connect cells. First described in immune cells, TNTs facilitate HIV-1 transfer and are found in various cell types, including neurons. We show that the microtubule-associated protein Tau, a key player in Alzheimer's disease, is a bona fide constituent of TNTs. This is important because Tau appears beside filamentous actin and myosin 10 as a specific marker of these fine protrusions of membranes and cytosol that are difficult to visualize. Furthermore, we observed that exogenous Tau species increase the number of TNTs established between primary neurons, thereby facilitating the intercellular transfer of Tau fibrils. In conclusion, Tau may contribute to the formation and function of the highly dynamic TNTs that may be involved in the prion-like propagation of Tau assemblies.

  17. Collective evolution of cyanobacteria and cyanophages mediated by horizontal gene transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Hong-Yan; Rogers, Tim; Goldenfeld, Nigel

    We describe a model for how antagonistic predator-prey coevolution can lead to mutualistic adaptation to an environment, as a result of horizontal gene transfer. Our model is a simple description of ecosystems such as marine cyanobacteria and their predator cyanophages, which carry photosynthesis genes. These genes evolve more rapidly in the virosphere than the bacterial pan-genome, and thus the bacterial population could potentially benefit from phage predation. By modeling both the barrier to predation and horizontal gene transfer, we study this balance between individual sacrifice and collective benefits. The outcome is an emergent mutualistic coevolution of improved photosynthesis capability, benefiting both bacteria and phage. This form of multi-level selection can contribute to niche stratification in the cyanobacteria-phage ecosystem. This work is supported in part by a cooperative agreement with NASA, Grant NNA13AA91A/A0018.

  18. Adenovirus-mediated transfer of RA538 gene and its antitumor effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程金科; 林晨; 隗玥; 张雪艳; 邢嵘; 牟巨伟; 王秀琴; 吴旻

    1999-01-01

    The RA538 cDNA was transferred into human ovarian cancer cell line SK-OV-3 and human melanoma cell line WM-983A by its recombinant adenoviral vector constructed through homologous recombination. It was demonstrated that the recombinant adenovirus could transfer RA538 gene with high efficiency, and could obviously inhibit tumor growth, with the inhibiting rates of 85% and 73% respectively, at the same time greatly repress the colony forming ability of the cells. The therapeutic experiments on transplanted subcutaneous tumor model in nude mice demonstrated that RA538 could significantly inhibit tumor growth. Flow cytometry and DNA fragmentation analysis indicated that RA538 could induce the cell cycle G1 arrest/apoptosis of the tumor cells. The expression of cmyc gene was found pronouncedly reduced by Western blot analysis. These results suggest that the RA538 recombinant adenovirus could be a promising drug in cancer gene therapy.

  19. Notch-mediated suppression of TSC2 expression regulates cell differentiation in the Drosophila intestinal stem cell lineage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subir Kapuria

    Full Text Available Epithelial homeostasis in the posterior midgut of Drosophila is maintained by multipotent intestinal stem cells (ISCs. ISCs self-renew and produce enteroblasts (EBs that differentiate into either enterocytes (ECs or enteroendocrine cells (EEs in response to differential Notch (N activation. Various environmental and growth signals dynamically regulate ISC activity, but their integration with differentiation cues in the ISC lineage remains unclear. Here we identify Notch-mediated repression of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex 2 (TSC2 in EBs as a required step in the commitment of EBs into the EC fate. The TSC1/2 complex inhibits TOR signaling, acting as a tumor suppressor in vertebrates and regulating cell growth. We find that TSC2 is expressed highly in ISCs, where it maintains stem cell identity, and that N-mediated repression of TSC2 in EBs is required and sufficient to promote EC differentiation. Regulation of TSC/TOR activity by N signaling thus emerges as critical for maintenance and differentiation in somatic stem cell lineages.

  20. Beyond vibrationally mediated electron transfer: interfacial charge injection on a sub-10-fs time scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Robert; Moser, Jacques E.; Gratzel, Michael; Wachtveitl, Josef L.

