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Sample records for medial-side knee pain

  1. Medial abrasion syndrome: a neglected cause of knee pain in middle and old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Shaw-Ruey; Lee, Ching-Chih; Hsu, Chia-Chen

    2015-04-01

    Knee pain is a prevailing health problem of middle and old age. Medial plica-related medial abrasion syndrome (MAS), although a well-known cause of knee pain in younger individuals, has rarely been investigated in older individuals. This prospective study was conducted to investigate the prevalence and clinical manifestations of this syndrome as a cause of knee pain in middle and old age. The outcomes of arthroscopic treatment for this syndrome were also evaluated.A total of 232 knees of 169 patients >40 years of age (41-82, median: 63 years old) suffering from chronic knee pain were analyzed. The clinical diagnosis, predisposing factors, presenting symptoms, and physical signs were investigated. The sensitivity and specificity of each parameter of the clinical presentation for the diagnosis of MAS were evaluated after confirmation by arthroscopy. For patients with MAS, the roentgenographic and arthroscopic manifestations were investigated, and arthroscopic medial release (AMR) was performed. The outcomes were evaluated by the changes in the pain domain of the Knee Society scoring system and by patient satisfaction. The prevalence of medial plica was 95%, and osteoarthritis (OA) was the most common clinical diagnosis. Symptoms of pain and crepitus in motion and local tenderness during physical examination were the most sensitive parameters for the diagnosis. A history of a single knee injury combined with local tenderness and a palpable band found during physical examination were the most specific parameters for the diagnosis. The majority of patients suffering from this syndrome were successfully treated using AMR, yielding a satisfaction rate of 85.5% after a minimum of 3 years.MAS is a common cause of knee pain in middle and old age and can be effectively treated by AMR. Its concomitance with OA warrants further investigation.

  2. Posteromedial knee friction syndrome: an entity with medial knee pain and edema between the femoral condyle, sartorius and gracilis

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    Simeone, F.J.; Huang, Ambrose J.; Chang, Connie Y.; Smith, Maximilian; Bredella, Miriam A.; Torriani, Martin [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Gill, Thomas J. [Boston Sports Medicine and Research Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-12-20

    To describe MRI features of an entity consisting of medial knee pain and edema between the posteromedial femoral condyle (PMFC), sartorius and/or gracilis tendons and determine whether reduced tendon-bone distances may account for these findings. We retrospectively identified MRI cases of edema between the PMFC, sartorius and/or gracilis tendons (25 subjects, 26 knees). Two musculoskeletal radiologists independently graded edema and measured the sartorius- and gracilis-PMFC distances and knee flexion angle. Age- and gender-matched subjects with normal knee MRIs (27 subjects, 27 knees) served as controls for measurements. Statistical analyses compared abnormal to control subjects. Sartorius-PMFC and gracilis-PMFC spaces were narrower in abnormal compared to control subjects (1.6 ± 1.0 vs. 2.1 ± 1.2 mm, P = 0.04; 2.3 ± 2.0 vs. 4.6 ± 3.0 mm, P = 0.002, respectively). The knee flexion angle was similar between groups (P > 0.05). In subjects with clinical information, medial knee pain was the main complaint in 58 % (15/26) of abnormal subjects, with 42 % (11/26) having clinical suspicion of medial meniscal tear. Edema between the PMFC, sartorius and/or gracilis was mild in 54 % (14/26), moderate in 35 % (9/26) and severe in 12 % (3/26), and it was most frequent deep to both the sartorius and gracilis (50 %, 13/26). Edema between the PMFC, sartorius and/or gracilis tendons identified on knee MRI may be associated with medial knee pain and may represent a friction syndrome. (orig.)

  3. Posteromedial knee friction syndrome: an entity with medial knee pain and edema between the femoral condyle, sartorius and gracilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeone, F Joseph; Huang, Ambrose J; Chang, Connie Y; Smith, Maximilian; Gill, Thomas J; Bredella, Miriam A; Torriani, Martin

    2015-04-01

    To describe MRI features of an entity consisting of medial knee pain and edema between the posteromedial femoral condyle (PMFC), sartorius and/or gracilis tendons and determine whether reduced tendon-bone distances may account for these findings. We retrospectively identified MRI cases of edema between the PMFC, sartorius and/or gracilis tendons (25 subjects, 26 knees). Two musculoskeletal radiologists independently graded edema and measured the sartorius- and gracilis-PMFC distances and knee flexion angle. Age- and gender-matched subjects with normal knee MRIs (27 subjects, 27 knees) served as controls for measurements. Statistical analyses compared abnormal to control subjects. Sartorius-PMFC and gracilis-PMFC spaces were narrower in abnormal compared to control subjects (1.6 ± 1.0 vs. 2.1 ± 1.2 mm, P = 0.04; 2.3 ± 2.0 vs. 4.6 ± 3.0 mm, P = 0.002, respectively). The knee flexion angle was similar between groups (P > 0.05). In subjects with clinical information, medial knee pain was the main complaint in 58 % (15/26) of abnormal subjects, with 42 % (11/26) having clinical suspicion of medial meniscal tear. Edema between the PMFC, sartorius and/or gracilis was mild in 54 % (14/26), moderate in 35 % (9/26) and severe in 12 % (3/26), and it was most frequent deep to both the sartorius and gracilis (50 %, 13/26). Edema between the PMFC, sartorius and/or gracilis tendons identified on knee MRI may be associated with medial knee pain and may represent a friction syndrome.

  4. Posteromedial knee friction syndrome: an entity with medial knee pain and edema between the femoral condyle, sartorius and gracilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simeone, F.J.; Huang, Ambrose J.; Chang, Connie Y.; Smith, Maximilian; Bredella, Miriam A.; Torriani, Martin; Gill, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    To describe MRI features of an entity consisting of medial knee pain and edema between the posteromedial femoral condyle (PMFC), sartorius and/or gracilis tendons and determine whether reduced tendon-bone distances may account for these findings. We retrospectively identified MRI cases of edema between the PMFC, sartorius and/or gracilis tendons (25 subjects, 26 knees). Two musculoskeletal radiologists independently graded edema and measured the sartorius- and gracilis-PMFC distances and knee flexion angle. Age- and gender-matched subjects with normal knee MRIs (27 subjects, 27 knees) served as controls for measurements. Statistical analyses compared abnormal to control subjects. Sartorius-PMFC and gracilis-PMFC spaces were narrower in abnormal compared to control subjects (1.6 ± 1.0 vs. 2.1 ± 1.2 mm, P = 0.04; 2.3 ± 2.0 vs. 4.6 ± 3.0 mm, P = 0.002, respectively). The knee flexion angle was similar between groups (P > 0.05). In subjects with clinical information, medial knee pain was the main complaint in 58 % (15/26) of abnormal subjects, with 42 % (11/26) having clinical suspicion of medial meniscal tear. Edema between the PMFC, sartorius and/or gracilis was mild in 54 % (14/26), moderate in 35 % (9/26) and severe in 12 % (3/26), and it was most frequent deep to both the sartorius and gracilis (50 %, 13/26). Edema between the PMFC, sartorius and/or gracilis tendons identified on knee MRI may be associated with medial knee pain and may represent a friction syndrome. (orig.)

  5. Chronic medial knee pain without history of prior trauma: correlation of pain at rest and during exercise using bone scintigraphy and MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buck, Florian M.; Hoffmann, Alexander; Hofer, Bernhard; Allgayer, Bernhard; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to correlate chronic medial knee pain at rest and during exercise with bone scintigraphic uptake, bone marrow edema pattern (BMEP), cartilage lesions, meniscal tears, and collateral ligament pathologies on magnetic resonance MR imaging (MRI). Fifty consecutive patients with chronic medial knee pain seen at our institute were included in our study. Pain level at rest and during exercise was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). On MR images, BMEP volume was measured, and the integrity of femoro-tibial cartilage, medial meniscus, and medial collateral ligament (MCL) were assessed. Semiquantitative scintigraphic tracer uptake was measured. Multivariate linear regression analysis was performed. At the day of examination, 40 patients reported medial knee pain at rest, 49 when climbing stairs (at rest mean VAS 33 mm, range 0-80 mm; climbing stairs mean VAS, 60 mm, range 20-100 mm). Bone scintigraphy showed increased tracer uptake in 36 patients (uptake factor, average 3.7, range 2.4-18.0). MRI showed BMEP in 31 studies (mean volume, 4,070 mm 3 ; range, 1,200-39,200 mm 3 ). All patients with BMEP had abnormal bone scintigraphy. Ten percent of patients with pain at rest and 8% of patients with pain during exercise showed no BMEP but tracer uptake in scintigraphy. Tracer uptake and signal change around MCL predicted pain at rest significantly (tracer uptake p=0.004; MCL signal changes p=0.002). Only MCL signal changes predicted pain during exercise significantly (p=0.001). In chronic medial knee pain, increased tracer uptake in bone scintigraphy is more sensitive for medial knee pain than BMEP on MRI. Pain levels at rest and during exercise correlate with signal changes in and around the MCL. (orig.)

  6. Diagnostic criterial to differentiate medial meniscal injury from degenerative changes on 99mTc-MDP knee SPECT in patients with chronic knee pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paeng, Jin Chul; Chung, June Key; Kang, Won Jun; So, Young; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Myung Chul; Yoo, Jae Ho; Lee, Myung Chul; Jeong, Hwan Jeong

    2003-01-01

    In patients with chronic knee pain, the diagnostic performance of 99m Tc-MDP knee SPECT for internal derangement of knee is deteriorated due to degenerative changes. In this study, we tried to establish diagnostic criteria to differentiate medial meniscal injury (MMI) from degenerative change (DC) when the uptake in increased in medial compartment. A total of 49 knee SPECT of the patients with chronic(more than 3 months) knee pain, which showed increased 99m Tc-MDP uptake in the medial compartment, were included in this study. The diagnosis was confirmed by arthroscopy. On knee SPECT, 3 diagnosic criteria for MMI were investigated. In Criterion, I, MMI was diagnosed when crescentic uptake was observed in the medial tibial plateau. In Criterion II, crescentic uptake was further classified into anterior, mid, posterior, and diffuse patterns, according to the location of maximal uptake; and only crescentic mid, posterior, and diffuse patterns were diagnosed as MMI. In Criterion III, MMI was diagnosed when medial tibial plateau showed higher activity then medial femoral condyle. The diagnostic performance of the 3 criteria was compared. The sensitivity and specificity were 93% and 14% in Criterion I, 89% and 38% in Criterion II, and 75% and 67% in Criterion III, respectively. Criterion III had significantly improve diagnostic performance, especially, specificity. In this study, we established a practical diagnostic criterion to differentiate MMI from DC on knee SPECT. The result is helpful to improve the diagnostic value of knee SPECT as a screening test for chronic knee pain

  7. Medial release and lateral imbrication for intractable anterior knee pain: diagnostic process, technique, and results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meldrum AR

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Alexander R Meldrum,1 Jeremy R Reed,2 Megan D Dash3 1Department of Surgery, Section of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; 2Department of Surgery, University of Saskatchewan College of Medicine, Regina, SK, Canada; 3Department of Family Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Regina, SK, Canada Purpose: To present two cases of intractable patellofemoral pain syndrome treated with a novel procedure, arthroscopic medial release, and lateral imbrication of the patellar retinaculum. Patients and methods: This case series presents the treatment of three knees in two patients (one bilateral in whom an all-inside arthroscopic medial release and lateral imbrication of the patellar retinaculum was performed. Subjective measurement of pain was the primary outcome measurement, and subjective patellofemoral instability was the secondary outcome measurement. Results: Subjectively the two patients had full resolution of their pain, without any patellofemoral instability. Conclusion: Medial release and lateral imbrication of the patellar retinaculum is a new surgical procedure that has been used in the treatment of intractable patellofemoral pain syndrome. This is the first report of its kind in the literature. While outcome measurements were less than ideal, the patients had positive outcomes, both functionally and in terms of pain. Keywords: anterior knee pain syndrome, chondromalacia patellae, runners knee, patellar chondropathy, patellofemoral dysfunction, patellofemoral tracking disorder

  8. Association between knee alignment and knee pain in patients surgically treated for medial knee osteoarthritis by high tibial osteotomy. A one year follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    W-Dahl, Annette; Toksvig-Larsen, Sören; Roos, Ewa

    2009-01-01

    on for knee OA by high tibial osteotomy. METHODS: 182 patients (68% men) mean age 53 years (34 - 69) with varus alignment having tibial osteotomy by the hemicallotasis technique for medial knee OA were consecutively included. Knee alignment was assessed by the Hip-Knee-Ankle (HKA) angle from radiographs...... including the hip and ankle joints. Knee pain was measured by the subscale pain (0 - 100, worst to best scale) of the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) preoperatively and at one year follow-up. To estimate the association between knee alignment and knee pain multivariate regression...... with every degree of HKA angle, adjusted analysis 0.3 points (95% CI -1.3 - 0.6).The mean postoperative knee alignment was 184 degrees (171 - 185). The mean change in knee alignment was 13 degrees (0 - 30). The mean change in KOOS pain was 32 (-16 - 83). There was neither any association between change...

  9. Anterior knee pain and evidence of osteoarthritis of the patellofemoral joint should not be considered contraindications to mobile-bearing unicompartmental knee arthroplasty: a 15-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, T W; Pandit, H G; Maurer, D G; Ostlere, S J; Jenkins, C; Mellon, S J; Dodd, C A F; Murray, D W

    2017-05-01

    It is not clear whether anterior knee pain and osteoarthritis (OA) of the patellofemoral joint (PFJ) are contraindications to medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA). Our aim was to investigate the long-term outcome of a consecutive series of patients, some of whom had anterior knee pain and PFJ OA managed with UKA. We assessed the ten-year functional outcomes and 15-year implant survival of 805 knees (677 patients) following medial mobile-bearing UKA. The intra-operative status of the PFJ was documented and, with the exception of bone loss with grooving to the lateral side, neither the clinical or radiological state of the PFJ nor the presence of anterior knee pain were considered a contraindication. The impact of radiographic findings and anterior knee pain was studied in a subgroup of 100 knees (91 patients). There was no relationship between functional outcomes, at a mean of ten years, or 15-year implant survival, and pre-operative anterior knee pain, or the presence or degree of cartilage loss documented intra-operatively at the medial patella or trochlea, or radiographic evidence of OA in the medial side of the PFJ. In 6% of cases there was full thickness cartilage loss on the lateral side of the patella. In these cases, the overall ten-year function and 15-year survival was similar to those without cartilage loss; however they had slightly more difficulty with descending stairs. Radiographic signs of OA seen in the lateral part of the PFJ were not associated with a definite compromise in functional outcome or implant survival. Severe damage to the lateral side of the PFJ with bone loss and grooving remains a contraindication to mobile-bearing UKA. Less severe damage to the lateral side of the PFJ and damage to the medial side, however severe, does not compromise the overall function or survival, so should not be considered to be a contraindication. However, if a patient does have full thickness cartilage loss on the lateral side of the PFJ they may

  10. Gait changes in patients with knee osteoarthritis are replicated by experimental knee pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Nielsen, Thomas Graven; Aaboe, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by pain and associated with abnormal knee moments during walking. The relationship between knee OA pain and gait changes remains to be clarified, and a better understanding of this link could advance the treatment and prevention of disease...... progression. This study investigated changes in knee moments during walking following experimental knee pain in healthy volunteers, and whether these changes replicated the joint moments observed in medial knee OA patients....

  11. Comparison of neuromuscular and quadriceps strengthening exercise in the treatment of varus malaligned knees with medial knee osteoarthritis: a randomised controlled trial protocol

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    Bennell Kim L

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoarthritis of the knee involving predominantly the medial tibiofemoral compartment is common in older people, giving rise to pain and loss of function. Many people experience progressive worsening of the disease over time, particularly those with varus malalignment and increased medial knee joint load. Therefore, interventions that can reduce excessive medial knee loading may be beneficial in reducing the risk of structural progression. Traditional quadriceps strengthening can improve pain and function in people with knee osteoarthritis but does not appear to reduce medial knee load. A neuromuscular exercise program, emphasising optimal alignment of the trunk and lower limb joints relative to one another, as well as quality of movement performance, while dynamically and functionally strengthening the lower limb muscles, may be able to reduce medial knee load. Such a program may also be superior to traditional quadriceps strengthening with respect to improved pain and physical function because of the functional and dynamic nature. This randomised controlled trial will investigate the effect of a neuromuscular exercise program on medial knee joint loading, pain and function in individuals with medial knee joint osteoarthritis. We hypothesise that the neuromuscular program will reduce medial knee load as well as pain and functional limitations to a greater extent than a traditional quadriceps strengthening program. Methods/Design 100 people with medial knee pain, radiographic medial compartment osteoarthritis and varus malalignment will be recruited and randomly allocated to one of two 12-week exercise programs: quadriceps strengthening or neuromuscular exercise. Each program will involve 14 supervised exercise sessions with a physiotherapist plus four unsupervised sessions per week at home. The primary outcomes are medial knee load during walking (the peak external knee adduction moment from 3D gait analysis, pain, and self

  12. Associations between MRI-defined structural pathology and generalized and localized knee pain - the Oulu Knee Osteoarthritis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaukinen, P; Podlipská, J; Guermazi, A; Niinimäki, J; Lehenkari, P; Roemer, F W; Nieminen, M T; Koski, J M; Arokoski, J P A; Saarakkala, S

    2016-09-01

    To determine the associations between multi-feature structural pathology assessed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the presence of knee pain, and to determine the associations between the locations of structural changes and different knee pain patterns. Eighty symptomatic subjects with knee pain and suspicion or diagnosis of knee OA and 63 asymptomatic subjects underwent knee MRI. Severity of structural changes was graded by MRI Osteoarthritis Knee Score (MOAKS) in separate knee locations. The associations between cartilage damage, bone marrow lesions (BMLs), osteophytes, Hoffa's synovitis, effusion-synovitis, meniscal damage and structural pathologies in ligaments, tendons and bursas and both the presence of pain and the knee pain patterns were assessed. The presence of Hoffa's synovitis (adjusted RR 1.6, 95% CI 1.2-1.3) and osteophytes in any region (2.07, 1.19-3.60) was significantly associated with the presence of pain. Any Hoffa's synovitis was associated with patellar pain (adjusted RR 4.70, 95% CI 1.19-3.60) and moderate-to-severe Hoffa's synovitis with diffuse pain (2.25, 1.13-4.50). Medial knee pain was associated with cartilage loss in the medial tibia (adjusted RR 2.66, 95% CI 1.22-5.80), osteophytes in the medial tibia (2.66, 1.17-6.07) and medial femur (2.55, 1.07-6.09), medial meniscal maceration (2.20, 1.01-4.79) and anterior meniscal extrusions (2.78, 1.14-6.75). Hoffa's synovitis and osteophytes were strongly associated with the presence of knee pain. Medial pain was associated most often with medially located structural pathologies. Copyright © 2016 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Atraumatic medial collateral ligament oedema in medial compartment knee osteoarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergin, D.; Keogh, C.; O'Connell, M.; Zoga, A.; Rowe, D.; Shah, B.; Eustace, S.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To describe and determine the prevalence of atraumatic medial collateral oedema identified in patients with medial compartment osteoarthritis. Design and patients: Sixty patients, 30 patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (Kellgren and Lawrence grade 2 to 4) and 30 age-matched patients with atraumatic knee pain without osteoarthritis, referred for MR imaging over a 2 year period were included in the study. In each case, severity of osteoarthritis was recorded on radiographs and correlated with the presence or absence of medial collateral ligament oedema at MR imaging. Results: Medial collateral oedema was identified in 27 of the 30 patients with osteoarthritis, of whom 14 had grade 1 oedema and 13 had grade 2 oedema compared with the presence of medial collateral ligament oedema (grade 1) in only two of the 30 control patients without osteoarthritis (P<<0.0001). Conclusion: Medial collateral oedema is common in patients with osteoarthritis in the absence of trauma. When identified, medial collateral ligament oedema should be considered to be a feature of osteoarthritis and should not be incorrectly attributed to an acute traumatic injury. (orig.)

  14. Appearance of medial plica of the knee on MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, J.; Pope, C.F.; Jokl, P.; Lynch, K.

    1989-01-01

    To assess the appearance of the abnormal plica, a rare but important cause of knee pain, the authors have reviewed 1.5-T MR images of 17 patients (mean age, 33 years) who had arthroscopically confirmed abnormal plicae involving the medial aspect of the patella pouch. Asymmetry in the medial wall of the patella pouch was seen in 17 of 17; 10 of 17 had a discernible edge, and four of 17 had sufficient fluid to surround the plica. When sufficient intraarticular fluid was present, the plica was easily detected. Asymmetry in the medial wall of the patella pouch was a helpful MR characteristic to account for unexplained knee pain

  15. The KineSpring® Knee Implant System: an implantable joint-unloading prosthesis for treatment of medial knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clifford AG

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Anton G Clifford,1 Stefan M Gabriel,1 Mary O’Connell,1 David Lowe,1 Larry E Miller,2,3 Jon E Block31Moximed, Inc, Hayward, CA, USA; 2Miller Scientific Consulting, Inc, Arden, NC, USA; 3The Jon Block Group, San Francisco, CA, USAAbstract: Symptomatic medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (OA is the leading cause of musculoskeletal pain and disability in adults. Therapies intended to unload the medial knee compartment have yielded unsatisfactory results due to low patient compliance with conservative treatments and high complication rates with surgical options. There is no widely available joint-unloading treatment for medial knee OA that offers clinically important symptom alleviation, low complication risk, and high patient acceptance. The KineSpring® Knee Implant System (Moximed, Inc, Hayward, CA, USA is a first-of-its-kind, implantable, extra-articular, extra-capsular prosthesis intended to alleviate knee OA-related symptoms by reducing medial knee compartment loading while overcoming the limitations of traditional joint-unloading therapies. Preclinical and clinical studies have demonstrated excellent prosthesis durability, substantial reductions in medial compartment and total joint loads, and clinically important improvements in OA-related pain and function. The purpose of this report is to describe the KineSpring System, including implant characteristics, principles of operation, indications for use, patient selection criteria, surgical technique, postoperative care, preclinical testing, and clinical experience. The KineSpring System has potential to bridge the gap between ineffective conservative treatments and irreversible surgical interventions for medial compartment knee OA.Keywords: KineSpring, knee, medial, osteoarthritis, prosthesis

  16. Gait changes in patients with knee osteoarthritis are replicated by experimental knee pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Aaboe, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by pain and associated with abnormal knee moments during walking. The relationship between knee OA pain and gait changes remains to be clarified, and a better understanding of this link could advance the treatment and prevention of disease...

  17. [Influence of patellofemoral joint degeneration on outcome of medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, B Y; Ji, B C; Guo, W T; Mu, W B; Cao, L

    2017-06-01

    Objective: To evaluate the influence of patellofemoral joint degeneration and pre-operative pain location on the outcome of medial Oxford unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA). Methods: A total of 58 patients (58 knees) with medial Oxford UKA had been performed for medial osteoarthritis from March 2013 to July 2014 in Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at First Teaching Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University were retrospective reviewed. There were 24 males and 34 females, the age from 43 to 87 years with the mean age was 68.5 years. The mean body mass index was 25.2 kg/m(2) ranging from 19.7 to 31.5 kg/m(2). Patients were divided into anterior-medial pain group (35 knees), anterior knee pain group (17 knees) and general knee pain group (6 knees) according to pre-operative pain location. Pre-operative radiological statuses of the patellefemoral joint were defined by Ahlback system and divided into patellofemoral joint degeneration group (16 knees) and normal group (42 knees). Patients were also divided into medial patellofemoral degeneration group (20 knees), lateral patellofemoral degeneration group (12 knees) and normal group (26 knees) according to Altman scoring system. Outerbridge system was used intraoperatively and the patients were divided into patellofemoral joint degeneration group (21 knees) and normal group (37 knees). Pre- and post-operative outcomes were evaluated with Oxford Knee Score (OKS), Western Ontario and MacMaster (WOMAC) and patellofemoral score system of Lonner. T test and ANOVA were used to analyze the data. Results: The average duration of follow-up was 33 months (from 26 to 42 months). There were no patients had complications of infection, deep vein thrombosis, dislocation or loosing at the last follow-up. Compared to pre-operation, OKS (18.9±3.5 vs . 38.9±4.7, 19.3±4.2 vs . 39.6±4.6, 18.1±3.2 vs . 38.1±3.7)( t =5.64 to 7.08, all P patellofemoral joint degeneration group and normal group, the outcomes were the same according to

  18. Prolonged knee pain relief by saphenous block (new technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev Harshe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain in the knee joint can be from a variety of reasons. It can be either from the joint itself, it can be myofascial or it can be neuropathy, radicular pain. The myofascial component can be in different forms, namely, collateral ligament pain, bursitis, tendinitis, and so on. This responds well to local injections of steroids. Pain from the joint can be because of osteoarthritis (OA, rheumatoid arthritis or any other variety of arthritis. Among these osteoarthritis is the most common and naturally occurring pain. There are several modalities used for managing pain in the knee joint. They include medicines and physiotherapy, intra-articular steroid injection, intra-articular Hyalgan, Synvisc injection, prolotherapy, genicular nerve block, ablation, intra-articular pulsed radio frequency (PRF ablation, acupuncture, injection of platelet-rich plasma in the joint, total knee replacement, high tibial osteotomy, arthroscopy and lavage, and so on. All these modalities have their pros and cons. Literature and experience state that the pain relief provided may last for a few months with these modalities except in surgical interventions in advanced OA. The saphenous nerve is termination of femoral nerve and it is essentially sensory nerve. It supplies the medial compartment and some part of the anterior compartment of the knee joint. This nerve has been blocked near the knee joint by way of infiltration by surgeons and anesthetists, for relief of pain after knee surgery, with varying pain relief of postoperative pain. When we block the saphenous in the mid thigh in the sartorial canal, the fluid tends to block the medial branch of the anterior femoral cutaneous nerve also. It is hypothesized that this may give complete medial and anterior knee pain relief and as most of the knee OA patients have medial and anterior knee pain, this may prove useful. Use of ultrasonography helps to locate the nerve better, ensuring perfection. An effort has been made to

  19. Joint space narrowing, body mass index, and knee pain: the ROAD study (OAC1839R1).

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    Muraki, S; Akune, T; En-Yo, Y; Yoshida, M; Suzuki, T; Yoshida, H; Ishibashi, H; Tokimura, F; Yamamoto, S; Tanaka, S; Nakamura, K; Kawaguchi, H; Oka, H; Yoshimura, N

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to clarify the association of joint space narrowing with knee pain in Japanese men and women using a large-scale population-based cohort of the Research on Osteoarthritis/osteoporosis Against Disability (ROAD) study. This study examined the association between minimum joint space width (mJSW) in the medial compartment and pain at the knee. mJSW was measured in the medial and lateral compartments of the knee using a knee osteoarthritis (OA) computer-aided diagnosis system. From the 3040 participants in the ROAD study, the present study analyzed 2733 participants who completed the radiographic examinations and questionnaires regarding knee pain (975 men and 1758 women; mean age, 69.9 ± 11.2 years). Subjects with lateral knee OA were excluded. After adjustment for age and Body mass index (BMI), medial mJSW, as well as medial mJSW/lateral mJSW, was significantly associated with knee pain. Sex and BMI affected the association of medial mJSW with knee pain. The threshold of medial mJSW was approximately 3 mm in men and 2 mm in women, while that of medial mJSW/lateral mJSW was approximately 60% in both men and women. BMI was found to have a distinct effect on the association of mJSW with pain. The present cross-sectional study using a large-scale population from the ROAD study showed that joint space narrowing had a significant association with knee pain. The thresholds of joint space narrowing for knee pain were also established. Copyright © 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The association between reduced knee joint proprioception and medial meniscal abnormalities using MRI in knee osteoarthritis: results from the Amsterdam osteoarthritis cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Esch, M; Knoop, J; Hunter, D J; Klein, J-P; van der Leeden, M; Knol, D L; Reiding, D; Voorneman, R E; Gerritsen, M; Roorda, L D; Lems, W F; Dekker, J

    2013-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is characterized by pain and activity limitations. In knee OA, proprioceptive accuracy is reduced and might be associated with pain and activity limitations. Although causes of reduced proprioceptive accuracy are divergent, medial meniscal abnormalities, which are highly prevalent in knee OA, have been suggested to play an important role. No study has focussed on the association between proprioceptive accuracy and meniscal abnormalities in knee OA. To explore the association between reduced proprioceptive accuracy and medial meniscal abnormalities in a clinical sample of knee OA subjects. Cross-sectional study in 105 subjects with knee OA. Knee proprioceptive accuracy was assessed by determining the joint motion detection threshold in the knee extension direction. The knee was imaged with a 3.0 T magnetic resonance (MR) scanner. Number of regions with medial meniscal abnormalities and the extent of abnormality in the anterior and posterior horn and body were scored according to the Boston-Leeds Osteoarthritis Knee Score (BLOKS) method. Multiple regression analyzes were used to examine whether reduced proprioceptive accuracy was associated with medial meniscal abnormalities in knee OA subjects. Mean proprioceptive accuracy was 2.9° ± 1.9°. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-detected medial meniscal abnormalities were found in the anterior horn (78%), body (80%) and posterior horn (90%). Reduced proprioceptive accuracy was associated with both the number of regions with meniscal abnormalities (P knee complaints. This is the first study showing that reduced proprioceptive accuracy is associated with medial meniscal abnormalities in knee OA. The study highlights the importance of meniscal abnormalities in understanding reduced proprioceptive accuracy in persons with knee OA. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. All rights reserved.

  1. Painful locking of the knee due to bucket handle tear of

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HE Rui

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】 A case of swelling and anterior painful knee due to tear of mediopatellar plica is reported. The patient also felt clunk of the patellofemoral joint and knee locking. Under arthroscopic examination, a thick and fibrous plica was found medial to patellar, and a bucket tear along the plica from medial patellar retinaculum to infrapatellar fat pad. Polarized microscopic examination showed collagen fiber fragment and loss of light reflecting property. Neuroimmunohistology suggested up-regulation of synovial plica innervation in the area around the crack. This may be related to the pain. The bucket tear of mediopatellar plicacaused pain and lock of knee are more common than previously reported. Key words: Knee injuries; Arthroscopy; Patellofemoral joint

  2. Neuromuscular versus quadriceps strengthening exercise in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis and varus malalignment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennell, Kim L; Kyriakides, Mary; Metcalf, Ben

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of neuromuscular exercise (NEXA) and quadriceps strengthening (QS) on the knee adduction moment (an indicator of mediolateral distribution of knee load), pain, and physical function in patients with medial knee joint osteoarthritis (OA) and varus malalignment. ME...

  3. Anterior knee pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LLopis, Eva [Hospital de la Ribera, Alzira, Valencia (Spain) and Carretera de Corbera km 1, 46600 Alzira Valencia (Spain)]. E-mail: ellopis@hospital-ribera.com; Padron, Mario [Clinica Cemtro, Ventisquero de la Condesa no. 42, 28035 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: mario.padron@clinicacemtro.com

    2007-04-15

    Anterior knee pain is a common complain in all ages athletes. It may be caused by a large variety of injuries. There is a continuum of diagnoses and most of the disorders are closely related. Repeated minor trauma and overuse play an important role for the development of lesions in Hoffa's pad, extensor mechanism, lateral and medial restrain structures or cartilage surface, however usually an increase or change of activity is referred. Although the direct relation of cartilage lesions, especially chondral, and pain is a subject of debate these lesions may be responsible of early osteoarthrosis and can determine athlete's prognosis. The anatomy and biomechanics of patellofemoral joint is complex and symptoms are often unspecific. Transient patellar dislocation has MR distinct features that provide evidence of prior dislocation and rules our complication. However, anterior knee pain more often is related to overuse and repeated minor trauma. Patella and quadriceps tendon have been also implicated in anterior knee pain, as well as lateral or medial restraint structures and Hoffa's pad. US and MR are excellent tools for the diagnosis of superficial tendons, the advantage of MR is that permits to rule out other sources of intraarticular derangements. Due to the complex anatomy and biomechanic of patellofemoral joint maltracking is not fully understood; plain films and CT allow the study of malalignment, new CT and MR kinematic studies have promising results but further studies are needed. Our purpose here is to describe how imaging techniques can be helpful in precisely defining the origin of the patient's complaint and thus improve understanding and management of these injuries.

  4. Anterior knee pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LLopis, Eva; Padron, Mario

    2007-01-01

    Anterior knee pain is a common complain in all ages athletes. It may be caused by a large variety of injuries. There is a continuum of diagnoses and most of the disorders are closely related. Repeated minor trauma and overuse play an important role for the development of lesions in Hoffa's pad, extensor mechanism, lateral and medial restrain structures or cartilage surface, however usually an increase or change of activity is referred. Although the direct relation of cartilage lesions, especially chondral, and pain is a subject of debate these lesions may be responsible of early osteoarthrosis and can determine athlete's prognosis. The anatomy and biomechanics of patellofemoral joint is complex and symptoms are often unspecific. Transient patellar dislocation has MR distinct features that provide evidence of prior dislocation and rules our complication. However, anterior knee pain more often is related to overuse and repeated minor trauma. Patella and quadriceps tendon have been also implicated in anterior knee pain, as well as lateral or medial restraint structures and Hoffa's pad. US and MR are excellent tools for the diagnosis of superficial tendons, the advantage of MR is that permits to rule out other sources of intraarticular derangements. Due to the complex anatomy and biomechanic of patellofemoral joint maltracking is not fully understood; plain films and CT allow the study of malalignment, new CT and MR kinematic studies have promising results but further studies are needed. Our purpose here is to describe how imaging techniques can be helpful in precisely defining the origin of the patient's complaint and thus improve understanding and management of these injuries

  5. Proximal fibular osteotomy: a new surgery for pain relief and improvement of joint function in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohu; Wei, Lei; Lv, Zhi; Zhao, Bin; Duan, Zhiqing; Wu, Wenjin; Zhang, Bin; Wei, Xiaochun

    2017-02-01

    Objective To explore the effects of proximal fibular osteotomy as a new surgery for pain relief and improvement of medial joint space and function in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Methods From January 2015 to May 2015, 47 patients who underwent proximal fibular osteotomy for medial compartment osteoarthritis were retrospectively followed up. Preoperative and postoperative weight-bearing and whole lower extremity radiographs were obtained to analyse the alignment of the lower extremity and ratio of the knee joint space (medial/lateral compartment). Knee pain was assessed using a visual analogue scale, and knee ambulation activities were evaluated using the American Knee Society score preoperatively and postoperatively. Results Medial pain relief was observed in almost all patients after proximal fibular osteotomy. Most patients exhibited improved walking postoperatively. Weight-bearing lower extremity radiographs showed an average increase in the postoperative medial knee joint space. Additionally, obvious correction of alignment was observed in the whole lower extremity radiographs in 8 of 47 patients. Conclusions The present study demonstrates that proximal fibular osteotomy effectively relieves pain and improves joint function in patients with medial compartment osteoarthritis at a mean of 13.38 months postoperatively.

  6. Bone scan features in spontaneous knee pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vattimo, A; Merlo, F; Bertelli, P; Burroni, L

    1992-01-01

    In 21 patients with "spontaneous" knee pain, 99mTc-MDP bone scan was found to be more sensitive than clinical and radiographic examination in detecting alterations of the joint components. These alterations were shown by increased radionuclide uptake in the compartments where pain was present, which was most commonly the medial femorotibial compartment, although the femoropatellar compartment was also frequently affected. The authors conclude that bone scan should be the first imaging study performed on the knee in order to establish if further tests are necessary.

  7. The relationship between pain and dynamic knee joint loading in knee osteoarthritis varies with radiographic disease severity. A cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Marius; Aaboe, Jens; Bliddal, Henning

    2012-08-01

    In a cross sectional study, we investigated the relationships between knee pain and mechanical loading across the knee, as indicated by the external knee adduction moment (KAM) during walking in patients with symptomatic knee OA who were distinguished by different radiographic disease severities. Data from 137 symptomatic medial knee OA patients were used. Based on Kellgren/Lawrence (K/L) grading, the patients were divided into radiographically less severe (K/L ≤ 2, n=68) or severe (K/L>2, n=69) medial knee OA. Overall knee pain was rated on a 10 cm visual analog scale, and peak KAM and KAM impulses were obtained from gait analyses. Mixed linear regression analyses were performed with KAM variables as the outcome, and pain and disease severity as independent variables, adjusting for age, gender, and walking speed. In adjusted analyses, less severe patients demonstrated negative relationships between pain intensities and dynamic loading. The severe patient group showed no relationship between pain intensity and peak KAM, and a positive relationship between pain intensity and KAM impulse. In radiographically less severe knee OA, the negative relationships between pain intensity and dynamic knee joint loading indicate a natural reaction to pain, which will limit the stress on the joint. In contrast, either absent or positive relationships between pain and dynamic loading in severe OA may lead to overuse and accelerated disease progression. These findings may have a large potential interest for strategies of treatment in knee OA. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Increased medial foot loading during drop jump in subjects with patellofemoral pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathleff, Michael S; Richter, Camilla; Brushøj, Christoffer

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare medial-to-lateral plantar forces during drop jump and single leg squat in individuals with and without patellofemoral pain. METHODS: This cross-sectional study compared 23 young adults with patellofemoral pain to 20 age- and sex-matched controls without knee pain. The plantar...... pressure distribution was collected during drop jump and single leg squat using pressure-sensitive Pedar insoles, inserted into a standard flat shoe. The primary outcome was the medial-to-lateral force, quantified as the peak force under the medial forefoot as the percentage of force under the total...... forefoot during drop jump. Secondary outcomes included peak medial-to-lateral force during single leg squat and mean forces during drop jump and single leg squat. RESULTS: The primary outcome showed that individuals with patellofemoral pain had a 22 % higher medial-to-lateral peak force during drop jump...

  9. The use of MRI in the investigation of lateral meniscal tear post medial unicompartmental knee replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanil H. Ajwani, MBChB, BSc (Hons, MRCS

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of lateral knee pain in patients with a medial unicompartmental knee replacement (UKR is complex. The native lateral compartment structures are prone to the same injuries as patients with normal knees. Historical reports of lateral meniscal injury post medial UKR have argued MRI evaluation is obsolete due to artefact caused by the prosthesis. We report a case of lateral meniscal injury in a patient two years after successful medial UKR. We identified the offending pathology via utilization of MRI scanners adopting metal artefact reduction sequences (MARS. The MARS MRI protocol helps clinicians accurately and non-invasively evaluate soft tissue structures in knees with metal prostheses. It also allows surgeons to accurately counsel patients and provides a higher degree of certainty in treating the pathology.

  10. Snapping Knee Caused by Medial Meniscal Cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Ohishi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Snapping phenomenon around the medial aspect of the knee is rare. We present this case of snapping knee caused by the sartorius muscle over a large medial meniscal cyst in a 66-year-old female. Magnetic resonance images demonstrated a large medial meniscal cyst with a horizontal tear of the medial meniscus. Arthroscopic cyst decompression with limited meniscectomy resulted in the disappearance of snapping, and no recurrence of the cyst was observed during a 2-year follow-up period.

  11. MRI findings associated with development of incident knee pain over 48 months: data from the osteoarthritis initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, Gabby B.; Hou, Stephanie W.; Nardo, Lorenzo; Heilmeier, Ursula; Link, Thomas M. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Nevitt, Michael C.; McCulloch, Charles E. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2016-05-15

    The purpose of this nested case-control study was to identify baseline, incident, and progressive MRI findings visible on standard MRI clinical sequences that were associated with development of incident knee pain in subjects at risk for OA over a period of 48 months. We analyzed 60 case knees developing incident pain (WOMAC{sub pain} = 0 at baseline and WOMAC{sub pain} ≥ 5 at 48 months) and 60 control knees (WOMAC{sub pain} = 0 at baseline and WOMAC{sub pain} = 0 at 48 months) from the Osteoarthritis Initiative. 3 T knee MRIs were analyzed using a modified WORMS score (cartilage, meniscus, bone marrow) at baseline and after 48 months. Baseline and longitudinal findings were grouped into logistic regression models and compared using likelihood-ratio tests. For each model that was significant, a stepwise elimination was used to isolate significant MRI findings. One baseline MRI finding and three findings that changed from baseline to 48 months were associated with the development of pain: at baseline, the severity of a cartilage lesion in the medial tibia was associated with incident pain - (odds ratio (OR) for incident pain = 3.05; P = 0.030). Longitudinally, an incident effusion (OR = 9.78; P = 0.005), a progressive cartilage lesion of the patella (OR = 4.59; P = 0.009), and an incident medial meniscus tear (OR = 4.91; P = 0.028) were associated with the development of pain. Our results demonstrate that baseline abnormalities of the medial tibia cartilage as well as an incident joint effusion, progressive patella cartilage defects, and an incident medial meniscus tear over 48 months may be associated with incident knee pain. Clinically, this study helps identify MRI findings that are associated with the development of knee pain. (orig.)

  12. MRI findings associated with development of incident knee pain over 48 months: data from the osteoarthritis initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, Gabby B.; Hou, Stephanie W.; Nardo, Lorenzo; Heilmeier, Ursula; Link, Thomas M.; Nevitt, Michael C.; McCulloch, Charles E.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this nested case-control study was to identify baseline, incident, and progressive MRI findings visible on standard MRI clinical sequences that were associated with development of incident knee pain in subjects at risk for OA over a period of 48 months. We analyzed 60 case knees developing incident pain (WOMAC pain = 0 at baseline and WOMAC pain ≥ 5 at 48 months) and 60 control knees (WOMAC pain = 0 at baseline and WOMAC pain = 0 at 48 months) from the Osteoarthritis Initiative. 3 T knee MRIs were analyzed using a modified WORMS score (cartilage, meniscus, bone marrow) at baseline and after 48 months. Baseline and longitudinal findings were grouped into logistic regression models and compared using likelihood-ratio tests. For each model that was significant, a stepwise elimination was used to isolate significant MRI findings. One baseline MRI finding and three findings that changed from baseline to 48 months were associated with the development of pain: at baseline, the severity of a cartilage lesion in the medial tibia was associated with incident pain - (odds ratio (OR) for incident pain = 3.05; P = 0.030). Longitudinally, an incident effusion (OR = 9.78; P = 0.005), a progressive cartilage lesion of the patella (OR = 4.59; P = 0.009), and an incident medial meniscus tear (OR = 4.91; P = 0.028) were associated with the development of pain. Our results demonstrate that baseline abnormalities of the medial tibia cartilage as well as an incident joint effusion, progressive patella cartilage defects, and an incident medial meniscus tear over 48 months may be associated with incident knee pain. Clinically, this study helps identify MRI findings that are associated with the development of knee pain. (orig.)

  13. Joint unloading implant modifies subchondral bone trabecular structure in medial knee osteoarthritis: 2-year outcomes of a pilot study using fractal signature analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller LE

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Larry E Miller,1,2 Miki Sode,3 Thomas Fuerst,3 Jon E Block2 1Miller Scientific Consulting, Inc., Asheville, NC, USA; 2The Jon Block Group, San Francisco, CA, USA; 3Bioclinica, Newark, CA, USA Background: Knee osteoarthritis (OA is largely attributable to chronic excessive and aberrant joint loading. The purpose of this pilot study was to quantify radiographic changes in subchondral bone after treatment with a minimally invasive joint unloading implant (KineSpring® Knee Implant System.Methods: Nine patients with unilateral medial knee OA resistant to nonsurgical therapy were treated with the KineSpring System and followed for 2 years. Main outcomes included Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC pain, function, and stiffness subscores and independent core laboratory determinations of joint space width and fractal signature of the tibial cortex.Results: WOMAC scores, on average, improved by 92% for pain, 91% for function, and 79% for stiffness over the 2-year follow-up period. Joint space width in the medial compartment of the treated knee significantly increased from 0.9 mm at baseline to 3.1 mm at 2 years; joint space width in the medial compartment of the untreated knee was unchanged. Fractal signatures of the vertically oriented trabeculae in the medial compartment decreased by 2.8% in the treated knee and increased by 2.1% in the untreated knee over 2 years. No statistically significant fractal signature changes were observed in the horizontally oriented trabeculae in the medial compartment or in the horizontal or vertical trabeculae of the lateral compartment in the treated knee.Conclusion: Preliminary evidence suggests that the KineSpring System may modify knee OA disease progression by increasing joint space width and improving subchondral bone trabecular integrity, thereby reducing pain and improving joint function. Keywords: disease modification, KineSpring, joint space, pain, trabecular

  14. Feasibility of the Atlas Unicompartmental Knee System Load Absorber in Improving Pain Relief and Function in Patients Needing Unloading of the Medial Compartment of the Knee: 1-Year Follow-Up of a Prospective, Multicenter, Single-Arm Pilot Study (PHANTOM High Flex Trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slynarski, Konrad; Walawski, Jacek; Smigielski, Robert; van der Merwe, Willem

    2017-01-01

    In young patients with medial knee osteoarthritis (OA), surgical intervention may not be desirable due to preferences to avoid bone cutting procedures, return to high activity levels, and prolong implant survival. The Atlas Knee System was designed to fill the gap between ineffective conservative treatments and invasive surgery. This single-arm study included 26 patients, aged 25 to 65 years, who completed 12 months of follow-up. All dimensions of the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), and Knee Society Score significantly improved from baseline to 12 months. About 96.2% and 92.3% of patients experienced a ⩾20% improvement in their KOOS pain and WOMAC pain scores, respectively, at 12 months. This study highlights the potential benefit of a joint unloading device in the management of young patients with medial knee OA. The trial is still ongoing and another analysis is planned at 24 months.

  15. Effect of medial–lateral malpositioning of the femoral component in total knee arthroplasty on anterior knee pain at greater than 8 years of follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Groes, S.A.W.; Koëter, S.; De Waal Malefijt, M.C.; Verdonschot, Nicolaas Jacobus Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Background The trochlea is often medialized after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) resulting in abnormal patellar tracking, which may lead to anterior knee pain. However, due to the difference in shape of the natural trochlea and the patellar groove of the femoral component, a medialization of the

  16. [Application of pie-crusting the medial collateral ligament release in arthroscopic surgery for posterior horn of 
medial meniscus in knee joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Weihong; Tang, Qi; Liao, Lele; Li, Ding; Yang, Yang; Chen, You

    2017-09-28

    To explore the effectiveness and safety of pie-crusting the medial collateral ligament release (MCL) in treating posterior horn of medial meniscus (PHMM) tear in tight medial tibiofemoral compartment of knee joint.
 Methods: Thirty-two consecutive patients with PHMM tear in tight medial tibiofemoral compartment of knee joint were admitted to our department from January, 2013 to December, 2014. All patients were performed pie-crusting the MCL release at its tibial insertion with 18-gauge intravenous needle. All patients were evaluated by valgus stress test and bilateral valgus stress radiograph at postoperative 1st day, 4th week and 12th week. Visual Analogue Scales (VAS), Lysholm scores, Tegner scores and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scores were recorded at the 1st, 3th, 6th month follow-up, then follow-up every 6 months.
 Results: The mean follow-up was 28 (24-36) months. All cases were negative in valgus stress test. MCL rupture, femoral fracture, articular cartilage lesion and neurovascular injury were not found at the last follow-up. The median medial joint space width of affected side and unaffected side for valgus stress radiographs were 6.8 mm and 4.3 mm (P0.05) at the 12th week, respectively. VAS scores was changed from 4.5±1.5 preoperatively to 1.7±1.0 at the final follow-up (t=16.561, Pjoint.

  17. High tibial closing wedge osteotomy for medial compartment osteoarthrosis of knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuli S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Most patients of symptomatic osteoarthrosis of knee are associated with varus malalignment that is causative or contributory to painful arthrosis. It is rational to correct the malalignment to transfer the functional load to the unaffected or less affected compartment of the knee to relieve symptoms. We report the outcome of a simple technique of high tibial osteotomy in the medial compartment of osteoarthrosis of the knee. Materials and Methods: Between 1996 and 2004 we performed closing wedge osteotomy in 78 knees in 65 patients. The patients selected for osteotomy were symptomatic essentially due to medial compartment osteoarthrosis associated with moderate genu varum. Of the 19 patients who had bilateral symptomatic disease 11 opted for high tibial osteotomy of their second knee 1-3 years after the first operation. Preoperative grading of osteoarthrosis and postoperative function was assessed using Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA rating scale. Results: At a minimum follow-up of 2 years (range 2-9 years 6-10° of valgus correction at the site of osteotomy was maintained, there was significant relief of pain while walking, negotiating stairs, squatting and sitting cross-legged. Walking distance in all patients improved by two to four times their preoperative distance of 200-400 m. No patient lost any preoperative knee function. The mean JOA scoring improved from preoperative 54 (40-65 to 77 (55-85 at final follow-up. Conclusion: Closing wedge high tibial osteotomy performed by our technique can be undertaken in any setup with moderate facilities. Operation related complications are minimal and avoidable. Kirschner wire fixation is least likely to interfere with replacement surgery if it becomes necessary.

  18. Evaluation of medial and lateral meniscus thicknesses in early osteoarthritis of the knee with magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamac, B.; Ozdemir, S.; Colak, T.; Ozbek, A.; Sarisoy, Hasan T.; Akansel, G.

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate early changes occurring in both medial and lateral meniscus thickness from the knees of patients with osteoarthritis (Oa). We conducted this study in the Department of Anatomy and Division of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Klucel University, Klucel, Turkey during the period 2004 to 2005. In this study, we measured the thickness of the medial and lateral meniscus in a group of 36 (50 knees) consecutive patients with chronic knee pain, and clinical findings of early Oa, and 10 (20 knees) control subjects using MRI. The thickness of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus and anterior horn of the lateral meniscus were significantly higher in the Oa patients compared with the control subjects. This study showed that meniscal degeneration in early stage Oa is not evenly distributed in the knee. Thickening of the menisci in some areas may occur due to their own localization and biomechanics. (author)

  19. Six degree-of-freedom knee joint kinematics in obese individuals with knee pain during gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing-Sheng; Tsai, Tsung-Yuan; Felson, David T; Li, Guoan; Lewis, Cara L

    2017-01-01

    Knee joint pain is a common symptom in obese individuals and walking is often prescribed as part of management programs. Past studies in obese individuals have focused on standing alignment and kinematics in the sagittal and coronal planes. Investigation of 6 degree-of-freedom (6DOF) knee joint kinematics during standing and gait is important to thoroughly understand knee function in obese individuals with knee pain. This study aimed to investigate the 6DOF knee joint kinematics in standing and during gait in obese patients using a validated fluoroscopic imaging system. Ten individuals with obesity and knee pain were recruited. While standing, the knee was in 7.4±6.3°of hyperextension, 2.8±3.3° of abduction and 5.6±7.3° of external rotation. The femoral center was located 0.7±3.1mm anterior and 5.1±1.5mm medial to the tibial center. During treadmill gait, the sagittal plane motion, i.e., flexion/extension and anterior-posterior translation, showed a clear pattern. Specifically, obese individuals with knee pain maintained the knee in more flexion and more anterior tibial translation during most of the stance phase of the gait cycle and had a reduced total range of knee flexion when compared to a healthy non-obese group. In conclusion, obese individuals with knee pain used hyperextension knee posture while standing, but maintained the knee in more flexion during gait with reduced overall range of motion in the 6DOF analysis.

  20. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous lavage of calcific bursitis of the medial collateral ligament of the knee: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Castillo-González, Federico; Ramos-Álvarez, Juan José; González-Pérez, José; Jiménez-Herranz, Elena; Rodríguez-Fabián, Guillermo

    2016-10-01

    Calcification of the medial collateral ligament (MCL) of the knee is rare. The literature reports no positive outcomes when conservative treatment has been followed. This paper reports a case of such calcification and its treatment using ultrasound-guided percutaneous lavage (UGPL). A 66-year-old patient presented with medial knee pain. X-ray, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance (MR) examinations revealed calcific bursitis of the MCL, which was treated by UGPL. One month after treatment the patient was asymptomatic. X-ray, ultrasound, and MR examinations confirmed the almost complete disappearance of the calcification; only very tiny fragments remained. Calcific bursitis of the MCL of the knee is very uncommon, but should be taken into account in differential diagnoses for medial knee pain. UGPL is proposed as a treatment for this condition.

  1. Clinical practice guidelines for rest orthosis, knee sleeves, and unloading knee braces in knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudreuil, Johann; Bendaya, Samy; Faucher, Marc; Coudeyre, Emmanuel; Ribinik, Patricia; Revel, Michel; Rannou, François

    2009-12-01

    To develop clinical practice guidelines concerning the use of bracing--rest orthosis, knee sleeves and unloading knee braces--for knee osteoarthritis. The French Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Society (SOFMER) methodology, associating a systematic literature review, collection of everyday clinical practice, and external review by multidisciplinary expert panel, was used. Few high-level studies of bracing for knee osteoarthritis were found. No evidence exists for the effectiveness of rest orthosis. Evidence for knee sleeves suggests that they decrease pain in knee osteoarthritis, and their use is associated with subjective improvement. These actions do not appear to depend on a local thermal effect. The effectiveness of knee sleeves for disability is not demonstrated for knee osteoarthritis. Short- and mid-term follow-up indicates that valgus knee bracing decreases pain and disability in medial knee osteoarthritis, appears to be more effective than knee sleeves, and improves quality of life, knee proprioception, quadriceps strength, and gait symmetry, and decreases compressive loads in the medial femoro-tibial compartment. However, results of response to valgus knee bracing remain inconsistent; discomfort and side effects can result. Thrombophlebitis of the lower limbs has been reported with the braces. Braces, whatever kind, are infrequently prescribed in clinical practice for osteoarthritis of the lower limbs. Modest evidence exists for the effectiveness of bracing--rest orthosis, knee sleeves and unloading knee braces--for knee osteoarthritis, with only low level recommendations for its use. Braces are prescribed infrequently in French clinical practice for osteoarthritis of the knee. Randomized clinical trials concerning bracing in knee osteoarthritis are still necessary.

  2. Association of knee confidence with pain, knee instability, muscle strength, and dynamic varus-valgus joint motion in knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skou, Søren T; Wrigley, Tim V; Metcalf, Ben R; Hinman, Rana S; Bennell, Kim L

    2014-05-01

    To investigate associations between self-reported knee confidence and pain, self-reported knee instability, muscle strength, and dynamic varus-valgus joint motion during walking. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from 100 participants with symptomatic and radiographic medial tibiofemoral compartment osteoarthritis (OA) and varus malalignment recruited for a randomized controlled trial. The extent of knee confidence, assessed using a 5-point Likert scale item from the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, was set as the dependent variable in univariable and multivariable ordinal regression, with pain during walking, self-reported knee instability, quadriceps strength, and dynamic varus-valgus joint motion during walking as independent variables. One percent of the participants were not troubled with lack of knee confidence, 17% were mildly troubled, 50% were moderately troubled, 26% were severely troubled, and 6% were extremely troubled. Significant associations were found between worse knee confidence and higher pain intensity, worse self-reported knee instability, lower quadriceps strength, and greater dynamic varus-valgus joint motion. The multivariable model consisting of the same variables significantly accounted for 24% of the variance in knee confidence (P knee confidence is associated with higher pain, worse self-reported knee instability, lower quadriceps muscle strength, and greater dynamic varus-valgus joint motion during walking. Since previous research has shown that worse knee confidence is predictive of functional decline in knee OA, addressing lack of knee confidence by treating these modifiable impairments could represent a new therapeutic target. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  3. Ipsilateral Medial and Lateral Discoid Meniscus with Medial Meniscus Tear

    OpenAIRE

    Shimozaki, Kengo; Nakase, Junsuke; Ohashi, Yoshinori; Numata, Hitoaki; Oshima, Takeshi; Takata, Yasushi; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Discoid meniscus is a well-documented knee pathology, and there are many cases of medial or lateral discoid meniscus reported in the literature. However, ipsilateral concurrent medial and lateral discoid meniscus is very rare, and only a few cases have been reported. Herein, we report a case of concurrent medial and lateral discoid meniscus. Case Report: A 27-year-old Japanese man complained of pain on medial joint space in his right knee that was diagnosed as a complete medial ...

  4. Obturator hernia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hip and knee pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, Ahmet Korkut; Memiş, Gündüz; Dere, Özcan; Koşan, Ulaş; Nazlı, Okay

    2016-11-01

    Obturator hernia is a rare disease usually occurring in debilitated elderly women. Pain radiating down the medial thigh and knee (Howship-Romberg sign) is a specific sign of the disease. Presently described is a case of obturator hernia in a 73-year-old female patient who presented with severe left hip pain radiating down the medial thigh and knee, nausea, and loss of appetite. Initially, vertebral disc herniation was thought to be cause, but abdomino-pelvic computed tomography scan revealed left strangulated obturator hernia. Diagnosis of obturator hernia can be challenging. Physicians should consider obturator hernia in the differential diagnosis of knee and hip pain, and investigate for Howship-Romberg sign. Early diagnosis of the disease not only decreases morbidity and mortality, but also presents opportunity to treat with minimally invasive methods.

  5. Association of medial meniscal extrusion with medial tibial osteophyte distance detected by T2 mapping MRI in patients with early-stage knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, Shinnosuke; Ishijima, Muneaki; Kaneko, Haruka; Kinoshita, Mayuko; Liu, Lizu; Sadatsuki, Ryo; Futami, Ippei; Yusup, Anwajan; Takamura, Tomohiro; Arita, Hitoshi; Shiozawa, Jun; Aoki, Takako; Takazawa, Yuji; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Aoki, Shigeki; Kurosawa, Hisashi; Okada, Yasunori; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2017-09-12

    Medial meniscal extrusion (MME) is associated with progression of medial knee osteoarthritis (OA), but no or little information is available for relationships between MME and osteophytes, which are found in cartilage and bone parts. Because of the limitation in detectability of the cartilage part of osteophytes by radiography or conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the rate of development and size of osteophytes appear to have been underestimated. Because T2 mapping MRI may enable us to evaluate the cartilage part of osteophytes, we aimed to examine the association between MME and OA-related changes, including osteophytes, by using conventional and T2 mapping MRI. Patients with early-stage knee OA (n = 50) were examined. MRI-detected OA-related changes, in addition to MME, were evaluated according to the Whole-Organ Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score. T2 values of the medial meniscus and osteophytes were measured on T2 mapping images. Osteophytes surgically removed from patients with end-stage knee OA were histologically analyzed and compared with findings derived by radiography and MRI. Medial side osteophytes were detected by T2 mapping MRI in 98% of patients with early-stage knee OA, although the detection rate was 48% by conventional MRI and 40% by radiography. Among the OA-related changes, medial tibial osteophyte distance was most closely associated with MME, as determined by multiple logistic regression analysis, in the patients with early-stage knee OA (β = 0.711, p T2 values of the medial meniscus were directly correlated with MME in patients with early-stage knee OA, who showed ≥ 3 mm of MME (r = 0.58, p = 0.003). The accuracy of osteophyte evaluation by T2 mapping MRI was confirmed by histological analysis of the osteophytes removed from patients with end-stage knee OA. Our study demonstrates that medial tibial osteophyte evaluated by T2 mapping MRI is frequently observed in the patients with early-stage knee OA, showing

  6. Patellar SPECT and planar imaging in orthopedic patients with knee pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehdashti, F.; Collier, B.D.; Johnson, R.P.; Isitman, A.T.; Hellman, R.S.; Carrera, G.F.; Krasnow, A.Z.

    1987-01-01

    Eighty-five painful knees in 56 patients were independently evaluated clinically, radiographically, and scintigraphically. All patients had an established final diagnosis of osteoarthritis or other predisposing conditions. Results of patellar bone scintigraphy were abnormal in 66 of 85 knees; there were ten isolated findings and 12 cases of medial, nine of lateral, and 35 of triple compartment involvement. Four-quadrant patellar analysis identified nine instances of isolated lateal patellar facet syndrome. Single-photon emission CT was of significant value in localizing patellar abnormalities. Radiographic evaluation disclosed osteoarthritis in 27 of 66 scintigraphically abnormal knees. Patellar bone scintigraphy is more valuable than radiography for evaluating adult orthopedic patients with knee pain

  7. Potential factors associated with knee pain in cyclists: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bini RR

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Rodrigo Rico Bini, Alice Flores Bini La Trobe Rural Health School, La Trobe University, Flora Hill Campus, Bendigo, VIC, Australia Abstract: The potential factors associated with overuse injuries and pain in cyclists that are supported by evidence remain unclear. Our study aimed at assessing, using a systematic search of the most updated evidence, the main factors related to overuse knee-related pain and/or injuries in cyclists. The search assessed any potential mechanism related to knee pain or injury that could be used in the clinical practice. Databases were searched (i.e., PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and EBSCO. Studies were included if they presented results from original studies. They had to include, preferably but not limited to, recreational and/or competitive cyclists with or without knee pain. Quality of articles was assessed. Eleven articles were deemed eligible for full text appraisal. Studies involved generally the assessment of biomechanical outcomes associated with knee pain in cyclists. Overall, studies showed that cyclists with knee pain present larger knee adduction and larger ankle dorsiflexion and differences in activation for hamstrings and quadriceps muscles. Unclear results were observed for knee moments and no differences were observed for knee flexion angle, tibiofemoral and patellofemoral forces. It is important to state that varied types of knee pain were mixed in most studies, with 2 focused on anterior-related pain. Cyclists with overuse-related pain or injuries on their knees presented an increased medial projection of their knees and an altered activation of the Vastus Medialis and Vastus Lateralis muscles. However, this limited evidence is based on retrospective studies comparing cyclists with and without pain, which limits the conclusion on how cyclists develop knee pain and what are the main options for treatment of knee pain. Keywords: injury, cycling, overuse, biomechanics

  8. Combined effects of knee brace, laterally wedged insoles and toe-in gait on knee adduction moment and balance in moderate medial knee osteoarthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Saad Jawaid; Khan, Soobia Saad; Usman, Juliana; Mokhtar, Abdul Halim; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan

    2018-03-01

    To test the hypothesis that toe-in gait (TI) will further reduce first peak (Knee Adduction Moment) KAM and decrease balance when combined with a knee brace (KB) and laterally wedged insoles (LWI) in medial knee osteoarthritis (kOA) patients. Twenty patients with bilateral symptomatic medial kOA. 4-point leverage-based KB, full-length LWI with 5° inclination and toe-in gait (TI). First and second peak knee adduction moment (fKAM and sKAM respectively), balance and pain. The fKAM and sKAM were determined from 3-dimensional gait analysis with six randomized conditions: (1) N (without any intervention), (2) KB, (3) KB + TI, (4) LWI, (5) LWI + TI, (6) KB + LWI + TI. Balance was assessed by Biodex Balance System using three stability settings, (i) Static (ii) Moderate dynamic setting for fall risk (FR12) and (iii) High dynamic setting for fall risk (FR8). The reduction in fKAM and sKAM was greatest (19.75% and 12%) when TI was combined with KB and LWI respectively. No change in balance was observed when TI combined with KB, and LWI and when used concurrently with both the orthosis at static and FR12 conditions. Significant balance reduction was found at FR8 for KB + TI (22.22%), and KB + LWI + TI (35.71%). Pain increased significantly for KB (258%), KB + TI (305%), LWI + TI (210%) and KB + LWI + TI (316%). LWI showed no effect on pain. There is a synergistic effect of TI when combined with KB and LWI concurrently in sKAM reduction. However, the concurrent use of TI, KB and LWI decreases balance and pain as assessed on a highly dynamic platform. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The association between knee joint biomechanics and neuromuscular control and moderate knee osteoarthritis radiographic and pain severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astephen Wilson, J L; Deluzio, K J; Dunbar, M J; Caldwell, G E; Hubley-Kozey, C L

    2011-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the association between biomechanical and neuromuscular factors of clinically diagnosed mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis (OA) with radiographic severity and pain severity separately. Three-dimensional gait analysis and electromyography were performed on a group of 40 participants with clinically diagnosed mild to moderate medial knee OA. Associations between radiographic severity, defined using a visual analog radiographic score, and pain severity, defined with the pain subscale of the WOMAC osteoarthritis index, with knee joint kinematics and kinetics, electromyography patterns of periarticular knee muscles, BMI and gait speed were determined with correlation analyses. Multiple linear regression analyses of radiographic and pain severity were also explored. Statistically significant correlations between radiographic severity and the overall magnitude of the knee adduction moment during stance (r²=21.4%, P=0.003) and the magnitude of the knee flexion angle during the gait cycle (r²=11.4%, P=0.03) were found. Significant correlations between pain and gait speed (r²=28.2%, Pjoint biomechanical variables are associated with structural knee OA severity measured from radiographs in clinically diagnosed mild to moderate levels of disease, but that pain severity is only reflected in gait speed and neuromuscular activation patterns. A combination of the knee adduction moment and BMI better explained structural knee OA severity than any individual factor alone. Copyright © 2010 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Lateral trunk lean and medializing the knee as gait strategies for knee osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerbrands, T. A.; Pisters, M. F.; Theeven, P. J R; Verschueren, S.; Vanwanseele, B.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To determine (1) if Medial Thrust or Trunk Lean reduces the knee adduction moment (EKAM) the most during gait in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis, (2) if the best overall strategy is the most effective for each patient and (3) if these strategies affect ankle and hip kinetics.

