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Sample records for medial meniscus tear

  1. Complex Medial Meniscus Tears Are Associated With a Biconcave Medial Tibial Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, F Alan; Getelman, Mark H; Berry, Kathy L

    2017-04-01

    To determine whether an association exists between a biconcave medial tibial plateau and complex medial meniscus tears. A consecutive series of stable knees undergoing arthroscopy were evaluated retrospectively with the use of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), radiographs, and arthroscopy documented by intraoperative videos. Investigators independently performed blinded reviews of the MRI or videos. Based on the arthroscopy findings, medial tibial plateaus were classified as either biconcave or not biconcave. A transverse coronal plane ridge, separating the front of the tibial plateau from the back near the inner margin of the posterior body of the medial meniscus, was defined as biconcave. The medial plateau slope was calculated with MRI sagittal views. General demographic information, body mass index, and arthroscopically confirmed knee pathology were recorded. A total of 179 consecutive knees were studied from July 2014 through August 2015; 49 (27.2%) biconcave medial tibial plateaus and 130 (72.8%) controls were identified at arthroscopy. Complex medial meniscus tears were found in 103. Patients with a biconcave medial tibial plateau were found to have more complex medial meniscus tears (69.4%) than those without a biconcavity (53.1%) (P = .049) despite having lower body mass index (P = .020). No difference in medial tibial plateau slope was observed for biconcavities involving both cartilage and bone, bone only, or an indeterminate group (P = .47). Biconcave medial tibial plateaus were present in 27.4% of a consecutive series of patients undergoing knee arthroscopy. A biconcave medial tibial plateau was more frequently associated with a complex medial meniscus tear. Level III, case-control study. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparison of Medial and Lateral Meniscus Root Tears.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hyun Koo

    Full Text Available The meniscus root plays an essential role in maintaining the circumferential hoop tension and preventing meniscal displacement. Studies on meniscus root tears have investigated the relationship of osteoarthritis and an anterior cruciate ligament tear. However, few studies have directly compared the medial and lateral root tears. To assess the prevalence of meniscal extrusion and its relationship with clinical features in medial and lateral meniscus root tears, we performed a retrospective review of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI results of 42 knee patients who had meniscus posterior horn root tears and who had undergone arthroscopic operations. The presence of meniscal extrusion was evaluated and the exact extent was measured from the tibial margin. The results were correlated with arthroscopic findings. Clinical features including patients' ages, joint abnormalities, and previous trauma histories were evaluated. Twenty-two patients had medial meniscus root tears (MMRTs and twenty patients had lateral meniscus root tears (LMRTs. Meniscal extrusion was present in 18 MMRT patients and one LMRT patient. The mean extent of extrusion was 4.2mm (range, 0.6 to 7.8 in the MMRT group and 0.9mm (range, -1.9 to 3.4 in the LMRT group. Five patients with MMRT had a history of trauma, while 19 patients with LMRT had a history of trauma. Three patients with MMRT had anterior cruciate ligament (ACL tears, while 19 patients with LMRT had ACL tears. The mean age of the patients was 52 years (range: 29-71 years and 30 years (range: 14-62 years in the MMRT and LMRT group, respectively. There was a significant correlation between a MMRT and meniscal extrusion (p<0.0001, and between an ACL tear and LMRT (p<0.0001. A history of trauma was significantly common in LMRT (p<0.0001. LMRT patients were significantly younger than MMRT patients (p<0.0001. Kellgren-Lawrence (K-L grade differed significantly between MMRT and LMRT group (p<0.0001. Meniscal extrusion is

  3. Traumatic posterior root tear of the medial meniscus in patients with severe medial instability of the knee.

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    Ra, Ho Jong; Ha, Jeong Ku; Jang, Ho Su; Kim, Jin Goo

    2015-10-01

    To examine the incidence and diagnostic rate of traumatic medial meniscus posterior root tear associated with severe medial instability and to evaluate the effectiveness of pullout repair. From 2007 to 2011, 51 patients who underwent operation due to multiple ligament injuries including medial collateral ligament rupture were reviewed retrospectively. The International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective and Lysholm score were evaluated pre- and postoperatively. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed, and if indicated, a second-look arthroscopic examination was conducted. Fourteen out of 51 patients were associated with severe medial instability. Seven patients were diagnosed with traumatic medial meniscus posterior root tear and underwent arthroscopic pullout repair. Five of them were missed at initial diagnosis using MRI. In seven patients, the mean Lysholm and IKDC subjective scores improved from 74.6 ± 10.3 and 47.6 ± 7.3 to 93.0 ± 3.7 and 91.6 ± 2.6, respectively. All showed complete healing of meniscus root on follow-up MRI and second-look arthroscopy. Medial meniscus posterior root tear may occur in severe medial instability from trauma. It is a common mistake that surgeons may not notice on the diagnosis of those injuries using MRI. Therefore, a high index of suspicion is required for the diagnosis of medial meniscus posterior root tear in this type of injuries. The traumatic medial meniscus posterior root tear could be healed successfully using arthroscopic pullout repair technique. The possibility of the medial meniscus posterior root tear should be considered in severe medial instability and arthroscopic pullout repair can be an effective option for treatment. Case series with no comparison group, Level IV.

  4. Radial tear of posterior horn of the medial meniscus and osteonecrosis of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motoyama, Tatsuo; Ihara, Hidetoshi; Kawashima, Mahito

    2003-01-01

    We studied the relation between a radial tear of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus and osteonecrosis of the knee. Thirty-eight knees of 37 patients were diagnosed as medial meniscus tear and received arthroscopic knee surgery. We divided them into two groups: knees having radial tear of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus (posterior horn group) and knees containing radial tear except for posterior horn, horizontal tear, degenerative tear, and flap tear of the medial meniscus (non-posterior horn group). The posterior horn group consisted of 14 knees (average age: 65.1 years old) and the non-posterior horn group consisted of 24 knees (average age: 59.6 years old). All cases underwent MRI before arthroscopy. MRI findings were classified into three types (typical osteonecrosis, small osteonecrosis, and non-osteonecrosis). In the posterior horn group, typical osteonecrosis were five knees and small osteonecrosis were five knees, while in the non-posterior horn group only three knees were small osteonecrosis. These findings suggest the relevance between radial tear of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus and osteonecrosis of the knee (Mann-Whitney test p<0.01). The etiology of spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee joint is unknown, however one etiology could be the radial tear of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. (author)

  5. Ipsilateral Medial and Lateral Discoid Meniscus with Medial Meniscus Tear

    OpenAIRE

    Shimozaki, Kengo; Nakase, Junsuke; Ohashi, Yoshinori; Numata, Hitoaki; Oshima, Takeshi; Takata, Yasushi; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Discoid meniscus is a well-documented knee pathology, and there are many cases of medial or lateral discoid meniscus reported in the literature. However, ipsilateral concurrent medial and lateral discoid meniscus is very rare, and only a few cases have been reported. Herein, we report a case of concurrent medial and lateral discoid meniscus. Case Report: A 27-year-old Japanese man complained of pain on medial joint space in his right knee that was diagnosed as a complete medial ...

  6. Diagnosis of radial tear of posterior horn of medial meniscus by MR imaging. Prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motoyama, Tatsuo; Ihara, Hidetoshi; Kawashima, Mahito

    2002-01-01

    It is not easy to detect radial tears of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus (torn posterior horn) under arthroscopy if the surgeon does not notice the tear before arthroscopy. Occasionally the tear goes undetected or is missed during arthroscopy. The sagittal view of MR imaging is very useful for diagnosing torn posterior horns. The normal posterior horn of the medial meniscus appears as an image of low intensity triangle of the sagittal MRI medial slice next to the PCL. On the contrary, the image of the torn posterior horn shows a high intensity triangle, so we refer to the feature as a white meniscus sign. We prospectively examined the accuracy of white meniscus sign of MRI. Forty-two knees in 41 patients were studied. They were over 40 years of age, diagnosed with medial meniscus tear and had undergone MRI before arthroscopy. Before arthroscopy, we predicted the existence of torn posterior horn by the white meniscus sign and examined the accuracy of the MRI after arthroscopy. Total accuracy rate was 90.5%, sensitivity was 94.1%, and specificity was 88.0%. We concluded that the white meniscus sign on MRI is very useful for defecting torn posterior horn of the medial meniscus. (author)

  7. Familial Discoid Medial Meniscus Tear in Three Members of a Family: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed Ali, Raheel; McKay, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Background. A discoid meniscus is a thickened variant of the normal C-shaped meniscus prone to injury. Discoid medial meniscal tears have rarely been reported within families and may suggest familial or developmental origins. Methods. We report the cases of two Caucasian brothers with symptomatic discoid medial meniscus tears. A literature review was conducted addressing discoid medial meniscus and cases of familial meniscus tears. Case Presentation. Physically active brothers presented with ...

  8. Effect of Leukocyte-Rich and Platelet-Rich Plasma on Healing of a Horizontal Medial Meniscus Tear in a Rabbit Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyun Ho Shin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There are limited reports on the effect of platelet-rich plasma (PRP on meniscus healing. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of leukocyte-rich PRP (L-PRP on potential healing of the horizontal medial meniscus tears in a rabbit model. A horizontal medial meniscus tear was created in both knees of nine skeletally mature adult rabbits. Left or right knees were randomly assigned to a L-PRP group, or a control group. 0.5 mL of L-PRP from 10 mL of each rabbit’s whole blood was prepared and injected into the horizontal tears in a L-PRP group. None was applied to the horizontal tears in a control group. The histological assessment of meniscus healing was performed at two, four, and six weeks after surgery. We found that there were no significant differences of quantitative histologic scoring between two groups at 2, 4, and 6 weeks after surgery (p>0.05. This study failed to show the positive effect of single injection of L-PRP on enhancing healing of the horizontal medial meniscus tears in a rabbit model. Single injection of L-PRP into horizontal meniscus tears may not effectively enhance healing of horizontal medial meniscus tears.

  9. Augmentation of the Pullout Repair of a Medial Meniscus Posterior Root Tear by Arthroscopic Centralization

    OpenAIRE

    Koga, Hideyuki; Watanabe, Toshifumi; Horie, Masafumi; Katagiri, Hiroki; Otabe, Koji; Ohara, Toshiyuki; Katakura, Mai; Sekiya, Ichiro; Muneta, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    The meniscus roots are critical for meniscus function in preserving correct knee kinematics and avoiding meniscus extrusion and, consequently, in the progression of osteoarthritis. Several techniques exist for medial meniscus posterior root tear repair; however, current surgical techniques have been proved to fail to reduce meniscus extrusion, which has been shown to be associated with development of osteoarthritis, although significant improvements in the postoperative clinical findings have...

  10. Bucket handle tears of the medial meniscus: meniscal intrusion rather than meniscal extrusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlossberg, S.; Umans, H.; Flusser, G.; DiFelice, G.S.; Lerer, D.B.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the frequency of medial meniscal extrusion (MME) versus ''medial meniscal intrusion'' in the setting of bucket handle tears. Images were evaluated for previously reported risk factors for MME, including: medial meniscal root tear, radial tear, degenerative joint disease and joint effusion. Forty-one consecutive cases of bucket handle tear of the medial meniscus were reviewed by consensus by two musculoskeletal radiologists. Imaging was performed using a 1.5 GE Signa MR unit. Patient age, gender, medial meniscal root integrity, MME, medial meniscal intrusion, degenerative joint disease, effusion and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear were recorded. Thirteen females and 27 males (age 12-62 years, median=30 years) were affected; one had bucket handle tear of each knee. Effusion was small in 13, moderate in 9 and large in 18. Degenerative joint disease was mild in three, moderate in two and severe in one. 26 ACL tears included three partial and three chronic. Medial meniscal root tear was complete in one case and partial thickness in two. None of the 40 cases with an intact or partially torn medial meniscal root demonstrated MME. MME of 3.1 mm was seen in the only full-thickness medial meniscal root tear, along with chronic ACL tear, moderate degenerative joint disease and large effusion. Medial meniscal intrusion of the central bucket handle fragment into the intercondylar notch was present in all 41 cases. Given an intact medial meniscal root in the setting of a ''pure'' bucket handle tear, there is no MME. (orig.)

  11. Anamnestic prediction of bucket handle compared to other tear patterns of the medial meniscus in stable knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haviv, Barak; Bronak, Shlomo; Kosashvili, Yona; Thein, Rafael

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze and compare the preoperative anamnestic details between patients with an arthroscopic diagnosis of bucket handle and other tear patterns of the medial meniscus in stable knees. A total of 204 patients (mean age 49.3 ± 13 years) were included in the study. The mean age was 49.3 ± 13 years. The study group included 65 patients (63 males, 2 females) with an arthroscopic diagnosis of bucket handle tear and the control group included 139 patients (90 males, 49 females) with non-bucket handle tear patterns. The preoperative clinical assessments of the two groups were analyzed retrospectively. Anamnestic prediction for the diagnosis of a bucket handle tear was based upon various medical history parameters. Multivariate logistic regression was carried out to identify independent anamnestic factors for predicting isolated bucket handle tears of the medial meniscus compared to non-bucket handle tears. Analysis of the multivariate logistic regression yielded 3 statistically significant independent anamnestic risk factors for predicting isolated bucket handle tears of the medial meniscus: male gender (OR, 9.7; 95% CI, 1.1-37.6), locking events (OR, 4.6; 95% CI, 1.8-11.3) and pain in extension (OR, 6.9; 95% CI, 2.5-23.7). Other preoperative variables such as age, BMI, activity level, comorbidities, duration of symptoms, pain location, preceding injury and its mechanism had no significant effect on tear pattern. Preoperative strong clues for bucket handle tears of the medial meniscus in stable knees are male gender, locking events and limitation in extension. Level III, Diagnostic study. Copyright © 2016 Turkish Association of Orthopaedics and Traumatology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Posterior meniscus root tears: associated pathologies to assist as diagnostic tools.

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    Matheny, Lauren M; Ockuly, Andrew C; Steadman, J Richard; LaPrade, Robert F

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate associated pathologies identified at arthroscopy in patients with meniscus root tears. This study was Institutional Review Board approved. All patients who underwent arthroscopic knee surgery where a complete meniscus root tear was identified were included in this study. Concurrent ligament tears and articular cartilage changes ≥Outerbridge grade 2 were recorded and stored in a data registry. Fifty patients (28 males, 22 females) [mean age = 36.5 years (range 17.1-68.1 years)] who were diagnosed with a medial or lateral meniscus root tear at arthroscopy were included in this study out of 673 arthroscopic surgeries (prevalence 7.4 %). Twenty-three (46 %) patients had a medial meniscus root tear, 26 (52 %) patients had a lateral meniscus root tear and one (2 %) patient had both. Thirty-four per cent of patients (n = 17) underwent partial meniscectomy, while 60 % (n = 31) underwent suture repair. During arthroscopy, 60 % (n = 30) of patients were diagnosed with an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. Patients with lateral meniscus root tears were 10.3 times (95 % CI 2.6-42.5) more likely to have ACL tears than patients with medial meniscus root tears (p = 0.012). Patients who had medial meniscus root tears were 5.8 times (95 % CI 1.6-20.5) more likely to have chondral defects than patients who had lateral meniscus root tears (p = 0.044). In this study, patients' preoperative functional scores and activity levels were low. Patients with lateral meniscal root tears were more likely to have an ACL tear. Patients with medial meniscal root tears were more likely to have an knee articular cartilage defect with an Outerbridge grade 2 or higher chondral defect. This study confirms the importance of comprehensive assessment of concurrent injuries to properly diagnose meniscus root tears. IV.

  13. A new arthroscopic classification of degenerative medial meniscus root tear that correlates with meniscus extrusion on magnetic resonance imaging.

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    Bin, Seong-Il; Jeong, Tae-Wan; Kim, Su-Jin; Lee, Dae-Hee

    2016-03-01

    To determine a new classification system for medial meniscus root tears (MMRT) based on arthroscopic findings. 24 knees (55%) belonged to the nondisplaced or overlapped group, and 20 knees (45%) to the widely displaced group. Absolute meniscal extrusion was defined as distance between outer edge of the articular cartilage of tibial plateau and meniscal outer edge. Relative extrusion was defined as extruded meniscus width divided by entire meniscal width, multiplied by 100. The proportion of knees with major (>3 mm) extrusion were compared in two groups, as were the severity of chondral wear and osteoarthritic change. Absolute (4.6 mm vs. 3.7 mm, P=0.006) and relative (46% vs. 39%, P=0.042) extrusion of the medial meniscus were greater in widely displaced than in nondisplaced or overlapped group. Medial joint space width was significantly narrower in the widely displaced than in the nondisplaced or overlapped group (3.0 mm vs. 4.0 mm, P=0.007). The widely displaced group had a 4° greater varus deformity, and higher rates of major extrusion (>3 mm), grade III or IV chondral wear in the medial femoral condyle (60% vs. 29%, P=0.039) and medial compartment osteoarthritis (75% vs. 21%, P=0.001) than did the nondisplaced or overlapped group. Widely displaced MMRT had greater meniscal extrusion and more severe chondral wear and osteoarthritis than did nondisplaced or overlapped MMRT. In this novel classification system, the stage of MMRT severity was associated with tear site displacement. Case series (level IV). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The Degeneration of Meniscus Roots Is Accompanied by Fibrocartilage Formation, Which May Precede Meniscus Root Tears in Osteoarthritic Knees.

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    Park, Do Young; Min, Byoung-Hyun; Choi, Byung Hyune; Kim, Young Jick; Kim, Mijin; Suh-Kim, Haeyoung; Kim, Joon Ho

    2015-12-01

    Fibrocartilage metaplasia in tendons and ligaments is an adaptation to compression as well as a pathological feature during degeneration. Medial meniscus posterior roots are unique ligaments that resist multidirectional forces, including compression. To characterize the degeneration of medial meniscus posterior root tears in osteoarthritic knees, with an emphasis on fibrocartilage and calcification. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Samples of medial meniscus posterior roots were harvested from cadaveric specimens and patients during knee replacement surgery and grouped as follows: normal reference, no tear, partial tear, and complete tear. Degeneration was analyzed with histology, immunohistochemistry, and real-time polymerase chain reaction. Uniaxial tensile tests were performed on specimens with and without fibrocartilage. Quantifiable data were statistically analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis test with the Dunn comparison test. Thirty, 28, and 42 samples harvested from 99 patients were allocated into the no tear, partial tear, and complete tear groups, respectively. Mean modified Bonar tendinopathy scores for each group were 3.97, 9.31, and 14.15, respectively, showing a higher degree of degeneration associated with the extent of the tear (P fibrocartilage according to the extent of the tear. Tear margins revealed fibrocartilage in 59.3% of partial tear samples and 76.2% of complete tear samples, with a distinctive cleavage-like shape. Root tears with a similar shape were induced within fibrocartilaginous areas during uniaxial tensile testing. Even in the no tear group, 56.7% of samples showed fibrocartilage in the anterior margin of the root, adjacent to the meniscus. An increased stained area of calcification and expression of the ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 1 gene were observed in the complete tear group compared with the no tear group (P Fibrocartilage and calcification increased in medial meniscus posterior roots, associated

  15. MRI evaluation of the posterior meniscus root tear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jianjun; Zheng Zhuozhao; Li Xuan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To determine the value of MRI for diagnosing the posterior meniscus root tear. Methods: MR examinations of 30 patients with tear of the posterior meniscus root confirmed by knee arthroscopies were retrospectively reviewed. Of the 30 patients, 17 with posterior medial meniscus root tear (MMRT) and 13 with posterior lateral meniscus root tear (LMRT). The diagnostic sensitivity of' MRI for the posterior meniscus root tear was analyzed. Fisher's exact test was used to compare the detection rate of MRI for MMRT with that for LMRT. Results: All 17 cases with MMRT and 9 cases out of 13 with LMRT were correctly diagnosed by MRI and the diagnostic sensitivity of MRI for the posterior meniscus root tear was 86.7% (26/30). The main MR appearance of the posterior meniscus root tear was distortion of the meniscal root, with its low signal replaced by abnormal high signal. The detection rate of MRI for MMRT (17/17) was significantly greater than that for LMRT (9/13) (P=0.026). The prevalence of MMRT associated with meniscus extrusion (15/17) was significantly greater than that of LMRT (6/13) (P=0.020), but the prevalence of MMRT associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury (5/17) was significantly lower than that of LMRT (11/13) (P=0.004). Conclusion: MRI is a relatively good method for detection of posterior meniscus root tears and associated injuries. (authors)

  16. A Novel Repair Method for Radial Tears of the Medial Meniscus: Biomechanical Comparison of Transtibial 2-Tunnel and Double Horizontal Mattress Suture Techniques Under Cyclic Loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Sanjeev; Civitarese, David M; Turnbull, Travis Lee; LaPrade, Christopher M; Nitri, Marco; Wijdicks, Coen A; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-03-01

    Complete radial tears of the medial meniscus have been reported to be functionally similar to a total meniscectomy. At present, there is no consensus on an ideal technique for repair of radial midbody tears of the medial meniscus. Prior attempts at repair with double horizontal mattress suture techniques have led to a reportedly high rate of incomplete healing or healing in a nonanatomic (gapped) position, which compromises the ability of the meniscus to withstand hoop stresses. A newly proposed 2-tunnel radial meniscal repair method will result in decreased gapping and increased ultimate failure loads compared with the double horizontal mattress suture repair technique under cyclic loading. Controlled laboratory study. Ten matched pairs of male human cadaveric knees (average age, 58.6 years; range, 48-66 years) were used. A complete radial medial meniscal tear was made at the junction of the posterior one-third and middle third of the meniscus. One knee underwent a horizontal mattress inside-out repair, while the contralateral knee underwent a radial meniscal repair entailing the same technique with a concurrent novel 2-tunnel repair. Specimens were potted and mounted on a universal testing machine. Each specimen was cyclically loaded 1000 times with loads between 5 and 20 N before experiencing a load to failure. Gap distances at the tear site and failure load were measured. The 2-tunnel repairs exhibited a significantly stronger ultimate failure load (median, 196 N; range, 163-212 N) than did the double horizontal mattress suture repairs (median, 106 N; range, 63-229 N) (P = .004). In addition, the 2-tunnel repairs demonstrated decreased gapping at all testing states (P meniscus significantly decrease the ability of the meniscus to dissipate tibiofemoral loads, predisposing patients to early osteoarthritis. Improving the ability to repair medial meniscal radial tears in a way that withstands cyclic loads and heals in an anatomic position could significantly

  17. Outside-In Deep Medial Collateral Ligament Release During Arthroscopic Medial Meniscus Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todor, Adrian; Caterev, Sergiu; Nistor, Dan Viorel

    2016-08-01

    Arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy is a very common orthopaedic procedure performed for symptomatic, irreparable meniscus tears. It is usually associated with a very good outcome and minimal complications. In some patients with tight medial compartment, the posterior horn of the medial meniscus can be difficult to visualize, and access in this area with instruments may be challenging. To increase the opening of the medial compartment, after valgus-extension stress position of the knee, different techniques of deep medial collateral ligament release have been described. The outside-in pie-crusting technique shown in this technical note has documented effectiveness and good outcomes with minimal or no morbidity.

  18. MR appearance of anomalous insertion of the medial meniscus. A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arjun, S.; Takahashi, S.; Nakane, N.; Yonemitsu, H.; Tang, Y.

    1998-01-01

    We report on the MR imaging of an anomalous medial meniscus with a tear in a 41-year-old man. Anomaly of the medial meniscus is rare and difficult to diagnose clinically. The MR images contributed to the pre-arthroscopic diagnosis and arthroscopy confirmed the lesion. The anomalous meniscus was not related to the symptoms. (orig.)

  19. Case report 483: Discoid lateral meniscus (DLM), medially displaced, with complex tear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, M.A.; Buckwalter, K.A.; Braunstein, E.M.; Wojtys, E.M.

    1988-01-01

    A case of a 9-year-old girl who presented with persistent pain in the left knee was demonstrated to have a discoid lateral meniscus (DLM). The sagittal MR images demonstrated the oval shape of the meniscus, consistent with the typical arthrographic appearance. The coronal images showed that the main substance of the meniscus was displaced medially, with overgrowth of the articular cartilage at the lateral aspect of the joint. The medial aspect of the lateral femoral condyle was concave to accommodate the abnormal meniscus. These findings are consistent with long-standing, medial displacement of the torn meniscus. The literature concerning DLM, an uncommon variant, was reviewed and discussed. (orig.)

  20. Novel technique for repairing posterior medial meniscus root tears using porcine knees and biomechanical study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Lin Wu

    Full Text Available Transtibial pullout suture (TPS repair of posterior medial meniscus root (PMMR tears was shown to achieve good clinical outcomes. The purpose of this study was to compare biomechanically, a novel technique designed to repair PMMR tears using tendon graft (TG and conventional TPS repair. Twelve porcine tibiae (n = 6 each TG group: flexor digitorum profundus tendon was passed through an incision in the root area, created 5 mm postero-medially along the edge of the attachment area. TPS group: a modified Mason-Allen suture was created using no. 2 FiberWire. The tendon grafts and sutures were threaded through the bone tunnel and then fixed to the anterolateral cortex of the tibia. The two groups underwent cyclic loading followed by a load-to-failure test. Displacements of the constructs after 100, 500, and 1000 loading cycles, and the maximum load, stiffness, and elongation at failure were recorded. The TG technique had significantly lower elongation and higher stiffness compared with the TPS. The maximum load of the TG group was significantly lower than that of the TPS group. Failure modes for all specimens were caused by the suture or graft cutting through the meniscus. Lesser elongation and higher stiffness of the constructs in TG technique over those in the standard TPS technique might be beneficial for postoperative biological healing between the meniscus and tibial plateau. However, a slower rehabilitation program might be necessary due to its relatively lower maximum failure load.

  1. Meniscus Tears (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Meniscus Tears KidsHealth / For Teens / Meniscus Tears What's in this ... surgery to fix it. What Is a Meniscus Tear? Your knee is made up of three bones: ...

  2. A Contact Pressure Analysis Comparing an All-Inside and Inside-Out Surgical Repair Technique for Bucket-Handle Medial Meniscus Tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Daniel Cole; Phelps, Brian M; Dahl, Kimi D; Slette, Erik L; Mikula, Jacob D; Dornan, Grant J; Bucci, Gabriella; Turnbull, Travis Lee; Singleton, Steven B

    2017-10-01

    To directly compare effectiveness of the inside-out and all-inside medial meniscal repair techniques in restoring native contact area and contact pressure across the medial tibial plateau at multiple knee flexion angles. Twelve male, nonpaired (n = 12), fresh-frozen human cadaveric knees underwent a series of 5 consecutive states: (1) intact medial meniscus, (2) MCL tear and repair, (3) simulated bucket-handle longitudinal tear of the medial meniscus, (4) inside-out meniscal repair, and (5) all-inside meniscal repair. Knees were loaded with a 1,000-N axial compressive force at 5 knee flexion angles (0°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 90°), and contact area, mean contact pressure, and peak contact pressure were calculated using thin film pressure sensors. No significant differences were observed between the inside-out and all-inside repair techniques at any flexion angle for contact area, mean contact pressure, and peak contact pressure (all P > .791). Compared with the torn meniscus state, inside-out and all-inside repair techniques resulted in increased contact area at all flexion angles (all P contact pressure at all flexion angles (all P contact pressure at all flexion angles (all P contact area and peak contact pressure between the intact state and inside-out technique at angles ≥45° (all P contact area at 60° and 90° and peak contact pressure at 90° (both P contact area, mean contact pressure, and peak contact pressure over the tested flexion angles ranged from 498 to 561 mm 2 , 786 to 997 N/mm 2 , and 1,990 to 2,215 N/mm 2 , respectively. Contact area, mean contact pressure, and peak contact pressure were not significantly different between the all-inside and inside-out repair techniques at any tested flexion angle. Both techniques adequately restored native meniscus biomechanics near an intact level. An all-inside repair technique provided similar, native-state-restoring contact mechanics compared with an inside-out repair technique for the treatment of

  3. The Relationship between Chondromalacia Patella, Medial Meniscal Tear and Medial Periarticular Bursitis in Patients with Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resorlu, Mustafa; Doner, Davut; Karatag, Ozan; Toprak, Canan Akgun

    2017-12-01

    This study investigated the presence of bursitis in the medial compartment of the knee (pes anserine, semimembranosus-tibial collateral ligament, and medial collateral ligament bursa) in osteoarthritis, chondromalacia patella and medial meniscal tears. Radiological findings of 100 patients undergoing magnetic resonance imaging with a preliminary diagnosis of knee pain were retrospectively evaluated by two radiologists. The first radiologist assessed all patients in terms of osteoarthritis, chondromalacia patella and medial meniscal tear. The second radiologist was blinded to these results and assessed the presence of bursitis in all patients. Mild osteoarthritis (grade I and II) was determined in 55 patients and severe osteoarthritis (grade III and IV) in 45 cases. At retropatellar cartilage evaluation, 25 patients were assessed as normal, while 29 patients were diagnosed with mild chondromalacia patella (grade I and II) and 46 with severe chondromalacia patella (grade III and IV). Medial meniscus tear was determined in 51 patients. Severe osteoarthritis and chondromalacia patella were positively correlated with meniscal tear (p chondromalacia patella (p = 0.023 and p = 0.479, respectively). Evaluation of lateral compartment bursae revealed lateral collateral ligament bursitis in 2 patients and iliotibial bursitis in 5 patients. We observed a greater prevalence of bursitis in the medial compartment of the knee in patients with severe osteoarthritis and medial meniscus tear.

  4. The Relationship between Chondromalacia Patella, Medial Meniscal Tear and Medial Periarticular Bursitis in Patients with Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doner, Davut; Karatag, Ozan; Toprak, Canan Akgun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background This study investigated the presence of bursitis in the medial compartment of the knee (pes anserine, semimembranosus-tibial collateral ligament, and medial collateral ligament bursa) in osteoarthritis, chondromalacia patella and medial meniscal tears. Patients and methods Radiological findings of 100 patients undergoing magnetic resonance imaging with a preliminary diagnosis of knee pain were retrospectively evaluated by two radiologists. The first radiologist assessed all patients in terms of osteoarthritis, chondromalacia patella and medial meniscal tear. The second radiologist was blinded to these results and assessed the presence of bursitis in all patients. Results Mild osteoarthritis (grade I and II) was determined in 55 patients and severe osteoarthritis (grade III and IV) in 45 cases. At retropatellar cartilage evaluation, 25 patients were assessed as normal, while 29 patients were diagnosed with mild chondromalacia patella (grade I and II) and 46 with severe chondromalacia patella (grade III and IV). Medial meniscus tear was determined in 51 patients. Severe osteoarthritis and chondromalacia patella were positively correlated with meniscal tear (p chondromalacia patella (p = 0.023 and p = 0.479, respectively). Evaluation of lateral compartment bursae revealed lateral collateral ligament bursitis in 2 patients and iliotibial bursitis in 5 patients. Conclusions We observed a greater prevalence of bursitis in the medial compartment of the knee in patients with severe osteoarthritis and medial meniscus tear. PMID:29333118

  5. Clinical significance of condylar chondromalacia after arthroscopic resection of flap-tears of the medial meniscus. A prospective study of 93 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aune, A K; Madsen, J E; Moen, H

    1995-01-01

    We describe the results after arthroscopic resection of flap-tears of the medial meniscus posterior horn in 93 patients with (40) or without (53) chondromalacia of the adjacent condylar cartilage at the time of operation. These were 93 consecutive patients presenting with medial flap-tears during the period 1988-1990 in our departments. The follow-up averaged 42 (range 26-50) months. There was a significant difference in the functional results at review depending on the presence or absence of condylar chondromalacia at arthroscopy. Among the 40 patients with chondromalacia, the Lysholm score was significantly lower (P chondromalacia with age (P < 0.001). In conclusion, the presence of minor degenerative changes in the articular cartilage adjacent to meniscal flap-tears correlated with a less favourable outcome.

  6. Isolated medial meniscal tear in a Border Collie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridge, P A

    2006-01-01

    A three-year-old, female Border Collie was successfully treated for an isolated, torn, medial meniscus by arthroscopic meniscal tear resection. The dog returned to agility competition without recurrence of lameness.

  7. Effect of radial meniscal tear on in situ forces of meniscus and tibiofemoral relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Yuta; Mae, Tatsuo; Fujie, Hiromichi; Shino, Konsei; Ohori, Tomoki; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Nakata, Ken

    2017-02-01

    To clarify the effect of the radial tear of the lateral meniscus on the in situ meniscus force and the tibiofemoral relationship under axial loads and valgus torques. Ten intact porcine knees were settled to a 6-degree of freedom robotic system, while the force and 3-dimensional path of the knees were recorded via Universal Force Sensor (UFS) during 3 cycles of 250-N axial load and 5-Nm valgus torque at 15°, 30°, 45°, and 60° of knee flexion. The same examination was performed on the following 3 meniscal states sequentially; 33, 66, and 100% width of radial tears at the middle segment of the lateral meniscus, while recording the force and path of the knees via UFS. Finally, all paths were reproduced after total lateral meniscectomy and the in situ force of the lateral meniscus were calculated with the principle of superposition. The radial tear of 100% width significantly decreased the in situ force of the lateral meniscus and caused tibial medial shift and valgus rotation at 30°-60° of knee flexion in both testing protocols. Under a 250-N axial load at 60° of knee flexion, the in situ force decreased to 36 ± 29 N with 100% width of radial tear, which was 122 ± 38 N in the intact state. Additionally, the tibia shifted medially by 2.1 ± 0.9 mm and valgusrotated by 2.5 ± 1.9° with the complete radial tear. However, the radial tear of 33 or 66% width had little effect on either the in situ force or the tibial position. A radial tear of 100% width involving the rim significantly decreased the in situ force of the lateral meniscus and caused medial shift and valgus rotation of the tibia, whereas a radial tear of up to 66% width produced only little change. The clinical relevance is that loss of meniscal functions due to complete radial tear can lead to abnormal stress concentration in a focal area of cartilage and can increase the risk of osteoarthritis in the future.

  8. Arthroscopic medial meniscus trimming or repair under nerve blocks: Which nerves should be blocked?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, AM; Abd-Elmaksoud, AM

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to determine the role of the sciatic and obturator nerve blocks (in addition to femoral block) in providing painless arthroscopic medial meniscus trimming/repair. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty patients with medial meniscus tear, who had been scheduled to knee arthroscopy, were planned to be included in this controlled prospective double-blind study. The patients were randomly allocated into three equal groups; FSO, FS, and FO. The femoral, sciatic, and obturator nerves were blocked in FSO groups. The femoral and sciatic nerves were blocked in FS group, while the femoral and obturator nerves were blocked in FO group. Intraoperative pain and its causative surgical maneuver were recorded. Results: All the patients (n = 7, 100%) in FO group had intraoperative pain. The research was terminated in this group but completed in FS and FSO groups (40 patients each). During valgus positioning of the knee for surgical management of the medial meniscus tear, the patients in FS group experienced pain more frequently than those in FSO group (P = 0.005). Conclusion: Adding a sciatic nerve block to the femoral nerve block is important for painless knee arthroscopy. Further adding of an obturator nerve block may be needed when a valgus knee position is required to manage the medial meniscus tear. PMID:27375382

  9. The Fate of Meniscus Tears Left in situ at the time of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A 6-year Follow-up Study from the MOON Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchman, Kyle R.; Westermann, Robert W.; Spindler, Kurt P.; Reinke, Emily K.; Huston, Laura J.; Amendola, Annunziato; Wolf, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Background The management of meniscus tears identified at the time of primary ACL reconstruction is highly variable and includes repair, meniscectomy, and non-treatment. Hypothesis/Purpose The purpose of this study is to determine the reoperation rate for meniscus tears left untreated at the time of ACL reconstruction with minimum follow-up of 6 years. We hypothesize that small, peripheral tears identified at the time of ACL reconstruction managed with “no treatment” will have successful clinical outcomes. Study Design Retrospective study of a prospective cohort; Level of Evidence, 3 Methods Patients with meniscus tears left untreated at the time of primary ACL reconstruction were identified from a multicenter study group with minimum 6-year follow-up. Patient, tear, and reoperation data were obtained for analysis. Need for reoperation was used as the primary endpoint, with analysis performed to determine patient and tear characteristics associated with reoperation. Results There were 194 patients with 208 meniscus tears (71 medial; 137 lateral) left in situ without treatment with complete follow-up for analysis. Of these, 97.8% of lateral and 94.4% of medial untreated tears required no reoperation. Sixteen tears (7.7%) left in situ without treatment underwent subsequent reoperation: 9 tears (4.3%) underwent reoperation in the setting of revision ACL reconstruction and 7 tears (3.4%) underwent reoperation for isolated meniscus pathology. Patient age was significantly lower in patients requiring reoperation, while tears measuring ≥ 10 mm more frequently required reoperation. Conclusions Lateral and medial meniscus tears left in situ at the time of ACL reconstruction did not require reoperation at minimum 6-year follow-up for 97.8% and 94.4% of tears, respectively. These findings reemphasize the low reoperation rate following non-treatment of small, peripheral lateral meniscus tears while noting less predictable results for medial meniscus tears left without

  10. Medial meniscal posterior root/horn radial tears correlate with cartilage degeneration detected by T1ρ relaxation mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Kenji, E-mail: Kenji-am@nms.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8603 (Japan); Hashimoto, Sanshiro, E-mail: info@msorc.jp [Minami-Shinjuku Orthopaedic Rehabilitation Clinic, 2-16-7 Yoyogi, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 151-0053 (Japan); Nakamura, Hiroshi, E-mail: nakamura@nms.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8603 (Japan); Mori, Atsushi, E-mail: atsu@nms.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8603 (Japan); Sato, Akiko, E-mail: akiko-sato@nms.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8603 (Japan); Majima, Tokifumi, E-mail: tkmajima@iuhw.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, International University of Health and Welfare Hospital, 537-3 Iguchi, Nasu-shiobara, Tochigi 329-2763 (Japan); Takai, Shinro, E-mail: takai-snr@nms.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8603 (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Posterior radial tears in medial meniscus associate T1ρ values of cartilage. • Posterior radial tears relate to cartilage degeneration even in early-stage osteoarthritis. • Abnormalities in meniscus on MRI are useful for screening early-stage osteoarthritis. - Abstract: Objective: This study aimed to identify factors on routine pulse sequence MRI associated with cartilage degeneration observed on T1ρ relaxation mapping. Materials and methods: This study included 137 subjects with knee pain. T1ρ values were measured in the regions of interest on the surface layer of the cartilage on mid-coronal images of the femorotibial joint. Assessment of cartilage, subchondral bone, meniscus and ligaments was performed using routine pulse sequence MRI. Radiographic evaluation for osteoarthritis was also performed. Results: Multiple regression analysis revealed posterior root/horn tears to be independent factors increasing the T1ρ values of the cartilage in the medial compartment of the femorotibial joint. Even when adjusted for radiographically defined early-stage osteoarthritis, medial posterior meniscal radial tears significantly increased the T1ρ values. Conclusions: This study showed that posterior root/horn radial tears in the medial meniscus are particularly important MRI findings associated with cartilage degeneration observed on T1ρ relaxation mapping. Morphological factors of the medial meniscus on MRI provide findings useful for screening early-stage osteoarthritis.

  11. Medial meniscal posterior root/horn radial tears correlate with cartilage degeneration detected by T1ρ relaxation mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Kenji; Hashimoto, Sanshiro; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Mori, Atsushi; Sato, Akiko; Majima, Tokifumi; Takai, Shinro

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Posterior radial tears in medial meniscus associate T1ρ values of cartilage. • Posterior radial tears relate to cartilage degeneration even in early-stage osteoarthritis. • Abnormalities in meniscus on MRI are useful for screening early-stage osteoarthritis. - Abstract: Objective: This study aimed to identify factors on routine pulse sequence MRI associated with cartilage degeneration observed on T1ρ relaxation mapping. Materials and methods: This study included 137 subjects with knee pain. T1ρ values were measured in the regions of interest on the surface layer of the cartilage on mid-coronal images of the femorotibial joint. Assessment of cartilage, subchondral bone, meniscus and ligaments was performed using routine pulse sequence MRI. Radiographic evaluation for osteoarthritis was also performed. Results: Multiple regression analysis revealed posterior root/horn tears to be independent factors increasing the T1ρ values of the cartilage in the medial compartment of the femorotibial joint. Even when adjusted for radiographically defined early-stage osteoarthritis, medial posterior meniscal radial tears significantly increased the T1ρ values. Conclusions: This study showed that posterior root/horn radial tears in the medial meniscus are particularly important MRI findings associated with cartilage degeneration observed on T1ρ relaxation mapping. Morphological factors of the medial meniscus on MRI provide findings useful for screening early-stage osteoarthritis

  12. Two-Tunnel Transtibial Repair of Radial Meniscus Tears Produces Comparable Results to Inside-Out Repair of Vertical Meniscus Tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinque, Mark E; Geeslin, Andrew G; Chahla, Jorge; Dornan, Grant J; LaPrade, Robert F

    2017-08-01

    Radial meniscus tears disrupt the circumferential fibers and thereby compromise meniscus integrity. Historically, radial tears were often treated with meniscectomy because of an incomplete understanding of the biomechanical consequences of these tears, limited information regarding the biomechanical performance of repair, and the technical difficulty associated with repair. There is a paucity of studies on the outcomes of the repair of radial meniscus tears. Purpose/Hypothesis: The purpose was to determine the outcomes of 2-tunnel transtibial repair of radial meniscus tears and compare these results to the outcomes of patients who underwent the repair of vertical meniscus tears with a minimum of 2-year follow-up. The hypothesis was that radial and vertical meniscus tear repair outcomes were comparable. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Patients who underwent 2-tunnel transtibial pullout repair for a radial meniscus tear were included in this study and compared with patients who underwent inside-out repair for a vertical meniscus tear. Subjective questionnaires were administered preoperatively and at a minimum of 2-year follow-up, including the Lysholm score, the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), the Short Form-12 (SF-12) physical component summary (PCS), the Tegner activity scale, and patient satisfaction. Analysis of covariance was used to compare postoperative outcome scores between the meniscus repair groups while accounting for baseline scores. Adjusted mean effects relative to the radial repair group were reported with 95% CIs. Twenty-seven patients who underwent 2-tunnel transtibial pullout repair for radial meniscus tears and 33 patients who underwent inside-out repair for vertical meniscus tears were available for follow-up at a mean of 3.5 years (range, 2.0-5.4 years). No preoperative outcome score significantly differed between the groups. There were no significant group differences for any of the 2-year

  13. Hemi-bucket-handle tears of the meniscus: appearance on MRI and potential surgical implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engstrom, Bjorn I.; Vinson, Emily N.; Helms, Clyde A. [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Box 3808, Durham, NC (United States); Taylor, Dean C.; Garrett, William E. [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedics, Box 3810, Durham, NC (United States)

    2012-08-15

    To describe a type of meniscus flap tear resembling a bucket-handle tear, named a ''hemi-bucket-handle'' tear; to compare its imaging features with those of a typical bucket-handle tear; and to discuss the potential therapeutic implications of distinguishing these two types of tears. Five knee MR examinations were encountered with a type of meniscus tear consisting of a flap of tissue from the undersurface of the meniscus displaced toward the intercondylar notch. A retrospective analysis of 100 MR examinations prospectively interpreted as having bucket-handle type tears yielded 10 additional cases with this type of tear. Cases of hemi-bucket-handle tears were reviewed for tear location and orientation, appearance of the superior articular surface of the meniscus, presence and location of displaced meniscal tissue, and presence of several classic signs of bucket-handle tears. A total of 15/15 tears involved the medial meniscus, had tissue displaced toward the notch, and were mainly horizontal in orientation. The superior surface was intact in 11/15 (73.3%). In 1/15 (6.7%) there was an absent-bow-tie sign; 6/15 (40%) had a double-PCL sign; 14/15 (93.3%) had a double-anterior horn sign. We describe a type of undersurface flap tear, named a hemi-bucket-handle tear, which resembles a bucket-handle tear. Surgeons at our institution feel this tear would likely not heal if repaired given its predominantly horizontal orientation, and additionally speculate the tear could be overlooked at arthroscopy. Thus, we feel it is important to distinguish this type of tear from the typical bucket-handle tear. (orig.)

  14. Hemi-bucket-handle tears of the meniscus: appearance on MRI and potential surgical implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engstrom, Bjorn I.; Vinson, Emily N.; Helms, Clyde A.; Taylor, Dean C.; Garrett, William E.

    2012-01-01

    To describe a type of meniscus flap tear resembling a bucket-handle tear, named a ''hemi-bucket-handle'' tear; to compare its imaging features with those of a typical bucket-handle tear; and to discuss the potential therapeutic implications of distinguishing these two types of tears. Five knee MR examinations were encountered with a type of meniscus tear consisting of a flap of tissue from the undersurface of the meniscus displaced toward the intercondylar notch. A retrospective analysis of 100 MR examinations prospectively interpreted as having bucket-handle type tears yielded 10 additional cases with this type of tear. Cases of hemi-bucket-handle tears were reviewed for tear location and orientation, appearance of the superior articular surface of the meniscus, presence and location of displaced meniscal tissue, and presence of several classic signs of bucket-handle tears. A total of 15/15 tears involved the medial meniscus, had tissue displaced toward the notch, and were mainly horizontal in orientation. The superior surface was intact in 11/15 (73.3%). In 1/15 (6.7%) there was an absent-bow-tie sign; 6/15 (40%) had a double-PCL sign; 14/15 (93.3%) had a double-anterior horn sign. We describe a type of undersurface flap tear, named a hemi-bucket-handle tear, which resembles a bucket-handle tear. Surgeons at our institution feel this tear would likely not heal if repaired given its predominantly horizontal orientation, and additionally speculate the tear could be overlooked at arthroscopy. Thus, we feel it is important to distinguish this type of tear from the typical bucket-handle tear. (orig.)

  15. UTE-T2* mapping detects sub-clinical meniscus injury after anterior cruciate ligament tear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, A.; Qian, Y.; Golla, S.; Chu, C.R.

    2018-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective Meniscus tear is a known risk factor for osteoarthritis (OA). Quantitative assessment of meniscus degeneration, prior to surface break-down, is important to identification of early disease potentially amenable to therapeutic interventions. This work examines the diagnostic potential of ultrashort echo time-enhanced T2* (UTE-T2*) mapping to detect human meniscus degeneration in vitro and in vivo in subjects at risk of developing OA. Design UTE-T2* maps of 16 human cadaver menisci were compared to histological evaluations of meniscal structural integrity and clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessment by a musculoskeletal radiologist. In vivo UTE-T2* maps were compared in 10 asymptomatic subjects and 25 ACL-injured patients with and without concomitant meniscal tear. Results In vitro, UTE-T2* values tended to be lower in histologically and clinically normal meniscus tissue and higher in torn or degenerate tissue. UTE-T2* map heterogeneity reflected collagen disorganization. In vivo, asymptomatic meniscus UTE-T2* values were repeatable within 9% (root-mean-square average coefficient of variation). Posteromedial meniscus UTE-T2* values in ACL-injured subjects with clinically diagnosed medial meniscus tear (n = 10) were 87% higher than asymptomatics (n = 10, P meniscus degeneration. Further study is needed to determine whether elevated subsurface meniscus UTE-T2* values predict progression of meniscal degeneration and development of OA. PMID:22306000

  16. MR Imaging of a Posterior Root Tear of the Medial Meniscus: Diagnostic Accuracy of Various Tear Configurations and Associated Knee Abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyang Mi; Shim, Jae Chan; Kim, Jin Goo; Lee, Jae Myeong; Nam, Mee Young; Lee, Ghi Jai; Kim, Ho Kyun; Suh, Jung Ho

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the various tear configurations in a medial meniscal posterior horn root tear and assess whether any correlation exists with other associated knee abnormalities in MR imaging. A retrospective review of 146 preoperative knee MR images were performed by one experienced musculoskeletal radiologist. The tear configuration and other abnormalities were evaluated. Sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of each configuration in the medial meniscal posterior horn root tear were calculated. A total of 48 medial meniscal posterior horn root tears including 38 full-thickness radial, 7 partial-thickness radial, and 3 complex tears were confirmed during arthroscopy. Overall, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for the detection of medial meniscal posterior horn root tear were 92% (44/48), 99% (97/98), and 97% (141/146), respectively. For each tear configuration, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 82% (31/38), 97% (105/108), and 93% (136/146) for full-thickness radial tears, respectively, and 43% (3/7), 94% (131/139), and 91% (134/146) for partial-thickness radial tears, respectively. The incidence of degenerative joint disease was 85% (41/48) for the tear group, revealing a strong association. In patients with a root tear and with degenerative joint disease, the incidence of high grade cartilage defects involving the medial femoral condyle was at 80% (33/41), compared to 56% (23/41) for the presence of medial meniscal extrusion. In contrast, a similar comparison of incidence for patients with no root tears but with degenerative joint disease was at 68% (17/25) and 26% (8/31), respectively. MR imaging is very sensitive for the detection of medial meniscal root tears, but has reduced the accuracy with regard to each tear configuration. Medial meniscal root tears showed a strong association with degenerative joint disease. High grade cartilage defects of the medial femoral condyle and medial meniscal extrusions also

  17. MR Imaging of a Posterior Root Tear of the Medial Meniscus: Diagnostic Accuracy of Various Tear Configurations and Associated Knee Abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyang Mi; Shim, Jae Chan; Kim, Jin Goo; Lee, Jae Myeong; Nam, Mee Young; Lee, Ghi Jai; Kim, Ho Kyun; Suh, Jung Ho [Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul Paik Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the various tear configurations in a medial meniscal posterior horn root tear and assess whether any correlation exists with other associated knee abnormalities in MR imaging. A retrospective review of 146 preoperative knee MR images were performed by one experienced musculoskeletal radiologist. The tear configuration and other abnormalities were evaluated. Sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of each configuration in the medial meniscal posterior horn root tear were calculated. A total of 48 medial meniscal posterior horn root tears including 38 full-thickness radial, 7 partial-thickness radial, and 3 complex tears were confirmed during arthroscopy. Overall, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for the detection of medial meniscal posterior horn root tear were 92% (44/48), 99% (97/98), and 97% (141/146), respectively. For each tear configuration, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 82% (31/38), 97% (105/108), and 93% (136/146) for full-thickness radial tears, respectively, and 43% (3/7), 94% (131/139), and 91% (134/146) for partial-thickness radial tears, respectively. The incidence of degenerative joint disease was 85% (41/48) for the tear group, revealing a strong association. In patients with a root tear and with degenerative joint disease, the incidence of high grade cartilage defects involving the medial femoral condyle was at 80% (33/41), compared to 56% (23/41) for the presence of medial meniscal extrusion. In contrast, a similar comparison of incidence for patients with no root tears but with degenerative joint disease was at 68% (17/25) and 26% (8/31), respectively. MR imaging is very sensitive for the detection of medial meniscal root tears, but has reduced the accuracy with regard to each tear configuration. Medial meniscal root tears showed a strong association with degenerative joint disease. High grade cartilage defects of the medial femoral condyle and medial meniscal extrusions also

  18. MRI diagnosis of meniscal tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuga, Naoyuki; Oh, Toshihiro

    1996-01-01

    We studied the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee in fifty-six patients who were also examined arthroscopically. The accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity were 96%, 100%, and 95% for medial meniscal tears, and 91%, 67%, and 100% for lateral meniscal tears respectively. Two MRIs of the medial meniscus were false-positives. These MRI findings were both meniscocapsular separation of the medial meniscus, but the arthroscopic findings were normal. One case was an ACL injury and the other PCL and MCL injury. Hemorrhage and edema of the medial capsule caused by valgus stress at injury may look like a meniscal pseudo-tear on MRI. Five MRIs of the lateral meniscus were false-negatives. All menisci showed normal signal and shape on MRI but traumatic and stable tears of the lateral meniscus were identified arthroscopically. All were associated with ACL tears and lateral condylar bone bruise. The traumatic and stable tear of the meniscus tended to be overlooked on MRI because a meniscus without degeneration shows a normal signal. (author)

  19. The relationship between prevalent medial meniscal intrasubstance signal changes and incident medial meniscal tears in women over a 1-year period assessed with 3.0 T MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crema, Michel D. [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Quantitative Imaging Center, Boston, MA (United States); Ribeirao Preto School of Medicine, University of Sao Paulo (USP), Department of Biomechanics, Medicine and Rehabilitation of the Locomotor Apparatus, and Department of Internal Medicine, Radiology Division, Ribeirao Preto (Brazil); Institute of Diagnostic Imaging (IDI), Ribeirao Preto (Brazil); Hunter, David J. [The University of Sydney, Sydney School of Medicine, Sydney (Australia); Roemer, Frank W. [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Quantitative Imaging Center, Boston, MA (United States); Klinikum Augsburg, Department of Radiology, Augsburg (Germany); Li, Ling [New England Baptist Hospital, Division of Research, Boston, MA (United States); Marra, Monica D. [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Quantitative Imaging Center, Boston, MA (United States); Institute of Diagnostic Imaging (IDI), Ribeirao Preto (Brazil); Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello H. [Ribeirao Preto School of Medicine, University of Sao Paulo (USP), Department of Biomechanics, Medicine and Rehabilitation of the Locomotor Apparatus, and Department of Internal Medicine, Radiology Division, Ribeirao Preto (Brazil); Hellio Le Graverand, Marie-Pierre; Wyman, Bradley T. [Pfizer Global Research and Development, New London, CT (United States); Guermazi, Ali [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Quantitative Imaging Center, Boston, MA (United States)

    2011-08-15

    Intrasubstance meniscal signal changes not reaching the articular surface on fast spin echo (FSE) sequences are considered to represent mucoid degeneration on MRI. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of prevalent intrasubstance signal changes with incident tears of the medial meniscus detected on 3.0 T MRI over a 1-year period. A total of 161 women aged {>=}40 years participated in a longitudinal 1-year observational study of knee osteoarthritis. MRI (3.0 T) was performed at baseline and 12-month follow-up. The anterior horn, body, and posterior horn of the medial meniscus were scored by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists using the Boston-Leeds Osteoarthritis Knee Score (BLOKS) system. Four grades were used to describe the meniscal morphology: grade 0 (normal), grade 1 (intrasubstance signal changes not reaching the articular surface), grade 2 (single tears), and grade 3 (complex tears and maceration). Fisher's exact test and the Cochran-Armitage trend test were performed to evaluate whether baseline intrasubstance signal changes (grade 1) predict incident meniscal tears/maceration (grades 2 and/or 3) in the same subregion of the medial meniscus, when compared to subregions without pathology as the reference group (grade 0). Medial meniscal intrasubstance signal changes at baseline did not predict tears at follow-up when evaluating the anterior and posterior horns (left-sided p-values 0.06 and 0.59, respectively). No incident tears were detected in the body. We could not demonstrate an association between prevalent medial meniscal intrasubstance signal changes with incident tears over a 1-year period. (orig.)

  20. The relationship between prevalent medial meniscal intrasubstance signal changes and incident medial meniscal tears in women over a 1-year period assessed with 3.0 T MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crema, Michel D.; Hunter, David J.; Roemer, Frank W.; Li, Ling; Marra, Monica D.; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello H.; Hellio Le Graverand, Marie-Pierre; Wyman, Bradley T.; Guermazi, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Intrasubstance meniscal signal changes not reaching the articular surface on fast spin echo (FSE) sequences are considered to represent mucoid degeneration on MRI. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of prevalent intrasubstance signal changes with incident tears of the medial meniscus detected on 3.0 T MRI over a 1-year period. A total of 161 women aged ≥40 years participated in a longitudinal 1-year observational study of knee osteoarthritis. MRI (3.0 T) was performed at baseline and 12-month follow-up. The anterior horn, body, and posterior horn of the medial meniscus were scored by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists using the Boston-Leeds Osteoarthritis Knee Score (BLOKS) system. Four grades were used to describe the meniscal morphology: grade 0 (normal), grade 1 (intrasubstance signal changes not reaching the articular surface), grade 2 (single tears), and grade 3 (complex tears and maceration). Fisher's exact test and the Cochran-Armitage trend test were performed to evaluate whether baseline intrasubstance signal changes (grade 1) predict incident meniscal tears/maceration (grades 2 and/or 3) in the same subregion of the medial meniscus, when compared to subregions without pathology as the reference group (grade 0). Medial meniscal intrasubstance signal changes at baseline did not predict tears at follow-up when evaluating the anterior and posterior horns (left-sided p-values 0.06 and 0.59, respectively). No incident tears were detected in the body. We could not demonstrate an association between prevalent medial meniscal intrasubstance signal changes with incident tears over a 1-year period. (orig.)

  1. MR imaging of meniscal tears: correlation with history of trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jong Cheul; Yang, Seoung Oh; Choi, Sun Seob; Son, Seok Hyun; Lee, Yung Il; Chung, Duck Hwan; Kim, Kyung Taek; Sohn, Sung Keun; Lee, Jung Yoon

    1994-01-01

    The medial meniscus is injured much more than the lateral meniscus. Because the medial meniscus is much larger in diameter, is thinner in its periphery and narrower in body than the lateral meniscus, and dose not attach to either cruciate ligament. We evaluated correlations with sites of tear and history of trauma. We reviewed retrospectively in 43 patients with meniscal tears on MR(51 cases) and correlated them with history of trauma. The most common site of injury was the posterior horn of the medial meniscuc(32/51), but high incidence of lateral meniscal tear compared with previous reports was seen. In the cases which had history of trauma, the posterior horn of medial meniscus was most commonly injured(26/34) and 5 meniscal tears were combined with meniscal tear in the other site. The tear in the anterior horn of the medial meniscus was seen only in a patient which had history of trauma and combined with meniscal tear in the other site. But in the meniscal tears without definite history of trauma, the incidence of meniscal tear was different from the meniscal tear with history of trauma. The incidence of lateral meniscal tear(11/17) was higher than medial meniscal tear and the posterior horn of lateral meniscus was commonly injured. We concluded that the medial meniscus was commonly injured, especially posterior horn, but in the cases which had no definite history of trauma, the lateral meniscus was commonly injured. An awareness of prevalent site of meniscal injuries may be helpful in the diagnostic interpretation of MR imaging of knee

  2. Tensile strength of the pullout repair technique for the medial meniscus posterior root tear: a porcine study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Masataka; Furumatsu, Takayuki; Xue, Haowei; Miyazawa, Shinichi; Kodama, Yuya; Hino, Tomohito; Kamatsuki, Yusuke; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the load-to-failure of different common suturing techniques with a new technique for the medial meniscus posterior root tear (MMPRT). Thirty porcine medial menisci were randomly assigned to three suturing techniques used for transtibial pullout repair of the MMPRT (n = 10 per group). Three different meniscal suture configurations were studied: the two simple suture (TSS) technique, the conventional modified Mason-Allen suture (MMA) technique, and the new MMA technique using the FasT-Fix combined with the Ultrabraid (F-MMA). The ultimate failure load was tested using a tensile testing machine. The MMA and F-MMA groups demonstrated significantly higher failure loads than the TSS group (P = 0.0003 and P = 0.0005, respectively). No significant differences were observed between the MMA and F-MMA groups (P = 0.734). The ultimate failure load was significantly greater in the F-MMA than the TSS group and similar to the conventional MMA technique.

  3. Relationship Between Preoperative Extrusion of the Medial Meniscus and Surgical Outcomes After Partial Meniscectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Jae; Choi, Chong Hyuk; Chun, Yong-Min; Kim, Sung-Hwan; Lee, Su-Keon; Jang, Jinyoung; Jeong, Howon; Jung, Min

    2017-07-01

    No previous study has examined arthritic change after meniscectomy with regard to extrusion of the medial meniscus. (1) To determine the factors related to preoperative meniscal extrusion; (2) to investigate the relationship between medial meniscal extrusion and postoperative outcomes of partial meniscectomy, and to identify a cutoff point of meniscal extrusion that contributes to arthritic change after partial meniscectomy in nonosteoarthritic knees. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 208 patients who underwent partial meniscectomy of the medial meniscus between January 2000 and September 2006 were retrospectively reviewed. The extent of extrusion and severity of degeneration of the medial meniscus as shown on preoperative MRI were evaluated. The minimum follow-up duration was 7 years. Clinical function was assessed with the Lysholm knee scoring scale, the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective knee evaluation form, and the Tapper and Hoover grading system. Radiological evaluation was conducted by use of the IKDC radiographic assessment scale. Regression analysis was performed to identify factors affecting preoperative extrusion of the medial meniscus and factors influencing follow-up results after partial meniscectomy. Receiver operating characteristic curve was used to identify a cutoff point for the extent of meniscal extrusion that was associated with arthritic change. The mean ± SD preoperative Lysholm knee score was 65.0 ± 6.3 and the mean IKDC subjective score was 60.1 ± 7.5. The mean follow-up functional scores were 93.2 ± 5.1 ( P meniscus showed a tendency to increase as the extent of intrameniscal degeneration increased, and the medial meniscus was extruded more in patients with horizontal, horizontal flap, and complex tears. The preoperative extent of meniscal extrusion had a statistically significant correlation with follow-up Lysholm knee score (coefficient = -0.10, P = .002), IKDC subjective score (coefficient

  4. Anterior Segment Optical Coherence Tomography for Tear Meniscus Evaluation and its Correlation with other Tear Variables in Healthy Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhasmana, Renu; Nagpal, Ramesh Chander

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dry eye is one of the most common ocular diseases in this cyber era. Despite availability of multiple tests, no single test is accurate for the diagnosis of dry eye. Anterior segment optical coherence tomography is the recent tool which can be added in the armentarium of dry eye tests. Aim To evaluate tear meniscus with anterior segment optical coherence tomography and its correlation with other tear variables in normal healthy individuals. Materials and Methods In this prospective cross-sectional observational study, right eye of 203 consecutive patients were studied. All the patients were divided into three groups Group 1, 2 and 3 according to their age ≤20 years, 21-40 years and >40 years respectively. All patients underwent routine ophthalmologic examinations along with slit-lamp bio-microscopy for tear meniscus height measurement, tear film break up time, Schirmer’s I test (with anaesthesia) and optical coherence tomography imaging of inferior tear meniscus height. After focusing of the instrument with a Cross Line (CL) centered on lower tear meniscus at 6’0 clock of cornea, a 6 mm long scan was obtained. The tear meniscus height (μm) and tear meniscus area (mm2) were measured manually with help of callipers by joining upper corneo-meniscus junction to the lower lid-meniscus junction and tear meniscus height and area within the plotted line respectively and calculated by using the integrated analysis available in the custom software. Results There was significant decrease in the all tear variables with the increase in the age. According to age groups in group 1, the mean Schirmer’s (24.0±4.9)mm, tear film break up time (11.1±1.9) sec, tear meniscus height on slit lamp (600.2±167.3)mm were higher but decreased in group 2 (21.5±5.4,10.8±1.4, 597.5±186.3) and group 3 (19.8 ± 5.1, 10.2 ± 1.6, 485.6 ± 157.7) respectively. Schirmer’s test values and tear film break up time were similar in both sexes (p=0.1 and p= 0.9). Tear meniscus

  5. Meniscotibial (coronary) ligament tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Khoury, G.Y.; Usta, H.Y.; Berger, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    Preservation of the meniscus whenever possible is essential in maintaining knee stability and preventing premature osteoarthritis. Peripheral meniscal tears are the most amenable to surgical repair. This study evaluates the peripheral attachments of the medial meniscus and focuses on a specific tear limited to the meniscotibial ligament (coronary ligament). The diagnosis is made arthrographically when the medial meniscus floats above the tibial plateau without separating completely from the capsule. The lateral meniscus is rarely involved in this type of injury. (orig.)

  6. Retropatellar chondromalacia associated with medial osteoarthritis after meniscus injury. One year of observations in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, C; Kabir, K; Mueller, M; Rangger, C; Minor, T; Tolba, R H

    2006-01-01

    In an ovine meniscal repair model, the patellofemoral (PF) osteoarthritis due to a non-sutured tear or failed repair was investigated. A radial meniscus tear was either sutured with polydioxanone (PDS), with a slow degrading polylactide long-term suture(LTS) or left without treatment. Knee joint cartilage in the PF and medial compartment was evaluated compared to normal knees (healthy controls). Retropatellar osteoarthritis in the non-sutured and sutured animals was intense in contrast to the control knees after 6 months in all groups (p < 0.001), and after 12 months in the PDS group (p < 0.001), LTS group and non-sutured animals (p < 0.05). Non-sutured meniscus tears and failed repair lead fast to intense PF osteoarthritis corresponding with tibial damage of the injured compartment.

  7. A Special Tear Pattern of Anterior Horn of the Lateral Meniscus: Macerated Tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jiapeng; Zhai, Wenliang; Li, Qiang; Jia, Qianxin; Lin, Dasheng

    2017-01-01

    We describe a special, interesting phenomenon found in the anterior horn of the lateral meniscus (AHLM): most tear patterns in the AHLM are distinctive, with loose fibers in injured region and circumferential fiber bundles were separated. We name it as macerated tear. The goal of this study was to bring forward a new type of meniscal tear in the AHLM and investigate its clinical value. AHLM tears underwent arthroscopic surgery from January 2012 to December 2014 were included. Data regarding the integrity of AHLM were prospectively recorded in a data registry. Tear morphology and treatment received were subsequently extracted by 2 independent reviewers from operative notes and arthroscopic surgical photos. A total of 60 AHLM tears in 60 patients (mean age 27.1 years) were grouped into horizontal tears (n = 15, 25%), vertical tears (n = 14, 23%), complex tears (n = 6, 10%), and macerated tears (n = 25, 42%). There were 6 patients with AHLM cysts in macerated tear group and one patient in vertical tear group. 60 patients were performed arthroscopic meniscus repairs and were followed-up with averaged 18.7 months. Each group had significant postoperative improvement in Lysholm and IKDC scores (p 0.05). This study demonstrated that the macerated tear is common in the tear pattern of AHLM. However, feasibility of the treatment of this type of meniscal tear, especially the meniscus repairs still requires further study.

  8. Centralization of extruded medial meniscus delays cartilage degeneration in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozeki, Nobutake; Muneta, Takeshi; Kawabata, Kenichi; Koga, Hideyuki; Nakagawa, Yusuke; Saito, Ryusuke; Udo, Mio; Yanagisawa, Katsuaki; Ohara, Toshiyuki; Mochizuki, Tomoyuki; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sekiya, Ichiro

    2017-05-01

    Meniscus extrusion often observed in knee osteoarthritis has a strong correlation with the progression of cartilage degeneration and symptom in the patients. We recently reported a novel procedure "arthroscopic centralization" in which the capsule was sutured to the edge of the tibial plateau to reduce meniscus extrusion in the human knee. However, there is no animal model to study the efficacy of this procedure. The purposes of this study were [1] to establish a model of centralization for the extruded medial meniscus in a rat model; and [2] to investigate the chondroprotective effect of this procedure. Medial meniscus extrusion was induced by the release of the anterior synovial capsule and the transection of the meniscotibial ligament. Centralization was performed by the pulled-out suture technique. Alternatively, control rats had only the medial meniscus extrusion surgery. Medial meniscus extrusion was evaluated by micro-CT and macroscopic findings. Cartilage degeneration of the medial tibial plateau was evaluated macroscopically and histologically. By micro-CT analysis, the medial meniscus extrusion was significantly improved in the centralization group in comparison to the extrusion group throughout the study. Both macroscopically and histologically, the cartilage lesion of the medial tibial plateau was prevented in the centralization group but was apparent in the control group. We developed medial meniscus extrusion in a rat model, and centralization of the extruded medial meniscus by the pull-out suture technique improved the medial meniscus extrusion and delayed cartilage degeneration, though the effect was limited. Centralization is a promising treatment to prevent the progression of osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical Results of Arthroscopic Repair of Isolated Longitudinal Tear of Medial Meniscus by Vertical Cruciate Double Mattress Sutures with Outside-in Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyied Hamid Barzgar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Meniscal tears are one of the most common injuries treated by arthroscopic techniques. Arthroscopic meniscal repair is an accepted way of treatment for meniscal tears. Different arthroscopic techniques for meniscal repair are: inside-out, outside-in and all inside. In the first 2 techniques, meniscus is repaired by sutures and in the later by suture or by commercial ready implants . The goal of current study is assessing clinical results of arthroscopic repair of longitudinal meniscal tears with vertical cruciate double mattress sutures by outside-in technique after 9 months.   Methods: In this case series study, in 13 patients having criteria for engaging the study with longitudinal isolated meniscus tear, arthroscopic meniscal repair was done with vertical cruciate double mattress sutures by outside-in technique and patients were followed for 9 months.   Results: Of 13 patients, there were 12 males (92.3% and one female (7.7% aged 15-38 (average 28.3 years. In follow up period, there was one case (7.7% of irritation by subcutaneous knot. There was not any failure of repair. Average Lysholm score increased from 55.23 to 91.23 after 9 months of follow up, which was statistically significant (p<0.001. At the end of follow up period, there was not any medial joint line tenderness of knee, giving way or significant effusion or pain.   Conclusion: This study shows that this technique has a good short term outcome with no failure and low complications but it is necessary to do more long term studies to prove it.

  10. Meniscus tear surgery and meniscus replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaquero, Javier; Forriol, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective the menisci are easily injured and difficult to repair. The aim of this study was to analyze the current state of meniscal surgery aimed at preserving morphology and conserving the biomechanics of the knee to prevent joint degeneration. Methodology a search of the electronic medical literature database Medline was conducted, from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed. The search was not limited by language. Candidate articles were identified by searching for those that included the keywords meniscus, surgery, suture, implant, allograft. The limits were included for clinical research and clinical trials. Basic research was not included. The studies selected were evaluated and classified in three different categories: basic science, reconstruction (suture and meniscectomy) and implants (scaffolds and allograft). Results the consequences of meniscectomy performed at a young age can lead to a joint cartilage degeneration twenty years later. There are few surgical options for the repair of meniscal injuries in order both to preserve the meniscus and to ensure the long term survival of the knee joint, meniscectomy, repair, suturing the tear, or reconstruction, when a meniscal allograft or synthetic substitute is used to replace the meniscus, but the biomechanical properties of the native meniscus are not reproduced entirely by the scaffolds that exist today. Conclusion therapies that successfully repair or replace the meniscus are therefore likely to prevent or delay osteoarthritis progression. PMID:27331034

  11. The meniscus tear. State of the art of rehabilitation protocols related to surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frizziero, Antonio; Ferrari, Raffaello; Giannotti, Erika; Ferroni, Costanza; Poli, Patrizia; Masiero, Stefano

    2012-10-01

    Meniscal injuries represent one of the most frequent lesions in sport practicing and in particular in soccer players and skiers. Pain, functional limitation and swelling are typical symptoms associated with meniscal tears. Epidemiological studies showed that all meniscal lesions, in different sports athletes, involves 24% of medial meniscus, while 8% of lateral meniscus and about 20-30% of meniscal lesions are associated with other ligament injuries. Meniscal tears can be treated conservatively or surgically. Surgery leads in many cases to complete resolution of symptoms and allows the return to sport activity. However many studies show that this treatment can induce more frequently the development of degenerative conditions if not correctly associated to a specific rehabilitation protocol. The aim of this article is to compare different timing in specific rehabilitation programs related to the most actual surgical options.