    2003-12-01

    The electron transfer (ET) from organic dye molecules to semiconductor-colloidal systems is characterized by a special energetic situation with a charge transfer reaction from a system of discrete donor levels to a continuum of acceptor states. If these systems show a strong electronic coupling they are amongst the fastest known ET systems with transfer times of less than 10 fs. In the first part a detailed discussion of the direct observation of an ET reaction with a time constant of about 6 fs will be given, with an accompanying argumentation concerning possible artifacts or other interfering signal contributions. In a second part we will try to give a simple picture for the scenario of such superfast ET reactions and one main focus will be the discussion of electronic dephasing and its consequences for the ET reaction. The actual ET process can be understood as a kind of dispersion process of the initially located electron into the colloid representing a real motion of charge density from the alizarin to the colloid.

  1. Exosomal transfer of functional small RNAs mediates cancer-stroma communication in human endometrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maida, Yoshiko; Takakura, Masahiro; Nishiuchi, Takumi; Yoshimoto, Tanihiro; Kyo, Satoru

    2016-02-01

    Exosomes are small membrane vesicles secreted from a variety of cell types. Recent evidence indicates that human cells communicate with each other by exchanging exosomes. Cancer cells closely interact with neighboring stromal cells, and together they cooperatively promote disease via bidirectional communication. Here, we investigated whether exosomes can play roles in intercellular communication between cancer cells and neighboring fibroblasts. Endometrial fibroblasts were isolated from normal endometrial tissues and from endometrial cancer tissues, and cell-to-cell transfer of endometrial cancer cell line Ishikawa-derived exosomes was examined. The isolated fibroblasts were cultured in conditioned media from CD63-GFP-expressing Ishikawa cells, and we found that GFP-positive exosomes were transferred from Ishikawa cells to the fibroblasts. Next, we introduced a shRNA for a luciferase gene into Ishikawa cells. This shRNA was encapsulated into exosomes, was transferred to the fibroblasts, and then downregulated luciferase expression in the fibroblasts. The mature microRNAs naturally expressed in Ishikawa-derived exosomes were also transported into the endometrial fibroblasts, and they altered the microRNA expression profiles of the fibroblasts. These results indicated that endometrial cancer cells could transmit small regulatory RNAs to endometrial fibroblasts via exosomes. Our findings document a previously unknown mode of intercellular communication between cancer cells and related fibroblasts in human endometrium.

  2. Anti-inflammatory activity of chloroquine and amodiaquine through p21-mediated suppression of T cell proliferation and Th1 cell differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Sera; Shin, Ji Hyun; Jang, Eun Jung; Won, Hee Yeon; Kim, Hyo Kyeong; Jeong, Mi- Gyeong [College of Pharmacy and Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwang Soo [Molecular Neurobiology Laboratory, Department of Psychiatry, McLean Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Belmont, MA 02478 (United States); Hwang, Eun Sook, E-mail: eshwang@ewha.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy and Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-27

    Chloroquine (CQ) and amodiaquine (AQ) have been used for treating or preventing malaria for decades, and their application has expanded into treating inflammatory disease in humans. CQ and AQ are applicable for controlling rheumatoid arthritis, but their molecular mechanisms of anti-inflammatory activity remain to be elucidated. In this study, we examined the effects of CQ and AQ on T cell activation and T cell-mediated immune response. CQ had no significant effect on T cell numbers, but decreased the population of T cells with a high division rate. However, AQ treatment significantly increased the number of cells with low division rates and eliminated cells with high division rates, resulting in the inhibition of T cell proliferation triggered by T cell receptor stimulation, of which inhibition occurred in developing effector T helper and regulatory T cells, regardless of the different exogenous cytokines. Interestingly, the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 was significantly and dose-dependently increased by CQ, and more potently by AQ, while other cell cycle regulators were unchanged. Both CQ and AQ elevated the transcription level of p21 though the activation of p53, but also blocked p21 protein degradation in the presence of cycloheximide, causing p21 protein accumulation mainly in the nucleus. Sustained treatment of developing T cells with either CQ or AQ suppressed IFN-γ production in a dose dependent manner and potently inhibited the differentiation of IFN-γ-producing Th1 cells. These results demonstrate that CQ and AQ increase the expression level of p21 and inhibit T cell proliferation and the development of IFN-γ-producing Th1 cells, thereby revealing beneficial roles in treating a wide range of chronic inflammatory diseases mediated by inflammatory T cells. -- Highlights: •T cell division rates are suppressed by chloroquine and amodiaquine treatment. •Chloroquine and amodiaquine potently increased the p21 expression. •The p21 induction is

