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Sample records for mechanical tissue properties

  1. Mechanical properties of brain tissue by indentation : interregional variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dommelen, van J.A.W.; Sande, van der T.P.J.; Hrapko, M.; Peters, G.W.M.

    2010-01-01

    Although many studies on the mechanical properties of brain tissue exist, some controversy concerning the possible differences in mechanical properties of white and gray matter tissue remains. Indentation experiments are conducted on white and gray matter tissue of various regions of the cerebrum

  2. Tissue-Level Mechanical Properties of Bone Contributing to Fracture Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, Jeffry S; Granke, Mathilde; Singleton, Robert C; Pharr, George M

    2016-08-01

    Tissue-level mechanical properties characterize mechanical behavior independently of microscopic porosity. Specifically, quasi-static nanoindentation provides measurements of modulus (stiffness) and hardness (resistance to yielding) of tissue at the length scale of the lamella, while dynamic nanoindentation assesses time-dependent behavior in the form of storage modulus (stiffness), loss modulus (dampening), and loss factor (ratio of the two). While these properties are useful in establishing how a gene, signaling pathway, or disease of interest affects bone tissue, they generally do not vary with aging after skeletal maturation or with osteoporosis. Heterogeneity in tissue-level mechanical properties or in compositional properties may contribute to fracture risk, but a consensus on whether the contribution is negative or positive has not emerged. In vivo indentation of bone tissue is now possible, and the mechanical resistance to microindentation has the potential for improving fracture risk assessment, though determinants are currently unknown.

  3. Mechanical properties of human atherosclerotic intima tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyildiz, Ali C; Speelman, Lambert; Gijsen, Frank J H

    2014-03-03

    Progression and rupture of atherosclerotic plaques in coronary and carotid arteries are the key processes underlying myocardial infarctions and strokes. Biomechanical stress analyses to compute mechanical stresses in a plaque can potentially be used to assess plaque vulnerability. The stress analyses strongly rely on accurate representation of the mechanical properties of the plaque components. In this review, the composition of intima tissue and how this changes during plaque development is discussed from a mechanical perspective. The plaque classification scheme of the American Heart Association is reviewed and plaques originating from different vascular territories are compared. Thereafter, an overview of the experimental studies on tensile and compressive plaque intima properties are presented and the results are linked to the pathology of atherosclerotic plaques. This overview revealed a considerable variation within studies, and an enormous dispersion between studies. Finally, the implications of the dispersion in experimental data on the clinical applications of biomechanical plaque modeling are presented. Suggestions are made on mechanical testing protocol for plaque tissue and on using a standardized plaque classification scheme. This review identifies the current status of knowledge on plaque mechanical properties and the future steps required for a better understanding of the plaque type specific material properties. With this understanding, biomechanical plaque modeling may eventually provide essential support for clinical plaque risk stratification. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Chronic alcohol abuse in men alters bone mechanical properties by affecting both tissue mechanical properties and microarchitectural parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruel, M; Granke, M; Bosser, C; Audran, M; Hoc, T

    2017-06-01

    Alcohol-induced secondary osteoporosis in men has been characterized by higher fracture prevalence and a modification of bone microarchitecture. Chronic alcohol consumption impairs bone cell activity and results in an increased fragility. A few studies highlighted effects of heavy alcohol consumption on some microarchitectural parameters of trabecular bone. But to date and to our knowledge, micro- and macro-mechanical properties of bone of alcoholic subjects have not been investigated. In the present study, mechanical properties and microarchitecture of trabecular bone samples from the iliac crest of alcoholic male patients (n=15) were analyzed and compared to a control group (n=8). Nanoindentation tests were performed to determine the tissue's micromechanical properties, micro-computed tomography was used to measure microarchitectural parameters, and numerical simulations provided the apparent mechanical properties of the samples. Compared to controls, bone tissue from alcoholic patients exhibited an increase of micromechanical properties at tissue scale, a significant decrease of apparent mechanical properties at sample scale, and significant changes in several microarchitectural parameters. In particular, a crucial role of structure model index (SMI) on mechanical properties was identified. 3D microarchitectural parameters are at least as important as bone volume fraction to predict bone fracture risk in the case of alcoholic patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. A method for quantifying mechanical properties of tissue following viral infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vy Lam

    Full Text Available Viral infection and replication involves the reorganization of the actin network within the host cell. Actin plays a central role in the mechanical properties of cells. We have demonstrated a method to quantify changes in mechanical properties of fabricated model three-dimensional (3D connective tissue following viral infection. Using this method, we have characterized the impact of infection by the human herpesvirus, cytomegalovirus (HCMV. HCMV is a member of the herpesvirus family and infects a variety of cell types including fibroblasts. In the body, fibroblasts are necessary for maintaining connective tissue and function by creating mechanical force. Using this 3D connective tissue model, we observed that infection disrupted the cell's ability to generate force and reduced the cumulative contractile force of the tissue. The addition of HCMV viral particles in the absence of both viral gene expression and DNA replication was sufficient to disrupt tissue function. We observed that alterations of the mechanical properties are, in part, due to a disruption of the underlying complex actin microfilament network established by the embedded fibroblasts. Finally, we were able to prevent HCMV-mediated disruption of tissue function by the addition of human immune globulin against HCMV. This study demonstrates a method to quantify the impact of viral infection on mechanical properties which are not evident using conventional cell culture systems.

  6. Manufacturing of hydrogel biomaterials with controlled mechanical properties for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedadghavami, Armin; Minooei, Farnaz; Mohammadi, Mohammad Hossein; Khetani, Sultan; Rezaei Kolahchi, Ahmad; Mashayekhan, Shohreh; Sanati-Nezhad, Amir

    2017-10-15

    Hydrogels have been recognized as crucial biomaterials in the field of tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and drug delivery applications due to their specific characteristics. These biomaterials benefit from retaining a large amount of water, effective mass transfer, similarity to natural tissues and the ability to form different shapes. However, having relatively poor mechanical properties is a limiting factor associated with hydrogel biomaterials. Controlling the biomechanical properties of hydrogels is of paramount importance. In this work, firstly, mechanical characteristics of hydrogels and methods employed for characterizing these properties are explored. Subsequently, the most common approaches used for tuning mechanical properties of hydrogels including but are not limited to, interpenetrating polymer networks, nanocomposites, self-assembly techniques, and co-polymerization are discussed. The performance of different techniques used for tuning biomechanical properties of hydrogels is further compared. Such techniques involve lithography techniques for replication of tissues with complex mechanical profiles; microfluidic techniques applicable for generating gradients of mechanical properties in hydrogel biomaterials for engineering complex human tissues like intervertebral discs, osteochondral tissues, blood vessels and skin layers; and electrospinning techniques for synthesis of hybrid hydrogels and highly ordered fibers with tunable mechanical and biological properties. We finally discuss future perspectives and challenges for controlling biomimetic hydrogel materials possessing proper biomechanical properties. Hydrogels biomaterials are essential constituting components of engineered tissues with the applications in regenerative medicine and drug delivery. The mechanical properties of hydrogels play crucial roles in regulating the interactions between cells and extracellular matrix and directing the cells phenotype and genotype. Despite

  7. Effects of tissue mechanical properties on susceptibility to histotripsy-induced tissue damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Kim, Yohan; Owens, Gabe; Roberts, William; Cain, Charles; Xu, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Histotripsy is a non-invasive tissue ablation method capable of fractionating tissue by controlling acoustic cavitation. To determine the fractionation susceptibility of various tissues, we investigated histotripsy-induced damage on tissue phantoms and ex vivo tissues with different mechanical strengths. A histotripsy bubble cloud was formed at tissue phantom surfaces using 5-cycle long ultrasound pulses with peak negative pressure of 18 MPa and PRFs of 10, 100, and 1000 Hz. Results showed significantly smaller lesions were generated in tissue phantoms of higher mechanical strength. Histotripsy was also applied to 43 different ex vivo porcine tissues with a wide range of mechanical properties. Gross morphology demonstrated stronger tissues with higher ultimate stress, higher density, and lower water content were more resistant to histotripsy damage in comparison to weaker tissues. Based on these results, a self-limiting vessel-sparing treatment strategy was developed in an attempt to preserve major vessels while fractionating the surrounding target tissue. This strategy was tested in porcine liver in vivo. After treatment, major hepatic blood vessels and bile ducts remained intact within a completely fractionated liver volume. These results identify varying susceptibilities of tissues to histotripsy therapy and provide a rational basis to optimize histotripsy parameters for treatment of specific tissues.

  8. Role of differential physical properties in the collective mechanics and dynamics of tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Moumita

    Living cells and tissues are highly mechanically sensitive and active. Mechanical stimuli influence the shape, motility, and functions of cells, modulate the behavior of tissues, and play a key role in several diseases. In this talk I will discuss how collective biophysical properties of tissues emerge from the interplay between differential mechanical properties and statistical physics of underlying components, focusing on two complementary tissue types whose properties are primarily determined by (1) the extracellular matrix (ECM), and (2) individual and collective cell properties. I will start with the structure-mechanics-function relationships in articular cartilage (AC), a soft tissue that has very few cells, and its mechanical response is primarily due to its ECM. AC is a remarkable tissue: it can support loads exceeding ten times our body weight and bear 60+ years of daily mechanical loading despite having minimal regenerative capacity. I will discuss the biophysical principles underlying this exceptional mechanical response using the framework of rigidity percolation theory, and compare our predictions with experiments done by our collaborators. Next I will discuss ongoing theoretical work on how the differences in cell mechanics, motility, adhesion, and proliferation in a co-culture of breast cancer cells and healthy breast epithelial cells may modulate experimentally observed differential migration and segregation. Our results may provide insights into the mechanobiology of tissues with cell populations with different physical properties present together such as during the formation of embryos or the initiation of tumors. This work was partially supported by a Cottrell College Science Award.

  9. Bioprinting of hybrid tissue constructs with tailorable mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuurman, W; Khristov, V; Pot, M W; Dhert, W J A; Malda, J [Department of Orthopaedics, University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands); Van Weeren, P R, E-mail: j.malda@umcutrecht.nl [Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, Department of Equine Sciences, Utrecht University (Netherlands)

    2011-06-15

    Tissue/organ printing aims to recapitulate the intrinsic complexity of native tissues. For a number of tissues, in particular those of musculoskeletal origin, adequate mechanical characteristics are an important prerequisite for their initial handling and stability, as well as long-lasting functioning. Hence, organized implants, possessing mechanical characteristics similar to the native tissue, may result in improved clinical outcomes of regenerative approaches. Using a bioprinter, grafts were constructed by alternate deposition of thermoplastic fibers and (cell-laden) hydrogels. Constructs of different shapes and sizes were manufactured and mechanical properties, as well as cell viability, were assessed. This approach yields novel organized viable hybrid constructs, which possess favorable mechanical characteristics, within the same range as those of native tissues. Moreover, the approach allows the use of multiple hydrogels and can thus produce constructs containing multiple cell types or bioactive factors. Furthermore, since the hydrogel is supported by the thermoplastic material, a broader range of hydrogel types can be used compared to bioprinting of hydrogels alone. In conclusion, we present an innovative and versatile approach for bioprinting, yielding constructs of which the mechanical stiffness provided by thermoplastic polymers can potentially be tailored, and combined specific cell placement patterns of multiple cell types embedded in a wide range of hydrogels. (communication)

  10. Bioprinting of hybrid tissue constructs with tailorable mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuurman, W; Khristov, V; Pot, M W; Dhert, W J A; Malda, J; Van Weeren, P R

    2011-01-01

    Tissue/organ printing aims to recapitulate the intrinsic complexity of native tissues. For a number of tissues, in particular those of musculoskeletal origin, adequate mechanical characteristics are an important prerequisite for their initial handling and stability, as well as long-lasting functioning. Hence, organized implants, possessing mechanical characteristics similar to the native tissue, may result in improved clinical outcomes of regenerative approaches. Using a bioprinter, grafts were constructed by alternate deposition of thermoplastic fibers and (cell-laden) hydrogels. Constructs of different shapes and sizes were manufactured and mechanical properties, as well as cell viability, were assessed. This approach yields novel organized viable hybrid constructs, which possess favorable mechanical characteristics, within the same range as those of native tissues. Moreover, the approach allows the use of multiple hydrogels and can thus produce constructs containing multiple cell types or bioactive factors. Furthermore, since the hydrogel is supported by the thermoplastic material, a broader range of hydrogel types can be used compared to bioprinting of hydrogels alone. In conclusion, we present an innovative and versatile approach for bioprinting, yielding constructs of which the mechanical stiffness provided by thermoplastic polymers can potentially be tailored, and combined specific cell placement patterns of multiple cell types embedded in a wide range of hydrogels. (communication)

  11. Mechanical properties of porcine brain tissue in vivo and ex vivo estimated by MR elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guertler, Charlotte A; Okamoto, Ruth J; Schmidt, John L; Badachhape, Andrew A; Johnson, Curtis L; Bayly, Philip V

    2018-03-01

    The mechanical properties of brain tissue in vivo determine the response of the brain to rapid skull acceleration. These properties are thus of great interest to the developers of mathematical models of traumatic brain injury (TBI) or neurosurgical simulations. Animal models provide valuable insight that can improve TBI modeling. In this study we compare estimates of mechanical properties of the Yucatan mini-pig brain in vivo and ex vivo using magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) at multiple frequencies. MRE allows estimations of properties in soft tissue, either in vivo or ex vivo, by imaging harmonic shear wave propagation. Most direct measurements of brain mechanical properties have been performed using samples of brain tissue ex vivo. It has been observed that direct estimates of brain mechanical properties depend on the frequency and amplitude of loading, as well as the time post-mortem and condition of the sample. Using MRE in the same animals at overlapping frequencies, we observe that porcine brain tissue in vivo appears stiffer than porcine brain tissue samples ex vivo at frequencies of 100 Hz and 125 Hz, but measurements show closer agreement at lower frequencies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Experimental study and constitutive modeling of the viscoelastic mechanical properties of the human prolapsed vaginal tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Estefania; Calvo, B; Martínez, M A; Martins, P; Mascarenhas, T; Jorge, R M N; Ferreira, A; Doblaré, M

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, the viscoelastic mechanical properties of vaginal tissue are investigated. Using previous results of the authors on the mechanical properties of biological soft tissues and newly experimental data from uniaxial tension tests, a new model for the viscoelastic mechanical properties of the human vaginal tissue is proposed. The structural model seems to be sufficiently accurate to guarantee its application to prediction of reliable stress distributions, and is suitable for finite element computations. The obtained results may be helpful in the design of surgical procedures with autologous tissue or prostheses.

  13. Chitosan fibers with improved biological and mechanical properties for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanna, Mohammad Z; Bou-Akl, Therese H; Blowytsky, Oksana; Walters, Henry L; Matthew, Howard W T

    2013-04-01

    The low mechanical properties of hydrogel materials such as chitosan hinder their broad utility for tissue engineering applications. Previous research efforts improved the mechanical properties of chitosan fiber through chemical and physical modifications; however, unfavorable toxicity effects on cells were reported. In this paper, we report the preparation of chitosan fibers with improved mechanical and biocompatibility properties. The structure-property relationships of extruded chitosan fibers were explored by varying acetic acid (AA) concentration, ammonia concentration, annealing temperature and degree of heparin crosslinking. Results showed that optimizing AA concentration to 2vol% improved fiber strength and stiffness by 2-fold. Extruding chitosan solution into 25wt% of ammonia solution reduced fiber diameters and improved fiber strength by 2-fold and stiffness by 3-fold, due to an increase in crystallinity as confirmed by XRD. Fiber annealing further reduced fiber diameter and improved fiber strength and stiffness as temperature increased. Chitosan fibers crosslinked with heparin had increased diameter but lower strength and stiffness properties and higher breaking strain values. When individual parameters were combined, further improvement in fiber mechanical properties was achieved. All mechanically improved fibers and heparin crosslinked fibers promoted valvular interstitial cells (VIC) attachment and growth over 10 day cultures. Our results demonstrate the ability to substantially improve the mechanical properties of chitosan fibers without adversely affecting their biological properties. The investigated treatments offer numerous advantages over previous physical/chemical modifications and thus are expected to expand the utility of chitosan fibers with tunable mechanical properties in various tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Gelatin Scaffolds with Controlled Pore Structure and Mechanical Property for Cartilage Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shangwu; Zhang, Qin; Nakamoto, Tomoko; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen, Guoping

    2016-03-01

    Engineering of cartilage tissue in vitro using porous scaffolds and chondrocytes provides a promising approach for cartilage repair. However, nonuniform cell distribution and heterogeneous tissue formation together with weak mechanical property of in vitro engineered cartilage limit their clinical application. In this study, gelatin porous scaffolds with homogeneous and open pores were prepared using ice particulates and freeze-drying. The scaffolds were used to culture bovine articular chondrocytes to engineer cartilage tissue in vitro. The pore structure and mechanical property of gelatin scaffolds could be well controlled by using different ratios of ice particulates to gelatin solution and different concentrations of gelatin. Gelatin scaffolds prepared from ≥70% ice particulates enabled homogeneous seeding of bovine articular chondrocytes throughout the scaffolds and formation of homogeneous cartilage extracellular matrix. While soft scaffolds underwent cellular contraction, stiff scaffolds resisted cellular contraction and had significantly higher cell proliferation and synthesis of sulfated glycosaminoglycan. Compared with the gelatin scaffolds prepared without ice particulates, the gelatin scaffolds prepared with ice particulates facilitated formation of homogeneous cartilage tissue with significantly higher compressive modulus. The gelatin scaffolds with highly open pore structure and good mechanical property can be used to improve in vitro tissue-engineered cartilage.

  15. Multiscale mechanics of hierarchical structure/property relationships in calcified tissues and tissue/material interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, J. Lawrence; Misra, Anil; Spencer, Paulette; Wang, Yong; Bumrerraj, Sauwanan; Nomura, Tsutomu; Eppell, Steven J.; Tabib-Azar, Massood

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a review plus new data that describes the role hierarchical nanostructural properties play in developing an understanding of the effect of scale on the material properties (chemical, elastic and electrical) of calcified tissues as well as the interfaces that form between such tissues and biomaterials. Both nanostructural and microstructural properties will be considered starting with the size and shape of the apatitic mineralites in both young and mature bovine bone. Microstructural properties for human dentin and cortical and trabecular bone will be considered. These separate sets of data will be combined mathematically to advance the effects of scale on the modeling of these tissues and the tissue/biomaterial interfaces as hierarchical material/structural composites. Interfacial structure and properties to be considered in greatest detail will be that of the dentin/adhesive (d/a) interface, which presents a clear example of examining all three material properties, (chemical, elastic and electrical). In this case, finite element modeling (FEA) was based on the actual measured values of the structure and elastic properties of the materials comprising the d/a interface; this combination provides insight into factors and mechanisms that contribute to premature failure of dental composite fillings. At present, there are more elastic property data obtained by microstructural measurements, especially high frequency ultrasonic wave propagation (UWP) and scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM) techniques. However, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and nanoindentation (NI) of cortical and trabecular bone and the dentin-enamel junction (DEJ) among others have become available allowing correlation of the nanostructural level measurements with those made on the microstructural level

  16. Changes in diffusion properties of biological tissues associated with mechanical strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Kenichiro; Imae, T.; Mima, Kazuo; Sekino, Masaki; Ohsaki, Hiroyuki; Ueno, Shogo

    2007-01-01

    Mechanical strain in biological tissues causes a change in the diffusion properties of water molecules. This paper proposes a method of estimating mechanical strain in biological tissues using diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Measurements were carried out on uncompressed and compressed chicken skeletal muscles. A theoretical model of the diffusion of water molecules in muscle fibers was derived based on Tanner's equation. Diameter of the muscle fibers was estimated by fitting the model equation to the measured signals. Changes in the mean diffusivity (MD), the fractional anisotropy (FA), and diameter of the muscle fiber did not have any statistical significance. The intracellular diffusion coefficient (D int ) was changed by mechanical strain (p<.05). This method has potential applications in the quantitative evaluation of strain in biological tissues, a though it poses several technical challenges. (author)

  17. Characterizing the lung tissue mechanical properties using a micromechanical model of alveolar sac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karami, Elham; Seify, Behzad; Moghadas, Hadi; Sabsalinejad, Masoomeh; Lee, Ting-Yim; Samani, Abbas

    2017-03-01

    According to statistics, lung disease is among the leading causes of death worldwide. As such, many research groups are developing powerful tools for understanding, diagnosis and treatment of various lung diseases. Recently, biomechanical modeling has emerged as an effective tool for better understanding of human physiology, disease diagnosis and computer assisted medical intervention. Mechanical properties of lung tissue are important requirements for methods developed for lung disease diagnosis and medical intervention. As such, the main objective of this study is to develop an effective tool for estimating the mechanical properties of normal and pathological lung parenchyma tissue based on its microstructure. For this purpose, a micromechanical model of the lung tissue was developed using finite element (FE) method, and the model was demonstrated to have application in estimating the mechanical properties of lung alveolar wall. The proposed model was developed by assembling truncated octahedron tissue units resembling the alveoli. A compression test was simulated using finite element method on the created geometry and the hyper-elastic parameters of the alveoli wall were calculated using reported alveolar wall stress-strain data and an inverse optimization framework. Preliminary results indicate that the proposed model can be potentially used to reconstruct microstructural images of lung tissue using macro-scale tissue response for normal and different pathological conditions. Such images can be used for effective diagnosis of lung diseases such as Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD).

  18. How preconditioning affects the measurement of poro-viscoelastic mechanical properties in biological tissues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hosseini, S.M.; Wilson, W.; Ito, K.; Donkelaar, van C.C.

    2014-01-01

    It is known that initial loading curves of soft biological tissues are substantially different from subsequent loadings. The later loading curves are generally used for assessing the mechanical properties of a tissue, and the first loading cycles, referred to as preconditioning, are omitted.

  19. Correlation between the mechanical and histological properties of liver tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarpuzlu, Berkay; Ayyildiz, Mehmet; Tok, Olgu Enis; Aktas, Ranan Gulhan; Basdogan, Cagatay

    2014-01-01

    In order to gain further insight into the mechanisms of tissue damage during the progression of liver diseases as well as the liver preservation for transplantation, an improved understanding of the relation between the mechanical and histological properties of liver is necessary. We suggest that this relation can only be established truly if the changes in the states of those properties are investigated dynamically as a function of post mortem time. In this regard, we first perform mechanical characterization experiments on three bovine livers to investigate the changes in gross mechanical properties (stiffness, viscosity, and fracture toughness) for the preservation periods of 5, 11, 17, 29, 41 and 53h after harvesting. Then, the histological examination is performed on the samples taken from the same livers to investigate the changes in apoptotic cell count, collagen accumulation, sinusoidal dilatation, and glycogen deposition as a function of the same preservation periods. Finally, the correlation between the mechanical and histological properties is investigated via the Spearman's Rank-Order Correlation method. The results of our study show that stiffness, viscosity, and fracture toughness of bovine liver increase as the preservation period is increased. These macroscopic changes are very strongly correlated with the increase in collagen accumulation and decrease in deposited glycogen level at the microscopic level. Also, we observe that the largest changes in mechanical and histological properties occur after the first 11-17h of preservation. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization of Mechanical Properties of Tissue Scaffolds by Phase Contrast Imaging and Finite Element Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bawolin, Nahshon K; Dolovich, Allan T; Chen, Daniel X B; Zhang, Chris W J

    2015-08-01

    In tissue engineering, the cell and scaffold approach has shown promise as a treatment to regenerate diseased and/or damaged tissue. In this treatment, an artificial construct (scaffold) is seeded with cells, which organize and proliferate into new tissue. The scaffold itself biodegrades with time, leaving behind only newly formed tissue. The degradation qualities of the scaffold are critical during the treatment period, since the change in the mechanical properties of the scaffold with time can influence cell behavior. To observe in time the scaffold's mechanical properties, a straightforward method is to deform the scaffold and then characterize scaffold deflection accordingly. However, experimentally observing the scaffold deflection is challenging. This paper presents a novel study on characterization of mechanical properties of scaffolds by phase contrast imaging and finite element modeling, which specifically includes scaffold fabrication, scaffold imaging, image analysis, and finite elements (FEs) modeling of the scaffold mechanical properties. The innovation of the work rests on the use of in-line phase contrast X-ray imaging at 20 KeV to characterize tissue scaffold deformation caused by ultrasound radiation forces and the use of the Fourier transform to identify movement. Once deformation has been determined experimentally, it is then compared with the predictions given by the forward solution of a finite element model. A consideration of the number of separate loading conditions necessary to uniquely identify the material properties of transversely isotropic and fully orthotropic scaffolds is also presented, along with the use of an FE as a form of regularization.

  1. Poly (Ethylene Glycol)-Based Hydrogels as Self-Inflating Tissue Expanders with Tunable Mechanical and Swelling Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamadi, Mahsa; Shokrollahi, Parvin; Houshmand, Behzad; Joupari, Mortaza Daliri; Mashhadiabbas, Fatemeh; Khademhosseini, Ali; Annabi, Nasim

    2017-08-01

    Tissue expansion is used by plastic/reconstructive surgeons to grow additional skin/tissue for replacing or repairing lost or damaged soft tissues. Recently, hydrogels have been widely used for tissue expansion applications. Herein, a self-inflating tissue expander blend composition from three different molecular weights (2, 6, and 10 kDa) of poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogel with tunable mechanical and swelling properties is presented. The in vitro results demonstrate that, of the eight studied compositions, P6 (PEGDA 6 kDa:10 kDa (50:50)) and P8 (PEGDA 6 kDa:10 kDa (35:65)) formulations provide a balance of mechanical property and swelling capability suitable for tissue expansion. Furthermore, these expanders can be compressed up to 60% of their original height and can be loaded and unloaded cyclically at least ten times with no permanent deformation. The in vivo results indicate that these two engineered blend compositions are capable to generate a swelling pressure sufficient to dilate the surrounding tissue while retaining their original shape. The histological analyses reveal the formation of fibrous capsule at the interface between the implant and the subcutaneous tissue with no signs of inflammation. Ultimately, controlling the PEGDA chain length shows potential for the development of self-inflating tissue expanders with tunable mechanical and swelling properties. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. A computational modeling approach for the characterization of mechanical properties of 3D alginate tissue scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, K; Yan, K C; Sun, W

    2008-01-01

    Scaffold guided tissue engineering is an innovative approach wherein cells are seeded onto biocompatible and biodegradable materials to form 3-dimensional (3D) constructs that, when implanted in the body facilitate the regeneration of tissue. Tissue scaffolds act as artificial extracellular matrix providing the environment conducive for tissue growth. Characterization of scaffold properties is necessary to understand better the underlying processes involved in controlling cell behavior and formation of functional tissue. We report a computational modeling approach to characterize mechanical properties of 3D gellike biomaterial, specifically, 3D alginate scaffold encapsulated with cells. Alginate inherent nonlinearity and variations arising from minute changes in its concentration and viscosity make experimental evaluation of its mechanical properties a challenging and time consuming task. We developed an in silico model to determine the stress-strain relationship of alginate based scaffolds from experimental data. In particular, we compared the Ogden hyperelastic model to other hyperelastic material models and determined that this model was the most suitable to characterize the nonlinear behavior of alginate. We further propose a mathematical model that represents the alginate material constants in Ogden model as a function of concentrations and viscosity. This study demonstrates the model capability to predict mechanical properties of 3D alginate scaffolds.

  3. A Guide for Using Mechanical Stimulation to Enhance Tissue-Engineered Articular Cartilage Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Evelia Y; Hu, Jerry C; Athanasiou, Kyriacos

    2018-04-26

    The use of tissue-engineered articular cartilage (TEAC) constructs has the potential to become a powerful treatment option for cartilage lesions resulting from trauma or early stages of pathology. Although fundamental tissue-engineering strategies based on the use of scaffolds, cells, and signals have been developed, techniques that lead to biomimetic AC constructs that can be translated to in vivo use are yet to be fully confirmed. Mechanical stimulation during tissue culture can be an effective strategy to enhance the mechanical, structural, and cellular properties of tissue-engineered constructs toward mimicking those of native AC. This review focuses on the use of mechanical stimulation to attain and enhance the properties of AC constructs needed to translate these implants to the clinic. In vivo, mechanical loading at maximal and supramaximal physiological levels has been shown to be detrimental to AC through the development of degenerative changes. In contrast, multiple studies have revealed that during culture, mechanical stimulation within narrow ranges of magnitude and duration can produce anisotropic, mechanically robust AC constructs with high cellular viability. Significant progress has been made in evaluating a variety of mechanical stimulation techniques on TEAC, either alone or in combination with other stimuli. These advancements include determining and optimizing efficacious loading parameters (e.g., duration and frequency) to yield improvements in construct design criteria, such as collagen II content, compressive stiffness, cell viability, and fiber organization. With the advancement of mechanical stimulation as a potent strategy in AC tissue engineering, a compendium detailing the results achievable by various stimulus regimens would be of great use for researchers in academia and industry. The objective is to list the qualitative and quantitative effects that can be attained when direct compression, hydrostatic pressure, shear, and tensile

  4. Development of Chitosan Scaffolds with Enhanced Mechanical Properties for Intestinal Tissue Engineering Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakhem, Elie; Bitar, Khalil N

    2015-10-13

    Massive resections of segments of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract lead to intestinal discontinuity. Functional tubular replacements are needed. Different scaffolds were designed for intestinal tissue engineering application. However, none of the studies have evaluated the mechanical properties of the scaffolds. We have previously shown the biocompatibility of chitosan as a natural material in intestinal tissue engineering. Our scaffolds demonstrated weak mechanical properties. In this study, we enhanced the mechanical strength of the scaffolds with the use of chitosan fibers. Chitosan fibers were circumferentially-aligned around the tubular chitosan scaffolds either from the luminal side or from the outer side or both. Tensile strength, tensile strain, and Young's modulus were significantly increased in the scaffolds with fibers when compared with scaffolds without fibers. Burst pressure was also increased. The biocompatibility of the scaffolds was maintained as demonstrated by the adhesion of smooth muscle cells around the different kinds of scaffolds. The chitosan scaffolds with fibers provided a better candidate for intestinal tissue engineering. The novelty of this study was in the design of the fibers in a specific alignment and their incorporation within the scaffolds.

  5. Mechanical and mineral properties of osteogenesis imperfecta human bones at the tissue level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbert, Laurianne; Aurégan, Jean-Charles; Pernelle, Kélig; Hoc, Thierry

    2014-08-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disorder characterized by an increase in bone fragility on the macroscopic scale, but few data are available to describe the mechanisms involved on the tissue scale and the possible correlations between these scales. To better understand the effects of OI on the properties of human bone, we studied the mechanical and chemical properties of eight bone samples from children suffering from OI and compared them to the properties of three controls. High-resolution computed tomography, nanoindentation and Raman microspectroscopy were used to assess those properties. A higher tissue mineral density was found for OI bone (1.131 gHA/cm3 vs. 1.032 gHA/cm3, p=0.032), along with a lower Young's modulus (17.6 GPa vs. 20.5 GPa, p=0.024). Obviously, the mutation-induced collagen defects alter the collagen matrix, thereby affecting the mineralization. Raman spectroscopy showed that the mineral-to-matrix ratio was higher in the OI samples, while the crystallinity was lower, suggesting that the mineral crystals were smaller but more abundant in the case of OI. This change in crystal size, distribution and composition contributes to the observed decrease in mechanical strength. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Determination of the axial and circumferential mechanical properties of the skin tissue using experimental testing and constitutive modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Alireza; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi; Haghighatnama, Maedeh; Haghi, Afsaneh Motevalli

    2015-01-01

    The skin, being a multi-layered material, is responsible for protecting the human body from the mechanical, bacterial, and viral insults. The skin tissue may display different mechanical properties according to the anatomical locations of a body. However, these mechanical properties in different anatomical regions and at different loading directions (axial and circumferential) of the mice body to date have not been determined. In this study, the axial and circumferential loads were imposed on the mice skin samples. The elastic modulus and maximum stress of the skin tissues were measured before the failure occurred. The nonlinear mechanical behavior of the skin tissues was also computationally investigated through a suitable constitutive equation. Hyperelastic material model was calibrated using the experimental data. Regardless of the anatomic locations of the mice body, the results revealed significantly different mechanical properties in the axial and circumferential directions and, consequently, the mice skin tissue behaves like a pure anisotropic material. The highest elastic modulus was observed in the back skin under the circumferential direction (6.67 MPa), while the lowest one was seen in the abdomen skin under circumferential loading (0.80 MPa). The Ogden material model was narrowly captured the nonlinear mechanical response of the skin at different loading directions. The results help to understand the isotropic/anisotropic mechanical behavior of the skin tissue at different anatomical locations. They also have implications for a diversity of disciplines, i.e., dermatology, cosmetics industry, clinical decision making, and clinical intervention.

  7. Characterization of the mechanical properties of resected porcine organ tissue using optical fiber photoelastic polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudnut, Alexa W; Babaei, Behzad; Liu, Sonya; Larson, Brent K; Mumenthaler, Shannon M; Armani, Andrea M

    2017-10-01

    Characterizing the mechanical behavior of living tissue presents an interesting challenge because the elasticity varies by eight orders of magnitude, from 50Pa to 5GPa. In the present work, a non-destructive optical fiber photoelastic polarimetry system is used to analyze the mechanical properties of resected samples from porcine liver, kidney, and pancreas. Using a quasi-linear viscoelastic fit, the elastic modulus values of the different organ systems are determined. They are in agreement with previous work. In addition, a histological assessment of compressed and uncompressed tissues confirms that the tissue is not damaged during testing.

  8. Mathematical Modeling of Uniaxial Mechanical Properties of Collagen Gel Scaffolds for Vascular Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramiro M. Irastorza

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Small diameter tissue-engineered arteries improve their mechanical and functional properties when they are mechanically stimulated. Applying a suitable stress and/or strain with or without a cycle to the scaffolds and cells during the culturing process resides in our ability to generate a suitable mechanical model. Collagen gel is one of the most used scaffolds in vascular tissue engineering, mainly because it is the principal constituent of the extracellular matrix for vascular cells in human. The mechanical modeling of such a material is not a trivial task, mainly for its viscoelastic nature. Computational and experimental methods for developing a suitable model for collagen gels are of primary importance for the field. In this research, we focused on mechanical properties of collagen gels under unconfined compression. First, mechanical viscoelastic models are discussed and framed in the control system theory. Second, models are fitted using system identification. Several models are evaluated and two nonlinear models are proposed: Mooney-Rivlin inspired and Hammerstein models. The results suggest that Mooney-Rivlin and Hammerstein models succeed in describing the mechanical behavior of collagen gels for cyclic tests on scaffolds (with best fitting parameters 58.3% and 75.8%, resp.. When Akaike criterion is used, the best is the Mooney-Rivlin inspired model.

  9. Mathematical modeling of uniaxial mechanical properties of collagen gel scaffolds for vascular tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irastorza, Ramiro M; Drouin, Bernard; Blangino, Eugenia; Mantovani, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Small diameter tissue-engineered arteries improve their mechanical and functional properties when they are mechanically stimulated. Applying a suitable stress and/or strain with or without a cycle to the scaffolds and cells during the culturing process resides in our ability to generate a suitable mechanical model. Collagen gel is one of the most used scaffolds in vascular tissue engineering, mainly because it is the principal constituent of the extracellular matrix for vascular cells in human. The mechanical modeling of such a material is not a trivial task, mainly for its viscoelastic nature. Computational and experimental methods for developing a suitable model for collagen gels are of primary importance for the field. In this research, we focused on mechanical properties of collagen gels under unconfined compression. First, mechanical viscoelastic models are discussed and framed in the control system theory. Second, models are fitted using system identification. Several models are evaluated and two nonlinear models are proposed: Mooney-Rivlin inspired and Hammerstein models. The results suggest that Mooney-Rivlin and Hammerstein models succeed in describing the mechanical behavior of collagen gels for cyclic tests on scaffolds (with best fitting parameters 58.3% and 75.8%, resp.). When Akaike criterion is used, the best is the Mooney-Rivlin inspired model.

  10. Effects of the Variation in Brain Tissue Mechanical Properties on the Intracranial Response of a 6-Year-Old Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Shihai; Li, Haiyan; Li, Xiangnan; Ruan, Jesse

    2015-01-01

    Brain tissue mechanical properties are of importance to investigate child head injury using finite element (FE) method. However, these properties used in child head FE model normally vary in a large range in published literatures because of the insufficient child cadaver experiments. In this work, a head FE model with detailed anatomical structures is developed from the computed tomography (CT) data of a 6-year-old healthy child head. The effects of brain tissue mechanical properties on traumatic brain response are also analyzed by reconstruction of a head impact on engine hood according to Euro-NCAP testing regulation using FE method. The result showed that the variations of brain tissue mechanical parameters in linear viscoelastic constitutive model had different influences on the intracranial response. Furthermore, the opposite trend was obtained in the predicted shear stress and shear strain of brain tissues caused by the variations of mentioned parameters.

  11. Effects of the Variation in Brain Tissue Mechanical Properties on the Intracranial Response of a 6-Year-Old Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shihai Cui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain tissue mechanical properties are of importance to investigate child head injury using finite element (FE method. However, these properties used in child head FE model normally vary in a large range in published literatures because of the insufficient child cadaver experiments. In this work, a head FE model with detailed anatomical structures is developed from the computed tomography (CT data of a 6-year-old healthy child head. The effects of brain tissue mechanical properties on traumatic brain response are also analyzed by reconstruction of a head impact on engine hood according to Euro-NCAP testing regulation using FE method. The result showed that the variations of brain tissue mechanical parameters in linear viscoelastic constitutive model had different influences on the intracranial response. Furthermore, the opposite trend was obtained in the predicted shear stress and shear strain of brain tissues caused by the variations of mentioned parameters.

  12. Emergent material properties of developing epithelial tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Pedro F; Duque, Julia; Étienne, Jocelyn; Martinez-Arias, Alfonso; Blanchard, Guy B; Gorfinkiel, Nicole

    2015-11-23

    Force generation and the material properties of cells and tissues are central to morphogenesis but remain difficult to measure in vivo. Insight is often limited to the ratios of mechanical properties obtained through disruptive manipulation, and the appropriate models relating stress and strain are unknown. The Drosophila amnioserosa epithelium progressively contracts over 3 hours of dorsal closure, during which cell apices exhibit area fluctuations driven by medial myosin pulses with periods of 1.5-6 min. Linking these two timescales and understanding how pulsatile contractions drive morphogenetic movements is an urgent challenge. We present a novel framework to measure in a continuous manner the mechanical properties of epithelial cells in the natural context of a tissue undergoing morphogenesis. We show that the relationship between apicomedial myosin fluorescence intensity and strain during fluctuations is consistent with a linear behaviour, although with a lag. We thus used myosin fluorescence intensity as a proxy for active force generation and treated cells as natural experiments of mechanical response under cyclic loading, revealing unambiguous mechanical properties from the hysteresis loop relating stress to strain. Amnioserosa cells can be described as a contractile viscoelastic fluid. We show that their emergent mechanical behaviour can be described by a linear viscoelastic rheology at timescales relevant for tissue morphogenesis. For the first time, we establish relative changes in separate effective mechanical properties in vivo. Over the course of dorsal closure, the tissue solidifies and effective stiffness doubles as net contraction of the tissue commences. Combining our findings with those from previous laser ablation experiments, we show that both apicomedial and junctional stress also increase over time, with the relative increase in apicomedial stress approximately twice that of other obtained measures. Our results show that in an epithelial

  13. Lung tissue mechanics as an emergent phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suki, Béla; Bates, Jason H T

    2011-04-01

    The mechanical properties of lung parenchymal tissue are both elastic and dissipative, as well as being highly nonlinear. These properties cannot be fully understood, however, in terms of the individual constituents of the tissue. Rather, the mechanical behavior of lung tissue emerges as a macroscopic phenomenon from the interactions of its microscopic components in a way that is neither intuitive nor easily understood. In this review, we first consider the quasi-static mechanical behavior of lung tissue and discuss computational models that show how smooth nonlinear stress-strain behavior can arise through a percolation-like process in which the sequential recruitment of collagen fibers with increasing strain causes them to progressively take over the load-bearing role from elastin. We also show how the concept of percolation can be used to link the pathologic progression of parenchymal disease at the micro scale to physiological symptoms at the macro scale. We then examine the dynamic mechanical behavior of lung tissue, which invokes the notion of tissue resistance. Although usually modeled phenomenologically in terms of collections of springs and dashpots, lung tissue viscoelasticity again can be seen to reflect various types of complex dynamic interactions at the molecular level. Finally, we discuss the inevitability of why lung tissue mechanics need to be complex.