  11. Typing of MRI in medial meniscus degeneration in relation to radiological grade in medial compartmental osteoarthritis of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, Nobuhito; Koshino, Tomihisa; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sakai, Naotaka; Takagi, Toshitaka; Takeuchi, Ryohei [Yokohama City Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1998-10-01

    The advancement of degeneration of 50 medial menisci in patients with medial compartmental osteoarthritic knees (OA) were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The average age of the patients was 66.6 years (range, 39 to 86). According to a radiographical grading system, 6 knees were classified as Grade 1, 24 as Grade 2, 16 as Grade 3, and 4 as Grade 4. The extent and the location of a high intensity region in MRI were observed in 3 parts of the meniscus, namely, the anterior, middle and posterior part. In Grade 1, no high intensity region was observed in 3 knees, and a high intensity region was observed only in the posterior part in 2 knees. A high intensity region was observed from the medial to the posterior part in 13 knees, and only in the posterior part in 10 knees of Grade 2; from the medial to the posterior part in 12 knees, and only in the posterior part in 3 knees of Grade 3, and from the anterior to the posterior part in 2 knees of Grade 4. The shape of the high intensity region in the medial meniscus was classified into 5 types, as follows: Type 1, there was no high intensity region; Type 2, the high intensity region was observed to be restricted within the meniscus; Type 3, the high intensity region resembled a horizontal tear; Type 4, the high intensity region was observed as all of the medial joint space without a marginal area; Type 5, the high intensity region was observed as all of the medial joint space. In Grade 1, 3 knees were classified as Type 1, and 2 knees as Type 2; in Grade 2, 7 knees as Type 2, and 13 knees as Type 3, and 4 knees into Type 4; in Grade 3, 6 knees as Type 3, and 7 knees as Type 4; and in Grade 4, 2 knees as Type 4, and 2 knees as Type 5. These findings might suggest that the degeneration of medial meniscus in the medial type of OA was accelerated by mechanical stress due to varus deformity. (author)

  12. Typing of MRI in medial meniscus degeneration in relation to radiological grade in medial compartmental osteoarthritis of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Nobuhito; Koshino, Tomihisa; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sakai, Naotaka; Takagi, Toshitaka; Takeuchi, Ryohei

    1998-01-01

    The advancement of degeneration of 50 medial menisci in patients with medial compartmental osteoarthritic knees (OA) were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The average age of the patients was 66.6 years (range, 39 to 86). According to a radiographical grading system, 6 knees were classified as Grade 1, 24 as Grade 2, 16 as Grade 3, and 4 as Grade 4. The extent and the location of a high intensity region in MRI were observed in 3 parts of the meniscus, namely, the anterior, middle and posterior part. In Grade 1, no high intensity region was observed in 3 knees, and a high intensity region was observed only in the posterior part in 2 knees. A high intensity region was observed from the medial to the posterior part in 13 knees, and only in the posterior part in 10 knees of Grade 2; from the medial to the posterior part in 12 knees, and only in the posterior part in 3 knees of Grade 3, and from the anterior to the posterior part in 2 knees of Grade 4. The shape of the high intensity region in the medial meniscus was classified into 5 types, as follows: Type 1, there was no high intensity region; Type 2, the high intensity region was observed to be restricted within the meniscus; Type 3, the high intensity region resembled a horizontal tear; Type 4, the high intensity region was observed as all of the medial joint space without a marginal area; Type 5, the high intensity region was observed as all of the medial joint space. In Grade 1, 3 knees were classified as Type 1, and 2 knees as Type 2; in Grade 2, 7 knees as Type 2, and 13 knees as Type 3, and 4 knees into Type 4; in Grade 3, 6 knees as Type 3, and 7 knees as Type 4; and in Grade 4, 2 knees as Type 4, and 2 knees as Type 5. These findings might suggest that the degeneration of medial meniscus in the medial type of OA was accelerated by mechanical stress due to varus deformity. (author)

  13. Knee pain (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The location of knee pain can help identify the problem. Pain on the front of the knee can be due to bursitis, arthritis, or ... synovial fluid) that forms behind the knee. Overall knee pain can be due to bursitis, arthritis, tears in ...

  14. Low implant migration of the SIGMA® medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koppens, Daan; Stilling, Maiken; Munk, Stig

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate implant migration of the fixed-bearing Sigma® medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA). UKA is a regularly used treatment for patients with medial osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. UKA has a higher revision rate than total knee arthroplasty. Implant...

  15. Use of the KineSpring system in the treatment of medial knee osteoarthritis: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madonna, Vincenzo; Condello, Vincenzo; Piovan, Gianluca; Screpis, Daniele; Zorzi, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    the purpose of this study was to analyze our preliminary results obtained with the KineSpring system in patients suffering from medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (OA). between September 2012 and May 2014, 53 patients underwent treatment with the KineSpring system. Patient self-assessment was performed pre-operatively and at 3, 6 and 12 months postoperatively, and included the KOOS, Tegner activity score, Lysholm functional knee score, VAS knee pain score, and IKDC score. Device- and procedure-related adverse events were recorded. mean KOOS subscales, except for the Sport/Recreation subscale at six months, improved over time. Mean WOMAC Pain and Function domains, Lysholm score, IKDC score and VAS knee pain score improved over the follow-up period and were significantly improved at 3, 6 and 12 months postoperatively compared to baseline. Mean Tegner score improved slightly over time. In 5 of the 53 (9.4%) patients re-operation was necessary. In 3 patients the device was removed due to infection (one case) or persistent knee pain (two cases). Surgical arthrolysis was performed in two patients. in our preliminary experience, the KineSpring system gave good short-term clinical results. Level IV, therapeutic case series.

  16. The Benefits of an In-Office Arthroscopy in the Diagnosis of Unresolved Knee Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garrett L. Chapman

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a patient who developed persistent knee pain with mechanical symptoms after an uncomplicated patellofemoral arthroplasty. The etiology of his knee pain remained inconclusive following magnetic resonance imaging due to metallic artifact image distortion. With the use of an in-office needle arthroscopy, an immediate and definitive diagnosis was obtained, preventing an unnecessary surgery for a diagnostic arthroscopy. We discovered a lateral meniscus tear, an anterior cruciate ligament tear, and a medial femoral condyle chondral defect for which the patient underwent arthroscopic partial meniscectomy, ligament reconstruction, and osteochondral allograft transplantation, with resolution of his knee pain.

  17. Biomechanical analysis of knee and trunk in badminton players with and without knee pain during backhand diagonal lunges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Cheng-Feng; Hua, Shiang-Hua; Huang, Ming-Tung; Lee, Hsing-Hsan; Liao, Jen-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    The contribution of core neuromuscular control to the dynamic stability of badminton players with and without knee pain during backhand lunges has not been investigated. Accordingly, this study compared the kinematics of the lower extremity, the trunk movement, the muscle activation and the balance performance of knee-injured and knee-uninjured badminton players when performing backhand stroke diagonal lunges. Seventeen participants with chronic knee pain (injured group) and 17 healthy participants (control group) randomly performed two diagonal backhand lunges in the forward and backward directions, respectively. This study showed that the injured group had lower frontal and horizontal motions of the knee joint, a smaller hip-shoulder separation angle and a reduced trunk tilt angle. In addition, the injured group exhibited a greater left paraspinal muscle activity, while the control group demonstrated a greater activation of the vastus lateralis, vastus medialis and medial gastrocnemius muscle groups. Finally, the injured group showed a smaller distance between centre of mass (COM) and centre of pressure, and a lower peak COM velocity when performing the backhand backward lunge tasks. In conclusion, the injured group used reduced knee and trunk motions to complete the backhand lunge tasks. Furthermore, the paraspinal muscles contributed to the lunge performance of the individuals with knee pain, whereas the knee extensors and ankle plantar flexor played a greater role for those without knee pain.

  18. Posterior-anterior weight-bearing radiograph in 15 knee flexion in medial osteoarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, Norio; Takahashi, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Ichikawa, Norikazu

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the degree of knee flexion at which: (1) degenerative joint space narrowing is best seen, (2) the tibial plateau is best visualized and (3) the tibiofemoral angle is most correct, in order to assess the degree of flexion in the anteroposterior radiographic view that is most useful for assessing medial compartment osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee.Design and patients. We compared the conventional extended view of the knee and views at 15 , 30 , and 45 of flexion with respect to joint space narrowing, alignment of the medial tibial plateau (MTP), and tibiofemoral angles in 113 knees of 95 patients with medial osteoarthritis of the knee (22 men, 73 women; mean age 67 years).Results. At the midpoint and the narrowest point of the medial compartment, joint space narrowing values at 15 , 30 , and 45 of flexion of the knee were smaller than that of the conventional extended view. Superimposition of the margins of the tibial plateau was satisfactory in 12% of patients in the conventional extended view, in 36% at 15 of flexion, in 20% at 30 of flexion, and in 19% at 45 of flexion of the knee. When the knee was at 15 of flexion there was a smaller difference in the tibiofemoral angle, in comparison with the knee extended, than was the case at 30 and 45 of flexion in patients with medial OA.Conclusion. A posteroanterior view with 15 of flexion of the knee was able to detect joint space narrowing accurately, to achieve good alignment of the MTP in the medial compartment, and to reduce the difference in tibiofemoral angle compared with a view of the knee in conventional extension, and may be an alternative view in cases of medial OA of the knee. (orig.)

  19. Three-dimensional dynamic analysis of knee joint during gait in medial knee osteoarthritis using loading axis of knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Katsutoshi; Omori, Go; Koga, Yoshio; Kobayashi, Koichi; Sakamoto, Makoto; Tanabe, Yuji; Tanaka, Masaei; Arakawa, Masaaki

    2015-07-01

    We recently developed a new method for three-dimensional evaluation of mechanical factors affecting knee joint in order to help identify factors that contribute to the progression of knee osteoarthritis (KOA). This study aimed to verify the clinical validity of our method by evaluating knee joint dynamics during gait. Subjects were 41 individuals (14 normal knees; 8 mild KOAs; 19 severe KOAs). The positions of skin markers attached to the body were captured during gait, and bi-planar X-ray images of the lower extremities were obtained in standing position. The positional relationship between the markers and femorotibial bones was determined from the X-ray images. Combining this relationship with gait capture allowed for the estimation of relative movement between femorotibial bones. We also calculated the point of intersection of loading axis of knee on the tibial proximal surface (LAK point) to analyze knee joint dynamics. Knee flexion range in subjects with severe KOA during gait was significantly smaller than that in those with normal knees (p=0.011), and knee adduction in those with severe KOA was significantly larger than in those with mild KOA (p<0.000). LAK point was locally loaded on the medial compartment of the tibial surface as KOA progressed, with LAK point of subjects with severe KOA rapidly shifting medially during loading response. Local loading and medial shear force were applied to the tibial surface during stance phase as medial KOA progressed. Our findings suggest that our method is useful for the quantitative evaluation of mechanical factors that affect KOA progression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Clinical application of skeletal scintigraphy and quantitative computed tomography (QCT) to osteoarthritis of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Muneshige

    1989-01-01

    Skeletal scintigraphy and QCT were performed to determine changes of subchondral bone tissues in osteoarthritis of the knee and findings were compared with plain X-ray findings, knee pain and femoro-tibial angle. Results on blood pool study were especially related to pain. Results in delayed study using single photon emission computed tomography revealed hign uptake on the medial side of the femur and tibia parallel to plain X-ray and pain. The QCT value was slightly decreased as osteoarthritic changes progressed without a significant change. In addition, delayed study in cases with previous surgical intervention by high tibial osteotomy revealed a lower uptake on the medial side of the femur and tibia. When skeletal scintigraphy accurately reflects blood flow through the subchondral bone tissues and is closely related to morbidity and pain, this modality is valuable in analysis of signs and symptoms as well as postoperative outcome. (author)

  1. Self-reported knee joint instability is related to passive mechanical stiffness in medial knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creaby, Mark W; Wrigley, Tim V; Lim, Boon-Whatt; Hinman, Rana S; Bryant, Adam L; Bennell, Kim L

    2013-11-20

    Self-reported knee joint instability compromises function in individuals with medial knee osteoarthritis and may be related to impaired joint mechanics. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between self-reported instability and the passive varus-valgus mechanical behaviour of the medial osteoarthritis knee. Passive varus-valgus angular laxity and stiffness were assessed using a modified isokinetic dynamometer in 73 participants with medial tibiofemoral osteoarthritis. All participants self-reported the absence or presence of knee instability symptoms and the degree to which instability affected daily activity on a 6-point likert scale. Forward linear regression modelling identified a significant inverse relationship between passive mid-range knee stiffness and symptoms of knee instability (r = 0.27; P 0.05). Conceivably, a stiffer passive system may contribute toward greater joint stability during functional activities. Importantly however, net joint stiffness is influenced by both active and passive stiffness, and thus the active neuromuscular system may compensate for reduced passive stiffness in order to maintain joint stability. Future work is merited to examine the role of active stiffness in symptomatic joint stability.

  2. Anserina Bursitis—A Treatable Cause of Knee Pain in Patients with Degenerative Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookler, Morton I.; Mongan, Edward S.

    1973-01-01

    The anserina bursa is located on the medial surface of the tibia deep to the tendons of the sartorius, gracilis, and semimembranosus muscles and superficial to the insertion of the tibial collateral ligament. Knee pain, a palpable swelling of the bursa, and tenderness over the medial anterior aspect of the tibia just below the knee are the hallmarks of anserina bursitis. In a three-year period, 24 patients with anserina bursitis were seen in a rheumatology clinic. All but one were women, 18 were obese, and only four were under 50 years old. Knee x-ray studies showed degenerative arthritis in 20 of the 24 patients. In ten, varus knee deformities were present, while three had valgus deformities. Ultrasound or local steroid injections gave dramatic relief in all but one patient. PMID:4731586

  3. The relationship between chondromalacia patella, medial meniscal tear and medial periarticular bursitis in patients with osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Resorlu Mustafa; Doner Davut; Karatag Ozan; Toprak Canan Akgun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background This study investigated the presence of bursitis in the medial compartment of the knee (pes anserine, semimembranosus-tibial collateral ligament, and medial collateral ligament bursa) in osteoarthritis, chondromalacia patella and medial meniscal tears. Patients and methods Radiological findings of 100 patients undergoing magnetic resonance imaging with a preliminary diagnosis of knee pain were retrospectively evaluated by two radiologists. The first radiologist assessed al...

  4. Reduced knee joint loading with lateral and medial wedge insoles for management of knee osteoarthritis: a protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewinson, Ryan T; Collins, Kelsey H; Vallerand, Isabelle A; Wiley, J Preston; Woodhouse, Linda J; Reimer, Raylene A; Worobets, Jay T; Herzog, Walter; Stefanyshyn, Darren J

    2014-12-03

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) progression has been linked to increased peak external knee adduction moments (KAMs). Although some trials have attempted to reduce pain and improve function in OA by reducing KAMs with a wedged footwear insole intervention, KAM reduction has not been specifically controlled for in trial designs, potentially explaining the mixed results seen in the literature. Therefore, the primary purpose of this trial is to identify the effects of reduced KAMs on knee OA pain and function. Forty-six patients with radiographically confirmed diagnosis medial knee OA will be recruited for this 3 month randomized controlled trial. Recruitment will be from Alberta and surrounding areas. Eligibility criteria include being between the ages of 40 and 85 years, have knee OA primarily localized to the medial tibiofemoral compartment, based on the American College of Rheumatology diagnostic criteria and be classified as having a Kellgren-Lawrence grade of 1 to 3. Patients will visit the laboratory at baseline for testing that includes dual x-ray absorptiometry, biomechanical testing, and surveys (KOOS, PASE activity scale, UCLA activity scale, comfort visual analog scale). At baseline, patients will be randomized to either a wedged insole group to reduce KAMs, or a waitlist control group where no intervention is provided. The survey tests will be repeated at 3 months, and response to wedged insoles over 3 months will be evaluated. This study represents the first step in systematically evaluating the effects of reduced KAMs on knee OA management by using a patient-specific wedged insole prescription procedure rather than providing the same insole to all patients. The results of this trial will provide indications as to whether reduced KAMs are an effective strategy for knee OA management, and whether a personalized approach to footwear insole prescription is warranted. NCT02067208.

  5. Prevalent knee pain and sport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hahn, Thomas; Foldspang, Anders

    1998-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of knee pain in active athletes and to investigate potential associations to type, amount and duration of sports participation. MEASUREMENTS: 339 athletes gave information about occupation, sports activity and different features of knee pain, based...... on a self-filled questionnaire. MAIN RESULTS: The prevalence of knee pain within the preceding 12 months, constant or recurrent knee pain, absence from sport and absence from work due to knee pain, was 54%, 34%, 19% and 4%, respectively. Knee pain was positively associated with years of jogging...... and with weekly hours of participation in competitive gymnastics but negatively with weekly hours of tennis. Constant or recurrent knee pain was positively associated with years of swimming. Absence from sport due to knee pain was positively associated with weekly hours of soccer participation. CONCLUSIONS: Knee...

  6. Multiple Nonspecific Sites of Joint Pain Outside the Knees Develop in Persons With Knee Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felson, David T; Niu, Jingbo; Quinn, Emily K; Neogi, Tuhina; Lewis, Cara L; Lewis, Cora E; Frey Law, Laura; McCulloch, Chuck; Nevitt, Michael; LaValley, Michael

    2017-02-01

    Many persons with knee pain have joint pain outside the knee, but despite the impact and high frequency of this pain, its distribution and causes have not been studied. We undertook this study to test the hypothesis of those studying gait abnormalities who have suggested that knee pain causes pain in adjacent joints but that pain adaptation strategies are highly individualized. We studied persons ages 50-79 years with or at high risk of knee osteoarthritis who were recruited from 2 community-based cohorts, the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study and the Osteoarthritis Initiative, and we followed them up for 5-7 years. We excluded those with knee pain at baseline and compared those who had developed knee pain at the first follow-up examination (the index visit) with those who had not. We examined pain on most days at joint regions outside the knee in examinations after the index visit. Logistic regression analyses examined the risk of joint-specific pain adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, and symptoms of depression, and we performed sensitivity analyses excluding those with widespread pain. In the combined cohorts, 693 persons had knee pain at the index visit and 2,793 did not. A total of 79.6% of those with bilateral knee pain and 63.8% of those with unilateral knee pain had pain during follow-up in a joint region outside the knee, compared with 49.9% of those without knee pain. There was an increased risk of pain at most extremity joint sites, without a predilection for specific sites. Results were unchanged when those with widespread pain were excluded. Persons with chronic knee pain are at increased risk of pain in multiple joints in no specific pattern. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  7. Dor aguda no joelho do paciente idoso Acute knee pain in elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Luís Camanho

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available A dor aguda no joelho de pacientes idosos é freqüente, sendo caracterizada por seu aparecimento súbito, sem causa aparente, com exame radiográfico dentro dos padrões da normalidade, na maioria dos casos. A etiologia da dor aguda no joelho é decorrente de insuficiência das estruturas, e seu quadro clínico difere completamente daquele determinado pela osteoartrose, sendo sempre unilateral e ocorre na grande maioria em pacientes do sexo feminino, após a quinta década de vida, e na região medial do joelho (local de maior carga. Com o propósito de analisar as possíveis etiologias para a dor aguda do joelho de pacientes acima de 60 anos de idade, suas características e tratamento, os autores discutem as etiologias relacionadas à dor aguda: lesão meniscal, fratura por fadiga e osteonecrose idiopática.Acute knee pain in elderly patients is not uncommon, and is characterized by a sudden onset, no apparent cause, and by normal radiographic findings in most cases. The etiology of acute knee pain is the result of insufficient structures, and clinical symptoms are totally different from the symptoms seen in osteoarthrosis. This acute pain in the knee is always unilateral and in the medial region of the knee joint (site with the heaviest load, predominantly in females after the fifth decade of live. In order to consider the possible etiologies for acute knee joint pain in patients older than 60 years, its characteristics and treatment, the authors discuss etiologies related to acute pain: lesion of the meniscus, stress fracture, and idiopathic osteonecrosis.

  8. EVALUATION OF FUNCTIONAL RESULTS OF MEDIAL OPENING WEDGE HIGH TIBIAL OSTEOTOMY FOR UNICOMPARTMENTAL OSTEOARTHRITIS VARUS KNEE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam Sundar Bakki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Osteoarthritis commonly affects the medial compartment of knee giving rise to varus deformity in majority of cases. Significant varus deformity further aggravates the pathology due to medialisation of the weight bearing line osteotomy of the proximal tibia realigns this weight bearing axis, thereby relieving pressure on the damaged medial compartment. OWHTO is a promising option in this scenario because it is associated with high accuracy in correcting the deformity and less number of complications when compared to lateral closing wedge HTO or UKA. In this study, we evaluate the functional outcome of HTO in patients with unicompartmental osteoarthritis. MATERIALS AND METHODS This is a prospective study of patients who attended the orthopaedic outpatient clinic in Government Hospital, Kakinada, between August 2013 to August 2015. The patients were evaluated by clinical examination and weight bearing radiographs. The patients who were found to have unicompartmental osteoarthritis with knee pain not relieved by conservative management and who satisfy the inclusion criteria were selected. RESULTS Excellent results can be achieved by appropriate selection criteria and planning with long limb weight bearing radiographs. There is an excellent relief of pain, which can be achieved within first few months postoperatively, which is assessed by VAS score. The KSS- knee score is excellent in 35%, good in 40%, fair in 20% and poor in 5%. The KSS- function score is excellent in 30%, good in 45%, fair in 20% and poor in 5%. There is significant improvement in the range of movement of the knee joint postoperatively. CONCLUSION In this study, we conclude that medial OWHTO is the preferred modality for unicompartmental OA in those aged <60 years and in developing nations like India where squatting is an important function, it has major role as it can restore near normal knee function without disturbing anatomy.

  9. Reliability and responsiveness of algometry for measuring pressure pain threshold in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutlu, Ebru Kaya; Ozdincler, Arzu Razak

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to establish the intrarater reliability and responsiveness of a clinically available algometer in patients with knee osteoarthritis as well as to determine the minimum-detectable-change and standard error of measurement of testing to facilitate clinical interpretation of temporal changes. [Subjects] Seventy-three patients with knee osteoarthritis were included. [Methods] Pressure pain threshold measured by algometry was evaluated 3 times at 2-min intervals over 2 clinically relevant sites-mediolateral to the medial femoral tubercle (distal) and lateral to the medial malleolus (local)-on the same day. Intrarater reliability was estimated by intraclass correlation coefficients. The minimum-detectable-change and standard error of measurement were calculated. As a measure of responsiveness, the effect size was calculated for the results at baseline and after treatment. [Results] The intrarater reliability was almost perfect (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.93-0.97). The standard error of measurement and minimum-detectable-change were 0.70-0.66 and 1.62-1.53, respectively. The pressure pain threshold over the distal site was inadequately responsive in knee osteoarthritis, but the local site was responsive. The effect size was 0.70. [Conclusion] Algometry is reliable and responsive to assess measures of pressure pain threshold for evaluating pain patients with knee osteoarthritis.

  10. Medial tibial “spackling” to lessen chronic medial tibial soft tissue irritation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ryan Martin, MD

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe a unique, utilitarian reconstructive treatment option known as tibial “spackling” for chronic, localized medial joint line pain corresponding with progressive radiographic peripheral medial tibial bone loss beneath a well-fixed revision total knee arthroplasty tibial baseplate. It is believed that this localized pain is due to chronic irritation of the medial capsule and collateral ligament from the prominent medial edge of the tibial component. In the setting of failed nonoperative treatment, our experience with utilizing bone cement to reconstruct the medial tibial bone defect and create a smooth medial tibial surface has been successful in eliminating chronic medial soft tissue irritation.

  11. Radial tear of posterior horn of the medial meniscus and osteonecrosis of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motoyama, Tatsuo; Ihara, Hidetoshi; Kawashima, Mahito

    2003-01-01

    We studied the relation between a radial tear of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus and osteonecrosis of the knee. Thirty-eight knees of 37 patients were diagnosed as medial meniscus tear and received arthroscopic knee surgery. We divided them into two groups: knees having radial tear of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus (posterior horn group) and knees containing radial tear except for posterior horn, horizontal tear, degenerative tear, and flap tear of the medial meniscus (non-posterior horn group). The posterior horn group consisted of 14 knees (average age: 65.1 years old) and the non-posterior horn group consisted of 24 knees (average age: 59.6 years old). All cases underwent MRI before arthroscopy. MRI findings were classified into three types (typical osteonecrosis, small osteonecrosis, and non-osteonecrosis). In the posterior horn group, typical osteonecrosis were five knees and small osteonecrosis were five knees, while in the non-posterior horn group only three knees were small osteonecrosis. These findings suggest the relevance between radial tear of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus and osteonecrosis of the knee (Mann-Whitney test p<0.01). The etiology of spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee joint is unknown, however one etiology could be the radial tear of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. (author)

  12. Percutaneous radiofrequency treatment for refractory anteromedial pain of osteoarthritic knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeuchi, Masahiko; Ushida, Takahiro; Izumi, Masashi; Tani, Toshikazu

    2011-04-01

    Although severe knee osteoarthritis with refractory pain is commonly treated surgically, this is often not an option for patients with poor health status or unwillingness to undergo major surgery. We examined the efficacy of radiofrequency application to sensory nerves as a novel alternative treatment for refractory knee pain. This study was an open-label, nonrandomized, and controlled study. Patients complaining of refractory anteromedial knee pain associated with radiological osteoarthritis (moderate or severe) were included. They were assigned to one of two groups: those receiving radiofrequency thermocoagulation (N = 18) or those receiving nerve block (N = 17), depending on the time period that they were referred to the clinic. Radiofrequency current or local anesthetics was applied to the medial retinacular nerve and the infrapatellar branch of the saphenous nerve. Western Ontario McMaster Universities osteoarthritis index score, pain visual analog scale (VAS), and patient's global assessment were assessed with a minimum follow-up of 6 months.   Radiofrequency treatment significantly decreased knee pain as measured by VAS for 12 weeks compared with the control group. In terms of responders, more patients in the RF group responded to the treatment than in the control group. The differences were statistically significant at 4 weeks, 8 weeks, and 12 weeks in pain VAS. Eight patients (44%) treated with radiofrequency rated excellent or good but only three (18%) in the control group rated good, although the difference was not statistically significant. Some patients were able to benefit substantially from radiofrequency treatment. Even if its effective period is limited, radiofrequency application is a promising treatment to alleviate refractory anteromedial knee pain with osteoarthritis. Further experience and technical improvements are needed to establish its role in the management of knee osteoarthritis. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. The effects of neuromuscular exercise on medial knee joint load post-arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy: 'SCOPEX', a randomised control trial protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Michelle; Hinman, Rana S; Wrigley, Tim V

    2012-01-01

    Meniscectomy is a risk factor for knee osteoarthritis, with increased medial joint loading a likely contributor to the development and progression of knee osteoarthritis in this group. Therefore, post-surgical rehabilitation or interventions that reduce medial knee joint loading have the potential...... to reduce the risk of developing or progressing osteoarthritis. The primary purpose of this randomised, assessor-blind controlled trial is to determine the effects of a home-based, physiotherapist-supervised neuromuscular exercise program on medial knee joint load during functional tasks in people who have...

  14. Correlation between hip function and knee kinematics evaluated by three-dimensional motion analysis during lateral and medial side-hopping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Hiromitsu; Takiguchi, Kohei; Shibata, Yohei; Okubo, Satoshi; Yoshiya, Shinichi; Kuroda, Ryosuke

    2016-09-01

    [Purpose] Kinematic and kinetic characteristics of the limb during side-hopping and hip/knee interaction during this motion have not been clarified. The purposes of this study were to examine the biomechanical parameters of the knee during side hop and analyze its relationship with clinical measurements of hip function. [Subjects and Methods] Eleven male college rugby players were included. A three-dimensional motion analysis system was used to assess motion characteristics of the knee during side hop. In addition, hip range of motion and muscle strength were evaluated. Subsequently, the relationship between knee motion and the clinical parameters of the hip was analyzed. [Results] In the lateral touchdown phase, the knee was positioned in an abducted and externally rotated position, and increasing abduction moment was applied to the knee. An analysis of the interaction between knee motion and hip function showed that range of motion for hip internal rotation was significantly correlated with external rotation angle and external rotation/abduction moments of the knee during the lateral touchdown phase. [Conclusion] Range of motion for hip internal rotation should be taken into consideration for identifying the biomechanical characteristics in the side hop test results.

  15. Feasibility study of simultaneous physical examination and dynamic MR imaging of medial collateral ligament knee injuries in a 1.5-T large-bore magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studler, Ueli; White, Lawrence M.; Deslandes, Melanie; Sussman, Marshall S.; Geddes, Christopher; Theodoropoulos, John

    2011-01-01

    To determine the feasibility of evaluating medial knee joint laxity with dynamic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and simultaneous physical joint examination in a large-bore 1.5-T system. The study included 10 patients (5 women, 5 men; mean age 35 years) with clinically diagnosed and categorized acute injuries of the medial collateral ligament (MCL). Intermittent valgus stress was applied separately to both the affected and the contralateral knee joint during dynamic MR imaging with a two-dimensional fast low-angle shot sequence. The width of the medial joint space and the opening angle between the femoral condyles and the tibial plateau were measured. Results obtained from dynamic MR imaging of the affected knee were compared with morphological MCL changes on static MRI, to kinematics of the contralateral side and to the clinical grading of MCL injuries. On clinical examination, all patients had grade 2 MCL injuries except one, who had a grade 1 lesion. Using morphological MRI criteria, 9 grade II and 1 grade III injuries were seen. Mean medial joint space width and opening angles of all affected knees were 2.8 mm and 2.7 respectively, compared with 1.7 mm and 2.1 on the contralateral side. The Wilcoxon signed rank test indicated that the differences in width (P = 0.005) and opening angle (P = 0.037) between the affected and contralateral knees were significant. Dynamic MR imaging and simultaneous physical joint examination is feasible. Our results suggest that this technique might enable the imaging documentation of medial ligamentous knee instability. (orig.)

  16. Surgical Stabilization of the Medial Capsulo-Ligamentous Envelope in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon Green, DO

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study will evaluate an alternative method in which a four prong bone staple was used to repair the medial collateral ligament following over-release or avulsion injuries in (#6 cases during a total knee arthroplasty. The use of a four prong bone staple to repair medial collateral ligament injuries status post total knee replacement will provide satisfactory results with respect to post-operative knee stability and range of motion. Our retrospective review revealed that all six patients improved with regards to range of motion following the total knee arthroplasty. We feel that repair of the medial collateral ligament with a four-prong bone staple is a viable option after an over-release or avulsion injury sustained during a total knee arthroplasty.

  17. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization as a Treatment for Medial Knee Pain in Patients with Mild to Moderate Osteoarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuno, Yuji, E-mail: how-lowlow@yahoo.co.jp [Edogawa Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery (Japan); Korchi, Amine Mohamed, E-mail: amine.korchi@gmail.com [Geneva University Hospitals, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Switzerland); Shinjo, Takuma, E-mail: shin.takuma@a7.keio.jp [Keio University, Institute for Integrated Sports Medicine, School of Medicine (Japan); Kato, Shojiro, E-mail: shojiro7@yahoo.co.jp [Edogawa Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery (Japan)

    2015-04-15

    PurposeOsteoarthritis is a common cause of pain and disability. Mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis that is resistant to nonsurgical options and not severe enough to warrant joint replacement represents a challenge in its management. On the basis of the hypothesis that neovessels and accompanying nerves are possible sources of pain, previous work demonstrated that transcatheter arterial embolization for chronic painful conditions resulted in excellent pain relief. We hypothesized that transcatheter arterial embolization can relieve pain associated with knee osteoarthritis.MethodsTranscatheter arterial embolization for mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis using imipenem/cilastatin sodium or 75 μm calibrated Embozene microspheres as an embolic agent has been performed in 11 and three patients, respectively. We assessed adverse events and changes in Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scores.ResultsAbnormal neovessels were identified within soft tissue surrounding knee joint in all cases by arteriography. No major adverse events were related to the procedures. Transcatheter arterial embolization rapidly improved WOMAC pain scores from 12.2 ± 1.9 to 3.3 ± 2.1 at 1 month after the procedure, with further improvement at 4 months (1.7 ± 2.2) and WOMAC total scores from 47.3 ± 5.8 to 11.6 ± 5.4 at 1 month, and to 6.3 ± 6.0 at 4 months. These improvements were maintained in most cases at the final follow-up examination at a mean of 12 ± 5 months (range 4–19 months).ConclusionTranscatheter arterial embolization for mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis was feasible, rapidly relieved resistant pain, and restored knee function.

  18. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization as a Treatment for Medial Knee Pain in Patients with Mild to Moderate Osteoarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuno, Yuji; Korchi, Amine Mohamed; Shinjo, Takuma; Kato, Shojiro

    2015-01-01

    PurposeOsteoarthritis is a common cause of pain and disability. Mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis that is resistant to nonsurgical options and not severe enough to warrant joint replacement represents a challenge in its management. On the basis of the hypothesis that neovessels and accompanying nerves are possible sources of pain, previous work demonstrated that transcatheter arterial embolization for chronic painful conditions resulted in excellent pain relief. We hypothesized that transcatheter arterial embolization can relieve pain associated with knee osteoarthritis.MethodsTranscatheter arterial embolization for mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis using imipenem/cilastatin sodium or 75 μm calibrated Embozene microspheres as an embolic agent has been performed in 11 and three patients, respectively. We assessed adverse events and changes in Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scores.ResultsAbnormal neovessels were identified within soft tissue surrounding knee joint in all cases by arteriography. No major adverse events were related to the procedures. Transcatheter arterial embolization rapidly improved WOMAC pain scores from 12.2 ± 1.9 to 3.3 ± 2.1 at 1 month after the procedure, with further improvement at 4 months (1.7 ± 2.2) and WOMAC total scores from 47.3 ± 5.8 to 11.6 ± 5.4 at 1 month, and to 6.3 ± 6.0 at 4 months. These improvements were maintained in most cases at the final follow-up examination at a mean of 12 ± 5 months (range 4–19 months).ConclusionTranscatheter arterial embolization for mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis was feasible, rapidly relieved resistant pain, and restored knee function

  19. Experimental knee pain reduces muscle strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Mortensen, Sara Rosager; Aaboe, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Pain is the principal symptom in knee pathologies and reduced muscle strength is a common observation among knee patients. However, the relationship between knee joint pain and muscle strength remains to be clarified. This study aimed at investigating the changes in knee muscle strength following...... experimental knee pain in healthy volunteers, and if these changes were associated with the pain intensities. In a crossover study, 18 healthy subjects were tested on 2 different days. Using an isokinetic dynamometer, maximal muscle strength in knee extension and flexion was measured at angular velocities 0....... Knee pain reduced the muscle strength by 5 to 15% compared to the control conditions (P knee extension and flexion at all angular velocities. The reduction in muscle strength was positively correlated to the pain intensity. Experimental knee pain significantly reduced knee extension...

  20. Effects of adductor-canal-blockade on pain and ambulation after total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenstrup, M T; Jæger, P; Lund, J

    2012-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is associated with intense post-operative pain. Besides providing optimal analgesia, reduction in side effects and enhanced mobilization are important in this elderly population. The adductor-canal-blockade is theoretically an almost pure sensory blockade. We hypothe...... hypothesized that the adductor-canal-blockade may reduce morphine consumption (primary endpoint), improve pain relief, enhance early ambulation ability, and reduce side effects (secondary endpoints) after TKA compared with placebo.......Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is associated with intense post-operative pain. Besides providing optimal analgesia, reduction in side effects and enhanced mobilization are important in this elderly population. The adductor-canal-blockade is theoretically an almost pure sensory blockade. We...

  1. Thigh muscle activity, knee motion, and impact force during side-step pivoting in agility-trained female basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilderman, Danielle R; Ross, Scott E; Padua, Darin A

    2009-01-01

    Improving neuromuscular control of hamstrings muscles might have implications for decreasing anterior cruciate ligament injuries in females. To examine the effects of a 6-week agility training program on quadriceps and hamstrings muscle activation, knee flexion angles, and peak vertical ground reaction force. Prospective, randomized clinical research trial. Sports medicine research laboratory. Thirty female intramural basketball players with no history of knee injury (age = 21.07 +/- 2.82 years, height = 171.27 +/- 4.66 cm, mass = 66.36 +/- 7.41 kg). Participants were assigned to an agility training group or a control group that did not participate in agility training. Participants in the agility training group trained 4 times per week for 6 weeks. We used surface electromyography to assess muscle activation for the rectus femoris, vastus medialis oblique, medial hamstrings, and lateral hamstrings for 50 milliseconds before initial ground contact and while the foot was in contact with the ground during a side-step pivot maneuver. Knee flexion angles (at initial ground contact, maximum knee flexion, knee flexion displacement) and peak vertical ground reaction force also were assessed during this maneuver. Participants in the training group increased medial hamstrings activation during ground contact after the 6-week agility training program. Both groups decreased their vastus medialis oblique muscle activation during ground contact. Knee flexion angles and peak vertical ground reaction force did not change for either group. Agility training improved medial hamstrings activity in female intramural basketball players during a side-step pivot maneuver. Agility training that improves hamstrings activity might have implications for reducing anterior cruciate ligament sprain injury associated with side-step pivots.

  2. Medial vs lateral unicompartmental knee arthrroplasty: clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiocchi, Andrea; Condello, Vincenzo; Madonna, Vincenzo; Bonomo, M; Zorzi, Claudio

    2017-06-07

    Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty (UKA) is a common procedure for the management of isolated osteoarthritis. UKA is considered less invasive compared to total knee arthroplasty, associated with less operative time, blood loss and faster recovery. Isolated lateral osteoarthritis is a relatively uncommon clinical problem, with an incidence about ten times lower than the medial compartment. In fact, lateral UKA are about 5-10% of the total amount of the UKAs. In addition, it's historically considered more challenging and with poorer results. The aim of this paper was to compare current indications, modes of failure, survivorship and clinical results of medial and lateral UKA by a narrative review of the latest literature.

  3. Knee medial and lateral contact forces in a musculoskeletal model with subject-specific contact point trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeighami, A; Aissaoui, R; Dumas, R

    2018-03-01

    Contact point (CP) trajectory is a crucial parameter in estimating medial/lateral tibio-femoral contact forces from the musculoskeletal (MSK) models. The objective of the present study was to develop a method to incorporate the subject-specific CP trajectories into the MSK model. Ten healthy subjects performed 45 s treadmill gait trials. The subject-specific CP trajectories were constructed on the tibia and femur as a function of extension-flexion using low-dose bi-plane X-ray images during a quasi-static squat. At each extension-flexion position, the tibia and femur CPs were superimposed in the three directions on the medial side, and in the anterior-posterior and proximal-distal directions on the lateral side to form the five kinematic constraints of the knee joint. The Lagrange multipliers associated to these constraints directly yielded the medial/lateral contact forces. The results from the personalized CP trajectory model were compared against the linear CP trajectory and sphere-on-plane CP trajectory models which were adapted from the commonly used MSK models. Changing the CP trajectory had a remarkable impact on the knee kinematics and changed the medial and lateral contact forces by 1.03 BW and 0.65 BW respectively, in certain subjects. The direction and magnitude of the medial/lateral contact force were highly variable among the subjects and the medial-lateral shift of the CPs alone could not determine the increase/decrease pattern of the contact forces. The suggested kinematic constraints are adaptable to the CP trajectories derived from a variety of joint models and those experimentally measured from the 3D imaging techniques. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [Medial unicompartmental knee prosthesis for patients with unicompartmental gonarthrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kort, N.P.; Deutman, R.; Raay, J.J. van; Horn, J.R. van

    2004-01-01

    The function and survival time of unicompartmental knee prostheses for patients with severe gonarthrosis have been improved the past few years by developments in their design, the instrumentarium and the surgical technique. A medial unicompartmental knee prosthesis may be indicated in patients with

  5. Predicting dynamic knee joint load with clinical measures in people with medial knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Michael A; Bennell, Kim L

    2011-08-01

    Knee joint loading, as measured by the knee adduction moment (KAM), has been implicated in the pathogenesis of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Given that the KAM can only currently be accurately measured in the laboratory setting with sophisticated and expensive equipment, its utility in the clinical setting is limited. This study aimed to determine the ability of a combination of four clinical measures to predict KAM values. Three-dimensional motion analysis was used to calculate the peak KAM at a self-selected walking speed in 47 consecutive individuals with medial compartment knee OA and varus malalignment. Clinical predictors included: body mass; tibial angle measured using an inclinometer; walking speed; and visually observed trunk lean toward the affected limb during the stance phase of walking. Multiple linear regression was performed to predict KAM magnitudes using the four clinical measures. A regression model including body mass (41% explained variance), tibial angle (17% explained variance), and walking speed (9% explained variance) explained a total of 67% of variance in the peak KAM. Our study demonstrates that a set of measures easily obtained in the clinical setting (body mass, tibial alignment, and walking speed) can help predict the KAM in people with medial knee OA. Identifying those patients who are more likely to experience high medial knee loads could assist clinicians in deciding whether load-modifying interventions may be appropriate for patients, whilst repeated assessment of joint load could provide a mechanism to monitor disease progression or success of treatment. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Clinical Outcome of Medial Pivot Compared With Press-Fit Condylar Sigma Cruciate-Retaining Mobile-Bearing Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Hoo; Park, Jang-Won; Kim, Jun-Shik

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the long-term clinical results, radiographic results, range of knee motion, patient satisfaction, and the survival rate of Medial-Pivot posterior cruciate-substituting, knee prosthesis and a press-fit condylar (PFC) Sigma cruciate-retaining mobile-bearing knee prosthesis in the same patients. One hundred eighty-two patients received Medial-Pivot knee prosthesis in one knee and a PFC Sigma knee prosthesis in the contralateral knee. The minimum duration of follow-up was 11 years (range, 11-12.6 years). The knees with a Medial-Pivot knee prosthesis had significantly worse results than those with a PFC Sigma knee prosthesis at the final follow-up with regard to the mean postoperative Knee Society knee scores (90 compared with 95 points), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index score (25 compared with 18 points), and range of knee motion (117° compared with 128°). Patients were more satisfied with PFC Sigma knee prosthesis (93%) than with Medial-Pivot knee prosthesis (75%). Complication rates were significantly higher in the Medial-Pivot knee group (26%) than those in the PFC Sigma knee group (6.5%). Radiographic results and survival rates (99% compared with 99.5%) were similar between the 2 groups. Although the long-term fixation and survival rate of both Medial-Pivot and PFC Sigma prostheses were similar, we observed a worse knee score, worse range of knee motion, and patient satisfaction was less in the Medial-Pivot knee group than in the PFC Sigma knee group. Furthermore, complication rate was also higher in the Medial-Pivot knee group than the other group. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Increase in vastus medialis cross-sectional area is associated with reduced pain, cartilage loss, and joint replacement risk in knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Wluka, Anita E; Berry, Patricia A; Siew, Terence; Teichtahl, Andrew J; Urquhart, Donna M; Lloyd, David G; Jones, Graeme; Cicuttini, Flavia M

    2012-12-01

    Although there is evidence for a beneficial effect of increased quadriceps strength on knee symptoms, the effect on knee structure is unclear. We undertook this study to examine the relationship between change in vastus medialis cross-sectional area (CSA) and knee pain, tibial cartilage volume, and risk of knee replacement in subjects with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA). One hundred seventeen subjects with symptomatic knee OA underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the knee at baseline and at 2 and 4.5 years. Vastus medialis CSA was measured at baseline and at 2 years. Tibial cartilage volume was measured at baseline and at 2 and 4.5 years. Knee pain was assessed by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index at baseline and at 2 years. The frequency of knee joint replacement over 4 years was determined. Regression coefficients (B) and odds ratios were determined along with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). After adjusting for confounders, baseline vastus medialis CSA was inversely associated with current knee pain (r = -0.16, P = 0.04) and with medial tibial cartilage volume loss from baseline to 2 years (B coefficient -10.9 [95% CI -19.5, -2.3]), but not with baseline tibial cartilage volume. In addition, an increase in vastus medialis CSA from baseline to 2 years was associated with reduced knee pain over the same time period (r = 0.24, P = 0.007), reduced medial tibial cartilage loss from 2 to 4.5 years (B coefficient -16.8 [95% CI -28.9, -4.6]), and reduced risk of knee replacement over 4 years (odds ratio 0.61 [95% CI 0.40, 0.94]). In a population of patients with symptomatic knee OA, increased vastus medialis size was associated with reduced knee pain and beneficial structural changes at the knee, suggesting that management of knee pain and optimizing vastus medialis size are important in reducing OA progression and subsequent knee replacement. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  8. Patellofemoral morphometry in patients with idiopathic patellofemoral pain syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mar Carrion Martin, Maria del; Ruiz Santiago, Fernando; Pozuelo Calvo, Rocio; Guzman Alvarez, Luis

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To compare clinical and computed tomography (CT) measures in extension, 20 o and 30 o of flexion of symptomatic knees of patient with idiopathic patellofemoral pain syndrome with the contra lateral asymptomatic knee. Materials and methods: Knees of 52 consecutive patients with idiopathic patellofemoral pain were studied with CT. In 28 patients this condition was unilateral and asymptomatic knee was used as control; 76 knees were symptomatic. Results: In patients with idiopathic patellofemoral pain we found a greater Q angle and internal condylar facet width in symptomatic knees with regard to asymptomatic knees. Conclusion: Greater Q angle and medial condylar facet can lead to overpressure on the medial knee compartment during maneuvers that increase contact between patella and medial condylar facet, such as knee flexion and squatting, contributing to development of idiopathic patellofemoral pain.

  9. Medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty improves congruence and restores joint space width of the lateral compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamaisy, Saker; Zuiderbaan, Hendrik A; van der List, Jelle P; Nam, Denis; Pearle, Andrew D

    2016-06-01

    Osteoarthritic progression of the lateral compartment remains a leading indication for medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) revision. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the alterations of the lateral compartment congruence and joint space width (JSW) following medial UKA. Retrospectively, lateral compartment congruence and JSW were evaluated in 174 knees (74 females, 85 males, mean age 65.5years; SD±10.1) preoperatively and six weeks postoperatively, and compared to 41 healthy knees (26 men, 15 women, mean age 33.7years; SD±6.4). Congruence (CI) was calculated using validated software that evaluates the geometric relationship between surfaces and calculates a congruence index (CI). JSW was measured on three sides (inner, middle, outer) by subdividing the lateral compartment into four quarters. The CI of the control group was 0.98 (SD±0.01). The preoperative CI was 0.88 (SD±0.01), which improved significantly to 0.93 (SD±0.03) postoperatively (pcongruence and restores the JSW of the lateral compartment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The effects of neuromuscular exercise on medial knee joint load post-arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy: 'SCOPEX', a randomised control trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Michelle; Hinman, Rana S; Wrigley, Tim V; Roos, Ewa M; Hodges, Paul W; Staples, Margaret; Bennell, Kim L

    2012-11-27

    Meniscectomy is a risk factor for knee osteoarthritis, with increased medial joint loading a likely contributor to the development and progression of knee osteoarthritis in this group. Therefore, post-surgical rehabilitation or interventions that reduce medial knee joint loading have the potential to reduce the risk of developing or progressing osteoarthritis. The primary purpose of this randomised, assessor-blind controlled trial is to determine the effects of a home-based, physiotherapist-supervised neuromuscular exercise program on medial knee joint load during functional tasks in people who have recently undergone a partial medial meniscectomy. 62 people aged 30-50 years who have undergone an arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy within the previous 3 to 12 months will be recruited and randomly assigned to a neuromuscular exercise or control group using concealed allocation. The neuromuscular exercise group will attend 8 supervised exercise sessions with a physiotherapist and will perform 6 exercises at home, at least 3 times per week for 12 weeks. The control group will not receive the neuromuscular training program. Blinded assessment will be performed at baseline and immediately following the 12-week intervention. The primary outcomes are change in the peak external knee adduction moment measured by 3-dimensional analysis during normal paced walking and one-leg rise. Secondary outcomes include the change in peak external knee adduction moment during fast pace walking and one-leg hop and change in the knee adduction moment impulse during walking, one-leg rise and one-leg hop, knee and hip muscle strength, electromyographic muscle activation patterns, objective measures of physical function, as well as self-reported measures of physical function and symptoms and additional biomechanical parameters. The findings from this trial will provide evidence regarding the effect of a home-based, physiotherapist-supervised neuromuscular exercise program on medial knee

  11. A Systematic Review of Clinical Functional Outcomes After Medial Stabilized Versus Non-Medial Stabilized Total Knee Joint Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Young

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Medial stabilized total knee joint replacement (TKJR construct is designed to closely replicate the kinematics of the knee. Little is known regarding comparison of clinical functional outcomes of patients utilising validated patient reported outcome measures (PROM after medial stabilized TKJR and other construct designs.PurposeTo perform a systematic review of the available literature related to the assessment of clinical functional outcomes following a TKJR employing a medial stabilized construct design.MethodsThe review was performed with a Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA algorithm. The literature search was performed using variouscombinations of keywords. The statistical analysis was completed using Review Manager (RevMan, Version 5.3.ResultsIn the nineteen unique studies identified, there were 2,448 medial stabilized TKJRs implanted in 2,195 participants, there were 1,777 TKJRs with non-medial stabilized design constructs implanted in 1,734 subjects. The final mean Knee Society Score (KSS value in the medial stabilized group was 89.92 compared to 90.76 in the non-medial stabilized group, with the final KSS mean value difference between the two groups was statistically significant and favored the non-medial stabilized group (SMD 0.21; 95% CI: 0.01 to 0.41; p = 004. The mean difference in the final WOMAC values between the two groups was also statistically significant and favored the medial stabilized group (SMD: −0.27; 95% CI: −0.47 to −0.07; p = 0.009. Moderate to high values (I2 of heterogeneity were observed during the statistical comparison of these functional outcomes.ConclusionBased on the small number of studies with appropriate statistical analysis, we are unable to reach a clear conclusion in the clinical performance of medial stabilized knee replacement construct.Level of EvidenceLevel II

  12. Clinical value of SPECT/CT for evaluation of patients with painful knees after total knee arthroplasty- a new dimension of diagnostics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasch Helmut

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of our study was to evaluate the clinical value of hybrid SPECT/CT for the assessment of patients with painful total knee arthroplasty (TKA. Methods Twenty-three painful knees in patients following primary TKA were assessed using Tc-99m-HDP-SPECT/CT. Rotational, sagittal and coronal position of the TKA was assessed on 3D-CT reconstructions. The level of the SPECT-tracer uptake (0-10 and its anatomical distribution was mapped using a validated localization scheme. Univariate analysis (Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney, Spearmean`s-rho test, p Results SPECT/CT imaging changed the suspected diagnosis and the proposed treatment in 19/23 (83% knees. Progression of patellofemoral OA (n = 11, loosening of the tibial (n = 3 and loosening of the femoral component (n = 2 were identified as the leading causes of pain after TKA. Patients with externally rotated tibial trays showed higher tracer uptake in the medial patellar facet (p = 0.049 and in the femur (p = 0.051. Patients with knee pain due to patellofemoral OA showed significantly higher tracer uptake in the patella than others (p Conclusions SPECT/CT was very helpful in establishing the diagnosis and guiding subsequent management in patients with painful knees after TKA, particularly in patients with patellofemoral problems and malpositioned or loose TKA.

  13. Somatosensory abnormalities in knee OA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylde, Vikki; Palmer, Shea; Learmonth, Ian D; Dieppe, Paul

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to use quantitative sensory testing (QST) to explore the range and prevalence of somatosensory abnormalities demonstrated by patients with advanced knee OA. One hundred and seven knee OA patients and 50 age- and sex-matched healthy participants attended a 1-h QST session. Testing was performed on the medial side of the knee and the pain-free forearm. Light-touch thresholds were assessed using von Frey filaments, pressure pain thresholds using a digital pressure algometer, and thermal sensation and pain thresholds using a Thermotest MSA. Significant differences in median threshold values from knee OA patients and healthy participants were identified using Mann-Whitney U-tests. The z-score transformations were used to determine the prevalence of the different somatosensory abnormalities in knee OA patients. Testing identified 70% of knee OA patients as having at least one somatosensory abnormality. Comparison of median threshold values between knee OA patients and healthy participants revealed that patients had localized thermal and tactile hypoaesthesia and pressure hyperalgesia at the osteoarthritic knee. Tactile hypoaesthesia and pressure hyperalgesia were also present at the pain-free forearm. The most prevalent somatosensory abnormalities were tactile hypoaesthesia and pressure hyperalgesia, evident in between 20 and 34% of patients. This study found that OA patients demonstrate an array of somatosensory abnormalities, of which the most prevalent were tactile hypoaesthesia and pressure hyperalgesia. Further research is now needed to establish the clinical implications of these somatosensory abnormalities.

  14. The association of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-detected structural pathology of the knee with crepitus in a population-based cohort with knee pain: the MoDEKO study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crema, M D; Guermazi, A; Sayre, E C; Roemer, F W; Wong, H; Thorne, A; Singer, J; Esdaile, J M; Marra, M D; Kopec, J A; Nicolaou, S; Cibere, J

    2011-12-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common arthropathy of the knee joint(1). Symptoms reported by patients and signs noted during physical examination guide clinicians in identifying subjects with knee OA(2-4). Pain is one of the most important symptoms reported by subjects with knee OA(2,3). Although very common, pain is a non-specific symptom, related to pathology in several structures within the knee joint, and includes synovitis(5), subchondral bone marrow lesions(6), and joint effusion(7). Further, pain is a subjective symptom that cannot be directly measured or assessed during physical examination. Crepitus or crepitation in association with arthritis is defined as a crackling or grinding sound on joint movement with a sensation in the joint. Crepitus may occur with or without pain and is a common finding during physical examination in subjects with knee OA(2-4,8,9). It is not known whether crepitus is related to pathology in various structures within the knee. The aim of our study was to determine the cross-sectional associations of structural pathologies within the knee with crepitus in a population-based cohort with knee pain, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Subjects with knee pain were recruited as a random population sample, with crepitus assessed in each compartment of the knee using a validated and standardized approach during physical examination(10). MRI of the knee was performed to assess cartilage morphology, meniscal morphology, osteophytes, cruciate ligaments, and collateral ligaments. For both compartment-specific and whole-knee analyses, a multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the associations of MRI-detected structural pathology with crepitus, adjusting for potential confounders. Variables were selected by backwards elimination within each compartment and in the overall knee models, and only statistically significant variables remained in the "selected" models; remaining variables in these models are adjusted for

  15. Patellofemoral morphometry in patients with idiopathic patellofemoral pain syndrome

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    Mar Carrion Martin, Maria del [Department of Rehabilitation, Hospital of Traumatology (Ciudad Sanitaria Virgen de las Nieves), Carretera de Jaen SN, 18014 Granada (Spain); Ruiz Santiago, Fernando, E-mail: ferruizsan@terra.e [Department of Radiology, Hospital of Traumatology (Ciudad Sanitaria Virgen de las Nieves), Carretera de Jaen SN, 18014 Granada (Spain); Pozuelo Calvo, Rocio [Department of Rehabilitation, Hospital of Traumatology (Ciudad Sanitaria Virgen de las Nieves), Carretera de Jaen SN, 18014 Granada (Spain); Guzman Alvarez, Luis [Department of Radiology, Hospital of Traumatology (Ciudad Sanitaria Virgen de las Nieves), Carretera de Jaen SN, 18014 Granada (Spain)

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To compare clinical and computed tomography (CT) measures in extension, 20{sup o} and 30{sup o} of flexion of symptomatic knees of patient with idiopathic patellofemoral pain syndrome with the contra lateral asymptomatic knee. Materials and methods: Knees of 52 consecutive patients with idiopathic patellofemoral pain were studied with CT. In 28 patients this condition was unilateral and asymptomatic knee was used as control; 76 knees were symptomatic. Results: In patients with idiopathic patellofemoral pain we found a greater Q angle and internal condylar facet width in symptomatic knees with regard to asymptomatic knees. Conclusion: Greater Q angle and medial condylar facet can lead to overpressure on the medial knee compartment during maneuvers that increase contact between patella and medial condylar facet, such as knee flexion and squatting, contributing to development of idiopathic patellofemoral pain.

  16. Diacerein: a treatment option in painful primary knee osteoarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhter, N.; Khan, A.A.; Ayaz, S.B.; Afzal, A.

    2015-01-01

    To identify the efficacy and side effects of Diacerein in patients with mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis. Study Design: Quasi experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: Outpatient Department of Armed Forces Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine, Rawalpindi from June 2012 to June 2013. Material and Methods: Ninety cases fulfilling American College of Rheumatology criteria for diagnosis of Knee Osteoarthritis and falling in Grades III of Kellgren-Lawrence Radiological Classification for Knee Osteoarthritis were included. Pre-treatment associated symptoms, complete blood count, renal and liver function tests were documented. After a baseline pain assessment on a 10-Point Visual Analogue Scale, 50 mg of Diacerein was given orally for 4 months followed by pain assessment and inquiry about adverse effects at 6th week, 3rd and 6th months. Post-treatment labs were repeated. Reduction in pain was analyzed by paired-sample t-test using SPSS version 17. Chi-Square test was used to assess the frequency of adverse effects. A p-value < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Mean age was 61.5 ± 7.8 years. Majority 77 (85.6%) were females. Mean Visual Analogue Scale at start was 6.1 ± 0.87. Significant pain reduction measured on Visual Analogue Scale was observed at six weeks (4.6 ± 1.2) (p < 0.001), three months (2.37 ± 0.91) (p < 0.001) and six months (2.2 ± 0.85) (p < 0.001). Very few patients developed diarrhea 3.3% and nausea 4.4%. Conclusion: Diacerein is effective drug with minimal side effects for treatment of mild to moderate painful Knee Osteoarthritis. (author)

  17. An in vitro analysis of medial structures and a medial soft tissue reconstruction in a constrained condylar total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athwal, Kiron K; El Daou, Hadi; Inderhaug, Eivind; Manning, William; Davies, Andrew J; Deehan, David J; Amis, Andrew A

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the medial soft tissue contributions to stability following constrained condylar (CC) total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and determine whether a medial reconstruction could restore stability to a soft tissue-deficient, CC-TKA knee. Eight cadaveric knees were mounted in a robotic system and tested at 0°, 30°, 60°, and 90° of flexion with ±50 N anterior-posterior force, ±8 Nm varus-valgus, and ±5 Nm internal-external torque. The deep and superficial medial collateral ligaments (dMCL, sMCL) and posteromedial capsule (PMC) were transected and their relative contributions to stabilising the applied loads were quantified. After complete medial soft tissue transection, a reconstruction using a semitendinosus tendon graft was performed, and the effect on kinematic behaviour under equivocal conditions was measured. In the CC-TKA knee, the sMCL was the major medial restraint in anterior drawer, internal-external, and valgus rotation. No significant differences were found between the rotational laxities of the reconstructed knee to the pre-deficient state for the arc of motion examined. The relative contribution of the reconstruction was higher in valgus rotation at 60° than the sMCL; otherwise, the contribution of the reconstruction was similar to that of the sMCL. There is contention whether a CC-TKA can function with medial deficiency or more constraint is required. This work has shown that a CC-TKA may not provide enough stability with an absent sMCL. However, in such cases, combining the CC-TKA with a medial soft tissue reconstruction may be considered as an alternative to a hinged implant.

  18. Effects of laterally wedged insoles on symptoms and disease progression in medial knee osteoarthritis: a protocol for a randomised, double-blind, placebo controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osborne Richard

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whilst laterally wedged insoles, worn inside the shoes, are advocated as a simple, inexpensive, non-toxic self-administered intervention for knee osteoarthritis (OA, there is currently limited evidence to support their use. The aim of this randomised, double-blind controlled trial is to determine whether laterally wedges insoles lead to greater improvements in knee pain, physical function and health-related quality of life, and slower structural disease progression as well as being more cost-effective, than control flat insoles in people with medial knee OA. Methods/Design Two hundred participants with painful radiographic medial knee OA and varus malalignment will be recruited from the community and randomly allocated to lateral wedge or control insole groups using concealed allocation. Participants will be blinded as to which insole is considered therapeutic. Blinded follow up assessment will be conducted at 12 months after randomisation. The outcome measures are valid and reliable measures recommended for OA clinical trials. Questionnaires will assess changes in pain, physical function and health-related quality-of-life. Magnetic resonance imaging will measure changes in tibial cartilage volume. To evaluate cost-effectiveness, participants will record the use of all health-related treatments in a log-book returned to the assessor on a monthly basis. To test the effect of the intervention using an intention-to-treat analysis, linear regression modelling will be applied adjusting for baseline outcome values and other demographic characteristics. Discussion Results from this trial will contribute to the evidence regarding the effectiveness of laterally wedged insoles for the management of medial knee OA. Trial registration ACTR12605000503628; NCT00415259.

  19. The effects of neuromuscular exercise on medial knee joint load post-arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy: ‘SCOPEX’ a randomised control trial protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Meniscectomy is a risk factor for knee osteoarthritis, with increased medial joint loading a likely contributor to the development and progression of knee osteoarthritis in this group. Therefore, post-surgical rehabilitation or interventions that reduce medial knee joint loading have the potential to reduce the risk of developing or progressing osteoarthritis. The primary purpose of this randomised, assessor-blind controlled trial is to determine the effects of a home-based, physiotherapist-supervised neuromuscular exercise program on medial knee joint load during functional tasks in people who have recently undergone a partial medial meniscectomy. Methods/design 62 people aged 30–50 years who have undergone an arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy within the previous 3 to 12 months will be recruited and randomly assigned to a neuromuscular exercise or control group using concealed allocation. The neuromuscular exercise group will attend 8 supervised exercise sessions with a physiotherapist and will perform 6 exercises at home, at least 3 times per week for 12 weeks. The control group will not receive the neuromuscular training program. Blinded assessment will be performed at baseline and immediately following the 12-week intervention. The primary outcomes are change in the peak external knee adduction moment measured by 3-dimensional analysis during normal paced walking and one-leg rise. Secondary outcomes include the change in peak external knee adduction moment during fast pace walking and one-leg hop and change in the knee adduction moment impulse during walking, one-leg rise and one-leg hop, knee and hip muscle strength, electromyographic muscle activation patterns, objective measures of physical function, as well as self-reported measures of physical function and symptoms and additional biomechanical parameters. Discussion The findings from this trial will provide evidence regarding the effect of a home-based, physiotherapist

  20. The effects of neuromuscular exercise on medial knee joint load post-arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy: ‘SCOPEX’ a randomised control trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hall Michelle

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Meniscectomy is a risk factor for knee osteoarthritis, with increased medial joint loading a likely contributor to the development and progression of knee osteoarthritis in this group. Therefore, post-surgical rehabilitation or interventions that reduce medial knee joint loading have the potential to reduce the risk of developing or progressing osteoarthritis. The primary purpose of this randomised, assessor-blind controlled trial is to determine the effects of a home-based, physiotherapist-supervised neuromuscular exercise program on medial knee joint load during functional tasks in people who have recently undergone a partial medial meniscectomy. Methods/design 62 people aged 30–50 years who have undergone an arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy within the previous 3 to 12 months will be recruited and randomly assigned to a neuromuscular exercise or control group using concealed allocation. The neuromuscular exercise group will attend 8 supervised exercise sessions with a physiotherapist and will perform 6 exercises at home, at least 3 times per week for 12 weeks. The control group will not receive the neuromuscular training program. Blinded assessment will be performed at baseline and immediately following the 12-week intervention. The primary outcomes are change in the peak external knee adduction moment measured by 3-dimensional analysis during normal paced walking and one-leg rise. Secondary outcomes include the change in peak external knee adduction moment during fast pace walking and one-leg hop and change in the knee adduction moment impulse during walking, one-leg rise and one-leg hop, knee and hip muscle strength, electromyographic muscle activation patterns, objective measures of physical function, as well as self-reported measures of physical function and symptoms and additional biomechanical parameters. Discussion The findings from this trial will provide evidence regarding the effect of a home

  1. [Overuse injury syndromes of the knee].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pećina, M; Bojanić, I; Haspl, M

    2001-12-01

    Overuse injuries are frequent in the knee joint. The reason for this is that the knee joint is engaged in all sports activities. Furthermore, the joint area has numerous attachment points for muscles and tendons and numerous bursae. Another reason is that the specific joint between the patella and femur (patellofemoral joint) constitutes a part of the knee joint. Speaking in general terms, all overuse injuries in the knee joint can be divided in four groups according to the aspect: anterior aspect--patellofemoral pain syndrome, patellar tendinitis (jumper's knee), Osgood-Schlatter disease, Sinding Larson Johanson disease, stress fracture of the patella, fat pad syndrome; medial aspect--plica syndrome, semimembranosus tendinitis, pes anserinus tendinitis (bursitis), breaststroker's knee, medial retinaculitis; lateral aspect--Iliotibial band friction syndrome (runner's knee), Popliteal Tendinitis, Bicipital tendinitis; posterior aspect--fabellitis, medial gastrocnemius strain. There are numerous possible reasons for pain caused by overuse injuries around the knee joint, but two are the most frequent: patellar tendinitis (jumper's knee) and Iliotibial band friction syndrome (runner's knee). This paper gives a brief overview of overuse injuries of the knee joint including their definition, anatomy, aetiology, clinical symptoms and signs, and non-operative and surgical treatment.

  2. The influence of knee pain location on symptoms, functional status and knee-related quality of life in older adults with chronic knee pain: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhi, Shawn; Chen, Yi-Fan; Piva, Sara R.; Fitzgerald, G. Kelley; Jeong, Jong-Hyeon; Kwoh, C. Kent

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether knee pain location can influence symptoms, functional status and knee-related quality of life in older adults with chronic knee pain. Methods A total of 2959 painful knees from the Osteoarthritis Initiative database were analyzed. Trained interviewers recorded patient-reported location of knee pain. Painful knees were divided into three groups of patellofemoral only pain, tibiofemoral only pain, and combined pain. Self-reported knee-specific symptoms, functional status and knee-related quality of life were assessed using the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). Results The most common knee pain pattern was tibiofemoral only pain (62%), followed by patellofemoral only pain (23%) and combined pain (15%). The combined pain pattern was associated with greater odds of reporting pain, symptoms, sports or recreational activity limitations and lower knee-related quality of life compared to either isolated knee pain patterns, after adjusting for demographics and radiographic disease severity. Individual item analysis further revealed that patients with combined pain had greater odds of reporting difficulty with daily weightbearing activities that required knee bending compared to tibiofemoral or patellofemoral only pain patterns. Furthermore, symptoms, functional status, and knee-related quality of life were comparable between patients with patellofemoral and tibiofemoral only pain patterns, after adjusting for demographics and radiographic disease severity. Discussion Combined patellofemoral and tibiofemoral pain is associated with poorer clinical presentation compared to isolated knee pain from either location. Additionally, patellofemoral pain in isolation may be as important as tibiofemoral pain in causing symptoms and functional limitation in older adults with chronic knee pain. PMID:26308705

  3. Arthroscopic treatment of symptomatic type D medial plica

    OpenAIRE

    Uysal, Mustafa; Asik, Mehmet; Akpinar, Sercan; Ciftci, Feyyaz; Cesur, Necip; Tandogan, Reha N.