  3. Exosomes released from M. tuberculosis infected cells can suppress IFN-γ mediated activation of naive macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prachi P Singh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Macrophages infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb are known to be refractory to IFN-γ stimulation. Previous studies have shown that M.tb express components such as the 19-kDa lipoprotein and peptidoglycan that can bind to macrophage receptors including the Toll-like receptor 2 resulting in the loss in IFN-γ responsiveness. However, it is unclear whether this effect is limited to infected macrophages. We have previously shown that M.tb-infected macrophages release exosomes which are 30-100 nm membrane bound vesicles of endosomal origin that function in intercellular communication. These exosomes contain mycobacterial components including the 19-kDa lipoprotein and therefore we hypothesized that macrophages exposed to exosomes may show limited response to IFN-γ stimulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Exosomes were isolated from resting as well as M.tb-infected RAW264.7 macrophages. Mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMØ were treated with exosomes +/- IFN-γ. Cells were harvested and analyzed for suppression of IFN-γ responsive genes by flow cytometry and real time PCR. We found that exosomes derived from M.tb H37Rv-infected but not from uninfected macrophages inhibited IFN-γ induced MHC class II and CD64 expression on BMMØ. This inhibition was only partially dependent on the presence of lipoproteins but completely dependent on TLR2 and MyD88. The exosomes isolated from infected cells did not inhibit STAT1 Tyrosine phosphorylation but down-regulated IFN-γ induced expression of the class II major histocompatibility complex transactivator; a key regulator of class II MHC expression. Microarray studies showed that subsets of genes induced by IFN-γ were inhibited by exosomes from H37Rv-infected cells including genes involved in antigen presentation. Moreover, this set of genes partially overlapped with the IFN-γ-induced genes inhibited by H37Rv infection. CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggests that exosomes, as

  4. MiR-129-5p-mediated Beclin-1 suppression inhibits endothelial cell autophagy in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Zhaohua; Xu, Fei; Zhang, Yiguan

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cell injury and subsequent death play an essential role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Autophagy of endothelial cells antagonizes the development of atherosclerosis, whereas the underlying molecular mechanisms are unclear. MicroRNA-129-5p (miR-129-5p) is a well-defined tumor suppressorin some types of cancer, while it is unknown whether miR-129-5p may also play a role in the development of atherosclerosis. Here, we addressed this question in the current study. We examined the levels of endothelial cell autophagy in ApoE (-/-) mice suppled with high-fat diet (HFD), a mouse model for atherosclerosis (simplified as HFD mice). We analyzed the levels of Beclin-1 and the levels of miR-129-5p in the purified CD31+ endothelial cells from mouse aorta. Prediction of the binding between miR-129-5p and 3'-UTR of Beclin-1 mRNA was performed by bioinformatics analyses and confirmed by a dual luciferase reporter assay. The effects of miR-129-5p were further analyzed in an in vitro model using oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)-treated human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). We found that HFD mice developed atherosclerosisin 12 weeks, while the control ApoE (-/-) mice that had received normal diet (simplified as CTL mice) did not. Compared to CTL mice, HFD mice had significantly lower levels of endothelial cell autophagy, resulting from decreases in Beclin-1 protein, but not mRNA. The decreases in Beclin-1 in endothelial cells were due to HFD-induced increases inmiR-129-5p, which suppressed the translation of Beclin-1 mRNA via 3'-UTR binding. These in vivo findings were reproduced in vitro on ox-LDL-treated HAECs. Together, these data suggest that upregulation of miR-129-5p by HFD may impair the protective effects of endothelial cell autophagy against development of atherosclerosis through suppressing protein translation of Beclin-1.