  14. High-resolution optical polarimetric elastography for measuring the mechanical properties of tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudnut, Alexa W.; Armani, Andrea M.

    2018-02-01

    Traditionally, chemical and molecular markers have been the predominate method in diagnostics. Recently, alternate methods of determining tissue and disease characteristics have been proposed based on testing the mechanical behavior of biomaterials. Existing methods for performing elastography measurements, such as atomic force microscopy, compression testing, and ultrasound elastography, require either extensive sample processing or have poor resolution. In the present work, we demonstrate an optical polarimetric elastography device to characterize the mechanical properties of salmon skeletal muscle. A fiber-coupled 1550nm laser paired with an optical polarizer is used to create a fiber optic sensing region. By measuring the change in polarization from the initial state to the final state within the fiber sensing region with a polarimeter, the loading-unloading curves can be determined for the biomaterial. The device is used to characterize the difference between samples with a range of collagen membranes. The loading-unloading curves are used to determine the change in polarization phase and energy loss of the samples at 10%, 20% and 30% strain. As expected, the energy loss is a better metric for measuring the mechanical properties of the tissues because it incorporates the entire loading-unloading curve rather than a single point. Using this metric, it is demonstrated the device can repeatedly differentiate between the different membrane configurations.

  15. MODELLING OF RING-SHAPED ULTRASONIC WAVEGUIDES FOR TESTING OF MECHANICAL PROPERTIES AND THERAPEUTIC TREATMENT OF BIOLOGICAL TISSUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. T. Minchenya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents results of modelling of ring-shaped waveguide tool for ultrasonic treatment of biological materials, particularly malignant tumours, and testing of their mechanical properties. Harmonic analysis of forced flexural vibration of the waveguide using ANSYS software and APDL programming language was implemented for determination of waveguide geometric parameters providing its resonance for the given excitation frequency. The developed finite element model accounts for interaction between the waveguide and tumour tissue as well as initial prestressing of tissue radially compressed by the waveguide. Resonant curves of the waveguide in terms of its thickness and diameter are calculated and presented. Principle of application of the developed modeling technique for extraction of diagnostic data on mechanical properties of biological tissues is described.

  16. Intermittent straining accelerates the development of tissue properties in engineered heart valve tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rubbens, M.P.; Mol, A.; Boerboom, R.A.; Bank, R.A.; Baaijens, F.P.T.; Bouten, C.V.C.

    2009-01-01

    Tissue-engineered heart valves lack sufficient amounts of functionally organized structures and consequently do not meet in vivo mechanical demands. To optimize tissue architecture and hence improve mechanical properties, various in vitro mechanical conditioning protocols have been proposed, of

  17. Mechanical and biological properties of the micro-/nano-grain functionally graded hydroxyapatite bioceramics for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Changchun; Deng, Congying; Chen, Xuening; Zhao, Xiufen; Chen, Ying; Fan, Yujiang; Zhang, Xingdong

    2015-08-01

    Functionally graded materials (FGM) open the promising approach for bone tissue repair. In this study, a novel functionally graded hydroxyapatite (HA) bioceramic with micrograin and nanograin structure was fabricated. Its mechanical properties were tailored by composition of micrograin and nanograin. The dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) indicated that the graded HA ceramics had similar mechanical property compared to natural bones. Their cytocompatibility was evaluated via fluorescent microscopy and MTT colorimetric assay. The viability and proliferation of rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) on ceramics indicated that this functionally graded HA ceramic had better cytocompatibility than conventional HA ceramic. This study demonstrated that functionally graded HA ceramics create suitable structures to satisfy both the mechanical and biological requirements of bone tissues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Mechanical properties and cellular response of novel electrospun nanofibers for ligament tissue engineering: Effects of orientation and geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauly, Hannah M; Kelly, Daniel J; Popat, Ketul C; Trujillo, Nathan A; Dunne, Nicholas J; McCarthy, Helen O; Haut Donahue, Tammy L

    2016-08-01

    Electrospun nanofibers are a promising material for ligamentous tissue engineering, however weak mechanical properties of fibers to date have limited their clinical usage. The goal of this work was to modify electrospun nanofibers to create a robust structure that mimics the complex hierarchy of native tendons and ligaments. The scaffolds that were fabricated in this study consisted of either random or aligned nanofibers in flat sheets or rolled nanofiber bundles that mimic the size scale of fascicle units in primarily tensile load bearing soft musculoskeletal tissues. Altering nanofiber orientation and geometry significantly affected mechanical properties; most notably aligned nanofiber sheets had the greatest modulus; 125% higher than that of random nanofiber sheets; and 45% higher than aligned nanofiber bundles. Modifying aligned nanofiber sheets to form aligned nanofiber bundles also resulted in approximately 107% higher yield stresses and 140% higher yield strains. The mechanical properties of aligned nanofiber bundles were in the range of the mechanical properties of the native ACL: modulus=158±32MPa, yield stress=57±23MPa and yield strain=0.38±0.08. Adipose derived stem cells cultured on all surfaces remained viable and proliferated extensively over a 7 day culture period and cells elongated on nanofiber bundles. The results of the study suggest that aligned nanofiber bundles may be useful for ligament and tendon tissue engineering based on their mechanical properties and ability to support cell adhesion, proliferation, and elongation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of tumor therapeutic irradiation on the mechanical properties of teeth tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraenzel, W.; Gerlach, R.; Hein, H.J.; Schaller, H.G.

    2006-01-01

    Tumor irradiation of the head-neck area is accompanied by the development of a so-called radiation caries in the treated patients. In spite of conservative therapeutic measures, the process results in tooth destruction. The present study investigated the effects of irradiation on the demineralization and remineralization of the dental tissue. For this purpose, retained third molars were prepared and assigned either to a test group, which was exposed to fractional irradiation up to 60 Gy, or to a non-irradiated control group. Irradiated and non-irradiated teeth were then demineralized using acidic hydroxyl-cellulose gel; afterwards the teeth were remineralized using either Bifluorid12 registered or elmex gelee registered . The nanoindentation technique was used to measure the mechanical properties, hardness and elasticity, of the teeth in each of the conditions. The values were compared to the non-irradiated control group. Irradiation decreased dramatically the mechanical parameters of enamel and dentine. In non-irradiated teeth, demineralization had nearly the same effects of irradiation on the mechanical properties. In irradiated teeth, the effects of demineralization were negligible in comparison to non-irradiated teeth. Remineralization with Bifluorid12 registered or elmex gelee registered led to a partial improvement of the mechanical properties of the teeth. The enamel was more positively affected, by remineralization than the dentine. (orig.)

  20. A novel bioreactor to simulate urinary bladder mechanical properties and compliance for bladder functional tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xin; Li, Dao-bing; Xu, Feng; Wang, Yan; Zhu, Yu-chun; Li, Hong; Wang, Kun-jie

    2011-02-01

    Bioreactors are pivotal tools for generating mechanical stimulation in functional tissue engineering study. This study aimed to create a bioreactor that can simulate urinary bladder mechanical properties, and to investigate the effects of a mechanically stimulated culture on urothelial cells and bladder smooth muscle cells. We designed a bioreactor to simulate the mechanical properties of bladder. A pressure-record system was used to evaluate the mechanical properties of the bioreactor by measuring the pressure in culture chambers. To test the biocompatibility of the bioreactor, viabilities of urothelial cells and smooth muscle cells cultured in the bioreactor under static and mechanically changed conditions were measured after 7-day culture. To evaluate the effect of mechanical stimulations on the vital cells, urethral cells and smooth muscle cells were cultured in the simulated mechanical conditions. After that, the viability and the distribution pattern of the cells were observed and compared with cells cultured in non-mechanical stimulated condition. The bioreactor system successfully generated waveforms similar to the intended programmed model while maintaining a cell-seeded elastic membrane between the chambers. There were no differences between viabilities of urothelial cells ((91.90 ± 1.22)% vs. (93.14 ± 1.78)%, P > 0.05) and bladder smooth muscle cells ((93.41 ± 1.49)% vs. (92.61 ± 1.34)%, P > 0.05). The viability of cells and tissue structure observation after cultured in simulated condition showed that mechanical stimulation was the only factor affected cells in the bioreactor and improved the arrangement of cells on silastic membrane. This bioreactor can effectively simulate the physiological and mechanical properties of the bladder. Mechanical stimulation is the only factor that affected the viability of cells cultured in the bioreactor. The bioreactor can change the growth behavior of urothelial cells and bladder smooth muscle cells, resulting in

  1. An optical coherence tomography (OCT)-based air jet indentation system for measuring the mechanical properties of soft tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Yan-Ping; Zheng, Yong-Ping; Wang, Shu-Zhe; Huang, Qing-Hua; Chen, Zhong-Ping; He, Yong-Hong

    2009-01-01

    A novel noncontact indentation system with the combination of an air jet and optical coherence tomography (OCT) was presented in this paper for the quantitative measurement of the mechanical properties of soft tissues. The key idea of this method is to use a pressure-controlled air jet as an indenter to compress the soft tissue in a noncontact way and utilize the OCT signals to extract the deformation induced. This indentation system provides measurement and mapping of tissue elasticity for small specimens with high scanning speed. Experiments were performed on 27 silicone tissue-mimicking phantoms with different Young's moduli, which were also measured by uniaxial compression tests. The regression coefficient of the indentation force to the indentation depth (N mm −1 ) was used as an indicator of the stiffness of tissue under air jet indentation. Results showed that the stiffness coefficients measured by the current system correlated well with the corresponding Young's moduli obtained by conventional mechanical testing (r = 0.89, p < 0.001). Preliminary in vivo tests also showed that the change of soft tissue stiffness with and without the contraction of the underlying muscles in the hand could be differentiated by the current measurement. This system may have broad applications in tissue assessment and characterization where alterations of mechanical properties are involved, in particular with the potential of noncontact micro-indentation for tissues

  2. Engineering the mechanical and biological properties of nanofibrous vascular grafts for in situ vascular tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Jeffrey J D; Yu, Jian; Wang, Aijun; Lee, Randall; Fang, Jun; Li, Song

    2017-08-17

    Synthetic small diameter vascular grafts have a high failure rate, and endothelialization is critical for preventing thrombosis and graft occlusion. A promising approach is in situ tissue engineering, whereby an acellular scaffold is implanted and provides stimulatory cues to guide the in situ remodeling into a functional blood vessel. An ideal scaffold should have sufficient binding sites for biomolecule immobilization and a mechanical property similar to native tissue. Here we developed a novel method to blend low molecular weight (LMW) elastic polymer during electrospinning process to increase conjugation sites and to improve the mechanical property of vascular grafts. LMW elastic polymer improved the elasticity of the scaffolds, and significantly increased the amount of heparin conjugated to the micro/nanofibrous scaffolds, which in turn increased the loading capacity of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and prolonged the release of VEGF. Vascular grafts were implanted into the carotid artery of rats to evaluate the in vivo performance. VEGF treatment significantly enhanced endothelium formation and the overall patency of vascular grafts. Heparin coating also increased cell infiltration into the electrospun grafts, thus increasing the production of collagen and elastin within the graft wall. This work demonstrates that LMW elastic polymer blending is an approach to engineer the mechanical and biological property of micro/nanofibrous vascular grafts for in situ vascular tissue engineering.

  3. Effect of tumor therapeutic irradiation on the mechanical properties of teeth tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraenzel, W. [Dept. of Physics, Martin Luther Univ. Halle (Germany); Gerlach, R. [Univ. Clinic and Policlinic for Radiation Therapy, Martin Luther Univ. Halle (Germany); Hein, H.J. [Univ. Clinic and Policlinic for Orthopaedics and Physical Medicine, Martin Luther Univ. Halle (Germany); Schaller, H.G. [Dept. of Operative Dentistry and Periodontology, Martin Luther Univ. Halle (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    Tumor irradiation of the head-neck area is accompanied by the development of a so-called radiation caries in the treated patients. In spite of conservative therapeutic measures, the process results in tooth destruction. The present study investigated the effects of irradiation on the demineralization and remineralization of the dental tissue. For this purpose, retained third molars were prepared and assigned either to a test group, which was exposed to fractional irradiation up to 60 Gy, or to a non-irradiated control group. Irradiated and non-irradiated teeth were then demineralized using acidic hydroxyl-cellulose gel; afterwards the teeth were remineralized using either Bifluorid12 {sup registered} or elmex gelee {sup registered}. The nanoindentation technique was used to measure the mechanical properties, hardness and elasticity, of the teeth in each of the conditions. The values were compared to the non-irradiated control group. Irradiation decreased dramatically the mechanical parameters of enamel and dentine. In non-irradiated teeth, demineralization had nearly the same effects of irradiation on the mechanical properties. In irradiated teeth, the effects of demineralization were negligible in comparison to non-irradiated teeth. Remineralization with Bifluorid12 {sup registered} or elmex gelee {sup registered} led to a partial improvement of the mechanical properties of the teeth. The enamel was more positively affected, by remineralization than the dentine. (orig.)

  4. An experimental study on the mechanical properties of rat brain tissue using different stress-strain definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Alireza; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi

    2014-07-01

    There are different stress-strain definitions to measure the mechanical properties of the brain tissue. However, there is no agreement as to which stress-strain definition should be employed to measure the mechanical properties of the brain tissue at both the longitudinal and circumferential directions. It is worth knowing that an optimize stress-strain definition of the brain tissue at different loading directions may have implications for neuronavigation and surgery simulation through haptic devices. This study is aimed to conduct a comparative study on different results are given by the various definitions of stress-strain and to recommend a specific definition when testing brain tissues. Prepared cylindrical samples are excised from the parietal lobes of rats' brains and experimentally tested by applying load on both the longitudinal and circumferential directions. Three stress definitions (second Piola-Kichhoff stress, engineering stress, and true stress) and four strain definitions (Almansi-Hamel strain, Green-St. Venant strain, engineering strain, and true strain) are used to determine the elastic modulus, maximum stress and strain. The highest non-linear stress-strain relation is observed for the Almansi-Hamel strain definition and it may overestimate the elastic modulus at different stress definitions at both the longitudinal and circumferential directions. The Green-St. Venant strain definition fails to address the non-linear stress-strain relation using different definitions of stress and triggers an underestimation of the elastic modulus. The results suggest the application of the true stress-true strain definition for characterization of the brain tissues mechanics since it gives more accurate measurements of the tissue's response using the instantaneous values.

  5. Chondroprotective supplementation promotes the mechanical properties of injectable scaffold for human nucleus pulposus tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss, Berit L; Maxwell, Thomas W; Deng, Ying

    2014-01-01

    A result of intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration, the nucleus pulposus (NP) is no longer able to withstand applied load leading to pain and disability. The objective of this study is to fabricate a tissue-engineered injectable scaffold with chondroprotective supplementation in vitro to improve the mechanical properties of a degenerative NP. Tissue-engineered scaffolds were fabricated using different concentrations of alginate and calcium chloride and mechanically evaluated. Fabrication conditions were based on structural and mechanical resemblance to the native NP. Chondroprotective supplementation, glucosamine (GCSN) and chondroitin sulfate (CS), were added to scaffolds at concentrations of 0:0µg/mL (0:0-S), 125:100µg/mL (125:100-S), 250:200µg/mL (250:200-S), and 500:400µg/mL (500:400-S), GCSN and CS, respectively. Scaffolds were used to fabricate tissue-engineered constructs through encapsulation of human nucleus pulposus cells (HNPCs). The tissue-engineered constructs were collected at days 1, 14, and 28 for biochemical and biomechanical evaluations. Confocal microscopy showed HNPC viability and rounded morphology over the 28 day period. MTT analysis resulted in significant increases in cell proliferation for each group. Collagen type II ELISA quantification and compressive aggregate moduli (HA) showed increasing trends for both 250:200-S and the 500:400-S groups on Day 28 with significantly greater HA compared to 0:0-S group. Glycosaminoglycan and water content decreased for all groups. Results indicate the increased mechanical properties of the 250:200-S and the 500:400-S was due to production of a functional matrix. This study demonstrated potential for a chondroprotective supplemented injectable scaffold to restore biomechanical function of a degenerative disc through the production of a mechanically functional matrix. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Carbon nanotubes reinforced chitosan films: mechanical properties and cell response of a novel biomaterial for cardiovascular tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroustalli, A; Zisimopoulou, A E; Koch, S; Rongen, L; Deligianni, D; Diamantouros, S; Athanassiou, G; Kokozidou, M; Mavrilas, D; Jockenhoevel, S

    2013-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been proposed as fillers to reinforce polymeric biomaterials for the strengthening of their structural integrity to achieve better biomechanical properties. In this study, a new polymeric composite material was introduced by incorporating various low concentrations of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) into chitosan (CS), aiming at achieving a novel composite biomaterial with superior mechanical and biological properties compared to neat CS, in order to be used in cardiovascular tissue engineering applications. Both mechanical and biological characteristics in contact with the two relevant cell types (endothelial cells and vascular myofibroblasts) were studied. Regarding the mechanical behavior of MWCNT reinforced CS (MWCNT/CS), 5 and 10 % concentrations of MWCNTs enhanced the mechanical behavior of CS, with that of 5 % exhibiting a superior mechanical strength compared to 10 % concentration and neat CS. Regarding biological properties, MWCNT/CS best supported proliferation of endothelial and myofibroblast cells, MWCNTs and MWCNT/CS caused no apoptosis and were not toxic of the examined cell types. Conclusively, the new material could be suitable for tissue engineering (TE) and particularly for cardiovascular TE applications.

  7. Mechanotransduction mechanisms in growing spherically structured tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlejohns, Euan; Dunlop, Carina M.

    2018-04-01

    There is increasing experimental interest in mechanotransduction in multi-cellular tissues as opposed to single cells. This is driven by a growing awareness of the importance of physiologically relevant three-dimensional culture and of cell–cell and cell–gel interactions in directing growth and development. The paradigm biophysical technique for investigating tissue level mechanobiology in this context is to grow model tissues in artificial gels with well-defined mechanical properties. These studies often indicate that the stiffness of the encapsulating gel can significantly alter cellular behaviours. We demonstrate here potential mechanisms linking tissue growth with stiffness-mediated mechanotransduction. We show how tissue growth in gel systems generates points at which there is a significant qualitative change in the cellular stress and strain experienced. We show analytically how these potential switching points depend on the mechanical properties of the constraining gel and predict when they will occur. Significantly, we identify distinct mechanisms that act separately in each of the stress and strain fields at different times. These observations suggest growth as a potential physical mechanism coupling gel stiffness with cellular mechanotransduction in three-dimensional tissues. We additionally show that non-proliferating areas, in the case that the constraining gel is soft compared with the tissue, will expand and contract passively as a result of growth. Central compartment size is thus seen to not be a reliable indicator on its own for growth initiation or active behaviour.

  8. Decreased mechanical properties of heart valve tissue constructs cultured in platelet lysate as compared to fetal bovine serum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geemen, van D.; Riem Vis, P.W.; Soekhradj - Soechit, R.S.; Sluijter, J.P.G.; Liefde - van Beest, de M.; Kluin, J.; Bouten, C.V.C.

    2011-01-01

    In autologous heart valve tissue engineering, there is an ongoing search for alternatives of fetal bovine serum (FBS). Human platelet-lysate (PL) might be a promising substitute. In the present article, we aimed to examine the tissue formation, functionality, and mechanical properties of engineered

  9. Mechanically Reinforced Catechol-Containing Hydrogels with Improved Tissue Gluing Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Feng

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In situ forming hydrogels with catechol groups as tissue reactive functionalities are interesting bioinspired materials for tissue adhesion. Poly(ethylene glycol (PEG–catechol tissue glues have been intensively investigated for this purpose. Different cross-linking mechanisms (oxidative or metal complexation and cross-linking conditions (pH, oxidant concentration, etc. have been studied in order to optimize the curing kinetics and final cross-linking degree of the system. However, reported systems still show limited mechanical stability, as expected from a PEG network, and this fact limits their potential application to load bearing tissues. Here, we describe mechanically reinforced PEG–catechol adhesives showing excellent and tunable cohesive properties and adhesive performance to tissue in the presence of blood. We used collagen/PEG mixtures, eventually filled with hydroxyapatite nanoparticles. The composite hydrogels show far better mechanical performance than the individual components. It is noteworthy that the adhesion strength measured on skin covered with blood was >40 kPa, largely surpassing (>6 fold the performance of cyanoacrylate, fibrin, and PEG–catechol systems. Moreover, the mechanical and interfacial properties could be easily tuned by slight changes in the composition of the glue to adapt them to the particular properties of the tissue. The reported adhesive compositions can tune and improve cohesive and adhesive properties of PEG–catechol-based tissue glues for load-bearing surgery applications.

  10. Mechanical characterization of bioprinted in vitro soft tissue models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Ting; Ouyang, Liliang; Sun, Wei; Yan, Karen Chang

    2013-01-01

    Recent development in bioprinting technology enables the fabrication of complex, precisely controlled cell-encapsulated tissue constructs. Bioprinted tissue constructs have potential in both therapeutic applications and nontherapeutic applications such as drug discovery and screening, disease modelling and basic biological studies such as in vitro tissue modelling. The mechanical properties of bioprinted in vitro tissue models play an important role in mimicking in vivo the mechanochemical microenvironment. In this study, we have constructed three-dimensional in vitro soft tissue models with varying structure and porosity based on the 3D cell-assembly technique. Gelatin/alginate hybrid materials were used as the matrix material and cells were embedded. The mechanical properties of these models were assessed via compression tests at various culture times, and applicability of three material constitutive models was examined for fitting the experimental data. An assessment of cell bioactivity in these models was also carried out. The results show that the mechanical properties can be improved through structure design, and the compression modulus and strength decrease with respect to time during the first week of culture. In addition, the experimental data fit well with the Ogden model and experiential function. These results provide a foundation to further study the mechanical properties, structural and combined effects in the design and the fabrication of in vitro soft tissue models. (paper)

  11. Viscoelastic Properties of Human Tracheal Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safshekan, Farzaneh; Tafazzoli-Shadpour, Mohammad; Abdouss, Majid; Shadmehr, Mohammad B

    2017-01-01

    The physiological performance of trachea is highly dependent on its mechanical behavior, and therefore, the mechanical properties of its components. Mechanical characterization of trachea is key to succeed in new treatments such as tissue engineering, which requires the utilization of scaffolds which are mechanically compatible with the native human trachea. In this study, after isolating human trachea samples from brain-dead cases and proper storage, we assessed the viscoelastic properties of tracheal cartilage, smooth muscle, and connective tissue based on stress relaxation tests (at 5% and 10% strains for cartilage and 20%, 30%, and 40% for smooth muscle and connective tissue). After investigation of viscoelastic linearity, constitutive models including Prony series for linear viscoelasticity and quasi-linear viscoelastic, modified superposition, and Schapery models for nonlinear viscoelasticity were fitted to the experimental data to find the best model for each tissue. We also investigated the effect of age on the viscoelastic behavior of tracheal tissues. Based on the results, all three tissues exhibited a (nonsignificant) decrease in relaxation rate with increasing the strain, indicating viscoelastic nonlinearity which was most evident for cartilage and with the least effect for connective tissue. The three-term Prony model was selected for describing the linear viscoelasticity. Among different models, the modified superposition model was best able to capture the relaxation behavior of the three tracheal components. We observed a general (but not significant) stiffening of tracheal cartilage and connective tissue with aging. No change in the stress relaxation percentage with aging was observed. The results of this study may be useful in the design and fabrication of tracheal tissue engineering scaffolds.

  12. Mechanics of fresh, frozen-thawed and heated porcine liver tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wex, Cora; Stoll, Anke; Fröhlich, Marlen; Arndt, Susann; Lippert, Hans

    2014-06-01

    For a better understanding of the effects of thermally altered soft tissue, the biothermomechanics of these tissues need to be studied. Without the knowledge of the underlying physical processes and the parameters that can be controlled clinically, thermal treatment of cancerous hepatic tissue or the preservation of liver grafts are based primarily on trial and error. Thus, this study is concerned with the investigation of the influence of temperature on the rheological properties and the histological properties of porcine liver. Heating previously cooled porcine liver tissue above 40 °C leads to significant, irreversible stiffness changes observed in the amplitude sweep. The increase of the complex shear module of healthy porcine liver from room temperature to 70 °C is approximately 9-fold. Comparing the temperatures -20 °C and 20 °C, no significant difference of the mechanical properties was observed. Furthermore, there is a strong relation between the mechanical and histological properties of the porcine liver. Temperatures above 40 °C destroy the collagen matrix within the liver tissue. This results in the alteration of the biomechanical properties. The time-temperature superposition principle is applied to generate temperature-dependent shift factors that can be described by a two-part exponential function model with an inflection temperature of 45 °C. Tumor ablation techniques such as heating or freezing have a significant influence on the histology of liver tissue. However, only for temperatures above body temperature an influence on the mechanical properties of hepatic tissues was noticeable. Freezing up to -20 °C did not affect the liver mechanics.

  13. Effect of pore architecture and stacking direction on mechanical properties of solid freeform fabrication-based scaffold for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Seob; Cha, Hwang Do; Shim, Jin-Hyung; Jung, Jin Woo; Kim, Jong Young; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2012-07-01

    Fabrication of a three-dimensional (3D) scaffold with increased mechanical strength may be an essential requirement for more advanced bone tissue engineering scaffolds. Various material- and chemical-based approaches have been explored to enhance the mechanical properties of engineered bone tissue scaffolds. In this study, the effects of pore architecture and stacking direction on the mechanical and cell proliferation properties of a scaffold were investigated. The 3D scaffold was prepared using solid freeform fabrication technology with a multihead deposition system. Various types of scaffolds with different pore architectures (lattice, stagger, and triangle types) and stacking directions (horizontal and vertical directions) were fabricated with a blend of polycaprolactone and poly lactic-co-glycolic acid. In compression tests, the triangle-type scaffold was the strongest among the experimental groups. Stacking direction affected the mechanical properties of scaffolds. An in vitro cell counting kit-8 assay showed no significant differences in optical density depending on the different pore architectures and stacking directions. In conclusion, mechanical properties of scaffolds can be enhanced by controlling pore architecture and stacking direction. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Influence of the temporal deposition of extracellular matrix on the mechanical properties of tissue-engineered cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khoshgoftar, M.; Wilson, W.; Ito, K.; Donkelaar, van C.C.

    2014-01-01

    Enhancement of the load-bearing capacity of tissue engineered (TE) cartilage is expected to improve the clinical outcome of implantations. Generally, cartilage TE studies aim to increase the total extracellular matrix (ECM) content to improve implant mechanical properties. Besides the ECM content,

  15. Nondestructive mechanical characterization of developing biological tissues using inflation testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oomen, P J A; van Kelle, M A J; Oomens, C W J; Bouten, C V C; Loerakker, S

    2017-10-01

    One of the hallmarks of biological soft tissues is their capacity to grow and remodel in response to changes in their environment. Although it is well-accepted that these processes occur at least partly to maintain a mechanical homeostasis, it remains unclear which mechanical constituent(s) determine(s) mechanical homeostasis. In the current study a nondestructive mechanical test and a two-step inverse analysis method were developed and validated to nondestructively estimate the mechanical properties of biological tissue during tissue culture. Nondestructive mechanical testing was achieved by performing an inflation test on tissues that were cultured inside a bioreactor, while the tissue displacement and thickness were nondestructively measured using ultrasound. The material parameters were estimated by an inverse finite element scheme, which was preceded by an analytical estimation step to rapidly obtain an initial estimate that already approximated the final solution. The efficiency and accuracy of the two-step inverse method was demonstrated on virtual experiments of several material types with known parameters. PDMS samples were used to demonstrate the method's feasibility, where it was shown that the proposed method yielded similar results to tensile testing. Finally, the method was applied to estimate the material properties of tissue-engineered constructs. Via this method, the evolution of mechanical properties during tissue growth and remodeling can now be monitored in a well-controlled system. The outcomes can be used to determine various mechanical constituents and to assess their contribution to mechanical homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Ultrasound Imaging Techniques for Spatiotemporal Characterization of Composition, Microstructure, and Mechanical Properties in Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Cheri X; Hong, Xiaowei; Stegemann, Jan P

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound techniques are increasingly being used to quantitatively characterize both native and engineered tissues. This review provides an overview and selected examples of the main techniques used in these applications. Grayscale imaging has been used to characterize extracellular matrix deposition, and quantitative ultrasound imaging based on the integrated backscatter coefficient has been applied to estimating cell concentrations and matrix morphology in tissue engineering. Spectral analysis has been employed to characterize the concentration and spatial distribution of mineral particles in a construct, as well as to monitor mineral deposition by cells over time. Ultrasound techniques have also been used to measure the mechanical properties of native and engineered tissues. Conventional ultrasound elasticity imaging and acoustic radiation force imaging have been applied to detect regions of altered stiffness within tissues. Sonorheometry and monitoring of steady-state excitation and recovery have been used to characterize viscoelastic properties of tissue using a single transducer to both deform and image the sample. Dual-mode ultrasound elastography uses separate ultrasound transducers to produce a more potent deformation force to microscale characterization of viscoelasticity of hydrogel constructs. These ultrasound-based techniques have high potential to impact the field of tissue engineering as they are further developed and their range of applications expands.

  17. Polyvinyl chloride as a multimodal tissue-mimicking material with tuned mechanical and medical imaging properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weisi; Belmont, Barry; Greve, Joan M; Manders, Adam B; Downey, Brian C; Zhang, Xi; Xu, Zhen; Guo, Dongming; Shih, Albert

    2016-10-01

    The mechanical and imaging properties of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) can be adjusted to meet the needs of researchers as a tissue-mimicking material. For instance, the hardness can be adjusted by changing the ratio of softener to PVC polymer, mineral oil can be added for lubrication in needle insertion, and glass beads can be added to scatter acoustic energy similar to biological tissue. Through this research, the authors sought to develop a regression model to design formulations of PVC with targeted mechanical and multimodal medical imaging properties. The design of experiment was conducted by varying three factors-(1) the ratio of softener to PVC polymer, (2) the mass fraction of mineral oil, and (3) the mass fraction of glass beads-and measuring the mechanical properties (elastic modulus, hardness, viscoelastic relaxation time constant, and needle insertion friction force) and the medical imaging properties [speed of sound, acoustic attenuation coefficient, magnetic resonance imaging time constants T 1 and T 2 , and the transmittance of the visible light at wavelengths of 695 nm (T λ695 ) and 532 nm (T λ532 )] on twelve soft PVC samples. A regression model was built to describe the relationship between the mechanical and medical imaging properties and the values of the three composition factors of PVC. The model was validated by testing the properties of a PVC sample with a formulation distinct from the twelve samples. The tested soft PVC had elastic moduli from 6 to 45 kPa, hardnesses from 5 to 50 Shore OOO-S, viscoelastic stress relaxation time constants from 114.1 to 191.9 s, friction forces of 18 gauge needle insertion from 0.005 to 0.086 N/mm, speeds of sound from 1393 to 1407 m/s, acoustic attenuation coefficients from 0.38 to 0.61 (dB/cm)/MHz, T 1 relaxation times from 426.3 to 450.2 ms, T 2 relaxation times from 21.5 to 28.4 ms, T λ695 from 46.8% to 92.6%, and T λ532 from 41.1% to 86.3%. Statistically significant factors of each property were

  18. A chondroitinase-ABC and TGF-β1 treatment regimen for enhancing the mechanical properties of tissue engineered fibrocartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacBarb, Regina F.; Makris, Eleftherios A.; Hu, Jerry C.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2012-01-01

    The development of functionally equivalent fibrocartilage remains elusive despite efforts to engineer tissues such as the knee menisci, intervertebral disc, and TMJ disc. Attempts to engineer these structures often fail to create tissues with mechanical properties on par with native tissue, resulting in constructs unsuitable for clinical applications. The objective of this study was to engineer a spectrum of biomimetic fibrocartilages representative of the distinct functional properties found in native tissues. Using the self-assembly process, different co-cultures of meniscus cells (MCs) and articular chondrocytes (ACs) were seeded into agarose wells and treated with the catabolic agent chondroitinase-ABC (C-ABC) and the anabolic agent transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) via a two-factor (cell ratio and bioactive treatment), full factorial study design. Application of both C-ABC and TGF-β1 resulted in a beneficial or positive increase in the collagen content of treated constructs compared to controls. Significant increases in both the collagen density and fiber diameter were also seen with this treatment, increasing these values 32% and 15%, respectively, over control values. Mechanical testing found the combined bioactive treatment to synergistically increase the Young’s modulus and ultimate tensile strength of the engineered fibrocartilages compared to controls, with values reaching the lower spectrum of those found in native tissues. Together, these data demonstrate that C-ABC and TGF-β1 interact to develop a denser collagen matrix better able to withstand tensile loading. This study highlights a way to optimize the tensile properties of engineered fibrocartilage using a biochemical and biophysical agent together to create distinct fibrocartilages with functional properties mimicking those of native tissue. PMID:23041782

  19. The influence of freezing and tissue porosity on the material properties of vegetable tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ralfs, Julie D.

    2002-01-01

    Tissue porosity and fluid flow have been shown to be important parameters affecting the mechanical and sensorial behaviour of edible plant tissues. The quantity of fluid and the manner with which it was released on compression of the plant tissue were also important regarding the sensory perception and a good indication of any structural damage resulting from freezing, for example. Potato, carrot and Chinese water chestnut were used to study the effects freezing has on model plant tissues. Mechanical and structural measurements of the plant tissue were correlated with sensory analysis. Conventional freezing was shown to cause severe structural damage predominantly in the form of cavities between or through cells, resulting in decreases in mechanical strength and stiffness, and samples that were perceived in the mouth as 'soft' and 'wet'. The location and size of the cavities formed from ice crystals, depended on the particular plant tissue being frozen, the processing it was subjected to prior to freezing, the size of the sample and the cooling regime employed to freeze the tissue. Cavitation in the tissue resulted in an increase in tissue porosity, which enabled fluid to flow more easily from the tissue on compression, thus affecting the mechanical properties and sensory perception. Freezing damage to plant tissues was shown to be reduced, and sometimes prevented, when active antifreeze proteins (AFPs) were introduced into the tissues by vacuum infiltration or transformation and the tissue was frozen at a suitable cooling rate. Theoretical modelling was applied to the fluid flow and porosity data to test the validity of the models and to subsequently predict the mechanical behaviour of potato from the structural properties of the tissue. (author)

  20. How does tissue regeneration influence the mechanical behavior of additively manufactured porous biomaterials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayati, R; Janbaz, S; Sadighi, M; Mohammadi-Aghdam, M; Zadpoor, A A

    2017-01-01

    Although the initial mechanical properties of additively manufactured porous biomaterials are intensively studied during the last few years, almost no information is available regarding the evolution of the mechanical properties of implant-bone complex as the tissue regeneration progresses. In this paper, we studied the effects of tissue regeneration on the static and fatigue behavior of selective laser melted porous titanium structures with three different porosities (i.e. 77, 81, and 85%). The porous structures were filled with four different polymeric materials with mechanical properties in the range of those observed for de novo bone (0.7GPamanufactured and filled porous structures were then determined. The static mechanical properties and fatigue life (including endurance limit) of the porous structures were found to increase by factors 2-7, even when they were filled with polymeric materials with relatively low mechanical properties. The relative increase in the mechanical properties was much higher for the porous structures with lower porosities. Moreover, the increase in the fatigue life was more notable as compared to the increase in the static mechanical properties. Such large values of increase in the mechanical properties with the progress of bone tissue regeneration have implications in terms of mechanical stimulus for bone tissue regeneration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The mechanical properties of human adipose tissues and their relationships to the structure and composition of the extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhouli, Nadia; Mansfield, Jessica; Green, Ellen; Bell, James; Knight, Beatrice; Liversedge, Neil; Tham, Ji Chung; Welbourn, Richard; Shore, Angela C; Kos, Katarina; Winlove, C Peter

    2013-12-01

    Adipose tissue (AT) expansion in obesity is characterized by cellular growth and continuous extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling with increased fibrillar collagen deposition. It is hypothesized that the matrix can inhibit cellular expansion and lipid storage. Therefore, it is important to fully characterize the ECM's biomechanical properties and its interactions with cells. In this study, we characterize and compare the mechanical properties of human subcutaneous and omental tissues, which have different physiological functions. AT was obtained from 44 subjects undergoing surgery. Force/extension and stress/relaxation data were obtained. The effects of osmotic challenge were measured to investigate the cellular contribution to tissue mechanics. Tissue structure and its response to tensile strain were determined using nonlinear microscopy. AT showed nonlinear stress/strain characteristics of up to a 30% strain. Comparing paired subcutaneous and omental samples (n = 19), the moduli were lower in subcutaneous: initial 1.6 ± 0.8 (means ± SD) and 2.9 ± 1.5 kPa (P = 0.001), final 11.7 ± 6.4 and 32 ± 15.6 kPa (P matrix fibers. These results suggest that subcutaneous AT has greater capacity for expansion and recovery from mechanical deformation than omental AT.

  2. A chondroitinase-ABC and TGF-β1 treatment regimen for enhancing the mechanical properties of tissue-engineered fibrocartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacBarb, Regina F; Makris, Eleftherios A; Hu, Jerry C; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2013-01-01

    The development of functionally equivalent fibrocartilage remains elusive despite efforts to engineer tissues such as knee meniscus, intervertebral disc and temporomandibular joint disc. Attempts to engineer these structures often fail to create tissues with mechanical properties on a par with native tissue, resulting in constructs unsuitable for clinical applications. The objective of this study was to engineer a spectrum of biomimetic fibrocartilages representative of the distinct functional properties found in native tissues. Using the self-assembly process, different co-cultures of meniscus cells and articular chondrocytes were seeded into agarose wells and treated with the catabolic agent chondroitinase-ABC (C-ABC) and the anabolic agent transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) via a two-factor (cell ratio and bioactive treatment), full factorial study design. Application of both C-ABC and TGF-β1 resulted in a beneficial or positive increase in the collagen content of treated constructs compared to controls. Significant increases in both the collagen density and fiber diameter were also seen with this treatment, increasing these values by 32 and 15%, respectively, over control values. Mechanical testing found the combined bioactive treatment to synergistically increase the Young's modulus and ultimate tensile strength of the engineered fibrocartilages compared to controls, with values reaching the lower spectrum of those found in native tissues. Together, these data demonstrate that C-ABC and TGF-β1 interact to develop a denser collagen matrix better able to withstand tensile loading. This study highlights a way to optimize the tensile properties of engineered fibrocartilage using a biochemical and a biophysical agent together to create distinct fibrocartilages with functional properties mimicking those of native tissue. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The role of mechanical loading in ligament tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhardt, Hugh A; Cosgriff-Hernandez, Elizabeth M

    2009-12-01

    Tissue-engineered ligaments have received growing interest as a promising alternative for ligament reconstruction when traditional transplants are unavailable or fail. Mechanical stimulation was recently identified as a critical component in engineering load-bearing tissues. It is well established that living tissue responds to altered loads through endogenous changes in cellular behavior, tissue organization, and bulk mechanical properties. Without the appropriate biomechanical cues, new tissue formation lacks the necessary collagenous organization and alignment for sufficient load-bearing capacity. Therefore, tissue engineers utilize mechanical conditioning to guide tissue remodeling and improve the performance of ligament grafts. This review provides a comparative analysis of the response of ligament and tendon fibroblasts to mechanical loading in current bioreactor studies. The differential effect of mechanical stimulation on cellular processes such as protease production, matrix protein synthesis, and cell proliferation is examined in the context of tissue engineering design.