    2007-01-01

    We aimed to review the results of subtotal arthroscopic resection of symptomatic type D medial plica. We retrospectively evaluated 23 knees with symptomatic type D medial plica in 22 patients without other intra-articular pathology. All patients complained of chronic knee pain that had not been alleviated by medical treatment or physical therapy. In only three (13%) of the patients studied was the plica diagnosed pre-operatively with magnetic resonance imaging. The type D medial plicae in our...

  4. Alterations in knee kinematics after partial medial meniscectomy are activity dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edd, Shannon N; Netravali, Nathan A; Favre, Julien; Giori, Nicholas J; Andriacchi, Thomas P

    2015-06-01

    Alterations in knee kinematics after partial meniscectomy have been linked to the increased risk of osteoarthritis in this population. Understanding differences in kinematics during static versus dynamic activities of increased demand can provide important information regarding the possible underlying mechanisms of these alterations. Differences in the following 2 kinematics measures will increase with activity demand: (1) the offset toward external tibial rotation for the meniscectomized limb compared with the contralateral limb during stance and (2) the difference in knee flexion angle at initial foot contact between the meniscectomized and contralateral limbs. Controlled laboratory study. This study compared side-to-side differences in knee flexion and rotation angles during static and dynamic activities. Thirteen patients (2 female) were tested in a motion capture laboratory at 6 ± 2 months after unilateral, arthroscopic, partial medial meniscectomy during a static reference pose and during 3 dynamic activities: walking, stair ascent, and stair descent. The meniscectomized limb demonstrated more external tibial rotation compared with the contralateral limb during dynamic activities, and there was a trend that this offset increased with activity demand (repeated-measures analysis of variance [ANOVA] for activity, P = .07; mean limb difference: static pose, -0.1° ± 3.3°, P = .5; walking, 1.2° ± 3.8°, P = .1; stair ascent, 2.0° ± 3.2°, P = .02; stair descent, 3.0° ± 3.5°, P = .005). Similarly, the meniscectomized knee was more flexed at initial contact than the contralateral limb during dynamic activities (repeated-measures ANOVA for activity P = .006; mean limb difference: reference pose, 1.0° ± 2.5°, P = .09; walking, 2.0° ± 3.9°, P = .05; stair ascent, 5.9° ± 5.3°, P = .009; stair descent, 3.5° ± 4.0°, P = .004). These results suggest both a structural element and a potential muscular element for the differences in kinematics after

  5. Patient-controlled oral analgesia for postoperative pain management following total knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastanias, Patti; Gowans, Sue; Tumber, Paul S; Snaith, Kianda; Robinson, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    To investigate whether patient-controlled oral analgesia (PCOA) used by individuals receiving a total knee replacement could reduce pain, increase patient satisfaction, reduce opioid use and/or reduce opioid side effects when compared with traditional nurse (RN)-administered oral analgesia. Patients who underwent an elective total knee replacement at a quaternary care centre (Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario) were randomly assigned to either PCOA or RN-administered short-acting oral opioids on postoperative day 2. Subjects in the RN group called the RN to receive their prescribed short-acting opioid. Subjects in the PCOA group kept a single dose of their prescribed oral opioid at their bedside and took this dose when they felt they needed it, to a maximum of one dose every 2 h. Study outcomes, collected on postoperative day 2, included pain (measured by the Brief Pain Inventory - Short Form), patient satisfaction (measured by the Pain Outcome Questionnaire Satisfaction subscale - component II), opioid use (oral morphine equivalents), opioid side effects (nausea, pruritus and/or constipation) and knee measures (maximum passive knee flexion and pain at maximum passive knee flexion, performed on the operative knee). Study outcomes were analyzed twice. First, for a subset of 73 subjects who remained in their randomly assigned group (PCOA group, n=36; RN group, n=37), randomized analyses were performed. Second, for the larger sample of 88 subjects who were categorized by their actual method of receiving oral opioids (PCOA group, n=41; RN group, n=47), as-treated analyses were performed. There were no differences in study outcomes between the PCOA and RN groups in either analysis. PCOA was not superior to RN administration on study outcomes. However, PCOA did not increase opioid use or pain. PCOA remains an important element in the patient-centred care facility.

  6. Evaluation and management of knee pain in young athletes: overuse injuries of the knee

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Dilip R.; Villalobos, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Recurrent or chronic activity related knee pain is common in young athletes. Numerous intrinsic conditions affecting the knee can cause such pain. In addition, knee pain can be referred pain from low back, hip or pelvic pathology. The most common cause of knee pain in young athletes is patellofemoral pain syndrome, or more appropriately termed idiopathic anterior knee pain. Although, numerous anatomical and biomechanical factors have been postulated to contribute the knee pain in young athlet...

  7. The utility of plain radiographs in the initial evaluation of knee pain amongst sports medicine patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaia, Michael J; Khatib, Omar; Shah, Mehul; A Bosco, Joseph; M Jazrawi, Laith; Strauss, Eric J

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate whether screening radiographs as part of the initial workup of knee pain impacts clinical decision-making in a sports medicine practice. A questionnaire was completed by the attending orthopaedic surgeon following the initial office visit for 499 consecutive patients presenting to the sports medicine centre with a chief complaint of knee pain. The questionnaire documented patient age, duration of symptoms, location of knee pain, associated mechanical symptoms, history of trauma within the past 2 weeks, positive findings on plain radiographs, whether magnetic resonance imaging was ordered, and whether plain radiographs impacted the management decisions for the patient. Patients were excluded if they had prior X-rays, history of malignancy, ongoing pregnancy, constitutional symptoms as well as those patients with prior knee surgery or intra-articular infections. Statistical analyses were then performed to determine which factors were more likely do correspond with diagnostic radiographs. Overall, initial screening radiographs did not change management in 72 % of the patients assessed in the office. The mean age of patients in whom radiographs did change management was 57.9 years compared to 37.1 years in those patients where plain radiograph did not change management (p < 0.0001). Plain radiographs had no impact on clinical management in 97.3 % of patients younger than 40. In patients whom radiographs did change management, radiographs were more likely to influence management if patients were over age forty, had pain for over 6 months, had medial or diffuse pain, or had mechanical symptoms. A basic cost analysis revealed that the cost of a clinically useful radiographic series in a patient under 40 years of age was $7,600, in contrast to $413 for a useful series in patients above the age of 40. Data from the current study support the hypothesis that for the younger patient population, routine radiographic imaging as a screening tool may be of

  8. The role of knee joint moments and knee impairments on self-reported knee pain during gait in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Megan; Farrokhi, Shawn; Fitzgerald, G Kelley

    2016-01-01

    The association between high mechanical knee joint loading during gait with onset and progression of knee osteoarthritis has been extensively studied. However, less attention has been given to risk factors related to increased pain during gait. The purpose of this study was to evaluate knee joint moments and clinical characteristics that may be associated with gait-related knee pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Sixty-seven participants with knee osteoarthritis were stratified into three groups of no pain (n=18), mild pain (n=27), or moderate/severe pain (n=22) based on their self-reported symptoms during gait. All participants underwent three-dimensional gait analysis. Quadriceps strength, knee extension range of motion, radiographic knee alignment and self-reported measures of global pain and function were also quantified. The moderate/severe pain group demonstrated worse global pain (Pknee flexion moments during the midstance phase of gait compared to the no pain group (P=0.02). Additionally, the moderate/severe pain group demonstrated greater varus knee malalignment (P=0.009), which was associated with higher weight acceptance peak knee adduction moments (P=0.003) and worse global pain (P=0.003) and physical function scores (P=0.006). Greater knee flexion moment is present during the midstance phase of gait in patients with knee osteoarthritis and moderate/severe pain during gait. Additionally, greater varus malalignment may be a sign of increased global knee joint dysfunction that can influence many activities of daily living beyond gait. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Auricular Acupuncture for Pain Relief after Ambulatory Knee Arthroscopy—A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taras I. Usichenko

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Auricular acupuncture (AA is effective in treating various pain conditions, but there have been no analyses of AA for the treatment of pain after ambulatory knee surgery. We assessed the range of analgesic requirements under AA after ambulatory knee arthroscopy. Twenty patients randomly received a true AA procedure (Lung, Shenmen and Knee points or sham procedure (three non-acupuncture points on the auricular helix before ambulatory knee arthroscopy. Permanent press AA needles were retained in situ for one day after surgery. Post-operative pain was treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory ibuprofen, and weak oral opioid tramadol was used for rescue analgesic medication. The quantity of post-operative analgesics and pain intensity were used to assess the effect of AA. The incidence of analgesia-related side effects, time to discharge from the anesthesia recovery room, heart rate and blood pressure were also recorded. Ibuprofen consumption after surgery in the AA group was lower than in the control group: median 500 versus 800 mg, P = 0.043. Pain intensity on a 100 mm visual analogue scale for pain measurement and other parameters were similar in both groups. Thus AA might be useful in reducing the post-operative analgesic requirement after ambulatory knee arthroscopy.

  10. Magnification bone scan of knees for knee pain evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Myoung Hoon; Park, Chan H.; Yoon, Seok Nam; Hwang, Kyung Hoon

    2001-01-01

    Knee pain is one of the common complaints of patients seen in our orthopedic clinic. Routine anterior and posterior views of whole body bone scan (WBBS) is often not sufficient in the evaluation of these patients. An ideal bone scan using pinhole collimator or single photon emission tomography (SPECT), however, is impractical and time consuming in busy nuclear medicine department with limited resources. Therefore, the aim of the study is to assess limited bone scan of knees with magnification (LNSKM) for knee pain evaluation. Technical aspect of LBSKM and diagnostic efficacy are discussed on this poster. Adult patients with knee pain were reffered for LBSKM from an orthopedic surgen specializing knees. Four hundred fifteen LBSKMs were performed since 1999. patients were given 740 MBq (20mCi) Tc-99m MDP intravenously and 3 hours later LBSKM was performed using a low energy high resolution parallel hole collimator and Siemens Orbitor camera. (Simens medical systems. Inc., Hoffman Estates, III., USA). Anterior view of the knees was taken for 5 min, without magnification and both lateral views of symptomatic knees were obtained with electronic magnification (1.25, upto 2.0) for 8 min each. Disease processes such as DJD, traumatic arthritis, P-F tendonitis, SONK, meniscus tear are detected and illustrated along with normal knee scan finding. We believe LBSKM may not be as good as SPECT or pinhole imaging of the knees in the evaluation of knee pain but superior to routine WBBS in the nuclear medicine department with limited resources of instrumentation and manpower

  11. The associations between indices of patellofemoral geometry and knee pain and patella cartilage volume: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urquhart Donna M

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whilst patellofemoral pain is one of the most common musculoskeletal disorders presenting to orthopaedic clinics, sports clinics, and general practices, factors contributing to its development in the absence of a defined arthropathy, such as osteoarthritis (OA, are unclear. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to describe the relationships between parameters of patellofemoral geometry (patella inclination, sulcus angle and patella height and knee pain and patella cartilage volume. Methods 240 community-based adults aged 25-60 years were recruited to take part in a study of obesity and musculoskeletal health. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the dominant knee was used to determine the lateral condyle-patella angle, sulcus angle, and Insall-Salvati ratio, as well as patella cartilage and bone volumes. Pain was assessed by the Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC VA pain subscale. Results Increased lateral condyle-patella angle (increased medial patella inclination was associated with a reduction in WOMAC pain score (Regression coefficient -1.57, 95% CI -3.05, -0.09 and increased medial patella cartilage volume (Regression coefficient 51.38 mm3, 95% CI 1.68, 101.08 mm3. Higher riding patella as indicated by increased Insall-Salvati ratio was associated with decreased medial patella cartilage volume (Regression coefficient -3187 mm3, 95% CI -5510, -864 mm3. There was a trend for increased lateral patella cartilage volume associated with increased (shallower sulcus angle (Regression coefficient 43.27 mm3, 95% CI -2.43, 88.98 mm3. Conclusion These results suggest both symptomatic and structural benefits associated with a more medially inclined patella while a high-riding patella may be detrimental to patella cartilage. This provides additional theoretical support for the current use of corrective strategies for patella malalignment that are aimed at medial patella translation, although

  12. The associations between indices of patellofemoral geometry and knee pain and patella cartilage volume: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanamas, Stephanie K; Teichtahl, Andrew J; Wluka, Anita E; Wang, Yuanyuan; Davies-Tuck, Miranda; Urquhart, Donna M; Jones, Graeme; Cicuttini, Flavia M

    2010-05-10

    Whilst patellofemoral pain is one of the most common musculoskeletal disorders presenting to orthopaedic clinics, sports clinics, and general practices, factors contributing to its development in the absence of a defined arthropathy, such as osteoarthritis (OA), are unclear.The aim of this cross-sectional study was to describe the relationships between parameters of patellofemoral geometry (patella inclination, sulcus angle and patella height) and knee pain and patella cartilage volume. 240 community-based adults aged 25-60 years were recruited to take part in a study of obesity and musculoskeletal health. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the dominant knee was used to determine the lateral condyle-patella angle, sulcus angle, and Insall-Salvati ratio, as well as patella cartilage and bone volumes. Pain was assessed by the Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) VA pain subscale. Increased lateral condyle-patella angle (increased medial patella inclination) was associated with a reduction in WOMAC pain score (Regression coefficient -1.57, 95% CI -3.05, -0.09) and increased medial patella cartilage volume (Regression coefficient 51.38 mm3, 95% CI 1.68, 101.08 mm3). Higher riding patella as indicated by increased Insall-Salvati ratio was associated with decreased medial patella cartilage volume (Regression coefficient -3187 mm3, 95% CI -5510, -864 mm3). There was a trend for increased lateral patella cartilage volume associated with increased (shallower) sulcus angle (Regression coefficient 43.27 mm3, 95% CI -2.43, 88.98 mm3). These results suggest both symptomatic and structural benefits associated with a more medially inclined patella while a high-riding patella may be detrimental to patella cartilage. This provides additional theoretical support for the current use of corrective strategies for patella malalignment that are aimed at medial patella translation, although longitudinal studies will be needed to further substantiate this.

  13. Subject-specific knee joint geometry improves predictions of medial tibiofemoral contact forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerus, Pauline; Sartori, Massimo; Besier, Thor F.; Fregly, Benjamin J.; Delp, Scott L.; Banks, Scott A.; Pandy, Marcus G.; D’Lima, Darryl D.; Lloyd, David G.

    2013-01-01

    Estimating tibiofemoral joint contact forces is important for understanding the initiation and progression of knee osteoarthritis. However, tibiofemoral contact force predictions are influenced by many factors including muscle forces and anatomical representations of the knee joint. This study aimed to investigate the influence of subject-specific geometry and knee joint kinematics on the prediction of tibiofemoral contact forces using a calibrated EMG-driven neuromusculoskeletal model of the knee. One participant fitted with an instrumented total knee replacement walked at a self-selected speed while medial and lateral tibiofemoral contact forces, ground reaction forces, whole-body kinematics, and lower-limb muscle activity were simultaneously measured. The combination of generic and subject-specific knee joint geometry and kinematics resulted in four different OpenSim models used to estimate muscle-tendon lengths and moment arms. The subject-specific geometric model was created from CT scans and the subject-specific knee joint kinematics representing the translation of the tibia relative to the femur was obtained from fluoroscopy. The EMG-driven model was calibrated using one walking trial, but with three different cost functions that tracked the knee flexion/extension moments with and without constraint over the estimated joint contact forces. The calibrated models then predicted the medial and lateral tibiofemoral contact forces for five other different walking trials. The use of subject-specific models with minimization of the peak tibiofemoral contact forces improved the accuracy of medial contact forces by 47% and lateral contact forces by 7%, respectively compared with the use of generic musculoskeletal model. PMID:24074941

  14. Impaired Varus-Valgus Proprioception and Neuromuscular Stabilization in Medial Knee Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Alison H.; Lee, Song Joo; Zhao, Heng; Ren, Yupeng; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2014-01-01

    Impaired proprioception and poor muscular stabilization in the frontal plane may lead to knee instability during functional activities, a common complaint in persons with knee osteoarthritis (KOA). Understanding these frontal plane neuromechanical properties in KOA will help elucidate the factors contributing to knee instability and aid in the development of targeted intervention strategies. The study objectives were to compare knee varus-valgus proprioception, isometric muscle strength, and active muscular contribution to stability between persons with medial KOA and healthy controls. We evaluated knee frontal plane neuromechanical parameters in 14 participants with medial KOA and 14 age- and gender-matched controls, using a joint driving device (JDD) with a customized motor and a 6-axis force sensor. Analysis of covariance with BMI as a covariate was used to test the differences in varus-valgus neuromechanical parameters between these two groups. The KOA group had impaired varus proprioception acuity (1.08 ± 0.59° vs. 0.69 ± 0.49°, p < 0.05), decreased normalized varus muscle strength (1.31 ± 0.75% vs. 1.79 ± 0.84% body weight, p < 0.05), a trend toward decreased valgus strength (1.29 ± 0.67% vs. 1.88 ± 0.99%, p = 0.054), and impaired ability to actively stabilize the knee in the frontal plane during external perturbation (4.67 ± 2.86 vs. 8.26 ± 5.95 Nm/degree, p < 0.05). The knee frontal plane sensorimotor control system is compromised in persons with medial KOA. Our findings suggest varus-valgus control deficits in both the afferent input (proprioceptive acuity) and muscular effectors (muscle strength and capacity to stabilize the joint). PMID:24321442

  15. Influence of knee flexion and atraumatic mobilisation of infrapatellar fat pad on incidence and severity of anterior knee pain after tibial nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovic, Andrija; Korac, Zelimir; Bozic, Nenad-Bozo; Stedul, Ivan

    2013-09-01

    We evaluated the incidence and aetiology of anterior knee pain (AKP) in a series of patients that underwent intramedullary nailing for stabilisation of tibial fractures. During the preparation of the entry site no excision of the infrapatellar fat was allowed and electrical haemostasis was kept at the lowest level. Medullary canal was reamed and the nails inserted in position of knee flexion over 100 degrees. All fractures were fixed using medial paratendinous approach. Functional outcome was measured using Lysholm knee score. The knee range of movement and return to previous level of activity were also documented and analysed. Mean follow up was 38.9 months (range 12-84 months). In total 60 patients with 62 tibial shaft fractures were analysed. The mean age at the time of final follow up was 49.4 years (range 20-87). In 22 (35.5%) a newly developed and persisting pain in the anterior region of the operated knee was reported. According to VAP scale, the pain was mild (VAS 1-3) in 12 cases (19.4%) and moderate (VAS 4-6) in 10 (16.1%). In 16 cases (73%) the pain was noticed 6-12 months after injury and subjectively related to return to full range of working and recreational activities. The mean Lysholm knee score in the group without AKP was 90.8. In the AKP group with mild pain it was 88.4 and in the group with moderate AKP it was 79.9. Complete return to previous professional and recreational activities occurred in 49/60 patients (81.7%). Content with the treatment regarding expectations in recovery dynamics and return to desired level of activity was present in 98.3% of patients; one patient was unsatisfied with the treatment. Our results indicate that respecting the physiological motion of Hoffa pad and menisci during knee flexion, accompanied with atraumatic mobilisation of retrotendinous fat, reduces incidence and severity of anterior knee pain following intramedullary fixation of tibial shaft fractures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. MRI EVALUATION OF PAINFUL KNEE JOINT- THE CORRELATION OF MULTIPLE COEXISTING PATHOLOGIES, AGE AND SEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukheswar Pame

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND 1. To evaluate the incidence and coexistence of multiple knee joint pathologies causing painful knee and their correlation to age and sex. 2. To evaluate the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI features in various knee pathologies and to identify the common lesions. MATERIALS AND METHODS A retrospective study was performed using the clinical data of patients presenting with painful knee joint which were evaluated with MRI. Data from 200 patients examined between September 2015 and August 2016 were included into this study. The data was analysed statistically to evaluate the correlation between the MR pathological findings to age and sex of the patients. RESULTS The patient’s age ranged between 8 and 75 years (mean: 36 years. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL tear was the commonest finding (60% followed by bursitis (55%, meniscal degeneration (54.6% and meniscal tear (52%. Primary signs of ACL tear were hyperintensity, discontinuity and nonvisualisation. Secondary signs like Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL buckling, PCL index of greater than 0.5, uncovered Lateral meniscus (LM and bone contusion assisted in diagnosis in indeterminate cases. Mid substance was the commonest site of ACL tear (64%. PCL tear accounted for only a small percentage (7%. Medial Meniscus (MM tear (35% was commoner than LM tear (17%. The posterior horn of meniscus was the commonest site of injury (86.5%. Age was significantly correlated with meniscal degeneration and tear, Medial collateral ligament (MCL degeneration, parameniscal cyst, and chondromalacia patellae. A significant correlation between male gender and ACL injury was noted. Meniscal injury was significantly correlated with bursitis, as well with MCL injury. Bone bruise was significantly correlated with ACL injury, MCL injury and Lateral collateral ligament (LCL injury. CONCLUSIONS MRI findings of certain pathologies in a painful knee can coexist and significantly correlate with each other, age and sex of

  17. How does knee pain affect trunk and knee motion during badminton forehand lunges?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ming-Tung; Lee, Hsing-Hsan; Lin, Cheng-Feng; Tsai, Yi-Ju; Liao, Jen-Chieh

    2014-01-01

    Badminton requires extensive lower extremity movement and a precise coordination of the upper extremity and trunk movements. Accordingly, this study investigated motions of the trunk and the knee, control of dynamic stability and muscle activation patterns of individuals with and without knee pain. Seventeen participants with chronic knee pain and 17 healthy participants participated in the study and performed forehand forward and backward diagonal lunges. This study showed that those with knee pain exhibited smaller knee motions in frontal and horizontal planes during forward lunge but greater knee motions in sagittal plane during backward lunge. By contrast, in both tasks, the injured group showed a smaller value on the activation level of the paraspinal muscles in pre-impact phase, hip-shoulder separation angle, trunk forward inclination range and peak centre of mass (COM) velocity. Badminton players with knee pain adopt a more conservative movement pattern of the knee to minimise recurrence of knee pain. The healthy group exhibit better weight-shifting ability due to a greater control of the trunk and knee muscles. Training programmes for badminton players with knee pain should be designed to improve both the neuromuscular control and muscle strength of the core muscles and the knee extensor with focus on the backward lunge motion.

  18. Effect of knee joint icing on knee extension strength and knee pain early after total knee arthroplasty: a randomized cross-over study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Bente; Husted, Henrik; Kehlet, Henrik; Bandholm, Thomas

    2012-08-01

    To investigate the acute effect of knee joint icing on knee extension strength and knee pain in patients shortly after total knee arthroplasty. A prospective, single-blinded, randomized, cross-over study. A fast-track orthopaedic arthroplasty unit at a university hospital. Twenty patients (mean age 66 years; 10 women) scheduled for primary unilateral total knee arthroplasty. The patients were treated on two days (day 7 and day 10) postoperatively. On one day they received 30 minutes of knee icing (active treatment) and on the other day they received 30 minutes of elbow icing (control treatment). The order of treatments was randomized. Maximal knee extension strength (primary outcome), knee pain at rest and knee pain during the maximal knee extensions were measured 2-5 minutes before and 2-5 minutes after both treatments by an assessor blinded for active or control treatment. The change in knee extension strength associated with knee icing was not significantly different from that of elbow icing (knee icing change (mean (1 SD)) -0.01 (0.07) Nm/kg, elbow icing change -0.02 (0.07) Nm/kg, P = 0.493). Likewise, the changes in knee pain at rest (P = 0.475), or knee pain during the knee extension strength measurements (P = 0.422) were not different between treatments. In contrast to observations in experimental knee effusion models and inflamed knee joints, knee joint icing for 30 minutes shortly after total knee arthroplasty had no acute effect on knee extension strength or knee pain.

  19. Simultaneous avascular necrosis of both medial and lateral femoral condyles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansberg, R.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Avascular necrosis (AVN) of a femoral condyle is a common orthopaedic condition. While both medial and lateral femoral condyles may be involved either singly or sequentially the simultaneous occurrence of AVN of both femoral condyles is extremely uncommon. A 57-year-old male is presented who developed the onset of severe left sided knee pain suddenly at rest. Plain and tomographic radiography was unremarkable and a bone scan was performed. Markedly increased vascularity was demonstrated in the left knee with intense osteoblastic activity in the left medial and femoral condyles more marked in the lateral femoral condyle. A diagnosis of AVN of both femoral condyles was made and a MRI exam was performed to confirm this unusual diagnosis. The MRI showed a diffuse increase in intensity bilaterally with subtle bony change in the subarticular bone consistent with AVN more marked in the left lateral femoral condyle. The patients' symptoms resolved with supportive treatment. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  20. Anamnestic prediction of bucket handle compared to other tear patterns of the medial meniscus in stable knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haviv, Barak; Bronak, Shlomo; Kosashvili, Yona; Thein, Rafael

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze and compare the preoperative anamnestic details between patients with an arthroscopic diagnosis of bucket handle and other tear patterns of the medial meniscus in stable knees. A total of 204 patients (mean age 49.3 ± 13 years) were included in the study. The mean age was 49.3 ± 13 years. The study group included 65 patients (63 males, 2 females) with an arthroscopic diagnosis of bucket handle tear and the control group included 139 patients (90 males, 49 females) with non-bucket handle tear patterns. The preoperative clinical assessments of the two groups were analyzed retrospectively. Anamnestic prediction for the diagnosis of a bucket handle tear was based upon various medical history parameters. Multivariate logistic regression was carried out to identify independent anamnestic factors for predicting isolated bucket handle tears of the medial meniscus compared to non-bucket handle tears. Analysis of the multivariate logistic regression yielded 3 statistically significant independent anamnestic risk factors for predicting isolated bucket handle tears of the medial meniscus: male gender (OR, 9.7; 95% CI, 1.1-37.6), locking events (OR, 4.6; 95% CI, 1.8-11.3) and pain in extension (OR, 6.9; 95% CI, 2.5-23.7). Other preoperative variables such as age, BMI, activity level, comorbidities, duration of symptoms, pain location, preceding injury and its mechanism had no significant effect on tear pattern. Preoperative strong clues for bucket handle tears of the medial meniscus in stable knees are male gender, locking events and limitation in extension. Level III, Diagnostic study. Copyright © 2016 Turkish Association of Orthopaedics and Traumatology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Preoperative Patellofemoral Chondromalacia is Not a Contraindication for Fixed-Bearing Medial Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Alexander J; Kazarian, Gregory S; Lonner, Jess H

    2017-06-01

    Patellofemoral chondromalacia (PFCM) has historically been considered a contraindication for unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA), but there is limited data assessing PFCM's impact on the results of fixed-bearing UKA. Our objective was to assess the impact of medial patellar and/or medial trochlear PFCM on overall and patellofemoral-specific 2-year outcomes after fixed-bearing medial UKA. Intraoperative notes defined the presence and location of PFCM during fixed bearing medial UKA. Outcome measures included the New Knee Society Score (NKSS), Kneeling Ability Score (KAS) and Forgotten Joint Score (FJS-12). Thirty-one knees with PFCM (PFCM group), and 52 knees without PFCM (N-PFCM group) were included for analysis. Mann-Whitney U tests assessed the statistical significance of observed differences, and a Bonferroni correction was applied, adjusting threshold for significance to P = .005. At minimum follow-up of 2 years, no statistical differences were detected between the N-PFCM and PFCM groups in the postoperative NKSS (159 vs 157, P = .731), preoperative to postoperative NKSS change (P = .447), FJS-12 (70.5 vs 67.6, P = .471), or KAS (71% vs 65%, P = .217). Patients with isolated patellar chondromalacia (n = 13) demonstrated trends toward worse outcomes according to NKSS (147, P = .198), FJS-12 (58, P = .094), and KAS (46%, P = .018), but were statistically insignificant. No failures occurred in either group. Functional outcomes of fixed-bearing medial UKA are not adversely impacted by the presence of PFCM involving the medial patellar facet and/or medial or central trochlea. Further follow-up is needed to determine longer-term implications of fixed-bearing medial UKA in patients with PFCM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Is knee pain during adolescence a self-limiting condition?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathleff, Michael S.; Rathleff, Camilla R.; Olesen, Jens L.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prevalence of adolescent knee pain is 33%, and patellofemoral pain (PFP) is the most common diagnosis with a nontraumatic onset. The 2-year prognosis of adolescent PFP compared with other types of knee pain is unknown. PURPOSE: To investigate the 2-year prognosis of knee pain amon...... without knee pain at baseline. CONCLUSION: Knee pain during adolescence, and PFP in particular, is in most cases present after 2 years and thus may not be self-limiting. A greater focus on early detection and prevention of knee pain during adolescence is needed....

  3. Techniques for assessing knee joint pain in arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Yu

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The assessment of pain is of critical importance for mechanistic studies as well as for the validation of drug targets. This review will focus on knee joint pain associated with arthritis. Different animal models have been developed for the study of knee joint arthritis. Behavioral tests in animal models of knee joint arthritis typically measure knee joint pain rather indirectly. In recent years, however, progress has been made in the development of tests that actually evaluate the sensitivity of the knee joint in arthritis models. They include measurements of the knee extension angle struggle threshold, hind limb withdrawal reflex threshold of knee compression force, and vocalizations in response to stimulation of the knee. A discussion of pain assessment in humans with arthritis pain conditions concludes this review.

  4. Pain of osteoarthritis and bone uptake - is there a correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadhwa, S.S.; Carollan, M.; Abbati, D.; Chan, W.-L.; Bui, C.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: In patients with osteoarthritis bone scintigraphy is consistently reported as demonstrating mild, moderate or severe arthritis, particularly for the medial compartment of the knee, depending on the degree of uptake. Numerous studies however have not demonstrated a correlation between severity of bone scan findings and severity of osteoarthritis (OA) demonstrated at surgery or arthroscopy. In fact, most studies have not demonstrated any correlation between OA as assessed with imaging and subsequent surgical findings. The only positive correlation for outcome of OA of the knee appears to be the severity of pain. In this pilot study we investigate if there is correlation between pain and scintigraphic findings in medial compartment OA. 69 patients (18 - 87 years) without history of recent knee trauma or previous surgery for insertion of knee prosthesis who presented for a bone scan for any reasons were studied. All patients were asked to quantify any knee pain on a simple 4 point score i.e. no pain, non limiting pain, pain limiting daily activity and rest pain. Uptake in the medial compartment of the knee was quantified by measuring the count ratio between the medial compartment and the corresponding distal femur. 45 patients reported no pain, 20 reported non-limiting pain while 4 reported limiting pain. No patient reported pain at rest. In general pain was bilateral with no major differences. The mean knee/femur ratio for patients with no pain was 1.46 +/- 0.95 (N=90). Knee/femur ratio for patients with non-limiting pain was 1.77 +/- 0.57 (N=40) and for those with limiting pain it was 2.36 +/- 1.82 (N=8). Although the results were not statistically significant there was a clear trend towards a rising knee/femur ratio with increasing pain. The number of patients with knee pain was small and further study concentrating on this group would be required to assess the significance of the trend findings. Further study particularly in patients with significant

  5. Congruence and joint space width alterations of the medial compartment following lateral unicompartmental knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuiderbaan, H A; Khamaisy, S; Thein, R; Nawabi, D H; Pearle, A D

    2015-01-01

    Progressive degenerative changes in the medial compartment of the knee following lateral unicompartmental arthroplasty (UKA) remains a leading indication for revision surgery. The purpose of this study is to evaluate changes in the congruence and joint space width (JSW) of the medial compartment following lateral UKA. The congruence of the medial compartment of 53 knees (24 men, 23 women, mean age 13.1 years; sd 62.1) following lateral UKA was evaluated pre-operatively and six weeks post-operatively, and compared with 41 normal knees (26 men, 15 women, mean age 33.7 years; sd 6.4), using an Interactive closest point algorithm which calculated the congruence index (CI) by performing a rigid transformation that best aligns the digitised tibial and femoral surfaces. Inner, middle and outer JSWs were measured by sub-dividing the medial compartment into four quarters on pre- and post-operative, weight bearing tunnel view radiographs. The mean CI of knees following lateral UKA significantly improved from 0.92 (sd 0.06) pre-operatively to 0.96 (sd 0.02) (p congruence and normalise the JSW of the medial compartment, potentially preventing progression of degenerative change. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  6. The Relationship between Chondromalacia Patella, Medial Meniscal Tear and Medial Periarticular Bursitis in Patients with Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resorlu, Mustafa; Doner, Davut; Karatag, Ozan; Toprak, Canan Akgun

    2017-12-01

    This study investigated the presence of bursitis in the medial compartment of the knee (pes anserine, semimembranosus-tibial collateral ligament, and medial collateral ligament bursa) in osteoarthritis, chondromalacia patella and medial meniscal tears. Radiological findings of 100 patients undergoing magnetic resonance imaging with a preliminary diagnosis of knee pain were retrospectively evaluated by two radiologists. The first radiologist assessed all patients in terms of osteoarthritis, chondromalacia patella and medial meniscal tear. The second radiologist was blinded to these results and assessed the presence of bursitis in all patients. Mild osteoarthritis (grade I and II) was determined in 55 patients and severe osteoarthritis (grade III and IV) in 45 cases. At retropatellar cartilage evaluation, 25 patients were assessed as normal, while 29 patients were diagnosed with mild chondromalacia patella (grade I and II) and 46 with severe chondromalacia patella (grade III and IV). Medial meniscus tear was determined in 51 patients. Severe osteoarthritis and chondromalacia patella were positively correlated with meniscal tear (p chondromalacia patella (p = 0.023 and p = 0.479, respectively). Evaluation of lateral compartment bursae revealed lateral collateral ligament bursitis in 2 patients and iliotibial bursitis in 5 patients. We observed a greater prevalence of bursitis in the medial compartment of the knee in patients with severe osteoarthritis and medial meniscus tear.

  7. Internet-mediated physiotherapy and pain coping skills training for people with persistent knee pain (IMPACT - knee pain): a randomised controlled trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Fiona; Hinman, Rana S; French, Simon; Rini, Christine; Keefe, Francis; Nelligan, Rachel; Abbott, J Haxby; Bryant, Christina; Staples, Margaret P; Dalwood, Andrew; Bennell, Kim L

    2014-08-13

    Persistent knee pain in people over 50 years of age is often attributable to knee osteoarthritis (OA), a common joint condition that causes physical and psychological dysfunction. Exercise and pain coping skills training (PCST) can help reduce the impact of persistent knee pain, however, access to health professionals who deliver these services can be challenging. With increasing access to the Internet, remotely delivered Internet-based treatment approaches may provide alternatives for healthcare delivery. This pragmatic randomised controlled trial will investigate whether an Internet-delivered intervention that combines PCST and physiotherapist-guided exercise (PCST + Ex) is more effective than online educational material (educational control) in people with persistent knee pain. We will recruit 148 people over 50 years of age with self-reported persistent knee pain consistent with knee OA from the Australian community. Following completion of baseline questionnaires, participants will be randomly allocated to access a 3-month intervention of either (i) online educational material, or (ii) the same online material plus an 8-module (once per week) Internet-based PCST program and seven Internet-delivered physiotherapy sessions with a home exercise programs to be performed 3 times per week. Outcomes will be measured at baseline, 3 months and 9 months with the primary time point at 3 months. Primary outcomes are average knee pain on walking (11-point numeric rating scale) and self-reported physical function (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index subscale). Secondary outcomes include additional measures of knee pain, health-related quality-of-life, perceived global change in symptoms, and potential moderators and mediators of outcomes including self-efficacy for pain management and function, pain coping attempts and pain catastrophising. Other measures of adherence, adverse events, harms, use of health services/co-interventions, and process

  8. Enhancing treatment of osteoarthritis knee pain by boosting expectancy: A functional neuroimaging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Kong

    Full Text Available Objectives: Expectation can significantly modulate pain and treatment effects. This study aims to investigate if boosting patients' expectancy can enhance the treatment of knee osteoarthritis (KOA, and its underlying brain mechanism. Methods: Seventy-four KOA patients were recruited and randomized to three groups: boosted acupuncture (with a manipulation to enhance expectation, standard acupuncture, or treatment as usual (TAU. Each patient underwent six treatments before being debriefed, and four additional treatments after being debriefed. The fMRI scans were applied during the first and sixth treatment sessions. Results: We found significantly decreased knee pain in the boosted acupuncture group compared to the standard acupuncture or TAU groups after both six and ten treatments. Resting state functional connectivity (rsFC analyses using the nucleus accumbens (NAc as the seed showed rsFC increases between the NAc and the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC/rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in the boosted group as compared to the standard acupuncture group after multiple treatments. Expectancy scores after the first treatment were significantly associated with increased NAc-rACC/MPFC rsFC and decreased knee pain following treatment. Conclusions: Our study provides a novel method and mechanism for boosting the treatment of pain in patients with KOA. Our findings may shed light on enhancing outcomes of pharmacological and integrative medicines in clinical settings. Keywords: Knee osteoarthritis, Expectancy, Acupuncture, Reward, Resting state functional connectivity

  9. Associations of anatomical measures from MRI with radiographically defined knee osteoarthritis score, pain, and physical functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowers, Maryfran; Karvonen-Gutierrez, Carrie A; Jacobson, Jon A; Jiang, Yebin; Yosef, Matheos

    2011-02-02

    The prevalence of knee osteoarthritis is traditionally based on radiographic findings, but magnetic resonance imaging is now being used to provide better visualization of bone, cartilage, and soft tissues as well as the patellar compartment. The goal of this study was to estimate the prevalences of knee features defined on magnetic resonance imaging in a population and to relate these abnormalities to knee osteoarthritis severity scores based on radiographic findings, physical functioning, and reported knee pain in middle-aged women. Magnetic resonance images of the knee were evaluated for the location and severity of cartilage defects, bone marrow lesions, osteophytes, subchondral cysts, meniscal and/or ligamentous tears, effusion, and synovitis among 363 middle-aged women (724 knees) from the Michigan Study of Women's Health Across the Nation. These findings were related to Kellgren-Lawrence osteoarthritis severity scores from radiographs, self-reported knee pain, self-reported knee injury, perception of physical functioning, and physical performance measures to assess mobility. Radiographs, physical performance assessment, and interviews were undertaken at the 1996 study baseline and again (with the addition of magnetic resonance imaging assessment) at the follow-up visit during 2007 to 2008. The prevalence of moderate-to-severe knee osteoarthritis changed from 3.7% at the baseline assessment to 26.7% at the follow-up visit eleven years later. Full-thickness cartilage defects of the medial, lateral, and patellofemoral compartments were present in 14.5% (105 knees), 4.6% (thirty-three knees), and 26.2% (190 knees), respectively. Synovitis was identified in 24.7% (179) of the knees, and joint effusions were observed in 70% (507 knees); 21.7% (157) of the knees had complex or macerated meniscal tears. Large osteophytes, marked synovitis, macerated meniscal tears, and full-thickness tibial cartilage defects were associated with increased odds of knee pain and with

  10. Effect of adductor-canal-blockade on established, severe post-operative pain after total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaeger, P; Grevstad, Ulrik; Henningsen, Maja

    2012-01-01

    In this proof-of-concept study, we investigated the effect of the predominantly sensory adductor-canal-blockade on established pain in the early post-operative period after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We hypothesised that the adductor-canal-blockade would reduce pain during flexion of the knee...... (primary end point) and at rest, as well as reducing morphine consumption and morphine-related side effects (secondary outcomes) compared with placebo....

  11. Care-seeking behaviour of adolescents with knee pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathleff, Michael Skovdal; Skuldbøl, Sune Kjems; Rasch, Mads Nyhuus

    2013-01-01

    Knee pain is common during adolescence. Adolescents and their parents may think that knee pain is benign and self-limiting and therefore avoid seeking medical care. However, long-term prognosis of knee pain is not favourable and treatment seems to offer greater reductions in pain compared...... to a "wait-and-see" approach. The purpose of this study was to describe the determinants of care-seeking behaviour among adolescents with current knee pain and investigate what types of treatment are initiated....

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging based Cartilage Loss in Painful Contra-Lateral Knees with and without Radiographic Joint Space Narrowing – Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein, Felix; Benichou, Olivier; Wirth, Wolfgang; Nelson, David R; Maschek, Susanne; Hudelmaier, Martin; Kwoh, C. Kent; Guermazi, Ali; Hunter, David

    2010-01-01

    Objective Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to assess whether knees with advanced radiographic disease (medial joint space narrowing = mJSN) encounter greater longitudinal cartilage loss than contra-lateral knees with earlier disease (no or less mJSN). Methods Participants were selected from 2678 cases in the Osteoarthritis Initiative, based on exhibition of bilateral pain, BMI>25, mJSN in one knee, no or less mJSN in the contra-lateral knee, and no lateral JSN in both knees. 80 participants (age 60.6±9.1 yrs) fulfilled these criteria. Medial tibial and femoral cartilage morphology was analyzed from baseline and 1-year follow-up sagittal DESSwe 3 Tesla MRI of both knees, by experienced readers blinded to the timepoint and mJSN status. Results Knees with more radiographic mJSN displayed greater medial cartilage loss (-80 μm), assessed by MRI, than contra-lateral knees with less mJSN (-57μm). The difference reached statistical significance in participants with mJSN grade 2 or 3 (p=0.005 to p=0.08), but not in participants with mJSN grade 1 (p=0.28 to 0.98). In knees with more mJSN, cartilage loss increased with higher grades of mJSN (p=0.003 in the medial femur). Knees with mJSN grade 2 or 3 displayed greater cartilage loss in the weight-bearing medial femur than in the posterior femur or in the medial tibia (p=0.048). Conclusion Knees with advanced mJSN displayed greater cartilage loss than contra-lateral knees with less mJSN. These data suggest that radiography can be used to stratify fast structural progressors, and that MRI cartilage thickness loss is more pronounced at advanced radiographic disease stage. PMID:19714595

  13. Matrix metalloproteases and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases in medial plica and pannus-like tissue contribute to knee osteoarthritis progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chih-Chang; Lin, Cheng-Yu; Wang, Hwai-Shi; Lyu, Shaw-Ruey

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by degradation of the cartilage matrix, leading to pathologic changes in the joints. However, the pathogenic effects of synovial tissue inflammation on OA knees are not clear. To investigate whether the inflammation caused by the medial plica is involved in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis, we examined the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs), interleukin (IL)-1β, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in the medial plica and pannus-like tissue in the knees of patients with medial compartment OA who underwent either arthroscopic medial release (stage II; 15 knee joints from 15 patients) or total knee replacement (stage IV; 18 knee joints from 18 patients). MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-9, IL-1β, and TNF-α mRNA and protein levels measured, respectively, by quantitative real-time PCR and Quantibody human MMP arrays, were highly expressed in extracts of medial plica and pannus-like tissue from stage IV knee joints. Immunohistochemical staining also demonstrated high expression of MMP-2, MMP-3, and MMP-9 in plica and pannus-like tissue of stage IV OA knees and not in normal cartilage. Some TIMP/MMP ratios decreased significantly in both medial plica and pannus-like tissue as disease progressed from stage II to stage IV. Furthermore, the migration of cells from the pannus-like tissue was enhanced by IL-1β, while plica cell migration was enhanced by TNF-α. The results suggest that medial plica and pannus-like tissue may be involved in the process of cartilage degradation in medial compartment OA of the knee.

  14. Matrix metalloproteases and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases in medial plica and pannus-like tissue contribute to knee osteoarthritis progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Chang Yang

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is characterized by degradation of the cartilage matrix, leading to pathologic changes in the joints. However, the pathogenic effects of synovial tissue inflammation on OA knees are not clear. To investigate whether the inflammation caused by the medial plica is involved in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis, we examined the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs, interleukin (IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α in the medial plica and pannus-like tissue in the knees of patients with medial compartment OA who underwent either arthroscopic medial release (stage II; 15 knee joints from 15 patients or total knee replacement (stage IV; 18 knee joints from 18 patients. MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-9, IL-1β, and TNF-α mRNA and protein levels measured, respectively, by quantitative real-time PCR and Quantibody human MMP arrays, were highly expressed in extracts of medial plica and pannus-like tissue from stage IV knee joints. Immunohistochemical staining also demonstrated high expression of MMP-2, MMP-3, and MMP-9 in plica and pannus-like tissue of stage IV OA knees and not in normal cartilage. Some TIMP/MMP ratios decreased significantly in both medial plica and pannus-like tissue as disease progressed from stage II to stage IV. Furthermore, the migration of cells from the pannus-like tissue was enhanced by IL-1β, while plica cell migration was enhanced by TNF-α. The results suggest that medial plica and pannus-like tissue may be involved in the process of cartilage degradation in medial compartment OA of the knee.

  15. Medial branch neurotomy in low back pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masala, Salvatore; Mammucari, Matteo; Simonetti, Giovanni; Nano, Giovanni; Marcia, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of pulsed radiofrequency medial branch dorsal ramus neurotomy in patients with facet joint syndrome. From January 2008 to April 2010, 92 patients with facet joint syndrome diagnosed by strict inclusion criteria and controlled diagnostic blocks undergone medial branch neurotomy. We did not exclude patients with failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS). Electrodes (20G) with 5-mm active tip were placed under fluoroscopy guide parallel to medial branch. Patients were followed up by physical examination and by Visual Analog Scale and Oswestry Disability Index at 1, 6, and 12 months. In all cases, pain improvement was statistically significant and so quality of life. Three non-FBSS patients had to undergo a second neurotomy because of non-satisfactory pain decrease. Complications were reported in no case. Medial branch radiofrequency neurotomy has confirmed its well-established effectiveness in pain and quality of life improvement as long as strict inclusion criteria be fulfilled and nerve ablation be accomplished by parallel electrode positioning. This statement can be extended also to FBSS patients. (orig.)

  16. Medial branch neurotomy in low back pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masala, Salvatore; Mammucari, Matteo; Simonetti, Giovanni [Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy University ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging, Rome (Italy); Nano, Giovanni [Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy University ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging, Rome (Italy); University ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Marcia, Stefano [S. Giovanni di Dio Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging, Cagliari (Italy)

    2012-07-15

    This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of pulsed radiofrequency medial branch dorsal ramus neurotomy in patients with facet joint syndrome. From January 2008 to April 2010, 92 patients with facet joint syndrome diagnosed by strict inclusion criteria and controlled diagnostic blocks undergone medial branch neurotomy. We did not exclude patients with failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS). Electrodes (20G) with 5-mm active tip were placed under fluoroscopy guide parallel to medial branch. Patients were followed up by physical examination and by Visual Analog Scale and Oswestry Disability Index at 1, 6, and 12 months. In all cases, pain improvement was statistically significant and so quality of life. Three non-FBSS patients had to undergo a second neurotomy because of non-satisfactory pain decrease. Complications were reported in no case. Medial branch radiofrequency neurotomy has confirmed its well-established effectiveness in pain and quality of life improvement as long as strict inclusion criteria be fulfilled and nerve ablation be accomplished by parallel electrode positioning. This statement can be extended also to FBSS patients. (orig.)

  17. The Relationship between Chondromalacia Patella, Medial Meniscal Tear and Medial Periarticular Bursitis in Patients with Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doner, Davut; Karatag, Ozan; Toprak, Canan Akgun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background This study investigated the presence of bursitis in the medial compartment of the knee (pes anserine, semimembranosus-tibial collateral ligament, and medial collateral ligament bursa) in osteoarthritis, chondromalacia patella and medial meniscal tears. Patients and methods Radiological findings of 100 patients undergoing magnetic resonance imaging with a preliminary diagnosis of knee pain were retrospectively evaluated by two radiologists. The first radiologist assessed all patients in terms of osteoarthritis, chondromalacia patella and medial meniscal tear. The second radiologist was blinded to these results and assessed the presence of bursitis in all patients. Results Mild osteoarthritis (grade I and II) was determined in 55 patients and severe osteoarthritis (grade III and IV) in 45 cases. At retropatellar cartilage evaluation, 25 patients were assessed as normal, while 29 patients were diagnosed with mild chondromalacia patella (grade I and II) and 46 with severe chondromalacia patella (grade III and IV). Medial meniscus tear was determined in 51 patients. Severe osteoarthritis and chondromalacia patella were positively correlated with meniscal tear (p chondromalacia patella (p = 0.023 and p = 0.479, respectively). Evaluation of lateral compartment bursae revealed lateral collateral ligament bursitis in 2 patients and iliotibial bursitis in 5 patients. Conclusions We observed a greater prevalence of bursitis in the medial compartment of the knee in patients with severe osteoarthritis and medial meniscus tear. PMID:29333118

  18. Prevalence of knee pain and knee OA in southern Sweden and the proportion that seeks medical care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turkiewicz, Aleksandra; Gerhardsson de Verdier, Maria; Engström, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of frequent knee pain in radiographic, symptomatic and clinically defined knee OA in middle-aged and elderly patients and the proportion that seeks medical care. METHODS: In 2007 a random sample of 10 000 56- to 84-year-old residents...... of Malmö, Sweden, were questioned about knee pain. We classified subjects reporting knee pain with a duration of at least 4 weeks as having frequent knee pain. A random sample of 1300 individuals with frequent knee pain and 650 without were invited for assessment by the ACR clinical knee OA criteria...... and for bilateral weight-bearing knee radiography. We considered a Kellgren-Lawrence grade ≥2 as radiographic knee OA and that in combination with frequent knee pain as symptomatic knee OA. By linkage with the Skåne Healthcare Register, we determined the proportion of subjects that had consulted for knee OA or pain...

  19. Effect of compression therapy on knee swelling and pain after total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Stig; Jensen, Niels J. F.; Andersen, Ida Bøgh

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Knee swelling after total knee arthroplasty may impair postoperative mobilisation and training, and as medical elastic compression stockings are well tolerated and effective to prevent oedema, haematoma and postoperative pain after venous surgery, we wanted to study whether this effect...... could be transferred to total knee arthroplasty surgery reducing postoperative swelling and pain and thereby facilitating mobilisation and improving patient-reported knee function. METHODS: In a randomised controlled study, 88 patients were randomised to use either a medical elastic compression stocking...... or no stocking from the first postoperative day and the following 4 weeks after total knee arthroplasty. Outcome measures were knee, calf and ankle swelling, knee flexion, pain and patient-reported knee function. RESULTS: Seventy per cent of the swelling had occurred before application of the stocking the day...

  20. Management of Medial Collateral Ligament Injury During Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Della Torre, MD

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Medial collateral ligament injury during primary total knee arthroplasty is a recognised complication potentially resulting in valgus instability, suboptimal patient outcomes and a higher rate of revision or reoperation. Options for management include primary repair with or without augmentation, reconstruction or immediate conversion to prosthesis with greater constraint, in conjunction with various postoperative rehabilitation protocols. Inconsistent recommendations throughout the orthopaedic literature have made the approach to managing this complication problematic. The objective of this study was to review the available literature to date comparing intraoperative and postoperative management options for primary total knee arthroplasty complicated by recognised injury to the medial collateral ligament. This systematic literature review was prospectively registered with PROSPERO (#CRD42014008866 and performed in accordance with PRISMA guidelines including a PRISMA flow diagram. Five articles satisfied the inclusion criteria. Each was a retrospective, observational cohort or case series with small numbers reported, inconsistent methodology and incompletely reported outcomes. Four of the five studies managing medial collateral ligament injury during total knee arthroplasty (47/84 patients with direct repair with or without autograft augmentation reported good outcomes with no revision or reoperation required for symptomatic instability over a follow-up period of 16 months to almost 8 years. The fifth study with a follow-up to 10 years and a high rate of conversion to unlinked semi constrained total knee arthroplasty implant (30/37 patients reported a greater incidence of revision due to instability, in patients in whom the medial collateral ligament injury was directly repaired without added constraint. Overall balance of evidence is in favour of satisfactory outcomes without symptomatic instability following direct repair with or without

  1. Knee pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fracture of the kneecap or other bones. Iliotibial band syndrome . Injury to the thick band that runs from your hip to the outside ... of your knee pain. When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your provider if: You cannot bear ...

  2. Effectiveness of Different Pain Control Methods in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis after Knee Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Lain Ming

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of patients with knee osteoarthritis has increased in tandem with population aging. Consequently, the number of knee arthroplasties has also risen. The postoperative pain is the biggest challenge faced by patients soon after knee arthroplasty; therefore, this study is among different methods for post-knee arthroplasty pain control. A prospective longitudinal research design was employed; 177 adult patients who proposed for primary knee arthroplasty were enrolled and recruited. The patients were divided into conventional Group 1 (n=120 and patient-controlled analgesia (PCA Group 2 (n=57 according to the treatment methods they received. All patients experience the highest pain level on the day of their surgery; women complained of higher pain levels than men did, while the PCA group had lower postoperative pain. Meanwhile, patients with general anesthesia experienced more pain than those with spinal anesthesia in postoperative period. Patients with a higher postoperative pain index have a smaller optimal knee flexion angle. The PCA group had lower postoperative pain; all patients experienced the highest pain level on the day of their surgery. The results of this study could serve as a reference for nurses where PCA ensures a better postoperative pain control and therefore facilitates recovery and improves the quality of nursing.

  3. Effect of subjective knee-joint pain on the laterality of knee extension strength and gait in elderly women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Hiroki; Demura, Shinichi

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the effect of subjective knee-joint pain on the laterality of knee extension strength and gait in elderly women. The subjects were 144 elderly women (62-94 years old; mean age 76.2±6.0 years; ±S.D.) who were divided into the following groups: 81 persons without knee-pain (no knee-pain group), 39 persons with the subjective pain in right or left knee (single knee-pain group), and 24 persons with the subjective pain in both knees (double knee-pain group). The subjects took a knee extension strength test and a 12 m maximum effort walk test. Knee extension strength, stance time, swing time, stride length, step length and swing speed were selected as parameters. A significant laterality was found in knee extension strength only in the one knee-pain group. The laterality of gait parameters was not found in all groups. In conclusion, elderly women who can perform daily living activity independently, even though having subjective pain in either knee or laterality in knee extension strength exertion show little laterality of gait during short distance walking. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Mechanical factors relate to pain in knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maly, Monica R; Costigan, Patrick A; Olney, Sandra J

    2008-07-01

    Pain experienced by people with knee osteoarthritis is related to psychosocial factors and damage to articular tissues and/or the pain pathway itself. Mechanical factors have been speculated to trigger this pain experience; yet mechanics have not been identified as a source of pain in this population. The purpose of this study was to identify whether mechanics could explain variance in pain intensity in people with knee osteoarthritis. Data from 53 participants with physician-diagnosed knee osteoarthritis (mean age=68.5 years; standard deviation=8.6 years) were analyzed. Pain intensity was reported on the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index. Mechanical measures included weight-bearing varus-valgus alignment, body mass index and isokinetic quadriceps torque. Gait analysis captured the range of adduction-abduction angle, range of flexion-extension angle and external knee adduction moment during level walking. Pain intensity was significantly related to the dynamic range of flexion-extension during gait and body mass index. A total of 29% of the variance in pain intensity was explained by mechanical variables. The range of flexion-extension explained 18% of variance in pain intensity. Body mass index added 11% to the model. The knee adduction moment was unrelated to pain intensity. The findings support that mechanical factors are related to knee osteoarthritis pain. Because limitations in flexion-extension range of motion and body size are modifiable factors, future research could examine whether interventions targeting these mechanics would facilitate pain management.

  5. Effect of knee joint icing on knee extension strength and knee pain early after total knee arthroplasty: a randomized cross-over study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Bente; Husted, Henrik; Kehlet, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the acute effect of knee joint icing on knee extension strength and knee pain in patients shortly after total knee arthroplasty.Design: A prospective, single-blinded, randomized, cross-over study.Setting: A fast-track orthopaedic arthroplasty unit at a university hospital.......Participants: Twenty patients (mean age 66 years; 10 women) scheduled for primary unilateral total knee arthroplasty.Interventions: The patients were treated on two days (day 7 and day 10) postoperatively. On one day they received 30 minutes of knee icing (active treatment) and on the other day they received 30...... minutes of elbow icing (control treatment). The order of treatments was randomized.Main outcome measures: Maximal knee extension strength (primary outcome), knee pain at rest and knee pain during the maximal knee extensions were measured 2-5 minutes before and 2-5 minutes after both treatments...

  6. Difference between right and left side in total knee and unicondylar knee replacement: An interesting observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasudevan Thirumal Selvan

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available We report an observation made about the differences between right and left side in case of total knee and unicondylar knee replacement. It was found that unicondylar knee replacement was performed more commonly on the left side (66%, as compared to only 34% on right side, where as total knee replacement was more common on the right side (64% as compared to 36% on left side. The exact clinical utility of this difference is yet to be known.

  7. Neuromuscular Exercise Post Partial Medial Meniscectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Michelle; Hinman, Rana S; Wrigley, Tim V

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the effects of a 12-week, home-based, physiotherapist-guided neuromuscular exercise program on the knee adduction moment (an indicator of mediolateral knee load distribution) in people with a medial arthroscopic partial meniscectomy within the past 3-12 months. METHODS......: An assessor-blinded, randomised controlled trial including people aged 30-50 years with no to mild pain following medial arthroscopic partial meniscectomy was conducted. Participants were randomly allocated to either a 12-week neuromuscular exercise program that targeted neutral lower limb alignment...... or a control group with no exercise. The exercise program included eight individual sessions with one of seven physiotherapists in private clinics, together with home exercises. Primary outcomes were the peak external knee adduction moment during normal pace walking and during a one-leg sit-to-stand. Secondary...

  8. Association Between Pain at Sites Outside the Knee and Knee Cartilage Volume Loss in Elderly People Without Knee Osteoarthritis: A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Feng; Laslett, Laura; Tian, Jing; Cicuttini, Flavia; Winzenberg, Tania; Ding, Changhai; Jones, Graeme

    2017-05-01

    Pain is common in the elderly. Knee pain may predict knee cartilage loss, but whether generalized pain is associated with knee cartilage loss is unclear. This study, therefore, aimed to determine whether pain at multiple sites predicts knee cartilage volume loss among community-dwelling older adults, and, if so, to explore potential mechanisms. Data from the prospective Tasmanian Older Adult Cohort study was utilized (n = 394, mean age 63 years, range 52-79 years). Experience of pain at multiple sites was assessed using a questionnaire at baseline. T1-weighted fat-saturated magnetic resonance imaging of the right knee was performed to assess the cartilage volume at baseline and after 2.6 years. Linear regression modeling was used with adjustment for potential confounders. The median number of painful sites was 3 (range 0-7). There was a dose-response relationship between the number of painful sites and knee cartilage volume loss in the lateral and total tibiofemoral compartments (lateral β = -0.28% per annum; total β = -0.25% per annum, both P for trend knee osteoarthritis (OA) (P pain medication, and knee structural abnormalities. The number of painful sites independently predicts knee cartilage volume loss, especially in people without knee OA, suggesting that widespread pain may be an early marker of more rapid knee cartilage loss in those without radiographic knee OA. The underlying mechanism is unclear, but it is independent of anthropometrics, physical activity, and knee structural abnormalities. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  9. Treatment of recurrent patellar dislocation via knee arthroscopy combined with C-arm fluoroscopy and reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Wang, Hongbo; He, Yun; Si, Yu; Zhou, Hongyu; Wang, Xin

    2018-06-01

    Recurrent patellar dislocations were treated via knee arthroscopy combined with C-arm fluoroscopy, and reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligaments. Between October 2013 and March 2017, 52 cases of recurrent patellar dislocation [27 males and 25 females; age, 16-47 years (mean, 21.90 years)] were treated. Arthroscopic exploration was performed and patellofemoral joint cartilage injuries were repaired. It was subsequently determined whether it was necessary to release the lateral patellofemoral support belt. Pre-operative measurements were used to decide whether tibial tubercle osteotomy was required. Medial patellofemoral ligaments were reconstructed using autologous semitendinosus tendons. Smith and Nephew model 3.5 line anchors were used to double-anchor the medial patellofemoral margin. On the femoral side, the medial patellofemoral ligament was fixed using 7-cm, absorbable, interfacial compression screws. All cases were followed for 1-40 months (average, 21 months). The Q angle, tibial tuberosity trochlear groove distance, Insall-Salvati index, patellofemoral angle, lateral patellofemoral angle and lateral shift were evaluated on X-Ray images using the picture archiving and communication system. Subjective International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) knee joint functional scores and Lysholm scores were recorded. Post-operative fear was absent, and no patellar re-dislocation or re-fracture was noted during follow-up. At the end of follow-up, the patellofemoral angle (0.22±4.23°), lateral patellofemoral angle (3.44±1.30°), and lateral shift (0.36+0.14°) differed significantly from the pre-operative values (all, Ppatellofemoral ligament was effective.

  10. Interposition of the posterior cruciate ligament into the medial compartment of the knee joint on coronal magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Su; Yoon, Young Cheol; Park, Ki Jeong; Wang, Joon Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Bong Keun [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the overall prevalence and clinical significance of interposition of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) into the medial compartment of the knee joint in coronal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We retrospectively reviewed 317 consecutive patients referred for knee MRI at our institution between October 2009 and December 2009. Interposition of the PCL into the medial compartment of the knee joint on proton coronal MRI was evaluated dichotomously (i.e., present or absent). We analyzed the interposition according to its prevalence as well as its relationship with right-left sidedness, gender, age, and disease categories (osteoarthritis, anterior cruciate ligament tear, and medial meniscus tear). Prevalence of interposition of PCL into the medial compartment of the knee joint was 47.0% (149/317). There was no right (50.0%, 83/166) to left (43.7%, 66/151) or male (50.3%, 87/173) to female (43.1%, 62/144) differences in the prevalence. There was no significant association between the prevalence and age, or the disease categories. Interposition of the PCL into the medial compartment of the knee joint is observed in almost half of patients on proton coronal MRI of the knee. Its presence is not associated with any particular factors including knee pathology and may be regarded as a normal MR finding.

  11. The effect on knee-joint load of instruction in analgesic use compared with neuromuscular exercise in patients with knee osteoarthritis: study protocol for a randomized, single-blind, controlled trial (the EXERPHARMA trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, Brian; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders; Søndergaard, Jens; Christensen, Robin; Andriacchi, Thomas P; Roos, Ewa M

    2014-11-15

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a mechanically driven disease, and it is suggested that medial tibiofemoral knee-joint load increases with pharmacologic pain relief, indicating that pharmacologic pain relief may be positively associated with disease progression. Treatment modalities that can both relieve pain and reduce knee-joint load would be preferable. The knee-joint load is influenced by functional alignment of the trunk, pelvis, and lower-limb segments with respect to the knee, as well as the ground-reaction force generated during movement. Neuromuscular exercise can influence knee load and decrease knee pain. It includes exercises to improve balance, muscle activation, functional alignment, and functional knee stability. The primary objective of this randomized controlled trial (RCT) is to investigate the efficacy of a NEuroMuscular EXercise (NEMEX) therapy program, compared with optimized analgesics and antiinflammatory drug use, on the measures of knee-joint load in people with mild to moderate medial tibiofemoral knee osteoarthritis. One hundred men and women with mild to moderate medial knee osteoarthritis will be recruited from general medical practices and randomly allocated (1:1) to one of two 8-week treatments, either (a) NEMEX therapy twice a week or (b) information on the recommended use of analgesics and antiinflammatory drugs (acetaminophen and oral NSAIDs) via a pamphlet and video materials. The primary outcome is change in knee load during walking (the Knee Index, a composite score of the first external peak total reaction moment on the knee joint from all three planes based on 3D movement analysis) after 8 weeks of intervention. Secondary outcomes include changes in the external peak knee-adduction moment and impulse and functional performance measures, in addition to changes in self-reported pain, function, health status, and quality of life. These findings will help determine whether 8 weeks of neuromuscular exercise is superior to optimized use

  12. Patient-Controlled Oral Analgesia for Postoperative Pain Management Following Total Knee Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patti Kastanias

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate whether patient-controlled oral analgesia (PCOA used by individuals receiving a total knee replacement could reduce pain, increase patient satisfaction, reduce opioid use and/or reduce opioid side effects when compared with traditional nurse (RN-administered oral analgesia.

  13. Association of knee pain and different definitions of knee osteoarthritis with health-related quality of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiadaliri, A. A.; Lamm, C.J.; Gerhardsson de Verdier, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background: While the impact of knee pain and knee osteoarthritis (OA) on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) has been investigated in the literature, there is a lack of knowledge on the impact of different definitions of OA on HRQoL. The main aim of this study was to measure and compare...... among references (neither knee pain nor OA) was 42 %. The participants with knee pain and OA had all HRQoL measures lower compared to those with knee pain but no OA. The ACR clinical definition of knee OA was associated with lower HRQoL than the definition based on radiographic knee OA (adjusted...