  5. Switching regimens in virologically suppressed HIV-1-infected patients: evidence base and rationale for integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI)-containing regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffi, F; Esser, S; Nunnari, G; Pérez-Valero, I; Waters, L

    2016-10-01

    In an era when most individuals with treated HIV infection can expect to live into old age, clinicians should proactively review their patients' current and future treatment needs and challenges. Clinical guidelines acknowledge that, in the setting of virological suppression, treatment switch may yield benefits in terms of tolerability, regimen simplification, adherence, convenience and long-term health considerations, particularly in the context of ageing. In this paper, we review evidence from six key clinical studies on switching virologically suppressed patients to regimens based on integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs), the antiretroviral class increasingly preferred as initial therapy in clinical guidelines. We review these studies and focus on the virological efficacy, safety, and tolerability of switching to INSTI-based regimens in suppressed HIV-positive individuals. We review the early switch studies SWITCHMRK and SPIRAL [assessing a switch from a ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor (PI/r) to raltegravir (RAL)-containing regimens], together with data from STRATEGY-PI [assessing a switch to elvitegravir (EVG)-containing regimens; EVG/cobicistat (COBI)/emtricitabine (FTC)/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) vs. remaining on a PI/r-containing regimen], STRATEGY-NNRTI [assessing a switch to EVG/COBI/FTC/TDF vs. continuation of a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) and two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs)], STRIIVING [assessing a switch to a dolutegravir (DTG)-containing regimen (abacavir (ABC)/lamivudine (3TC)/DTG) vs. staying on the background regimen], and GS study 109 [assessing a switch to EVG/COBI/FTC/tenofovir alafenamide fumarate (TAF) vs. continuation of FTC/TDF-based regimens]. Switching to INSTI-containing regimens has been shown to support good virological efficacy, with evidence from two studies demonstrating superior virological efficacy for a switch to EVG-containing regimens. In addition, switching

  6. Citrus limon-derived nanovesicles inhibit cancer cell proliferation and suppress CML xenograft growth by inducing TRAIL-mediated cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondo, Stefania; Naselli, Flores; Fontana, Simona; Monteleone, Francesca; Lo Dico, Alessia; Saieva, Laura; Zito, Giovanni; Flugy, Anna; Manno, Mauro; Di Bella, Maria Antonietta; De Leo, Giacomo; Alessandro, Riccardo

    2015-08-14

    Nanosized vesicles are considered key players in cell to cell communication, thus influencing physiological and pathological processes, including cancer. Nanovesicles have also been found in edible-plants and have shown therapeutic activity in inflammatory bowel diseases; however information on their role in affecting cancer progression is missing.Our study identify for the first time a fraction of vesicles from lemon juice (Citrus limon L.), obtained as a result of different ultracentrifugation, with density ranging from 1,15 to 1,19 g/ml and specific proteomic profile. By using an in vitro approach, we show that isolated nanovesicles inhibit cancer cell proliferation in different tumor cell lines, by activating a TRAIL-mediated apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, we demonstrate that lemon nanovesicles suppress CML tumor growth in vivo by specifically reaching tumor site and by activating TRAIL-mediated apoptotic cell processes. Overall, this study suggests the possible use of plant-edible nanovesicles as a feasible approach in cancer treatment.

  7. Moringa oleifera Flower Extract Suppresses the Activation of Inflammatory Mediators in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated RAW 264.7 Macrophages via NF-κB Pathway.