  4. Multi-axial mechanical stimulation of tissue engineered cartilage: Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S D Waldman

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of tissue engineered cartilage is a promising new approach for the repair of damaged or diseased tissue. Since it has proven difficult to generate cartilaginous tissue with properties similar to that of native articular cartilage, several studies have used mechanical stimuli as a means to improve the quantity and quality of the developed tissue. In this study, we have investigated the effect of multi-axial loading applied during in vitro tissue formation to better reflect the physiological forces that chondrocytes are subjected to in vivo. Dynamic combined compression-shear stimulation (5% compression and 5% shear strain amplitudes increased both collagen and proteoglycan synthesis (76 ± 8% and 73 ± 5%, respectively over the static (unstimulated controls. When this multi-axial loading condition was applied to the chondrocyte cultures over a four week period, there were significant improvements in both extracellular matrix (ECM accumulation and the mechanical properties of the in vitro-formed tissue (3-fold increase in compressive modulus and 1.75-fold increase in shear modulus. Stimulated tissues were also significantly thinner than the static controls (19% reduction suggesting that there was a degree of ECM consolidation as a result of long-term multi-axial loading. This study demonstrated that stimulation by multi-axial forces can improve the quality of the in vitro-formed tissue, but additional studies are required to further optimize the conditions to favour improved biochemical and mechanical properties of the developed tissue.

  5. The influence of freezing and tissue porosity on the material properties of vegetable tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ralfs, Julie D

    2002-07-01

    Tissue porosity and fluid flow have been shown to be important parameters affecting the mechanical and sensorial behaviour of edible plant tissues. The quantity of fluid and the manner with which it was released on compression of the plant tissue were also important regarding the sensory perception and a good indication of any structural damage resulting from freezing, for example. Potato, carrot and Chinese water chestnut were used to study the effects freezing has on model plant tissues. Mechanical and structural measurements of the plant tissue were correlated with sensory analysis. Conventional freezing was shown to cause severe structural damage predominantly in the form of cavities between or through cells, resulting in decreases in mechanical strength and stiffness, and samples that were perceived in the mouth as 'soft' and 'wet'. The location and size of the cavities formed from ice crystals, depended on the particular plant tissue being frozen, the processing it was subjected to prior to freezing, the size of the sample and the cooling regime employed to freeze the tissue. Cavitation in the tissue resulted in an increase in tissue porosity, which enabled fluid to flow more easily from the tissue on compression, thus affecting the mechanical properties and sensory perception. Freezing damage to plant tissues was shown to be reduced, and sometimes prevented, when active antifreeze proteins (AFPs) were introduced into the tissues by vacuum infiltration or transformation and the tissue was frozen at a suitable cooling rate. Theoretical modelling was applied to the fluid flow and porosity data to test the validity of the models and to subsequently predict the mechanical behaviour of potato from the structural properties of the tissue. (author)

  6. Soft tissue deformation modelling through neural dynamics-based reaction-diffusion mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinao; Zhong, Yongmin; Gu, Chengfan

    2018-05-30

    Soft tissue deformation modelling forms the basis of development of surgical simulation, surgical planning and robotic-assisted minimally invasive surgery. This paper presents a new methodology for modelling of soft tissue deformation based on reaction-diffusion mechanics via neural dynamics. The potential energy stored in soft tissues due to a mechanical load to deform tissues away from their rest state is treated as the equivalent transmembrane potential energy, and it is distributed in the tissue masses in the manner of reaction-diffusion propagation of nonlinear electrical waves. The reaction-diffusion propagation of mechanical potential energy and nonrigid mechanics of motion are combined to model soft tissue deformation and its dynamics, both of which are further formulated as the dynamics of cellular neural networks to achieve real-time computational performance. The proposed methodology is implemented with a haptic device for interactive soft tissue deformation with force feedback. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed methodology exhibits nonlinear force-displacement relationship for nonlinear soft tissue deformation. Homogeneous, anisotropic and heterogeneous soft tissue material properties can be modelled through the inherent physical properties of mass points. Graphical abstract Soft tissue deformation modelling with haptic feedback via neural dynamics-based reaction-diffusion mechanics.

  7. Improving the mechanical properties of collagen-based membranes using silk fibroin for corneal tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Kai; Liu, Yang; Li, Weichang; Wang, Lin; Liu, Sa; Wang, Yingjun; Wang, Zhichong; Ren, Li

    2015-03-01

    Although collagen with outstanding biocompatibility has promising application in corneal tissue engineering, the mechanical properties of collagen-based scaffolds, especially suture retention strength, must be further improved to satisfy the requirements of clinical applications. This article describes a toughness reinforced collagen-based membrane using silk fibroin. The collagen-silk fibroin membranes based on collagen [silk fibroin (w/w) ratios of 100:5, 100:10, and 100:20] were prepared by using silk fibroin and cross-linking by 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide. These membranes were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and their optical property, and NaCl and tryptophan diffusivity had been tested. The water content was found to be dependent on the content of silk fibroin, and CS10 membrane (loading 10 wt % of silk fibroin) performed the optimal mechanical properties. Also the suture experiments have proved CS10 has high suture retention strength, which can be sutured in rabbit eyes integrally. Moreover, the composite membrane proved good biocompatibility for the proliferation of human corneal epithelial cells in vitro. Lamellar keratoplasty shows that CS10 membrane promoted complete epithelialization in 35 ± 5 days, and their transparency is restored quickly in the first month. Corneal rejection reaction, neovascularization, and keratoconus are not observed. The composite films show potential for use in the field of corneal tissue engineering. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Mechanical, Permeability, and Degradation Properties of 3D Designed Poly(1,8 Octanediol-co-Citrate)(POC) Scaffolds for Soft Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Claire G.; Hollister, Scott J.

    2015-01-01

    Poly(1,8-octanediol-co-citric acid) (POC) is a synthetic biodegradable elastomer that can be processed into 3D scaffolds for tissue engineering. We investigated the effect of designed porosity on the mechanical properties, permeability and degradation profiles of the POC scaffolds. For mechanical properties, scaffold compressive data was fit to a 1D nonlinear elastic model and solid tensile data was fit to a Neohookean incompressible nonlinear elastic model. Chondrocytes were seeded on scaffolds to assess the biocompatibility of POC. Increased porosity was associated with increased degradation rate, increased permeability, and decreased mechanical stiffness which also became less nonlinear. Scaffold characterization in this paper will provide design guidance for POC scaffolds to meet the mechanical and biological parameters needed for engineering soft tissues such as cartilage. PMID:20091910

  9. Modeling material-degradation-induced elastic property of tissue engineering scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bawolin, N K; Li, M G; Chen, X B; Zhang, W J

    2010-11-01

    The mechanical properties of tissue engineering scaffolds play a critical role in the success of repairing damaged tissues/organs. Determining the mechanical properties has proven to be a challenging task as these properties are not constant but depend upon time as the scaffold degrades. In this study, the modeling of the time-dependent mechanical properties of a scaffold is performed based on the concept of finite element model updating. This modeling approach contains three steps: (1) development of a finite element model for the effective mechanical properties of the scaffold, (2) parametrizing the finite element model by selecting parameters associated with the scaffold microstructure and/or material properties, which vary with scaffold degradation, and (3) identifying selected parameters as functions of time based on measurements from the tests on the scaffold mechanical properties as they degrade. To validate the developed model, scaffolds were made from the biocompatible polymer polycaprolactone (PCL) mixed with hydroxylapatite (HA) nanoparticles and their mechanical properties were examined in terms of the Young modulus. Based on the bulk degradation exhibited by the PCL/HA scaffold, the molecular weight was selected for model updating. With the identified molecular weight, the finite element model developed was effective for predicting the time-dependent mechanical properties of PCL/HA scaffolds during degradation.

  10. Quantifying dynamic mechanical properties of human placenta tissue using optimization techniques with specimen-specific finite-element models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jingwen; Klinich, Kathleen D; Miller, Carl S; Nazmi, Giseli; Pearlman, Mark D; Schneider, Lawrence W; Rupp, Jonathan D

    2009-11-13

    Motor-vehicle crashes are the leading cause of fetal deaths resulting from maternal trauma in the United States, and placental abruption is the most common cause of these deaths. To minimize this injury, new assessment tools, such as crash-test dummies and computational models of pregnant women, are needed to evaluate vehicle restraint systems with respect to reducing the risk of placental abruption. Developing these models requires accurate material properties for tissues in the pregnant abdomen under dynamic loading conditions that can occur in crashes. A method has been developed for determining dynamic material properties of human soft tissues that combines results from uniaxial tensile tests, specimen-specific finite-element models based on laser scans that accurately capture non-uniform tissue-specimen geometry, and optimization techniques. The current study applies this method to characterizing material properties of placental tissue. For 21 placenta specimens tested at a strain rate of 12/s, the mean failure strain is 0.472+/-0.097 and the mean failure stress is 34.80+/-12.62 kPa. A first-order Ogden material model with ground-state shear modulus (mu) of 23.97+/-5.52 kPa and exponent (alpha(1)) of 3.66+/-1.90 best fits the test results. The new method provides a nearly 40% error reduction (p<0.001) compared to traditional curve-fitting methods by considering detailed specimen geometry, loading conditions, and dynamic effects from high-speed loading. The proposed method can be applied to determine mechanical properties of other soft biological tissues.

  11. Hybrid chitosan-ß-glycerol phosphate-gelatin nano-/micro fibrous scaffolds with suitable mechanical and biological properties for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfi, Marzieh; Bagherzadeh, Roohollah; Naderi-Meshkin, Hojjat; Mahdipour, Elahe; Mafinezhad, Asghar; Sadeghnia, Hamid Reza; Esmaily, Habibollah; Maleki, Masoud; Hasssanzadeh, Halimeh; Ghayaour-Mobarhan, Majid; Bidkhori, Hamid Reza; Bahrami, Ahmad Reza

    2016-03-01

    Scaffold-based tissue engineering is considered as a promising approach in the regenerative medicine. Graft instability of collagen, by causing poor mechanical properties and rapid degradation, and their hard handling remains major challenges to be addressed. In this research, a composite structured nano-/microfibrous scaffold, made from a mixture of chitosan-ß-glycerol phosphate-gelatin (chitosan-GP-gelatin) using a standard electrospinning set-up was developed. Gelatin-acid acetic and chitosan ß-glycerol phosphate-HCL solutions were prepared at ratios of 30/70, 50/50, 70/30 (w/w) and their mechanical and biological properties were engineered. Furthermore, the pore structure of the fabricated nanofibrous scaffolds was investigated and predicted using a theoretical model. Higher gelatin concentrations in the polymer blend resulted in significant increase in mean pore size and its distribution. Interaction between the scaffold and the contained cells was also monitored and compared in the test and control groups. Scaffolds with higher chitosan concentrations showed higher rate of cell attachment with better proliferation property, compared with gelatin-only scaffolds. The fabricated scaffolds, unlike many other natural polymers, also exhibit non-toxic and biodegradable properties in the grafted tissues. In conclusion, the data clearly showed that the fabricated biomaterial is a biologically compatible scaffold with potential to serve as a proper platform for retaining the cultured cells for further application in cell-based tissue engineering, especially in wound healing practices. These results suggested the potential of using mesoporous composite chitosan-GP-gelatin fibrous scaffolds for engineering three-dimensional tissues with different inherent cell characteristics. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Multiaxial mechanical response and constitutive modeling of esophageal tissues: Impact on esophageal tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Gerhard; Schriefl, Andreas; Zeindlinger, Georg; Katzensteiner, Andreas; Ainödhofer, Herwig; Saxena, Amulya; Holzapfel, Gerhard A

    2013-12-01

    Congenital defects of the esophagus are relatively frequent, with 1 out of 2500 babies suffering from such a defect. A new method of treatment by implanting tissue engineered esophagi into newborns is currently being developed and tested using ovine esophagi. For the reconstruction of the biological function of native tissues with engineered esophagi, their cellular structure as well as their mechanical properties must be considered. Since very limited mechanical and structural data for the esophagus are available, the aim of this study was to investigate the multiaxial mechanical behavior of the ovine esophagus and the underlying microstructure. Therefore, uniaxial tensile, biaxial tensile and extension-inflation tests on esophagi were performed. The underlying microstructure was examined in stained histological sections through standard optical microscopy techniques. Moreover, the uniaxial ultimate tensile strength and residual deformations of the tissue were determined. Both the mucosa-submucosa and the muscle layers showed nonlinear and anisotropic mechanical behavior during uniaxial, biaxial and inflation testing. Cyclical inflation of the intact esophageal tube caused marked softening of the passive esophagi in the circumferential direction. The rupture strength of the mucosa-submucosa layer was much higher than that of the muscle layer. Overall, the ovine esophagus showed a heterogeneous and anisotropic behavior with different mechanical properties for the individual layers. The intact and layer-specific multiaxial properties were characterized using a well-known three-dimensional microstructurally based strain-energy function. This novel and complete set of data serves the basis for a better understanding of tissue remodeling in diseased esophagi and can be used to perform computer simulations of surgical interventions or medical-device applications. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Microstructure, Mechanical Properties and Corrosion Behavior of Porous Mg-6 wt.% Zn Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yang; Kang, Yijun; Li, Ding; Yu, Kun; Xiao, Tao; Wang, Qiyuan; Deng, Youwen; Fang, Hongjie; Jiang, Dayue; Zhang, Yu

    2018-03-01

    Porous Mg-based scaffolds have been extensively researched as biodegradable implants due to their attractive biological and excellent mechanical properties. In this study, porous Mg-6 wt.% Zn scaffolds were prepared by powder metallurgy using ammonium bicarbonate particles as space-holder particles. The effects of space-holder particle content on the microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of the Mg-6 wt.% Zn scaffolds were studied. The mean porosity and pore size of the open-cellular scaffolds were within the range 6.7-52.2% and 32.3-384.2 µm, respectively. Slight oxidation was observed at the grain boundaries and on the pore walls. The Mg-6 wt.% Zn scaffolds were shown to possess mechanical properties comparable with those of natural bone and had variable in vitro degradation rates. Increased content of space-holder particles negatively affected the mechanical behavior and corrosion resistance of the Mg-6 wt.% Zn scaffolds, especially when higher than 20%. These results suggest that porous Mg-6 wt.% Zn scaffolds are promising materials for application in bone tissue engineering.

  14. Fabrication method, structure, mechanical, and biological properties of decellularized extracellular matrix for replacement of wide bone tissue defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimova, N Y; Kiselevsky, M V; Sukhorukova, I V; Shvindina, N V; Shtansky, D V

    2015-09-01

    The present paper was focused on the development of a new method of decellularized extracellular matrix (DECM) fabrication via a chemical treatment of a native bone tissue. Particular attention was paid to the influence of chemical treatment on the mechanical properties of native bones, sterility, and biological performance in vivo using the syngeneic heterotopic and orthotopic implantation models. The obtained data indicated that after a chemical decellularization treatment in 4% aqueous sodium chlorite, no noticeable signs of the erosion of compact cortical bone surface or destruction of trabeculae of spongy bone in spinal channel were observed. The histological studies showed that the chemical treatment resulted in the decellularization of both bone and cartilage tissues. The DECM samples demonstrated no signs of chemical and biological degradation in vivo. Thorough structural characterization revealed that after decellularization, the mineral frame retained its integrity with the organic phase; however clotting and destruction of organic molecules and fibers were observed. FTIR studies revealed several structural changes associated with the destruction of organic molecules, although all organic components typical of intact bone were preserved. The decellularization-induced structural changes in the collagen constituent resulted changed the deformation under compression mechanism: from the major fracture by crack propagation throughout the sample to the predominantly brittle fracture. Although the mechanical properties of radius bones subjected to decellularization were observed to degrade, the mechanical properties of ulna bones in compression and humerus bones in bending remained unchanged. The compressive strength of both the intact and decellularized ulna bones was 125-130 MPa and the flexural strength of humerus bones was 156 and 145 MPa for the intact and decellularized samples, respectively. These results open new avenues for the use of DECM samples as

  15. Nondestructive measurement of esophageal biaxial mechanical properties utilizing sonometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aho, Johnathon M.; Qiang, Bo; Wigle, Dennis A.; Tschumperlin, Daniel J.; Urban, Matthew W.

    2016-07-01

    Malignant esophageal pathology typically requires resection of the esophagus and reconstruction to restore foregut continuity. Reconstruction options are limited and morbid. The esophagus represents a useful target for tissue engineering strategies based on relative simplicity in comparison to other organs. The ideal tissue engineered conduit would have sufficient and ideally matched mechanical tolerances to native esophageal tissue. Current methods for mechanical testing of esophageal tissues both in vivo and ex vivo are typically destructive, alter tissue conformation, ignore anisotropy, or are not able to be performed in fluid media. The aim of this study was to investigate biomechanical properties of swine esophageal tissues through nondestructive testing utilizing sonometry ex vivo. This method allows for biomechanical determination of tissue properties, particularly longitudinal and circumferential moduli and strain energy functions. The relative contribution of mucosal-submucosal layers and muscular layers are compared to composite esophagi. Swine thoracic esophageal tissues (n  =  15) were tested by pressure loading using a continuous pressure pump system to generate stress. Preconditioning of tissue was performed by pressure loading with the pump system and pre-straining the tissue to in vivo length before data was recorded. Sonometry using piezocrystals was utilized to determine longitudinal and circumferential strain on five composite esophagi. Similarly, five mucosa-submucosal and five muscular layers from thoracic esophagi were tested independently. This work on esophageal tissues is consistent with reported uniaxial and biaxial mechanical testing and reported results using strain energy theory and also provides high resolution displacements, preserves native architectural structure and allows assessment of biomechanical properties in fluid media. This method may be of use to characterize mechanical properties of tissue engineered esophageal

  16. Development of acute hydrocephalus does not change brain tissue mechanical properties in adult rats, but in juvenile rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pong, Alice C; Jugé, Lauriane; Bilston, Lynne E; Cheng, Shaokoon

    2017-01-01

    Regional changes in brain stiffness were previously demonstrated in an experimental obstructive hydrocephalus juvenile rat model. The open cranial sutures in the juvenile rats have influenced brain compression and mechanical properties during hydrocephalus development and the extent by which closed cranial sutures in adult hydrocephalic rat models affect brain stiffness in-vivo remains unclear. The aims of this study were to determine changes in brain tissue mechanical properties and brain structure size during hydrocephalus development in adult rat with fixed cranial volume and how these changes were related to brain tissue deformation. Hydrocephalus was induced in 9 female ten weeks old Sprague-Dawley rats by injecting 60 μL of a kaolin suspension (25%) into the cisterna magna under anaesthesia. 6 sham-injected age-matched female SD rats were used as controls. MR imaging (9.4T, Bruker) was performed 1 day before and then at 3 days post injection. T2-weighted anatomical MR images were collected to quantify ventricle and brain tissue cross-sectional areas. MR elastography (800 Hz) was used to measure the brain stiffness (G*, shear modulus). Brain tissue in the adult hydrocephalic rats was more compressed than the juvenile hydrocephalic rats because the skulls of the adult hydrocephalic rats were unable to expand like the juvenile rats. In the adult hydrocephalic rats, the cortical gray matter thickness and the caudate-putamen cross-sectional area decreased (Spearman, P hydrocephalus is complex and is not solely dependent on brain tissue deformation. Further studies on the interactions between brain tissue stiffness, deformation, tissue oedema and neural damage are necessary before MRE can be used as a tool to track changes in brain biomechanics in hydrocephalus.

  17. Enhanced mechanical properties and biocompatibility of novel hydroxyapatite/TOPAS hybrid composite for bone tissue engineering applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ain, Qurat Ul [Department of Materials Engineering, School of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National University of Sciences and Technology, H-12, Islamabad (Pakistan); Khan, Ahmad Nawaz, E-mail: ahmad.nawaz@scme.nust.edu.pk [Department of Materials Engineering, School of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National University of Sciences and Technology, H-12, Islamabad (Pakistan); Nabavinia, Mahboubeh [Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA (United States); Mujahid, Mohammad [Department of Materials Engineering, School of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National University of Sciences and Technology, H-12, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2017-06-01

    The bioactivity and mechanical properties of hybrid composites of hydroxyapatite (HA) in cyclic olefinic copolymer (COC) also known commercially as TOPAS are investigated, first time, for regeneration and repair of the bone tissues. HA is synthesized to obtain the spherically shaped nanoparticles in the size range of 60 ± 20 nm. Various concentrations of HA ranging from 1 to 30 wt% are dispersed in TOPAS using sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) coupling agent for better dispersion and interaction of hydrophilic HA with hydrophobic TOPAS. Scanning electron microscope shows the uniform dispersion of HA ≤ 10 wt% in TOPAS and at higher concentrations > 10 wt%, agglomeration occurs in the hybrid composites. Tunable mechanical properties are achieved as the compressive modulus and strength are increased around 140% from 6.4 to 15.3 MPa and 185% from 0.26 to 0.74 MPa, respectively. Such increase in the mechanical properties of TOPAS is attributed to the anchoring of the polymer chains in the vicinity of HA nanoparticles owing to better dispersion and interfacial interactions. In comparison to neat TOPAS, hybrid composites of TOPAS/HA promoted the cell adhesion and proliferation significantly. The cell density and proliferation of TOPAS/HA hybrid composites is enhanced 9 and 3 folds, respectively, after 1 day culturing in preosteoblasts cells. Moreover, the morphology of cells changed from spherical to flattened spread morphology demonstrating clearly the migration of the cells for the formation of interconnected cellular network. Additionally, very few dead cells are found in hybrid composites showing their cytocompatibility. Overall, the hybrid composites of TOPAS/HA exhibited superior strength and stiffness along with enhanced cytocompatibility for bone tissue engineering applications. - Highlights: • TOPAS/HA hybrid composites exhibited enhanced mechanical properties owing to better dispersion and interaction of HA. • Without affecting the degradation rate, the

  18. Enhanced mechanical properties and biocompatibility of novel hydroxyapatite/TOPAS hybrid composite for bone tissue engineering applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ain, Qurat Ul; Khan, Ahmad Nawaz; Nabavinia, Mahboubeh; Mujahid, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    The bioactivity and mechanical properties of hybrid composites of hydroxyapatite (HA) in cyclic olefinic copolymer (COC) also known commercially as TOPAS are investigated, first time, for regeneration and repair of the bone tissues. HA is synthesized to obtain the spherically shaped nanoparticles in the size range of 60 ± 20 nm. Various concentrations of HA ranging from 1 to 30 wt% are dispersed in TOPAS using sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) coupling agent for better dispersion and interaction of hydrophilic HA with hydrophobic TOPAS. Scanning electron microscope shows the uniform dispersion of HA ≤ 10 wt% in TOPAS and at higher concentrations > 10 wt%, agglomeration occurs in the hybrid composites. Tunable mechanical properties are achieved as the compressive modulus and strength are increased around 140% from 6.4 to 15.3 MPa and 185% from 0.26 to 0.74 MPa, respectively. Such increase in the mechanical properties of TOPAS is attributed to the anchoring of the polymer chains in the vicinity of HA nanoparticles owing to better dispersion and interfacial interactions. In comparison to neat TOPAS, hybrid composites of TOPAS/HA promoted the cell adhesion and proliferation significantly. The cell density and proliferation of TOPAS/HA hybrid composites is enhanced 9 and 3 folds, respectively, after 1 day culturing in preosteoblasts cells. Moreover, the morphology of cells changed from spherical to flattened spread morphology demonstrating clearly the migration of the cells for the formation of interconnected cellular network. Additionally, very few dead cells are found in hybrid composites showing their cytocompatibility. Overall, the hybrid composites of TOPAS/HA exhibited superior strength and stiffness along with enhanced cytocompatibility for bone tissue engineering applications. - Highlights: • TOPAS/HA hybrid composites exhibited enhanced mechanical properties owing to better dispersion and interaction of HA. • Without affecting the degradation rate, the

  19. Let's push things forward: disruptive technologies and the mechanics of tissue assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varner, Victor D; Nelson, Celeste M

    2013-09-01

    Although many of the molecular mechanisms that regulate tissue assembly in the embryo have been delineated, the physical forces that couple these mechanisms to actual changes in tissue form remain unclear. Qualitative studies suggest that mechanical loads play a regulatory role in development, but clear quantitative evidence has been lacking. This is partly owing to the complex nature of these problems - embryonic tissues typically undergo large deformations and exhibit evolving, highly viscoelastic material properties. Still, despite these challenges, new disruptive technologies are enabling study of the mechanics of tissue assembly in unprecedented detail. Here, we present novel experimental techniques that enable the study of each component of these physical problems: kinematics, forces, and constitutive properties. Specifically, we detail advances in light sheet microscopy, optical coherence tomography, traction force microscopy, fluorescence force spectroscopy, microrheology and micropatterning. Taken together, these technologies are helping elucidate a more quantitative understanding of the mechanics of tissue assembly.

  20. Geometric and mechanical properties evaluation of scaffolds for bone tissue applications designing by a reaction-diffusion models and manufactured with a material jetting system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco A. Velasco

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Scaffolds are essential in bone tissue engineering, as they provide support to cells and growth factors necessary to regenerate tissue. In addition, they meet the mechanical function of the bone while it regenerates. Currently, the multiple methods for designing and manufacturing scaffolds are based on regular structures from a unit cell that repeats in a given domain. However, these methods do not resemble the actual structure of the trabecular bone which may work against osseous tissue regeneration. To explore the design of porous structures with similar mechanical properties to native bone, a geometric generation scheme from a reaction-diffusion model and its manufacturing via a material jetting system is proposed. This article presents the methodology used, the geometric characteristics and the modulus of elasticity of the scaffolds designed and manufactured. The method proposed shows its potential to generate structures that allow to control the basic scaffold properties for bone tissue engineering such as the width of the channels and porosity. The mechanical properties of our scaffolds are similar to trabecular tissue present in vertebrae and tibia bones. Tests on the manufactured scaffolds show that it is necessary to consider the orientation of the object relative to the printing system because the channel geometry, mechanical properties and roughness are heavily influenced by the position of the surface analyzed with respect to the printing axis. A possible line for future work may be the establishment of a set of guidelines to consider the effects of manufacturing processes in designing stages.

  1. Fibrin Gels Exhibit Improved Biological, Structural, and Mechanical Properties Compared with Collagen Gels in Cell-Based Tendon Tissue-Engineered Constructs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyment, Nathaniel A.; Lu, Yinhui; Rao, Marepalli; Shearn, Jason T.; Rowe, David W.; Kadler, Karl E.; Butler, David L.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of tendon and ligament injuries and inadequacies of current treatments is driving the need for alternative strategies such as tissue engineering. Fibrin and collagen biopolymers have been popular materials for creating tissue-engineered constructs (TECs), as they exhibit advantages of biocompatibility and flexibility in construct design. Unfortunately, a few studies have directly compared these materials for tendon and ligament applications. Therefore, this study aims at determining how collagen versus fibrin hydrogels affect the biological, structural, and mechanical properties of TECs during formation in vitro. Our findings show that tendon and ligament progenitor cells seeded in fibrin constructs exhibit improved tenogenic gene expression patterns compared with their collagen-based counterparts for approximately 14 days in culture. Fibrin-based constructs also exhibit improved cell-derived collagen alignment, increased linear modulus (2.2-fold greater) compared with collagen-based constructs. Cyclic tensile loading, which promotes the maturation of tendon constructs in a previous work, exhibits a material-dependent effect in this study. Fibrin constructs show trending reductions in mechanical, biological, and structural properties, whereas collagen constructs only show improved tenogenic expression in the presence of mechanical stimulation. These findings highlight that components of the mechanical stimulus (e.g., strain amplitude or time of initiation) need to be tailored to the material and cell type. Given the improvements in tenogenic expression, extracellular matrix organization, and material properties during static culture, in vitro findings presented here suggest that fibrin-based constructs may be a more suitable alternative to collagen-based constructs for tissue-engineered tendon/ligament repair. PMID:25266738

  2. Biphasic Finite Element Modeling Reconciles Mechanical Properties of Tissue-Engineered Cartilage Constructs Across Testing Platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meloni, Gregory R; Fisher, Matthew B; Stoeckl, Brendan D; Dodge, George R; Mauck, Robert L

    2017-07-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering is emerging as a promising treatment for osteoarthritis, and the field has progressed toward utilizing large animal models for proof of concept and preclinical studies. Mechanical testing of the regenerative tissue is an essential outcome for functional evaluation. However, testing modalities and constitutive frameworks used to evaluate in vitro grown samples differ substantially from those used to evaluate in vivo derived samples. To address this, we developed finite element (FE) models (using FEBio) of unconfined compression and indentation testing, modalities commonly used for such samples. We determined the model sensitivity to tissue radius and subchondral bone modulus, as well as its ability to estimate material parameters using the built-in parameter optimization tool in FEBio. We then sequentially tested agarose gels of 4%, 6%, 8%, and 10% weight/weight using a custom indentation platform, followed by unconfined compression. Similarly, we evaluated the ability of the model to generate material parameters for living constructs by evaluating engineered cartilage. Juvenile bovine mesenchymal stem cells were seeded (2 × 10 7 cells/mL) in 1% weight/volume hyaluronic acid hydrogels and cultured in a chondrogenic medium for 3, 6, and 9 weeks. Samples were planed and tested sequentially in indentation and unconfined compression. The model successfully completed parameter optimization routines for each testing modality for both acellular and cell-based constructs. Traditional outcome measures and the FE-derived outcomes showed significant changes in material properties during the maturation of engineered cartilage tissue, capturing dynamic changes in functional tissue mechanics. These outcomes were significantly correlated with one another, establishing this FE modeling approach as a singular method for the evaluation of functional engineered and native tissue regeneration, both in vitro and in vivo.

  3. Enhanced mechanical properties and biocompatibility of novel hydroxyapatite/TOPAS hybrid composite for bone tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ain, Qurat Ul; Khan, Ahmad Nawaz; Nabavinia, Mahboubeh; Mujahid, Mohammad

    2017-06-01

    The bioactivity and mechanical properties of hybrid composites of hydroxyapatite (HA) in cyclic olefinic copolymer (COC) also known commercially as TOPAS are investigated, first time, for regeneration and repair of the bone tissues. HA is synthesized to obtain the spherically shaped nanoparticles in the size range of 60±20nm. Various concentrations of HA ranging from 1 to 30wt% are dispersed in TOPAS using sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) coupling agent for better dispersion and interaction of hydrophilic HA with hydrophobic TOPAS. Scanning electron microscope shows the uniform dispersion of HA≤10wt% in TOPAS and at higher concentrations >10wt%, agglomeration occurs in the hybrid composites. Tunable mechanical properties are achieved as the compressive modulus and strength are increased around 140% from 6.4 to 15.3MPa and 185% from 0.26 to 0.74MPa, respectively. Such increase in the mechanical properties of TOPAS is attributed to the anchoring of the polymer chains in the vicinity of HA nanoparticles owing to better dispersion and interfacial interactions. In comparison to neat TOPAS, hybrid composites of TOPAS/HA promoted the cell adhesion and proliferation significantly. The cell density and proliferation of TOPAS/HA hybrid composites is enhanced 9 and 3 folds, respectively, after 1day culturing in preosteoblasts cells. Moreover, the morphology of cells changed from spherical to flattened spread morphology demonstrating clearly the migration of the cells for the formation of interconnected cellular network. Additionally, very few dead cells are found in hybrid composites showing their cytocompatibility. Overall, the hybrid composites of TOPAS/HA exhibited superior strength and stiffness along with enhanced cytocompatibility for bone tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Quantitative assessment of the mechanical properties of prostate tissue with optical coherence elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Yuting; Li, Chunhui; Zhou, Kanheng; Guan, Guangying; Lang, Stephen; McGloin, David; Nabi, Ghulam; Huang, Zhihong

    2018-02-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is a heterogeneous disease with multifocal origin. In current clinical care, the Gleason scoring system is the well-established diagnosis by microscopic evaluation of the tissue from trans-rectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided biopsies. Nevertheless, the sensitivity and specificity in detecting PCa can range from 40 to 50% for conventional TRUS B-mode imaging. Tissue elasticity is associated with the disease progression and elastography technique has recently shown promise in aiding PCa diagnosis. However, many cancer foci in the prostate gland has very small size less than 1 mm and those detected by medical elastography were larger than 2 mm. Hereby, we introduce optical coherence elastography (OCE) to quantify the prostate stiffness with high resolution in the magnitude of 10 µm. Following our feasibility study of 10 patients reported previously, we recruited 60 more patients undergoing 12-core TRUS guided biopsies for suspected PCa with a total of 720 biopsies. The stiffness of cancer tissue was approximately 57.63% higher than that of benign ones. Using histology as reference standard and cut-off threshold of 600kPa, the data analysis showed sensitivity and specificity of 89.6% and 99.8% respectively. The method also demonstrated potential in characterising different grades of PCa based on the change of tissue morphology and quantitative mechanical properties. In conclusion, quantitative OCE can be a reliable technique to identify PCa lesion and differentiate indolent from aggressive cancer.

  5. A high throughput mechanical screening device for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanraj, Bhavana; Hou, Chieh; Meloni, Gregory R; Cosgrove, Brian D; Dodge, George R; Mauck, Robert L

    2014-06-27

    Articular cartilage enables efficient and near-frictionless load transmission, but suffers from poor inherent healing capacity. As such, cartilage tissue engineering strategies have focused on mimicking both compositional and mechanical properties of native tissue in order to provide effective repair materials for the treatment of damaged or degenerated joint surfaces. However, given the large number design parameters available (e.g. cell sources, scaffold designs, and growth factors), it is difficult to conduct combinatorial experiments of engineered cartilage. This is particularly exacerbated when mechanical properties are a primary outcome, given the long time required for testing of individual samples. High throughput screening is utilized widely in the pharmaceutical industry to rapidly and cost-effectively assess the effects of thousands of compounds for therapeutic discovery. Here we adapted this approach to develop a high throughput mechanical screening (HTMS) system capable of measuring the mechanical properties of up to 48 materials simultaneously. The HTMS device was validated by testing various biomaterials and engineered cartilage constructs and by comparing the HTMS results to those derived from conventional single sample compression tests. Further evaluation showed that the HTMS system was capable of distinguishing and identifying 'hits', or factors that influence the degree of tissue maturation. Future iterations of this device will focus on reducing data variability, increasing force sensitivity and range, as well as scaling-up to even larger (96-well) formats. This HTMS device provides a novel tool for cartilage tissue engineering, freeing experimental design from the limitations of mechanical testing throughput. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. An anisotropically and heterogeneously aligned patterned electrospun scaffold with tailored mechanical property and improved bioactivity for vascular tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, He; Li, Haiyan; Ke, Qinfei; Chang, Jiang

    2015-04-29

    The development of vascular scaffolds with controlled mechanical properties and stimulatory effects on biological activities of endothelial cells still remains a significant challenge to vascular tissue engineering. In this work, we reported an innovative approach to prepare a new type of vascular scaffolds with anisotropically and heterogeneously aligned patterns using electrospinning technique with unique wire spring templates, and further investigated the structural effects of the patterned electrospun scaffolds on mechanical properties and angiogenic differentiation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Results showed that anisotropically aligned patterned nanofibrous structure was obtained by depositing nanofibers on template in a structurally different manner, one part of nanofibers densely deposited on the embossments of wire spring and formed cylindrical-like structures in the transverse direction, while others loosely suspended and aligned along the longitudinal direction, forming a three-dimensional porous microstructure. We further found that such structures could efficiently control the mechanical properties of electrospun vascular scaffolds in both longitudinal and transverse directions by altering the interval distances between the embossments of patterned scaffolds. When HUVECs were cultured on scaffolds with different microstructures, the patterned scaffolds distinctively promoted adhesion of HUVECs at early stage and proliferation during the culture period. Most importantly, cells experienced a large shape change associated with cell cytoskeleton and nuclei remodeling, leading to a stimulatory effect on angiogenesis differentiation of HUVECs by the patterned microstructures of electrospun scaffolds, and the scaffolds with larger distances of intervals showed a higher stimulatory effect. These results suggest that electrospun scaffolds with the anisotropically and heterogeneously aligned patterns, which could efficiently control the

  7. Collagen tissue treated with chitosan solution in H2O/CO2 mixtures: Influence of clathrates hydrates on the structure and mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaschin, Ivan S; Bakuleva, Natalia P; Grigoriev, Timofei E; Krasheninnikov, Sergey V; Nikitin, Lev N

    2017-03-01

    A mixture of water/carbon dioxide is a "green" perspective solvent from the viewpoint of biomedical applications. Clathrate hydrates are formed this solvent under certain conditions and a very interesting question is the impact of clathrates hydrates on the structure and properties of bovine pericardium, which is used in biomedicine, in particular as a main part of biological heart valve prostheses. The aim of the present work is to investigate the influence of clathrates on the structure and mechanical properties of the collagen tissue treated with chitosan in H 2 O/CO 2 mixtures under pressure 3.0-3.5MPa and temperatures 2-4°C. It was first found that the clathrate hydrates in this media due to the strong fluctuations "bomb" collagen tissue of bovine pericardium, which is manifested in the appearance of numerous small gaps (pores) with mean size of 225±25nm and large pores with size of 1-3μ on the surface and within collagen matrices. High porosity leads to averaging characteristics of the organization structure in tissues with different orientation of the collagen fibers. As a result, the mechanical properties of the collagen tissue with a different orientation of the collagen fibrils become similar, which is quite different from their original properties. The structural changes caused by the influence of the environment clathrate hydrates led to a significant decrease of the tensile strength (30-47% in total, p<0.05) and initial elastic moduli (74-83%, p<0.05). However, the final elastic moduli and the maximum tensile virtually unchanged compared to the control. Nevertheless, it was found that the direct deposition of chitosan from the H 2 O/CO 2 mixtures with clathrate improve the mechanical-strength properties of the porous matrices. We believe that these improved mechanical properties are achieved due to particularly deep and uniform impregnation of the collagen matrix with chitosan from its pressurized solutions in H 2 O/CO 2 mixtures. Copyright © 2016

  8. Viscoelastic properties of bovine orbital connective tissue and fat: constitutive models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Lawrence; Gupta, Vijay; Lee, Choongyeop; Kavehpore, Pirouz; Demer, Joseph L

    2011-12-01

    Reported mechanical properties of orbital connective tissue and fat have been too sparse to model strain-stress relationships underlying biomechanical interactions in strabismus. We performed rheological tests to develop a multi-mode upper convected Maxwell (UCM) model of these tissues under shear loading. From 20 fresh bovine orbits, 30 samples of connective tissue were taken from rectus pulley regions and 30 samples of fatty tissues from the posterior orbit. Additional samples were defatted to determine connective tissue weight proportion, which was verified histologically. Mechanical testing in shear employed a triborheometer to perform: strain sweeps at 0.5-2.0 Hz; shear stress relaxation with 1% strain; viscometry at 0.01-0.5 s(-1) strain rate; and shear oscillation at 1% strain. Average connective tissue weight proportion was 98% for predominantly connective tissue and 76% for fatty tissue. Connective tissue specimens reached a long-term relaxation modulus of 668 Pa after 1,500 s, while corresponding values for fatty tissue specimens were 290 Pa and 1,100 s. Shear stress magnitude for connective tissue exceeded that of fatty tissue by five-fold. Based on these data, we developed a multi-mode UCM model with variable viscosities and time constants, and a damped hyperelastic response that accurately described measured properties of both connective and fatty tissues. Model parameters differed significantly between the two tissues. Viscoelastic properties of predominantly connective orbital tissues under shear loading differ markedly from properties of orbital fat, but both are accurately reflected using UCM models. These viscoelastic models will facilitate realistic global modeling of EOM behavior in binocular alignment and strabismus.