  12. Changes in Contact Area in Meniscus Horizontal Cleavage Tears Subjected to Repair and Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beamer, Brandon S; Walley, Kempland C; Okajima, Stephen; Manoukian, Ohan S; Perez-Viloria, Miguel; DeAngelis, Joseph P; Ramappa, Arun J; Nazarian, Ara

    2017-03-01

    To assess the changes in tibiofemoral contact pressure and contact area in human knees with a horizontal cleavage tear before and after treatment. Ten human cadaveric knees were tested. Pressure sensors were placed under the medial meniscus and the knees were loaded at twice the body weight for 20 cycles at 0°, 10°, and 20° of flexion. Contact area and pressure were recorded for the intact meniscus, the meniscus with a horizontal cleavage tear, after meniscal repair, after partial meniscectomy (single leaflet), and after subtotal meniscectomy (double leaflet). The presence of a horizontal cleavage tear significantly increased average peak contact pressure and reduced effective average tibiofemoral contact area at all flexion angles tested compared with the intact state (P contact pressure after creation of the horizontal cleavage tear. Repairing the horizontal cleavage tear restored peak contact pressures and areas to within 15% of baseline, statistically similar to the intact state at all angles tested (P contact pressure and reduced average contact area at all degrees of flexion compared with the intact state (P contact area and a significant elevation in contact pressure. These changes may accelerate joint degeneration. A suture-based repair of these horizontal cleavage tears returns the contact area and contact pressure to nearly normal, whereas both partial and subtotal meniscectomy lead to significant reductions in contact area and significant elevations in contact pressure within the knee. Repairing horizontal cleavage tears may lead to improved clinical outcomes by preserving meniscal tissue and the meniscal function. Understanding contact area and peak contact pressure resulting from differing strategies for treating horizontal cleavage tears will allow the surgeon to evaluate the best strategy for treating his or her patients who present with this meniscal pathology. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier

  13. Typing of MRI in medial meniscus degeneration in relation to radiological grade in medial compartmental osteoarthritis of the knee

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    Nagata, Nobuhito; Koshino, Tomihisa; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sakai, Naotaka; Takagi, Toshitaka; Takeuchi, Ryohei [Yokohama City Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1998-10-01

    The advancement of degeneration of 50 medial menisci in patients with medial compartmental osteoarthritic knees (OA) were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The average age of the patients was 66.6 years (range, 39 to 86). According to a radiographical grading system, 6 knees were classified as Grade 1, 24 as Grade 2, 16 as Grade 3, and 4 as Grade 4. The extent and the location of a high intensity region in MRI were observed in 3 parts of the meniscus, namely, the anterior, middle and posterior part. In Grade 1, no high intensity region was observed in 3 knees, and a high intensity region was observed only in the posterior part in 2 knees. A high intensity region was observed from the medial to the posterior part in 13 knees, and only in the posterior part in 10 knees of Grade 2; from the medial to the posterior part in 12 knees, and only in the posterior part in 3 knees of Grade 3, and from the anterior to the posterior part in 2 knees of Grade 4. The shape of the high intensity region in the medial meniscus was classified into 5 types, as follows: Type 1, there was no high intensity region; Type 2, the high intensity region was observed to be restricted within the meniscus; Type 3, the high intensity region resembled a horizontal tear; Type 4, the high intensity region was observed as all of the medial joint space without a marginal area; Type 5, the high intensity region was observed as all of the medial joint space. In Grade 1, 3 knees were classified as Type 1, and 2 knees as Type 2; in Grade 2, 7 knees as Type 2, and 13 knees as Type 3, and 4 knees into Type 4; in Grade 3, 6 knees as Type 3, and 7 knees as Type 4; and in Grade 4, 2 knees as Type 4, and 2 knees as Type 5. These findings might suggest that the degeneration of medial meniscus in the medial type of OA was accelerated by mechanical stress due to varus deformity. (author)

  14. Typing of MRI in medial meniscus degeneration in relation to radiological grade in medial compartmental osteoarthritis of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Nobuhito; Koshino, Tomihisa; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sakai, Naotaka; Takagi, Toshitaka; Takeuchi, Ryohei

    1998-01-01

    The advancement of degeneration of 50 medial menisci in patients with medial compartmental osteoarthritic knees (OA) were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The average age of the patients was 66.6 years (range, 39 to 86). According to a radiographical grading system, 6 knees were classified as Grade 1, 24 as Grade 2, 16 as Grade 3, and 4 as Grade 4. The extent and the location of a high intensity region in MRI were observed in 3 parts of the meniscus, namely, the anterior, middle and posterior part. In Grade 1, no high intensity region was observed in 3 knees, and a high intensity region was observed only in the posterior part in 2 knees. A high intensity region was observed from the medial to the posterior part in 13 knees, and only in the posterior part in 10 knees of Grade 2; from the medial to the posterior part in 12 knees, and only in the posterior part in 3 knees of Grade 3, and from the anterior to the posterior part in 2 knees of Grade 4. The shape of the high intensity region in the medial meniscus was classified into 5 types, as follows: Type 1, there was no high intensity region; Type 2, the high intensity region was observed to be restricted within the meniscus; Type 3, the high intensity region resembled a horizontal tear; Type 4, the high intensity region was observed as all of the medial joint space without a marginal area; Type 5, the high intensity region was observed as all of the medial joint space. In Grade 1, 3 knees were classified as Type 1, and 2 knees as Type 2; in Grade 2, 7 knees as Type 2, and 13 knees as Type 3, and 4 knees into Type 4; in Grade 3, 6 knees as Type 3, and 7 knees as Type 4; and in Grade 4, 2 knees as Type 4, and 2 knees as Type 5. These findings might suggest that the degeneration of medial meniscus in the medial type of OA was accelerated by mechanical stress due to varus deformity. (author)

  15. Non-operative management of medial meniscus posterior horn root tears is associated with worsening arthritis and poor clinical outcome at 5-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krych, Aaron J; Reardon, Patrick J; Johnson, Nick R; Mohan, Rohith; Peter, Logan; Levy, Bruce A; Stuart, Michael J

    2017-02-01

    Medial meniscus posterior root tears (MMPRTs) are a significant source of pain and dysfunction, but little is known about the natural history and outcome and for non-operative management of these lesions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate (1) the mid-term clinical and radiographic outcomes of non-operative treatment of MMPRTs and (2) risk factors for worse outcomes. A retrospective review was performed for patients with symptomatic, unrepaired MMPRTs and a minimum 2-year follow-up for IKDC and Tegner outcome scores. Baseline and final radiographs were reviewed and graded according to Kellgren-Lawrence scores. Baseline MRIs were reviewed for the presence of meniscal extrusion, subchondral oedema, and insufficiency fractures. Failure was defined as conversion to arthroplasty or severely abnormal patient subjective IKDC score. Fifty-two patients (21M:31F) with a mean age of 58 ± 10 years were diagnosed with symptomatic MMPRTs clinically and confirmed by MRI and followed for a mean of 62 ± 30 months. Sixteen patients (31 %) underwent total knee arthroplasty at a mean of 30 ± 32 months after diagnosis with higher Kellgren-Lawrence grades associated with increased rates of arthroplasty (p = 0.01). Mean IKDC scores for the remaining patients were 61.2 ± 21 with significantly lower scores in females compared to males (75 ± 12 vs. 49 ± 20; p = 0.03). Mean Kellgren-Lawrence grades and rates of arthritis progressed over time on radiographs (1.5 ± 0.7 vs. 2.4 ± 1.0; p meniscus posterior horn root tears is associated with poor clinical outcome, worsening arthritis, and a relatively high rate of arthroplasty at 5-year follow-up. Female gender was associated with lower subjective scores and higher rate of arthroplasty. The current study provides a natural history benchmark for clinical outcomes that can be expected in patients with medial meniscus posterior horn root tears undergoing non-operative treatment and helps in counselling

  16. [The correlations between corneal sensation, tear meniscus volume, and tear film osmolarity after femtosecond laser-assisted LASIK].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Luyan; Sun, Xiyu; Yu, Ye; Xiong, Yan; Cui, Yuxin; Wang, Qinmei; Hu, Liang

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the correlations between corneal sensation, tear meniscus volume, and tear film osmolarity after femtosecond laser-assisted LASIK (FS-LASIK) surgery. In this prospective clinical study, 31 patients undergoing FS-LASIK for myopia were recruited. The upper and lower tear meniscus volumes (UTMV and LTMV) were measured by customized anterior segment optical coherence tomography, tear film osmolarity was measured by a TearLab Osmolarity test device, central corneal sensation was measured by a Cochet-Bonner esthesiometer preoperatively, at 1 week, 1 and 3 months postoperatively. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to evaluate whether the tear film osmolarity, tear meniscus volume, and corneal sensation were changed after surgery. The correlations between these variables were analyzed by the Pearson correlation analysis. The tear film osmolarity was (310.03 ± 16.48) mOsms/L preoperatively, (323.51 ± 15.92) mOsms/L at 1 week, (319.93 ± 14.27) mOsms/L at 1 month, and (314.97±12.91) mOsms/L at 3 months. The UTMV was (0.42±0.15), (0.25± 0.09), (0.30±0.11), and (0.35±0.09) μL, respectively; the LTMV was (0.60±0.21),(0.37±0.08), (0.44± 0.14), and (0.52±0.17) μL, respectively. The tear film osmolarity was significantly higher at 1 week and 1 month postoperatively compared with the baseline (P=0.001, 0.004), and reduced to the preoperative level at 3 months (P=0.573). The UTMV, LTMV, and corneal sensation values presented significant decreases at all postoperative time points (all Psensation at 1 week after surgery (r=0.356,P=0.005). There were significant correlations between the preoperative LTMV and corneal sensation at 1 week, 1 and 3 months (respectively, r=0.422, 0.366, 0.352;P=0.001, 0.004, 0.006). No significant correlations were found between the tear film osmolarity, tear meniscus volume, and corneal sensation after surgery (all P>0.05). The tear film osmolarity, tear meniscus volume, and corneal sensation became aggravated due

  17. Radiological classification of meniscocapsular tears of the anterolateral portion of the lateral meniscus of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, J.; Packya, N.; Tan, A.H.; Paul, G.

    2000-01-01

    In an arthroscopic-MRI correlation study of acute injuries to the knee it was found that anterolateral meniscocapsular separations of the lateral aspect of the knee were missed on MRI reporting. Eighty sports-related injuries of the knee were seen by experienced orthopaedic surgeons at the University of Malaya Medical Centre and at the National Sports Centre, Malaysia from January 1996 to July 1997. Fifty of the patients were suspected to have meniscal tears that were either lateral or medial on clinical examination and they were sent for MRI. Many of these patients were tertiary referrals. Magnetic resonance imaging examinations in 27 of the 50 patients were reported as not showing any intrasubstance or obvious meniscocapsular tears, but arthroscopy performed on them revealed anterolateral meniscocapsular tears of the lateral meniscus of varying degrees in nine of these patients. In retrospect the tears could be seen on MRI, and a pattern to the tears was noted and classified as follows. Type 0, normal; type 1, torn inferior or superior meniscocapsular attachment; type 2, both meniscofemoral and meniscotibial ligaments torn but with minimal separation of meniscus and capsule by fluid or synovitis; and type 3, marked separation of meniscus and capsule by fluid (> 3 mm). Ten patients who did not undergo arthroscopy for various personal and financial reasons underwent MRI which showed type 1 and type 2 tears, and were treated conservatively. These patients were all asymptomatic after 4-6 weeks with regard to clinical signs, suggesting a lateral meniscal tear. Magnetic resonance imaging therefore does reveal minor degrees of meniscocapsular tears anterolaterally when one understands the normal anatomy in this region. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  18. Matrix metalloproteinase activity and prostaglandin E2 are elevated in the synovial fluid of meniscus tear patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Betty; Goode, Adam P; Carter, Teralyn E; Utturkar, Gangadhar M; Huebner, Janet L; Taylor, Dean C; Moorman, Claude T; Garrett, William E; Kraus, Virginia B; Guilak, Farshid; DeFrate, Louis E; McNulty, Amy L

    Meniscus tears are a common knee injury and are associated with the development of post-traumatic osteoarthritis (OA). The purpose of this study is to evaluate potential OA mediators in the synovial fluid and serum of meniscus tear subjects compared to those in the synovial fluid of radiographic non-OA control knees. Sixteen subjects with an isolated unilateral meniscus injury and six subjects who served as reference controls (knee Kellgren-Lawrence grade 0-1) were recruited. Twenty-one biomarkers were measured in serum from meniscus tear subjects and in synovial fluid from both groups. Meniscus tear subjects were further stratified by tear type to assess differences in biomarker levels. Synovial fluid total matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were increased 25-fold and 290-fold, respectively, in meniscus tear subjects as compared to reference controls (p meniscus tear subjects (R = 0.83, p meniscus tear subjects, synovial fluid levels of MMP activity, MMP-2, MMP-3, sGAG, COMP, IL-6, and PGE2 were higher than serum levels (p meniscus tears had higher synovial fluid MMP-10 (p meniscus injury may be targets to promote meniscus repair and prevent OA development.

  19. Three-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging of the meniscus of the knee: What about equivocal errors?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyck, Pieter van; Vanhoenacker, Filip M.; Gielen, Jan L.; Parizel, Paul M.; Dossche, Lieven; Weyler, Joost

    2010-01-01

    Background: The significance of borderline magnetic resonance (MR) findings that are equivocal for a tear of the knee meniscus remains uncertain. Given their higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and greater spatial resolution, these equivocal meniscal tears could be expected to be less frequent using a 3.0T MR system. Purpose: To investigate the prevalence of equivocal meniscal tears using 3.0T MR, and to study their impact on MR accuracy compared with arthroscopy in the detection of meniscal tears. Material and Methods: The medical records of 100 patients who underwent 3.0T MR imaging and subsequent arthroscopy of the knee were retrospectively reviewed. Two observers interpreted MR images in consensus, and menisci were diagnosed as torn (abnormality on two or more images), equivocal for a tear (abnormality on one image), or intact, using arthroscopy as the standard of reference. The prevalence of equivocal meniscal tears was assessed, and MR accuracy was calculated as follows: first, considering both torn menisci and equivocal diagnoses as positive for a tear; and second, considering only torn menisci as positive for a tear. Results: Evidence of meniscal tears on MR images was equivocal in 12 medial (12%) and three lateral (3%) menisci. Of these equivocal MR diagnoses, tears were found at arthroscopy in eight medial and one lateral meniscus. In our study, the specificity and positive predictive value increased for both the medial and lateral meniscus when only menisci with two or more abnormal images were considered to be torn: from 80% and 89% to 91% and 94% for the medial meniscus, and from 91% and 73% to 93% and 78% for the lateral meniscus, respectively. Conclusion: Subtle findings that are equivocal for a tear of the knee meniscus still make MR diagnosis difficult, even at 3.0T. We recommend that radiologists should rather be descriptive in reporting subtle or equivocal MR findings, alerting the clinician of possible meniscal tear

  20. Three-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging of the meniscus of the knee: What about equivocal errors?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyck, Pieter van; Vanhoenacker, Filip M.; Gielen, Jan L.; Parizel, Paul M. (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital Antwerp and Univ. of Antwerp, Antwerp (Edegem) (Belgium)), e-mail: pieter.van.dyck@uza.be; Dossche, Lieven (Dept. of Orthopedics, Univ. Hospital Antwerp and Univ. of Antwerp, Antwerp (Edegem) (Belgium)); Weyler, Joost (Dept. of Epidemiology and Social Medicine, Univ. of Antwerp, Antwerp (Wilrijk) (Belgium))

    2010-04-15

    Background: The significance of borderline magnetic resonance (MR) findings that are equivocal for a tear of the knee meniscus remains uncertain. Given their higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and greater spatial resolution, these equivocal meniscal tears could be expected to be less frequent using a 3.0T MR system. Purpose: To investigate the prevalence of equivocal meniscal tears using 3.0T MR, and to study their impact on MR accuracy compared with arthroscopy in the detection of meniscal tears. Material and Methods: The medical records of 100 patients who underwent 3.0T MR imaging and subsequent arthroscopy of the knee were retrospectively reviewed. Two observers interpreted MR images in consensus, and menisci were diagnosed as torn (abnormality on two or more images), equivocal for a tear (abnormality on one image), or intact, using arthroscopy as the standard of reference. The prevalence of equivocal meniscal tears was assessed, and MR accuracy was calculated as follows: first, considering both torn menisci and equivocal diagnoses as positive for a tear; and second, considering only torn menisci as positive for a tear. Results: Evidence of meniscal tears on MR images was equivocal in 12 medial (12%) and three lateral (3%) menisci. Of these equivocal MR diagnoses, tears were found at arthroscopy in eight medial and one lateral meniscus. In our study, the specificity and positive predictive value increased for both the medial and lateral meniscus when only menisci with two or more abnormal images were considered to be torn: from 80% and 89% to 91% and 94% for the medial meniscus, and from 91% and 73% to 93% and 78% for the lateral meniscus, respectively. Conclusion: Subtle findings that are equivocal for a tear of the knee meniscus still make MR diagnosis difficult, even at 3.0T. We recommend that radiologists should rather be descriptive in reporting subtle or equivocal MR findings, alerting the clinician of possible meniscal tear

  1. Vertical tears of the cranial horn of the meniscus and its cranial ligament in the equine femorotibial joint: 7 cases and their treatment by arthroscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmsley, J P

    1995-01-01

    Five horses with a vertical tear in the cranial horn and cranial ligament of the medial meniscus and 2 horses with a similar injury in the lateral meniscus were diagnosed from a series of 126 horses which were examined arthroscopically for stifle lameness. All the lesions had similar characteristics. The tear was about 1 cm from the axial border of the meniscus and its ligament and, in all but one case in which it was incomplete, much of the torn tissue was loosely attached in the axial part of the joint from where it was removed. The remaining meniscus, abaxial to the tear, was displaced cranially and abaxially and its torn edges were debrided. Radiographically, 6 cases had proliferative new bone on the cranial aspect of the intercondylar eminence of the tibia and 3 had calcified soft tissue densities in the cranial, medial or lateral femorotibial joint. Following surgery and a 6 month period of rest and controlled exercise, 3 horses returned to full competition work, one was usable for hacking, 2 are convalescing and one is lame after one year. It is postulated that this could be a characteristic meniscal injury in horses which can benefit from arthroscopic surgery. Better techniques for accessing the body and caudal pole of the menisci are needed if a more complete diagnosis and treatment of meniscal injuries are to be achieved.

  2. Vertical tears of the cranial horn of the meniscus and its cranial ligament in the equine femorotibial joint: 7 cases and their treatment by arthroscopic surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walmsley, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    Five horses with a vertical tear in the cranial horn and cranial ligament of the medial meniscus and 2 horses with a similar injury in the lateral meniscus were diagnosed from a series of 126 horses which were examined arthroscopically for stifle lameness. All the lesions had similar characteristics. The tear was about 1 cm from the axial border of the meniscus and its ligament and, in all but one case in which it was incomplete, much of the torn tissue was loosely attached in the axial part of the joint from where it was removed. The remaining meniscus, abaxial to the tear, was displaced cranially and abaxially and its torn edges were debrided. Radiographically, 6 cases had proliferative new bone on the cranial aspect of the intercondylar eminence of the tibia and 3 had calcified soft tissue densities in the cranial, medial or lateral femorotibial joint. Following surgery and a 6 month period of rest and controlled exercise, 3 horses returned to full competition work, one was usable for hacking, 2 are convalescing and one is lame after one year. It is postulated that this could be a characteristic meniscal injury in horses which can benefit from arthroscopic surgery. Better techniques for accessing the body and caudal pole of the menisci are needed if a more complete diagnosis and treatment of meniscal injuries are to be achieved

  3. Discoid meniscus of the knee: MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Moon; Kang, Heung Sik; Ahn, Joong Mo; Seong, Sang Cheol

    1992-01-01

    To evaluate the role of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the diagnosis of the discoid meniscus, the authors reviewed 31 cases of discoid menisci diagnosed by MR imaging among which 16 cases received arthroscopy. Using knee surface coil, sagittal T1, T2 and proton density images and coronal T1 weighted images were obtained with 18 cm FOV and 4 mm/ 1 mm thickness/gap. A discoid meniscus was considered if three or more contiguous sagittal images demonstrated continuity of the meniscus between the anterior and posterior horns or the diameter of the mid-portion of the meniscus exceeded 15 mm on the coronal image. The authors also observed the associated abnormalities including tears of meniscus and ligament, meniscal cyst, and osteochondral defects. All discoid menisci were lateral menisci and torn discoid lateral menisci were present in 26 cases (83%). In two cases, tears of the contralateral medial meniscus were present. The tears of anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments, meniscal cyst, and osteochondral defects were present in 4, 2, 4, and 5 cases respectively. All collateral ligaments were intact. In conclusion MR imaging was useful for the detection of discoid meniscus and associated abnormalities

  4. Fourier-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography for Monitoring the Lower Tear Meniscus in Dry Eye after Acupuncture Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dry eye is highly prevalent and has a significant impact on quality of life. Acupuncture was found to be effective to treat dry eye. However, little was known about the effect of acupuncture on different subtypes of dry eye. The objective of this study was to investigate the applicability of tear meniscus assessment by Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography in the evaluation of acupuncture treatment response in dry eye patients and to explore the effect of acupuncture on different subtypes of dry eye compared with artificial tear treatment. A total of 108 dry eye patients were randomized into acupuncture or artificial tear group. Each group was divided into three subgroups including lipid tear deficiency (LTD, Sjögren syndrome dry eye (SSDE, and non-Sjögren syndrome dry eye (Non-SSDE for data analysis. After 4-week treatment, the low tear meniscus parameters including tear meniscus height (TMH, tear meniscus depth (TMD, and tear meniscus area (TMA in the acupuncture group increased significantly for the LTD and Non-SSDE subgroups compared with both the baseline and the control groups (all P values < 0.05, but not for the SSDE. Acupuncture provided a measurable improvement of the tear meniscus dimensions for the Non-SSDE and LTD patients, but not for the SSDE patients.

  5. [Application of pie-crusting the medial collateral ligament release in arthroscopic surgery for posterior horn of 
medial meniscus in knee joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Weihong; Tang, Qi; Liao, Lele; Li, Ding; Yang, Yang; Chen, You

    2017-09-28

    To explore the effectiveness and safety of pie-crusting the medial collateral ligament release (MCL) in treating posterior horn of medial meniscus (PHMM) tear in tight medial tibiofemoral compartment of knee joint.
 Methods: Thirty-two consecutive patients with PHMM tear in tight medial tibiofemoral compartment of knee joint were admitted to our department from January, 2013 to December, 2014. All patients were performed pie-crusting the MCL release at its tibial insertion with 18-gauge intravenous needle. All patients were evaluated by valgus stress test and bilateral valgus stress radiograph at postoperative 1st day, 4th week and 12th week. Visual Analogue Scales (VAS), Lysholm scores, Tegner scores and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scores were recorded at the 1st, 3th, 6th month follow-up, then follow-up every 6 months.
 Results: The mean follow-up was 28 (24-36) months. All cases were negative in valgus stress test. MCL rupture, femoral fracture, articular cartilage lesion and neurovascular injury were not found at the last follow-up. The median medial joint space width of affected side and unaffected side for valgus stress radiographs were 6.8 mm and 4.3 mm (P0.05) at the 12th week, respectively. VAS scores was changed from 4.5±1.5 preoperatively to 1.7±1.0 at the final follow-up (t=16.561, Pjoint.

  6. A 12-Week Exercise Therapy Program in Middle-Aged Patients With Degenerative Meniscus Tears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensrud, Silje; Roos, Ewa M.; Risberg, May Arna

    2012-01-01

    Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 STUDY DESIGN: Case Series. BACKGROUND: Exercise is a viable treatment alternative to arthroscopic partial meniscectomy in patients with degenerative meniscus tears. No study has reported in detail type of exercises, progres......Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 STUDY DESIGN: Case Series. BACKGROUND: Exercise is a viable treatment alternative to arthroscopic partial meniscectomy in patients with degenerative meniscus tears. No study has reported in detail type of exercises......, progression, tolerance, and potential benefit from an exercise therapy program in these patients who have not had surgery. This study describes a progressive exercise therapy program aiming at improving neuromuscular function and muscle strength in middle-aged patients with degenerative meniscus tears...... had undergone surgery. DISCUSSION: The described neuromuscular- and strength-training program should be considered for rehabilitation of middle-aged individuals with degenerative meniscus tears. Head-to-head comparison of programs in a randomized design is however needed to be able to answer...

  7. Clinical and radiographic outcomes of meniscus surgery and future targets for biologic intervention: A review of data from the MOON Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westermann, Robert W; Jones, Morgan; Wasserstein, David; Spindler, Kurt P

    Meniscus injury and treatment occurred with the majority of anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions (ACLR) in the multicenter orthopedic outcomes (MOON) cohort. We describe the patient-reported outcomes, radiographic outcomes, and predictors of pain from meniscus injuries and treatment in the setting of ACLR. Patient-reported outcomes improve significantly following meniscus repair with ACLR, but differences exist based on the meniscus injury laterally (medial or lateral). Patients undergoing medial meniscus repair have worse patient-reported outcomes and more pain compared to those with uninjured menisci. However, lateral meniscal tears can be repaired with similar outcomes as uninjured menisci. Medial meniscal treatment (meniscectomy or repair) results in a significant loss of joint space at 2 years compared to uninjured menisci. Menisci treated with excision had a greater degree of joint space loss compared to those treated with repair. Clinically significant knee pain is more common following injuries to the medial meniscus and increased in patients who undergo early re-operation after initial ACLR. Future research efforts aimed at improving outcomes after combined ACLR and meniscus treatment should focus on optimizing biologic and mechanical environments that promote healing of medial meniscal tears sustained during ACL injury.

  8. Tibial avulsion fracture of the posterior root of the medial meniscus in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Jonas Vestergård; Krogsgaard, Michael Rindom

    2012-01-01

    of displaced avulsion fractures of the posterior root of the medial meniscus in children are presented along with a concise report of the literature regarding avulsion fractures of the posterior root of the medial meniscus. Both avulsions were reattached arthroscopically by trans-tibial pull-out sutures...

  9. Cartilage Delamination Flap Mimicking a Torn Medial Meniscus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gan Zhi-Wei Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a chondral delamination lesion due to medial parapatellar plica friction syndrome involving the medial femoral condyle. This mimicked a torn medial meniscus in clinical and radiological presentation. Arthroscopy revealed a chondral delamination flap, which was debrided. Diagnosis of chondral lesions in the knee can be challenging. Clinical examination and MRI have good accuracy for diagnosis and should be used in tandem. Early diagnosis and treatment of chondral lesions are important to prevent progression to early osteoarthritis.

  10. Review: Modelling of meniscus of knee joint during soccer kicking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azrul Hisham Mohd Adib, Mohd; Firdaus Jaafar, Mohd

    2013-12-01

    Knee is a part of the body that located between thigh and shank is one of the most complicated and largest joints in the human body. The common injuries that occur are ligaments, meniscus or bone fracture. During soccer games, the knee is the most critical part that will easily injure due to the shock from an external impact. Torn meniscus is one of the effects. This study will investigate the effect towards the meniscus within the knee joint during soccer ball kicking. We conduct a literary review of 14 journals that discuss the general view of meniscus and also soccer kicking. The selected topics for this review paper are meniscal function, meniscal movement, meniscal tears and also instep kick. As a finding, statistics show that most meniscal tears (73%) occurred in athletes who were soccer players, basketball players or skiers. The tear is frequently happening at the medial side rather than lateral side with a percentage of 70%.

  11. Incidence and treatment of intra-articular lesions associated with anterior cruciate ligament tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todor, Adrian; Nistor, Dan; Buescu, Cristian; Pojar, Adina; Lucaciu, Dan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to retrospectively review the patients admitted and treated in the "Alexandru Rădulescu" Orthopedics and Traumatology Clinic, Cluj-Napoca for an anterior cruciate ligament tear over a 2-year period and document the intra-articular lesions found at arthroscopy as well as the treatment used for these associated lesions. The case records of 88 patients operated for anterior cruciate ligament tear over a period of 2 years were reviewed. There were 67 males and 21 females with a mean age of 28.9 years, ranging from 14 to 49 years. After recording the patient demographics, we documented all the intra-articular lesions found during knee arthroscopy, as well as all procedures undertaken concomitant with the ACL reconstruction. 50 of the 88 patients (56.8%) had associated intra-articular lesions at the time of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The most common injury found was a meniscus tear, 48 patients (54.5%) had a meniscal pathology at the time of ligament reconstruction, medial meniscus being the most frequent injured one, found in 37 patients. Meniscectomy and meniscus suture were the procedures performed for these lesions, meniscectomy being more frequent. Chondral defects were the next associated injuries found with an incidence of 15.9% of the cases. The medial side of the knee was the most common site of chondral pathology. ACL tears are frequently associated with other intra-articular lesions, especially medial meniscus tears and chondral defects affecting the medial compartment. Such pathology most often needs surgical attention during the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

  12. Symptomatic discoid lateral meniscus: a clinical and arthroscopic study in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang; Zhang, Zhong; Li, Jian

    2016-08-05

    Discoid lateral meniscus (DLM) is relatively common in East Asia..Symptomatic discoid lateral meniscus (SDLM) is an important indication for knee arthroscopic surgery. However, studies investigating SDLM are rare. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics and intra-articular variants of SDLM in a Chinese population. We retrospectively reviewed all patients with SDLM from January 2005 to December 2014 in our hospital. Clinical variables included gender, age, duration, age of onset, affected side, symptoms and trauma history as well as arthroscopic findings: DLM types, tear patterns and concomitant medial meniscus tear, which were evaluated and compared statistically. Of the 496 consecutive participants with SDLM, females outnumbered males (69.6 % vs. 30.4 %). The age of onset ranged from 3 to 80 years (median, 31 years), and was significantly higher in females than in males (p meniscus tear (11, 2.2 %), at a significantly higher age compared with patients without tear (median, 57 years vs. 33 years, p meniscus.

  13. Middle-aged patients with an MRI-verified medial meniscal tear report symptoms commonly associated with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hare, Kristoffer B.; Stefan Lohmander, L.; Kise, Nina Jullum

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose — No consensus exists on when to perform arthroscopic partial meniscectomy in patients with a degenerative meniscal tear. Since MRI and clinical tests are not accurate in detecting a symptomatic meniscal lesion, the patient’s symptoms often play a large role when deciding...... when to perform surgery. We determined the prevalence and severity of self-reported knee symptoms in patients eligible for arthroscopic partial meniscectomy due to a degenerative meniscal tear. We investigated whether symptoms commonly considered to be related to meniscus injury were associated...... with early radiographic signs of knee osteoarthritis. Patients and methods — We included individual baseline items from the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score collected in 2 randomized controlled trials evaluating treatment for an MRI-verified degenerative medial meniscal tears in 199 patients aged...

  14. Rupture of posterior cruciate ligament leads to radial displacement of the medial meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Can; Deng, Zhenhan; Luo, Wei; Xiao, Wenfeng; Hu, Yihe; Liao, Zhan; Li, Kanghua; He, Hongbo

    2017-07-11

    To explore the association between the rupture of posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) and the radial displacement of medial meniscus under the conditions of different flexion and various axial loads. The radial displacement value of medial meniscus was measured for the specimens of normal adult knee joints, including 12 intact PCLs, 6 ruptures of the anterolateral bundle (ALB), 6 ruptures of the postmedial bundle (PMB), and 12 complete ruptures. The measurement was conducted at 0°, 30°, 60°, and 90° of knee flexion angles under 200 N, 400 N, 600 N, 800 N and 1000 N of axial loads respectively. The displacement values of medial meniscus of the ALB rupture group increased at 0° flexion under 800 N and 1000 N, and at 30°, 60° and 90° flexion under all loads in comparison with the PCL intact group. The displacement values of the PMB rupture group was higher at 0° and 90° flexion under all loads, and at 30° and 60° flexion under 800 N and 1000 N loads. The displacement of the PCL complete rupture group increased at all flexion angles under all loads. Either partial or complete rupture of the PCL can increase in the radial displacement of the medial meniscus, which may explain the degenerative changes that occuring in the medial meniscus due to PCL injury. Therefore, early reestablishment of the PCL is necessarily required in order to maintain stability of the knee joint after PCL injury.

  15. Development of biodegradable hyper-branched tissue adhesives for the repair of meniscus tears

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bochynska, A. I.; Van Tienen, T. G.; Hannink, G.; Buma, P.; Grijpma, D. W.

    2016-01-01

    Meniscus tears are one of the most commonly occurring injuries of the knee joint. Current meniscus repair techniques are challenging and do not bring fully satisfactory results. Tissue adhesives are a promising alternative, since they are easy to apply and cause minimal tissue trauma. In this study,

  16. Evaluating of Tear Meniscus Parameters with Optical Coherent Tomography in Dry-Eye Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülizar Soyugelen Demirok

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the changes in meniscus parameters with optical coherence tomography (OCT after treatment and consider the correlation between the OCT parameters and dry-eye tests. Material and Method: Thirty-two dry-eye patients and 30 healthy individuals were included. Visual acuities, biomicroscopic evaluation, Schirmer-I test, tear-break-up time (T-BUT, and lower-tear meniscus parameters measured with OCT were evaluated. Ocular surface disease index (OSDI was performed. The measurements were repeated on the 10th day and 1st month of the treatment. Lower tear meniscus height (LTMH, depth (LTMD, area (LTMA and α-angle were measured. The tear meniscus parameters of the dry-eye group were compared with the control group before treatment, and the correlation between the dry-eye tests and OCT measurements were evaluated. The change in the results of the dry-eye tests and OCT measurements with treatment were assessed. Results: There was statistically no significant difference between the age and gender of the patients in groups. Before treatment the mean Schirmer-I test, TBUT and OSDI scores were different. The LTMH and LTMA were higher in the control group. In the dry-eye group before treatment, there was a negative correlation between the OSDI score and OCT parameters, however, no meaningful correlation was observed between any other test and OCT parameters. Although there were no change in LTMD and α-angle with treatment, the 1st month values of LTMH and LTMA were significantly higher from the pre-treatment and 10th day values. Discussion: When diagnosing dry-eye, TBUT and OSDI scores were found to be more effective compared to Schirmer-I test for the diagnosis of dry eye. Although not adequate by itself, tear meniscus parameters measured with OCT, LTMH and LTMA, may be helpful for evaluating the efficacy of treatment, and the correlation of these two parameters with the OSDI score may increase the objectivity while questioning the

  17. Analysis of MR imaging with FSE and DESS for the diagnosis of meniscal tears in 316 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Gue; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Hong, Hyun Pyo

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of a magnetic resonance(MR) imaging strategy that primarily uses fast spin-echo(SE) sequences for the diagnosis of meniscal tears. The original clinical interpretations of MR images in 316 patients who underwent imaging for suspected internal derangement of a knee joint were correlated with results from subsequent arthroscopy (mean interval:48.9 days). In all patients, MR examinations included double-echo fast SE T2-weighted sagittal and coronal imaging and double-echo steady state (DESS) sequence sagittal imaging. In 199 patients fat-suppressed conventional SE T1-weighted sagittal imaging was used. In cases in which interpretation was erroneous, imaging findings and arthroscopy reports were reviewed. For ISO confirmed tears of the medial meniscus, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 94%, 93%, and 94%, respectively, while respective values for 147 confirmed tears of the lateral meniscus were 85%, 97%, and 91%. These values are within the ranges recently reported for imaging strategies relying predominantly on conventional SE sequences. Of the 12 false-positive tears of the medial meniscus, five menisci showed a high signal contacting the surface on only one image and seven, that in all cases were located in the periphery of the posterior horn, showed such signal on more than one image. Of the six false-positive tears of the lateral meniscus, three menisci showed a high signal contacting the surface on only one image. Of the nine false-negative tears of the medial meniscus, eight menisci showed an abnormal signal that did not demonstrate definitive contact with the surface. Of the 22 false-negative tears of the lateral meniscus, 18 menisci showed this same type of signal. Fast SE imaging of the knee can be an alternative to conventional SE imaging for the detection of meniscal tears. Most errors in our series were due to either an abnormal signal that failed to show definitive contact with the surface, a high signal which contacted

  18. Comparison of Tibiofemoral Contact Mechanics After Various Transtibial and All-Inside Fixation Techniques for Medial Meniscus Posterior Root Radial Tears in a Porcine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kyu Sung; Choi, Choong Hyeok; Bae, Tae Soo; Ha, Jeong Ku; Jun, Dal Jae; Wang, Joon Ho; Kim, Jin Goo

    2018-04-01

    To compare tibiofemoral contact mechanics after fixation for medial meniscus posterior root radial tears (MMPRTs). Seven fresh knees from mature pigs were used. Each knee was tested under 5 conditions: normal knee, MMPRT, pullout fixation with simple sutures, fixation with modified Mason-Allen sutures, and all-inside fixation using Fastfix 360. The peak contact pressure and contact surface area were evaluated using a capacitive sensor positioned between the meniscus and tibial plateau, under a 1,000-N compression force, at different flexion angles (0°, 30°, 60°, and 90°). The peak contact pressure was significantly higher in MMPRTs than in normal knees (P = .018). Although the peak contact pressure decreased significantly after fixation at all flexion angles (P = .031), it never recovered to the values noted in the normal meniscus. No difference was observed among fixation groups (P = .054). The contact surface area was significantly lower in MMPRTs than in the normal meniscus (P = .018) and increased significantly after fixation at all flexion angles (P = .018) but did not recover to within normal limits. For all flexion angles except 60°, the contact surface area was significantly higher for fixation with Mason-Allen sutures than for fixation with simple sutures or all-inside fixation (P = .027). At 90° of flexion, the contact surface area was significantly better for fixation with simple sutures than for all-inside fixation (P = .031). The peak contact pressure and contact surface area improved significantly after fixation, regardless of the fixation method, but did not recover to the levels noted in the normal meniscus after any type of fixation. Among the fixation methods evaluated in this time 0 study, fixation using modified Mason-Allen sutures provided a superior contact surface area compared with that noted after fixation using simple sutures or all-inside fixation, except at 60° of flexion. However, this study had insufficient power to

  19. The frequency of cartilage lesions in non-injured knees with symptomatic meniscus tears: results from an arthroscopic and NIR- (near-infrared) spectroscopic investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spahn, Gunter; Plettenberg, Holger; Hoffmann, Martin; Klemm, Holm-Torsten; Brochhausen-Delius, Christoph; Hofmann, Gunther O

    2017-06-01

    Are symptomatic tear injuries to the menisci of the knee frequently or always associated with cartilage damage to the corresponding articular surfaces and other joint surfaces, respectively? A total of 137 patients (medial n = 127; lateral n = 10) underwent a meniscus resection. These patients showed no signs of a clear radiographic arthrosis and no MRI-detectable cartilage lesions > grade II. Traumatic injury was ruled out with a thorough medical history. The indication for operation was made exclusively on the basis of distinct, clinically apparent meniscus signs. In addition to the ICRS classification, all articular surfaces were examined spectroscopically (NIRS, near-infrared spectroscopy). In 76.6% (n = 105) of all knees examined, clear cartilage damage (ICRS-grade III/IV) was found. For 43.8%, these were in the area of the patella, while for 34.3% they were in the area of the medial femur, and for 17.5%, in the area of the medial tibial plateau. More rarely, this damage was localized to the area of the trochlea (8.8%) or the lateral joint compartment (femoral 2.2%, tibial 15.3%). There were no significant differences between patients with medial or lateral meniscus lesions with respect to the distribution pattern of the joint injuries. During spectroscopic examination, pathological values were demonstrated (objective evidence of cartilage degeneration) in at least one of the examined articular surfaces (media n = 6, range 1-6). Through our investigations, a high, if not complete, concomitance of degenerative cartilage lesions and degenerative meniscus damage was demonstrated. From this it can be concluded that the entity of "isolated degenerative meniscus damage" clearly does not exist in practice. It is therefore highly probable that degenerative meniscus lesions, as a part of general joint degeneration, are to be interpreted in the context of the development of arthrosis. The practical consequences still are unclear. Patients after partial

  20. Posterior horn medial meniscal root tear: the prequel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umans, H. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Lenox Hill Radiology and Imaging Associates, New York, NY (United States); Morrison, W. [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); DiFelice, G.S. [Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY (United States); Vaidya, N. [Crystal Run Healthcare, Middletown, NY (United States); Winalski, C.S. [Cleveland Clinic, Imaging Institute, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2014-06-15

    To determine whether subarticular marrow changes deep to the posterior horn medial meniscal root anchor might predict subsequent medial meniscal root tear. Fifteen patients with MR-diagnosed posterior horn medial meniscal root (PHMMR) tear and a knee MRI antecedent to the tear were identified at three imaging centers over a 7-year period. The pre- and post-tear MR images were evaluated for marrow signal changes deep to the root anchor, meniscal root signal intensity, medial compartment articular cartilage thinning, and meniscal body extrusion. Images of 29 age- and gender-matched individuals with two MRIs of the same knee were reviewed as a control group. MRI in 11 of 15 (73 %) cases with subsequent PHMMR tear demonstrated linear subcortical marrow edema deep to the meniscal root anchor on the antecedent MRI compared to only 1 of 29 (3 %) non-tear controls (p < 0.0001). The abnormal signal resolved on post-tear MRI in all but two patients. Cyst-like changes deep to the PHMMR were present on initial MRI in three of 15 (23 %) cases and three of 29 (10 %) controls, persisting in all but one case on follow-up imaging. The PHMMR was gray on the initial MRI in seven of 15 (47 %) of cases that developed tears compared to four of 29 (14 %) controls (p < 0.0001). There was medial meniscal extrusion (MME) prior to tear in two of 15 (13 %) patients and in ten of 15 (67 %) patients after PHMMR failure. In the control group, MME was present in one (3 %) and three (10 %) of 29 subjects on the initial and follow-up MRIs, respectively. Articular cartilage loss was noted in two of 15 (15 %) cases before tear and nine of 15 (69 %) on follow-up imaging, as compared to one (3 %) and four (14 %) of 29 subjects in the control group. Subcortical marrow edema deep to the PHMMR may result from abnormal stresses and thus be a harbinger of meniscal root failure. This hypothesis is supported by resolution of these marrow signal changes after root tear. Following tear, extrusion of the

  1. MR imaging of medial collateral ligament injury and associated internal knee joint injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Chae Ha; Lee, Sun Kyoung; Lim, Dong Hun; Kim, Young Sook; Byun, Ju Nam; Kim, Young Chul; Oh, Jae Hee

    1996-01-01

    To assess the value of MR imaging in the diagnosis of medial collateral ligament injury of the knee, we used MR imaging to evaluate the characteristic findings in MCL tears and the frequency of associated knee joint injury. We retrospectively reviewed 26 patients within four weeks of MCL injury, analysed MR findings and correlated them with surgical findings. We evaluated discontinuity, heterogeneous signal intensity of MCL, thin band- like low signal intensity at MCL, facial edema, loss of clear demarcation of adjacent fat also combined bone injury, meniscus injury and other ligament injury. Complete MCL tears were present in 14 patients and partial tears in 12. Complete tears showed discontinuity of MCL, fascial edema and loss of clear demarcation from adjacent fat in 11 patients(79%);proximal MCL tears are more common than distal tears. Partial tears showed thin band-like low signal intensity within MCL, fascial edema and loss of clear demarcation from adjacent fat in seven patients (58%);all patient s with MCL injury showed fascial edema;in 12 patients there was loss of clear demarcation from adjacent fat. We could not, however, distinguish between complete tears and partial tears when MCL showed heterogeneous high signal intensity. Combined bone injury in MCL tears was found in eight patients(62%);the most common sites of this were the lateral femoral condyle and lateral tibial plateau. There was associated injury involving other ligaments(ACL:50%;PCL:27%). Combined meniscus injury in MCL tears was present in 17 patients and the most common meniscus site(50%) is the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. Complete MCL tears showed discontinuity of MCL and partial tears showed a thin band-like low signal intensity within MCL. All patients with MCL injury showed fascial edema, and loss of clear demarcation from adjacent fat. Various other injuries combine with MCL tears. MR imaging is therefore useful in the evaluation of medial collateral ligament injury and

  2. Arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy

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    Dašić Žarko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Meniscal injuries are common in professional or recreational sports as well as in daily activities. If meniscal lesions lead to physical impairment they usually require surgical treatment. Arthroscopic treatment of meniscal injuries is one of the most often performed orthopedic operative procedures. Methods. The study analyzed the results of arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy in 213 patients in a 24-month period, from 2006, to 2008. Results. In our series of arthroscopically treated medial meniscus tears we noted 78 (36.62% vertical complete bucket handle lesions, 19 (8.92% vertical incomplete lesions, 18 (8.45% longitudinal tears, 35 (16.43% oblique tears, 18 (8.45% complex degenerative lesions, 17 (7.98% radial lesions and 28 (13.14% horisontal lesions. Mean preoperative International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC score was 49.81%, 1 month after the arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy the mean IKDC score was 84.08%, and 6 months after mean IKDC score was 90.36%. Six months after the procedure 197 (92.49% of patients had good or excellent subjective postoperative clinical outcomes, while 14 (6.57% patients subjectively did not notice a significant improvement after the intervention, and 2 (0.93% patients had no subjective improvement after the partial medial meniscectomy at all. Conclusion. Arthroscopic partial medial meniscetomy is minimally invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedure and in well selected cases is a method of choice for treatment of medial meniscus injuries when repair techniques are not a viable option. It has small rate of complications, low morbidity and fast rehabilitation.

  3. MR imaging of the anatomy of the anterior horn of the medial meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Coninck, Tineke; Vanrietvelde, Frederik; Seynaeve, Patrick; Verdonk, Peter; Verstraete, Koenraad

    2017-04-01

    Background In cadaveric and arthroscopic studies different insertion locations of the anterior horn of the medial meniscus (AHMM) have been described. Purpose To investigate if the different insertion locations of the AHMM, as described in cadaveric studies, can be determined on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Material and Methods MR images of 100 patients without meniscal tears on MRI were retrospectively evaluated. Two observers classified the AHMM insertion based on its position relative to the anterior tibial edge and the medial tibial spine. The association between AHMM insertion and tibial plateau slope, meniscal radial displacement, and anterior intermeniscal ligament (AIL) presence was investigated. Results The AHMM inserted posterior to the anterior tibial edge in 93 knees and anterior to the tibial edge in seven knees (= type III). Of the 93 knees with AHMM insertion posterior to the anterior tibial edge, 63 inserted lateral to the medial tibial spine (= type I) and 30 medial (= type II). The AHMMs inserting anterior to the tibial edge had a significantly ( P  0.05). A strong inter- and intra-observer agreement was observed. Conclusion Three different bony insertion locations of the AHMM, as described in cadaveric studies, could be identified on MRI. All AHMMs inserting anterior to the tibial edge displayed an AIL. Whether there is a clinical correlation with these insertion patterns remains unclear.

  4. Repair of Avascular Meniscus Tears with Electrospun Collagen Scaffolds Seeded with Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Jihye; Sovani, Sujata; Glembotski, Nicholas E; Du, Jiang; Jin, Sungho; Grogan, Shawn P; D'Lima, Darryl D

    2016-03-01

    The self-healing capacity of an injured meniscus is limited to the vascularized regions and is especially challenging in the inner avascular regions. As such, we investigated the use of human meniscus cell-seeded electrospun (ES) collagen type I scaffolds to produce meniscal tissue and explored whether these cell-seeded scaffolds can be implanted to repair defects created in meniscal avascular tissue explants. Human meniscal cells (derived from vascular and avascular meniscal tissue) were seeded on ES scaffolds and cultured. Constructs were evaluated for cell viability, gene expression, and mechanical properties. To determine potential for repair of meniscal defects, human meniscus avascular cells were seeded and cultured on aligned ES collagen scaffolds for 4 weeks before implantation. Surgical defects resembling "longitudinal tears" were created in the avascular zone of bovine meniscus and implanted with cell-seeded collagen scaffolds and cultured for 3 weeks. Tissue regeneration and integration were evaluated by histology, immunohistochemistry, mechanical testing, and magentic resonance imaging. Ex vivo implantation with cell-seeded collagen scaffolds resulted in neotissue that was significantly better integrated with the native tissue than acellular collagen scaffolds or untreated defects. Human meniscal cell-seeded ES collagen scaffolds may therefore be useful in facilitating meniscal repair of avascular meniscus tears.

  5. A meta-analysis of clinical and radiographic outcomes of posterior horn medial meniscus root repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kyu Sung; Ha, Jeong Ku; Ra, Ho Jong; Kim, Jin Goo

    2016-05-01

    Although interest in medial meniscus posterior root tear (MMPRT) repair has increased, few case series have been reported. This meta-analysis aimed to examine the clinical and radiological effects of MMPRT repair by pooling pre- and post-operative data from case-series reports. A literature search was performed using MEDLINE/PubMed, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and EMBASE databases. Pre- and post-operative data were pooled to investigate the effects of MMPRT repair, including the Lysholm score improvement, meniscal extrusion (mm) reduction, progression of the Kellgren-Lawrence (K-L) grade, and cartilage status according to the Outerbridge classification. Treatment effects included paired standardized mean differences (difference in the pre- and post-operative mean outcomes divided by the standard deviation) for the Lysholm score and meniscal extrusion, as well as the pooled event rates of progression of K-L grade and cartilage status. As treatment effects, the Lysholm score increased by as much as 3.675 (P meniscus extrusion was not reduced (n.s.). The overall pooled event rates of progression of K-L grade and cartilage status were 10.6 and 17.3 % (P meniscus extrusion was not reduced. Considering the occurrence of progression of K-L grade and cartilage status, it did not prevent the progression of arthrosis completely. Based on these results, repair results in favourable outcomes for MMPRT. Meta-analysis, Level IV.

  6. Correlation of histological examination of meniscus with MR images; Focused on high signal intensity of the meniscus not caused by definite meniscal tear and impact on MR diagnosis of tears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chun Ai; Kim, Min Ki; Kim, In Hwan; Lee, Ju Hong; Jang, Kyu Yun; Lee, Sang Yong [Chonbuk National University Hospital, Chonbuk National University College of Medicine, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    To document the causes of high signal intensity of the meniscus which is not caused by definite meniscal tears on MR imaging, through correlation with histological examination. For the correlation between the MR image and histology, we obtained prospectively 31 meniscal specimens from 21 patients. Proton density-weighted turbo spin-echo MR images were used. Minimal tear, thinning of the lamellar layer, degeneration of the central layer, and radial tie fibers were detected upon histological examination, and were correlated with the corresponding MR images. Minimal tear of the lamellar layer was seen in 60 zones out of 100 slides. On MR images, 29 (48.3%) of these 60 zones had high signal intensity. Thinning of the lamellar layer was seen in 24 zones, with 7 (29.2%) having high signal intensity. 57 central zones showed degenerative change in the central layer and high signal intensity on all corresponding MR images. Radial tie fibers in the central layer appeared as high signal intensity areas. Minimal tear and thinning of the lamellar layer, degeneration and radial tie fibers of the central layer of the meniscus cause high signal intensity on MR images.

  7. Development of biodegradable hyper-branched tissue adhesives for the repair of meniscus tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochyńska, A I; Van Tienen, T G; Hannink, G; Buma, P; Grijpma, D W

    2016-03-01

    Meniscus tears are one of the most commonly occurring injuries of the knee joint. Current meniscus repair techniques are challenging and do not bring fully satisfactory results. Tissue adhesives are a promising alternative, since they are easy to apply and cause minimal tissue trauma. In this study, a series of amphiphilic copolymers based on polyethylene glycol, trimethylene carbonate and citric acid were synthesized and subsequently end-functionalized with hexamethylene diisocyanate to form reactive adhesive materials. The shear adhesive strength of the networks to bovine meniscus tissue measured in a lap-shear adhesion test ranged between 20 and 80 kPa, which was better than for fibrin glue (10 kPa). The elastic modulus of the networks depended on composition and was in the same range as that of human meniscus. Cell compatibility was assessed using Alamar Blue staining after incubation of the bovine meniscus cells with different concentrations of the glues for 7 days. Cell viability was not affected after adding up to 3mg of the adhesive/mL of medium. The proposed materials are suitable candidates to be used as resorbable tissue adhesives for meniscus repair. They have excellent mechanical and adhesive properties that can be adjusted by varying the composition of the copolymers. Meniscal tears often occur and current treatment strategies do not bring fully satisfactory results. Use of biodegradable tissue adhesives would be an interesting option, but currently available adhesives are not suited due to toxicity or poor mechanical properties. Here, we describe the development of novel biodegradable, hyper-branched, adhesive copolymers. These adhesives cure upon contact with water forming flexible networks. Their adhesion to bovine meniscus tissue was significantly better than that of clinically used fibrin glue. The tensile properties of the cured networks were in the same range of values of the human meniscus. When physiologically relevant amounts were added to

  8. Snapping Knee Caused by Medial Meniscal Cyst

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    Tsuyoshi Ohishi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Snapping phenomenon around the medial aspect of the knee is rare. We present this case of snapping knee caused by the sartorius muscle over a large medial meniscal cyst in a 66-year-old female. Magnetic resonance images demonstrated a large medial meniscal cyst with a horizontal tear of the medial meniscus. Arthroscopic cyst decompression with limited meniscectomy resulted in the disappearance of snapping, and no recurrence of the cyst was observed during a 2-year follow-up period.

  9. Evaluation of medial and lateral meniscus thicknesses in early osteoarthritis of the knee with magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamac, B.; Ozdemir, S.; Colak, T.; Ozbek, A.; Sarisoy, Hasan T.; Akansel, G.

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate early changes occurring in both medial and lateral meniscus thickness from the knees of patients with osteoarthritis (Oa). We conducted this study in the Department of Anatomy and Division of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Klucel University, Klucel, Turkey during the period 2004 to 2005. In this study, we measured the thickness of the medial and lateral meniscus in a group of 36 (50 knees) consecutive patients with chronic knee pain, and clinical findings of early Oa, and 10 (20 knees) control subjects using MRI. The thickness of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus and anterior horn of the lateral meniscus were significantly higher in the Oa patients compared with the control subjects. This study showed that meniscal degeneration in early stage Oa is not evenly distributed in the knee. Thickening of the menisci in some areas may occur due to their own localization and biomechanics. (author)

  10. Isolated partial tear and partial avulsion of the medial head of gastrocnemius tendon presenting as posterior medial knee pain

    OpenAIRE

    Watura, Christopher; Ward, Anthony; Harries, William

    2010-01-01

    We present a case of medial head of gastrocnemius tendon tear. The type of injury widely reported in the literature is tear of the medial head of gastrocnemius muscle or ‘tennis leg’. We previously reported an isolated partial tear and longitudinal split of the tendon to the medial head of gastrocnemius at its musculotendinous junction. The case we now present has notable differences; the tear was interstitial and at the proximal (femoral attachment) part of the tendon, the patient’s symptoms...

  11. Impact of Partial and complete rupture of anterior cruciate ligament on medial meniscus: A cadavaric study

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    Wei Jiang

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: Similar to complete rupture, partial rupture of ACL can also trigger strain concentration on medial meniscus, especially posterior horn, which may be a more critical reason for meniscus injury associated with chronic ACL deficiency.

  12. The Inverted Discoid Meniscus Segment: Clinical, Radiographic, and Arthroscopic Description of a Hidden Tear Pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMont, Lauren; Ellis, Henry; Wise, Kelsey; Wilson, Philip

    2016-06-01

    A flipped, or inverted, meniscus segment is easily visualized in the normal meniscus. However, an inverted discoid meniscus segment may be difficult to appreciate because the tear occurs more centrally and leaves more meniscal rim; thus, it may be undertreated if not addressed during arthroscopy. To describe findings on clinical history, radiographs, MRI, and arthroscopy of a lateral discoid meniscus with an inverted segment and compare them with characteristics of a lateral discoid meniscus without an inverted segment. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Between 2009 and 2012, a retrospective series of 121 consecutive knee arthroscopies for symptomatic lateral discoid meniscus were reviewed for the presence of an inverted fragment. Chart review of clinical presentation, operative reports, radiographic images, and arthroscopic images was performed. Comparative analysis of the clinical presentation between lateral discoid menisci with an inverted segment and noninverted lateral discoid menisci was performed by use of Fisher exact test and Mann-Whitney test. Nineteen patients with an inverted discoid meniscus segment (14 males, 5 females; average age, 15.0 years; range, 9.5-17.0 years) were compared with 102 patients with a noninverted discoid meniscus (53 males, 49 females; average age, 12.3 years; range, 5-17.0 years) (P = .011 for sex and P meniscus patients with an inverted segment had activity-related knee pain. Only 4 patients (21.0%) reported mechanical symptoms. Patients with an inverted discoid segment, compared with patients with discoid menisci without inverted segments, were more likely to have instability and effusion (P = .012 and P meniscus patients with an inverted segment (94.7%) had an injury, while only 41.2% of patients with noninverted symptomatic discoid menisci had an injury (P meniscus. During arthroscopy, the inverted discoid segment appeared normal, without a tear; upon probing, however, the inverted segment could be exposed. An

  13. Potential Market for New Meniscus Repair Strategies: Evaluation of the MOON Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetzer, Gary B.; Spindler, Kurt P.; Amendola, Annunziato; Andrish, Jack T.; Bergfeld, John A.; Dunn, Warren R.; Flanigan, David C.; Jones, Morgan; Kaeding, Christopher C.; Marx, Robert G.; Matava, Matthew J.; McCarty, Eric C.; Parker, Richard D.; Wolcott, Michelle; Vidal, Armando; Wolf, Brian R.; Wright, Rick W.

    2013-01-01

    Background An estimated 200,000 ACL reconstructions are performed each year in the United States. The presence of concomitant meniscus tears and subsequent treatment at the time of ACL reconstruction may determine long-term outcomes of these knees. The authors contend that a substantial number of these meniscal tears are treated in a fashion that reduces meniscal function and that new technologies are needed to treat meniscal tears in a fashion that preserves function. A large cohort of patients with meniscal tears is needed to demonstrate this need. The purpose of this study is to determine the incidence of meniscal tears, describe tear morphology, and selected treatment in the MOON prospective longitudinal cohort of ACL reconstruction. We also will demonstrate based on national statistics the large potential market that exists for future tissue engineering aimed at preserving meniscal function. Methods A multicenter cohort of 1014 patients undergoing ACL reconstruction between January 2002 and December 2003 were evaluated. All procedures were performed by nine fellowship trained sports medicine orthopaedic surgeons. Data on patient demographics, presence of a meniscus tear at time of ACL reconstruction, tear morphology, and meniscal treatment were collected prospectively. Meniscal tears were categorized into three potential tissue engineering treatment strategies: all-biologic repair, advanced repair, and scaffold replacement. Results 1014 ACL reconstructions were performed over the two year period. The median age at the time of surgery was 24 years. Thirty-six percent of the knees had medial meniscal tears and 44% of the knees had lateral meniscal tears. Longitudinal tears were the most common tear morphology. The most frequent treatment modality was partial meniscectomy (60%). Thirty percent of medial meniscal tears and 10% of lateral meniscal tears could be treated with all-biologic repair, 32% of medial meniscal tears and 28% of lateral meniscal tears could

  14. Acute Medial Plantar Fascia Tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoe, Stephanie C; Mazzola, Timothy J

    2016-06-01

    A 32-year-old man who participated in competitive soccer came to physical therapy via direct access for a chief complaint of plantar foot pain. The clinical examination findings and mechanism of injury raised a concern for a plantar fascia tear, so the patient was referred to the physician and magnetic resonance imaging was obtained. The magnetic resonance image confirmed a high-grade, partial-thickness, proximal plantar fascia tear with localized edema at the location of the medial band. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(6):495. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.0409.

  15. Time course of changes in tear meniscus radius and blink rate after instillation of artificial tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandlitz, Stefan; Purslow, Christine; Murphy, Paul J; Pult, Heiko

    2014-08-26

    Using a novel digital meniscometer (PDM), alterations in tear meniscus radius (TMR) were measured simultaneously with blink rate (BR) following the instillation of artificial tears. Central TMR and BR of 22 subjects (11 male and 11 female; mean age, 24.3 ± 2.6 SD years) were measured at baseline, and 0, 1, 5, 10, and 30 minutes after instillation of an artificial tear containing hydroxypropyl-guar and glycol (SYS) or saline (SAL). A dose of 35 μL was applied in one eye in a randomized order with a washout period between each drop. For SAL, compared to baseline TMR (0.33 ± 0.08 mm), TMR significantly increased with drop instillation (1.55 ± 0.69 mm) and at 1 minute (0.66 ± 0.36 mm; P tears. Difference in residence time reflects the different viscosity of each drop. An overload with a large drop may result in an initially increased BR. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  16. Meniscus transplantation in skeletally immature patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocher, Mininder S; Tepolt, Frances A; Vavken, Patrick

    2016-07-01

    Meniscal pathology in skeletally immature patients includes meniscal tears and discoid lateral meniscus. Total or subtotal meniscectomy may occur in patients with discoid lateral meniscus or severe meniscal tears. Meniscal transplantation may be an option in skeletally immature patients status after total or subtotal meniscectomy with knee symptoms or dysfunction. This study focuses on the surgical technique and short-term outcomes of meniscus transplantation in skeletally immature patients. We reviewed our clinical database for skeletally immature patients who had undergone meniscus transplantation with a minimum of 2 years of follow-up. Patients were contacted, invited for a physical exam, and asked to complete a Pedi-IKDC, Lysholm, and Tegner outcomes questionnaire. The study protocol was approved by the responsible institutional review board. Three patients (two females/one male) were eligible for the study, each of whom responded to our invitation indicating availability for physical exam and questionnaire. Two patients had undergone subtotal discoid meniscus resection, leading to early lateral compartment degeneration. One patient developed advanced degeneration after a delay in treatment for a medial bucket-handle tear associated with anterior cruciate ligament rupture. The mean age of the patients at the time of surgery was 12.6±2.3 years. At a mean follow-up of 31±20 months, the mean Pedi-IKDC score was 68.3±4, the mean Lysholm was 55.7±22.3, and the median Tegner was 7 points. There were no indications of growth deformity during the regular postoperative radiological assessments. One patient required subsequent lysis of adhesions along the lateral mini arthrotomy and mobilization under anesthesia. The other two patients were able to return to sports at the same level as before meniscus transplantation and were able to do so within 9 months postoperatively. Over-resection of discoid menisci as well as untreated meniscus injury, the latter typically in

  17. Quantitative histological grading methods to assess subchondral bone and synovium changes subsequent to medial meniscus transection in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloefkorn, Heidi E; Allen, Kyle D

    The importance of the medial meniscus to knee health is demonstrated by studies which show meniscus injuries significantly increase the likelihood of developing osteoarthritis (OA), and knee OA can be modeled in rodents using simulated meniscus injuries. Traditionally, histological assessments of OA in these models have focused on damage to the articular cartilage; however, OA is now viewed as a disease of the entire joint as an organ system. The aim of this study was to develop quantitative histological measures of bone and synovial changes in a rat medial meniscus injury model of knee OA. To initiate OA, a medial meniscus transection (MMT) and a medial collateral ligament transection (MCLT) were performed in 32 male Lewis rats (MMT group). MCLT alone served as the sham procedure in 32 additional rats (MCLT sham group). At weeks 1, 2, 4, and 6 post-surgery, histological assessment of subchondral bone and synovium was performed (n = 8 per group per time point). Trabecular bone area and the ossification width at the osteochondral interface increased in both the MMT and MCLT groups. Subintimal synovial cell morphology also changed in MMT and MCLT groups relative to naïve animals. OA affects the joint as an organ system, and quantifying changes throughout an entire joint can improve our understanding of the relationship between joint destruction and painful OA symptoms following meniscus injury.

  18. A Case Report of Intra-articular Bee Venom Pharmacopuncture combining with oriental medical treatment for Acute Traumatic Partial Tear of Meniscus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Jae-Hoon

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This case was report of intra-articular bee venom pharmacopuncture injection on the patient with Acute Traumatic Partial tear of meniscus. We used intra-articular bee venom pharmacopuncture injection to Acute Traumatic Partial tear of meniscus diagnosed by symptoms and MR imaging. Be under treatment if necessary we prescribed herbal medication and physiotherapy. The state of patient was measured by Visual Analog Scale(VAS and Walking time and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities(WOMAC Index score. After several times of treatments, noticeable reduction of pain was measured and increased time of walking on floor and decreased WOMAC score. This results suggest that intra-articular bee venom pharmacopuncture injection are effective to treatments of Acute Traumatic Partial tear of meniscus.

  19. The relationship between chondromalacia patella, medial meniscal tear and medial periarticular bursitis in patients with osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Resorlu Mustafa

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the presence of bursitis in the medial compartment of the knee (pes anserine, semimembranosus-tibial collateral ligament, and medial collateral ligament bursa in osteoarthritis, chondromalacia patella and medial meniscal tears.

  20. MRI imaging of displaced meniscal tears: Report of a case highlighting new potential pitfalls of the MRI signs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, Abhishek; Brar, Rahat; Rana, Shaleen

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been found to be an excellent imaging tool for meniscal injuries. Various MRI signs have been described to detect displaced meniscal injuries, specifically the bucket-handle tears. Although these signs are quite helpful in diagnosing meniscal tears, various pitfalls have also been reported for these signs. Double anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) sign refers to presence of a linear hypointense soft tissue anterior to the ACL, which represented the flipped bucket-handle tear of the meniscus. Disproportional posterior horn and flipped meniscus signs represent asymmetrically thickened horns of the menisci due to overlying displaced meniscal fragments. We report a case wherein MRI of the knee showed tear and displacement of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) and vastus medialis complex, medial collateral ligament (MCL), and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) mimicking these signs. To our knowledge, internally displaced MPFL and MCLs have not been described as mimics for displaced meniscal fragments

  1. Arthroscopic Treatment of Discoid Lateral Meniscus Tears in Children With Achondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanda, Alfred; Wallace, Maegen; Bober, Michael B; Mackenzie, William

    2016-01-01

    Achondroplasia is the most common form of skeletal dysplasia that presents to the pediatric orthopaedist. More than half of achondroplasia patients are affected with knee pain. It is thought that the majority of this pain may be due to spinal stenosis, hip pathology, or knee malalignment. Discoid menisci can be a source of lateral knee joint pain in skeletally immature patients in general. We present the first case series of patients with achondroplasia who had symptomatic discoid lateral menisci treated with arthroscopic knee surgery. The charts of 6 patients (8 knees) with achondroplasia who underwent arthroscopic knee surgery for symptomatic discoid lateral menisci were collected. History and physical examination data, magnetic resonance imaging findings, and operative reports were reviewed. Meniscal tear configuration and treatment type (meniscectomy vs. repair) were noted. Each patient was found to have a tear of the discoid meniscus. All menisci were treated with saucerization. In addition, meniscal repair was performed in 2 cases, partial meniscectomy in 3 cases, and subtotal meniscectomy in 3 cases. Two patients had bilateral discoid meniscal tears which were treated. Average follow-up was 2.4 years (range, 1 to 4.5 y) and the average pediatric International Knee Documentation Committee (pedi-IKDC) score was 85.3% (range, 75% to 95.4%). At final follow-up, all patients were pain free and able to return to full activities. Discoid meniscus tears may be a source of lateral joint line pain in patients with achondroplasia. These injuries can be successfully treated with arthroscopic surgery in this patient population. Future studies need to be done to determine the exact incidence of discoid menisci in achondroplasia patients and also to determine whether there is a genetic relationship between the 2 conditions. Level IV-case series.

  2. Usefulness of turbo spin-echo MR imaging in meniscal tears of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Gun Young; Choi, Chang Lak; Chung, Jin Young; Han, Tae Il; Jang, Hong Im; Kim, Ji Min; Han, Hyun Young; Song, Mun Kab; Yang, Chang Kyu

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness and diagnostic accuracy of turbo spin-echo(TSE) proton-density and T2-weighted images of meniscal tears of the knee. We retrospectively evaluated the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of TSE proton density and T2-weighted images of meniscal tears confirmed arthroscopically or surgically in 47 patients(98 menisci). The routine TSE parameters used in all patients were the dual echo sequence with sagittal proton density and T2-weighed images(4000/16, 90/5/2 [TR/effectiveTE/ETL/NEX]), and fat-suppressed coronal proton density and T2-weighted images. The chi-square test was used for statistical analysis. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of TSE proton density images for the detection of meniscal tears were 93.9%, 93.8%, and 93.9%, respectively, in the medial meniscus, and 92.9%, 91.4%, and 91.8% in the lateral. On T2-weighted images the corresponding figures were 87.9%, 8%, and 89.8%, respectively, in the medial meniscus, and 64.3%, 91.4%, and 83.7% in the lateral. With regard to sensitivity and accuracy, TSE proton density images of meniscal tears were superior to TSE T2-weighted images.=20

  3. Validation of a semi-automatic protocol for the assessment of the tear meniscus central area based on open-source software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena-Verdeal, Hugo; Garcia-Resua, Carlos; Yebra-Pimentel, Eva; Giraldez, Maria J.

    2017-08-01

    Purpose: Different lower tear meniscus parameters can be clinical assessed on dry eye diagnosis. The aim of this study was to propose and analyse the variability of a semi-automatic method for measuring lower tear meniscus central area (TMCA) by using open source software. Material and methods: On a group of 105 subjects, one video of the lower tear meniscus after fluorescein instillation was generated by a digital camera attached to a slit-lamp. A short light beam (3x5 mm) with moderate illumination in the central portion of the meniscus (6 o'clock) was used. Images were extracted from each video by a masked observer. By using an open source software based on Java (NIH ImageJ), a further observer measured in a masked and randomized order the TMCA in the short light beam illuminated area by two methods: (1) manual method, where TMCA images was "manually" measured; (2) semi-automatic method, where TMCA images were transformed in an 8-bit-binary image, then holes inside this shape were filled and on the isolated shape, the area size was obtained. Finally, both measurements, manual and semi-automatic, were compared. Results: Paired t-test showed no statistical difference between both techniques results (p = 0.102). Pearson correlation between techniques show a significant positive near to perfect correlation (r = 0.99; p Conclusions: This study showed a useful tool to objectively measure the frontal central area of the meniscus in photography by free open source software.

  4. [SPECIFIC DIAGNOSTIC SIGNIFICANCE OF "RIPPLE SIGN" OF MEDIAL FEMORAL CONDYLE UNDER ARTHROSCOPE IN MEDIAL LONGITUDINAL MENISCAL TEARS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren Shiyou; Sun, Limang; Chen, Guofei; Jiang, Changqing; Zhang, Xintao; Zhang Wentao

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the reliability of the "ripple sign" on the upper surface of the medial femoral condyle in the diagnosis of medial longitudinal meniscal tears under arthroscope. Between June 2013 and June 2014, 56 patients with knee injuries were included. There were 35 males and 21 females with an average age of 22.2 years (range, 12-38 years). The causes of injury were sports in 40 cases, falling in 10 cases, and traffic accident in 6 cases. The injury was located at the left knee in 22 cases and at the right knee in 34 cases. The disease duration was 10-40 days (mean, 20.2 days). Of 56 patients, 15 cases had simple medial meniscal injury; 41 cases had combined injuries, including anterior cruciate ligament injury in 38 cases, posterior cruciate ligament injury in 2 cases, and patellar dislocation in 1 case. The "ripple sign" was observed under arthroscope before operation. Repair of medial meniscal injury and reconstruction of cruciate ligament were performed. The positive "ripple sign" was seen under arthroscope in all patients, who were diagnosed to have longitudinal meniscal tears, including 23 cases of mild "ripple sign" , 28 cases of moderate "ripple sign", and 5 cases of severe "ripple sign". The "ripple sign" on the upper surface of the medial femoral condyle is a reliable diagnostic evidence of medial longitudinal meniscal tears.

  5. The relationship between chondromalacia patella, medial meniscal tear and medial periarticular bursitis in patients with osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Resorlu Mustafa; Doner Davut; Karatag Ozan; Toprak Canan Akgun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background This study investigated the presence of bursitis in the medial compartment of the knee (pes anserine, semimembranosus-tibial collateral ligament, and medial collateral ligament bursa) in osteoarthritis, chondromalacia patella and medial meniscal tears. Patients and methods Radiological findings of 100 patients undergoing magnetic resonance imaging with a preliminary diagnosis of knee pain were retrospectively evaluated by two radiologists. The first radiologist assessed al...