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    Tan, Woan Sean; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Karthivashan, Govindarajan; Fakurazi, Sharida

    2015-01-01

    Aim of Study. Moringa oleifera Lam. (M. oleifera) possess highest concentration of antioxidant bioactive compounds and is anticipated to be used as an alternative medicine for inflammation. In the present study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory activity of 80% hydroethanolic extract of M. oleifera flower on proinflammatory mediators and cytokines produced in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced RAW 264.7 macrophages. Materials and Methods. Cell cytotoxicity was conducted by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Nitric oxide (NO) production was quantified through Griess reaction while proinflammatory cytokines and other key inflammatory markers were assessed through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoblotting. Results. Hydroethanolic extract of M. oleifera flower significantly suppressed the secretion and expression of NO, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), interleukin- (IL-) 6, IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), inducible NO synthase (iNOS), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). However, it significantly increased the production of IL-10 and IκB-α (inhibitor of κB) in a concentration dependent manner (100 μg/mL and 200 μg/mL). Conclusion. These results suggest that 80% hydroethanolic extract of M. oleifera flower has anti-inflammatory action related to its inhibition of NO, PGE2, proinflammatory cytokines, and inflammatory mediator's production in LPS-stimulated macrophages through preventing degradation of IκB-α in NF-κB signaling pathway.

  8. Osthole inhibits the invasive ability of human lung adenocarcinoma cells via suppression of NF-κB-mediated matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, Shang-Jyh [Department of Chest Medicine, Shin-Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); School of Respiratory Therapy, Taipei Medical University, Taipei Taiwan (China); Su, Jen-Liang [Graduate Institute of Cancer Biology, College of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Center for Molecular Medicine, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Biotechnology, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chi-Kuan [Graduate Institute of Toxicology, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Yu, Ming-Chih; Bai, Kuan-Jen; Chang, Jer-Hua [Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei Medical University-Wan Fang Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Bien, Mauo-Ying [School of Respiratory Therapy, Taipei Medical University, Taipei Taiwan (China); Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei Medical University-Wan Fang Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Yang, Shun-Fa [Institute of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chien, Ming-Hsien, E-mail: mhchien1976@gmail.com [Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2012-05-15

    The induction of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 is particularly important for the invasiveness of various cancer cells. Osthole, a natural coumarin derivative extracted from traditional Chinese medicines, is known to inhibit the proliferation of a variety of tumor cells, but the effect of osthole on the invasiveness of tumor cells is largely unknown. This study determines whether and by what mechanism osthole inhibits invasion in CL1-5 human lung adenocarcinoma cells. Herein, we found that osthole effectively inhibited the migratory and invasive abilities of CL1-5 cells. A zymographic assay showed that osthole inhibited the proteolytic activity of MMP-9 in CL1-5 cells. Inhibition of migration, invasion, and MMP2 and/or MMP-9 proteolytic activities was also observed in other lung adenocarcinoma cell lines (H1299 and A549). We further found that osthole inhibited MMP-9 expression at the messenger RNA and protein levels. Moreover, a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that osthole inhibited the transcriptional activity of MMP-9 by suppressing the DNA binding activity of nuclear factor (NF)-κB in the MMP-9 promoter. Using reporter assays with point-mutated promoter constructs further confirmed that the inhibitory effect of osthole requires an NF-κB binding site on the MMP-9 promoter. Western blot and immunofluorescence assays demonstrated that osthole inhibited NF-κB activity by inhibiting IκB-α degradation and NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation. In conclusion, we demonstrated that osthole inhibits NF-κB-mediated MMP-9 expression, resulting in suppression of lung cancer cell invasion and migration, and osthole might be a potential agent for preventing the invasion and metastasis of lung cancer. -- Highlights: ► Osthole treatment inhibits lung adenocarcinoma cells migration and invasion. ► Osthole reduces the expression and proteolytic activity of MMP-9. ► Osthole inhibits MMP-9 transcription via suppression of NF-κB binding activity. ► Osthole

  9. Cyanidin Chloride Inhibits Ovariectomy-Induced Osteoporosis by Suppressing RANKL-mediated Osteoclastogenesis and Associated Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jianwen; Zhou, Lin; Liu, Qian; Tickner, Jennifer; Tan, Zhen; Li, Xiaofeng; Liu, Mei; Lin, Xixi; Wang, Tao; Pavlos, Nathan J; Zhao, Jinmin; Xu, Jiake