  9. Hybrid printing of mechanically and biologically improved constructs for cartilage tissue engineering applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Tao; Binder, Kyle W; Albanna, Mohammad Z; Dice, Dennis; Zhao Weixin; Yoo, James J; Atala, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Bioprinting is an emerging technique used to fabricate viable, 3D tissue constructs through the precise deposition of cells and hydrogels in a layer-by-layer fashion. Despite the ability to mimic the native properties of tissue, printed 3D constructs that are composed of naturally-derived biomaterials still lack structural integrity and adequate mechanical properties for use in vivo, thus limiting their development for use in load-bearing tissue engineering applications, such as cartilage. Fabrication of viable constructs using a novel multi-head deposition system provides the ability to combine synthetic polymers, which have higher mechanical strength than natural materials, with the favorable environment for cell growth provided by traditional naturally-derived hydrogels. However, the complexity and high cost associated with constructing the required robotic system hamper the widespread application of this approach. Moreover, the scaffolds fabricated by these robotic systems often lack flexibility, which further restrict their applications. To address these limitations, advanced fabrication techniques are necessary to generate complex constructs with controlled architectures and adequate mechanical properties. In this study, we describe the construction of a hybrid inkjet printing/electrospinning system that can be used to fabricate viable tissues for cartilage tissue engineering applications. Electrospinning of polycaprolactone fibers was alternated with inkjet printing of rabbit elastic chondrocytes suspended in a fibrin–collagen hydrogel in order to fabricate a five-layer tissue construct of 1 mm thickness. The chondrocytes survived within the printed hybrid construct with more than 80% viability one week after printing. In addition, the cells proliferated and maintained their basic biological properties within the printed layered constructs. Furthermore, the fabricated constructs formed cartilage-like tissues both in vitro and in vivo as evidenced by the

  10. Rationally designed synthetic protein hydrogels with predictable mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junhua; Li, Pengfei; Dong, Chenling; Jiang, Heting; Bin Xue; Gao, Xiang; Qin, Meng; Wang, Wei; Bin Chen; Cao, Yi

    2018-02-12

    Designing synthetic protein hydrogels with tailored mechanical properties similar to naturally occurring tissues is an eternal pursuit in tissue engineering and stem cell and cancer research. However, it remains challenging to correlate the mechanical properties of protein hydrogels with the nanomechanics of individual building blocks. Here we use single-molecule force spectroscopy, protein engineering and theoretical modeling to prove that the mechanical properties of protein hydrogels are predictable based on the mechanical hierarchy of the cross-linkers and the load-bearing modules at the molecular level. These findings provide a framework for rationally designing protein hydrogels with independently tunable elasticity, extensibility, toughness and self-healing. Using this principle, we demonstrate the engineering of self-healable muscle-mimicking hydrogels that can significantly dissipate energy through protein unfolding. We expect that this principle can be generalized for the construction of protein hydrogels with customized mechanical properties for biomedical applications.

  11. Nondestructive and noninvasive assessment of mechanical properties in heart valve tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortsmit, J.; Driessen, N.J.B.; Rutten, M.C.M.; Baaijens, F.P.T.

    2009-01-01

    Despite recent progress, mechanical behavior of tissue-engineered heart valves still needs improvement when native aortic valves are considered as a benchmark. Although it is known that cyclic straining enhances tissue formation, optimal loading protocols have not been defined yet. To obtain a

  12. Skin mechanical properties and modeling: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joodaki, Hamed; Panzer, Matthew B

    2018-04-01

    The mechanical properties of the skin are important for various applications. Numerous tests have been conducted to characterize the mechanical behavior of this tissue, and this article presents a review on different experimental methods used. A discussion on the general mechanical behavior of the skin, including nonlinearity, viscoelasticity, anisotropy, loading history dependency, failure properties, and aging effects, is presented. Finally, commonly used constitutive models for simulating the mechanical response of skin are discussed in the context of representing the empirically observed behavior.

  13. Mechanical properties of hyaline and repair cartilage studied by nanoindentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, O; Durst, K; Maier, V; Göken, M; Birkholz, T; Schneider, H; Hennig, F; Gelse, K

    2007-11-01

    Articular cartilage is a highly organized tissue that is well adapted to the functional demands in joints but difficult to replicate via tissue engineering or regeneration. Its viscoelastic properties allow cartilage to adapt to both slow and rapid mechanical loading. Several cartilage repair strategies that aim to restore tissue and protect it from further degeneration have been introduced. The key to their success is the quality of the newly formed tissue. In this study, periosteal cells loaded on a scaffold were used to repair large partial-thickness cartilage defects in the knee joint of miniature pigs. The repair cartilage was analyzed 26 weeks after surgery and compared both morphologically and mechanically with healthy hyaline cartilage. Contact stiffness, reduced modulus and hardness as key mechanical properties were examined in vitro by nanoindentation in phosphate-buffered saline at room temperature. In addition, the influence of tissue fixation with paraformaldehyde on the biomechanical properties was investigated. Although the repair process resulted in the formation of a stable fibrocartilaginous tissue, its contact stiffness was lower than that of hyaline cartilage by a factor of 10. Fixation with paraformaldehyde significantly increased the stiffness of cartilaginous tissue by one order of magnitude, and therefore, should not be used when studying biomechanical properties of cartilage. Our study suggests a sensitive method for measuring the contact stiffness of articular cartilage and demonstrates the importance of mechanical analysis for proper evaluation of the success of cartilage repair strategies.

  14. Structure and mechanical properties of Octopus vulgaris suckers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramacere, Francesca; Kovalev, Alexander; Kleinteich, Thomas; Gorb, Stanislav N; Mazzolai, Barbara

    2014-02-06

    In this study, we investigate the morphology and mechanical features of Octopus vulgaris suckers, which may serve as a model for the creation of a new generation of attachment devices. Octopus suckers attach to a wide range of substrates in wet conditions, including rough surfaces. This amazing feature is made possible by the sucker's tissues, which are pliable to the substrate profile. Previous studies have described a peculiar internal structure that plays a fundamental role in the attachment and detachment processes of the sucker. In this work, we present a mechanical characterization of the tissues involved in the attachment process, which was performed using microindentation tests. We evaluated the elasticity modulus and viscoelastic parameters of the natural tissues (E ∼ 10 kPa) and measured the mechanical properties of some artificial materials that have previously been used in soft robotics. Such a comparison of biological prototypes and artificial material that mimics octopus-sucker tissue is crucial for the design of innovative artificial suction cups for use in wet environments. We conclude that the properties of the common elastomers that are generally used in soft robotics are quite dissimilar to the properties of biological suckers.

  15. Supplementation of exogenous adenosine 5'-triphosphate enhances mechanical properties of 3D cell-agarose constructs for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadjanski, Ivana; Yodmuang, Supansa; Spiller, Kara; Bhumiratana, Sarindr; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2013-10-01

    Formation of tissue-engineered cartilage is greatly enhanced by mechanical stimulation. However, direct mechanical stimulation is not always a suitable method, and the utilization of mechanisms underlying mechanotransduction might allow for a highly effective and less aggressive alternate means of stimulation. In particular, the purinergic, adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP)-mediated signaling pathway is strongly implicated in mechanotransduction within the articular cartilage. We investigated the effects of transient and continuous exogenous ATP supplementation on mechanical properties of cartilaginous constructs engineered using bovine chondrocytes and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) encapsulated in an agarose hydrogel. For both cell types, we have observed significant increases in equilibrium and dynamic compressive moduli after transient ATP treatment applied in the fourth week of cultivation. Continuous ATP treatment over 4 weeks of culture only slightly improved the mechanical properties of the constructs, without major changes in the total glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and collagen content. Structure-function analyses showed that transiently ATP-treated constructs, and in particular those based on hMSCs, had the highest level of correlation between compositional and mechanical properties. Transiently treated groups showed intense staining of the territorial matrix for GAGs and collagen type II. These results indicate that transient ATP treatment can improve functional mechanical properties of cartilaginous constructs based on chondrogenic cells and agarose hydrogels, possibly by improving the structural organization of the bulk phase and territorial extracellular matrix (ECM), that is, by increasing correlation slopes between the content of the ECM components (GAG, collagen) and mechanical properties of the construct.

  16. Porous Nb-Ti-Ta alloy scaffolds for bone tissue engineering: Fabrication, mechanical properties and in vitro/vivo biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jue; Ruan, Jianming; Chang, Lin; Yang, Hailin; Ruan, Wei

    2017-09-01

    Porous Nb-Ti-Ta (at.%) alloys with the pore size of 100-600μm and the porosity of 50%-80% were fabricated by the combination of the sponge impregnation technique and sintering method. The results revealed that the pores were well connected with three-dimensional (3D) network structure, which showed morphological similarity to the anisotropic porous structure of human bones. The results also showed that the alloys could provide the compressive Young's modulus of 0.11±0.01GPa to 2.08±0.09GPa and the strength of 17.45±2.76MPa to 121.67±1.76MPa at different level of porosity, indicating that the mechanical properties of the alloys are similar to those of human bones. Pore structure on the compressive properties was also discussed on the basis of the deformation mode. The relationship between compressive properties and porosity was well consistent with the Gibson-Ashby model. The mechanical properties could be tailored to match different requirements of the human bones. Moreover, the alloys had good biocompatibility due to the porous structure with higher surface, which were suitable for apatite formation and cell adhesion. In conclusion, the porous Nb-Ti-Ta alloy is potentially useful in the hard tissue implants for the appropriate mechanical properties as well as the good biocompatible properties. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Enhanced mechanical properties of thermosensitive chitosan hydrogel by silk fibers for cartilage tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirahmadi, Fereshteh; Tafazzoli-Shadpour, Mohammad; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Bonakdar, Shahin

    2013-01-01

    Articular cartilage has limited repair capability following traumatic injuries and current methods of treatment remain inefficient. Reconstructing cartilage provides a new way for cartilage repair and natural polymers are often used as scaffold because of their biocompatibility and biofunctionality. In this study, we added degummed chopped silk fibers and electrospun silk fibers to the thermosensitive chitosan/glycerophosphate hydrogels to reinforce two hydrogel constructs which were used as scaffold for hyaline cartilage regeneration. The gelation temperature and gelation time of hydrogel were analyzed by the rheometer and vial tilting method. Mechanical characterization was measured by uniaxial compression, indentation and dynamic mechanical analysis assay. Chondrocytes were then harvested from the knee joint of the New Zealand white rabbits and cultured in constructs. The cell proliferation, viability, production of glycosaminoglycans and collagen type II were assessed. The results showed that mechanical properties of the hydrogel were significantly enhanced when a hybrid with two layers of electrospun silk fibers was made. The results of GAG and collagen type II in cell-seeded scaffolds indicate support of the chondrogenic phenotype for chondrocytes with a significant increase in degummed silk fiber–hydrogel composite for GAG content and in two-layer electrospun fiber–hydrogel composite for Col II. It was concluded that these two modified scaffolds could be employed for cartilage tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Chitosan hydrogel composites fabricated by two forms of silk fiber • Silk fibers provide structural support for the hydrogel matrix. • The mechanical properties of hydrogel significantly improved by associating with silk. • Production of GAG and collagen type II was demonstrated within the scaffolds

  18. Enhanced mechanical properties of thermosensitive chitosan hydrogel by silk fibers for cartilage tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirahmadi, Fereshteh [Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); National Cell Bank of Iran, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tafazzoli-Shadpour, Mohammad, E-mail: Tafazoli@aut.ac.ir [Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali, E-mail: mashokrgozar@pasteur.ac.ir [National Cell Bank of Iran, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bonakdar, Shahin [National Cell Bank of Iran, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-12-01

    Articular cartilage has limited repair capability following traumatic injuries and current methods of treatment remain inefficient. Reconstructing cartilage provides a new way for cartilage repair and natural polymers are often used as scaffold because of their biocompatibility and biofunctionality. In this study, we added degummed chopped silk fibers and electrospun silk fibers to the thermosensitive chitosan/glycerophosphate hydrogels to reinforce two hydrogel constructs which were used as scaffold for hyaline cartilage regeneration. The gelation temperature and gelation time of hydrogel were analyzed by the rheometer and vial tilting method. Mechanical characterization was measured by uniaxial compression, indentation and dynamic mechanical analysis assay. Chondrocytes were then harvested from the knee joint of the New Zealand white rabbits and cultured in constructs. The cell proliferation, viability, production of glycosaminoglycans and collagen type II were assessed. The results showed that mechanical properties of the hydrogel were significantly enhanced when a hybrid with two layers of electrospun silk fibers was made. The results of GAG and collagen type II in cell-seeded scaffolds indicate support of the chondrogenic phenotype for chondrocytes with a significant increase in degummed silk fiber–hydrogel composite for GAG content and in two-layer electrospun fiber–hydrogel composite for Col II. It was concluded that these two modified scaffolds could be employed for cartilage tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Chitosan hydrogel composites fabricated by two forms of silk fiber • Silk fibers provide structural support for the hydrogel matrix. • The mechanical properties of hydrogel significantly improved by associating with silk. • Production of GAG and collagen type II was demonstrated within the scaffolds.

  19. Polymer structure-property requirements for stereolithographic 3D printing of soft tissue engineering scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondschein, Ryan J; Kanitkar, Akanksha; Williams, Christopher B; Verbridge, Scott S; Long, Timothy E

    2017-09-01

    This review highlights the synthesis, properties, and advanced applications of synthetic and natural polymers 3D printed using stereolithography for soft tissue engineering applications. Soft tissue scaffolds are of great interest due to the number of musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and connective tissue injuries and replacements humans face each year. Accurately replacing or repairing these tissues is challenging due to the variation in size, shape, and strength of different types of soft tissue. With advancing processing techniques such as stereolithography, control of scaffold resolution down to the μm scale is achievable along with the ability to customize each fabricated scaffold to match the targeted replacement tissue. Matching the advanced manufacturing technique to polymer properties as well as maintaining the proper chemical, biological, and mechanical properties for tissue replacement is extremely challenging. This review discusses the design of polymers with tailored structure, architecture, and functionality for stereolithography, while maintaining chemical, biological, and mechanical properties to mimic a broad range of soft tissue types. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization of the anisotropic mechanical behavior of human abdominal wall connective tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astruc, Laure; De Meulaere, Maurice; Witz, Jean-François; Nováček, Vit; Turquier, Frédéric; Hoc, Thierry; Brieu, Mathias

    2018-06-01

    Abdominal wall sheathing tissues are commonly involved in hernia formation. However, there is very limited work studying mechanics of all tissues from the same donor which prevents a complete understanding of the abdominal wall behavior and the differences in these tissues. The aim of this study was to investigate the differences between the mechanical properties of the linea alba and the anterior and posterior rectus sheaths from a macroscopic point of view. Eight full-thickness human anterior abdominal walls of both genders were collected and longitudinal and transverse samples were harvested from the three sheathing connective tissues. The total of 398 uniaxial tensile tests was conducted and the mechanical characteristics of the behavior (tangent rigidities for small and large deformations) were determined. Statistical comparisons highlighted heterogeneity and non-linearity in behavior of the three tissues under both small and large deformations. High anisotropy was observed under small and large deformations with higher stress in the transverse direction. Variabilities in the mechanical properties of the linea alba according to the gender and location were also identified. Finally, data dispersion correlated with microstructure revealed that macroscopic characterization is not sufficient to fully describe behavior. Microstructure consideration is needed. These results provide a better understanding of the mechanical behavior of the abdominal wall sheathing tissues as well as the directions for microstructure-based constitutive model. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Mechanical Characterization of Tissue-Engineered Cartilage Using Microscopic Magnetic Resonance Elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ziying; Schmid, Thomas M.; Yasar, Temel K.; Liu, Yifei; Royston, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of mechanical properties of tissue-engineered cartilage is essential for the optimization of cartilage tissue engineering strategies. Microscopic magnetic resonance elastography (μMRE) is a recently developed MR-based technique that can nondestructively visualize shear wave motion. From the observed wave pattern in MR phase images the tissue mechanical properties (e.g., shear modulus or stiffness) can be extracted. For quantification of the dynamic shear properties of small and stiff tissue-engineered cartilage, μMRE needs to be performed at frequencies in the kilohertz range. However, at frequencies greater than 1 kHz shear waves are rapidly attenuated in soft tissues. In this study μMRE, with geometric focusing, was used to overcome the rapid wave attenuation at high frequencies, enabling the measurement of the shear modulus of tissue-engineered cartilage. This methodology was first tested at a frequency of 5 kHz using a model system composed of alginate beads embedded in agarose, and then applied to evaluate extracellular matrix development in a chondrocyte pellet over a 3-week culture period. The shear stiffness in the pellet was found to increase over time (from 6.4 to 16.4 kPa), and the increase was correlated with both the proteoglycan content and the collagen content of the chondrocyte pellets (R2=0.776 and 0.724, respectively). Our study demonstrates that μMRE when performed with geometric focusing can be used to calculate and map the shear properties within tissue-engineered cartilage during its development. PMID:24266395

  2. Cell-matrix mechanical interaction in electrospun polymeric scaffolds for tissue engineering: Implications for scaffold design and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Kelsey M; Bhaw-Luximon, Archana; Jhurry, Dhanjay

    2017-03-01

    Engineered scaffolds produced by electrospinning of biodegradable polymers offer a 3D, nanofibrous environment with controllable structural, chemical, and mechanical properties that mimic the extracellular matrix of native tissues and have shown promise for a number of tissue engineering applications. The microscale mechanical interactions between cells and electrospun matrices drive cell behaviors including migration and differentiation that are critical to promote tissue regeneration. Recent developments in understanding these mechanical interactions in electrospun environments are reviewed, with emphasis on how fiber geometry and polymer structure impact on the local mechanical properties of scaffolds, how altering the micromechanics cues cell behaviors, and how, in turn, cellular and extrinsic forces exerted on the matrix mechanically remodel an electrospun scaffold throughout tissue development. Techniques used to measure and visualize these mechanical interactions are described. We provide a critical outlook on technological gaps that must be overcome to advance the ability to design, assess, and manipulate the mechanical environment in electrospun scaffolds toward constructs that may be successfully applied in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Tissue engineering requires design of scaffolds that interact with cells to promote tissue development. Electrospinning is a promising technique for fabricating fibrous, biomimetic scaffolds. Effects of electrospun matrix microstructure and biochemical properties on cell behavior have been extensively reviewed previously; here, we consider cell-matrix interaction from a mechanical perspective. Micromechanical properties as a driver of cell behavior has been well established in planar substrates, but more recently, many studies have provided new insights into mechanical interaction in fibrillar, electrospun environments. This review provides readers with an overview of how electrospun scaffold mechanics and

  3. Evaluation of structural and mechanical properties of electrospun nano-micro hybrid of poly hydroxybutyrate-chitosan/silk scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbasi, Saeed; Fekrat, Farnoosh; Semnani, Daryoush; Razavi, Shahnaz; Zargar, Elham Naghash

    2016-01-01

    One of the new methods of scaffold fabrication is a nano-micro hybrid structure in which the properties of the scaffold are improved by introducing nanometer and micrometer structures. This method could be suitable for scaffold designing if some features improve. In this study, electrospun nanofibers of 9% weight solution of poly (3-hydroxybutyrate) (P3HB) and a 15% weight of chitosan by trifluoroacetic acid were coated on both the surface of a silk knitted substrate in the optimum condition to improve the mechanical properties of scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering application. These hybrid nano-micro fibrous scaffolds were characterized by structural and mechanical evaluation methods. Scanning electron microscopy values and porosity analysis showed that average diameter of nanofibers was 584.94 nm in electrospinning part and general porosity was more than 80%. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy results indicated the presence of all elements without pollution. The tensile test also stated that by electrospinning, as well as adding chitosan, both maximum strength and maximum elongation increased to 187 N and 10 mm. It means that the microfibrous part of scaffold could affect mechanical properties of nano part of the hybrid scaffold, significantly. It could be concluded that P3HB-chitosan/silk hybrid scaffolds can be a good candidate for cartilage tissue engineering.

  4. Design properties of hydrogel tissue-engineering scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Junmin; Marchant, Roger E

    2011-01-01

    This article summarizes the recent progress in the design and synthesis of hydrogels as tissue-engineering scaffolds. Hydrogels are attractive scaffolding materials owing to their highly swollen network structure, ability to encapsulate cells and bioactive molecules, and efficient mass transfer. Various polymers, including natural, synthetic and natural/synthetic hybrid polymers, have been used to make hydrogels via chemical or physical crosslinking. Recently, bioactive synthetic hydrogels have emerged as promising scaffolds because they can provide molecularly tailored biofunctions and adjustable mechanical properties, as well as an extracellular matrix-like microenvironment for cell growth and tissue formation. This article addresses various strategies that have been explored to design synthetic hydrogels with extracellular matrix-mimetic bioactive properties, such as cell adhesion, proteolytic degradation and growth factor-binding. PMID:22026626

  5. Engineering on the straight and narrow: the mechanics of nanofibrous assemblies for fiber-reinforced tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauck, Robert L; Baker, Brendon M; Nerurkar, Nandan L; Burdick, Jason A; Li, Wan-Ju; Tuan, Rocky S; Elliott, Dawn M

    2009-06-01

    Tissue engineering of fibrous tissues of the musculoskeletal system represents a considerable challenge because of the complex architecture and mechanical properties of the component structures. Natural healing processes in these dense tissues are limited as a result of the mechanically challenging environment of the damaged tissue and the hypocellularity and avascular nature of the extracellular matrix. When healing does occur, the ordered structure of the native tissue is replaced with a disorganized fibrous scar with inferior mechanical properties, engendering sites that are prone to re-injury. To address the engineering of such tissues, we and others have adopted a structurally motivated approach based on organized nanofibrous assemblies. These scaffolds are composed of ultrafine polymeric fibers that can be fabricated in such a way to recreate the structural anisotropy typical of fiber-reinforced tissues. This straight-and-narrow topography not only provides tailored mechanical properties, but also serves as a 3D biomimetic micropattern for directed tissue formation. This review describes the underlying technology of nanofiber production and focuses specifically on the mechanical evaluation and theoretical modeling of these structures as it relates to native tissue structure and function. Applying the same mechanical framework for understanding native and engineered fiber-reinforced tissues provides a functional method for evaluating the utility and maturation of these unique engineered constructs. We further describe several case examples where these principles have been put to test, and discuss the remaining challenges and opportunities in forwarding this technology toward clinical implementation.

  6. Engineering on the Straight and Narrow: The Mechanics of Nanofibrous Assemblies for Fiber-Reinforced Tissue Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Brendon M.; Nerurkar, Nandan L.; Burdick, Jason A.; Li, Wan-Ju; Tuan, Rocky S.; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2009-01-01

    Tissue engineering of fibrous tissues of the musculoskeletal system represents a considerable challenge because of the complex architecture and mechanical properties of the component structures. Natural healing processes in these dense tissues are limited as a result of the mechanically challenging environment of the damaged tissue and the hypocellularity and avascular nature of the extracellular matrix. When healing does occur, the ordered structure of the native tissue is replaced with a disorganized fibrous scar with inferior mechanical properties, engendering sites that are prone to re-injury. To address the engineering of such tissues, we and others have adopted a structurally motivated approach based on organized nanofibrous assemblies. These scaffolds are composed of ultrafine polymeric fibers that can be fabricated in such a way to recreate the structural anisotropy typical of fiber-reinforced tissues. This straight-and-narrow topography not only provides tailored mechanical properties, but also serves as a 3D biomimetic micropattern for directed tissue formation. This review describes the underlying technology of nanofiber production and focuses specifically on the mechanical evaluation and theoretical modeling of these structures as it relates to native tissue structure and function. Applying the same mechanical framework for understanding native and engineered fiber-reinforced tissues provides a functional method for evaluating the utility and maturation of these unique engineered constructs. We further describe several case examples where these principles have been put to test, and discuss the remaining challenges and opportunities in forwarding this technology toward clinical implementation. PMID:19207040

  7. Review on patents for mechanical stimulation of articular cartilage tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donkelaar, van C.C.; Schulz, R.M.

    2008-01-01

    To repair articular cartilage defects in osteoarthritic patients with three-dimensional tissue engineered chondrocyte grafts, requires the formation of new cartilage with sufficient mechanical properties. The premise is that mechanical stimulation during the culturing process is necessary to reach

  8. Combination of biochemical and mechanical cues for tendon tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Stefano; Costantini, Marco; Fornetti, Ersilia; Bernardini, Sergio; Trombetta, Marcella; Seliktar, Dror; Cannata, Stefano; Rainer, Alberto; Gargioli, Cesare

    2017-11-01

    Tendinopathies negatively affect the life quality of millions of people in occupational and athletic settings, as well as the general population. Tendon healing is a slow process, often with insufficient results to restore complete endurance and functionality of the tissue. Tissue engineering, using tendon progenitors, artificial matrices and bioreactors for mechanical stimulation, could be an important approach for treating rips, fraying and tissue rupture. In our work, C3H10T1/2 murine fibroblast cell line was exposed to a combination of stimuli: a biochemical stimulus provided by Transforming Growth Factor Beta (TGF-β) and Ascorbic Acid (AA); a three-dimensional environment represented by PEGylated-Fibrinogen (PEG-Fibrinogen) biomimetic matrix; and a mechanical induction exploiting a custom bioreactor applying uniaxial stretching. In vitro analyses by immunofluorescence and mechanical testing revealed that the proposed combined approach favours the organization of a three-dimensional tissue-like structure promoting a remarkable arrangement of the cells and the neo-extracellular matrix, reflecting into enhanced mechanical strength. The proposed method represents a novel approach for tendon tissue engineering, demonstrating how the combined effect of biochemical and mechanical stimuli ameliorates biological and mechanical properties of the artificial tissue compared to those obtained with single inducement. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  9. Can plantar soft tissue mechanics enhance prognosis of diabetic foot ulcer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naemi, R; Chatzistergos, P; Suresh, S; Sundar, L; Chockalingam, N; Ramachandran, A

    2017-04-01

    To investigate if the assessment of the mechanical properties of plantar soft tissue can increase the accuracy of predicting Diabetic Foot Ulceration (DFU). 40 patients with diabetic neuropathy and no DFU were recruited. Commonly assessed clinical parameters along with plantar soft tissue stiffness and thickness were measured at baseline using ultrasound elastography technique. 7 patients developed foot ulceration during a 12months follow-up. Logistic regression was used to identify parameters that contribute to predicting the DFU incidence. The effect of using parameters related to the mechanical behaviour of plantar soft tissue on the specificity, sensitivity, prediction strength and accuracy of the predicting models for DFU was assessed. Patients with higher plantar soft tissue thickness and lower stiffness at the 1st Metatarsal head area showed an increased risk of DFU. Adding plantar soft tissue stiffness and thickness to the model improved its specificity (by 3%), sensitivity (by 14%), prediction accuracy (by 5%) and prognosis strength (by 1%). The model containing all predictors was able to effectively (χ 2 (8, N=40)=17.55, P<0.05) distinguish between the patients with and without DFU incidence. The mechanical properties of plantar soft tissue can be used to improve the predictability of DFU in moderate/high risk patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Micro-mechanical model for the tension-stabilized enzymatic degradation of collagen tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thao; Ruberti, Jeffery

    We present a study of how the collagen fiber structure influences the enzymatic degradation of collagen tissues. Experiments of collagen fibrils and tissues show that mechanical tension can slow and halt enzymatic degradation. Tissue-level experiments also show that degradation rate is minimum at a stretch level coincident with the onset of strain-stiffening in the stress response. To understand these phenomena, we developed a micro-mechanical model of a fibrous collagen tissue undergoing enzymatic degradation. Collagen fibers are described as sinusoidal elastica beams, and the tissue is described as a distribution of fibers. We assumed that the degradation reaction is inhibited by the axial strain energy of the crimped collagen fibers. The degradation rate law was calibrated to experiments on isolated single fibrils from bovine sclera. The fiber crimp and properties were fit to uniaxial tension tests of tissue strips. The fibril-level kinetic and tissue-level structural parameters were used to predict tissue-level degradation-induced creep rate under a constant applied force. We showed that we could accurately predict the degradation-induce creep rate of the pericardium and cornea once we accounted for differences in the fiber crimp structure and properties.

  11. Collagen hydrogels incorporated with surface-aminated mesoporous nanobioactive glass: Improvement of physicochemical stability and mechanical properties is effective for hard tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Fiqi, Ahmed; Lee, Jae Ho; Lee, Eun-Jung; Kim, Hae-Won

    2013-12-01

    Collagen (Col) hydrogels have poor physicochemical and mechanical properties and are susceptible to substantial shrinkage during cell culture, which limits their potential applications in hard tissue engineering. Here, we developed novel nanocomposite hydrogels made of collagen and mesoporous bioactive glass nanoparticles (mBGns) with surface amination, and addressed the effects of mBGn addition (Col:mBG = 2:1, 1:1 and 1:2) and its surface amination on the physicochemical and mechanical properties of the hydrogels. The amination of mBGn was shown to enable chemical bonding with collagen molecules. As a result, the nanocomposite hydrogels exhibited a significantly improved physicochemical and mechanical stability. The hydrolytic and enzymatic degradation of the Col-mBGn hydrogels were slowed down due to the incorporation of mBGn and its surface amination. The mechanical properties of the hydrogels, specifically the resistance to loading as well as the stiffness, significantly increased with the addition of mBGn and its aminated form, as assessed by a dynamic mechanical analysis. Mesenchymal stem cells cultivated within the Col-mBGn hydrogels were highly viable, with enhanced cytoskeletal extensions, due to the addition of surface aminated mBGn. While the Col hydrogel showed extensive shrinkage (down to ∼20% of initial size) during a few days of culture, the shrinkage of the mBGn-added hydrogel was substantially reduced, and the aminated mBGn-added hydrogel had no observable shrinkage over 21 days. Results demonstrated the effective roles of aminated mBGn in significantly improving the physicochemical and mechanical properties of Col hydrogel, which are ultimately favorable for applications in stem cell culture for bone tissue engineering. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A Novel High Mechanical Property PLGA Composite Matrix Loaded with Nanodiamond-Phospholipid Compound for Bone Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Song, Qingxin; Huang, Xuan; Li, Fengning; Wang, Kun; Tang, Yixing; Hou, Canglong; Shen, Hongxing

    2016-01-20

    A potential bone tissue engineering material was produced from a biodegradable polymer, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), loaded with nanodiamond phospholipid compound (NDPC) via physical mixing. On the basis of hydrophobic effects and physical absorption, we modified the original hydrophilic surface of the nanodiamond (NDs) with phospholipids to be amphipathic, forming a typical core-shell structure. The ND-phospholipid weight ratio was optimized to generate sample NDPC50 (i.e., ND-phospholipid weight ratio of 100:50), and NDPC50 was able to be dispersed in a PLGA matrix at up to 20 wt %. Compared to a pure PLGA matrix, the introduction of 10 wt % of NDPC (i.e., sample NDPC50-PF10) resulted in a significant improvement in the material's mechanical and surface properties, including a decrease in the water contact angle from 80 to 55°, an approximately 100% increase in the Young's modulus, and an approximate 550% increase in hardness, thus closely resembling that of human cortical bone. As a novel matrix supporting human osteoblast (hFOB1.19) growth, NDPC50-PFs with different amounts of NDPC50 demonstrated no negative effects on cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. Furthermore, we focused on the behaviors of NDPC-PFs implanted into mice for 8 weeks and found that NDPC-PFs induced acceptable immune response and can reduce the rapid biodegradation of PLGA matrix. Our results represent the first in vivo research on ND (or NDPC) as nanofillers in a polymer matrix for bone tissue engineering. The high mechanical properties, good in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility, and increased mineralization capability suggest that biodegradable PLGA composite matrices loaded with NDPC may potentially be useful for a variety of biomedical applications, especially bone tissue engineering.

  13. Mechanical properties and biocompatibility of porous titanium scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunhui; Frith, Jessica Ellen; Dehghan-Manshadi, Ali; Attar, Hooyar; Kent, Damon; Soro, Nicolas Dominique Mathieu; Bermingham, Michael J; Dargusch, Matthew S

    2017-11-01

    Synthetic scaffolds are a highly promising new approach to replace both autografts and allografts to repair and remodel damaged bone tissue. Biocompatible porous titanium scaffold was manufactured through a powder metallurgy approach. Magnesium powder was used as space holder material which was compacted with titanium powder and removed during sintering. Evaluation of the porosity and mechanical properties showed a high level of compatibility with human cortical bone. Interconnectivity between pores is higher than 95% for porosity as low as 30%. The elastic moduli are 44.2GPa, 24.7GPa and 15.4GPa for 30%, 40% and 50% porosity samples which match well to that of natural bone (4-30GPa). The yield strengths for 30% and 40% porosity samples of 221.7MPa and 117MPa are superior to that of human cortical bone (130-180MPa). In-vitro cell culture tests on the scaffold samples using Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hMSCs) demonstrated their biocompatibility and indicated osseointegration potential. The scaffolds allowed cells to adhere and spread both on the surface and inside the pore structures. With increasing levels of porosity/interconnectivity, improved cell proliferation is obtained within the pores. It is concluded that samples with 30% porosity exhibit the best biocompatibility. The results suggest that porous titanium scaffolds generated using this manufacturing route have excellent potential for hard tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Influence of tissue- and cell-scale extracellular matrix distribution on the mechanical properties of tissue-engineered cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khoshgoftar, M.; Wilson, W.; Ito, K.; Donkelaar, C.C. van

    2013-01-01

    The insufficient load-bearing capacity of today's tissue- engineered (TE) cartilage limits its clinical application. Generally, cartilage TE studies aim to increase the extracellular matrix (ECM) content, as this is thought to determine the load-bearing properties of the cartilage. However, there

  15. Influence of tissue- and cell-scale extracellular matrix distribution on the mechanical properties of tissue engineered cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khoshgoftar, M.; Wilson, W.; Ito, K.; Donkelaar, van C.C.

    2013-01-01

    The insufficient load-bearing capacity of today’s tissue- engineered (TE) cartilage limits its clinical application. Generally, cartilage TE studies aim to increase the extracellular matrix (ECM) content, as this is thought to determine the load-bearing properties of the cartilage. However, there

  16. Uphill running improves rat Achilles tendon tissue mechanical properties and alters gene expression without inducing pathological changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinemeier, K M; Skovgaard, D; Bayer, M L

    2012-01-01

    was increased, while collagen I was unchanged, and decreases were seen in noncollagen matrix components (fibromodulin and biglycan), matrix degrading enzymes, transforming growth factor-ß1, and connective tissue growth factor. In conclusion, the tested model could not be validated as a model for Achilles...... tendinopathy, as the rats were able to adapt to 12 wk of uphill running without any signs of tendinopathy. Improved mechanical properties were observed, as well as changes in gene-expression that were distinctly different from what is seen in tendinopathy and in response to short-term tendon loading....

  17. Mechanical characterization and non-linear elastic modeling of poly(glycerol sebacate) for soft tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsak, Anna G; Dunn, Andrew M; Hollister, Scott J

    2012-07-01

    Scaffold tissue engineering strategies for repairing and replacing soft tissue aim to improve reconstructive and corrective surgical techniques whose limitations include suboptimal mechanical properties, fibrous capsule formation and volume loss due to graft resorption. An effective tissue engineering strategy requires a scaffolding material with low elastic modulus that behaves similarly to soft tissue, which has been characterized as a nonlinear elastic material. The material must also have the ability to be manufactured into specifically designed architectures. Poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) is a thermoset elastomer that meets these criteria. We hypothesize that the mechanical properties of PGS can be modulated through curing condition and architecture to produce materials with a range of stiffnesses. To evaluate this hypothesis, we manufactured PGS constructs cured under various conditions and having one of two architectures (solid or porous). Specimens were then tensile tested according to ASTM standards and the data were modeled using a nonlinear elastic Neo-Hookean model. Architecture and testing conditions, including elongation rate and wet versus dry conditions, affected the mechanical properties. Increasing curing time and temperature led to increased tangent modulus and decreased maximum strain for solid constructs. Porous constructs had lower nonlinear elastic properties, as did constructs of both architectures tested under simulated physiological conditions (wetted at 37 °C). Both solid and porous PGS specimens could be modeled well with the Neo-Hookean model. Future studies include comparing PGS properties to other biological tissue types and designing and characterizing PGS scaffolds for regenerating these tissues. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Hydroxyapatite-TiO(2)-based nanocomposites synthesized in supercritical CO(2) for bone tissue engineering: physical and mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salarian, Mehrnaz; Xu, William Z; Wang, Zhiqiang; Sham, Tsun-Kong; Charpentier, Paul A

    2014-10-08

    Calcium phosphate-based nanocomposites offer a unique solution toward producing scaffolds for orthopedic and dental implants. However, despite attractive bioactivity and biocompatibility, hydroxyapatite (HAp) has been limited in heavy load-bearing applications due to its intrinsically low mechanical strength. In this work, to improve the mechanical properties of HAp, we grew HAp nanoplates from the surface of one-dimensional titania nanorod structures by combining a coprecipitation and sol-gel methodology using supercritical fluid processing with carbon dioxide (scCO2). The effects of metal alkoxide concentration (1.1-1.5 mol/L), reaction temperature (60-80 °C), and pressure (6000-8000 psi) on the morphology, crystallinity, and surface area of the resulting nanostructured composites were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) method. Chemical composition of the products was characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) analyses. HAp nanoplates and HAp-TiO2 nanocomposites were homogeneously mixed within poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) to develop scaffolds with enhanced physical and mechanical properties for bone regeneration. Mechanical behavior analysis demonstrated that the Young's and flexural moduli of the PCL/HAp-TiO2 composites were substantially higher than the PCL/HAp composites. Therefore, this new synthesis methodology in scCO2 holds promise for bone tissue engineering with improved mechanical properties.