  6. In-vivo evaluation of the kinematic behavior of an artificial medial meniscus implant: A pilot study using open-MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Coninck, Tineke; Elsner, Jonathan J; Linder-Ganz, Eran; Cromheecke, Michiel; Shemesh, Maoz; Huysse, Wouter; Verdonk, René; Verstraete, Koenraad; Verdonk, Peter

    2014-09-01

    In this pilot study we wanted to evaluate the kinematics of a knee implanted with an artificial polycarbonate-urethane meniscus device, designed for medial meniscus replacement. The static kinematic behavior of the implant was compared to the natural medial meniscus of the non-operated knee. A second goal was to evaluate the motion pattern, the radial displacement and the deformation of the meniscal implant. Three patients with a polycarbonate-urethane implant were included in this prospective study. An open-MRI was used to track the location of the implant during static weight-bearing conditions, within a range of motion of 0° to 120° knee flexion. Knee kinematics were evaluated by measuring the tibiofemoral contact points and femoral roll-back. Meniscus measurements (both natural and artificial) included anterior-posterior meniscal movement, radial displacement, and meniscal height. No difference (P>0.05) was demonstrated in femoral roll-back and tibiofemoral contact points during knee flexion between the implanted and the non-operated knees. Meniscal measurements showed no significant difference in radial displacement and meniscal height (P>0.05) at all flexion angles, in both the implanted and non-operated knees. A significant difference (P ≤ 0.05) in anterior-posterior movement during flexion was observed between the two groups. In this pilot study, the artificial polycarbonate-urethane implant, indicated for medial meniscus replacement, had no influence on femoral roll-back and tibiofemoral contact points, thus suggesting that the joint maintains its static kinematic properties after implantation. Radial displacement and meniscal height were not different, but anterior-posterior movement was slightly different between the implant and the normal meniscus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Fat-suppressed volume isotropic turbo spin echo acquisition (VISTA) MR imaging in evaluating radial and root tears of the meniscus: Focusing on reader-defined axial reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Daekeon; Lee, Young Han; Kim, Sungjun; Song, Ho-Taek; Suh, Jin-Suck, E-mail: jss@yuhs.ac

    2013-12-01

    Objective: To assess the diagnostic value of fat-suppressed (FS) three-dimensional (3D) volume isotropic turbo spin echo acquisition (VISTA) imaging in detecting radial and root tears of the meniscus, including the reader-defined reformatted axial (RDA) plane. Materials and methods: Twenty-three patients with arthroscopically confirmed radial or root tears of the meniscus underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with 2D and FS 3D VISTA sequences. MRIs were reviewed independently by two musculoskeletal radiologists blinded to the arthroscopic findings. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and interobserver agreement were calculated for radial and root tears. Both radiologists reported confidence scale for the presence of meniscal tears in 2D axial imaging, 3D axial imaging, and RDA imaging, based on a five-point scale. Wilcoxon's signed rank test was used to compare confidence scale. Results: The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of FS 3D VISTA MR imaging versus 2D MR imaging were as follows: 96%, 96%, and 96% versus 91%, 91%, and 91%, respectively in reader 1, and 96%, 96%, and 96% versus 83%, 91%, and 87%, respectively, in reader 2. Interobserver agreement for detecting meniscal tears was excellent (κ = 1) with FS 3D VISTA. The confidence scale was significantly higher for 3D axial images than 2D imaging (p = 0.03) and significantly higher in RDA images than 3D axial image in detecting radial and root tears. Conclusions: FS 3D VISTA had a better diagnostic performance in evaluating radial and root tears of the meniscus. The reader-defined reformatted axial plane obtained from FS 3D VISTA MR imaging is useful in detecting radial and root tears of the meniscus.

  8. MR diagnosis of meniscal tears of the knee: analysis of error patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dyck, Pieter; Gielen, Jan; D'Anvers, Jan; Vanhoenacker, Filip; Dossche, Lieven; Van Gestel, Jozef; Parizel, Paul M

    2007-11-01

    Despite high accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for diagnosing meniscal tears, MR findings do not always agree with surgical findings. We performed a blinded, retrospective study to analyze the nature and frequency of errors in the MR diagnosis of meniscal tears. Medical records of 100 consecutive patients who underwent MR and arthroscopy of the knee at our institution were reviewed. Twelve patients underwent prior meniscal surgery. Twenty-three patients had 27 discrepancies between MR and surgical findings. These were independently reviewed by two additional musculoskeletal radiologists in a double blinded fashion. Original incorrect diagnoses were categorized as either unavoidable, interpretation error or equivocal for meniscal tear. MR accuracy was 88% for the medial and 85% for the lateral meniscus. Of 27 incorrect MR diagnoses, 12 (44%) were unavoidable, 10 (37%) equivocal and 5 (19%) interpretation errors. Of the 67 medial meniscal tears, 12 (18%) were missed. Eight (67%) of these 12 were categorized as equivocal, including three postoperative menisci. Of 30 lateral tears, 12 (40%) were missed, 7 (58%) of which were categorized as unavoidable. Of these 12, 11 (92%) showed fraying of the inner edge, which was shaved at arthroscopy (n = 8) or had stable tear treated conservatively (n = 3). There were three false-positive diagnoses, all occuring in the lateral meniscus, two of which were unavoidable and one interpretation error. Of all missed lateral meniscal tears, most are unavoidable and related to confusion between what represents fraying and what represents a tear. Unavoidable false-positive diagnoses are infrequent and may be related to incomplete arthroscopic evaluation. Subtle or equivocal findings still make MR diagnosis difficult, even for experienced radiologists.

  9. Effect of Exercise Therapy Compared with Arthroscopic Surgery on Knee Muscle Strength and Functional Performance in Middle-Aged Patients with Degenerative Meniscus Tears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensrud, Silje; Risberg, May Arna; Roos, Ewa M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to compare the effect of a 12-wk exercise therapy program and arthroscopic partial meniscectomy on knee strength and functional performance in middle-aged patients with degenerative meniscus tears. DESIGN: A total of 82 patients (mean age, 49 yrs; 35% women......) with a symptomatic, unilateral, magnetic resonance imaging-verified degenerative meniscus tear and no or mild radiographic osteoarthritis were randomly assigned to a supervised neuromuscular and strength exercise program or arthroscopic partial meniscectomy. Outcomes assessed 3 mos after intervention initiation were...

  10. Acute compartment syndrome after medial gastrocnemius tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sit, Yan Kit; Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-02-01

    Acute compartment syndrome after medial gastrocnemius tear is very rare. It can involve the superficial posterior compartment alone or progress to involve all the 4 compartments of the lower legs. Those patients with high pain tolerance and minor trauma can lead to delayed presentation. Immediate fasciotomy is the treatment of choice. Therapeutic Level IV, Case Study. © 2014 The Author(s).

  11. Rapidly dissociated autologous meniscus tissue enhances meniscus healing: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numpaisal, Piya-On; Rothrauff, Benjamin B; Gottardi, Riccardo; Chien, Chung-Liang; Tuan, Rocky S

    Treatment of meniscus tears is a persistent challenge in orthopedics. Although cell therapies have shown promise in promoting fibrocartilage formation in in vitro and preclinical studies, clinical application has been limited by the paucity of autologous tissue and the need for ex vivo cell expansion. Rapid dissociation of the free edges of the anterior and posterior meniscus with subsequent implantation in a meniscus lesion may overcome these limitations. The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of rapidly dissociated meniscus tissue in enhancing neotissue formation in a radial meniscus tear, as simulated in an in vitro explant model. All experiments in this study, performed at minimum with biological triplicates, utilized meniscal tissues from hind limbs of young cows. The effect of varying collagenase concentration (0.1%, 0.2% and 0.5% w/v) and treatment duration (overnight and 30 minutes) on meniscus cell viability, organization of the extracellular matrix (ECM), and gene expression was assessed through a cell metabolism assay, microscopic examination, and quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis, respectively. Thereafter, an explant model of a radial meniscus tear was used to evaluate the effect of a fibrin gel seeded with one of the following: (1) fibrin alone, (2) isolated and passaged (P2) meniscus cells, (3) overnight digested tissue, and (4) rapidly dissociated tissue. The quality of in vitro healing was determined through histological analysis and derivation of an adhesion index. Rapid dissociation in 0.2% collagenase yielded cells with higher levels of metabolism than either 0.1% or 0.5% collagenase. When seeded in a three-dimensional fibrin hydrogel, both overnight digested and rapidly dissociated cells expressed greater levels of collagens type I and II than P2 meniscal cells at 1 week. At 4 and 8 weeks, collagen type II expression remained elevated only in the rapid dissociation group. Histological

  12. Evidence that meniscus damage may be a component of osteoarthritis: the Framingham study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englund, M; Haugen, I K; Guermazi, A; Roemer, F W; Niu, J; Neogi, T; Aliabadi, P; Felson, D T

    2016-02-01

    The etiology of degenerative meniscus tear is unclear but could be related to a generalized osteoarthritic disease process. We studied whether radiographic hand osteoarthritis (OA) is associated with meniscus damage. We examined 974 persons aged 50-90 years drawn via census tract data and random-digit dialing from Framingham, Massachusetts, United States. One reader assessed bilateral hand radiographs (30 joints) and another read frontal knee radiographs, all according to the Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) scale. A third reader assessed right knee 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans for meniscus damage. We calculated the prevalence of medial and/or lateral meniscus damage in those with one to two and three or more finger joints with radiographic OA (KL grade ≥2) compared to those without radiographic hand OA with adjustment for age, sex, and body mass index. We also evaluated the above association in persons without evidence of radiographic OA (KL grade 0) in their knee (n = 748). The prevalence of meniscus damage in the knee of subjects with no, one to two, and three or more finger joints with OA was 24.9%, 31.7%, and 47.2%, respectively. The adjusted prevalence ratio (PR) of having meniscus damage was significantly increased in those who had three or more finger joints with OA (1.40 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.11-1.77]). The estimate remained similar in persons without evidence of radiographic OA in their knee (PR, 1.42 [95% CI 1.03-1.97]). The association was more robust for medial meniscus damage. Results suggest a common non-age related etiologic pathway for both radiographic hand OA and meniscus damage. Copyright © 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of meniscal subluxation of the knee with MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Chul; Park, Jin Gyoon; Kang, Heoung Keun; Kim, Jae Kyu; Seo, Jeong Jin; Kim, Yun Hyeon; Chung, Tae Woong

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the normal meniscal position and meniscal subluxation by means of MR imaging. The normal position of the meniscus was determined by measuring the distance between the peripheral meniscal borders and the tibial plateau, as seen on coronal, sagittal and oblique MR images of 40 normal knees. For 33 abnormal knees in which outward subluxation of the meniscus from the tibial plateau was noted, the involved site, the predisposing factor, and the frequency of meniscus tearing were analyzed. In normal knees, the peripheral border of the meniscus extruded 3mm or less from the peripheral border of the tibial plateau. Among 33 abnormal knees, in which 5mm or more outward subluxation of the meniscus was seen, 19 menisci were medial and 14 were lateral. Among the 19, the body was involved in 12, the anterior horn in six, and the posterior horn in one. With regard to the 14 lateral subluxations, involvement of the posterior horn occurred in ten, of both the body and posterior horn in two, of the anterior horn in one, and of the body in one. The common predisposing factor in medial meniscus subluxation was osteoarthritis, seen in 89% of such cases, and in lateral subluxation, anterior cruciate ligament tear, which occurred in 79% of cases. Medial meniscus tear was noted in 89% of medial meniscus subluxations and lateral meniscus tear in 43% of lateral subluxations. Meniscal subluxation was easily detected by MR imaging of the knee. The common predisposing factor in medial meniscus subluxation was osteoarthritis, and in lateral meniscus subluxation, anterior cruciate ligament tear. A torn meniscus frequently co-occurred

  14. Development of a fast curing tissue adhesive for meniscus tear repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochyńska, Agnieszka Izabela; Hannink, Gerjon; Janssen, Dennis; Buma, Pieter; Grijpma, Dirk W

    2017-01-01

    Isocyanate-terminated adhesive amphiphilic block copolymers are attractive materials to treat meniscus tears due to their tuneable mechanical properties and good adhesive characteristics. However, a drawback of this class of materials is their relatively long curing time. In this study, we evaluate the use of an amine cross-linker and addition of catalysts as two strategies to accelerate the curing rates of a recently developed biodegradable reactive isocyanate-terminated hyper-branched adhesive block copolymer prepared from polyethylene glycol (PEG), trimethylene carbonate, citric acid and hexamethylene diisocyanate. The curing kinetics of the hyper-branched adhesive alone and in combination with different concentrations of spermidine solutions, and after addition of 2,2-dimorpholinodiethylether (DMDEE) or 1,4-diazabicyclo [2.2.2] octane (DABCO) were determined using FTIR. Additionally, lap-shear adhesion tests using all compositions at various time points were performed. The two most promising compositions of the fast curing adhesives were evaluated in a meniscus bucket handle lesion model and their performance was compared with that of fibrin glue. The results showed that addition of both spermidine and catalysts to the adhesive copolymer can accelerate the curing rate and that firm adhesion can already be achieved after 2 h. The adhesive strength to meniscus tissue of 3.2-3.7 N was considerably higher for the newly developed compositions than for fibrin glue (0.3 N). The proposed combination of an adhesive component and a cross-linking component or catalyst is a promising way to accelerate curing rates of isocyanate-terminated tissue adhesives.

  15. The Influence of Articular Cartilage Thickness Reduction on Meniscus Biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łuczkiewicz, Piotr; Daszkiewicz, Karol; Chróścielewski, Jacek; Witkowski, Wojciech; Winklewski, Pawel J

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of the biomechanical interaction between meniscus and cartilage in medial compartment knee osteoarthritis. The finite element method was used to simulate knee joint contact mechanics. Three knee models were created on the basis of knee geometry from the Open Knee project. We reduced the thickness of medial cartilages in the intact knee model by approximately 50% to obtain a medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) model. Two variants of medial knee OA model with congruent and incongruent contact surfaces were analysed to investigate the influence of congruency. A nonlinear static analysis for one compressive load case was performed. The focus of the study was the influence of cartilage degeneration on meniscal extrusion and the values of the contact forces and contact areas. In the model with incongruent contact surfaces, we observed maximal compressive stress on the tibial plateau. In this model, the value of medial meniscus external shift was 95.3% greater, while the contact area between the tibial cartilage and medial meniscus was 50% lower than in the congruent contact surfaces model. After the non-uniform reduction of cartilage thickness, the medial meniscus carried only 48.4% of load in the medial compartment in comparison to 71.2% in the healthy knee model. We have shown that the change in articular cartilage geometry may significantly reduce the role of meniscus in load transmission and the contact area between the meniscus and cartilage. Additionally, medial knee OA may increase the risk of meniscal extrusion in the medial compartment of the knee joint.

  16. The accuracy of musculoskeletal ultrasound examination for the exploration of meniscus injuries in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mureşan, Simona; Mureşan, Mircea; Voidăzan, Septimiu; Neagoe, Radu

    2017-05-01

    Meniscus injuries represent a frequently occurring pathology in athletes and require an optimum diagnosis protocol. This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of ultrasound examination for the identification of meniscus injuries, in comparison with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), using the arthroscopy as reference. This prospective longitudinal comparative study included 45 athletes who were clinically examined by MRI and further, by arthroscopy, in a medical center dedicated to sport traumatology. The conventional ultrasound exploration of the knee allowed the identification of a diverse pathology, presenting a sensitivity of 88.8% for the diagnosis of medial meniscus injuries and 70.0% for the lateral meniscus. The specificity was 77.7% for the medial meniscus and 96.0% for the identification of lateral meniscus injuries. Using MRI, a sensitivity of 69.4% was obtained for the medial meniscus and 75.0% for the lateral meniscus, with a specificity of 76.6% for the pathology of medial meniscus and 80.0% for the lateral meniscus. Statistical analysis, based on the comparison of ROC curves, did not show any significant difference between the two applied diagnostic techniques (P=0.061 for the medial meniscus and P=0.534 for the lateral meniscus). The musculoskeletal ultrasound exploration of the knee joint, performed in a medical center with high addressability, by an experienced examiner, was able to identify the medial and lateral meniscus injuries with an accuracy comparable to that of MRI examination.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of meniscal bucket-handle tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dfouni, N.; Garcia, J.; Kindynis, Ph.; Bosson, D.

    1997-01-01

    To define MR signs of meniscal bucket-handle tears and evaluate the diagnostic efficiency of this technique. Retrospective study of 30 patients with a meniscal bucket-handle tear and 30 with a different type of tear, all proven by arthroscopy. The following MR signs of a bucket-handle tear were evaluated: 'separate meniscal fragment, 'double posterior cruciate ligament', 'snake sign' and 'double anterior horn'. A correct diagnosis of a bucket-handle tear was only made in 18/30 of patients. Several of the MR signs were seen in the same patient in 17 cases. A double posterior cruciate ligament was present only in cases of medial meniscus tears. The 12 menisci without these signs, and therefore not diagnosed as bucket-handle tears, were all classified as meniscal tears on the basis of signal extending to the meniscal surface. Nine of these were not displaced into the inter-condylar notch at arthroscopy. The interobserver agreement was excellent: kappa 0.88. The diagnosis of a bucket-handle meniscal tear, if it is displaced, can be made when one or more of the four MR evaluated signs are present. Other forms of meniscal tears are only exceptionally diagnosed as bucket-handle tears. (authors)

  18. Occupational kneeling and meniscal tears: a magnetic resonance imaging study in floor layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rytter, Søren; Jensen, Lilli Kirkeskov; Bonde, Jens Peter

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between occupational kneeling and degenerative meniscal tears. METHODS: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of both knees was conducted in 92 male floor layers and 49 male graphic designers (referents), with a mean age of 55.6 years (range 42-70 yrs). The prese......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between occupational kneeling and degenerative meniscal tears. METHODS: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of both knees was conducted in 92 male floor layers and 49 male graphic designers (referents), with a mean age of 55.6 years (range 42-70 yrs......). The presence of grade 3 MRI signal intensities indicating degenerative tears of the anterior, middle, and posterior one-third of the lateral and medial menisci was assessed on 1.5-Tesla MRI scans. The odds ratio (OR) of meniscal tears was determined among floor layers compared to graphic designers. Using...... logistic regression, models were adjusted for age, body mass index, and knee-straining sports. RESULTS: Degenerative tears were significantly more prevalent in the medial meniscus among floor layers than among graphic designers [OR 2.28, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.10-4.98] and significantly more floor...

  19. Isolated tear of the tendon to the medial head of gastrocnemius presenting as a painless lump in the calf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watura, Christopher; Harries, William

    2009-01-01

    We report on a case of isolated tear of the medial head of gastrocnemius tendon. The patient presented with a painless lump in the right calf and denied any prior history of trauma or strain to the leg. A longitudinal split of the tendon was demonstrated at ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). There were no other abnormalities and the gastrocnemius muscle was normal. There are no reports in the literature of isolated gastrocnemius tendon tear. To date the calf muscle complex injury described in this area is tearing of the medial head of gastrocnemius muscle, sometimes referred to as "tennis leg". We conclude that an isolated tear of the tendon to the medial head of gastrocnemius should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a lump or swelling in the upper medial area of the calf and we recommend ultrasound or MRI as the investigations of choice.

  20. Prevalence of Discoid Meniscus During Arthroscopy for Isolated Lateral Meniscal Pathology in the Pediatric Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Henry B; Wise, Kelsey; LaMont, Lauren; Copley, Lawson; Wilson, Philip

    2017-06-01

    Meniscus tears in the young patient are becoming more prevalent. Knowledge of presenting characteristics and morphology can affect treatment decisions. The purpose of this study was to review and evaluate all the isolated lateral meniscus pathology that required arthroscopic treatment in a pediatric sports medicine practice and compare presenting characteristics between those with a discoid meniscus and those with normal meniscal morphology. We performed a retrospective review of all isolated lateral meniscus arthroscopic procedures from 2003 to 2012 in a high-volume pediatric sports practice. Presentation, radiographs, and intraoperative findings were reviewed. The prevalence and clinical findings of a discoid meniscus in this population and among all age groups were compared with those with a meniscus tear occurring in a normal meniscus. Two hundred and sixty-one arthroscopies were performed for symptomatic isolated lateral menisci pathology. Of these, 75% were discoid in nature; the remainder was tears occurring in normal menisci. Ninety-six of 99 patients (97%) with lateral meniscus pathology under the age of 13 had a discoid meniscus and 66% presented with no injury. There was a transition within the population at 14 years of age, with a rise in the incidence of normal meniscal body tears. Even after this transition point, meniscal pathology incidence remained notable; 59% of isolated lateral meniscus pathology in patients between the ages of 14 and 16 years old were a discoid meniscus. Magnetic resonance imaging criteria for discoid meniscus (3 consecutive sagittal cuts or coronal mid-compartment measure) were unreliable after the age of 13 years old. The ratio of complete to incomplete discoids in all age groups was 4 to 3. In conclusion, discoid menisci have a high prevalence in isolated lateral meniscus pathology requiring knee arthroscopy. Clinical presentation, imaging, characteristics, and treatment may be different among different age groups. In the

  1. Meniscal Tear Film Fluid Dynamics Near Marx’s Line

    KAUST Repository

    Zubkov, V. S.; Breward, C. J. W.; Gaffney, E. A.

    2013-01-01

    meniscus. However, resolving tear film behaviour within the meniscus and especially its apices is required to characterise the flow dynamics where the tear film is especially thin, and thus most susceptible to evaporatively induced hyperosmolarity

  2. T-Fix endoscopic meniscal repair: technique and approach to different types of tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, G R; Richardson, K; Koenig, V

    1995-04-01

    Endoscopic meniscus repair using the T-Fix suture device (Acufex Microsurgical, Inc, Mansfield, MA) allows ease of suture placement for meniscus stability without the problems associated with ancillary incisions such as neurovascular compromise. It is ideal for the central posterior horn tears that are difficult using conventional techniques. Vertical tears, bucket handle tears, flap tears, and horizontal tears can be approached using a temporary "anchor stitch" to stabilize the meniscus before T-Fix repair. The basic method of repair and our approach to these different types of tears is presented.

  3. Medialized repair for retracted rotator cuff tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Kyu; Jung, Kyu-Hak; Won, Jun-Sung; Cho, Seung-Hyun

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the functional outcomes of medialized rotator cuff repair and the continuity of repaired tendon in chronic retracted rotator cuff tears. Thirty-five consecutive patients were selected from 153 cases that underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair for more than medium-sized posterosuperior rotator cuff tears between July 2009 and July 2012 performed with the medialized repair. All cases were available for at least 2 years of postoperative follow-up. The visual analog scale of pain, muscle strength, Constant score, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, and University of California-Los Angeles score were evaluated. At the final follow-up, all clinical outcomes were significantly improved. The visual analog scale score for pain improved from 6 ± 1 preoperatively to 2 ± 1 postoperatively. The range of motion increased from preoperatively to postoperatively: active forward elevation, from 134° ± 49° to 150° ± 16°; active external rotation at the side, from 47° ± 15° to 55° ± 10°; and active internal rotation, from L3 to L1. The shoulder score also improved: Constant score, from 53.5 ± 16.7 to 79 ± 10; American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, from 51 ± 15 to 82 ± 8; and University of California-Los Angeles score, from 14 ± 4 to 28 ± 4. The retear cases at the final follow-up were 6 (17%). Medialized repair may be useful in cases in which anatomic bone-to-tendon repair would be difficult because of the excessive tension of the repaired tendon and a torn tendon that does not reach the anatomic insertion. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Single-leaf partial meniscectomy in extensive horizontal tears of the discoid lateral meniscus: Does decreased peripheral meniscal thickness affect outcomes? (Mean four-year follow-up).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Se-Won; Chun, Yong-Min; Choi, Chong-Hyuk; Kim, Sung-Jae; Jung, Min; Han, Joon-Woo; Kim, Sung-Hwan

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate whether single-leaf partial meniscectomy in horizontal tears along the entire discoid lateral meniscus has any advantages in clinical and radiological results compared with other meniscectomies in discoid lateral meniscus. A total of 145 patients with a horizontal tear pattern in symptomatic lateral discoid meniscus were retrospectively reviewed. Twenty-seven patients had undergone full-extent single-leaf partial meniscectomy (group A), 60 had undergone conventional partial meniscectomy (saucerization) maintaining peripheral meniscal height (group B), and 58 patients had undergone total meniscectomy (group C). Each patient was evaluated with the Lysholm knee score, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective grading, and modified Kellgren-Lawrence grade in plain radiography at their last follow-up. Group C had inferior functional results to groups A and B on the Lysholm knee score and IKDC subjective score. There was no significant difference between groups A and B. Group C fared significantly worse than groups A and B (p=0.003, pmeniscus tears, the full-extent single-leaf partial meniscectomy group had no adverse results compared with the total meniscectomy group and was not significantly different compared to the conventional partial meniscectomy group. Cohort study. Level III, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Meniscus maturation in the swine model: changes occurring along with anterior to posterior and medial to lateral aspect during growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giancamillo, Alessia; Deponti, Daniela; Addis, Alessandro; Domeneghini, Cinzia; Peretti, Giuseppe M

    2014-01-01

    The meniscus plays important roles in knee function and mechanics and is characterized by a heterogeneous matrix composition. The changes in meniscus vascularization observed during growth suggest that the tissue-specific composition may be the result of a maturation process. This study has the aim to characterize the structural and biochemical variations that occur in the swine meniscus with age. To this purpose, menisci were collected from young and adult pigs and divided into different zones. In study 1, both lateral and medial menisci were divided into the anterior horn, the body and the posterior horn for the evaluation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), collagen 1 and 2 content. In study 2, the menisci were sectioned into the inner, the intermediate and the outer zones to determine the variations in the cell phenotype along with the inner–outer direction, through gene expression analysis. According to the results, the swine meniscus is characterized by an increasing enrichment in the cartilaginous component with age, with an increasing deposition in the anterior horn (GAGs and collagen 2; P meniscus maturation, suggesting a specific response of meniscal cells to the regional mechanical stimuli in the knee joint. PMID:25216283

  6. MR imaging characteristics and clinical symptoms related to displaced meniscal flap tears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lance, Valentin; Heilmeier, Ursula R.; Joseph, Gabby B.; Steinbach, Lynne; Link, Thomas M. [University of California, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Ma, Benjamin [University of California, Department of Orthopedic Surgery and Sports Medicine, San Francisco (United States)

    2014-11-16

    The purpose of our study was (1) to analyze the flap tear location, direction of displacement and size on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, (2) to describe associated knee abnormalities including presence of effusion, synovitis, bone marrow edema pattern or ligamentous tear, and (3) to assess clinical findings found with flap tears, including the pain score, and determine differences between operative and nonoperative groups. A retrospective radiology database search over the last 3 years identified 238 patients with flap tears, of which ultimately 58 with isolated flap tears were included after exclusion of patients with other significant knee internal derangement, severe degenerative change or prior surgery. MR studies of the knee were analyzed by two radiologists. Imaging characteristics were correlated with associated knee abnormalities and clinical findings. Statistical analysis employed linear and logistic regression models. Inter- and intrareader reliability was calculated. The medial meniscus was the most common site of flap tears (52/60, 87 %), with inferior displacement (47/60, 78 %). The degree of tibial cartilage loss had a positive correlation with the visual analog pain scale (p = 0.03). Patients who underwent arthroscopy were younger than those who did not (p = 0.01) and more likely to have a positive clinical McMurray test (p = 0.01). Medially and inferiorly displaced flap tears are the most common tear pattern. Those undergoing arthroscopy are more likely to have positive meniscal signs on clinical examination. A greater degree of cartilage loss involving the tibia on MR imaging was associated with increasing visual analog pain scores. (orig.)

  7. MR imaging characteristics and clinical symptoms related to displaced meniscal flap tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lance, Valentin; Heilmeier, Ursula R.; Joseph, Gabby B.; Steinbach, Lynne; Link, Thomas M.; Ma, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our study was (1) to analyze the flap tear location, direction of displacement and size on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, (2) to describe associated knee abnormalities including presence of effusion, synovitis, bone marrow edema pattern or ligamentous tear, and (3) to assess clinical findings found with flap tears, including the pain score, and determine differences between operative and nonoperative groups. A retrospective radiology database search over the last 3 years identified 238 patients with flap tears, of which ultimately 58 with isolated flap tears were included after exclusion of patients with other significant knee internal derangement, severe degenerative change or prior surgery. MR studies of the knee were analyzed by two radiologists. Imaging characteristics were correlated with associated knee abnormalities and clinical findings. Statistical analysis employed linear and logistic regression models. Inter- and intrareader reliability was calculated. The medial meniscus was the most common site of flap tears (52/60, 87 %), with inferior displacement (47/60, 78 %). The degree of tibial cartilage loss had a positive correlation with the visual analog pain scale (p = 0.03). Patients who underwent arthroscopy were younger than those who did not (p = 0.01) and more likely to have a positive clinical McMurray test (p = 0.01). Medially and inferiorly displaced flap tears are the most common tear pattern. Those undergoing arthroscopy are more likely to have positive meniscal signs on clinical examination. A greater degree of cartilage loss involving the tibia on MR imaging was associated with increasing visual analog pain scores. (orig.)

  8. MR Imaging findings of avulsion fracture of the tibial spine of the knee, focusing of cruciate ligament tear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang Won; Hong, Hoon Pyo; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Jin, Wook

    2003-01-01

    To determine the presence of cruciate ligament tears following avulsion injuries involving the ACL and PCL, and to correlate the findings with those of surgery. Between March 1997 and May 2002, avulsion injury involving the ACL and PCL was diagnosed in 19 patients. Ten of these [8 males and 2 females aged 10-51 (avergae, 27.7) years] were included in this study. We assessed the presence of cruciate ligament tears at MR imaging, correlating the findings with those of surgery. Associated intra-articular injuries, treatment methods and follow-up results were also evaluated. Among seven patients with ACL avulsion injury, this was assessed at MR imaging as complete tear (n=1), partial tear (n=5), or intact (n=1), while all MR images of PCL avulsion injury (n=3) showed that this was partial teat. All imaging findings corresponded with the surgical findings. In four patients there was associated knee injury involving, respectively, teats of the medial meniscus, lateral meniscus, PCL and MCL, and popliteal ligament. Our findings showed that with one exception, patients with avulsion injury of the ACL or PCL had suffered either a partial or complete tear. MR imaging may be useful in the diagnosis of tears of the cruciate ligament which have not been noticed at surgery or arthroscopy in avulsion injuries involving the ACL and PCL

  9. Successful anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and meniscal repair in osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae-Young; Cho, Tae-Joon; Lee, Myung Chul; Han, Hyuk-Soo

    2018-03-20

    A case of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with meniscal repair in an osteogenesis imperfecta patient is reported. A 24-year-old female with osteogenesis imperfecta type 1a suffered from a valgus extension injury resulting in tear of ACL and medial meniscus. She underwent an arthroscopic-assisted ACL reconstruction and medial meniscus repair. Meniscal tear at the menisco-capsular junction of the posterior horn of medial meniscus was repaired with three absorbable sutures via inside-out technique. ACL reconstruction was then performed with a bone-patellar tendon-bone allograft. The patient was followed up for 1 year with intact ACL grafts and healed medial meniscus. This case report showed that successful ACL reconstruction and meniscal repair is possible in an osteogenesis imperfecta patient.Level of evidence V.

  10. Meniscal pathology in children: differences and similarities with the adult meniscus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francavilla, Michael L.; Restrepo, Ricardo; Zamora, Kathryn W.; Sarode, Vijaya [Department of Radiology, Miami Children' s Hospital, Miami, FL (United States); Swirsky, Stephen M. [Department of Orthopedics, Miami Children' s Hospital, Miami, FL (United States); Mintz, Douglas [Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-08-15

    The normal meniscus undergoes typical developmental changes during childhood, reaching a mature adult appearance by approximately 10 years of age. In addition to recognizing normal meniscal appearances in children, identifying abnormalities - such as tears and the different types of discoid meniscus and meniscal cysts, as well as the surgical implications of these abnormalities - is vital in pediatric imaging. The reported incidence of meniscal tears in adolescents and young adults has increased because of increased sports participation and more widespread use of MRI. This review discusses the normal appearance of the pediatric meniscus, meniscal abnormalities, associated injuries, and prognostic indicators for repair. (orig.)

  11. Meniscal pathology in children: differences and similarities with the adult meniscus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francavilla, Michael L.; Restrepo, Ricardo; Zamora, Kathryn W.; Sarode, Vijaya; Swirsky, Stephen M.; Mintz, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    The normal meniscus undergoes typical developmental changes during childhood, reaching a mature adult appearance by approximately 10 years of age. In addition to recognizing normal meniscal appearances in children, identifying abnormalities - such as tears and the different types of discoid meniscus and meniscal cysts, as well as the surgical implications of these abnormalities - is vital in pediatric imaging. The reported incidence of meniscal tears in adolescents and young adults has increased because of increased sports participation and more widespread use of MRI. This review discusses the normal appearance of the pediatric meniscus, meniscal abnormalities, associated injuries, and prognostic indicators for repair. (orig.)

  12. Comparison of the biomechanical tensile and compressive properties of decellularised and natural porcine meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelgaied, A; Stanley, M; Galfe, M; Berry, H; Ingham, E; Fisher, J

    2015-06-01

    Meniscal repair is widely used as a treatment for meniscus injury. However, where meniscal damage has progressed such that repair is not possible, approaches for partial meniscus replacement are now being developed which have the potential to restore the functional role of the meniscus, in stabilising the knee joint, absorbing and distributing stress during loading, and prevent early degenerative joint disease. One attractive potential solution to the current lack of meniscal replacements is the use of decellularised natural biological scaffolds, derived from xenogeneic tissues, which are produced by treating the native tissue to remove the immunogenic cells. The current study investigated the effect of decellularisation on the biomechanical tensile and compressive (indentation and unconfined) properties of the porcine medial meniscus through an experimental-computational approach. The results showed that decellularised medial porcine meniscus maintained the tensile biomechanical properties of the native meniscus, but had lower tensile initial elastic modulus. In compression, decellularised medial porcine meniscus generally showed lower elastic modulus and higher permeability compared to that of the native meniscus. These changes in the biomechanical properties, which ranged from less than 1% to 40%, may be due to the reduction of glycosaminoglycans (GAG) content during the decellularisation process. The predicted biomechanical properties for the decellularised medial porcine meniscus were within the reported range for the human meniscus, making it an appropriate biological scaffold for consideration as a partial meniscus replacement. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluating tear clearance rate with optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garaszczuk, Izabela K; Mousavi, Maryam; Cervino Exposito, Alejandro; Bartuzel, Maciej M; Montes-Micó, Robert; Iskander, D Robert

    2018-02-01

    To assess the early-phase of tear clearance rate (TCR) with anterior segment optical coherence tomography (OCT) and to determine the association between TCR and other clinical measures of the tear film in a group of young subjects with different levels of tear film quality. TCR was classified as the percentage decrease of subject's inferior tear meniscus height 30s after instillation of 5μl 0.9% saline solution. Fifty subjects (32F and 18M) aged (mean±standard deviation) 25.5±4.3 years volunteered for the study. It consisted of a review of medical history, Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) questionnaire, tear film osmolarity measurements, slit lamp examination and TCR estimation based on dynamic measurements of the lower tear meniscus with OCT. Estimates of TCR were contrasted against subject age and tear film measures commonly used for dry eye diagnosis, which includes OSDI score, fluorescein tear film break-up time (FBUT), tear meniscus height (TMH), blinking frequency, tear film osmolarity and corneal staining. The group mean TCR was 29±13% and 36±19% respectively after 30 and 60s margin after saline solution instillation. Statistically significant correlations were found between TCR and FBUT (r 2 =0.319, placrimal functional unit. Copyright © 2017 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. MRI profiles of menisci of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitano, Kimizo; Akahori, Osamu; Suwa, Shinichi

    1992-01-01

    The rate of correct diagnosis of disorders of menisci is considered to exceed 95% by arthrography and arthroscopy, but these examinations are both invasive and effective only for evaluation of changes on the surface of meniscus. Diagnosis of injury of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus is difficult by athrography, and that of injury of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus is difficult by arthroscopy. MRI is a non-invasive examination that allows the diagnosis of changes of the surface and the inside of the meniscus. This study reviewed 44 cases in which MRI findings could be confirmed by arthroscopy or at operating among 114 patients who underwent MRI to rule out the possibility of meniscus injury during the period between August 1988 and June 1991. The total number of patients who underwent MRI during this period was 6,983. The apparatus used was a 1.5-Tesla superconductive MR system, and evaluation was based mainly on the control T1-weighted image obtained by the spin-echo mode and sagittal image double-echo sequence. Characteristics of MRI were described as follows. Four cases of injury of the medial meniscus are (1) typical bucket-handle injury; (2) horizontal tear visible by arthroscopy; (3) horizontal tear difficult to observe by arthroscopy; (4) horizontal tear after partial meniscectomy under arthroscopy. Four cases of injury of the lateral meniscus are (1) multiple tear and artifact of foreign body of needle-fragment; (2) longitudinal tear; (3) multiple injury of discoid meniscus; (4) locking of discoid meniscus. MRI was considered to be advantageous over arthrography or arthroscopy in injury of medial meniscus (especially horizonal tear extending to the lower surface on the tibial side), meniscus ganglion, injury of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus, and discoid menisci of children. From the findings in these 44 cases, MRI is considered to provide important information for the diagnosis of injury of menisci. (author)

  15. MRI of meniscal bucket-handle tears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magee, T.H.; Hinson, G.W. [Menorah Medical Center, Overland Park, KS (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1998-09-01

    A meniscal bucket-handle tear is a tear with an attached fragment displaced from the meniscus of the knee joint. Low sensitivity of MRI for detection of bucket-handle tears (64% as compared with arthroscopy) has been reported previously. We report increased sensitivity for detecting bucket-handle tears with the use of coronal short tau inversion recovery (STIR) images. Results. By using four criteria for diagnosis of meniscal bucket-handle tears, our overall sensitivity compared with arthroscopy was 93% (28 of 30 meniscal bucket-handle tears seen at arthroscopy were detected by MRI). The meniscal fragment was well visualized in all 28 cases on coronal STIR images. The double posterior cruciate ligament sign was seen in 8 of 30 cases, the flipped meniscus was seen in 10 of 30 cases and a fragment in the intercondylar notch was seen in 18 of 30 cases. (orig.)

  16. Societal and Economic Effect of Meniscus Scaffold Procedures for Irreparable Meniscus Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rongen, Jan J; Govers, Tim M; Buma, Pieter; Grutters, Janneke P C; Hannink, Gerjon

    2016-07-01

    Meniscus scaffolds are currently evaluated clinically for their efficacy in preventing the development of osteoarthritis as well as for their efficacy in treating patients with chronic symptoms. Procedural costs, therapeutic consequences, clinical efficacy, and future events should all be considered to maximize the monetary value of this intervention. To examine the socioeconomic effect of treating patients with irreparable medial meniscus injuries with a meniscus scaffold. Economic and decision analysis; Level of evidence, 2. Two Markov simulation models for patients with an irreparable medial meniscus injury were developed. Model 1 was used to investigate the lifetime cost-effectiveness of a meniscus scaffold compared with standard partial meniscectomy by the possibility of preventing the development of osteoarthritis. Model 2 was used to investigate the short-term (5-year) cost-effectiveness of a meniscus scaffold compared with standard partial meniscectomy by alleviating clinical symptoms, specifically in chronic patients with previous meniscus surgery. For both models, probabilistic Monte Carlo simulations were applied. Treatment effectiveness was expressed as quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), while costs (estimated in euros) were assessed from a societal perspective. We assumed €20,000 as a reference value for the willingness to pay per QALY. Next, comprehensive sensitivity analyses were performed to identify the most influential variables on the cost-effectiveness of meniscus scaffolds. Model 1 demonstrated an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of a meniscus scaffold treatment of €54,463 per QALY (€5991/0.112). A threshold analysis demonstrated that a meniscus scaffold should offer a relative risk reduction of at least 0.34 to become cost-effective, assuming a willingness to pay of €20,000. Decreasing the costs of the meniscus scaffold procedure by 33% (€10,160 instead of €15,233; an absolute change of €5073) resulted in an incremental

  17. Meniscus repair and regeneration: review on current methods and research potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Scotti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Meniscus regeneration is an unsolved clinical challenge. Despite the wide acceptance of the degenerative consequences of meniscectomy, no surgical procedure has succeeded to date in regenerating a functional and long-lasting meniscal fibrocartilage. Research proposed a number of experimental approaches encompassing all the typical strategies of regenerative medicine: cell-free scaffolds, gene therapy, intra-articular delivery of progenitor cells, biological glues for enhanced bonding of reparable tears, partial and total tissue engineered meniscus replacement. None of these approaches has been completely successful and can be considered suitable for all patients, as meniscal tears require specific and patient-related treatments depending on the size and type of lesion. Recent advances in cell biology, biomaterial science and bioengineering (e.g., bioreactors have now the potential to drive meniscus regeneration into a series of clinically relevant strategies. In this tutorial paper, the clinical need for meniscus regeneration strategies will be explained, and past and current experimental studies on meniscus regeneration will be reported.

  18. Quantitative analysis of the difference between an intact complete discoid lateral meniscus and a torn complete discoid meniscus on MR imaging: a feasibility study for a new classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Mi Hee; Choi, Sang-Hee; Woo, Sook Young

    2010-01-01

    To determine the quantitative difference between an intact complete discoid lateral meniscus (CDLM) and a torn CDLM on MR imaging. Between May 2005 to November 2009, 137 patients with a CDLM (107 intact CDLM and 30 torn CDLM) and 92 patients with a normal meniscus were included in this study. The evaluated parameters were the height of the posterior horn of the lateral and medial menisci on the sagittal images and their ratio as assessed by two observers twice at an interval of 1 month. Each parameter was analyzed based on the Kruskal Wallis test, and the analysis using the mixed model. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to determine the interobserver reliabilities at session 2. The mean heights of the posterior horn of the lateral and medial menisci on the sagittal images for an intact CDLM, a torn CLDM, and a normal meniscus were 6.5, 7.3, 5.7 and 6.6, 6.4, 6.7 mm at session 1, respectively. The mean heights of the posterior horn of the lateral and medial menisci on the sagittal images for an intact CDLM, a torn CDLM, and a normal meniscus for both observers were 6.5, 7.2, 5.7 and 6.6, 6.3, 6.8 mm at session 2, respectively. The ratio of the height of the lateral to the height of the medial meniscus for an intact CDLM at both sessions for both observers was 1.0. The ratios were 1.2 and 0.8 for a torn CDLM and for a normal meniscus, respectively, at both sessions for observer 1. The ratios were 1.2 and 0.9 for a torn CDLM and for a normal meniscus, respectively, at session 2 for observer 2. The heights of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus on the sagittal images and the ratios of the heights of the lateral to the medial menisci in all three groups were statistically significantly different for both sessions (p < 0.0001). The interobserver ICCs for each parameter of both an intact CDLM and a torn CDLM at session 2 showed high correlations (p < 0.0001). The height of the lateral meniscus and the ratio of the height of the lateral to the height

  19. Anterior cruciate ligament tear: comparison of MR features between complete and partial tear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Ki Young; Lee, Joo Hyuk; Park, Jin Hee; Lee, Yu Jin; Rho, Eun Jin; Kim, Young Hoon; Yi, Jeong Geun; Ahn, Joong Mo

    1997-01-01

    To determine the MRI features which distinguish complete and partial tear of the anterior cruciate ligament(ACL) and to thus improve MRI interpretation. In 80 patients, we analyzed MR findings of direct and indirect signs of ACL tear (complete tear, 61 cases, partial tear, 19 cases) confirmed by arthroscopy or surgery, and compared the relative incidence of each sign in cases of complete and partial tear. Direct and indirect signs were found in 61 (100%) and 60 cases (98.4%), respectively, in complete tears, but in 16 (84.2%) and 15 cases (78.9%), respectively, in partial tears. Poor visualization, discontinuity and hyperintensity were seen in all complete tears but in only nine cases (47.4%) of partial tear. A wavy or abnormal contour was seen in 53 cases (86.9%) of complete tear and 14 (73.7%) of partial tear. A wavy contour without other direct signs was seen in only five cases (26.3%) of partial tear. Three cases (15.8%) of partial tear showed normal MR finding. Indirect signs, i.e. abnormal ACL angle, abnormal ACL-Blumensaat line angle, abnormal posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) line, abnormal PCL angle, PCL buckling, anterior displacement of tibia, posterior displacement of lateral meniscus, bone bruise, Segond fracture, tear of collateral ligaments, PCL, and tear of meniscus were commoner in complete than in partial tears. Two cases of O'Donoghue's triad and two of popliteus injury were seen only in complete tears. Direct and indirect signs of ACL tear were more commonly noted in complete than in partial tears. The latter showed MR features varying from normal to almost complete tear. We suggest that a wavy contour without other direct signs is indicative of a partial tear, and that O'Donoghue's triad and popliteus muscle injury are indirect signs of a complete tear

  20. Similar failure rate in immediate post-operative weight bearing versus protected weight bearing following meniscal repair on peripheral, vertical meniscal tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Bryan; Gronbeck, Kyle R; Yue, Ruixian Alexander; Tompkins, Marc A

    2017-08-16

    Post-operative weight bearing after meniscal repair is a point of debate among physicians. This study sought to evaluate whether patients adhering to an immediate WBAT rehabilitation programme have a higher failure rate compared to those adhering to a more traditional, protected, NWB status following meniscal repair. The null hypothesis was that there would be no difference in failure between the two groups. A retrospective review of meniscal repair patients greater than 5 years from surgery was performed for patients receiving meniscal repair treatment. Patients were categorized by post-surgical weight-bearing status, either NWB or WBAT, and then analysed for failure of repair. Failure was defined as re-operation on the torn meniscus. The study controlled for variables including age at surgery, sex, height, weight, and BMI, classification of tear type, acuity of the tear, repair location (medial or lateral), repair location within the meniscus, repair technique, and concomitant procedures. Re-operations were performed in 61 of 157 patients [38.9%]. There was no difference between weight-bearing groups for failure of meniscus repair (n.s.). The tears were acute vertical tears located in the posterior horn and body. For the 61 patients with re-operation, the average time to re-operation was 2.2 years with 10 [16%] > 5 years from surgery, 17 [28%] 2-5 years from surgery, and 34 [56%] bearing groups for rate of re-operation (n.s.). Weight bearing as tolerated after meniscal repair for peripheral, vertical tears does not result in a higher failure rate than traditional, non-weight bearing over a five-year follow-up period. The clinical relevance is that, based on these data, it may be appropriate to allow weight bearing as tolerated following meniscal repair of peripheral, vertical tears. Retrospective cohort study, Level III.

  1. Efficacy of artificial tears for children xerophthalmia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Yang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To observe the efficacy and safety of artificial tears for children xerophthalmia.METHODS:Fifty-eight cases with 116 eyes were diagnosed as xerophthalmia by tear break-up time(BUT, Schirmer Ⅰ test(SⅠt, tear meniscus height, corneal staining, meibomian gland function test and were given artificial tears therapy for 1mo. Then the aforementioned tests were conducted again for statistical analysis.RESULTS:The mean BUT of all the children before treatments was 6.03±1.19s, SⅠt was 7.67±2.32mm/5min, tear meniscus height was 0.20±0.02mm, corneal staining was 1.02±0.13 scores and meibomian gland function was 2.45±0.86 scores. Sixty-two eyes in 31 cases were the lipid-deficient type, 40 eyes in 20 cases were aqueous-deficient type, and 14 eyes in 7 cases were other types. According to their types, corresponding artificial tears therapy was given. At 1mo after treatments, the clinical symptoms were improved significantly. BUT was 13.72±1.83s, SⅠt was 12.38±3.64mm/5min, tear meniscus height was 0.36±0.08mm, corneal fluorescein staining was 0.03±0.24 scores and meibomian gland function was 1.57±0.93 scores. Compared with those before treatments, the difference of each observed indicators was statistically significant(PCONCLUSION:Artificial tears treatment for children xerophthalmia is safe and effective.

  2. Accuracy of clinical diagnosis in knee arthroscopy.

    OpenAIRE

    Brooks, Stuart; Morgan, Mamdouh

    2002-01-01

    A prospective study of 238 patients was performed in a district general hospital to assess current diagnostic accuracy rates and to ascertain the use and the effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning in reducing the number of negative arthroscopies. The pre-operative diagnosis of patients listed for knee arthroscopy was medial meniscus tear 94 (40%) and osteoarthritis 59 (25%). MRI scans were requested in 57 patients (24%) with medial meniscus tear representing 65% (37 patien...

  3. Longitudinal change in quantitative meniscus measurements in knee osteoarthritis - data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloecker, Katja; Wirth, W.; Eckstein, F.; Guermazi, A.; Hitzl, W.; Hunter, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to apply 3D MRI-based measurement technology to studying 2-year change in quantitative measurements of meniscus size and position. Forty-seven knees from the Osteoarthritis Initiative with medial radiographic joint space narrowing had baseline and 2-year follow-up MRIs. Quantitative measures were obtained from manual segmentation of the menisci and tibia using coronal DESSwe images. The standardized response mean (SRM = mean/SD change) was used as measure of sensitivity to longitudinal change. Medial tibial plateau coverage decreased from 34.8 % to 29.9 % (SRM -0.82; p < 0.001). Change in medial meniscus extrusion in a central image (SRM 0.18) and in the central five slices (SRM 0.22) did not reach significance, but change in extrusion across the entire meniscus (SRM 0.32; p = 0.03) and in the relative area of meniscus extrusion (SRM 0.56; p < 0.001) did. There was a reduction in medial meniscus volume (10 %; p < 0.001), width (7 %; p < 0.001), and height (2 %; p = 0.08); meniscus substance loss was strongest in the posterior (SRM -0.51; p = 0.001) and weakest in the anterior horn (SRM -0.15; p = 0.31). This pilot study reports, for the first time, longitudinal change in quantitative 3D meniscus measurements in knee osteoarthritis. It provides evidence of improved sensitivity to change of 3D measurements compared with single slice analysis. (orig.)

  4. Longitudinal change in quantitative meniscus measurements in knee osteoarthritis - data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloecker, Katja [Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg and Nuremberg (Austria); Salzburg, Institute of Anatomy, Salzburg (Austria); BHS Linz, Department of Orthopaedics, Linz (Austria); Wirth, W.; Eckstein, F. [Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg and Nuremberg (Austria); Salzburg, Institute of Anatomy, Salzburg (Austria); Chondrometrics GmbH, Ainring (Germany); Guermazi, A. [Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Boston Imaging Core Lab (BICL), Boston, MA (United States); Hitzl, W. [Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg and Nuremberg, Research Office, Salzburg (Austria); Hunter, D.J. [University of Sydney, Royal North Shore Hospital and Institute of Bone and Joint Research, Kolling Institute, Sydney (Australia)

    2015-10-15

    We aimed to apply 3D MRI-based measurement technology to studying 2-year change in quantitative measurements of meniscus size and position. Forty-seven knees from the Osteoarthritis Initiative with medial radiographic joint space narrowing had baseline and 2-year follow-up MRIs. Quantitative measures were obtained from manual segmentation of the menisci and tibia using coronal DESSwe images. The standardized response mean (SRM = mean/SD change) was used as measure of sensitivity to longitudinal change. Medial tibial plateau coverage decreased from 34.8 % to 29.9 % (SRM -0.82; p < 0.001). Change in medial meniscus extrusion in a central image (SRM 0.18) and in the central five slices (SRM 0.22) did not reach significance, but change in extrusion across the entire meniscus (SRM 0.32; p = 0.03) and in the relative area of meniscus extrusion (SRM 0.56; p < 0.001) did. There was a reduction in medial meniscus volume (10 %; p < 0.001), width (7 %; p < 0.001), and height (2 %; p = 0.08); meniscus substance loss was strongest in the posterior (SRM -0.51; p = 0.001) and weakest in the anterior horn (SRM -0.15; p = 0.31). This pilot study reports, for the first time, longitudinal change in quantitative 3D meniscus measurements in knee osteoarthritis. It provides evidence of improved sensitivity to change of 3D measurements compared with single slice analysis. (orig.)

  5. Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy in middle-aged patients with mild or no knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hare, Kristoffer B; Lohmander, Stefan; Christensen, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy has been shown to be of no benefit to patients with concomitant knee osteoarthritis, but the optimal treatment of a degenerative meniscus tear in patients with mild or no knee osteoarthritis is unknown. This article describes the rationale and methodology...... of a randomized sham-controlled trial to assess the benefit of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy of a medial meniscus tear in patients with mild or no knee osteoarthritis. The objective of the study is to test whether the benefit from arthroscopic partial meniscectomy in patients with knee pain, medial meniscus...... lesion and mild/no knee osteoarthritis, is greater after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy than following sham surgery....

  6. Quantitative measures of meniscus extrusion predict incident radiographic knee osteoarthritis – data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmanuel, K.; Quinn, E.; Niu, J.; Guermazi, A.; Roemer, F.; Wirth, W.; Eckstein, F.; Felson, D.

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective To test the hypothesis that quantitative measures of meniscus extrusion predict incident radiographic knee osteoarthritis (KOA), prior to the advent of radiographic disease. Methods 206 knees with incident radiographic KOA (Kellgren Lawrence Grade (KLG) 0 or 1 at baseline, developing KLG 2 or greater with a definite osteophyte and joint space narrowing (JSN) grade ≥1 by year 4) were matched to 232 control knees not developing incident KOA. Manual segmentation of the central five slices of the medial and lateral meniscus was performed on coronal 3T DESS MRI and quantitative meniscus position was determined. Cases and controls were compared using conditional logistic regression adjusting for age, sex, BMI, race and clinical site. Sensitivity analyses of early (year [Y] 1/2) and late (Y3/4) incidence was performed. Results Mean medial extrusion distance was significantly greater for incident compared to non-incident knees (1.56 mean ± 1.12 mm SD vs 1.29 ± 0.99 mm; +21%, P meniscus (25.8 ± 15.8% vs 22.0 ± 13.5%; +17%, P meniscus in incident medial KOA, or for the tibial plateau coverage between incident and non-incident knees. Restricting the analysis to medial incident KOA at Y1/2 differences were attenuated, but reached significance for extrusion distance, whereas no significant differences were observed at incident KOA in Y3/4. Conclusion Greater medial meniscus extrusion predicts incident radiographic KOA. Early onset KOA showed greater differences for meniscus position between incident and non-incident knees than late onset KOA. PMID:26318658

  7. Quantitative measures of meniscus extrusion predict incident radiographic knee osteoarthritis--data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmanuel, K; Quinn, E; Niu, J; Guermazi, A; Roemer, F; Wirth, W; Eckstein, F; Felson, D

    2016-02-01

    To test the hypothesis that quantitative measures of meniscus extrusion predict incident radiographic knee osteoarthritis (KOA), prior to the advent of radiographic disease. 206 knees with incident radiographic KOA (Kellgren Lawrence Grade (KLG) 0 or 1 at baseline, developing KLG 2 or greater with a definite osteophyte and joint space narrowing (JSN) grade ≥1 by year 4) were matched to 232 control knees not developing incident KOA. Manual segmentation of the central five slices of the medial and lateral meniscus was performed on coronal 3T DESS MRI and quantitative meniscus position was determined. Cases and controls were compared using conditional logistic regression adjusting for age, sex, BMI, race and clinical site. Sensitivity analyses of early (year [Y] 1/2) and late (Y3/4) incidence was performed. Mean medial extrusion distance was significantly greater for incident compared to non-incident knees (1.56 mean ± 1.12 mm SD vs 1.29 ± 0.99 mm; +21%, P meniscus (25.8 ± 15.8% vs 22.0 ± 13.5%; +17%, P meniscus in incident medial KOA, or for the tibial plateau coverage between incident and non-incident knees. Restricting the analysis to medial incident KOA at Y1/2 differences were attenuated, but reached significance for extrusion distance, whereas no significant differences were observed at incident KOA in Y3/4. Greater medial meniscus extrusion predicts incident radiographic KOA. Early onset KOA showed greater differences for meniscus position between incident and non-incident knees than late onset KOA. Copyright © 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Surgical techniques and radiological findings of meniscus allograft transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hoseok; Lee, Sang Yub; Na, Young Gon; Kim, Sung Kwan; Yi, Jae Hyuck; Lim, Jae Kwang; Lee, So Mi

    2016-08-01

    Meniscus allograft transplantation has been performed over the past 25 years to relieve knee pain and improve knee function in patients with an irreparable meniscus injury. The efficacy and safety of meniscus allograft transplantation have been established in numerous experimental and clinical researches. However, there is a lack of reviews to aid radiologists who are routinely interpreting images and evaluating the outcome of the procedures, and also meniscus allograft transplantation is not widely performed in most hospitals. This review focuses on the indications of the procedure, the different surgical techniques used for meniscus allograft transplantation according to the involvement of the lateral and medial meniscus, and the associated procedures. The postoperative radiological findings and surgical complications of the meniscus allograft transplantation are also described in detail. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The tear turnover and tear clearance tests - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garaszczuk, Izabela K; Montes Mico, Robert; Iskander, D Robert; Expósito, Alejandro Cerviño

    2018-03-01

    The aim is to provide a summary of methods available for the assessment of tear turnover and tear clearance rates. The review defines tear clearance and tear turnover and describes their implication for ocular surface health. Additionally, it describes main types of techniques for measuring tear turnover, including fluorescein tear clearance tests, techniques utilizing electromagnetic spectrum and tracer molecule and novel experimental techniques utilizing optical coherence tomography and fluorescein profilometry. Areas covered: Internet databases (PubMed, Science Direct, Google Scholar) and most frequently cited references were used as a principal resource of information on tear turnover rate and tear clearance rate, presenting methodologies and equipment, as well as their definition and implications for the anterior eye surface health and function. Keywords used for data-search were as follows: tear turnover, tear clearance, fluorescein clearance, scintigraphy, fluorophotometry, tear flow, drainage, tear meniscus dynamics, Krehbiel flow and lacrimal functional unit. Expert commentary: After decades, the topic of tear turnover assessment has been reintroduced. Recently, new techniques have been developed to propose less invasive, less time consuming and simpler methodologies for the assessment of tear dynamics that have the potential to be utilized in clinical practice.

  10. MRI of discoid lateral meniscus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, Yutaka; Ootani, Masatoshi; Furukawa, Tomoaki; Yamamoto, Tadatsuka; Tomoda, Kaname; Tsukaguchi, Isao; Mitomo, Masanori.

    1991-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed the MR examinations of 10 patients (17 knees) with surgically documented discoid lateral meniscus of the knee joint. As MRI of the knee is being used more often, the criteria for diagnosis of this entity with MRI need to be established. We tried to define MRI criteria for the detection of discoid menisci by performing numerical measurements of MR images on a display screen. The transverse diameter of the midbody of a discoid lateral meniscus averaged 21.9 mm (normal control: 8.6 mm), and its proportion to the transverse width of the tibia averaged 29.4% (normal control: 12.0%). The measurable difference in height between the discoid and the medial meniscus was negligible. The number of sagittal sections on which the anterior and posterior horns connected varied from two to five in cases of discoid lateral meniscus, and from zero to two in normal controls. Among these parameters, the transverse diameter and its proportion of the transverse width of the tibia proved to be the most reliable. We concluded that a discoid meniscus is indicated if a transverse diameter of a lateral meniscus exceeds 15 mm (proportion to the tibia: 20%). (author)

  11. Transplantation of autologous synovial mesenchymal stem cells promotes meniscus regeneration in aged primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Shimpei; Muneta, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Yusuke; Koga, Hideyuki; Watanabe, Toshifumi; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Sotome, Shinichi; Okawa, Atsushi; Kiuchi, Shinji; Ono, Hideo; Mizuno, Mitsuru; Sekiya, Ichiro

    2017-06-01

    Transplantation of aggregates of synovial mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) enhanced meniscus regeneration in rats. Anatomy and biological properties of the meniscus depend on animal species. To apply this technique clinically, it is valuable to investigate the use of animals genetically close to humans. We investigated whether transplantation of aggregates of autologous synovial MSCs promoted meniscal regeneration in aged primates. Chynomolgus primates between 12 and 13 years old were used. After the anterior halves of the medial menisci in both knees were removed, an average of 14 aggregates consisting of 250,000 synovial MSCs were transplanted onto the meniscus defect. No aggregates were transplanted to the opposite knee for the control. Meniscus and articular cartilage were analyzed macroscopically, histologically, and by MRI T1rho mapping at 8 (n = 3) and 16 weeks (n = 4). The medial meniscus was larger and the modified Pauli's histological score for the regenerated meniscus was better in the MSC group than in the control group in each primate at 8 and 16 weeks. Mankin's score for the medial femoral condyle cartilage was better in the MSC group than in the control group in all primates at 16 weeks. T1rho value for both the regenerated meniscus and adjacent articular cartilage in the MSC group was closer to the normal meniscus than in the control group in all primates at 16 weeks. Transplantation of aggregates of autologous synovial MSCs promoted meniscus regeneration and delayed progression of degeneration of articular cartilage in aged primates. This is the first report dealing with meniscus regeneration in primates. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1274-1282, 2017. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Reversed double PCL sign: unusual location of a meniscal fragment of the knee observed by MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niitsu, M.; Itai, Y. [Dept. of Radiology, Inst. of Clinical Medicine, Univ. of Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Ikeda, K. [Inst. of Clinical Medicine, Univ. of Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2003-12-01

    A 36-year-old woman with tears of the anterior cruciate ligament and medial meniscus received a meniscectomy. The MR images obtained prior to the partial meniscectomy showed a bucket-handle meniscal tear with centrally displaced fragment lying anterior to the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), representing a ''double PCL sign''; however, after the meniscectomy, MR images demonstrated a fragment in the space posterior to the PCL where no structure is generally recognized except for the ligament of wrisberg. This article reports a ''reversed'' double PCL sign, caused by inadequate surgical clearance of a bucket-handle tear of the medial meniscus. (orig.)

  13. The "moving valgus stress test" for medial collateral ligament tears of the elbow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Driscoll, Shawn W M; Lawton, Richard L; Smith, Adam M

    2005-02-01

    The diagnosis of a painful partial tear of the medial collateral ligament in overhead-throwing athletes is challenging, even for experienced elbow surgeons and despite the use of sophisticated imaging techniques. The "moving valgus stress test" is an accurate physical examination technique for diagnosis of medial collateral ligament attenuation in the elbow. Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 2. Twenty-one patients underwent surgical intervention for medial elbow pain due to medial collateral ligament insufficiency or other abnormality of chronic valgus overload, and they were assessed preoperatively with an examination called the moving valgus stress test. To perform the moving valgus stress test, the examiner applies and maintains a constant moderate valgus torque to the fully flexed elbow and then quickly extends the elbow. The test is positive if the medial elbow pain is reproduced at the medial collateral ligament and is at maximum between 120 degrees and 70 degrees. The moving valgus stress test was highly sensitive (100%, 17 of 17 patients) and specific (75%, 3 of 4 patients) when compared to assessment of the medial collateral ligament by surgical exploration or arthroscopic valgus stress testing. The mean shear range (ie, the arc within which pain was produced with the moving valgus stress test) was 120 degrees to 70 degrees. The mean angle at which pain was at a maximum was 90 degrees of elbow flexion. The moving valgus stress test is an accurate physical examination technique that, when performed and interpreted correctly, is highly sensitive for medial elbow pain arising from the medial collateral ligament.

  14. Interposition of the posterior cruciate ligament into the medial compartment of the knee joint on coronal magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Su; Yoon, Young Cheol; Park, Ki Jeong; Wang, Joon Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Bong Keun [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the overall prevalence and clinical significance of interposition of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) into the medial compartment of the knee joint in coronal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We retrospectively reviewed 317 consecutive patients referred for knee MRI at our institution between October 2009 and December 2009. Interposition of the PCL into the medial compartment of the knee joint on proton coronal MRI was evaluated dichotomously (i.e., present or absent). We analyzed the interposition according to its prevalence as well as its relationship with right-left sidedness, gender, age, and disease categories (osteoarthritis, anterior cruciate ligament tear, and medial meniscus tear). Prevalence of interposition of PCL into the medial compartment of the knee joint was 47.0% (149/317). There was no right (50.0%, 83/166) to left (43.7%, 66/151) or male (50.3%, 87/173) to female (43.1%, 62/144) differences in the prevalence. There was no significant association between the prevalence and age, or the disease categories. Interposition of the PCL into the medial compartment of the knee joint is observed in almost half of patients on proton coronal MRI of the knee. Its presence is not associated with any particular factors including knee pathology and may be regarded as a normal MR finding.

  15. The relation between chondromalacia patella and meniscal tear and the sulcus angle/ trochlear depth ratio as a powerful predictor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resorlu, Hatice; Zateri, Coskun; Nusran, Gurdal; Goksel, Ferdi; Aylanc, Nilufer

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the relation between chondromalacia patella and the sulcus angle/trochlear depth ratio as a marker of trochlear morphology. In addition, we also planned to show the relationship between meniscus damage, subcutaneous adipose tissue thickness as a marker of obesity, patellar tilt angle and chondromalacia patella. Patients with trauma, rheumatologic disease, a history of knee surgery and patellar variations such as patella alba and patella baja were excluded. Magnetic resonance images of the knees of 200 patients were evaluated. Trochlear morphology from standardized levels, patellar tilt angle, lateral/medial facet ratio, subcutaneous adipose tissue thickness from 3 locations and meniscus injury were assessed by two specialist radiologists. Retropatellar cartilage was normal in 108 patients (54%) at radiological evaluation, while chondromalacia patella was determined in 92 (46%) cases. Trochlear sulcus angle and prepatellar subcutaneous adipose tissue thickness were significantly high in patients with chondromalacia patella, while trochlear depth and lateral patellar tilt angle were low. The trochlear sulcus angle/trochlear depth ratio was also high in chondromalacia patella and was identified as an independent risk factor at regression analysis. Additionally, medial meniscal tear was observed in 35 patients (38%) in the chondromalacia patella group and in 27 patients (25%) in the normal group, the difference being statistically significant (P = 0.033). An increased trochlear sulcus angle/trochlear depth ratio is a significant predictor of chondromalacia patella. Medial meniscus injury is more prevalent in patients with chondromalacia patella in association with impairment in knee biomechanics and the degenerative process.

  16. Epidemiology of isolated meniscal injury and its effect on performance in athletes from the National Basketball Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Peter C; Starkey, Chad; Lombardo, Stephen; Vitti, Gary; Kharrazi, F Daniel

    2012-03-01

    The current incidence and outcomes of meniscal injury have not been quantified in professional athletes. To describe the incidence, risk, amount of time lost, and effect on performance for isolated meniscal injury in athletes from the National Basketball Association (NBA). Demographic factors predicting the risk of meniscal tears and the effect of injury in return to play were also investigated. Descriptive epidemiology study. A centralized database was queried to identify meniscal injuries occurring in the NBA over 21 seasons. The frequency of injury, time lost, game exposures, and incidence, rate, and risk were calculated. The preinjury and postinjury player efficiency rating (PER) was used to identify changes in player performance. We identified 129 isolated meniscal tears in NBA athletes during a 21-season span. From this number, 77 (59.7%) involved the lateral meniscus and 52 (40.3%) the medial meniscus. Injuries occurred more frequently in games. The lateral meniscus had a statistically significant higher injury rate. Both left and right knees were equally affected. The number of days missed for lateral meniscal tears and medial meniscal tears was 43.8 ± 35.7 days and 40.9 ± 29.7 days, respectively, and was not statistically different. There was a significant inverse relationship between age and rate of lateral meniscal tears, with lateral meniscal tears more likely to occur up to age 30 years; beyond that medial meniscal tears were more common. Players with a body mass index (BMI) greater than 25 had a significantly increased risk of meniscal tears compared with players with a BMI less than 25, specifically with an increased risk of lateral meniscal tears. Twenty-five players (19.4%) did not return to play. For those who did, upon returning to competition, there was no statistical change in PER from their preinjury status, and the mean number of seasons completed was 4.1 ± 3.7 seasons. The lateral meniscus is more frequently torn than the medial meniscus

  17. Changes of tear film after trabeculectomy in glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Jun Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To learn the changes of the tear film before and after the trabeculectomy of glaucoma and explore the incidence of dry eye and the prevention and control measures.METHODS: The 36 patients(60 eyesof glaucoma were examined in detail before 3d of trabeculectomy and after the surgery at 3, 7, 14 and 30d. The examinations include lower eyelid central river of tears, break-up time(BUT, Schirmer Ⅰ test(SⅠtand staining scores of corneal fluorescein under slit lamp microscope.RESULTS:The tear meniscus height of central lower eyelid was increased and the tear film BUT was shortened at the same time, the scores of SⅠt was reduced and corneal fluorescein staining score was increased at postoperative 3 and 7d compared with that of preoperation. The tear meniscus height of central lower eyelid, tear film BUT and SIt and score of corneal fluorescein staining began to recover in most of the affected eyes after surgery 14d. At 30d after surgery, 22% of patients tear film failed to recover to the preoperative level; dry eye occured in 18% preoperative eyes with normal tear film.CONCLUSION:Trabeculectomy of glaucoma may affect the stability of the tear film and some patients showeing obvious dry eye and should be intervened and treatmented timely.

  18. MR imaging-based diagnosis and classification of meniscal tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Jie C; De Smet, Arthur A; Graf, Ben K; Rosas, Humberto G

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is currently the modality of choice for detecting meniscal injuries and planning subsequent treatment. A thorough understanding of the imaging protocols, normal meniscal anatomy, surrounding anatomic structures, and anatomic variants and pitfalls is critical to ensure diagnostic accuracy and prevent unnecessary surgery. High-spatial-resolution imaging of the meniscus can be performed using fast spin-echo and three-dimensional MR imaging sequences. Normal anatomic structures that can mimic a tear include the meniscal ligament, meniscofemoral ligaments, popliteomeniscal fascicles, and meniscomeniscal ligament. Anatomic variants and pitfalls that can mimic a tear include discoid meniscus, meniscal flounce, a meniscal ossicle, and chondrocalcinosis. When a meniscal tear is identified, accurate description and classification of the tear pattern can guide the referring clinician in patient education and surgical planning. For example, longitudinal tears are often amenable to repair, whereas horizontal and radial tears may require partial meniscectomy. Tear patterns include horizontal, longitudinal, radial, root, complex, displaced, and bucket-handle tears. Occasionally, meniscal tears can be difficult to detect at imaging; however, secondary indirect signs, such as a parameniscal cyst, meniscal extrusion, or linear subchondral bone marrow edema, should increase the radiologist's suspicion for an underlying tear. Awareness of common diagnostic errors can ensure accurate diagnosis of meniscal tears. Online supplemental material is available for this article. ©RSNA, 2014.

  19. Clinical Application of Scaffolds for Partial Meniscus Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Cathal J; Withers, Daniel P; Kurzweil, Peter R; Verdonk, Peter C

    2015-09-01

    Meniscal tears are common injuries often treated by partial meniscectomy. This may result in altered joint contact mechanics which in turn may lead to worsening symptoms and an increased risk of osteoarthritis. Meniscal scaffolds have been proposed as a treatment option aimed at reducing symptoms while also potentially reducing progression of degenerative change. There are 2 scaffolds available for clinical use at the present time; Collagen Meniscus Implant and Actifit. Medium-term to long-term data (4.9 to 11.3 y) demonstrate efficacy of partial meniscus replacement. The patients who seem to benefit most are chronic postmeniscectomy rather than acute meniscal injuries. Herein we report on available clinical data for Collagen Meniscus Implant and Actifit while describing our preferred surgical technique and postoperative rehabilitation program.