    2017-08-03

    Over-production and activation of osteoclasts is a common feature of osteolytic conditions such as osteoporosis, tumor-associated osteolysis, and inflammatory bone erosion. Cyanidin Chloride, a subclass of anthocyanin, displays antioxidant and anti-carcinogenesis properties, but its role in osteoclastic bone resorption and osteoporosis is not well understood. In this study, we showed that Cyanidin Chloride inhibits osteoclast formation, hydroxyapatite resorption, and receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast marker gene expression; including ctr, ctsk and trap. Further investigation revealed that Cyanidin Chloride inhibits RANKL-induced NF-κB activation, suppresses the degradation of IκB-α and attenuates the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK). In addition, Cyanidin Chloride abrogated RANKL-induced calcium oscillations, the activation of nuclear factor of activated T cells calcineurin-dependent 1 (NFATc1), and the expression of c-Fos. Further, we showed that Cyanidin Chloride protects against ovariectomy-induced bone loss in vivo. Together our findings suggest that Cyanidin Chloride is capable of inhibiting osteoclast formation, hydroxyapatite resorption and RANKL-induced signal pathways in vitro and OVX-induced bone loss in vivo, and thus might have therapeutic potential for osteolytic diseases. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced mastitis in rats via suppressing MAPK mediated inflammatory responses and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinglou; Xu, Jun; Li, Jingjing; Du, Lifen; Chen, Tao; Liu, Ping; Peng, Sisi; Wang, Mingwei; Song, Hongping

    2015-05-01

    Green tea (Camellia sinensis) is an extremely popular beverage worldwide. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is one of the major catechins isolated from green tea and contributes to its beneficial therapeutic functions including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects. However, the effect of EGCG on mastitis is not yet known. This study was to investigate the protective potential of EGCG against mastitis in rats. The rat mastitis model was induced by injecting lipopolysaccharide (LPS) into the duct of mammary gland. The mammary gland was collected after the experimental period. The levels of mammary oxidative stress and inflammatory responses were assessed by measuring the local activities of antioxidant enzymes and the levels of inflammatory cytokines. The mammary expressions of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), nuclear factor κB-p65 (NFκB-p65) and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) were evaluated by western blot analysis. It was found that EGCG obviously normalized LPS-induced low activities of antioxidant enzymes as well as decreased the high levels of inflammatory cytokines. Additionally, EGCG inhibited the mammary over-expression of MAPKs, NFκB-p65 and HIF-1α. These results indicated that EGCG was able to attenuate LPS-induced mastitis in rats by suppressing MAPK related oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Risperidone-induced weight gain is mediated through shifts in the gut microbiome and suppression of energy expenditure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M. Bahr

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Risperidone is a second-generation antipsychotic that causes weight gain. We hypothesized that risperidone-induced shifts in the gut microbiome are mechanistically involved in its metabolic consequences. Wild-type female C57BL/6J mice treated with risperidone (80 μg/day exhibited significant excess weight gain, due to reduced energy expenditure, which correlated with an altered gut microbiome. Fecal transplant from risperidone-treated mice caused a 16% reduction in total resting metabolic rate in naïve recipients, attributable to suppression of non-aerobic metabolism. Risperidone inhibited growth of cultured fecal bacteria grown anaerobically more than those grown aerobically. Finally, transplant of the fecal phage fraction from risperidone-treated mice was sufficient to cause excess weight gain in naïve recipients, again through reduced energy expenditure. Collectively, these data highlight a major role for the gut microbiome in weight gain following chronic use of risperidone, and specifically implicates the modulation of non-aerobic resting metabolism in this mechanism.