  14. Arthroscopic medial meniscus trimming or repair under nerve blocks: Which nerves should be blocked?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, AM; Abd-Elmaksoud, AM

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to determine the role of the sciatic and obturator nerve blocks (in addition to femoral block) in providing painless arthroscopic medial meniscus trimming/repair. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty patients with medial meniscus tear, who had been scheduled to knee arthroscopy, were planned to be included in this controlled prospective double-blind study. The patients were randomly allocated into three equal groups; FSO, FS, and FO. The femoral, sciatic, and obturator nerves were blocked in FSO groups. The femoral and sciatic nerves were blocked in FS group, while the femoral and obturator nerves were blocked in FO group. Intraoperative pain and its causative surgical maneuver were recorded. Results: All the patients (n = 7, 100%) in FO group had intraoperative pain. The research was terminated in this group but completed in FS and FSO groups (40 patients each). During valgus positioning of the knee for surgical management of the medial meniscus tear, the patients in FS group experienced pain more frequently than those in FSO group (P = 0.005). Conclusion: Adding a sciatic nerve block to the femoral nerve block is important for painless knee arthroscopy. Further adding of an obturator nerve block may be needed when a valgus knee position is required to manage the medial meniscus tear. PMID:27375382

  15. CRPS Knee: How frequently encountered in differential diagnosis of Knee pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Aakanksha; Agarwal, Anil

    2018-04-13

    We have read with great interest the paper by Catelijne M. van Bussel [1] recently published in Pain Practice. I wish to congratulate the authors for their valuable contributions. In the said article, 12 patients who had complex regional pain syndrome confined to the knee have been included. Though reports have been published involving primarily the knee after total knee arthroplasty [2,3] the incidence of CRPS knee following trauma or otherwise is not well appreciated. We would have appreciated if presence or absence of any inciting event for the development CRPS knee in these 12 patients could be mentioned, which could be helpful in a better diagnosis and management of the patients with CRPS knee. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Relationships between the center of pressure and the movements of the ankle and knee joints during the stance phase in patients with severe medial knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukaya, Takashi; Mutsuzaki, Hirotaka; Okubo, Tomoyuki; Mori, Koichi; Wadano, Yasuyoshi

    2016-08-01

    The knee joint movement during the stance phase is affected by altered ankle movement and the center of pressure (COP). However the relationships between changes in the center of pressure (COP) and the altered kinematics and kinetics of the ankle and knee joints in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationships between changes in the COP and the altered kinematic and kinetic variables in ankle and knee joints during the stance phase in patients with medial knee OA. Fourteen patients with knee OA (21 knees) and healthy subjects were assessed by gait analysis using an eight-camera motion analysis system to record forward and lateral shifts in the COP and the angle and net internal moments of the knee and ankle joint. Spearman rank-correlation coefficients were used to determine the relationship between these results. In knees with medial OA, lateral shifts in the COP were correlated with knee flexion angle. Lateral shifts in the COP were correlated with the second peak of the knee extensor moment and correlated with the knee abductor moment. In patients with medial knee OA, lateral shifts in the COP were negatively correlated with the kinematic and kinetic variables in the sagittal plane of the knee joints. Controlling such lateral shifts in the COP may thus be an effective intervention for mechanical loads on the knee during the stance phase in patients with knee OA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Experimental knee pain evoke spreading hyperalgesia and facilitated temporal summation of pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Tanja Schjødt; Henriksen, Marius; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the deep-tissue pressure pain sensitivity and temporal summation of pain within and around healthy knees exposed to experimental pain. DESIGN: The study was designed as a randomized crossover trial, with each subject tested on 1 day. SETTING: All tests were carried...... occasions: baseline, immediately after the injection, and when pain had vanished. Assessments sites were located in the peripatellar region, vastus lateralis, and tibialis anterior muscles. RESULTS: The experimental knee pain model demonstrated 1) hyperalgesia to pressure stimulation on the infrapatellar...... fat pad during experimental pain, and 2) facilitated temporal summation of pressure pain at the infrapatellar fat pad and knee-related muscles. CONCLUSION: The increased sensitivity and temporal summation found in this study were exclusive to deep -tissue with no contralateral decreased pain...

  18. Preoperative Pain Neuroscience Education Combined With Knee Joint Mobilization for Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lluch, Enrique; Dueñas, Lirios; Falla, Deborah; Baert, Isabel; Meeus, Mira; Sánchez-Frutos, José; Nijs, Jo

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to first compare the effects of a preoperative treatment combining pain neuroscience education (PNE) with knee joint mobilization versus biomedical education with knee joint mobilization on central sensitization (CS) in patients with knee osteoarthritis, both before and after surgery. Second, we wanted to compare the effects of both interventions on knee pain, disability, and psychosocial variables. Forty-four patients with knee osteoarthritis were allocated to receive 4 sessions of either PNE combined with knee joint mobilization or biomedical education with knee joint mobilization before surgery. All participants completed self-administered questionnaires and quantitative sensory testing was performed at baseline, after treatment and at a 1 month follow-up (all before surgery), and at 3 months after surgery. Significant and clinically relevant differences before and after surgery were found after treatments for both knee pain and disability, and some measures of CS (ie, widespread hyperalgesia, CS inventory), with no significant between-group differences. Other indicators of CS (ie, conditioned pain modulation, temporal summation) did not change over time following either treatment, and in some occasions the observed changes were not in the expected direction. Patients receiving PNE with knee joint mobilization achieved greater improvements in psychosocial variables (pain catastrophizing, kinesiophobia) both before and after surgery. Preoperative PNE combined with knee joint mobilization did not produce any additional benefits over time for knee pain and disability, and CS measures compared with biomedical education with knee joint mobilization. Superior effects in the PNE with knee joint mobilization group were only observed for psychosocial variables related to pain catastrophizing and kinesiophobia.

  19. Knee adduction moment and medial contact force--facts about their correlation during gait.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Kutzner

    Full Text Available The external knee adduction moment is considered a surrogate measure for the medial tibiofemoral contact force and is commonly used to quantify the load reducing effect of orthopedic interventions. However, only limited and controversial data exist about the correlation between adduction moment and medial force. The objective of this study was to examine whether the adduction moment is indeed a strong predictor for the medial force by determining their correlation during gait. Instrumented knee implants with telemetric data transmission were used to measure tibiofemoral contact forces in nine subjects. Gait analyses were performed simultaneously to the joint load measurements. Skeletal kinematics, as well as the ground reaction forces and inertial parameters, were used as inputs in an inverse dynamics approach to calculate the external knee adduction moment. Linear regression analysis was used to analyze the correlation between adduction moment and medial force for the whole stance phase and separately for the early and late stance phase. Whereas only moderate correlations between adduction moment and medial force were observed throughout the whole stance phase (R(2 = 0.56 and during the late stance phase (R(2 = 0.51, a high correlation was observed at the early stance phase (R(2 = 0.76. Furthermore, the adduction moment was highly correlated to the medial force ratio throughout the whole stance phase (R(2 = 0.75. These results suggest that the adduction moment is a surrogate measure, well-suited to predicting the medial force ratio throughout the whole stance phase or medial force during the early stance phase. However, particularly during the late stance phase, moderate correlations and high inter-individual variations revealed that the predictive value of the adduction moment is limited. Further analyses are necessary to examine whether a combination of other kinematic, kinetic or neuromuscular factors may lead to a more

  20. Prediction of medial and lateral contact force of the knee joint during normal and turning gait after total knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purevsuren, Tserenchimed; Dorj, Ariunzaya; Kim, Kyungsoo; Kim, Yoon Hyuk

    2016-04-01

    The computational modeling approach has commonly been used to predict knee joint contact forces, muscle forces, and ligament loads during activities of daily living. Knowledge of these forces has several potential applications, for example, within design of equipment to protect the knee joint from injury and to plan adequate rehabilitation protocols, although clinical applications of computational models are still evolving and one of the limiting factors is model validation. The objective of this study was to extend previous modeling technique and to improve the validity of the model prediction using publicly available data set of the fifth "Grand Challenge Competition to Predict In Vivo Knee Loads." A two-stage modeling approach, which combines conventional inverse dynamic analysis (the first stage) with a multi-body subject-specific lower limb model (the second stage), was used to calculate medial and lateral compartment contact forces. The validation was performed by direct comparison of model predictions and experimental measurement of medial and lateral compartment contact forces during normal and turning gait. The model predictions of both medial and lateral contact forces showed strong correlations with experimental measurements in normal gait (r = 0.75 and 0.71) and in turning gait trials (r = 0.86 and 0.72), even though the current technique over-estimated medial compartment contact forces in swing phase. The correlation coefficient, Sprague and Geers metrics, and root mean squared error indicated that the lateral contact forces were predicted better than medial contact forces in comparison with the experimental measurements during both normal and turning gait trials. © IMechE 2016.

  1. Cross-sectional and Longitudinal Associations between Knee Joint Effusion Synovitis and Knee Pain in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; Jin, Xingzhong; Han, Weiyu; Cao, Yuelong; Halliday, Andrew; Blizzard, Leigh; Pan, Faming; Antony, Benny; Cicuttini, Flavia; Jones, Graeme; Ding, Changhai

    2016-01-01

    To describe the cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between knee regional effusion synovitis and knee pain in older adults. Data from a population-based random sample (n = 880, mean age 62 yrs, 50% women) were used. Baseline knee joint effusion synovitis was graded (0-3) using T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the suprapatellar pouch, central portion, posterior femoral recess, and subpopliteal recess. Effusion synovitis of the whole joint was defined as a score of ≥ 2 in any subregion. Other knee structural (including cartilage, bone marrow, and menisci) lesions were assessed by MRI at baseline. Knee pain was assessed by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index questionnaire at baseline and 2.6 years later. Multivariable analyses were performed after adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, and other structural lesions. The prevalence of effusion synovitis was 67%. Suprapatellar pouch effusion synovitis was significantly and independently associated with increased total and nonweight-bearing knee pain in both cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses (for an increase in total knee pain of ≥ 5, RR 1.26 per grade, 95% CI 1.04-1.52), and increased weight-bearing knee pain in longitudinal analysis only. Effusion synovitis in posterior femoral recess and central portion were independently associated with increases in nonweight-bearing pain (RR 1.63 per grade, 95% CI 1.32-2.01 and RR 1.29 per grade, 95% CI 1.01-1.65, respectively) in longitudinal analyses only. Knee joint effusion synovitis has independent associations with knee pain in older adults. Suprapatellar pouch effusion synovitis is associated with nonweight-bearing and weight-bearing knee pain, while posterior femoral recess and central portion effusion synovitis are only associated with nonweight-bearing pain.

  2. The photographic knee pain map: locating knee pain with an instrument developed for diagnostic, communication and research purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elson, D W; Jones, S; Caplan, N; Stewart, S; St Clair Gibson, A; Kader, D F

    2011-12-01

    Pain maps are used to determine the location of pain. Knee pain maps have previously been described, but only one study has reported on reliability and none report validity. The present study describes the generation of a photographic knee pain map (PKPM) together with its validity and reliability. A photographic representation of a pair of knees was chosen by 26 patients, (66.7%) from a group of 39. The selected photograph was modified and a template of anatomical zones was generated. The opinions of 25 independent subject matter experts were canvassed and validity ratios calculated for these zones, ranged from 0.28 to 0.84. Hypothetical comparisons were made between the PKPM and an alternative knee pain map, in a cross-sectional group of 26 patients (35 knees). Convergent patterns of validity were found where hypothesised. Reliability was determined using a different cohort of 44 patients (58 knees) who completed the PKPM before and after a sampling delay. Four of these patients were excluded with a short sampling delay. Calculated agreement of test-retest reproducibility was fair to good. All of the completed PKPM (151 knees) were then subject to further analysis where inter-rater reproducibility was good to very good and intra-rater reproducibility was very good. The PKPM is readily accessible to patients with low completion burden. It is both valid and reliable and we suggest it can be used in both clinical and research settings. Further studies are planned to explore its predictive ability as a diagnostic tool. The PKPM can be found at www.photographickneepainmap.com. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. No Exacerbation of Knee Joint Pain and Effusion Following Preoperative Progressive Resistance Training in Patients Scheduled for Total Knee Arthroplasty: Secondary Analyses From a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoffer, Birgit; Dalgas, Ulrik; Maribo, Thomas; Søballe, Kjeld; Mechlenburg, Inger

    2017-11-09

    Preoperative progressive resistance training (PRT) is controversial in patients scheduled for total knee arthroplasty (TKA), because of the concern that it may exacerbate knee joint pain and effusion. To examine whether preoperative PRT initiated 5 weeks prior to TKA would exacerbate pain and knee effusion, and would allow a progressively increased training load throughout the training period that would subsequently increase muscle strength. Secondary analyses from a randomized controlled trial. University Hospital and a Regional Hospital. A total of 30 patients who were scheduled for TKA due to osteoarthritis and assigned as the intervention group. Patients underwent unilateral PRT (3 sessions per week). Exercise loading was 12 repetitions maximum (RM) with progression toward 8 RM. The training program consisted of 6 exercises performed unilaterally. Before and after each training session, knee joint pain was rated on an 11-point scale, effusion was assessed by measuring the knee joint circumference, and training load was recorded. The first and last training sessions were initiated by 1 RM testing of unilateral leg press, unilateral knee extension, and unilateral knee flexion. The median pain change score from before to after each training session was 0 at all training sessions. The average increase in knee joint effusion across the 12 training sessions was a mean 0.16 cm ± 0.23 cm. No consistent increase in knee joint effusion after training sessions during the training period was found (P = .21). Training load generally increased, and maximal muscle strength improved as follows: unilateral leg press: 18% ± 30% (P = .03); unilateral knee extension: 81% ± 156% (P knee flexion: 53% ± 57% (P knee joint pain and effusion, despite a substantial progression in loading and increased muscle strength. Concerns for side effects such as pain and effusion after PRT seem unfounded. To be determined. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Arthroscopic meniscectomy in medial compartment osteoarthritis of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, Joji; Shimoyama, Gishichiro; Shinozaki, Toshiro; Nagata, Kensei

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to evaluate the results of arthroscopic meniscectomy in medial compartment osteoarthritis of the knee. The operation was performed on 25 knee joints (8 male, 17 female) with the mean age of 67 years. The mean period of follow-up was 19 months. Clinical results were more or less excellent, but radiological assessment suggested slight osteoarthritic changes. In addition, two cases progressed to subchondral bone collapse. Of 12 cases which had no bone marrow edema on MRI before surgery, six (50%) cases showed it at follow-up. These findings suggest a possible relationship between arthroscopic meniscectomy and later appearance of osteonecrosis in some cases. (author)

  5. Medial tibial pain. A prospective study of its cause among military recruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgrom, C; Giladi, M; Stein, M; Kashtan, H; Margulies, J; Chisin, R; Steinberg, R; Swissa, A; Aharonson, Z

    1986-12-01

    In a prospective study of 295 infantry recruits during 14 weeks of basic training, 41% had medial tibial pain. Routine scintigraphic evaluation in cases of medial tibial bone pain showed that 63% had abnormalities. A stress fracture was found in 46%. Only two patients had periostitis. None had ischemic medial compartment syndrome. Physical examination could not differentiate between cases with medial tibial bone pain secondary to stress fractures and those with scintigraphically normal tibias. When both pain and swelling were localized in the middle one-third of the tibia, the lesion most likely proved to be a stress fracture.

  6. Dietary Fiber Intake in Relation to Knee Pain Trajectory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhaoli; Lu, Na; Niu, Jingbo; Felson, David T; Zhang, Yuqing

    2017-09-01

    Dietary fiber may reduce knee pain, in part by lowering body weight and reducing inflammation. In this study, we assessed whether fiber intake was associated with patterns of knee pain development. In a prospective, multicenter cohort of 4,796 men and women ages 45-79 years with or at risk of knee osteoarthritis, participants underwent annual followups for 8 years. Dietary fiber intake was estimated using a validated food frequency questionnaire at baseline. Group-based trajectory modeling was used to identify Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index pain trajectories, which were assessed for associations with dietary fiber intake using polytomous regression models. Of the eligible participants (4,470 persons and 8,940 knees, mean ± SD age 61.3 ± 9.1 years, 58% women), 4.9% underwent knee replacement and were censored at the time of surgery. Four distinct knee pain patterns were identified: no pain (34.5%), mild pain (38.1%), moderate pain (21.2%), and severe pain (6.2%). Dietary total fiber was inversely related to membership in the moderate or severe pain groups (P ≤ 0.006 for trend for both). Subjects in the highest versus those in the lowest quartile of total fiber intake had a lower risk of belonging to the moderate pain pattern group (odds ratio [OR] 0.76 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.61-0.93]) and severe pain pattern group (OR 0.56 [95% CI 0.41-0.78]). Similar results were found with grain fiber and these 2 pain pattern groups. Our findings suggest that a high intake of dietary total or grain fiber, particularly the recommended daily fiber average intake of 25 gm per day, is associated with a lower risk of developing moderate or severe knee pain over time. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  7. Pes anserine bursitis: incidence in symptomatic knees and clinical presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rennie, W.J. [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Saifuddin, A. [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); University College London, Institute of Orthopaedics and Musculoskeletal Sciences (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-01

    To determine the prevalence and associated clinical symptoms of pes anserine bursitis in symptomatic adult knees. A retrospective review was performed of the reports of 509 knee MRI studies obtained from July 1998 to June 2004 on 488 patients presenting to an orthopaedic clinic with knee pain suspected to be due to internal derangement. The MRI studies and case histories of all patients reported to have pes anserine bursitis were reviewed. The management of these patients was also noted. The prevalence of pes anserine bursitis as detected on MRI is 2.5%. The commonest clinical presentation was pain along the medial joint line mimicking a medial meniscal tear. We suggest that an accurate diagnosis of pes anserine bursitis on MRI will help prevent unnecessary arthroscopy and possibly initiate early treatment of the condition. Axial imaging is important in these cases to differentiate the bursa from other medial fluid collections. (orig.)

  8. Pes anserine bursitis: incidence in symptomatic knees and clinical presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rennie, W.J.; Saifuddin, A.

    2005-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and associated clinical symptoms of pes anserine bursitis in symptomatic adult knees. A retrospective review was performed of the reports of 509 knee MRI studies obtained from July 1998 to June 2004 on 488 patients presenting to an orthopaedic clinic with knee pain suspected to be due to internal derangement. The MRI studies and case histories of all patients reported to have pes anserine bursitis were reviewed. The management of these patients was also noted. The prevalence of pes anserine bursitis as detected on MRI is 2.5%. The commonest clinical presentation was pain along the medial joint line mimicking a medial meniscal tear. We suggest that an accurate diagnosis of pes anserine bursitis on MRI will help prevent unnecessary arthroscopy and possibly initiate early treatment of the condition. Axial imaging is important in these cases to differentiate the bursa from other medial fluid collections. (orig.)

  9. Altered spinal microRNA-146a and the microRNA-183 cluster contribute to osteoarthritic pain in knee joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Kroin, Jeffrey S; Kc, Ranjan; Gibson, Gary; Chen, Di; Corbett, Grant T; Pahan, Kalipada; Fayyaz, Sana; Kim, Jae-Sung; van Wijnen, Andre J; Suh, Joon; Kim, Su-Gwan; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to examine whether altered expression of microRNAs in central nervous system components is pathologically linked to chronic knee joint pain in osteoarthritis. A surgical animal model for knee joint OA was generated by medial meniscus transection in rats followed by behavioral pain tests. Relationships between pathological changes in knee joint and development of chronic joint pain were examined by histology and imaging analyses. Alterations in microRNAs associated with OA-evoked pain sensation were determined in bilateral lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and the spinal dorsal horn by microRNA array followed by individual microRNA analyses. Gain- and loss-of-function studies of selected microRNAs (miR-146a and miR-183 cluster) were conducted to identify target pain mediators regulated by these selective microRNAs in glial cells. The ipsilateral hind leg displayed significantly increased hyperalgesia after 4 weeks of surgery, and sensitivity was sustained for the remainder of the 8-week experimental period (F = 341, p pain was correlated with pathological changes in the knee joints as assessed by histological and imaging analyses. MicroRNA analyses showed that miR-146a and the miR-183 cluster were markedly reduced in the sensory neurons in DRG (L4/L5) and spinal cord from animals experiencing knee joint OA pain. The downregulation of miR-146a and/or the miR-183 cluster in the central compartments (DRG and spinal cord) are closely associated with the upregulation of inflammatory pain mediators. The corroboration between decreases in these signature microRNAs and their specific target pain mediators were further confirmed by gain- and loss-of-function analyses in glia, the major cellular component of the central nervous system (CNS). MicroRNA therapy using miR-146a and the miR-183 cluster could be powerful therapeutic intervention for OA in alleviating joint pain and concomitantly regenerating peripheral knee joint cartilage. © 2013

  10. OCCURRENCE OF EARLY KNEE ARTHROSIS FOLLOWING TOTAL MENISCECTOMIES IN YOUTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasa Milenkovic

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of early knee arthrosis following early total meniscectomy is a significant orthopedic, social and economical problem. Arthroscopic surgery shows the role and significance of the menisci for normal knee functioning. The outcome of 19 knee arthroscopies are presented; patients are of male sex, average age 39 (from 34 to 45. All patients underwent knee arthrotomy and total medial and lateral meniscectomy before the age of 25. All patients were active sportsmen. 12 arthroscopies of the right knee and 7 arthroscopies of the left one were done. In 13 patients, medial knee arthrosis following medial meniscectomy was found. One patient had lateral knee arthrosis and degeneration of the medial meniscus following lateral meniscectomy . The same patient had the total rupture of LCA. The remaining 5 patients had lateral knee arthrosis following lateral meniscectomy. One or more loose bodies of cartilaginous origin were found in 8 patients. All the operated patients had evident early signs of initial or progressive knee arthrosis confirmed or diagnosed arthroscopically. Knee arthroscopy in early arthroses following knee meniscectomies in youth can relieve the pain and slow down disease progression. A permanent solution to the problem is possible only with unicompartmental knee arthroplasty.

  11. Study of the lateral raise in foot wear for the management of medial compartment degenerative joint disease of knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, A.; Manawar, A.

    2014-01-01

    A wide spread disease, which may lead the patient to severe outcomes e.g. pain, loss of joint motion, inflexibility and even disability, is Knee osteoarthritis (OA). It is most common among adults of older age and should not be ignored at all. Literature does not show any clear pathogenesis for occurrence of Knee OA, but most of the indications point toward biomechanical stresses which may influence the articular cartilage and sub chondral bone. Objective: The Aim of this study is to become aware of the effects of physical therapy with and without laterally raised footwear in the management of medial knee osteoarthritis. Methodology: We have used experimental comparative study in 35 patients which were randomly selected from Department of Physiotherapy, Fatima Memorial Hospital, Shadman, Lahore. The study consisted of 2 groups, Group I (Experimental Group): In experimental group, patients were treated with laterally raised foot wear and physical therapy both. Group II (Control Group): Whereas in control group patients were treated by physical therapy alone. Kellgren and Lawrence (KL) scale was used to assess radiograph of the knee joints after an anteroposterior weight-bearing standing. The assessment of disease in patients was done by using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) Index, Muscle flexibility, Muscle strengthening and Tolerance scales. Results: In group-I the mean age of patients observed was 59.52+-13.66 years and 65+-12.87 years in Group-II. In Group-I, 9 (52.9%) patients were males and 8 (47.1%) patients were females while in Group-II, 9 patients (50%) were male and 9 (50%) were female. In Group-I 2 (11.8%) patients used flat and open shoes, 6 (35.3%) used flat and close shoe, 3 (17.6%) patients used dress shoes and 2 (11.8%) used flat shoes. In Group-I, the frequency of patients wearing laterally raised foot wear in terms of duration was; 5 (29.4%) patients for 20 days, 4 (23.5%) for 24 days, 4 (23.5%) for 25 days, whilst 2 patients

  12. Ten-year survival and patient-reported outcomes of a medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty incorporating an all-polyethylene tibial component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Chloe E H; Wade, Frazer A; MacDonald, Deborah; Nutton, Richard W

    2018-05-01

    Biomechanical studies have suggested that proximal tibial strain is elevated in UKAs incorporating all-polyethylene tibial components with concern that this leads to premature failure. This study reports minimum 10-year outcomes for a UKA incorporating an all-polyethylene tibial component to determine whether these concerns were realised. 109 fixed bearing UKAs (97 patients, mean age 68 (range 48-87), 54/97 (56%) female) with all-polyethylene tibial components were followed up for ≥ 10 years with Oxford Knee Scores, Forgotten Joint Scores and Kaplan-Meier analysis. 106/109 implants were 7 mm, 3 were 9.5 mm. Ten-year survival was 85.5% (78.6-92.4 95% CI) with the end-point failure for any reason. Unexplained pain was the commonest mode of failure (6/17) followed by lateral compartment osteoarthritis (5/17) and tibial subsidence/loosening (4/17). Revision rate was highest at 2-5 years due to revisions for unexplained pain. Ten-year survival was worse in patients  30 (p = 0.017) and in those with postoperative increases in medial tibial sclerosis (p  30 was 2.9 (1.2-6.9 95% CI). In those with intact UKAs at 10 years, mean Oxford Knee Score was 34.8 ± 10.7, Forgotten Joint Score was 37.9 ± 26.7 and 96% were satisfied with their knee. The high rate of early failure between 2 and 5 years in this all-polyethylene tibial component UKA did not persist in the long term. Though medial proximal tibial metabolic changes appear to persist they are not necessarily symptomatic. BMI > 30 and age < 65 years were significant risk factors for revision.

  13. The Relationship Between Early-Stage Knee Osteoarthritis and Lower-Extremity Alignment, Joint Laxity, and Subjective Scores of Pain, Stiffness, and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks-Little, Charlie A; Peindl, Richard D; Hubbard-Turner, Tricia J; Cordova, Mitchell L

    2016-08-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a debilitating disease that affects an estimated 27 million Americans. Changes in lower-extremity alignment and joint laxity have been found to redistribute the medial and/or lateral loads at the joint. However, the effect that changes in anteroposterior knee-joint laxity have on lower-extremity alignment and function in individuals with knee OA remains unclear. To examine anteroposterior knee-joint laxity, lower-extremity alignment, and subjective pain, stiffness, and function scores in individuals with early-stage knee OA and matched controls and to determine if a relationship exists among these measures. Case control. Sports-medicine research laboratory. 18 participants with knee OA and 18 healthy matched controls. Participants completed the Western Ontario McMaster (WOMAC) osteoarthritis questionnaire and were tested for total anteroposterior knee-joint laxity (A-P) and knee-joint alignment (ALIGN). WOMAC scores, A-P (mm), and ALIGN (°). A significant multivariate main effect for group (Wilks' Λ = 0.30, F7,26 = 8.58, P Knee-OA participants differed in WOMAC scores (P knee OA had worse pain, stiffness, and functional outcome scores than the matched controls; however, ALIGN and A-P were no different. There was no association identified among participants' subjective scores, ALIGN, or A-P measures in this study.

  14. Half of 12-15-year-olds with knee pain still have pain after one year

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathleff, Camilla Rams; Olesen, Jens Lykkegaard; Roos, Ewa M.

    2013-01-01

    knee pain after one year. Funding: Danish Rheumatism Association, The Association of Danish Physiotherapists Research Fund and The Obel Family Foundation. None of the funders have any role in the study other than to provide funding. Trial registration: Ethical approval was obtained from the local...... adolescents with and without self-reported knee pain, 2) investigate how many adolescents still have knee pain after one year and 3) identify risk factors for one-year persistence of knee pain. Material and methods: The design was a prospective cohort study and a nested case-control study. In September 2011......, a total of 768 adolescents between 12-15 years of age from schools in the municipality of Aalborg answered a questionnaire on demographics, sports participation, current pain and HRQoL. After one year, adolescents who reported knee pain at first contact were again contacted by telephone and asked...

  15. Effects of proprioceptive circuit exercise on knee joint pain and muscle function in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Sung-Bum; Park, Gi Duck; Kim, Sang-Soo

    2015-08-01

    [Purpose] This study applied proprioceptive circuit exercise to patients with degenerative knee osteoarthritis and examined its effects on knee joint muscle function and the level of pain. [Subjects] In this study, 14 patients with knee osteoarthritis in two groups, a proprioceptive circuit exercise group (n = 7) and control group (n = 7), were examined. [Methods] IsoMed 2000 (D&R Ferstl GmbH, Hemau, Germany) was used to assess knee joint muscle function, and a Visual Analog Scale was used to measure pain level. [Results] In the proprioceptive circuit exercise group, knee joint muscle function and pain levels improved significantly, whereas in the control group, no significant improvement was observed. [Conclusion] A proprioceptive circuit exercise may be an effective way to strengthen knee joint muscle function and reduce pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

  16. Radiographic joint space narrowing in osteoarthritis of the knee: relationship to meniscal tears and duration of pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Wing P.; Huang, Guo-Shu; Hsu, Shu-Mei; Chang, Yue-Cune; Ho, Wei-Pin

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess, with knee radiography, joint space narrowing (JSN) and its relationship to meniscal tears, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures, articular cartilage erosion, and duration of pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis. A total of 140 patients who had knee osteoarthritis and underwent primary total knee replacement (TKR) surgery, with unicompartmental medial tibiofemoral JSN (grade 1 or greater) and normal lateral compartments, were recruited. Polytomous logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between JSN and risk factors. All patients with JSN were categorized as grade 1 (n=14, 10.0%), grade 2 (n=64, 45.7%), or grade 3 (n=62, 44.3%). Women presented with indications for a TKR at a younger age than men (mean age, 69 vs 73 years, P<0.05). There were 123 (87.9%) meniscal tears and 58 (41.4%) partial (insufficient or attenuated ACL fibers) and 10 (7.1%) complete ACL ruptures; 115 of 134 (85.8%) patients had moderate to severe cartilage erosion. A higher grade of JSN was correlated with a higher frequency of meniscal tears [odds ratio (OR) 6.00, 95% CI 1.29-27.96 for grade 2 vs grade 1 JSN] and duration of knee pain (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.01-1.53 for grade 3 vs grade 1 JSN). A higher grade of JSN was not correlated with a higher frequency of ACL rupture or articular cartilage erosion. A higher grade of JSN is associated with a higher frequency of meniscal tears and long duration of knee pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis. (orig.)

  17. Radiographic joint space narrowing in osteoarthritis of the knee: relationship to meniscal tears and duration of pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Wing P. [Taipei Medical University, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Taipei (China); Taipei Medical University-Wan Fang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Taipei (China); Huang, Guo-Shu [Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Taipei (China); Hsu, Shu-Mei [Taipei Medical University, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Taipei (China); National Taiwan University, Department of Public Health, Taipei (China); Chang, Yue-Cune [Tamkang University, Department of Mathematics, Taipei County (China); Ho, Wei-Pin [Taipei Medical University-Wan Fang Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Taipei (China)

    2008-10-15

    The objective of this study was to assess, with knee radiography, joint space narrowing (JSN) and its relationship to meniscal tears, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures, articular cartilage erosion, and duration of pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis. A total of 140 patients who had knee osteoarthritis and underwent primary total knee replacement (TKR) surgery, with unicompartmental medial tibiofemoral JSN (grade 1 or greater) and normal lateral compartments, were recruited. Polytomous logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between JSN and risk factors. All patients with JSN were categorized as grade 1 (n=14, 10.0%), grade 2 (n=64, 45.7%), or grade 3 (n=62, 44.3%). Women presented with indications for a TKR at a younger age than men (mean age, 69 vs 73 years, P<0.05). There were 123 (87.9%) meniscal tears and 58 (41.4%) partial (insufficient or attenuated ACL fibers) and 10 (7.1%) complete ACL ruptures; 115 of 134 (85.8%) patients had moderate to severe cartilage erosion. A higher grade of JSN was correlated with a higher frequency of meniscal tears [odds ratio (OR) 6.00, 95% CI 1.29-27.96 for grade 2 vs grade 1 JSN] and duration of knee pain (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.01-1.53 for grade 3 vs grade 1 JSN). A higher grade of JSN was not correlated with a higher frequency of ACL rupture or articular cartilage erosion. A higher grade of JSN is associated with a higher frequency of meniscal tears and long duration of knee pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis. (orig.)

  18. Quadriceps Strength and Anterior Knee Pain following Tibia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-07-17

    Jul 17, 2017 ... prior history of knee pain, but had unilateral tibiofibular fracture, who had internal fixation with ... It may take several months for healing and subsequent .... time after surgery and those with anterior knee pain may never get ...

  19. Influence of Elastic Bandage and Neoprene Sleeve on Knee Position Sense and Pain in Subjects with Knee Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basir Majdoleslami

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to investigate whether a neoprene sleeve and elastic bandage around the knee joint of subjects with knee osteoarthritis (OA would , in short term (a reduce pain (b improve knee joint position sense and comparison of their effect with each other if they have. Materials & Methods: In a semi-experimental study, 30 subjects (11 men, 19 women, age between 33-75 with unilateral knee OA. Subjects had to have at least 2cm from 10cm visual analogue scale (VAS of knee pain for study entry.All patients were randomly assigned to either an elastic bandage or a neoprene sleeve. One week later they were assigned to the opposite selection. Joint position sense was assessed in the sitting position using an electrogoniometer and pain by VAS where 0cm equals no pain and 10 cm equals worst pain. Knee pain and JPS were assessed for each selection one week apart. During each visit assessment were performed at baseline and after 20 min of bandage/neoprene sleeve application. Results: the mean of scores for knee variables JPS and VAS was taken and paired-t test and Wilcoxon signed rank test was employed to calculate the different between two trails. Neoprene sleeve had significant effect on knee JPS (P=0.037. But elastic bandage had no effect (P=0.631. Both of them had significantly reduced knee pain. (P=0.000 Conclusion: In subjects with both neoprene sleeve and elastic bandage reduced knee pain with more effect of neoprene sleeve. Only the neoprene sleeve had effect on knee JPS.

  20. Knee joint kinetics in response to multiple three-dimensional printed, customised foot orthoses for the treatment of medial compartment knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Richard; Woodburn, James; Telfer, Scott; Abbott, Mandy; Steultjens, Martijn Pm

    2017-06-01

    The knee adduction moment is consistently used as a surrogate measure of medial compartment loading. Foot orthoses are designed to reduce knee adduction moment via lateral wedging. The 'dose' of wedging required to optimally unload the affected compartment is unknown and variable between individuals. This study explores a personalised approach via three-dimensional printed foot orthotics to assess the biomechanical response when two design variables are altered: orthotic length and lateral wedging. Foot orthoses were created for 10 individuals with symptomatic medial knee osteoarthritis and 10 controls. Computer-aided design software was used to design four full and four three-quarter-length foot orthoses per participant each with lateral posting of 0° 'neutral', 5° rearfoot, 10° rearfoot and 5° forefoot/10° rearfoot. Three-dimensional printers were used to manufacture all foot orthoses. Three-dimensional gait analyses were performed and selected knee kinetics were analysed: first peak knee adduction moment, second peak knee adduction moment, first knee flexion moment and knee adduction moment impulse. Full-length foot orthoses provided greater reductions in first peak knee adduction moment (p = 0.038), second peak knee adduction moment (p = 0.018) and knee adduction moment impulse (p = 0.022) compared to three-quarter-length foot orthoses. Dose effect of lateral wedging was found for first peak knee adduction moment (p knee adduction moment (p knee adduction moment impulse (p knee adduction moment (p = 0.028) and knee adduction moment impulse (p = 0.036). Significant interaction effects were found between orthotic length and wedging condition for second peak knee adduction moment (p = 0.002). No significant changes in first knee flexion moment were found. Individual heterogeneous responses to foot orthosis conditions were observed for first peak knee adduction moment, second peak knee adduction moment and knee adduction moment impulse. Biomechanical response

  1. Knee Pain during Strength Training Shortly following Fast-Track Total Knee Arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandholm, Thomas; Thorborg, Kristian; Lunn, Troels Haxholdt

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Loading and contraction failure (muscular exhaustion) are strength training variables known to influence neural activation of the exercising muscle in healthy subjects, which may help reduce neural inhibition of the quadriceps muscle following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). It is unkn......BACKGROUND: Loading and contraction failure (muscular exhaustion) are strength training variables known to influence neural activation of the exercising muscle in healthy subjects, which may help reduce neural inhibition of the quadriceps muscle following total knee arthroplasty (TKA......). It is unknown how these exercise variables influence knee pain after TKA. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of loading and contraction failure on knee pain during strength training, shortly following TKA. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Consecutive sample of patients from the Copenhagen area, Denmark...... TKA. However, only the increase in pain during repetitions to contraction failure exceeded that defined as clinically relevant, and was very short-lived. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01729520....

  2. Dynamic weight-bearing assessment of pain in knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klokker, Louise; Christensen, Robin; Osborne, Richard

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the reliability, agreement and smallest detectable change in a measurement instrument for pain and function in knee osteoarthritis; the Dynamic weight-bearing Assessment of Pain (DAP). METHODS: The sample size was set to 20 persons, recruited from the outpatient osteoarthritis...... for intra-rater test (1.95). The three knee bend scores all had ICC above 0.50, showing fair-to-good reliability. None of the knee bend scores showed acceptable SEM and SDC. CONCLUSIONS: The reproducibility of the DAP pain score meets the demands for use in clinical practice and research. The total knee...

  3. Gait Mechanics in Those With/Without Medial Compartment Knee Osteoarthritis 5 Years After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandha, Ashutosh; Manal, Kurt; Wellsandt, Elizabeth; Capin, Jacob; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn; Buchanan, Thomas S.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate differences in gait mechanics 5 years after unilateral anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery, for non-osteoarthritic (n = 24) versus osteoarthritic (n = 9) subjects. For the involved knee, the osteoarthritic group demonstrated significantly lower peak knee flexion angles (non-osteoarthritic = 24.3 ± 4.6°, osteoarthritic = 19.1 ± 2.9°, p = 0.01) and peak knee flexion moments (non-osteoarthritic = 5.3 ± 1.2% Body Weight × Height, osteoarthritic = 4.4 ± 1.2% Body Weight × Height, p = 0.05). Differences in peak knee adduction moment approached significance, with a higher magnitude for the osteoarthritic group (non-osteoarthritic = 2.4 ±0.8% Body Weight × Height, osteoarthritic = 2.9 ± 0.5% Body Weight × Height, p = 0.09). Peak medial compartment joint load was evaluated using electromyography-informed neuromusculoskeletal modeling. Peak medial compartment joint load in the involved knee for the two groups was not different (non-osteoarthritic = 2.4 ± 0.4 Body Weight, osteoarthritic = 2.3 ± 0.6 Body Weight). The results suggest that subjects with dissimilar peak knee moments can have similar peak medial compartment joint load magnitudes. There was no evidence of inter-limb asymmetry for either group. Given the presence of inter-group differences (non-osteoarthritic vs. osteoarthritic) for the involved knee, but an absence of inter-limb asymmetry in either group, it may be necessary to evaluate how symmetry is achieved, over time, and to differentiate between good versus bad inter-limb symmetry, when evaluating knee gait parameters. PMID:27082166

  4. Tratamento da artrose unicompartimental medial do joelho com artroplastia unicompartimental tipo Repicci II: relato preliminar de 42 casos Treatment of medial unicompartmental arthrosis of the knee with Repicci II unicompartmental arthroplasty: preliminary report of 42 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Sanches Vaz

    2008-04-01

    que técnica cirúrgica aprimorada, escolha correta dos implantes e rigorosa seleção dos pacientes sejam empregadas.OBJECTIVE:To report the evolution with medial unicompartmental arthrosis of the knee submitted to Repicci II unicompartmental arthroplasty in order to evaluate the validity of the procedure. METHODS: 36 patients with unicompartmental arthrosis of the knee were included in the study, six of them with bilateral involvement, in a total of 42 knees. Age ranged from 54 to 82, with a mean of 67 years. Thirty-two patients were female, and 10 male. Clinical section criteria were: patients had to be older than 50, with light/moderate level activity, joint amplitude of at least 90º of flexion and -10º of extension, varus deformity of less than or equal to 5º, no anterior ligament instability, and pain restricted to the medial compartment. Radiographic selection criteria were: arthrosis confined to the medial compartment, with none or minimal patellofemoral arthrosis. The Ahlbäck classification was used to quantify the degree of extension of the arthrosis, surgery being indicated for grades II, III, and IV. The Knee International Society scale was used to follow results. RESULTS: The mean follow-up period was 36 months. There were no cases of post-operative infection, deep venous thrombosis, or embolism. Two patients developed major pain with no improvement in the follow-up, and a revision with total knee prosthesis was required. No cases of aseptic loosening or early polyethylene wear were seen. The mean pre-operative score was 45 for the knee and 57 for the overall function of the patient. The post-operative score was 76 and 90, respectively. CONCLUSION: Repicci II unicompartmental arthroplasty is a good option of the treatment of medial unicompartmental arthrosis of the knee, and it achieves consistent results leading to high patient satisfaction provided that an improved surgical technique, the right choice of implants, and a strict selection of patients

  5. Keblish's lateral surgical approach enhances patellar tilt in valgus knee arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Roberto Tonelli Filho

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To compare the clinical and radiological outcomes of conventional medial and lateral approaches for total knee replacement in the valgus osteoarthritic knee. METHODS: In this randomized controlled trial, 21 patients with valgus knee osteoarthritis were randomized to total knee replacement through medial or lateral approach. The primary outcome was radiographic patellar tilt. Secondary outcomes were visual analog scale of pain, postoperative levels of hemoglobin, and clinical aspect of the operative wound. RESULTS: There were no differences between the groups regarding other clinical variables. Mean lateral tilt of the patella was 3.1 degrees (SD ± 5.3 in the lateral approach group and 18 degrees (SD ± 10.2 in the medial approach group (p = 0.02. There were no differences regarding the secondary outcomes. CONCLUSION: Lateral approach provided better patellar tilt following total knee replacement in valgus osteoarthritic knee.

  6. Low Level Laser Therapy for chronic knee joint pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Takashi; Ebihara, Satoru; Ohkuni, Ikuko; Izukura, Hideaki; Harada, Takashi; Ushigome, Nobuyuki; Ohshiro, Toshio; Musha, Yoshiro; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Tsuchiya, Kazuaki; Kubota, Ayako

    2014-12-27

    Chronic knee joint pain is one of the most frequent complaints which is seen in the outpatient clinic in our medical institute. In previous studies we have reported the benefits of low level laser therapy (LLLT) for chronic pain in the shoulder joints, elbow, hand, finger and the lower back. The present study is a report on the effects of LLLT for chronic knee joint pain. Over the past 5 years, 35 subjects visited the outpatient clinic with complaints of chronic knee joint pain caused by the knee osteoarthritis-induced degenerative meniscal tear. They received low level laser therapy. A 1000 mW semi-conductor laser device was used to deliver 20.1 J/cm(2) per point in continuous wave at 830nm, and four points were irradiated per session (1 treatment) twice a week for 4 weeks. A visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to determine the effects of LLLT for the chronic pain and after the end of the treatment regimen a significant improvement was observed (pknee joint range of motion. Discussions with the patients revealed that it was important for them to learn how to avoid postures that would cause them knee pain in everyday life in order to have continuous benefits from the treatment. The present study demonstrated that 830 nm LLLT was an effective form of treatment for chronic knee pain caused by knee osteoarthritis. Patients were advised to undertake training involving gentle flexion and extension of the knee.

  7. Morel-Lavallée Lesions of the Knee: MRI Findings Compared With Cadaveric Study Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassalou, Evangelia E; Zibis, Aristeidis H; Raoulis, Vasileios A; Tsifountoudis, Ioannis P; Karantanas, Apostolos H

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the MRI findings and treatment decisions and outcome for Morel-Lavallée lesions (MLLs) of the knee and to investigate whether evidence exists to support an increased frequency of such lesions on the medial or lateral side by performing a cadaveric experiment. In a 4-year period, 24 MRI studies of 24 consecutive patients (16 male patients and eight female patients) with knee MLLs were retrospectively reviewed. Patient demographic characteristics, treatment decisions and outcome, and associated injuries were recorded. The location of the MLL was categorized as medial, lateral, or global. Lesions were categorized according to an established MRI classification. During the cadaveric experiment, the compartmental pressures of the medial or lateral aspect of the knee were monitored in 20 cadaveric knees. The chi-square test, t test, and Pearson correlation were used for statistical analysis. MLLs were located medially in 16 patients, laterally in two patients, and globally in six patients. The medial location was significantly more common than a lateral or global location (p < 0.05). MLLs were classified as type I in 14 patients, type II in eight patients, and type III in two patients. MRI type was correlated with the chronicity of injury (r 2 = 0.614; p = 0.0014). Fractures were the most common associated injuries, occurring in seven of 24 patients. In 17 patients, all of whom had conservatively treated type I or type II lesions, complete resolution of the MLL occurred. The maximum compartmental pressures were significantly higher on the lateral side than on the medial side (p < 0.0001). Knee MLLs have a predilection for the medial side, which may be attributed to the lower resistance in this location, and they have variable patterns on MRI, which correlate with chronicity. Conservative treatment of type I and II lesions seems effective.

  8. ANTERIOR KNEE PAIN AND LOWER EXTREMITY FUNCTIONS IN INDIAN ADOLESCENT POPULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riddhi Shroff

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & Purpose - Anterior knee pain is one of the most common musculoskeletal complain seen in Indian adolescent population with high incidence among those who are active in sports and recreation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the age of onset of anterior knee pain, to find its effect on sports participation and also to find the activities which are maximally affected due to anterior knee pain in Indian population. Method- A questionnaire based survey was conducted among 50 subjects using three outcome measures namely self made demographic questionnaire, anterior knee pain scale and lower extremity functional scale. Result- Maximally affected activities are running, jumping & squatting and maximally affected functions are squatting, running on uneven ground, making sharp turns while running and hopping with increase incidence of anterior knee pain among those who participate daily in sports. Conclusion- The study concluded, that in adolescent age group of 11-17 years, anterior knee pain is more prevalent in adolescent girls with the age of onset being around 13 years for girls & 14.5 years in boys and it also showed moderate positive correlation between anterior knee pain and lower extremity functions.

  9. [Correlation analysis of bone marrow edema degree and serum inflammatory factors change with knee joint pain symptoms in patients with bone contusion around the knee joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Songiun; An, Rongze; Wang, Zhaojie; Kuang, Lipeng; Tan, Weiyuan; Fang, Cunxun

    2014-05-01

    To explore the correlation between the degree of bone marrow edema (BME) and the content change of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP-3) and the knee pain symptoms in patients with bone contusion around the knee joint. Thirty patients (30 knees) of bone contusion around the knee joint were chosen as the trial group between October 2009 and April 2012. According to visual analogue scale (VAS), 30 patients were divided into mild group (10 cases), moderate group (10 cases), and severe group (10 cases); according to MRI morphological changes, the patients were divided into type I group (12 cases), type II group (11 cases), and type III group (7 cases). Ten patients (10 knees) with soft tissue injury of the knee were chosen as control group. No significant difference was found (P > 0.05) in gender, age, causes, side, and admission time after injury between 2 groups. The serum contents of MMP-3 and TNF-alpha were detected and statistically analysed between different degrees of pain groups and between different degrees of BME groups. Correlation was analysed between BME and inflammatory factor changes and VAS score. The MMP-3 and TNF-alpha contents in trial group [(29.580 +/- 6.870) (microg/L and (23.750 +/- 7.096) ng/L] were significantly higher than those in control group [(8.219 +/- 1.355) microg/L and (6.485 +/- 1.168) ng/L] (t = 9.686, P = 0.000; t = 7.596, P =0.000). The MMP-3 and TNF-alpha contents in patients with different degrees of pain and BME were significantly higher than those in patients of control group (P pain (P 0.05). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that TNF-alpha content was significantly correlated with VAS score (P = 0.000). Knee pain symptoms are not related to the degree of BME in patients with bone contusion around the knee joint. Inflammatory factor TNF-alpha content is the main influence factor of knee joint pain symptoms.

  10. Don't forget the hip! Hip arthritis masquerading as knee pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian F. Dibra, MD

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hip osteoarthritis typically manifests with groin or thigh pain. Other atypical pain patterns, including knee pain, have been described. Except for 2 case reports, there is no literature on this subject. Methods: From our institutional database, between 2011 and 2016, we identified 21 patients who were referred for treatment of knee pain but ultimately diagnosed with hip pathology as the cause of their pain. This group was evaluated for duration of symptoms prior to diagnosis, previous interventions, presence of walking aids, and symptom resolution after treatment of the hip pathology. Results: Fifteen of the 21 patients were referred from musculoskeletal providers (12 from orthopaedic surgeons. Prior to diagnosis of the hip etiology, 16 patients were reduced to major assistive devices including wheelchairs. Twelve of 21 patients had undergone surgical knee interventions, including total knee arthroplasty, with minimal to no relief of their pain. Seventeen of 21 referred patients underwent total hip arthroplasty at our institution. Fourteen patients had complete resolution of knee pain after total hip arthroplasty. Conclusions: Although knee pain referred from hip disease may be considered a basic and common knowledge, it continues to be an overlooked phenomenon. Most of the cases were misdiagnosed by musculoskeletal providers including orthopaedic surgeons and this highlights the need for continued education and awareness of this clinical scenario. Keywords: Hip pain, Knee pain, Referred pain, Delay in diagnosis, Unnecessary surgery

  11. A study on MR images of the articular cartilage in medial-type osteoarthritis of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Yoshiaki; Hayashi, Mitsutoshi; Kotani, Akihiro

    2001-01-01

    Changes in the articular cartilage of 88 knees of 73 cases (age range 40-78) diagnosed clinically and radiologically as OA (osteoarthritis) were studied by obtaining fat-suppressed MR images of the knee. On 27 knees out of the 88, moreover, macroscopic observation was performed to make a comparative study between the directly-observed findings and MR findings. Fat-suppressed MR images were obtained sagittally by 3D-FLASH (fast low angle shot) sequence. The examined regions consisted of the following 4 sites; the medial condyle of the femur, its lateral condyle, the medial condyle of the tibia, and its lateral condyle. The revealed conditions of the cartilage were morphologically classified into 4 Stages. The evidence of cartilage defect on MR images was most frequently found at the medial condyle of the femur, with the medial condyle of the tibia, the lateral condyle of the femur, and the lateral condyle of the tibia following in a less frequent order. Fat-suppressed MRI's sensitivity to cartilage defect against macroscopy was 94.5%, specificity 95.4%, and accuracy 95.2%. MR imaging using fat-suppression can reveal cartilaginous degeneration and defect so well that this technique provides an important indication for selecting a proper method of treatment. (author)

  12. Krill Oil Improves Mild Knee Joint Pain: A Randomized Control Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yoshio; Fukushima, Minoru; Sakuraba, Keishoku; Sawaki, Keisuke; Sekigawa, Kazuaki

    2016-01-01

    Krill oil is an edible oil extracted from krill, a small red-colored crustacean found in the Antarctic Ocean. The administration of krill oil is reported to mitigate inflammation in patients with cardiac disease, rheumatoid arthritis, or osteoarthritis. However, the effect of krill oil on mild knee pain has not yet been determined. To assess the effect of krill oil on mild knee pain. A randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled trial of fifty adults (38-85 years old) with mild knee pain attending the Fukushima Orthopedic Clinic (Tochigi, Japan) between September 2014 and March 2015. Participants were randomized to receive 2 g per day of either krill oil or an identical placebo for 30 days. The primary outcome was improvement in subjective symptoms of knee pain as assessed by the Japanese Knee Osteoarthritis Measure (JKOM) and Japanese Orthopaedic Association score (JOA). Secondary outcomes included blood and urine biochemical parameters. Both the placebo and krill oil groups showed significant improvements in the questions in the JKOM and JOA questionnaires after administration. After the intervention, krill oil group showed more improvements than placebo group in two questions regarding the pain and stiffness in knees in JKOM. Controlling for age, sex, weight, and smoking and drinking habits, krill oil significantly mitigated knee pain in sleeping (P knees (both P = 0.011) compared to placebo. Krill oil administration raised plasma EPA (P = 0.048) and EPA/AA ratio (P = 0.003). This study indicates that krill oil administration (2 g/day, 30 days) improved the subjective symptoms of knee pain in adults with mild knee pain. UMIN-CTR; ID UMIN000014413.

  13. Socioeconomic inequalities in knee pain, knee osteoarthritis, and health-related quality of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiadaliri, A. A.; Gerhardsson de Verdier, Maria; Turkiewicz, Aleksandra

    2017-01-01

    L questionnaires. We used the individuals’ level of education and occupation as socioeconomic status (SES) measures, and we calculated the relative index of inequality (RII) using Poisson regression with robust standard errors adjusted for age and gender. We applied weighting to account for a possible selection......Objectives: To determine socioeconomic inequalities in frequent knee pain (FKP), knee osteoarthritis (OA), and associated health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in Sweden. Method: In 2007 a postal questionnaire about knee pain was sent to a random sample of 10 000 residents of Malmö, Sweden (7402...

  14. Reproducibility of joint space width and the intermargin distance measurements in patients with medial osteoarthritis of the knee in various degrees of flexion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Haruyasu; Yamanaka, Norio; Ikeuchi, Masahiko

    2009-01-01

    This study tested the variability and reproducibility of measurements of the joint space width (JSW) and intermargin distance (IMD) of the medial tibial plateau in specific positions of knee flexion in osteoarthritic knees in order to evaluate the most useful knee angle for radiographic measurements. Radiographs from 56 knees with osteoarthritis from 46 patients were taken with the knees in conventional full extension and 15 , 30 , and 45 of flexion with weight bearing. Three orthopedic surgeons independently measured the JSW and IMD at the narrowest point and the midpoint of medial tibial plateau using a computer-assisted method. The JSW and IMD were smallest at 15 flexion, both measured at the narrowest point and the midpoint of the medial compartment. Reproducibility of the IMD at the midpoint was better than at the narrowest point for all four flexion angles. Measurements of the medial JSW and IMD are smallest at 15 of knee flexion indicating that radiographs should be obtained at this angle in order to best demonstrate the extent of osteoarthritis. (orig.)

  15. Reproducibility of joint space width and the intermargin distance measurements in patients with medial osteoarthritis of the knee in various degrees of flexion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Haruyasu [Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Bone and Joint Surgery, Toon, Ehime (Japan); Yamanaka, Norio; Ikeuchi, Masahiko [Kochi University, Department of Orthopaedics, Kochi Medical School, Nankoku, Kochi (Japan)

    2009-01-15

    This study tested the variability and reproducibility of measurements of the joint space width (JSW) and intermargin distance (IMD) of the medial tibial plateau in specific positions of knee flexion in osteoarthritic knees in order to evaluate the most useful knee angle for radiographic measurements. Radiographs from 56 knees with osteoarthritis from 46 patients were taken with the knees in conventional full extension and 15 , 30 , and 45 of flexion with weight bearing. Three orthopedic surgeons independently measured the JSW and IMD at the narrowest point and the midpoint of medial tibial plateau using a computer-assisted method. The JSW and IMD were smallest at 15 flexion, both measured at the narrowest point and the midpoint of the medial compartment. Reproducibility of the IMD at the midpoint was better than at the narrowest point for all four flexion angles. Measurements of the medial JSW and IMD are smallest at 15 of knee flexion indicating that radiographs should be obtained at this angle in order to best demonstrate the extent of osteoarthritis. (orig.)

  16. Q-angle in patellofemoral pain: relationship with dynamic knee valgus, hip abductor torque, pain and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Peixoto Leão Almeida

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between the q-angle and anterior knee pain severity, functional capacity, dynamic knee valgus and hip abductor torque in women with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS. METHODS: This study included 22 women with PFPS. The q-angle was assessed using goniometry: the participants were positioned in dorsal decubitus with the knee and hip extended, and the hip and foot in neutral rotation. Anterior knee pain severity was assessed using a visual analog scale, and functional capacity was assessed using the anterior knee pain scale. Dynamic valgus was evaluated using the frontal plane projection angle (FPPA of the knee, which was recorded using a digital camera during step down, and hip abductor peak torque was recorded using a handheld dynamometer. RESULTS: The q-angle did not present any significant correlation with severity of knee pain (r = -0.29; p = 0.19, functional capacity (r = -0.08; p = 0.72, FPPA (r = -0.28; p = 0.19 or isometric peak torque of the abductor muscles (r = -0.21; p = 0.35. CONCLUSION: The q-angle did not present any relationship with pain intensity, functional capacity, FPPA, or hip abductor peak torque in the patients with PFPS.

  17. Myofascial Pain in Patients Waitlisted for Total Knee Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Henry

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Knee pain is one of the major sources of pain and disability in developed countries, particularly in aging populations, and is the primary indication for total knee arthroplasty (TKA in patients with osteoarthritis (OA.

  18. Increased joint loads during walking--a consequence of pain relief in knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Simonsen, Erik B; Alkjaer, T

    2006-01-01

    Joint pain is a primary symptom in knee osteoarthritis (OA), but the effect of pain and pain relief on the knee joint mechanics of walking is not clear. In this study, the effects of local knee joint analgesia on knee joint loads during walking were studied in a group of knee osteoarthritis....... Although the patients walked with less compressive knee joint forces compared to the reference group, the effects of pain relief may accelerate the degenerative changes....

  19. Traumatic posterior root tear of the medial meniscus in patients with severe medial instability of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ra, Ho Jong; Ha, Jeong Ku; Jang, Ho Su; Kim, Jin Goo

    2015-10-01

    To examine the incidence and diagnostic rate of traumatic medial meniscus posterior root tear associated with severe medial instability and to evaluate the effectiveness of pullout repair. From 2007 to 2011, 51 patients who underwent operation due to multiple ligament injuries including medial collateral ligament rupture were reviewed retrospectively. The International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective and Lysholm score were evaluated pre- and postoperatively. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed, and if indicated, a second-look arthroscopic examination was conducted. Fourteen out of 51 patients were associated with severe medial instability. Seven patients were diagnosed with traumatic medial meniscus posterior root tear and underwent arthroscopic pullout repair. Five of them were missed at initial diagnosis using MRI. In seven patients, the mean Lysholm and IKDC subjective scores improved from 74.6 ± 10.3 and 47.6 ± 7.3 to 93.0 ± 3.7 and 91.6 ± 2.6, respectively. All showed complete healing of meniscus root on follow-up MRI and second-look arthroscopy. Medial meniscus posterior root tear may occur in severe medial instability from trauma. It is a common mistake that surgeons may not notice on the diagnosis of those injuries using MRI. Therefore, a high index of suspicion is required for the diagnosis of medial meniscus posterior root tear in this type of injuries. The traumatic medial meniscus posterior root tear could be healed successfully using arthroscopic pullout repair technique. The possibility of the medial meniscus posterior root tear should be considered in severe medial instability and arthroscopic pullout repair can be an effective option for treatment. Case series with no comparison group, Level IV.

  20. Adductor canal block for postoperative pain treatment after revision knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jæger, Pia; Koscielniak-Nielsen, Zbigniew J; Schrøder, Henrik M

    2014-01-01

    arthroplasty in general anesthesia into this blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized trial. Patients were allocated to an adductor canal block via a catheter with either ropivacaine or placebo; bolus of 0.75% ropivacaine/saline, followed by infusion of 0.2% ropivacaine/saline. Clinicaltrials.gov ID: NCT......01191593. RESULTS: We enrolled 36 patients, of which 30 were analyzed. Mean pain scores during knee flexion at 4 h (primary endpoint) were: 52±22 versus 71±25 mm (mean difference 19, 95% CI: 1 to 37, P = 0.04), ropivacaine and placebo group respectively. When calculated as area under the curve (1-8 h/7 h......) pain scores were 55±21 versus 69±21 mm during knee flexion (P = 0.11) and 39±18 versus 45±23 mm at rest (P = 0.43), ropivacaine and placebo group respectively. Groups were similar regarding morphine consumption and morphine-related side effects (P>0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The only statistically significant...

  1. Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy in middle-aged patients with mild or no knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hare, Kristoffer B; Lohmander, Stefan; Christensen, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy has been shown to be of no benefit to patients with concomitant knee osteoarthritis, but the optimal treatment of a degenerative meniscus tear in patients with mild or no knee osteoarthritis is unknown. This article describes the rationale and methodology...... of a randomized sham-controlled trial to assess the benefit of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy of a medial meniscus tear in patients with mild or no knee osteoarthritis. The objective of the study is to test whether the benefit from arthroscopic partial meniscectomy in patients with knee pain, medial meniscus...... lesion and mild/no knee osteoarthritis, is greater after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy than following sham surgery....

  2. Krill Oil Improves Mild Knee Joint Pain: A Randomized Control Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshio Suzuki

    Full Text Available Krill oil is an edible oil extracted from krill, a small red-colored crustacean found in the Antarctic Ocean. The administration of krill oil is reported to mitigate inflammation in patients with cardiac disease, rheumatoid arthritis, or osteoarthritis. However, the effect of krill oil on mild knee pain has not yet been determined.To assess the effect of krill oil on mild knee pain.A randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled trial of fifty adults (38-85 years old with mild knee pain attending the Fukushima Orthopedic Clinic (Tochigi, Japan between September 2014 and March 2015.Participants were randomized to receive 2 g per day of either krill oil or an identical placebo for 30 days.The primary outcome was improvement in subjective symptoms of knee pain as assessed by the Japanese Knee Osteoarthritis Measure (JKOM and Japanese Orthopaedic Association score (JOA. Secondary outcomes included blood and urine biochemical parameters.Both the placebo and krill oil groups showed significant improvements in the questions in the JKOM and JOA questionnaires after administration. After the intervention, krill oil group showed more improvements than placebo group in two questions regarding the pain and stiffness in knees in JKOM. Controlling for age, sex, weight, and smoking and drinking habits, krill oil significantly mitigated knee pain in sleeping (P < 0.001, standing (P < 0.001 and the range of motion of both right and left knees (both P = 0.011 compared to placebo. Krill oil administration raised plasma EPA (P = 0.048 and EPA/AA ratio (P = 0.003.This study indicates that krill oil administration (2 g/day, 30 days improved the subjective symptoms of knee pain in adults with mild knee pain.UMIN-CTR; ID UMIN000014413.

  3. Selective peripheral nerve resection for treatment of persistent pain around the knee joint after total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Guangjun; Liang, Zhu; Kan, Jiang; Muheremu, Aikeremujiang

    2018-01-01

    Objective This study was performed to determine the efficacy of selective peripheral nerve resection for treatment of persistent neuropathic pain after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Methods Patients who underwent TKA in our department from January 2013 to July 2016 and experienced persistent pain around the knee joint after TKA were retrospectively included in the current study. Sixty patients were divided into experimental and control groups according the treatment they received. The treatment effect was evaluated by the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) knee score and visual analog scale (VAS) pain score preoperatively and at 1, 2, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Results The HSS knee scores were higher in both groups after than before the treatment, and HSS knee scores were significantly higher in the experimental group than in the control group. The VAS pain scores were lower in both groups after than before the treatment, and VAS pain scores were significantly lower in the experimental group than in the control group. Conclusions Selective peripheral nerve resection is an effective treatment method for persistent neuropathic pain after TKA.

  4. Custom-Made Foot Orthoses Decrease Medial Foot Loading During Drop Jump in Individuals With Patellofemoral Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathleff, Michael S; Richter, Camilla; Brushøj, Christoffer

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of foot orthoses on medial-to-lateral plantar forces during drop jump and single leg squat, and second, to explore the self-reported change in symptoms after 12 weeks of wearing the orthoses in individuals with patellofemoral pain (PFP). DESIGN: Cohort study...... with 12 weeks of follow-up. SETTING: Hospital setting. PARTICIPANTS: 23 adults with PFP. INTERVENTIONS: Custom-made foot orthoses. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Foot loading (plantar pressure) was collected from the most painful side during drop jump and single leg squat using pressure sensitive Pedar insoles....... Primary outcome was the medial-to-lateral peak force under the forefoot during drop jump. The PFP syndrome severity score was used to measure self-reported improvement from baseline to follow-up. RESULTS: Orthoses were associated with a significant 2.9%-point (95% confidence intervals: 0.7-5.1) reduction...

  5. Knee Pain in a Renal Transplant Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-26

    MATERIAL TO BE PUBLISHED OR PRESENTED: Knee Pain in a Renal Transplant Patient 7. FUNDING RECEIVED FOR THIS STUDY? 0 YES IZJNO FUNDING SOURCE: 8. DO... renal transplant patient with progressive posterior knee pain secondary to amyloidosis. Case: A 57 year-old black-male presented with 6 months of...idiopathic causes, for which he had received hemodialysis for 20 years followed by cadaveric renal transplant four years prior to development of the

  6. Exercise Alters Gait Pattern but Not Knee Load in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ssu-Yu Chang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Six female patients with bilateral medial knee OA and 6 healthy controls were recruited. Patients with knee OA received a 6-week physiotherapist-supervised and home-based exercise program. Outcome measures, including the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index and Short Form-36 Health Survey as well as objective biomechanical indices were obtained at baseline and follow-up. After treatment, no significant difference was observed in the knee abductor moment (KAM, lever arm, and ground reaction force. We, however, observed significantly improved pain and physical function as well as altered gait patterns, including a higher hip flexor moment and hip extension angle with a faster walking speed. Although KAM was unchanged, patients with bilateral knee OA showed an improved walking speed and altered the gait pattern after 6 weeks of supervised exercise. This finding suggests that the exercise intervention improves proximal joint mechanics during walking and can be considered for patients with bilateral knee OA. Non-weight-bearing strengthening without external resistance combined with stretching exercise may be an option to improve pain and function in individuals with OA who cannot perform high resistance exercises owing to pain or other reasons.

  7. Knee joint pain potentially due to bone alterations in a knee osteoarthritis patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Masatoshi; Nakamura, Yukio; Kamimura, Mikio; Uchiyama, Shigeharu; Mukaiyama, Keijiro; Ikegami, Shota; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2014-12-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the leading cause of musculoskeletal pain and functional disability worldwide. However, the etiology of this condition is still largely unknown. We report the clinical course of an elderly man with knee OA. Plain radiographs and MRI examinations performed during follow-up suggested that the pathophysiology of the patient's knee OA and joint pain may have been primarily due to bone alterations.