  20. Meniscus tears of the knee: Postarthrogram high resolution CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Hyoung; Do, Young Soo; You, Jin Jong; Gong, Jae Chul; Kim, Hyung Jin; Chung, Sung Hoon

    1990-01-01

    Thirty-eight knees with clinically suspected meniscal tears were examined with high resolution computed tomography(HRCT) immediately following double contrast arthrography. All subsequently underwent arthroscopy. The findings of postarthrogram HRCT and arthroscopy were compared to evaluated the usefulness of postarthrogram HRCT in diagnosis of the meniscal tears. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of HRCT were 96.2%. 83.3% and 92.1% respectively. The anatomic details of the meniscal tears were clearly visible on the HRCT scans. Sagittal and coronal reformation views well visualized the horizontal tears and the relationship of torn meniscal fragments, and well differential the peripheral tears from the synovial recess. Our result indicate that postarthrogram HRCT not only is a sensitive and effective method for the detection and characterization of the meniscal tears, but also provides arthroscopists with the appropriate surgical plans

  1. MR accuracy and arthroscopic incidence of meniscal radial tears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magee, Thomas; Shapiro, Marc; Williams, David [Department of Radiology, Neuroimaging Institute, 27 East Hibiscus Blvd., Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States)

    2002-12-01

    A meniscal radial tear is a vertical tear that involves the inner meniscal margin. The tear is most frequent in the middle third of the lateral meniscus and may extend outward in any direction. We report (1) the arthroscopic incidence of radial tears, (2) MR signs that aid in the detection of radial tears and (3) our prospective accuracy in detection of radial tears. Design and patients. Three musculoskeletal radiologists prospectively read 200 consecutive MR examinations of the knee that went on to arthroscopy by one orthopedic surgeon. MR images were assessed for location and MR characteristics of radial tears. MR criteria used for diagnosis of a radial tear were those outlined by Tuckman et al.: truncation, abnormal morphology and/or lack of continuity or absence of the meniscus on one or more MR images. An additional criterion used was abnormal increased signal in that area on fat-saturated proton density or T2-weighted coronal and sagittal images. Prospective MR readings were correlated with the arthroscopic findings.Results. Of the 200 consecutive knee arthroscopies, 28 patients had radial tears reported arthroscopically (14% incidence). MR readings prospectively demonstrated 19 of the 28 radial tears (68% sensitivity) when the criteria for diagnosis of a radial tear were truncation or abnormal morphology of the meniscus. With the use of the additional criterion of increased signal in the area of abnormal morphology on fat-saturated T2-weighted or proton density weighted sequences, the prospective sensitivity was 25 of 28 radial tears (89% sensitivity). There were no radial tears described in MR reports that were not demonstrated on arthroscopy (i.e., there were no false positive MR readings of radial tears in these 200 patients). Radial tears are commonly seen at arthroscopy. There was a 14% incidence in this series of 200 patients who underwent arthroscopy. Prospective detection of radial tears was 68% as compared with arthroscopy when the criteria as

  2. MR accuracy and arthroscopic incidence of meniscal radial tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magee, Thomas; Shapiro, Marc; Williams, David

    2002-01-01

    A meniscal radial tear is a vertical tear that involves the inner meniscal margin. The tear is most frequent in the middle third of the lateral meniscus and may extend outward in any direction. We report (1) the arthroscopic incidence of radial tears, (2) MR signs that aid in the detection of radial tears and (3) our prospective accuracy in detection of radial tears. Design and patients. Three musculoskeletal radiologists prospectively read 200 consecutive MR examinations of the knee that went on to arthroscopy by one orthopedic surgeon. MR images were assessed for location and MR characteristics of radial tears. MR criteria used for diagnosis of a radial tear were those outlined by Tuckman et al.: truncation, abnormal morphology and/or lack of continuity or absence of the meniscus on one or more MR images. An additional criterion used was abnormal increased signal in that area on fat-saturated proton density or T2-weighted coronal and sagittal images. Prospective MR readings were correlated with the arthroscopic findings.Results. Of the 200 consecutive knee arthroscopies, 28 patients had radial tears reported arthroscopically (14% incidence). MR readings prospectively demonstrated 19 of the 28 radial tears (68% sensitivity) when the criteria for diagnosis of a radial tear were truncation or abnormal morphology of the meniscus. With the use of the additional criterion of increased signal in the area of abnormal morphology on fat-saturated T2-weighted or proton density weighted sequences, the prospective sensitivity was 25 of 28 radial tears (89% sensitivity). There were no radial tears described in MR reports that were not demonstrated on arthroscopy (i.e., there were no false positive MR readings of radial tears in these 200 patients). Radial tears are commonly seen at arthroscopy. There was a 14% incidence in this series of 200 patients who underwent arthroscopy. Prospective detection of radial tears was 68% as compared with arthroscopy when the criteria as

  3. Mechanical function near defects in an aligned nanofiber composite is preserved by inclusion of disorganized layers: Insight into meniscus structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Sonia; Mandalapu, Sai; Aeppli, Céline; Qu, Feini; Szczesny, Spencer E; Mauck, Robert L; Zgonis, Miltiadis H

    2017-07-01

    The meniscus is comprised of circumferentially aligned fibers that resist the tensile forces within the meniscus (i.e., hoop stress) that develop during loading of the knee. Although these circumferential fibers are severed by radial meniscal tears, tibial contact stresses do not increase until the tear reaches ∼90% of the meniscus width, suggesting that the severed circumferential fibers still bear load and maintain the mechanical functionality of the meniscus. Recent data demonstrates that the interfibrillar matrix can transfer strain energy to disconnected fibrils in tendon fascicles. In the meniscus, interdigitating radial tie fibers, which function to stabilize and bind the circumferential fibers together, are hypothesized to function in a similar manner by transmitting load to severed circumferential fibers near a radial tear. To test this hypothesis, we developed an engineered fibrous analog of the knee meniscus using poly(ε-caprolactone) to create aligned scaffolds with variable amounts of non-aligned elements embedded within the scaffold. We show that the tensile properties of these scaffolds are a function of the ratio of aligned to non-aligned elements, and change in a predictable fashion following a simple mixture model. When measuring the loss of mechanical function in scaffolds with a radial tear, compared to intact scaffolds, the decrease in apparent linear modulus was reduced in scaffolds containing non-aligned layers compared to purely aligned scaffolds. Increased strains in areas adjacent to the defect were also noted in composite scaffolds. These findings indicate that non-aligned (disorganized) elements interspersed within an aligned network can improve overall mechanical function by promoting strain transfer to nearby disconnected fibers. This finding supports the notion that radial tie fibers may similarly promote tear tolerance in the knee meniscus, and will direct changes in clinical practice and provide guidance for tissue engineering

  4. Prosthetic replacement of the medial meniscus in cadaveric knees - Does the prosthesis mimic the functional behavior of the native meniscus?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tienen, TG; Verdonschot, N; Heijkants, RGJC; Buma, R; Scholten, JGF; van Kampen, A; Veth, RPH

    2004-01-01

    Meniscus replacement by a polymer meniscus prosthesis in dogs resulted in generation of new meniscal tissue. Hypothesis: Optimal functioning of the prosthesis would involve realistic deformation and motion patterns of the prosthesis during knee joint motion. Study Design: Controlled laboratory

  5. A mass and solute balance model for tear volume and osmolarity in the normal and the dry eye

    KAUST Repository

    Gaffney, E.A.

    2010-01-01

    Tear hyperosmolarity is thought to play a key role in the mechanism of dry eye, a common symptomatic condition accompanied by visual disturbance, tear film instability, inflammation and damage to the ocular surface. We have constructed a model for the mass and solute balance of the tears, with parameter estimation based on extensive data from the literature which permits the influence of tear evaporation, lacrimal flux and blink rate on tear osmolarity to be explored. In particular the nature of compensatory events has been estimated in aqueous-deficient (ADDE) and evaporative (EDE) dry eye. The model reproduces observed osmolarities of the tear meniscus for the healthy eye and predicts a higher concentration in the tear film than meniscus in normal and dry eye states. The differential is small in the normal eye, but is significantly increased in dry eye, especially for the simultaneous presence of high meniscus concentration and low meniscus radius. This may influence the interpretation of osmolarity values obtained from meniscus samples since they need not fully reflect potential damage to the ocular surface caused by tear film hyperosmolarity. Interrogation of the model suggests that increases in blink rate may play a limited role in compensating for a rise in tear osmolarity in ADDE but that an increase in lacrimal flux, together with an increase in blink rate, may delay the development of hyperosmolarity in EDE. Nonetheless, it is predicted that tear osmolarity may rise to much higher levels in EDE than ADDE before the onset of tear film breakup, in the absence of events at the ocular surface which would independently compromise tear film stability. Differences in the predicted responses of the pre-ocular tears in ADDE compared to EDE or hybrid disease to defined conditions suggest that no single, empirically-accessible variable can act as a surrogate for tear film concentration and the potential for ocular surface damage. This emphasises the need to measure

  6. A mass and solute balance model for tear volume and osmolarity in the normal and the dry eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffney, E A; Tiffany, J M; Yokoi, N; Bron, A J

    2010-01-01

    Tear hyperosmolarity is thought to play a key role in the mechanism of dry eye, a common symptomatic condition accompanied by visual disturbance, tear film instability, inflammation and damage to the ocular surface. We have constructed a model for the mass and solute balance of the tears, with parameter estimation based on extensive data from the literature which permits the influence of tear evaporation, lacrimal flux and blink rate on tear osmolarity to be explored. In particular the nature of compensatory events has been estimated in aqueous-deficient (ADDE) and evaporative (EDE) dry eye. The model reproduces observed osmolarities of the tear meniscus for the healthy eye and predicts a higher concentration in the tear film than meniscus in normal and dry eye states. The differential is small in the normal eye, but is significantly increased in dry eye, especially for the simultaneous presence of high meniscus concentration and low meniscus radius. This may influence the interpretation of osmolarity values obtained from meniscus samples since they need not fully reflect potential damage to the ocular surface caused by tear film hyperosmolarity. Interrogation of the model suggests that increases in blink rate may play a limited role in compensating for a rise in tear osmolarity in ADDE but that an increase in lacrimal flux, together with an increase in blink rate, may delay the development of hyperosmolarity in EDE. Nonetheless, it is predicted that tear osmolarity may rise to much higher levels in EDE than ADDE before the onset of tear film breakup, in the absence of events at the ocular surface which would independently compromise tear film stability. Differences in the predicted responses of the pre-ocular tears in ADDE compared to EDE or hybrid disease to defined conditions suggest that no single, empirically-accessible variable can act as a surrogate for tear film concentration and the potential for ocular surface damage. This emphasises the need to measure

  7. Magnetic resonance tomography - a possibility for noninvasive meniscus diagnosis. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wacker, F.; Koenig, H.; Sell, S.

    1989-01-01

    Meniscus tears were experimentally produced by surgery in 5 pigs. They were identified via MR tomography with the selected routine sequence (SE: TR 1600, TE 22/80msec, SD 3 mm) independent of position, orientation and severity. The best imaging was obtained between the 2nd and 8th weeks after the operation in the sagittal plane. Subsequently the contrast and with it simultaneously the delineation between intact fibrous cartilage and rupture cleft decreased; this could be observed in sequences weighted according to proton density and T2 in different degrees of intensity. Parallel to this a trial to induce degeneration in the meniscus tissue resulted 8 weeks after the operation in central, signal-intensive zones in the menisci. No success was achieved in trying to improve imaging of the pathological changes by means of intraarticular injections of Gd-DTPA; this was tried out at various points of time. Besides enabling the imaging of lesions of the fibrous cartilage as a matter of principle, MR tomography can also give limited information on the age of a meniscus tear. (orig.) [de

  8. Meniscofemoral ligaments: patterns of tears and pseudotears of the menisci using cadaveric and clinical material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Marcelo R. de [University of California San Diego, VA Health Care System, San Diego, CA (United States); Hospital Mae de Deus, Porto Alegre (Brazil); Universidade Federal Rio Grande do Sul, PPG Clinica Medica, Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); Chung, Christine B.; Trudell, Debbra; Resnick, Donald [University of California San Diego, VA Health Care System, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2007-08-15

    The purpose of the study was to determine the different types of pseudotears of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus caused by the nearby meniscofemoral ligaments (MFLs), and to correlate the presence of these ligaments with patterns of meniscal tear. Retrospective clinical study with patients and prospective observatory study with cadaveric material. Magnetic resonance imaging studies of the knee in 49 patients who had subsequent arthroscopy of the knee performed over a 1-year period at a single institution were reviewed by two readers in consensus for the presence and morphology of the MFLs of Humphry (LH) and Wrisberg (LW). Ten cadaveric knee specimens were used for MRI, anatomic, and histologic study. The LH was present in 55% of patients, the LW in 94%, and both were present in 44.9%. The thickness of the LH and LW ranged from 1-3 mm (mean 1.9, SD 0.61), and from 1-3.8 mm (mean 1.8, SD 0.65) respectively (p > 0.05). A pseudotear in the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus was present in 63% of patients. In 13% the pseudotear was vertically oriented, and in 87% the pseudotear had an anterosuperior to posteroinferior orientation, ranging from 37 to 87 . There was no association between the presence of one or both MFLs and the occurrence of medial or lateral meniscal tears (p > 0.05). Meniscofemoral ligaments are frequent anatomical structures that are found in the majority of knees with MRI. They commonly cause a pseudotear of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus that can be simple, double, or complex in appearance, with vertical or anterosuperior to posteroinferior orientation. (orig.)

  9. Isolated tear of the tendon to the medial head of gastrocnemius presenting as a painless lump in the calf

    OpenAIRE

    Watura, Christopher; Harries, William

    2009-01-01

    We report on a case of isolated tear of the medial head of gastrocnemius tendon. The patient presented with a painless lump in the right calf and denied any prior history of trauma or strain to the leg. A longitudinal split of the tendon was demonstrated at ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). There were no other abnormalities and the gastrocnemius muscle was normal. There are no reports in the literature of isolated gastrocnemius tendon tear. To date the calf muscle complex injur...

  10. Cost effectiveness of meniscal allograft for torn discoid lateral meniscus in young women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramme, Austin J; Strauss, Eric J; Jazrawi, Laith; Gold, Heather T

    2016-09-01

    A discoid meniscus is more prone to tears than a normal meniscus. Patients with a torn discoid lateral meniscus are at increased risk for early onset osteoarthritis requiring total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Optimal management for this condition is controversial given the up-front cost difference between the two treatment options: the more expensive meniscal allograft transplantation compared with standard partial meniscectomy. We hypothesize that meniscal allograft transplantation following excision of a torn discoid lateral meniscus is more cost-effective compared with partial meniscectomy alone because allografts will extend the time to TKA. A decision analytic Markov model was created to compare the cost effectiveness of two treatments for symptomatic, torn discoid lateral meniscus: meniscal allograft and partial meniscectomy. Probability estimates and event rates were derived from the scientific literature, and costs and benefits were discounted by 3%. One-way sensitivity analyses were performed to test model robustness. Over 25 years, the partial meniscectomy strategy cost $10,430, whereas meniscal allograft cost on average $4040 more, at $14,470. Partial meniscectomy postponed TKA an average of 12.5 years, compared with 17.30 years for meniscal allograft, an increase of 4.8 years. Allograft cost $842 per-year-gained in time to TKA. Meniscal allografts have been shown to reduce pain and improve function in patients with discoid lateral meniscus tears. Though more costly, meniscal allografts may be more effective than partial meniscectomy in delaying TKA in this model. Additional future long term clinical studies will provide more insight into optimal surgical options.

  11. Changes in Tear Volume after 3% Diquafosol Treatment in Patients with Dry Eye Syndrome: An Anterior Segment Spectral-domain Optical Coherence Tomography Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwan Bok; Koh, Kyung Min; Kwon, Young A; Song, Sang Wroul; Kim, Byoung Yeop; Chung, Jae Lim

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate changes in the tear meniscus area and tear meniscus height over time in patients with dry eye syndrome, using anterior segment spectral-domain optical coherence tomography after the instillation of 3% diquafosol ophthalmic solution. Sixty eyes from 30 patients with mild to moderate dry eye syndrome were included. Tear meniscus images acquired by anterior segment spectral-domain optical coherence tomography were analyzed using National Institutes of Health's image-analysis software (ImageJ 1.44p). Tear meniscus area and tear meniscus height were measured at baseline, 5 minutes, 10 minutes, and 30 minutes after instillation of a drop of diquafosol in one eye and normal saline in the other eye. Changes in ocular surface disease index score, tear film break-up time, corneal staining score by Oxford schema, and meibomian expressibility were also evaluated at baseline, and after 1 week and 1 month of a diquafosol daily regimen. Sixty eyes from 30 subjects (mean age, 29.3 years; 8 men and 22 women) were included. In eyes receiving diquafosol, tear volume was increased at 5 and 10 minutes compared with baseline. It was also higher than saline instilled eyes at 5, 10, and 30 minutes. Changes in tear volume with respect to baseline were not statistically different after the use of diquafosol for 1 month. Ocular surface disease index score, tear film break-up time, and Oxford cornea stain score were significantly improved after 1 week and 1 month of daily diquafosol instillation, but meibomian expressibility did not change. Topical diquafosol ophthalmic solution effectively increased tear volume for up to 30 minutes, compared to normal saline in patients with dry eye syndrome. © 2017 The Korean Ophthalmological Society

  12. Meniscal Tear Film Fluid Dynamics Near Marx’s Line

    KAUST Repository

    Zubkov, V. S.

    2013-07-03

    Extensive studies have explored the dynamics of the ocular surface fluid, though theoretical investigations are typically limited to the use of the lubrication approximation, which is not guaranteed to be uniformly valid a-priori throughout the tear meniscus. However, resolving tear film behaviour within the meniscus and especially its apices is required to characterise the flow dynamics where the tear film is especially thin, and thus most susceptible to evaporatively induced hyperosmolarity and subsequent epithelial damage. Hence, we have explored the accuracy of the standard lubrication approximation for the tear film by explicit comparisons with the 2D Navier-Stokes model, considering both stationary and moving eyelids. Our results demonstrate that the lubrication model is qualitatively accurate except in the vicinity of the eyelids. In particular, and in contrast to lubrication theory, the solution of the full Navier-Stokes equations predict a distinct absence of fluid flow, and thus convective mixing in the region adjacent to the tear film contact line. These observations not only support emergent hypotheses concerning the formation of Marx\\'s line, a region of epithelial cell staining adjacent to the contact line on the eyelid, but also enhance our understanding of the pathophysiological consequences of the flow profile near the tear film contact line. © 2013 Society for Mathematical Biology.

  13. Tibial coverage, meniscus position, size and damage in knees discordant for joint space narrowing – data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloecker, K.; Guermazi, A.; Wirth, W.; Benichou, O.; Kwoh, C.K.; Hunter, D.J.; Englund, M.; Resch, H.; Eckstein, F.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Introduction Meniscal extrusion is thought to be associated with less meniscus coverage of the tibial surface, but the association of radiographic disease stage with quantitative measures of tibial plateau coverage is unknown. We therefore compared quantitative and semi-quantitative measures of meniscus position and morphology in individuals with bilateral painful knees discordant on medial joint space narrowing (mJSN). Methods A sample of 60 participants from the first half (2,678 cases) of the Osteoarthritis Initiative cohort fulfilled the inclusion criteria: bilateral frequent pain, Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) mJSN grades 1–3 in one, no-JSN in the contra-lateral (CL), and no lateral JSN in either knee (43 unilateral mJSN1; 17 mJSN2/3; 22 men, 38 women, body mass index (BMI) 31.3 ± 3.9 kg/m2). Segmentation and three-dimensional quantitative analysis of the tibial plateau and meniscus, and semi-quantitative evaluation of meniscus damage (magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) osteoarthritis knee score – MOAKS) was performed using coronal 3T MR images (MPR DESSwe and intermediate-weighted turbo spin echo (IW-TSE) images). CL knees were compared using paired t-tests (between-knee, within-person design). Results Medial tibial plateau coverage was 36 ± 9% in mJSN1 vs 45 ± 8% in CL no-JSN knees, and was 31 ± 9% in mJSN2/3 vs 46 ± 6% in no-JSN knees (both P meniscus extrusion and damage (MOAKS), but no significant difference in meniscus volume. No significant differences in lateral tibial coverage, lateral meniscus morphology or position were observed. Conclusions Knees with medial JSN showed substantially less medial tibial plateau coverage by the meniscus. We suggest that the less meniscal coverage, i.e., less mechanical protection may be a reason for greater rates of cartilage loss observed in JSN knees. PMID:23220556

  14. Smoking increases the risk of early meniscus repair failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, Ryan; Schmitt, Laura C; Flanigan, David C; Magnussen, Robert A

    2016-05-01

    The goal of this study is to determine whether patients who smoke cigarettes at the time of surgery are at significantly increased risk of early meniscus repair failure relative to non-smokers. Retrospective chart review identified 64 current smokers within a series of 444 consecutive patients who underwent meniscus repair during a 7 years period. Fifty-two of these 64 smokers were available for follow-up and were matched by age, sex, and ACL status with non-smokers from the same cohort. Records of these 104 patients with a total of 120 meniscus repairs were reviewed to identify meniscus repair failure (defined as repeat surgery on the index meniscus) during the median 13-month (range: 3-79 months) follow-up period. The smoking and non-smoking groups were similar in age, sex, ACL status, BMI, meniscus repair technique, and meniscus involved. Meniscus repair failure occurred in 19 of the 112 menisci in 104 patients, for an overall failure risk of 17 %. Of the 19 failures, 14 occurred in 79 repaired medial menisci (18 % failure risk) and 5 occurred in 33 repaired lateral menisci (15 % failure risk). Meniscus repair failure occurred in significantly more smokers (15 failures in 56 menisci in 52 patients -27 % failure risk) than non-smokers (4 failures in 56 menisci in 52 patients -7 % failure risk) (p = 0.0076). Smoking is associated with significantly increased risk of early meniscus repair failure as defined by the incidence of repeat surgery on the index meniscus. III.

  15. Partial and complete tear of the anterior cruciate ligament. Direct and indirect MR signs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, W.T.; Tu, H.Y.; Chen, R.C.; Shih, T.T.F.; Shau, W.Y.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze MR direct and indirect signs for knees with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) partial or complete tear. Material and Methods: According to documented MR direct and indirect signs for ACL tear, we retrospectively reviewed the incidence of those signs in 15 partial ACL tear and 17 complete ACL tear patients. The findings were also compared with duration of injury (less or more than 6 weeks, as acute or chronic stages). Results: A residual straight and tight ACL fiber in at least one pulse sequence was more frequently detected in partial ACL tears. The empty notch sign, a wavy contour of ACL, bone contusion at lateral compartment and lateral meniscus posterior horn tear were significantly more frequently seen in complete tear cases. The posterior cruciate ligament angle in chronic complete ACL tear cases (109 deg ±20 deg) had a tendency to be less than in chronic partial ACL tear cases (119 deg ±18 deg). Conclusion: The empty notch sign, a wavy ACL, bone contusion, and posterior horn of lateral meniscus tears are suggestive of a complete ACL tear. A residual straight and tight ACL fiber seen in at least one image section is a helpful sign to diagnosis of partial ACL tear. In the acute ACL injury stage, a focal increase of the ACL signal intensity is more suggestive of a partial ACL tear

  16. Bony landmark between the attachment of the medial meniscus posterior root and the posterior cruciate ligament: CT and MR imaging assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Masataka; Furumatsu, Takayuki; Miyazawa, Shinichi; Kodama, Yuya; Hino, Tomohito; Kamatsuki, Yusuke; Ozaki, Toshifumi [Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Science of Functional Recovery and Reconstruction, Okayama (Japan)

    2017-08-15

    (1) To reveal the prevalence of the bony recess (posterior dimple) and (2) to determine the position of the posterior dimple on the tibial plateau using three-dimensional computed tomography (3DCT). In this study, a retrospective review of 112 patients was performed to identify the posterior dimple and to evaluate its position on 3DCT. Magnetic resonance images (MRIs) were also used to determine the positional relationship among the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), medial meniscus posterior insertion (MMPI), and posterior dimple. The posterior dimple was observed in 100 of 112 knees (89.3%) on 3DCT. The center of the posterior dimple was 13.6 ± 0.8 mm from the medial tibial eminence apex. MRI showed that the posterior dimple separated the tibial attachment of the PCL and MMPI. This is the first study to discuss the prevalence and position of the bony recess in the posterior intercondylar fossa. (orig.)

  17. Bony landmark between the attachment of the medial meniscus posterior root and the posterior cruciate ligament: CT and MR imaging assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Masataka; Furumatsu, Takayuki; Miyazawa, Shinichi; Kodama, Yuya; Hino, Tomohito; Kamatsuki, Yusuke; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2017-01-01

    (1) To reveal the prevalence of the bony recess (posterior dimple) and (2) to determine the position of the posterior dimple on the tibial plateau using three-dimensional computed tomography (3DCT). In this study, a retrospective review of 112 patients was performed to identify the posterior dimple and to evaluate its position on 3DCT. Magnetic resonance images (MRIs) were also used to determine the positional relationship among the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), medial meniscus posterior insertion (MMPI), and posterior dimple. The posterior dimple was observed in 100 of 112 knees (89.3%) on 3DCT. The center of the posterior dimple was 13.6 ± 0.8 mm from the medial tibial eminence apex. MRI showed that the posterior dimple separated the tibial attachment of the PCL and MMPI. This is the first study to discuss the prevalence and position of the bony recess in the posterior intercondylar fossa. (orig.)

  18. Do MRI features at baseline predict radiographic joint space narrowing in the medial compartment of the osteoarthritic knee 2 years later?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madan-Sharma, Ruby; Kornaat, Peter R.; Bloem, Johannes L.; Watt, Iain [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Kloppenburg, Margreet; Botha-Scheepers, Stella A. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Rheumatology, Leiden (Netherlands); Graverand, Marie-Pierre Hellio le [Pfizer Groton, Groton, CT (United States)

    2008-09-15

    The purpose of the study was to relate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features at baseline with radiographically determined joint space narrowing (JSN) in the medial compartment of the knee after 2 years in a group of patients with symptomatic osteoarthritis at multiple joint sites. MRI of the knee and standardized radiographs were obtained at baseline and after 2 years in 186 patients (81% female; aged 43-76 years; mean 60 years). MRI was analyzed for bone marrow lesions, cysts, osteophytes, hyaline cartilage defects, joint effusion, and meniscal pathology in the medial compartment. Radiographs were scored semiquantitatively for JSN in the medial tibiofemoral joint using the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) atlas. Radiological progression was defined as {>=}1 grade increase. Associations between baseline magnetic resonance (MR) parameters and subsequent radiographic JSN changes were assessed using logistic regression. Relative risk (RR) was then calculated. Radiographic progression of JSN was observed in 17 (9.1%) of 186 patients. Eleven patients had a Kellgren and Lawrence (KL) score of {>=}2. A significant association was observed between all patients and meniscal tears (RR 3.57; confidence interval (CI) 1.08-10.0) and meniscal subluxation (RR 2.73; CI 1.20-5.41), between KL<2 and meniscal subluxation (RR 11.3; CI 2.49-29.49) and KL {>=} 2 and meniscus tears (RR 8.91; CI 1.13-22.84) and radiographic JSN 2 years later. Follow-up MR in 15 of 17 patients with progressive JSN showed only new meniscal abnormalities and no progression of cartilage loss. Meniscal pathology (tears and/or meniscal subluxation) was the only MRI parameter to be associated with subsequent radiographic progression of JSN in the medial tibiofemoral compartment on a radiograph 2 years later, as assessed by the OARSI score. (orig.)

  19. In Vivo Tibial Cartilage Strains in Regions of Cartilage-to-Cartilage Contact and Cartilage-to-Meniscus Contact in Response to Walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Betty; Lad, Nimit K; Collins, Amber T; Ganapathy, Pramodh K; Utturkar, Gangadhar M; McNulty, Amy L; Spritzer, Charles E; Moorman, Claude T; Sutter, E Grant; Garrett, William E; DeFrate, Louis E

    2017-10-01

    There are currently limited human in vivo data characterizing the role of the meniscus in load distribution within the tibiofemoral joint. Purpose/Hypothesis: The purpose was to compare the strains experienced in regions of articular cartilage covered by the meniscus to regions of cartilage not covered by the meniscus. It was hypothesized that in response to walking, tibial cartilage covered by the meniscus would experience lower strains than uncovered tibial cartilage. Descriptive laboratory study. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knees of 8 healthy volunteers was performed before and after walking on a treadmill. Using MRI-generated 3-dimensional models of the tibia, cartilage, and menisci, cartilage thickness was measured in 4 different regions based on meniscal coverage and compartment: covered medial, uncovered medial, covered lateral, and uncovered lateral. Strain was defined as the normalized change in cartilage thickness before and after activity. Within each compartment, covered cartilage before activity was significantly thinner than uncovered cartilage before activity ( P meniscus experiences lower strains than uncovered cartilage in the medial compartment. These findings provide important baseline information on the relationship between in vivo tibial compressive strain responses and meniscal coverage, which is critical to understanding normal meniscal function.

  20. A Controlled Study on the Correlation between Tear Film Volume and Tear Film Stability in Diabetic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eissa, Iman M; Khalil, Noha M; El-Gendy, Heba A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the tear film quantity and correlate it with the quality and stability of the tear film in diabetics and compare them to age matched controls. Introduction. Diabetes affects tear film parameters in multiple ways. Poor metabolic control and neuropathy are postulated factors. To further understand how diabetes affects tear film parameters this study was conducted. Subjects and Methods. Tear meniscus height was measured by anterior segment OCT, along with tear thinning time, a subtype of noninvasive tear break-up time, and blinking rate per minute which were all recorded for 22 diabetic patients. Correlations between these tear film parameters were studied and then compared to 16 age matched controls. Results. A statistically significant difference was found in blinking rate between the diabetic and the control group (P = 0.002), with higher blinking rate among diabetics. All tear film parameters were negatively correlated with duration of diabetes. A positive correlation was found between tear film volume and stability. Conclusion. Diabetes affects the tear film in various ways. Diabetics should be examined for dry eye signs even in absence of symptoms which may be masked by associated neuropathy. Duration of diabetes has an impact on tear film status.

  1. Diagnostic value of MRI in meniscus injury. Comparison of MRI and arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iso, Yoshinori; Nozaki, Hiroyuki; Emoto, Mari; Miyairi, Taro; Hirata, Aya; Hirasawa, Seiichi; Suguro, Toru; Igata, Atsuomi; Kudo, Yukihiko.

    1995-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and arthrography were performed on 90 knees to compare the diagnostic value for meniscus injury with these techniques. The diagnostic accuracy of MRI and arthrography was 89.1% and 87.1%, respectively. Imaging of the medial meniscus was somewhat better with arthrography, and delineation of the lateral meniscus was somewhat better with MRI. MRI was superior in diagnoses of horizontal and degenerative lacerations, but showed the shape of the injuries less clearly than arthrography. The diagnostic accuracy of MRI decreased with the age of the patients and was inferior to arthrography for patients in their forties or older. In conclusion, MRI is a less invasive approach with high diagnostic accuracy for meniscus injury and is a promising substitute for arthrography. (author)

  2. Evaluation of medial patellofemoral ligament tears after acute lateral patellar dislocation: comparison of high-frequency ultrasound and MR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guang-Ying; Ding, Hong-Yu [Shandong University, Department of Ultrasonography, Qianfoshan Hospital, Jinan (China); Zheng, Lei; Sun, Bai-Sheng [Chinese People' s Armed Police Force, Department of Radiology, Shandong Provincial Corps Hospital, Jinan (China); Li, En-Miao [Jinan Third People' s Hospital, Department of Ultrasonography, Jinan (China); Shi, Hao [Shandong University, Department of Radiology, Qianfoshan Hospital, Jinan (China)

    2015-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic performance of high-frequency ultrasound with MR in the evaluation of medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) lesions after acute lateral patellar dislocation (LPD). High-frequency ultrasound and MR images were prospectively obtained in 97 consecutive patients with acute LPD. Images were acquired using standardised protocols and were independently evaluated by two radiologists. The MPFL was assessed at three sites (patellar insertion, femoral attachment, and mid-substance) for signs of injury. Of a total of 291 sites in 97 MPFLs, 127 showed proven MPFL tear at surgery, including 51 sites of complete tear and 76 sites of partial tear. In a site-based analysis, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of high-frequency ultrasound was 90.8 %, 96.3 %, and 94.6 %, respectively, for partial MPFL tear and 86.3 %, 96.3 %, and 94 %, respectively, for complete tear. For MR, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy was 81.6 %, 95.7 %, and 91.3 %, respectively, for partial MPFL tear and 80.4 %, 95.7 %, and 92.1 %, respectively, for complete tear. There was no statistical difference between high-frequency ultrasound and MR in the assessment of partial (P = 0.1, 0.777, 0.155) or complete (P = 0.425, 0.777, 0.449) MPFL lesions. Interobserver agreement was very good for high-frequency ultrasound and good for MR. Data suggest that high-frequency ultrasound and MR have similar diagnostic performance in the evaluation of MPFL lesions after acute LPD. (orig.)

  3. Evaluation of medial patellofemoral ligament tears after acute lateral patellar dislocation: comparison of high-frequency ultrasound and MR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Guang-Ying; Ding, Hong-Yu; Zheng, Lei; Sun, Bai-Sheng; Li, En-Miao; Shi, Hao

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic performance of high-frequency ultrasound with MR in the evaluation of medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) lesions after acute lateral patellar dislocation (LPD). High-frequency ultrasound and MR images were prospectively obtained in 97 consecutive patients with acute LPD. Images were acquired using standardised protocols and were independently evaluated by two radiologists. The MPFL was assessed at three sites (patellar insertion, femoral attachment, and mid-substance) for signs of injury. Of a total of 291 sites in 97 MPFLs, 127 showed proven MPFL tear at surgery, including 51 sites of complete tear and 76 sites of partial tear. In a site-based analysis, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of high-frequency ultrasound was 90.8 %, 96.3 %, and 94.6 %, respectively, for partial MPFL tear and 86.3 %, 96.3 %, and 94 %, respectively, for complete tear. For MR, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy was 81.6 %, 95.7 %, and 91.3 %, respectively, for partial MPFL tear and 80.4 %, 95.7 %, and 92.1 %, respectively, for complete tear. There was no statistical difference between high-frequency ultrasound and MR in the assessment of partial (P = 0.1, 0.777, 0.155) or complete (P = 0.425, 0.777, 0.449) MPFL lesions. Interobserver agreement was very good for high-frequency ultrasound and good for MR. Data suggest that high-frequency ultrasound and MR have similar diagnostic performance in the evaluation of MPFL lesions after acute LPD. (orig.)

  4. Is there crosstalk between subchondral bone, cartilage, and meniscus in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atik, O Şahap; Erdoğan, Deniz; Seymen, Cemile Merve; Bozkurt, Hasan Hüseyin; Kaplanoğlu, Gülnur Take

    2016-08-01

    This study aims to investigate if there is any crosstalk between subchondral bone, cartilage, and meniscus in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis. Twelve female patients (mean age 64 years; range 59 to 71 years) with osteoarthritis in medial compartment were included in the study. The samples of subchondral bone, cartilage and meniscus were obtained during total knee arthroplasty. Degenerated tissue samples obtained from medial compartment were used as the experimental group (12 samples of subchondral bone and cartilage, 1x1 cm each; and 12 samples of meniscus, 1x1 cm each). Healthy tissue samples obtained from lateral compartment were used as the control group (12 samples of subchondral bone and cartilage; 1x1 cm each; and 12 samples of meniscus, 1x1 cm each). After decalcification, tissue samples were evaluated with light and transmission electron microscopy. In the experimental group, light microscopic evaluation of subchondral bone samples demonstrated that the cartilage-to-bone transition region had an irregular structure. Degenerated cartilage cells were observed in the transition region and bone cells were significantly corrupted. In the experimental group, light microscopic evaluation of the meniscus samples demonstrated that the intercellular tissue was partly corrupted. Separation and concentration of the collagen fibers were evident. All findings were supported with ultra structural evaluations. Our findings indicate that degeneration of subchondral bone, cartilage, and meniscus probably plays a role in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis with crosstalk.

  5. An Overview of Scaffold Design and Fabrication Technology for Engineered Knee Meniscus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Sun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Current surgical treatments for meniscal tears suffer from subsequent degeneration of knee joints, limited donor organs and inconsistent post-treatment results. Three clinical scaffolds (Menaflex CMI, Actifit® scaffold and NUsurface® Meniscus Implant are available on the market, but additional data are needed to properly evaluate their safety and effectiveness. Thus, many scaffold-based research activities have been done to develop new materials, structures and fabrication technologies to mimic native meniscus for cell attachment and subsequent tissue development, and restore functionalities of injured meniscus for long-term effects. This study begins with a synopsis of relevant structural features of meniscus and goes on to describe the critical considerations. Promising advances made in the field of meniscal scaffolding technology, in terms of biocompatible materials, fabrication methods, structure design and their impact on mechanical and biological properties are discussed in detail. Among all the scaffolding technologies, additive manufacturing (AM is very promising because of its ability to precisely control fiber diameter, orientation, and pore network micro-architecture to mimic the native meniscus microenvironment.

  6. MR imaging of displaced meniscal tears of the knee. Importance of a 'disproportional posterior horn sign'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, H.C.; Hsu, C.Y.; Shih, T.T.F.; Huang, K.M.; Li, Y.W.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Meniscal tears associated with displaced fragments are clinically significant. We propose the 'disproportional posterior horn sign' as a supportive criterion to identify a posterocentrally displaced meniscal fragment on MR imaging studies. If the meniscal posterior horn in the central portion appears larger than that in the peripheral section, it is considered positive for 'disproportional posterior horn sign'. Material and Methods: MR images obtained in 42 patients with 43 lesions, confirmed to have displaced meniscal tears, were included in this study. The MR images were retrospectively evaluated for the presence of the 'disproportional posterior horn sign', as well as the other known signs. Results: The 'disproportional posterior horn sign' was seen in 9 (20.9%) of 43 lesions, including 1 lateral discoid meniscal tear, 5 lateral meniscal tears and 3 medial meniscal tears. Five of them also had other signs of a displaced meniscal fragment. However, the remaining 4 cases only exhibited the 'disproportional posterior horn sign'. For the other MR signs, the 'absent bow tie sign' was detected in 40 (93%) of 43 lesions, the 'flipped meniscus sign' in 27 (62.8%) of 43 lesions, the 'double posterior cruciate ligament sign' in 17 (39.5%) of 43 lesions and the 'notch fragment sign' in 22 (51.2%) of 43 lesions. Conclusion: The 'disproportional posterior horn sign' is helpful in demonstrating a posterocentrally displaced meniscal fragment, especially when other characteristic signs are unremarkable or absent

  7. Comparison of the insertion of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus: discoid versus non-discoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Nam-Hong; Yang, Bong-Seok; Lee, Sang-Young; Lee, Chae-Chul; Lee, Chang-Yk; Victoroff, Brian N

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the insertion sites of the posterior horn between discoid and non-discoid lateral meniscus using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Two hundred and twenty-seven patients who had MRI scans before surgery and underwent arthroscopy were enroled in this study. A coronal view showing the narrowest width of the midbody of the lateral meniscus was chosen to measure the widths of the entire tibial plateau and the midbody of the lateral meniscus. Considering the ratio of the meniscal width to the tibial plateau width, the patients were divided into non-discoid, incomplete discoid, and complete discoid groups. On a coronal view accurately showing the insertion of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus, a distance between the peak of the lateral tibial eminence and the centre of the insertion of the posterior horn, and a width of the lateral tibial plateau between the lateral edge of the tibial plateau and the peak of the lateral tibial eminence were measured. The insertion centre of the posterior horn was located more medially in the incomplete and complete discoid groups than in the non-discoid group (p = 0.003, 0.010, respectively). When individual differences in the knee size were corrected, the insertion centre of the posterior horn in the incomplete discoid and complete discoid groups was located more medially than in the non-discoid group (p = 0.009, 0.003, respectively). The insertion centre of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus is located more medially to the apex of the lateral tibial eminence in the discoid group than in the non-discoid group. This finding needs to be considered for an accurate position of the posterior horn of lateral meniscus during the lateral meniscal allograft transplantation. IV.

  8. Diagnostic value of self-reported mechanical symptoms for diagnosing large meniscal tears in patients aged 40 years or older with meniscal tears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Kenneth; Englund, Martin; Lohmander, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Meniscal tears, which are longitudinal-vertical tears (e.g. bucket-handle tears) and/or involve all three meniscal sub regions (anterior horn, body and posterior horn), are typically large and assumed to cause patient perceived mechanical knee symptoms (knee grinding or clicking and knee...... catching or locking). However, whether the presence of such mechanical symptoms is useful for diagnosing these forms of meniscus tears is unknown. Therefore, we investigated the diagnostic values of having mechanical symptoms in diagnosing a bucket-handle tear and/or a tear involving all three meniscal sub...... regions in middle-aged and older patients undergoing arthroscopic meniscal surgery. Methods: This study is a secondary analysis of Pihl et al. OARSI 2017. The study included patients aged 40 years or older undergoing surgery for a meniscal tear from Knee Arthroscopy Cohort Southern Denmark (KACS...

  9. Synovial Mesenchymal Stem Cells Promote Meniscus Regeneration Augmented by an Autologous Achilles Tendon Graft in a Rat Partial Meniscus Defect Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozeki, Nobutake; Muneta, Takeshi; Matsuta, Seiya; Koga, Hideyuki; Nakagawa, Yusuke; Mizuno, Mitsuru; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Mabuchi, Yo; Akazawa, Chihiro; Kobayashi, Eiji; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sekiya, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Although meniscus defects and degeneration are strongly correlated with the later development of osteoarthritis, the promise of regenerative medicine strategies is to prevent and/or delay the disease's progression. Meniscal reconstruction has been shown in animal models with tendon grafting and transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs); however, these procedures have not shown the same efficacy in clinical studies. Here, our aim was to investigate the ability of tendon grafts pretreated with exogenous synovial-derived MSCs to prevent cartilage degeneration in a rat partial meniscus defect model. We removed the anterior half of the medial meniscus and grafted autologous Achilles tendons with or without a 10-minute pretreatment of the tendon with synovial MSCs. The meniscus and surrounding cartilage were evaluated at 2, 4, and 8 weeks (n = 5). Tendon grafts increased meniscus size irrespective of synovial MSCs. Histological scores for regenerated menisci were better in the tendon + MSC group than in the other two groups at 4 and 8 weeks. Both macroscopic and histological scores for articular cartilage were significantly better in the tendon + MSC group at 8 weeks. Implanted synovial MSCs survived around the grafted tendon and native meniscus integration site by cell tracking assays with luciferase+, LacZ+, DiI+, and/or GFP+ synovial MSCs and/or GFP+ tendons. Flow cytometric analysis showed that transplanted synovial MSCs retained their MSC properties at 7 days and host synovial tissue also contained cells with MSC characteristics. Synovial MSCs promoted meniscus regeneration augmented by autologous Achilles tendon grafts and prevented cartilage degeneration in rats. Stem Cells 2015;33:1927–1938 PMID:25993981

  10. Longitudinal follow-up of patients with conservatively treated and arthroscopically repaired peripheral meniscal tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutsch, A.L.; Mink, J.H.; Rothman, B.J.

    1989-01-01

    Tears involving the peripheral third of the meniscus represent an important subgroup of meniscal injuries due to their unique ability to heal by synovial ingrowth and vascular proliferation. Serial MR images were obtained in 14 patients with arthroscopically proved peripheral meniscal tears to assess changes in MR appearance associated with meniscal healing. Six patients were treated conservatively, and eight underwent arthroscopic repair. All patients were considered clinically stable and presumably healed based on commonly accepted orthopedic criteria. Persistent grade 3 signal was seen in all patients up to 6 months after injury. In two patients more than 14 months after repair, grade 3 signal was present but decreased. In no patient did the signal entirely resolve. The authors concluded that signal from conservatively treated and repaired meniscal tears may persist long after the tear has become asymptomatic and presumable healed. This likely reflects known histologic differences between the native meniscus and reparative fibrocartilage. Persistence of grade 3 signal should not be interpreted as reflective of nonhealing in patients with persistent symptoms or as evidence of another tear in those with recurrent symptoms

  11. A Controlled Study on the Correlation between Tear Film Volume and Tear Film Stability in Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman M. Eissa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To assess the tear film quantity and correlate it with the quality and stability of the tear film in diabetics and compare them to age matched controls. Introduction. Diabetes affects tear film parameters in multiple ways. Poor metabolic control and neuropathy are postulated factors. To further understand how diabetes affects tear film parameters this study was conducted. Subjects and Methods. Tear meniscus height was measured by anterior segment OCT, along with tear thinning time, a subtype of noninvasive tear break-up time, and blinking rate per minute which were all recorded for 22 diabetic patients. Correlations between these tear film parameters were studied and then compared to 16 age matched controls. Results. A statistically significant difference was found in blinking rate between the diabetic and the control group (P=0.002, with higher blinking rate among diabetics. All tear film parameters were negatively correlated with duration of diabetes. A positive correlation was found between tear film volume and stability. Conclusion. Diabetes affects the tear film in various ways. Diabetics should be examined for dry eye signs even in absence of symptoms which may be masked by associated neuropathy. Duration of diabetes has an impact on tear film status.

  12. Structure-function relationships of human meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danso, Elvis K; Oinas, Joonas M T; Saarakkala, Simo; Mikkonen, Santtu; Töyräs, Juha; Korhonen, Rami K

    2017-03-01

    Biomechanical properties of human meniscus have been shown to be site-specific. However, it is not known which meniscus constituents at different depths and locations contribute to biomechanical properties obtained from indentation testing. Therefore, we investigated the composition and structure of human meniscus in a site- and depth-dependent manner and their relationships with tissue site-specific biomechanical properties. Elastic and poroelastic properties were analyzed from experimental stress-relaxation and sinusoidal indentation measurements with fibril reinforced poroelastic finite element modeling. Proteoglycan (PG) and collagen contents, as well as the collagen orientation angle, were determined as a function of tissue depth using microscopic and spectroscopic methods, and they were compared with biomechanical properties. For all the measurement sites (anterior, middle and posterior) of lateral and medial menisci (n=26), PG content and collagen orientation angle increased as a function of tissue depth while the collagen content had an initial sharp increase followed by a decrease across tissue depth. The highest values (pmeniscus. This location had also higher (pmeniscus, higher (pmeniscus) significantly higher (pmeniscus modulus and/or nonlinear permeability. This study suggests that nonlinear biomechanical properties of meniscus, caused by the collagen network and fluid, may be strongly influenced by tissue osmotic swelling from the deep meniscus caused by the increased PG content, leading to increased collagen fibril tension. These nonlinear biomechanical properties are suggested to be further amplified by higher collagen content at all tissue depths and superficial collagen fibril orientation. However, these structure-function relationships are suggested to be highly site-specific. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The role of biomaterials in the treatment of meniscal tears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal O. Kean

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Extensive investigations over the recent decades have established the anatomical, biomechanical and functional importance of the meniscus in the knee joint. As a functioning part of the joint, it serves to prevent the deterioration of articular cartilage and subsequent osteoarthritis. To this end, meniscus repair and regeneration is of particular interest from the biomaterial, bioengineering and orthopaedic research community. Even though meniscal research is previously of a considerable volume, the research community with evolving material science, biology and medical advances are all pushing toward emerging novel solutions and approaches to the successful treatment of meniscal difficulties. This review presents a tactical evaluation of the latest biomaterials, experiments to simulate meniscal tears and the state-of-the-art materials and strategies currently used to treat tears.

  14. Characterization of site-specific biomechanical properties of human meniscus-Importance of collagen and fluid on mechanical nonlinearities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danso, E K; Mäkelä, J T A; Tanska, P; Mononen, M E; Honkanen, J T J; Jurvelin, J S; Töyräs, J; Julkunen, P; Korhonen, R K

    2015-06-01

    Meniscus adapts to joint loads by depth- and site-specific variations in its composition and structure. However, site-specific mechanical characteristics of intact meniscus under compression are poorly known. In particular, mechanical nonlinearities caused by different meniscal constituents (collagen and fluid) are not known. In the current study, in situ indentation testing was conducted to determine site-specific elastic, viscoelastic and poroelastic properties of intact human menisci. Lateral and medial menisci (n=26) were harvested from the left knee joint of 13 human cadavers. Indentation tests, using stress-relaxation and dynamic (sinusoidal) loading protocols, were conducted for menisci at different sites (anterior, middle, posterior, n=78). Sample- and site-specific axisymmetric finite element models with fibril-reinforced poroelastic properties were fitted to the corresponding stress-relaxation curves to determine the mechanical parameters. Elastic moduli, especially the instantaneous and dynamic moduli, showed site-specific variation only in the medial meniscus (pmeniscus. The phase angle showed no statistically significant variation between the sites (p>0.05). The values for the strain-dependent fibril network modulus (nonlinear behaviour of collagen) were significantly different (pmeniscus only between the middle and posterior sites. For the strain-dependent permeability coefficient, only anterior and middle sites showed a significant difference (pmeniscus. This parameter demonstrated a significant difference (pmeniscus shows more site-dependent variation in the mechanical properties as compared to lateral meniscus. In particular, anterior horn of medial meniscus was the stiffest and showed the most nonlinear mechanical behaviour. The nonlinearity was related to both collagen fibrils and fluid. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Surgical management of degenerative meniscus lesions: the 2016 ESSKA meniscus consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaufils, Ph; Becker, R; Kopf, S; Englund, M; Verdonk, R; Ollivier, M; Seil, R

    2017-02-01

    A degenerative meniscus lesion is a slowly developing process typically involving a horizontal cleavage in a middle-aged or older person. When the knee is symptomatic, arthroscopic partial meniscectomy has been practised for a long time with many case series reporting improved patient outcomes. Since 2002, several randomised clinical trials demonstrated no additional benefit of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy compared to non-operative treatment, sham surgery or sham arthroscopic partial meniscectomy. These results introduced controversy in the medical community and made clinical decision-making challenging in the daily clinical practice. To facilitate the clinical decision-making process, a consensus was developed. This initiative was endorsed by ESSKA. A degenerative meniscus lesion was defined as a lesion occurring without any history of significant acute trauma in a patient older than 35 years. Congenital lesions, traumatic meniscus tears and degenerative lesions occurring in young patients, especially in athletes, were excluded. The project followed the so-called formal consensus process, involving a steering group, a rating group and a peer-review group. A total of 84 surgeons and scientists from 22 European countries were included in the process. Twenty questions, their associated answers and an algorithm based on extensive literature review and clinical expertise, were proposed. Each question and answer set was graded according to the scientific level of the corresponding literature. The main finding was that arthroscopic partial meniscectomy should not be proposed as a first line of treatment for degenerative meniscus lesions. Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy should only be considered after a proper standardised clinical and radiological evaluation and when the response to non-operative management has not been satisfactory. Magnetic resonance imaging of the knee is typically not indicated in the first-line work-up, but knee radiography should be used as

  16. Surgical Management of Degenerative Meniscus Lesions: The 2016 ESSKA Meniscus Consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaufils, P; Becker, R; Kopf, S; Englund, M; Verdonk, R; Ollivier, M; Seil, R

    2017-06-01

    Purpose  A degenerative meniscus lesion is a slowly developing process typically involving a horizontal cleavage in a middle-aged or older person. When the knee is symptomatic, arthroscopic partial meniscectomy has been practised for a long time with many case series reporting improved patient outcomes. Since 2002, several randomised clinical trials demonstrated no additional benefit of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy compared to non-operative treatment, sham surgery or sham arthroscopic partial meniscectomy. These results introduced controversy in the medical community and made clinical decision-making challenging in the daily clinical practice. To facilitate the clinical decision-making process, a consensus was developed. This initiative was endorsed by ESSKA. Methods  A degenerative meniscus lesion was defined as a lesion occurring without any history of significant acute trauma in a patient older than 35 years. Congenital lesions, traumatic meniscus tears and degenerative lesions occurring in young patients, especially in athletes, were excluded. The project followed the so-called formal consensus process, involving a steering group, a rating group and a peer-review group. A total of 84 surgeons and scientists from 22 European countries were included in the process. Twenty questions, their associated answers and an algorithm based on extensive literature review and clinical expertise, were proposed. Each question and answer set was graded according to the scientific level of the corresponding literature. Results  The main finding was that arthroscopic partial meniscectomy should not be proposed as a first line of treatment for degenerative meniscus lesions. Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy should only be considered after a proper standardised clinical and radiological evaluation and when the response to non-operative management has not been satisfactory. Magnetic resonance imaging of the knee is typically not indicated in the first-line work-up, but

  17. Assessment of Corneal and Tear Film Parameters in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Using Anterior Segment Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Fayoumi, Dina; Youssef, Maha Mohamed; Khafagy, Mohamed Mahmoud; Badr El Dine, Nashwa; Gaber, Wafaa

    2018-01-01

    To study the corneal changes in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients in vivo, using spectral domain anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT). A case-control study was done on 43 RA patients and 40 controls. The disease activity score (DAS28-ESR) was calculated and all participants had lower tear meniscus, corneal thickness, and epithelial thickness evaluation using AS-OCT. The lower tear meniscus height (LTMH) and the lower tear meniscus area (LTMA) were significantly lower in the RA patients than in controls (p < 0.001). RA patients also had a significantly thinner central corneal thickness (p = 0.02) and their epithelium was found to be thinner in the superotemporal peripheral sector. The LTMH and LTMA are significantly reduced in RA patients, despite the absence of clinical diagnosis of dry eye. RA patients have thinner corneal thickness and epithelial thickness than controls, which did not correlate with either disease duration or activity.

  18. Opening the medial tibiofemoral compartment by pie-crusting the superficial medial collateral ligament at its tibial insertion: a cadaver study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussignol, X; Gauthe, R; Rahali, S; Mandereau, C; Courage, O; Duparc, F

    2015-09-01

    Arthroscopic treatment of tears in the middle and posterior parts of the medial meniscus can be difficult when the medial tibiofemoral compartment is tight. Passage of the instruments may damage the cartilage. The primary objective of this cadaver study was to perform an arthroscopic evaluation of medial tibiofemoral compartment opening after pie-crusting release (PCR) of the superficial medial collateral ligament (sMCL) at its distal insertion on the tibia. The secondary objective was to describe the anatomic relationships at the site of PCR (saphenous nerve, medial saphenous vein). We studied 10 cadaver knees with no history of invasive procedures. The femur was held in a vise with the knee flexed at 45°, and the medial aspect of the knee was dissected. PCR of the sMCL was performed under arthroscopic vision, in the anteroposterior direction, at the distal tibial insertion of the sMCL, along the lower edge of the tibial insertion of the semi-tendinosus tendon. Continuous 300-N valgus stress was applied to the ankle. Opening of the medial tibiofemoral compartment was measured arthroscopically using graduated palpation hooks after sequential PCR of the sMCL. The compartment opened by 1mm after release of the anterior third, 2.3mm after release of the anterior two-thirds, and 3.9mm after subtotal release. A femoral fracture occurred in 1 case, after completion of all measurements. Both the saphenous nerve and the medial saphenous vein were located at a distance from the PCR site in all 10 knees. PCR of the sMCL is chiefly described as a ligament-balancing method during total knee arthroplasty. This procedure is usually performed at the joint line, where it opens the compartment by 4-6mm at the most, with some degree of unpredictability. PCR of the sMCL at its distal tibial insertion provides gradual opening of the compartment, to a maximum value similar to that obtained with PCR at the joint space. The lower edge of the semi-tendinosus tendon is a valuable landmark

  19. Changes of rabbit meniscus influenced by hyaline cartilage injury of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiajun; Huang, Suizhu; Zheng, Jia; Zhong, Chunan; Tang, Chao; Zheng, Lei; Zhang, Zhen; Xu, Jianzhong

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common disease in the elderly population. Most of the previous OA-related researches focused on articular cartilage degeneration, osteophyte formation and synovitis etc. However, the role of the meniscus in these pathological changes has not been given enough attention. The goal of our study was to find the pathological changes of the meniscus in OA knee and determine their relationship. 20 months old female Chinese rabbits received either knee damaging operations with articular cartilage scratch method or sham operation randomly on one of their knees. They were sacrificed after 1-6 weeks post-operation. Medial Displacement Index (MDI) for meniscus dislocation, hematoxylin and eosin (HE) for routine histological evaluation, Toluidine blue (TB) stains for evaluating proteoglycans were carried out. Immunohistochemical (IHC) staining was performed with a two-step detection kit. Histological analysis showed chondrocyte clusters around cartilage lesions and moderate loss of proteoglycans in the operation model, as well as MDI increase and all characteristics of OA. High expression of MMP-3 and TIMP-1 also were found in both hyaline cartilage and meniscus. Biomechanical and biochemistry environment around the meniscus is altered when OA occur. If meniscus showed degeneration, subluxation and dysfunction, OA would be more severe. Prompt repair or reconstruction of hyaline cartilage in weight bearing area when it injured could prevent meniscus degeneration and subluxation, then prevent the development of OA.

  20. PCL tibial avulsion with an associated medial meniscal tear in a child: a case report on diagnosis and management.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries from tibial avulsions are rare in the paediatric setting. One would need a high index of suspicion as clinical examination may be difficult, especially in the early period. Magnetic resonance imaging is an excellent diagnostic modality for this condition and other associated injuries within the knee. We report a rare case in which the patient had a PCL avulsion off the tibial insertion site with an associated posterior horn medial meniscal tear off the posterior capsule. He was treated through open reduction and internal fixation of the avulsed fragment with suture repair of the meniscal tear. We emphasize the importance of diagnosing and managing associated intra-articular injuries when dealing with the rare condition of PCL tibial avulsion in the paediatric setting.

  1. Assessment of apoptosis and MMP-1, MMP-3 and TIMP-2 expression in tibial hyaline cartilage after viable medial meniscus transplantation in the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwierzchowski, Tomasz J; Stasikowska-Kanicka, Olga; Danilewicz, Marian; Fabiś, Jarosław

    2012-12-20

    The porpuse of this animal study was to assess chondrocyte apoptosis and MMP-1, MMP-3 and TIMP-2 expression in rabbit tibial cartilage 6 months after viable medial meniscal autografts and allografts. Twenty white male New Zealand rabbits were chosen for the study. The medial meniscus was excised from 14 animals and stored under tissue culture conditions for 2 weeks, following which t of them were implantated as autografts and 7 as allografts. The control group consisted of 6 animals which underwent arthtrotomy. When the animals were eutanized, the tibial cartilage was used for immunohisochemical examination. Apoptosis (TUNEL method) and MMP-1, MMP-3 and TIMP-2 expression were estimated semiquantatively. An increased level of chodrocyte apoptosis in the tibail cartilage was observed after both kinds of transplants (p hyaline cartilage against excessive apoptosis. The results of experimantal studies on humans indicate the need to device a method of apoptosis inhibition in the hyaline cartilage to improve long-term results of meniscal transplantation.

  2. Tear dynamics in healthy and dry eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerretani, Colin F; Radke, C J

    2014-06-01

    Dry-eye disease, an increasingly prevalent ocular-surface disorder, significantly alters tear physiology. Understanding the basic physics of tear dynamics in healthy and dry eyes benefits both diagnosis and treatment of dry eye. We present a physiological-based model to describe tear dynamics during blinking. Tears are compartmentalized over the ocular surface; the blink cycle is divided into three repeating phases. Conservation laws quantify the tear volume and tear osmolarity of each compartment during each blink phase. Lacrimal-supply and tear-evaporation rates are varied to reveal the dependence of tear dynamics on dry-eye conditions, specifically tear osmolarity, tear volume, tear-turnover rate (TTR), and osmotic water flow. Predicted periodic-steady tear-meniscus osmolarity is 309 and 321 mOsM in normal and dry eyes, respectively. Tear osmolarity, volume, and TTR all match available clinical measurements. Osmotic water flow through the cornea and conjunctiva contribute 10 and 50% to the total tear supply in healthy and dry-eye conditions, respectively. TTR in aqueous-deficient dry eye (ADDE) is only half that in evaporative dry eye (EDE). The compartmental periodic-steady tear-dynamics model accurately predicts tear behavior in normal and dry eyes. Inclusion of osmotic water flow is crucial to match measured tear osmolarity. Tear-dynamics predictions corroborate the use of TTR as a clinical discriminator between ADDE and EDE. The proposed model is readily extended to predict the dynamics of aqueous solutes such as drugs or fluorescent tags.

  3. Effectiveness of Combined Tear Film Therapy in Patients with Evaporative Dry Eye with Short Tear Film Breakup Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yung Hui; Kang, Yeon Soo; Lee, Hyo Seok; Choi, Won; You, In Cheon; Yoon, Kyung Chul

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of combined tear film therapy targeted to aqueous, mucin, and lipid layers in patients with refractory evaporative dry eye (EDE) with short tear film breakup time (TBUT). The patients who had EDE with short TBUT and severe symptoms refractory to artificial tears were treated with hyaluronic acid (HA) 0.15% and diquafosol tetrasodium (DQS) 3% (Group 1), HA and carbomer-based lipid-containing eyedrops (Liposic EDO Gel, LPO) (Group 2), or HA, DQS, and LPO (Group 3). Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) score, visual analog scale (VAS) symptom score, TBUT, Schirmer score, and corneal and conjunctival staining scores were evaluated, and noninvasive tear film breakup time (NIBUT) and tear meniscus height were measured using Keratograph ® 5 M before and 1 and 3 months after treatment. OSDI scores, VAS scores, TBUT, and NIBUT were improved at 1 and 3 months after treatment in all groups (all P film layers was most effective in improving ocular symptoms and tear film quality.

  4. Mechanical modeling and characterization of meniscus tissue using flat punch indentation and inverse finite element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfi, Behzad; Fatouraee, Nasser; Imeni, Milad

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, to characterize the mechanical properties of meniscus by considering its local microstructure, a novel nonlinear poroviscoelastic Finite Element (FE) model has been developed. To obtain the mechanical response of meniscus, indentation experiments were performed on bovine meniscus samples. The ramp-relaxation test scenario with different depths and preloads was designed to capture the mechanical characteristics of the tissue in different regions of the medial and lateral menisci. Thereafter, a FE simulation was performed considering experimental conditions. Constitutive parameters were optimized by solving a FE-based inverse problem using the heuristic Simulated Annealing (SA) optimization algorithm. These parameters were ranged according to previously reported data to improve the optimization procedure. Based on the results, the mechanical properties of meniscus were highly influenced by both superficial and main layers. At low indentation depths, a high percentage relaxation (p < 0.01) with a high relaxation rate (p < 0.05) was obtained, due to the poroelastic and viscoelastic nature of the superficial layer. Increasing both penetration depth and preload level involved the main layer response and caused alterations in hyperelastic and viscoelastic parameters of the tissue, such that for both layers, the shear modulus was increased (p < 0.01) while the rate and percentage of relaxation were decreased (p < 0.01). Results reflect that, shear modulus of the main layer in anterior region is higher than central and posterior sites in medial meniscus. In contrast, in lateral meniscus, posterior side is stiffer than central and anterior sides. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effectiveness and biocompatibility of a novel biological adhesive application for repair of meniscal tear on the avascular zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takahito; Taguchi, Tetsushi; Imade, Shinji; Kumahashi, Nobuyuki; Uchio, Yuji

    2012-12-01

    We have investigated the effectiveness and safety of a newly developed biological adhesive for repair of meniscal tear. The adhesive was composed of disuccinimidyl tartrate (DST) as a crosslinker and human serum albumin (HSA) as a hardener. To determine adequate concentration, bonding strength was measured using a tensiometer 5 min after applying the adhesive on the avascular zone tear of porcine meniscus; it was compared with the strengths of commercially available cyanoacrylate-based and fibrin-based adhesives. In vivo examination was performed using Japanese white rabbits, creating longitudinal tears on the avascular zone of meniscus and applying DST-HSA adhesive. Three months after operation the rabbits were sacrificed and tension test and histological evaluation were performed. Bonding strength was measured in three porcine meniscus groups: (i) only suturing, (ii) suturing after applying the adhesive on surface and (iii) suturing using an adhesive-soaked suture. The optimum concentrations were 0.1 mmol of DST and 42 w/v% of HAS. Bonding strength was greatest with cyanoacrylate-based adhesive, followed by DST-HSA adhesive, and fibrin-based adhesive. No inflammation was observed in the synovium or surrounding tissues 3 months after using the DST-HSA adhesive. Bonding strength was greatest with DST-HSA adhesive-soaked suturing group (77 ± 6 N), followed by suturing only group (61 ± 5 N) and surface adhesive application group (60 ± 8 N). The newly developed DST-HSA adhesive is considered safe and may be effective in enforcement of bonding of avascular zone tear of the meniscus.

  6. Chronic anterior cruciate ligament tears and associated meniscal and traumatic cartilage lesions: evaluation with morphological sequences at 3.0 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlychou, Marianna; Fezoulidis, Ioannis V. [University Hospital of Larissa, Department of Radiology, Medical School of Thessaly, Larissa (Greece); Hantes, Michalis; Michalitsis, Sotirios; Malizos, Konstantinos [University Hospital of Larissa, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Medical School of Thessaly, Larissa (Greece); Tsezou, Aspasia [University Hospital of Larissa, Department of Molecular Genetics and Cytogenetics, Medical School of Thessaly, Larissa (Greece)

    2011-06-15

    To investigate the diagnostic efficacy of morphological sequences at 3.0 T MR imaging in detecting anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), meniscal pathology and traumatic cartilage legions in young patients with chronic deficient anterior cruciate ligament knees. This prospective study included 43 patients (39 male) between the age of 15 and 37 years (mean age 22.6 years) with a history of knee injury sustained at least 3 months prior to the decision to repair a torn ACL. All patients underwent a 3.0 T MR scan with the same standard protocol, including intermediate-weighted and three-dimensional spoiled gradient-recalled T1-weighted sequences with fat saturation and subsequently surgical reconstruction of the ACL, along with meniscal and cartilage repair, when necessary. All ACL tears were correctly interpreted by 3.0 T MR images. The sensitivity of the MR scans regarding tears of the medial meniscus was 93.7%, the specificity 92.6%, the positive predictive value 88.2% and the negative predictive value 95.8%. The sensitivity of the MR scans regarding tears of lateral meniscus was 85.7%, the specificity was 93.1%, the positive predictive value 85.7% and the negative predictive value 93.1%. With regard to the grading of the cartilage lesions, Cohen's kappa coefficient indicated moderate agreement for grade I and II cartilage lesions (0.5), substantial agreement for grade III and IV cartilage lesions (0.70 and 0.66) and substantial agreement for normal regions (0.75). Regarding location of the cartilage lesions, Cohen's kappa coefficient varied between almost perfect agreement in the lateral femoral condyle and no agreement in the trochlea. In the setting of chronic ACL deficiency, MR imaging at 3.0 T achieves satisfactory diagnostic performance regarding meniscal and ligamentous pathology. In the detection of cartilage lesions MRI is less successful. (orig.)

  7. Evaluation of posterior lateral femoral condylar hypoplasia using axial MRI images in patients with complete discoid meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhihong; Chen, Dongyang; Shi, Dongquan; Dai, Jin; Yao, Yao; Jiang, Qing

    2016-03-01

    Hypoplasia of the lateral femoral condyle has been reported in discoid lateral meniscus patients, but associated imaging findings in the axial plane have not been characterized. In this study, we aimed to identify differences in the lateral femoral condyle between patients with discoid lateral meniscus and those with normal menisci using axial MRI images. Twenty-three patients (24 knees) with complete discoid lateral meniscus, 43 (45 knees) with incomplete discoid lateral meniscus, and 50 with normal menisci (50 knees) were enrolled and distributed into three groups. Two new angles, posterior lateral condylar angle (PLCA) and posterior medial condylar angle (PMCA), were measured on axial MRI images; the posterior condylar angle (PCA) was also measured. Differences between the three groups in the PLCA, PMCA, PCA, and PLCA/PMCA were analysed. The predictive value of PLCA and PLCA/PMCA for complete discoid lateral meniscus was assessed. In the complete discoid lateral meniscus group, PLCA and PLCA/PMCA were significantly smaller compared with the normal meniscus group and the incomplete discoid lateral meniscus group (P meniscus group compared with the incomplete discoid lateral meniscus group (P meniscus group (P meniscus. Hypoplasia of the posterior lateral femoral condyle is typically seen in patients with complete discoid lateral meniscus. PLCA and PLCA/PMCA can be measured from axial MRI images and used as excellent predictive parameters for complete discoid lateral meniscus. Diagnostic study, Level III.

  8. ARTHROSCOPIC MENISCUS REPAIR WITH BIOABSORBABLE ARROWS IN LOCAL ANESTHESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Senekovič

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. The menisci have important function in the knee joint. Because of this it is universally accepted that we have to preserve them as much as possible. After open and partially arthroscopic suture techniques new methods of all-inside meniscus repair with bioabsorbable arrows have been developed in the last decade. The meniscus repair using these arrows represents an easy task for a skilled surgeon. In addition, it can be performed in local anesthesia. We have evaluated the results of the first group of patients who were treated by this method.Methods. From February 2001 to August 2002 15 patients with torn meniscuses have been treated at the Clinical Department for Traumatology, University Medical centre, Ljubljana. We repaired their torn menisci arthroscopically with bioabsorbable arrows in local anesthesia. We divided patients in three groups: a group with isolated meniscus injury, a group with meniscus injury and anterior cruciate ligament injury and a group with associated pathology. Four patients had incarcerated meniscuses. Preoperative Lysholm score in the first group was 38, in the second 42 and in the third group 48. We repaired 12 medial and 3 lateral meniscuses. On average we need 45 minutes for therapeutic arthroscopy. Torn meniscus was fixated with minimum of 1 and maximum of 5 bioabsorbable arrows. All patients except one had the affected knee immobilized with cylinder plaster for 15 days on average.Results. At least three months after the arthroscopic fixation of the torn meniscus in local anesthesia another clinical evaluation was made. In all groups significant improvement was observed regarding the range of motions and absence of pain. Postoperative Lysholm score in the first group was 89, in the second 75 and in the third 71. Average deficit of flexion was 3 degrees while extension was full. One patient complained about the same pain in the joint, he underwent another arthroscopy which showed that the meniscus was

  9. Meniscal position on routine MR imaging of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, T.T.; Staron, R.B.; Feldman, F.; Cepel, E.