  12. Modulation of Cell-Mediated Immunity to Suppress High Fat Diet-Induced Obesity and Insulin Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Linna; Song, Kexiu; Gao, Mingming; Qu, Shen; Liu, Dexi

    2016-02-01

    To assess the effect of immune modulators, cyclosporin A and fingolimod, on high fat diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance. C57BL/6 mice were fed a high fat diet and injected intraperitoneally with cyclosporine A, fingolimod, or vehicle twice weekly for 15 weeks. Body weight and food intake were manually measured every other day. Glucose tolerance test, insulin sensitivity, and body composition were examined and compared between the control and the immune modulator treated animals. Tissue samples were collected at the end of the experiment and examined for serum biochemistry, histology, and mRNA levels of marker genes for inflammation, and glucose and lipid metabolism in white and brown adipose tissues and in the liver. Cyclosporine A and fingolimod suppressed high fat diet-induced weight gain, reduced hepatic fat accumulation, and improved insulin sensitivity. The beneficial effects are associated with altered expression of F4/80, Cd68, Il-6, Tnf-α, and Mcp-1 genes, which are involved in macrophage-related chronic inflammation in adipose and hepatic tissues. Immune modulation represents an important intervention for obesity and obesity-associated insulin resistance.

  13. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor (ACEI-Mediated Amelioration in Renal Fibrosis Involves Suppression of Mast Cell Degranulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Sun

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The mechanism by which angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs attenuate renal fibrosis has not been fully uncovered. Methods: Renal fibrosis in rats was triggered by unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO and treated with Enalapril. Results: Enalapril attenuated renal fibrosis, as evidenced by the fibrosis scores (1.07±0.73 versus 2.18±0.75 for 200 mg/ml Enalapril versus control, pwsh/wsh mice developing renal fibrosis. We detected lower levels of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β and alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA, a fibroblast activation marker in the kidney tissue of Enalapril-treated UUO rats relative to the control UUO rats. Enalapril-treated UUO rats exhibited far fewer mast cells infiltrating per area in the kidney tissue than the control UUO rats (8.00±0.65 versus 29.00±0.57, pin vivo. Conclusion: Enalapril attenuated renal fibrosis in UUO rats, possibly by a mechanism involving the suppression of mast cell degranulation.

  14. RAGE-Mediated Suppression of Interleukin-10 Results in Enhanced Mortality in a Murine Model of Acinetobacter baumannii Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noto, Michael J; Becker, Kyle W; Boyd, Kelli L; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Skaar, Eric P

    2017-03-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a pattern recognition receptor capable of recognizing multiple pathogen-associated and danger-associated molecular patterns that contributes to the initiation and potentiation of inflammation in many disease processes. During infection, RAGE functions to either exacerbate disease severity or enhance pathogen clearance depending on the pathogen studied. Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic human pathogen capable of causing severe infections, including pneumonia and sepsis, in impaired hosts. The role of RAGE signaling in response to opportunistic bacterial infections is largely unknown. In murine models of A. baumannii pneumonia, RAGE signaling alters neither inflammation nor bacterial clearance. In contrast, RAGE(-/-) mice systemically infected with A. baumannii exhibit increased survival and reduced bacterial burdens in the liver and spleen. The increased survival of RAGE(-/-) mice is associated with increased circulating levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10). Neutralization of IL-10 in RAGE(-/-) mice results in decreased survival during systemic A. baumannii infection that mirrors that of wild-type (WT) mice, and exogenous IL-10 administration to WT mice enhances survival in this model. These findings demonstrate the role for RAGE-dependent IL-10 suppression as a key modulator of mortality from Gram-negative sepsis. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  15. Curcumin-Mediated HDAC Inhibition Suppresses the DNA Damage Response and Contributes to Increased DNA Damage Sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Huei Wang

    Full Text Available Chemo- and radiotherapy cause multiple forms of DNA damage and lead to the death of cancer cells. Inhibitors of the DNA damage response are candidate drugs for use in combination therapies to increase the efficacy of such treatments. In this study, we show that curcumin, a plant polyphenol, sensitizes budding yeast to DNA damage by counteracting the DNA damage response. Following DNA damage, the Mec1-dependent DNA damage checkpoint is inactivated and Rad52 recombinase is degraded by curcumin, which results in deficiencies in double-stand break repair. Additive effects on damage-induced apoptosis and the inhibition of damage-induced autophagy by curcumin were observed. Moreover, rpd3 mutants were found to mimic the curcumin-induced suppression of the DNA damage response. In contrast, hat1 mutants were resistant to DNA damage, and Rad52 degradation was impaired following curcumin treatment. These results indicate that the histone deacetylase inhibitor activity of curcumin is critical to DSB repair and DNA damage sensitivity.