  8. The influence of continuous versus interval walking exercise on knee joint loading and pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhi, Shawn; Jayabalan, Prakash; Gustafson, Jonathan A; Klatt, Brian A; Sowa, Gwendolyn A; Piva, Sara R

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate whether knee contact force and knee pain are different between continuous and interval walking exercise in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Twenty seven patients with unilateral symptomatic knee OA completed two separate walking exercise sessions on a treadmill at 1.3m/s on two different days: 1) a continuous 45min walking exercise session, and 2) three 15min bouts of walking exercise separated by 1h rest periods for a total of 45min of exercise in an interval format. Estimated knee contact forces using the OpenSim software and knee pain were evaluated at baseline (1st minute of walking) and after every 15min between the continuous and interval walking conditions. A significant increase from baseline was observed in peak knee contact force during the weight-acceptance phase of gait after 30 and 45min of walking, irrespective of the walking exercise condition. Additionally, whereas continuous walking resulted in an increase in knee pain, interval walking did not lead to increased knee pain. Walking exercise durations of 30min or greater may lead to undesirable knee joint loading in patients with knee OA, while performing the same volume of exercise in multiple bouts as opposed to one continuous bout may be beneficial for limiting knee pain. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Examination of factors affecting gait properties in healthy older adults: focusing on knee extension strength, visual acuity, and knee joint pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demura, Tomohiro; Demura, Shin-ichi; Uchiyama, Masanobu; Sugiura, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    Gait properties change with age because of a decrease in lower limb strength and visual acuity or knee joint disorders. Gait changes commonly result from these combined factors. This study aimed to examine the effects of knee extension strength, visual acuity, and knee joint pain on gait properties of for 181 healthy female older adults (age: 76.1 (5.7) years). Walking speed, cadence, stance time, swing time, double support time, step length, step width, walking angle, and toe angle were selected as gait parameters. Knee extension strength was measured by isometric dynamometry; and decreased visual acuity and knee joint pain were evaluated by subjective judgment whether or not such factors created a hindrance during walking. Among older adults without vision problems and knee joint pain that affected walking, those with superior knee extension strength had significantly greater walking speed and step length than those with inferior knee extension strength (P pain in both knees showed slower walking speed and longer stance time and double support time. A decrease of knee extension strength and visual acuity and knee joint pain are factors affecting gait in the female older adults. Decreased knee extension strength and knee joint pain mainly affect respective distance and time parameters of the gait.

  10. Side Effects: Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Controlling pain is an important part of your cancer treatment plan. Learn how to track levels of pain. Find out how pain, a side effect of cancer treatment, is treated using acupuncture, biofeedback, and physical therapy.

  11. A rare cause of forearm pain: anterior branch of the medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve injury: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Necmettin; Ardic, Füsun

    2008-04-21

    Medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve (MACN) neuropathy is reported to be caused by iatrogenic reasons. Although the cases describing the posterior branch of MACN neuropathy are abundant, only one case caused by lipoma has been found to describe the anterior branch of MACN neuropathy in the literature. As for the reason for the forearm pain, we report the only case describing isolated anterior branch of MACN neuropathy which has developed due to repeated minor trauma. We report a 37-year-old woman patient with pain in her medial forearm and elbow following the shaking of a rug. Pain and symptoms of dysestesia in the distribution of the right MACN were found. Electrophysiological examination confirmed the normality of the main nerve trunks of the right upper limb and demonstrated abnormalities of the right MACN when compared with the left side. Sensory action potential (SAP) amplitude on the right anterior branch of the MACN was detected to be lower in proportion to the left. In the light of these findings, NSAI drug and physical therapy was performed. Dysestesia and pain were relieved and no recurrence was observed after a follow-up of 14 months. MACN neuropathy should be taken into account for the differential diagnosis of the patients with complaints of pain and dysestesia in medial forearm and anteromedial aspect of the elbow.

  12. A rare cause of forearm pain: anterior branch of the medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve injury: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardic Füsun

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve (MACN neuropathy is reported to be caused by iatrogenic reasons. Although the cases describing the posterior branch of MACN neuropathy are abundant, only one case caused by lipoma has been found to describe the anterior branch of MACN neuropathy in the literature. As for the reason for the forearm pain, we report the only case describing isolated anterior branch of MACN neuropathy which has developed due to repeated minor trauma. Case presentation We report a 37-year-old woman patient with pain in her medial forearm and elbow following the shaking of a rug. Pain and symptoms of dysestesia in the distribution of the right MACN were found. Electrophysiological examination confirmed the normality of the main nerve trunks of the right upper limb and demonstrated abnormalities of the right MACN when compared with the left side. Sensory action potential (SAP amplitude on the right anterior branch of the MACN was detected to be lower in proportion to the left. In the light of these findings, NSAI drug and physical therapy was performed. Dysestesia and pain were relieved and no recurrence was observed after a follow-up of 14 months. Conclusion MACN neuropathy should be taken into account for the differential diagnosis of the patients with complaints of pain and dysestesia in medial forearm and anteromedial aspect of the elbow.

  13. Combined Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction and High Tibial Osteotomy in Anterior Cruciate Ligament-Deficient Varus Knees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman M. Ebied

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion: The combined procedure of ACL reconstruction and high tibial osteotomy restored knee stability and reduced pain over the medial compartment. Although the combined procedure has a longer period of rehabilitation than an isolated ACL reconstruction, the elimination of lateral thrust and preservation of articular cartilage of the medial compartment are of paramount importance to the future of these knees.

  14. Knee Pain during Strength Training Shortly following Fast-Track Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandholm, Thomas; Thorborg, Kristian; Lunn, Troels Haxholdt; Kehlet, Henrik; Jakobsen, Thomas Linding

    2014-01-01

    Background Loading and contraction failure (muscular exhaustion) are strength training variables known to influence neural activation of the exercising muscle in healthy subjects, which may help reduce neural inhibition of the quadriceps muscle following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). It is unknown how these exercise variables influence knee pain after TKA. Objective To investigate the effect of loading and contraction failure on knee pain during strength training, shortly following TKA. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Consecutive sample of patients from the Copenhagen area, Denmark, receiving a TKA, between November 2012 and April 2013. Participants Seventeen patients, no more than 3 weeks after their TKA. Main outcome measures: In a randomized order, the patients performed 1 set of 4 standardized knee extensions, using relative loads of 8, 14, and 20 repetition maximum (RM), and ended with 1 single set to contraction failure (14 RM load). The individual loadings (kilograms) were determined during a familiarization session >72 hours prior. The patients rated their knee pain during each repetition, using a numerical rating scale (0–10). Results Two patients were lost to follow up. Knee pain increased with increasing load (20 RM: 3.1±2.0 points, 14 RM: 3.5±1.8 points, 8 RM: 4.3±2.5 points, P = 0.006), and repetitions to contraction failure (10% failure: 3.2±1.9 points, 100% failure: 5.4±1.6 points, Pknee pain 60 seconds after the final repetition (2.7±2.4 points) was not different from that recorded before strength training (2.7±1.8 points, P = 0.88). Conclusion Both loading and repetitions performed to contraction failure during knee- extension strength-training, increased post-operative knee pain during strength training implemented shortly following TKA. However, only the increase in pain during repetitions to contraction failure exceeded that defined as clinically relevant, and was very short-lived. Trial Registration Clinical

  15. MR imaging findings of medial tibial crest friction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klontzas, Michail E.; Akoumianakis, Ioannis D.; Vagios, Ilias; Karantanas, Apostolos H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Medial tibial condyle bone marrow edema (BME), associated with soft tissue edema (STe) surrounding the medial collateral ligament, was incidentally observed in MRI examinations of young and athletic individuals. The aim of the present study was to 1. Prospectively investigate the association between these findings and coexistence of localized pain, and 2. Explore the possible contribution of the tibial morphology to its pathogenesis. Methods: The medial tibial condyle crest was evaluated in 632 knee MRI examinations. The angle and depth were measured by two separate evaluators. The presence of STe and BME was recorded. A third evaluator blindly assessed the presence of pain at this site. Results: BME associated with STe was found in 24 patients (with no history of previous trauma, osteoarthritis, tumor or pes anserine bursitis). The mean crest angle was 151.3° (95%CI 147.4–155.3°) compared to 159.4° (95%CI 158.8–160°) in controls (Mann–Whitney test, P < 0.0001). MRI findings were highly predictive of localized pain (sensitivity 92% specificity 99%, Fisher's exact test, P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Friction at the medial tibial condyle crest is a painful syndrome. MRI is a highly specific and sensitive imaging modality for its diagnosis

  16. MR imaging findings of medial tibial crest friction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klontzas, Michail E., E-mail: miklontzas@gmail.com; Akoumianakis, Ioannis D., E-mail: ioannis.akoumianakis@gmail.com; Vagios, Ilias, E-mail: iliasvagios@gmail.com; Karantanas, Apostolos H., E-mail: akarantanas@gmail.com

    2013-11-01

    Objective: Medial tibial condyle bone marrow edema (BME), associated with soft tissue edema (STe) surrounding the medial collateral ligament, was incidentally observed in MRI examinations of young and athletic individuals. The aim of the present study was to 1. Prospectively investigate the association between these findings and coexistence of localized pain, and 2. Explore the possible contribution of the tibial morphology to its pathogenesis. Methods: The medial tibial condyle crest was evaluated in 632 knee MRI examinations. The angle and depth were measured by two separate evaluators. The presence of STe and BME was recorded. A third evaluator blindly assessed the presence of pain at this site. Results: BME associated with STe was found in 24 patients (with no history of previous trauma, osteoarthritis, tumor or pes anserine bursitis). The mean crest angle was 151.3° (95%CI 147.4–155.3°) compared to 159.4° (95%CI 158.8–160°) in controls (Mann–Whitney test, P < 0.0001). MRI findings were highly predictive of localized pain (sensitivity 92% specificity 99%, Fisher's exact test, P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Friction at the medial tibial condyle crest is a painful syndrome. MRI is a highly specific and sensitive imaging modality for its diagnosis.

  17. MID-VASTUS VS MEDIAL PARA-PATELLAR APPROACH IN TOTAL KNEE REPLACEMENT—TIME TO DISCHARGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, P.; Press, J.; Hockings, M.

    2009-01-01

    Background It has been shown before that when compared with the medial para-patellar approach, the mid-vastus approach for TKR results in less post-operative pain for patients and more rapid recovery of straight leg raise. As far as we are aware the post-operative length of stay of the two groups of patients has not been compared. We postulated that the reduced pain and more rapid recovery of straight leg raise would translate into an earlier, safe, discharge home for the mid-vastus patients compared with those who underwent a traditional medial para-patellar approach. Methods Twenty patients operated on by each of five established knee arthroplasty surgeons were evaluated prospectively with regard to their pre and post-operative range of movement, time to achieve straight leg raise post-operatively and length of post-operative hospital stay. Only one of the surgeons performed the mid-vastus approach, and the measurements were recorded by physiotherapists who were blinded as to the approach used on each patient. Results The results were analysed using a standard statistical software package, and although the mean length of stay was lower for the mid-vastus patients, the difference did not reach a level of significance (p = 0.13). The time taken to achieve straight leg raise post-operatively was significantly less in the mid-vastus group (p<0.001). Conclusion Although this study confirms previous findings that the mid-vastus approach reduces the time taken for patients to achieve straight leg raise, when compared with the medial para-patellar approach, on its own it does not translate into a significantly shorter length of hospital stay. In order to reduce the length of post-operative hospital stay with an accelerated rehabilitation program for TKR, a multi-disciplinary approach is required. Patient expectations, GP support, physiotherapists and nursing staff all have a role to play and the mid-vastus approach, in permitting earlier straight leg raising

  18. A mixed methods study to investigate needs assessment for knee pain and disability: population and individual perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ong Bie

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The new Musculoskeletal Services Framework outlines the importance of health care needs assessment. Our aim was to provide a model for this for knee pain and disability, describing felt need (individual assessment of a need for health care and expressed need (demand for health care. This intelligence is required by health care planners in order to implement the new Framework. Methods A multi-method approach was used. A population survey (n = 5784 was administered to adults aged 50+ registered with 3 general practices. The questionnaire contained a Knee Pain Screening Tool to identify the prevalence of knee pain and health care use in the population, and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC. Survey responders who scored "severe" or "extreme" on at least one item on the pain or physical function scale on the WOMAC were categorised into "severe" groups. Qualitative interviews were undertaken with 22 survey responders to explore in detail the experience of living with knee pain and disability. A sample of interviewees (n = 10 completed an open format patient diary to explore the experience of knee pain in everyday life. Results The 12-month period prevalence of knee pain was 49.5%, of which half was severe. Severe difficulties were reported with domestic duties, bending, bathing, climbing stairs and getting in or out of a car. Some self-care is occurring. The majority (53% of responders with severe pain or disability had not consulted their GP in the last 12 months. The qualitative study revealed reasons for this including a perception that knee pain is part of normal ageing, little effective prevention and treatment is available and the use of medications causes side effects and dependency. Conclusion This study adds to previous work by highlighting a gap between felt and expressed need and the reasons for this mismatch. There is evidence of self-management, but also missed opportunities for

  19. Long-term use of minimal footwear on pain, self-reported function, analgesic intake, and joint loading in elderly women with knee osteoarthritis: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombini-Souza, Francis; Matias, Alessandra B; Yokota, Mariane; Butugan, Marco K; Goldenstein-Schainberg, Claudia; Fuller, Ricardo; Sacco, Isabel C N

    2015-12-01

    Efforts have been made to retard the progressive debilitating pain and joint dysfunction in patients with knee osteoarthritis. We aimed to evaluate the therapeutic effect of a low-cost minimalist footwear on pain, function, clinical and gait-biomechanical aspects of elderly women with knee osteoarthritis. Throughout a randomized, parallel and controlled clinical trial, fifty-six patients with medial knee osteoarthritis were randomly allocated to an intervention (n=28) or control group (n=28), and assessed at baseline and after three and six months. The intervention involved wearing Moleca(®) footwear for at least 6h/day, 7 days/week, over 6 months. The pain subscale of the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index was the primary outcome. The secondary outcomes were the other subscales, Lequesne score, distance walked in 6 min, knee oedema and effusion, knee adduction moment and paracetamol intake. Intention-to-treat analysis was performed using two-way casewise ANOVA (coefficient. Intervention group showed improvement in pain (effect size: 1.41, p<.001), function (effect size: 1.22, p=.001), stiffness (effect size: 0.76, p=.001), Lequesne score (effect size: 1.07, p<.001), and reduction by 21.8% in the knee adduction moment impulse (p=.017) during gait wearing Moleca(®). The analgesic intake was lower in the intervention group. The long-term use of Moleca(®) footwear relieves pain, improves self-reported function, reduces the knee loading while wearing Moleca(®), refrains the increase of analgesic intake in elderly women with knee osteoarthritis and can be considered as a conservative mechanical treatment option. ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01342458). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Future Directions in Painful Knee Osteoarthritis: Harnessing Complexity in a Heterogeneous Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Steven Z.; Maluf, Katrina S.; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer E.

    2014-01-01

    This perspective article proposes a conceptual model for the pain experience for individuals diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Pain in knee OA is likely a heterogeneous, multifactorial phenomenon that involves not only the OA disease process but also elements specific to patient psychology and pain neurophysiology. The relevant contributions to the pain experience for any individual patient remain difficult, if not impossible, to definitively determine, and the rationale for many clinical treatment decisions arises primarily from a mechanistic understanding of OA pathophysiology. The Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) recently identified “phenotyping” of OA pain as a research priority to “better target pain therapies to individual patients.” This perspective article proposes that contributions from 3 domains—knee pathology, psychological distress, and pain neurophysiology—should be considered equally important in future efforts to understand pain phenotypes in knee OA. Ultimately, characterization of pain phenotypes may aid in the understanding of the pain experience and the development of interventions specific to pain for individual patients. PMID:24179141

  1. Experimental knee joint pain during strength training and muscle strength gain in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, T J; Langberg, Henning; Hodges, P W

    2012-01-01

    Knee joint pain and reduced quadriceps strength are cardinal symptoms in many knee pathologies. In people with painful knee pathologies, quadriceps exercise reduces pain, improves physical function, and increases muscle strength. A general assumption is that pain compromises muscle function...... and thus may prevent effective rehabilitation. This study evaluated the effects of experimental knee joint pain during quadriceps strength training on muscle strength gain in healthy individuals....

  2. Forward lunge knee biomechanics before and after partial meniscectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Michelle; Nielsen, Jonas Høberg; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    partial meniscectomy (APM) on knee joint mechanics. The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in knee joint biomechanics during a forward lunge in patients with a suspected degenerative meniscal tear from before to three months after APM. METHODS: Twenty-two patients (35-55years old......) with a suspected degenerative medial meniscal tear participated in this study. Three dimensional knee biomechanics were assessed on the injured and contralateral leg before and three months after APM. The visual analogue scale was used to assess knee pain and the Knee Injury Osteoarthritis Outcome Score was used...

  3. Neuromuscular Activity and Knee Kinematics in Adolescents with Patellofemoral Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathleff, Michael Skovdal; Samani, Afshin; Olesen, Jens L

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the neuromuscular control of the knee during stair descent among female adolescents with patellofemoral pain (PFP) and to report its association with self-reported clinical status assessed by the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS).......This study aimed to investigate the neuromuscular control of the knee during stair descent among female adolescents with patellofemoral pain (PFP) and to report its association with self-reported clinical status assessed by the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS)....

  4. Ultrasound-guided genicular nerve block for pain control after total knee replacement: Preliminary case series and technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Sotelo, V; Maculé, F; Minguell, J; Bergé, R; Franco, C; Sala-Blanch, X

    2017-12-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is an operation with moderate to severe postoperative pain. The Fast-Track models employ local infiltration techniques with anaesthetics at high volumes (100-150ml). We proposed a genicular nerve block with low volume of local anaesthetic. The aim of our study is to evaluate the periarticular distribution of these blocks in a fresh cadaver model and to describe the technique in a preliminary group of patients submitted to TKA. In the anatomical phase, 4 genicular nerves (superior medial, superior lateral, inferior medial and inferior lateral) were blocked with 4ml of local anaesthetic with iodinated contrast and methylene blue in each (16ml in total). It was performed on a fresh cadaver and the distribution of the injected medium was evaluated by means of a CT-scan and coronal anatomical sections on both knees. The clinical phase included 12 patients scheduled for TKA. Ultrasound-guided block of the 4 genicular nerves was performed preoperatively and their clinical efficacy evaluated by assessing pain after the reversal of the spinal block and at 12h after the block. Pain was measured using the numerical scale and the need for rescue analgesia was evaluated. A wide periarticular distribution of contrast was observed by CT-scan, which was later evaluated in the coronal sections. The distribution followed the joint capsule without entering the joint, both in the femur and in the tibia. The pain after the reversal of the subarachnoid block was 2±1, requiring rescue analgesia in 42% of the patients. At 12h, the pain according to the numerical scale was 4±1, 33% required rescue analgesia. The administration of 4ml of local anaesthetic at the level of the 4 genicular nerves of the knee produces a wide periarticular distribution. Our preliminary data in a series of 12 patients undergoing TKA seems to be clinically effective. Nevertheless, extensive case series and comparative studies with local infiltration techniques with anaesthetics are

  5. Outcome of medial hamstring lengthening in children with spastic paresis: A biomechanical and morphological observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberfehlner, Helga; Jaspers, Richard T; Rutz, Erich; Harlaar, Jaap; van der Sluijs, Johannes A; Witbreuk, Melinda M; van Hutten, Kim; Romkes, Jacqueline; Freslier, Marie; Brunner, Reinald; Becher, Jules G; Maas, Huub; Buizer, Annemieke I

    2018-01-01

    To improve gait in children with spastic paresis due to cerebral palsy or hereditary spastic paresis, the semitendinosus muscle is frequently lengthened amongst other medial hamstring muscles by orthopaedic surgery. Side effects on gait due to weakening of the hamstring muscles and overcorrections have been reported. How these side effects relate to semitendinosus morphology is unknown. This study assessed the effects of bilateral medial hamstring lengthening as part of single-event multilevel surgery (SEMLS) on (1) knee joint mechanics (2) semitendinosus muscle morphology and (3) gait kinematics. All variables were assessed for the right side only. Six children with spastic paresis selected for surgery to counteract limited knee range of motion were measured before and about a year after surgery. After surgery, in most subjects popliteal angle decreased and knee moment-angle curves were shifted towards a more extended knee joint, semitendinosus muscle belly length was approximately 30% decreased, while at all assessed knee angles tendon length was increased by about 80%. In the majority of children muscle volume of the semitendinosus muscle decreased substantially suggesting a reduction of physiological cross-sectional area. Gait kinematics showed more knee extension during stance (mean change ± standard deviation: 34±13°), but also increased pelvic anterior tilt (mean change ± standard deviation: 23±5°). In most subjects, surgical lengthening of semitendinosus tendon contributed to more extended knee joint angle during static measurements as well as during gait, whereas extensibility of semitendinosus muscle belly was decreased. Post-surgical treatment to maintain muscle belly length and physiological cross-sectional area may improve treatment outcome of medial hamstring lengthening.

  6. MRI findings in renal transplant recipients with hip and knee pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donmez, Fuldem Yildirim [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Caddesi 10. sokak no: 45, Bahcelievler 06490, Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: fuldemyildirim@yahoo.com; Basaran, Ceyla [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Caddesi 10. sokak no: 45, Bahcelievler 06490, Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: ceylab@baskent-ank.edu.tr; Ulu, Esra Meltem Kayahan [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Caddesi 10. sokak no: 45, Bahcelievler 06490, Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: emkayahanulu@yahoo.com; Uyusur, Arzu [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Caddesi 10. sokak no: 45, Bahcelievler 06490, Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: arzuuyusur@yahoo.com; Tarhan, Nefise Cagla [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Caddesi 10. sokak no: 45, Bahcelievler 06490, Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: caglat@baskent-ank.edu.tr; Muhtesem Agildere, A. [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Caddesi 10. sokak no: 45, Bahcelievler 06490, Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: amuhtesem@superonline.com

    2009-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate and demonstrate the MRI findings of renal transplant recipients with hip and knee pain and to investigate the most common etiology of pain. Materials and methods: 69 hip MRIs of 57 patients with hip pain and 30 knee MRIs of 24 patients with knee pain with no history of trauma were retrospectively evaluated by two radiologists. Results: In the evaluation of hip MRIs, 24 patients had avascular necrosis and effusion, 2 patients had bone marrow edema consistent with early stage of avascular necrosis. 18 patients had only intraarticular effusion, 6 patients had tendinitis, 6 patients had bursitis and 1 patient had soft tissue abscess. Five patients had muscle edema and five patients had muscle atrophy as additional findings to the primary pathologies. Among patients with knee pain, nine patients had degenerative joint disease. Seven patients had chondromalacia, five had bone marrow edema, six had meniscal tear, six had ligament rupture and two had bone infarct. Three of the patients had muscle edema accompanying to other pathologies. Conclusion: The most common etiology of hip pain in renal transplant recipients is avascular necrosis as expected, intraarticular effusion is found to be Second reason for pain. However, knee pain is explained by ligament pathology, meniscal tear, chondromalacia or degenerative joint disease rather than osteonecrosis.

  7. MRI findings in renal transplant recipients with hip and knee pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donmez, Fuldem Yildirim; Basaran, Ceyla; Ulu, Esra Meltem Kayahan; Uyusur, Arzu; Tarhan, Nefise Cagla; Muhtesem Agildere, A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and demonstrate the MRI findings of renal transplant recipients with hip and knee pain and to investigate the most common etiology of pain. Materials and methods: 69 hip MRIs of 57 patients with hip pain and 30 knee MRIs of 24 patients with knee pain with no history of trauma were retrospectively evaluated by two radiologists. Results: In the evaluation of hip MRIs, 24 patients had avascular necrosis and effusion, 2 patients had bone marrow edema consistent with early stage of avascular necrosis. 18 patients had only intraarticular effusion, 6 patients had tendinitis, 6 patients had bursitis and 1 patient had soft tissue abscess. Five patients had muscle edema and five patients had muscle atrophy as additional findings to the primary pathologies. Among patients with knee pain, nine patients had degenerative joint disease. Seven patients had chondromalacia, five had bone marrow edema, six had meniscal tear, six had ligament rupture and two had bone infarct. Three of the patients had muscle edema accompanying to other pathologies. Conclusion: The most common etiology of hip pain in renal transplant recipients is avascular necrosis as expected, intraarticular effusion is found to be Second reason for pain. However, knee pain is explained by ligament pathology, meniscal tear, chondromalacia or degenerative joint disease rather than osteonecrosis.

  8. Knee Pain and Low Back Pain Additively Disturb Sleep in the General Population: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of the Nagahama Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimihiko Murase

    Full Text Available Association of knee and low back pain with sleep disturbance is poorly understood. We aimed to clarify the independent and combined effects of these orthopedic symptoms on sleep in a large-scale general population.Cross-sectional data about sleep and knee/low back pain were collected for 9,611 community residents (53±14 years old by a structured questionnaire. Sleep duration less than 6 h/d was defined as short sleep. Sleep quality and the presence of knee and low back pain were evaluated by dichotomous questions. Subjects who complained about knee or low back pains were graded by tertiles of a numerical response scale (NRS score and a Roland-Morris disability questionnaire (RDQ score respectively. Multivariate regression analyses were performed to determine the correlates of short sleep duration and poor sleep quality.Frequency of participants who complained of the orthopedic symptoms was as follows; knee pain, 29.0%; low back pain, 42.0% and both knee and low back pain 17.6%. Both knee and low back pain were significantly and independently associated with short sleep duration (knee pain: odds ratio (OR = 1.19, p<0.01; low back pain: OR = 1.13, p = 0.01 and poor sleep quality (knee pain: OR = 1.22, p<0.01; low back pain; OR = 1.57, p<0.01. The group in the highest tertile of the NRS or RDQ score had the highest risk for short sleep duration and poor sleep quality except for the relationship between the highest tertile of the RDQ score and short sleep duration.(the highest tertile of the NRS: OR for short sleep duration = 1.31, p<0.01; OR for poor sleep quality = 1.47, p<0.01; the highest tertile of the RDQ: OR for short sleep duration = 1.11, p = 0.12; OR for poor sleep quality = 1.81, p<0.01 Further, coincident knee and low back pain raised the odds ratios for short sleep duration (either of knee or low back pain: OR = 1.10, p = 0.06; both knee and low back pain: OR = 1.40, p<0.01 and poor sleep quality (either of knee or low back pain: OR

  9. Complex Medial Meniscus Tears Are Associated With a Biconcave Medial Tibial Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, F Alan; Getelman, Mark H; Berry, Kathy L

    2017-04-01

    To determine whether an association exists between a biconcave medial tibial plateau and complex medial meniscus tears. A consecutive series of stable knees undergoing arthroscopy were evaluated retrospectively with the use of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), radiographs, and arthroscopy documented by intraoperative videos. Investigators independently performed blinded reviews of the MRI or videos. Based on the arthroscopy findings, medial tibial plateaus were classified as either biconcave or not biconcave. A transverse coronal plane ridge, separating the front of the tibial plateau from the back near the inner margin of the posterior body of the medial meniscus, was defined as biconcave. The medial plateau slope was calculated with MRI sagittal views. General demographic information, body mass index, and arthroscopically confirmed knee pathology were recorded. A total of 179 consecutive knees were studied from July 2014 through August 2015; 49 (27.2%) biconcave medial tibial plateaus and 130 (72.8%) controls were identified at arthroscopy. Complex medial meniscus tears were found in 103. Patients with a biconcave medial tibial plateau were found to have more complex medial meniscus tears (69.4%) than those without a biconcavity (53.1%) (P = .049) despite having lower body mass index (P = .020). No difference in medial tibial plateau slope was observed for biconcavities involving both cartilage and bone, bone only, or an indeterminate group (P = .47). Biconcave medial tibial plateaus were present in 27.4% of a consecutive series of patients undergoing knee arthroscopy. A biconcave medial tibial plateau was more frequently associated with a complex medial meniscus tear. Level III, case-control study. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. All rights reserved.

  10. Changes in gait characteristics of women with early and established medial knee osteoarthritis : Results from a 2-years longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahmoudian, Armaghan; van Dieёn, Jaap H.; Baert, Isabel A.C.; Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Faber, Gert S.; Luyten, Frank P.; Verschueren, Sabine M.P.

    2017-01-01

    Background Despite the large number of cross-sectional studies on gait in subjects with knee osteoarthritis, there are scarcely any longitudinal studies on gait changes in knee osteoarthritis. Methods Gait analysis was performed on 25 women with early and 18 with established medial knee

  11. Anterior Knee Pain (Chondromalacia Patellae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrick, James G.

    1989-01-01

    This article presents a pragmatic approach to the definition, diagnosis, and management of anterior knee pain. Symptoms and treatment are described. Emphasis is on active involvement of the patient in the rehabilitation exercise program. (IAH)

  12. Psychosocial and demographic factors influencing pain scores of patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberly, Lauren; Richter, Dustin; Comerci, George; Ocksrider, Justin; Mercer, Deana; Mlady, Gary; Wascher, Daniel; Schenck, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Pain levels in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee are commonly assessed by using a numeric scoring system, but results may be influenced by factors other than the patient's actual physical discomfort or disease severity, including psychosocial and demographic variables. We examined the possible relation between knee-pain scores and several psychosocial, sociodemographic, disease, and treatment variables in 355 patients with knee OA. The pain-evaluation instrument was a 0- to 10-point rating scale. Data obtained retrospectively from the patients' medical records were demographic characteristics, body mass index (BMI), concomitant disorders, illicit and prescription drug use, alcohol use, smoking, knee OA treatment, and severity of knee OA indicated by Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) radiographic grade. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine whether these variables correlated with reported pain scores. On univariate analysis, higher pain scores were significantly associated with Native American or Hispanic ethnicity; a higher BMI; current prescription for an opioid, antidepressant, or gabapentinoid medication; depression; diabetes mellitus; fibromyalgia; illicit drug use; lack of health insurance; smoking; previous knee injection; and recommendation by the clinician that the patient undergo knee surgery. Neither the patient's sex nor the KL grade showed a correlation. On multivariate analysis, depression, current opioid prescription, and Native American or Hispanic ethnicity retained a significant association with higher pain scores. Our results in a large, ethnically diverse group of patients with knee OA suggest that psychosocial and sociodemographic factors may be important determinants of pain levels reported by patients with knee OA.

  13. Quadriceps strength and anterior knee pain following tibia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The tension generated on extension of the knee against a resistance using tensiometer was measured in Newton. The ranges of motion of the knees were documented, as well as Lysholm score which measures activities and document the presence and limitation caused by anterior knee pain. Results: A total of 36 patients ...

  14. Simultaneous MPFL and LPFL reconstruction for recurrent lateral patellar dislocation with medial patellofemoral instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masashi Kusano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an extremely rare case of both recurrent lateral patella dislocation and medial patellofemoral instability, following prior operations to correct patella maltracking. Manual translation of the patella revealed medial and lateral instability with a positive apprehension sign. 3-D computer modelling of kinematics based on MRI data demonstrated that the patella deviated laterally at full extension and translated medially with knee flexion. The medial and lateral patellofemoral ligaments were reconstructed simultaneously with hamstring tendons, alleviating peripatellar pain and patellar instability in both directions.

  15. Detection of osteophytes and subchondral cysts in the knee with use of tomosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Daichi; Xu, Li; Roemer, Frank W; Hunter, David J; Li, Ling; Katur, Avinash M; Guermazi, Ali

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of tomosynthesis in depicting osteophytes and subchondral cysts, with use of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging as the reference, and to test whether the lesions detected at radiography and tomosynthesis are associated with pain. The study was approved by local institutional review board, and all subjects gave written informed consent. Forty subjects (80 knees) older than 40 years were recruited irrespective of knee pain or radiographic osteoarthritis. Knees were imaged with radiography, tomosynthesis, and MR imaging. Presence of osteophytes and subchondral cysts in four locations of tibiofemoral joint (medial and lateral femur and tibia) was recorded. Knee pain was assessed by using the Western Ontario and McMaster University pain subscale. MR imaging depicted 171 osteophytes and 51 subchondral cysts. Tomosynthesis had a higher sensitivity for osteophyte detection in left and right lateral femur (0.96 vs 0.75, P = .025, and 1.00 vs 0.71, P = .008, respectively), right medial femur (0.94 vs 0.72, P = .046), and right lateral tibia (1.00 vs 0.83, P = .046). For subchondral cyst detection, the sensitivity of tomosynthesis was 0.14-1.00 and that of radiography was 0.00-0.56. Both modalities had similar specificity for both lesions. Subjects with tomosynthesis-depicted osteophytes (odds ratio, 4.2-6.4; P = .001-.011) and medially located subchondral cysts (odds ratio, 6.7-17.8; P = .004-.03) were more likely to feel pain than those without. However, radiography-depicted osteophytes were more strongly associated with pain than were tomosynthesis-depicted osteophytes. Tomosynthesis depicted more osteophytes and subchondral cysts than did radiography. Subjects with tomosynthesis-depicted osteophytes and subchondral cysts were more likely to feel pain than those without such lesions. © RSNA, 2012.

  16. The Effect of 8 Weeks of the Selected Combined Exercises on Balance and Pain of Patients Suffering from Arthritis of Knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elnaz Karimi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis is considered as the most common joint disease of humans and one of the most common causes of chronic disability among elderly people in the developed countries. The main objective of the present research was to determine the impact of 8 weeks of the combined exercises on the balance and the amount of pain of patients with knee osteoarthritis. 15 patients with knee arthritis were selected purposefully and in form of convenience and they participated in this research. The patients implemented the Training Protocol of walking in water and land and the knee locking and the front thigh exercises for 8 weeks. Dynamic balance (Y test and pain (McGill questionnaire of patients with knee arthritis were measured and evaluated before and after eight weeks of combined exercises. The data were analyzed by use of the t-dependent (P˂0.05. In the dynamic balance of patients with knee arthritis, there was significant difference regarding the anterior side between before-exercises (39.9 7.2 and after-exercises (50.76.8, regarding the internal posterior side between before-exercises (28.8 9.2 and after-exercises (38.0 8.7, regarding the external posterior direction between before-exercises (37.5 7.2 and after-exercises (44.4 7.4. (P˂0.05. Regarding sense perception of pain by patients, there was significant difference between before-exercises (2.2 0.6 and after-exercises (1.8 0.5, regarding the emotional perception of pain by patients between beforeexercises (1.5 0.3 and after-exercises (1.2 0.3 and on perceiving variety of pain by patients between before- (2.10.8 and after-practices (1.8 0.7 (P˂0.05. From the findings of the present research we can conclude that the hydrotherapy exercises combined with exercises on land can cause to improve the dynamic balance and the pain of patients with knee arthritis; therefore we can recommend it as a modality for these patients.

  17. Pelvic movement strategies and leg extension power in patients with end-stage medial compartment knee osteoarthritis: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierkegaard, Signe; Jørgensen, Peter Bo; Dalgas, Ulrik; Søballe, Kjeld; Mechlenburg, Inger

    2015-09-01

    During movement tasks, patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis use compensatory strategies to minimise the joint load of the affected leg. Movement strategies of the knees and trunk have been investigated, but less is known about movement strategies of the pelvis during advancing functional tasks, and how these strategies are associated with leg extension power. The aim of the study was to investigate pelvic movement strategies and leg extension power in patients with end-stage medial compartment knee osteoarthritis compared with controls. 57 patients (mean age 65.6 years) scheduled for medial uni-compartmental knee arthroplasty, and 29 age and gender matched controls were included in this cross-sectional study. Leg extension power was tested with the Nottingham Leg Extension Power-Rig. Pelvic range of motion was derived from an inertia-based measurement unit placed over the sacrum bone during walking, stair climbing and stepping. Patients had lower leg extension power than controls (20-39 %, P 0.06). Furthermore, an inverse association (coefficient: -0.03 to -0.04; R (2) = 13-22 %) between leg extension power and pelvic range of motion during stair and step descending was found in the patients. Compared to controls, patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis use greater pelvic movements during advanced functional performance tests, particularly when these involve descending tasks. Further studies should investigate if it is possible to alter these movement strategies by an intervention aimed at increasing strength and power for the patients.

  18. Pelvic movement strategies and leg extension power in patients with end-stage medial compartment knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kierkegaard, Signe; Jørgensen, Peter Bo; Dalgas, Ulrik

    2015-01-01

    advancing functional tasks, and how these strategies are associated with leg extension power. The aim of the study was to investigate pelvic movement strategies and leg extension power in patients with end-stage medial compartment knee osteoarthritis compared with controls. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 57...... patients (mean age 65.6 years) scheduled for medial uni-compartmental knee arthroplasty, and 29 age and gender matched controls were included in this cross-sectional study. Leg extension power was tested with the Nottingham Leg Extension Power-Rig. Pelvic range of motion was derived from an inertia......-based measurement unit placed over the sacrum bone during walking, stair climbing and stepping. RESULTS: Patients had lower leg extension power than controls (20-39 %, P

  19. Experimental quadriceps muscle pain impairs knee joint control during walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Alkjaer, Tine; Lund, Hans

    2007-01-01

    Pain is a cardinal symptom in musculoskeletal diseases involving the knee joint, and aberrant movement patterns and motor control strategies are often present in these patients. However, the underlying neuromuscular mechanisms linking pain to movement and motor control are unclear. To investigate...... the functional significance of muscle pain on knee joint control during walking, three-dimensional gait analyses were performed before, during, and after experimentally induced muscle pain by means of intramuscular injections of hypertonic saline (5.8%) into vastus medialis (VM) muscle of 20 healthy subjects....... Isotonic saline (0.9%) was used as control. Surface electromyography (EMG) recordings of VM, vastus lateralis (VL), biceps femoris, and semitendinosus muscles were synchronized with the gait analyses. During experimental muscle pain, the loading response phase peak knee extensor moments were attenuated...

  20. Frequency of non-traumatic anterior knee pain in secondary school students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafiq, W.; Ajmad, F.; Ahmed, A.; Fatima, M.

    2017-01-01

    To find out the frequency of non-traumatic anterior knee pain in secondary school students of Lahore, Pakistan. Methodology: This observational study was conducted among 350 students of secondary school of Lahore during a 3 months period. Both males and females of age 11-17 years were included in the study. A questionnaire was completed which included demographic data, Numeric Rating scale (NRS) and Kujala Scale. The data were being analyzed using SPSS version 21.0. Results: Out of 350 secondary school students, 145 (41%) had anterior knee pain (AKP). Twenty seven (19%) had pain in the left knee only, 54 (37%) had pain in right knee only while 64 (44%) had pain in both knees. The incidence of AKP was highest among 11 to 15 years old students. Moreover, the girls reported high frequency of AKP then the boys. The activities that were affected because of AKP included running, walking, stair climbing and jumping. Conclusion: Non-traumatic AKP is common among students of age 11-17 years, with a peak during adolescence (11-15). This pain not only affects the sports activities but also affects the activity of daily livings. (author)

  1. Women with knee osteoarthritis have more pain and poorer function than men, but similar physical activity prior to total knee replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonelli Shalome M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoarthritis of the knee is a major clinical problem affecting a greater proportion of women than men. Women generally report higher pain intensity at rest and greater perceived functional deficits than men. Women also perform worse than men on function measures such as the 6-minute walk and timed up and go tests. Differences in pain sensitivity, pain during function, psychosocial variables, and physical activity levels are unclear. Further the ability of various biopsychosocial variables to explain physical activity, function and pain is unknown. Methods This study examined differences in pain, pain sensitivity, function, psychosocial variables, and physical activity between women and men with knee osteoarthritis (N = 208 immediately prior to total knee arthroplasty. We assessed: (1 pain using self-report measures and a numerical rating scale at rest and during functional tasks, (2 pain sensitivity using quantitative sensory measures, (3 function with self-report measures and specific function tasks (timed walk, maximal active flexion and extension, (4 psychosocial measures (depression, anxiety, catastrophizing, and social support, and (5 physical activity using accelerometry. The ability of these mixed variables to explain physical activity, function and pain was assessed using regression analysis. Results Our findings showed significant differences on pain intensity, pain sensitivity, and function tasks, but not on psychosocial measures or physical activity. Women had significantly worse pain and more impaired function than men. Their levels of depression, anxiety, pain catastrophizing, social support, and physical activity, however, did not differ significantly. Factors explaining differences in (1 pain during movement (during gait speed test were pain at rest, knee extension, state anxiety, and pressure pain threshold; (2 function (gait speed test were sex, age, knee extension, knee flexion opioid medications, pain

  2. Selective Denervation for Persistent Knee Pain After Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Report of 50 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shao-Min; Meister, David W; Graner, Kelly C; Ninomiya, James T

    2017-03-01

    Despite the general success of total knee arthroplasty (TKA), up to 20% of patients report dissatisfaction following surgery. One potential cause of this dissatisfaction is residual pain secondary to neuroma formation in the sensory nerve branches that innervate the knee. We found, after performing a retrospective review, that up to 9.7% of patients following primary TKA and up to 21% of revision cases exhibited persistent knee pain attributable to neuroma formation. Despite the high incidence of this pathology, little is known about the effective diagnosis or treatment of neuroma formation following TKA. Between 2011 and 2014, 50 patients with persistent symptomatic neuroma pain following TKA underwent selective denervation. These patients had demonstrated the appropriate selection criteria and had failed conservative management. Patients were evaluated by the visual analog scale pain score and the Knee Society Score to determine the outcome of the described treatment. Thirty-two patients (64%) rated their outcome as excellent, 10 (20%) as good, 3 (6%) as fair, and 2 (4%) reported no change. The mean visual analog scale pain score was improved from 9.4 ± 0.8 to 1.1 ± 1.6 following surgery (P ≤ .001). The mean Knee Society Scores increased from 45.5 ± 14.3 to 94.1 ± 8.6 points (P ≤ .0001). Three patients (6%) required the second neurectomy due to recurrent pain and received excellent pain relief postoperatively. There were 2 complications of superficial skin peri-incisional hyperemia related to dressings. Average follow-up duration was 24 months (range, 16-38 months). Our study suggests that selective denervation provides an effective and long-lasting option for the management of this pathology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. MR imaging of meniscal subluxation in the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitenseher, M.J.; Tratting, S.; Dobrocky, I.; Steiner, E.; Imhof, H.; Kukla, C.; Nehrer, S.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to establish diagnostic criteria for meniscal subluxation, and to determine whether there was any connection between meniscal subluxation and other common meniscal and knee-joint abnormalities. Material and Methods: The normal position of the meniscal body was assessed in 10 asymptomatic volunteers. MR signs of meniscal subluxation were evaluated retrospectively in 60 symptomatic patients with pain the knee, impaired mobility, and/or joint swelling who had no clear diagnosis after the evaluation of case history, clinical examination, and radiography. The criterion for subluxation of the meniscus was defined as a distance of ≥3 mm between the peripheral border of the meniscus and the edge of the tibial plateau. Results: In the volunteers, the mean distance form the medial meniscus to the edge of the tibial plateau was 0.07 mm, and that from the lateral meniscus was 0 mm. In 55 symptomatic patients without meniscal subluxation, the mean distance from the meniscus to the edge of the tribial plateau was 0.27 mm. Five patients (8%) had evidence of meniscal subluxation, 4 in the medial meniscus and one in the lateral meniscus. The most commonly associated knee abnormality was joint effusion in 5 knees and osteoarthritis in 2 knees. Conclusion: Meniscal subluxation was not a rare finding with MR imaging in patients with painful knees. Meniscal subluxation was associated with other knee abnormalities such as joint effusion or osteoarthritis. (orig.)

  4. A Novel Association between Femoroacetabular Impingement and Anterior Knee Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchis-Alfonso, Vicente; Tey, Marc; Monllau, Joan Carles

    2015-01-01

    Background. For a long time it has been accepted that the main problem in the anterior knee pain (AKP) patient is in the patella. Currently, literature supports the link between abnormal hip function and AKP. Objective. Our objective is to investigate if Cam femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) resolution is related to the outcome in pain and disability in patients with chronic AKP recalcitrant to conservative treatment associated with Cam FAI. Material and Methods. A retrospective study on 7 patients with chronic AKP associated with FAI type Cam was performed. Knee and hip pain were measured with the visual analogue scale (VAS), knee disability with the Kujala scale, and hip disability with the Nonarthritic Hip Score (NAHS). Results. The VAS knee pain score and VAS hip pain score had a significant improvement postoperatively. At final follow-up, there was significant improvement in all functional scores (Kujala score and NAHS). Conclusion. Our finding supports the link between Cam FAI and AKP in some young patients. Assessment of Cam FAI should be considered as a part of the physical examination of patients with AKP, mainly in cases with pain recalcitrant to conservative treatment.

  5. A Novel Association between Femoroacetabular Impingement and Anterior Knee Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Sanchis-Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. For a long time it has been accepted that the main problem in the anterior knee pain (AKP patient is in the patella. Currently, literature supports the link between abnormal hip function and AKP. Objective. Our objective is to investigate if Cam femoroacetabular impingement (FAI resolution is related to the outcome in pain and disability in patients with chronic AKP recalcitrant to conservative treatment associated with Cam FAI. Material and Methods. A retrospective study on 7 patients with chronic AKP associated with FAI type Cam was performed. Knee and hip pain were measured with the visual analogue scale (VAS, knee disability with the Kujala scale, and hip disability with the Nonarthritic Hip Score (NAHS. Results. The VAS knee pain score and VAS hip pain score had a significant improvement postoperatively. At final follow-up, there was significant improvement in all functional scores (Kujala score and NAHS. Conclusion. Our finding supports the link between Cam FAI and AKP in some young patients. Assessment of Cam FAI should be considered as a part of the physical examination of patients with AKP, mainly in cases with pain recalcitrant to conservative treatment.

  6. Synovial folds in the knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, H.

    1987-01-01

    Stimulated by arthroscopic insight into central abnormalities of the knee joint and by the large number of unexplained case of 'anterior knee pain', we have studied the synovia in more than 2000 contrast examinations of the joint. Surprisingly, and contrary to the views expressed in the literature, the clinically significant plica parapatellaris medialis was seen as frequently during pneumo-arthrography as during more complex procedures. Abnormalities in the synovial fold emerged as a discreet disease identified as the 'medial shelf syndrome' and should be included in the differential diagnosis of causes of pain round the lower end of the femur and patella. (orig.) [de

  7. Existence of a neuropathic pain component in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtori, Seiji; Orita, Sumihisa; Yamashita, Masaomi; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Ito, Toshinori; Shigemura, Tomonori; Nishiyama, Hideki; Konno, Shin; Ohta, Hideyuki; Takaso, Masashi; Inoue, Gen; Eguchi, Yawara; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Kishida, Shunji; Kuniyoshi, Kazuki; Aoki, Yasuchika; Arai, Gen; Miyagi, Masayuki; Kamoda, Hiroto; Suzkuki, Miyako; Nakamura, Junichi; Furuya, Takeo; Kubota, Gou; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Masahiko; Sasho, Takahisa; Nakagawa, Koichi; Toyone, Tomoaki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2012-07-01

    Pain from osteoarthritis (OA) is generally classified as nociceptive (inflammatory). Animal models of knee OA have shown that sensory nerve fibers innervating the knee are significantly damaged with destruction of subchondral bone junction, and induce neuropathic pain (NP). Our objective was to examine NP in the knees of OA patients using painDETECT (an NP questionnaire) and to evaluate the relationship between NP, pain intensity, and stage of OA. Ninety-two knee OA patients were evaluated in this study. Pain scores using Visual Analogue Scales (VAS), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), painDETECT, duration of symptoms, severity of OA using the Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) system, and amount of joint fluid were evaluated and compared using a Spearman's correlation coefficient by rank test. Our study identified at least 5.4% of our knee OA patients as likely to have NP and 15.2% as possibly having NP. The painDETECT score was significantly correlated with the VAS and WOMAC pain severity. Compared with the painDETECT score, there was a tendency for positive correlation with the KL grade, and tendency for negative correlation with the existence and amount of joint fluid, but these correlations were not significant. PainDETECT scores classified 5.4% of pain from knee OA as NP. NP tended to be seen in patients with less joint fluid and increased KL grade, both of which corresponded to late stages of OA. It is important to consider the existence of NP in the treatment of knee OA pain.

  8. Treatment modalities for patients with varus medial knee osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Duivenvoorden (Tijs)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common joint disorders in the Western population, which causes pain, stiffness, loss of function and disability. In patients with OA the cartilage, located at the ends of long bones, is damaged. OA is most prevalent in the knee

  9. Altering Knee Abduction Angular Impulse Using Wedged Insoles for Treatment of Patellofemoral Pain in Runners: A Six-Week Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan T Lewinson

    Full Text Available Determine if a change in internal knee abduction angular impulse (KAAI is related to pain reduction for runners with patellofemoral pain (PFP by comparing lateral and medial wedge insole interventions, and increased KAAI and decreased KAAI groups.Randomized controlled clinical trial (ClinicalTrials.gov ID# NCT01332110.Biomechanics laboratory and community.Thirty-six runners with physician-diagnosed PFP enrolled in the trial, and 27 were analyzed.Runners with PFP were randomly assigned to either an experimental 3 mm lateral wedge or control 6 mm medial wedge group. Participants completed a biomechanical gait analysis to quantify KAAIs with their assigned insole, and then used their assigned insole for six-weeks during their regular runs. Usual pain during running was measured at baseline and at six-week follow-up using a visual analog scale. Statistical tests were performed to identify differences between wedge types, differences between biomechanical response types (i.e. increase or decrease KAAI, as well as predictors of pain reduction.Percent change in KAAI relative to neutral, and % change in pain over six weeks.Clinically meaningful reductions in pain (>33% were measured for both footwear groups; however, no significant differences between footwear groups were found (p = 0.697. When participants were regrouped based on KAAI change (i.e., increase or decrease, again, no significant differences in pain reduction were noted (p = 0.146. Interestingly, when evaluating absolute change in KAAI, a significant relationship between absolute % change in KAAI and % pain reduction was observed (R2 = 0.21; p = 0.030, after adjusting for baseline pain levels.The greater the absolute % change in KAAI during running, the greater the % reduction in pain over six weeks, regardless of wedge type, and whether KAAIs increased or decreased. Lateral and medial wedge insoles were similar in effectiveness for treatment of PFP.Altering KAAI should be a focus of future

  10. Short Term Effects of Kinesiotape Application in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

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    Zeliha Başkurt

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this prospective, randomized, controlled study is to determine the effect of kinesiotape on pain, range of motion, muscle strength and lower extremity functions in medial compartmental osteoarthritis patients. Materials and Methods: Patients with medial compartmental knee osteoarthritis were participated in the study. They were randomized into two groups. While kinesiotaping was applied to the first group (n:23, six men, 17 women; age: 57.6±11.5 yrs; BMI: 28.8±4.3 kg/m2; 15 right, eight left knee, sham taping was applied to the second group (n:22, five men, 17 women; age: 61.1±7.0 yrs; BMI: 31.1±4.1 kg/m2; 13 right, nine left knee twice, three days apart. Visual pain scale, knee range of motion, muscle strength measurements, and Lower Extremity Functional Scale scores were recorded at baseline, immediately following the first taping, three days and seven days later. Results: Kinesiotape outperformed sham tape statistically significantly in the test parameters (p

  11. A Survey On The Effects Of Iontophoresis Of Piroxicam Gel On Pain And Knee Muscles Strengthn Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis

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    Asghar RezaSoltani

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Knee osteoarthritis is the most common cause of disability in many societies. Therapeutic measures such as using anti-inflammation drugs and physiotherapy programs have been used to suppress knee pain and improve knee joint function in patients with knee osteoarthritis. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of iontophoresis of piroxicam gel, galvanic current with or without piroxicam gel on pain, functional ability and knee muscle strength in patients with knee osteoarthritis.Materials and Method: This study was a clinical trial conducted in Akhtar hospital. Forty two female patients (mean age 58.52 years old with knee osteoarthritis participated in this study. The protocol was performed in Physiotherapy Clinic of Mazandaran Medical University, Mazandaran, Iran. All patients were randomly assigned to three groups. Iontophoresis of piroxicam gel was applied for group 1 (n=14, proxicam gel for group 2 (n=14 and galvanic current for group 3 (n=14. The procedure was carried out for 20-minutes, three times a week and for two following weeks. Knee pain and functional ability were estimated by knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS questioner and the strength of knee extensor and flexor muscles by an isometric device just before the first treatment and immediately after the last treatment times.Results: A significant decrease in pain and a significant increase in functional ability and the strength of knee extensor muscles were resulted in all studied groups (P < 0.05. According to ANOVA test, the level of the percentage difference which was computed for KOOS and knee muscle strength before and after treatments was significantly higher in group 1 than the other two (P < 0.01.Conclusion: Pain and knee functional ability were significantly improved in patients in all three methods. But iontophoresis of piroxicam gel appeared to be more effective in relieving pain and improving knee functional abilities than the

  12. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Acupuncture in the Treatment of Knee Osteoarthritis: A Case Study

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    Joana Teixeira

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Osteoarthritis is a widespread chronic disease seen as a continuum of clinical occurrences within several phases, which go from synovial inflammation and microscopic changes of bone and cartilage to painful destructive changes of all the joint structures. Being the most common joint disease, it is the leading cause of disability in working individuals above 50 years of age. In some cases, conventional treatments produce just a mild and brief pain reduction and have considerable side-effects. Contemporary Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM is a model of systems biology based on a logically accessible theoretical background. It integrates several therapeutic approaches, among them acupuncture, which has shown effective results in the treatment of knee and hip osteoarthritis, minimizing pain, improving functionality and consequently leading to a better quality of life. Methods: The present case study included two patients with clinical signs of osteoarthritis and diagnosis of medial pain, as defined by the Heidelberg Model of TCM. Over 6 weeks, those patients were treated with acupuncture, with a frequency of one session a week. The sessions lasted for thirty minutes and were based on the needling of 4 local acupoints. Before and after each session, pain and mobility assessments were performed. Results: The results were positive, with significant reduction of pain and increased knee joint flexion amplitude and mobility. Conclusion: Acupuncture was effective as an alternative or complementary treatment of knee osteoarthritis, with high levels of improvement within a modest intervention period.

  13. MR imaging appearance of insufficiency fractures of the medial tibial plateau

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laredo, J.D.; Savy, J.M.; Oreel, P.; Liote, F.; Kuntz, D.; Kaplan, G.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the etiology of a painful syndrome of the medial tibial plateau (MTP) in elderly patients. Findings include acute pain of the medial aspect of the knee, normal plain radiographs, and increased uptake of the MTP on bone scans. It has been related to osteonecrosis in most cases and, more rarely, to an insufficiency fracture. To our knowledge, no MR studies of patients with this syndrome have been previously reported. Five patients presenting with this syndrome (age > 59 years) were studied with MR imaging. In all five cases, initial plain radiographs were normal and increased uptake of the MTP was found on bone scans

  14. Pain sensation in human osteoarthritic knee joints is strongly enhanced by diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eitner, Annett; Pester, Julia; Vogel, Franziska; Marintschev, Ivan; Lehmann, Thomas; Hofmann, Gunther O; Schaible, Hans-Georg

    2017-09-01

    The major burden of knee joint osteoarthritis (OA) is pain. Since in elder patients diabetes mellitus is an important comorbidity of OA, we explored whether the presence of diabetes mellitus has a significant influence on pain intensity at the end stage of knee OA, and we aimed to identify factors possibly related to changes of pain intensity in diabetic patients. In 23 diabetic and 47 nondiabetic patients with OA undergoing total knee arthroplasty, we assessed the pain intensity before the operation using the "Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score". Furthermore, synovial tissue, synovial fluid (SF), cartilage, and blood were obtained. We determined the synovitis score, the concentrations of prostaglandin E2 and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the SF and serum, and of C-reactive protein and HbA1c and other metabolic parameters in the serum. We performed multivariate regression analyses to study the association of pain with several parameters. Diabetic patients had on average a higher Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score pain score than nondiabetic patients (P Knee joints from diabetic patients exhibited on average higher synovitis scores (P = 0.024) and higher concentrations of IL-6 in the SF (P = 0.003) than knee joints from nondiabetic patients. Multivariate regression analysis showed that patients with higher synovitis scores had more intense pain independent of all investigated confounders, and that the positive association between pain intensities and IL-6 levels was dependent on diabetes mellitus and/or synovitis. These data suggest that diabetes mellitus significantly increases pain intensity of knee OA, and that in diabetic patients higher pain intensities were determined by stronger synovitis.

  15. MRI EVALUATION OF PAINFUL KNEE: A STUDY AT KATURI TERTIARY REFERRAL CENTER

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    Bhimeswarao Pasupuleti

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Normal knee joint functional activity is essential for day to day life . The number of patients with complaints of painful knee joint is quite significant and therefore magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the knee is of great value in understanding and to diagnose the varied pathologies causing painful knee joint. The information obtained from conventional radiographs of the knee is limited, and by CT scans is limited to bone pathog l y with limited information about ligaments and synovium. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES : a To describe the MRI features in various types of traumatic and non - traumatic knee pain . b To identify the common lesions seen in the knee joint . METHODOLOGY : The study population included 100 patients who underwent MR imaging of the knee who presented with knee pain to the DEPARTMENT OF RADIOLOGY, KATURI MEDICALCOLLEGE referred by the clinician. STUDY PERIOD: Nov 2010 to Oct 2012 . STUDY DESIGN : Descriptive study . All the MRI scans of the knee in this study were performed using GE Signa Profile EXCITE MR machine with a 0.2 tesla field strength magnet in a closely coupled extremity coil. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION : The pathology of knee joint is broadly classified as traumatic and non - traumatic. Traumatic pathol o gy mainly included the ligament injuries and non - traumatic included arthritis, cysts and neoplastic lesions

  16. Knee pain and swelling: An atypical presentation of metastatic colon cancer to the patella

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    Bethany Gasagranda, DO

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Knee pain is a common reason for a patient to seek medical evaluation. Of the many causes of knee pain, malignancy is one of the least common. When malignancy is the etiology of the pain, it is usually due to a primary tumor of the osseous structures or soft tissues of the knee joint. Metastatic disease involving the knee joint is uncommon, with few cases reported in the literature. Of these reported cases, metastatic colon cancer is exceedingly rare. However, in a patient with new onset knee pain and the proper clinical history, metastatic disease should be considered as a potential explanation of symptoms. We report a case of knee pain and swelling due to metastatic colon cancer to the patella.

  17. The dynamics of the pain system is intact in patients with knee osteoarthritis: An exploratory experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Tanja Schjødt; Henriksen, Marius; Rosager, Sara; Klokker, Louise; Ellegaard, Karen; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente; Bliddal, Henning; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2017-12-29

    Background and aims Despite the high prevalence of knee osteoarthritis (OA) it remains one of the most frequent knee disorders without a cure. Pain and disability are prominent clinical features of knee OA. Knee OA pain is typically localized but can also be referred to the thigh or lower leg. Widespread hyperalgesia has been found in knee OA patients. In addition, patients with hyperalgesia in the OA knee joint show increased pain summation scores upon repetitive stimulation of the OA knee suggesting the involvement of facilitated central mechanisms in knee OA. The dynamics of the pain system (i.e., the adaptive responses to pain) has been widely studied, but mainly from experiments on healthy subjects, whereas less is known about the dynamics of the pain system in chronic pain patients, where the pain system has been activated for a long time. The aim of this study was to assess the dynamics of the nociceptive system quantitatively in knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients before and after induction of experimental knee pain. Methods Ten knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients participated in this randomized crossover trial. Each subject was tested on two days separated by 1 week. The most affected knee was exposed to experimental pain or control, in a randomized sequence, by injection of hypertonic saline into the infrapatellar fat pad and a control injection of isotonic saline. Pain areas were assessed by drawings on anatomical maps. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) at the knee, thigh, lower leg, and arm were assessed before, during, and after the experimental pain and control conditions. Likewise, temporal summation of pressure pain on the knee, thigh and lower leg muscles was assessed. Results Experimental knee pain decreased the PPTs at the knee (P system in individuals with knee OA can be affected even after many years of nociceptive input. This study indicates that the adaptability in the pain system is intact in patients with knee OA, which opens for opportunities to

  18. Knee Pain and the Use of Various Types of Footwear-A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chugthai, Morad; Newman, Jared M; Akil, Samuel; Khlopas, Anton; Sultan, Assem A; Sodhi, Nipun; Bhave, Anil; Harwin, Steven F; Mont, Michael A

    2018-02-08

    Knee pain is a highly prevalent condition in the United States with multiple etiologies, with two of the most common sources being osteoarthritis (OA) and patellofemoral pain (PFP). These conditions can lead to reduced physical function and a poor quality of life. Various modalities have been used to decrease the amount of knee pain that individuals' experience; however, they are not always successful and can be expensive. Several studies have reported on specialized footwear for symptomatic alleviation of conditions that affect the knee, this is because it has been theorized that certain footwear can alter the forces placed by muscles on lower-extremity joints, and can potentially alleviate pain by reducing the load placed on the joint. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to review the current literature on the use of various types of footwear used in patients who suffer from knee pain. Specifically, we evaluated: (1) knee OA and (2) PFP and the effect that different footwear has on patients' symptoms. Multiple different types of footwear and orthosis were utilized to treat patients with chronic knee pain. However, the results from reported outcomes by different studies are conflicting, which warrant further studies. Nevertheless, there are enough positive results to view this as a potential major modality to utilize for the treatment of knee OA. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  19. Effect of a physiotherapy rehabilitation program on knee osteoarthritis in patients with different pain intensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Aziem, Amr Almaz; Soliman, Elsadat Saad; Mosaad, Dalia Mohammed; Draz, Amira Hussin

    2018-02-01

    [Purpose] To examine the effect of physiotherapy rehabilitation program on moderate knee osteoarthritis in patients with different pain intensities. [Subjects and Methods] Sixty subjects (37 men and 23 women) with moderate knee osteoarthritis participated in the current study. Randomization software was used to select the participating subjects' numbers from the clinic records. They were classified into three groups according to pain intensity: mild, moderate, and severe pain groups. All groups underwent a standard set of pulsed electromagnetic field, ultrasound, stretching exercises, and strengthening exercises. Pain intensity, knee range of motion, knee function, and isometric quadriceps strength were evaluated using the visual analogue scale, universal goniometer, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities osteoarthritis index, and Jamar hydraulic dynamometer, respectively. The evaluation was performed before and after a 4-week rehabilitation program. [Results] All groups showed significant differences in pain intensity, knee range of motion, isometric quadriceps strength, and knee function. The score change in moderate pain group was significantly greater than those in mild and severe pain groups. [Conclusion] Pain intensity is one of the prominent factors that are responsible for the improvement of knee osteoarthritis. Consequently, pain intensity should be considered during rehabilitation of knee osteoarthritis.

  20. Role of pathophysiology of patellofemoral instability in the treatment of spontaneous medial patellofemoral subluxation: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doğruyol Dağhan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Medial patellar subluxation is usually seen after lateral retinacular release. Spontaneous medial subluxation of the patella is a very rare condition. There are few reports in the literature on the pathophysiology of iatrogenic medial patellar subluxation. To our knowledge, there are no reports of the pathophysiology of non-iatrogenic medial patellar subluxation in the English literature. In this study we present a case of spontaneous medial patellar instability that is more prominent in extension during weight bearing. We also try to define the treatment protocol based on pathophsiology. Case presentation We report the case of a 21-year-old Turkish man with spontaneous medial patellar instability. He had suffered right knee pain, clicking and popping sensation in the affected knee for three months prior to presentation. Clinical examination demonstrated medial patellar subluxation that is more prominent in extension during the weight bearing phase of gait and while standing. Increased medial tilt was observed when the patella was stressed medially. Conventional anterior to posterior, lateral and Merchant radiographs did not reveal any abnormalities. After three months of physical therapy, our patient was still suffering from right knee pain which disturbed his gait pattern. Throughout the surgery, medial patellar translation was tested following the imbrication of lateral structures. He still had a medial patellar translation that was more than 50% of his patellar width. Patellotibial ligament augmentation using an iliotibial band flap was added. When examined after surgery, the alignment of the patella was effectively corrected. Conclusions Chronic imbalance between the strengths of vastus lateralis and vastus medialis results in secondary changes in passive ligamentous structures and causes additional instability. Physical therapy modalities that aim to strengthen the vastus lateralis might be sufficient for the

  1. Risk prediction model for knee pain in the Nottingham community: a Bayesian modelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, G S; Bhattacharya, A; McWilliams, D F; Ingham, S L; Doherty, M; Zhang, W

    2017-03-20

    Twenty-five percent of the British population over the age of 50 years experiences knee pain. Knee pain can limit physical ability and cause distress and bears significant socioeconomic costs. The objectives of this study were to develop and validate the first risk prediction model for incident knee pain in the Nottingham community and validate this internally within the Nottingham cohort and externally within the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) cohort. A total of 1822 participants from the Nottingham community who were at risk for knee pain were followed for 12 years. Of this cohort, two-thirds (n = 1203) were used to develop the risk prediction model, and one-third (n = 619) were used to validate the model. Incident knee pain was defined as pain on most days for at least 1 month in the past 12 months. Predictors were age, sex, body mass index, pain elsewhere, prior knee injury and knee alignment. A Bayesian logistic regression model was used to determine the probability of an OR >1. The Hosmer-Lemeshow χ 2 statistic (HLS) was used for calibration, and ROC curve analysis was used for discrimination. The OAI cohort from the United States was also used to examine the performance of the model. A risk prediction model for knee pain incidence was developed using a Bayesian approach. The model had good calibration, with an HLS of 7.17 (p = 0.52) and moderate discriminative ability (ROC 0.70) in the community. Individual scenarios are given using the model. However, the model had poor calibration (HLS 5866.28, p prediction model for knee pain, regardless of underlying structural changes of knee osteoarthritis, in the community using a Bayesian modelling approach. The model appears to work well in a community-based population but not in individuals with a higher risk for knee osteoarthritis, and it may provide a convenient tool for use in primary care to predict the risk of knee pain in the general population.