    1997-01-01

    Objective. To determine the prevalence of meniscal protrusion (i.e. location of the outer edge of a meniscus beyond the tibial articular surface), and to determine its relationship with internal derangement, joint effusion, and degenerative arthropathy. Design and patients. Sagittal and coronal MR images of 111 abnormal and 46 normal knees were evaluated for the presence of meniscal protrusion. We set 25% as the minimum amount of displacement considered abnormal because this was the smallest amount of displacement we could confidently discern. Presence of meniscal tear, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, joint effusion, or osteophytosis was also recorded. Results and conclusion. Normal examinations demonstrated protrusion of the medial meniscus in 6.5% of sagittal images and 15% of coronal images, and of the lateral meniscus in 2% and 13%, respectively. Fisher's exact test demonstrated a statistically significant difference between the normal and abnormal groups for the medial meniscus on both sagittal (P 0.2). A protruding medial meniscus was associated with effusion and osteophytosis (P 0.1). Posterior protrusion of the lateral meniscus was only associated with ACL injury (P<0.0001); protruding anterior horns and bodies of lateral menisci were not associated with any of the four abnormalities. It is concluded that the medial meniscus may occasionally protrude more than 25% of its width, but protrusion is more often due to effusion and osteophytes. Protrusion of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus is associated with ACL insufficiency, while protrusion of the body and anterior horn of the lateral meniscus is a normal variant. (orig.). With 4 figs

  10. MRI EVALUATION OF PAINFUL KNEE JOINT- THE CORRELATION OF MULTIPLE COEXISTING PATHOLOGIES, AGE AND SEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukheswar Pame

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND 1. To evaluate the incidence and coexistence of multiple knee joint pathologies causing painful knee and their correlation to age and sex. 2. To evaluate the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI features in various knee pathologies and to identify the common lesions. MATERIALS AND METHODS A retrospective study was performed using the clinical data of patients presenting with painful knee joint which were evaluated with MRI. Data from 200 patients examined between September 2015 and August 2016 were included into this study. The data was analysed statistically to evaluate the correlation between the MR pathological findings to age and sex of the patients. RESULTS The patient’s age ranged between 8 and 75 years (mean: 36 years. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL tear was the commonest finding (60% followed by bursitis (55%, meniscal degeneration (54.6% and meniscal tear (52%. Primary signs of ACL tear were hyperintensity, discontinuity and nonvisualisation. Secondary signs like Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL buckling, PCL index of greater than 0.5, uncovered Lateral meniscus (LM and bone contusion assisted in diagnosis in indeterminate cases. Mid substance was the commonest site of ACL tear (64%. PCL tear accounted for only a small percentage (7%. Medial Meniscus (MM tear (35% was commoner than LM tear (17%. The posterior horn of meniscus was the commonest site of injury (86.5%. Age was significantly correlated with meniscal degeneration and tear, Medial collateral ligament (MCL degeneration, parameniscal cyst, and chondromalacia patellae. A significant correlation between male gender and ACL injury was noted. Meniscal injury was significantly correlated with bursitis, as well with MCL injury. Bone bruise was significantly correlated with ACL injury, MCL injury and Lateral collateral ligament (LCL injury. CONCLUSIONS MRI findings of certain pathologies in a painful knee can coexist and significantly correlate with each other, age and sex of

  11. Correlation between bone contusion and ligament, menisci injury of knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lijuan; Li Pei; Tu Changzhuo; Wu Guangren; Qi Yuliang; Yan Xiaoqun

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the correlation between bone contusion and ligament, meniscus injury of knee joint with MR imaging. Methods: Thirty-five patients with acute trauma of knee joint were studied retrospectively. All eases showed negative on X-ray and bone cont, -sion on MR imaging. Results: in all patients, ligament and meniscus injury were seen in 25 cases (71%), incorporate anterior cruciate ligament injury in 12 cases, posterior cruciate ligament in 6, tibial collateral ligament in 8 cases, fibular collateral ligament in 6 cases, medial meniscus tear in 4 cases, lateral meniscus tear in 5 cases, and hydrops in 29 cases. There were only 3 patients with ligament or meniscus injury but no bone contusion during the same period. Conclusion: It is necessary to check by MR for the patients with acute trauma of knee joint, who have clinical symptom such as ache, swelling, move un-freely showing bone contusion on MR Imaging but without any abnormality on X-ray in order to avoid failure in diagnosing injury of ligament and meniscus. (authors)

  12. Use of the V-sign in the diagnosis of bucket-handle meniscal tear of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Nisha [Radiology Associates of Tampa, Tampa, FL (United States); Patel, Yogita [Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, Jamaica, NY (United States); Opsha, Oleg; Eisemon, Eric; Beltran, Javier [Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY (United States); Chen, Qi [SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Brooklyn, NY (United States); Owen, Joshua [Saint Louis University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Fogel, Joshua [Brooklyn College of the City University of New York, Department of Economics, Brooklyn, NY (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Bucket-handle tear is a displaced vertical longitudinal tear of the meniscus. Several signs of the tear have been described on MRI but none in the axial plane. We propose to describe such a sign named the V-sign that is seen at the junction of the displaced fragment and the meniscus, which is in place. MRI imaging of 25 surgically proven bucket-handle tears was reviewed for presence of the V-sign. Two control groups, one with normal menisci (n = 75) and one with surgically proven non-bucket-handle tears (n = 25), were also evaluated. Comparisons for presence or absence of the V-sign were performed among the three groups, and also for other commonly associated signs such as double PCL sign, double delta sign, and presence of ACL tear. Also, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated. Among those with bucket-handle tear, 72% demonstrated the V-sign while no participant in either control group had the V-sign (P {<=} 0.001). The V-sign occurred in 38% of those with double PCL sign, 55.6% with ACL tear, and 66.7% with double delta sign. The V-sign had higher sensitivity and negative predictive values than other signs related to bucket-handle tear. The V-sign, when seen on an axial plane image, is highly suggestive of bucket-handle tear. Our data suggest the benefit of using the V-sign for detecting bucket-handle tears, perhaps even above other commonly used approaches. (orig.)

  13. Use of the V-sign in the diagnosis of bucket-handle meniscal tear of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, Nisha; Patel, Yogita; Opsha, Oleg; Eisemon, Eric; Beltran, Javier; Chen, Qi; Owen, Joshua; Fogel, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    Bucket-handle tear is a displaced vertical longitudinal tear of the meniscus. Several signs of the tear have been described on MRI but none in the axial plane. We propose to describe such a sign named the V-sign that is seen at the junction of the displaced fragment and the meniscus, which is in place. MRI imaging of 25 surgically proven bucket-handle tears was reviewed for presence of the V-sign. Two control groups, one with normal menisci (n = 75) and one with surgically proven non-bucket-handle tears (n = 25), were also evaluated. Comparisons for presence or absence of the V-sign were performed among the three groups, and also for other commonly associated signs such as double PCL sign, double delta sign, and presence of ACL tear. Also, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated. Among those with bucket-handle tear, 72% demonstrated the V-sign while no participant in either control group had the V-sign (P ≤ 0.001). The V-sign occurred in 38% of those with double PCL sign, 55.6% with ACL tear, and 66.7% with double delta sign. The V-sign had higher sensitivity and negative predictive values than other signs related to bucket-handle tear. The V-sign, when seen on an axial plane image, is highly suggestive of bucket-handle tear. Our data suggest the benefit of using the V-sign for detecting bucket-handle tears, perhaps even above other commonly used approaches. (orig.)

  14. Estudo artroscópico da articulação do joelho em cães portadores de lesão do ligamento cruzado cranial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Cecilia Tatarunas

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to report intra articular changes observed by means of arthroscopic in dogs bearing cranial cruciate ligament injuries. Sixty-three dogs (sixty-five knee joints with naturally occurring cranial cruciate injury were used. The arthroscopy was carried out before the ligament repair and the observed changes were both recorded and reported. According to the results obtained from this research it is significant to mention the presence of plicae on suprapatelar joint pouch; roughness, neovascularization and osteophytes in patella. The lateral meniscus presented axial fringe tear, fibrillation, neovascularization and complete laceration. The medial meniscus showed bucket handle tear, complete laceration, axial fringe tear, fibrillation, neovascularization and mineralization. The cranial cruciate ligament was completely ruptured, partially ruptured, interstitially ruptured and linked to the structures of the intercondylar notch. The caudal cruciate ligament showed vertical splits, besides fibrillation and partial rupture. Arthroscopy has been used for diagnostic of cranial cruciate ligament injuries in dogs. It permits improved diagnostic capability when evaluating cartilage and sinovial changes, meniscus and ligaments tears.

  15. Radiologic findings of double contrast knee arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hye Ran; Ahn, Byeong Yeob; Kim, Mi Young; Lee, So Hyun; Suh, Chang Hae; Chung, Won Kyun

    1990-01-01

    The double contrast arthrography of the knee is a highly accurate diagnostic modality in wide rage of the clinical disorders of the knee. It allows radiological assessment of the menisci, the articular cartilages, the synovium and the ligaments. The double contrast knee arthrography was performed in 356 cases at Inha hospital for about 3 years from June 1986 to June 1989. Among them, 115 cases were abnormal, and were analyzed clinically and radiologically with the back ground of the operative finding. The results were as follows ; 1. Of the 115 cases, male were 77 and female 38. Male exceeds female in the ratio of 2 : 1. 2. The age group of 20 - 39 years was commonly involved (60%). 3. The right knee was more commonly involved than the left and the medial meniscus tear was more common (61%). The posterior horn of the meniscus was more frequently torn than the other parts of the meniscus (42%). 4. The incidence of the bucket-handle tear was the most frequent (33%). 5. The cases of the popliteal cyst were 16 (13.9%), and the combined meniscus tears were in 4 cases (25%). 6. The numbers of the discoid meniscus were 9 (7.8%), and all were present in the lateral meniscus, and combined tears were in 4 cases (44.4%). 7. The diagnostic accuracy of the double contrast knee arthrogram was 82.7% compared with operative finding. The false positive examination were 17.3%

  16. MR imaging of meniscal bucket-handle tears: a review of signs and their relation to arthroscopic classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aydingoez, Uestuen; Firat, Ahmet K.; Atay, Ahmet Oe.; Doral, Nedim M.

    2003-01-01

    Our objective was to review the MR imaging signs of meniscal bucket-handle tears and assess the relevance of these signs to the arthroscopic classification of displaced meniscal tears. Forty-five menisci in 42 patients who had a diagnosis of bucket-handle tear either on MR imaging or on subsequent arthroscopy (in which Dandy's classification of meniscal tears was used) were retrospectively analyzed for MR imaging findings of double posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), fragment within the intercondylar notch, absent bow tie, flipped meniscus, double-anterior horn, and disproportional posterior horn signs. Arthroscopy, which was considered as the gold standard, revealed 41 bucket-handle tears (either diagnosed or not diagnosed by MR imaging) in 38 patients (33 males, 5 females). There was a stastistically significant male preponderance for the occurrence of meniscal bucket-handle tears. Overall, sensitivity and positive predictive value of MR imaging for the detection of meniscal bucket-handle tears were calculated as 90%. Common MR imaging signs of meniscal bucket-handle tears in arthroscopically proven cases of such tears were the fragment in the notch and absent bow tie signs (98% frequency for each). Double-PCL, flipped meniscus, double-anterior horn, and disproportional posterior horn signs, however, were less common (32, 29, 29, and 27%, respectively). An arthroscopically proven bucket-handle tear was found in all patients who displayed at least three of the six MR imaging signs of meniscal bucket-handle tears. The presence of three or more MR imaging signs of meniscal bucket-handle tears is highly suggestive of this condition. (orig.)

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging for the diagnosis of chondral, meniscal and cruciate ligaments injuries of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karam, Francisco Consoli; Fridmann, Marcos William; Arbo, Rodrigo Di Mare; Vieira, Jose Francisco; Silva, Jefferson Luis Braga da; Pires, Luiz Antonio Simoes; Abreu, Armando; Abreu, Marcelo

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee. Materials and methods: Seventy-two patients have been submitted to MRI previously to arthroscopy of the knee performed by a single surgeon and utilized as a comparative standard method. Sensitivity, specificity, values of likelihood and rate of interobserver agreement have been evaluated. Results: The kappa agreement coefficient between MRI and arthroscopy was very good for lesions in the anterior cruciate ligament (0.84), good for lateral meniscus (0.75), reasonable for medial meniscus (0.50) and poor for chondral lesions (< 0.50). MRI has demonstrated high sensitivity for tears in the anterior cruciate ligament (94%) and in the medial meniscus (92%), good sensitivity for lesions in the lateral meniscus (80%), and low sensitivity for lesions in all of the chondral zones (< 50%), while the specificity has been excellent for all the chondral, and ligamentous structures, besides the lateral menisci analyzed (more than 97%), and reasonable (65%) for the medial meniscus. Conclusion: MRI is an useful tool in the clinical diagnosis of intra-articular knee lesions, as already demonstrated by similar results reported both in the Brazilian and international literature. (author)

  18. Posterior horn lateral meniscal tears simulating meniscofemoral ligament attachment in the setting of ACL tear: MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Lawrence S.; Jacobson, Jon A.; Jamadar, David A.; Caoili, Elaine; Kalume-Brigido, Monica; Wojtys, Edward

    2007-01-01

    We have noted apparent far lateral meniscal attachment of the meniscofemoral ligament (MFL) with an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. This study evaluates MFL attachment and association with posterior horn lateral meniscus (PHLM) tear. Nine months of knee arthroscopy reports were reviewed to classify the PHLM and ACL as torn or normal. After excluding those with prior knee surgery, MR images were reviewed by two radiologists to determine the number of images lateral to PCL, which showed the ligaments of Humphrey and Wrisberg visible as structures separate from the PHLM. Any patient with abnormal PHLM surface signal not continuous with the MFL was excluded. MRI findings were compared with arthroscopy using Student's t test and Fisher's exact test. Of the 54 participants, 5 had PHLM tears and 49 were normal. Twenty-one had ACL tears; all those with an PHLM tear had an ACL tear. The ligament of Humphrey inserted on average 0.9 consecutive images lateral to the PCL without an PHLM tear and 4.7 with an PHLM tear; the ligament of Wrisberg inserted on average 3.0 consecutive images without an PHLM tear and 4.5 with an PHLM tear (slice thickness/gap = 3 mm/0.5 mm). There was a significant association between PHLM tear and number of images (p = 0.0028), and between ACL tear and this type of PHLM tear (p = 0.0064). Apparent far lateral meniscal extension of a meniscofemoral ligament (greater than or equal to four images lateral to the PCL) should be considered as a possible PHLM tear, especially in the setting of an ACL tear. (orig.)

  19. Signs of knee osteoarthritis common in 620 patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery for meniscal tear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Kenneth; Englund, Martin; Lohmander, L. Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose - Recent evidence has questioned the effect of arthroscopic knee surgery for middle-aged and older patients with degenerative meniscal tears with or without concomitant radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA). We investigated the prevalence of early or more established knee OA...... and patients' characteristics in a cohort of patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery for a meniscal tear. Patients and methods - 641 patients assigned for arthroscopy on suspicion of meniscus tear were consecutively recruited from February 2013 through January 2015. Of these, 620 patients (mean age 49 (18...... established knee OA was present in 43% of patients undergoing knee arthroscopy for meniscal tear....

  20. The Challenges of Recruiting Patients into a Sham Surgery Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hare, Kristoffer Borbjerg; Lohmander, Stefan; Roos, Ewa M.

    the challenges in recruiting patients into a placebo controlled surgical trial of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy. Materials and Methods Results presented are from an ongoing RCT where patients aged 35-55 with an MRI confirmed degenerative medial meniscus tear were randomized to arthroscopic partial...

  1. Role of scaffold mean pore size in meniscus regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zheng-Zheng; Jiang, Dong; Ding, Jian-Xun; Wang, Shao-Jie; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Ji-Ying; Qi, Yan-Song; Chen, Xue-Si; Yu, Jia-Kuo

    2016-10-01

    Recently, meniscus tissue engineering offers a promising management for meniscus regeneration. Although rarely reported, the microarchitectures of scaffolds can deeply influence the behaviors of endogenous or exogenous stem/progenitor cells and subsequent tissue formation in meniscus tissue engineering. Herein, a series of three-dimensional (3D) poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds with three distinct mean pore sizes (i.e., 215, 320, and 515μm) were fabricated via fused deposition modeling. The scaffold with the mean pore size of 215μm significantly improved both the proliferation and extracellular matrix (ECM) production/deposition of mesenchymal stem cells compared to all other groups in vitro. Moreover, scaffolds with mean pore size of 215μm exhibited the greatest tensile and compressive moduli in all the acellular and cellular studies. In addition, the relatively better results of fibrocartilaginous tissue formation and chondroprotection were observed in the 215μm scaffold group after substituting the rabbit medial meniscectomy for 12weeks. Overall, the mean pore size of 3D-printed PCL scaffold could affect cell behavior, ECM production, biomechanics, and repair effect significantly. The PCL scaffold with mean pore size of 215μm presented superior results both in vitro and in vivo, which could be an alternative for meniscus tissue engineering. Meniscus tissue engineering provides a promising strategy for meniscus regeneration. In this regard, the microarchitectures (e.g., mean pore size) of scaffolds remarkably impact the behaviors of cells and subsequent tissue formation, which has been rarely reported. Herein, three three-dimensional poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds with different mean pore sizes (i.e., 215, 320, and 515μm) were fabricated via fused deposition modeling. The results suggested that the mean pore size significantly affected the behaviors of endogenous or exogenous stem/progenitor cells and subsequent tissue formation. This study furthers

  2. Segond fracture: involvement of the iliotibial band, anterolateral ligament, and anterior arm of the biceps femoris in knee trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeseneer, Michel de; Boulet, Cedric; Willekens, Inneke; Mey, Johan de; Shahabpour, Maryam [Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Department of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium); Lenchik, Leon [Wake Forest University, Department of Radiology, Winston Salem, NC (United States); Cattrysse, Erik [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Department of Experimental Anatomy, Brussels (Belgium)

    2014-12-04

    To evaluate the involvement of the iliotibial band (ITB), the anterolateral ligament (ALL), and the anterior arm of the biceps femoris in MRI-diagnosed Segond fracture and to evaluate other associated findings of Segond fracture. We retrospectively reviewed the MRI of 13 cases of Segond fracture. The studies included proton density-weighted, T2-weighted, and proton density-weighted with fat saturation images in the three planes. We studied 2 cadaveric specimens with emphasis on the ALL. One cadaveric specimen was dissected while the other was sectioned in the sagittal plane. The mean age of the patients was 36 years (range, 17-52). There were 7 men and 6 women. The mean size of the Segond bone fragment was 8 x 10 x 2 mm. The distance from the tibia varied from 2 to 6 mm. Associated findings included anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear (n = 13), medial collateral ligament (MCL) tear (n = 8), meniscocapsular tear of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus (n = 5), and posterolateral corner involvement (n = 4). Bone marrow edema involved the mid-lateral femoral condyle and the posterior tibial plateau on both the medial and the lateral side. Edema at the Segond area was seen, but was limited. Fibular head edema was also seen. The ITB (11 out of 13) and ALL (10 out of 13) inserted on the Segond bone fragment. The anterior arm of the biceps tendon did not insert on the Segond fracture. Associated findings of Segond fracture include ACL tear, MCL tear, medial meniscus tear, and posterolateral corner injury. Both the ITB and the ALL may be involved in the Segond avulsion. The anterior arm of the biceps femoris tendon is not involved. (orig.)

  3. Segond fracture: involvement of the iliotibial band, anterolateral ligament, and anterior arm of the biceps femoris in knee trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeseneer, Michel de; Boulet, Cedric; Willekens, Inneke; Mey, Johan de; Shahabpour, Maryam; Lenchik, Leon; Cattrysse, Erik

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the involvement of the iliotibial band (ITB), the anterolateral ligament (ALL), and the anterior arm of the biceps femoris in MRI-diagnosed Segond fracture and to evaluate other associated findings of Segond fracture. We retrospectively reviewed the MRI of 13 cases of Segond fracture. The studies included proton density-weighted, T2-weighted, and proton density-weighted with fat saturation images in the three planes. We studied 2 cadaveric specimens with emphasis on the ALL. One cadaveric specimen was dissected while the other was sectioned in the sagittal plane. The mean age of the patients was 36 years (range, 17-52). There were 7 men and 6 women. The mean size of the Segond bone fragment was 8 x 10 x 2 mm. The distance from the tibia varied from 2 to 6 mm. Associated findings included anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear (n = 13), medial collateral ligament (MCL) tear (n = 8), meniscocapsular tear of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus (n = 5), and posterolateral corner involvement (n = 4). Bone marrow edema involved the mid-lateral femoral condyle and the posterior tibial plateau on both the medial and the lateral side. Edema at the Segond area was seen, but was limited. Fibular head edema was also seen. The ITB (11 out of 13) and ALL (10 out of 13) inserted on the Segond bone fragment. The anterior arm of the biceps tendon did not insert on the Segond fracture. Associated findings of Segond fracture include ACL tear, MCL tear, medial meniscus tear, and posterolateral corner injury. Both the ITB and the ALL may be involved in the Segond avulsion. The anterior arm of the biceps femoris tendon is not involved. (orig.)

  4. MRI diagnosis in meniscal tears: a Meta analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiaosheng; Xu Jianrong; Hua Jia; Wang Baisong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To perform a Meta-analysis to evaluate the overall diagnostic value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with suspected meniscal tears. Methods: All the papers concerning the diagnosis of meniscal tears using MRI in both English and Chinese published from 1998 to 2004 had been searched and reviewed, and the studies with the arthroscopy as the gold standard were adopted as eligible. Statistical analysis was performed employing SAS 8.0. Heterogeneity of the included articles was tested, which was used to select proper effect model to calculate pooled weighted sensitivity, specificity and accuracy. Summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) analyses were performed for tears of both menisci. Finally, subgroup analysis on magnetic field strength was performed. Results: Totally 11 studies were met the inclusion criteria with a total of 1221 patients. The pooled indexes of diagnostic performance and SROC demonstrated a high discriminatory power for detecting tears of the medial and lateral menisci. The value of TPR * for medial and lateral menisci showed no significant difference (0.90, 0.86, respectively, Z=0.11, P>0.05). Subgroup analysis demonstrated no statistically significant difference on diagnostic performance for various magnetic field strength (P>0.05). Conclusion: MRI is a highly accurate diagnostic tool for detecting tears of the medial and lateral menisci. At present, there is no evidence to ascertain that higher magnetic field strength improves discriminatory power for meniscal tears. (authors)

  5. MRI of radial displacement of the meniscus in the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jian; Lv Houshan; Lao Shan; Guan Zhenpeng; Hong Nan; Liang Hao

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To describe the phenomenon of radial displacement of the meniscus of the knees in the study population with MR imaging, and to establish MRI diagnostic criteria for radial displacement of the meniscus and displacement index. Methods: MR signs of radial displacement of the meniscus were evaluated retrospectively in 398 patients with knee symptoms who were examined with non- weight bearing MR images from Jan. 2000 to Feb. 2004. The patients younger than 18 years old, with joint effusion or serious arthropathy were excluded and 312 patients were eligible to be enrolled in this study. The criterion for radial displacement of the meniscus was defined as the location of the edge of meniscal body beyond the femoral and tibial outer border line. A displacement index, defined as the ratio of meniscal overhang to meniscal width, was used to quantify meniscal displacement. Results: The prevalence of radial displacement of the meniscus was 16.7% (52/312) and 13.9% (21/151) in right knee and 19.3% (31/161 )in left knee, respectively. There was no significant difference between left and right knee (χ 2 =1.60, P>0.05) and the ratio between medial and lateral meniscus was 7.8:1. The average displacement index was 0.54±0.24. The displacement indices were significant higher in older group (F=3.63, P<0.05). The incidence and indices of radial displacement of the meniscus for patients under or above 50 year older were 12.0%(17/142), 0.46±0.22 and 20.6% (35/170), 0.64±0.20, respectively. Difference was highly significant (t=0.84, P<0.01). Conclusion: It was concluded that radial displacement of the meniscus in knees was not a rare finding with MR imaging in patients with knee symptoms. The incidence increased in older age group. Further investigations were recommended to understand the etiology and clinical significance of the phenomenon of radial displacement of the meniscus. (authors)

  6. Biomechanical Properties of Murine Meniscus Surface via AFM-based Nanoindentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Doyran, Basak; Gamer, Laura W.; Lu, X. Lucas; Qin, Ling; Ortiz, Christine; Grodzinsky, Alan J.; Rosen, Vicki; Han, Lin

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to quantify the biomechanical properties of murine meniscus surface. Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation was performed on the central region, proximal side of menisci from 6- to 24-week old male C57BL/6 mice using microspherical tips (Rtip ≈ 5 μm) in PBS. A unique, linear correlation between indentation depth, D, and response force, F, was found on menisci from all age groups. This non-Hertzian behavior is likely due to the dominance of tensile resistance by the collagen fibril bundles on meniscus surface that are mostly aligned along the circumferential direction observed on 12-week old menisci. The indentation resistance was calculated as both the effective stiffness, Sind = dF/dD, and the effective modulus, Eind, via the isotropic Hertz model. Values of Sind and Eind were found to depend on indentation rate, suggesting the existence of poro-viscoelasticity. These values do not significantly vary with anatomical sites, lateral versus medial compartments, or mouse age. In addition, Eind of meniscus surface (e.g., 6.1 ± 0.8 MPa for 12 weeks of age, mean ± SEM, n = 13) was found to be significantly higher than those of meniscus surfaces in other species, and of murine articular cartilage surface (1.4 ± 0.1 MPa, n = 6). In summary, these results provided the first direct mechanical knowledge of murine knee meniscus tissues. We expect this understanding to serve as a mechanics-based benchmark for further probing the developmental biology and osteoarthritis symptoms of meniscus in various murine models. PMID:25817332

  7. Kinematic characteristics of anterior cruciate ligament deficient knees with concomitant meniscus deficiency during ascending stairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Huang, Wenhan; Ma, Limin; Lin, Zefeng; Huang, Huayang; Xia, Hong

    2017-02-01

    It is commonly believed that a torn ACL or a damaged meniscus may be associated with altered knee joint movements. The purpose of this study was to measure the tibiofemoral kinematics of ACL deficiency with concomitant meniscus deficiency. Unilateral knees of 28 ACL deficient participants were studied while ascending stairs. Among these patients, 6 had isolated ACL injuries (group I), 8 had combined ACL and medial meniscus injuries (group II), 8 had combined ACL and lateral meniscus injuries (group III) and 6 had combined ACL and medial-lateral meniscus injuries (group IV). Both knees were then scanned during a stair climb activity using single fluoroscopic image system. Knee kinematics were measured at 0°, 5°, 10°, 15°, 30° and 60° of flexion during ascending stairs. At 0°, 15° and 30° flexion of the knee, the tibia rotated externally by 13.9 ± 6.1°,13.8 ± 9.5° and 15.9 ± 9.8° in Group I. Group II and III exhibited decreased external rotation from 60° to full extension. Statistical differences were found in 0°, 15°and 30° of flexion for the 2 groups compared with Group I. In general, the tibia showed anterior translation with respect to the femur during ascending stairs. It was further determined that Group III had larger anterior translation compared with Group IV at 0° and 5° of flexion (-6.9 ± 1.7 mm vs. 6.2 ± 11.3 mm, P = 0.041; -9.0 ± 1.8 mm vs. 8.1 ± 13.4 mm, P = 0.044). During ascending stairs the ACL deficient knee with different deficiencies in the meniscus will show significantly different kinematics compared with that of uninjured contralateral knee. Considering the varying effect of meniscus injuries on knee joint kinematics, future studies should concentrate on specific treatment of patients with combined ACL and meniscus injuries to protect the joint from abnormal kinematics and subsequent postoperative degeneration.

  8. Atypically thick and high location of the Wrisberg ligament in patients with a complete lateral discoid meniscus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eun Young; Choi, Sang-Hee; Kwon, Jong Won; Ahn, Jin Hwan

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to document the relationship between a discoid lateral meniscus and a thickened Wrisberg ligament with a higher location on the medial femoral condyle. Between July 2002 and February 2006, 100 consecutive patients who had a complete lateral discoid meniscus and another 100 patients without a discoid lateral meniscus (control group) were included. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed all of the magnetic resonance images, paying particular attention to the presence and thickness of the Wrisberg ligament and the location of the attachment of the Wrisberg ligament to the medial femoral condyle (types I, II, or III). We assumed that type I Wrisberg ligaments had a higher location. All 141 patients had a Wrisberg ligament (71%). There were 73 patients (73%) in the discoid group and 68 patients (68%) in the non-discoid group. The mean thickness of the Wrisberg ligament in the patients in the discoid and non-discoid groups was 2.1 mm (range, 0.4-4.7 mm; median, 2.1 mm) and 1.6 mm (range, 0.4-4.5 mm; median, 1.3 mm), respectively. The Wrisberg ligaments of the discoid group were thicker than the non-discoid group (p=0.0002). The Wrisberg ligament was attached to the upper part of the medial femoral condyle in the discoid group more often than in the non-discoid group (p<0.0001). (orig.)

  9. Arthroscopic all-inside meniscal repair - Does the meniscus heal? A clinical and radiological follow-up examination to verify meniscal healing using a 3-T MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffelner, Thomas; Resch, Herbert; Mayer, Michael; Tauber, Mark [Department of Traumatology and Sports Injuries, Salzburg (Austria); Forstner, Rosemarie [University Hospital of Salzburg, Department of Radiology, Salzburg (Austria); Minnich, Bernd [University of Salzburg, Department of Organismic Biology, Salzburg (Austria)

    2011-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to correlate clinical and radiological results using a 3-T MRI to verify meniscal healing after arthroscopic all-inside meniscus repair. We selected 27 patients (14 men and 13 women) with an average age of 31 {+-} 9 years and retrospective clinical examinations and radiological assessments using a 3-T MRI after all-inside arthroscopic meniscal repair were conducted. Repair of the medial meniscus was performed in 19 patients and of the lateral meniscus in eight. In 17 patients (63%), we performed concomitant anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The mean follow-up period was 4.5 {+-} 1.7 years. The Lysholm score and Tegner activity index were used for clinical evaluation. Four grades were used to classify the radiological signal alterations within the meniscus: central globular (grade 1); linear horizontal or band-like (grade 2); intrameniscal alterations and linear signal alterations communicating with the articular surface (grade 3); and complex tears (grade 4). At follow-up, the average Lysholm score was 76 {+-} 15 points, with ten of the patients placed in group 6 based on the Tegner activity index. MRI examinations revealed no signal alteration in three patients, grade 1 in 0, grade 2 in five, grade 3 in 13, and grade 4 in six. The MRI findings correlated positively with the clinical scores in 21 patients (78%). Correlation of clinical and radiological examination was performed using 3-T MRI. In spite of satisfactory clinical outcomes at follow-up, a radiological signal alteration may still be visible on MRI, which was believed to be scar tissue, but could not be proven definitively. Imaging with a 3-Tesla MRI after meniscal suture surgery provides good but no definitive reliability on meniscus healing and therefore gives no advantage compared to 1.5-T MRI, with good clinical outcome using an all-inside arthroscopic meniscal repair. 3T-MRI can not substitute diagnostic arthroscopy in patients with persistent complaints after

  10. Arthroscopic all-inside meniscal repair - Does the meniscus heal? A clinical and radiological follow-up examination to verify meniscal healing using a 3-T MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffelner, Thomas; Resch, Herbert; Mayer, Michael; Tauber, Mark; Forstner, Rosemarie; Minnich, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to correlate clinical and radiological results using a 3-T MRI to verify meniscal healing after arthroscopic all-inside meniscus repair. We selected 27 patients (14 men and 13 women) with an average age of 31 ± 9 years and retrospective clinical examinations and radiological assessments using a 3-T MRI after all-inside arthroscopic meniscal repair were conducted. Repair of the medial meniscus was performed in 19 patients and of the lateral meniscus in eight. In 17 patients (63%), we performed concomitant anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The mean follow-up period was 4.5 ± 1.7 years. The Lysholm score and Tegner activity index were used for clinical evaluation. Four grades were used to classify the radiological signal alterations within the meniscus: central globular (grade 1); linear horizontal or band-like (grade 2); intrameniscal alterations and linear signal alterations communicating with the articular surface (grade 3); and complex tears (grade 4). At follow-up, the average Lysholm score was 76 ± 15 points, with ten of the patients placed in group 6 based on the Tegner activity index. MRI examinations revealed no signal alteration in three patients, grade 1 in 0, grade 2 in five, grade 3 in 13, and grade 4 in six. The MRI findings correlated positively with the clinical scores in 21 patients (78%). Correlation of clinical and radiological examination was performed using 3-T MRI. In spite of satisfactory clinical outcomes at follow-up, a radiological signal alteration may still be visible on MRI, which was believed to be scar tissue, but could not be proven definitively. Imaging with a 3-Tesla MRI after meniscal suture surgery provides good but no definitive reliability on meniscus healing and therefore gives no advantage compared to 1.5-T MRI, with good clinical outcome using an all-inside arthroscopic meniscal repair. 3T-MRI can not substitute diagnostic arthroscopy in patients with persistent complaints after

  11. Quantitative evaluation of hyaline articular cartilage T2 maps of knee and determine the relationship of cartilage T2 values with age, gender, articular changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cağlar, E; Şahin, G; Oğur, T; Aktaş, E

    2014-11-01

    To identify changes in knee joint cartilage transverse relaxation values depending on the patient's age and gender and to investigate the relationship between knee joint pathologies and the transverse relaxation time. Knee MRI images of 107 symptomatic patients with various pathologic knee conditions were analyzed retrospectively. T2 values were measured at patellar cartilage, posteromedial and posterolateral femoral cartilage adjacent to the central horn of posterior meniscus. 963 measurements were done for 107 knees MRI. Relationship of T2 values with seven features including subarticular bone marrow edema, subarticular cysts, marginal osteophytes, anterior-posterior cruciate and collateral ligament tears, posterior medial and posterior lateral meniscal tears, synovial thickening and effusion were analyzed. T2 values in all three compartments were evaluated according to age and gender. A T2 value increase correlated with age was present in all three compartments measured in the subgroup with no knee joint pathology and in all patient groups. According to the ROC curve, an increase showing a statistically significant difference was present in the patient group aged over 40 compared to the patient group aged 40 and below in all patient groups. There is a statistically difference at T2 values with and without subarticular cysts, marginal osteophytes, synovial thickening and effusion. T2 relaxation time showed a statistically significant increase in the patients with a medial meniscus tear compared to those without a tear and no statistically significant difference was found in T2 relaxation times of patients with and without a posterior lateral meniscus tear. T2 cartilage mapping on MRI provides opportunity to exhibit biochemical and structural changes related with cartilage extracellular matrix without using invasive diagnostic methods.

  12. Squat Winnowing: Cause of Meniscus Injuries in Non-Athletic Females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Younis; Ahmad Khan, Hayat; Ahmad Latoo, Irfan; Gani, Naseemul; Farooq, Munir; Gul, Snobar

    2016-02-01

    Sports activities were thought to be the major cause of meniscus injury in both men and woman, but our observations of non-athletic females show that the cause of meniscus injury was unrelated to any type of sports activity. This study revealed squat winnowing to be a major cause of meniscus injury in non-athletic females. This retrospective study was conducted in a tertiary care orthopaedic hospital which caters to a population of 10 million people. We assessed 120 non-athletic females who had received treatment in our hospital over a period of 2 years. The most probable cause of knee injury, per initial patient history, was recorded for all non-athletic females who presented clinical signs and symptoms of meniscus injury. The diagnoses were confirmed by relevant MRI and arthroscopy of patients' knees. All females who engaged in athletic activity and other females with unrelated, non-traumatic knee pathologies were excluded from the study. Through our study, we found that 42% (n = 50) of females suffered an injury during squat winnowing of rice, either at home or at work. Another 29% (n = 35) of females cited a history of slipping and spraining their knee as a cause of knee injury, while 19% (n = 16) of females suffered a knee injury during complex accidents such as a traffic accident. Finally, 13% (n = 16) of the females had no definite history of knee injury. Our observations add to the knowledge base of the various causes of meniscus tears; this study also revealed that socio-cultural factors influence and contribute to the mechanism of various types of knee injury.

  13. Allergy and allergic mediators in tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, Andrea

    2013-12-01

    The identification of inflammatory mediators in the tear fluid have been extensively used in ocular allergy to find either a 'disease marker', to better understand the immune mechanisms involved in the ocular surface inflammation, or to identify potential targets for therapeutic interventions. While the clinical characteristics allow a relatively convincing diagnosis of ocular allergic diseases, in the initial, non active phases, or in the chronic stages, the diagnosis may not be clear. Although not highly specific, total tear IgE can be measured with local tests by inserting a paper strip in the lower meniscus. The measurement of tear specific inflammatory markers, such as histamine, tryptase, ECP, IL-4, IL-5 and eotaxin, may be useful for the diagnosis or monitoring ocular allergy. New technologies such as multiplex bead assays, membrane-bound antibody array and proteomic techniques can characterize the distribution of a wide range of bioactive trace proteins in tears. Dozens of mediators, cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, angiogenic modulators, enzymes and inhibitors were thus identified in small tear samples using these techniques, providing the possible identification of specific biomarker for either specific disease or disease activity. However, to date, there is no a single specific laboratory test suitable for the diagnosis and monitoring of allergic conjunctivitis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Revision 1 size and position of the healthy meniscus, and its correlation with sex, height, weight, and bone area- a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloecker, Katja; Englund, Martin; Wirth, Wolfgang; Hudelmaier, Martin; Burgkart, Rainer; Frobell, Richard B; Eckstein, Felix

    2011-10-28

    Meniscus extrusion or hypertrophy may occur in knee osteoarthritis (OA). However, currently no data are available on the position and size of the meniscus in asymptomatic men and women with normal meniscus integrity. Three-dimensional coronal DESSwe MRIs were used to segment and quantitatively measure the size and position of the medial and lateral menisci, and their correlation with sex, height, weight, and tibial plateau area. 102 knees (40 male and 62 female) were drawn from the Osteoarthritis Initiative "non-exposed" reference cohort, including subjects without symptoms, radiographic signs, or risk factors for knee OA. Knees with MRI signs of meniscus lesions were excluded. The tibial plateau area was significantly larger (p sexes, and that tibial coverage by the meniscus is similar between men and women.

  15. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    2016-11-06

    Nov 6, 2016 ... The purpose of this study was to determine the diagnostic value of Joint line tenderness and McMurray's test, as clinical signs, to diagnose underlying medial meniscus tears. METHODS: This was a prospective observational study done in Tribhuwan University Teaching. Hospital. Patients undergoing knee ...

  16. Meniscal tears, repairs and replacement: their relevance to osteoarthritis of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Ian

    2011-04-01

    The menisci of the knee are important load sharers and shock absorbers in the joint. Meniscal tears are common, and whenever possible meniscal tears should be surgically repaired. Meniscectomy leads to a significant increased risk of osteoarthritis, and various options now exist for replacing missing menisci, including the use of meniscal scaffolds or the replacement of the entire meniscus by meniscal allograft transplantation. The field of meniscal surgery continues to develop apace, and the future may lie in growing new menisci by tissue engineering techniques.

  17. O'Donoghue's triad: magnetic resonance imaging evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staron, R.B.; Haramati, N.; Feldman, F.; Kiernan, H.A.; Pfaff, H.C.; Rubin, S.J.; Zwass, A.

    1994-01-01

    The objective was to search for magnetic resonance imaging evidence of medial collateral ligament (MCL) injury in knees with proven tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and medial meniscus; the three abnormalities that make up O'Donoghue's triad. Although the MCL injury can be unapparent clinically, knee joint stability may be compromised. The superficial portion of the MCL was evaluated on 19 MR studies of 16 knees with arthroscopically proven ACL and medial meniscal tears. MCL thicknesses were compared to those on MR images of 19 normal knees. The injured knees were of 13 men and 3 women, ranging in age from 19 to 56 years; the normal knees were of 10 men and 9 women, ranging in age from 19 to 55 years. The medial collateral ligaments of all injured knees were abnormal, and, as a group, they had greater thicknesses and more intraligamentous thickness variability than normal knees. The MR appearance of both ACL and medial meniscal tears served as indirect evidence of MCL injury, with irregular MCL thickening indicative of prior injury. (orig.)

  18. Medial joint line bone bruising at MRI complicating acute ankle inversion injury: What is its clinical significance?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, V.O.; Moran, D.E.; Shine, S.; Eustace, S.J.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To assess the incidence and clinical significance of medial joint line bone bruising following acute ankle inversion injury. Materials and methods: Forty-five patients who underwent ankle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) within 2 weeks of acute ankle inversion injury were included in this prospective study. Integrity of the lateral collateral ligament complex, presence of medial joint line bone bruising, tibio-talar joint effusion, and soft-tissue swelling were documented. Clinical follow-up at 6 months was carried out to determine the impact of injury on length of time out of work, delay in return to normal walking, delay in return to sports activity, and persistence of medial joint line pain. Results: Thirty-seven patients had tears of the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL). Twenty-six patients had medial joint line bone bruising with altered marrow signal at the medial aspect of the talus and congruent surface of the medial malleolus. A complete ATFL tear was seen in 92% of the patients with medial joint line bone bruising (p = 0.05). Patients with an ATFL tear and medial joint line bone bruising had a longer delay in return to normal walking (p = 0.0002), longer delay in return to sports activity (p = 0.0001), and persistent medial joint line pain (p = 0.0003). There was no statistically significant difference in outcome for the eight patients without ATFL tears. Conclusion: Medial joint line bone bruising following an acute ankle inversion injury was significantly associated with a complete ATFL tear, longer delay in the return to normal walking and sports activity, as well as persistent medial joint line pain. Its presence should prompt detailed assessment of the lateral collateral ligament complex, particularly the ATFL

  19. Quantitative MRI T2 relaxation time evaluation of knee cartilage: comparison of meniscus-intact and -injured knees after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Chen, Shuang; Tao, Hongyue; Chen, Shiyi

    2015-04-01

    Associated meniscal injury is well recognized at anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, and it is a known risk factor for osteoarthritis. To evaluate and characterize the postoperative appearance of articular cartilage after different meniscal treatment in ACL-reconstructed knees using T2 relaxation time evaluation on MRI. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 62 consecutive patients who under ACL reconstruction were recruited in this study, including 23 patients undergoing partial meniscectomy (MS group), 21 patients undergoing meniscal repair (MR group), and 18 patients with intact menisci (MI group) at time of surgery. Clinical evaluation, including subjective functional scores and physical examination, was performed on the same day as the MRI examination and at follow-up times ranging from 2 to 4.2 years. The MRI multiecho sagittal images were segmented to determine the T2 relaxation time value of each meniscus and articular cartilage plate. Differences in each measurement were compared among groups. No patient had joint-line tenderness or reported pain or clicking on McMurray test or instability. There were also no statistically significant differences in functional scores or medial or lateral meniscus T2 values among the 3 groups (P > .05 for both). There was a significantly higher articular cartilage T2 value in the medial femorotibial articular cartilage for the MS group (P T2 value between the MS and MR groups (P > .05) in each articular cartilage plate. The medial tibial articular cartilage T2 value had a significant positive correlation with medial meniscus T2 value (r = 0.287; P = .024) CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that knees with meniscectomy or meniscal repair had articular cartilage degeneration at 2 to 4 years postoperatively, with higher articular cartilage T2 relaxation time values compared with the knees with an intact meniscus. © 2015 The Author(s).

  20. Characteristics of meniscus progenitor cells migrated from injured meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Dongrim; Zhou, Cheng; Brouillette, Marc J; Song, Ino; Yu, Yin; Choe, Hyeong Hun; Lehman, Abigail D; Jang, Kee W; Fredericks, Douglas C; Laughlin, Barbara J; Martin, James A

    2017-09-01

    Serious meniscus injuries seldom heal and increase the risk for knee osteoarthritis; thus, there is a need to develop new reparative therapies. In that regard, stimulating tissue regeneration by autologous stem/progenitor cells has emerged as a promising new strategy. We showed previously that migratory chondrogenic progenitor cells (CPCs) were recruited to injured cartilage, where they showed a capability in situ tissue repair. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the meniscus contains a similar population of regenerative cells. Explant studies revealed that migrating cells were mainly confined to the red zone in normal menisci: However, these cells were capable of repopulating defects made in the white zone. In vivo, migrating cell numbers increased dramatically in damaged meniscus. Relative to non-migrating meniscus cells, migrating cells were more clonogenic, overexpressed progenitor cell markers, and included a larger side population. Gene expression profiling showed that the migrating population was more similar to CPCs than other meniscus cells. Finally, migrating cells equaled CPCs in chondrogenic potential, indicating a capacity for repair of the cartilaginous white zone of the meniscus. These findings demonstrate that, much as in articular cartilage, injuries to the meniscus mobilize an intrinsic progenitor cell population with strong reparative potential. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1966-1972, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Do Cartilage Repair Procedures Prevent Degenerative Meniscus Changes? Longitudinal T1ρ and Morphological Evaluation at 3.0T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungmann, Pia M.; Li, Xiaojuan; Nardo, Lorenzo; Subburaj, Karupppasamy; Lin, Wilson; Ma, C. Benjamin; Majumdar, Sharmila; Link, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cartilage repair (CR) procedures are widely accepted for treatment of isolated cartilage defects at the knee joint. However, it is not well known whether these procedures prevent degenerative joint disease. Hypothesis/Purpose CR procedures prevent accelerated qualitative and quantitative progression of meniscus degeneration in individuals with focal cartilage defects. Study Design Cohort Study; Level of evidence 2b Methods A total of 94 subjects were studied. CR procedures were performed on 34 patients (n=16 osteochondral transplantation, n=18 microfracture); 34 controls were matched. An additional 13 patients received CR and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction (CR&ACL) and 13 patients received only ACL reconstruction. 3.0T MRI with T1ρ mapping and sagittal fat-saturated intermediate-weighted fast spin echo (FSE) sequences was performed to analyze menisci quantitatively and qualitatively (Whole-Organ Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score, WORMS). CR and CR&ACL patients were examined 4 months (n=34; n=13), 1 (n=21; n=8) and 2 (n=9; n=5) years post CR. Control subjects were scanned at baseline and after 1 and 2 years, ACL patients after 1 and 2 years. Results At baseline, global meniscus T1ρ values were higher in individuals with CR (14.2±0.6ms; P=0.004) and in individuals with CR&ACL (17.1±0.9ms; Pmeniscus above cartilage defects (16.4±1.0ms) and T1ρ of the subgroup of control knees without cartilage defects (12.1±0.8ms; Pmeniscus tears at the overlying meniscus; 10% of CR subjects showed an increase of WORMS meniscus score within the first year, none progressed in the second year. Control subjects with (without) cartilage defects showed meniscus tears in 30% (5%) at baseline; 38% (19%) increased within the first, and 15% (10%) within the second year. Conclusions This study identified more severe meniscus degeneration after CR surgery compared to controls. However, progression of T1ρ values was not observed from 1 to 2 years after surgery

  2. Readability of Online Sources Regarding Meniscal Tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodax, Jonathan D; Baird, Grayson L; McBride, Trevor; Owens, Brett D

    2017-09-01

    Meniscal injuries are extremely common, with an incidence of 8.3 per 1,000 person/years in young, active individuals. Patients often turn to the internet to glean information about their injuries, and even to guide decision making about treatment. Much research has been done demonstrating that a reading level of eighth grade or lower is appropriate for accurately communicating written information to patients, yet medical practitioners often fail to meet this requirement. To better examine the information patients receive about meniscal injuries, we set out to evaluate the reading level and content of three commonly used search terms on the three search engines with the largest market share. The authors examined the keywords "meniscus tear," "meniscus tear treatment," and "knee pain meniscus" on the three highest market share search engines. The top 10 results from each search were included, and redundancies identified. Unique Web sites were evaluated for source, word count, reading level, and content including advertisements, diagrams, photographs, nonoperative and operative options, and accurate medical information. A total of 23 unique Web sites were identified in our search, including 13 public education sources, 6 academic institutions, and 4 private physicians/groups. Average grade levels of articles ranged from 9.4 to 14.2 (mean, 11.14; standard deviation [SD] 1.46), and Flesch-Kincaid reading ease scores ranged from 23.9 to 68.7 (mean, 55.31; SD, 10.11). Pages from public sources required the highest level of readability (11.6, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 9.8-13.2), which was significantly higher than private (11.0, 95% CI: 9.3, 12.7]) and academic (10.9, 95% CI: 8.9-12.9), p  = 0.007 and p  = 0.002, respectively. Further efforts to make appropriate health information available to patients are needed. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  3. The meniscus ganglion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, H.

    1982-01-01

    Normal dimensions of the meniscus quoted in the literature vary somewhat; measurements were therefore carried out on the height and width on standardised arthrograms. This made it possible to evaluate changes in the height of the meniscus objectively and to diagnose degeneration with a ganglion at an earlier stage. Taking into account other, secondary, signs, 261 meniscus ganglia were diagnosed amongst 3133 meniscus lesions (8.3%) in the course of 5650 knee arthrograms. These were confirmed at operation and histologically. For the first time it has been possible to provide an estimate of the frequency of meniscus ganglion in the radiological literature. (orig.) [de

  4. Riboflavin-induced photo-crosslinking of collagen hydrogel and its application in meniscus tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Jiseung; Koh, Rachel H; Shim, Whuisu; Kim, Hwan D; Yim, Hyun-Gu; Hwang, Nathaniel S

    2016-04-01

    A meniscus tear is a common knee injury, but its regeneration remains a clinical challenge. Recently, collagen-based scaffolds have been applied in meniscus tissue engineering. Despite its prevalence, application of natural collagen scaffold in clinical setting is limited due to its extremely low stiffness and rapid degradation. The purpose of the present study was to increase the mechanical properties and delay degradation rate of a collagen-based scaffold by photo-crosslinking using riboflavin (RF) and UV exposure. RF is a biocompatible vitamin B2 that showed minimal cytotoxicity compared to conventionally utilized photo-initiator. Furthermore, collagen photo-crosslinking with RF improved mechanical properties and delayed enzyme-triggered degradation of collagen scaffolds. RF-induced photo-crosslinked collagen scaffolds encapsulated with fibrochondrocytes resulted in reduced scaffold contraction and enhanced gene expression levels for the collagen II and aggrecan. Additionally, hyaluronic acid (HA) incorporation into photo-crosslinked collagen scaffold showed an increase in its retention. Based on these results, we demonstrate that photo-crosslinked collagen-HA hydrogels can be potentially applied in the scaffold-based meniscus tissue engineering.

  5. Painful locking of the knee due to bucket handle tear of

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HE Rui

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】 A case of swelling and anterior painful knee due to tear of mediopatellar plica is reported. The patient also felt clunk of the patellofemoral joint and knee locking. Under arthroscopic examination, a thick and fibrous plica was found medial to patellar, and a bucket tear along the plica from medial patellar retinaculum to infrapatellar fat pad. Polarized microscopic examination showed collagen fiber fragment and loss of light reflecting property. Neuroimmunohistology suggested up-regulation of synovial plica innervation in the area around the crack. This may be related to the pain. The bucket tear of mediopatellar plicacaused pain and lock of knee are more common than previously reported. Key words: Knee injuries; Arthroscopy; Patellofemoral joint

  6. PLDLA/PCL-T Scaffold for Meniscus Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Andrea Rodrigues; Moda, Marlon; Cattani, Silvia Mara de Melo; de Santana, Gracy Mara; Barbieri, Juliana Abreu; Munhoz, Monique Moron; Cardoso, Túlio Pereira; Barbo, Maria Lourdes Peris; Russo, Teresa; D'Amora, Ugo; Gloria, Antonio; Ambrosio, Luigi; Duek, Eliana Aparecida de Rezende

    2013-04-01

    The inability of the avascular region of the meniscus to regenerate has led to the use of tissue engineering to treat meniscal injuries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of fibrochondrocytes preseeded on PLDLA/PCL-T [poly(L-co-D,L-lactic acid)/poly(caprolactone-triol)] scaffolds to stimulate regeneration of the whole meniscus. Porous PLDLA/PCL-T (90/10) scaffolds were obtained by solvent casting and particulate leaching. Compressive modulus of 9.5±1.0 MPa and maximum stress of 4.7±0.9 MPa were evaluated. Fibrochondrocytes from rabbit menisci were isolated, seeded directly on the scaffolds, and cultured for 21 days. New Zealand rabbits underwent total meniscectomy, after which implants consisting of cell-free scaffolds or cell-seeded scaffolds were introduced into the medial knee meniscus; the negative control group consisted of rabbits that received no implant. Macroscopic and histological evaluations of the neomeniscus were performed 12 and 24 weeks after implantation. The polymer scaffold implants adapted well to surrounding tissues, without apparent rejection, infection, or chronic inflammatory response. Fibrocartilaginous tissue with mature collagen fibers was observed predominantly in implants with seeded scaffolds compared to cell-free implants after 24 weeks. Similar results were not observed in the control group. Articular cartilage was preserved in the polymeric implants and showed higher chondrocyte cell number than the control group. These findings show that the PLDLA/PCL-T 90/10 scaffold has potential for orthopedic applications since this material allowed the formation of fibrocartilaginous tissue, a structure of crucial importance for repairing injuries to joints, including replacement of the meniscus and the protection of articular cartilage from degeneration.

  7. T2 -Mapping evaluation of early cartilage alteration of talus for chronic lateral ankle instability with isolated anterior talofibular ligament tear or combined with calcaneofibular ligament tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Hongyue; Hu, Yiwen; Qiao, Yang; Ma, Kui; Yan, Xu; Hua, Yinghui; Chen, Shuang

    2018-01-01

    To quantitatively evaluate the cartilage alteration of talus for chronic lateral ankle instability (LAI) with isolated anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) tear and combined ATFL and calcaneofibular ligament (CFL) tear using T 2 -mapping at 3.0T. In all, 27 patients including 17 with isolated ATFL tear and 10 with ATFL+CFL tear, and 21 healthy subjects were recruited. All participants underwent T 2 -mapping scan at 3T and patients completed American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) scoring. The total talar cartilage (TTC) was segmented into six compartments: medial anterior (MA), medial center (MC), medial posterior (MP), lateral anterior (LA), lateral center (LC), and lateral posterior (LP). The T 2 value of each compartment was measured from T 2 -mapping images. Data were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), Student's t-test, and Pearson's correlation coefficient. The T 2 values of MA, MC, MP, TTC in the ATFL group and MA, MC, MP, LC, LP, TTC in the ATFL+CFL group were higher than those in the control group (P < 0.05). Moreover, the T 2 values of MC, MP, LC, and TTC in the ATFL+CFL group were higher than those in the ATFL group (P < 0.05). The T 2 values of MA in both patient groups were negatively correlated with AOFAS scores (r = -0.596, r = -0.690, P < 0.05). Chronic LAI with ATFL tear had a trend of increasing cartilage T 2 values in talar trochlea, mainly involving medial cartilage compartments. Chronic LAI with ATFL+CFL tear might result in higher T 2 values in a much larger cartilage region than with ATFL tear. MA could be the main cartilage compartment that may affect the patient's clinical symptoms. 1 Technical Efficacy: Stage 3 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018;47:69-77. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  8. Varus deformity of the left lower extremity causing degenerative lesion of the posterior horn of the left medial meniscus in a patient with Paget’s disease of bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Kaissi, Ali

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available [english] We report on a 42-year-old woman who presented with persistent pain in her left knee with no history of trauma. Sagittal T1-weighted MRI of the left knee showed discontinuity between the anterior and posterior horns of the left medial meniscus, causing effectively the development of degenerative lesion of the posterior horn. The latter was correlated to varus deformity of the left lower extremity associated with subsequent narrowing of the medial knee joint. The unusual craniofacial contour of the patient, the skeletal survey and the elevated serum alkaline phosphatase were compatible with the diagnosis of Paget’s disease of the bone. To alleviate the adverse effect of the mal-alignment of the left femur onto the left knee, corrective osteotomy of the left femoral diaphysis by means of fixators was performed. To the best of our knowledge this is the first clinical report describing the management and the pathological correlation of a unilateral varus deformity of the femoral shaft and degenerative lesions of the left knee in a patient with Paget’s disease of the bone.

  9. Comparison of spin echo T1-weighted sequences versus fast spin-echo proton density-weighted sequences for evaluation of meniscal tears at 1.5 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, Andrew B.; Pesce, Lorenzo L.; Wu, Jim S.; Smart, L.R.; Medvecky, Michael J.; Haims, Andrew H.

    2009-01-01

    At our institution, fast spin-echo (FSE) proton density (PD) imaging is used to evaluate articular cartilage, while conventional spin-echo (CSE) T1-weighted sequences have been traditionally used to characterize meniscal pathology. We sought to determine if FSE PD-weighted sequences are equivalent to CSE T1-weighted sequences in the detection of meniscal tears, obviating the need to perform both sequences. We retrospectively reviewed the records of knee arthroscopies performed by two arthroscopy-focused surgeons from an academic medical center over a 2-year period. The preoperative MRI images were interpreted independently by two fellowship-trained musculoskeletal radiologists who graded the sagittal CSE T1 and FSE PD sequences at different sittings with grades 1-5, where 1 = normal meniscus, 2 = probable normal meniscus, 3 indeterminate, 4 = probable torn meniscus, and 5 = torn meniscus. Each meniscus was divided into an anterior and posterior half, and these halves were graded separately. Operative findings provided the gold standard. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to compare the two sequences. There were 131 tears in 504 meniscal halves. Using ROC analysis, the reader 1 area under curve for FSE PD was significantly better than CSE T1 (0.939 vs. 0.902, >95% confidence). For reader 2, the difference met good criteria for statistical non-inferiority but not superiority (0.913 for FSE PD and 0.908 for CSE T1; >95% non-inferiority for difference at most of -0.027). FSE PD-weighted sequences, using our institutional protocol, are not inferior to CSE T1-weighted sequences for the detection of meniscal tears and may be superior. (orig.)

  10. T1rho and T2 relaxation times of the normal adult knee meniscus at 3T: analysis of zonal differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takao, Shoichiro; Nguyen, Tan B; Yu, Hon J; Hagiwara, Shigeo; Kaneko, Yasuhito; Nozaki, Taiki; Iwamoto, Seiji; Otomo, Maki; Schwarzkopf, Ran; Yoshioka, Hiroshi

    2017-05-18

    Prior studies describe histological and immunohistochemical differences in collagen and proteoglycan content in different meniscal zones. The aim of this study is to evaluate horizontal and vertical zonal differentiation of T1rho and T2 relaxation times of the entire meniscus from volunteers without symptom and imaging abnormality. Twenty volunteers age between 19 and 38 who have no knee-related clinical symptoms, and no history of prior knee surgeries were enrolled in this study. Two T1rho mapping (b-FFE T1rho and SPGR T1rho) and T2 mapping images were acquired with a 3.0-T MR scanner. Each meniscus was divided manually into superficial and deep zones for horizontal zonal analysis. The anterior and posterior horns of each meniscus were divided manually into white, red-white and red zones for vertical zonal analysis. Zonal differences of average relaxation times among each zone, and both inter- and intra-observer reproducibility were statistically analyzed. In horizontal zonal analysis, T1rho relaxation times of the superficial zone tended to be higher than those of the deep zone, and this difference was statistically significant in the medial meniscal segments (84.3 ms vs 76.0 ms on b-FFE, p meniscus (88.4 ms vs 77.1 ms on b-FFE, p meniscus, p = 0.011). T2 relaxation times of the white zone were significantly higher than those of the red zone in the medial meniscus posterior horn (96.8 ms vs 84.3 ms, p meniscus anterior horn (104.6 ms vs 84.2 ms, p 0.74) or good (0.60-0.74) in all meniscal segments on both horizontal and vertical zonal analysis, except for inter-class correlation coefficients of the lateral meniscus on SPGR. Compared with SPGR T1rho images, b-FFE T1rho images demonstrated more significant zonal differentiation with higher inter- and intra-observer reproducibility. There are zonal differences in T1rho and T2 relaxation times of the normal meniscus.

  11. Effect of Strain, Region, and Tissue Composition on Glucose Partitioning in Meniscus Fibrocartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinhans, Kelsey L; Jackson, Alicia R

    2017-03-01

    A nearly avascular tissue, the knee meniscus relies on diffusive transport for nutritional supply to cells. Nutrient transport depends on solute partitioning in the tissue, which governs the amount of nutrients that can enter a tissue. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of mechanical strain, tissue region, and tissue composition on the partition coefficient of glucose in meniscus fibrocartilage. A simple partitioning experiment was employed to measure glucose partitioning in porcine meniscus tissues from two regions (horn and central), from both meniscal components (medial and lateral), and at three levels of compression (0%, 10%, and 20%). Partition coefficient values were correlated to strain level, water volume fraction, and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content of tissue specimens. Partition coefficient values ranged from 0.47 to 0.91 (n = 48). Results show that glucose partition coefficient is significantly (p < 0.001) affected by compression, decreasing with increasing strain. Furthermore, we did not find a statistically significant effect of tissue when comparing medial versus lateral (p = 0.181) or when comparing central and horn regions (p = 0.837). There were significant positive correlations between tissue water volume fraction and glucose partitioning for all groups. However, the correlation between GAG content and partitioning was only significant in the lateral horn group. Determining how glucose partitioning is affected by tissue composition and loading is necessary for understanding nutrient availability and related tissue health and/or degeneration. Therefore, this study is important for better understanding the transport and nutrition-related mechanisms of meniscal degeneration.

  12. Tear film dynamics with evaporation, wetting, and time-dependent flux boundary condition on an eye-shaped domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Longfei; Braun, R. J.; Maki, K. L.; Henshaw, W. D.; King-Smith, P. E.

    2014-01-01

    We study tear film dynamics with evaporation on a wettable eye-shaped ocular surface using a lubrication model. The mathematical model has a time-dependent flux boundary condition that models the cycles of tear fluid supply and drainage; it mimics blinks on a stationary eye-shaped domain. We generate computational grids and solve the nonlinear governing equations using the OVERTURE computational framework. In vivo experimental results using fluorescent imaging are used to visualize the influx and redistribution of tears for an open eye. Results from the numerical simulations are compared with the experiment. The model captures the flow around the meniscus and other dynamic features of human tear film observed in vivo. PMID:24926191

  13. Association of medial meniscal extrusion with medial tibial osteophyte distance detected by T2 mapping MRI in patients with early-stage knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, Shinnosuke; Ishijima, Muneaki; Kaneko, Haruka; Kinoshita, Mayuko; Liu, Lizu; Sadatsuki, Ryo; Futami, Ippei; Yusup, Anwajan; Takamura, Tomohiro; Arita, Hitoshi; Shiozawa, Jun; Aoki, Takako; Takazawa, Yuji; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Aoki, Shigeki; Kurosawa, Hisashi; Okada, Yasunori; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2017-09-12

    Medial meniscal extrusion (MME) is associated with progression of medial knee osteoarthritis (OA), but no or little information is available for relationships between MME and osteophytes, which are found in cartilage and bone parts. Because of the limitation in detectability of the cartilage part of osteophytes by radiography or conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the rate of development and size of osteophytes appear to have been underestimated. Because T2 mapping MRI may enable us to evaluate the cartilage part of osteophytes, we aimed to examine the association between MME and OA-related changes, including osteophytes, by using conventional and T2 mapping MRI. Patients with early-stage knee OA (n = 50) were examined. MRI-detected OA-related changes, in addition to MME, were evaluated according to the Whole-Organ Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score. T2 values of the medial meniscus and osteophytes were measured on T2 mapping images. Osteophytes surgically removed from patients with end-stage knee OA were histologically analyzed and compared with findings derived by radiography and MRI. Medial side osteophytes were detected by T2 mapping MRI in 98% of patients with early-stage knee OA, although the detection rate was 48% by conventional MRI and 40% by radiography. Among the OA-related changes, medial tibial osteophyte distance was most closely associated with MME, as determined by multiple logistic regression analysis, in the patients with early-stage knee OA (β = 0.711, p T2 values of the medial meniscus were directly correlated with MME in patients with early-stage knee OA, who showed ≥ 3 mm of MME (r = 0.58, p = 0.003). The accuracy of osteophyte evaluation by T2 mapping MRI was confirmed by histological analysis of the osteophytes removed from patients with end-stage knee OA. Our study demonstrates that medial tibial osteophyte evaluated by T2 mapping MRI is frequently observed in the patients with early-stage knee OA, showing

  14. Sequential change in T2* values of cartilage, meniscus, and subchondral bone marrow in a rat model of knee osteoarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Huei Tsai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is an emerging interest in using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI T2* measurement for the evaluation of degenerative cartilage in osteoarthritis (OA. However, relatively few studies have addressed OA-related changes in adjacent knee structures. This study used MRI T2* measurement to investigate sequential changes in knee cartilage, meniscus, and subchondral bone marrow in a rat OA model induced by anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLX. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eighteen male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly separated into three groups (n = 6 each group. Group 1 was the normal control group. Groups 2 and 3 received ACLX and sham-ACLX, respectively, of the right knee. T2* values were measured in the knee cartilage, the meniscus, and femoral subchondral bone marrow of all rats at 0, 4, 13, and 18 weeks after surgery. RESULTS: Cartilage T2* values were significantly higher at 4, 13, and 18 weeks postoperatively in rats of the ACLX group than in rats of the control and sham groups (p<0.001. In the ACLX group (compared to the sham and control groups, T2* values increased significantly first in the posterior horn of the medial meniscus at 4 weeks (p = 0.001, then in the anterior horn of the medial meniscus at 13 weeks (p<0.001, and began to increase significantly in the femoral subchondral bone marrow at 13 weeks (p = 0.043. CONCLUSION: Quantitative MR T2* measurements of OA-related tissues are feasible. Sequential change in T2* over time in cartilage, meniscus, and subchondral bone marrow were documented. This information could be potentially useful for in vivo monitoring of disease progression.

  15. Chronic medial knee pain without history of prior trauma: correlation of pain at rest and during exercise using bone scintigraphy and MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buck, Florian M.; Hoffmann, Alexander; Hofer, Bernhard; Allgayer, Bernhard; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to correlate chronic medial knee pain at rest and during exercise with bone scintigraphic uptake, bone marrow edema pattern (BMEP), cartilage lesions, meniscal tears, and collateral ligament pathologies on magnetic resonance MR imaging (MRI). Fifty consecutive patients with chronic medial knee pain seen at our institute were included in our study. Pain level at rest and during exercise was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). On MR images, BMEP volume was measured, and the integrity of femoro-tibial cartilage, medial meniscus, and medial collateral ligament (MCL) were assessed. Semiquantitative scintigraphic tracer uptake was measured. Multivariate linear regression analysis was performed. At the day of examination, 40 patients reported medial knee pain at rest, 49 when climbing stairs (at rest mean VAS 33 mm, range 0-80 mm; climbing stairs mean VAS, 60 mm, range 20-100 mm). Bone scintigraphy showed increased tracer uptake in 36 patients (uptake factor, average 3.7, range 2.4-18.0). MRI showed BMEP in 31 studies (mean volume, 4,070 mm 3 ; range, 1,200-39,200 mm 3 ). All patients with BMEP had abnormal bone scintigraphy. Ten percent of patients with pain at rest and 8% of patients with pain during exercise showed no BMEP but tracer uptake in scintigraphy. Tracer uptake and signal change around MCL predicted pain at rest significantly (tracer uptake p=0.004; MCL signal changes p=0.002). Only MCL signal changes predicted pain during exercise significantly (p=0.001). In chronic medial knee pain, increased tracer uptake in bone scintigraphy is more sensitive for medial knee pain than BMEP on MRI. Pain levels at rest and during exercise correlate with signal changes in and around the MCL. (orig.)

  16. Delaminated rotator cuff tear: extension of delamination and cuff integrity after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwak, Heui-Chul; Kim, Chang-Wan; Kim, Jung-Han; Choo, Hye-Jeung; Sagong, Seung-Yeob; Shin, John

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the extension of delamination and the cuff integrity after arthroscopic repair of delaminated rotator cuff tears. Sixty-five patients with delaminated rotator cuff tears were retrospectively reviewed. The delaminated tears were divided into full-thickness delaminated tears and partial-thickness delaminated tears. To evaluate the medial extension, we calculated the coronal size of the delaminated portion. To evaluate the posterior extension, we checked the tendon involved. Cuff integrity was evaluated by computed tomography arthrography. The mean medial extension in the full-thickness and partial-thickness delaminated tears was 18.1 ± 6.0 mm and 22.7 ± 6.3 mm, respectively (P = .0084). The posterior extension into the supraspinatus and the infraspinatus was 36.9% and 32.3%, respectively, in the full-thickness delaminated tears, and it was 27.7% and 3.1%, respectively, in the partial-thickness delaminated tears (P = .0043). With regard to cuff integrity, 35 cases of anatomic healing, 10 cases of partial healing defects, and 17 cases of retear were detected. Among the patients with retear and partial healing of the defect, all the partially healed defects showed delamination. Three retear patients showed delamination, and 14 retear patients did not show delamination; the difference was statistically significant (P = .0001). The full-thickness delaminated tears showed less medial extension and more posterior extension than the partial-thickness delaminated tears. Delamination did not develop in retear patients, but delamination was common in the patients with partially healed defects. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Loading of the knee during 3.0 T MRI is associated with significantly increased medial meniscus extrusion in mild and moderate osteoarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stehling, Christoph, E-mail: christoph.stehling@radiology.ucsf.edu [Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Group (MQIR), Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Department of Clinical Radiology, University of Muenster, Muenster (Germany); Souza, Richard B. [Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Group (MQIR), Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Graverand, Marie-Pierre Hellio Le; Wyman, Bradley T. [Pfizer Inc. New London, CT (United States); Li, Xiaojuan; Majumdar, Sharmila; Link, Thomas M. [Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Group (MQIR), Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: Standard knee MRI is performed under unloading (ULC) conditions and not much is known about changes of the meniscus, ligaments or cartilage under loading conditions (LC). The aim is to study the influence of loading of different knee structures at 3 Tesla (T) in subjects with osteoarthritis (OA) and normal controls. Materials and methods: 30 subjects, 10 healthy and 20 with radiographic evidence of OA (10 mild and 10 moderate) underwent 3 T MRI under ULC and LC at 50% body weight. All images were analyzed by two musculoskeletal radiologists identifying and grading cartilage, meniscal, ligamentous abnormalities. The changes between ULC and LC were assessed. For meniscus, cartilage and ligaments the changes of lesions, signal and shape were evaluated. In addition, for the meniscus changes in extrusion were examined. A multivariate regression model was used for correlations to correct the data for the impact of age, gender, BMI. A paired T-Test was performed to calculate the differences in meniscus extrusion. Results: Subjects with degenerative knee abnormalities demonstrated significantly increased meniscus extrusion under LC when compared to normal subjects (p = 0.0008-0.0027). Subjects with knee abnormalities and higher KL scores showed significantly more changes in lesion, signal and shape of the meniscus (80% (16/20) vs. 20% (2/10); p = 0.0025), ligaments and cartilage during LC. Conclusion: The study demonstrates that axial loading has an effect on articular cartilage, ligament, and meniscus morphology, which is more significant in subjects with degenerative disease and may serve as an additional diagnostic tool for disease diagnosis and assessing progression in subjects with knee OA.

  18. Loading of the knee during 3.0 T MRI is associated with significantly increased medial meniscus extrusion in mild and moderate osteoarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stehling, Christoph; Souza, Richard B.; Graverand, Marie-Pierre Hellio Le; Wyman, Bradley T.; Li, Xiaojuan; Majumdar, Sharmila; Link, Thomas M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Standard knee MRI is performed under unloading (ULC) conditions and not much is known about changes of the meniscus, ligaments or cartilage under loading conditions (LC). The aim is to study the influence of loading of different knee structures at 3 Tesla (T) in subjects with osteoarthritis (OA) and normal controls. Materials and methods: 30 subjects, 10 healthy and 20 with radiographic evidence of OA (10 mild and 10 moderate) underwent 3 T MRI under ULC and LC at 50% body weight. All images were analyzed by two musculoskeletal radiologists identifying and grading cartilage, meniscal, ligamentous abnormalities. The changes between ULC and LC were assessed. For meniscus, cartilage and ligaments the changes of lesions, signal and shape were evaluated. In addition, for the meniscus changes in extrusion were examined. A multivariate regression model was used for correlations to correct the data for the impact of age, gender, BMI. A paired T-Test was performed to calculate the differences in meniscus extrusion. Results: Subjects with degenerative knee abnormalities demonstrated significantly increased meniscus extrusion under LC when compared to normal subjects (p = 0.0008–0.0027). Subjects with knee abnormalities and higher KL scores showed significantly more changes in lesion, signal and shape of the meniscus (80% (16/20) vs. 20% (2/10); p = 0.0025), ligaments and cartilage during LC. Conclusion: The study demonstrates that axial loading has an effect on articular cartilage, ligament, and meniscus morphology, which is more significant in subjects with degenerative disease and may serve as an additional diagnostic tool for disease diagnosis and assessing progression in subjects with knee OA.