  19. Mechanical properties of natural chitosan/hydroxyapatite/magnetite nanocomposites for tissue engineering applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidari, Fatemeh [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Engineering, Yasouj University, Yasuj 75918-74934 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Razavi, Mehdi [BCAST, Institute of Materials and Manufacturing, Brunel University London, Uxbridge, London UB8 3PH (United Kingdom); Brunel Institute for Bioengineering, Brunel University London, Uxbridge, London UB8 3PH (United Kingdom); Bahrololoom, Mohammad E. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bazargan-Lari, Reza [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Marvdasht Branch, Islamic Azad University, Marvdasht (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Vashaee, Daryoosh [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606 (United States); Kotturi, Hari [Department of Biology, University of Central Oklahoma, Edmond, OK 73034 (United States); Tayebi, Lobat, E-mail: lobat.tayebi@marquette.edu [Department of Developmental Sciences, Marquette University School of Dentistry, Milwaukee, WI 53233 (United States); Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PJ (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-01

    Chitosan (CS), hydroxyapatite (HA), and magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) have been broadly employed for bone treatment applications. Having a hybrid biomaterial composed of the aforementioned constituents not only accumulates the useful characteristics of each component, but also provides outstanding composite properties. In the present research, mechanical properties of pure CS, CS/HA, CS/HA/magnetite, and CS/magnetite were evaluated by the measurements of bending strength, elastic modulus, compressive strength and hardness values. Moreover, the morphology of the bending fracture surfaces were characterized using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an image analyzer. Studies were also conducted to examine the biological response of the human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hMSCs) on different composites. We conclude that, although all of these composites possess in-vitro biocompatibility, adding hydroxyapatite and magnetite to the chitosan matrix can noticeably enhance the mechanical properties of the pure chitosan. - Highlights: • Chitosan (CS)/magnetite composite presented the maximum bending strength. • Adding hydroxyapatite and magnetite to the CS enhances its mechanical properties. • Magnetic does not have reverse effect on the cyto-compatibility of samples.

  20. A Robust Method to Generate Mechanically Anisotropic Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Sheets for Vascular Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backman, Daniel E; LeSavage, Bauer L; Shah, Shivem B; Wong, Joyce Y

    2017-06-01

    In arterial tissue engineering, mimicking native structure and mechanical properties is essential because compliance mismatch can lead to graft failure and further disease. With bottom-up tissue engineering approaches, designing tissue components with proper microscale mechanical properties is crucial to achieve the necessary macroscale properties in the final implant. This study develops a thermoresponsive cell culture platform for growing aligned vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) sheets by photografting N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm) onto micropatterned poly(dimethysiloxane) (PDMS). The grafting process is experimentally and computationally optimized to produce PNIPAAm-PDMS substrates optimal for VSMC attachment. To allow long-term VSMC sheet culture and increase the rate of VSMC sheet formation, PNIPAAm-PDMS surfaces were further modified with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane yielding a robust, thermoresponsive cell culture platform for culturing VSMC sheets. VSMC cell sheets cultured on patterned thermoresponsive substrates exhibit cellular and collagen alignment in the direction of the micropattern. Mechanical characterization of patterned, single-layer VSMC sheets reveals increased stiffness in the aligned direction compared to the perpendicular direction whereas nonpatterned cell sheets exhibit no directional dependence. Structural and mechanical anisotropy of aligned, single-layer VSMC sheets makes this platform an attractive microstructural building block for engineering a vascular graft to match the in vivo mechanical properties of native arterial tissue. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Capabilities and Limitations of Tissue Size Control through Passive Mechanical Forces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Kursawe

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Embryogenesis is an extraordinarily robust process, exhibiting the ability to control tissue size and repair patterning defects in the face of environmental and genetic perturbations. The size and shape of a developing tissue is a function of the number and size of its constituent cells as well as their geometric packing. How these cellular properties are coordinated at the tissue level to ensure developmental robustness remains a mystery; understanding this process requires studying multiple concurrent processes that make up morphogenesis, including the spatial patterning of cell fates and apoptosis, as well as cell intercalations. In this work, we develop a computational model that aims to understand aspects of the robust pattern repair mechanisms of the Drosophila embryonic epidermal tissues. Size control in this system has previously been shown to rely on the regulation of apoptosis rather than proliferation; however, to date little work has been done to understand the role of cellular mechanics in this process. We employ a vertex model of an embryonic segment to test hypotheses about the emergence of this size control. Comparing the model to previously published data across wild type and genetic perturbations, we show that passive mechanical forces suffice to explain the observed size control in the posterior (P compartment of a segment. However, observed asymmetries in cell death frequencies across the segment are demonstrated to require patterning of cellular properties in the model. Finally, we show that distinct forms of mechanical regulation in the model may be distinguished by differences in cell shapes in the P compartment, as quantified through experimentally accessible summary statistics, as well as by the tissue recoil after laser ablation experiments.

  2. Enabling real-time ultrasound imaging of soft tissue mechanical properties by simplification of the shear wave motion equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Aaron J; Bashford, Gregory R

    2015-08-01

    Ultrasound based shear wave elastography (SWE) is a technique used for non-invasive characterization and imaging of soft tissue mechanical properties. Robust estimation of shear wave propagation speed is essential for imaging of soft tissue mechanical properties. In this study we propose to estimate shear wave speed by inversion of the first-order wave equation following directional filtering. This approach relies on estimation of first-order derivatives which allows for accurate estimations using smaller smoothing filters than when estimating second-order derivatives. The performance was compared to three current methods used to estimate shear wave propagation speed: direct inversion of the wave equation (DIWE), time-to-peak (TTP) and cross-correlation (CC). The shear wave speed of three homogeneous phantoms of different elastic moduli (gelatin by weight of 5%, 7%, and 9%) were measured with each method. The proposed method was shown to produce shear speed estimates comparable to the conventional methods (standard deviation of measurements being 0.13 m/s, 0.05 m/s, and 0.12 m/s), but with simpler processing and usually less time (by a factor of 1, 13, and 20 for DIWE, CC, and TTP respectively). The proposed method was able to produce a 2-D speed estimate from a single direction of wave propagation in about four seconds using an off-the-shelf PC, showing the feasibility of performing real-time or near real-time elasticity imaging with dedicated hardware.

  3. Bone density does not reflect mechanical properties in early-stage arthrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming; Danielsen, CC; Hvid, I

    2001-01-01

    : medial arthrosis, lateral control, normal medial and normal lateral controls. The specimens were tested in compression to determine mechanical properties and then physical/compositional properties. Compared to the normal medial control, we found reductions in ultimate stress, Young's modulus, and failure...... cancellous bone and the 3 controls. None of the mechanical properties of arthrotic cancellous bone could be predicted by the physical/compositional properties measured. The increase in bone tissue in early-stage arthrotic cancellous bone did not make up for the loss of mechanical properties, which suggests...

  4. Enhanced mechanical properties of thermosensitive chitosan hydrogel by silk fibers for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirahmadi, Fereshteh; Tafazzoli-Shadpour, Mohammad; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Bonakdar, Shahin

    2013-12-01

    Articular cartilage has limited repair capability following traumatic injuries and current methods of treatment remain inefficient. Reconstructing cartilage provides a new way for cartilage repair and natural polymers are often used as scaffold because of their biocompatibility and biofunctionality. In this study, we added degummed chopped silk fibers and electrospun silk fibers to the thermosensitive chitosan/glycerophosphate hydrogels to reinforce two hydrogel constructs which were used as scaffold for hyaline cartilage regeneration. The gelation temperature and gelation time of hydrogel were analyzed by the rheometer and vial tilting method. Mechanical characterization was measured by uniaxial compression, indentation and dynamic mechanical analysis assay. Chondrocytes were then harvested from the knee joint of the New Zealand white rabbits and cultured in constructs. The cell proliferation, viability, production of glycosaminoglycans and collagen type II were assessed. The results showed that mechanical properties of the hydrogel were significantly enhanced when a hybrid with two layers of electrospun silk fibers was made. The results of GAG and collagen type II in cell-seeded scaffolds indicate support of the chondrogenic phenotype for chondrocytes with a significant increase in degummed silk fiber-hydrogel composite for GAG content and in two-layer electrospun fiber-hydrogel composite for Col II. It was concluded that these two modified scaffolds could be employed for cartilage tissue engineering. © 2013.

  5. The effects of matrix inhomogeneities on the cellular mechanical environment in tissue-engineered cartilage: an in silico investigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khoshgoftar, M.; Wilson, W.; Ito, K.; Donkelaar, C.C. van

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical stimulation during cartilage tissue-engineering enhances extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis and thereby improves the mechanical properties of tissue engineered (TE) cartilage. Generally, these mechanical stimuli are of a fixed magnitude. However, as a result of ECM synthesis and spatial

  6. Nonlinear and anisotropic tensile properties of graft materials used in soft tissue applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Jonathon H; Elliott, Dawn M

    2010-05-01

    The mechanical properties of extracellular matrix grafts that are intended to augment or replace soft tissues should be comparable to the native tissue. Such grafts are often used in fiber-reinforced tissue applications that undergo multi-axial loading and therefore knowledge of the anisotropic and nonlinear properties are needed, including the moduli and Poisson's ratio in two orthogonal directions within the plane of the graft. The objective of this study was to measure the tensile mechanical properties of several marketed grafts: Alloderm, Restore, CuffPatch, and OrthADAPT. The degree of anisotropy and non-linearity within each graft was evaluated from uniaxial tensile tests and compared to their native tissue. The Alloderm graft was anisotropic in both the toe- and linear-region of the stress-strain response, was highly nonlinear, and generally had low properties. The Restore and CuffPatch grafts had similar stress-strain responses, were largely isotropic, had a linear-region modulus of 18MPa, and were nonlinear. OrthADAPT was anisotropic in the linear-region (131 MPA vs 47MPa in the toe-region) and was highly nonlinear. The Poisson ratio for all grafts was between 0.4 and 0.7, except for the parallel orientation of Restore which was greater than 1.0. Having an informed understanding of how the available grafts perform mechanically will allow for better assessment by the physician for which graft to apply depending upon its application. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Biocompatible Porous Polyester-Ether Hydrogel Scaffolds with Cross-Linker Mediated Biodegradation and Mechanical Properties for Tissue Augmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berkay Ozcelik

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Porous polyester-ether hydrogel scaffolds (PEHs were fabricated using acid chloride/alcohol chemistry and a salt templating approach. The PEHs were produced from readily available and cheap commercial reagents via the reaction of hydroxyl terminated poly(ethylene glycol (PEG derivatives with sebacoyl, succinyl, or trimesoyl chloride to afford ester cross-links between the PEG chains. Through variation of the acid chloride cross-linkers used in the synthesis and the incorporation of a hydrophobic modifier (poly(caprolactone (PCL, it was possible to tune the degradation rates and mechanical properties of the resulting hydrogels. Several of the hydrogel formulations displayed exceptional mechanical properties, remaining elastic without fracture at compressive strains of up to 80%, whilst still displaying degradation over a period of weeks to months. A subcutaneous rat model was used to study the scaffolds in vivo and revealed that the PEHs were infiltrated with well vascularised tissue within two weeks and had undergone significant degradation in 16 weeks without any signs of toxicity. Histological evaluation for immune responses revealed that the PEHs incite only a minor inflammatory response that is reduced over 16 weeks with no evidence of adverse effects.

  8. High seeding density of human chondrocytes in agarose produces tissue-engineered cartilage approaching native mechanical and biochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigan, Alexander D; Roach, Brendan L; Nims, Robert J; Tan, Andrea R; Albro, Michael B; Stoker, Aaron M; Cook, James L; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Hung, Clark T; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2016-06-14

    Animal cells have served as highly controllable model systems for furthering cartilage tissue engineering practices in pursuit of treating osteoarthritis. Although successful strategies for animal cells must ultimately be adapted to human cells to be clinically relevant, human chondrocytes are rarely employed in such studies. In this study, we evaluated the applicability of culture techniques established for juvenile bovine and adult canine chondrocytes to human chondrocytes obtained from fresh or expired osteochondral allografts. Human chondrocytes were expanded and encapsulated in 2% agarose scaffolds measuring ∅3-4mm×2.3mm, with cell seeding densities ranging from 15 to 90×10(6)cells/mL. Subsets of constructs were subjected to transient or sustained TGF-β treatment, or provided channels to enhance nutrient transport. Human cartilaginous constructs physically resembled native human cartilage, and reached compressive Young's moduli of up to ~250kPa (corresponding to the low end of ranges reported for native knee cartilage), dynamic moduli of ~950kPa (0.01Hz), and contained 5.7% wet weight (%/ww) of glycosaminoglycans (≥ native levels) and 1.5%/ww collagen. We found that the initial seeding density had pronounced effects on tissue outcomes, with high cell seeding densities significantly increasing nearly all measured properties. Transient TGF-β treatment was ineffective for adult human cells, and tissue construct properties plateaued or declined beyond 28 days of culture. Finally, nutrient channels improved construct mechanical properties, presumably due to enhanced rates of mass transport. These results demonstrate that our previously established culture system can be successfully translated to human chondrocytes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of crystallinity and plasticizer on mechanical properties and tissue integration of starch-based materials from two botanical origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasquez, Diego; Pavon-Djavid, Graciela; Chaunier, Laurent; Meddahi-Pellé, Anne; Lourdin, Denis

    2015-06-25

    The application of starch-based materials for biomedical purposes has attracted significant interest due to their biocompatibility. The physical properties and crystal structure of materials based on potato starch (PS) and amylomaize starch (AMS) were studied under physiological conditions. PS plasticized with 20% glycerol presented the best mechanical properties with an elastic modulus of 1.6MPa and a weak swelling, remaining stable for 30 days. The in vitro cell viability of 3T3 cells after contact with extracts from PS and AMS with 20% glycerol is 72% and 80%, respectively. PS presented good tissue integration and no significant inflammation or foreign body response after 30 days intra-muscular implantation in a rat model, contrary to AMS. It was shown that glycerol plasticization favors a fast B-type crystallization of PS materials, enhancing their mechanical strength and durability, and making them a good candidate for bioresorbable and biocompatible materials for implantable medical devices. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A preliminary study of patient-specific mechanical properties of diabetic and healthy plantar soft tissue from gated magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Evan D; Stebbins, Michael J; Cavanagh, Peter R; Haynor, David R; Chu, Baocheng; Fassbind, Michael J; Isvilanonda, Vara; Ledoux, William R

    2017-07-01

    Foot loading rate, load magnitude, and the presence of diseases such as diabetes can all affect the mechanical properties of the plantar soft tissues of the human foot. The hydraulic plantar soft tissue reducer instrument was designed to gain insight into which variables are the most significant in determining these properties. It was used with gated magnetic resonance imaging to capture three-dimensional images of feet under dynamic loading conditions. Custom electronics controlled by LabVIEW software simultaneously recorded system pressure, which was then translated to applied force values based on calibration curves. Data were collected for two subjects, one without diabetes (Subject A) and one with diabetes (Subject B). For a 0.2-Hz loading rate, and strains 0.16, 0.18, 0.20, and 0.22, Subject A's average tangential heel pad stiffness was 10 N/mm and Subject B's was 24 N/mm. Maximum test loads were approximately 200 N. Loading rate and load magnitude limitations (both were lower than physiologic values) will continue to be addressed in the next version of the instrument. However, the current hydraulic plantar soft tissue reducer did produce a data set for healthy versus diabetic tissue stiffness that agrees with previous trends. These data are also being used to improve finite element analysis models of the foot as part of a related project.

  11. Effects of Inflammation on Multiscale Biomechanical Properties of Cartilaginous Cells and Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Q T; Jacobsen, T D; Chahine, N O

    2017-11-13

    Cells within cartilaginous tissues are mechanosensitive and thus require mechanical loading for regulation of tissue homeostasis and metabolism. Mechanical loading plays critical roles in cell differentiation, proliferation, biosynthesis, and homeostasis. Inflammation is an important event occurring during multiple processes, such as aging, injury, and disease. Inflammation has significant effects on biological processes as well as mechanical function of cells and tissues. These effects are highly dependent on cell/tissue type, timing, and magnitude. In this review, we summarize key findings pertaining to effects of inflammation on multiscale mechanical properties at subcellular, cellular, and tissue level in cartilaginous tissues, including alterations in mechanotransduction and mechanosensitivity. The emphasis is on articular cartilage and the intervertebral disc, which are impacted by inflammatory insults during degenerative conditions such as osteoarthritis, joint pain, and back pain. To recapitulate the pro-inflammatory cascades that occur in vivo, different inflammatory stimuli have been used for in vitro and in situ studies, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF), various interleukins (IL), and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Therefore, this review will focus on the effects of these stimuli because they are the best studied pro-inflammatory cytokines in cartilaginous tissues. Understanding the current state of the field of inflammation and cell/tissue biomechanics may potentially identify future directions for novel and translational therapeutics with multiscale biomechanical considerations.

  12. Bone scaffolds with homogeneous and discrete gradient mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelen, C; Mattei, G; Montemurro, F; De Maria, C; Mattioli-Belmonte, M; Vozzi, G

    2013-01-01

    Bone TE uses a scaffold either to induce bone formation from surrounding tissue or to act as a carrier or template for implanted bone cells or other agents. We prepared different bone tissue constructs based on collagen, gelatin and hydroxyapatite using genipin as cross-linking agent. The fabricated construct did not present a release neither of collagen neither of genipin over its toxic level in the surrounding aqueous environment. Each scaffold has been mechanically characterized with compression, swelling and creep tests, and their respective viscoelastic mechanical models were derived. Mechanical characterization showed a practically elastic behavior of all samples and that compressive elastic modulus basically increases as content of HA increases, and it is strongly dependent on porosity and water content. Moreover, by considering that gradients in cellular and extracellular architecture as well as in mechanical properties are readily apparent in native tissues, we developed discrete functionally graded scaffolds (discrete FGSs) in order to mimic the graded structure of bone tissue. These new structures were mechanically characterized showing a marked anisotropy as the native bone tissue. Results obtained have shown FGSs could represent valid bone substitutes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Inference of Cell Mechanics in Heterogeneous Epithelial Tissue Based on Multivariate Clone Shape Quantification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Alice; Umetsu, Daiki; Kuranaga, Erina; Fujimoto, Koichi

    2017-01-01

    Cell populations in multicellular organisms show genetic and non-genetic heterogeneity, even in undifferentiated tissues of multipotent cells during development and tumorigenesis. The heterogeneity causes difference of mechanical properties, such as, cell bond tension or adhesion, at the cell–cell interface, which determine the shape of clonal population boundaries via cell sorting or mixing. The boundary shape could alter the degree of cell–cell contacts and thus influence the physiological consequences of sorting or mixing at the boundary (e.g., tumor suppression or progression), suggesting that the cell mechanics could help clarify the physiology of heterogeneous tissues. While precise inference of mechanical tension loaded at each cell–cell contacts has been extensively developed, there has been little progress on how to distinguish the population-boundary geometry and identify the cause of geometry in heterogeneous tissues. We developed a pipeline by combining multivariate analysis of clone shape with tissue mechanical simulations. We examined clones with four different genotypes within Drosophila wing imaginal discs: wild-type, tartan (trn) overexpression, hibris (hbs) overexpression, and Eph RNAi. Although the clones were previously known to exhibit smoothed or convoluted morphologies, their mechanical properties were unknown. By applying a multivariate analysis to multiple criteria used to quantify the clone shapes based on individual cell shapes, we found the optimal criteria to distinguish not only among the four genotypes, but also non-genetic heterogeneity from genetic one. The efficient segregation of clone shape enabled us to quantitatively compare experimental data with tissue mechanical simulations. As a result, we identified the mechanical basis contributed to clone shape of distinct genotypes. The present pipeline will promote the understanding of the functions of mechanical interactions in heterogeneous tissue in a non-invasive manner. PMID

  14. Effect of six-month hypokinesia in dogs on mineral component, reconstruction and mechanical properties of bone tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volozhin, A. I.; Pavlova, M. P.; Muradov, I. S.; Stupakov, G. P.; Korzhenyants, V. A.

    1980-01-01

    Ca45 incorporation into the bones of the limbs, particularly in the area of the muscle attachment increased in dogs as a result of 6 month hypokinesia. There were no phenomena of osteoporosis in the cortical layer of the diaphyses; however, changes in the form of osteons, an increase in the number of anastomoses between the channels and the thinning of the subperiosteal layer pointed to disturbances of the bone tissue reconstruction. Mineral saturation of the bone microstructures of the experimental dogs had a tendency to rise. No changes in the mechanical properties of the long bones occurred as a result of hypokinesia in dogs.

  15. Mechanical phenotyping of cells and extracellular matrix as grade and stage markers of lung tumor tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzetta, Valeria; Musella, Ida; Rapa, Ida; Volante, Marco; Netti, Paolo A; Fusco, Sabato

    2017-07-15

    The mechanical cross-talk between cells and the extra-cellular matrix (ECM) regulates the properties, functions and healthiness of the tissues. When this is disturbed it changes the mechanical state of the tissue components, singularly or together, and cancer, along with other diseases, may start and progress. However, the bi-univocal mechanical interplay between cells and the ECM is still not properly understood. In this study we show how a microrheology technique gives us the opportunity to evaluate the mechanics of cells and the ECM at the same time. The mechanical phenotyping was performed on the surgically removed tissues of 10 patients affected by adenocarcinoma of the lung. A correlation between the mechanics and the grade and stage of the tumor was reported and compared to the mechanical characteristics of the healthy tissue. Our findings suggest a sort of asymmetric modification of the mechanical properties of the cells and the extra-cellular matrix in the tumor, being the more compliant cell even though it resides in a stiffer matrix. Overall, the simultaneous mechanical characterization of the tissues constituents (cells and ECM) provided new support for diagnosis and offered alternative points of analysis for cancer mechanobiology. When the integrity of the mechanical cross-talk between cells and the extra-cellular matrix is disturbed cancer, along with other diseases, may initiate and progress. Here, we show how a new technique gives the opportunity to evaluate the mechanics of cells and the ECM at the same time. It was applied on surgically removed tissues of 10 patients affected by adenocarcinoma of the lung and a correlation between the mechanics and the grade and stage of the tumor was reported and compared to the mechanical characteristics of the healthy tissue. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. New methodology for mechanical characterization of human superficial facial tissue anisotropic behaviour in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Then, C; Stassen, B; Depta, K; Silber, G

    2017-07-01

    Mechanical characterization of human superficial facial tissue has important applications in biomedical science, computer assisted forensics, graphics, and consumer goods development. Specifically, the latter may include facial hair removal devices. Predictive accuracy of numerical models and their ability to elucidate biomechanically relevant questions depends on the acquisition of experimental data and mechanical tissue behavior representation. Anisotropic viscoelastic behavioral characterization of human facial tissue, deformed in vivo with finite strain, however, is sparse. Employing an experimental-numerical approach, a procedure is presented to evaluate multidirectional tensile properties of superficial tissue layers of the face in vivo. Specifically, in addition to stress relaxation, displacement-controlled multi-step ramp-and-hold protocols were performed to separate elastic from inelastic properties. For numerical representation, an anisotropic hyperelastic material model in conjunction with a time domain linear viscoelasticity formulation with Prony series was employed. Model parameters were inversely derived, employing finite element models, using multi-criteria optimization. The methodology provides insight into mechanical superficial facial tissue properties. Experimental data shows pronounced anisotropy, especially with large strain. The stress relaxation rate does not depend on the loading direction, but is strain-dependent. Preconditioning eliminates equilibrium hysteresis effects and leads to stress-strain repeatability. In the preconditioned state tissue stiffness and hysteresis insensitivity to strain rate in the applied range is evident. The employed material model fits the nonlinear anisotropic elastic results and the viscoelasticity model reasonably reproduces time-dependent results. Inversely deduced maximum anisotropic long-term shear modulus of linear elasticity is G ∞,max aniso =2.43kPa and instantaneous initial shear modulus at an

  17. Measurement of the uniaxial mechanical properties of rat skin using different stress-strain definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, A; Navidbakhsh, M

    2015-05-01

    The mechanical properties of skin tissue may vary according to the anatomical locations of a body. There are different stress-strain definitions to measure the mechanical properties of skin tissue. However, there is no agreement as to which stress-strain definition should be implemented to measure the mechanical properties of skin at different anatomical locations. Three stress definitions (second Piola-Kichhoff stress, engineering stress, and true stress) and four strain definitions (Almansi-Hamel strain, Green-St. Venant strain, engineering strain, and true strain) are employed to determine the mechanical properties of skin tissue at back and abdomen locations of a rat body. The back and abdomen skins of eight rats are excised and subjected to a series of tensile tests. The elastic modulus, maximum stress, and strain of skin tissues are measured using three stress definitions and four strain definitions. The results show that the effect of varying the stress definition on the maximum stress measurements of the back skin is significant but not when calculating the elastic modulus and maximum strain. No significant effects are observed on the elastic modulus, maximum stress, and strain measurements of abdomen skin by varying the stress definition. In the true stress-strain diagram, the maximum stress (20%), and elastic modulus (35%) of back skin are significantly higher than that of abdomen skin. The true stress-strain definition is favored to measure the mechanical properties of skin tissue since it gives more accurate measurements of the skin's response using the instantaneous values. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. On the influence of surface patterning on tissue self-assembly and mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, Valerio; Ventre, Maurizio; Natale, Carlo F; Rescigno, Francesca; Netti, Paolo A

    2018-04-28

    Extracellular matrix assembly and composition influence the biological and mechanical functions of tissues. Developing strategies to control the spatial arrangement of cells and matrix is of central importance for tissue engineering-related approaches relying on self-assembling and scaffoldless processes. Literature reports demonstrated that signals patterned on material surfaces are able to control cell positioning and matrix orientation. However, the mechanisms underlying the interactions between material signals and the structure of the de novo synthesized matrix are far from being thoroughly understood. In this work, we investigated the ordering effect provided by nanoscale topographic patterns on the assembly of tissue sheets grown in vitro. We stimulated MC3T3-E1 preosteoblasts to produce and assemble a collagen-rich matrix on substrates displaying patterns with long- or short-range order. Then, we investigated microstructural features and mechanical properties of the tissue in uniaxial tension. Our results demonstrate that patterned material surfaces are able to control the initial organization of cells in close contact to the surface; then cell-generated contractile forces profoundly remodel tissue structure towards mechanically stable spatial patterns. Such a remodelling effect acts both locally, as it affects cell and nuclear shape and globally, by affecting the gross mechanical response of the tissue. Such an aspect of dynamic interplay between cells and the surrounding matrix must be taken into account when designing material platform for the in vitro generation of tissue with specific microstructural assemblies. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. The design and validation of a magnetic resonance imaging-compatible device for obtaining mechanical properties of plantar soft tissue via gated acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Evan D; Stebbins, Michael J; Cavanagh, Peter R; Haynor, David R; Chu, Baocheng; Fassbind, Michael J; Isvilanonda, Vara; Ledoux, William R

    2015-10-01

    Changes in the mechanical properties of the plantar soft tissue in people with diabetes may contribute to the formation of plantar ulcers. Such ulcers have been shown to be in the causal pathway for lower extremity amputation. The hydraulic plantar soft tissue reducer (HyPSTER) was designed to measure in vivo, rate-dependent plantar soft tissue compressive force and three-dimensional deformations to help understand, predict, and prevent ulcer formation. These patient-specific values can then be used in an inverse finite element analysis to determine tissue moduli, and subsequently used in a foot model to show regions of high stress under a wide variety of loading conditions. The HyPSTER uses an actuator to drive a magnetic resonance imaging-compatible hydraulic loading platform. Pressure and actuator position were synchronized with gated magnetic resonance imaging acquisition. Achievable loading rates were slower than those found in normal walking because of a water-hammer effect (pressure wave ringing) in the hydraulic system when the actuator direction was changed rapidly. The subsequent verification tests were, therefore, performed at 0.2 Hz. The unloaded displacement accuracy of the system was within 0.31%. Compliance, presumably in the system's plastic components, caused a displacement loss of 5.7 mm during a 20-mm actuator test at 1354 N. This was accounted for with a target to actual calibration curve. The positional accuracy of the HyPSTER during loaded displacement verification tests from 3 to 9 mm against a silicone backstop was 95.9% with a precision of 98.7%. The HyPSTER generated minimal artifact in the magnetic resonance imaging scanner. Careful analysis of the synchronization of the HyPSTER and the magnetic resonance imaging scanner was performed. With some limitations, the HyPSTER provided key functionality in measuring dynamic, patient-specific plantar soft tissue mechanical properties. © IMechE 2015.

  20. Mechanical modulation of nascent stem cell lineage commitment in tissue engineering scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Min Jae; Dean, David; Knothe Tate, Melissa L

    2013-07-01

    Taking inspiration from tissue morphogenesis in utero, this study tests the concept of using tissue engineering scaffolds as delivery devices to modulate emergent structure-function relationships at early stages of tissue genesis. We report on the use of a combined computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling, advanced manufacturing methods, and experimental fluid mechanics (micro-piv and strain mapping) for the prospective design of tissue engineering scaffold geometries that deliver spatially resolved mechanical cues to stem cells seeded within. When subjected to a constant magnitude global flow regime, the local scaffold geometry dictates the magnitudes of mechanical stresses and strains experienced by a given cell, and in a spatially resolved fashion, similar to patterning during morphogenesis. In addition, early markers of mesenchymal stem cell lineage commitment relate significantly to the local mechanical environment of the cell. Finally, by plotting the range of stress-strain states for all data corresponding to nascent cell lineage commitment (95% CI), we begin to "map the mechanome", defining stress-strain states most conducive to targeted cell fates. In sum, we provide a library of reference mechanical cues that can be delivered to cells seeded on tissue engineering scaffolds to guide target tissue phenotypes in a temporally and spatially resolved manner. Knowledge of these effects allows for prospective scaffold design optimization using virtual models prior to prototyping and clinical implementation. Finally, this approach enables the development of next generation scaffolds cum delivery devices for genesis of complex tissues with heterogenous properties, e.g., organs, joints or interface tissues such as growth plates. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Quantitative methods for reconstructing tissue biomechanical properties in optical coherence elastography: a comparison study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Zhaolong; Li, Jiasong; Singh, Manmohan; Wu, Chen; Liu, Chih-hao; Wang, Shang; Idugboe, Rita; Raghunathan, Raksha; Sudheendran, Narendran; Larin, Kirill V; Aglyamov, Salavat R; Twa, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    We present a systematic analysis of the accuracy of five different methods for extracting the biomechanical properties of soft samples using optical coherence elastography (OCE). OCE is an emerging noninvasive technique, which allows assessment of biomechanical properties of tissues with micrometer spatial resolution. However, in order to accurately extract biomechanical properties from OCE measurements, application of a proper mechanical model is required. In this study, we utilize tissue-mimicking phantoms with controlled elastic properties and investigate the feasibilities of four available methods for reconstructing elasticity (Young’s modulus) based on OCE measurements of an air-pulse induced elastic wave. The approaches are based on the shear wave equation (SWE), the surface wave equation (SuWE), Rayleigh-Lamb frequency equation (RLFE), and finite element method (FEM), Elasticity values were compared with uniaxial mechanical testing. The results show that the RLFE and the FEM are more robust in quantitatively assessing elasticity than the other simplified models. This study provides a foundation and reference for reconstructing the biomechanical properties of tissues from OCE data, which is important for the further development of noninvasive elastography methods. (paper)

  2. Mechanical homeostasis regulating adipose tissue volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svedman Paul

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The total body adipose tissue volume is regulated by hormonal, nutritional, paracrine, neuronal and genetic control signals, as well as components of cell-cell or cell-matrix interactions. There are no known locally acting homeostatic mechanisms by which growing adipose tissue might adapt its volume. Presentation of the hypothesis Mechanosensitivity has been demonstrated by mesenchymal cells in tissue culture. Adipocyte differentiation has been shown to be inhibited by stretching in vitro, and a pathway for the response has been elucidated. In humans, intermittent stretching of skin for reconstructional purposes leads to thinning of adipose tissue and thickening of epidermis – findings matching those observed in vitro in response to mechanical stimuli. Furthermore, protracted suspension of one leg increases the intermuscular adipose tissue volume of the limb. These findings may indicate a local homeostatic adipose tissue volume-regulating mechanism based on movement-induced reduction of adipocyte differentiation. This function might, during evolution, have been of importance in confined spaces, where overgrowth of adipose tissue could lead to functional disturbance, as for instance in the turtle. In humans, adipose tissue near muscle might in particular be affected, for instance intermuscularly, extraperitoneally and epicardially. Mechanical homeostasis might also contribute to protracted maintainment of soft tissue shape in the face and neck region. Testing of the hypothesis Assessment of messenger RNA-expression of human adipocytes following activity in adjacent muscle is planned, and study of biochemical and volumetric adipose tissue changes in man are proposed. Implications of the hypothesis The interpretation of metabolic disturbances by means of adipose tissue might be influenced. Possible applications in the head and neck were discussed.

  3. Effects of surface modification on the mechanical and structural properties of nanofibrous poly(ε-caprolactone)/forsterite scaffold for tissue engineering applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kharaziha, M., E-mail: Kharaziha.ma@yahoo.com [Biomaterials Research Group, Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 8415683111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 8415683111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fathi, M.H. [Biomaterials Research Group, Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 8415683111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dental Materials Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Edris, H. [Biomaterials Research Group, Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 8415683111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 8415683111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-12-01

    Composite scaffolds consisting of polymers reinforced with ceramic nanoparticles are widely applied for hard tissue engineering. However, due to the incompatible polarity of ceramic nanoparticles with polymers, they tend to agglomerate in the polymer matrix which results in undesirable effects on the integral properties of composites. In this research, forsterite (Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) nanoparticles was surface esterified by dodecyl alcohol and nanofibrous poly(ε-caprolactone)(PCL)/modified forsterite scaffolds were developed through electrospinning technique. The aim of this research was to investigate the properties of surface modified forsterite nanopowder and PCL/modified forsterite scaffolds, before and after hydrolytic treatment, as well as the cellular attachment and proliferation. Results demonstrated that surface modification of nanoparticles significantly enhanced the tensile strength and toughness of scaffolds upon 1.5- and 4-folds compared to unmodified samples, respectively, due to improved compatibility between matrix and filler. Hydrolytic treatment of scaffolds also modified the bioactivity and cellular attachment and proliferation due to greatly enhanced hydrophilicity of the forsterite nanoparticles after this process compared to surface modified samples. Results suggested that surface modification of forsterite nanopowder and hydrolytic treatment of the developed scaffolds were effective approaches to address the issues in the formation of composite fibers and resulted in development of bioactive composite scaffolds with ideal mechanical and structural properties for bone tissue engineering applications. - Highlights: • Forsterite nanopowder was surface modified with dodecyl alcohol. • Nanofibrous PCL/forsterite scaffolds were developed through electrospinning. • Composite scaffolds were treated in boiled water to remove the dodecyl chains. • Surface modification resulted in improved mechanical properties. • Hydrolytic treatment

  4. Methods of improving mechanical and biomedical properties of Ca-Si-based ceramics and scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chengtie

    2009-05-01

    CaSiO3 ceramics and porous scaffolds are regarded as potential materials for bone tissue regeneration owing to their excellent bioactivity. However, their low mechanical strength and high dissolution limit their further biomedical application. In this report, we introduce three methods to improve the mechanical and biomedical properties of CaSiO3 ceramics and scaffolds. Positive ions and polymer modification are two promising ways to improve the mechanical and biomedical properties of CaSiO3 ceramics and scaffolds for bone tissue regeneration.

  5. Improvement of mechanical and biological properties of Polycaprolactone loaded with Hydroxyapatite and Halloysite nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, E; Fombuena, V; Vallés-Lluch, A; Ellingham, T

    2017-06-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) and Halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) percentages have been optimized in Polycaprolactone (PCL) polymeric matrices to improve mechanical, thermal and biological properties of the composites, thus, to be applied in bone tissue engineering or as fixation plates. Addition of HA guarantees a proper compatibility with human bone due to its osteoconductive and osteoinductive properties, facilitating bone regeneration in tissue engineering applications. Addition of HNTs ensures the presence of tubular structures for subsequent drug loading in their lumen, of molecules such as curcumin, acting as controlled drug delivery systems. The addition of 20% of HA and different amounts of HNTs leads to a substantial improvement in mechanical properties with values of flexural strength up to 40% over raw PCL, with an increase in degradation temperature. DMA analyses showed stability in mechanical and thermal properties, having as a result a potential composite to be used as tissue engineering scaffold or resorbable fixation plate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Influence of Structure and Composition on Dynamic Viscoelastic Property of Cartilaginous Tissue: Criteria for Classification between Hyaline Cartilage and Fibrocartilage Based on Mechanical Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Shogo; Tateishi, Tetsuya; Furukawa, Katsuko; Ushida, Takashi

    Recently, many types of methodologies have been developed to regenerate articular cartilage. It is important to assess whether the reconstructed cartilaginous tissue has the appropriate mechanical functions to qualify as hyaline (articular) cartilage. In some cases, the reconstructed tissue may become fibrocartilage and not hyaline cartilage. In this study, we determined the dynamic viscoelastic properties of these two types of cartilage by using compression and shear tests, respectively. Hyaline cartilage specimens were harvested from the articular surface of bovine knee joints and fibrocartilage specimens were harvested from the meniscus tissue of the same. The results of this study revealed that the compressive energy dissipation of hyaline cartilage showed a strong dependence on testing frequency at low frequencies, while that of fibrocartilage did not. Therefore, the compressive energy dissipation that is indicated by the loss tangent could become the criterion for the in vitro assessment of the mechanical function of regenerated cartilage.

  7. Improved mechanical properties of retorted carrots by ultrasonic pre-treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Li; Xu, Mi; Øiseth, Sofia K; Mawson, Raymond

    2012-05-01

    The use of ultrasound pre-processing treatment, compared to blanching, to enhance mechanical properties of non-starchy cell wall materials was investigated using carrot as an example. The mechanical properties of carrot tissues were measured by compression and tensile testing after the pre-processing treatment prior to and after retorting. Carrot samples ultrasound treated for 10 min at 60 °C provided a higher mechanical strength (P<0.05) to the cell wall structure than blanching for the same time period. With the addition of 0.5% CaCl(2) in the pre-treatment solution, both blanching and ultrasound treatment showed synergistic effect on enhancing the mechanical properties of retorted carrot pieces. At a relatively short treatment time (10 min at 60 °C) with the use of 0.5% CaCl(2), ultrasound treatment achieved similar enhancement to the mechanical strength of retorted carrots to blanching for a much longer time period (i.e. 40 min). The mechanism involved appears to be related to the stress responses present in all living plant matter. However, there is a need to clarify the relative importance of the potential stress mechanisms in order to get a better understanding of the processing conditions likely to be most effective. The amount of ultrasound treatment required is likely to involve low treatment intensities and there are indications from the structural characterisation and mechanical property analyses that the plant cell wall tissues were more elastic than that accomplished using low temperature long time blanching. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Suitability of a PLCL fibrous scaffold for soft tissue engineering applications: A combined biological and mechanical characterisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Cédric P; Vaquette, Cédryck; Liu, Xing; Schmitt, Jean-François; Rahouadj, Rachid

    2018-04-01

    Poly(lactide-co-ε-caprolactone) (PLCL) has been reported to be a good candidate for tissue engineering because of its good biocompatibility. Particularly, a braided PLCL scaffold (PLL/PCL ratio = 85/15) has been recently designed and partially validated for ligament tissue engineering. In the present study, we assessed the in vivo biocompatibility of acellular and cellularised scaffolds in a rat model. We then determined its in vitro biocompatibility using stem cells issued from both bone marrow and Wharton Jelly. From a biological point of view, the scaffold was shown to be suitable for tissue engineering in all these cases. Secondly, while the initial mechanical properties of this scaffold have been previously reported to be adapted to load-bearing applications, we studied the evolution in time of the mechanical properties of PLCL fibres due to hydrolytic degradation. Results for isolated PLCL fibres were extrapolated to the fibrous scaffold using a previously developed numerical model. It was shown that no accumulation of plastic strain was to be expected for a load-bearing application such as anterior cruciate ligament tissue engineering. However, PLCL fibres exhibited a non-expected brittle behaviour after two months. This may involve a potential risk of premature failure of the scaffold, unless tissue growth compensates this change in mechanical properties. This combined study emphasises the need to characterise the properties of biomaterials in a pluridisciplinary approach, since biological and mechanical characterisations led in this case to different conclusions concerning the suitability of this scaffold for load-bearing applications.