  2. Dynamic weight-bearing assessment of pain in knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klokker, Louise; Christensen, Robin; Wæhrens, Eva Elisabet Ejlersen

    2016-01-01

    -minute-walk-test (6MWT), and 6-min-walk-test with subsequent pain rating (6MWTpain), and once with a transition questionnaire (TRANS-Q) for the patient-reported change in pain after 12 weeks of exercise. Construct validity (baseline-scores) and responsiveness (change-scores) were estimated by Spearman Correlation...... a standing position). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the construct validity, responsiveness, and interpretability of the DAP for knee osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: One-hundred participants with knee OA were tested twice each with the DAP, the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), six...

  3. Dutch translation of the Kujala Anterior Knee Pain Scale and validation in patients after knee arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kievit, Arthur J.; Breugem, Stefan J. M.; Sierevelt, Inger N.; Heesterbeek, Petra J. C.; van de Groes, Sebastiaan A. W.; Kremers, Keetie C. A. L. C.; Koëter, Sander; Haverkamp, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    To translate and validate the Kujala Anterior Knee Pain Scale (AKPS) in patients who have undergone total knee arthroplasty (TKA) or unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) and evaluate the internal consistency, construct validity and ceiling or floor effect. After standard forward and backward

  4. Comparison of robot surgery modular and total knee arthroplasty kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Gokce; Fernandez-Madrid, Ivan; Schwarzkopf, Ran; Walker, Peter S; Karia, Raj

    2014-04-01

    The kinematics of seven knee specimens were measured from 0 to 120 degrees flexion using an up-and-down crouching machine. Motion was characterized by the positions of the centers of the lateral and medial femoral condyles in the anterior-posterior direction relative to a fixed tibia. A modular unicompartmental knee, trochlea flange, and patella resurfacing (multicompartmental knee [MCK] system) were implanted using a surgeon-interactive robot system that provided accurate surface matching. The MCK was tested, followed by standard cruciate retaining (CR) and posterior stabilized (PS) knees. The motion of the MCK was close to anatomic, especially on the medial side, in contrast to the CR and PS knees that showed abnormal motion features. Such a modular knee system, accurately inserted, has the potential for close to normal function in clinical application. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  5. Effect of rocker-soled shoes on parameters of knee joint load in knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Elizabeth G; Kean, Crystal O; Wrigley, Tim V; Bennell, Kim L; Hinman, Rana S

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the immediate effects of rocker-soled shoes on parameters of the knee adduction moment (KAM) and pain in individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Three-dimensional gait analysis was performed on 30 individuals (mean (SD): age, 61 (7) yr; 15 (50%) male) with radiographic and symptomatic knee OA under three walking conditions in a randomized order: i) wearing rocker-soled shoes (Skechers Shape-ups), ii) wearing non-rocker-soled shoes (ASICS walking shoes), and iii) barefoot. Peak KAM and KAM angular impulse were measured as primary indicators of knee load distribution. Secondary measures included the knee flexion moment (KFM) and knee pain during walking. Peak KAM was significantly lower when wearing the rocker-soled shoes compared with that when wearing the non-rocker-soled shoes (mean difference (95% confidence interval), -0.27 (-0.42 to -0.12) N·m/BW × Ht%; P < 0.001). Post hoc tests revealed no significant difference in KAM impulse between rocker-soled and non-rocker-soled shoe conditions (P = 0.13). Both peak KAM and KAM impulse were significantly higher during both shoe conditions compared with those during the barefoot condition (P < 0.001). There were no significant differences in KFM (P = 0.36) or knee pain (P = 0.89) between conditions. Rocker-soled shoes significantly reduced peak KAM when compared with non-rocker-soled shoes, without a concomitant change in KFM, and thus may potentially reduce medial knee joint loading. However, KAM parameters in the rocker-soled shoes remained significantly higher than those during barefoot walking. Wearing rocker-soled shoes did not have a significant immediate effect on walking pain. Further research is required to evaluate whether rocker-soled shoes can influence symptoms and progression of knee OA with prolonged wear.

  6. Intra-Articular Analgesia and Steroid Reduce Pain Sensitivity in Knee OA Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Tanja Schjødt; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Ellegaard, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To assess the effects of intra-articular therapy on pain sensitivity in the knee and surrounding tissues in knee OA patients. Methods. Twenty-five knee OA patients with symptomatic knee OA were included in this interventional cohort study. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were recorded...... muscles (control site). Results. Significantly increased PPTs were found following intra-articular injection, at both the knee (P effects were sustained for two weeks, and at some points the effect was even greater at two weeks (P 

  7. French translation and validation of the "Anterior Knee Pain Scale" (AKPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckinx, F; Bornheim, S; Remy, G; Van Beveren, J; Reginster, Jy; Bruyère, O; Dardenne, N; Kaux, J F

    2017-12-21

    To linguistically and cross-culturally translate the Anterior Knee Pain Scale into French and to evaluate the reliability and validity of this translated version of the questionnaire. The translation part was performed in six stages, according to international guidelines: (i) two initial translations from English to French; (ii) synthesis of the two translations; (iii) backward translations into the original language; (iv) expert committee to compare the backward translations with the original questionnaire; (v) pre-final version testing and (VI) expert committee appraisal. To validate the French version of the Anterior Knee Pain Scale, we assessed its validity, reliability and floor/ceiling effects. To do this, volunteer patients from the French part of Belgium and from France, with patellofemoral pain were asked to answer the French version of the Anterior Knee Pain Scale at baseline and after 7 days, as well as the generic SF-36 questionnaire. The Anterior Knee Pain Scale was translated without any major difficulties. A total of 101 subjects aged 34.5 ± 11.4 years (58.4% of women) were included in this study. Results indicated an excellent test-retest reliability (Intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.97, 95%CI: 0.96-0.98), a high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.87), a consistent construct validity (high correlations with the SF-36 questionnaire were found with domains related to physical function (r = 0.80), physical role (r = 0.70) and pain (r = 0.64)) and low or moderate correlations with domains related to mental health (r = 0.26), vitality (r = 0.32) and social function (r = 0.41). Moreover, no floor/ceiling effects have been found. A valid French version of the Anterior Knee Pain Scale is now available and can be used with confidence to better assess the disease burden associated with patellofemoral pain. It was successfully cross-culturally adapted into French. Implications for rehabilitation The

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging signs of iliotibial band friction in patients with isolated medial compartment osteoarthritis of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilevska, Violeta; Szeimies, Ulrike; Staebler, Axel

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to assess the frequency of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signs of iliotibial band friction (ITBF) in patients with advanced medial compartment knee osteoarthritis. Proton density-weighted (PDw) fat-saturated (fatsat) MR images (1.5 T, slice thickness (SL) 2.5-3 mm, eight-channel phased array coil) of 128 patients with isolated advanced osteoarthritis of the medial knee compartment and complete or subtotal (>80%) loss of cartilage were evaluated. There were 41 men and 87 women. Mean age was 63 years, range 34-89 years. The control group consisted of 94 patients with medial meniscus degeneration without cartilage loss (56 men and 38 women, mean age 50 years, range 16-89 years). MRI signs of ITBF were evaluated in both groups [poorly defined abnormalities of signal intensity and localized fluid collection lateral, distal or proximal to the lateral epicondyle; signal intensity abnormalities superficial to or deep by the iliotibial band (ITB)]. Transverse images were evaluated separately. Consensus evaluation using all imaging planes was performed. Of 128 patients with osteoarthritis, 95 had moderate or advanced MRI signs of ITBF (74.2%). Eighty-nine patients (69.5%) had advanced degeneration of the meniscus. In the control group, 26 of 94 patients had only moderate MRI signs of ITBF. There was a statistically significant difference between both groups for the presence of MR signs of ITBF (P ≤ 0.01). MRI signs of ITBF were frequently present in patients with severe medial compartment osteoarthritis of the knee. Joint space narrowing with varus knee deformity may be a cause of ITBF. Level 4 (Historic, non-randomized, retrospective, cohort study with a control group) (orig.)

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging signs of iliotibial band friction in patients with isolated medial compartment osteoarthritis of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilevska, Violeta [University Surgical Clinic ' St. Naum Ohridski' , Skopje (Macedonia (The Former Yugoslav Republic of)); Szeimies, Ulrike; Staebler, Axel [Radiology in Muenchen Harlaching, Orthopedic Clinic Harlaching, Munich (Germany)

    2009-09-15

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to assess the frequency of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signs of iliotibial band friction (ITBF) in patients with advanced medial compartment knee osteoarthritis. Proton density-weighted (PDw) fat-saturated (fatsat) MR images (1.5 T, slice thickness (SL) 2.5-3 mm, eight-channel phased array coil) of 128 patients with isolated advanced osteoarthritis of the medial knee compartment and complete or subtotal (>80%) loss of cartilage were evaluated. There were 41 men and 87 women. Mean age was 63 years, range 34-89 years. The control group consisted of 94 patients with medial meniscus degeneration without cartilage loss (56 men and 38 women, mean age 50 years, range 16-89 years). MRI signs of ITBF were evaluated in both groups [poorly defined abnormalities of signal intensity and localized fluid collection lateral, distal or proximal to the lateral epicondyle; signal intensity abnormalities superficial to or deep by the iliotibial band (ITB)]. Transverse images were evaluated separately. Consensus evaluation using all imaging planes was performed. Of 128 patients with osteoarthritis, 95 had moderate or advanced MRI signs of ITBF (74.2%). Eighty-nine patients (69.5%) had advanced degeneration of the meniscus. In the control group, 26 of 94 patients had only moderate MRI signs of ITBF. There was a statistically significant difference between both groups for the presence of MR signs of ITBF (P {<=} 0.01). MRI signs of ITBF were frequently present in patients with severe medial compartment osteoarthritis of the knee. Joint space narrowing with varus knee deformity may be a cause of ITBF. Level 4 (Historic, non-randomized, retrospective, cohort study with a control group) (orig.)

  10. No exacerbation of knee joint pain and effusion following preoperative progressive resistance training in patients scheduled for total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skoffer, Birgit; Dalgas, Ulrik; Maribo, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Preoperative progressive resistance training (PRT) is controversial in patients scheduled for total knee arthroplasty (TKA), because of the concern that it may exacerbate knee joint pain and effusion. OBJECTIVE: To examine if preoperative PRT initiated 5 weeks prior to TKA would 1......) exacerbate pain and knee effusion, 2) allow a progressively increased training load throughout the training period that would subsequently increase muscle strength. DESIGN: Secondary analyses from a randomized controlled trial. SETTING: University Hospital and a Regional Hospital. PATIENTS: Thirty patients...... OUTCOME MEASURES: Before and after each training session, knee joint pain rated on an 11-point scale, effusion assessed by measuring the knee joint circumference, and training load were recorded. The first and last training session were initiated by 1RM testing of unilateral leg press, knee extension...

  11. Structure and function, injury, pathology, and treatment of the medial collateral ligament of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schein, Aaron; Matcuk, George; Patel, Dakshesh; Gottsegen, Christopher J; Hartshorn, Timothy; Forrester, Deborah; White, Eric

    2012-12-01

    The medial collateral ligament (MCL) is the most commonly injured ligament of the knee. There is a spectrum of injury severity, and injuries may be acute or chronic. The MCL is also frequently injured in conjunction with other knee structures. Clinical evaluation of the knee is important to assess the degree of surgical acuity, but magnetic resonance imaging can provide details about the injury that may not be obvious clinically. In addition to injury, MCL bursitis can occur and may be treated with needle aspiration and corticosteroid injection. This review article covers the anatomy and biomechanics of the MCL, its injury patterns and approach to management, and MCL bursitis.

  12. The value of FDG-PET in patients with painful total knee arthroplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stumpe, Katrin D.M.; Schulthess, Gustav K. von; Strobel, Klaus [University Hospital, Department of Medical Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Romero, Jose [Orthopaedic University Hospital Balgrist, Orthopaedic Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland); Center for Joint Diseases at Hirslanden Clinic, EndoClinic Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Ziegler, Oliver [Orthopaedic University Hospital Balgrist, Orthopaedic Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland); Ortho Zentrum Rosenheim, Rosenheim (Germany); Kamel, Ehab M. [University Hospital, Department of Medical Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV), Division of Nuclear Medicine, Lausanne (Switzerland); Hodler, Juerg [Orthopaedic University Hospital Balgrist, Department of Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2006-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate{sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in patients with painful total knee arthroplasty and to relate FDG uptake to the location of soft tissue pain. Twenty-eight patients with painful total knee arthroplasty had a clinical examination, standard radiographs, CT measurement of rotation of the femoral component and FDG-PET (18 PET/CT, 10 PET). The diagnosis of infection was based on microbiological examinations of surgical specimens (n=12) or clinical follow-up for at least 6 months (n=16),{sup 99m}Tc-labelled monoclonal antibody scintigraphy and joint aspiration. Twenty-seven of 28 patients presented with diffuse synovial FDG uptake. Additional focal extrasynovial FDG uptake was observed in 19 knees. Twenty-four of the 28 patients had a diagnosis of internal femoral malrotation. The remaining four patients showed no rotation (0 ) and 3 , 4 and 7 of external rotation, respectively. Three patients presented with the additional diagnosis of an infected total knee replacement. Pain was described as diffuse (n=10) or focal (n=18). In two knees a relationship between pain location and FDG uptake was observed. Of ten patients with a severe internal femoral component rotation (>6 ), seven had focal uptake, four in the femoral periosteum and three in the tibial periosteum. The difference between knees with severe malrotation and the remaining knees was not significant (p=1.000, Fisher's Exact Test). Diffuse synovial and focal extrasynovial FDG-PET uptake is commonly found in patients with malrotation of the femoral component and is not related to pain location. The information provided by FDG-PET does not contribute to the diagnosis and management of individual patients with persistent pain after total knee replacement. (orig.)

  13. The value of FDG-PET in patients with painful total knee arthroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stumpe, Katrin D.M.; Schulthess, Gustav K. von; Strobel, Klaus; Romero, Jose; Ziegler, Oliver; Kamel, Ehab M.; Hodler, Juerg

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in patients with painful total knee arthroplasty and to relate FDG uptake to the location of soft tissue pain. Twenty-eight patients with painful total knee arthroplasty had a clinical examination, standard radiographs, CT measurement of rotation of the femoral component and FDG-PET (18 PET/CT, 10 PET). The diagnosis of infection was based on microbiological examinations of surgical specimens (n=12) or clinical follow-up for at least 6 months (n=16), 99m Tc-labelled monoclonal antibody scintigraphy and joint aspiration. Twenty-seven of 28 patients presented with diffuse synovial FDG uptake. Additional focal extrasynovial FDG uptake was observed in 19 knees. Twenty-four of the 28 patients had a diagnosis of internal femoral malrotation. The remaining four patients showed no rotation (0 ) and 3 , 4 and 7 of external rotation, respectively. Three patients presented with the additional diagnosis of an infected total knee replacement. Pain was described as diffuse (n=10) or focal (n=18). In two knees a relationship between pain location and FDG uptake was observed. Of ten patients with a severe internal femoral component rotation (>6 ), seven had focal uptake, four in the femoral periosteum and three in the tibial periosteum. The difference between knees with severe malrotation and the remaining knees was not significant (p=1.000, Fisher's Exact Test). Diffuse synovial and focal extrasynovial FDG-PET uptake is commonly found in patients with malrotation of the femoral component and is not related to pain location. The information provided by FDG-PET does not contribute to the diagnosis and management of individual patients with persistent pain after total knee replacement. (orig.)

  14. Bone marrow abnormality associated with painful osteoarthritis of the knee. A cross-sectional study of magnetic resonance imaging findings with the radiographic stage and clinical findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Mitsuaki; Kurosawa, Hisashi; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Takazawa, Yuji; Kawasaki, Takayuki; Ishijima, Muneaki; Kim, Song-Gon; Seto, Hiroaki

    2009-01-01

    Bone marrow abnormalities (BMAs) are frequently found in osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Some reports have suggested BMA was correlated with the X-ray stage of OA and also with knee pain, but the reports depended on two-dimensional images without considering the spatial expansion of BMAs. To determine whether three-dimensional expansion of a BMA with MRI in patient with medial-type OA of the knee is correlated with the radiographic stage of OA and clinical findings using a semi-quantitative method. Cross-sectional study. This study enrolled 238 patients with medial-type OA. Radiography and MRI of the knee were taken in all participants. X-rays were graded using the Kellgren-Lawrence (K/L) grade (1-4). T2-weighted fat-suppressed MRI images were used to score the size of the BMA according to the whole-organ MRI score (WORMS). A new scoring system defined as the spatial BMA score (s-score), which specifically addressed the spatial expansion of BMAs, was examined to assess the size of the BMA. BMA frequency was examined in subdivisions of the articular surfaces of the knee according to the X-ray stages of the K/L grade and the correlation of the s-score to the clinical findings. BMA frequency in the medial femorotibial joint (MFTJ; 74%) was significantly higher than in the lateral femorotibial joint (LFTJ; 14%) and patellofemoral joint (PFJ; 14%; P<0.01). The s-score of the MFTJ was strongly correlated with the X-ray stage assessed by the K/L grade. The s-score of the MFTJ was also correlated with the clinical findings. The frequency and spatial expansion of BMAs in the MFTJ are strongly correlated with the X-ray stage of medial-type OA as well as the clinical findings. (author)

  15. Thermal and mechanical pain sensitization in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevilaqua-Grossi, Debora; Zanin, Marilia; Benedetti, Camila; Florencio, Lidiane; Oliveira, Anamaria

    2018-02-26

    The aim was to assess sensitization using quantitative sensory testing in mechanical and thermal modes in individuals with and without osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. Pain thresholds were correlated with functionality, symptoms of depression and intensity of pain. Thirty control volunteers and 30 patients with OA of the knee were assessed. Punctate pain thresholds using Von Frey filaments and thermal pain thresholds using a Thermal Sensory Analyzer were evaluated in the periarticular region of the knee and forearm. Using a digital pressure algometer, pressure pain thresholds were assessed in the periarticular region of the knee and on the root exit zone on the lumbar and sacral spine. Punctate, pressure, and thermal pain thresholds differed significantly between participants with and without OA (p pain sensitization. Pressure pain thresholds also showed moderate and negative correlations with data on functionality, symptoms of depression and intensity of pain (-0.36  -0.56), contributing up to 30% of their variability. Allodynia and hyperalgesia were demonstrated in the OA group, suggesting central sensitization in patients with mild to moderate severity of joint damage. Correlation between mechanical hypersensitivity and psychosocial factors seems to be small, despite of its significance.

  16. Imaging assessment of anterior knee pain and patellar maltracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNally, E.G.

    2001-01-01

    Anterior knee pain is a common complaint in the orthopaedic clinic. The differential diagnosis is wide and the principal goal of initial assessment is to detect remediable causes. The majority of patients do not have a specific disease and increasingly interest has focused on the role of patello-femoro-tibial morphology and of patellar maltracking in the aetiology of anterior knee pain. Classification in this group of patients is poor and there is no uniform agreement on which patient groups benefit from treatment and which treatment is best. Much of the literature involves relatively small numbers of patients, is poorly controlled and there is little agreement on outcome measures [1, 2]. The purpose of this review is to outline the current status of the imaging assessment of recalcitrant anterior knee pain with particular reference to patellar maltracking. (orig.)

  17. Use of Low Level of Continuous Heat as an Adjunct to Physical Therapy Improves Knee Pain Recovery and the Compliance for Home Exercise in Patients With Chronic Knee Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrofsky, Jerrold S; Laymon, Michael S; Alshammari, Faris S; Lee, Haneul

    2016-11-01

    Petrofsky, JS, Laymon, MS, Alshammari, FS, and Lee, H. Use of low level of continuous heat as an adjunct to physical therapy improves knee pain recovery and the compliance for home exercise in patients with chronic knee pain: a randomized controlled trial. J Strength Cond Res 30(11): 3107-3115, 2016-This study examined if the use of low level continuous heat (LLCH) wraps at home between physical therapy sessions at a clinic resulted in better therapy outcomes in patients with chronic knee pain. Fifty individuals with chronic nonspecific knee pain was randomly allocated to 2 groups: the LLCH group and the placebo group. All subjects underwent 1 hour of conventional physical therapy twice per week for 2 weeks at the outpatient clinic and they were asked to accomplish 1 hour of therapeutic exercise at home each day between sessions. The LLCH group applied LLCH knee wraps for 6 hours at home before home exercise while placebo group took a placebo ibuprofen. (This was done since placebo heat is impossible to use since subjects would notice that the wraps were cold) Before, during, and after intervention, pain intensity, active range of motion of the knee (AROM), knee strength, and home exercise compliance were measured. The LLCH group showed pain attenuation after 2 weeks of therapy sessions (p ≤ 0.05). AROM and strength of the knee significantly improved over time compared to the placebo group. Home exercise compliance was significantly higher in the LLCH group than placebo group (p ≤ 0.05). These results indicated that the use of LLCH as an adjunct to conventional physical therapy for chronic knee pain significantly improved pain attenuation and recovery of strength and movement in patients with chronic knee pain.

  18. Pseudogout at the knee joint will frequently occur after hip fracture and lead to the knee pain in the early postoperative period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harato, Kengo; Yoshida, Hiroki

    2015-01-14

    Symptomatic knee joint effusion is frequently observed after hip fracture, which may lead to postoperative knee pain during rehabilitation after hip fracture surgery. However, unfortunately, very little has been reported on this phenomenon in the literature. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the relationship between symptomatic knee effusion and postoperative knee pain and to clarify the reason of the effusion accompanied by hip fracture. A total of 100 patients over 65 years of age with an acute hip fracture after fall were prospectively followed up. Knee effusion was assessed on admission and at the operating room before the surgery. If knee effusion was observed at the time of the surgery, synovial fluid was collected into syringes to investigate the cause of the effusion using a compensated polarized light microscope. Furthermore, for each patient, we evaluated age, sex, radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA), type of the fracture, laterality, severity of the fracture, and postoperative knee pain during rehabilitation. These factors were compared between patients with and without knee effusion at the time of the surgery. As a statistical analysis, we used Mann-Whitney U-test for patients' age and categorical variables were analyzed by chi-square test or Fisher's exact test. A total of 30 patients presented symptomatic knee effusion at the time of the surgery. In patients with knee effusion, numbers of intertrochanteric fracture, radiographic knee OA, and postoperative knee pain were significantly large compared to those without effusion. In terms of synovial fluid analysis, calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals were observed in 80% of patients with knee effusion. From our study, approximately 63% of patients with knee effusion at the time of the surgery had postoperative knee pain. In addition, this effusion was basically related to pseudogout.

  19. Association of bone scintigraphic abnormalities with knee malalignment and pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, V B; McDaniel, G; Worrell, T W; Feng, S; Vail, T P; Varju, G; Coleman, R E

    2009-11-01

    The information content of knee bone scintigraphy was evaluated, including pattern, localisation and intensity of retention relative to radiographic features of knee osteoarthritis, knee alignment and knee symptoms. A total of 308 knees (159 subjects) with symptomatic and radiographic knee osteoarthritis of at least one knee was assessed by late-phase (99m)Technetium methylene disphosphonate bone scintigraph, fixed-flexion knee radiograph, full limb radiograph for knee alignment and for self-reported knee symptom severity. Generalised linear models were used to control for within-subject correlation of knee data. The compartmental localisation (medial vs lateral) and intensity of knee bone scan retention were associated with the pattern (varus vs valgus) (p<0.001) and severity (p<0.001) of knee malalignment and localisation and severity of radiographic osteoarthritis (p<0.001). Bone scan agent retention in the tibiofemoral, but not patellofemoral, compartment was associated with severity of knee symptoms (p<0.001) and persisted after adjusting for radiographic osteoarthritis (p<0.001). To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study describing a relationship between knee malalignment, joint symptom severity and compartment-specific abnormalities by bone scintigraphy. This work demonstrates that bone scintigraphy is a sensitive and quantitative indicator of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis. Used selectively, bone scintigraphy is a dynamic imaging modality that holds great promise as a clinical trial screening tool and outcome measure.

  20. Isolated partial tear and partial avulsion of the medial head of gastrocnemius tendon presenting as posterior medial knee pain

    OpenAIRE

    Watura, Christopher; Ward, Anthony; Harries, William

    2010-01-01

    We present a case of medial head of gastrocnemius tendon tear. The type of injury widely reported in the literature is tear of the medial head of gastrocnemius muscle or ‘tennis leg’. We previously reported an isolated partial tear and longitudinal split of the tendon to the medial head of gastrocnemius at its musculotendinous junction. The case we now present has notable differences; the tear was interstitial and at the proximal (femoral attachment) part of the tendon, the patient’s symptoms...

  1. Knee Moment-Angle Characteristics and Semitendinosus Muscle Morphology in Children with Spastic Paresis Selected for Medial Hamstring Lengthening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberfehlner, Helga; Jaspers, Richard T; Rutz, Erich; Becher, Jules G; Harlaar, Jaap; van der Sluijs, Johannes A; Witbreuk, Melinda M; Romkes, Jacqueline; Freslier, Marie; Brunner, Reinald; Maas, Huub; Buizer, Annemieke I

    2016-01-01

    To increase knee range of motion and improve gait in children with spastic paresis (SP), the semitendinosus muscle (ST) amongst other hamstring muscles is frequently lengthened by surgery, but with variable success. Little is known about how the pre-surgical mechanical and morphological characteristics of ST muscle differ between children with SP and typically developing children (TD). The aims of this study were to assess (1) how knee moment-angle characteristics and ST morphology in children with SP selected for medial hamstring lengthening differ from TD children, as well as (2) how knee moment-angle characteristics and ST morphology are related. In nine SP and nine TD children, passive knee moment-angle characteristics and morphology of ST (i.e. fascicle length, muscle belly length, tendon length, physiological cross-sectional area, and volume) were assessed by hand-held dynamometry and freehand 3D ultrasound, respectively. At net knee flexion moments above 0.5 Nm, more flexed knee angles were found for SP compared to TD children. The measured knee angle range between 0 and 4 Nm was 30% smaller in children with SP. Muscle volume, physiological cross-sectional area, and fascicle length normalized to femur length were smaller in SP compared to TD children (62%, 48%, and 18%, respectively). Sixty percent of the variation in knee angles at 4 Nm net knee moment was explained by ST fascicle length. Altered knee moment-angle characteristics indicate an increased ST stiffness in SP children. Morphological observations indicate that in SP children planned for medial hamstring lengthening, the longitudinal and cross-sectional growth of ST muscle fibers is reduced. The reduced fascicle length can partly explain the increased ST stiffness and, hence, a more flexed knee joint in these SP children.

  2. SPECT/CT in patients with painful knee arthroplasty - what is the evidence?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirschmann, Michael T.; Henckel, Johann; Rasch, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    SPECT/CT is increasingly recognized as a promising imaging modality for the investigation of patients with a painful knee after knee arthroplasty. In this review article, we give an overview of the clinical value and current and future applications of SPECT/CT for patients with knee pain following joint arthroplasty. A detailed evidence-based literature review is performed and presented. (orig.)

  3. SPECT/CT in patients with painful knee arthroplasty - what is the evidence?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirschmann, Michael T. [Kantonsspital Baselland-Bruderholz, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology, Bruderholz (Switzerland); Henckel, Johann [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Rasch, Helmut [Kantonsspital Baselland-Bruderholz, Institute for Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Bruderholz (Switzerland)

    2013-09-15

    SPECT/CT is increasingly recognized as a promising imaging modality for the investigation of patients with a painful knee after knee arthroplasty. In this review article, we give an overview of the clinical value and current and future applications of SPECT/CT for patients with knee pain following joint arthroplasty. A detailed evidence-based literature review is performed and presented. (orig.)

  4. [Clinical effect of total knee arthroplasty on patients with knee osteoarthritis combined with mild to moderate valgus knee deformity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng; Zeng, Min; Xie, Jie; Wang, Long; Su, Weiping; Hu, Yihe

    2016-09-28

    To investigate the clinical effect of total knee arthroplasty on patients with knee osteoarthritis combined with mild to moderate valgus knee deformity.
 A total of 15 patients received total knee arthroplasty for correcting mild (10°-15°) to moderate (15°-30°) valgus knee between January 2011 and February 2014 in Xiangya Hospital of Central South University. We adopted a stable prosthesis surgery through patellar medial approach, osteophytes cleaning, conventional osteotomy, a selective soft tissue release and balance technical correcting of knee valgus deformity. Then conventional anticoagulation and symptomatic rehabilitation was utilized. Preoperative and postoperative X-ray was conducted in patients with measuring femor-tibial angle (FTA) and inspecting the prosthesis position. FTA, visual analog scale (VAS) standard, and parallel knee scoring system (KSS) were used to evaluate the clinical effect.
 Fifteen patients were followed up for 14 to 36 (22.40±11.88) months. The hospitalization time was 7-13 (7.73±1.58) d; operative time was 58-110 (81.8±16.85) min, the dominant blood loss was 140-600 (337.30±143.65) mL. Two cases had knee extension hysteresis, and the knee activity recovered after exercise. Leg power lines were normal. Three postoperative cases suffered anterior knee pain. They were subjected to celecoxib analgesic treatment and the pain gradually eased after 3 months. One postoperative case showed incision discharge and swelling, which was healed after change of dressing. During follow-up, review of X-ray film does not show prosthesis loose, subsidence and other complications. The knee valgus angle (8.1±1.8)°, knee motion range (107.33±9.61)°, KSS knee score (74.7±14.5, 75.3±2.7) and pain score (2.5±0.9) were significantly better than the preoperative (Pclinical and function KSS scores showed that the improvement rate was 80%. 
 Total knee arthroplasty is an effective way to treat patients with knee osteoarthritis combined with

  5. [SECOT consensus on painful knee replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaquero, J; Macule, F; Bello, S; Chana, F; Forriol, F

    2013-01-01

    The opinions of 21 experts in knee surgery were evaluated in this study, using a DELPHI questionnaire method in two successive rounds, on 64 controversial scenarios that covered both the diagnosis and possible treatment of painful knee replacements. The level of consensus was significantly unanimous in 42 items and of the design in 5, with no agreement in 17 of the questions presented. light of the published scientific evidence, the surgeons who took part showed to have a notable level of information on the most effective diagnostic tests, although, it should be pointed out that there was a lack of confidence in the possibility of ruling out an infection when the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and the C-reactive protein were within normal values, which have been demonstrated in the literature to have a high negative predictive value As regards the treatments to employ in the different situations, the responses of the expert panel were mainly in agreement with the data in the literature. The conclusions of this consensus may help other surgeons when they are faced with a painful knee prosthesis. Copyright © 2013 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparison of lbuprofen with Acupuncture in Reducing Knee Osteoarthritis Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MR Emad

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Introduction & Objective: Osteoarthritis is the most common joint disease of humans. Acupuncture is one of the treatments for osteoarthritis. This study aimed to compare lbuprofen with acupuncture in the pain reduction in knee osteoarthritis. Materials & Methods: This is a clinical trial which was performed in Shiraz Medical School Clinics in 2007. Forty six patients with chronic pain due to the knee osteoarthritis were recruited using strict inclusion and exclusion criteria. All the patients were randomly divided into two groups (A and B who received lbuprofen (1200 mg/day or acupuncture (2 sessions per week for 2 weeks, respectively. Evaluating measuring tools were pain intensity (based on VAS, ROM (based on degree and morning stiffness of the knee joint. Collected data were analyzed by Chi-Square test, using SPSS software. Results: Pain intensity at baseline, after the course of treatment and 3 weeks after the treatment in group A was 7.29 ± 0.61, 4.20±0.93 and 5.20± 1.32 cm, respectively while these figures for group B were 7.35±0.82, 3.43±0.96 and 4.93±1.32 cm, respectively (p<0.005. Also knee ROM degree in group A was 21.54±7.46, 13.08±5.60 and 15.38±3.2 and for group B was 20.36±7.19, 12.40±5.78 and 10.36±5.30, respectively (p=0.003. Knee morning stiffness improved more in group B. Conclusion: Result of this study showed that both modalities significantly reduced the pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis and improved ROM while morning stiffness improved more in group B.

  7. Pain and senzitisation after total knee replacement or nonsurgical treatment in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Simonsen, Ole; Laursen, Mogens Berg

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study is a secondary analysis of 12-month follow-ups from two parallel, randomised controlled trials (RCT) in painful knee osteoarthritis patients. RCT1: Total knee replacement (TKR) followed by non-surgical treatment compared with non-surgical treatment. RCT2: Non...

  8. Acute patellofemoral pain: aggravating activities, clinical examination, MRI and ultrasound findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brushoj, C.; Holmich, P.; Nielsen, M.B.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate acute anterior knee pain caused by overuse in terms of pain location, aggravating activities, findings on clinical examination and ultrasound/MRI examination. To determine if acute anterior knee pain caused by overuse should be classified as a subgroup of patellofemoral......%)), but other synovial covered structures including the fat pad of Hoffa (12 patients (40%)), the medial plica and the joint line (12 patients (40%)) were also involved. Only eight patients (27%) experienced pain on the patellofemoral compression test. Only discrete changes was detected on MRI...

  9. [Antero-medial incision of knee joint for the treatment of intercondylar fracture of femur].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zi-Fei; Sun, Bin-Feng; Yang, Xiao-Hai; Wang, Qing; Qian, Ping-Kang; Wu, Xiao-Feng; Xu, Feng

    2017-12-25

    To explore the clinical effect of antero-medial incision of knee joint in treating intercondylar fracture of femur. From September 2012 to March 2015, 24 patients with intercondylar fracture of femur were selected, including 17 males and 7 females, aged from 20 to 65 years old with an average of(38.3±9.5) years old. Among them, 12 cases were caused by traffic accident, 8 cases were caused by falling injury and 4 cases were caused by falling down. All patients were closed fractures. The time from injury to hospital was from 30 min to 8 h with an average of(2.2±0.3) h. According to AO classification, 4 cases were type B1, 3 type B2, 2 type B3, 5 type C1, 6 type C2 and 4 type C3. All patients were treated with antero-medial incision of knee joint. Operative time, blood loss and postoperative complications were observed and recovery of keen function was evaluated by Kolmert scoring. All patients were followed-up from 6 to 12 months with average of (9.0±1.7) months. Operative time ranged from 50 to 90 min with an average of (70.0±8.2) min; blood loss ranged from 90 to 400 ml with an average of (180±36) ml; negative pressure flow was from 30 to 90 ml, with an average of (50.0±7.1) ml. All fracture were healed at stage I without loosening of internal fixator, fracture nonunion, and deep vein thrombosis. According to Kolmert scoring, 16 patients got excellent result, 5 patients good and 3 fair. Antero-medial incision of knee joint in treating intercondylar fracture of femur, which has advantages of good fracture reduction, less injury of soft tissue and simple operation, could obtain good clinical results.

  10. Systematic Analysis of Painful Total Knee Prosthesis, a Diagnostic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Djahani

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available   Remaining pain after total knee arthroplasty (TKA is a common observation in about 20% of postoperative patients; where in about 60% of these knees require early revision surgery within five years. Obvious causes of this pain could be identified simply with clinical examinations and standard radiographs. However, unexplained painful TKA still remains a challenge for the surgeon. The management should include a multidisciplinary approach to the patient`s pain as well as addressing the underlying etiology. There are a number of extrinsic (tendinopathy, hip, ankle, spine, CRPS and so on and intrinsic (infection, instability, malalignment, wear and so on causes of painful knee replacement. On average, diagnosis takes more than 12 months and patients become very dissatisfied and some of them even acquire psychological problems. Hence, a systematic diagnostic algorithm might be helpful. This review article aims to act as a guide to the evaluation of patients with painful TKA described in 10 different steps. Furthermore, the preliminary results of a series of 100 consecutive cases will be discussed. Revision surgery was performed only in those cases with clear failure mechanism.

  11. Device-length changes and implant function following surgical implantation of the KineSpring in cadaver knees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McNicholas MJ

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Michael J McNicholas,1 Stefan M Gabriel,2 Anton G Clifford,2 Evelyne M Hasler2 1Aintree University Hospital, Teaching Hospital, Major Trauma Centre, NHS Foundation Trust, Liverpool, UK; 2Moximed, Hayward, CA, USA Introduction: The KineSpring implant system has been shown to provide load reductions at the medial compartment of the knee, and has demonstrated clinical success in reducing pain and increasing function in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis. These results depend on the ability of the KineSpring to rotate, lengthen, and shorten to accommodate knee motions, and in response to knee position and loading. Purpose: The present study was undertaken to determine length changes of the implanted KineSpring in response to a range of knee positions, external knee loads, and placements by different orthopedic surgeons. Materials and methods: KineSpring system components were implanted in ten cadaver leg specimens by ten orthopedic surgeons, and absorber-length changes were measured under combined loading and in different positions of the knee. Results and conclusion: Spring compression consistent with knee-load reduction, and device lengthening and shortening to accommodate knee loads and motions were seen. These confirm the functionality of the KineSpring when implanted medially to the knee. Keywords: KineSpring, knee, function, preservation, offloading, osteoarthritis

  12. Intraoperative low-dose ketamine infusion reduces acute postoperative pain following total knee replacement surgery: a prospective, randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, Pelin; Gokcinar, Derya; Karabeyoglu, Isil; Topcu, Hulya; Cicek, Gizem Selen; Gogus, Nermin

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of intraoperative low-dose ketamine with general anesthesia on postoperative pain after total knee replacement surgery. A randomized, double-blind comparative study. Ankara Numune Training and Research Hospital, Turkey, from January and June 2011. Sixty adults undergoing total knee arthroplasty were enrolled in this study. The patients were randomly allocated into two groups of equal size to receive either racemic ketamine infusion (6 μg/kg/minute) or the same volume of saline. A visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to measure each patient's level of pain at 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours after surgery. Time to first analgesic request, postoperative morphine consumption and the incidence of side effects were also recorded. Low-dose ketamine infusion prolonged the time to first analgesic request. It also reduced postoperative cumulative morphine consumption at 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours postsurgery (p < 0.001). Postoperative VAS scores were also significantly lower in the ketamine group than placebo, at all observation times. Incidences of side effects were similar in both study groups. Intraoperative continuous low-dose ketamine infusion reduced pain and postoperative analgesic consumption without affecting the incidence of side effects.

  13. Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis Who Score Highly on the PainDETECT Questionnaire Present With Multimodality Hyperalgesia, Increased Pain, and Impaired Physical Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Penny; Benson, Heather A E; Will, Rob; Wright, Anthony

    2018-01-01

    PainDETECT is a self-report questionnaire that can be used to identify features of neuropathic pain. A proportion of patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) score highly on the PainDETECT questionnaire. This study aimed to determine whether those with a higher "positive neuropathic" score on the PainDETECT questionnaire also had greater pain, hypersensitivity, and reduced function compared with individuals with knee OA with lower PainDETECT scores. In total, 130 participants with knee OA completed the PainDETECT, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC), and Pain Quality Assessment Scale questionnaires. Quantitative sensory testing was carried out at 3 sites (both knees and elbow) using standard methods. Cold and heat pain thresholds were tested using a Peltier thermode and pressure pain thresholds using a digital algometer. Physical function was assessed using 3 timed locomotor function tests. In total, 22.3% of participants scored in the "positive neuropathic" category with a further 35.4% in the unclear category. Participants in the "positive neuropathic" category reported higher levels of pain and more impaired function based on the WOMAC questionnaire (Ppain thresholds at the OA knee. They were also slower to complete 2 of the locomotion tasks. This study identified a specific subgroup of people with knee OA who exhibited PainDETECT scores in the "positive neuropathic" category. These individuals experienced increased levels of pain, widespread, multimodality hyperalgesia, and greater functional impairment than the remaining cohort. Identification of OA patients with this pain phenotype may permit more targeted and effective pain management.

  14. Temporal summation of pain as a prospective predictor of clinical pain severity in adults aged 45 years and above with knee osteoarthritis: ethnic differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodin, Burel R.; Bulls, Hailey W.; Herbert, Matthew S.; Schmidt, Jessica; King, Christopher D.; Glover, Toni L.; Sotolongo, Adriana; Sibille, Kimberly T.; Cruz-Almeida, Yenisel; Staud, Roland; Fessler, Barri J.; Redden, David T.; Bradley, Laurence A.; Fillingim, Roger B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Enhanced pain facilitation is reportedly an important contributor to the clinical pain experiences of individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Ethnic differences in the prevalence and severity of knee OA in addition to associated pain are also well documented. Temporal summation (TS) of pain is a widely applicable quantitative sensory testing method that invokes neural mechanisms related to pain facilitatory processes. This study tested whether TS of pain, an index of pain facilitation, differentially predicts the clinical pain experiences of African Americans and non-Hispanic Whites with symptomatic knee OA. Methods A total of 225 study participants underwent assessment of TS of mechanical and heat pain stimuli applied to their most symptomatic knee and their ipsilateral hand (mechanical) or forearm (heat). Using telephone-based surveys, participants subsequently reported their average and worst clinical pain severity across four consecutive weeks following assessment of TS. Results In predicting future clinical pain, ethnicity interacted with TS of mechanical pain (but not heat pain), such that TS of mechanical pain at the knee significantly predicted greater clinical ratings of average (b = .02, p = .016) and worst (b = .02, p = .044) clinical pain for non-Hispanic Whites but not African Americans (p’s > .30). Conclusions These results reveal the importance of considering ethnicity when examining pain facilitation and the clinical pain of individuals with symptomatic knee OA. The results of this study are discussed in terms of ethnic differences in the predictors of clinical pain experiences among African Americans and non-Hispanic Whites with knee OA. PMID:24804882

  15. 153Sm-HM for arthritic knee pain. Estimated dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy-Pérez, Alberto E.; Torres-García, Eugenio; Mitsoura, Eleni; Jiménez-Mancilla, Nallely P.; Arteaga-de-Murphy, Consuelo; Pedraza-López, Martha

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthropathy and after cardiovascular diseases is the most disabling disease in developing countries. The dosimetry for the clinical application of 153-samarium-hydroxymacroaggregates ( 153 Sm-HM) for radiation synovectomy (RSV) and palliative treatment for arthritic pain, as far as we know, has not been reported. The aim of this research was to estimate the radiation dose necessary for synovial ablation and pain palliation with minimum risk to the patient. 153 Sm-HM (370 MBq) was administered intra-articularly in a patient with severe knee pain and hindered motility. Regions of interest drawn on sequential, conjugated, anterior and posterior scintigraphy images were used to obtain the respective activity. The data was entered into a knee joint histological-geometric model designed with micrometric dimensions to represent the synovial cell layers. The Monte Carlo code was used to calculate the absorbed dose in each of the 12 model-cells representing the distance from the synovial liquid to the cartilage or bone. The absorbed dose in the synovial cavity was 114 Gy which is sufficient energy for RSV. The treated patient referred little pain and higher motility with no adverse reactions. 153 Sm-HM is a potentially valid radiopharmaceutical for RSV, which effectively palliates knee pain.

  16. Association of Exercise Therapy and Reduction of Pain Sensitivity in Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Klokker, Louise; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Exercise has beneficial effects on pain in knee osteoarthritis (OA), yet the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of exercise on pressure-pain sensitivity in patients with knee OA. METHODS: In a randomized controlled trial...... visual analog scale pain scores during constant pressure for 6 minutes at 125% of the PPT as a measure of temporal summation (TS) of pressure-pain. Secondary outcomes included self-reported pain using the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) questionnaire. Analyses were based on the "per...

  17. Spontaneous Relocation of a Posterior Dislocation of Mobile Bearing in a Medial Unicompartmental Knee Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noureddine, Hussein; Aird, Jaimes; Latimer, Paul

    2012-01-01

    We describe a case of spontaneous relocation of a posterior dislocation of the mobile bearing in a medial unicompartmental knee replacement, prior to surgical intervention. We are unaware of any similar cases in the published literature. This paper highlights some clinical issues around this type of dislocation. PMID:23259116

  18. Adductor canal blockade for moderate to severe pain after arthroscopic knee surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espelund, M; Grevstad, U; Jaeger, P

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The analgesic effect of the adductor canal block (ACB) after knee surgery has been evaluated in a number of trials. We hypothesized that the ACB would provide substantial pain relief to patients responding with moderate to severe pain after arthroscopic knee surgery. METHODS: Fifty...... subjects with moderate to severe pain after arthroscopic knee surgery were enrolled in this placebo-controlled, blinded trial. All subjects received two ACBs; an initial ACB with either 30 ml ropivacaine 7.5 mg/ml (n = 25) (R group) or saline (n = 25) (C group) and after 45 min a second ACB...... score difference was 32 (23 to 41) mm, P moderate to severe pain after...

  19. Do Psychosocial Factors Predict Muscle Strength, Pain, or Physical Performance in Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baert, Isabel A C; Meeus, Mira; Mahmoudian, Armaghan; Luyten, Frank P; Nijs, Jo; Verschueren, Sabine M P

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship of psychosocial factors, namely, pain catastrophizing, kinesiophobia, and maladaptive coping strategies, with muscle strength, pain, and physical performance in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA)-related symptoms. A total of 109 women (64 with knee OA-related symptoms) with a mean age of 65.4 years (49-81 years) were recruited for this study. Psychosocial factors were quantified by the Pain Catastrophizing Scale, Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia, and Pain Coping Inventory. Clinical features were assessed using isometric and isokinetic knee muscle strength measurements, visual analog scale, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, and functional tests. Associations were examined using correlation and regression analysis. In knee OA patients, pain catastrophizing, kinesiophobia, and coping strategy explained a significant proportion of the variability in isometric knee extension and flexion strength (6.3%-9.2%), accounting for more overall variability than some demographic and medical status variables combined. Psychosocial factors were not significant independent predictors of isokinetic strength, knee pain, or physical performance. In understanding clinical features related to knee OA, such as muscle weakness, pain catastrophizing, kinesiophobia, and coping strategy might offer something additional beyond what might be explained by traditional factors, underscoring the importance of a biopsychosocial approach in knee OA management. Further research on individual patient characteristics that mediate the effects of psychosocial factors is, however, required in order to create opportunities for more targeted, personalized treatment for knee OA.

  20. MR imaging of medial collateral ligament injury and associated internal knee joint injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Chae Ha; Lee, Sun Kyoung; Lim, Dong Hun; Kim, Young Sook; Byun, Ju Nam; Kim, Young Chul; Oh, Jae Hee

    1996-01-01

    To assess the value of MR imaging in the diagnosis of medial collateral ligament injury of the knee, we used MR imaging to evaluate the characteristic findings in MCL tears and the frequency of associated knee joint injury. We retrospectively reviewed 26 patients within four weeks of MCL injury, analysed MR findings and correlated them with surgical findings. We evaluated discontinuity, heterogeneous signal intensity of MCL, thin band- like low signal intensity at MCL, facial edema, loss of clear demarcation of adjacent fat also combined bone injury, meniscus injury and other ligament injury. Complete MCL tears were present in 14 patients and partial tears in 12. Complete tears showed discontinuity of MCL, fascial edema and loss of clear demarcation from adjacent fat in 11 patients(79%);proximal MCL tears are more common than distal tears. Partial tears showed thin band-like low signal intensity within MCL, fascial edema and loss of clear demarcation from adjacent fat in seven patients (58%);all patient s with MCL injury showed fascial edema;in 12 patients there was loss of clear demarcation from adjacent fat. We could not, however, distinguish between complete tears and partial tears when MCL showed heterogeneous high signal intensity. Combined bone injury in MCL tears was found in eight patients(62%);the most common sites of this were the lateral femoral condyle and lateral tibial plateau. There was associated injury involving other ligaments(ACL:50%;PCL:27%). Combined meniscus injury in MCL tears was present in 17 patients and the most common meniscus site(50%) is the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. Complete MCL tears showed discontinuity of MCL and partial tears showed a thin band-like low signal intensity within MCL. All patients with MCL injury showed fascial edema, and loss of clear demarcation from adjacent fat. Various other injuries combine with MCL tears. MR imaging is therefore useful in the evaluation of medial collateral ligament injury and

  1. Preliminary study of highly cross-linked hyaluronic acid-based combination therapy for management of knee osteoarthritis-related pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palmieri B

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Beniamino Palmieri,1,2 Valentina Rottigni,1,2 Tommaso Iannitti2,31Department of General Surgery and Surgical Specialties, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia Medical School, Surgical Clinic, Modena, Italy; 2Poliambulatorio del Secondo Parere, Modena, Italy; 3Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, KY, USABackground: Hyaluronic acid has been extensively used for treatment of knee osteoarthritis due to its anti-inflammatory properties and its ability to act as a synovial lubricant. Furthermore, it has found application in combination with other drugs in the dermatological field and in pre-clinical studies in animal models of osteoarthritis. Experimental evidence suggests that a combination of this macromolecule with other drugs may act as a slow-release depot. However, to date, to the best of our knowledge, no one has tested local intra-articular delivery of highly cross-linked hyaluronic acid combined with bisphosphonate or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for management of knee osteoarthritis pain in the clinical setting. The aim of the present randomized double-blind study was to investigate, for the first time, the effect of a highly cross-linked hyaluronic acid, Variofill®, alone or in combination with diclofenac sodium or sodium clodronate, for management of bilateral knee osteoarthritis-related pain.Methods: Sixty-two patients with symptomatic bilateral medial tibiofemoral knee osteoarthritis (Kellgren–Lawrence grade II and III and pain in both knees corresponding to a daily visual analog scale (VAS score ≥ 30 in the month before the beginning of the study were included in this investigation. Patients were divided into three groups: group 1, treated with an injection of hyaluronic acid alone (66 mg into each knee; group 2, treated with an injection of hyaluronic acid (49.5 mg plus diclofenac sodium (5 mg into each knee; group 3, treated with an injection of hyaluronic acid

  2. Radiofrequency Procedures to Relieve Chronic Knee Pain: An Evidence-Based Narrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Anuj; Peng, Philip; Cohen, Steven P

    2016-01-01

    Chronic knee pain from osteoarthritis or following arthroplasty is a common problem. A number of publications have reported analgesic success of radiofrequency (RF) procedures on nerves innervating the knee, but interpretation is hampered by lack of clarity regarding indications, clinical protocols, targets, and longevity of benefit from RF procedures. We reviewed the following medical literature databases for publications on RF procedures on the knee joint for chronic pain: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Google Scholar up to August 9, 2015. Data on scores for pain, validated scores for measuring physical disability, and adverse effects measured at any timepoint after 1 month following the interventions were collected, analyzed, and reported in this narrative review. Thirteen publications on ablative or pulsed RF treatments of innervation of the knee joint were identified. A high success rate of these procedures in relieving chronic pain of the knee joint was reported at 1 to 12 months after the procedures, but only 2 of the publications were randomized controlled trials. There was evidence for improvement in function and a lack of serious adverse events of RF treatments. Radiofrequency treatments on the knee joint (major or periarticular nerve supply or intra-articular branches) have the potential to reduce pain from osteoarthritis or persistent postarthroplasty pain. Ongoing concerns regarding the quality, procedural aspects, and monitoring of outcomes in publications on this topic remain. Randomized controlled trials of high methodological quality are required to further elaborate role of these interventions in this population.

  3. Analysis of knee movement with low-field MR equipment. A normal volunteer study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Yoko; Fukatsu, Hiroshi; Ishigaki, Takeo; Aoki, Ikuo; Yamada, Takashi.

    1994-01-01

    This study was performed to make a normal standard by analyzing knee movement in detail. An open low-field unit was used for 23 healthy knee joints. With three-dimensional Fourier transformation (3DFT) gradient echo sequence, 50 sagittal slices of 4.5 mm in thickness were obtained at four flexion angles: 0, 30, 60, and 90 degrees (lateral position). Although the tension ratio of the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments (ACL, PCL) increased during knee flexion, the change in the tension ratio was significantly different between the ACL and PCL. The femur-ACL angle and femur-PCL angle were parallel with the knee flexion angle, but the tibia-ACL angle and tibia-PCL angle changed complexly. The lateral and medial condyles rolled and slid during knee flexion, and the medial side moved more than the lateral side, consistent with rotation of the lower thigh. The difference in backward movement distance on the tibia between the two condyles was significantly larger in females than in males. This might explain the dominance of knee osteoarthritis in women. Although the lateral position is not completely physiological, we could show initial cinematic data of up to 90 degrees of knee flexion using open-type MRI, which is impossible with high- and middle-field machines. (author)

  4. Evaluation of a Patient Decision Aid for Unicompartmental or Total Knee Arthroplasty for Medial Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesus, Christopher; Stacey, Dawn; Dervin, Geoffrey F

    2017-11-01

    Many patients with isolated medial compartment osteoarthritis are candidates for either unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A novel patient decision aid (PDA) was developed to educate patients on both interventions and prepare them for making the decision with their surgeon. The study objective was to evaluate the acceptability and usefulness of a PDA for informing and helping patients reach a surgical preference without increasing decisional conflict. A PDA was developed in accordance with the criteria listed by Ottawa Decision Support Framework and prospectively tested in UKA and TKA patients, who were mailed the PDAs to complete at home along with outcome measures before surgeon consultation. Of 50 patients who consented to participate, 45 patients (26 men, 19 women) used the PDA. Quantitative analysis of acceptability, decisional conflict, knowledge, and preferred surgical option was then performed. Mean patient age was 64.6 years (range, 50-80 years). Patients rated the PDA as acceptable: 84.4% indicated balanced presentation of information and 77.8% asserted that PDA helped them to make decisions between UKA and TKA. Mean knowledge score was 86.6% and total decisional conflict was 19.7 out of 100. Of 45, 33 stated a preferred option (24 UKA; 9 TKA; 12 unsure). Patients understood the majority of the benefits and risks for each surgical option without increasing decisional conflict. The decision aid for advanced medial compartment osteoarthritis is shown to be acceptable and useful for choosing between UKA and TKA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Cold Pain Threshold Identifies a Subgroup of Individuals With Knee Osteoarthritis That Present With Multimodality Hyperalgesia and Elevated Pain Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Anthony; Benson, Heather A E; Will, Rob; Moss, Penny

    2017-09-01

    Cold hyperalgesia has been established as an important marker of pain severity in a number of conditions. This study aimed to establish the extent to which patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) demonstrate widespread cold, heat, and pressure hyperalgesia. OA participants with widespread cold hyperalgesia were compared with the remaining OA cohort to determine whether they could be distinguished in terms of hyperalgesia, pain report, pain quality, and physical function. A total of 80 participants with knee OA and 40 matched healthy, pain-free controls participated. OA participants completed a washout of their usual medication. Quantitative sensory testing was completed at 3 sites using standard methods. Cold pain threshold (CPT) and heat pain thresholds (HPT) were tested using a Peltier thermode and pressure pain thresholds (PPT) using a digital algometer. All participants completed the short-form health survey questionnaire and OA participants completed the PainDETECT, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index of the Knee (WOMAC), and pain quality assessment scale questionnaires. OA participants demonstrated widespread cold hyperalgesia (Ppain, decreased function, and more features of neuropathic pain. This study identified a specific subgroup of patients with knee OA who exhibited widespread, multimodality hyperalgesia, more pain, more features of neuropathic pain, and greater functional impairment. Identification of patients with this pain phenotype may permit more targeted and effective pain management.

  6. CT determination of tibial tubercle lateralization in patients presenting with anterior knee pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, R.B. [Dept. of Physiology, School of Medicine, East Carolina Univ., Greenville, NC (United States); Bartlett, E.C. [Dept. of Surgery, School of Medicine, East Carolina Univ., Greenville, NC (United States); Vainright, J.R. [Dept. of Radiology, School of Medicine, East Carolina Univ., Greenville, NC (United States); Carrol, R.G. [Dept. of Physiology, School of Medicine, East Carolina Univ., Greenville, NC (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Using CT imaging with computerized technique to measure anatomic relationships, we evaluated patients (n = 50) with anterior knee pain for excessive lateralization of the tibial tubercle. The symptomatic knee of each patient was compared with their asymptomatic knee as well as with the knees of patients with other causes of anterior knee pain (n = 10) and with the knees of asymptomatic controls (n = 10). The symptomatic knee of patients with suspected patellofemoral malalignment demonstrated significantly greater lateralization of the tibial tubercle (12.2 {+-} 0.5 mm) than did the asymptomatic knee (9.0 {+-} 0.7 mm). The symptomatic knees of patients with patellofemoral malalignment also demonstrated significantly greater lateralization of the tibial tubercle than did the knees of patients with other causes of anterior knee pain (5.9 {+-} 0.9 mm). When a control population was added to the analysis, the patients with symptomatic patellofemoral malalignment demonstrated significantly greater lateralization of the tibial tubercle than did the controls (6.4 {+-} 0.4 mm). Using a critical value of 9 mm lateralization, the CT diagnosis of patellofemoral malalignment had a specificity of 95% and a sensitivity of 85%. We conclude that CT determination of tibial tubercle position assists the diagnosis of patellofemoral malalignment. (orig./MG)

  7. CT determination of tibial tubercle lateralization in patients presenting with anterior knee pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.B.; Bartlett, E.C.; Vainright, J.R.; Carrol, R.G.

    1995-01-01

    Using CT imaging with computerized technique to measure anatomic relationships, we evaluated patients (n = 50) with anterior knee pain for excessive lateralization of the tibial tubercle. The symptomatic knee of each patient was compared with their asymptomatic knee as well as with the knees of patients with other causes of anterior knee pain (n = 10) and with the knees of asymptomatic controls (n = 10). The symptomatic knee of patients with suspected patellofemoral malalignment demonstrated significantly greater lateralization of the tibial tubercle (12.2 ± 0.5 mm) than did the asymptomatic knee (9.0 ± 0.7 mm). The symptomatic knees of patients with patellofemoral malalignment also demonstrated significantly greater lateralization of the tibial tubercle than did the knees of patients with other causes of anterior knee pain (5.9 ± 0.9 mm). When a control population was added to the analysis, the patients with symptomatic patellofemoral malalignment demonstrated significantly greater lateralization of the tibial tubercle than did the controls (6.4 ± 0.4 mm). Using a critical value of 9 mm lateralization, the CT diagnosis of patellofemoral malalignment had a specificity of 95% and a sensitivity of 85%. We conclude that CT determination of tibial tubercle position assists the diagnosis of patellofemoral malalignment. (orig./MG)

  8. The Effect of Patellar Denervation by Circumpatellar Electrocautery on Anterior Knee Pain Following Total Knee Replacement – An Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaji Zacharia

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVES Anterior knee pain is a common problem in patients who have undergone TKR which causes dissatisfaction among them. There are Various methods for prevention of anterior knee pain following TKR .The  objective of this study is to determine the  effect of circumpatellar electrocautery on anterior knee pain following TKR and to compare the results with that of those patients who have undergone TKR without circumpatellar denervation. METHODS This is a cohort study conducted in Dept. of Orthopedics, Govt. Medical College, Kozhikode,kerala, 2014. Total sample size was 90.out of which 2 patients died during the study period. We lost follow up of 7 patients.  Among the remaining 81 patients 42 had undergone TKR with circumpatellar denervation using electocautery and 39 without circumpatellar denervation. They were kept under follow up. Patients were followed up postoperatively at 1 month, 3 months, 6 months and at one year. At all postoperative visits, a clinical score was determined using the Knee Society score and the clinical anterior knee pain rating system described by Waters and Bentley RESULTS There is no statistically significant difference in AKP score between both groups.There is a statistically significant difference in the knee society score at 1st month(p value <.001.  But there is no difference on further follow up visits . CONCLUSION There is no statistically significant difference between final outcome of patients who underwent patella denervation using circumpatellar electrocauterisation and those without denervation  with respect to anterior knee pain among patients who have undergone TKR.

  9. Spontaneous Relocation of a Posterior Dislocation of Mobile Bearing in a Medial Unicompartmental Knee Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Noureddine

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of spontaneous relocation of a posterior dislocation of the mobile bearing in a medial unicompartmental knee replacement, prior to surgical intervention. We are unaware of any similar cases in the published literature. This paper highlights some clinical issues around this type of dislocation.

  10. Case report 483: Discoid lateral meniscus (DLM), medially displaced, with complex tear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, M.A.; Buckwalter, K.A.; Braunstein, E.M.; Wojtys, E.M.

    1988-01-01

    A case of a 9-year-old girl who presented with persistent pain in the left knee was demonstrated to have a discoid lateral meniscus (DLM). The sagittal MR images demonstrated the oval shape of the meniscus, consistent with the typical arthrographic appearance. The coronal images showed that the main substance of the meniscus was displaced medially, with overgrowth of the articular cartilage at the lateral aspect of the joint. The medial aspect of the lateral femoral condyle was concave to accommodate the abnormal meniscus. These findings are consistent with long-standing, medial displacement of the torn meniscus. The literature concerning DLM, an uncommon variant, was reviewed and discussed. (orig.)

  11. Risk factors associated with reduced work productivity among people with chronic knee pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agaliotis, M; Fransen, M; Bridgett, L; Nairn, L; Votrubec, M; Jan, S; Heard, R; Mackey, M

    2013-09-01

    To determine the burden and risk factors associated with reduced work productivity among people with chronic knee pain. A longitudinal study, nested within a randomised controlled trial (RCT) evaluating the long-term effects of dietary supplements, was conducted among people with chronic knee pain in paid employment (n = 360). Participants recorded days off work (absenteeism) and reduced productivity while at work (presenteeism) for seven days every two months over a 12-month period in a study specific diary. Examined risk factors included knee pain severity, occupational group, radiographic disease severity, physical activity, body mass index (BMI), health-related quality of life (SF-12) and co-morbidity. Over the 12-month follow up period, 50 (14%) participants reported one or more days off work due to knee problems, while 283 (79%) reported reduced productivity while at work (presenteeism absenteeism was having an SF-12 Mental Component Summary (MCS) score labour (OR: 2.23 [1.09-4.59]) or manual labour (OR: 6.40 [1.44-28.35]) or a high maximum knee pain (4-6 out of 10) (OR: 2.29 [1.17-4.46]). This longitudinal study found that among this cohort of people with chronic knee pain, the burden of reduced work productivity is mainly attributable to presenteeism rather absenteeism. This study demonstrated that effective strategies to increase work productivity should focus on reducing knee pain or physical disability especially among workers in manual or semi-manual labour. © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Lateral trunk motion and knee pain in osteoarthritis of the knee: a cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Esch, M.; Steultjens, M.P.M.; Harlaar, J.; van den Noort, J.C.; Knol, D.L.; Dekker, J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Patients with osteoarthritis of the knee may change their gait in an attempt to reduce loading of the affected knee, thereby reducing pain. Especially changes in lateral trunk motion may be potentially effective, since these will affect the position of the centre of mass relative to the

  13. Ultrasound imaging for the rheumatologist XXX. Sonographic assessment of the painful knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meenagh, G; Filippucci, E; Delle Sedie, A; Iagnocco, A; Scirè, C A; Riente, L; Montecucco, C; Valesini, G; Bombardieri, S; Grassi, W

    2010-01-01

    The knee joint is a frequent focus of attention for rheumatologists when assessing patients presenting to a clinic and may represent underlying intra-articular inflammatory pathology or involvement of the surrounding soft tissues. This study describes the correlation between clinical and ultrasound findings in patients presenting with a variety of rheumatic disorders and knee pain. US imaging provides for a sensitive and detailed identification of different intra- and peri-articular pathology responsible for knee pain.

  14. Pain Sensitization Associated with Non-Response Following Physiotherapy in People with Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Helen; Smart, Keith M; Moloney, Niamh A; Blake, Catherine; Doody, Catherine M

    2018-05-22

    In knee osteoarthritis (OA) pain sensitization has been linked to a more severe symptomatology, but the prognostic implications of pain sensitivity in people undergoing conservative treatment such as physiotherapy are not established. This study aimed to prospectively investigate the association between features of pain sensitization and clinical outcome (non-response) following guideline-based physiotherapy in people with knee OA. Participants (n=156) with moderate/severe knee OA were recruited from secondary care. All participants completed self-administered questionnaires and underwent quantitative sensory testing (QST) at baseline, thereby establishing subjective and objective measures of pain sensitization. Participants (n=134) were later classified following a physiotherapy intervention, using treatment responder criteria (responder/non-responder). QST data was reduced to a core set of latent variables using principal component analysis. A hierarchical logistic regression model was constructed to investigate if features related to pain sensitization predicted non-response after controlling for other known predictors of poor outcome in knee OA. Higher temporal summation (TS) (OR 2.00, 95% CI 1.23 to 3.27) and lower pressure pain thresholds (PPT) (OR 0.48, 95% CI 0.29 to 0.81) emerged as robust predictors of non-response following physiotherapy, along with a higher comorbidity score. The model demonstrated high sensitivity (87.8%) but modest specificity (52.3%). The independent relationship between pain sensitization and non-response may indicate an underlying explanatory association between neuroplastic changes in nociceptive processing and the maintenance of on-going pain and disability in knee OA pain. These preliminary results suggest interventions targeting pain sensitization may warrant future investigation in this population.

  15. Double-Cone Coil TMS Stimulation of the Medial Cortex Inhibits Central Pain Habituation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico D'Agata

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate whether Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS applied over the medial line of the scalp affects the subjective perception of continuous pain induced by means of electric stimulation. In addition, we wanted to identify the point of stimulation where this effect was maximum.Superficial electrical stimulation was used to induce continuous pain on the dominant hand. At the beginning of the experiment we reached a pain rating of 5 on an 11-point numeric rating scale (NRS; 0 = no pain and 10 = maximum tolerable pain for each subject by setting individually the current intensity. The TMS (five pulses at increasing intensities was applied on 5 equidistant points (one per session over the medial line of the scalp in 13 healthy volunteers using a double-cone coil to stimulate underlying parts of the brain cortex. In every experimental session the painful stimulation lasted 45 minutes, during which pain and distress intensities NRS were recorded continuously. We calculated the effect of adaptation and the immediate effect of the TMS stimulation for all locations. Additionally, an ALE (Activation Likelihood Estimation meta-analysis was performed to compare our results with the neuroimaging literature on subjective pain rating.TMS stimulation temporarily decreased the pain ratings, and pain adaptation was suppressed when applying the TMS over the FCz site on the scalp. No effect was found for distress ratings.The present data suggest that the medial cortex in proximity of the cingulated gyrus has a causal role in adaptation mechanisms and in processing ongoing pain and subjective sensation of pain intensity.