  19. Fatigue life of bovine meniscus under longitudinal and transverse tensile loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creechley, Jaremy J; Krentz, Madison E; Lujan, Trevor J

    2017-05-01

    The knee meniscus is composed of a fibrous extracellular matrix that is subjected to large and repeated loads. Consequently, the meniscus is frequently torn, and a potential mechanism for failure is fatigue. The objective of this study was to measure the fatigue life of bovine meniscus when applying cyclic tensile loads either longitudinal or transverse to the principal fiber direction. Fatigue experiments consisted of cyclic loads to 60%, 70%, 80% or 90% of the predicted ultimate tensile strength until failure occurred or 20,000 cycles was reached. The fatigue data in each group was fit with a Weibull distribution to generate plots of stress level vs. cycles to failure (S-N curve). Results showed that loading transverse to the principal fiber direction gave a two-fold increase in failure strain, a three-fold increase in creep, and a nearly four-fold increase in cycles to failure (not significant), compared to loading longitudinal to the principal fiber direction. The S-N curves had strong negative correlations between the stress level and the mean cycles to failure for both loading directions, where the slope of the transverse S-N curve was 11% less than the longitudinal S-N curve (longitudinal: S=108-5.9ln(N); transverse: S=112-5.2ln(N)). Collectively, these results suggest that the non-fibrillar matrix is more resistant to fatigue failure than the collagen fibers. Results from this study are relevant to understanding the etiology of atraumatic radial and horizontal meniscal tears, and can be utilized by research groups that are working to develop meniscus implants with fatigue properties that mimic healthy tissue. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography study on dynamic changes of human tears after instillation of artificial tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, Pietro Emanuele; Satta, Giovanni Maria; Coronella, Franco; Fossarello, Maurizio

    2014-07-01

    To analyze in vivo the dynamic changes induced by different artificial tears (ATs) in the precorneal tear film (PCTF) and lower tear meniscus (LTM) by using spectral-domain (SD) anterior segment optical coherence tomography (OCT). We prospectively examined 42 normal human eyes by using SD-OCT imaging. On the day before OCT imaging, all enrolled subjects were evaluated for abnormalities of ocular surface. All tear film images were obtained before and after instillation of three different types of ATs (mucomimetic, lipid-based, and saline) in five serial scans: immediately (within 30 seconds), at the first, fifth, 10th, and 20th minute. Subjects received a drop of 35 μL in one randomly selected eye. All examinations were conducted in the same conditions of temperature, brightness, humidity, and time of day. Changes in the morphological pattern of both LTM and PCTF were associated with the type of artificial tear instilled on the ocular surface. Similarly, the radius of curvature (rc), the height (h), and the depth (d) showed dynamic variations depending on treatment. Although by the 20th minute, both h and d returned to baseline values in all groups, a significant difference in rc (compared with baseline) was detected for mucomimetic ATs (P = 0.04) and lipid ATs (P = 0.02). Spectral-domain OCT imaging has preliminarily proved to be a noninvasive tool to evaluate, in real time, the different changes induced by ATs instillation. An important stride in understanding the clinical response to various tear substitutes can be achieved by this objective and quantitative approach. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  1. A Current Review of the Meniscus Imaging: Proposition of a Useful Tool for Its Radiologic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Lefevre

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this review was to present a synthesis of the current literature in order to provide a useful tool to clinician in radiologic analysis of the meniscus. All anatomical descriptions were clearly illustrated by MRI, arthroscopy, and/or drawings. The value of standard radiography is extremely limited for the assessment of meniscal injuries but may be indicated to obtain a differential diagnosis such as osteoarthritis. Ultrasound is rarely used as a diagnostic tool for meniscal pathologies and its accuracy is operator-dependent. CT arthrography with multiplanar reconstructions can detect meniscus tears that are not visible on MRI. This technique is also useful in case of MRI contraindications, in postoperative assessment of meniscal sutures and the condition of cartilage covering the articular surfaces. MRI is the most accurate and less invasive method for diagnosing meniscal lesions. MRI allows confirming and characterizing the meniscal lesion, the type, the extension, its association with a cyst, the meniscal extrusion, and assessing cartilage and subchondral bone. New 3D-MRI in three dimensions with isotropic resolution allows the creation of multiplanar reformatted images to obtain from an acquisition in one sectional plane reconstructions in other spatial planes. 3D MRI should further improve the diagnosis of meniscal tears.

  2. A Current Review of the Meniscus Imaging: Proposition of a Useful Tool for Its Radiologic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefevre, Nicolas; Naouri, Jean Francois; Herman, Serge; Gerometta, Antoine; Klouche, Shahnaz; Bohu, Yoann

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this review was to present a synthesis of the current literature in order to provide a useful tool to clinician in radiologic analysis of the meniscus. All anatomical descriptions were clearly illustrated by MRI, arthroscopy, and/or drawings. The value of standard radiography is extremely limited for the assessment of meniscal injuries but may be indicated to obtain a differential diagnosis such as osteoarthritis. Ultrasound is rarely used as a diagnostic tool for meniscal pathologies and its accuracy is operator-dependent. CT arthrography with multiplanar reconstructions can detect meniscus tears that are not visible on MRI. This technique is also useful in case of MRI contraindications, in postoperative assessment of meniscal sutures and the condition of cartilage covering the articular surfaces. MRI is the most accurate and less invasive method for diagnosing meniscal lesions. MRI allows confirming and characterizing the meniscal lesion, the type, the extension, its association with a cyst, the meniscal extrusion, and assessing cartilage and subchondral bone. New 3D-MRI in three dimensions with isotropic resolution allows the creation of multiplanar reformatted images to obtain from an acquisition in one sectional plane reconstructions in other spatial planes. 3D MRI should further improve the diagnosis of meniscal tears. PMID:27057352

  3. Contribution of regional 3D meniscus and cartilage morphometry by MRI to joint space width in fixed flexion knee radiography—A between-knee comparison in subjects with unilateral joint space narrowing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloecker, K.; Wirth, W.; Hunter, D.J.; Duryea, J.; Guermazi, A.; Kwoh, C.K.; Resch, H.; Eckstein, F.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Radiographic joint space width (JSW) is considered the reference standard for demonstrating structural therapeutic benefits in knee osteoarthritis. Our objective was to determine the proportion by which 3D (regional) meniscus and cartilage measures explain between-knee differences of JSW in the fixed flexion radiographs. Methods: Segmentation of the medial meniscus and tibial and femoral cartilage was performed in double echo steady state (DESS) images. Quantitative measures of meniscus size and position, femorotibial cartilage thickness, and radiographic JSW (minimum, and fixed locations) were compared between both knees of 60 participants of the Osteoarthritis Initiative, with strictly unilateral medial joint space narrowing (JSN). Statistical analyses (between-knee, within-person comparison) were performed using regression analysis. Results: A strong relationship with side-differences in minimum and a central fixed location JSW was observed for percent tibial plateau coverage by the meniscus (r = .59 and .47; p < .01) and central femoral cartilage thickness (r = .69 and .75; p < .01); other meniscus and cartilage measures displayed lower coefficients. The correlation of central femoral cartilage thickness with JSW (but not that of meniscus measures) was greater (r = .78 and .85; p < .01) when excluding knees with non-optimal alignment between the tibia and X-ray beam. Conclusion: 3D measures of meniscus and cartilage provide significant, independent information in explaining side-differences in radiographic JSW in fixed flexion radiographs. Tibial coverage by the meniscus and central femoral cartilage explained two thirds of the variability in minimum and fixed location JSW. JSW provides a better representation of (central) femorotibial cartilage thickness, when optimal positioning of the fixed flexion radiographs is achieved

  4. Contribution of regional 3D meniscus and cartilage morphometry by MRI to joint space width in fixed flexion knee radiography—A between-knee comparison in subjects with unilateral joint space narrowing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloecker, K., E-mail: katja.bloecker@pmu.ac.at [Institute of Anatomy and Musculoskeletal Research, Paracelsus Medical University, Strubergasse 21, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Department of Traumatology and Sports Medicine, Paracelsus Medical University, Müllner Hauptstrasse 48, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Wirth, W., E-mail: wolfgang.wirth@pmu.ac.at [Institute of Anatomy and Musculoskeletal Research, Paracelsus Medical University, Strubergasse 21, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Chondrometrics GmbH, Ulrichshöglerstrasse 23, 83404 Ainring (Germany); Hunter, D.J., E-mail: david.hunter@sydney.edu.au [Royal North Shore Hospital and Kolling Institute, University of Sydney, Pacific Highway, St Leonards, Sydney, NSW 2065 (Australia); Duryea, J., E-mail: jduryea@bwh.harvard.edu [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA (United States); Guermazi, A., E-mail: Ali.Guermazi@bmc.org [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 820 Harrison Avenue, FGH Building 3rd Floor, Boston, MA (United States); Boston Imaging Core Lab (BICL), 601 Albany Street, Boston, MA (United States); Kwoh, C.K., E-mail: kwoh@pitt.edu [Division of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Division of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, University of Pittsburgh and VA, Pittsburgh Healthcare System, 3500 Terrace Street, Biomedical Science Tower South 702, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Resch, H., E-mail: Herbert.resch@salk.at [Department of Traumatology and Sports Medicine, Paracelsus Medical University, Müllner Hauptstrasse 48, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Eckstein, F. [Institute of Anatomy and Musculoskeletal Research, Paracelsus Medical University, Strubergasse 21, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Chondrometrics GmbH, Ulrichshöglerstrasse 23, 83404 Ainring (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Background: Radiographic joint space width (JSW) is considered the reference standard for demonstrating structural therapeutic benefits in knee osteoarthritis. Our objective was to determine the proportion by which 3D (regional) meniscus and cartilage measures explain between-knee differences of JSW in the fixed flexion radiographs. Methods: Segmentation of the medial meniscus and tibial and femoral cartilage was performed in double echo steady state (DESS) images. Quantitative measures of meniscus size and position, femorotibial cartilage thickness, and radiographic JSW (minimum, and fixed locations) were compared between both knees of 60 participants of the Osteoarthritis Initiative, with strictly unilateral medial joint space narrowing (JSN). Statistical analyses (between-knee, within-person comparison) were performed using regression analysis. Results: A strong relationship with side-differences in minimum and a central fixed location JSW was observed for percent tibial plateau coverage by the meniscus (r = .59 and .47; p < .01) and central femoral cartilage thickness (r = .69 and .75; p < .01); other meniscus and cartilage measures displayed lower coefficients. The correlation of central femoral cartilage thickness with JSW (but not that of meniscus measures) was greater (r = .78 and .85; p < .01) when excluding knees with non-optimal alignment between the tibia and X-ray beam. Conclusion: 3D measures of meniscus and cartilage provide significant, independent information in explaining side-differences in radiographic JSW in fixed flexion radiographs. Tibial coverage by the meniscus and central femoral cartilage explained two thirds of the variability in minimum and fixed location JSW. JSW provides a better representation of (central) femorotibial cartilage thickness, when optimal positioning of the fixed flexion radiographs is achieved.

  5. Kinematic change of the meniscus and the tibiofemoral joint space in asymptomatic volunteers using a wide bore 3T closed MRI system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eugene; Kim, Yeo Ju; Kim, Mi Young; Cho, Soon Gu [Inha University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Choong-gu, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Jang Gyu [Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dae Hyung [Inha University Hospital, Clinical Trail Center, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ryuh Sup [Inha University Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    To evaluate kinematic changes in menisci and tibiofemoral joint spaces in extension and flexion using asymptomatic volunteers using a wide-bore 3-T closed MRI system. Twenty-two knees from asymptomatic volunteers were examined in knee extension and flexion using a 3-T MRI (sagittal 2D FSE T2-weighted sequence and sagittal 3D isotropic FSE proton density-weighted cube sequence). The meniscal positions, meniscal floating and flounce were evaluated. The widths of the medial and lateral tibiofemoral joint spaces and coronal tibiofemoral angles were measured. In the anteroposterior direction, meniscal extrusion was most frequently seen in the anterior horn of the medial menisci (100 %) in extensions (maximum 6.04 mm). Most of the menisci moved significantly to the posterior side from extension to flexion. The anteroposterior meniscal movement was the greatest for the anterior horn of the medial meniscus and least for the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. In the mediolateral direction, meniscal extrusion was seen in 52 % of the medial menisci in extensions (maximum 1.91 mm) and 29 % of lateral menisci in flexions (maximum 2.36 mm). From the extension to flexion, all medial and lateral menisci moved significantly to the lateral side. Meniscal floating was frequently observed in the posterior horn of medial menisci in extension. Meniscal flounce was frequently seen in lateral menisci in flexion with a widened lateral tibiofemoral joint space gap. The coronal tibiofemoral angle showed medial wedging in flexion, but not in extension. Wide-bore 3-T closed MRI revealed significant kinematic changes in the menisci and tibiofemoral joint spaces in asymptomatic volunteers. (orig.)

  6. MRI findings associated with development of incident knee pain over 48 months: data from the osteoarthritis initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, Gabby B.; Hou, Stephanie W.; Nardo, Lorenzo; Heilmeier, Ursula; Link, Thomas M. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Nevitt, Michael C.; McCulloch, Charles E. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2016-05-15

    The purpose of this nested case-control study was to identify baseline, incident, and progressive MRI findings visible on standard MRI clinical sequences that were associated with development of incident knee pain in subjects at risk for OA over a period of 48 months. We analyzed 60 case knees developing incident pain (WOMAC{sub pain} = 0 at baseline and WOMAC{sub pain} ≥ 5 at 48 months) and 60 control knees (WOMAC{sub pain} = 0 at baseline and WOMAC{sub pain} = 0 at 48 months) from the Osteoarthritis Initiative. 3 T knee MRIs were analyzed using a modified WORMS score (cartilage, meniscus, bone marrow) at baseline and after 48 months. Baseline and longitudinal findings were grouped into logistic regression models and compared using likelihood-ratio tests. For each model that was significant, a stepwise elimination was used to isolate significant MRI findings. One baseline MRI finding and three findings that changed from baseline to 48 months were associated with the development of pain: at baseline, the severity of a cartilage lesion in the medial tibia was associated with incident pain - (odds ratio (OR) for incident pain = 3.05; P = 0.030). Longitudinally, an incident effusion (OR = 9.78; P = 0.005), a progressive cartilage lesion of the patella (OR = 4.59; P = 0.009), and an incident medial meniscus tear (OR = 4.91; P = 0.028) were associated with the development of pain. Our results demonstrate that baseline abnormalities of the medial tibia cartilage as well as an incident joint effusion, progressive patella cartilage defects, and an incident medial meniscus tear over 48 months may be associated with incident knee pain. Clinically, this study helps identify MRI findings that are associated with the development of knee pain. (orig.)

  7. MRI findings associated with development of incident knee pain over 48 months: data from the osteoarthritis initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, Gabby B.; Hou, Stephanie W.; Nardo, Lorenzo; Heilmeier, Ursula; Link, Thomas M.; Nevitt, Michael C.; McCulloch, Charles E.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this nested case-control study was to identify baseline, incident, and progressive MRI findings visible on standard MRI clinical sequences that were associated with development of incident knee pain in subjects at risk for OA over a period of 48 months. We analyzed 60 case knees developing incident pain (WOMAC pain = 0 at baseline and WOMAC pain ≥ 5 at 48 months) and 60 control knees (WOMAC pain = 0 at baseline and WOMAC pain = 0 at 48 months) from the Osteoarthritis Initiative. 3 T knee MRIs were analyzed using a modified WORMS score (cartilage, meniscus, bone marrow) at baseline and after 48 months. Baseline and longitudinal findings were grouped into logistic regression models and compared using likelihood-ratio tests. For each model that was significant, a stepwise elimination was used to isolate significant MRI findings. One baseline MRI finding and three findings that changed from baseline to 48 months were associated with the development of pain: at baseline, the severity of a cartilage lesion in the medial tibia was associated with incident pain - (odds ratio (OR) for incident pain = 3.05; P = 0.030). Longitudinally, an incident effusion (OR = 9.78; P = 0.005), a progressive cartilage lesion of the patella (OR = 4.59; P = 0.009), and an incident medial meniscus tear (OR = 4.91; P = 0.028) were associated with the development of pain. Our results demonstrate that baseline abnormalities of the medial tibia cartilage as well as an incident joint effusion, progressive patella cartilage defects, and an incident medial meniscus tear over 48 months may be associated with incident knee pain. Clinically, this study helps identify MRI findings that are associated with the development of knee pain. (orig.)

  8. Oxidative Stress Measures of Lipid and DNA Damage in Human Tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haworth, Kristina M; Chandler, Heather L

    2017-05-01

    We evaluate feasibility and repeatability of measures for lipid peroxidation and DNA oxidation in human tears, as well as relationships between outcome variables, and compared our findings to previously reported methods of evaluation for ocular sun exposure. A total of 50 volunteers were seen for 2 visits 14 ± 2 days apart. Tear samples were collected from the inferior tear meniscus using a glass microcapillary tube. Oxidative stress biomarkers were quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA): lipid peroxidation by measurement of hexanoyl-lysine (HEL) expression; DNA oxidation by measurement of 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguinosone (8OHdG) expression. Descriptive statistics were generated. Repeatability estimates were made using Bland-Altman plots with mean differences and 95% limits of agreement were calculated. Linear regression was conducted to evaluate relationships between measures. Mean (±SD) values for tear HEL and 8OHdG expression were 17368.02 (±9878.42) nmol/L and 66.13 (±19.99) ng/mL, respectively. Repeatability was found to be acceptable for both HEL and 8OHdG expression. Univariate linear regression supported tear 8OHdG expression and spring season of collection to be predictors of higher tear HEL expression; tear HEL expression was confirmed as a predictor of higher tear 8OHdG expression. We demonstrate feasibility and repeatability of estimating previously unreported tear 8OHdG expression. Seasonal temperature variation and other factors may influence tear lipid peroxidation. Support is demonstrated to suggest lipid damage and DNA damage occur concurrently on the human ocular surface.

  9. Use of intravoxel incoherent motion diffusion-weighted imaging in identifying the vascular and avascular zones of human meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tan; Chen, Juan; Wu, Bing; Zheng, Dandan; Jiao, Sheng; Song, Yan; Chen, Min

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the hypothesis that the intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) diffusion-weighted imaging may depict microcirculation of meniscus and the perfusion changes in meniscal disorder. Fifty patients received diffusion-weighted MRI with multiple b-values ranging from 0 to 400 s/mm 2 . The four horns of the menisci were divided into normal, degenerated, and torn groups. IVIM parameters including perfusion fraction (f), pseudo-diffusion coefficient (D*), true diffusion coefficient (D), and the product of f and D* (f D*) of normal meniscal red zone and white zone were derived and compared for microcirculation changes of normal, degenerated, and torn posterior horn of the medial meniscus (PMM). The parameters between red and white zones among the groups were compared. Significant differences were considered when P meniscus and the perfusion changes in meniscal disorder. 3 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;45:1090-1096. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  10. Diagnosis and rehabilitation of gastrocnemius muscle tear: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsitem, Virginia

    2013-12-01

    This case study presents the epidemiology, etiology, diagnostic criteria, and therapeutic interventions for a common clinical condition - gastrocnemius injury. A 44-year old male presented with acute calf pain with a palpable defect, loss of range of motion, and loss of strength after sustaining a soft tissue injury to the lower leg. The differential diagnosis of tear of the medial head of the gastrocnemius was confirmed by physical examination and diagnostic ultrasound imaging. The patient was treated over a 6 week period. Initially, rehabilitation was approached using the PRICE principles for symptomatic relief, followed by stretching, strengthening, proprioception, and conditioning exercises. At 9-month follow-up post injury, there was no residual impairment in the gastrocnemius muscle function. This case demonstrates the importance of epidemiology, clinical assessment, and the use of diagnostic ultrasound and MRI imaging in the diagnosis of a tear of the medial head of the gastrocnemius muscle. With an accurate diagnosis and comprehension of classification of muscle injuries, management of gastrocnemius tears is straightforward.

  11. Intra-articular pathology associated with isolated posterior cruciate ligament injury on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ringler, Michael D.; Collins, Mark S.; Howe, B.M. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Shotts, Ezekiel E. [NEA Baptist Clinic, Jonesboro, AR (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Unlike with anterior cruciate ligament injury, little is known about the prevalence of intra-articular pathology associated with isolated posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injury in the knee. The objectives of this study were to characterize and identify the frequency of meniscal tears and osteochondral injuries in these patients, and to see if management might be affected. Altogether, 48 knee MRI exams with isolated PCL tears were evaluated for the presence of: grade and location of PCL tear, meniscal tear, articular chondral lesion, bone bruise, and fracture. Comparisons between PCL tear grade and location, as well as mechanism of injury when known, with the presence of various intra-articular pathologies, were made using the chi-square or Fisher's exact test as appropriate. In all, 69 % of isolated PCL tears occur in the midsubstance, 27 % proximally. Meniscal tears were seen in 25 % of knees, involving all segments of both menisci, except for the anterior horn medial meniscus. Altogether, 23 % had focal cartilage lesions, usually affecting the central third medial femoral condyle and medial trochlea, while 12.5 % of knees had fractures, and 48 % demonstrated bone bruises, usually involving the central to anterior tibiofemoral joint. The presence of a fracture (p = 0.0123) and proximal location of PCL tear (p = 0.0016) were both associated with the hyperextension mechanism of injury. There were no statistically significant associations between PCL tear grade and presence of intra-articular abnormality. Potentially treatable meniscal tears and osteochondral injuries are relatively prevalent, and demonstrable on MRI in patients with isolated acute PCL injury of the knee. (orig.)

  12. Smectic meniscus and dislocations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geminard, J.C.; Oswald, P.; Holyst, R.

    1998-01-01

    In ordinary liquids the size of a meniscus and its shape is set by a competition between surface tension and gravity. The thermodynamical process of its creation can be reversible. On the contrary, in smectic liquid crystals the formation of the meniscus is always an irreversible thermodynamic process since it involves the creation of dislocations (therefore it involves friction). Also the meniscus is usually small in experiments with smectics in comparison to the capillary length and therefore the gravity does not play any role in determining the meniscus shape. Here we discuss the relation between dislocations and meniscus in smectics. The theoretical predictions are supported by a recent experiment performed on freely suspended films of smectic liquid crystals. In this experiment the measurement of the meniscus radius of curvature gives the pressure difference, Δp, according to the Laplace law. From the measurements of the growth dynamics of a dislocation loop (governed by Δp) we find the line tension (∼8 x 10 -8 dyn) and the mobility of an elementary edge dislocation (∼4 x 10 - 7 cm 2 s/g). (author)

  13. A-B Hourglass Technique in Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abuhamella, Tamer M.; Batterjee, Khaled A.

    2006-01-01

    Within a period of 2 years starting from April 2000 to November 2002, fifty (50) cases of torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) were treated and followed up using our simple modified technique in a retrospective non-randomized study conducted in Saudi-German Hospital, Saudi Arabia. All of which had torn ACL either isolated or associated with meniscal tear. Some of our study group was subjected arthroscopic interference in the same knee before either in the form of ACL reconstruction using P-T-B graft or for menisectomy. During this study per-operative evaluation, intra-operative technique and post-operative follow-up were standardized, with maximum follow-up period of 19 months and minimum follow-up period of 9 month. The final outcome was graded according to Lyshom knee score (1982). The mean age at surgery was 26.5 (from 17 to 36 years). The study group included 11 isolated torn ACL, 29 torn ACL with tear in the medial meniscus, 4 torn ACL with lateral meniscus tear and 6 cases with torn ACL associated with tear in both menisci. All of the cases were treated using the same technique. (author)

  14. The MR diagnosis and clinical significance of bone contusion of knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wei; Yang Jun; Shao Kangwei; Zhu Caisong; Zhu Ying; Zhai Lulan

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate MRI in the diagnosis of the bone contusion of the knee .joint and its clinical significance. Methods: Using special coil for knee joint, coronal, sagittal, axial and oblique sagittal plane scanning with fast spin-echo sequence(T 1 WI, T 2 WI, PDWI + FS) was performed on knee joint in 205 patients in three days after injury. According the distributing bone marrow edema and injury mechanism, bone contusion were classified five types as pivot shift injury, clip injury, dashboard injury, hyperextension injury and lateral patellar dislocation. Results: One hundred and forty-five cases of the 205 patients were found bone marrow edema without fracture on X-ray films. Among them, pivot shift injury was found in 43 cases accompanied with anterior cruciate ligament rupture in 30 cases, tear of the posterior horn of the lateral or medial meniscus in 12 and tears of the medial collateral ligament in 8 cases; clip injury in 53 cases accompanied with anterior cruciate ligament rupture in 10 cases, tear of the posterior horn of the lateral or medial meniscus in 15 and tears of the medial collateral ligament in 38 cases; dashboard injury 40 cases accompanied with posterior cruciate ligament rupture in 16 cases, hyperextension injury. 9 cases accompanied with anterior cruciate ligament rupture in 2 cases, posterior cruciate ligament rupture in 3 cases. No lateral patellar dislocation was found. Forty-eight of 145 patients had undergone arthroscopy, 43 cases (89.6%) of them were in accordance with Mill diagnosis. Bone contusion were defined as geographic regions of abnormal signal intensity, that is, low signal intensity in T 1 -weighted images and high signal intensity in PD-weighted or T 2 -weigeted images with fat saturation. Conclusion: MRI can accurately display the location and area of bone contusion of the knee joint as well as its adjunctive structure injury and deduce their injury mechanism. MRI should be used routinely for knee trauma. (authors)

  15. The potential of optical coherence tomography for diagnosing meniscal pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang-Yin Ling, Carrie; Pozzi, Antonio; Thieman, Kelley M.; Tonks, Catherine A.; Guo, Shuguang; Xie, Huikai; Horodyski, MaryBeth

    2010-04-01

    Meniscal tears are often associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and may lead to pain and discomfort in humans. Maximal preservation of meniscal tissue is highly desirable to mitigate the progression of osteoarthritis. Guidelines of which meniscal tears are amenable to repair and what part of damaged tissues should be removed are elusive and lacking consensus. Images of microstructural changes in meniscus would potentially guide the surgeons to manage the meniscal tears better, but the resolution of current diagnostic techniques is limited for this application. In this study, we demonstrated the feasibility of using optical coherence tomography (OCT) for the diagnosis of meniscal pathology. Torn medial menisci were collected from dogs with ACL insufficiency. The torn meniscus was divided into three tissue samples and scanned by OCT and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). OCT and SEM images of torn menisci were compared. Each sample was evaluated for gross and microstructural abnormalities and reduction or loss of birefringence from the OCT images. The abnormalities detected with OCT were described for each type of tear. OCT holds promise in non-destructive and fast assessment of microstructural changes and tissue birefringence of meniscal tears. Future development of intraoperative OCT may help surgeons in the decision making of meniscal treatment.

  16. The potential of optical coherence tomography for diagnosing meniscal pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, Carrie Hang-Yin; Horodyski, MaryBeth; Pozzi, Antonio; Thieman, Kelley M; Tonks, Catherine A; Guo, Shuguang; Xie, Huikai

    2010-01-01

    Meniscal tears are often associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and may lead to pain and discomfort in humans. Maximal preservation of meniscal tissue is highly desirable to mitigate the progression of osteoarthritis. Guidelines of which meniscal tears are amenable to repair and what part of damaged tissues should be removed are elusive and lacking consensus. Images of microstructural changes in meniscus would potentially guide the surgeons to manage the meniscal tears better, but the resolution of current diagnostic techniques is limited for this application. In this study, we demonstrated the feasibility of using optical coherence tomography (OCT) for the diagnosis of meniscal pathology. Torn medial menisci were collected from dogs with ACL insufficiency. The torn meniscus was divided into three tissue samples and scanned by OCT and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). OCT and SEM images of torn menisci were compared. Each sample was evaluated for gross and microstructural abnormalities and reduction or loss of birefringence from the OCT images. The abnormalities detected with OCT were described for each type of tear. OCT holds promise in non-destructive and fast assessment of microstructural changes and tissue birefringence of meniscal tears. Future development of intraoperative OCT may help surgeons in the decision making of meniscal treatment

  17. Mechanobiology of the Meniscus

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNulty, Amy L.; Guilak, Farshid

    2015-01-01

    The meniscus plays a critical biomechanical role in the knee, providing load support, joint stability, and congruity. Importantly, growing evidence indicates that the mechanobiologic response of meniscal cells plays a critical role in the physiologic, pathologic, and repair responses of the meniscus. Here we review experimental and theoretical studies that have begun to directly measure the biomechanical effects of joint loading on the meniscus under physiologic and pathologic conditions, showing that the menisci are exposed to high contact stresses, resulting in a complex and nonuniform stress-strain environment within the tissue. By combining microscale measurements of the mechanical properties of meniscal cells and their pericellular and extracellular matrix regions, theoretical and experimental models indicate that the cells in the meniscus are exposed to a complex and inhomogeneous environment of stress, strain, fluid pressure, fluid flow, and a variety of physicochemical factors. Studies across a range of culture systems from isolated cells to tissues have revealed that the biological response of meniscal cells is directly influenced by physical factors, such as tension, compression, and hydrostatic pressure. In addition, these studies have provided new insights into the mechanotransduction mechanisms by which physical signals are converted into metabolic or pro/anti-inflammatory responses. Taken together, these in vivo and in vitro studies show that mechanical factors play an important role in the health, degeneration, and regeneration of the meniscus. A more thorough understanding of the mechanobiologic responses of the meniscus will hopefully lead to therapeutic approaches to prevent degeneration and enhance repair of the meniscus. PMID:25731738

  18. Analysis of the correlation between tear film changes of allergic conjunctivitis and dry eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Li

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To analyze the correlation between tear film changes of allergic conjunctivitis and dry eye, then provide clinical references for better treatment. METHODS: Fifty patients with allergic conjunctivitis were taken as the observation group, the control group was selected based on 1:1 case control theory, and we chose 50 health volunteers without ocular surface diseases, xerophthalmia and systematic diseases randomly, then fluorescein(FLstaining, break-up time(BUT, Schirner I test(SⅠt, tear meniscus high(TMHand slit-lamp examinations were performed in the two groups. RESULTS: In the observation group, FL, BUT, SIt, TMH of right eyes and left eyes were statistically significant correlated(PPPCONCLUSION: Due to inflammatory mediators participation, allergic conjunctivitis could lead to the stability changes of tear film which cause in dry eye. The stability changes of allergic conjunctivitis correlate to the damage degree of epithelium.

  19. Optical spectroscopic characterization of human meniscus biomechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ala-Myllymäki, Juho; Danso, Elvis K.; Honkanen, Juuso T. J.; Korhonen, Rami K.; Töyräs, Juha; Afara, Isaac O.

    2017-12-01

    This study investigates the capacity of optical spectroscopy in the visible (VIS) and near-infrared (NIR) spectral ranges for estimating the biomechanical properties of human meniscus. Seventy-two samples obtained from the anterior, central, and posterior locations of the medial and lateral menisci of 12 human cadaver joints were used. The samples were subjected to mechanical indentation, then traditional biomechanical parameters (equilibrium and dynamic moduli) were calculated. In addition, strain-dependent fibril network modulus and permeability strain-dependency coefficient were determined via finite-element modeling. Subsequently, absorption spectra were acquired from each location in the VIS (400 to 750 nm) and NIR (750 to 1100 nm) spectral ranges. Partial least squares regression, combined with spectral preprocessing and transformation, was then used to investigate the relationship between the biomechanical properties and spectral response. The NIR spectral region was observed to be optimal for model development (83.0%≤R2≤90.8%). The percentage error of the models are: Eeq (7.1%), Edyn (9.6%), Eɛ (8.4%), and Mk (8.9%). Thus, we conclude that optical spectroscopy in the NIR range is a potential method for rapid and nondestructive evaluation of human meniscus functional integrity and health in real time during arthroscopic surgery.

  20. A novel technique of contrast-enhanced optical coherence tomography imaging in evaluation of clearance of lipids in human tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, Pietro Emanuele; Coronella, Franco; Satta, Giovanni Maria; Fossarello, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to gather preliminary data in different conditions of healthy eyes, aqueous tear deficient dry eyes, obstructive meibomian gland disease (MGD) and non-obvious obstructive MGD (NOMGD) individuals, using a new, contrast-enhanced optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging method to evaluate the clearance of lipids in human tears. Eighty-two adult patients presenting with complaints of ocular irritation were studied for abnormalities of the ocular surface and classified as healthy (n = 21), aqueous tear deficient dry eyes (n = 20), obstructive MGD (n = 15) and NOMGD (n = 26) individuals. A lipid-based tracer, containing an oil-in-water emulsion, was used to obtain an enhanced OCT imaging of the lower tear meniscus. After instillation, a dramatic initial increase of reflectivity of the lower tear meniscus was detected by OCT, followed by a decay back to baseline values over time. Based on this finding, the clearance of lipids was measured in real-time by Fourier-domain anterior segment OCT. The differences in the clearance of lipids among the four groups as well as the correlations between symptom questionnaire score, standardized visual scale test, fluorescein break-up time, ocular surface fluorescein staining score, Schirmer I test scores were found to be statistically significant. The individual areas under the curve of the clearance of lipids calculated by the receiver operating characteristic curve technique ranged from 0.66 to 0.98, suggesting reliable sensitivity and specificity of lipid-enhanced OCT imaging. This new technique of contrast-enhanced OCT imaging of the tear film following lipid-based tracer instillation provides a measure of the clearance of lipids. The quantitative values found are in agreement with other methods of evaluation of the lacrimal system. An improvement of the clinician's ability in the diagnosis and understanding of abnormalities of the ocular surface may be achieved by this simple approach.

  1. Cell-Based Strategies for Meniscus Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Wei; Guo, Weimin; Han, Shufeng; Zhu, Yun; Liu, Shuyun; Guo, Quanyi

    2016-01-01

    Meniscus injuries remain a significant challenge due to the poor healing potential of the inner avascular zone. Following a series of studies and clinical trials, tissue engineering is considered a promising prospect for meniscus repair and regeneration. As one of the key factors in tissue engineering, cells are believed to be highly beneficial in generating bionic meniscus structures to replace injured ones in patients. Therefore, cell-based strategies for meniscus tissue engineering play a fundamental role in meniscal regeneration. According to current studies, the main cell-based strategies for meniscus tissue engineering are single cell type strategies; cell coculture strategies also were applied to meniscus tissue engineering. Likewise, on the one side, the zonal recapitulation strategies based on mimicking meniscal differing cells and internal architectures have received wide attentions. On the other side, cell self-assembling strategies without any scaffolds may be a better way to build a bionic meniscus. In this review, we primarily discuss cell seeds for meniscus tissue engineering and their application strategies. We also discuss recent advances and achievements in meniscus repair experiments that further improve our understanding of meniscus tissue engineering. PMID:27274735

  2. The Benefits of an In-Office Arthroscopy in the Diagnosis of Unresolved Knee Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garrett L. Chapman

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a patient who developed persistent knee pain with mechanical symptoms after an uncomplicated patellofemoral arthroplasty. The etiology of his knee pain remained inconclusive following magnetic resonance imaging due to metallic artifact image distortion. With the use of an in-office needle arthroscopy, an immediate and definitive diagnosis was obtained, preventing an unnecessary surgery for a diagnostic arthroscopy. We discovered a lateral meniscus tear, an anterior cruciate ligament tear, and a medial femoral condyle chondral defect for which the patient underwent arthroscopic partial meniscectomy, ligament reconstruction, and osteochondral allograft transplantation, with resolution of his knee pain.

  3. Meniscus suture repair: minimum 10-year outcomes in patients younger than 40 years compared with patients 40 and older.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steadman, J Richard; Matheny, Lauren M; Singleton, Steven B; Johnson, Nicholas S; Rodkey, William G; Crespo, Bernardo; Briggs, Karen K

    2015-09-01

    side, presence of an ACL tear, or concomitant microfracture procedure. Meniscus repair failure rate was not different in patients who were younger than 40 years versus those who were 40 years or older at time of meniscus index surgery. Patients who underwent meniscus suture repair had high function and high patient satisfaction at an average of 16 years after meniscus suture repair, and no differences were seen based on age. © 2015 The Author(s).

  4. MR imaging of delamination tears of the rotator cuff tendons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walz, Daniel M.; Chen, Steven; Miller, Theodore T.; Hofman, Josh

    2007-01-01

    The objective was to describe the imaging appearances and location of delamination tears of the rotator cuff tendons on non-contrast conventional MR imaging. This study was reviewed and approved by our Institutional Review Board. The reports of 548 consecutive MR examinations of the shoulder were reviewed, looking for mention or description of delamination tears of the rotator cuff. The images of the identified cases were then reviewed by two radiologists to confirm the findings. Correlation with surgical and arthroscopic information was then performed. Delamination tears were defined as horizontal retraction of either the bursal or articular surface of the tendon, manifest as thickening of the torn retracted edge, and/or interstitial splitting of the tendon, manifest as fluid-like high signal intensity on fat-suppressed T2-weighted oblique coronal images. Fourteen cases of delamination tears were identified in 13 patients. Ten of the cases involved the supraspinatus tendon, all with articular surface involvement. Nine of these supraspinatus cases were isolated tears and one occurred as part of a full thickness tear. All 10 of these supraspinatus cases showed medial retraction of the articular surface of the tendon, with thickening of the retracted edge, and 5 of the 10 had a demonstrable horizontal cleft in the interstitium. Four cases involved the subscapularis tendon, with articular surface disruption in three and pure interstitial delamination in one. Medial subluxation of the tendon of the long head of the biceps was present in all four cases. No delamination tears occurred on the bursal surface. Only three of the 14 shoulders underwent surgical repair with one confirmation of supraspinatus delamination, one confirmation of a subscapularis tear that had become a full thickness tear 10 months after initial imaging and another interstitial subscapularis delamination that was not identified arthroscopically. Delamination tears occur most often in the

  5. MR imaging of delamination tears of the rotator cuff tendons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walz, Daniel M.; Chen, Steven [North Shore University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Manhasset, NY (United States); Miller, Theodore T. [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Radiology and Imaging, New York, NY (United States); Hofman, Josh [Long Island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, NY (United States)

    2007-05-15

    The objective was to describe the imaging appearances and location of delamination tears of the rotator cuff tendons on non-contrast conventional MR imaging. This study was reviewed and approved by our Institutional Review Board. The reports of 548 consecutive MR examinations of the shoulder were reviewed, looking for mention or description of delamination tears of the rotator cuff. The images of the identified cases were then reviewed by two radiologists to confirm the findings. Correlation with surgical and arthroscopic information was then performed. Delamination tears were defined as horizontal retraction of either the bursal or articular surface of the tendon, manifest as thickening of the torn retracted edge, and/or interstitial splitting of the tendon, manifest as fluid-like high signal intensity on fat-suppressed T2-weighted oblique coronal images. Fourteen cases of delamination tears were identified in 13 patients. Ten of the cases involved the supraspinatus tendon, all with articular surface involvement. Nine of these supraspinatus cases were isolated tears and one occurred as part of a full thickness tear. All 10 of these supraspinatus cases showed medial retraction of the articular surface of the tendon, with thickening of the retracted edge, and 5 of the 10 had a demonstrable horizontal cleft in the interstitium. Four cases involved the subscapularis tendon, with articular surface disruption in three and pure interstitial delamination in one. Medial subluxation of the tendon of the long head of the biceps was present in all four cases. No delamination tears occurred on the bursal surface. Only three of the 14 shoulders underwent surgical repair with one confirmation of supraspinatus delamination, one confirmation of a subscapularis tear that had become a full thickness tear 10 months after initial imaging and another interstitial subscapularis delamination that was not identified arthroscopically. Delamination tears occur most often in the

  6. Cell-Based Meniscus Repair and Regeneration: At the Brink of Clinical Translation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpershoek, Jasmijn V.; de Windt, Tommy S.; Hagmeijer, Michella H.; Vonk, Lucienne A.; Saris, Daniel B. F.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Meniscus damage can be caused by trauma or degeneration and is therefore common among patients of all ages. Repair or regeneration of the menisci could be of great importance not only for pain relief or regaining function but also to prevent degenerative disease and osteoarthritis. Current treatment does not offer consistent long-term improvement. Although preclinical research focusing on augmentation of meniscal tear repair and regeneration after meniscectomy is encouraging, clinical translation remains difficult. Purpose: To systematically evaluate the literature on in vivo meniscus regeneration and explore the optimal cell sources and conditions for clinical translation. We aimed at thorough evaluation of current evidence as well as clarifying the challenges for future preclinical and clinical studies. Study Design: Systematic review. Methods: A search was conducted using the electronic databases of MEDLINE, Embase, and the Cochrane Collaboration. Search terms included meniscus, regeneration, and cell-based. Results: After screening 81 articles based on title and abstract, 51 articles on in vivo meniscus regeneration could be included; 2 additional articles were identified from the references. Repair and regeneration of the meniscus has been described by intra-articular injection of multipotent mesenchymal stromal (stem) cells from adipose tissue, bone marrow, synovium, or meniscus or the use of these cell types in combination with implantable or injectable scaffolds. The use of fibrochondrocytes, chondrocytes, and transfected myoblasts for meniscus repair and regeneration is limited to the combination with different scaffolds. The comparative in vitro and in vivo studies mentioned in this review indicate that the use of allogeneic cells is as successful as the use of autologous cells. In addition, the implantation or injection of cell-seeded scaffolds increased tissue regeneration and led to better structural organization compared with scaffold

  7. MR imaging of anterior cruciate ligament tears: is there a gender gap?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayad, Laura M.; Parellada, J.Antoni; Parker, Laurence; Schweitzer, Mark E.

    2003-01-01

    Clinically, females receive anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears more commonly than males. We explored whether gender differences exist in MR imaging patterns of ACL tears. At 1.5T, two observers evaluated MR examinations of 84 consecutive age-matched patients (42 males, 42 females, aged 16-39) with ACL tears, for mechanism of injury, extent and type of tear, the presence of secondary signs and associated osseous, meniscal and ligamentous injuries. The most common mechanism of injury for both females and males was the pivot shift mechanism (67 and 60%, respectively). Females were more commonly imaged in the acute stage of tear than males (98 and 67%, respectively, p=0.001) and more commonly possessed the typical posterolateral tibial bone contusion pattern (88 and 62%, respectively, p=0.0131). Males exhibited a deeper femoral notch sign (2.7 and 2.0 mm, p=0.007) and medial meniscal, lateral collateral ligament and posterior cruciate ligament injuries more commonly than females (48 and 24%, p=0.009, 30 and 7%, p=0.035, 17 and 0%, p=0.035). There was no significant difference between genders for the presence of other secondary signs and contusion patterns, associated lateral meniscal tears, presence of O'Donoghue's triad or associated medial collateral ligament injuries. Gender differences in MR imaging patterns of ACL tears exist: females are more commonly imaged in the acute stage and more commonly possess posterolateral tibial bone contusions; males have a more severe presentation than females, associated with more severe lateral femoral condyle and soft tissue injuries. (orig.)

  8. Meniscus Shapes in Detached Bridgman Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volz, M. P.; Mazuruk, K

    2010-01-01

    In detached Bridgman crystal growth, most of the melt is in contact with the ampoule wall, but the crystal is separated from the wall by a small gap, typically 1-100 micrometers. A liquid free surface, or meniscus, bridges across this gap at the position of the melt-crystal interface. Meniscus shapes have been calculated for the case of detached Bridgman growth in cylindrical ampoules by solving the Young-Laplace equation. Key parameters affecting meniscus shapes are the growth angle, contact angle of the meniscus to the ampoule wall, the pressure differential across the meniscus, and the Bond number, a measure of the ratio of gravitational to capillary forces. In general, for specified values of growth and contact angles, solutions exist only over a finite range of pressure differentials. For intermediate values of the Bond number, there are multiple solutions to the Young-Laplace equations. There are also cases where, as a function of pressure differential, existence intervals alternate with intervals where no solutions exist. The implications of the meniscus shape calculations on meniscus stability are discussed.

  9. Incarceration of the medial collateral ligament in the intercondylar notch following proximal avulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, Edward [Fiona Stanley Hospital, Department of Radiology, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Williams, Martin [North Bristol NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Bristol (United Kingdom); Robinson, James R. [Bristol Knee Group, Avon Orthopaedic Centre, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2017-11-15

    Intra-articular entrapment of the medial collateral ligament (MCL) is a rare but recognised complication of traumatic injury to the posteromedial corner (PMC) of the knee. Considering the MCL is the most commonly injured ligament of the knee this complication is extremely rare with only a handful of cases describing MCL entrapment following distal avulsion of the MCL. We present the first known case of MCL entrapment following proximal avulsion of the MCL and posterior oblique ligament (POL) with the mid-substance of the MCL becoming entrapped in the joint, lying on the superior surface of the medial meniscus and extending up into the intercondylar notch. In addition, the medial patellar retinaculum was also entrapped in the medial aspect of the medial patellofemoral joint. MCL entrapment is best treated with expeditious surgical intervention and it is therefore crucial that the MRI findings are not overlooked. Details of the clinical assessment, MRI and operative findings are presented with a literature review of MCL entrapment. (orig.)

  10. Incarceration of the medial collateral ligament in the intercondylar notch following proximal avulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, Edward; Williams, Martin; Robinson, James R.

    2017-01-01

    Intra-articular entrapment of the medial collateral ligament (MCL) is a rare but recognised complication of traumatic injury to the posteromedial corner (PMC) of the knee. Considering the MCL is the most commonly injured ligament of the knee this complication is extremely rare with only a handful of cases describing MCL entrapment following distal avulsion of the MCL. We present the first known case of MCL entrapment following proximal avulsion of the MCL and posterior oblique ligament (POL) with the mid-substance of the MCL becoming entrapped in the joint, lying on the superior surface of the medial meniscus and extending up into the intercondylar notch. In addition, the medial patellar retinaculum was also entrapped in the medial aspect of the medial patellofemoral joint. MCL entrapment is best treated with expeditious surgical intervention and it is therefore crucial that the MRI findings are not overlooked. Details of the clinical assessment, MRI and operative findings are presented with a literature review of MCL entrapment. (orig.)

  11. AMECM/DCB scaffold prompts successful total meniscus reconstruction in a rabbit total meniscectomy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhiguo; Liu, Shuyun; Hao, Chunxiang; Guo, Weimin; Gao, Shuang; Wang, Mingjie; Chen, Mingxue; Sun, Zhen; Xu, Yichi; Wang, Yu; Peng, Jiang; Yuan, Mei; Guo, Quan-Yi

    2016-12-01

    Tissue-engineered meniscus regeneration is a very promising treatment strategy for meniscus lesions. However, generating the scaffold presents a huge challenge for meniscus engineering as this has to meet particular biomechanical and biocompatibility requirements. In this study, we utilized acellular meniscus extracellular matrix (AMECM) and demineralized cancellous bone (DCB) to construct three different types of three-dimensional porous meniscus scaffold: AMECM, DCB, and AMECM/DCB, respectively. We tested the scaffolds' physicochemical characteristics and observed their interactions with meniscus fibrochondrocytes to evaluate their cytocompatibility. We implanted the three different types of scaffold into the medial knee menisci of New Zealand rabbits that had undergone total meniscectomy; negative control rabbits received no implants. The reconstructed menisci and corresponding femoral condyle and tibial plateau cartilage were all evaluated at 3 and 6 months (n = 8). The in vitro study demonstrated that the AMECM/DCB scaffold had the most suitable biomechanical properties, as this produced the greatest compressive and tensile strength scores. The AMECM/DCB and AMECM scaffolds facilitated fibrochondrocyte proliferation and the secretion of collagen and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) more effectively than did the DCB scaffold. The in vivo experiments demonstrated that both the AMECM/DCB and DCB groups had generated neomeniscus at both 3 and 6 months post-implantation, but there was no obvious meniscus regeneration in the AMECM or control groups, so the neomeniscus analysis could not perform on AMECM and control group. At both 3 and 6 months, histological scores were better for regenerated menisci in the AMECM/DCB than in the DCB group, and significantly better for articular cartilage in the AMECM/DCB group compared with the other three groups. Knee MRI scores (Whole-Organ Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scores (WORMS)) were better in the AMECM/DCB group than in the

  12. Stable or unstable tear of the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee: an MR diagnosis?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyck, Pieter van; Gielen, Jan L.; Parizel, Paul M. [University Hospital Antwerp and University of Antwerp, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium); Vanhoenacker, Filip M. [University Hospital Antwerp and University of Antwerp, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium); AZ St-Maarten Duffel/Mechelen, Department of Radiology, Duffel (Belgium); Wouters, Kristien [University Hospital Antwerp and University of Antwerp, Department of Scientific Coordination and Biostatistics, Edegem (Belgium); Dossche, Lieven [University Hospital Antwerp and University of Antwerp, Department of Orthopedics, Edegem (Belgium)

    2012-03-15

    To determine the usefulness of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to distinguish stable from unstable tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of the knee. MR images of 97 patients with surgically confirmed ACL tear were retrospectively reviewed. According to arthroscopic and clinical examination, these patients had 36 stable and 61 unstable (9 partial and 52 complete) ACL tears. MR images were interpreted by two blinded reviewers and scored with respect to previously reported primary and secondary MR signs of ACL injury. Based on a comprehensive assessment of all the MR findings, ACLs were categorized as being stable or unstable. MR accuracy was calculated considering only primary MR signs and considering both primary and secondary MR signs of ACL injury, separately. Accuracy of each individual primary and secondary MR sign was calculated. Considering only primary MR signs, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of MR were 77, 92, and 82%, respectively. Considering both primary and secondary MR signs, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of MR were 59, 81, and 67%, respectively. Of all MR signs, discontinuity and abnormal orientation had highest test accuracy (79 and 87%, respectively). Anterior tibial translation, uncovering of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus, and hyperbuckled PCL were only seen in unstable ACLs (specificity 100%), but these secondary findings had low sensitivity (23%). Bone contusion around the lateral knee compartment was seen in both unstable and stable ACLs (accuracy 64%). Previously reported MR imaging signs do not allow accurate distinction between clinically stable and unstable ACL injuries. Anterior tibial translation, uncovering of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus, and hyperbuckled PCL, if present, are helpful signs in the diagnosis of an unstable tear. The presence of bone marrow edema around the lateral knee compartment is not predictive of ACL insufficiency. (orig.)

  13. Building an Anisotropic Meniscus with Zonal Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashioka, Michael M.; Chen, Justin A.; Hu, Jerry C.

    2014-01-01

    Toward addressing the difficult problems of knee meniscus regeneration, a self-assembling process has been used to re-create the native morphology and matrix properties. A significant problem in such attempts is the recapitulation of the distinct zones of the meniscus, the inner, more cartilaginous and the outer, more fibrocartilaginous zones. In this study, an anisotropic and zonally variant meniscus was produced by self-assembly of the inner meniscus (100% chondrocytes) followed by cell seeding the outer meniscus (coculture of chondrocytes and meniscus cells). After 4 weeks in culture, the engineered, inner meniscus exhibited a 42% increase in both instantaneous and relaxation moduli and a 62% increase in GAG/DW, as compared to the outer meniscus. In contrast, the circumferential tensile modulus and collagen/DW of the outer zone was 101% and 129% higher, respectively, than the values measured for the inner zone. Furthermore, there was no difference in the radial tensile modulus between the control and zonal engineered menisci, suggesting that the inner and outer zones of the engineered zonal menisci successfully integrated. These data demonstrate that not only can biomechanical and biochemical properties be engineered to differ by the zone, but they can also recapitulate the anisotropic behavior of the knee meniscus. PMID:23931258

  14. Kissing contusion between the posterolateral tibial plateau and lateral femoral condyle: associated ligament and meniscal tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Hyun Pyo; Lee, Jae Gue; Park, Ji Seon; Ryu, Kyung Nam

    2004-01-01

    Kissing contusion between the posterolateral tibial plateau and lateral femoral condyle is frequently found in association with a tear of the anterior cruciate liagment (ACL). The purpose of this study was to determine which ligamentous and meniscal tears are associated with kissing contusion. We retrospectively reviewed the findings depicted by 323 consecutive MR images of the knee and confirmed at arthroscopy. For the diagnosis of disruption, ligaments, medial menisci (MM) and lateral menisci (LM) were evaluated using accepted criteria. We compared the prevalence and location of meniscal and ligamentous tears between group I (44 knees with kissing contusion) and group II (279 knees without kissing contusion). For statistical analysis the chi-square test was used. ACLs were torn in all 44 knees (100%) with kissing contusion, and 78 (28%) of 279 without kissing contusion. There were ten medial collateral ligament (MCL) tears (23%) in group I, and 17 MCL tears (6%), five lateral collateral ligament (LCL) tears (2%) and ten posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) tears (4%) in group II. In group I, meniscal tears were found in 22 MM (50%) and in 19 LM (43%), while in group II, they occurred in 128 MM (46%) and 128 LM (46%), In group I, 17 (77%) of 22 MM tears and 13 (68%) of 19 LM tears were located in the posterior horn, while in group II, the corresponding figures were 97/128 (76%) and 60 of 128 (47%). The differing prevalence of ACL and MCL tears between the groups was statistically significant (p 0.05). Although kissing contusion was a highly specific sign of ACL tears, its presence was also significant among MCL tears. There was no significant difference in meniscal tears with or without kissing contusion

  15. MR imaging of the combined anterior and posterior cruciate ligament tears: focussing on the ratterns of injuries and associated findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Seon Young; Choi, Chang Lak; Park, Dal Soo; Park, Eun Hee; Lee, Sang Ho; Song, Mun Kab; Lee, Kwang Won; Kwon, Soon Tae

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the patterns of injuries and frequency of associated findings on MR imaging in patients with both anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL)tears;to compare the associated findings, as seen on MR imaging, in cases with both ACL and PCL tears with those with ACL or PCL tears. Ten patients with compbined ACL and PCL tears, 16 with ACL tears and 18 with PCL tears, all confirmed by arthroscopy or open surgery, were involved in this study. To identify the associated knee injuries, MR images were retrospectively evaluated. In ten patients with combined ACL and PCL tears, open surgery led to the identification of six complete ACL tears (60%), four partial ACL tears (40%), eitht complete PCL tears (80%) and two partial PCL tears (20%). Injuries associated with these combined tears, and revealed by MR imaging, comprised six medial collateral ligament injuries (60%), six lateral collateral ligament jnjuries (60%), five medial meniscal injuries (50%), three lateral meniscal injuries (30%), nine bony injuries (90%), two posterior capsular injuries (20%), and three popliteus muscle injuries (30%). The frequency of popliteus muscle injury was significantly different (p<0.05, Fisher's exact test) between the group with both ACL and PCL tears and that with ACL or PCL tears. Associated findings in patients with combined ACL and PCL tears are more frequent than in those with ACL or PCL tears. In cases involving combined ACL and PCL tears, associated findings-as seen on MR images-should thus be carefully examined

  16. Fat transposition with a single subdermal stitch for the treatment of deep tear trough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medel, Ramón; Hristodulopulos, Vanessa; Vásquez, LuzMaría

    2014-12-01

    To describe a fixation technique of the medial and central fat pads in the subperiosteal pocket for transconjunctival fat transposition, using a single subdermal, non-removable, non-absorbable stitch. Retrospective study of 19 patients with bilateral deep tear through treated by means of transconjunctival fat transposition. Charts and photographic records were reviewed. Photographical and clinical improvement of the deep tear through and fat prolapse was observed in all patients in variable degrees. There were no intraoperative complications. Significant periocular hematoma occurred in 1 patient and solved without complications. Two patients presented transitory fat pedicle hardening and one patient presented a conjunctival inferior fornix granuloma, surgically removed. All patients were satisfied. Transconjunctival subperiosteal fat transposition with single subdermal stitch to fix the medial and central fat pads, for the treatment of deep tear trough and fat prolapse demonstrated high patient satisfaction, good aesthetic results with no significant or permanent complications.

  17. Three percent diquafosol ophthalmic solution as an additional therapy to existing artificial tears with steroids for dry-eye patients with Sjögren's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoi, N; Sonomura, Y; Kato, H; Komuro, A; Kinoshita, S

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the long-term results of 3% diquafosol ophthalmic solution as an alternative therapy to existing ophthalmic solutions, including topical immunosuppression, for the treatment of dry eye in patients with Sjögren's syndrome. This study involved 14 female dry-eye patients (mean age: 62.4 years) with Sjögren's syndrome who insufficiently responded to their current therapy. In all patients, 3% diquafosol ophthalmic solution was administered six times daily for 12 months in substitution for artificial tears and sodium hyaluronate ophthalmic solution. Their use of corticosteroid eye drops remained unchanged from that prior to the treatment with diquafosol sodium. The subjective symptoms assessed, and ocular signs including tear meniscus radius and the tear film breakup time, and ocular-surface epithelial damage score were examined at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, and 12 months after initiating treatment. Among the subjective symptoms, significant improvement was obtained in dryness at 2 months post treatment, in eye fatigue at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 12 months post treatment, and in pain at 1, 2, 6, and 12 months post treatment. Difficulty in opening the eye, foreign body sensation, and redness were also significantly ameliorated at various time-points. The tear meniscus radius and the tear film breakup time were significantly improved throughout the observation period, and the corneal epithelial staining scores were significantly decreased at 3 months post treatment. In dry-eye patients with Sjögren's syndrome, treatment with 3% diquafosol ophthalmic solution improved both symptoms and signs, and that effectiveness was maintained for 12 months.

  18. Morphology of large rotator cuff tears and of the rotator cable and long-term shoulder disability in conservatively treated elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morag, Yoav; Jamadar, David A; Miller, Bruce; Brandon, Catherine; Gandikota, Girish; Jacobson, Jon A

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the morphology of the rotator cuff tendon tears and long-term shoulder disability in conservatively treated elderly patients and determine if an association exists between these factors. Assessment of the rotator cuff tendon tear dimensions and depth, rotator interval involvement, rotator cable morphology and location, and rotator cuff muscle status was carried out on magnetic resonance studies of 24 elderly patients treated nonoperatively for rotator cuff tendon tears. Long-term shoulder function was measured using the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff (WORC) index; Disabilities of the Shoulder, Arm, and Hand questionnaire; and the American Shoulder Elbow Self-assessment form, and a correlation between the outcome scores and morphologic magnetic resonance findings was carried out. The majority of large rotator cuff tendon tears are limited to the rotator cuff crescent. Medial rotator interval involvement (isolated or in association with lateral rotator interval involvement) was significantly associated with WORC physical symptoms total (P = 0.01), WORC lifestyle total (P = 0.04), percentage of all WORC domains (P = 0.03), and American Shoulder Elbow Self-assessment total (P = 0.01), with medial rotator interval involvement associated with an inferior outcome. Medial rotator interval tears are associated with long-term inferior outcome scores in conservatively treated elderly patients with large rotator cuff tendon tears.

  19. Can the optimum artificial tear treatment for dry eye disease be predicted from presenting signs and symptoms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essa, Laika; Laughton, Deborah; Wolffsohn, James S

    2018-02-01

    To assess dry eye treatment with four preservative-free dry eye artificial tear treatments to facilitate evidence-based prescribing. A randomised, single masked crossover trial of Clinitas Soothe, Hyabak, Tears Again and TheraTears artificial tears was conducted on 50 symptomatic dry eye patients, aged 60.8±14.2years. At baseline and after trialling each treatment for 4 weeks, signs and symptoms were assessed using the Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI), non-invasive tear break-up time, fluorescein tear break-up time, tear meniscus height (TMH), Phenol Red test, lid-parallel conjunctival folds (LIPCOF), ocular surface staining, and lipid layer grading and osmolarity (baseline visit only). OSDI (p=0.002), LIPCOF (p=0.014) and conjunctival staining (pdry eye treatment on ocular symptoms and signs was similar. Clinitas Soothe and Hyabak were preferred by 34%/30% of participants, but only subjective comparison with the other drops influenced this choice. TheraTears was preferred (by 24%) by those with a lower baseline tear volume (p=0.01) and Tears Again (by 12%) by those with a thinner baseline lipid layer (p=0.04). The treatment that afforded the greatest improvement in clinical signs did not consistently match each individual's preferred treatment. If prescribed to a general dry eye population, the artificial tears performed similarly, improving symptoms and conjunctival signs. However, osmolarity balanced artificial tears were the preferred treatment in individuals with low baseline tear volume and lipisomal spray for individuals with a baseline lipid layer deficiency. Copyright © 2017 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of the meniscus (dGEMRIM) in patients with knee osteoarthritis: relation with meniscal degeneration on conventional MRI, reproducibility, and correlation with dGEMRIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiel, Jasper van; Kotek, Gyula; Krestin, Gabriel P.; Oei, Edwin H.G.; Reijman, Max; Bos, Pieter K.; Verhaar, Jan A.N.; Bron, Esther E.; Klein, Stefan; Weinans, Harrie

    2014-01-01

    To assess (1) whether normal and degenerated menisci exhibit different T1 GD on delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of the meniscus (dGEMRIM), (2) the reproducibility of dGEMRIM and (3) the correlation between meniscus and cartilage T1 GD in knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients. In 17 OA patients who underwent dGEMRIM twice within 7 days, meniscus and cartilage T1 GD was calculated. Meniscus pathology was evaluated on conventional MRI. T1 GD in normal and degenerated menisci were compared using a Student's t-test. Reproducibility was assessed using ICCs. Pearson's correlation was calculated between meniscus and cartilage T1 GD . A trend towards lower T1 GD in degenerated menisci (mean: 402 ms; 95 % CI: 359-444 ms) compared to normal menisci (mean: 448 ms; 95 % CI: 423-473 ms) was observed (p = 0.05). Meniscus T1 GD ICCs were 0.85-0.90. The correlation between meniscus and cartilage T1 GD was moderate in the lateral (r = 0.52-0.75) and strong in the medial compartment (r = 0.78-0.94). Our results show that degenerated menisci have a clear trend towards lower T1 GD compared to normal menisci. Since these results are highly reproducible, meniscus degeneration may be assessed within one delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI simultaneously with cartilage. The strong correlation between meniscus and cartilage T1 GD suggests concomitant degeneration in both tissues in OA, but also suggests that dGEMRIC may not be regarded entirely as sulphated glycosaminoglycan specific. (orig.)

  1. Role of MRI in predicting meniscal tear reparability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felisaz, Paolo Florent [Universita degli Studi di Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Istituto di Radiologia, Pavia (Italy); Alessandrino, Francesco; Perelli, Simone [Universita degli Studi di Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Zanon, Giacomo; Benazzo, Francesco [Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Clinica Ortopedica e Traumatologica, Pavia (Italy); Calliada, Fabrizio; Sammarchi, Luigi [Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo Radiologia, Diagnostica per Immagini-Istituto di Radiologia, Pavia (Italy)

    2017-10-15

    To elucidate the role of MRI in predicting meniscal tear reparability according to tear type and location in relation to vascular zones. In this retrospective study, two readers evaluated 79 pre-surgical MRIs of meniscal tears arthroscopically treated with meniscectomy or meniscal repair. Tears were classified according to type into vertical, horizontal, radial, complex, flaps and bucket handle and were considered reparable if the distance measured from the tear to the menisco-capsular junction was less than or equal to 5 mm. Predictions were compared with the surgical procedure performed in arthroscopy. We assessed the diagnostic performance of MRI, agreement between MRI and arthroscopy, and interrater agreement. Then, we conducted an ROC analysis on the distances measured by the first reader and built a multivariate logistic regression model. MRI had a sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy, respectively, of 85%, 79%, 86%, 76% and 83% in predicting meniscal tear reparability. Correct predictions for the specific tear pattern were 76% for vertical, 84% for horizontal, 88% for radial, 86% for complex, 84% for flaps and 86% for bucket handle. Agreement between the two readers' predictions and arthroscopy was good (k = 0.65 and 0.61, respectively). Inter-rater agreement was almost excellent (k = 0.79). The ROC analysis revealed sensitivity and specificity of 73% and 83% with a cutoff value of <4 mm (p < 0.001). Anterior cruciate ligament injury and medial meniscal tear increased the likelihood of meniscal tear reparability. MRI can be a reliable and accurate tool to predict the reparability of meniscal tears, with higher prediction rates for bucket-handle tears. (orig.)

  2. The concentration, gene expression, and spatial distribution of aggrecan in canine articular cartilage, meniscus, and anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments: a new molecular distinction between hyaline cartilage and fibrocartilage in the knee joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiyaveettil, Manojkumar; Mort, John S; McDevitt, Cahir A

    2005-01-01

    The concentration, spatial distribution, and gene expression of aggrecan in meniscus, articular cartilage, and the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments (ACL and PCL) was determined in the knee joints of five mature dogs. An anti-serum against peptide sequences specific to the G1 domain of aggrecan was employed in competitive-inhibition ELISA of guanidine HCl extracts and immunofluorescence microscopy. Gene expression was determined by Taqman real-time PCR. The concentration of aggrecan in articular cartilage (240.1 +/- 32 nMol/g dry weight) was higher than that in meniscus (medial meniscus: 33.4 +/- 4.3 nMol/g) and ligaments (ACL: 6.8 +/- 0.9 nMol/g). Aggrecan was more concentrated in the inner than the outer zone of the meniscus. Aggrecan in meniscus showed an organized, spatial network, in contrast to its diffuse distribution in articular cartilage. Thus, differences in the concentration, gene expression, and spatial distribution of aggrecan constitute another molecular distinction between hyaline cartilage and fibrocartilage of the knee.

  3. An in vitro study of cartilage-meniscus tribology to understand the changes caused by a meniscus implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majd, Sara Ehsani; Rizqy, Aditya Iman; Kaper, Hans J; Schmidt, Tannin A; Kuijer, Roel; Sharma, Prashant K

    2017-07-01

    Active lifestyles increase the risk of meniscal injury. A permanent meniscus implant of polycarbonate urethane (PCU) is a promising treatment to postpone/prevent total knee arthroplasty. Study of the changes in articular cartilage tribology in the presence of PCU is essential in developing the optimum meniscus implant. Therefore, a cartilage-meniscus reciprocating, sliding model was developed in vitro, mimicking the stance and swing phases of the gait cycle. The meniscus was further replaced with PCU and surface-modified PCUs (with C18 chains, mono-functional polydimethylsiloxane groups and mono-functional polytetrafluoroethylene groups) to study the changes. The coefficient of friction (COF) was calculated, and cartilage wear was determined and quantified histologically. The cartilage-meniscus sliding resulted in low COF during both stance and swing (0.01tribological performance. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Bone signal abnormality, as seen on knee joint MRI : relationship between its location and associated injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Nam; Kim, Baek Hyun; Jung, Hoe Seok; Na, Eui Sung; Seol, Hye Young; Cha, In Ho; Lim, Hong Chul

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the relationship between the location of bone signal abnormality and associated injury, as seen on MR, in patients with acute knee joint injury. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six patients with acute knee injury and bone signal abnormalities on MR were included in this study. The femur and tibia were each divided into six compartments, namely the anteromedial, medial, posteromedial,anterolateral, lateral, and posterolateral ; these were obtained in each knee joint. We evaluated the location of bone signal abnormality and the corresponding arthroscopic or operative findings of injury to ligaments and menisci. Cases with signal abnormalities involving more than three compartments were excluded. Results : Bone signal abnormalities were demonstrated in 51 compartments. Most(84%, 43/51) were noted in the lateral half of the knee joint, the most common location being the tibio- posterolateral compartment(13/51). The femoro-lateral(11/51) and tibio- anterolateral compartment(8/51) were the next most common locations. All cases(13/13)with bone signal abnormality in the tibio- posterolateral compartment had tears at the anterior cruciate ligament,while 9 of 11 cases(81%) with abnormality in the femoro- lateral compartment had tears at the anterior cruciate ligament. Six of eight cases(75%) with signal abnormality in the tibio- anterolateral compartment had tears at the posterior cruciate ligament ; 31 of 43 cases (72%) with abnormality in the lateral half of the knee joint had tears at the medial collateral ligament. Six of eight cases(75%) with signal abnormality in the medial half of the knee joint had tears at the medial meniscus, but no lateral meniscal tear was found. Among patients with signal abnormality in the lateral half of the knee joint, the tear was lateral meniscal in nine of 43 cases(21%) and medial meniscal in six of 43(14%). Conclusion : The location of bone signal abnormality, as seen on knee MR, inpatients with

  5. In vivo transport of Gd-DTPA2- into human meniscus and cartilage assessed with delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Impaired stability is a risk factor in knee osteoarthritis (OA), where the whole joint and not only the joint cartilage is affected. The meniscus provides joint stability and is involved in the early pathological progress of OA. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) has been used to identify pre-radiographic changes in the cartilage in OA, but has been used less commonly to examine the meniscus, and then using only a double dose of the contrast agent. The purpose of this study was to enable improved early OA diagnosis by investigate the temporal contrast agent distribution in the meniscus and femoral cartilage simultaneously, in healthy volunteers, using 3D dGEMRIC at two different doses of the contrast agent Gd-DTPA2-. Methods The right knee in 12 asymptomatic volunteers was examined using a 3D Look-Locker sequence on two occasions after an intravenous injection of a double or triple dose of Gd-DTPA2- (0.2 or 0.3 mmol/kg body weight). The relaxation time (T1) and relaxation rate (R1 = 1/T1) were measured in the meniscus and femoral cartilage before, and 60, 90, 120 and 180 minutes after injection, and the change in relaxation rate (ΔR1) was calculated. Paired t-test and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) were used for statistical evaluation. Results The triple dose yielded higher concentrations of Gd-DTPA2- in the meniscus and cartilage than the double dose, but provided no additional information. The observed patterns of ΔR1 were similar for double and triple doses of the contrast agent. ΔR1 was higher in the meniscus than in femoral cartilage in the corresponding compartments at all time points after injection. ΔR1 increased until 90-180 minutes in both the cartilage and the meniscus (p meniscus at all time points (p meniscus, than in the avascular central part of the posterior medial meniscus during the first 60 minutes (p meniscus and cartilage simultaneously using dGEMRIC, preferably 90 minutes after the injection of a

  6. Bucket-handle meniscal tears of the knee: sensitivity and specificity of MRI signs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorsay, Theodore A.; Helms, Clyde A.

    2003-01-01

    To determine the sensitivity and specificity of reported MRI signs in the evaluation of bucket-handle tears of the knee.Design and patients A retrospective analysis of 71 knee MR examinations that were read as displaying evidence of a bucket-handle or ''bucket-handle type'' tear was performed. We evaluated for the presence or absence of the absent bow tie sign, the coronal truncation sign, the double posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) sign, the anterior flipped fragment sign, and a fragment displaced into the intercondylar notch. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated relative to the gold standard of arthroscopy. Forty-three of 71 cases were surgically proven as bucket-handle tears. The absent bow tie sign demonstrated a sensitivity of 88.4%. The presence of at least one of the displaced fragment signs had a sensitivity of 90.7%. A finding of both the absent bow tie sign and one of the displaced fragment signs demonstrated a specificity of 85.7%. The double PCL sign demonstrated a specificity of 100%. The anterior flipped meniscus sign had a specificity of 89.7%. Bucket-handle tears of the menisci, reported in about 10% of most large series, have been described by several signs with MRI. This report gives the sensitivity and specificity of MRI for bucket-handle tears using each of these signs independently and in combination. MRI is shown to be very accurate for diagnosing bucket-handle tears when two or more of these signs coexist. (orig.)