  9. Biological and mechanical evaluation of a Bio-Hybrid scaffold for autologous valve tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahnavi, S [Stem Cell and Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai, TN 600036 (India); Tissue Culture Laboratory, Biomedical Technology Wing, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Poojappura, Trivandrum, Kerala 695012 (India); Saravanan, U [Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai, TN 600036 (India); Arthi, N [Stem Cell and Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai, TN 600036 (India); Bhuvaneshwar, G S [Department of Engineering Design, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai, TN 600036 (India); Kumary, T V [Tissue Culture Laboratory, Biomedical Technology Wing, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Poojappura, Trivandrum, Kerala 695012 (India); Rajan, S [Madras Medical Mission, Institute of Cardio-Vascular Diseases, Mogappair, Chennai, Tamil Nadu 600037 (India); Verma, R S, E-mail: vermars@iitm.ac.in [Stem Cell and Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai, TN 600036 (India)

    2017-04-01

    Major challenge in heart valve tissue engineering for paediatric patients is the development of an autologous valve with regenerative capacity. Hybrid tissue engineering approach is recently gaining popularity to design scaffolds with desired biological and mechanical properties that can remodel post implantation. In this study, we fabricated aligned nanofibrous Bio-Hybrid scaffold made of decellularized bovine pericardium: polycaprolactone-chitosan with optimized polymer thickness to yield the desired biological and mechanical properties. CD44{sup +}, αSMA{sup +}, Vimentin{sup +} and CD105{sup −} human valve interstitial cells were isolated and seeded on these Bio-Hybrid scaffolds. Subsequent biological evaluation revealed interstitial cell proliferation with dense extra cellular matrix deposition that indicated the viability for growth and proliferation of seeded cells on the scaffolds. Uniaxial mechanical tests along axial direction showed that the Bio-Hybrid scaffolds has at least 20 times the strength of the native valves and its stiffness is nearly 3 times more than that of native valves. Biaxial and uniaxial mechanical studies on valve interstitial cells cultured Bio-Hybrid scaffolds revealed that the response along the axial and circumferential direction was different, similar to native valves. Overall, our findings suggest that Bio-Hybrid scaffold is a promising material for future development of regenerative heart valve constructs in children. - Highlights: • We report detailed biological and mechanical investigations of a Bio-Hybrid scaffold. • Optimized polymer thickness yielded desired biological and mechanical properties. • Bio-Hybrid scaffold revealed hVIC proliferation with dense ECM deposition. • Biaxial testing indicated that Bio-Hybrid scaffolds are mechanically stronger than native valves. • Bio-Hybrid scaffold is a promising material for autologous valve tissue engineering.

  10. Mechanical properties of natural chitosan/hydroxyapatite/magnetite nanocomposites for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Fatemeh; Razavi, Mehdi; E Bahrololoom, Mohammad; Bazargan-Lari, Reza; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Kotturi, Hari; Tayebi, Lobat

    2016-08-01

    Chitosan (CS), hydroxyapatite (HA), and magnetite (Fe3O4) have been broadly employed for bone treatment applications. Having a hybrid biomaterial composed of the aforementioned constituents not only accumulates the useful characteristics of each component, but also provides outstanding composite properties. In the present research, mechanical properties of pure CS, CS/HA, CS/HA/magnetite, and CS/magnetite were evaluated by the measurements of bending strength, elastic modulus, compressive strength and hardness values. Moreover, the morphology of the bending fracture surfaces were characterized using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an image analyzer. Studies were also conducted to examine the biological response of the human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hMSCs) on different composites. We conclude that, although all of these composites possess in-vitro biocompatibility, adding hydroxyapatite and magnetite to the chitosan matrix can noticeably enhance the mechanical properties of the pure chitosan. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Fabrication and mechanical characterization of 3D electrospun scaffolds for tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, L D; Young, R T; Andric, T; Freeman, J W

    2010-01-01

    Electrospinning is a polymer processing technique that produces fibrous structures comparable to the extracellular matrix of many tissues. Electrospinning, however, has been severely limited in its tissue engineering capabilities because this technique has produced few three-dimensional structures. Sintering of electrospun materials provides a method to fabricate unique architectures and allow much larger structures to be made. Electrospun mats were sintered into strips and cylinders, and their tensile and compressive mechanical properties were measured. In addition, electrospun materials with salt pores (salt embedded within the material and then leached out) were fabricated to improve porosity of the electrospun materials for tissue engineering scaffolds. Sintered electrospun poly(d,l-lactide) and poly(l-lactide) (PDLA/PLLA) materials have higher tensile mechanical properties (modulus: 72.3 MPa, yield: 960 kPa) compared to unsintered PLLA (modulus: 40.36 MPa, yield: 675.5 kPa). Electrospun PDLA/PLLA cylinders with and without salt-leached pores had compressive moduli of 6.69 and 26.86 MPa, respectively, and compressive yields of 1.36 and 0.56 MPa, respectively. Sintering of electrospun materials is a novel technique that improves electrospinning application in tissue engineering by increasing the size and types of electrospun structures that can be fabricated.

  12. Mechanics of oriented electrospun nanofibrous scaffolds for annulus fibrosus tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerurkar, Nandan L; Elliott, Dawn M; Mauck, Robert L

    2007-08-01

    Engineering a functional replacement for the annulus fibrosus (AF) of the intervertebral disc is contingent upon recapitulation of AF structure, composition, and mechanical properties. In this study, we propose a new paradigm for AF tissue engineering that focuses on the reconstitution of anatomic fiber architecture and uses constitutive modeling to evaluate construct function. A modified electrospinning technique was utilized to generate aligned nanofibrous polymer scaffolds for engineering the basic functional unit of the AF, a single lamella. Scaffolds were tested in uniaxial tension at multiple fiber orientations, demonstrating a nonlinear dependence of modulus on fiber angle that mimicked the nonlinearity and anisotropy of native AF. A homogenization model previously applied to native AF successfully described scaffold mechanical response, and parametric studies demonstrated that nonfibrillar matrix, along with fiber connectivity, are key contributors to tensile mechanics for engineered AF. We demonstrated that AF cells orient themselves along the aligned scaffolds and deposit matrix that contributes to construct mechanics under loading conditions relevant to the in vivo environment. The homogenization model was applied to cell-seeded constructs and provided quantitative measures for the evolution of matrix and interfibrillar interactions. Finally, the model demonstrated that at fiber angles of the AF (28 degrees -44 degrees ), engineered material behaved much like native tissue, suggesting that engineered constructs replicate the physiologic behavior of the single AF lamella. Constitutive modeling provides a powerful tool for analysis of engineered AF neo-tissue and native AF tissue alike, highlighting key mechanical design criteria for functional AF tissue engineering.

  13. Functionally graded electrospun scaffolds with tunable mechanical properties for vascular tissue regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Vinoy [Center for Nanoscale Materials and Biointegration (CNMB), Department of Physics, University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), AL 35294 (United States); Zhang Xing [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), AL 35294 (United States); Catledge, Shane A [Center for Nanoscale Materials and Biointegration (CNMB), Department of Physics, University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), AL 35294 (United States); Vohra, Yogesh K [Center for Nanoscale Materials and Biointegration (CNMB), Department of Physics, University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), AL 35294 (United States)

    2007-12-15

    Electrospun tubular scaffolds (4 mm inner diameter) based on bio-artificial blends of polyglyconate (Maxon (registered) ) and proteins such as gelatin and elastin having a spatially designed multilayer structure were prepared for use as vascular tissue scaffolds. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of scaffolds showed a random nanofibrous morphology with fiber diameter in the range of 200-400 nm for protein-blended Maxon, which mimics the nanoscale dimensions of collagen (50-500 nm). The scaffolds have a well interconnected pore structure and porosity up to 82%, with protein blending and multi-layering in contrast to electrospun Maxon (registered) scaffolds (67%). Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry results confirmed the blended composition and crystallinity of fibers. Uniaxial tensile testing revealed a strength of 14.46 {+-} 0.42 MPa and a modulus of 15.44 {+-} 2.53 MPa with a failure strain of 322.5 {+-} 10% for a pure Maxon (registered) scaffold. The blending of polyglyconate with biopolymers decreased the tensile properties in general, with an exception of the tensile modulus (48.38 {+-} 2 MPa) of gelatin/Maxon mesh, which was higher than that of the pure Maxon (registered) scaffold. Trilayered tubular scaffolds of gelatin/elastin, gelatin/elastin/Maxon and gelatin/Maxon (GE-GEM-GM) that mimic the complex trilayer matrix structure of natural artery have been prepared by sequential electrospinning. Tensile testing under dry conditions revealed a tensile strength of 2.71 {+-} 0.2 MPa and a modulus of 20.4 {+-} 3 MPa with a failure strain of 140 {+-} 10%. However, GE-GEM-GM scaffolds tested under wet conditions after soaking in a phosphate buffered saline medium at 37 {sup 0}C for 24 h exhibited mechanical properties (2.5 MPa tensile strength and 9 MPa tensile modulus) comparable to those of native femoral artery.

  14. Functionally graded electrospun scaffolds with tunable mechanical properties for vascular tissue regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Vinoy; Zhang Xing; Catledge, Shane A; Vohra, Yogesh K

    2007-01-01

    Electrospun tubular scaffolds (4 mm inner diameter) based on bio-artificial blends of polyglyconate (Maxon (registered) ) and proteins such as gelatin and elastin having a spatially designed multilayer structure were prepared for use as vascular tissue scaffolds. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of scaffolds showed a random nanofibrous morphology with fiber diameter in the range of 200-400 nm for protein-blended Maxon, which mimics the nanoscale dimensions of collagen (50-500 nm). The scaffolds have a well interconnected pore structure and porosity up to 82%, with protein blending and multi-layering in contrast to electrospun Maxon (registered) scaffolds (67%). Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry results confirmed the blended composition and crystallinity of fibers. Uniaxial tensile testing revealed a strength of 14.46 ± 0.42 MPa and a modulus of 15.44 ± 2.53 MPa with a failure strain of 322.5 ± 10% for a pure Maxon (registered) scaffold. The blending of polyglyconate with biopolymers decreased the tensile properties in general, with an exception of the tensile modulus (48.38 ± 2 MPa) of gelatin/Maxon mesh, which was higher than that of the pure Maxon (registered) scaffold. Trilayered tubular scaffolds of gelatin/elastin, gelatin/elastin/Maxon and gelatin/Maxon (GE-GEM-GM) that mimic the complex trilayer matrix structure of natural artery have been prepared by sequential electrospinning. Tensile testing under dry conditions revealed a tensile strength of 2.71 ± 0.2 MPa and a modulus of 20.4 ± 3 MPa with a failure strain of 140 ± 10%. However, GE-GEM-GM scaffolds tested under wet conditions after soaking in a phosphate buffered saline medium at 37 0 C for 24 h exhibited mechanical properties (2.5 MPa tensile strength and 9 MPa tensile modulus) comparable to those of native femoral artery

  15. Fracture mechanics model of stone comminution in ESWL and implications for tissue damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokhandwalla, Murtuza; Sturtevant, Bradford

    2000-07-01

    Focused shock waves administered during extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL) cause stone fragmentation. The process of stone fragmentation is described in terms of a dynamic fracture process. As is characteristic of all brittle materials, fragmentation requires nucleation, growth and coalescence of flaws, caused by a tensile or shear stress. The mechanisms, operative in the stone, inducing these stresses have been identified as spall and compression-induced tensile microcracks, nucleating at pre-existing flaws. These mechanisms are driven by the lithotripter-generated shock wave and possibly also by cavitation effects in the surrounding fluid. In this paper, the spall mechanism has been analysed, using a cohesive-zone model for the material. The influence of shock wave parameters, and physical properties of stone, on stone comminution is described. The analysis suggests a potential means to exploit the difference between the stone and tissue physical properties, so as to make stone comminution more effective, without increasing tissue damage.

  16. Characterization of mechanical and biological properties of 3-D scaffolds reinforced with zinc oxide for bone tissue engineering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Feng

    Full Text Available A scaffold for bone tissue engineering should have highly interconnected porous structure, appropriate mechanical and biological properties. In this work, we fabricated well-interconnected porous β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP scaffolds via selective laser sintering (SLS. We found that the mechanical and biological properties of the scaffolds were improved by doping of zinc oxide (ZnO. Our data showed that the fracture toughness increased from 1.09 to 1.40 MPam(1/2, and the compressive strength increased from 3.01 to 17.89 MPa when the content of ZnO increased from 0 to 2.5 wt%. It is hypothesized that the increase of ZnO would lead to a reduction in grain size and an increase in density of the strut. However, the fracture toughness and compressive strength decreased with further increasing of ZnO content, which may be due to the sharp increase in grain size. The biocompatibility of the scaffolds was investigated by analyzing the adhesion and the morphology of human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells cultured on the surfaces of the scaffolds. The scaffolds exhibited better and better ability to support cell attachment and proliferation when the content of ZnO increased from 0 to 2.5 wt%. Moreover, a bone like apatite layer formed on the surfaces of the scaffolds after incubation in simulated body fluid (SBF, indicating an ability of osteoinduction and osteoconduction. In summary, interconnected porous β-TCP scaffolds doped with ZnO were successfully fabricated and revealed good mechanical and biological properties, which may be used for bone repair and replacement potentially.

  17. Altering the swelling pressures within in vitro engineered cartilage is predicted to modulate the configuration of the collagen network and hence improve tissue mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Thomas; Kelly, Daniel J

    2013-06-01

    Prestress in the collagen network has a significant impact on the material properties of cartilaginous tissues. It is closely related to the recruitment configuration of the collagen network which defines the transition from lax collagen fibres to uncrimped, load-bearing collagen fibres. This recruitment configuration can change in response to alterations in the external environmental conditions. In this study, the influence of changes in external salt concentration or sequential proteoglycan digestion on the configuration of the collagen network of tissue engineered cartilage is investigated using a previously developed computational model. Collagen synthesis and network assembly are assumed to occur in the tissue configuration present during in vitro culture. The model assumes that if this configuration is more compact due to changes in tissue swelling, the collagen network will adapt by lowering its recruitment stretch. When returned to normal physiological conditions, these tissues will then have a higher prestress in the collagen network. Based on these assumptions, the model demonstrates that proteoglycan digestion at discrete time points during culture as well as culture in a hypertonic medium can improve the functionality of tissue engineered cartilage, while culture in hypotonic solution is detrimental to the apparent mechanical properties of the graft. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Mechanical properties, biological activity and protein controlled release by poly(vinyl alcohol)–bioglass/chitosan–collagen composite scaffolds: A bone tissue engineering applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pon-On, Weeraphat, E-mail: fsciwpp@ku.ac.th [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol; Teerapornpuntakit, Jarinthorn; Thongbunchoo, Jirawan; Krishnamra, Nateetip [Center of Calcium and Bone Research (COCAB), Faculty of Science, Mahidol University (Thailand); Department of Physiology, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University (Thailand); Tang, I-Ming [ThEP Center, Commission of Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Rd. (Thailand); Department of Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand)

    2014-05-01

    In the present study, composite scaffolds made with different weight ratios (0.5:1, 1:1 and 2:1) of bioactive glass (15Ca:80Si:5P) (BG)/polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) (PVABG) and chitosan (Chi)/collagen (Col) (ChiCol) were prepared by three mechanical freeze–thaw followed by freeze-drying to obtain the porous scaffolds. The mechanical properties and the in vitro biocompatibility of the composite scaffolds to simulated body fluid (SBF) and to rat osteoblast-like UMR-106 cells were investigated. The results from the studies indicated that the porosity and compressive strength were controlled by the weight ratio of PVABG:ChiCol. The highest compressive modulus of the composites made was 214.64 MPa which was for the 1:1 weight ratio PVABG:ChiCol. Mineralization study in SBF showed the formation of apatite crystals on the PVABG:ChiCol surface after 7 days of incubation. In vitro cell availability and proliferation tests confirmed the osteoblast attachment and growth on the PVABG:ChiCol surface. MTT and ALP tests on the 1:1 weight ratio PVABG:ChiCol composite indicated that the UMR-106 cells were viable. Alkaline phosphatase activity was found to increase with increasing culturing time. In addition, we showed the potential of PVABG:ChiCol drug delivery through PBS solution studies. 81.14% of BSA loading had been achieved and controlled release for over four weeks was observed. Our results indicated that the PVABG:ChiCol composites, especially the 1:1 weight ratio composite exhibited significantly improved mechanical, mineral deposition, biological properties and controlled release. This made them potential candidates for bone tissue engineering applications. - Graphical abstract: Mechanical properties, biological activity and protein controlled release by poly(vinyl alcohol)–bioglass/chitosan–collagen composite scaffolds: A bone tissue engineering applications. - Highlights: • Preparation of PVABG:ChiCol hybrid composites and their bioactivities • Mechanical

  19. Mechanical properties, biological activity and protein controlled release by poly(vinyl alcohol)–bioglass/chitosan–collagen composite scaffolds: A bone tissue engineering applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pon-On, Weeraphat; Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol; Teerapornpuntakit, Jarinthorn; Thongbunchoo, Jirawan; Krishnamra, Nateetip; Tang, I-Ming

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, composite scaffolds made with different weight ratios (0.5:1, 1:1 and 2:1) of bioactive glass (15Ca:80Si:5P) (BG)/polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) (PVABG) and chitosan (Chi)/collagen (Col) (ChiCol) were prepared by three mechanical freeze–thaw followed by freeze-drying to obtain the porous scaffolds. The mechanical properties and the in vitro biocompatibility of the composite scaffolds to simulated body fluid (SBF) and to rat osteoblast-like UMR-106 cells were investigated. The results from the studies indicated that the porosity and compressive strength were controlled by the weight ratio of PVABG:ChiCol. The highest compressive modulus of the composites made was 214.64 MPa which was for the 1:1 weight ratio PVABG:ChiCol. Mineralization study in SBF showed the formation of apatite crystals on the PVABG:ChiCol surface after 7 days of incubation. In vitro cell availability and proliferation tests confirmed the osteoblast attachment and growth on the PVABG:ChiCol surface. MTT and ALP tests on the 1:1 weight ratio PVABG:ChiCol composite indicated that the UMR-106 cells were viable. Alkaline phosphatase activity was found to increase with increasing culturing time. In addition, we showed the potential of PVABG:ChiCol drug delivery through PBS solution studies. 81.14% of BSA loading had been achieved and controlled release for over four weeks was observed. Our results indicated that the PVABG:ChiCol composites, especially the 1:1 weight ratio composite exhibited significantly improved mechanical, mineral deposition, biological properties and controlled release. This made them potential candidates for bone tissue engineering applications. - Graphical abstract: Mechanical properties, biological activity and protein controlled release by poly(vinyl alcohol)–bioglass/chitosan–collagen composite scaffolds: A bone tissue engineering applications. - Highlights: • Preparation of PVABG:ChiCol hybrid composites and their bioactivities • Mechanical

  20. Biaxial Stretch Improves Elastic Fiber Maturation, Collagen Arrangement, and Mechanical Properties in Engineered Arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Angela H; Balestrini, Jenna L; Udelsman, Brooks V; Zhou, Kevin C; Zhao, Liping; Ferruzzi, Jacopo; Starcher, Barry C; Levene, Michael J; Humphrey, Jay D; Niklason, Laura E

    2016-06-01

    Tissue-engineered blood vessels (TEVs) are typically produced using the pulsatile, uniaxial circumferential stretch to mechanically condition and strengthen the arterial grafts. Despite improvements in the mechanical integrity of TEVs after uniaxial conditioning, these tissues fail to achieve critical properties of native arteries such as matrix content, collagen fiber orientation, and mechanical strength. As a result, uniaxially loaded TEVs can result in mechanical failure, thrombus, or stenosis on implantation. In planar tissue equivalents such as artificial skin, biaxial loading has been shown to improve matrix production and mechanical properties. To date however, multiaxial loading has not been examined as a means to improve mechanical and biochemical properties of TEVs during culture. Therefore, we developed a novel bioreactor that utilizes both circumferential and axial stretch that more closely simulates loading conditions in native arteries, and we examined the suture strength, matrix production, fiber orientation, and cell proliferation. After 3 months of biaxial loading, TEVs developed a formation of mature elastic fibers that consisted of elastin cores and microfibril sheaths. Furthermore, the distinctive features of collagen undulation and crimp in the biaxial TEVs were absent in both uniaxial and static TEVs. Relative to the uniaxially loaded TEVs, tissues that underwent biaxial loading remodeled and realigned collagen fibers toward a more physiologic, native-like organization. The biaxial TEVs also showed increased mechanical strength (suture retention load of 303 ± 14.53 g, with a wall thickness of 0.76 ± 0.028 mm) and increased compliance. The increase in compliance was due to combinatorial effects of mature elastic fibers, undulated collagen fibers, and collagen matrix orientation. In conclusion, biaxial stretching is a potential means to regenerate TEVs with improved matrix production, collagen organization, and mechanical

  1. The role of focal adhesion kinase in the regulation of cellular mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2013-01-01

    The regulation of mechanical properties is necessary for cell invasion into connective tissue or intra- and extravasation through the endothelium of blood or lymph vessels. Cell invasion is important for the regulation of many healthy processes such as immune response reactions and wound healing. In addition, cell invasion plays a role in disease-related processes such as tumor metastasis and autoimmune responses. Until now the role of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in regulating mechanical properties of cells and its impact on cell invasion efficiency is still not well known. Thus, this review focuses on mechanical properties regulated by FAK in comparison to the mechano-regulating protein vinculin. Moreover, it points out the connection between cancer cell invasion and metastasis and FAK by showing that FAK regulates cellular mechanical properties required for cellular motility. Furthermore, it sheds light on the indirect interaction of FAK with vinculin by binding to paxillin, which then impairs the binding of paxillin to vinculin. In addition, this review emphasizes whether FAK fulfills regulatory functions similar to vinculin. In particular, it discusses the differences and the similarities between FAK and vinculin in regulating the biomechanical properties of cells. Finally, this paper highlights that both focal adhesion proteins, vinculin and FAK, synergize their functions to regulate the mechanical properties of cells such as stiffness and contractile forces. Subsequently, these mechanical properties determine cellular invasiveness into tissues and provide a source sink for future drug developments to inhibit excessive cell invasion and hence, metastases formation. (paper)

  2. The role of focal adhesion kinase in the regulation of cellular mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2013-12-01

    The regulation of mechanical properties is necessary for cell invasion into connective tissue or intra- and extravasation through the endothelium of blood or lymph vessels. Cell invasion is important for the regulation of many healthy processes such as immune response reactions and wound healing. In addition, cell invasion plays a role in disease-related processes such as tumor metastasis and autoimmune responses. Until now the role of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in regulating mechanical properties of cells and its impact on cell invasion efficiency is still not well known. Thus, this review focuses on mechanical properties regulated by FAK in comparison to the mechano-regulating protein vinculin. Moreover, it points out the connection between cancer cell invasion and metastasis and FAK by showing that FAK regulates cellular mechanical properties required for cellular motility. Furthermore, it sheds light on the indirect interaction of FAK with vinculin by binding to paxillin, which then impairs the binding of paxillin to vinculin. In addition, this review emphasizes whether FAK fulfills regulatory functions similar to vinculin. In particular, it discusses the differences and the similarities between FAK and vinculin in regulating the biomechanical properties of cells. Finally, this paper highlights that both focal adhesion proteins, vinculin and FAK, synergize their functions to regulate the mechanical properties of cells such as stiffness and contractile forces. Subsequently, these mechanical properties determine cellular invasiveness into tissues and provide a source sink for future drug developments to inhibit excessive cell invasion and hence, metastases formation.

  3. Effect of mechanical tissue properties on thermal damage in skin after IR-laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frenz, M.; Romano, V.; Forrer, M.; Weber, H.P. (Inst. of Applied Physics, Bern Univ. (Switzerland)); Mischler, C.; Mueller, O.M. (Anatomical Inst., Bern Univ. (Switzerland))

    1991-04-01

    The damage created instantaneously in dorsal skin and in the subjacent skeletal muscle layer after CO{sub 2} and Er{sup 3+} laser incisions is histologically and ultrastructurally investigated. Light microscopical examinations show an up to three times larger damage zone in the subcutaneous layer of skeletal muscle than in the connective tissue above. The extent of thermally altered muscle tissue is classified by different zones and characterized by comparison to long time heating injuries. The unexpectedly large damage is a result of the change of elastic properties occurring abruptly at the transition between different materials. This leads to a discontinuity of the cutting dynamics that reduces the ejection of tissue material. We show that the degree of thermal damage originates from the amount of hot material that is not ejected out of the crater acting as a secondary heat source. (orig.).

  4. Active Vertex Model for cell-resolution description of epithelial tissue mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Daniel L; Henkes, Silke; Weijer, Cornelis J; Sknepnek, Rastko

    2017-06-01

    We introduce an Active Vertex Model (AVM) for cell-resolution studies of the mechanics of confluent epithelial tissues consisting of tens of thousands of cells, with a level of detail inaccessible to similar methods. The AVM combines the Vertex Model for confluent epithelial tissues with active matter dynamics. This introduces a natural description of the cell motion and accounts for motion patterns observed on multiple scales. Furthermore, cell contacts are generated dynamically from positions of cell centres. This not only enables efficient numerical implementation, but provides a natural description of the T1 transition events responsible for local tissue rearrangements. The AVM also includes cell alignment, cell-specific mechanical properties, cell growth, division and apoptosis. In addition, the AVM introduces a flexible, dynamically changing boundary of the epithelial sheet allowing for studies of phenomena such as the fingering instability or wound healing. We illustrate these capabilities with a number of case studies.

  5. Micromechanical finite element modeling and experimental characterization of the compressive mechanical properties of polycaprolactone:hydroxyapatite composite scaffolds prepared by selective laser sintering for bone tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshraghi, Shaun; Das, Suman

    2012-01-01

    Bioresorbable scaffolds with mechanical properties suitable for bone tissue engineering were fabricated from polycaprolactone (PCL) and hydroxyapatite (HA) by selective laser sintering (SLS) and modeled by finite element analysis (FEA). Both solid gage parts and scaffolds having 1-D, 2-D and 3-D orthogonal, periodic porous architectures were made with 0, 10, 20 and 30% HA by volume. PCL:HA scaffolds manufactured by SLS had nearly full density (99%) in the designed solid regions and had excellent geometric and dimensional control. Through optimization of the SLS process, the compressive moduli for our solid gage parts and scaffolds are the highest reported in the literature for additive manufacturing. The compressive moduli of solid gage parts were 299.3, 311.2, 415.5 and 498.3 MPa for PCL:HA loading at 100:0, 90:10, 80:20 and 70:30 respectively. The compressive effective stiffness tended to increase as the loading of HA was increased and the designed porosity was lowered. In the case of the most 3-D porous scaffold, the compressive modulus more than doubled from 14.9 MPa to 36.2 MPa when changing the material from 100:0 to 70:30 PCL:HA. A micromechanical finite element analysis (FEA) model was developed to investigate the reinforcement effect of HA loading on the compressive modulus of the bulk material. Using a first-principles based approach, the random distribution of HA particles in a solidified PCL matrix was modeled for any loading of HA to predict the bulk mechanical properties of the composites. The bulk mechanical properties were also used for FEA of the scaffold geometries. Results of the FEA were found to be in good agreement with experimental mechanical testing. The development of patient and site-specific composite tissue engineering constructs with tailored properties can be seen as a direct extension of this work on computational design, a priori modeling of mechanical properties and direct digital manufacturing. PMID:22522129

  6. Micromechanical finite-element modeling and experimental characterization of the compressive mechanical properties of polycaprolactone-hydroxyapatite composite scaffolds prepared by selective laser sintering for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshraghi, Shaun; Das, Suman

    2012-08-01

    Bioresorbable scaffolds with mechanical properties suitable for bone tissue engineering were fabricated from polycaprolactone (PCL) and hydroxyapatite (HA) by selective laser sintering (SLS) and modeled by finite-element analysis (FEA). Both solid gage parts and scaffolds having 1-D, 2-D and 3-D orthogonal, periodic porous architectures were made with 0, 10, 20 and 30 vol.% HA. PCL:HA scaffolds manufactured by SLS had nearly full density (99%) in the designed solid regions and had excellent geometric and dimensional control. Through optimization of the SLS process, the compressive moduli for our solid gage parts and scaffolds are the highest reported in the literature for additive manufacturing. The compressive moduli of solid gage parts were 299.3, 311.2, 415.5 and 498.3 MPa for PCL:HA loading at 100:0, 90:10, 80:20 and 70:30, respectively. The compressive effective stiffness tended to increase as the loading of HA was increased and the designed porosity was lowered. In the case of the most 3-D porous scaffold, the compressive modulus more than doubled from 14.9 to 36.2 MPa when changing the material from 100:0 to 70:30 PCL:HA. A micromechanical FEA model was developed to investigate the reinforcement effect of HA loading on the compressive modulus of the bulk material. Using a first-principles based approach, the random distribution of HA particles in a solidified PCL matrix was modeled for any HA loading to predict the bulk mechanical properties of the composites. The bulk mechanical properties were also used for FEA of the scaffold geometries. The results of the FEA were found to be in good agreement with experimental mechanical testing. The development of patient- and site-specific composite tissue-engineering constructs with tailored properties can be seen as a direct extension of this work on computational design, a priori modeling of mechanical properties and direct digital manufacturing. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  7. Bioprinting of a mechanically enhanced three-dimensional dual cell-laden construct for osteochondral tissue engineering using a multi-head tissue/organ building system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Jin-Hyung; Lee, Jung-Seob; Cho, Dong-Woo; Kim, Jong Young

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to build a mechanically enhanced three-dimensional (3D) bioprinted construct containing two different cell types for osteochondral tissue regeneration. Recently, the production of 3D cell-laden structures using various scaffold-free cell printing technologies has opened up new possibilities. However, ideal 3D complex tissues or organs have not yet been printed because gel-state hydrogels have been used as the principal material and are unable to maintain the desired 3D structure due to their poor mechanical strength. In this study, thermoplastic biomaterial polycaprolactone (PCL), which shows relatively high mechanical properties as compared with hydrogel, was used as a framework for enhancing the mechanical stability of the bioprinted construct. Two different alginate solutions were then infused into the previously prepared framework consisting of PCL to create the 3D construct for osteochondral printing. For this work, a multi-head tissue/organ building system (MtoBS), which was particularly designed to dispense thermoplastic biomaterial and hydrogel having completely different rheology properties, was newly developed and used to bioprint osteochondral tissue. It was confirmed that the line width, position and volume control of PCL and alginate solutions were adjustable in the MtoBS. Most importantly, dual cell-laden 3D constructs consisting of osteoblasts and chondrocytes were successfully fabricated. Further, the separately dispensed osteoblasts and chondrocytes not only retained their initial position and viability, but also proliferated up to 7 days after being dispensed. (paper)

  8. Bioprinting of a mechanically enhanced three-dimensional dual cell-laden construct for osteochondral tissue engineering using a multi-head tissue/organ building system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Jin-Hyung; Lee, Jung-Seob; Kim, Jong Young; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to build a mechanically enhanced three-dimensional (3D) bioprinted construct containing two different cell types for osteochondral tissue regeneration. Recently, the production of 3D cell-laden structures using various scaffold-free cell printing technologies has opened up new possibilities. However, ideal 3D complex tissues or organs have not yet been printed because gel-state hydrogels have been used as the principal material and are unable to maintain the desired 3D structure due to their poor mechanical strength. In this study, thermoplastic biomaterial polycaprolactone (PCL), which shows relatively high mechanical properties as compared with hydrogel, was used as a framework for enhancing the mechanical stability of the bioprinted construct. Two different alginate solutions were then infused into the previously prepared framework consisting of PCL to create the 3D construct for osteochondral printing. For this work, a multi-head tissue/organ building system (MtoBS), which was particularly designed to dispense thermoplastic biomaterial and hydrogel having completely different rheology properties, was newly developed and used to bioprint osteochondral tissue. It was confirmed that the line width, position and volume control of PCL and alginate solutions were adjustable in the MtoBS. Most importantly, dual cell-laden 3D constructs consisting of osteoblasts and chondrocytes were successfully fabricated. Further, the separately dispensed osteoblasts and chondrocytes not only retained their initial position and viability, but also proliferated up to 7 days after being dispensed.

  9. Cellular Force Microscopy for in Vivo Measurements of Plant Tissue Mechanics1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routier-Kierzkowska, Anne-Lise; Weber, Alain; Kochova, Petra; Felekis, Dimitris; Nelson, Bradley J.; Kuhlemeier, Cris; Smith, Richard S.

    2012-01-01

    Although growth and morphogenesis are controlled by genetics, physical shape change in plant tissue results from a balance between cell wall loosening and intracellular pressure. Despite recent work demonstrating a role for mechanical signals in morphogenesis, precise measurement of mechanical properties at the individual cell level remains a technical challenge. To address this challenge, we have developed cellular force microscopy (CFM), which combines the versatility of classical microindentation techniques with the high automation and resolution approaching that of atomic force microscopy. CFM’s large range of forces provides the possibility to map the apparent stiffness of both plasmolyzed and turgid tissue as well as to perform micropuncture of cells using very high stresses. CFM experiments reveal that, within a tissue, local stiffness measurements can vary with the level of turgor pressure in an unexpected way. Altogether, our results highlight the importance of detailed physically based simulations for the interpretation of microindentation results. CFM’s ability to be used both to assess and manipulate tissue mechanics makes it a method of choice to unravel the feedbacks between mechanics, genetics, and morphogenesis. PMID:22353572

  10. Mechanical enhancement and in vitro biocompatibility of nanofibrous collagen-chitosan scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Fengjuan; Li, Runrun; Jiang, Jianjun; Mo, Xiumei; Gu, Guofeng; Guo, Zhongwu; Chen, Zonggang

    2017-12-01

    The collagen-chitosan complex with a three-dimensional nanofiber structure was fabricated to mimic native ECM for tissue repair and biomedical applications. Though the three-dimensional hierarchical fibrous structures of collagen-chitosan composites could provide more adequate stimulus to facilitate cell adhesion, migrate and proliferation, and thus have the potential as tissue engineering scaffolding, there are still limitations in their applications due to the insufficient mechanical properties of natural materials. Because poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) as biocompatible synthetic polymers can offer excellent mechanical properties, they were introduced into the collagen-chitosan composites to fabricate the mixed collagen/chitosan/PVA fibers and a sandwich structure (collagen/chitosan-TPU-collagen/chitosan) of nanofiber in order to enhance the mechanical properties of the nanofibrous collagen-chitosan scaffold. The results showed that the tensile behavior of materials was enhanced to different degrees with the difference of collagen content in the fibers. Besides the Young's modulus had no obvious changes, both the break strength and the break elongation of materials were heightened after reinforced by PVA. For the collagen-chitosan nanofiber reinforced by TPU, both the break strength and the Young's modulus of materials were heightened in different degrees with the variety of collagen content in the fibers despite the decrease of the break elongation of materials to some extent. In vitro cell test demonstrated that the materials could provide adequate environment for cell adhesion and proliferation. All these indicated that the reinforced collagen-chitosan nanofiber could be as potential scaffold for tissue engineering according to the different mechanical requirements in clinic.

  11. Poly (glycerol sebacate) elastomer supports bone regeneration by its mechanical properties being closer to osteoid tissue rather than to mature bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaky, S H; Lee, K W; Gao, J; Jensen, A; Verdelis, K; Wang, Y; Almarza, A J; Sfeir, C

    2017-05-01

    Mechanical load influences bone structure and mass. Arguing the importance of load-transduction, we investigated the mechanisms inducing bone formation using an elastomeric substrate. We characterized Poly (glycerol sebacate) (PGS) in vitro for its mechanical properties, compatibility with osteoprogenitor cells regarding adhesion, proliferation, differentiation under compression versus static cultures and in vivo for the regeneration of a rabbit ulna critical size defect. The load-transducing properties of PGS were compared in vitro to a stiffer poly lactic-co-glycolic-acid (PLA/PGA) scaffold of similar porosity and interconnectivity. Under cyclic compression for 7days, we report focal adhesion kinase overexpression on the less stiff PGS and upregulation of the transcription factor Runx2 and late osteogenic markers osteocalcin and bone sialoprotein (1.7, 4.0 and 10.0 folds increase respectively). Upon implanting PGS in the rabbit ulna defect, histology and micro-computed tomography analysis showed complete gap bridging with new bone by the PGS elastomer by 8weeks while minimal bone formation was seen in empty controls. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated the new bone to be primarily regenerated by recruited osteoprogenitors cells expressing periostin protein during early phase of maturation similar to physiological endochondral bone development. This study confirms PGS to be osteoconductive contributing to bone regeneration by recruiting host progenitor/stem cell populations and as a load-transducing substrate, transmits mechanical signals to the populated cells promoting differentiation and matrix maturation toward proper bone remodeling. We hence conclude that the material properties of PGS being closer to osteoid tissue rather than to mineralized bone, allows bone maturation on a substrate mechanically closer to where osteoprogenitor/stem cells differentiate to develop mature load-bearing bone. The development of effective therapies for bone and

  12. Mechanical stimulation improves tissue-engineered human skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Courtney A.; Smiley, Beth L.; Mills, John; Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    2002-01-01

    Human bioartificial muscles (HBAMs) are tissue engineered by suspending muscle cells in collagen/MATRIGEL, casting in a silicone mold containing end attachment sites, and allowing the cells to differentiate for 8 to 16 days. The resulting HBAMs are representative of skeletal muscle in that they contain parallel arrays of postmitotic myofibers; however, they differ in many other morphological characteristics. To engineer improved HBAMs, i.e., more in vivo-like, we developed Mechanical Cell Stimulator (MCS) hardware to apply in vivo-like forces directly to the engineered tissue. A sensitive force transducer attached to the HBAM measured real-time, internally generated, as well as externally applied, forces. The muscle cells generated increasing internal forces during formation which were inhibitable with a cytoskeleton depolymerizer. Repetitive stretch/relaxation for 8 days increased the HBAM elasticity two- to threefold, mean myofiber diameter 12%, and myofiber area percent 40%. This system allows engineering of improved skeletal muscle analogs as well as a nondestructive method to determine passive force and viscoelastic properties of the resulting tissue.