  16. Tibial coverage, meniscus position, size and damage in knees discordant for joint space narrowing – data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloecker, K.; Guermazi, A.; Wirth, W.; Benichou, O.; Kwoh, C.K.; Hunter, D.J.; Englund, M.; Resch, H.; Eckstein, F.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Introduction Meniscal extrusion is thought to be associated with less meniscus coverage of the tibial surface, but the association of radiographic disease stage with quantitative measures of tibial plateau coverage is unknown. We therefore compared quantitative and semi-quantitative measures of meniscus position and morphology in individuals with bilateral painful knees discordant on medial joint space narrowing (mJSN). Methods A sample of 60 participants from the first half (2,678 cases) of the Osteoarthritis Initiative cohort fulfilled the inclusion criteria: bilateral frequent pain, Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) mJSN grades 1–3 in one, no-JSN in the contra-lateral (CL), and no lateral JSN in either knee (43 unilateral mJSN1; 17 mJSN2/3; 22 men, 38 women, body mass index (BMI) 31.3 ± 3.9 kg/m2). Segmentation and three-dimensional quantitative analysis of the tibial plateau and meniscus, and semi-quantitative evaluation of meniscus damage (magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) osteoarthritis knee score – MOAKS) was performed using coronal 3T MR images (MPR DESSwe and intermediate-weighted turbo spin echo (IW-TSE) images). CL knees were compared using paired t-tests (between-knee, within-person design). Results Medial tibial plateau coverage was 36 ± 9% in mJSN1 vs 45 ± 8% in CL no-JSN knees, and was 31 ± 9% in mJSN2/3 vs 46 ± 6% in no-JSN knees (both P meniscus extrusion and damage (MOAKS), but no significant difference in meniscus volume. No significant differences in lateral tibial coverage, lateral meniscus morphology or position were observed. Conclusions Knees with medial JSN showed substantially less medial tibial plateau coverage by the meniscus. We suggest that the less meniscal coverage, i.e., less mechanical protection may be a reason for greater rates of cartilage loss observed in JSN knees. PMID:23220556

  17. IS PAIN IN ONE KNEE ASSOCIATED WITH ISOMETRIC MUSCLE STRENGTH IN THE CONTRALATERAL LIMB? - DATA FROM THE OSTEOARTHRITIS INITIATIVE (OAI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steidle, E.; Wirth, W.; Glass, N.; Ruhdorfer, A.; Cotofana, S.; Eckstein, F.; Segal, N. A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Knee pain and muscle weakness confer risk for knee osteoarthritis incidence and progression. The purpose of this study was to determine whether unilateral knee pain influences contralateral thigh muscle strength. Design Of 4796 Osteoarthritis Initiative participants, 224 (mean±SD age 63.9±8.9 years) cases could be matched to a control. Cases were defined as having unilateral knee pain (numerical rating scale (NRS)≥4/10; ≥infrequent pain) and one pain-free knee (NRS 0–1; ≤infrequent pain; WOMAC≤1). Controls were defined as having bilaterally pain-free knees (NRS 0–1; ≤infrequent pain; WOMAC≤1). Maximal isometric muscle strength [N] was compared between limbs in participants with unilateral pain (cases), and between pain-free limbs of cases and controls. Results Knee extensor/flexor strength in pain-free limbs of cases was lower than in bilaterally pain-free controls (−5.5%/–8.4%; p=0.043/p=0.022). Within cases, maximum extensor/flexor strength was significantly lower in the painful than in the pain-free limb (−6.4%/4.1%; pstrength in limbs without knee pain is associated with the pain status of the contralateral knee. The strength difference between unilateral pain-free cases and matched bilateral pain-free controls was similar to that between limbs in persons with unilateral knee pain. Lower strength due to contralateral knee pain might be centrally mediated. PMID:25768069

  18. The effectiveness of hyaluronic acid intra-articular injections in managing osteoarthritic knee pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, A

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a common and progressive joint disease. Treatment options for knee OA vary from simple analgesia in mild cases to knee replacement for advanced disease. Knee pain due to moderate OA can be targeted with intra-articular injections. Steroid injections have been used widely in managing acute flare-ups of the disease. In recent years, viscosupplementation has been used as a therapeutic modality for the management of knee OA. The principle of viscosupplementation is based on the physiological properties of the hyaluronic acid (HA) in the synovial joint. Despite a sound principle and promising in vitro studies, clinical studies have been less conclusive on the effectiveness of HA in managing osteoarthritic knee pain. The aim of this systematic review was to assess the effectiveness of HA intra-articular injections in the management of osteoarthritic knee pain. Methods A systematic review of the literature was performed using MEDLINE®, Embase™ and CINAHL® (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature). The databases were searched for randomised controlled trials available on the effectiveness of HA intra-articular injections in managing osteoarthritic knee pain. Results The search yielded 188 studies. Of these, 14 met the eligibility criteria and were reviewed in chronological order. Conclusions HA intra-articular injections have a modest effect on early to moderate knee OA. The effect peaks at around 6–8 weeks following administration, with a doubtful effect at 6 months. PMID:24165334

  19. Auricular Acupressure for Managing Postoperative Pain and Knee Motion in Patients with Total Knee Replacement: A Randomized Sham Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-hua Chang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Postoperative pain management remains a significant challenge for all healthcare providers. A randomized controlled trial was conducted to examine the adjuvant effects of auricular acupressure on relieving postoperative pain and improving the passive range of motion in patients with total knee replacement (TKR. Method. Sixty-two patients who had undergone a TKR were randomly assigned to the acupressure group and the sham control group. The intervention was delivered three times a day for 3 days. A visual analog scale (VAS and the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire were used to assess pain intensity. Pain medication consumption was recorded, and the knee motion was measured using a goniometer. Results. The patients experienced a moderately severe level of pain postoperatively (VAS 58.66 ± 20.35 while being on the routine PCA. No differences were found in pain scores between the groups at all points. However, analgesic drug usage in the acupressure group patients was significantly lower than in the sham control group (<0.05, controlling for BMI, age, and pain score. On the 3rd day after surgery, the passive knee motion in the acupressure group patients was significantly better than in the sham control group patients (<0.05, controlling for BMI. Conclusion. The application of auricular acupressure at specific therapeutic points significantly reduces the opioid analgesia requirement and improves the knee motion in patients with TKR.

  20. Experimental knee joint pain during strength training and muscle strength gain in healthy subjects: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, T J; Langberg, H; Hodges, P W; Bliddal, H; Henriksen, M

    2012-01-01

    Knee joint pain and reduced quadriceps strength are cardinal symptoms in many knee pathologies. In people with painful knee pathologies, quadriceps exercise reduces pain, improves physical function, and increases muscle strength. A general assumption is that pain compromises muscle function and thus may prevent effective rehabilitation. This study evaluated the effects of experimental knee joint pain during quadriceps strength training on muscle strength gain in healthy individuals. Twenty-seven healthy untrained volunteers participated in a randomized controlled trial of quadriceps strengthening (3 times per week for 8 weeks). Participants were randomized to perform resistance training either during pain induced by injections of painful hypertonic saline (pain group, n = 13) or during a nonpainful control condition with injection of isotonic saline (control group, n = 14) into the infrapatellar fat pad. The primary outcome measure was change in maximal isokinetic muscle strength in knee extension/flexion (60, 120, and 180 degrees/second). The group who exercised with pain had a significantly larger improvement in isokinetic muscle strength at all angular velocities of knee extension compared to the control group. In knee flexion there were improvements in isokinetic muscle strength in both groups with no between-group differences. Experimental knee joint pain improved the training-induced gain in muscle strength following 8 weeks of quadriceps training. It remains to be studied whether knee joint pain has a positive effect on strength gain in patients with knee pathology. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  1. The effects of total knee replacement and non-surgical treatment on pain sensitization and clinical pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, S. T.; Roos, E. M.; Simonsen, O.

    2016-01-01

    (PPTs) at the knee (localized sensitization) and the lower leg (spreading sensitization), (2) peak pain intensity during the previous 24 h, (3) pain intensity after 30 min of walking, (4) pain location and pattern, (5) spreading of pain on a region-divided body chart and (6) the usage of pain medication...

  2. Cam Femoroacetabular Impingement as a Possible Explanation of Recalcitrant Anterior Knee Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchis-Alfonso, Vicente; Tey, Marc; Monllau, Joan Carles

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a patient with chronic anterior knee pain (AKP) recalcitrant to conservative treatment who returned to our office for severe hip pain secondary to Cam femoroacetabular impingement (Cam FAI) at 10 months after the onset of knee pain. This case highlights the fact that the main problem is not in the patella but in the hip in some patients with AKP. We hypothesize that there is an external femoral rotation in order to avoid the impingement and therefore the hip pain in patie...

  3. Experimental knee pain impairs submaximal force steadiness in isometric, eccentric, and concentric muscle actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, David A; McNair, Peter J; Lewis, Gwyn N; Mannion, Jamie

    2015-09-12

    Populations with knee joint damage, including arthritis, have noted impairments in the regulation of submaximal muscle force. It is difficult to determine the exact cause of such impairments given the joint pathology and associated neuromuscular adaptations. Experimental pain models that have been used to isolate the effects of pain on muscle force regulation have shown impaired force steadiness during acute pain. However, few studies have examined force regulation during dynamic contractions, and these findings have been inconsistent. The goal of the current study was to examine the effect of experimental knee joint pain on submaximal quadriceps force regulation during isometric and dynamic contractions. The study involved fifteen healthy participants. Participants were seated in an isokinetic dynamometer. Knee extensor force matching tasks were completed in isometric, eccentric, and concentric muscle contraction conditions. The target force was set to 10 % of maximum for each contraction type. Hypertonic saline was then injected into the infrapatella fat pad to generate acute joint pain. The force matching tasks were repeated during pain and once more 5 min after pain had subsided. Hypertonic saline resulted in knee pain with an average peak pain rating of 5.5 ± 2.1 (0-10 scale) that lasted for 18 ± 4 mins. Force steadiness significantly reduced during pain across all three muscle contraction conditions. There was a trend to increased force matching error during pain but this was not significant. Experimental knee pain leads to impaired quadriceps force steadiness during isometric, eccentric, and concentric contractions, providing further evidence that joint pain directly affects motor performance. Given the established relationship between submaximal muscle force steadiness and function, such an effect may be detrimental to the performance of tasks in daily life. In order to restore motor performance in people with painful arthritic conditions of the

  4. Prevalence of falls and the association with knee osteoarthritis and lumbar spondylosis as well as knee and lower back pain in Japanese men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraki, Shigeyuki; Akune, Toru; Oka, Hiroyuki; En-Yo, Yoshio; Yoshida, Munehito; Nakamura, Kozo; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Yoshimura, Noriko

    2011-10-01

    There is little information on falls by sex and age strata in Japan, and few factors associated with falls have been established. However, the association between bone and joint diseases and falls remains unclear. We examined prevalence of falls by sex and age strata, determined its association with radiographic osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee and lumbar spine, and determined knee and lower back pain after single and multiple falls. A questionnaire assessed the number of falls during 12 months preceding baseline. Knee and lumbar spine radiographs were read by Kellgren/Lawrence (K/L) grade; radiographic knee OA and lumbar spondylosis were defined as a K/L grade of 3 or 4. Knee and lower back pain were estimated by an interview. A total of 587 men and 1,088 women (mean ± SD age 65.3 ± 12.0 years) were analyzed. During 1 year, 79 (13.5%) men and 207 (19.0%) women reported at least 1 fall. With increasing age, the prevalence of multiple falls was higher in women, but lower in elderly men age >60 years. In men, few factors were significantly associated with falls. In women, radiographic knee OA and lumbar spondylosis, as well as knee and lower back pain, were significantly associated with multiple falls without adjustment. Lower back pain and knee pain were independently associated with multiple falls in women after adjustment. Lower back pain and knee pain were significantly associated with multiple falls in women. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  5. Taping reduces pain and disability in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ende, E. van den

    2004-01-01

    Question: Is taping of the knee effective in improving pain and disability in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee? Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting University and private practices in Melbourne, Australia. Patients: Volunteers who responded to advertisements in local newspapers.

  6. Depression and Pain in Asian and White Americans With Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Hyochol; Weaver, Michael; Lyon, Debra; Choi, Eunyoung; Fillingim, Roger B

    2017-10-01

    Few studies have examined the underlying psychosocial mechanisms of pain in Asian Americans. Using the biopsychosocial model, we sought to determine whether variations in depression contribute to racial group differences in symptomatic knee osteoarthritis pain between Asian Americans and non-Hispanic white Americans. The sample consisted of 100 participants, including 50 Asian Americans (28 Korean Americans, 9 Chinese Americans, 7 Japanese Americans, 5 Filipino Americans, and 1 Indian American) and 50 age- and sex-matched non-Hispanic white Americans with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis pain. The Centers for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale was used to assess symptoms of depression, and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index and the Graded Chronic Pain Scale were used to measure clinical pain. In addition, quantitative sensory testing was used to measure experimental sensitivity to heat- and mechanically-induced pain. The results indicated that higher levels of depression in Asian Americans may contribute to greater clinical pain and experimental pain sensitivity. These findings add to the growing literature regarding ethnic and racial differences in pain and its associated psychological conditions, and additional research is warranted to strengthen these findings. This article shows the contribution of depression to clinical pain and experimental pain sensitivity in Asian Americans with knee osteoarthritis. Our results suggest that Asian Americans have higher levels of depressive symptoms and that depression plays a relevant role in greater clinical pain and experimental pain sensitivity in Asian Americans. Copyright © 2017 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Treatment of Osteoarthritis of the Knee (Nonarthroplasty)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, John; Hunter, David; Irrgang, Jay; Jones, Morgan H.; Levy, Bruce; Marx, Robert; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn; Watters, William C.; Haralson, Robert H.; Turkelson, Charles M.; Wies, Janet L.; Boyer, Kevin M.; Anderson, Sara; Andre, St. Justin St.; Sluka, Patrick; McGowan, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The clinical practice guideline was explicitly developed to include only treatments less invasive than knee replacement (ie, arthroplasty). Patients with symptomatic osteoarthritis of the knee are to be encouraged to participate in self-management educational programs and to engage in self-care, as well as to lose weight and engage in exercise and quadriceps strengthening. The guideline recommends taping for short-term relief of pain as well as analgesics and intra-articular corticosteroids, but not glucosamine and/or chondroitin. Patients need not undergo needle lavage or arthroscopy with débridement or lavage. Patients may consider partial meniscectomy or loose body removal or realignment osteotomy, as conditions warrant. Use of a free-floating interpositional device should not be considered for symptomatic unicompartmental osteoarthritis of the knee. Lateral heel wedges should not be prescribed for patients with symptomatic medial compartmental osteoarthritis of the knee. The work group was unable either to recommend or not recommend the use of braces with either valgus- or varus-directing forces for patients with medial unicompartmental osteoarthritis; the use of acupuncture or of hyaluronic acid; or osteotomy of the tibial tubercle for isolated symptomatic patellofemoral osteoarthritis. PMID:19726743

  8. Arthroscopic treatment of patients with moderate arthrofibrosis after total knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerosch, Joerg; Aldawoudy, Akram M

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to document the effect of arthroscopic management in patients with knee stiffness after total knee replacement. We present a case series study, in which 32 patients have been treated for moderate arthrofibrosis of the knee after total knee replacement, with the same regimen. We have excluded all cases of stiffness, because of infection, mechanical mal-alignment, loosening of the implants and other obvious reasons of stiffness of the knee, rather than pure arthrofibrosis. All patients first underwent a trial of conservative treatment before going for arthroscopic management. A pain catheter for femoral nerve block was inserted just before anesthesia for post-operative pain management. Arthroscopic arthrolysis of the intra-articular pathology was performed in a standardized technique with release of all fibrous bands in the suprapatellar pouch, reestablishing the medial and lateral gutter, release of the patella, resection of the remaining meniscal tissue or an anterior cyclops, if needed. Intensive physiotherapy and continuous passive motion were to start immediately post-operatively. All the patients were available for the follow up and they were evaluated using the knee society rating system. A total of 25 of the 32 procedures resulted in an improvement of the patients knee score. All the knees operated upon had intra-articular fibrous bands, hypertrophic synovitis and peri-patellar adhesions. A total of eight patients suffered from an anterior cyclops lesion and six patients showed pseudomenicus. In 19 cases a medial and lateral relapse of the patella was performed; only 5 patients got an isolated lateral release. The mean knee flexion was 119 degrees (100-130) at the end of arthroscopy and was 97 degrees (75-115) at the last follow up. The eight patients with extension lags decreased from 27 degrees (10 degrees-35 degrees) pre-operatively to 4 degrees (0-10) at time of follow up. The average knee society ratings increased from 70

  9. Pain catastrophizing as a risk factor for chronic pain after total knee arthroplasty: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burns LC

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lindsay C Burns,1–3 Sarah E Ritvo,1 Meaghan K Ferguson,1 Hance Clarke,3–5 Ze’ev Seltzer,3,5 Joel Katz1,3–5 1Department of Psychology, York University, Toronto, ON, Canada; 2Arthritis Research Centre of Canada, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 3Department of Anesthesia and Pain Management, Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada; 4Department of Anesthesia, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 5Centre for the Study of Pain, Faculties of Dentistry and Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Background: Total knee arthroplasty (TKA is a common and costly surgical procedure. Despite high success rates, many TKA patients develop chronic pain in the months and years following surgery, constituting a public health burden. Pain catastrophizing is a construct that reflects anxious preoccupation with pain, inability to inhibit pain-related fears, amplification of the significance of pain vis-à-vis health implications, and a sense of helplessness regarding pain. Recent research suggests that it may be an important risk factor for untoward TKA outcomes. To clarify this impact, we systematically reviewed the literature to date on pain catastrophizing as a prospective predictor of chronic pain following TKA. Methods: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsycINFO databases to identify articles related to pain catastrophizing, TKA, risk models, and chronic pain. We reviewed titles and abstracts to identify original research articles that met our specified inclusion criteria. Included articles were then rated for methodological quality. including methodological quality. Due to heterogeneity in follow-up, analyses, and outcomes reported across studies, a quantitative meta-analysis could not be performed. Results: We identified six prospective longitudinal studies with small-to-mid-sized samples that met the inclusion criteria. Despite considerable variability in reported pain outcomes, pain catastrophizing was identified as a significant

  10. The role of pain for early rehabilitation in fast track total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Bente; Kristensen, Morten Tange; Myhrmann, Lis

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between early functional mobility and pain intensity in a fast track program after total knee arthroplasty (TKA).......To investigate the relationship between early functional mobility and pain intensity in a fast track program after total knee arthroplasty (TKA)....

  11. Intraoperative Low-Dose Ketamine Infusion Reduces Acute Postoperative Pain Following Total Knee Replacement Surgery: A Prospective, Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelin Cengiz, P.; Gokcinar, D.; Karabeyoglu, I.; Topcu, H.; Cicek, G. S.; Gogus, N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of intraoperative low-dose ketamine with general anesthesia on postoperative pain after total knee replacement surgery. Study Design: A randomized, double-blind comparative study. Place and Duration of Study: Ankara Numune Training and Research Hospital, Turkey, from January and June 2011. Methodology: Sixty adults undergoing total knee arthroplasty were enrolled in this study. The patients were randomly allocated into two groups of equal size to receive either racemic ketamine infusion (6.25 g/kg/minute) or the same volume of saline. A visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to measure each patient's level of pain at 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours after surgery. Time to first analgesic request, postoperative morphine consumption and the incidence of side effects were also recorded. Results: Low-dose ketamine infusion prolonged the time to first analgesic request. It also reduced postoperative cumulative morphine consumption at 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours postsurgery (p < 0.001). Postoperative VAS scores were also significantly lower in the ketamine group than placebo, at all observation times. Incidences of side effects were similar in both study groups. Conclusion: Intraoperative continuous low-dose ketamine infusion reduced pain and postoperative analgesic consumption without affecting the incidence of side effects. (author)

  12. Contemporary pain management in total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanasuk, Yutthana; Ngarmukos, Srihatach

    2012-10-01

    Pain management has become a very important part of postoperative care for total knee arthroplasty patients. Contemporary pain control has evolved from high-dose opioid in the past to state-of-the-art multimodal regimens. These include multiple non-opioid medication such as NSAIDs, COX-2 inhibitors, and gabapentinoid, and novel anesthetic techniques such as preemptive analgesia and ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve blocks. Another method which is gaining popularity is intraarticular injection of anesthetic cocktail during surgery. Pre-op education can also help patients cope with their pain better.

  13. Neurodynamic responses to the femoral slump test in patients with anterior knee pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Pei-Ling; Shih, Yi-Fen; Chen, Wen-Yin; Ma, Hsiao-Li

    2014-05-01

    Matched-control, cross-sectional study. The purpose of this study was to compare the responses to the femoral slump test (FST), including the change in hip range of motion and level of discomfort, between subjects with and without anterior knee pain. Anterior knee pain syndrome is a common problem among adults. The FST is the neurodynamic test used to assess the mechanosensitivity of the femoral component of the nervous system. However, as of yet, there is no literature discussing the use of the FST in patients with anterior knee pain. Thirty patients with anterior knee pain and 30 control participants, matched by gender, age, and dominant leg, were recruited. The subjects received the FST, during which the hip extension angle and the location and intensity of pain/discomfort were recorded. Reproduction of symptoms that were alleviated by neck extension was interpreted as a positive test. Differences in hip extension angle and pain intensity between groups were examined using a 2-way, repeated-measures analysis of variance and a Kruskal-Wallis analysis. The level of significance was set at α = .05. Subjects with anterior knee pain had a smaller hip extension angle than that of controls (-3.6° ± 5.3° versus 0.6° ± 6.1°; mean difference, 4.2°; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.24°, 7.15°; P = .006). Eight patients with anterior knee pain showed a positive FST, and those with a positive FST had a smaller hip extension angle (-5.7° ± 4.5°) than that of controls (mean difference, 6.3°; 95% CI: 0.8°, 11.8°; P = .007). There was no difference in the hip extension angle between the positive and negative FST groups (mean difference, 2.9°; 95% CI: -8.5°, 2.0°) or between the negative FST and control groups (mean difference, 3.4°; 95% CI: -0.4°, 7.3°). Results of this study suggest that altered mechanosensitivity of the femoral nerve occurred in the patients with anterior knee pain who presented with a positive FST. The role of increased mechanosensitivity

  14. Imaging of early spontaneous osteonecrosis and osteoarthritis of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusayama, Takeshi; Tomatsu, Taisuke

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, the available of MRI in diagnosis on early spontaneous osteonecrosis and osteoarthritis was investigated. Subjects were 5 cases (5 knees) with spontaneous osteonecrosis (stage 1 in Koshino's classification) and 96 cases (104 knees) in osteoarthritis who were more than 50 years old. Patients with an early spontaneous osteonecrosis were elderly females and had night pain and severe spontaneous pain. On MRI, lesions of all cases were clearly detected in early stage. On the other hand, only 47 of 104 knees (45%) were detected in patients with osteoarthritis, and mirror lesions at shank sides were detected in 45 of 47 knees. These results suggest that it is possible to diagnose early spontaneous osteonecrosis from osteoarthritis by MRI image with the clue to mirror lesion at shank sides, incidence, stage, etc. On the diagnosis of early spontaneous osteonecrosis, MRI image should be performed as soon as possible if a patient was older, had no anamnesis of lesions, and no changes by the X-ray radiography in spite of severe pain of the knee joints. (K.H.)

  15. Association of gastrocnemius tendon calcification with chondrocalcinosis of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foldes, K. [Department of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center (VAMC), San Diego, CA (United States)]|[University of California San Diego Medical Center (UCSD), San Diego, CA (United States)]|[National Institute of Rheumatology and Physiotherapy, Budapest (Hungary); Lenchik, L. [Department of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center (VAMC), San Diego, CA (United States)]|[University of California San Diego Medical Center (UCSD), San Diego, CA (United States); Jaovisidha, S. [Department of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center (VAMC), San Diego, CA (United States)]|[University of California San Diego Medical Center (UCSD), San Diego, CA (United States); Clopton, P. [Department of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center (VAMC), San Diego, CA (United States); Sartoris, D.J. [Department of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center (VAMC), San Diego, CA (United States)]|[University of California San Diego Medical Center (UCSD), San Diego, CA (United States); Resnick, D. [Department of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center (VAMC), San Diego, CA (United States)]|[University of California San Diego Medical Center (UCSD), San Diego, CA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Objective. Chondrocalcinosis of the knee is a common radiological finding in the elderly. However, visualization of chondrocalcinosis may be difficult in patients with advanced cartilage loss.The purpose of this study was to determine sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of gastrocnemius tendon calcification that might serve as a radiographic marker of chondrocalcinosis in patients with painful knees. Design and patients. We prospectively evaluated 37 knee radiographs in 30 consecutive patients (29 men, 8 women; mean age 67 years, age range 37-90 years) with painful knees who had radiographic evidence of chondrocalcinosis. The frequency of fibrocartilage, hyaline cartilage, and gastrocnemius tendon calcification was determined. For a control group, we evaluated knee radiographs in 65 consecutive patients with knee pain (54 men, 11 women; mean age 59 years, age range 40-93 years) who had no radiological signs of chondrocalcinosis. The frequency of gastrocnemius tendon calcification in the control group was determined. Results. Gastrocnemius tendon calcification was 41% sensitive, 100% specific, and 78% accurate in predicting chondrocalcinosis. The gastrocnemius tendon was calcified on 15 of 37 (41%) radiographs in the experimental group and on 0 of 67 radiographs in the control group. In the chondrocalcinosis group, 23 (62%) had posterior hyaline cartilage calcification, 14 (38%) had anterior hyaline cartilage calcification, 31 (84%) had medial meniscus calcification, and 36 (97%) had lateral meniscus calcification. Conclusions. Our results show that gastrocnemius tendon calcification is an accurate radiographic marker of chondrocalcinosis in patients with knee pain. (orig.). With 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Association of gastrocnemius tendon calcification with chondrocalcinosis of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foldes, K.; Lenchik, L.; Jaovisidha, S.; Clopton, P.; Sartoris, D.J.; Resnick, D.

    1996-01-01

    Objective. Chondrocalcinosis of the knee is a common radiological finding in the elderly. However, visualization of chondrocalcinosis may be difficult in patients with advanced cartilage loss.The purpose of this study was to determine sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of gastrocnemius tendon calcification that might serve as a radiographic marker of chondrocalcinosis in patients with painful knees. Design and patients. We prospectively evaluated 37 knee radiographs in 30 consecutive patients (29 men, 8 women; mean age 67 years, age range 37-90 years) with painful knees who had radiographic evidence of chondrocalcinosis. The frequency of fibrocartilage, hyaline cartilage, and gastrocnemius tendon calcification was determined. For a control group, we evaluated knee radiographs in 65 consecutive patients with knee pain (54 men, 11 women; mean age 59 years, age range 40-93 years) who had no radiological signs of chondrocalcinosis. The frequency of gastrocnemius tendon calcification in the control group was determined. Results. Gastrocnemius tendon calcification was 41% sensitive, 100% specific, and 78% accurate in predicting chondrocalcinosis. The gastrocnemius tendon was calcified on 15 of 37 (41%) radiographs in the experimental group and on 0 of 67 radiographs in the control group. In the chondrocalcinosis group, 23 (62%) had posterior hyaline cartilage calcification, 14 (38%) had anterior hyaline cartilage calcification, 31 (84%) had medial meniscus calcification, and 36 (97%) had lateral meniscus calcification. Conclusions. Our results show that gastrocnemius tendon calcification is an accurate radiographic marker of chondrocalcinosis in patients with knee pain. (orig.). With 2 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Expected prevalence from the differential diagnosis of anterior knee pain in adolescent female athletes during preparticipation screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber Foss, Kim D; Myer, Gregory D; Chen, Stephen S; Hewett, Timothy E

    2012-01-01

    Anterior knee pain is a common disorder in female athletes with an undefined cause. The relative prevalence of specific patellofemoral disorders associated with anterior knee pain in adolescent females remains undetermined. To determine the prevalence of specific patellofemoral disorders obtained using the differential diagnosis of anterior knee pain in adolescent female athletes during preparticipation screening. Descriptive epidemiology study. Preparticipation screening evaluations at a county public school district in Kentucky. A total of 419 unique middle and high school-aged female athletes. Participants were evaluated by physicians for anterior knee pain over 3 consecutive basketball seasons. Given the longitudinal nature of this study, some participants were tested longitudinally over multiple years. Over the course of 3 basketball seasons, 688 patient evaluations were performed. Of these, 183 (26.6%) were positive for anterior knee pain. A statistically significant difference was noted in the prevalence of anterior knee pain by school level, with 34.4% (n = 67) in high school-aged athletes versus 23.5% (n = 116) in middle school-aged athletes (P patellar tendinopathy, with 38 cases (9.7%) in high school-aged and 31 (3.1%) in middle school-aged athletes (P < .05). Anterior knee pain was present in 26.6% of the adolescent female athletes screened over 3 years. Symptoms of anterior knee pain likely persist after middle school-aged onset and reach peak prevalence during the high school years.

  18. Weighted cumulative exposure models helped identify an association between early knee-pain consultations and future knee OA diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dahai; Peat, George; Bedson, John; Edwards, John J; Turkiewicz, Aleksandra; Jordan, Kelvin P

    2016-08-01

    To establish the association between prior knee-pain consultations and early diagnosis of knee osteoarthritis (OA) by weighted cumulative exposure (WCE) models. Data were from an electronic health care record (EHR) database (Consultations in Primary Care Archive). WCE functions for modeling the cumulative effect of time-varying knee-pain consultations weighted by recency were derived as a predictive tool in a population-based case-control sample and validated in a prospective cohort sample. Two WCE functions ([i] weighting of the importance of past consultations determined a priori; [ii] flexible spline-based estimation) were comprehensively compared with two simpler models ([iii] time since most recent consultation; total number of past consultations) on model goodness of fit, discrimination, and calibration both in derivation and validation phases. People with the most recent and most frequent knee-pain consultations were more likely to have high WCE scores that were associated with increased risk of knee OA diagnosis both in derivation and validation phases. Better model goodness of fit, discrimination, and calibration were observed for flexible spline-based WCE models. WCE functions can be used to model prediagnostic symptoms within routine EHR data and provide novel low-cost predictive tools contributing to early diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction: Impact of Knee Flexion Angle During Graft Fixation on Dynamic Patellofemoral Contact Pressure-A Biomechanical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorbach, Olaf; Zumbansen, Nikolaus; Kieb, Matthias; Efe, Turgay; Pizanis, Antonius; Kohn, Dieter; Haupert, Alexander

    2018-04-01

    Objective evaluation of the optimal graft tension angle to fully restore patellofemoral contact pressure in reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) in comparison to the native knee. Twelve cadaveric knee specimens were fixed in a custom-made fixation device. A sensitive pressure film (Tekscan) was fixed in the patellofemoral joint, and patellofemoral contact pressure was assessed during a dynamic flexion movement from 0° to 90°. The MPFL was cut and measurements were repeated. Reconstruction of the MPFL was performed with the gracilis tendon subsequently fixed in the femur at 15°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 75°, and 90° of knee flexion under controlled tension (2 N). The sequence of the flexion angles was alternated. Pressure measurements were repeated after every fixation of the graft. No significant differences were seen in the overall patellofemoral contact pressure compared to the native knee (P > .05). However, medial patellofemoral pressure showed a significant increased patellofemoral contact pressure after MPFL reconstruction at a knee flexion angle during graft fixation of 15° (P = .027), 45° (P = .050, P = .044), and 75° (P = .039). Moreover, proximal/distal patellofemoral contact pressure revealed a significantly reduced contact pressure at 15° (P = .003), 30° (P = .009), 45° (P = .025), 75° (P = .021), and 90° (P = .022) of flexion distal after MPFL reconstruction compared with the intact knee. Lateral patellofemoral contact pressure was significantly reduced in all performed reconstructions (P angle during graft fixation for MPFL reconstruction did not have a significant impact on the overall patellofemoral contact pressure. However, selective medial, proximal, distal, and lateral patellofemoral contact pressure was significantly altered for all reconstructions. Fixation of the MPFL graft at 60° of flexion was able to most closely restore patellofemoral contact pressure compared with the intact knee. Based on the

  20. Pulsed Dose Radiofrequency Before Ablation of Medial Branch of the Lumbar Dorsal Ramus for Zygapophyseal Joint Pain Reduces Post-procedural Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsanious, David; Gage, Emmanuel; Koning, Jonathon; Sarhan, Mazin; Chaiban, Gassan; Almualim, Mohammed; Atallah, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    One of the potential side effects with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) includes painful cutaneous dysesthesias and increased pain due to neuritis or neurogenic inflammation. This pain may require the prescription of opioids or non-opioid analgesics to control post-procedural pain and discomfort. The goal of this study is to compare post-procedural pain scores and post-procedural oral analgesic use in patients receiving continuous thermal radiofrequency ablation versus patients receiving pulsed dose radiofrequency immediately followed by continuous thermal radiofrequency ablation for zygopophaseal joint disease. This is a prospective, double-blinded, randomized, controlled trial. Patients who met all the inclusion criteria and were not subject to any of the exclusion criteria were required to have two positive diagnostic medial branch blocks prior to undergoing randomization, intervention, and analysis. University hospital. Eligible patients were randomized in a 1:1 ratio to either receive thermal radiofrequency ablation alone (standard group) or pulsed dose radiofrequency (PDRF) immediately followed by thermal radiofrequency ablation (investigational group), all of which were performed by a single Board Certified Pain Medicine physician. Post-procedural pain levels between the two groups were assessed using the numerical pain Scale (NPS), and patients were contacted by phone on post-procedural days 1 and 2 in the morning and afternoon regarding the amount of oral analgesic medications used in the first 48 hours following the procedure. Patients who received pulsed dose radiofrequency followed by continuous radiofrequency neurotomy reported statistically significantly lower post-procedural pain scores in the first 24 hours compared to patients who received thermal radiofrequency neurotomy alone. These patients also used less oral analgesic medication in the post-procedural period. These interventions were carried out by one board accredited pain physician at one

  1. Longitudinal evaluation of T1ρ and T2 spatial distribution in osteoarthritic and healthy medial knee cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schooler, J; Kumar, D; Nardo, L; McCulloch, C; Li, X; Link, T M; Majumdar, S

    2014-01-01

    To investigate longitudinal changes in laminar and spatial distribution of knee articular cartilage magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) T1ρ and T2 relaxation times, in individuals with and without medial compartment cartilage defects. All subjects (at baseline n = 88, >18 years old) underwent 3-Tesla knee MRI at baseline and annually thereafter for 3 years. The MR studies were evaluated for presence of cartilage defects (modified Whole-Organ Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scoring - mWORMS), and quantitative T1ρ and T2 relaxation time maps. Subjects were segregated into those with (mWORMS ≥2) and without (mWORMS ≤1) cartilage lesions at the medial tibia (MT) or medial femur (MF) at each time point. Laminar (bone and articular layer) and spatial (gray level co-occurrence matrix - GLCM) distribution of the T1ρ and T2 relaxation time maps were calculated. Linear regression models (cross-sectional) and Generalized Estimating Equations (GEEs) (longitudinal) were used. Global T1ρ, global T2 and articular layer T2 relaxation times at the MF, and global and articular layer T2 relaxation times at the MT, were higher in subjects with cartilage lesions compared to those without lesions. At the MT global T1ρ relaxation times were higher at each time point in subjects with lesions. MT T1ρ and T2 became progressively more heterogeneous than control compartments over the course of the study. Spatial distribution of T1ρ and T2 relaxation time maps in medial knee OA using GLCM technique may be a sensitive indicator of cartilage deterioration, in addition to whole-compartment relaxation time data. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Pain trajectory and exercise-induced pain flares during 8 weeks of neuromuscular exercise in individuals with knee and hip pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandal, L F; Roos, E M; Bøgesvang, S J; Thorlund, J B

    2016-04-01

    Patients considering or engaged in exercise as treatment may expect or experience transient increases in joint pain, causing fear of exercise and influencing compliance. This study investigated the pain trajectory during an 8-week neuromuscular exercise (NEMEX) program together with acute exercise-induced pain flares in persons with knee or hip pain. Individuals above 35 years self-reporting persistent knee or hip pain for the past 3 months were offered 8 weeks of supervised NEMEX, performed in groups twice weekly. The program consisted of 11 exercises focusing on joint stability and neuromuscular control. Participants self-reported joint pain on a 0-10 numerical rating scale (NRS) at baseline and 8-weeks follow-up. NRS pain ratings were also collected before and immediately after every attended exercise session. Joint pain was reduced from baseline (NRS 3.6; 95% CI 3.2-4.1) to 8-weeks follow-up (2.6; 95% CI 2.1-3.1), (P neuromuscular exercise. Copyright © 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Synovitis assessed on static and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and its association with pain in knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Robert Gabriel Coumine; Gudbergsen, Henrik; Henriksen, Marius

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between pain and peripatellar-synovitis on static and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in knee osteoarthritis. METHODS: In a cross-sectional setting, knee synovitis was assessed using 3-Tesla MRI and correlated with pain using the knee injury and osteoarthr......OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between pain and peripatellar-synovitis on static and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in knee osteoarthritis. METHODS: In a cross-sectional setting, knee synovitis was assessed using 3-Tesla MRI and correlated with pain using the knee injury...

  4. Comparison of quadriceps-sparing minimally invasive and medial parapatellar total knee arthroplasty: A 2-year follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongsen Chiang

    2012-12-01

    Conclusions: Patients undergoing quadriceps-sparing and standard medial parapatellar TKA had comparable outcomes for quadriceps muscle strength, hamstring–quadriceps balance, and knee function; however, the quadriceps-sparing TKA was more time consuming surgically and resulted in a less accurate prosthesis position.

  5. Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis Who Score Highly on the PainDETECT Questionnaire Present With Multimodality Hyperalgesia, Increased Pain, and Impaired Physical Function

    OpenAIRE

    Moss, Penny; Benson, Heather A.E.; Will, Rob; Wright, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: PainDETECT is a self-report questionnaire that can be used to identify features of neuropathic pain. A proportion of patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) score highly on the PainDETECT questionnaire. This study aimed to determine whether those with a higher “positive neuropathic” score on the PainDETECT questionnaire also had greater pain, hypersensitivity, and reduced function compared with individuals with knee OA with lower PainDETECT scores. Materials and Methods: In total, ...

  6. The relationship between chondromalacia patella, medial meniscal tear and medial periarticular bursitis in patients with osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Resorlu Mustafa

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the presence of bursitis in the medial compartment of the knee (pes anserine, semimembranosus-tibial collateral ligament, and medial collateral ligament bursa in osteoarthritis, chondromalacia patella and medial meniscal tears.

  7. Mobile bearing medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty in patients whose lifestyles involve high degrees of knee flexion: A 10-14year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Won Sik; Lee, Kwang Won; Kim, Ha Yong; Kim, Kap Jung; Chun, Young Sub; Yang, Dae Suk

    2017-08-01

    Because Asian populations have different lifestyles, such as squatting and sitting on the floor, from those of Western populations, it is possible that the clinical results and survival rate of unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) for Asian patients may be different. This study described outcomes of mobile bearing medial UKA for Korean patients. A total of the 164 knees treated with mobile bearing UKAs in 147 patients (14 males and 133 females) were reviewed. The mean follow-up period was 12.1years (range 10.1-14). The clinical outcomes, such as the Hospital for Special Surgery Knee score, the Oxford Knee Score and the Knee Society rating system, showed statistically significant improvement from pre-operative to final follow-up (Pbearing dislocation. The 95% confidence interval of survival rate at 12years was 84.1%, with revision for any reason as the end point. Minimally invasive mobile bearing UKA in Asian patients who required high degrees of knee flexion showed rapid recovery and good clinical outcome. However, they also showed relatively high rates of bearing dislocation and aseptic loosening. Therefore, mobile bearing UKA should only be performed in patients whose lifestyle involves high flexions after carefully considering these risks and benefits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Knee osteoarthritis related pain: a narrative review of diagnosis and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshami, Ali M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis is a common progressive joint disease, involving not only the joint lining but also cartilage, ligaments, and bone. For the last ten years, majority of published review articles were not specific to osteoarthritis of the knee, and strength of evidence and clinical guidelines were not appropriately summarized. Objectives To appraise the literature by summarizing the findings of current evidence and clinical guidelines on the diagnosis and treatment of knee osteoarthritis pain. Methodology English journal articles that focused on knee osteoarthritis related pain were searched via PubMed (1 January 2002 – 26 August 2012) and Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) databases, using the terms ‘knee’, ‘osteoarthritis’ and ‘pain’. In addition, reference lists from identified articles and related book chapters were included as comprehensive overviews. Results For knee osteoarthritis, the highest diagnostic accuracy can be achieved by presence of pain and five or more clinical or laboratory criteria plus osteophytes. Some inconsistencies in the recommendations and findings were found between the clinical guidelines and systematic reviews. Generally, paracetamol, oral and topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, opioids, corticosteroid injections and physical therapy techniques, such as therapeutic exercises, joint manual therapy and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, can help reduce pain and improve function. Patient education programs and weight reduction for overweight patients are important to be considered. Conclusions Some inconsistencies in the recommendations and findings were found between the clinical guidelines and systematic reviews. However, it is likely that a combination of pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments is most effective in treating patients with knee osteoarthritis. PMID:24899883

  9. Comparison of the effects of knee and hip and single knee muscles strengthening/ stretching exercises on pain intensity and function in athletes with patellofemoral pain syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Mazloum

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS is a common musculoskeletal condition among athletes. The evidence emphasizes on the importance of hip musculature strengthening exercises for such patients. Objective: To investigate the effects of strengthening-stretching knee muscles exercises and hip posterolateral musculature exercises in athletes with PFPS. Methods: In this clinical trial, 28 athletes with age average of 22.7±2.4 years with PFPS were allocated into conventional knee muscles exercises (CKME (n=14 and posterolateral hip muscles exercises (PHME (n=14. The subjects of both groups performed the supervised exercise protocols in 12 sessions. The Visual Analogue Scale and 6-minute walking tests were administrated respectively to evaluate pain intensity and function. The data were analyzed using Shapiro-wilk test, Independent-sample t test, and Repeated Measure ANOVA test. Findings: Demographic, pain intensity, and physical function data were similar between groups at baseline. Both groups significantly improved in pain intensity and function following a 4-week exercise program. Additionally, the athletes in PHME group had higher level of decreased pain intensity and improved function in follow-up assessment than the subjects in CKME group. Conclusion: Using hip posterolateral musculature exercises in addition to the knee conventional exercises is more effective for athletes with PFPS.

  10. Relationship between decreased lower extremity muscle mass and knee pain severity in both the general population and patients with knee osteoarthritis: Findings from the KNHANES V 1-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Hong Cheon

    Full Text Available To identify the prevalence of and risk factors for knee pain and radiographic knee osteoarthritis (RKOA and to investigate the relationship between decreased lower extremity muscle mass (DLEM and knee pain severity.Using data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 3,278 participants who were ≥50 years old and who underwent dual x-ray absorptiometry, plain knee radiographs and completed a knee pain questionnaire were enrolled. Lower extremity muscle mass (LEM was defined as the sum of the fat-free soft tissue mass of the legs, and lower extremity muscle mass index (LMI was calculated as LEM/body weight (%. DLEM was defined as an LMI more than two standard deviations below the mean of a gender-matched young reference group. Categorical variables were presented as numbers (weighted %.The prevalence of knee pain and RKOA were 22% (n = 721 and 34.7% (n = 1,234, respectively. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed being female (OR 2.15, 95% CI 1.67-2.79, older (OR 1.03, 95% CI 1.01-1.04, less educated (OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.09-2.71, stiffness (OR 16.15, 95% CI 12.04-21.66, bed rest (OR 2.49, 95% CI 1.81-3.43, RKOA (OR 2.20, 95% CI 1.78-2.74 and DLEM (OR 1.54, 95% CI 1.09-2.17 were associated with knee pain. Participants with simultaneous RKOA and DLEM complained of more severe pain (pain score 7.18 ± 2.48 than those with knee pain without RKOA or DLEM (5.02 ± 2.44, those with only RKOA (6.29 ± 2.50, or those with only DLEM (6.78 ± 2.18 (P<0.001. These results remained after multivariate analyses of variance (MANOVAs.The prevalence of knee pain and RKOA were 22% and 34.7%, respectively, in the general Korean population. DLEM was an independent risk factor for knee pain and it was associated with increased pain severity, regardless of RKOA.

  11. Medial tibial pain: a dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattila, K T; Komu, M E; Dahlström, S; Koskinen, S K; Heikkilä, J

    1999-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the sensitivity of different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences to depict periosteal edema in patients with medial tibial pain. Additionally, we evaluated the ability of dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging (DCES) to depict possible temporal alterations in muscular perfusion within compartments of the leg. Fifteen patients with medial tibial pain were examined with MRI. T1-, T2-weighted, proton density axial images and dynamic and static phase post-contrast images were compared in ability to depict periosteal edema. STIR was used in seven cases to depict bone marrow edema. Images were analyzed to detect signs of compartment edema. Region-of-interest measurements in compartments were performed during DCES and compared with controls. In detecting periosteal edema, post-contrast T1-weighted images were better than spin echo T2-weighted and proton density images or STIR images, but STIR depicted the bone marrow edema best. DCES best demonstrated the gradually enhancing periostitis. Four subjects with severe periosteal edema had visually detectable pathologic enhancement during DCES in the deep posterior compartment of the leg. Percentage enhancement in the deep posterior compartment of the leg was greater in patients than in controls. The fast enhancement phase in the deep posterior compartment began slightly slower in patients than in controls, but it continued longer. We believe that periosteal edema in bone stress reaction can cause impairment of venous flow in the deep posterior compartment. MRI can depict both these conditions. In patients with medial tibial pain, MR imaging protocol should include axial STIR images (to depict bone pathology) with T1-weighted axial pre and post-contrast images, and dynamic contrast enhanced imaging to show periosteal edema and abnormal contrast enhancement within a compartment.

  12. Pain sensitivity profiles in patients with advanced knee osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey-Law, Laura A.; Bohr, Nicole L.; Sluka, Kathleen A.; Herr, Keela; Clark, Charles R.; Noiseux, Nicolas O.; Callaghan, John J; Zimmerman, M Bridget; Rakel, Barbara A.

    2016-01-01

    The development of patient profiles to subgroup individuals on a variety of variables has gained attention as a potential means to better inform clinical decision-making. Patterns of pain sensitivity response specific to quantitative sensory testing (QST) modality have been demonstrated in healthy subjects. It has not been determined if these patterns persist in a knee osteoarthritis population. In a sample of 218 participants, 19 QST measures along with pain, psychological factors, self-reported function, and quality of life were assessed prior to total knee arthroplasty. Component analysis was used to identify commonalities across the 19 QST assessments to produce standardized pain sensitivity factors. Cluster analysis then grouped individuals that exhibited similar patterns of standardized pain sensitivity component scores. The QST resulted in four pain sensitivity components: heat, punctate, temporal summation, and pressure. Cluster analysis resulted in five pain sensitivity profiles: a “low pressure pain” group, an “average pain” group, and three “high pain” sensitivity groups who were sensitive to different modalities (punctate, heat, and temporal summation). Pain and function differed between pain sensitivity profiles, along with sex distribution; however no differences in OA grade, medication use, or psychological traits were found. Residualizing QST data by age and sex resulted in similar components and pain sensitivity profiles. Further, these profiles are surprisingly similar to those reported in healthy populations suggesting that individual differences in pain sensitivity are a robust finding even in an older population with significant disease. PMID:27152688

  13. Relevance of infiltration analgesia in pain relief after total knee arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Znojek-Tymborowska, Justyna; Kęska, Rafał; Paradowski, Przemysław T.; Witoński, Dariusz

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to assess the effect of different types of anesthesia on pain intensity in early postoperative period. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 87 patients (77 women, 10 men) scheduled for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) were assigned to receive either subarachnoid anesthesia alone or in combination with local soft tissue anesthesia, local soft tissue anesthesia and femoral nerve block and pre-emptive infiltration together with local soft tissue anesthesia. We assessed the pain intensity, opioid consumption, knee joint mobility, and complications of surgery. RESULTS: Subjects with pre-emptive infiltration and local soft tissue anesthesia had lower pain intensity on the first postoperative day compared to those with soft tissue anesthesia and femoral nerve block (P=0.012, effect size 0.68). Subjects who received pre-emptive infiltration and local soft-tissue anesthesia had the greatest range of motion in the operated knee at discharge (mean 90 grades [SD 7], P=0.01 compared to those who received subarachnoid anesthesia alone, and P=0.001 compared to those with subarachnoid together with soft tissue anesthesia). CONCLUSION: Despite the differences in postoperative pain and knee mobility, the results obtained throughout the postoperative period do not enable us to favour neither local nor regional infiltration anesthesia in TKA. Level of Evidence II, Prospective Comparative Study. PMID:24453679

  14. The influence of isometric exercises of the quadriceps muscle on young female patients with anterior knee pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Wilczyński

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Anterior knee pain is a disease associated with abnormalities in the patellofemoral joint. It is a common reason for seeking advice from an orthopaedist. This problem is characterised by chronic pain in the anterior part of one or both knees. This issue often affects women, especially at a young age. The effect of this ailment is deterioration of the quality of life. This dysfunction significantly reduces abilities, and often prevents the performance of daily activities. Pain usually occurs during physical activity, but may also be accompanied by prolonged immobilisation of the knee joint. In defining the type of patellofemoral instability, orthopaedists use magnetic resonance imaging, arthroscopy, ultrasonography, and X-ray examination. A relatively effective method of treatment of pain in the patellofemoral joint is through isometric exercises of the quadriceps. They increase the strength of the quadriceps femoris muscle and reduce instability in the patellofemoral joint. Aim of the research: To evaluate the effectiveness of isometric exercises of the quadriceps muscle on young female patients with anterior knee pain. Material and methods : The study involved 30 women aged 13–44 years (mean age: 26.8 years, who had been diagnosed with pain in the front of the knee. Results and conclusions: Isometric exercises of the quadriceps muscle are an effective method of reducing anterior knee pain. Isometric exercises have a beneficial influence on improving physical activity, including performing basic activities of daily living. Student’s t distribution showed, that isometric exercises of the quadriceps muscle reduce pain at the front of the knee. Kruskal-Wallis test confirmed a significant reduction of anterior knee pain.

  15. Minimally invasive unicompartmental knee replacement: Midterm clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Shaoqi; Liu, Jiangjun; Yuan, Wanqing; Wang, Yuanhe; Ha, Chengzhi; Liu, Lun; Li, Qicai; Yang, Xu; Sun, Kang

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the midterm clinical outcomes of unicompartmental knee replacement (UKR) for medial knee arthropathy through a minimally invasive approach (MIA). From January 2006 to June 2010, 442 consecutive patients (485 knees) were included in the study. All patients underwent MIA-UKR with the mobile bearing Oxford phrase III prosthesis. The incision was made starting 1 cm medial to the medial pole of the patella and extending distally to the tibial tubercle. Radiographic evaluations include femorotibial angle (FTA) from coronal x-rays and rectified varus deformity angle, while clinical evaluations included Knee Society Score (KSS, clinical score and function score), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) osteoarthritis index and visual analog scale (VAS) for pain. Patients followed-up at 1, 3, 6, 12 months after surgery and each year thereafter. Four hundreds and two patients completed the entire follow-up, 40 patients (45 knees) were lost to follow-up. The average follow-up time was 73.0 ± 1.9 months. The mean length of the incisions was 5.0 ± 0.2 cm. The average FTA decreased from 183.6° ± 5.1° preoperatively to 174.3° ± 4.2° postoperatively, and the mean rectified varus deformity angle was 9.3° ± 1.2°. The KSS clinical score improved from 42.4 ± 2.9 to 92.9 ± 3.8, and the function score improved from 53.5 ± 3.8 to 93.5 ± 4.0. The WOMAC score improved from 47.5 ± 3.1 preoperatively to 12.3 ± 1.5 at the last evaluation. The VAS dropped from 7.8 ± 1.9 preoperatively to 1.6 ± 0.2 postoperatively. All clinical evaluations (KSS, WOMAC, VAS) were significantly different (p clinical outcomes of MIA-UKR are satisfactory in a Chinese patient population, which is a good surgical option for patients with medial arthropathy of the knee. However, longer-term follow-up studies should be performed in these patients.

  16. Changes in motor unit recruitment strategy during pain alters force direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Kylie J; Hodges, Paul W

    2010-10-01

    Motor unit (MU) recruitment is altered (decreased discharge rate and cessation of discharge in some units, and recruitment of new units) in force-matched contractions during pain compared to contractions performed before pain. As MU's within a motoneurone pool have different force direction properties we hypothesised that altered MU recruitment during experimental knee pain would change the force vector (total force (F(T)): amplitude and angle) generated by the quadriceps. Force was produced at two levels during 1 × 60-s and 3 × 10-s isometric contractions of knee extensors, and recorded by two force transducers at right angles. This enabled calculation of both F(E) (extension force) and F(T). MU recruitment was recorded from the medial and lateral vastii with four fine-wire electrodes. Pain was induced by hypertonic saline injection in the infra-patella fat pad. Nine subjects matched F(E) and six subjects also matched both medial and lateral forces (F(T)) before and during pain. Changes in MU discharge pattern (decreased discharge rate (Precruitment of new units) during pain were associated with a ∼5° change in absolute force angle. As force angle changed in both directions (left/right) for individual subjects with pain there was no change in average F(T) amplitude between conditions. When both medial and lateral forces were matched MU discharge rate decreased (Punits ceased firing or were newly recruited during pain. Change in motoneurone recruitment during pain alters direction of muscle force. This may be a strategy to avoid pain or protect the painful part. Copyright © 2010 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The Associations between Pain Sensitivity and Knee Muscle Strength in Healthy Volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Klokker, Louise; Bartholdy, Cecilie

    2013-01-01

    lateralis, deltoid, and infrapatellar fat pad. Quadriceps and hamstring muscle strength was assessed isometrically at 60-degree knee flexion using a dynamometer. Associations between pain sensitivity and muscle strength were investigated using multiple regressions including age, gender, and body mass index...... as covariates. Results. Knee extension strength was associated with computer-controlled PPT on the vastus lateralis muscle. Computer-controlled PPTs were significantly correlated between sites (r > 0.72) and with cuff PPT (r > 0.4). Saline induced pain intensity and duration were correlated between sites (r > 0......Objectives. To investigate associations between muscle strength and pain sensitivity among healthy volunteers and associations between different pain sensitivity measures. Methods. Twenty-eight healthy volunteers (21 females) participated. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were obtained from 1...

  18. Cam Femoroacetabular Impingement as a Possible Explanation of Recalcitrant Anterior Knee Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchis-Alfonso, Vicente; Tey, Marc; Monllau, Joan Carles

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a patient with chronic anterior knee pain (AKP) recalcitrant to conservative treatment who returned to our office for severe hip pain secondary to Cam femoroacetabular impingement (Cam FAI) at 10 months after the onset of knee pain. This case highlights the fact that the main problem is not in the patella but in the hip in some patients with AKP. We hypothesize that there is an external femoral rotation in order to avoid the impingement and therefore the hip pain in patients with Cam FAI. This functional femoral rotation could provoke a patellofemoral imbalance that may be, in theory, responsible for patellofemoral pain in this particular patient. In our case, Cam FAI resolution was related to the resolution of AKP.

  19. A meta-analysis into the effect of lateral-wedged insoles with subtalar strapping versus traditional insoles in adults with medial knee osteoarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Duvenhage

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available To  systematically  identify,  collate,  and  analyze  the  current available evidence  for  the  effectiveness  of  lateral-wedged  insoles,  with subtalar strapping,  on  reducing  pain,  improving  function  and  improving  the femoral-tibial  angle  (FTA,  in  adults  with  medial  knee osteoarthritis compared to traditional insoles without subtalar strapping.Six computerised databases, namely Cochrane Library, CiNAHL, PEDro, BIOMED central,  PubMed  and  ScienceDirect  were  searched. The  included articles were  then  all  rated  using  the  PEDro  scale  to  determine  their meth-odological quality.  Homogeneous data were pooled in a meta-analysis using Review Manager (REVMAN software.  Where statistical pooling of the results was not possible, findings were summarised in narrative form. Three randomised controlled trials were selected for this review. The average PEDro score was 5.7. A meta-analysis demonstrated that lateral-wedged insoles with subtalar strapping significantly reduced pain in the short-term (p=0.004. The review found that lateral-wedge insoles with subtalar strapping significantly decreased pain in the short-term and seemed to have a positive effect on the FTA in the long-term, when compared to traditional insoles without  subtalar strapping. The lateral-wedge insole with subtalar strapping may provide a financially feasible adjunctive self-management treatment for knee OA and should be considered before invasive procedures such as surgery.

  20. Morphology of the medial collateral ligament of the knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gill Thomas J

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative knowledge on the anatomy of the medial collateral ligament (MCL is important for treatment of MCL injury and for MCL release during total knee arthroplasty (TKA. The objective of this study was to quantitatively determine the morphology of the MCL of human knees. Methods 10 cadaveric human knees were dissected to investigate the MCL anatomy. The specimens were fixed in full extension and this position was maintained during the dissection and morphometric measurements. The outlines of the insertion sites of the superficial MCL (sMCL and deep MCL (dMCL were digitized using a 3D digitizing system. Results The insertion areas of the superficial MCL (sMCL were 348.6 ± 42.8 mm2 and 79.7 ± 17.6 mm2 on the tibia and femur, respectively. The insertion areas of the deep MCL (dMCL were 63.6 ± 13.4 mm2 and 71.9 ± 14.8 mm2 on the tibia and femur, respectively. The distances from the centroids of the tibial and femoral insertions of the sMCL to the tibial and femoral joint line were 62.4 ± 5.5 mm and 31.1 ± 4.6 mm, respectively. The distances from the centroids of dMCL in the tibial insertion and the femoral insertion to the tibial and femoral joint line were 6.5 ± 1.3 mm and 20.5 ± 4.2 mm, respectively. The distal portion of the dMCL (meniscotibial ligament - MTL was approximately 1.7 times wider than the proximal portion of the dMCL (meniscofemoral ligament - MFL, whereas the MFL was approximately 3 times longer than the MTL. Conclusions The morphologic data on the MCL may provide useful information for improving treatments of MCL-related pathology and performing MCL release during TKA.

  1. Can multivariate models based on MOAKS predict OA knee pain? Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna-Gómez, Carlos D.; Zanella-Calzada, Laura A.; Galván-Tejada, Jorge I.; Galván-Tejada, Carlos E.; Celaya-Padilla, José M.

    2017-03-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most common rheumatic disease in the world. Knee pain is the most disabling symptom in the disease, the prediction of pain is one of the targets in preventive medicine, this can be applied to new therapies or treatments. Using the magnetic resonance imaging and the grading scales, a multivariate model based on genetic algorithms is presented. Using a predictive model can be useful to associate minor structure changes in the joint with the future knee pain. Results suggest that multivariate models can be predictive with future knee chronic pain. All models; T0, T1 and T2, were statistically significant, all p values were 0.60.

  2. Managing Knee Osteoarthritis: The Effects of Body Weight Supported Physical Activity on Joint Pain, Function, and Thigh Muscle Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeler, Jason; Christian, Mathew; Cooper, Juliette; Leiter, Jeffrey; MacDonald, Peter

    2015-11-01

    To determine the effect of a 12-week lower body positive pressure (LBPP)-supported low-load treadmill walking program on knee joint pain, function, and thigh muscle strength in overweight patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Prospective, observational, repeated measures investigation. Community-based, multidisciplinary sports medicine clinic. Thirty-one patients aged between 55 and 75 years, with a body mass index ≥25 kg/m and mild-to-moderate knee OA. Twelve-week LBPP-supported low-load treadmill walking regimen. Acute knee joint pain (visual analog scale) during full weight bearing treadmill walking, chronic knee pain, and joint function [Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) questionnaire] during normal activities of daily living, and thigh muscle strength (isokinetic testing). Appropriate methods of statistical analysis were used to compare data from baseline and follow-up evaluation. Participants reported significant improvements in knee joint pain and function and demonstrated significant increases in thigh muscle strength about the degenerative knee. Participants also experienced significant reductions in acute knee pain during full weight bearing treadmill walking and required dramatically less LBPP support to walk pain free on the treadmill. Data suggest that an LBPP-supported low-load exercise regimen can be used to significantly diminish knee pain, enhance joint function, and increase thigh muscle strength, while safely promoting pain-free walking exercise in overweight patients with knee OA. These findings have important implications for the development of nonoperative treatment strategies that can be used in the management of joint symptoms associated with progressive knee OA in at-risk patient populations. This research suggests that LBPP-supported low-load walking is a safe user-friendly mode of exercise that can be successfully used in the management of day-to-day joint symptoms associated with knee OA, helping to improve the

  3. Patella position is not a determinant for anterior knee pain 10 years after balanced gap total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Houten, Albert H; Heesterbeek, Petra J C; Wymenga, Ate B

    2016-08-01

    Incidence of anterior knee pain after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is reported to be between 4 and 49 %. The incidence of AKP at long-term follow-up and possible determinants after cruciate cruciate-retaining TKA were investigated. A 10-year follow-up of a cohort of 55 patients (63 TKAs), who received the balanSys™ cruciate-retaining total knee system (Mathys Ltd, Bettlach, Switzerland) between 1999 and 2002, was performed. Patients had undergone the balanced gap technique, with either a fixed bearing or an AP-glide bearing. Standardised diagnostic questions regarding AKP were collected and categorised into two groups: those with and without AKP. The lateral patellar tilt, patellar displacement measurement and modified Insall-Salvati ratio were used for patella position evaluation on skyline radiographs. The Knee Society Score (KSS), the Knee Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and Numerical Rating Scales (NRS) for pain and satisfaction were obtained at follow-up. Sixteen patients in the study population experienced AKP. Incidence of AKP (fixed bearing 13/44; AP-glide bearing baring 3/17) was not dependent on type of insert (n.s.). There were no statistical differences in patella position and tibiofemoral contact point between the AKP group and the no AKP group (n.s.). KSS, KOOS, NRS-pain and NRS-satisfaction were significantly lower for the patients with AKP (all p years after balanced gap TKA. Postoperative patella positioning was not found to be a determinant for anterior knee pain after TKA. However, patellar displacement does not seem completely favourable. Moreover, type of bearing was not found a determinant for AKP at long-term follow-up. Lower quality prospective cohort study (<80 % follow-up, patients enrolled at different time points in disease), Level II.

  4. Relationship between knee kinetic outcome measures in vertical counter movement jumps and self-reported function in ACL reconstructed subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brekke, Anders Falk

    2014-01-01

    Relationship between knee kinetic outcome measures in counter movement jumps and self-reported function in ACL reconstructed subjects Brekke AF1,2, Nielsen DB2, Holsgaard-Larsen A2 1School of physiotherapy, University College Zealand, Denmark 2Orthopaedic Research Unit, Department of Orthopaedics...... and Traumatology, Odense University Hospital, Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark Introduction: Altered loading pattern of the medial aspect of the knee has been associated with the development of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are associated...... with early-onset OA with associated pain, functional limitations, and decreased quality of life. However, specific knee loading pattern of the medial aspect has not been investigated during different jump-tasks in ACL-reconstructed patients. The purpose was to investigate potential kinetic differences...

  5. Effect of Grade 1 Mobilization on Osteoarthritic Knee Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tavakkoli Mehdi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Knee osteoarthritis (OA is one of the common disabling conditions in human. Joint mobilization is a passive rhythmic accessory movement therapy that is used in the treatment of OA. In this study, the effect of grade one mobilization, on pain reduction of knee OA has been investigated.Materials and Methods: This study was an unidirectional blind clinical trial with random sampling from patients admitted to Sarcheshme physiotherapy clinic in 2007. Thirty participants were divided into 3 groups randomly: group 1: Mobilization + Exercise therapy, group 2: Exercise therapy and group 3: Mobilization. Ultrasound with the intensity below 0.2 W/Cm2 was used for all groups as placebo. The treatment was done in 10 sessions during 3 weeks. Outcome was measured using was WOMAC questionnaire form (Likert Type. Measurements were done before and after treatment and one week after final treatment session. Friedman, Wilcoxon and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used for data analysis included.Results: Comparison of pain between before and after treatment showed significant differences in group 1 (P=0.01 and group 3 (P=0.04 but was not significant in group 2 (P=0.135. The difference of pain at follow up visit was significant only in group 1 in comparison to before treatment (P=0.007. Pain reduction between before and after treatment (P=0.504 and before treatment and follow up session (P=0.18, showed no significant differences, between 3 groups.Conclusion: This study showed that grade 1 mobilization can decrease the pain of knee OA. If exercise therapy is used combined with mobilization, the effect of treatment will continue at least for about one week.