  7. Randomized Controlled Study to Investigate the Effect of Topical Diquafosol Tetrasodium on Corneal Sensitivity in Short Tear Break-Up Time Dry Eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaido, Minako; Kawashima, Motoko; Shigeno, Yuta; Yamada, Yoshiaki; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2018-05-01

    Complex mechanisms underlie dry eye (DE) symptom provocation. In particular, corneal hypersensitivity may provoke symptoms in short tear break-up time (BUT) DE characterized by tear film instability. We hypothesized that improved tear film stability may alleviate corneal sensitivity in patients with short tear BUT DE. Therefore, we investigated the effect of topical diquafosol tetrasodium (DQS) on corneal sensitivity in unstable tear film DE. This prospective, randomized study included 27 subjects (age: 39.1 ± 8.4 years; range: 25-59 years) with short tear BUT DE, defined based on the presence of DE symptoms and tear film instability. Subjects were randomly divided into DQS (3% DQS, 12 subjects) and artificial tear (AT; preservative-free AT, 15 subjects) groups. Subjects applied the medication 6 times a day for 5 weeks. The perception of touch (S-touch) and pain (S-pain) sensitivity was measured using a Cochet-Bonnet esthesiometer. Tear evaluation, corneal sensitivity, and DE symptoms were compared before and after DQS or AT administration. The correlation between the improvement degrees of corneal sensitivity and DE symptoms following medication was analyzed. DQS significantly improved tear BUT and tear meniscus height (TMH) scores (p short tear BUT DE. However, DQS seems to be more effective to adjust tear environment, leading to the normalization of corneal sensitivity and DE symptoms. UMIN Clinical Trials Registry Identifier, UMIN000014536.

  8. Age-dependent Changes in the Articular Cartilage and Subchondral Bone of C57BL/6 Mice after Surgical Destabilization of Medial Meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Henry; Skelly, Jordan D; Ayers, David C; Song, Jie

    2017-02-09

    Age is the primary risk factor for osteoarthritis (OA), yet surgical OA mouse models such as destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) used for evaluating disease-modifying OA targets are frequently performed on young adult mice only. This study investigates how age affects cartilage and subchondral bone changes in mouse joints following DMM. DMM was performed on male C57BL/6 mice at 4 months (4 M), 12 months (12 M) and 19+ months (19 M+) and on females at 12 M and 18 M+. Two months after surgery, operated and unoperated contralateral knees were harvested and evaluated using cartilage histology scores and μCT quantification of subchondral bone plate thickness and osteophyte formation. The 12 M and 19 M+ male mice developed more cartilage erosions and thicker subchondral bone plates after DMM than 4 M males. The size of osteophytes trended up with age, while the bone volume fraction was significantly higher in the 19 M+ group. Furthermore, 12 M females developed milder OA than males as indicated by less cartilage degradation, less subchondral bone plate sclerosis and smaller osteophytes. Our results reveal distinct age/gender-dependent structural changes in joint cartilage and subchondral bone post-DMM, facilitating more thoughtful selection of murine age/gender when using this surgical technique for translational OA research.

  9. Age-dependent Changes in the Articular Cartilage and Subchondral Bone of C57BL/6 Mice after Surgical Destabilization of Medial Meniscus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Henry; Skelly, Jordan D.; Ayers, David C.; Song, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Age is the primary risk factor for osteoarthritis (OA), yet surgical OA mouse models such as destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) used for evaluating disease-modifying OA targets are frequently performed on young adult mice only. This study investigates how age affects cartilage and subchondral bone changes in mouse joints following DMM. DMM was performed on male C57BL/6 mice at 4 months (4 M), 12 months (12 M) and 19+ months (19 M+) and on females at 12 M and 18 M+. Two months after surgery, operated and unoperated contralateral knees were harvested and evaluated using cartilage histology scores and μCT quantification of subchondral bone plate thickness and osteophyte formation. The 12 M and 19 M+ male mice developed more cartilage erosions and thicker subchondral bone plates after DMM than 4 M males. The size of osteophytes trended up with age, while the bone volume fraction was significantly higher in the 19 M+ group. Furthermore, 12 M females developed milder OA than males as indicated by less cartilage degradation, less subchondral bone plate sclerosis and smaller osteophytes. Our results reveal distinct age/gender-dependent structural changes in joint cartilage and subchondral bone post-DMM, facilitating more thoughtful selection of murine age/gender when using this surgical technique for translational OA research. PMID:28181577

  10. Meniscus Membranes For Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Robert C.; Jorgensen, Betty; Pesiri, David R.

    2005-09-20

    Gas separation membranes, especially meniscus-shaped membranes for gas separations are disclosed together with the use of such meniscus-shaped membranes for applications such as thermal gas valves, pre-concentration of a gas stream, and selective pre-screening of a gas stream. In addition, a rapid screening system for simultaneously screening polymer materials for effectiveness in gas separation is provided.

  11. Meniscus membranes for separations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Robert C [Irvine, CA; Jorgensen, Betty [Jemez Springs, NM; Pesiri, David R [Aliso Viejo, CA

    2004-01-27

    Gas separation membranes, especially meniscus-shaped membranes for gas separations are disclosed together with the use of such meniscus-shaped membranes for applications such as thermal gas valves, pre-concentration of a gas stream, and selective pre-screening of a gas stream. In addition, a rapid screening system for simultaneously screening polymer materials for effectiveness in gas separation is provided.

  12. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of the meniscus (dGEMRIM) in patients with knee osteoarthritis: relation with meniscal degeneration on conventional MRI, reproducibility, and correlation with dGEMRIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiel, Jasper van [University Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Erasmus MC, P.O. Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Kotek, Gyula; Krestin, Gabriel P.; Oei, Edwin H.G. [University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Erasmus MC, P.O. Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Reijman, Max; Bos, Pieter K.; Verhaar, Jan A.N. [University Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Bron, Esther E.; Klein, Stefan [University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Erasmus MC, P.O. Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); University Medical Center, Department of Medical Informatics, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Weinans, Harrie [University Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Delft University of Technology, Department of Biomechanical Engineering, Delft (Netherlands); University Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Utrecht (Netherlands); University Medical Center, Department of Rheumatology, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2014-09-15

    To assess (1) whether normal and degenerated menisci exhibit different T1{sub GD} on delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of the meniscus (dGEMRIM), (2) the reproducibility of dGEMRIM and (3) the correlation between meniscus and cartilage T1{sub GD} in knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients. In 17 OA patients who underwent dGEMRIM twice within 7 days, meniscus and cartilage T1{sub GD} was calculated. Meniscus pathology was evaluated on conventional MRI. T1{sub GD} in normal and degenerated menisci were compared using a Student's t-test. Reproducibility was assessed using ICCs. Pearson's correlation was calculated between meniscus and cartilage T1{sub GD}. A trend towards lower T1{sub GD} in degenerated menisci (mean: 402 ms; 95 % CI: 359-444 ms) compared to normal menisci (mean: 448 ms; 95 % CI: 423-473 ms) was observed (p = 0.05). Meniscus T1{sub GD} ICCs were 0.85-0.90. The correlation between meniscus and cartilage T1{sub GD} was moderate in the lateral (r = 0.52-0.75) and strong in the medial compartment (r = 0.78-0.94). Our results show that degenerated menisci have a clear trend towards lower T1{sub GD} compared to normal menisci. Since these results are highly reproducible, meniscus degeneration may be assessed within one delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI simultaneously with cartilage. The strong correlation between meniscus and cartilage T1{sub GD} suggests concomitant degeneration in both tissues in OA, but also suggests that dGEMRIC may not be regarded entirely as sulphated glycosaminoglycan specific. (orig.)

  13. Effectiveness and comfort of Oculus Keratograph on tear film function test before corneal refractive surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To explore correlation, consistency and comfort between traditional tear film examination methods and Oculus Keratograph. METHODS: A retrospective study. Totally 101 cases(101 eyeswere diagnosed myopia and then accepted LASEK(laser epithelial keratomileusis. Non-invasive tear film break-up time(NIBUT, lower tear meniscus height(LTMHwere measured with Oculus Keratograph, fluorescein tear film break-up time(fl-BUTand Schimer Ⅰ test(SⅠtwere performed on all cases. The correlations analysis between NIBUT and fl-BUT, LTMH and SⅠt were performed by Spearman rank correlation, consistency check between NIBUT and fl-BUT by Bland-Altman analysis. Visual analogue scale(VASwas applied on evaluating the comfort of two kinds of examination methods. RESULTS: LTMH and SⅠt showed positive correlation(rs=0.346, P=0.001. NIBUT and fl-BUT showed positive correlation(rs=0.393, P=0.001, 95% consistency limits range -9.62 to 14.18 in Bland-Altman Figure. There was significant difference between VAS of NIBUT and VAS of fl-BUT(z=-2.324, P=0.020. There was significant difference between VAS of LTMH and VAS of SⅠt(z=-8.845,P=0.001.CONCLUSION: Oculus Keratograph can objectively measure NIBUT and LTMH, and was more comfortable than traditional tear film examination methods. It can effectively assess tear film function before corneal refractive surgery.

  14. Radiologic Study of Meniscus Perforations in the Temporomandibular Joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kee Duck; Park, Chang Seo

    1990-01-01

    Thirty-nine patients (forty-four joints) who had been diagnosed as having meniscus perforation of the temporomandibular joint by inferior joint space arthrography and had been treated by surgical procedures were evaluated retrospectively. Information of clinical findings, arthrotomographic findings and surgical findings was collected on a standardized form and evaluated. The results were as follows: 1. On the 34 patients of 38 joints which were surgically confirmed perforation of meniscus or its attachments of the temporomandibular joint, there were 29 females and 5 males (5.8:1). The average age was 36 years (range 17 to 70). 2. The common clinical findings of group that had meniscus displacement without reduction and with perforation were pain on the affected joint and limitation of mouth opening. In the group showing meniscus displacement with reduction and with perforation the common clinical findings were pain and clicking on the affected joint. 3. 32 joints (84.2%) were arthrotomographically anterior meniscus displacement without reduction and with perforation, 6 joints (15.8%) showed anterior meniscus displacement with reduction and with perforation. 4. Joints categorized arthrotomographically as having meniscus displacement without reduction and with perforation were less likely to have full translation of the condyle in comparison with the normal or meniscus displacement with reduction and with perforation groups (p<0.05) 5. The arthrographic findings of 44 joints having meniscus perforation were compared with surgical findings, there were 6 false positive findings of meniscus perforation, the reliability of arthrographic findings of meniscus perforation was a 86.4% correlation with surgical findings. 6. On the site of perforations of 38 joints which were surgically confirmed perforation of meniscus or its attachments, twenty-three of perforations (60.5%) were in location at the junction of the meniscus and posterior attachment, fourteen (36.9%) were

  15. The natural course of nonoperatively treated rotator cuff tears: an 8.8-year follow-up of tear anatomy and clinical outcome in 49 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosmayer, Stefan; Gärtner, Anne V; Tariq, Rana

    2017-04-01

    The natural course of nonoperatively treated rotator cuff tears is not fully understood. We explored the long-term development of tear anatomy and assessed functional outcomes. Eighty-nine small to medium-sized full-thickness tears of the rotator cuff, all primarily treated by physiotherapy, were identified retrospectively. Twenty-three tears needed surgical treatment later on, and 17 patients were unable to meet for follow-up. The remaining 49 still unrepaired tears were re-examined after 8.8 (8.2-11.0) years with sonography. Re-examination by magnetic resonance imaging was possible for 37 patients. Shoulder function was assessed with shoulder scores. Primary outcome measures were progression of tear size, muscle atrophy, and fatty degeneration and the Constant score (CS). Mean tear size increased by 8.3 mm in the anterior-posterior plane (P = .001) and by 4.5 mm in the medial-lateral plane (P = .001). Increase of tear size was -5 to +9.9 mm in 33 patients, 10 to 19.9 mm in 8 patients, and ≥20 mm in 8 patients. The CS was 81 points for tear increases Muscle atrophy and fatty degeneration progressed in 18 and 15 of the 37 patients, respectively. In tears with no progression of atrophy, the CS was 82 points compared with 75.5 points in tears with progression (P = .04). Anatomic tear deterioration was found in the majority of patients, but it was often moderate. Large tear size increases and progression of muscle atrophy were correlated to a poorer functional outcome. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Influence of meniscus on cartilage and subchondral bone features of knees from older individuals: A cadaver study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touraine, Sébastien; Bouhadoun, Hamid; Engelke, Klaus; Laredo, Jean Denis; Chappard, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Cartilage and subchondral bone form a functional unit. Here, we aimed to examine the effect of meniscus coverage on the characteristics of this unit in knees of older individuals. We assessed the hyaline cartilage, subchondral cortical plate (SCP), and subchondral trabecular bone in areas covered or uncovered by the meniscus from normal cadaver knees (without degeneration). Bone cores harvested from the medial tibial plateau at locations uncovered (central), partially covered (posterior), and completely covered (peripheral) by the meniscus were imaged by micro-CT. The following were measured on images: cartilage volume (Cart.Vol, mm3) and thickness (Cart.Th, mm); SCP thickness (SCP.Th, μm) and porosity (SCP.Por, %); bone volume to total volume fraction (BV/TV, %); trabecular thickness (Tb.Th, μm), spacing (Tb.Sp, μm), and number (Tb.N, 1/mm); structure model index (SMI); trabecular pattern factor (Tb.Pf); and degree of anisotropy (DA). Among the 28 specimens studied (18 females) from individuals with mean age 82.8±10.2 years, cartilage and SCP were thicker at the central site uncovered by the meniscus than the posterior and peripheral sites, and Cart.Vol was greater. SCP.Por was highest in posterior samples. In the upper 1-5 mm of subchondral bone, central samples were characterized by higher values for BV/TV, Tb.N, Tb.Th, and connectivity (Tb.Pf), a more plate-like trabecular structure and lower anisotropy than with other samples. Deeper down, at 6-10 mm, the differences were slightly higher for Tb.Th centrally, DA peripherally and SMI posteriorly. The coverage or not by meniscus in the knee of older individuals is significantly associated with Cart.Th, SCP.Th, SCP.Por and trabecular microarchitectural parameters in the most superficial 5 mm and to a lesser extent the deepest area of subchondral trabecular bone. These results suggest an effect of differences in local loading conditions. In subchondral bone uncovered by the meniscus, the trabecular architecture

  17. Influence of meniscus on cartilage and subchondral bone features of knees from older individuals: A cadaver study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Touraine

    Full Text Available Cartilage and subchondral bone form a functional unit. Here, we aimed to examine the effect of meniscus coverage on the characteristics of this unit in knees of older individuals.We assessed the hyaline cartilage, subchondral cortical plate (SCP, and subchondral trabecular bone in areas covered or uncovered by the meniscus from normal cadaver knees (without degeneration. Bone cores harvested from the medial tibial plateau at locations uncovered (central, partially covered (posterior, and completely covered (peripheral by the meniscus were imaged by micro-CT. The following were measured on images: cartilage volume (Cart.Vol, mm3 and thickness (Cart.Th, mm; SCP thickness (SCP.Th, μm and porosity (SCP.Por, %; bone volume to total volume fraction (BV/TV, %; trabecular thickness (Tb.Th, μm, spacing (Tb.Sp, μm, and number (Tb.N, 1/mm; structure model index (SMI; trabecular pattern factor (Tb.Pf; and degree of anisotropy (DA.Among the 28 specimens studied (18 females from individuals with mean age 82.8±10.2 years, cartilage and SCP were thicker at the central site uncovered by the meniscus than the posterior and peripheral sites, and Cart.Vol was greater. SCP.Por was highest in posterior samples. In the upper 1-5 mm of subchondral bone, central samples were characterized by higher values for BV/TV, Tb.N, Tb.Th, and connectivity (Tb.Pf, a more plate-like trabecular structure and lower anisotropy than with other samples. Deeper down, at 6-10 mm, the differences were slightly higher for Tb.Th centrally, DA peripherally and SMI posteriorly.The coverage or not by meniscus in the knee of older individuals is significantly associated with Cart.Th, SCP.Th, SCP.Por and trabecular microarchitectural parameters in the most superficial 5 mm and to a lesser extent the deepest area of subchondral trabecular bone. These results suggest an effect of differences in local loading conditions. In subchondral bone uncovered by the meniscus, the trabecular architecture

  18. Optical spectroscopic determination of human meniscus composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ala-Myllymäki, Juho; Honkanen, Juuso T J; Töyräs, Juha; Afara, Isaac O

    2016-02-01

    This study investigates the correlation between the composition of human meniscus and its absorption spectrum in the visible (VIS) and near infrared (NIR) spectral range. Meniscus samples (n = 24) were obtained from nonarthritic knees of human cadavers with no history of joint diseases. Specimens (n = 72) were obtained from three distinct sections of the meniscus, namely; anterior, center, posterior. Absorption spectra were acquired from each specimen in the VIS and NIR spectral range (400-1,100 nm). Following spectroscopic probing, the specimens were subjected to biochemical analyses to determine the matrix composition, that is water, hydroxyproline, and uronic acid contents. Multivariate analytical techniques, including principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares (PLS) regression, were then used to investigate the correlation between the matrix composition and it spectral response. Our results indicate that the optical absorption of meniscus matrix is related to its composition, and this relationship is optimal in the NIR spectral range (750-1,100 nm). High correlations (R(2) (uronic)  = 86.9%, R(2) (water)  = 83.8%, R(2) (hydroxyproline)  = 81.7%, p meniscus composition, thus suggesting that spectral data in the NIR range can be utilized for estimating the matrix composition of human meniscus. In conclusion, optical spectroscopy, particularly in the NIR spectral range, is a potential method for evaluating the composition of human meniscus. This presents a promising technique for rapid and nondestructive evaluation of meniscus integrity in real-time during arthroscopic surgery. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. MRI evaluation of the bucket handle tears of menisci of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Zhuozhao; Fan Jiadong; Xie Jingxia

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To determine the value of five MR imaging signs in diagnosing the bucket handle tears (BHT) of menisci of the knee. Methods: MR imaging of 139 knees with subsequent arthroscopy exams were retrospectively evaluated. Based on the results of arthroscopy, 19 knees had BHT of menisci. Two radiologists evaluated each MR exam independently, with discrepancies resolved by consensus. Each MR exam was analyzed for five signs: a double posterior cruciate ligament sign, a flipped meniscus sign, an absent bow tie sign, an internal displaced fragment sign, and an abnormal circumferential meniscus sign. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy for diagnosing BHT of menisci were calculated for the presence of each individual sign. Results: The sensitivities of these five signs ranged between 52.6% and 89.5%, and specificities ranged between 83.3% and 98.3%, respectively. Positive and negative predictive values ranged between 42.9% and 88.2%, and between 92.7% and 98.3%, respectively. The accuracy of these five signs ranged between 82.7% and 96.4%. Conclusion: BHT of menisci may have many signs on MR imaging. The diagnostic sensitivities of the internal displaced fragment sign and the abnormal circumferential meniscus sign are the highest. The double posterior cruciate ligament sign has the highest specificity and positive predictive value, while the internal displaced fragment sign has the highest negative predictive value and accuracy

  20. Region-Specific Effect of the Decellularized Meniscus Extracellular Matrix on Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Meniscus Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimomura, Kazunori; Rothrauff, Benjamin B; Tuan, Rocky S

    2017-03-01

    The meniscus is the most commonly injured knee structure, and surgical repair is often ineffective. Tissue engineering-based repair or regeneration may provide a needed solution. Decellularized, tissue-derived extracellular matrices (ECMs) have received attention for their potential use as tissue-engineered scaffolds. In considering meniscus-derived ECMs (mECMs) for meniscus tissue engineering, it is noteworthy that the inner and outer regions of the meniscus have different structural and biochemical features, potentially directing the differentiation of cells toward region-specific phenotypes. To investigate the applicability of mECMs for meniscus tissue engineering by specifically comparing region-dependent effects of mECMs on 3-dimensional constructs seeded with human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs). Controlled laboratory study. Bovine menisci were divided into inner and outer halves and were minced, treated with Triton X-100 and DNase, and extracted with urea. Then, hBMSCs (1 × 10 6 cells/mL) were encapsulated in a photo-cross-linked 10% polyethylene glycol diacrylate scaffold containing mECMs (60 μg/mL) derived from either the inner or outer meniscus, with an ECM-free scaffold as a control. The cell-seeded constructs were cultured with chondrogenic medium containing recombinant human transforming growth factor β3 (TGF-β3) and were analyzed for expression of meniscus-associated genes as well as for the collagen (hydroxyproline) and glycosaminoglycan content as a function of time. Decellularization was verified by the absence of 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI)-stained cell nuclei and a reduction in the DNA content. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that collagen type I expression was significantly higher in the outer mECM group than in the other groups, while collagen type II and aggrecan expression was highest in the inner mECM group. The collagen (hydroxyproline) content was highest in the outer mECM group, while the

  1. Shifting the IGF-axis: An age-related decline in human tear IGF-1 correlates with clinical signs of dry eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Roshni; Zhu, Meifang; Robertson, Danielle M

    2018-02-06

    The human corneal epithelium expresses both the insulin-like growth factor type 1 receptor (IGF-1R) and the IGF-1R/insulin receptor (INSR) hybrid. Despite the previous identification of IGF-1 in human tear fluid, little is known regarding the regulation of IGF-1 in tear fluid and its role in corneal epithelial homeostasis. In the present study, we investigated the impact of biological parameters on the concentration of human tear levels of IGF-1. Tear levels of IGF-1 were measured in 41 healthy, human volunteers without any reported symptoms of dry eye. All volunteers underwent standard biomicroscopic examination of the cornea and tear film. In a subgroup of volunteers, corneal staining with sodium fluorescein, tear film break up time and tear production using a Schirmer's test strip were measured to assess clinical signs of dry eye. Tears were collected from the inferior tear meniscus using glass microcapillary tubes and IGF-1 levels were measured using a solid phase sandwich ELISA. Tear levels of IGF-1 were highest in young adults and significantly decreased in older adults (P = 0.003). There were no differences in tear IGF-1 between males and females (P = 0.628). Tear IGF-1 levels were correlated with tear film break up time (R = 0.738) and tear production (R = 0.826). These data indicate that there is a progressive decline in tear IGF-1 due to aging that is associated with clinical signs of dry eye. This effect is likely due to age-related changes in the lacrimal gland. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Impact of Visual Guided Order Picking on Ocular Comfort, Ocular Surface and Tear Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika Klein-Theyer

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of a visual picking system on ocular comfort, the ocular surface and tear function compared to those of a voice guided picking solution.Prospective, observational, cohort study.Institutional.A total of 25 young asymptomatic volunteers performed commissioning over 10 hours on two consecutive days.The operators were guided in the picking process by two different picking solutions, either visually or by voice while their subjective symptoms and ocular surface and tear function parameters were recorded.The visual analogue scale (VAS values, according to subjective dry eye symptoms, in the visual condition were significantly higher at the end of the commissioning than the baseline measurements. In the voice condition, the VAS values remained stable during the commissioning. The tear break-up time (BUT values declined significantly in the visual condition (pre-task: 16.6 sec and post-task: 9.6 sec in the right eyes, that were exposed to the displays, the left eyes in the visual condition showed only a minor decline, whereas the BUT values in the voice condition remained constant (right eyes or even increased (left eyes over the time. No significant differences in the tear meniscus height values before and after the commissioning were observed in either condition.In our study, the use of visually guided picking solutions was correlated with post-task subjective symptoms and tear film instability.

  3. Passive Posterior Tibial Subluxation on Routine Knee MRI as a Secondary Sign of PCL Tear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degnan, A.J.; Adam, R.J.; Maldjian, C.; Harner, Ch.D.

    2014-01-01

    The posterior drawer test is an accurate clinical test to diagnose posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), indicating laxity of the PCL that allows posterior tibial translation. This study aimed to determine whether posterior tibial translation relative to the femur on routine MRI could serve as an additional sign of PCL tear. Routine knee MRI in eleven patients (7 males, 4 females) with arthroscopically confirmed isolated PCL tears were reviewed independently by two musculoskeletal radiologists. Measurements of tibial translation were made in the medial and lateral compartments of patients and controls (10 males, 12 females) without clinical or MRI evidence of ligament injury. Significant medial compartment posterior tibial translation was present in patients with PCL tear compared to controls (+2.93 mm versus +0.03 mm, Ρ=0.002) with excellent interobserver agreement (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.94). No significant difference in lateral compartment tibial translation was observed (+0.17 mm versus -0.57 mm, Ρ=0.366) despite excellent interobserver agreement (ICC = 0.96). Posterior tibial translation in the midmedial compartment may be a secondary sign of isolated PCL tear on routine knee MRI with passive extension without manipulation or weight bearing. Additional work in a larger cohort may better address the accuracy of this finding

  4. Facilitation of tear fluid secretion by 3% diquafosol ophthalmic solution in normal human eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoi, Norihiko; Kato, Hiroaki; Kinoshita, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the increase in tear fluid volume induced by 3% diquafosol ophthalmic solution in normal human eyes. Prospective, randomized, double-masked, comparative study. Twenty healthy adults (17 males and 3 females; mean age, 38.8 years) underwent topical instillation of 2 ophthalmic solutions, artificial tears in 1 eye and 3% diquafosol ophthalmic solution in the fellow eye, in a masked manner. The radius of curvature of the central lower tear meniscus was measured at 5, 10, 15, 30, and 60 minutes after instillation by use of reflective meniscometry, and subjects' self-evaluated symptoms of wetness and stinging using a visual analog scale. Changes after instillation in the radius of curvature from baseline (artificial tear group vs diquafosol group; mean ± standard error of the mean) were as follows: at 5 minutes, -0.008 ± 0.012 vs 0.045 ± 0.013; at 10 minutes, 0.001 ± 0.014 vs 0.057 ± 0.016; at 15 minutes, -0.012 ± 0.014 vs 0.037 ± 0.019; at 30 minutes, -0.010 ± 0.016 vs 0.030 ± 0.025; and at 60 minutes, -0.029 ± 0.012 vs -0.020 ± 0.012. The diquafosol group showed significantly greater values from 5 to 30 minutes after instillation. Of the 40 eyes, 13 showed abnormal tear film breakup time (≤5 seconds). The diquafosol group had significantly more wetness at 15 minutes after instillation than did the artificial tear group. Topical instillation of 3% diquafosol ophthalmic solution increases tear fluid on the ocular surface for up to 30 minutes in normal human eyes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Extrusion of the medial meniscus in knee osteoarthritis assessed with a rotating clino-orthostatic permanent-magnet MRI scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paparo, Francesco; Revelli, Matteo; Piccazzo, Riccardo; Astengo, Davide; Camellino, Dario; Puntoni, Matteo; Muda, Alessandro; Rollandi, Gian Andrea; Garlaschi, Giacomo; Cimmino, Marco Amedeo

    2015-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the influence of weight-bearing on tibiofemoral osteoarthritis, including medial meniscal extrusion, by using a low-field (0.25 T) rotating clino-orthostatic permanent-magnet magnetic resonance (MR) scanner, and to analyse correlations of medial meniscal extrusion with the patient's Kellgren-Lawrence score, body mass index, and all the osteoarthritis features of the WORMS scoring system. Twenty-six patients (69.2% women and 30.8% men; mean age 67 ± 9.7 years) with medial tibiofemoral knee osteoarthritis were prospectively enrolled and MR sequences were acquired in both clino- and orthostatic position. MR images were assessed by two independent radiologists, according to the WORMS scale. Medial meniscal extrusion was measured and its clino-orthostatic difference (∆MME) was calculated. Intra- and inter-observer agreement of the WORMS Global Score readings was high by Cohen's K test (>0.81). No significant clino-orthostatic changes in the scoring parameters of the medial tibiofemoral joint were shown by Wilcoxon's test. Medial meniscal extrusion measured on orthostatic images was significantly higher than that measured in clinostatic position (p < 0.0001). At univariate analysis, the Kellgren-Lawrence score, WORMS Global Score, cartilage loss, meniscal damage, and osteophytes were significantly correlated to ∆MME (p < 0.005). Using a multiple regression model, tibiofemoral cartilage loss was found to correlate independently with ∆MME (p = 0.0499). Medial meniscal extrusion, evaluated with an open-configuration, rotating MR scanner, increased from the clinostatic to the orthostatic position. ∆MME, a new meniscal parameter, correlated with several important features of medial tibiofemoral osteoarthritis.

  6. Analysis of Meniscus Fluctuation in a Continuous Casting Slab Mold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kaitian; Liu, Jianhua; Cui, Heng; Xiao, Chao

    2018-03-01

    A water model of slab mold was established to analyze the microscopic and macroscopic fluctuation of meniscus. The fast Fourier transform and wavelet entropy were adopted to analyze the wave amplitude, frequency, and components of fluctuation. The flow patterns under the meniscus were measured by using particle image velocimetry measurement and then the mechanisms of meniscus fluctuation were discussed. The results reflected that wavelet entropy had multi-scale and statistical properties, and it was suitable for the study of meniscus fluctuation details both in time and frequency domain. The basic wave, frequency of which exceeding 1 Hz in the condition of no mold oscillation, was demonstrated in this work. In fact, three basic waves were found: long-wave with low frequency, middle-wave with middle frequency, and short-wave with high frequency. In addition, the upper roll flow in mold had significant effect on meniscus fluctuation. When the position of flow impinged was far from the meniscus, long-wave dominated the fluctuation and the stability of meniscus was enhanced. However, when the velocity of flow was increased, the short-wave dominated the meniscus fluctuation and the meniscus stability was decreased.

  7. Biomechanical validation of load-sharing rip-stop fixation for the repair of tissue-deficient rotator cuff tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhart, Stephen S; Denard, Patrick J; Konicek, John; Hanypsiak, Bryan T

    2014-02-01

    Poor-quality tendon is one of the most difficult problems the surgeon must overcome in achieving secure fixation during rotator cuff repair. A load-sharing rip-stop construct (LSRS) has recently been proposed as a method for improving fixation strength, but the biomechanical properties of this construct have not yet been examined. To compare the strength of the LSRS construct to that of single-row fixation for rotator cuff repair. Controlled laboratory study. Rotator cuff tears were created in 6 cadaveric matched-pair specimens and repaired with a single row or an LSRS. In the LSRS repair, a 2-mm suture tape was placed as an inverted mattress stitch in the rotator cuff, and sutures from 2 anchors were placed as simple stitches that passed medial to the suture tape. The suture tape limbs were secured with knotless anchors laterally before sutures were tied from the medial anchors. Displacement was observed with video tracking after cyclic loading, and specimens were loaded to failure. The mean load to failure was 371 ± 102 N in single-row repairs compared with 616 ± 185 N in LSRS repairs (P = .031). There was no difference in displacement with cyclic loading between the groups (3.3 ± 0.8 mm vs. 3.5 ± 1.1 mm; P = .561). In the single-row group, 4 of 6 failures occurred at the suture-tendon interface. In the LSRS group, only 1 failure occurred at the suture-tendon interface. The ultimate failure load of the LSRS construct for rotator cuff repair was 1.7 times that of a single-row construct in a cadaveric model. The LSRS rotator cuff repair construct may be useful in the repair of difficult tears such as massive tears, medial tears, and tears with tendon loss.

  8. Negative Outcomes of Poly(l-Lactic Acid) Fiber-Reinforced Scaffolds in an Ovine Total Meniscus Replacement Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jay M; Merriam, Aaron R; Kohn, Joachim; Gatt, Charles J; Dunn, Michael G

    2016-09-01

    Our objective was to test the efficacy of collagen-hyaluronan scaffolds reinforced with poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) fibers in an ovine total meniscus replacement model. Scaffolds were implanted into 9 sheep (n = 1 at 8 weeks, n = 2 at 16 weeks, n = 3 at both 24, 32 weeks) following total medial meniscectomy. From 16 weeks on, explants were characterized by confined compression creep, histological, and biochemical analyses. Articular surfaces were observed macroscopically and damage was ranked histologically using the Mankin score. At sacrifice, three of the nine PLLA scaffolds had completely ruptured, and the intact scaffolds experienced progressive shape changes and severe narrowing in the body region at 16, 24, and 32 weeks. Aggregate compressive modulus and permeability did not improve with time. Histological and biochemical analyses showed significantly less extracellular matrix and less matrix organization compared to native tissue. Osteophytes, bone erosion, and cartilage damage were observed, increasing with time postimplantation. A buildup of lactic acid and/or the rapid loss of scaffold mechanical integrity due to PLLA degradation are probable causes for the joint abnormalities observed in this study. These results are in sharp contrast to those of our previous successful total meniscus replacement studies using polyarylate [p(DTD DD)] fiber-reinforced scaffolds. This suggests that PLLA fiber as produced in this study cannot be used as reinforcement for a meniscus replacement scaffold.

  9. An osteophyte in the tibial plateau is a risk factor for allograft extrusion after meniscus allograft transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Byeongsam; Kim, Jong-Min; Kim, Jong-Min; Lee, Chang-Rack; Kim, Kyung-Ah; Bin, Seong-Il

    2015-05-01

    Osteophytes can be observed on the tibial plateau during meniscus allograft transplantation (MAT). However, no studies to date have evaluated the effect of these osteophytes on meniscus allograft extrusion. Osteophyte excision in the tibial plateau could reduce extrusion of the transplanted meniscus and improve short-term clinical outcomes with meniscus allograft transplantation. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Between October 2004 and July 2012, a total of 323 patients underwent MAT at a single institution. Of these, 88 patients had a peripheral osteophyte in their tibial plateau, and they were enrolled in the study retrospectively. The mean age of the patients was 35.3 years (range, 15-56 years); there were 57 male and 31 female patients. Forty-four patients underwent osteophyte excision concomitantly with MAT and 44 patients underwent MAT only. The 2 groups showed no difference in terms of age, body mass index, time after meniscectomy, and preoperative knee scores. A medial meniscus allograft was transplanted in 13 cases (15%) and a lateral meniscus in 75 (85%). The absolute extrusion and relative percentage of extrusion were measured to evaluate allograft extrusion 12 months after MAT. The modified Lysholm scoring system and the Hospital for Special Surgery score at 2 years after MAT were used to evaluate clinical outcomes. The mean absolute extrusions at 1 year postoperatively in the excision and nonexcision groups were 3.5±1.5 and 5.5±1.6 mm, respectively. The mean relative percentages of extrusion were 34.1%±15.9% and 54.7%±20.7%, respectively. The rates of allograft extrusion (>3 mm) were 28 of 44 (63.6%) and 41 of 44 (93.2%) in the excision and nonexcision groups, respectively. The intergroup differences in absolute extrusion, relative percentage of extrusion, and rate of allograft extrusion were statistically significant (P<.001 for all 3 parameters). There were no significant differences in the clinical outcomes (modified Lysholm or Hospital of

  10. Study design does not always allow a simple conclusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roos, Ewa M.; Thorlund, Jonas Bloch; Juhl, Carsten Bogh

    2014-01-01

    Response to Arthroscopic surgery for degenerative tears of the meniscus: a systematic review and meta-analysis......Response to Arthroscopic surgery for degenerative tears of the meniscus: a systematic review and meta-analysis...

  11. Hydrogels for precision meniscus tissue engineering: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey-Rico, Ana; Cucchiarini, Magali; Madry, Henning

    The meniscus plays a pivotal role to preserve the knee joint homeostasis. Lesions to the meniscus are frequent, have a reduced ability to heal, and may induce tibiofemoral osteoarthritis. Current reconstructive therapeutic options mainly focus on the treatment of lesions in the peripheral vascularized region. In contrast, few approaches are capable of stimulating repair of damaged meniscal tissue in the central, avascular portion. Tissue engineering approaches are of high interest to repair or replace damaged meniscus tissue in this area. Hydrogel-based biomaterials are of special interest for meniscus repair as its inner part contains relatively high proportions of proteoglycans which are responsible for the viscoelastic compressive properties and hydration grade. Hydrogels exhibiting high water content and providing a specific three-dimensional (3D) microenvironment may be engineered to precisely resemble this topographical composition of the meniscal tissue. Different polymers of both natural and synthetic origins have been manipulated to produce hydrogels hosting relevant cell populations for meniscus regeneration and provide platforms for meniscus tissue replacement. So far, these compounds have been employed to design controlled delivery systems of bioactive molecules involved in meniscal reparative processes or to host genetically modified cells as a means to enhance meniscus repair. This review describes the most recent advances on the use of hydrogels as platforms for precision meniscus tissue engineering.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging signs of iliotibial band friction in patients with isolated medial compartment osteoarthritis of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilevska, Violeta; Szeimies, Ulrike; Staebler, Axel

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to assess the frequency of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signs of iliotibial band friction (ITBF) in patients with advanced medial compartment knee osteoarthritis. Proton density-weighted (PDw) fat-saturated (fatsat) MR images (1.5 T, slice thickness (SL) 2.5-3 mm, eight-channel phased array coil) of 128 patients with isolated advanced osteoarthritis of the medial knee compartment and complete or subtotal (>80%) loss of cartilage were evaluated. There were 41 men and 87 women. Mean age was 63 years, range 34-89 years. The control group consisted of 94 patients with medial meniscus degeneration without cartilage loss (56 men and 38 women, mean age 50 years, range 16-89 years). MRI signs of ITBF were evaluated in both groups [poorly defined abnormalities of signal intensity and localized fluid collection lateral, distal or proximal to the lateral epicondyle; signal intensity abnormalities superficial to or deep by the iliotibial band (ITB)]. Transverse images were evaluated separately. Consensus evaluation using all imaging planes was performed. Of 128 patients with osteoarthritis, 95 had moderate or advanced MRI signs of ITBF (74.2%). Eighty-nine patients (69.5%) had advanced degeneration of the meniscus. In the control group, 26 of 94 patients had only moderate MRI signs of ITBF. There was a statistically significant difference between both groups for the presence of MR signs of ITBF (P ≤ 0.01). MRI signs of ITBF were frequently present in patients with severe medial compartment osteoarthritis of the knee. Joint space narrowing with varus knee deformity may be a cause of ITBF. Level 4 (Historic, non-randomized, retrospective, cohort study with a control group) (orig.)

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging signs of iliotibial band friction in patients with isolated medial compartment osteoarthritis of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilevska, Violeta [University Surgical Clinic ' St. Naum Ohridski' , Skopje (Macedonia (The Former Yugoslav Republic of)); Szeimies, Ulrike; Staebler, Axel [Radiology in Muenchen Harlaching, Orthopedic Clinic Harlaching, Munich (Germany)

    2009-09-15

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to assess the frequency of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signs of iliotibial band friction (ITBF) in patients with advanced medial compartment knee osteoarthritis. Proton density-weighted (PDw) fat-saturated (fatsat) MR images (1.5 T, slice thickness (SL) 2.5-3 mm, eight-channel phased array coil) of 128 patients with isolated advanced osteoarthritis of the medial knee compartment and complete or subtotal (>80%) loss of cartilage were evaluated. There were 41 men and 87 women. Mean age was 63 years, range 34-89 years. The control group consisted of 94 patients with medial meniscus degeneration without cartilage loss (56 men and 38 women, mean age 50 years, range 16-89 years). MRI signs of ITBF were evaluated in both groups [poorly defined abnormalities of signal intensity and localized fluid collection lateral, distal or proximal to the lateral epicondyle; signal intensity abnormalities superficial to or deep by the iliotibial band (ITB)]. Transverse images were evaluated separately. Consensus evaluation using all imaging planes was performed. Of 128 patients with osteoarthritis, 95 had moderate or advanced MRI signs of ITBF (74.2%). Eighty-nine patients (69.5%) had advanced degeneration of the meniscus. In the control group, 26 of 94 patients had only moderate MRI signs of ITBF. There was a statistically significant difference between both groups for the presence of MR signs of ITBF (P {<=} 0.01). MRI signs of ITBF were frequently present in patients with severe medial compartment osteoarthritis of the knee. Joint space narrowing with varus knee deformity may be a cause of ITBF. Level 4 (Historic, non-randomized, retrospective, cohort study with a control group) (orig.)

  14. Magnetic resonance analysis of loaded meniscus deformation: a novel technique comparing participants with and without radiographic knee osteoarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacLeod, Toran D. [California State University, Department of Physical Therapy, Sacramento, CA (United States); Subburaj, Karupppasamy; Wu, Samuel; Kumar, Deepak; Wyatt, Cory; Souza, Richard B. [University of California, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Research Group, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2015-01-15

    To establish a novel method of quantifying meniscal deformation using loaded MRI. More specifically, the goals were to evaluate the (1) accuracy, (2) inter-rater reliability, (3) intra-rater reliability, and (4) scan-rescan reliability. The secondary purpose of this experiment was to evaluate group differences in meniscal deformation in participants with and without radiographic knee OA. Weight-bearing 3-T MRIs of the knee in full extension and 30 of flexion were processed to create 3D models of meniscal deformation. Accuracy was assessed using a custom-designed phantom. Twenty-one participants either with or without signs of OA were evaluated, and another six participants (14 knees, one subject was scanned twice) underwent repeated imaging to assess scan-rescan reproducibility. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), root-mean squared error (RMSE), and root-mean-square percent coefficient-of-variation (RMS%CV) analyses were performed. Exploratory comparisons were made between those with and without OA to evaluate potential group differences. All variables were found to be accurate with RMSE ranging from 0.08 to 0.35 mm and 5.99 to 14.63 mm{sup 2}. Reproducibility of peak anterior-posterior meniscal deformation was excellent (ICC > 0.821; p < 0.013) with RMS%CV for intra-rater ranging from 0.06 to 1.53 % and 0.17 to 1.97 %, inter-rater ranging from 0.10 to 7.20 % and 3.95 to 18.53 %, and scan-rescan reliability ranging from 1.531 to 7.890 % and 4.894 to 9.142 %, for distance and area metric, respectively. Participants with OA were found to have significantly greater anterior horn movement of both the medial (p = 0.039) and lateral meniscus (p = 0.015), and smaller flexed medial meniscus outer area (p = 0.048) when compared to controls. MRI-based variables of meniscus deformation were found to be valid in participants with and without OA. Significant differences were found between those with and without radiographic OA; further study is warranted. (orig.)

  15. Exercise therapy versus arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for degenerative meniscal tear in middle aged patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kise, Nina Jullum; Risberg, May Arna; Stensrud, Silje

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine if exercise therapy is superior to arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for knee function in middle aged patients with degenerative meniscal tears. Design Randomised controlled superiority trial. Setting Orthopaedic departments at two public hospitals and two physiotherapy...... clinics in Norway. Participants 140 adults, mean age 49.5 years (range 35.7-59.9), with degenerative medial meniscal tear verified by magnetic resonance imaging. 96% had no definitive radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis. Interventions 12 week supervised exercise therapy alone or arthroscopic partial....... Our results should encourage clinicians and middle aged patients with degenerative meniscal tear and no definitive radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis to consider supervised exercise therapy as a treatment option. Trial registration www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01002794)....

  16. Exercise therapy versus arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for degenerative meniscal tear in middle aged patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kise, Nina Jullum; Risberg, May Arna; Stensrud, Silje

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine if exercise therapy is superior to arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for knee function in middle aged patients with degenerative meniscal tears. DESIGN: Randomised controlled superiority trial. SETTING: Orthopaedic departments at two public hospitals and two physiotherapy...... clinics in Norway. PARTICIPANTS: 140 adults, mean age 49.5 years (range 35.7-59.9), with degenerative medial meniscal tear verified by magnetic resonance imaging. 96% had no definitive radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis. INTERVENTIONS: 12 week supervised exercise therapy alone or arthroscopic partial....... Our results should encourage clinicians and middle aged patients with degenerative meniscal tear and no definitive radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis to consider supervised exercise therapy as a treatment option.Trial registration www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01002794)....

  17. Evaluation of the menisci of the knee joint using three-dimensional isotropic resolution fast spin-echo imaging: diagnostic performance in 250 patients with surgical correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kijowski, Richard; Davis, Kirkland W.; Blankenbaker, Donna G.; Woods, Michael A.; De Smet, Arthur A. [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Munoz del Rio, Alejandro [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Statistics, Madison, WI (United States)

    2012-02-15

    To compare the diagnostic performance of FSE-Cube, a three-dimensional isotropic resolution intermediate-weighted fast spin-echo sequence, with a routine magnetic resonance (MR) protocol at 3.0 T for detecting surgically confirmed meniscal tears of the knee joint in a large patient population. FSE-Cube was added to a routine MR protocol performed at 3.0 T on 250 patients who underwent subsequent knee arthroscopy. Three radiologists independently used FSE-Cube during one review and the routine MR protocol during a second review to detect medial and lateral meniscal tears. Using arthroscopy as the reference standard, the sensitivity and specificity of FSE-Cube and the routine MR protocol for detecting meniscal tears were determined for all readers combined. McNemar's tests were used to compare diagnostic performance between FSE-Cube and the routine MR protocol. FSE-cube and the routine MR protocol had similar sensitivity (95.5%/95.3% respectively, P=0.94) and similar specificity (69.8%/74.0% respectively, P=0.10) for detecting 156 medial meniscal tears. FSE-Cube had significantly lower sensitivity than the routine MR protocol (79.4%/85.0% respectively, P < 0.05) but similar specificity (83.9%/82.2% respectively, P=0.37) for detecting 89 lateral mensical tears. For lateral meniscal tears, FSE-Cube had significantly lower sensitivity (P < 0.05) than the routine MR protocol for detecting 19 root tears but similar sensitivity (P=0.17-1.00) for detecting all other tear locations and types. FSE-Cube had diagnostic performance similar to a routine MR protocol for detecting meniscal tears except for a significantly lower sensitivity for detecting lateral meniscal tears, which was mainly attributed to decreased ability to identify lateral meniscus root tears. (orig.)

  18. Evaluation of the menisci of the knee joint using three-dimensional isotropic resolution fast spin-echo imaging: diagnostic performance in 250 patients with surgical correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kijowski, Richard; Davis, Kirkland W.; Blankenbaker, Donna G.; Woods, Michael A.; De Smet, Arthur A.; Munoz del Rio, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic performance of FSE-Cube, a three-dimensional isotropic resolution intermediate-weighted fast spin-echo sequence, with a routine magnetic resonance (MR) protocol at 3.0 T for detecting surgically confirmed meniscal tears of the knee joint in a large patient population. FSE-Cube was added to a routine MR protocol performed at 3.0 T on 250 patients who underwent subsequent knee arthroscopy. Three radiologists independently used FSE-Cube during one review and the routine MR protocol during a second review to detect medial and lateral meniscal tears. Using arthroscopy as the reference standard, the sensitivity and specificity of FSE-Cube and the routine MR protocol for detecting meniscal tears were determined for all readers combined. McNemar's tests were used to compare diagnostic performance between FSE-Cube and the routine MR protocol. FSE-cube and the routine MR protocol had similar sensitivity (95.5%/95.3% respectively, P=0.94) and similar specificity (69.8%/74.0% respectively, P=0.10) for detecting 156 medial meniscal tears. FSE-Cube had significantly lower sensitivity than the routine MR protocol (79.4%/85.0% respectively, P < 0.05) but similar specificity (83.9%/82.2% respectively, P=0.37) for detecting 89 lateral mensical tears. For lateral meniscal tears, FSE-Cube had significantly lower sensitivity (P < 0.05) than the routine MR protocol for detecting 19 root tears but similar sensitivity (P=0.17-1.00) for detecting all other tear locations and types. FSE-Cube had diagnostic performance similar to a routine MR protocol for detecting meniscal tears except for a significantly lower sensitivity for detecting lateral meniscal tears, which was mainly attributed to decreased ability to identify lateral meniscus root tears. (orig.)

  19. Ferrofluid meniscus in a horizontal or vertical magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosensweig, R.E.; Elborai, S.; Lee, S.-H.; Zahn, M.

    2005-01-01

    An optical system using reflections of a narrow laser beam to measure the height and shape of a ferrofluid meniscus in response to uniform applied magnetic fields finds that meniscus height on a vertical flat wall decreases in horizontal applied field and increases in vertical applied field. An approximate energy minimization analysis predicts meniscus height in directional agreement with measurements. This study is a first step in calculating the tangential surface force acting in flows where magnetization magnitude and direction lag a changing magnetic field direction, and the meniscus shape is magnetically perturbed

  20. Cationic Contrast Agent Diffusion Differs Between Cartilage and Meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honkanen, Juuso T J; Turunen, Mikael J; Freedman, Jonathan D; Saarakkala, Simo; Grinstaff, Mark W; Ylärinne, Janne H; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Töyräs, Juha

    2016-10-01

    Contrast enhanced computed tomography (CECT) is a non-destructive imaging technique used for the assessment of composition and structure of articular cartilage and meniscus. Due to structural and compositional differences between these tissues, diffusion and distribution of contrast agents may differ in cartilage and meniscus. The aim of this study is to determine the diffusion kinematics of a novel iodine based cationic contrast agent (CA(2+)) in cartilage and meniscus. Cylindrical cartilage and meniscus samples (d = 6 mm, h ≈ 2 mm) were harvested from healthy bovine knee joints (n = 10), immersed in isotonic cationic contrast agent (20 mgI/mL), and imaged using a micro-CT scanner at 26 time points up to 48 h. Subsequently, normalized X-ray attenuation and contrast agent diffusion flux, as well as water, collagen and proteoglycan (PG) contents in the tissues were determined. The contrast agent distributions within cartilage and meniscus were different. In addition, the normalized attenuation and diffusion flux were higher (p < 0.05) in cartilage. Based on these results, diffusion kinematics vary between cartilage and meniscus. These tissue specific variations can affect the interpretation of CECT images and should be considered when cartilage and meniscus are assessed simultaneously.

  1. Three-Dimensional Coculture of Meniscal Cells and Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Collagen Type I Hydrogel on a Small Intestinal Matrix-A Pilot Study Toward Equine Meniscus Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Antje; Ribitsch, Iris; Reboredo, Jenny; Dürr, Julia; Egerbacher, Monika; Jenner, Florien; Walles, Heike

    2017-05-01

    Meniscal injuries are the most frequently encountered soft tissue injuries in the equine stifle joint. Due to the inherent limited repair potential of meniscal tissue, meniscal injuries do not only affect the meniscus itself but also lead to impaired joint homeostasis and secondary osteoarthritis. The presented study compares 3D coculture constructs of primary equine mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and meniscus cells (MC) seeded on three different scaffolds-a cell-laden collagen type I hydrogel (Col I gel), a tissue-derived small intestinal matrix scaffold (SIS-muc) and a combination thereof-for their qualification to be applied for meniscus tissue engineering. To investigate cell attachment of primary MC and MSC on SIS-muc matrix SEM pictures were performed. For molecular analysis, lyophilized samples of coculture constructs with different cell ratios (100% MC, 100% MSC, and 50% MC and 50% MSC, 20% MC, and 80% MSC) were digested and analyzed for DNA and GAG content. Active matrix remodeling of 3D coculture models was indicated by matrix metalloproteinases detection. For comparison of tissue-engineered constructs with the histologic architecture of natural equine menisci, paired lateral and medial menisci of 15 horses representing different age groups were examined. A meniscus phenotype with promising similarity to native meniscus tissue in its GAG/DNA expression in addition to Col I, Col II, and Aggrecan production was achieved using a scaffold composed of Col I gel on SIS-muc combined with a coculture of MC and MSC. The results encourage further development of this scaffold-cell combination for meniscus tissue engineering.

  2. Effect of Time after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tears on Proprioception and Postural Stability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae-Hee Lee

    Full Text Available This study was designed to compare proprioception and postural stability in patients with acute (time from injury ≤ 3 months and chronic (time from injury > 3 months ACL tears, and to evaluate the correlation between time interval after ACL injury and proprioception. Thigh muscle strength, postural stability, and joint position sense were compared in 48 patients with acute ACL tears and in 28 with chronic ACL tears. Maximal torque (60°/sec of the quadriceps and hamstring was evaluated using an isokinetic testing device. Postural stability was determined from the anterior-posterior (APSI, medial-lateral (MLSI, and overall (OSI stability indices using stabilometry. Joint position sense was also tested by reproduction of passive positioning (RPP. Muscle strengths and stability indices on both the involved and uninvolved sides were similar in the acute and chronic ACL tear groups. RPP on the involved side was significantly greater in the chronic than in the acute ACL tear group (7.8° vs. 5.6°, P = 0.041. Two of three stability indices (APSI, OSI and RPP were significantly greater on the involved than the uninvolved side in the chronic ACL tear group.

  3. Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Disorders Knee Arthroscopy for Treatment of a Meniscus Tear (Broward Health Medical Center, Fort Lauderdale, FL, 11/ ... Disorders Knee Arthroscopy for Treatment of a Meniscus Tear (Broward Health Medical Center, Fort Lauderdale, FL, 11/ ...

  4. Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 2011) Knee Injuries and Disorders Knee Arthroscopy for Treatment of a Meniscus Tear (Broward Health Medical Center, ... 2014) Knee Injuries and Disorders Knee Arthroscopy for Treatment of a Meniscus Tear (Broward Health Medical Center, ...

  5. Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Disorders Knee Arthroscopy for Treatment of a Meniscus Tear (Broward Health Medical Center, Fort Lauderdale, FL, ... and Disorders Knee Arthroscopy for Treatment of a Meniscus Tear (Broward Health Medical Center, Fort Lauderdale, FL, ...

  6. Discoid Meniscus Associated With Achondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoernschemeyer, Daniel G; Atanda, Alfred; Dean-Davis, Ellen; Gupta, Sumit K

    2016-05-01

    Achondroplasia is the most common skeletal dysplasia. This form of dwarfism is caused by a point mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) gene, leading to inhibition of endochondral ossification for these patients. This results in a normal trunk height but shortened limbs. The discoid meniscus may be an important associated finding to better understand the common complaints of leg pain for these patients. Although the incidence for a discoid meniscus is between 3% and 5% for the general population, it is unknown with achondroplasia. This case series includes 4 patients, with ages ranging from adolescence to early adulthood, with symptoms of knee pain that were not attributable to some of the more common findings seen in this patient population. Typically, patients with achondroplasia who experience knee pain are evaluated for more common and well-known etiologies such as genu varum, ligamentous instability, and neurogenic claudication. However, the authors propose that symptomatic discoid lateral meniscus should be added to the differential diagnosis for lower-extremity pain in the achondroplasia population. A thorough history and physical examination, in combination with magnetic resonance imaging, can aid in making the diagnosis. Treatment with arthroscopic debridement, saucerization of the meniscus, and repair for unstable injuries has yielded good outcomes for this patient population. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):e498-e503.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. The distal semimembranosus complex: normal MR anatomy, variants, biomechanics and pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltran, Javier; Jbara, Marlena; Maimon, Ron; Matityahu, Amir; Hwang, Ki; Padron, Mario; Mota, Javier; Beltran, Luis; Sundaram, Murali

    2003-01-01

    To describe the normal MR anatomy and variations of the distal semimembranosus tendinous arms and the posterior oblique ligament as seen in the three orthogonal planes, to review the biomechanics of this complex and to illustrate pathologic examples. The distal semimembranosus tendon divides into five tendinous arms named the anterior, direct, capsular, inferior and the oblique popliteal ligament. These arms intertwine with the branches of the posterior oblique ligament in the posterior medial aspect of the knee, providing stability. This tendon-ligamentous complex also acts synergistically with the popliteus muscle and actively pulls the posterior horn of the medial meniscus during knee flexion. Pathologic conditions involving this complex include complete and partial tears, insertional tendinosis, avulsion fractures and bursitis. (orig.)

  8. The distal semimembranosus complex: normal MR anatomy, variants, biomechanics and pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltran, Javier; Jbara, Marlena; Maimon, Ron [Department of Radiology, Maimonides Medical Center, 4802 Tenth Avenue, NY 11219, Brooklyn (United States); Matityahu, Amir; Hwang, Ki [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY (United States); Padron, Mario [Department of Radiology, Clinica CEMTRO, Madrid (Spain); Mota, Javier [Department of Radiology, Instituto Clinica Corachan, Barcelona (Spain); Beltran, Luis [New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY (United States); Sundaram, Murali [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2003-08-01

    To describe the normal MR anatomy and variations of the distal semimembranosus tendinous arms and the posterior oblique ligament as seen in the three orthogonal planes, to review the biomechanics of this complex and to illustrate pathologic examples. The distal semimembranosus tendon divides into five tendinous arms named the anterior, direct, capsular, inferior and the oblique popliteal ligament. These arms intertwine with the branches of the posterior oblique ligament in the posterior medial aspect of the knee, providing stability. This tendon-ligamentous complex also acts synergistically with the popliteus muscle and actively pulls the posterior horn of the medial meniscus during knee flexion. Pathologic conditions involving this complex include complete and partial tears, insertional tendinosis, avulsion fractures and bursitis. (orig.)

  9. Tendon retraction with rotator cuff tear causes a decrease in cross-sectional area of the supraspinatus muscle on magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuta, Shoji; Tsutsui, Takahiko; Amari, Rui; Wada, Keizo; Sairyo, Koichi

    2016-07-01

    Muscle atrophy and fatty degeneration of the rotator cuff muscles have been reported as negative prognostic indicators after rotator cuff repair. Although the Y-shaped view is widely used for measuring the cross-sectional area of the supraspinatus muscle, the contribution of retraction of the torn tendon as well as muscle atrophy must be considered. The purpose of this study was to clarify the relationship between cross-sectional area and tendon retraction or size of the tear. This study included 76 shoulders that were evaluated arthroscopically for the presence and size of tears. Cross-sectional areas of rotator cuff muscles were measured from the Y-shaped view to 3 more medial slices. The occupation ratio and tangent sign were evaluated on the Y-shaped view. The retraction of torn tendon was also measured on the oblique coronal images. On the Y-shaped view, the cross-sectional area of the supraspinatus and the occupation ratio decreased in conjunction with the increase in tear size. A significant decrease in cross-sectional area was noted only in large and massive tears on more medial slices from the Y-shaped view. Significant decreases in the cross-sectional area of the infraspinatus were observed in large and massive tears on all images. A negative correlation was found between tendon retraction and cross-sectional area, which was strongest on the Y-shaped view. To avoid the influence of retraction of the supraspinatus tendon, sufficient medial slices from the musculotendinous junction should be used for evaluation of muscle atrophy. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Three Tesla MRI for the diagnosis of meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament pathology: a comparison to arthroscopic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampson, M.J.; Jackson, M.P.; Moran, C.J.; Moran, R.; Eustace, S.J.; Shine, S.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To assess the accuracy of 3 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Materials and methods: Sixty-one consecutive patients were identified who were referred for evaluation of suspected intra-articular pathology with a 3 T MRI and who, subsequently, underwent an arthroscopic procedure of the knee were included for the study. Two musculoskeletal radiologists interpreted the images. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were then calculated for the MRI versus the arthroscopic findings as a reference standard. Results: The sensitivity and specificity for the overall detection of meniscal tears in this study was 84 and 93%, respectively. The results for the medial meniscus separately were 91 and 93% and for the lateral 77 and 93%. The evaluation of ACL integrity was 100% sensitive and specific. The meniscal tear type was correctly identified in 75% of cases and its location in 94%. Conclusion: This study demonstrates good results of 3 T MRI in the evaluation of the injured knee. Caution should still be given to the interpretation on MRI of a lateral meniscus tear, and it is suggested that the standard diagnostic criteria of high signal reaching the articular surface on two consecutive image sections be adhered to even at these higher field strengths

  11. Double-Layered Lateral Meniscus in an 8-Year-Old Child: Report of a Rare Case

    OpenAIRE

    Araki, Susumu; Kubo, Mitsuhiko; Kumagai, Kosuke; Imai, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Reports of congenital abnormalities of the lateral meniscus include discoid meniscus, accessory meniscus, double-layered meniscus, and ring-shaped meniscus. Particularly, only a few cases of double-layered meniscus have been reported. We report a case of double-layered lateral meniscus, in which an additional semicircular meniscus was observed under the normal lateral meniscus. The accessory hemimeniscus was resected by means of arthroscopic surgery. This case demonstrates an interesting and ...

  12. A physical model of the evaporating meniscus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirzamoghadam, A.; Catton, I.

    1985-01-01

    Transport phenomena associated with the heating of a saturated stationary fluid near saturation by an inclined, partially submerged copper plate was studied analytically. Under steady state evaporation, the meniscus profile was derived using an appropriate liquid film velocity and temperature distribution in an integral approach. The solution was then back-substituted in order to identify regions of influence of various physical phenomena given the fluid properties, wall superheat and plate tilt. The degree of superheat and wall tilt were seen to control instability in the meniscus. This instability, connected to the experimental observation of meniscus oscillation, was credited to contributions by liquid inertia and Marangoni convection

  13. Modeling study on axial wetting length of meniscus in vertical rectangular microgrooves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nie, Xuelei; Hu, Xuegong; Tang, Dawei

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the traditional model for predicting axial wetting length of meniscus in vertical microgrooves is introduced firstly. The traditional model may cause inaccurate results in predicting wetting length in vertical microgrooves because of the assumption of round meniscus in cross sections of microgrooves and the way of calculating curvature. In order to develop this model and make it more accurate, a revised micro-PIV system is built to test the meniscus shapes in cross sections of vertical and horizontal microgrooves, and the experimental results prove that the real shapes of meniscus are parabolic other than round. The fitting formulas of meniscus shapes are obtained with software Origin 7.5. Based on experimental results and fitting formulas, the traditional model is revised by changing the way to calculate curvature. In the modified model, the curvature for calculating axial wetting length of meniscus equals average curvature of meniscus in cross section of vertical microgrooves minus the average curvature of meniscus in cross section of horizontal microgrooves. It is proved that the modified model can predict the wetting length in vertical microgrooves better than the original model. The average difference between experiment and modified model is 2.5% while that between experiment and traditional model is 174.2%. The disadvantage of the modified model is that using the new model to predict wetting length needs to know the real shapes of meniscus in vertical and horizontal microgrooves. -- Highlights: ► An experimental system is designed to test the shapes of meniscus in microgrooves. ► The real shapes of meniscus in microgrooves are obtained for first time. ► The shapes of meniscus in microgrooves is compared and analyzed. ► The model for predicting wetting length of meniscus in microgrooves is developed

  14. Noninvasive Dry Eye Assessment Using High-Technology Ophthalmic Examination Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Masahiko; Sakane, Yuri; Kamao, Tomoyuki; Zheng, Xiaodong; Goto, Tomoko; Shiraishi, Atsushi; Ohashi, Yuichi

    2016-11-01

    Recently, the number of dry eye cases has dramatically increased. Thus, it is important that easy screening, exact diagnoses, and suitable treatments be available. We developed 3 original and noninvasive assessments for this disorder. First, a DR-1 dry eye monitor was used to determine the tear meniscus height quantitatively by capturing a tear meniscus digital image that was analyzed by Meniscus Processor software. The DR-1 meniscus height value significantly correlated with the fluorescein meniscus height (r = 0.06, Bland-Altman analysis). At a cutoff value of 0.22 mm, sensitivity of the dry eye diagnosis was 84.1% with 90.9% specificity. Second, the Tear Stability Analysis System was used to quantitatively measure tear film stability using a topographic modeling system corneal shape analysis device. Tear film stability was objectively and quantitatively evaluated every second during sustained eye openings. The Tear Stability Analysis System is currently installed in an RT-7000 autorefractometer and topographer to automate the diagnosis of dry eye. Third, the Ocular Surface Thermographer uses ophthalmic thermography for diagnosis. The decrease in ocular surface temperature in dry eyes was significantly greater than that in normal eyes (P eye opening. Decreased corneal temperature correlated significantly with the tear film breakup time (r = 0.572; P dry eye, sensitivity was 0.83 and specificity was 0.80 after 10 seconds. This article describes the details and potential of these 3 noninvasive dry eye assessment systems.

  15. Polymer composite microtube array produced by meniscus-guided approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyu Hwang Won

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Single freestanding microtubes of poly(methyl methacrylate/polypyrrole (PMMA/PPy are produced based on a meniscus-guided approach. A ring-deposit of nanoparticles is first formed in a meniscus solution of PMMA/PPy nanoparticles by outward liquid flow in fast solvent evaporation. Continuous accumulation of nanoparticles on the ring-deposit is then made by guiding the meniscus upward under the outward flow, thereby forming single composite microtube with controlled outer diameter and wall thickness. The meniscus-guiding enables us to produce an array of freestanding microtubes that are individually controlled in size at the desired positions. We demonstrate individually addressable gas sensors by integrating PMMA/PPy microtubes on electrodes.

  16. Do cell based tissue engineering products for meniscus regeneration influence vascularization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Matthias; Ehrenreich, Tobias; Koehl, Gudrun; Pattappa, Girish; Pfeifer, Christian; Loibl, Markus; Müller, Michael; Nerlich, Michael; Angele, Peter; Zellner, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    Meniscus regeneration is observed within the peripheral, vascularized zone but decreases in the inner two thirds alongside the vascularization. Within this avascular area, cell-based tissue-engineering-approaches appear to be a promising strategy for the treatment of meniscal defects. Evaluation of the angiogenic potential of cell-based tissue-engineering-products for meniscus healing. Evaluation of angiogenesis induced by rabbit meniscus-pellets, meniscus-cells (MC) or mesenchymal stem-cells (MSC) in cell-based tissue-engineering-products within a rabbit meniscus-ring was performed using a transparent dorsal skin fold chamber in nude mice. Observations were undertaken during a 14 days period. Cell preconditioning differed between experimental groups. Immunohistochemical analysis of the regenerated tissue in the meniscus-ring induced by cell loaded composite scaffolds for differentiation and anti-angiogenic factors were performed. Meniscus-pellets and MSC-/MC-based tissue-engineering-products induced angiogenesis. An accelerated vascularization was detected in the group of meniscus-pellets derived from the vascularized zone compared to avascular meniscus-pellets. In terms of cell-based tissue-engineering-products, chondrogenic preconditioning resulted in significantly increased vessel growth. MSC-constructs showed an accelerated angiogenesis. Immunohistochemical evaluation showed a progressive differentiation and lower content for anti-angiogenic endostatin in the precultured group. Preconditioning of MC-/MSC-based tissue-engineering-products is a promising tool to influence the angiogenic potential of tissue-engineering-products and to adapt these properties according to the aimed tissue qualities.

  17. Transtendon, double-row, transosseous-equivalent arthroscopic repair of partial-thickness, articular-surface rotator cuff tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilisio, Matthew F; Miller, Lindsay R; Higgins, Laurence D

    2014-10-01

    Arthroscopic transtendinous techniques for the arthroscopic repair of partial-thickness, articular-surface rotator cuff tears offer the advantage of minimizing the disruption of the patient's remaining rotator cuff tendon fibers. In addition, double-row fixation of full-thickness rotator cuff tears has shown biomechanical advantages. We present a novel method combining these 2 techniques for transtendon, double-row, transosseous-equivalent arthroscopic repair of partial-thickness, articular-surface rotator cuff tears. Direct visualization of the reduction of the retracted articular tendon layer to its insertion on the greater tuberosity is the key to the procedure. Linking the medial-row anchors and using a double-row construct provide a stable repair that allows early shoulder motion to minimize the risk of postoperative stiffness.

  18. Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Miami, FL, 8/30/2011) Knee Injuries and Disorders Knee Arthroscopy for Treatment of a Meniscus Tear (Broward Health Medical Center, ... Greenville, SC, 1/27/2014) Knee Injuries and Disorders Knee Arthroscopy for Treatment of a Meniscus Tear (Broward Health Medical Center, ...

  19. MRI diagnosis of reverse and separation of meniscus articular capsule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Xiaofeng; Zhou Chengtao; Mu Renqi; Zhang Guanghui; Xu Yongzhong

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore the MR imaging of reverse and separation of meniscal articular capsule. Methods: MR imaging of reverse and separation of meniscus articular capsule confirmed by surgery and arthroscope were analyzed retrospectively in 8 cases. Results: The 'Butterfly knot sign' disappeared and was replaced with fluid signal on the sagittal slice of meniscal body in 8 cases. Part of back angle remained in 3 cases. 'Double anterior cruciate ligament sign' was showed on one side of middle sagittal slice in 7 cases. 'Reverse meniscus sign' was revealed in intercondylar fossa on the coronary view in 8 cases. Abnormal high signal was showed in the injured meniscus in 6 cases. Abnormal high signal was detected in the opposite meniscus in 5 cases. Conclusion: The MR findings of reverse and separation of meniscus articular capsule include disappearance of 'butterfly knot sign', appearance of 'reverse meniscus sign' and 'double anterior cruciate ligament sign'. The diagnosis would be established if the former 2 signs were present or all the 3 signs were present simultaneously. (authors)

  20. Biochemical Stimulus-Based Strategies for Meniscus Tissue Engineering and Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mingxue; Guo, Weimin; Gao, Shunag; Hao, Chunxiang; Shen, Shi; Zhang, Zengzeng; Wang, Zhenyong; Wang, Zehao; Li, Xu; Jing, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Xueliang; Yuan, Zhiguo; Wang, Mingjie; Zhang, Yu; Peng, Jiang; Wang, Aiyuan; Wang, Yu; Sui, Xiang

    2018-01-01

    Meniscus injuries are very common and still pose a challenge for the orthopedic surgeon. Meniscus injuries in the inner two-thirds of the meniscus remain incurable. Tissue-engineered meniscus strategies seem to offer a new approach for treating meniscus injuries with a combination of seed cells, scaffolds, and biochemical or biomechanical stimulation. Cell- or scaffold-based strategies play a pivotal role in meniscus regeneration. Similarly, biochemical and biomechanical stimulation are also important. Seed cells and scaffolds can be used to construct a tissue-engineered tissue; however, stimulation to enhance tissue maturation and remodeling is still needed. Such stimulation can be biomechanical or biochemical, but this review focuses only on biochemical stimulation. Growth factors (GFs) are one of the most important forms of biochemical stimulation. Frequently used GFs always play a critical role in normal limb development and growth. Further understanding of the functional mechanism of GFs will help scientists to design the best therapy strategies. In this review, we summarize some of the most important GFs in tissue-engineered menisci, as well as other types of biological stimulation. PMID:29581987

  1. Transport of Iodine Is Different in Cartilage and Meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honkanen, J T J; Turunen, M J; Tiitu, V; Jurvelin, J S; Töyräs, J

    2016-07-01

    Contrast enhanced computed tomography (CECT) has been proposed for diagnostics of cartilage and meniscus injuries and degeneration. As both tissues may be imaged simultaneously, CECT could provide a method for comprehensive evaluation of knee joint health. Since the composition and structure of cartilage and meniscus are different, we hypothesize that transport characteristics of anionic contrast agents also differ between the tissues. This would affect interpretation of CECT images and warrants investigation. To clarify this, we aimed to determine the transport kinematics of anionic iodine (q = -1, M = 126.9 g/mol), assumed to not be significantly affected by the steric hindrance, thus providing faster transport than large molecule contrast agents (e.g., ioxaglate). Cylindrical samples (d = 6 mm, h = 2 mm) were prepared from healthy bovine (n = 10) patella and meniscus, immersed in isotonic phosphate-buffered NaI solution (20 mgI/mL), and subsequently imaged with a micro-CT at 20 time points up to 23 h. Subsequently, normalized attenuation and contrast agent flux, as well as water, collagen, and proteoglycan (PG) contents in the tissues were determined. Normalized attenuation at equilibrium was higher (p = 0.005) in meniscus. Contrast agent flux was lower (p = 0.005) in the meniscus at 10 min, but higher (p meniscus was different, especially between the first 2 hours after the immersion. This is an important finding which should be considered during simultaneous CECT of cartilage and meniscus.

  2. The MR diagnosis of discoid lateral meniscus of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, Yutaka; Ishida, Tsuyoshi; Ohtani, Masatoshi; Yamamoto, Hironori; Yamamoto, Tadasi; Tsukaguchi, Isao; Nakamura, Hitonobu.

    1992-01-01

    To establish the criteria for the diagnosis of discoid lateral meniscus, we introduced a discriminant analysis to our statistical study. Materials included surgically proved 38 discoid lateral menisci and 36 normal menisci imaged by means of MR. Numerical measurements were performed interactively on the MR monitor with eight possible parameters of these parameters, a discriminant analysis revealed that the transverse width of the lateral meniscus on the coronal image was the best parameter. Our study showed that discoid lateral meniscus should be present if the transverse width of the lateral meniscus exceeded 14.3 mm. (author)

  3. Silicon Sheet Quality is Improved By Meniscus Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, D. A.; Hatch, A. E.; Goldsmith, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Better quality silicon crystals for solar cells are possible with instrument that monitors position of meniscus as sheet of solid silicon is drawn from melt. Using information on meniscus height, instrument generates feedback signal to control melt temperature. Automatic control ensures more uniform silicon sheets.