  13. Electro-mechanical dynamics of spiral waves in a discrete 2D model of human atrial tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Brocklehurst

    Full Text Available We investigate the effect of mechano-electrical feedback and atrial fibrillation induced electrical remodelling (AFER of cellular ion channel properties on the dynamics of spiral waves in a discrete 2D model of human atrial tissue. The tissue electro-mechanics are modelled using the discrete element method (DEM. Millions of bonded DEM particles form a network of coupled atrial cells representing 2D cardiac tissue, allowing simulations of the dynamic behaviour of electrical excitation waves and mechanical contraction in the tissue. In the tissue model, each cell is modelled by nine particles, accounting for the features of individual cellular geometry; and discrete inter-cellular spatial arrangement of cells is also considered. The electro-mechanical model of a human atrial single-cell was constructed by strongly coupling the electrophysiological model of Colman et al. to the mechanical myofilament model of Rice et al., with parameters modified based on experimental data. A stretch-activated channel was incorporated into the model to simulate the mechano-electrical feedback. In order to investigate the effect of mechano-electrical feedback on the dynamics of spiral waves, simulations of spiral waves were conducted in both the electromechanical model and the electrical-only model in normal and AFER conditions, to allow direct comparison of the results between the models. Dynamics of spiral waves were characterized by tracing their tip trajectories, stability, excitation frequencies and meandering range of tip trajectories. It was shown that the developed DEM method provides a stable and efficient model of human atrial tissue with considerations of the intrinsically discrete and anisotropic properties of the atrial tissue, which are challenges to handle in traditional continuum mechanics models. This study provides mechanistic insights into the complex behaviours of spiral waves and the genesis of atrial fibrillation by showing an important role of

  14. Electro-mechanical dynamics of spiral waves in a discrete 2D model of human atrial tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocklehurst, Paul; Ni, Haibo; Zhang, Henggui; Ye, Jianqiao

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the effect of mechano-electrical feedback and atrial fibrillation induced electrical remodelling (AFER) of cellular ion channel properties on the dynamics of spiral waves in a discrete 2D model of human atrial tissue. The tissue electro-mechanics are modelled using the discrete element method (DEM). Millions of bonded DEM particles form a network of coupled atrial cells representing 2D cardiac tissue, allowing simulations of the dynamic behaviour of electrical excitation waves and mechanical contraction in the tissue. In the tissue model, each cell is modelled by nine particles, accounting for the features of individual cellular geometry; and discrete inter-cellular spatial arrangement of cells is also considered. The electro-mechanical model of a human atrial single-cell was constructed by strongly coupling the electrophysiological model of Colman et al. to the mechanical myofilament model of Rice et al., with parameters modified based on experimental data. A stretch-activated channel was incorporated into the model to simulate the mechano-electrical feedback. In order to investigate the effect of mechano-electrical feedback on the dynamics of spiral waves, simulations of spiral waves were conducted in both the electromechanical model and the electrical-only model in normal and AFER conditions, to allow direct comparison of the results between the models. Dynamics of spiral waves were characterized by tracing their tip trajectories, stability, excitation frequencies and meandering range of tip trajectories. It was shown that the developed DEM method provides a stable and efficient model of human atrial tissue with considerations of the intrinsically discrete and anisotropic properties of the atrial tissue, which are challenges to handle in traditional continuum mechanics models. This study provides mechanistic insights into the complex behaviours of spiral waves and the genesis of atrial fibrillation by showing an important role of the mechano

  15. Dynamic Mechanical Compression of Chondrocytes for Tissue Engineering: A Critical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devon E. Anderson

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage functions to transmit and translate loads. In a classical structure–function relationship, the tissue resides in a dynamic mechanical environment that drives the formation of a highly organized tissue architecture suited to its biomechanical role. The dynamic mechanical environment includes multiaxial compressive and shear strains as well as hydrostatic and osmotic pressures. As the mechanical environment is known to modulate cell fate and influence tissue development toward a defined architecture in situ, dynamic mechanical loading has been hypothesized to induce the structure–function relationship during attempts at in vitro regeneration of articular cartilage. Researchers have designed increasingly sophisticated bioreactors with dynamic mechanical regimes, but the response of chondrocytes to dynamic compression and shear loading remains poorly characterized due to wide variation in study design, system variables, and outcome measurements. We assessed the literature pertaining to the use of dynamic compressive bioreactors for in vitro generation of cartilaginous tissue from primary and expanded chondrocytes. We used specific search terms to identify relevant publications from the PubMed database and manually sorted the data. It was very challenging to find consensus between studies because of species, age, cell source, and culture differences, coupled with the many loading regimes and the types of analyses used. Early studies that evaluated the response of primary bovine chondrocytes within hydrogels, and that employed dynamic single-axis compression with physiologic loading parameters, reported consistently favorable responses at the tissue level, with upregulation of biochemical synthesis and biomechanical properties. However, they rarely assessed the cellular response with gene expression or mechanotransduction pathway analyses. Later studies that employed increasingly sophisticated biomaterial-based systems, cells

  16. Dynamic Mechanical Compression of Chondrocytes for Tissue Engineering: A Critical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Devon E; Johnstone, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Articular cartilage functions to transmit and translate loads. In a classical structure-function relationship, the tissue resides in a dynamic mechanical environment that drives the formation of a highly organized tissue architecture suited to its biomechanical role. The dynamic mechanical environment includes multiaxial compressive and shear strains as well as hydrostatic and osmotic pressures. As the mechanical environment is known to modulate cell fate and influence tissue development toward a defined architecture in situ , dynamic mechanical loading has been hypothesized to induce the structure-function relationship during attempts at in vitro regeneration of articular cartilage. Researchers have designed increasingly sophisticated bioreactors with dynamic mechanical regimes, but the response of chondrocytes to dynamic compression and shear loading remains poorly characterized due to wide variation in study design, system variables, and outcome measurements. We assessed the literature pertaining to the use of dynamic compressive bioreactors for in vitro generation of cartilaginous tissue from primary and expanded chondrocytes. We used specific search terms to identify relevant publications from the PubMed database and manually sorted the data. It was very challenging to find consensus between studies because of species, age, cell source, and culture differences, coupled with the many loading regimes and the types of analyses used. Early studies that evaluated the response of primary bovine chondrocytes within hydrogels, and that employed dynamic single-axis compression with physiologic loading parameters, reported consistently favorable responses at the tissue level, with upregulation of biochemical synthesis and biomechanical properties. However, they rarely assessed the cellular response with gene expression or mechanotransduction pathway analyses. Later studies that employed increasingly sophisticated biomaterial-based systems, cells derived from different

  17. Hydrogels for lung tissue engineering: Biomechanical properties of thin collagen-elastin constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunphy, Siobhán E; Bratt, Jessica A J; Akram, Khondoker M; Forsyth, Nicholas R; El Haj, Alicia J

    2014-10-01

    In this study, collagen-elastin constructs were prepared with the aim of producing a material capable of mimicking the mechanical properties of a single alveolar wall. Collagen has been used in a wide range of tissue engineering applications; however, due to its low mechanical properties its use is limited to non load-bearing applications without further manipulation using methods such as cross-linking or mechanical compression. Here, it was hypothesised that the addition of soluble elastin to a collagen hydrogel could improve its mechanical properties. Hydrogels made from collagen only and collagen plus varying amounts elastin were prepared. Young׳s modulus of each membrane was measured using the combination of a non-destructive indentation and a theoretical model previously described. An increase in Young׳s modulus was observed with increasing concentration of elastin. The use of non-destructive indentation allowed for online monitoring of the elastic moduli of cell-seeded constructs over 8 days. The addition of lung fibroblasts into the membrane increased the stiffness of the hydrogels further and cell-seeded collagen hydrogels were found to have a stiffness equal to the theoretical value for a single alveolar wall (≈5kPa). Through provision of some of the native extracellular matrix components of the lung parenchyma these scaffolds may be able to provide an initial building block toward the regeneration of new functional lung tissue. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Mechanical properties and structure-function relationships of human chondrocyte-seeded cartilage constructs after in vitro culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middendorf, Jill M; Griffin, Darvin J; Shortkroff, Sonya; Dugopolski, Caroline; Kennedy, Stephen; Siemiatkoski, Joseph; Cohen, Itai; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2017-10-01

    Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation (ACI) is a widely recognized method for the repair of focal cartilage defects. Despite the accepted use, problems with this technique still exist, including graft hypertrophy, damage to surrounding tissue by sutures, uneven cell distribution, and delamination. Modified ACI techniques overcome these challenges by seeding autologous chondrocytes onto a 3D scaffold and securing the graft into the defect. Many studies on these tissue engineered grafts have identified the compressive properties, but few have examined frictional and shear properties as suggested by FDA guidance. This study is the first to perform three mechanical tests (compressive, frictional, and shear) on human tissue engineered cartilage. The objective was to understand the complex mechanical behavior, function, and changes that occur with time in these constructs grown in vitro using compression, friction, and shear tests. Safranin-O histology and a DMMB assay both revealed increased sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) content in the scaffolds with increased maturity. Similarly, immunohistochemistry revealed increased lubricin localization on the construct surface. Confined compression and friction tests both revealed improved properties with increased construct maturity. Compressive properties correlated with the sGAG content, while improved friction coefficients were attributed to increased lubricin localization on the construct surfaces. In contrast, shear properties did not improve with increased culture time. This study suggests the various mechanical and biological properties of tissue engineered cartilage improve at different rates, indicating thorough mechanical evaluation of tissue engineered cartilage is critical to understanding the performance of repaired cartilage. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:2298-2306, 2017. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. A study on improving mechanical properties of porous HA tissue engineering scaffolds by hot isostatic pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jing; Xiao Suguang; Lu Xiong; Wang Jianxin; Weng Jie

    2006-01-01

    Various interconnected porous hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramic scaffolds are universally used to induct the tissue growth for bone repair and replacement, and serve to support the adhesion, transfer, proliferation and differentiation of cells. Impregnation of polyurethane sponges with a ceramic slurry is adopted to produce highly porous HA ceramic scaffolds with a 3D interconnected structure. However, high porosity always accompanies a decrease in the strength of the HA ceramic scaffolds. Therefore, it is significant to improve the strength of the HA ceramic scaffolds with highly interconnected porosity so that they are more suitable in clinical applications. In this work, highly porous HA ceramic scaffolds are first produced by the polymer impregnation approach, and subsequently further sintered by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). The phase composition, macro- and micro-porous structure, sintering and mechanical properties of the porous HA scaffolds are investigated by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), nanoindentation analysis and compressive test. The experimental results show that the nanohardness and compressive strength of HIP-sintered porous HA ceramics are higher than those of commonly sintered HA scaffolds. The HIP technique can effectively improve the sintering property and densification of porous HA ceramic scaffolds, so inducing an increase in the compression strength

  20. Hyaluronan supplementation as a mechanical regulator of cartilage tissue development under joint-kinematic-mimicking loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yabin; Stoddart, Martin J; Wuertz-Kozak, Karin; Grad, Sibylle; Alini, Mauro; Ferguson, Stephen J

    2017-08-01

    Articular cartilage plays an essential role in joint lubrication and impact absorption. Through this, the mechanical signals are coupled to the tissue's physiological response. Healthy synovial fluid has been shown to reduce and homogenize the shear stress acting on the cartilage surfaces due to its unique shear-thinning viscosity. As cartilage tissues are sensitive to mechanical changes in articulation, it was hypothesized that replacing the traditional culture medium with a healthy non-Newtonian lubricant could enhance tissue development in a cartilage engineering model, where joint-kinematic-mimicking mechanical loading is applied. Different amounts of hyaluronic acid were added to the culture medium to replicate the viscosities of synovial fluid at different health states. Hyaluronic acid supplementation, especially at a physiologically healthy concentration (2.0 mg ml -1 ), promoted a better preservation of chondrocyte phenotype. The ratio of collagen II to collagen I mRNA was 4.5 times that of the control group, implying better tissue development (however, with no significant difference of measured collagen II content), with a good retention of collagen II and proteoglycan in the mechanically active region. Simulating synovial fluid properties by hyaluronic acid supplementation created a favourable mechanical environment for mechanically loaded constructs. These findings may help in understanding the influence of joint articulation on tissue homeostasis, and moreover, improve methods for functional cartilage tissue engineering. © 2017 The Author(s).

  1. High-resolution analysis of the mechanical behavior of tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudnut, Alexa W.; Armani, Andrea M.

    2017-06-01

    The mechanical behavior and properties of biomaterials, such as tissue, have been directly and indirectly connected to numerous malignant physiological states. For example, an increase in the Young's Modulus of tissue can be indicative of cancer. Due to the heterogeneity of biomaterials, it is extremely important to perform these measurements using whole or unprocessed tissue because the tissue matrix contains important information about the intercellular interactions and the structure. Thus, developing high-resolution approaches that can accurately measure the elasticity of unprocessed tissue samples is of great interest. Unfortunately, conventional elastography methods such as atomic force microscopy, compression testing, and ultrasound elastography either require sample processing or have poor resolution. In the present work, we demonstrate the characterization of unprocessed salmon muscle using an optical polarimetric elastography system. We compare the results of compression testing within different samples of salmon skeletal muscle with different numbers of collagen membranes to characterize differences in heterogeneity. Using the intrinsic collagen membranes as markers, we determine the resolution of the system when testing biomaterials. The device reproducibly measures the stiffness of the tissues at variable strains. By analyzing the amount of energy lost by the sample during compression, collagen membranes that are 500 μm in size are detected.

  2. Fluid mechanics as a driver of tissue-scale mechanical signaling in organogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Rachel M; Morgan, Joshua T; Marcin, Elizabeth S; Gleghorn, Jason P

    2016-12-01

    Organogenesis is the process during development by which cells self-assemble into complex, multi-scale tissues. Whereas significant focus and research effort has demonstrated the importance of solid mechanics in organogenesis, less attention has been given to the fluid forces that provide mechanical cues over tissue length scales. Fluid motion and pressure is capable of creating spatial gradients of forces acting on cells, thus eliciting distinct and localized signaling patterns essential for proper organ formation. Understanding the multi-scale nature of the mechanics is critically important to decipher how mechanical signals sculpt developing organs. This review outlines various mechanisms by which tissues generate, regulate, and sense fluid forces and highlights the impact of these forces and mechanisms in case studies of normal and pathological development.

  3. Towards enamel biomimetics: Structure, mechanical properties and biomineralization of dental enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Hanson Kwok

    Dental enamel is the most mineralized tissue in the human body. This bioceramic, composed largely of hydroxyapatite (HAp), is also one of the most durable tissues despite a lifetime of masticatory loading and bacterial attack. The biosynthesis of enamel, which occurs in physiological conditions is a complex orchestration of protein assembly and mineral formation. The resulting product is the hardest tissue in the vertebrate body with the longest and most organized arrangement of hydroxyapatite crystals known to biomineralizing systems. Detail understanding of the structure of enamel in relationship to its mechanical function and the biomineralization process will provide a framework for enamel regeneration as well as potential lessons in the design of engineering materials. The objective of this study, therefore, is twofold: (1) establish the structure-function relationship of enamel as well as the dentine-enamel junction (DEJ) and (2) determine the effect of proteins on the enamel biomineralization process. A hierarchy in the enamel structure was established by means of various microscopy techniques (e.g. SEM, TEM, AFM). Mechanical properties (hardness and elastic modulus) associated with the microstructural features were also determined by nanoindentation. Furthermore, the DEJ was found to have a width in the range of micrometers to 10s of micrometers with continuous change in structure and mechanical properties. Indentation tests and contact fatigue tests using a spherical indenter have revealed that the structural features in the enamel and the DEJ played important roles in containing crack propagation emanating from the enamel tissue. To further understand the effect of this protein on the biominerailzation process, we have studied genetically engineered animals that express altered amelogenin which lack the known self-assembly properties. This in vivo study has revealed that, without the proper self-assembly of the amelogenin protein as demonstrated by the

  4. Determining the influence of calcification on the failure properties of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Siobhan A; Mulvihill, John J; Barrett, Hilary E; Kavanagh, Eamon G; Walsh, Michael T; McGloughlin, Tim M; Doyle, Barry J

    2015-02-01

    Varying degrees of calcification are present in most abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). However, their impact on AAA failure properties and AAA rupture risk is unclear. The aim of this work is evaluate and compare the failure properties of partially calcified and predominantly fibrous AAA tissue and investigate the potential reasons for failure. Uniaxial mechanical testing was performed on AAA samples harvested from 31 patients undergoing open surgical repair. Individual tensile samples were divided into two groups: fibrous (n=31) and partially calcified (n=38). The presence of calcification was confirmed by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). A total of 69 mechanical tests were performed and the failure stretch (λf), failure stress (σf) and failure tension (Tf) were recorded for each test. Following mechanical testing, the failure sites of a subset of both tissue types were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) to investigate the potential reasons for failure. It has been shown that the failure properties of partially calcified tissue are significantly reduced compared to fibrous tissue and SEM and EDS results suggest that the junction between a calcification deposit and the fibrous matrix is highly susceptible to failure. This study implicates the presence of calcification as a key player in AAA rupture risk and provides further motivation for the development of non-invasive methods of measuring calcification. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Microfibrous silver-coated polymeric scaffolds with tunable mechanical properties

    KAUST Repository

    Kalakonda, Parvathalu.; Aldhahri, Musab A.; Abdel-wahab, Mohamed Shaaban; Tamayol, Ali; Moghaddam, K. Mollazadeh; Ben Rached, Fathia; Pain, Arnab; Khademhosseini, Ali; Memic, Adnan; Chaieb, Saharoui

    2017-01-01

    Electrospun scaffolds of poly(glycerol sebacate)/poly(ε-caprolactone) (PGS/PCL) have been used for engineered tissues due to their desirable thermal and mechanical properties as well as their tunable degradability. In this paper, we fabricated micro-fibrous scaffolds from a composite of PGS/PCL using a standard electrospinning method and coated them with silver (Ag). The low temperature coating method prevented substrate melting and the Ag coating decreases the pore size and increases the diameter of fibers which resulted in enhanced thermal and mechanical properties. We further compared the mechanical properties of the composite fibrous scaffolds with different thicknesses of Ag coated scaffolds. The composite fibrous scaffold with a 275 nm Ag coating showed higher tensile modulus (E) and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) without any post-processing treatment. Lastly, potential controlled release of the Ag coating from the composite fibrous scaffolds could present interesting biomedical applications.

  6. Microfibrous silver-coated polymeric scaffolds with tunable mechanical properties

    KAUST Repository

    Kalakonda, Parvathalu.

    2017-07-07

    Electrospun scaffolds of poly(glycerol sebacate)/poly(ε-caprolactone) (PGS/PCL) have been used for engineered tissues due to their desirable thermal and mechanical properties as well as their tunable degradability. In this paper, we fabricated micro-fibrous scaffolds from a composite of PGS/PCL using a standard electrospinning method and coated them with silver (Ag). The low temperature coating method prevented substrate melting and the Ag coating decreases the pore size and increases the diameter of fibers which resulted in enhanced thermal and mechanical properties. We further compared the mechanical properties of the composite fibrous scaffolds with different thicknesses of Ag coated scaffolds. The composite fibrous scaffold with a 275 nm Ag coating showed higher tensile modulus (E) and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) without any post-processing treatment. Lastly, potential controlled release of the Ag coating from the composite fibrous scaffolds could present interesting biomedical applications.

  7. Regional and depth variability of porcine meniscal mechanical properties through biaxial testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlon, A; Hurtig, M B; Gordon, K D

    2015-01-01

    The menisci in the knee joint undergo complex loading in-vivo resulting in a multidirectional stress distribution. Extensive mechanical testing has been conducted to investigate the tissue properties of the knee meniscus, but the testing conditions do not replicate this complex loading regime. Biaxial testing involves loading tissue along two different directions simultaneously, which more accurately simulates physiologic loading conditions. The purpose of this study was to report mechanical properties of meniscal tissue resulting from biaxial testing, while simultaneously investigating regional variations in properties. Ten left, fresh porcine joints were obtained, and the medial and lateral menisci were harvested from each joint (twenty menisci total). Each menisci was divided into an anterior, middle and posterior region; and three slices (femoral, deep and tibial layers) were obtained from each region. Biaxial and constrained uniaxial testing was performed on each specimen, and Young's moduli were calculated from the resulting stress strain curves. Results illustrated significant differences in regional mechanical properties, with the medial anterior (Young's modulus (E)=11.14 ± 1.10 MPa), lateral anterior (E=11.54 ± 1.10 MPa) and lateral posterior (E=9.0 ± 1.2 MPa) regions exhibiting the highest properties compared to the medial central (E=5.0 ± 1.22 MPa), medial posterior (E=4.16 ± 1.13 MPa) and lateral central (E=5.6 ± 1.20 MPa) regions. Differences with depth were also significant on the lateral meniscus, with the femoral (E=12.7 ± 1.22 MPa) and tibial (E=8.6 ± 1.22 MPa) layers exhibiting the highest Young's moduli. This data may form the basis for future modeling of meniscal tissue, or may aid in the design of synthetic replacement alternatives. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Manipulation of mechanical compliance of elastomeric PGS by incorporation of halloysite nanotubes for soft tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qi-Zhi; Liang, Shu-Ling; Wang, Jiang; Simon, George P

    2011-11-01

    Poly (glycerol sebacate) (PGS) is a promising elastomer for use in soft tissue engineering. However, it is difficult to achieve with PGS a satisfactory balance of mechanical compliance and degradation rate that meet the requirements of soft tissue engineering. In this work, we have synthesised a new PGS nanocomposite system filled with halloysite nanotubes, and mechanical properties, as well as related chemical characters, of the nanocomposites were investigated. It was found that the addition of nanotubular halloysite did not compromise the extensibility of material, compared with the pure PGS counterpart; instead the elongation at rupture was increased from 110 (in the pure PGS) to 225% (in the 20 wt% composite). Second, Young's modulus and resilience of 3-5 wt% composites were ∼0.8 MPa and >94% respectively, remaining close to the level of pure PGS which is desired for applications in soft tissue engineering. Third, an important feature of the 1-5 wt% composites was their stable mechanical properties over an extended period, which could allow the provision of reliable mechanical support to damaged tissues during the lag phase of the healing process. Finally, the in vitro study indicated that the addition of halloysite slowed down the degradation rate of the composites. In conclusion, the good compliance, enhanced stretchability, stable mechanical behavior over an extended period, and reduced degradation rates make the 3-5 wt% composites promising candidates for application in soft tissue engineering. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Mechanical properties of ceramic structures based on Triply Periodic Minimal Surface (TPMS) processed by 3D printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, S.; Ocampo, S.; Ramírez, J. A.; Paucar, C.; García, C.

    2017-12-01

    Repairing tissues and organs has been the main goal of surgical procedures. Since the 1990s, the main goal of tissue engineering has been reparation, using porous scaffolds that serve as a three-dimensional template for the initial fixation of cells and subsequent tissue formation both in vitro and in vivo. A scaffold must have specific characteristics of porosity, interconnectivity, surface area, pore volume, surface tortuosity, permeability and mechanical properties, which makes its design, manufacturing and characterization a complex process. Inspired by nature, triply periodic minimal surfaces (TPMS) have emerged as an alternative for the manufacture of porous pieces with design requirements, such as scaffolds for tissue repair. In the present work, we used the technique of 3D printing to obtain ceramic structures with Gyroid, Schwarz Primitive and Schwarz Diamond Surfaces shapes, three TPMS that fulfil the geometric requirements of a bone tissue scaffold. The main objective of this work is to compare the mechanical properties of ceramic pieces of three different forms of TPMS printed in 3D using a commercial ceramic paste. In this way it will be possible to clarify which is the TPMS with appropriate characteristics to construct scaffolds of ceramic materials for bone repair. A dependence of the mechanical properties with the geometry was found being the Primitive Surface which shows the highest mechanical properties.

  10. The effects of matrix inhomogeneities on the cellular mechanical environment in tissue-engineered cartilage : an in silico investigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khoshgoftar, M.; Wilson, W.; Ito, K.; Donkelaar, van C.C.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical stimulation during cartilage tissue-engineering (TE) enhances extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis and thereby improves the mechanical properties of TE cartilage. Generally, these mechanical stimuli are of a fixed magnitude. However, as a result of ECM synthesis and spatial variations

  11. Mechanisms of lamellar collagen formation in connective tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazanfari, Samaneh; Khademhosseini, Ali; Smit, Theodoor H

    2016-08-01

    The objective of tissue engineering is to regenerate functional tissues. Engineering functional tissues requires an understanding of the mechanisms that guide the formation and evolution of structure in the extracellular matrix (ECM). In particular, the three-dimensional (3D) collagen fiber arrangement is important as it is the key structural determinant that provides mechanical integrity and biological function. In this review, we survey the current knowledge on collagen organization mechanisms that can be applied to create well-structured functional lamellar tissues and in particular intervertebral disc and cornea. Thus far, the mechanisms behind the formation of cross-aligned collagen fibers in the lamellar structures is not fully understood. We start with cell-induced collagen alignment and strain-stabilization behavior mechanisms which can explain a single anisotropically aligned collagen fiber layer. These mechanisms may explain why there is anisotropy in a single layer in the first place. However, they cannot explain why a consecutive collagen layer is laid down with an alternating alignment. Therefore, we explored another mechanism, called liquid crystal phasing. While dense concentrations of collagen show such behavior, there is little evidence that the conditions for liquid crystal phasing are actually met in vivo. Instead, lysyl aldehyde-derived collagen cross-links have been found essential for correct lamellar matrix deposition. Furthermore, we suggest that supra-cellular (tissue-level) shear stress may be instrumental in the alignment of collagen fibers. Understanding the potential mechanisms behind the lamellar collagen structure in connective tissues will lead to further improvement of the regeneration strategies of functional complex lamellar tissues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Multifunctional Hydrogel with Good Structure Integrity, Self-Healing, and Tissue-Adhesive Property Formed by Combining Diels-Alder Click Reaction and Acylhydrazone Bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Feng; Cao, Xiaodong; Du, Jie; Wang, Gang; Chen, Xiaofeng

    2015-11-04

    Hydrogel, as a good cartilage tissue-engineered scaffold, not only has to possess robust mechanical property but also has to have an intrinsic self-healing property to integrate itself or the surrounding host cartilage. In this work a double cross-linked network (DN) was designed and prepared by combining Diels-Alder click reaction and acylhydrazone bond. The DA reaction maintained the hydrogel's structural integrity and mechanical strength in physiological environment, while the dynamic covalent acylhydrazone bond resulted in hydrogel's self-healing property and controlled the on-off switch of network cross-link density. At the same time, the aldehyde groups contained in hydrogel further promote good integration of the hydrogel to surrounding tissue based on aldehyde-amine Schiff-base reaction. This kind of hydrogel has good structural integrity, autonomous self-healing, and tissue-adhesive property and simultaneously will have a good application in tissue engineering and tissue repair field.

  13. Microstructure and Mechanical Property of Glutaraldehyde-Treated Porcine Pulmonary Ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huan; Zhao, Xuefeng; Berwick, Zachary C; Krieger, Joshua F; Chambers, Sean; Kassab, Ghassan S

    2016-06-01

    There is a significant need for fixed biological tissues with desired structural and material constituents for tissue engineering applications. Here, we introduce the lung ligament as a fixed biological material that may have clinical utility for tissue engineering. To characterize the lung tissue for potential clinical applications, we studied glutaraldehyde-treated porcine pulmonary ligament (n = 11) with multiphoton microscopy (MPM) and conducted biaxial planar experiments to characterize the mechanical property of the tissue. The MPM imaging revealed that there are generally two families of collagen fibers distributed in two distinct layers: The first family largely aligns along the longitudinal direction with a mean angle of θ = 10.7 ± 9.3 deg, while the second one exhibits a random distribution with a mean θ = 36.6 ± 27.4. Elastin fibers appear in some intermediate sublayers with a random orientation distribution with a mean θ = 39.6 ± 23 deg. Based on the microstructural observation, a microstructure-based constitutive law was proposed to model the elastic property of the tissue. The material parameters were identified by fitting the model to the biaxial stress-strain data of specimens, and good fitting quality was achieved. The parameter e0 (which denotes the strain beyond which the collagen can withstand tension) of glutaraldehyde-treated tissues demonstrated low variability implying a relatively consistent collagen undulation in different samples, while the stiffness parameters for elastin and collagen fibers showed relatively greater variability. The fixed tissues presented a smaller e0 than that of fresh specimen, confirming that glutaraldehyde crosslinking increases the mechanical strength of collagen-based biomaterials. The present study sheds light on the biomechanics of glutaraldehyde-treated porcine pulmonary ligament that may be a candidate for tissue engineering.

  14. Multiaxial mechanical properties and constitutive modeling of human adipose tissue: a basis for preoperative simulations in plastic and reconstructive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Gerhard; Eder, Maximilian; Kovacs, Laszlo; Pathak, Heramb; Bonitz, Lars; Mueller, Christoph; Regitnig, Peter; Holzapfel, Gerhard A

    2013-11-01

    A preoperative simulation of soft tissue deformations during plastic and reconstructive surgery is desirable to support the surgeon's planning and to improve surgical outcomes. The current development of constitutive adipose tissue models, for the implementation in multilayer computational frameworks for the simulation of human soft tissue deformations, has proved difficult because knowledge of the required mechanical parameters of fat tissue is limited. Therefore, for the first time, human abdominal adipose tissues were mechanically investigated by biaxial tensile and triaxial shear tests. The results of this study suggest that human abdominal adipose tissues under quasi-static and dynamic multiaxial loadings can be characterized as a nonlinear, anisotropic and viscoelastic soft biological material. The nonlinear and anisotropic features are consequences of the material's collagenous microstructure. The aligned collagenous septa observed in histological investigations causes the anisotropy of the tissue. A hyperelastic model used in this study was appropriate to represent the quasi-static multiaxial mechanical behavior of fat tissue. The constitutive parameters are intended to serve as a basis for soft tissue simulations using the finite element method, which is an apparent method for obtaining promising results in the field of plastic and reconstructive surgery. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Viscoelastic behaviour of hydrogel-based composites for tissue engineering under mechanical load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocen, Rok; Gasik, Michael; Gantar, Ana; Novak, Saša

    2017-03-06

    Along with biocompatibility, bioinductivity and appropriate biodegradation, mechanical properties are also of crucial importance for tissue engineering scaffolds. Hydrogels, such as gellan gum (GG), are usually soft materials, which may benefit from the incorporation of inorganic particles, e.g. bioactive glass, not only due to the acquired bioactivity, but also due to improved mechanical properties. They exhibit complex viscoelastic properties, which can be evaluated in various ways. In this work, to reliably evaluate the effect of the bioactive glass (BAG) addition on viscoelastic properties of the composite hydrogel, we employed and compared the three most commonly used techniques, analyzing their advantages and limitations: monotonic uniaxial unconfined compression, small amplitude oscillatory shear (SAOS) rheology and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). Creep and small amplitude dynamic strain-controlled tests in DMA are suggested as the best ways for the characterization of mechanical properties of hydrogel composites, whereas the SAOS rheology is more useful for studying the hydrogel's processing kinetics, as it does not induce volumetric changes even at very high strains. Overall, the results confirmed a beneficial effect of BAG (nano)particles on the elastic modulus of the GG-BAG composite hydrogel. The Young's modulus of 6.6 ± 0.8 kPa for the GG hydrogel increased by two orders of magnitude after the addition of 2 wt.% BAG particles (500-800 kPa).

  16. Electrospun microcrimped fibers with nonlinear mechanical properties enhance ligament fibroblast phenotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grace Chao, Pen-hsiu; Hsu, Hsiang-Yi; Tseng, Hsiao-Yun

    2014-01-01

    Fiber structure and order greatly impact the mechanical behavior of fibrous materials. In biological tissues, the nonlinear mechanics of fibrous scaffolds contribute to the functionality of the material. The nonlinear mechanical properties of the wavy structure (crimp) in collagen allow tissue flexibility while preventing over-extension. A number of approaches have tried to recreate this complex mechanical functionality. We generated microcrimped fibers by briefly heating electrospun parallel fibers over the glass transition temperature or by ethanol treatment. The crimp structure is similar to those of collagen fibers found in native aorta, intestines, or ligaments. Using poly-L-lactic acid fibers, we demonstrated that the bulk materials exhibit changed stress–strain behaviors with a significant increase in the toe region in correlation to the degree of crimp, similar to those observed in collagenous tissues. In addition to mimicking the stress–strain behavior of biological tissues, the microcrimped fibers are instructive in cell morphology and promote ligament phenotypic gene expression. This effect can be further enhanced by dynamic tensile loading, a physiological perturbation in vivo. This rapid and economical approach for microcrimped fiber production provides an accessible platform to study structure–function relationships and a novel functional scaffold for tissue engineering and cell mechanobiology studies. (papers)

  17. Electrospun microcrimped fibers with nonlinear mechanical properties enhance ligament fibroblast phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace Chao, Pen-hsiu; Hsu, Hsiang-Yi; Tseng, Hsiao-Yun

    2014-09-01

    Fiber structure and order greatly impact the mechanical behavior of fibrous materials. In biological tissues, the nonlinear mechanics of fibrous scaffolds contribute to the functionality of the material. The nonlinear mechanical properties of the wavy structure (crimp) in collagen allow tissue flexibility while preventing over-extension. A number of approaches have tried to recreate this complex mechanical functionality. We generated microcrimped fibers by briefly heating electrospun parallel fibers over the glass transition temperature or by ethanol treatment. The crimp structure is similar to those of collagen fibers found in native aorta, intestines, or ligaments. Using poly-L-lactic acid fibers, we demonstrated that the bulk materials exhibit changed stress-strain behaviors with a significant increase in the toe region in correlation to the degree of crimp, similar to those observed in collagenous tissues. In addition to mimicking the stress-strain behavior of biological tissues, the microcrimped fibers are instructive in cell morphology and promote ligament phenotypic gene expression. This effect can be further enhanced by dynamic tensile loading, a physiological perturbation in vivo. This rapid and economical approach for microcrimped fiber production provides an accessible platform to study structure-function relationships and a novel functional scaffold for tissue engineering and cell mechanobiology studies.

  18. Beneficial effects of a N-terminally modified GIP agonist on tissue-level bone material properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabilleau, Guillaume; Mieczkowska, Aleksandra; Irwin, Nigel; Simon, Yannick; Audran, Maurice; Flatt, Peter R; Chappard, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    Bone remodeling is under complex regulation from nervous, hormonal and local signals, including gut hormones. Among the gut hormones, a role for the glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) has been suggested. However, the rapid degradation of GIP in the bloodstream by the ubiquitous enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) precludes therapeutic use. To circumvent this problem, a series of N-terminally modified GIP agonists have been developed, with N-AcGIP being the most promising. The aims of the present study were to investigate the effects of N-AcGIP on bone at the micro-level using trabecular and cortical microstructural morphology, and at the tissue-level in rats. Copenhagen rats were randomly assigned into control or N-AcGIP-treated groups and received daily injection for 4 weeks. Bone microstructural morphology was assessed by microCT and dynamic histomorphometry and tissue-level properties by nanoindentation, qBEI and infra-red microscopy. Four week treatment with N-AcGIP did not alter trabecular or cortical microstructural morphology. In addition, no significant modifications of mechanical response and properties at the tissue-level were observed in trabecular bone. However, significant augmentations in maximum load (12%), hardness (14%), indentation modulus (13%) and dissipated energy (16%) were demonstrated in cortical bone. These beneficial modifications of mechanical properties at the tissue-level were associated with increased mineralization (22%) and collagen maturity (13%) of the bone matrix. Taken together, the results support a beneficial role of GIP, and particularly stable analogs such as N-AcGIP, on tissue material properties of bone. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mechanical testing of hydrogels in cartilage tissue engineering: beyond the compressive modulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yinghua; Friis, Elizabeth A; Gehrke, Stevin H; Detamore, Michael S

    2013-10-01

    Injuries to articular cartilage result in significant pain to patients and high medical costs. Unfortunately, cartilage repair strategies have been notoriously unreliable and/or complex. Biomaterial-based tissue-engineering strategies offer great promise, including the use of hydrogels to regenerate articular cartilage. Mechanical integrity is arguably the most important functional outcome of engineered cartilage, although mechanical testing of hydrogel-based constructs to date has focused primarily on deformation rather than failure properties. In addition to deformation testing, as the field of cartilage tissue engineering matures, this community will benefit from the addition of mechanical failure testing to outcome analyses, given the crucial clinical importance of the success of engineered constructs. However, there is a tremendous disparity in the methods used to evaluate mechanical failure of hydrogels and articular cartilage. In an effort to bridge the gap in mechanical testing methods of articular cartilage and hydrogels in cartilage regeneration, this review classifies the different toughness measurements for each. The urgency for identifying the common ground between these two disparate fields is high, as mechanical failure is ready to stand alongside stiffness as a functional design requirement. In comparing toughness measurement methods between hydrogels and cartilage, we recommend that the best option for evaluating mechanical failure of hydrogel-based constructs for cartilage tissue engineering may be tensile testing based on the single edge notch test, in part because specimen preparation is more straightforward and a related American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard can be adopted in a fracture mechanics context.

  20. Active tension network model suggests an exotic mechanical state realized in epithelial tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, Nicholas; Mani, Madhav; Heemskerk, Idse; Streichan, Sebastian J.; Shraiman, Boris I.

    2017-12-01

    Mechanical interactions play a crucial role in epithelial morphogenesis, yet understanding the complex mechanisms through which stress and deformation affect cell behaviour remains an open problem. Here we formulate and analyse the active tension network (ATN) model, which assumes that the mechanical balance of cells within a tissue is dominated by cortical tension and introduces tension-dependent active remodelling of the cortex. We find that ATNs exhibit unusual mechanical properties. Specifically, an ATN behaves as a fluid at short times, but at long times supports external tension like a solid. Furthermore, an ATN has an extensively degenerate equilibrium mechanical state associated with a discrete conformal--`isogonal'--deformation of cells. The ATN model predicts a constraint on equilibrium cell geometries, which we demonstrate to approximately hold in certain epithelial tissues. We further show that isogonal modes are observed in the fruit fly embryo, accounting for the striking variability of apical areas of ventral cells and helping understand the early phase of gastrulation. Living matter realizes new and exotic mechanical states, the study of which helps to understand biological phenomena.

  1. Mechanically driven interface propagation in biological tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranft, Jonas; Joanny, Jean-François; Aliee, Maryam; Jülicher, Frank; Prost, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Many biological tissues consist of more than one cell type. We study the dynamics of an interface between two different cell populations as it occurs during the growth of a tumor in a healthy host tissue. Recent work suggests that the rates of cell division and cell death are under mechanical control, characterized by a homeostatic pressure. The difference in the homeostatic pressures of two cell types drives the propagation of the interface, corresponding to the invasion of one cell type into the other. We derive a front propagation equation that takes into account the coupling between cell number balance and tissue mechanics. We show that in addition to pulled fronts, pushed-front solutions occur as a result of convection driven by mechanics. (paper)

  2. Electrospun meshes possessing region-wise differences in fiber orientation, diameter, chemistry and mechanical properties for engineering bone-ligament-bone tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samavedi, Satyavrata; Vaidya, Prasad; Gaddam, Prudhvidhar; Whittington, Abby R; Goldstein, Aaron S

    2014-12-01

    Although bone-patellar tendon-bone (B-PT-B) autografts are the gold standard for repair of anterior cruciate ligament ruptures, they suffer from drawbacks such as donor site morbidity and limited supply. Engineered tissues modeled after B-PT-B autografts are promising alternatives because they have the potential to regenerate connective tissue and facilitate osseointegration. Towards the long-term goal of regenerating ligaments and their bony insertions, the objective of this study was to construct 2D meshes and 3D cylindrical composite scaffolds - possessing simultaneous region-wise differences in fiber orientation, diameter, chemistry and mechanical properties - by electrospinning two different polymers from off-set spinnerets. Using a dual drum collector, 2D meshes consisting of an aligned polycaprolactone (PCL) fiber region, randomly oriented poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) fiber region and a transition region (comprised of both PCL and PLGA fibers) were prepared, and region-wise differences were confirmed by microscopy and tensile testing. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) cultured on these meshes exhibited random orientations and low aspect ratios on the random PLGA regions, and high aspect ratios and alignment on the aligned PCL regions. Next, meshes containing an aligned PCL region flanked by two transition regions and two randomly oriented PLGA regions were prepared and processed into 3D cylindrical composite scaffolds using an interpenetrating photo-crosslinkable polyethylene glycol diacrylate hydrogel to recapitulate the shape of B-PT-B autografts. Tensile testing indicated that cylindrical composites were mechanically robust, and eventually failed due to stress concentration in the aligned PCL region. In summary, this study demonstrates a process to fabricate electrospun meshes possessing region-wise differences in properties that can elicit region-dependent cell responses, and be readily processed into scaffolds with the shape of B-PT-B autografts.

  3. Characterization of tissue biomechanics and mechanical signaling in uterine leiomyoma☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norian, John M.; Owen, Carter M.; Taboas, Juan; Korecki, Casey; Tuan, Rocky; Malik, Minnie; Catherino, William H.; Segars, James H.