  6. Knee osteoarthritis pain in the elderly can be reduced by massage therapy, yoga and tai chi: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Tiffany

    2016-02-01

    This is a review of recently published research, both empirical studies and meta-analyses, on the effects of complementary therapies including massage therapy, yoga and tai chi on pain associated with knee osteoarthritis in the elderly. The massage therapy protocols have been effective in not only reducing pain but also in increasing range of motion, specifically when moderate pressure massage was used and when both the quadriceps and hamstrings were massaged. The yoga studies typically measured pain by the WOMAC. Most of those studies showed a clinically significant reduction in pain, especially the research that focused on poses (e.g. the Iyengar studies) as opposed to those that had integrated protocols (poses, breathing and meditation exercises). The tai chi studies also assessed pain by self-report on the WOMAC and showed significant reductions in pain. The tai chi studies were difficult to compare because of their highly variable protocols in terms of the frequency and duration of treatment. Larger, randomized control trials are needed on each of these therapies using more standardized protocols and more objective variables in addition to the self-reported WOMAC pain scale, for example, range-of-motion and observed range-of-motion pain. In addition, treatment comparison studies should be conducted so, for example, if the lower-cost yoga and tai chi were as effective as massage therapy, they might be used in combination with or as supplemental to massage therapy. Nonetheless, these therapies are at least reducing pain in knee osteoarthritis and they do not seem to have side effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. MR Imaging of a Posterior Root Tear of the Medial Meniscus: Diagnostic Accuracy of Various Tear Configurations and Associated Knee Abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyang Mi; Shim, Jae Chan; Kim, Jin Goo; Lee, Jae Myeong; Nam, Mee Young; Lee, Ghi Jai; Kim, Ho Kyun; Suh, Jung Ho

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the various tear configurations in a medial meniscal posterior horn root tear and assess whether any correlation exists with other associated knee abnormalities in MR imaging. A retrospective review of 146 preoperative knee MR images were performed by one experienced musculoskeletal radiologist. The tear configuration and other abnormalities were evaluated. Sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of each configuration in the medial meniscal posterior horn root tear were calculated. A total of 48 medial meniscal posterior horn root tears including 38 full-thickness radial, 7 partial-thickness radial, and 3 complex tears were confirmed during arthroscopy. Overall, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for the detection of medial meniscal posterior horn root tear were 92% (44/48), 99% (97/98), and 97% (141/146), respectively. For each tear configuration, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 82% (31/38), 97% (105/108), and 93% (136/146) for full-thickness radial tears, respectively, and 43% (3/7), 94% (131/139), and 91% (134/146) for partial-thickness radial tears, respectively. The incidence of degenerative joint disease was 85% (41/48) for the tear group, revealing a strong association. In patients with a root tear and with degenerative joint disease, the incidence of high grade cartilage defects involving the medial femoral condyle was at 80% (33/41), compared to 56% (23/41) for the presence of medial meniscal extrusion. In contrast, a similar comparison of incidence for patients with no root tears but with degenerative joint disease was at 68% (17/25) and 26% (8/31), respectively. MR imaging is very sensitive for the detection of medial meniscal root tears, but has reduced the accuracy with regard to each tear configuration. Medial meniscal root tears showed a strong association with degenerative joint disease. High grade cartilage defects of the medial femoral condyle and medial meniscal extrusions also

  8. MR Imaging of a Posterior Root Tear of the Medial Meniscus: Diagnostic Accuracy of Various Tear Configurations and Associated Knee Abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyang Mi; Shim, Jae Chan; Kim, Jin Goo; Lee, Jae Myeong; Nam, Mee Young; Lee, Ghi Jai; Kim, Ho Kyun; Suh, Jung Ho [Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul Paik Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the various tear configurations in a medial meniscal posterior horn root tear and assess whether any correlation exists with other associated knee abnormalities in MR imaging. A retrospective review of 146 preoperative knee MR images were performed by one experienced musculoskeletal radiologist. The tear configuration and other abnormalities were evaluated. Sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of each configuration in the medial meniscal posterior horn root tear were calculated. A total of 48 medial meniscal posterior horn root tears including 38 full-thickness radial, 7 partial-thickness radial, and 3 complex tears were confirmed during arthroscopy. Overall, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for the detection of medial meniscal posterior horn root tear were 92% (44/48), 99% (97/98), and 97% (141/146), respectively. For each tear configuration, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 82% (31/38), 97% (105/108), and 93% (136/146) for full-thickness radial tears, respectively, and 43% (3/7), 94% (131/139), and 91% (134/146) for partial-thickness radial tears, respectively. The incidence of degenerative joint disease was 85% (41/48) for the tear group, revealing a strong association. In patients with a root tear and with degenerative joint disease, the incidence of high grade cartilage defects involving the medial femoral condyle was at 80% (33/41), compared to 56% (23/41) for the presence of medial meniscal extrusion. In contrast, a similar comparison of incidence for patients with no root tears but with degenerative joint disease was at 68% (17/25) and 26% (8/31), respectively. MR imaging is very sensitive for the detection of medial meniscal root tears, but has reduced the accuracy with regard to each tear configuration. Medial meniscal root tears showed a strong association with degenerative joint disease. High grade cartilage defects of the medial femoral condyle and medial meniscal extrusions also

  9. MR imaging of edematous anconeus epitrochlearis: another cause of medial elbow pain?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, In-Ho; Neumann, Lars; Wallace, W. Angus; Fairbairn, K. Julia

    2005-01-01

    Two patients with unusual medial elbow pain had MRI scans performed that revealed edema of the aberrant muscle of the anconeus epitrochlearis. MRI of this anconeus epitrochlearis muscle are presented. (orig.)

  10. Cam Femoroacetabular Impingement as a Possible Explanation of Recalcitrant Anterior Knee Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Sanchis-Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a patient with chronic anterior knee pain (AKP recalcitrant to conservative treatment who returned to our office for severe hip pain secondary to Cam femoroacetabular impingement (Cam FAI at 10 months after the onset of knee pain. This case highlights the fact that the main problem is not in the patella but in the hip in some patients with AKP. We hypothesize that there is an external femoral rotation in order to avoid the impingement and therefore the hip pain in patients with Cam FAI. This functional femoral rotation could provoke a patellofemoral imbalance that may be, in theory, responsible for patellofemoral pain in this particular patient. In our case, Cam FAI resolution was related to the resolution of AKP.

  11. Incidence of non-traumatic anterior knee pain among 11 - 17-year-olds

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    valgus or varus knee, external tibial torsion, increased Q-. ORIGINAL RESEARCH ... incidence of anterior knee pain, the effect of sport participation, age at onset of the condition, gender differences and other factors that could influence the ...

  12. Middle-aged patients with an MRI-verified medial meniscal tear report symptoms commonly associated with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hare, Kristoffer B.; Stefan Lohmander, L.; Kise, Nina Jullum

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose — No consensus exists on when to perform arthroscopic partial meniscectomy in patients with a degenerative meniscal tear. Since MRI and clinical tests are not accurate in detecting a symptomatic meniscal lesion, the patient’s symptoms often play a large role when deciding...... when to perform surgery. We determined the prevalence and severity of self-reported knee symptoms in patients eligible for arthroscopic partial meniscectomy due to a degenerative meniscal tear. We investigated whether symptoms commonly considered to be related to meniscus injury were associated...... with early radiographic signs of knee osteoarthritis. Patients and methods — We included individual baseline items from the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score collected in 2 randomized controlled trials evaluating treatment for an MRI-verified degenerative medial meniscal tears in 199 patients aged...

  13. Radiosynovectomy of Painful Synovitis of Knee Joints Due to Rheumatoid Arthritis by Intra-Articular Administration of (177)Lu-Labeled Hydroxyapatite Particulates: First Human Study and Initial Indian Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinto, Ajit S; Kamaleshwaran, K K; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Vyshakh, K; Thirumalaisamy, S G; Karthik, S; Nagaprabhu, V N; Vimalnath, K V; Das, Tapas; Banerjee, Sharmila

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of Radiosynovectomy (RSV) using (177)Lu-labeled hydroxyapatite ((177)Lu-HA) in the treatment of painful synovitis and recurrent joint effusion of knee joints in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Ten patients, diagnosed with RA and suffering from chronic painful resistant synovitis of the knee joints were referred for RSV. The joints were treated with 333 ± 46 MBq of (177)Lu-HA particles administered intra-articularly. Monitoring of activity distribution was performed by static imaging of knee joint and whole-body gamma imaging. The patients were evaluated clinically before RSV and at 6 months after the treatment by considering the pain improvement from baseline values in terms of a 100-point visual analog scale (VAS), the improvement of knee flexibility and the pain remission during the night. RSV response was classified as poor (VAS body scan. Static scans of the joint at 1 month revealed complete retention of (177)Lu-HA in the joints. All patients showed decreased joint swelling and pains, resulting in increased joint motion after 6 months. The percentage of VAS improvement from baseline values was 79.5 ± 20.0% 6 months after RS and found to be significantly related to patients' age (P = 0.01) and duration of the disease (P = 0.03). Knees with Steinbrocker's Grades 0 and I responded better than those with more advanced changes (Steinbrocker's Grades III and IV) in terms of VAS improvement (75% vs. 45.8%) (P level was not different before and after RSV. RSV side-effects assessed for the whole follow-up period were minor and not significant. RSV with (177)Lu-HA was safe and effective in patients with knee joint chronic painful synovitis of rheumatoid origin. It exhibited significant therapeutic effect after 6 months follow-up period with no significant side-effects. The preliminary investigations reveal that (177)Lu-labeled HA particles hold considerable promise as a cost-effective agent for RSV. More elaborate and

  14. Thermal and pressure pain sensitivity in patients with unilateral shoulder pain: comparison of involved and uninvolved sides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronado, Rogelio A; Kindler, Lindsay L; Valencia, Carolina; George, Steven Z

    2011-03-01

    Cross-sectional. In the examination of patients with unilateral shoulder pain, pain provocation testing to compare the involved and uninvolved sides has been considered useful. However, side-to-side comparisons of experimental pain sensitivity in patients with unilateral shoulder pain are not widely reported in the literature. To compare experimental pain sensitivity between the involved and uninvolved sides in patients with unilateral shoulder pain. In consecutive patients seeking operative treatment for shoulder pain, sensitivity measures of bilateral pressure pain threshold at the shoulder and forearm, and thermal pain threshold, tolerance, and temporal summation at the forearm, were examined. Pressure sensitivity was tested with a Fischer pressure algometer, and thermal sensitivity with a computer-controlled Medoc neurosensory analyzer. The involved and uninvolved sides were compared with an analysis of variance. Influence of sex and location of testing were considered as covariates in the analysis. Fifty-nine consecutively recruited participants completed experimental pain sensitivity testing. Participants reported significantly lower pressure pain thresholds in the involved side compared to the uninvolved side (F1,56 = 4.96, P = .030). In addition, female compared to male participants demonstrated lower pressure pain thresholds in the bilateral shoulder regions (F1,56 = 10.84, P = .002). There was no difference in thermal pain sensitivity between sides. Average clinical pain intensity was negatively correlated with pressure pain threshold at the involved local site (r = -0.284, P = .029), indicating an influence of clinical pain intensity on local pressure pain. The results of this study provide evidence for higher experimental pressure pain sensitivity in the involved side of patients with unilateral shoulder pain and no difference between sides for thermal pain sensitivity. Females demonstrated higher pain sensitivity than males to pressure stimuli at the

  15. Effect of an ankle-foot orthosis on knee joint mechanics: a novel conservative treatment for knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantini Pagani, Cynthia H; Willwacher, Steffen; Benker, Rita; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter

    2014-12-01

    Several conservative treatments for medial knee osteoarthritis such as knee orthosis and laterally wedged insoles have been shown to reduce the load in the medial knee compartment. However, those treatments also present limitations such as patient compliance and inconsistent results regarding the treatment success. To analyze the effect of an ankle-foot orthosis on the knee adduction moment and knee joint alignment in the frontal plane in subjects with knee varus alignment. Controlled laboratory study, repeated measurements. In total, 14 healthy subjects with knee varus alignment were analyzed in five different conditions: without orthotic, with laterally wedged insoles, and with an ankle-foot orthosis in three different adjustments. Three-dimensional kinetic and kinematic data were collected during gait analysis. Significant decreases in knee adduction moment, knee lever arm, and joint alignment in the frontal plane were observed with the ankle-foot orthosis in all three different adjustments. No significant differences could be found in any parameter while using the laterally wedged insoles. The ankle-foot orthosis was effective in reducing the knee adduction moment. The decreases in this parameter seem to be achieved by changing the knee joint alignment and thereby reducing the knee lever arm in the frontal plane. This study presents a novel approach for reducing the load in the medial knee compartment, which could be developed as a new treatment option for patients with medial knee osteoarthritis. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2013.

  16. [Fear and preoperative anxiety behaviour and pain intensity perceived after knee arthroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguita-Palacios, M Carmen; Talayero-San-Miguel, Marta; Herrero-Cereceda, Salomé; Martín-Cadenas, Mar; Pardo-Cuevas, Pilar; Gil-Martínez, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the short-term (24hours) association between postoperative pain and preoperative psychological variables (anxiety, pain catastrophizing and kinesiophobia) in a sample of knee arthroscopy ambulatory surgery. Observational cross-sectional study, conducted with 40 adult subjects who underwent knee arthroscopy in the surgical area of Cantoblanco Hospital (Hospital Universitario La Paz) in Madrid. The fear-avoidance beliefs and anxiety were assessed using validated questionnaires of pain catastrophizing, kinesiophobia and anxiety. Pre and post-surgical pain and perceived disability were evaluated by the Verbal Numeric Scale. Mean age of the sample (22 men and 18 women) was 52.85±14.21 without significant differences between gender. No statistically significant data for the association between variables of kinesiofobia, anxiety and pain catastrophizing and the intensity of perceived pain by the postoperative knee arthroscopy patient were found. Length of surgery in our study has a correlation with the immediate post-surgical pain (r=0.468; P=.002) and there is a relationship between age and pain intensity at 24hours (r=-0.329; P=.038), and between age and perceived disability (r=-0.314; P=.049). An association between catastrophizing and kinesiophobia scales (r=0.337; P=.033) is obtained likewise. In conclusion, preoperative fear-avoidance beliefs like pain anxiety or pain catastrophizing and kinesiophobia were not associated with acute postoperative pain in our study. Analyses of secondary pain related outcomes, however, indicated that reduced time of surgery may contribute to enhance clinical postoperative pain. If confirmed and replicated in larger samples, this may potentially enable clinicians to improve postoperative pain management in future patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Muscle Power Is an Independent Determinant of Pain and Quality of Life in Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Kieran F; Price, Lori Lyn; Harvey, William F; Driban, Jeffrey B; Hau, Cynthia; Fielding, Roger A; Wang, Chenchen

    2015-12-01

    This study examined the relationships between leg muscle strength, power, and perceived disease severity in subjects with knee osteoarthritis (OA) in order to determine whether dynamic leg extensor muscle power would be associated with pain and quality of life in knee OA. Baseline data on 190 subjects with knee OA (mean ± SD age 60.2 ± 10.4 years, body mass index 32.7 ± 7.2 kg/m(2) ) were obtained from a randomized controlled trial. Knee pain was measured using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, and health-related quality of life was assessed using the Short Form 36 (SF-36). One-repetition maximum (1RM) strength was assessed using the bilateral leg press, and peak muscle power was measured during 5 maximum voluntary velocity repetitions at 40% and 70% of 1RM. In univariate analysis, greater muscle power was significantly associated with pain (r = -0.17, P power was a significant independent predictor of pain (P ≤ 0.05) and PCS scores (P ≤ 0.04). However, muscle strength was not an independent determinant of pain or quality of life (P ≥ 0.06). Muscle power is an independent determinant of pain and quality of life in knee OA. Compared to strength, muscle power may be a more clinically important measure of muscle function within this population. New trials to systematically examine the impact of muscle power training interventions on disease severity in knee OA are particularly warranted. © 2015, American College of Rheumatology.

  18. Radiofrequency neurotomy of the medial branch for the management of lumbar zygapophysial joint pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Kim, Hyoung Ihl; Han, Young Min

    2006-01-01

    We wanted to investigate the efficacy of percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) neurotomy of the medial branch for the management of chronic low back pain due to lumbar zygapophysial joint dysfunction. Thirteen patients who had unremitting chronic low back pain for more than 6 months and whose VAS scores were over 7 were selected on the basis of double comparative nerve blocks. The patients consist of three males and 10 females, and their nean age was 67 years. Sensory stimulation was performed to detect the 'pathologic branches' that were responsible for pain generation. RF neurotomy was performed using a lesion generator at 80 C for 90 seconds. The postoperative outcome was classified, depending on the degree of pain reduction, as excellent (≥ 75%), good (50-75%), and poor (<50%). Follow-up evaluation was performed at 6 weeks, 3 months and 6 months after surgery. The mean number of medial branches was 6.2. Eleven patients had bilateral disease and two had unilateral disease. Sensory stimulation was positive in all patients with a mean amplitude of 4.5V (range: 0.15-6 V). The L5 dorsal ramus was the most frequently involved segment, and this was followed by L4, L3 and L2. The number of lesionings for each medial branch was 3.7. The surgical outcome was graded as excellent (53%), good (23%), and poor (24%) after 6 months of follow-up. Transient backaches were noticed in two patients; however, complications were not observed. Recurrences were not demonstrated during the follow-up period. We conclude that RF neurotomy of the medial branches is an efficient method to substantially alleviate the chronic low back pain caused by zygapophysial joint dysfunction

  19. Radiofrequency neurotomy of the medial branch for the management of lumbar zygapophysial joint pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Hoon [Bong-Sang Clinic, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyoung Ihl [Presbyterian Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Young Min [Chonbuk National University Medical School, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-08-15

    We wanted to investigate the efficacy of percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) neurotomy of the medial branch for the management of chronic low back pain due to lumbar zygapophysial joint dysfunction. Thirteen patients who had unremitting chronic low back pain for more than 6 months and whose VAS scores were over 7 were selected on the basis of double comparative nerve blocks. The patients consist of three males and 10 females, and their nean age was 67 years. Sensory stimulation was performed to detect the 'pathologic branches' that were responsible for pain generation. RF neurotomy was performed using a lesion generator at 80 C for 90 seconds. The postoperative outcome was classified, depending on the degree of pain reduction, as excellent ({>=} 75%), good (50-75%), and poor (<50%). Follow-up evaluation was performed at 6 weeks, 3 months and 6 months after surgery. The mean number of medial branches was 6.2. Eleven patients had bilateral disease and two had unilateral disease. Sensory stimulation was positive in all patients with a mean amplitude of 4.5V (range: 0.15-6 V). The L5 dorsal ramus was the most frequently involved segment, and this was followed by L4, L3 and L2. The number of lesionings for each medial branch was 3.7. The surgical outcome was graded as excellent (53%), good (23%), and poor (24%) after 6 months of follow-up. Transient backaches were noticed in two patients; however, complications were not observed. Recurrences were not demonstrated during the follow-up period. We conclude that RF neurotomy of the medial branches is an efficient method to substantially alleviate the chronic low back pain caused by zygapophysial joint dysfunction.

  20. Lower Limbs Function and Pain Relationships after Unilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tali, Maie; Maaroos, Jaak

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate gait characteristics, lower limbs joint function, and pain relationships associated with knee osteoarthritis of female patients before and 3 months after total knee arthroplasty at an outpatient clinic rehabilitation department. Gait parameters were registered, the active range of lower extremity joints was…

  1. Medial Unicondylar Knee Arthroplasty Improves Patellofemoral Congruence: a Possible Mechanistic Explanation for Poor Association Between Patellofemoral Degeneration and Clinical Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thein, Ran; Zuiderbaan, Hendrik A; Khamaisy, Saker; Nawabi, Danyal H; Poultsides, Lazaros A; Pearle, Andrew D

    2015-11-01

    The purpose was to determine the effect of medial fixed bearing unicondylar knee arthroplasty (UKA) on postoperative patellofemoral joint (PFJ) congruence and analyze the relationship of preoperative PFJ degeneration on clinical outcome. We retrospectively reviewed 110 patients (113 knees) who underwent medial UKA. Radiographs were evaluated to ascertain PFJ degenerative changes and congruence. Clinical outcomes were assessed preoperatively and postoperatively. The postoperative absolute patellar congruence angle (10.05 ± 10.28) was significantly improved compared with the preoperative value (14.23 ± 11.22) (P = 0.0038). No correlation was found between preoperative PFJ congruence or degeneration severity, and WOMAC scores at two-year follow up. Pre-operative PFJ congruence and degenerative changes do not affect UKA clinical outcomes. This finding may be explained by the post-op PFJ congruence improvement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. SHORT TERM EFFECT OF MULLIGANS MOBILIZATION VERSUS KINESIO TAPING ON KNEE PAIN AND DISABILITY FOR OSTEOARTHRITIS OF KNEE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyesh P. Malgaonkar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mulligan’s mobilization and Kinesio taping treatment techniques found to be effective on improving pain and functional disability for osteoarthritis of knee. Hence the purpose is to compare the effect of Mulligan’s mobilization and kinesio taping on improvement of pain and functional disability in subjects with osteoarthritis of knee. Method: An experimental study design, 40 subjects with osteoarthritis of knee joint randomized 20 subjects each into Mobilization Group and Taping Group. Mobilization Group was treated with Mulligan’s Mobilization and Taping Group was treated with Therapeutic Kinesio Taping thrice a week for 2 weeks. Outcome measurements such as Visual analog scale (VAS for pain, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC for functional disability was measured before and after 2 weeks post intervention. Results: Analysis using Paired ‘t’ test and Wilcoxon signed rank test found that there is a statistically significant improvement in VAS and WOMAC within the group. Comparative analysis using Independent‘t’ test and Mann Whitney U test found there is a statistically significant difference in post-intervention means between the groups. Conclusion: The study concluded that both Mulligan’s Mobilization and Kinesio Taping techniques significantly shown short term effect on improvement of pain and functional disability for subjects with osteoarthritis of knee. However, there is no statistically significant difference in short term improvements between Mulligan’s Mobilization and Kinesio Taping. Among both, Mulligan’s Mobilization technique found clinically more effective with greater percentage of improvement than Kinesio Taping technique.

  3. Determinant factors of pain intensity in overweight and obese adults with knee osteoarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlota Leão Cunha

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis is one of the most disabling diseases, the main symptom being pain, which is associated with a low level of physical activity. The incidence and progression of knee osteoarthritis are directly related with risk factors such as obesity, age and mechanical factors. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to identify which variables (physical activity, anthropometry and body composition of the lower limb best predict pain intensity in obese individuals with knee osteoarthritis. METHODS: The sample consisted of 44 individuals of both genders (mean age 56.6 ± 6.6 yrs. Anthropometric measures of body mass, stature, mid-thigh, patellar and calf circumferences, and foot breadth were obtained. The body composition of the most painful lower limb was obtained by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in different regions: mid-thigh; patella; calf and foot. For each of these regions, fat mass percentage, the amount of fat and fat-free mass, bone mass and bone mineral density were evaluated. Physical activity was assessed by the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (short version and pain intensity with the numeric rating scale. Data analysis was done using the multifactorial logistic regression (backward conditional method. RESULTS: The multifactorial analysis showed that gender (Odds Ratio of 7.448 for a 95% Confidence Interval of [1.032 – 53.747] and foot breadth (Odds Ratio of 3.730 for a 95% Confidence Interval of [1.006 – 13.827] are important factors to explain the risk of pain. CONCLUSIONS: These results seem to indicate that the assessment of foot morphology must be considered in knee osteoarthritis studies, since foot breadth is a predictor of knee pain. Further research is required to investigate the influence of foot morphology as well as of the use of insoles, splints or adapting shoes, on obese individuals with knee osteoarthritis.

  4. Anterior knee pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patellofemoral syndrome; Chondromalacia patella; Runner's knee; Patellar tendinitis; Jumper's knee ... kneecap (patella) sits over the front of your knee joint. As you bend or straighten your knee, ...

  5. Role of magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of articular cartilage in painful knee joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Digish Shah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the role of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in patients with atraumatic knee pain. Background and Objectives: Knee pain is one of the most common problems faced by people from time immemorial. There is a wide range of disease ranging from traumatic to degenerative causing knee pain in which articular cartilage is involved. Over the past 15 years, MRI has become the premier, first-line imaging study that should be performed in the evaluation of the painful knee in particular in tears of menisci, cruciate and collateral ligaments, osteochondral abnormalities (chondromalacia, osteoarthritis and osteochondral defects, synovial cysts and bone bruises. MRI, by virtue of its superior soft-tissue contrast, lack of ionizing radiation and multiplanar capabilities, is superior to more conventional techniques for the evaluation of articular cartilage. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was carried out on 150 patients in the Department of Radio-diagnosis, Padmashree Dr. D. Y. Patil Medical College, Hospital and Research Centre, Pimpri, Pune over a period of 2 years from June 2011 to May 2013. Patients having fracture or dislocations of the knee joint were also excluded from the study. Detailed clinical history, physical and systemic examination findings of all patients were noted in addition to the laboratory investigations. All patients were subjected to radiograph of knee anterior-posterior and lateral view. MRI was performed with Siemens 1.5 Tesla MAGNETOM Avanto machine. Results: In our study of 150 patients with knee pain, articular cartilage defect was found in 90 patients (60%. Out of 90 patients with articular cartilage defect, 30 patients (20% had full thickness cartilage defects. Subchondral marrow edema was seen beneath 30 patients (20% with articular cartilage defects. 32 patients (21.1% had a complex or macerated meniscal tear. Complete anterior cruciate ligament tear was found in seven

  6. Ground reaction vector re-adjustment-the secret of success in treatment of medial compartment knee osteoarthritis by novel high fibular osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wenjun; Zhang, Yu; Qin, Xiaodong; Song, Lijun; Chen, Qun

    2018-03-01

    High fibular osteotomy has been preliminarily proved to be an effective treatment of knee osteoarthritis by excising a segment of bone at the proximal part of fibula. This imaginative procedure is clinical validated by its instant and explicit knee pain resorption and eventually deformity correction. The rationale of this treatment is named non-uniform settlement of the tibial plateau and used to elucidate the cause of knee joint degeneration, but cannot illuminate the reason of prompt postoperative pain resorption faithfully. To assist in better understanding of this therapeutic method and raising alert to possible unexpected complications, we proposed a new theory to elucidate the pain relief mechanism.

  7. A systematic review and meta-analysis into the effect of lateral wedge arch support insoles for reducing knee joint load in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Fei; Lu, Bin; Kuang, Ming-jie; Wang, Ying; Zhao, Yun-long; Zhao, Jie; Sun, Lei; Wang, Yan; Ma, Jian-xiong; Ma, Xin-long

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the immediate effects of lateral wedge arch support insoles (LWAS) on reducing the knee joint load in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) compared with an appropriate control. Methods: Databases including Medline, EMBASE, Web of Science, Wiley Online Library, Cochrane library, and Google Scholar were searched with no limits on study date or language, from the earliest available date to October 31, 2016. The included studies had to have the aim of reducing knee load and have an appropriate control. The main measured values were the first and second peak external knee adduction moments (EKAM) and the knee adduction angular impulse (KAAI). The random-effects model was used for analyzing the eligible studies. Results: Nine studies met the inclusion criteria with a total of 356 participants of whom 337 received LWAS treatment. The risk of methodological bias scores (quality index) ranged from 21 to 27 of 32. Treatment with LWAS resulted in statistically significant reductions in the first peak EKAM (P = .005), the second peak EKAM (P = .01), and the KAAI (P = .03). However, among trials in which the control treatment was control shoes, the LWAS showed no associations on the first peak EKAM (P = .10) or the KAAI (P =  .06); among trials in which the control treatment was neutral insoles, the LWAS showed no associations on the second peak EKAM (P = .21) or the KAAI (P = .23). At the same time, the LWAS showed no statistically significant reduction on the first peak EKAM (P = .39) when compared with flat insoles. Conclusion: Although meta-analysis outcomes of all studies indicated statistically significant associations between LWAS and reductions of the first peak EKAM, second peak EKAM and KAAI in people with medial knee OA while walking, different results existed in subgroups using various control conditions for comparison. These findings do not support the use of LWAS

  8. Adipose Derived Stromal Cell (ADSC) Injections for Pain Management of Osteoarthritis in the Human Knee Joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fodor, Peter B; Paulseth, Stephen G

    2016-02-01

    This safety and feasibility study used autologous adipose-derived stromal vascular cells (the stromal vascular fraction [SVF] of adipose tissue), to treat 8 osteoarthritic knees in 6 patients of grade I to III (K-L scale) with initial pain of 4 or greater on a 10-point Visual Analog Scale (VAS). The primary objective of the study was evaluation of the safety of intra-articular injection of SVF. The secondary objective was to assess initial feasibility for reduction of pain in osteoarthritic knees. Adipose-derived SVF cells were obtained through enzymatic disaggregation of lipoaspirate, resuspension in 3 mL of Lactated Ringer's Solution, and injection directly into the intra-articular space of the knee, with a mean of 14.1 million viable, nucleated SVF cells per knee. Metrics included monitoring of adverse events and preoperative to postoperative changes in the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC), the VAS pain scale, range of motion (ROM), timed up-and-go (TUG), and MRI. No infections, acute pain flares, or other adverse events were reported. At 3-months postoperative, there was a statistically significant improvement in WOMAC and VAS scores (P knee pain. Autologous SVF was shown to be safe and to present a new potential therapy for reduction of pain for osteoarthritis of the knee. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE 4: Therapeutic. © 2015 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Patient pain and blood management in total hip and knee arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomassen, Bregje J.W.

    2014-01-01

    What is already known on this topic: Local infiltration analgesia in combination with a multimodal pain approach helps for adequate postoperative pain control. Blood saving alternatives should be implemented in the process of primary total hip and knee arthroplasties. The endpoint in patient

  10. Effects of a 12-Week Digital Care Program for Chronic Knee Pain on Pain, Mobility, and Surgery Risk: Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecklenburg, Gabriel; Smittenaar, Peter; Erhart-Hledik, Jennifer C; Perez, Daniel A; Hunter, Simon

    2018-04-25

    Chronic knee pain, most commonly caused by knee osteoarthritis, is a prevalent condition which in most cases can be effectively treated through conservative, non-surgical care involving exercise therapy, education, psychosocial support, and weight loss. However, most people living with chronic knee pain do not receive adequate care, leading to unnecessary use of opiates and surgical procedures. Assess the efficacy of a remotely delivered digital care program for chronic knee pain. We enrolled 162 participants into a randomized controlled trial between January and March 2017. Participants were recruited from participating employers using questionnaires for self-assessment of their knee pain, and randomized into treatment (n=101) and control (n=61) groups. Participants in the treatment group were enrolled in the Hinge Health digital care program for chronic knee pain. This is a remotely delivered, home-based 12-week intervention that includes sensor-guided exercise therapy, education, cognitive behavioral therapy, weight loss, and psychosocial support through a personal coach and team-based interactions. The control group received three education pieces regarding self-care for chronic knee pain. Both groups had access to treatment-as-usual. The primary outcome was the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) Pain subscale and KOOS Physical Function Shortform (KOOS-PS). Secondary outcomes were visual analog scales (VAS) for pain and stiffness respectively, surgery intent, and self-reported understanding of the condition and treatment options. Outcome measures were analyzed by intention to treat (excluding 7 control participants who received the digital care program due to administrative error) and per protocol. In an intent-to-treat analysis the digital care program group had a significantly greater reduction in KOOS Pain compared to the control group at the end of the program (greater reduction of 7.7, 95% CI 3.0 to 12.3, P=.002), as well as a

  11. Joint awareness after total knee arthroplasty is affected by pain and quadriceps strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiyama, Y; Wada, O; Nakakita, S; Mizuno, K

    2016-06-01

    There is a growing interest in the use of patient-reported outcomes to provide a more patient-centered view on treatment. Forgetting the artificial joint can be regarded as the goal in joint arthroplasty. The goals of the study were to describe changes in joint awareness in the artificial joint after total knee arthroplasty (TKA), and to determine which factors among pain, knee range of motion (ROM), quadriceps strength, and functional ability affect joint awareness after TKA. Patients undergoing TKA demonstrate changes in joint awareness and joint awareness is associated with pain, knee ROM, quadriceps strength, and functional ability. This prospective cohort study comprised 63 individuals undergoing TKA, evaluated at 1, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Outcomes included joint awareness assessed using the Forgotten Joint Score (FJS), pain score, knee ROM, quadriceps strength, and functional ability. Fifty-eight individuals completed all postoperative assessments. All measures except for knee extension ROM improved from 1 to 6 months. However, there were no differences in any measures from 6 to 12 months. FJS was affected most greatly by pain at 1 month and by quadriceps strength at 6 and 12 months. Patients following TKA demonstrate improvements in joint awareness and function within 6 months after surgery, but reach a plateau from 6 to 12 months. Quadriceps strength could contribute to this plateau of joint awareness. Prospective cohort study, IV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Combined nuclear and digital subtraction contrast arthrography in painful knee prosthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namasivayam, J.; Forrester, A.; Poon, F.W.; Cuthbert, G.F.; McKillop, J.H.; Bryan, A.S.

    1992-01-01

    The evaluation of a painful knee prosthesis remains a difficult problem for both orthopaedic surgeons and radiologists. We have compared digital subtraction arthrography with nuclear-arthrography in 7 patients with a painful knee prosthesis. Three patients showed a loose tibial component, demonstrated by both digital subtraction and nuclear arthrography. All 3 underwent revision of their prosthesis. One patient had an equivocal digital subtraction arthrogram and negative nuclear arthrogram, while both studies were negative in the 3 remaining patients. Nuclear arthrography is a simple procedure and can provide useful additional information when combined with digital subtraction arthrography. (orig.)

  13. Shea Nut Oil Triterpene Concentrate Attenuates Knee Osteoarthritis Development in Rats: Evidence from Knee Joint Histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Jen-Hsin; Lin, Sheng-Hsiung; Lai, Chun-Fu; Lin, Yu-Chieh; Kong, Zwe-Ling; Wong, Chih-Shung

    2016-01-01

    Shea nut oil triterpene concentrate is considered to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Traditionally, it has been used to treat arthritic conditions in humans. This study aimed to investigate the effect of attenuating osteoarthritis (OA)-induced pain and joint destruction in rats by administering shea nut oil triterpene concentrate (SheaFlex75, which is more than 50% triterpenes). An anterior cruciate ligament transaction (ACLT) with medial meniscectomy (MMx) was used to induce OA in male Wistar rats. Different doses of SheaFlex75 (111.6 mg/kg, 223.2 mg/kg, and 446.4 mg/kg) were then intragastrically administered daily for 12 weeks after surgery. Body weight and the width of the knee joint were measured weekly. Additionally, incapacitance tests were performed at weeks 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 to measure the weight bearing of the hind limbs, and the morphology and histopathology of the medial femoral condyles were examined and were evaluated using the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) scoring system. This study showed that SheaFlex75 reduced the swelling of the knee joint with OA and rectified its weight bearing after ACLT plus MMx surgery in rats. Treatment with SheaFlex75 also decreased ACLT plus MMx surgery-induced knee joint matrix loss and cartilage degeneration. SheaFlex75 relieves the symptoms of OA and protects cartilage from degeneration. SheaFlex75 thus has the potential to be an ideal nutraceutical supplement for joint protection, particularly for injured knee joints.

  14. Identifying specific profiles in patients with different degrees of painful knee osteoarthritis based on serological biochemical and mechanistic pain biomarkers: a diagnostic approach based on cluster analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egsgaard, Line Lindhardt; Eskehave, Thomas Navndrup; Bay-Jensen, Anne C; Hoeck, Hans Christian; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Biochemical and pain biomarkers can be applied to patients with painful osteoarthritis profiles and may provide more details compared with conventional clinical tools. The aim of this study was to identify an optimal combination of biochemical and pain biomarkers for classification of patients with different degrees of knee pain and joint damage. Such profiling may provide new diagnostic and therapeutic options. A total of 216 patients with different degrees of knee pain (maximal pain during the last 24 hours rated on a visual analog scale [VAS]) (VAS 0-100) and 64 controls (VAS 0-9) were recruited. Patients were separated into 3 groups: VAS 10 to 39 (N = 81), VAS 40 to 69 (N = 70), and VAS 70 to 100 (N = 65). Pressure pain thresholds, temporal summation to pressure stimuli, and conditioning pain modulation were measured from the peripatellar and extrasegmental sites. Biochemical markers indicative for autoinflammation and immunity (VICM, CRP, and CRPM), synovial inflammation (CIIIM), cartilage loss (CIIM), and bone degradation (CIM) were analyzed. WOMAC, Lequesne, and pain catastrophizing scores were collected. Principal component analysis was applied to select the optimal variable subset, and cluster analysis was applied to this subset to create distinctly different knee pain profiles. Four distinct knee pain profiles were identified: profile A (N = 27), profile B (N = 59), profile C (N = 85), and profile D (N = 41). Each knee pain profile had a unique combination of biochemical markers, pain biomarkers, physical impairments, and psychological factors that may provide the basis for mechanism-based diagnosis, individualized treatment, and selection of patients for clinical trials evaluating analgesic compounds. These results introduce a new profiling for knee OA and should be regarded as preliminary.

  15. Mindfulness is associated with psychological health and moderates pain in knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, A C; Harvey, W F; Price, L L; Morgan, L P K; Morgan, N L; Wang, C

    2017-06-01

    Previous studies suggest that higher mindfulness is associated with less pain and depression. However, the role of mindfulness has never been studied in knee osteoarthritis (OA). We evaluate the relationships between mindfulness and pain, psychological symptoms, and quality of life in knee OA. We performed a secondary analysis of baseline data from our randomized comparative trial in participants with knee OA. Mindfulness was assessed using the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ). We measured pain, physical function, quality of life, depression, stress, and self-efficacy with commonly-used patient-reported measures. Simple and multivariable regression models were utilized to assess associations between mindfulness and health outcomes. We further tested whether mindfulness moderated the pain-psychological outcome associations. Eighty patients were enrolled (60.3 ± 10.3 years; 76.3% female, body mass index: 33.0 ± 7.1 kg/m 2 ). Total mindfulness score was associated with mental (beta = 1.31, 95% CI: 0.68, 1.95) and physical (beta = 0.69, 95% CI:0.06, 1.31) component quality of life, self-efficacy (beta = 0.22, 95% CI:0.07, 0.37), depression (beta = -1.15, 95% CI:-1.77, -0.54), and stress (beta = -1.07, 95% CI:-1.53, -0.60). Of the five facets, the Describing, Acting-with-Awareness, and Non-judging mindfulness facets had the most associations with psychological health. No significant association was found between mindfulness and pain or function (P = 0.08-0.24). However, we found that mindfulness moderated the effect of pain on stress (P = 0.02). Mindfulness is associated with depression, stress, self-efficacy, and quality of life among knee OA patients. Mindfulness also moderates the influence of pain on stress, which suggests that mindfulness may alter the way one copes with pain. Future studies examining the benefits of mind-body therapy, designed to increase mindfulness, for patients with OA are warranted. Copyright © 2016

  16. Comparable effects of exercise and analgesics for pain secondary to knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Hansen, Julie B; Klokker, Louise

    2016-01-01

    administered analgesics for pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis. METHODS: The Cochrane Database of systematic reviews was searched for meta-analyses of randomized controlled studies comparing exercise or analgesics with a control group (placebo or usual care) and with pain as an outcome. Individual study......AIM: Evidence of comparative effectiveness of different treatment approaches is important for clinical decision-making, yet absent for most recommended treatments of knee osteoarthritis pain. The objective of this study was to estimate the comparative effectiveness of exercise versus orally...... estimates were identified and effect sizes were calculated from group differences. We combined study-level effects on pain with a random effects meta-analysis and compared effect sizes between exercise trials and trials with analgesic interventions. RESULTS: We included six Cochrane reviews (four...

  17. Acupuncture for chronic knee pain: a protocol for an updated systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qinhong; Yue, Jinhuan; Sun, Zhongren; Lu, Ying

    2016-02-24

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of acupuncture for patients with chronic knee pain. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTERAL, CINAHL and four Chinese medical databases will be searched from their inception to present. We will also manually retrieve eligible studies. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in which acupuncture is assessed as the sole treatment or as an adjunct treatment for chronic knee pain will be included. The primary outcome of our analysis is pain measured by the visual analogue scale (VAS), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain subscale or the 11-point numeric rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes will include the quality of life, measured by the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) and adverse events. Two researchers will conduct the study selection, data extraction and quality assessment independently. Any disagreement will be resolved through discussion with a third reviewer. The Cochrane risk-of-bias criteria and the Standards for Reporting Interventions in Controlled Trials of Acupuncture (STRICTA) checklist will be used to assess the methodological quality of the trials. This systematic review will assess the current evidence on acupuncture therapy for chronic knee pain. It uses aggregated published data instead of individual patient data and does not require an ethical board review and approval. The findings will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and disseminated in conference presentations. It will provide the latest analysis of the currently available evidence for acupuncture treating chronic knee pain. CRD42014015514. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  18. [SPECIFIC DIAGNOSTIC SIGNIFICANCE OF "RIPPLE SIGN" OF MEDIAL FEMORAL CONDYLE UNDER ARTHROSCOPE IN MEDIAL LONGITUDINAL MENISCAL TEARS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren Shiyou; Sun, Limang; Chen, Guofei; Jiang, Changqing; Zhang, Xintao; Zhang Wentao

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the reliability of the "ripple sign" on the upper surface of the medial femoral condyle in the diagnosis of medial longitudinal meniscal tears under arthroscope. Between June 2013 and June 2014, 56 patients with knee injuries were included. There were 35 males and 21 females with an average age of 22.2 years (range, 12-38 years). The causes of injury were sports in 40 cases, falling in 10 cases, and traffic accident in 6 cases. The injury was located at the left knee in 22 cases and at the right knee in 34 cases. The disease duration was 10-40 days (mean, 20.2 days). Of 56 patients, 15 cases had simple medial meniscal injury; 41 cases had combined injuries, including anterior cruciate ligament injury in 38 cases, posterior cruciate ligament injury in 2 cases, and patellar dislocation in 1 case. The "ripple sign" was observed under arthroscope before operation. Repair of medial meniscal injury and reconstruction of cruciate ligament were performed. The positive "ripple sign" was seen under arthroscope in all patients, who were diagnosed to have longitudinal meniscal tears, including 23 cases of mild "ripple sign" , 28 cases of moderate "ripple sign", and 5 cases of severe "ripple sign". The "ripple sign" on the upper surface of the medial femoral condyle is a reliable diagnostic evidence of medial longitudinal meniscal tears.

  19. Minimally invasive unicompartmental knee replacement: Midterm clinical outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaoqi Tian

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore the midterm clinical outcomes of unicompartmental knee replacement (UKR for medial knee arthropathy through a minimally invasive approach (MIA.From January 2006 to June 2010, 442 consecutive patients (485 knees were included in the study. All patients underwent MIA-UKR with the mobile bearing Oxford phrase III prosthesis. The incision was made starting 1 cm medial to the medial pole of the patella and extending distally to the tibial tubercle. Radiographic evaluations include femorotibial angle (FTA from coronal x-rays and rectified varus deformity angle, while clinical evaluations included Knee Society Score (KSS, clinical score and function score, the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC osteoarthritis index and visual analog scale (VAS for pain. Patients followed-up at 1, 3, 6, 12 months after surgery and each year thereafter.Four hundreds and two patients completed the entire follow-up, 40 patients (45 knees were lost to follow-up. The average follow-up time was 73.0 ± 1.9 months. The mean length of the incisions was 5.0 ± 0.2 cm. The average FTA decreased from 183.6° ± 5.1° preoperatively to 174.3° ± 4.2° postoperatively, and the mean rectified varus deformity angle was 9.3° ± 1.2°. The KSS clinical score improved from 42.4 ± 2.9 to 92.9 ± 3.8, and the function score improved from 53.5 ± 3.8 to 93.5 ± 4.0. The WOMAC score improved from 47.5 ± 3.1 preoperatively to 12.3 ± 1.5 at the last evaluation. The VAS dropped from 7.8 ± 1.9 preoperatively to 1.6 ± 0.2 postoperatively. All clinical evaluations (KSS, WOMAC, VAS were significantly different (p < 0.05 from pre and post-operative evaluations. The survival rate was 99.1% at 73 months, and the revision rate was 0.9%.The midterm clinical outcomes of MIA-UKR are satisfactory in a Chinese patient population, which is a good surgical option for patients with medial arthropathy of the knee. However, longer

  20. Clinical, nociceptive and psychological profiling to predict acute pain after total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luna, I E; Kehlet, H; Petersen, M A

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pre-operative identification of high-pain responders for acute pain after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) could lead to targeted analgesic trials and individualized analgesic strategies to improve recovery and potentially reduce the risk of persistent post-surgical pain. The aim...

  1. Modificações biomecânicas na marcha de indivíduos com osteoartrite medial do joelho Biomechanical changes in gait of subjects with medial knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hésojy Gley Pereira Vital da Silva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Demonstrar a presença e magnitude de determinadas variáveis biomecânicas na marcha de pacientes com osteoartrite (OA medial de joelho e suas relações com o carregamento deste. MÉTODOS: Vinte e um indivíduos diagnosticados com OA do compartimento medial do joelho foram submetidos à avaliação da marcha e comparados com grupo controle. RESULTADOS: O grupo com OA em relação ao grupo controle apresentou: menor velocidade da marcha (0,8±0,1 vs. 1,1±0,1m/s, maior pico precoce do momento adutor (2,6±1,2 vs. 0,3±1,4 Nm/kg, maior pico tardio do momento adutor (1,8±0,7 vs. 0,9±0,2 Nm/kg, maior pico do momento flexor (1,6±0,9 vs. 0,6±0,4 Nm/kg, elevado pico de varo dinâmico (11,5º±8,3 vs. 3º±3,9, maior pico de flexão (15,6º±8 vs. 9,3º±4,1, com tendência ao flexo (5,5º±8,5 na fase de apoio, menor pico de flexão (58,7º±13,3 vs. 67,5º±4,8 no balanço e elevados picos de rotação externa (25,5º±12,7 vs. 0,5º±12,4. Os picos de ângulos e de momentos ocorreram nas mesmas fases da marcha nos dois grupos. CONCLUSÃO: Pacientes com OA do compartimento medial do joelho apresentam modificações na marcha com aumento rotação externa, redução da velocidade, aumento do momento flexor e flexão no apoio, insuficientes para uma redução considerável do carregamento. Nível de Evidência III, Estudo caso-controle.OBJETIVE: Demonstrate the presence and magnitude of biomechanical variables during gait in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis (OA and the relationship with the knee loading. METHODS: Gait of 21 subjects diagnosed with medial knee OA was evaluated and compared to the control group. RESULTS: The group with OA showed: Lower gait speed (0.8 ± 0.1 vs. 1.1 ± 0.1m/s, higher peak early (2.6 ± 1.2 vs. 0.3 ± 1.4 Nm/Kg and late peak of the adduction moment (1.8 ± 0.7 vs. 0.9 ± 0.2 Nm/Kg, higher peak flexor moment (1.6 ± 0.9 vs. 0.6 ± 0.4 Nm/Kg , high dynamic peak varus (11.5 ± 8.3 vs. 3o ± 3.9, higher

  2. Outside-In Deep Medial Collateral Ligament Release During Arthroscopic Medial Meniscus Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todor, Adrian; Caterev, Sergiu; Nistor, Dan Viorel

    2016-08-01

    Arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy is a very common orthopaedic procedure performed for symptomatic, irreparable meniscus tears. It is usually associated with a very good outcome and minimal complications. In some patients with tight medial compartment, the posterior horn of the medial meniscus can be difficult to visualize, and access in this area with instruments may be challenging. To increase the opening of the medial compartment, after valgus-extension stress position of the knee, different techniques of deep medial collateral ligament release have been described. The outside-in pie-crusting technique shown in this technical note has documented effectiveness and good outcomes with minimal or no morbidity.

  3. Knee Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knee replacement is surgery for people with severe knee damage. Knee replacement can relieve pain and allow you to ... Your doctor may recommend it if you have knee pain and medicine and other treatments are not ...

  4. Popliteal cysts and subgastrocnemius bursitis are associated with knee symptoms and structural abnormalities in older adults: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yuelong; Jones, Graeme; Han, Weiyu; Antony, Benny; Wang, Xia; Cicuttini, Flavia; Ding, Changhai

    2014-03-03

    The role of popliteal cysts and subgastrocnemius bursitis in knee joint homeostasis is uncertain. The aim of this study is to describe cross-sectional associations between popliteal cysts, subgastrocnemius bursitis, knee symptoms and structural abnormalities in older adults. A cross-sectional sample of 900 randomly-selected subjects (mean age 63 years, 48% female) were studied. Knee pain, stiffness and dysfunction were assessed by self-administered Western Ontario McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) questionnaire. Radiographic knee osteophyte and joint space narrowing (JSN) were recorded. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was utilized to assess popliteal cysts, subgastrocnemius bursitis, cartilage defects and bone marrow lesions (BMLs). Popliteal cysts were present in 11.7% and subgastrocnemius bursitis in 12.7% of subjects. Subgastrocnemius bursitis was more common in those with popliteal cyst (36.2% versus 9.7%, P bursitis was associated with increased osteophytes and JSN in the medial tibiofemoral compartment. Both were significantly associated with cartilage defects in all compartments, and with BMLs in the medial tibiofemoral compartment. Furthermore, both popliteal cysts and subgastrocnemius bursitis were significantly associated with increased weight-bearing knee pain but these associations became non-significant after adjustment for cartilage defects and BMLs. Popliteal cysts and subgastrocnemius bursitis are associated with increased symptoms as well as radiographic and MRI-detected joint structural abnormalities. Longitudinal data will help resolve if they are a consequence or a cause of knee joint abnormalities.

  5. Knee pain and future self-reliance in older adults: evidence from a community-based 3-year cohort study in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiwaki, Yuji; Michikawa, Takehiro; Yamada, Mutsuko; Eto, Norihito; Takebayashi, Toru

    2011-01-01

    Although knee pain is common in older persons and can cause ambulatory limitation, its impact on self-reliance has rarely been examined in Japan, particularly in a community setting. The aim of this 3-year cohort study was to investigate the association of knee pain with dependence in activities of daily living (ADL) and mortality in community-dwelling older Japanese adults. In 2005, presence of knee pain was assessed by a home visit survey of 1391 older adults aged 65 years or older (participation proportion = 97.3%). A total of 1265 participants who were ADL-independent at baseline were followed for 3 years, and information on outcomes, namely death and dependence in ADL, was collected. Participants who always had knee pain were more likely to become dependent in ADL than those who reported no knee pain (multivariate-adjusted OR, 1.98; 95% CI, 1.03-3.83); however, always having knee pain was not associated with mortality or a composite outcome of ADL dependence and death. Further analyses of each component of ADL dependence revealed that knee pain was associated with a need for assistance at home (long-term care eligibility, bathing, dressing, and transferring), but not with institutionalization. The participants were highly representative of the target population and the rate of follow-up was almost perfect (99.4%). The results suggest that knee pain is associated with future dependence in ADL, particularly a need for assistance at home.

  6. The Role of Botulinum Toxin Type A in the Clinical Management of Refractory Anterior Knee Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara J. Singer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Anterior knee pain is a highly prevalent condition affecting largely young to middle aged adults. Symptoms can recur in more than two thirds of cases, often resulting in activity limitation and reduced participation in employment and recreational pursuits. Persistent anterior knee pain is difficult to treat and many individuals eventually consider a surgical intervention. Evidence for long term benefit of most conservative treatments or surgical approaches is currently lacking. Injection of Botulinum toxin type A to the distal region of vastus lateralis muscle causes a short term functional “denervation” which moderates the influence of vastus lateralis muscle on the knee extensor mechanism and increases the relative contribution of the vastus medialis muscle. Initial data suggest that, compared with other interventions for anterior knee pain, Botulinum toxin type A injection, in combination with an active exercise programme, can lead to sustained relief of symptoms, reduced health care utilisation and increased activity participation. The procedure is less invasive than surgical intervention, relatively easy to perform, and is time- and cost-effective. Further studies, including larger randomized placebo-controlled trials, are required to confirm the effectiveness of Botulinum toxin type A injection for anterior knee pain and to elaborate the possible mechanisms underpinning pain and symptom relief.

  7. Mechanical and physiological factors in knee joint contact mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølgaard, Carsten

    conservative treatment modalities also increases. The aim of this thesis was to 1) identify relationships between footwear and laterally wedged insoles in a healthy group, 2) to evaluate the mechanical and physiological factors of experimental pain when introducing a laterally wedged insoles to otherwise...... not to the level of healthy matched controls. In conclusion, although similar reductions can be achieved by choice of shoe design the difference between a neutral running shoe and Oxford leather shoes are similar in magnitude compared to the effect of lateral wedges in any type of shoe. Experimental pain does...... not seem to change the effect of lateral wedges independently. The knee adduction moment in patients 3-5 years after a medial arthroscopic partial meniscectomy was at a similar level to what is observed with advanced knee osteoarthritis. Therefore, laterally wedged insoles should be considered part...

  8. The surgical anatomy of the infrapatellar branch of the saphenous nerve in relation to incisions for anteromedial knee surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerver, A L A; Leliveld, M S; den Hartog, D; Verhofstad, M H J; Kleinrensink, G J

    2013-12-04

    Iatrogenic injury to the infrapatellar branch of the saphenous nerve is a common complication of surgical approaches to the anteromedial side of the knee. A detailed description of the relative anatomic course of the nerve is important to define clinical guidelines and minimize iatrogenic damage during anterior knee surgery. In twenty embalmed knees, the infrapatellar branch of the saphenous nerve was dissected. With use of a computer-assisted surgical anatomy mapping tool, safe and risk zones, as well as the location-dependent direction of the nerve, were calculated. The location of the infrapatellar branch of the saphenous nerve is highly variable, and no definite safe zone could be identified. The infrapatellar branch runs in neither a purely horizontal nor a vertical course. The course of the branch is location-dependent. Medially, it runs a nearly vertical course; medial to the patellar tendon, it has a -45° distal-lateral course; and on the patella and patellar tendon, it runs a close to horizontal-lateral course. Three low risk zones for iatrogenic nerve injury were identified: one is on the medial side of the knee, at the level of the tibial tuberosity, where a -45° oblique incision is least prone to damage the nerves, and two zones are located medial to the patellar apex (cranial and caudal), where close to horizontal incisions are least prone to damage the nerves. The infrapatellar branch of the saphenous nerve is at risk for iatrogenic damage in anteromedial knee surgery, especially when longitudinal incisions are made. There are three low risk zones for a safer anterior approach to the knee. The direction of the infrapatellar branch of the saphenous nerve is location-dependent. To minimize iatrogenic damage to the nerve, the direction of incisions should be parallel to the direction of the nerve when technically possible. These findings suggest that iatrogenic damage of the infrapatellar branch of the saphenous nerve can be minimized in anteromedial

  9. Reconstruction of medial patellofemoral ligament using quadriceps tendon combined with reconstruction of medial patellotibial ligament using patellar tendon: initial experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betina Bremer Hinckel

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To describe a surgical technique for anatomical reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament using the quadriceps tendon, combined with reconstruction of the medial patellotibial ligament using the patellar tendon; and to present the initial results from a case series. METHOD: The proposed technique was used on a series of cases of patients with diagnoses of patellofemoral instability and indications for surgical treatment, who were attended by the Knee Group of HC-IOT, University of São Paulo. The following were evaluated before and after the operation: range of motion (ROM, apprehension test, lateral translation test, patellar inclination test, inverted J sign, subluxation upon extension, pain from compression of the patella and pain from contraction of the quadriceps. After the operation, the patients were asked whether any new episode of dislocation had occurred, what their degree of satisfaction with the surgery was (on a scale from 0 to 10 and whether they would be prepared to go through this operation again. RESULTS: Seven knees were operated, in seven patients, with a mean follow-up of 5.46 months (±2.07. Four patients who presented apprehension before the operation did not show this after the operation. The lateral translation test became normal for all the patients, while the patellar inclination test remained positive for two patients. The patients with an inverted J sign continued to be positive for this sign. Five patients were positive for subluxation upon extension before the operation, but all patients were negative for this after the operation. None of the patients presented any new episode of dislocation of the patella. All of them stated that they were satisfied: five gave a satisfaction score of 9 and two, a score of 10. All of them said that they would undergo the operation again. Only one patient presented a postoperative complication: dehiscence of the wound. CONCLUSION: Reconstruction of the

  10. Clinical value of SPECT/CT for evaluation of patients with painful knees after total knee arthroplasty- a new dimension of diagnostics?

    OpenAIRE

    Hirschmann, Michael T; Konala, Praveen; Iranpour, Farhad; Kerner, Anna; Rasch, Helmut; Friederich, Niklaus F

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The purpose of our study was to evaluate the clinical value of hybrid SPECT/CT for the assessment of patients with painful total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Methods Twenty-three painful knees in patients following primary TKA were assessed using Tc-99m-HDP-SPECT/CT. Rotational, sagittal and coronal position of the TKA was assessed on 3D-CT reconstructions. The level of the SPECT-tracer uptake (0-10) and its anatomical distribution was mapped using a validated localization sch...

  11. Tibial condylar valgus osteotomy (TCVO) for osteoarthritis of the knee: 5-year clinical and radiological results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Ko; Yonekura, Akihiko; Miyamoto, Takashi; Osaki, Makoto; Chiba, Goji

    2017-03-01

    Tibial condylar valgus osteotomy (TCVO) is a type of opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy for advanced medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) with subluxated lateral joint. We report the concept, the current surgical technique with a locking plate, and the short-term clinical and radiological results of this procedure. 11 knees with medial OA and a widened lateral joint were treated by TCVO (KL stage III: 6, IV: 5). In this procedure, by the L-shaped osteotomy from the medial side of the proximal tibia to the intercondylar eminence and the valgus correction, lateralization of the mechanical axis and reduction of the subluxated lateral joint are obtained with early postoperative weight-bearing. Before, 6 months, 1, and 5 years after the operation, a visual analog scale (VAS), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC), alignment of the lower extremity, and congruency and stability of the femorotibial joint were investigated. The VAS improved from an average of 73 mm to 13 mm, and the total WOMAC score from 52 to 14 before to 5 years after the operation, respectively. The mechanical axis changed from 1 to 60%, and the FTA changed from 186° to 171°. The joint line convergence angle (JLCA) changed from 6° to 1°, and the angle difference of JLCA between varus and valgus stress improved from 8° to 4° after the procedure. Improvements in pain and activities of daily living were observed by TCVO along with valgus correction of the lower extremity and stabilization of the femorotibial joint.

  12. Preoperative hypoalgesia after cold pressor test and aerobic exercise is associated with pain relief six months after total knee replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaegter, Henrik Bjarke; Handberg, Gitte; Emmeluth, Claus

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Chronic pain after total knee replacement (TKR) is not uncommon. Preoperative impaired conditioning pain modulation (CPM) has been used to predict chronic postoperative pain. Interestingly, exercises reduce pain sensitivity in patients with knee osteoarthritis. This pilot study...... investigated the association between exercise-induced hypoalgesia (EIH) and CPM on post-TKR pain relief. METHODS: Before and six months post-TKR, 14 patients with chronic knee osteoarthritis performed the cold pressor test on the non-affected leg and two exercise conditions (bicycling and isometric knee...... at the affected leg improved post-TKR compared with pre-TKR (PCPM and bicycling EIH assessed by the increase in cPTT correlated with reduction in NRS pain scores post-TKR (PCPM and EIH responses after TKR were significantly correlated with reduction in NRS pain scores...

  13. Bridging the osteoarthritis treatment gap with the KineSpring Knee Implant System: early evidence in 100 patients with 1-year minimum follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    London NJ

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Nicholas J London,1 Jon Smith,2 Larry E Miller,3,4 Jon E Block4 1Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Harrogate District Foundation Trust, Harrogate, UK; 2The Mid Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust, Yorkshire, UK; 3Miller Scientific Consulting, Arden, NC, USA; 4The Jon Block Group, San Francisco, CA, USA Abstract: Almost 4 million Americans are within the knee osteoarthritis (OA treatment gap, the period from unsuccessful exhaustion of conservative treatment to major surgical intervention. New treatment alternatives for symptomatic knee OA are greatly needed. The purpose of this report was to assess outcomes of a joint-unloading implant (KineSpring® Knee Implant System in patients with symptomatic medial knee OA. A total of 100 patients enrolled in three clinical trials were treated with the KineSpring System and followed for a minimum of 1 year. All devices were successfully implanted and activated, with no operative complications. Knee pain severity improved 60% (P < 0.001 at 1 year, with 76% of patients reporting a minimum 30% improvement in pain severity. All Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC subscores significantly improved at 1 year, with a 56% improvement in pain, 57% improvement in function, and a 39% improvement in stiffness (all P < 0.001. The percentage of patients experiencing a minimum 20% improvement in WOMAC subscores was 74% for pain, 83% for function, and 67% for stiffness. During follow-up, six (6% patients required additional surgery, including four total knee arthroplasties and two high tibial osteotomies. The KineSpring System effectively bridges the treatment gap between failed conservative care and surgical joint-modifying procedures. Keywords: implant, KineSpring, knee, medial, osteoarthritis, unloading

  14. Clinically assessed mediolateral knee motion: impact on gait

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlund, Jonas Bloch; Creaby, Mark W; Simic, Milena

    2011-01-01

    Mediolateral knee movement can be assessed visually with clinical tests. A knee-medial-to-foot position is associated with an increased risk of knee injuries and pathologies. However, the implications of such findings on daily tasks are not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigat...... if a knee-medial-to-foot position assessed during a clinical test was associated with altered hip and knee joint kinematics and knee joint kinetics during gait compared with those with a knee-over-foot position....

  15. Impairment-targeted exercises for older adults with knee pain: protocol for a proof-of-principle study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Elaine

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exercise therapy for knee pain and osteoarthritis remains a key element of conservative treatment, recommended in clinical guidelines. Yet systematic reviews point to only modest benefits from exercise interventions. One reason for this might be that clinical trials tend to use a one-size-fits-all approach to exercise, effectively disregarding the details of their participants' clinical presentations. This uncontrolled before-after study (TargET-Knee-Pain aims to test the principle that exercises targeted at the specific physical impairments of older adults with knee pain may be able to significantly improve those impairments. It is a first step towards testing the effectiveness of this more individually-tailored approach. Methods/Design We aim to recruit 60 participants from an existing observational cohort of community-dwelling older adults with knee pain. Participants will all have at least one of the three physical impairments of weak quadriceps, a reduced range of knee flexion and poor standing balance. Each participant will be asked to undertake a programme of exercises, targeted at their particular combination and degree of impairment(s, over the course of twelve weeks. The exercises will be taught and progressed by an experienced physiotherapist, with reference to a "menu" of agreed exercises for each of the impairments, over the course of six fortnightly home visits, alternating with six fortnightly telephone calls. Primary outcome measures will be isometric quadriceps strength, knee flexion range of motion, timed single-leg standing balance and the "Four Balance Test Scale" at 12 weeks. Key secondary outcome measures will be self-reported levels of pain, stiffness and difficulties with day-to-day functional tasks (WOMAC. Outcome measures will be taken at three time-points (baseline, six weeks and twelve weeks by a study nurse blinded to the exercise status of the participants. Discussion This study (TargET-Knee-Pain

  16. Cost Utility Analysis of Cervical Therapeutic Medial Branch Blocks in Managing Chronic Neck Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Kaye, Alan D; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2017-01-01

    Background: Controlled diagnostic studies have established the prevalence of cervical facet joint pain to range from 36% to 67% based on the criterion standard of ≥ 80% pain relief. Treatment of cervical facet joint pain has been described with Level II evidence of effectiveness for therapeutic facet joint nerve blocks and radiofrequency neurotomy and with no significant evidence for intraarticular injections. However, there have not been any cost effectiveness or cost utility analysis studies performed in managing chronic neck pain with or without headaches with cervical facet joint interventions. Study Design: Cost utility analysis based on the results of a double-blind, randomized, controlled trial of cervical therapeutic medial branch blocks in managing chronic neck pain. Objectives: To assess cost utility of therapeutic cervical medial branch blocks in managing chronic neck pain. Methods: A randomized trial was conducted in a specialty referral private practice interventional pain management center in the United States. This trial assessed the clinical effectiveness of therapeutic cervical medial branch blocks with or without steroids for an established diagnosis of cervical facet joint pain by means of controlled diagnostic blocks. Cost utility analysis was performed with direct payment data for the procedures for a total of 120 patients over a period of 2 years from this trial based on reimbursement rates of 2016. The payment data provided direct procedural costs without inclusion of drug treatments. An additional 40% was added to procedural costs with multiplication of a factor of 1.67 to provide estimated total costs including direct and indirect costs, based on highly regarded surgical literature. Outcome measures included significant improvement defined as at least a 50% improvement with reduction in pain and disability status with a combined 50% or more reduction in pain in Neck Disability Index (NDI) scores. Results: The results showed direct

  17. Influence of meteorological elements on balance control and pain in patients with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peultier, Laetitia; Lion, Alexis; Chary-Valckenaere, Isabelle; Loeuille, Damien; Zhang, Zheng; Rat, Anne-Christine; Gueguen, René; Paysant, Jean; Perrin, Philippe P.

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to determine if pain and balance control are related to meteorological modifications in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). One hundred and thirteen patients with knee OA (mean age = 65 ± 9 years old, 78 women) participated in this study. Static posturography was performed, sway area covered and sway path traveled by the center of foot pressure being recorded under six standing postural conditions that combine three visual situations (eyes open, eyes closed, vision altered) with two platform situations (firm and foam supports). Knee pain score was assessed using a visual analog scale. Balance control and pain measurements recorded in the morning were correlated with the meteorological data. Morning and daily values for temperature, precipitation, sunshine, height of rain in 1 h, wind speed, humidity, and atmospheric pressure were obtained from the nearest data collecting weather station. The relationship between postural control, pain, and weather variations were assessed for each patient on a given day with multiple linear regressions. A decrease of postural stability was observed when atmospheric pressure and maximum humidity decreased in the morning ( p knee pain was more enhanced when it is warmer in the morning ( p < 0.05) and when it is wetter and warmer within a day ( p < 0.05). The relationship between weather, pain, and postural control can help patients and health professionals to better manage daily activities.

  18. An Isolated Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction with Patellar Tendon Autograft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)