  4. Usefulness of meniscal width to transverse diameter ratio on coronal MRI in the diagnosis of incomplete discoid lateral meniscus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, H.J.; Lee, S.Y.; Park, N.-H.; Chung, E.C.; Park, J.Y.; Kim, M.S.; Lee, E.J.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the clinical utility of the meniscal width to transverse diameter ratio (L/M ratio) of the lateral meniscus in the diagnosis of incomplete discoid lateral meniscus (IDLM) as compared with the arthroscopic diagnosis, meniscal width to tibial diameter ratio (L/T ratio) and conventional lateral meniscus width criteria. Materials and methods: This retrospective study sample included 41 patients with IDLM who underwent knee magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and arthroscopy, as well as 50 controls with normal lateral menisci. MRI examinations were interpreted independently by two radiologists, both of whom were blinded to clinical information and radiological reports. Assessment of meniscal width (L), maximal transverse diameter of the lateral meniscus (M), and transverse diameter of the tibia (T) was carried out on central coronal sections that were observed to pass through the medial collateral ligament. L/M and L/T ratios were calculated. These results were correlated with arthroscopic findings and analysed statistically using categorical regression analysis and non-parametric correlation analysis. Using arthroscopic findings as the standard of reference, sensitivity and specificity were calculated for: (1) 12, 13, 14, and 15 mm meniscal width thresholds; (2) 40%, 50%, 60%, and 70% L/M ratio thresholds; and (3) 15%, 18%, 20%, and 25% L/T ratio thresholds. Results: The mean L/M ratio of the IDLM was approximately 67% and was statistically significantly higher than the control (44%). The best diagnostic discrimination was achieved using a threshold of 50%. The mean L/T ratio of the IDLM was approximately 23% and was statistically significant. The best diagnostic discrimination was achieved using a threshold of 18%. The threshold of 13 mm of meniscal width also showed high sensitivity and high specificity. Conclusion: The use of the L/M ratio or L/T ratio in combination with meniscal width criteria may be a useful method for evaluating IDLM

  5. Meniscus and viscous forces during normal separation of liquid-mediated contacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Shaobiao; Bhushan, Bharat

    2007-01-01

    Menisci form between two solid surfaces with the presence of an ultra-thin liquid film. Meniscus and viscous forces contribute to an adhesive force when two surfaces are separated. The adhesive force can be very large and can result in high friction, stiction and possibly high wear. The situation may become more pronounced when the contacting surfaces are ultra-smooth and the normal load is small, as is common for micro-/nanodevices. In this study, equations for meniscus and viscous forces during separation of two flat surfaces, and a sphere and a flat surface, are developed, and the corresponding adhesive forces contributed by these two types of forces are examined. The geometric meniscus curvatures and break point are theoretically determined, and the role of meniscus and viscous forces is evaluated during separation. The influence of separation distance, liquid thickness, meniscus area, separation time, liquid properties and contact angles are analyzed. Critical meniscus areas at which transition in the dominance of meniscus to viscous forces occurs for different given conditions, i.e. various initial liquid thicknesses, contact angles and designated separation time, are identified. The analysis provides a fundamental understanding of the physics of separation process, and insights into the relationships between meniscus and viscous forces. It is also valuable for the design of the interface for various devices

  6. Meniscus tears -- aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Quickly stop moving and change direction while running, landing from a jump, or turning Kneel down Squat ... Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: 30 April 2018

  7. [Correlation between morphogical factor of lateral plateau fracture and meniscus injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, L; Zhou, W; Zhang, W T; Huang, W; You, T; Chen, P; Zhang, H L

    2016-04-18

    To analyze morphological character of lateral tibial plateau fracture fragment, and its correlation to the presence of a meniscus injury in tibial plateau fractures. A total of 79 consecutive patients of the simple lateral tibial plateau fractures from July 2011 to July 2015 were included in this study, with 65 males and 14 females with an average age of (34.3±7.2) years and 22-61 years. According to Schatzker classification, 21 cases were of Type I, 41 cases Type II, and 17 cases Type III. The characteristics of lateral tibial plateau fractures were evaluated by plain X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The type and severity of meniscus injury were diagnosed by MRI scan. Three-dimensional measurements of the lateral fragment width (LFW), the lateral plateau depression (LPD), the coronal angulation of lateral fragment (CALF), and tibial plateau widening (TPW) were measured with Picture Archiving and Communication Systems(PACS) software. The patients with and without meniscus injuries were divided into different groups and analyzed respectively. Comparison of the above measurements between the two groups was analyzed by independent t test. In all the 79 lateral tibial plateau fracture patients, 26 cases (32.9%) of meniscus injuries were detected by MRI. Among all the meniscus injury cases, 3 were of Schatzker I, 16 Schatzker II, and 7 Schatzker III. In meniscus intact group, the average LFW was (22.0±2.8) mm while in meniscus injury group it was (21.3± 3.3) mm (t=-1.008, P=0.317).The average LPD of non meniscus injury group was (5.4±2.8) mm, while in meniscus injury group was (8.7±2.8) mm (t=4.98, P=0.001). The average CALF of the two groups were 9.1°±6.1°and 10.6°± 7.1°, and there was no significant difference between the two groups (t=0.38, P=0.831). The average TPW was (3.0± 1.1) mm, and (4.8±1.7) mm of the two groups. There were significant differences between the two groups (t=5.216, P=0.001). There was no obvious correlation between the

  8. Tears of anterior cruciate ligament and associated injury in the knee joint: MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eui Jong; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Ahn, Jin Whan; Yoon, Yup

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the characteristic findings in tears of the anterior cruciate ligament(ACL) and associated injury at MR imaging. We reviewed the findings of MR images and the corresponding arthroscopic results of 32 patients with ACL tears. We evaluated the signal intensity and contour of ACL surrounding bony structures, menisci and associated injury of the knee joint. Complete ACL tears were present in 25 patients and partial ACL tears were in 7 patients. Complete ACL tears showed heterogenously increased signal intensity with contour bulging of the ACL in 14 patients (56%) and without bulging or absence in 11 patients(44%). Most patients torn ACL with contour bulging(12/14) had bone bruise, but only one patient torn ACL without bulging contour had bone bruise. ACL with thin continuous low signal band surrounding heterogenously increased signal intensity suggests partial tear which was seen in three patients of seven proved partial ACL tears. Combined bone injury in ACL tear were in 23 patients (73%) and most of these(22/23) were at midportion of lateral notch of femur and/or posterior portion of lateral tibial plateu. Deepening of lateral notch of femur were noted in 17 patients(53%). Associated injuries of the other ligaments of knee joint were buckling of the posterior cruciate ligament(16/32, 50%) and tears of the medial collateral ligament(11/32, 34%). Posterior horns of menisci were more frequent site of combined injury within menisci in patients with ACL tear. Acute tearing of ACL in MRI is seen as heterogenously increased signal intensity with contour bulging of ACL and combined bone bruises. Patients with torn ACL frequently have various combined injury. In patient with knee injury, these associated or ancillary findings suggest that ACL tear is present

  9. Influence of the liquid helium meniscus on neutron reflectometry data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinane, C.J.; Kirichek, O.; Charlton, T.R.; McClintock, P.V.E.

    2016-01-01

    Neutron reflectometry offers a unique opportunity for the direct observation of nanostratification in 3 He- 4 He mixtures in the ultra-low temperature limit. Unfortunately the results of recent experiments could not be well-modelled on account of a seemingly anomalous variation of reflectivity with momentum transfer. We now hypothesize that this effect is attributable to an optical distortion caused by the liquid meniscus near the container wall. The validity of this idea is tested and confirmed through a subsidiary experiment on a D 2 O sample, showing that the meniscus can significantly distort results if the beam size in the horizontal plane is comparable with, or bigger than, the diameter of the container. The meniscus problem can be eliminated if the beam size is substantially smaller than the diameter of the container, such that reflection takes place only from the flat region of the liquid surface thus excluding the meniscus tails. Practical measures for minimizing the meniscus distortion effect are discussed.

  10. Autologous Bone Marrow Concentrate in a Sheep Model of Osteoarthritis: New Perspectives for Cartilage and Meniscus Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desando, Giovanna; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Cavallo, Carola; Bartolotti, Isabella; Sartoni, Federica; Nicoli Aldini, Nicolò; Martini, Lucia; Parrilli, Annapaola; Mariani, Erminia; Fini, Milena; Grigolo, Brunella

    2016-06-01

    Cell-based therapies are becoming a valuable tool to treat osteoarthritis (OA). This study investigated and compared the regenerative potential of bone marrow concentrate (BMC) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), both engineered with Hyaff(®)-11 (HA) for OA treatment in a sheep model. OA was induced via unilateral medial meniscectomy. Bone marrow was aspirated from the iliac crest, followed by concentration processes or cell isolation and expansion to obtain BMC and MSC, respectively. Treatments consisted of autologous BMC and MSC seeded onto HA. The regenerative potential of bone, cartilage, menisci, and synovia was monitored using macroscopy, histology, immunohistochemistry, and micro-computed tomography at 12 weeks post-op. Data were analyzed using the general linear model with adjusted Sidak's multiple comparison and Spearman's tests. BMC-HA treatment showed a greater repair ability in inhibiting OA progression compared to MSC-HA, leading to a reduction of inflammation in cartilage, meniscus, and synovium. Indeed, the decrease of inflammation positively contributed to counteract the progression of fibrotic and hypertrophic processes, known to be involved in tissue failure. Moreover, the treatment with BMC-HA showed the best results in allowing meniscus regeneration. Minor healing effects were noticed at bone level for both cell strategies; however, a downregulation of subchondral bone thickness (Cs.Th) was found in both cell treatments compared to the OA group in the femur. The transplantation of BMC-HA provided the best effects in supporting regenerative processes in cartilage, meniscus, and synovium and at less extent in bone. On the whole, both MSC and BMC combined with HA reduced inflammation and contributed to switch off fibrotic and hypertrophic processes. The observed regenerative potential by BMC-HA on meniscus could open new perspectives, suggesting its use not only for OA care but also for the treatment of meniscal lesions, even if further analyses are

  11. Micromechanical anisotropy and heterogeneity of the meniscus extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Qu, Feini; Han, Biao; Wang, Chao; Li, Hao; Mauck, Robert L; Han, Lin

    2017-05-01

    To understand how the complex biomechanical functions of the meniscus are endowed by the nanostructure of its extracellular matrix (ECM), we studied the anisotropy and heterogeneity in the micromechanical properties of the meniscus ECM. We used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to quantify the time-dependent mechanical properties of juvenile bovine meniscus at deformation length scales corresponding to the diameters of collagen fibrils. At this scale, anisotropy in the elastic modulus of the circumferential fibers, the major ECM structural unit, can be attributed to differences in fibril deformation modes: uncrimping when normal to the fiber axis, and laterally constrained compression when parallel to the fiber axis. Heterogeneity among different structural units is mainly associated with their variations in microscale fiber orientation, while heterogeneity across anatomical zones is due to alterations in collagen fibril diameter and alignment at the nanoscale. Unlike the elastic modulus, the time-dependent properties are more homogeneous and isotropic throughout the ECM. These results enable a detailed understanding of the meniscus structure-mechanics at the nanoscale, and can serve as a benchmark for understanding meniscus biomechanical functions, documenting disease progression and designing tissue repair strategies. Meniscal damage is a common cause of joint injury, which can lead to the development of post-traumatic osteoarthritis among young adults. Restoration of meniscus function requires repairing its highly heterogeneous and complex extracellular matrix. Employing AFM, this study quantifies the anisotropic and heterogeneous features of the meniscus ECM structure and mechanics. The micromechanical properties are interpreted within the context of the collagen fibril nanostructure and its variation with tissue anatomical locations. These results provide a fundamental structure-mechanics knowledge benchmark, against which, repair and regeneration strategies can

  12. Transtendon rotator-cuff repair of partial-thickness articular surface tears can lead to medial rotator-cuff failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woods TC

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Tom C Woods,4 Michael J Carroll,1 Atiba A Nelson,2 Kristie D More,2 Randa Berdusco,1 Stephen Sohmer,3 Richard S Boorman,1,2 Ian KY Lo1,21Department of Surgery, 2Sport Medicine Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; 3Department of Orthopaedics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, 4St Joseph's Hospital, Comox, BC, CanadaPurpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical and anatomic outcomes of patients following transtendon rotator-cuff repair of partial articular supraspinatus tendon avulsion (PASTA lesions.Patients and methods: Patients in the senior author's practice who had isolated PASTA lesions treated by transtendon rotator-cuff repair were included (n=8 and retrospectively reviewed. All patients were evaluated preoperatively and at a mean of 21.2 months (±9.7 months postoperatively using standardized clinical evaluation (physical exam, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons, and Simple Shoulder Test. All patients underwent postoperative imaging with a magnetic resonance imaging arthrogram.Results: There was a significant improvement in American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (42.7±17.5 to 86.9±25.2 and Simple Shoulder Test (4.6±3.2 to 10.1±3.8 scores from pre- to postoperative, respectively. Postoperative imaging demonstrated full-thickness medial cuff tearing in seven patients, and one patient with a persistent partial articular surface defect.Conclusion: Transtendon repair of PASTA lesions may lead to improvements in clinical outcome. However, postoperative imaging demonstrated a high incidence of full-thickness rotator-cuff defects following repair.Keywords: rotator cuff, PASTA lesion, transtendon repair

  13. The active abduction view: A new maneuvre in the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    A new projection is described, the active abduction view of the shoulder, where in many patients with a comlete rotator cuff tear the humeral head is closely apposed to the acromion, obliterating the subacromial space. In such a situation,the medial portion of the torn rotator cuff retracts during active abduction, allowing approximation of the two bones. (orig./GDG)

  14. Integrity of articular cartilage on T2 mapping associated with meniscal signal change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kai, Brian; Mann, Sumeer A.; King, Chris; Forster, Bruce B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between T2 relaxation values (T2 RVs) within the superficial zone of articular cartilage and different types of meniscal degeneration/tear. Materials and methods: A review of 310 consecutive knee MRIs which included an 8 echo T2 relaxation sequence, in patients referred for standard clinical indications, was performed independently and in blinded fashion by 2 observers. The posterior horns of the medial and lateral menisci were each evaluated and divided into 4 subgroups: Normal (control), Grade I/II meniscal signal, Grade III meniscal signal-simple tear (Grade III-S), and Grade III meniscal signal-complex tear (Grade III-C). After exclusion criteria were applied, the medial meniscal group consisted of 65 controls and 133 patients, while the lateral meniscal group consisted of 143 controls and 55 patients. T2 RVs were measured by an observer blinded to the clinical history and MRI grading. Measurements were obtained over the superficial zone of femoral and tibial articular cartilage adjacent to the center of the posterior horn of each meniscus to ensure consistency between measurements. Analysis of covariance adjusting for age and gender was used to compare T2 RVs between patients and controls. Results: T2 RVs were significantly increased in patients with Grade III-C meniscal tears compared to controls over the medial tibial plateau (MTP; p = 0.0001) and lateral tibial plateau (LTP; p = 0.0008). T2 RVs were not increased in patients with Grade III-C meniscal tears over the medial femoral condyle (MFC; p = 0.11) or lateral femoral condyle (LFC; p = 0.99). Grade I/II meniscal signal was not associated with elevated T2 RVs over the MFC (p = 0.15), LFC (p = 0.69), MTP (p = 0.42), or LTP (p = 0.50). Grade III-S meniscal signal was not associated with elevated T2 RVs over the MFC (p = 0.54), LFC (p = 0.43), MTP (p = 0.30), or LTP (p = 0.38). Conclusion: Grade III-C meniscal tears are associated with

  15. Integrity of articular cartilage on T2 mapping associated with meniscal signal change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kai, Brian [Department of Radiology, University of British Columbia, UBC Hospital, 2211 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2B5 (Canada); Mann, Sumeer A. [Department of Radiology, University of Alberta, Walter Mackenzie Health Sciences Center, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2B7 (Canada); King, Chris [Department of Radiology, University of British Columbia, UBC Hospital, 2211 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2B5 (Canada); Forster, Bruce B., E-mail: bruce.forster@vch.ca [Department of Radiology, University of British Columbia, UBC Hospital, 2211 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2B5 (Canada)

    2011-09-15

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between T2 relaxation values (T2 RVs) within the superficial zone of articular cartilage and different types of meniscal degeneration/tear. Materials and methods: A review of 310 consecutive knee MRIs which included an 8 echo T2 relaxation sequence, in patients referred for standard clinical indications, was performed independently and in blinded fashion by 2 observers. The posterior horns of the medial and lateral menisci were each evaluated and divided into 4 subgroups: Normal (control), Grade I/II meniscal signal, Grade III meniscal signal-simple tear (Grade III-S), and Grade III meniscal signal-complex tear (Grade III-C). After exclusion criteria were applied, the medial meniscal group consisted of 65 controls and 133 patients, while the lateral meniscal group consisted of 143 controls and 55 patients. T2 RVs were measured by an observer blinded to the clinical history and MRI grading. Measurements were obtained over the superficial zone of femoral and tibial articular cartilage adjacent to the center of the posterior horn of each meniscus to ensure consistency between measurements. Analysis of covariance adjusting for age and gender was used to compare T2 RVs between patients and controls. Results: T2 RVs were significantly increased in patients with Grade III-C meniscal tears compared to controls over the medial tibial plateau (MTP; p = 0.0001) and lateral tibial plateau (LTP; p = 0.0008). T2 RVs were not increased in patients with Grade III-C meniscal tears over the medial femoral condyle (MFC; p = 0.11) or lateral femoral condyle (LFC; p = 0.99). Grade I/II meniscal signal was not associated with elevated T2 RVs over the MFC (p = 0.15), LFC (p = 0.69), MTP (p = 0.42), or LTP (p = 0.50). Grade III-S meniscal signal was not associated with elevated T2 RVs over the MFC (p = 0.54), LFC (p = 0.43), MTP (p = 0.30), or LTP (p = 0.38). Conclusion: Grade III-C meniscal tears are associated with

  16. Inertial rise of a meniscus on a vertical cylinder

    KAUST Repository

    O’ Kiely, Doireann; Whiteley, Jonathan P.; Oliver, James M.; Vella, Dominic

    2015-01-01

    © © 2015 Cambridge University PressA. We consider the inertia-dominated rise of a meniscus around a vertical circular cylinder. Previous experiments and scaling analysis suggest that the height of the meniscus, h-{m}, grows with the time following

  17. Outcomes of Osteochondral Allograft Transplantation With and Without Concomitant Meniscus Allograft Transplantation: A Comparative Matched Group Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Rachel M; Lee, Simon; Cotter, Eric J; Hannon, Charles P; Leroux, Timothy; Cole, Brian J

    2018-03-01

    Osteochondral allograft transplantation (OCA) is often performed with concomitant meniscus allograft transplantation (MAT) as a strategy for knee joint preservation, although to date, the effect of concomitant MAT on outcomes and failure rates after OCA has not been assessed. To determine clinical outcomes for patients undergoing OCA with MAT as compared with a matched cohort of patients undergoing isolated OCA. Control study; Level of evidence, 3. Patients who underwent OCA of the medial or lateral femoral condyle without concomitant MAT by a single surgeon were compared with a matched group of patients who underwent OCA with concomitant MAT (ipsilateral compartment). The patients were matched per age, sex, body mass index, and number of previous ipsilateral knee operations ±1. Patient-reported outcomes, complications, reoperations, and survival rates were compared between groups. One hundred patients undergoing OCA (50 isolated, 50 with MAT) with a mean ± SD follow-up of 4.9 ± 2.7 years (minimum, 2 years) were included (age, 31.7 ± 9.8 years; 52% male). Significantly more patients underwent OCA to the medial femoral condyle (n = 59) than the lateral femoral condyle (n = 41, P OCA. There were no significant differences between the groups regarding reoperation rate (n = 18 for OCA with MAT, n = 17 for OCA without MAT, P = .834), time to reoperation (2.2 ± 2.4 years for OCA with MAT, 3.4 ± 2.7 years for OCA without MAT, P = .149), or failure rates (n = 7 [14%] for OCA with MAT, n = 7 [14%] for OCA without MAT, P > .999). There were no significant differences in patient-reported clinical outcome scores between the groups at final follow-up. There was no significant difference in failure rates between patients undergoing medial femoral condyle OCA (n = 12, 15.3%) and lateral femoral condyle OCA (n = 5, 12.2%, P = .665). These results imply that with appropriate surgical indications to address meniscus deficiency in patients otherwise indicated for OCA and

  18. Formation and maturation of the murine meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamer, Laura W; Xiang, Lin; Rosen, Vicki

    2017-08-01

    Meniscal injuries are commonplace, but current surgical repair procedures do not prevent degenerative joint changes that occur after meniscal injury and often lead to osteoarthritis. Successful tissue regeneration in adults often recapitulates events that occur during embryogenesis, suggesting that understanding the regulatory pathways controlling these early processes may provide clues for developing strategies for tissue repair. While the mouse is now widely used to study joint diseases, detailed knowledge of the basic biology of murine meniscus is not readily available. Here, we examine meniscal morphogenesis in mice from embryonic day 13.5 (E13.5) to 6 months of age using histology, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry. We find that the meniscus is a morphologically distinct structure at E16 when it begins to regionalize. At birth, the meniscus has a distinguishable inner, avascular, round chondrocyte cell region, an outer, vascularized, fibroblast cell region, and a surface superficial zone. Maturation begins at 2 weeks of age when the meniscus expresses type I collagen, type II collagen, type X collagen, and MMP-13 in specific patterns. By 4 weeks of age, small areas of ossification are detected in the anterior meniscal horn, a common feature seen in rodents. Maturation appears complete at 8 weeks of age, when the meniscus resembles the adult structure complete with ossifying tissue that contains bone marrow like areas. Our results provide, the first systematic study of mouse meniscal development and will be a valuable tool for analyzing murine models of knee joint formation and disease. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1683-1689, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Biomechanics of Meniscus Cells: Regional Variation and Comparison to Articular Chondrocytes and Ligament Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez-Adams, Johannah; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2012-01-01

    Central to understanding mechanotransduction in the knee meniscus is the characterization of meniscus cell mechanics. In addition to biochemical and geometric differences, the inner and outer regions of the meniscus contain cells that are distinct in morphology and phenotype. This study investigated the regional variation in meniscus cell mechanics in comparison to articular chondrocytes and ligament cells. It was found that the meniscus contains two biomechanically distinct cell populations,...

  20. Analysis of Multigrid Extraction Plasma Meniscus Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Cavenago, Marco; Sattin, Fabio; Tanga, Arturo

    2005-01-01

    Effects of plasma meniscus on the emittance in negative ion source proposed for spallation sources or neutral beam injectors (NBI) for tokamaks are particularly interesting to study with fluid models because: 1) at least three different charged fluid can be recognised: the thermalized and fully magnetized electrons; the slightly magnetized and roughly thermalized positive ions; the negative ions, typically formed within few cm from meniscus; 2) different implementation of the magnetic filter system need to be compared; 3) optimization of electron dump and outlet electrode strongly depends on plasma meniscus contact point. With reasonable assumption on system geometry, 2D and 3D charged fluid quation for the selfconsistent electrostatic field can be written and effect of grid aperture is investigated. Moreover, these equations are easily implemented into a multiphysics general purpose program. Preliminary results are described, and compared to existing codes.

  1. Biomechanical Performance of Medial Row Suture Placement Relative to the Musculotendinous Junction in Transosseous Equivalent Suture Bridge Double-Row Rotator Cuff Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virk, Mandeep S; Bruce, Benjamin; Hussey, Kristen E; Thomas, Jacqueline M; Luthringer, Tyler A; Shewman, Elizabeth F; Wang, Vincent M; Verma, Nikhil N; Romeo, Anthony A; Cole, Brian J

    2017-02-01

    To compare the biomechanical performance of medial row suture placement relative to the musculotendinous junction (MTJ) in a cadaveric transosseous equivalent suture bridge (TOE-SB) double-row (DR) rotator cuff repair (RCR) model. A TOE-SB DR technique was used to reattach experimentally created supraspinatus tendon tears in 9 pairs of human cadaveric shoulders. The medial row sutures were passed either near the MTJ (MTJ group) or 10 mm lateral to the MTJ (rotator cuff tendon [RCT] group). After the supraspinatus repair, the specimens underwent cyclic loading and load to failure tests. The localized displacement of the markers affixed to the tendon surface was measured with an optical tracking system. The MTJ group showed a significantly higher (P = .03) medial row failure (5/9; 3 during cyclic testing and 2 during load to failure testing) compared with the RCT group (0/9). The mean number of cycles completed during cyclic testing was lower in the MTJ group (77) compared with the RCT group (100; P = .07) because 3 specimens failed in the MTJ group during cyclic loading. There were no significant differences between the 2 study groups with respect to biomechanical properties during the load to failure testing. In a cadaveric TOE-SB DR RCR model, medial row sutures through the MTJ results in a significantly higher rate of medial row failure. In rotator cuff tears with tendon tissue loss, passage of medial row sutures through the MTJ should be avoided in a TOE-SB RCR technique because of the risk of medial row failure. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Fracture of the medial intercondylar eminence of the tibia in horses treated by arthroscopic fragment removal (21 horses).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Martínez, L M; Redding, W R; Bladon, B; Wilderjans, H; Payne, R J; Tessier, C; Geffroy, O; Parker, R; Bell, C; Collingwood, F A

    2018-01-01

    Fractures of the medial intercondylar eminence of the tibia (MICET) are scarcely reported in horses. To report the clinical and diagnostic findings, surgical treatment and outcome in a series of horses presented with MICET fracture and treated with arthroscopic fragment removal. Multicentre retrospective case series. Case records of horses diagnosed with MICET fractures that had undergone surgical treatment were reviewed. Follow-up information was obtained from re-examination visits and/or owners. Twenty-one cases were identified at 9 equine hospitals between 2004 and 2016. A history of trauma and acute onset of lameness was reported in 12 horses. All cases underwent fracture removal via arthroscopy of the medial femorotibial joint. The cranial cruciate ligament was intact in 6 horses and damaged in 15 horses (damage was ≤25% [n = 9], 25-50% [n = 4] or ≥50% [n = 2] of the cross-sectional area). The cranial ligament of the medial meniscus was damaged in 11 horses (≤25% [n = 8], 25-50% [n = 3]). The medial meniscus was damaged in 5 horses and articular cartilage damage was identified in 14 horses (mild [n = 8], moderate [n = 6]). Follow-up information (median 14 months; 4 months-6 years) was available for 20 cases; 2 horses were sound but convalescing; 13 horses were sound and returned to their previous or expected use. Of the 4 horses with the most severe changes to the articular soft tissue structures, 2 remained lame and 2 were subjected to euthanasia because of persistent lameness. The retrospective, multicentre nature of this study and the limited number of horses are the main limitations. Fractures of the MICET are commonly associated with a traumatic event. Prompt diagnosis and early arthroscopic removal of the fracture are recommended. © 2017 The Authors. Equine Veterinary Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of EVJ Ltd.

  3. Chronic Changes in the Articular Cartilage and Meniscus Following Traumatic Impact to the Lapine Knee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischenich, Kristine M.; Button, Keith D.; Coatney, Garrett A.; Fajardo, Ryan S.; Leikert, Kevin M.; Haut, Roger C.; Haut Donahue, Tammy L.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to induce anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and meniscal damage, via a single tibiofemoral compressive impact, in order to document articular cartilage and meniscal changes post impact. Tibiofemoral joints of Flemish Giant rabbits were subjected to a single blunt impact that ruptured the ACL and produced acute meniscal damage. Animals were allowed unrestricted cage activity for 12 weeks before euthanasia. India ink analysis of the articular cartilage revealed higher degrees of surface damage on the impacted tibias (p=0.018) and femurs (p<0.0001) compared to controls. Chronic meniscal damage was most prevalent in the medial central and medial posterior regions. Mechanical tests revealed an overall 19.4% increase in tibial plateau cartilage thickness (p=0.026), 34.8% increase in tibial plateau permeability (p=0.054), 40.8% increase in femoral condyle permeability (p=0.029), and 20.1% decrease in femoral condyle matrix modulus (p=0.012) in impacted joints compared to controls. Both the instantaneous and equilibrium moduli of the lateral and medial menisci were decreased compared to control (p<0.02). Histological analyses revealed significantly increased presence of fissures in the medial femur (p = 0.036). In both the meniscus and cartilage there was a significant decrease in GAG coverage for the impacted limbs. Based on these results it is clear that an unattended combined meniscal and ACL injury results in significant changes to the soft tissues in this experimental joint 12 weeks post injury. Such changes are consistent with a clinical description of mid to late stage PTOA of the knee. PMID:25523754

  4. Biological augmentation and tissue engineering approaches in meniscus surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Cathal J; Busilacchi, Alberto; Lee, Cassandra A; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A; Verdonk, Peter C

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this review was to evaluate the role of biological augmentation and tissue engineering strategies in meniscus surgery. Although clinical (human), preclinical (animal), and in vitro tissue engineering studies are included here, we have placed additional focus on addressing preclinical and clinical studies reported during the 5-year period used in this review in a systematic fashion while also providing a summary review of some important in vitro tissue engineering findings in the field over the past decade. A search was performed on PubMed for original works published from 2009 to March 31, 2014 using the term "meniscus" with all the following terms: "scaffolds," "constructs," "cells," "growth factors," "implant," "tissue engineering," and "regenerative medicine." Inclusion criteria were the following: English-language articles and original clinical, preclinical (in vivo), and in vitro studies of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine application in knee meniscus lesions published from 2009 to March 31, 2014. Three clinical studies and 18 preclinical studies were identified along with 68 tissue engineering in vitro studies. These reports show the increasing promise of biological augmentation and tissue engineering strategies in meniscus surgery. The role of stem cell and growth factor therapy appears to be particularly useful. A review of in vitro tissue engineering studies found a large number of scaffold types to be of promise for meniscus replacement. Limitations include a relatively low number of clinical or preclinical in vivo studies, in addition to the fact there is as yet no report in the literature of a tissue-engineered meniscus construct used clinically. Neither does the literature provide clarity on the optimal meniscus scaffold type or biological augmentation with which meniscus repair or replacement would be best addressed in the future. There is increasing focus on the role of mechanobiology and biomechanical and

  5. Evaluation of dacryocystorhinostomy using optical coherence tomography and rebamipide ophthalmic suspension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujimoto M

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Masahiro Fujimoto,1 Ken Ogino,1 Chika Miyazaki,1,2 Miou Hirose,1,3 Hiroko Matsuyama,1,4 Takeshi Moritera,1,5 Nagahisa Yoshimura1 1Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Hyogo Prefectural Tsukaguchi Hospital, Hyogo, Japan; 3Department of Ophthalmology, Hyogo Prefectural Amagasaki Hospital, Hyogo, Japan; 4Department of Ophthalmology, National Hospital Organization Himeji Medical Center, Hyogo, Japan; 5Moritera Eye Clinic, Shiga, Japan Purpose: To evaluate the surgical outcome of dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR by measuring the tear meniscus, using optical coherence tomography and rebamipide ophthalmic suspension. Methods: Patients with nasolacrimal obstruction and chronic dacryocystitis who were scheduled for an endonasal DCR underwent tear meniscus examinations before and 2 months after surgery. Vertical scans of the inferior menisci were performed before and at 1, 3, 5, 7, and 10 minutes after the instillation of rebamipide ophthalmic suspension. The tear menisci areas were measured with imaging software. Ten young adults without epiphora formed the control group.Results: Anatomical success was achieved on 22 sides of 21 patients. The patients’ postoperative tear menisci were significantly smaller than the preoperative menisci at all points during the test, and the response to volume loading in the postoperative patients was corrected to nearly that of the young, healthy adults. Nevertheless, the postoperative meniscus area tended to be larger than that of the young adults at all points.Conclusion: The reduced tear meniscus area after DCR reflected the success of the surgical procedure. However, incomplete recovery of the meniscus after the test might suggest a residual disorder of the lacrimal drainage system after DCR. Keywords: dacryocystorhinostomy, tear meniscus, rebamipide, optical coherence tomography

  6. Dislocation of the temporomandibular joint meniscus: contrast arthrography vs. computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, J.R.; Christiansen, E.; Sauser, D.; Hasso, A.N.; Hinshaw, D.B. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A prospective study to determine the accuracy of computed tomography (CT) for the diagnosis of dislocation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) meniscus was made by performing both CT and contrast arthrography on 18 joints suspected of meniscus dislocation. Arthography rather than surgery was chosen as the quality standard for comparing CT findings, as not all patients undergoing the studies underwent surgery. The results of each test were reported independently by the radiologist who obtained either all of the arthograms or all of the CT scans. For dislocation of the meniscus, there were excellent agreement between the two methods. CT seems to be nearly as accurate as arthrography for showing meniscus dislocation, is performed with lower x-ray exposure, and is noninvasive. Arthrograpy discloses more detailed information about the joint meniscus, such as perforation and maceration, and should continue to be used when this kind of information is clinically important

  7. Effect of open wedge high tibial osteotomy on the lateral tibiofemoral compartment in sheep. Part III: analysis of the microstructure of the subchondral bone and correlations with the articular cartilage and meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Raphaela; Goebel, Lars; Seidel, Roland; Cucchiarini, Magali; Pape, Dietrich; Madry, Henning

    2015-09-01

    First, to evaluate whether medial open wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO) induces alterations of the microstructure of the lateral tibial subchondral bone plate of sheep. Second, to test the hypothesis that specific correlations exist between topographical structural alterations of the subchondral bone, the cartilage and the lateral meniscus. Three experimental groups received biplanar osteotomies of the right proximal tibiae: (a) closing wedge HTO (4.5° of tibial varus), (b) opening wedge HTO (4.5° tibial valgus; standard correction) and (c) opening wedge HTO (9.5° of valgus; overcorrection), each of which was compared to the non-osteotomised contralateral proximal tibiae. After 6 months, subchondral bone structure indices were measured by computed tomography. Correlations between the subchondral bone, the articular cartilage and the lateral meniscus were determined. Increased loading by valgus overcorrection led to an enlarged specific bone surface (BS/BV) in the subarticular spongiosa compared with unloading by varisation. The subchondral bone plate was 3.9-fold thicker in the central region of the lateral tibial plateau than in the submeniscal periphery. Its thickness in the central region significantly correlated with the thickness of the articular cartilage. In the submeniscal region, such correlation did not exist. In general, a higher degree of osteoarthritis (OA) correlated with alterations of the subchondral bone plate microstructure. OA of the submeniscal articular cartilage also correlated with worse matrix staining of the lateral meniscus. Osteoarthritis changes are associated with alterations of the subchondral bone plate microstructure. Specific topographical relationships exist in the central region between the articular cartilage and subchondral bone plate thickness, and in the submeniscal periphery between and the articular cartilage and lateral meniscus. From a clinical perspective, the combined follow-up data from this and the previous two

  8. Repair of the meniscus. An experimental investigation in rabbits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veth, R. P.; den Heeten, G. J.; Jansen, H. W.; Nielsen, H. K.

    1983-01-01

    The healing process of wedge-shaped and longitudinal lesions in the meniscus of the knee was investigated in 74 menisci in 24 Chinchilla rabbits. In four cases the whole meniscus was removed and reimplanted. healing was most evident in the wedge-shaped lesions, which were repaired by fibrocartilage.

  9. MRI EVALUATION OF INTERNAL DERANGEMENT OF KNEE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Srikar Chowdhary

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Internal derangement of knee means loss of normal knee function due to ligament or meniscal injuries. MRI is a routinely utilised noninvasive modality for evaluation of various knee disorders including internal derangement. MRI provides excellent soft tissue contrast and multiplanar images when compared to other musculoskeletal imaging modalities. The aim of the study is to study the demographic profile of patients presenting with internal derangement of knee, identify the various ligament and meniscal injuries causing internal derangement of knee and describe the MRI features of the ligament and meniscal injuries. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study was undertaken from January 2016 to mid-December 2017 in the Department of Radiodiagnosis, MVJ Medical College and Research Hospital, Hoskote. The study population consisted of 108 patients with internal derangement of knee who underwent MRI of knee. All the MRI scans of the knee in this study were performed using Siemens Magnetom Essenza (A Tim+Dot system MR machine with a 1.5 tesla field strength magnet using a flex coil. RESULTS The study population consisted of 108 patients comprising of 90 males and 18 females. The age of the patients ranged from 16 to 67 years. Majority of the patients belonged to the age group of 21-30 years constituting about 41% of the total study population. Anterior cruciate ligament injury was the commonest followed by medial and lateral meniscus tears. Flap tear was the commonest type of meniscal tear. Posterior horn of the meniscus was the commonest tear site. CONCLUSION MRI is the investigation of choice in evaluating internal derangement of knee. MRI can accurately diagnose ligament and meniscal injuries and guide arthroscopy.

  10. Electrical stimulation enhances cell migration and integrative repair in the meniscus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiaoning; Arkonac, Derya E.; Chao, Pen-hsiu Grace; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2014-01-01

    Electrical signals have been applied towards the repair of articular tissues in the laboratory and clinical settings for over seventy years. We focus on healing of the meniscus, a tissue essential to knee function with limited innate repair potential, which has been largely unexplored in the context of electrical stimulation. Here we demonstrate for the first time that electrical stimulation enhances meniscus cell migration and integrative tissue repair. We optimize pulsatile direct current electrical stimulation parameters on cells at the micro-scale, and apply these to healing of full-thickness defects in explants at the macro-scale. We report increased expression of the adenosine A2b receptor in meniscus cells after stimulation at the micro- and macro-scale, and propose a role for A2bR in meniscus electrotransduction. Taken together, these findings advance our understanding of the effects of electrical signals and their mechanisms of action, and contribute to developing electrotherapeutic strategies for meniscus repair. PMID:24419206

  11. Canine stifle stability following cranial cruciate ligament transection and medial meniscal release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel, T.; Kristiansen, S.; Jensen, Bente Rona

    stifle stability was evaluated in right pelvic limbs from canine cadavers under three different test situations (intact, CrCL deficient and medial meniscal release (MMR)). Dogs were euthanized for reasons unrelated to the study, owner approval given for research use and institutional ethical approval...... to an intact stifle PTA between 95.5° and 97°. The mean maximal CTS in CrCL deficient stifles was 52.8% of intact marker separation distance, occurring at an average joint angle of 130°, equivalent to an intact PTA of 109°.After MMR, CTS initiated significantly earlier in extension, at a joint angle of 65...... meniscus, but did not cause a significant change in the maximal amount of CTS....

  12. The use of MRI in the investigation of lateral meniscal tear post medial unicompartmental knee replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanil H. Ajwani, MBChB, BSc (Hons, MRCS

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of lateral knee pain in patients with a medial unicompartmental knee replacement (UKR is complex. The native lateral compartment structures are prone to the same injuries as patients with normal knees. Historical reports of lateral meniscal injury post medial UKR have argued MRI evaluation is obsolete due to artefact caused by the prosthesis. We report a case of lateral meniscal injury in a patient two years after successful medial UKR. We identified the offending pathology via utilization of MRI scanners adopting metal artefact reduction sequences (MARS. The MARS MRI protocol helps clinicians accurately and non-invasively evaluate soft tissue structures in knees with metal prostheses. It also allows surgeons to accurately counsel patients and provides a higher degree of certainty in treating the pathology.

  13. Coupling Fluid and Solute Dynamics Within the Ocular Surface Tear Film: A Modelling Study of Black Line Osmolarity

    KAUST Repository

    Zubkov, V. S.

    2012-07-06

    We present a mathematical model describing the spatial distribution of tear film osmolarity across the ocular surface of a human eye during one blink cycle, incorporating detailed fluid and solute dynamics. Based on the lubrication approximation, our model comprises three coupled equations tracking the depth of the aqueous layer of the tear film, the concentration of the polar lipid, and the concentration of physiological salts contained in the aqueous layer. Diffusive boundary layers in the salt concentration occur at the thinnest regions of the tear film, the black lines. Thus, despite large Peclet numbers, diffusion ameliorates osmolarity around the black lines, but nonetheless is insufficient to eliminate the build-up of solute in these regions. More generally, a heterogeneous distribution of solute concentration is predicted across the ocular surface, indicating that measurements of lower meniscus osmolarity are not globally representative, especially in the presence of dry eye. Vertical saccadic eyelid motion can reduce osmolarity at the lower black line, raising the prospect that select eyeball motions more generally can assist in alleviating tear film hyperosmolarity. Finally, our results indicate that measured evaporative rates will induce excessive hyperosmolarity at the black lines, even for the healthy eye. This suggests that further evaporative retardation at the black lines, for instance due to the cellular glycocalyx at the ocular surface or increasing concentrations of mucus, will be important for controlling hyperosmolarity as the black line thins. © 2012 Society for Mathematical Biology.

  14. Tendon and ligament as novel cell sources for engineering the knee meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadidi, P; Paschos, N K; Huang, B J; Aryaei, A; Hu, J C; Athanasiou, K A

    2016-12-01

    The application of cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine is hindered by the difficulty of acquiring adequate numbers of competent cells. For the knee meniscus in particular, this may be solved by harvesting tissue from neighboring tendons and ligaments. In this study, we have investigated the potential of cells from tendon and ligament, as compared to meniscus cells, to engineer scaffold-free self-assembling fibrocartilage. Self-assembling meniscus-shaped constructs engineered from a co-culture of articular chondrocytes and either meniscus, tendon, or ligament cells were cultured for 4 weeks with TGF-β1 in serum-free media. After culture, constructs were assessed for their mechanical properties, histological staining, gross appearance, and biochemical composition including cross-link content. Correlations were performed to evaluate relationships between biochemical content and mechanical properties. In terms of mechanical properties as well as biochemical content, constructs engineered using tenocytes and ligament fibrocytes were found to be equivalent or superior to constructs engineered using meniscus cells. Furthermore, cross-link content was found to be correlated with engineered tissue tensile properties. Tenocytes and ligament fibrocytes represent viable cell sources for engineering meniscus fibrocartilage using the self-assembling process. Due to greater cross-link content, fibrocartilage engineered with tenocytes and ligament fibrocytes may maintain greater tensile properties than fibrocartilage engineered with meniscus cells. Copyright © 2016 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Quantification of in vitro wear of a synthetic meniscus implant using gravimetric and micro-CT measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, Jonathan J; Shemesh, Maoz; Shefy-Peleg, Adaya; Gabet, Yankel; Zylberberg, Eyal; Linder-Ganz, Eran

    2015-09-01

    A synthetic meniscus implant was recently developed for the treatment of patients with mild to moderate osteoarthritis with knee pain associated with medial joint overload. The implant is distinctively different from most orthopedic implants in its pliable construction, and non-anchored design, which enables implantation through a mini-arthrotomy without disruption to the bone, cartilage, and ligaments. Due to these features, it is important to show that the material and design can withstand knee joint conditions. This study evaluated the long-term performance of this device by simulating loading for a total of 5 million gait cycles (Mc), corresponding to approximately five years of service in-vivo. All five implants remained in good condition and did not dislodge from the joint space during the simulation. Mild abrasion was detected by electron microscopy, but µ-CT scans of the implants confirmed that the damage was confined to the superficial surfaces. The average gravimetric wear rate was 14.5 mg/Mc, whereas volumetric changes in reconstructed µ-CT scans point to an average wear rate of 15.76 mm(3)/Mc (18.8 mg/Mc). Particles isolated from the lubricant had average diameter of 15 µm. The wear performance of this polycarbonate-urethane meniscus implant concept under ISO-14243 loading conditions is encouraging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Anisotropy in the viscoelastic response of knee meniscus cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coluccino, Luca; Peres, Chiara; Gottardi, Riccardo; Bianchini, Paolo; Diaspro, Alberto; Ceseracciu, Luca

    2017-01-26

    The knee meniscus is instrumental to stability, shock absorption, load transmission and stress distribution within the knee joint. Such functions are mechanically demanding, and replacement constructs used in meniscus repair often fail because of a poor match with the surrounding tissue. This study focused on the native structure-mechanics relationships and on their anisotropic behavior in meniscus, to define the target biomechanical viscoelastic properties required by scaffolds upon loading. To show regional orientation of the collagen fibers and their viscoelastic behavior, bovine lateral menisci were characterized by second harmonic generation microscopy and through time-dependent mechanical tests. Furthermore, their dynamic viscoelastic response was analyzed over a wide range of frequencies. Multilevel characterization aims to expand the biomimetic approach from the structure itself, to include the mechanical characteristics that give the meniscus its peculiar properties, thus providing tools for the design of novel, effective scaffolds. An example of modeling of anisotropic open-cell porous material tailored to fulfill the measured requirements is presented, leading to a definition of additional parameters for a better understanding of the load transmission mechanism and for better scaffold functionality.

  17. When should the external approach be resorted to in the arthroscopic treatment of perimeniscal cyst?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bombaci Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Meniscal cysts very often cause meniscal tears and especially when it is peripheral, some of the healthy parts of meniscus might be needlessly sacrificed. In particular conditions, extraarticular approaches might save some menisci. In the present study, we evaluated the conditions which required using the extraarticular approach in addition to the arthroscopic procedure, to maximally preserve the meniscus. Methods: Eight patients with perimeniscal cysts were evaluated retrospectively. One cyst was localized within the medial meniscus and seven in the lateral meniscus. The mean age was 36.13 (range; 19–63 years, mean follow-up time, 27.3 (range; 12–47 months. Patients were evaluated by using a Visual Analogue Score (VAS to measure pain relief and “Lysholm score” to measure functional improvement. In all patients except one, in which the cystic cavity was connected with the joint at the periphery of the meniscus, the cyst was drained from the intraarticular opening. When the cyst was too large (three cases and in one case where a large amount of meniscus was preserved for reasons mentioned above, additional extraarticular drainage was carried out. Results: The mean preoperative and postoperative VAS were 6 (range; 2–8 and 1.55 (range; 0–3 (p = 0.00058 and Lysholm scores were 64.75 (range; 48–86 and 93.11 (range; 80–100 (p = 0.0014, respectively. Discussion: In cysts, which have very limited or no connection with the joint on the most peripheral region of the meniscus and/or are larger than the meniscus height, extraarticular drainage of the cyst might produce unnecessary meniscal loss and function. In the extraarticular drainage, scrapping the walls of the cyst, while inspecting with an arthroscope, reduces recurrence of the cyst.

  18. As tears go by : Baby tears trigger more brain activity than adult tears in nulliparous women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendricx-Riem, M.M.E.; De Carli, P.; van IJzendoorn, M.H.; Vingerhoets, A.J.J.M.; Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J.

    2017-01-01

    The current functional magnetic resonance imaging study examines brain activity during the perception of infant and adult tears. Infant tears evoke stronger responses in the visual cortex than adult tears, indicating that infant tears are highly salient. In addition, our study shows that infant

  19. Prevalence of abnormal findings in magnetic resonance images of asymptomatic knees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuta, Shoji; Masaki, Kunihiro; Korai, Fumiaki

    2002-01-01

    One hundred fifteen asymptomatic Japanese volunteers aged from 13 to 76 years were examined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate age-related meniscal degeneration and to determine the prevalence of discoid menisci. Each meniscus was graded in the anterior and posterior portions according to intrameniscal MRI signals. Discoid meniscus was diagnosed if a bow-tie configuration was noted on three or more contiguous sagittal sections. Meniscal abnormalities on MRI became more prevalent with age in both men and women. The posterior horn of the medial meniscus showed a significantly higher prevalence of degeneration than other parts of the meniscus. Discoid menisci were noted in 15 subjects (13% prevalence), always representing the lateral meniscus. Subchondral changes were observed in 13 subjects more than 40 years old, mostly women, and were located in the medial compartment. These abnormalities were not correlated with severity of degeneration in the posterior portion of the medial meniscus. This study demonstrates considerable prevalence of meniscal abnormalities in asymptomatic Japanese subjects. (author)

  20. Sutura de menisco com implantes absorvíveis Meniscus suture with absorbable implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaldo José Hernandez

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Os autores avaliam clinicamente 19 pacientes (19 joelhos - 15 meniscos mediais e 5 laterais submetidos à sutura de menisco, utilizando 2 tipos de implantes absorvíveis (ácido polilático Arrow® e Clear fix®. O estudo compõe-se de 15 homens e 4 mulheres com idades entre 16 e 44 anos, com média de 26,8 anos. O tempo de seguimento médio foi de 24 meses, com mínimo de 18 e máximo de 32 meses. A técnica operatória constituiu-se da sutura de um ou ambos os meniscos (1 caso, via artroscópica com Arrow® em 15 pacientes e Clear fix® em 4. Dos 19 indivíduos, 6 foram submetidos à sutura meniscal isolada, 11 associada à reconstrução do LCA e 2 à reconstrução do LCA com osteotomia valgizante da tíbia. Os resultados foram avaliados segundo exame físico incluindo as manobras de Appley e Mc Murray. A avaliação funcional pré e pós-operatória do joelho foi realizada pela escala de Lysholm modificada. Todos os pacientes tiveram suas manobras meniscais negativadas no pós-operatório. A pontuação média pré-operatória segundo a escala de Lysholm foi de 39,8 subindo para 91,5 no pós-operatório. Os autores concluem que a sutura de menisco, utilizando implantes absorvíveis, tem se mostrado eficiente até o momento, e que tecnicamente ela é mais simples que a sutura convencional.The authors clinically assessed 19 patients (19 knees - 15 medial meniscus and 5 lateral meniscus submitted to meniscus suture using 2 kinds of absorbable implants (polylactic acid Arrow® and Clear fix®. The study is composed of 15 males and 4 females, ages ranging 16 - 44 years old (average = 26.8 years old. The mean follow-up time was 24 months, ranging from 18 to 32 months, at most. The surgical technique was constituted of a suture in one or both meniscus (1 case, through arthroscopy with Arrow® in 15 patients and Clear fix® in 4. From the 19 individuals, 6 were submitted to isolated meniscal suture, 11 combined to ACL reconstruction and 2 to ACL

  1. Identification and characterization of adult mouse meniscus stem/progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamer, Laura W; Shi, Rui Rui; Gendelman, Ashira; Mathewson, Dylan; Gamer, Jackson; Rosen, Vicki

    Meniscal damage is a common problem that accelerates the onset of knee osteoarthritis. Stem cell-based tissue engineering treatment approaches have shown promise in preserving meniscal tissue and restoring meniscal function. The purpose of our study was to identify meniscus-derived stem/progenitor cells (MSPCs) from mouse, a model system that allows for in vivo analysis of the mechanisms underlying meniscal injury and healing. MSPCs were isolated from murine menisci grown in explant culture and characterized for stem cell properties. Flow cytometry was used to detect the presence of surface antigens related to stem cells, and qRT-PCR was used to examine the gene expression profile of MSPCs. Major proteins associated with MSPCs were localized in the adult mouse knee using immunohistochemistry. Our data show that MSPCs have universal stem cell-like properties including clonogenicity and multi-potentiality. MSPCs expressed the mesenchymal stem cell markers CD44, Sca-1, CD90, and CD73 and when cultured had elevated levels of biglycan and collagen type I, important extracellular matrix components of adult meniscus. MSPC also expressed significant levels of Lox and Igf-1, genes associated with the embryonic meniscus. Localization studies showed staining for these same proteins in the superficial and outer zones of the adult mouse meniscus, regions thought to harbor endogenous repair cells. MSPCs represent a novel resident stem cell population in the murine meniscus. Analysis of MSPCs in mice will allow for a greater understanding of the cell biology of the meniscus, essential information for enhancing therapeutic strategies for treating knee joint injury and disease.

  2. Tear trough – Anatomy and treatment by autologous fat grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Yung Chia

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Tear trough is the main irregularity at midface, of which treatment is difficult. There is no agreement in literature about its anatomy and best treatment. The author presented an anatomical study and personal autologous fat grafting technique for tear trough treatment. Anatomical dissections were done on two fresh cadavers to examine the skin, subcutaneous, muscle and bone layers, spaces, and attachments. Safety and efficacy were evaluated via retrospective analysis of the last 200 consecutive procedures performed by the author. Tear trough is caused by the abrupt transition of the palpebral orbicular oculi muscle (OOM (i.e., thin skin without subcutaneous fat compartment to the orbital OOM (i.e., thicker skin with malar fat compartment. The tear trough region is located at the OOM bony origin at the medial canthus where no specific ligament was found. The grafted fat volume stabilized at two or three months after the procedure, instead of six months as stated in literature, with excellent results and no severe complications. Tear trough is a personal characteristic, a natural anatomical depression caused by subcutaneous irregularity and can worsen with age. The lack of volume is not effectively corrected by surgeries and thus it must be filled. Fat grafting has several advantages over alloplastic fillers, although it may be more difficult. Fat graft is autologous and abundant, and tissue transplantation could enhance skin quality. Fat grafting is a simple, safe, and effective solution for adding extra volume to correct the deflation phenomenon of the midface aging process. There is no specific anatomical plane for volume injection; the fat graft must be evenly distributed in the deep and superficial plane for uniformity.

  3. Laser reflectometry of submegahertz liquid meniscus ringing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahi, R H; Passian, A; Jones, Y K; Tetard, L; Lereu, A L; Thundat, T G

    2009-10-15

    Optical techniques that permit nondestructive probing of interfacial dynamics of various media are of key importance in numerous applications such as ellipsometry, mirage effect, and all-optical switching. Characterization of the various phases of microjet droplet formation yields important information for volume control, uniformity, velocity, and rate. The ringing of the meniscus and the associated relaxation time that occurs after droplet breakoff affect subsequent drop formation and is an indicator of the physical properties of the fluid. Using laser reflectometry, we present an analysis of the meniscus oscillations in an orifice of a piezoelectric microjet.

  4. Growth Factor Supplementation Improves Native and Engineered Meniscus Repair in Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionescu, Lara C.; Lee, Gregory C.; Huang, Kevin L.; Mauck, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Few therapeutic options exist for meniscus repair after injury. Local delivery of growth factors may stimulate repair and create a favorable environment for engineered replacement materials. In this study, we assessed the effect of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) (a pro-mitotic agent) and transforming growth factor beta 3 (TGF-β3) (a pro-matrix formation agent) on meniscus repair and the integration/maturation of electrospun poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds for meniscus tissue engineering. Circular meniscus repair constructs were formed and refilled with either native tissue or scaffolds. Repair constructs were cultured in serum-containing media for 4 and 8 weeks with various growth factor formulations, and assessed for mechanical strength, biochemical content, and histological appearance. Results showed that either short-term delivery of bFGF or sustained delivery of TGF-β3 increased integration strength for both juvenile and adult bovine tissue, with similar findings for engineered materials. While TGF-β3 increased proteoglycan content in the explants, bFGF did not increase DNA content after 8 weeks. This work suggests that in vivo delivery of bFGF or TGF-β3 may stimulate meniscus repair, but that the time course of delivery will strongly influence success. Further, this study demonstrates that electrospun scaffolds are a promising material for meniscus tissue engineering, achieving comparable or superior integration compared to native tissue. PMID:22698946

  5. Propagative modes along a superfluid helium-4 meniscus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poujade, M.; Guthmann, C.; Rolley, E.

    2002-01-01

    We have studied the dynamics of a superfluid helium-4 meniscus on a solid substrate. In a pseudo-non-wetting situation, there is no hysteresis of the contact angle. We show that distortions of a liquid meniscus do propagate along the contact line. We have analyzed the propagation of pulses. We find a good agreement with theoretical predictions by Brochard for the dispersion relation of oscillation modes of the contact line. (authors)

  6. Etiologic factors in the development of medial tibial stress syndrome: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweed, Jo L; Avil, Steven J; Campbell, Jackie A; Barnes, Mike R

    2008-01-01

    Medial tibial stress syndrome is a type of exercise-induced leg pain that is common in recreational and competitive athletes. Although various studies have attempted to find the exact pathogenesis of this common condition, it remains unknown. Various theories in literature from 1976 to 2006 were reviewed using key words. Until recently, inflammation of the periosteum due to excessive traction was thought to be the most likely cause of medial tibial stress syndrome. This periostitis has been hypothesized by some authors to be caused by the tearing away of the muscle fibers at the muscle-bone interface, although there are several suggestions as to which, if any, muscle is responsible. Recent studies have supported the view that medial tibial stress syndrome is not an inflammatory process of the periosteum but instead a stress reaction of bone that has become painful.

  7. Human Migratory Meniscus Progenitor Cells Are Controlled via the TGF-β Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Hayat; Schminke, Boris; Bode, Christa; Roth, Moritz; Albert, Julius; von der Heyde, Silvia; Rosen, Vicki; Miosge, Nicolai

    2014-01-01

    Summary Degeneration of the knee joint during osteoarthritis often begins with meniscal lesions. Meniscectomy, previously performed extensively after meniscal injury, is now obsolete because of the inevitable osteoarthritis that occurs following this procedure. Clinically, meniscus self-renewal is well documented as long as the outer, vascularized meniscal ring remains intact. In contrast, regeneration of the inner, avascular meniscus does not occur. Here, we show that cartilage tissue harvested from the avascular inner human meniscus during the late stages of osteoarthritis harbors a unique progenitor cell population. These meniscus progenitor cells (MPCs) are clonogenic and multipotent and exhibit migratory activity. We also determined that MPCs are likely to be controlled by canonical transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signaling that leads to an increase in SOX9 and a decrease in RUNX2, thereby enhancing the chondrogenic potential of MPC. Therefore, our work is relevant for the development of novel cell biological, regenerative therapies for meniscus repair. PMID:25418724

  8. Anterior cruciate ligament tears: MRI versus arthroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosch, U.; Felix, R.; Schauwecker, W.; Dreithaler, B.

    1992-01-01

    Because of suspected rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament sixteen acute traumatised patients were investigated by MR and arthroscopy. The MR diagnosis of a lesion of the anterior cruciate ligament proved to be correct by arthroscopy in fifteen of sixteen cases. Diagnostic criteria for lesions of the anterior cruciate ligament were: increased signal intensity in T 1 - and T 2 weighted images, increased volume and discontinuity of ligamentous structures. Additional MR findings of meniscal tears were correct in three of four cases laterally and in four of four cases medially. Femoral cartilage lesions were correctly identified by MR in three cases. MR normal findings proved to be correct by arthroscopy in another five cases. (orig.) [de

  9. Yoga is found hazardous to the meniscus for Chinese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHU Jun-kun

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: Yoga is becoming more and more popular in the female society while the concomitant sports injury is seldom mentioned. Many clinicians have noted that yoga may result in knee problems, which though requires more researches to corroborate. This investigation was conducted to ascertain the relationship between yoga and meniscus injury as well as the extent of impairment ac-cording to variant yoga practice periods. Methods: Totally 819 women aged 20-49 years who practiced yoga or other popular sports including badminton, jogging, climbing hills, etc for at least one hour per day were selected to participate in this research. These subjects were required to complete a questionnaire and receive relevant physical examination. Magnetic resonance (MR scan of the knee was recommended for the suspicious subjects for ultimate diagnosis. The subject with abnormal meniscus MR signals was defined as a case and matched with two con-trols in terms of age and body mass index (BMI. Altogether there were 273 cases and 546 controls. The nested case-control model was adopted to assess the risk of meniscus injury between variant exposures in practicing yoga and several other popular sports. Moreover, the 181 yoga sub-jects were subdivided into three groups according to differ-ent exercise durations, followed by further analysis with the variables of age, BMI and Lysholm score. Results: Yoga was found associated with a higher risk (P=0.008, OR=1.621 of meniscus injury compared with badminton, jogging and climbing hills. The three yoga sub-groups showed statistical difference between each other in terms of Lysholm score (P=0.027 and BMI (P=0.003. The subjects with longer-term yoga practice had lighter weight but lower Lysholm scores. Conclusions: Yoga perhaps exerts destructive impact on the meniscus for Chinese women, yet it needs further verifications. Furthermore, the female yoga players with longer exercise duration are more susceptible to

  10. Intra-Articular Injection of Human Meniscus Stem/Progenitor Cells Promotes Meniscus Regeneration and Ameliorates Osteoarthritis Through Stromal Cell-Derived Factor-1/CXCR4-Mediated Homing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Weiliang; Chen, Jialin; Zhu, Ting; Chen, Longkun; Zhang, Wei; Fang, Zhi; Heng, Boon Chin; Yin, Zi; Chen, Xiao; Ji, Junfeng

    2014-01-01

    Meniscus injury is frequently encountered in clinical practice. Current surgical therapy involving partial or complete meniscectomy relieves pain in the short-term but often leads to osteoarthritis (OA) in the long-term. In this study, we report a new strategy of articular cartilage protection by intra-articular injection of novel human meniscus stem/progenitor cells (hMeSPCs). We found that hMeSPCs displayed both mesenchymal stem cell characteristics and high expression levels of collagen II. In the rat meniscus injury model, hMeSPC transplantation not only led to more neo-tissue formation and better-defined shape but also resulted in more rounded cells and matured extracellular matrix. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) enhanced the migration of hMeSPCs, whereas AMD3100 abolished the chemotactic effects of SDF-1 on hMeSPCs, both in vitro and in vivo. In an experimental OA model, transplantation of hMeSPCs effectively protected articular cartilage, as evidenced by reduced expression of OA markers such as collagen I, collagen X, and hypoxia-inducible factor 2α but increased expression of collagen II. Our study demonstrated for the first time that intra-articular injection of hMeSPCs enhanced meniscus regeneration through the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis. Our study highlights a new strategy of intra-articular injection of hMeSPCs for meniscus regeneration. PMID:24448516

  11. Reconstruction of ACL Ligament rupture: results of 96 operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahmasebi MN

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL is one of the main knee stabilizing ligaments. Because of high incidence of ACL tearing especially in young athletes its reconstruction is very important. The aim of this study was to evaluate short-term results of anterior cruciate ligament ruptures using four strand hamstring auto graft and Bone patellar tendon autograph. "nMethods: The study group included 96 patients (3 female and 93 male with ACL teared who had been referred to our center in 5 years period (2002-2007. The subject which were Accessed in this study included meniscal injury concomitant chondral injury, determine the most common cause of ACL tearing, comparision of IKDC and lysholm score in all patients before and after surgery, and limitation of rang of motion of knee post operation. "nResults: Involvement was in the right knee in 38 patients and in the left knee in 58 patients. Mean age of patients was 27.6 years (19-48. Mean surgical delay was 18 month (1-77. The most common cause of tear was playing soccer. Meniscal injury was in 78 patients. (Medial meniscus in 63 patients, lateral meniscus in 29 patients Concommitent chondral injury was in 54 patients (56.25%. 68% of patients returned to preoperative functions sport activity. There was no limitation in extension and there was 6 patients limitation in flexion about 20º. In last visit of patients IKDS in class A and B was 96. "nConclusion: It is seem that arthroscopic reconstruction of ACL is a safe and good method in treatment of Knee stability. Use of IKDC and lysholm score for comparision of patients before and after surgery is helpful. The operation should be done early after injury. Reconstruction of ACL in older patients in the abscense of DJD is effective.

  12. Ex vivo quantitative multiparametric MRI mapping of human meniscus degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nebelung, Sven; Kuhl, Christiane; Truhn, Daniel; Tingart, Markus; Jahr, Holger; Pufe, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of T1, T1ρ, T2, T2*, and UTE-T2* (ultrashort-echo time-enhanced T2*) mapping in the refined graduation of human meniscus degeneration with histology serving as standard-of-reference. This IRB-approved intra-individual comparative ex vivo study was performed on 24 lateral meniscus body samples obtained from 24 patients undergoing total knee replacement. Samples were assessed on a 3.0-T MRI scanner using inversion-recovery (T1), spin-lock multi-gradient-echo (T1ρ), multi-spin-echo (T2) and multi-gradient-echo (T2* and UTE-T2*) sequences to determine relaxation times of quantitative MRI (qMRI) parameters. Relaxation times were calculated on the respective maps, averaged to the entire meniscus and to its zones. Histologically, samples were analyzed on a four-point score according to Williams (0-III). QMRI results and Williams (sub)scores were correlated using Spearman's ρ, while Williams grade-dependent differences were assessed using Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's tests. Sensitivities and specificities in the detection of intact (Williams grade [WG]-0) and severely degenerate meniscus (WG-II-III) were calculated. Except for T2*, significant increases in qMRI parameters with increasing Williams grades were observed. T1, T1ρ, T2, and UTE-T2* exhibited high sensitivity and variable specificity rates. Significant marked-to-strong correlations were observed for these parameters with each other, with histological WGs and the subscores tissue integrity and cellularity. QMRI mapping holds promise in the objective evaluation of human meniscus. Although sufficient discriminatory power of T1, T1ρ, T2, and UTE-T2* was only demonstrated for the histological extremes, these data may aid in the future MRI-based parameterization and quantification of human meniscus degeneration. (orig.)

  13. Ex vivo quantitative multiparametric MRI mapping of human meniscus degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebelung, Sven; Tingart, Markus; Pufe, Thomas; Kuhl, Christiane; Jahr, Holger; Truhn, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of T1, T1ρ, T2, T2*, and UTE-T2* (ultrashort-echo time-enhanced T2*) mapping in the refined graduation of human meniscus degeneration with histology serving as standard-of-reference. This IRB-approved intra-individual comparative ex vivo study was performed on 24 lateral meniscus body samples obtained from 24 patients undergoing total knee replacement. Samples were assessed on a 3.0-T MRI scanner using inversion-recovery (T1), spin-lock multi-gradient-echo (T1ρ), multi-spin-echo (T2) and multi-gradient-echo (T2* and UTE-T2*) sequences to determine relaxation times of quantitative MRI (qMRI) parameters. Relaxation times were calculated on the respective maps, averaged to the entire meniscus and to its zones. Histologically, samples were analyzed on a four-point score according to Williams (0-III). QMRI results and Williams (sub)scores were correlated using Spearman's ρ, while Williams grade-dependent differences were assessed using Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's tests. Sensitivities and specificities in the detection of intact (Williams grade [WG]-0) and severely degenerate meniscus (WG-II-III) were calculated. Except for T2*, significant increases in qMRI parameters with increasing Williams grades were observed. T1, T1ρ, T2, and UTE-T2* exhibited high sensitivity and variable specificity rates. Significant marked-to-strong correlations were observed for these parameters with each other, with histological WGs and the subscores tissue integrity and cellularity. QMRI mapping holds promise in the objective evaluation of human meniscus. Although sufficient discriminatory power of T1, T1ρ, T2, and UTE-T2* was only demonstrated for the histological extremes, these data may aid in the future MRI-based parameterization and quantification of human meniscus degeneration.

  14. Ex vivo quantitative multiparametric MRI mapping of human meniscus degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nebelung, Sven; Kuhl, Christiane; Truhn, Daniel [Aachen University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Aachen (Germany); Tingart, Markus; Jahr, Holger [Aachen University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics, Aachen (Germany); Pufe, Thomas [RWTH Aachen University, Institute of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Aachen (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of T1, T1ρ, T2, T2*, and UTE-T2* (ultrashort-echo time-enhanced T2*) mapping in the refined graduation of human meniscus degeneration with histology serving as standard-of-reference. This IRB-approved intra-individual comparative ex vivo study was performed on 24 lateral meniscus body samples obtained from 24 patients undergoing total knee replacement. Samples were assessed on a 3.0-T MRI scanner using inversion-recovery (T1), spin-lock multi-gradient-echo (T1ρ), multi-spin-echo (T2) and multi-gradient-echo (T2* and UTE-T2*) sequences to determine relaxation times of quantitative MRI (qMRI) parameters. Relaxation times were calculated on the respective maps, averaged to the entire meniscus and to its zones. Histologically, samples were analyzed on a four-point score according to Williams (0-III). QMRI results and Williams (sub)scores were correlated using Spearman's ρ, while Williams grade-dependent differences were assessed using Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's tests. Sensitivities and specificities in the detection of intact (Williams grade [WG]-0) and severely degenerate meniscus (WG-II-III) were calculated. Except for T2*, significant increases in qMRI parameters with increasing Williams grades were observed. T1, T1ρ, T2, and UTE-T2* exhibited high sensitivity and variable specificity rates. Significant marked-to-strong correlations were observed for these parameters with each other, with histological WGs and the subscores tissue integrity and cellularity. QMRI mapping holds promise in the objective evaluation of human meniscus. Although sufficient discriminatory power of T1, T1ρ, T2, and UTE-T2* was only demonstrated for the histological extremes, these data may aid in the future MRI-based parameterization and quantification of human meniscus degeneration. (orig.)

  15. Geometry Effects of Capillary on the Evaporation from the Meniscus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Choong Hyo; Jin, Song Wan; Yoo, Jung Yul

    2007-01-01

    The effect of capillary cross-section geometry on evaporation is investigated in terms of the meniscus shape, evaporation rate and evaporation-induced flow for circular, square and rectangular cross-sectional capillaries. The shapes of water and ethanol menisci are not much different from each other in square and rectangular capillaries even though the surface tension of water is much larger than that of ethanol. On the other hand, the shapes of water and ethanol menisci are very different from each other in circular capillary. The averaged evaporation fluxes in circular and rectangular capillaries are measured by tracking the meniscus position. At a given position, the averaged evaporation flux in rectangular capillaries in much larger than that in circular capillary with comparable hydraulic diameter. The flow near the evaporating meniscus is also measured using micro-PIV, so that the rotating vortex motion is observed near the evaporating ethanol and methanol menisci except for the case of methanol meniscus in rectangular capillary. This difference is considered to be due to the existence of corner menisci at the four corners

  16. Streaming tearing mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigeta, M.; Sato, T.; Dasgupta, B.

    1985-01-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic stability of streaming tearing mode is investigated numerically. A bulk plasma flow parallel to the antiparallel magnetic field lines and localized in the neutral sheet excites a streaming tearing mode more strongly than the usual tearing mode, particularly for the wavelength of the order of the neutral sheet width (or smaller), which is stable for the usual tearing mode. Interestingly, examination of the eigenfunctions of the velocity perturbation and the magnetic field perturbation indicates that the streaming tearing mode carries more energy in terms of the kinetic energy rather than the magnetic energy. This suggests that the streaming tearing mode instability can be a more feasible mechanism of plasma acceleration than the usual tearing mode instability.

  17. Mass spectrometric identification of phospholipids in human tears and tear lipocalin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Austin W; Glasgow, Ben J

    2012-04-02

    The purpose of this article was to identify by mass spectrometry phosphocholine lipids in stimulated human tears and determine the molecules bound to tear lipocalin or other proteins. Tear proteins were separated isocratically from pooled stimulated human tears by gel filtration fast performance liquid chromatography. Separation of tear lipocalin was confirmed by SDS tricine gradient PAGE. Protein fractions were extracted with chloroform/methanol and analyzed with electrospray ionization MS/MS triple quadrupole mass spectrometry in precursor ion scan mode for select leaving groups. For quantification, integrated ion counts were derived from standard curves of authentic compounds of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylserine. Linear approximation was possible from integration of the mass spectrometrically obtained ion peaks at 760 Da for the PC standard. Tears contained 194 ng/mL of the major intact PC (34:2), m/z 758.6. Ten other monoisotopic phosphocholines were found in tears. A peak at 703.3 Da was assigned as a sphingomyelin. Four lysophosphatidylcholines (m/z 490-540) accounted for about 80% of the total integrated ion count. The [M+H](+) compound, m/z 496.3, accounted for 60% of the signal intensity. Only the tear lipocalin-bearing fractions showed phosphocholines (104 ng/mL). Although the intact phospholipids bound to tear lipocalin corresp