  16. Tumour and host cell PD-L1 is required to mediate suppression of anti-tumour immunity in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Janet; Cheung, Jeanne; Navarro, Armando; Lianoglou, Steve; Haley, Benjamin; Totpal, Klara; Sanders, Laura; Koeppen, Hartmut; Caplazi, Patrick; McBride, Jacqueline; Chiu, Henry; Hong, Rebecca; Grogan, Jane; Javinal, Vincent; Yauch, Robert; Irving, Bryan; Belvin, Marcia; Mellman, Ira; Kim, Jeong M.; Schmidt, Maike

    2017-01-01

    Expression of PD-L1, the ligand for T-cell inhibitory receptor PD-1, is one key immunosuppressive mechanism by which cancer avoids eradication by the immune system. Therapeutic use of blocking antibodies to PD-L1 or its receptor PD-1 has produced unparalleled, durable clinical responses, with highest likelihood of response seen in patients whose tumour or immune cells express PD-L1 before therapy. The significance of PD-L1 expression in each cell type has emerged as a central and controversial unknown in the clinical development of immunotherapeutics. Using genetic deletion in preclinical mouse models, here we show that PD-L1 from disparate cellular sources, including tumour cells, myeloid or other immune cells can similarly modulate the degree of cytotoxic T-cell function and activity in the tumour microenvironment. PD-L1 expression in both the host and tumour compartment contribute to immune suppression in a non-redundant fashion, suggesting that both sources could be predictive of sensitivity to therapeutic agents targeting the PD-L1/PD-1 axis. PMID:28220772

  17. Antisense-mediated suppression of tomato thylakoidal ascorbate peroxidase influences anti-oxidant network during chilling stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Ming; Ma, Na-Na; Li, Dong; Deng, Yong-Sheng; Kong, Fan-Ying; Lv, Wei; Meng, Qing-Wei

    2012-09-01

    Photosynthesis is a well-established source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plants particularly under chilling stress. Ascorbate peroxidase (APXs) plays an important role in the anti-oxidant system by utilizing AsA as specific electron donor to reduce H(2)O(2) to water. In order to investigate the possible mechanisms of ascorbate peroxidsae (APX) in photoprotection under chilling stress, a tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) thylakoidal ascorbate peroxidase gene (LetAPX) was isolated and antisense transgenic tomato plants were produced. Under chilling stress, transgenic plants accumulated more H(2)O(2), and showed higher levels of ion leakage and malondialdehyde (MDA), lower net photosynthetic rate (Pn), lower maximal photochemical efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm) and less content of D1 protein compared with wild type (WT) plants. On the other hand, after chilling stress, transgenic plants showed higher reduced ascorbate (AsA) and activities of catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) than those in WT plants, and the expression of several known stress-responsive and antioxidative genes was also higher at the end of chilling treatment. These results suggested that the suppression of LetAPX gene induced compensatory anti-oxidant mechanisms in tomato, and inactivation of tAPX may have a regulatory role in facilitating redox signaling pathways under chilling stress. Furthermore, transient increases in ROS levels also have a vital role in stress signaling and thereby in the survival of plants under chilling conditions.

  18. Sucrose Production Mediated by Lipid Metabolism Suppresses the Physical Interaction of Peroxisomes and Oil Bodies during Germination of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Songkui; Hayashi, Yasuko; Otomo, Masayoshi; Mano, Shoji; Oikawa, Kazusato; Hayashi, Makoto; Nishimura, Mikio

    2016-09-16

    Physical interaction between organelles is a flexible event and essential for cells to adapt rapidly to environmental stimuli. Germinating plants utilize oil bodies and peroxisomes to mobilize storage lipids for the generation of sucrose as the main energy source. Although membrane interaction between oil bodies and peroxisomes has been widely observed, its underlying molecular mechanism is largely unknown. Here we present genetic evidence for control of