    2012-01-01

    Leiomyoma are common tumors arising within the uterus that feature excessive deposition of a stiff, disordered extracellular matrix (ECM). Mechanical stress is a critical determinant of excessive ECM deposition and increased mechanical stress has been shown to be involved in tumorigenesis. Here we tested the viscoelastic properties of leiomyoma and characterized dynamic and static mechanical signaling in leiomyoma cells using three approaches, including measurement of active RhoA. We found that the peak strain and pseudo-dynamic modulus of leiomyoma tissue was significantly increased relative to matched myometrium. In addition, leiomyoma cells demonstrated an attenuated response to applied cyclic uniaxial strain and to variation in substrate stiffness, relative to myometrial cells. However, on a flexible pronectin-coated silicone substrate, basal levels and lysophosphatidic acid-stimulated levels of activated RhoA were similar between leiomyoma and myometrial cells. In contrast, leiomyoma cells plated on a rigid polystyrene substrate had elevated levels of active RhoA, compared to myometrial cells. The results indicate that viscoelastic properties of the ECM of leiomyoma contribute significantly to the tumor’s inherent stiffness and that leiomyoma cells have an attenuated sensitivity to mechanical cues. The findings suggest there may be a fundamental alteration in the communication between the external mechanical environment (extracellular forces) and reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton mediated by RhoA in leiomyoma cells. Additional research will be needed to elucidate the mechanism(s) responsible for the attenuated mechanical signaling in leiomyoma cells. PMID:21983114

  4. Assessing the functional mechanical properties of bioengineered organs with emphasis on the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suki, Béla

    2014-09-01

    Recently, an exciting new approach has emerged in regenerative medicine pushing the forefront of tissue engineering to create bioartificial organs. The basic idea is to create biological scaffolds made of extracellular matrix (ECM) that preserves the three-dimensional architecture of an entire organ. These scaffolds are then used as templates for functional tissue and organ reconstruction after re-seeding the structure with stem cells or appropriately differentiated cells. In order to make sure that these bioartificial organs will be able to function in the mechanical environment of the native tissue, it is imperative to fully characterize their mechanical properties and match them with those of the normal native organs. This mini-review briefly summarizes modern measurement techniques of mechanical function characterized mostly by the material or volumetric stiffness. Micro-scale and macro-scale techniques such as atomic force microscopy and the tissue strip stress-strain approach are discussed with emphasis on those that combine mechanical measurements with structural visualization. Proper micro-scale stiffness helps attachment and differentiation of cells in the bioartificial organ whereas macro-scale functionality is provided by the overall mechanical properties of the construct. Several approaches including failure mechanics are also described, which specifically probe the contributions of the main ECM components including collagen, elastin, and proteoglycans to organ level ECM function. Advantages, drawbacks, and possible pitfalls as well as interpretation of the data are given throughout. Finally, specific techniques to assess the functionality of the ECM of bioartificial lungs are separately discussed. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Mechanical properties of electrospun bilayer fibrous membranes as potential scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Juan; Komvopoulos, Kyriakos

    2014-06-01

    Bilayer fibrous membranes of poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) were fabricated by electrospinning, using a parallel-disk mandrel configuration that resulted in the sequential deposition of a layer with fibers aligned across the two parallel disks and a layer with randomly oriented fibers, both layers deposited in a single process step. Membrane structure and fiber alignment were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and two-dimensional fast Fourier transform. Because of the intricacies of the generated electric field, bilayer membranes exhibited higher porosity than single-layer membranes consisting of randomly oriented fibers fabricated with a solid-drum collector. However, despite their higher porosity, bilayer membranes demonstrated generally higher elastic modulus, yield strength and toughness than single-layer membranes with random fibers. Bilayer membrane deformation at relatively high strain rates comprised multiple abrupt microfracture events characterized by discontinuous fiber breakage. Bilayer membrane elongation yielded excessive necking of the layer with random fibers and remarkable fiber stretching (on the order of 400%) in the layer with fibers aligned in the stress direction. In addition, fibers in both layers exhibited multiple localized necking, attributed to the nonuniform distribution of crystalline phases in the fibrillar structure. The high membrane porosity, good mechanical properties, and good biocompatibility and biodegradability of PLLA (demonstrated in previous studies) make the present bilayer membranes good scaffold candidates for a wide range of tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The influence of supercritical foaming conditions on properties of polymer scaffolds for tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosowska Katarzyna

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of experimental investigations into foaming process of poly(ε-caprolactone using supercritical CO2 are presented. The objective of the study was to explore the aspects of fabrication of biodegradable and biocompatible scaffolds that can be applied as a temporary three-dimensional extracellular matrix analog for cells to grow into a new tissue. The influence of foaming process parameters, which have been proven previously to affect significantly scaffold bioactivity, such as pressure (8-18 MPa, temperature (323-373 K and time of saturation (1-6 h on microstructure and mechanical properties of produced polymer porous structures is presented. The morphology and mechanical properties of considered materials were analyzed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM, x-ray microtomography (μ-CT and a static compression test. A precise control over porosity and morphology of obtained polymer porous structures by adjusting the foaming process parameters has been proved. The obtained poly(ε-caprolactone solid foams prepared using scCO2 have demonstrated sufficient mechanical strength to be applied as scaffolds in tissue engineering.

  7. β-Tricalcium phosphate/poly(glycerol sebacate) scaffolds with robust mechanical property for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai; Zhang, Jing; Ma, Xiaoyu; Ma, Yifan; Kan, Chao; Ma, Haiyan; Li, Yulin; Yuan, Yuan; Liu, Changsheng

    2015-11-01

    Despite good biocompatibility and osteoconductivity, porous β-TCP scaffolds still lack the structural stability and mechanical robustness, which greatly limit their application in the field of bone regeneration. The hybridization of β-TCP with conventional synthetic biodegradable PLA and PCL only produced a limited toughening effect due to the plasticity of the polymers in nature. In this study, a β-TCP/poly(glycerol sebacate) scaffold (β-TCP/PGS) with well interconnected porous structure and robust mechanical property was prepared. Porous β-TCP scaffold was first prepared with polyurethane sponge as template and then impregnated into PGS pre-polymer solution with moderate viscosity, followed by in situ heat crosslinking and freezing-drying process. The results indicated that the freezing-drying under vacuum process could further facilitate crosslinking of PGS and formation of Ca(2+)-COO(-) ionic complexing and thus synergistically improved the mechanical strength of the β-TCP/PGS with in situ heat crosslinking. Particularly, the β-TCP/PGS with 15% PGS content after heat crosslinking at 130°C and freezing-drying at -50°C under vacuum exhibited an elongation at break of 375±25% and a compressive strength of 1.73MPa, 3.7-fold and 200-fold enhancement compared to the β-TCP, respectively. After the abrupt drop of compressive load, the β-TCP/PGS scaffolds exhibited a full recovery of their original shape. More importantly, the PGS polymer in the β-TCP/PGS scaffolds could direct the biomineralization of Ca/P from particulate shape into a nanofiber-interweaved structure. Furthermore, the β-TCP/PGS scaffolds allowed for cell penetration and proliferation, indicating a good cytobiocompatibility. It is believed that β-TCP/PGS scaffolds have great potential application in rigid tissue regeneration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Multi-scale mechanical response of freeze-dried collagen scaffolds for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offeddu, Giovanni S; Ashworth, Jennifer C; Cameron, Ruth E; Oyen, Michelle L

    2015-02-01

    Tissue engineering has grown in the past two decades as a promising solution to unresolved clinical problems such as osteoarthritis. The mechanical response of tissue engineering scaffolds is one of the factors determining their use in applications such as cartilage and bone repair. The relationship between the structural and intrinsic mechanical properties of the scaffolds was the object of this study, with the ultimate aim of understanding the stiffness of the substrate that adhered cells experience, and its link to the bulk mechanical properties. Freeze-dried type I collagen porous scaffolds made with varying slurry concentrations and pore sizes were tested in a viscoelastic framework by macroindentation. Membranes made up of stacks of pore walls were indented using colloidal probe atomic force microscopy. It was found that the bulk scaffold mechanical response varied with collagen concentration in the slurry consistent with previous studies on these materials. Hydration of the scaffolds resulted in a more compliant response, yet lesser viscoelastic relaxation. Indentation of the membranes suggested that the material making up the pore walls remains unchanged between conditions, so that the stiffness of the scaffolds at the scale of seeded cells is unchanged; rather, it is suggested that thicker pore walls or more of these result in the increased moduli for the greater slurry concentration conditions. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Characterization of mechanical properties of pericardium tissue using planar biaxial tension and flexural deformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdock, Kyle; Martin, Caitlin; Sun, Wei

    2018-01-01

    Flexure is an important mode of deformation for native and bioprosthetic heart valves. However, mechanical characterization of bioprosthetic leaflet materials has been done primarily through planar tensile testing. In this study, an integrated experimental and computational cantilever beam bending test was performed to characterize the flexural properties of glutaraldehyde-treated bovine and porcine pericardium of different thicknesses. A strain-invariant based structural constitutive model was used to model the pericardial mechanical behavior quantified through the bending tests of this study and the planar biaxial tests previously performed. The model parameters were optimized through an inverse finite element (FE) procedure in order to describe both sets of experimental data. The optimized material properties were implemented in FE simulations of transcatheter aortic valve (TAV) deformation. It was observed that porcine pericardium TAV leaflets experienced significantly more flexure than bovine when subjected to opening pressurization, and that the flexure may be overestimated using a constitutive model derived from purely planar tensile experimental data. Thus, modeling of a combination of flexural and biaxial tensile testing data may be necessary to more accurately describe the mechanical properties of pericardium, and to computationally investigate bioprosthetic leaflet function and design. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Mechanical cues in orofacial tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Katrien M; Lundvig, Ditte M S; Middelkoop, Esther; Wagener, Frank A D T G; Von den Hoff, Johannes W

    2015-01-01

    Cleft lip and palate patients suffer from functional, aesthetical, and psychosocial problems due to suboptimal regeneration of skin, mucosa, and skeletal muscle after restorative cleft surgery. The field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TE/RM) aims to restore the normal physiology of tissues and organs in conditions such as birth defects or after injury. A crucial factor in cell differentiation, tissue formation, and tissue function is mechanical strain. Regardless of this, mechanical cues are not yet widely used in TE/RM. The effects of mechanical stimulation on cells are not straight-forward in vitro as cellular responses may differ with cell type and loading regime, complicating the translation to a therapeutic protocol. We here give an overview of the different types of mechanical strain that act on cells and tissues and discuss the effects on muscle, and skin and mucosa. We conclude that presently, sufficient knowledge is lacking to reproducibly implement external mechanical loading in TE/RM approaches. Mechanical cues can be applied in TE/RM by fine-tuning the stiffness and architecture of the constructs to guide the differentiation of the seeded cells or the invading surrounding cells. This may already improve the treatment of orofacial clefts and other disorders affecting soft tissues. © 2015 by the Wound Healing Society.

  11. Analysis of terahertz dielectric properties of pork tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuqing; Xie, Qiaoling; Sun, Ping

    2017-10-01

    Seeing that about 70% component of fresh biological tissues is water, many scientists try to use water models to describe the dielectric properties of biological tissues. The classical water dielectric models are Debye model, Double Debye model and Cole-Cole model. This work aims to determine a suitable model by comparing three models above with experimental data. These models are applied to fresh pork tissue. By means of least square method, the parameters of different models are fitted with the experimental data. Comparing different models on both dielectric function, the Cole-Cole model is verified the best to describe the experiments of pork tissue. The correction factor α of the Cole-Cole model is an important modification for biological tissues. So Cole-Cole model is supposed to be a priority selection to describe the dielectric properties for biological tissues in the terahertz range.

  12. Biological and mechanical evaluation of a Bio-Hybrid scaffold for autologous valve tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnavi, S; Saravanan, U; Arthi, N; Bhuvaneshwar, G S; Kumary, T V; Rajan, S; Verma, R S

    2017-04-01

    Major challenge in heart valve tissue engineering for paediatric patients is the development of an autologous valve with regenerative capacity. Hybrid tissue engineering approach is recently gaining popularity to design scaffolds with desired biological and mechanical properties that can remodel post implantation. In this study, we fabricated aligned nanofibrous Bio-Hybrid scaffold made of decellularized bovine pericardium: polycaprolactone-chitosan with optimized polymer thickness to yield the desired biological and mechanical properties. CD44 + , αSMA + , Vimentin + and CD105 - human valve interstitial cells were isolated and seeded on these Bio-Hybrid scaffolds. Subsequent biological evaluation revealed interstitial cell proliferation with dense extra cellular matrix deposition that indicated the viability for growth and proliferation of seeded cells on the scaffolds. Uniaxial mechanical tests along axial direction showed that the Bio-Hybrid scaffolds has at least 20 times the strength of the native valves and its stiffness is nearly 3 times more than that of native valves. Biaxial and uniaxial mechanical studies on valve interstitial cells cultured Bio-Hybrid scaffolds revealed that the response along the axial and circumferential direction was different, similar to native valves. Overall, our findings suggest that Bio-Hybrid scaffold is a promising material for future development of regenerative heart valve constructs in children. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Mechanical design criteria for intervertebral disc tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerurkar, Nandan L; Elliott, Dawn M; Mauck, Robert L

    2010-04-19

    Due to the inability of current clinical practices to restore function to degenerated intervertebral discs, the arena of disc tissue engineering has received substantial attention in recent years. Despite tremendous growth and progress in this field, translation to clinical implementation has been hindered by a lack of well-defined functional benchmarks. Because successful replacement of the disc is contingent upon replication of some or all of its complex mechanical behaviors, it is critically important that disc mechanics be well characterized in order to establish discrete functional goals for tissue engineering. In this review, the key functional signatures of the intervertebral disc are discussed and used to propose a series of native tissue benchmarks to guide the development of engineered replacement tissues. These benchmarks include measures of mechanical function under tensile, compressive, and shear deformations for the disc and its substructures. In some cases, important functional measures are identified that have yet to be measured in the native tissue. Ultimately, native tissue benchmark values are compared to measurements that have been made on engineered disc tissues, identifying where functional equivalence was achieved, and where there remain opportunities for advancement. Several excellent reviews exist regarding disc composition and structure, as well as recent tissue engineering strategies; therefore this review will remain focused on the functional aspects of disc tissue engineering. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Mechanics of Biological Tissues and Biomaterials: Current Trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir A. Zadpoor

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of the mechanical behavior of biological tissues and biomaterials has been an active area of research for several decades. However, in recent years, the enthusiasm in understanding the mechanical behavior of biological tissues and biomaterials has increased significantly due to the development of novel biomaterials for new fields of application, along with the emergence of advanced computational techniques. The current Special Issue is a collection of studies that address various topics within the general theme of “mechanics of biomaterials”. This editorial aims to present the context within which the studies of this Special Issue could be better understood. I, therefore, try to identify some of the most important research trends in the study of the mechanical behavior of biological tissues and biomaterials.

  15. Effect of penetrating ionising radiation on the mechanical properties of pericardium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daar, Eman, E-mail: e.daar@surrey.ac.u [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Woods, E. [Royal Free Hampstead NHS Trust, Pond Street, Hampstead, London NW3 2QG (United Kingdom); Keddie, J.L. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Nisbet, A. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford (United Kingdom); Bradley, D.A. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-21

    The pericardium is an anistropic composite material made up of collagen and elastin fibres embedded in an amorphous matrix mainly composed of proteoglycan and hyaluronan. The collagen fibres are arranged in layers, with different directions of alignment in each layer, giving rise to interesting mechanical properties of pericardium, including the ability to undergo large deformation during performance of regular physiological functions. The present study aims to investigate the effect of penetrating photon ionising radiation on bovine pericardium tissue, being part of a study of the effect of cardiac doses received in breast radiotherapy and the possibility that this can give rise to cardiovascular complications. Irradiation doses in the range 5-80 Gy were used. To characterise the various mechanical properties [elastic modulus, stress relaxation, ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and fracture] a uniaxial tensile test method was applied. The preliminary results reflect the wide inter-sample variations that are expected in dealing with tissues, with only a weak indication of increase in the UTS of the pericardium tissue with increase in radiation dose. Such an effect has also been observed by others, with reduction in UTS at doses of 80 Gy.

  16. Myocardial scaffold-based cardiac tissue engineering: application of coordinated mechanical and electrical stimulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Wang, Guangjun; To, Filip; Butler, J Ryan; Claude, Andrew; McLaughlin, Ronald M; Williams, Lakiesha N; de Jongh Curry, Amy L; Liao, Jun

    2013-09-03

    Recently, we developed an optimal decellularization protocol to generate 3D porcine myocardial scaffolds, which preserve the natural extracellular matrix structure, mechanical anisotropy, and vasculature templates and also show good cell recellularization and differentiation potential. In this study, a multistimulation bioreactor was built to provide coordinated mechanical and electrical stimulation for facilitating stem cell differentiation and cardiac construct development. The acellular myocardial scaffolds were seeded with mesenchymal stem cells (10(6) cells/mL) by needle injection and subjected to 5-azacytidine treatment (3 μmol/L, 24 h) and various bioreactor conditioning protocols. We found that after 2 days of culturing with mechanical (20% strain) and electrical stimulation (5 V, 1 Hz), high cell density and good cell viability were observed in the reseeded scaffold. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that the differentiated cells showed a cardiomyocyte-like phenotype by expressing sarcomeric α-actinin, myosin heavy chain, cardiac troponin T, connexin-43, and N-cadherin. Biaxial mechanical testing demonstrated that positive tissue remodeling took place after 2 days of bioreactor conditioning (20% strain + 5 V, 1 Hz); passive mechanical properties of the 2 day and 4 day tissue constructs were comparable to those of the tissue constructs produced by stirring reseeding followed by 2 weeks of static culturing, implying the effectiveness and efficiency of the coordinated simulations in promoting tissue remodeling. In short, the synergistic stimulations might be beneficial not only for the quality of cardiac construct development but also for patients by reducing the waiting time in future clinical scenarios.

  17. Quantitative characterization of viscoelastic behavior in tissue-mimicking phantoms and ex vivo animal tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashkan Maccabi

    Full Text Available Viscoelasticity of soft tissue is often related to pathology, and therefore, has become an important diagnostic indicator in the clinical assessment of suspect tissue. Surgeons, particularly within head and neck subsites, typically use palpation techniques for intra-operative tumor detection. This detection method, however, is highly subjective and often fails to detect small or deep abnormalities. Vibroacoustography (VA and similar methods have previously been used to distinguish tissue with high-contrast, but a firm understanding of the main contrast mechanism has yet to be verified. The contributions of tissue mechanical properties in VA images have been difficult to verify given the limited literature on viscoelastic properties of various normal and diseased tissue. This paper aims to investigate viscoelasticity theory and present a detailed description of viscoelastic experimental results obtained in tissue-mimicking phantoms (TMPs and ex vivo tissues to verify the main contrast mechanism in VA and similar imaging modalities. A spherical-tip micro-indentation technique was employed with the Hertzian model to acquire absolute, quantitative, point measurements of the elastic modulus (E, long term shear modulus (η, and time constant (τ in homogeneous TMPs and ex vivo tissue in rat liver and porcine liver and gallbladder. Viscoelastic differences observed between porcine liver and gallbladder tissue suggest that imaging modalities which utilize the mechanical properties of tissue as a primary contrast mechanism can potentially be used to quantitatively differentiate between proximate organs in a clinical setting. These results may facilitate more accurate tissue modeling and add information not currently available to the field of systems characterization and biomedical research.

  18. Quantitative characterization of viscoelastic behavior in tissue-mimicking phantoms and ex vivo animal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccabi, Ashkan; Shin, Andrew; Namiri, Nikan K; Bajwa, Neha; St John, Maie; Taylor, Zachary D; Grundfest, Warren; Saddik, George N

    2018-01-01

    Viscoelasticity of soft tissue is often related to pathology, and therefore, has become an important diagnostic indicator in the clinical assessment of suspect tissue. Surgeons, particularly within head and neck subsites, typically use palpation techniques for intra-operative tumor detection. This detection method, however, is highly subjective and often fails to detect small or deep abnormalities. Vibroacoustography (VA) and similar methods have previously been used to distinguish tissue with high-contrast, but a firm understanding of the main contrast mechanism has yet to be verified. The contributions of tissue mechanical properties in VA images have been difficult to verify given the limited literature on viscoelastic properties of various normal and diseased tissue. This paper aims to investigate viscoelasticity theory and present a detailed description of viscoelastic experimental results obtained in tissue-mimicking phantoms (TMPs) and ex vivo tissues to verify the main contrast mechanism in VA and similar imaging modalities. A spherical-tip micro-indentation technique was employed with the Hertzian model to acquire absolute, quantitative, point measurements of the elastic modulus (E), long term shear modulus (η), and time constant (τ) in homogeneous TMPs and ex vivo tissue in rat liver and porcine liver and gallbladder. Viscoelastic differences observed between porcine liver and gallbladder tissue suggest that imaging modalities which utilize the mechanical properties of tissue as a primary contrast mechanism can potentially be used to quantitatively differentiate between proximate organs in a clinical setting. These results may facilitate more accurate tissue modeling and add information not currently available to the field of systems characterization and biomedical research.

  19. A combination of experimental measurement, constitutive damage model, and diffusion tensor imaging to characterize the mechanical properties of the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Alireza; Rahmati, Seyed Mohammadali; Razaghi, Reza

    2017-09-01

    Understanding the mechanical properties of the human brain is deemed important as it may subject to various types of complex loadings during the Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). Although many studies so far have been conducted to quantify the mechanical properties of the brain, there is a paucity of knowledge on the mechanical properties of the human brain tissue and the damage of its axon fibers under the various types of complex loadings during the Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). Although many studies so far have been conducted to quantify the mechanical properties of the brain, there is a paucity of knowledge on the mechanical properties of the human brain tissue and the damage of its axon fibers under the frontal lobe of the human brain. The constrained nonlinear minimization method was employed to identify the brain coefficients according to the axial and transversal compressive data. The pseudo-elastic damage model data was also well compared with that of the experimental data and it not only up to the primary loading but also the discontinuous softening could well address the mechanical behavior of the brain tissue.

  20. Freeze-thaw treatment effects on the dynamic mechanical properties of articular cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muldrew Ken

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a relatively non-regenerative tissue, articular cartilage has been targeted for cryopreservation as a method of mitigating a lack of donor tissue availability for transplant surgeries. In addition, subzero storage of articular cartilage has long been used in biomedical studies using various storage temperatures. The current investigation studies the potential for freeze-thaw to affect the mechanical properties of articular cartilage through direct comparison of various subzero storage temperatures. Methods Both subzero storage temperature as well as freezing rate were compared using control samples (4°C and samples stored at either -20°C or -80°C as well as samples first snap frozen in liquid nitrogen (-196°C prior to storage at -80°C. All samples were thawed at 37.5°C to testing temperature (22°C. Complex stiffness and hysteresis characterized load resistance and damping properties using a non-destructive, low force magnitude, dynamic indentation protocol spanning a broad loading rate range to identify the dynamic viscoelastic properties of cartilage. Results Stiffness levels remained unchanged with exposure to the various subzero temperatures. Hysteresis increased in samples snap frozen at -196°C and stored at -80°C, though remained unchanged with exposure to the other storage temperatures. Conclusions Mechanical changes shown are likely due to ice lens creation, where frost heave effects may have caused collagen damage. That storage to -20°C and -80°C did not alter the mechanical properties of articular cartilage shows that when combined with a rapid thawing protocol to 37.5°C, the tissue may successfully be stored at subzero temperatures.

  1. Doped tricalcium phosphate bone tissue engineering scaffolds using sucrose as template and microwave sintering: enhancement of mechanical and biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Dongxu; Bose, Susmita

    2017-09-01

    β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) is a widely used biocompatible ceramic in orthopedic and dental applications. However, its osteoinductivity and mechanical properties still require improvements. In this study, porous β-TCP and MgO/ZnO-TCP scaffolds were prepared by the thermal decomposition of sucrose. Crack-free cylindrical scaffolds could only be prepared with the addition of MgO and ZnO due to their stabilization effects. Porous MgO/ZnO-TCP scaffolds with a density of 61.39±0.66%, an estimated pore size of 200μm and a compressive strength of 24.96±3.07MPa were prepared by using 25wt% sucrose after conventional sintering at 1250°C. Microwave sintering further increased the compressive strength to 37.94±6.70MPa, but it decreased the open interconnected porosity to 8.74±1.38%. In addition, the incorporation of polycaprolactone (PCL) increased 22.36±3.22% of toughness while maintaining its compressive strength at 25.45±2.21MPa. Human osteoblast cell line was seeded on scaffolds to evaluate the effects of MgO/ZnO and PCL on the biological property of β-TCP in vitro. Both MgO/ZnO and PCL improved osteoinductivity of β-TCP. PCL also decreased osteoblastic apoptosis due to its particular surface chemistry. This novel porous MgO/ZnO-TCP scaffold with PCL shows improved mechanical and biological properties, which has great potential in bone tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Modelling the electrical properties of tissue as a porous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smye, S W; Evans, C J; Robinson, M P; Sleeman, B D

    2007-01-01

    Models of the electrical properties of biological tissue have been the subject of many studies. These models have sought to explain aspects of the dielectric dispersion of tissue. This paper develops a mathematical model of the complex permittivity of tissue as a function of frequency f, in the range 10 4 7 Hz, which is derived from a formulation used to describe the complex permittivity of porous media. The model introduces two parameters, porosity and percolation probability, to the description of the electrical properties of any tissue which comprises a random arrangement of cells. The complex permittivity for a plausible porosity and percolation probability distribution is calculated and compared with the published measured electrical properties of liver tissue. Broad agreement with the experimental data is noted. It is suggested that future detailed experimental measurements should be undertaken to validate the model. The model may be a more convenient method of parameterizing the electrical properties of biological tissue and subsequent measurement of these parameters in a range of tissues may yield information of biological and clinical significance

  3. A comparative evaluation of mechanical properties of nanofibrous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubun, German P.; Bessudnova, Nadezda O.

    2014-01-01

    Restoration or replacement of lost or damaged hard tooth tissues remain a reconstructive clinical dentistry challenge. One of the most promising solutions to this problem is the development of novel concepts and methodologies of tissue engineering for the synthesis of three-dimensional graft constructs that are equivalent to original organs and tissues. This structural and functional compatibility can be reached by producing ultra-thin polymer filament scaffolds. This research aims through a series of studies to examine different methods of polymer filament material special preparation and test mechanical properties of the produced materials subjected to a tensile strain. Nanofibrous material preparation using chemically pure acetone and mixtures of ethanol/water has shown no significant changes in sample surface morphology. The high temperature impact on material morphology has resulted in the modification of fiber structure. In the course of mechanical tests it has been revealed the dependence of the material strength on the spinning solution compositions. The results achieved point to the possibility to develop nanofibrous materials with required parameters changing the methodology of spinning solution production.

  4. Glial Tissue Mechanics and Mechanosensing by Glial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Katarzyna Pogoda; Katarzyna Pogoda; Paul A. Janmey

    2018-01-01

    Understanding the mechanical behavior of human brain is critical to interpret the role of physical stimuli in both normal and pathological processes that occur in CNS tissue, such as development, inflammation, neurodegeneration, aging, and most common brain tumors. Despite clear evidence that mechanical cues influence both normal and transformed brain tissue activity as well as normal and transformed brain cell behavior, little is known about the links between mechanical signals and their bio...

  5. The fundamental role of mechanical properties in the progression of cancer disease and inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2014-01-01

    The role of mechanical properties in cancer disease and inflammation is still underinvestigated and even ignored in many oncological and immunological reviews. In particular, eight classical hallmarks of cancer have been proposed, but they still ignore the mechanics behind the processes that facilitate cancer progression. To define the malignant transformation of neoplasms and finally reveal the functional pathway that enables cancer cells to promote cancer progression, these classical hallmarks of cancer require the inclusion of specific mechanical properties of cancer cells and their microenvironment such as the extracellular matrix as well as embedded cells such as fibroblasts, macrophages or endothelial cells. Thus, this review will present current cancer research from a biophysical point of view and will therefore focus on novel physical aspects and biophysical methods to investigate the aggressiveness of cancer cells and the process of inflammation. As cancer or immune cells are embedded in a certain microenvironment such as the extracellular matrix, the mechanical properties of this microenvironment cannot be neglected, and alterations of the microenvironment may have an impact on the mechanical properties of the cancer or immune cells. Here, it is highlighted how biophysical approaches, both experimental and theoretical, have an impact on the classical hallmarks of cancer and inflammation. It is even pointed out how these biophysical approaches contribute to the understanding of the regulation of cancer disease and inflammatory responses after tissue injury through physical microenvironmental property sensing mechanisms. The recognized physical signals are transduced into biochemical signaling events that guide cellular responses, such as malignant tumor progression, after the transition of cancer cells from an epithelial to a mesenchymal phenotype or an inflammatory response due to tissue injury. Moreover, cell adaptation to mechanical alterations, in

  6. The fundamental role of mechanical properties in the progression of cancer disease and inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2014-07-01

    The role of mechanical properties in cancer disease and inflammation is still underinvestigated and even ignored in many oncological and immunological reviews. In particular, eight classical hallmarks of cancer have been proposed, but they still ignore the mechanics behind the processes that facilitate cancer progression. To define the malignant transformation of neoplasms and finally reveal the functional pathway that enables cancer cells to promote cancer progression, these classical hallmarks of cancer require the inclusion of specific mechanical properties of cancer cells and their microenvironment such as the extracellular matrix as well as embedded cells such as fibroblasts, macrophages or endothelial cells. Thus, this review will present current cancer research from a biophysical point of view and will therefore focus on novel physical aspects and biophysical methods to investigate the aggressiveness of cancer cells and the process of inflammation. As cancer or immune cells are embedded in a certain microenvironment such as the extracellular matrix, the mechanical properties of this microenvironment cannot be neglected, and alterations of the microenvironment may have an impact on the mechanical properties of the cancer or immune cells. Here, it is highlighted how biophysical approaches, both experimental and theoretical, have an impact on the classical hallmarks of cancer and inflammation. It is even pointed out how these biophysical approaches contribute to the understanding of the regulation of cancer disease and inflammatory responses after tissue injury through physical microenvironmental property sensing mechanisms. The recognized physical signals are transduced into biochemical signaling events that guide cellular responses, such as malignant tumor progression, after the transition of cancer cells from an epithelial to a mesenchymal phenotype or an inflammatory response due to tissue injury. Moreover, cell adaptation to mechanical alterations, in

  7. Mechanical Stimulation of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells for Functional Tissue Engineering of the Musculoskeletal System via Cyclic Hydrostatic Pressure, Simulated Microgravity, and Cyclic Tensile Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordberg, Rachel C; Bodle, Josie C; Loboa, Elizabeth G

    2018-01-01

    It is critical that human adipose stem cell (hASC) tissue-engineering therapies possess appropriate mechanical properties in order to restore function of the load bearing tissues of the musculoskeletal system. In an effort to elucidate the hASC response to mechanical stimulation and develop mechanically robust tissue engineered constructs, recent research has utilized a variety of mechanical loading paradigms including cyclic tensile strain, cyclic hydrostatic pressure, and mechanical unloading in simulated microgravity. This chapter describes methods for applying these mechanical stimuli to hASC to direct differentiation for functional tissue engineering of the musculoskeletal system.

  8. Mechanical properties of the human scalp in tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falland-Cheung, Lisa; Scholze, Mario; Lozano, Pamela F; Ondruschka, Benjamin; Tong, Darryl C; Brunton, Paul A; Waddell, J Neil; Hammer, Niels

    2018-08-01

    Mechanical properties of the human scalp have not been investigated to a great extent with limited information available. The purpose of this study was to provide new baseline material data for human scalp tissue of various ages, which can be applied to experimental and constitutive models, such as in the area of impact biomechanics. This study used specimens from the left and right temporal, fronto-parietal and occipital regions of the human scalp. It investigated the tensile behavior of scalp tissue using tissues harvested from unfixed, fresh cadavers. These samples were subjected to an osmotic stress analysis and upon testing, cyclic loading followed by stretching until failure in a universal testing machine. Strain evaluation was conducted using digital image correlation in a highly standardized approach. Elastic modulus, tensile strength, strain at maximum load and strain to failure were evaluated computationally. No significant differences were observed comparing the tensile strength between males and females. In contrast to that, a sex-dependent difference was found for the elastic modulus of the occipital scalp region and for the elongation properties. Additionally, regional differences within the male group, as well as an age dependent correlation for females were found in the elastic modulus and tensile strength. Scanning electron microscope analyses have shown the ultrastructural failure patterns, indicated by damaged keratin plates, as well as partially disrupted and retraced collagens at the failure site. The novel data obtained in this study could add valuable information to be used for modeling purposes, as well as provide baseline data for simulant materials and comparisons of tissue properties following head injury or forensic investigations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Thermal-mechanical deformation modelling of soft tissues for thermal ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Zhong, Yongmin; Jazar, Reza; Subic, Aleksandar

    2014-01-01

    Modeling of thermal-induced mechanical behaviors of soft tissues is of great importance for thermal ablation. This paper presents a method by integrating the heating process with thermal-induced mechanical deformations of soft tissues for simulation and analysis of the thermal ablation process. This method combines bio-heat transfer theories, constitutive elastic material law under thermal loads as well as non-rigid motion dynamics to predict and analyze thermal-mechanical deformations of soft tissues. The 3D governing equations of thermal-mechanical soft tissue deformation are discretized by using the finite difference scheme and are subsequently solved by numerical algorithms. Experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively predict the thermal-induced mechanical behaviors of soft tissues, and can be used for the thermal ablation therapy to effectively control the delivered heat energy for cancer treatment.

  10. Computational methods for describing the laser-induced mechanical response of tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trucano, T.; McGlaun, J.M.; Farnsworth, A.

    1994-02-01

    Detailed computational modeling of laser surgery requires treatment of the photoablation of human tissue by high intensity pulses of laser light and the subsequent thermomechanical response of the tissue. Three distinct physical regimes must be considered to accomplish this: (1) the immediate absorption of the laser pulse by the tissue and following tissue ablation, which is dependent upon tissue light absorption characteristics; (2) the near field thermal and mechanical response of the tissue to this laser pulse, and (3) the potential far field (and longer time) mechanical response of witness tissue. Both (2) and (3) are dependent upon accurate constitutive descriptions of the tissue. We will briefly review tissue absorptivity and mechanical behavior, with an emphasis on dynamic loads characteristic of the photoablation process. In this paper our focus will center on the requirements of numerical modeling and the uncertainties of mechanical tissue behavior under photoablation. We will also discuss potential contributions that computational simulations can make in the design of surgical protocols which utilize lasers, for example, in assessing the potential for collateral mechanical damage by laser pulses.

  11. Monitoring of tissue optical properties during thermal coagulation of ex vivo tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Vivek Krishna; Yu, Bing

    2016-09-01

    Real-time monitoring of tissue status during thermal ablation of tumors is critical to ensure complete destruction of tumor mass, while avoiding tissue charring and excessive damage to normal tissues. Currently, magnetic resonance thermometry (MRT), along with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), is the most commonly used technique for monitoring and assessing thermal ablation process in soft tissues. MRT/MRI is very expensive, bulky, and often subject to motion artifacts. On the other hand, light propagation within tissue is sensitive to changes in tissue microstructure and physiology which could be used to directly quantify the extent of tissue damage. Furthermore, optical monitoring can be a portable, and cost-effective alternative for monitoring a thermal ablation process. The main objective of this study, is to establish a correlation between changes in tissue optical properties and the status of tissue coagulation/damage during heating of ex vivo tissues. A portable diffuse reflectance spectroscopy system and a side-firing fiber-optic probe were developed to study the absorption (μa (λ)), and reduced scattering coefficients (μ's (λ)) of native and coagulated ex vivo porcine, and chicken breast tissues. In the first experiment, both porcine and chicken breast tissues were heated at discrete temperature points between 24 and 140°C for 2 minutes. Diffuse reflectance spectra (430-630 nm) of native and coagulated tissues were recorded prior to, and post heating. In a second experiment, porcine tissue samples were heated at 70°C and diffuse reflectance spectra were recorded continuously during heating. The μa (λ) and μ's (λ) of the tissues were extracted from the measured diffuse reflectance spectra using an inverse Monte-Carlo model of diffuse reflectance. Tissue heating was stopped when the wavelength-averaged scattering plateaued. The wavelength-averaged optical properties, and , for native porcine tissues (n = 66) at room temperature, were 5.4

  12. Study of the optical properties of solid tissue phantoms using single and double integrating sphere systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Monem, S

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available light propagation mechanisms inside the tissues. In this work, two calibration models based on measurements adopting integrating sphere systems have been used to determine the optical properties of the studied solid phantoms. Integrating sphere...

  13. β-Tricalcium phosphate/poly(glycerol sebacate) scaffolds with robust mechanical property for bone tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Kai [The State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Engineering Research Centre for Biomedical Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Zhang, Jing; Ma, Xiaoyu; Ma, Yifan; Kan, Chao [Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Engineering Research Centre for Biomedical Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Ma, Haiyan [Engineering Research Centre for Biomedical Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Li, Yulin, E-mail: yulinli@ecust.edu.cn [Engineering Research Centre for Biomedical Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Yuan, Yuan, E-mail: yyuan@ecust.edu.cn [The State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Engineering Research Centre for Biomedical Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Liu, Changsheng, E-mail: liucs@ecust.edu.cn [The State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Engineering Research Centre for Biomedical Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China)

    2015-11-01

    Despite good biocompatibility and osteoconductivity, porous β-TCP scaffolds still lack the structural stability and mechanical robustness, which greatly limit their application in the field of bone regeneration. The hybridization of β-TCP with conventional synthetic biodegradable PLA and PCL only produced a limited toughening effect due to the plasticity of the polymers in nature. In this study, a β-TCP/poly(glycerol sebacate) scaffold (β-TCP/PGS) with well interconnected porous structure and robust mechanical property was prepared. Porous β-TCP scaffold was first prepared with polyurethane sponge as template and then impregnated into PGS pre-polymer solution with moderate viscosity, followed by in situ heat crosslinking and freezing–drying process. The results indicated that the freezing–drying under vacuum process could further facilitate crosslinking of PGS and formation of Ca{sup 2+}–COO{sup −} ionic complexing and thus synergistically improved the mechanical strength of the β-TCP/PGS with in situ heat crosslinking. Particularly, the β-TCP/PGS with 15% PGS content after heat crosslinking at 130 °C and freezing–drying at − 50 °C under vacuum exhibited an elongation at break of 375 ± 25% and a compressive strength of 1.73 MPa, 3.7-fold and 200-fold enhancement compared to the β-TCP, respectively. After the abrupt drop of compressive load, the β-TCP/PGS scaffolds exhibited a full recovery of their original shape. More importantly, the PGS polymer in the β-TCP/PGS scaffolds could direct the biomineralization of Ca/P from particulate shape into a nanofiber-interweaved structure. Furthermore, the β-TCP/PGS scaffolds allowed for cell penetration and proliferation, indicating a good cytobiocompatibility. It is believed that β-TCP/PGS scaffolds have great potential application in rigid tissue regeneration. - Graphical abstract: Robust β-TCP/PGS porous scaffolds are developed by incorporation of poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS, a flexible

  14. The effect of irradiation and hydration upon the mechanical properties of tendon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.W.; Kearney, J.N.

    1996-01-01

    Irradiation sterilization is in wide use among tissue banks, for both hard and soft tissue grafts. Irradiation of tendon can impair its mechanical properties. Following implantation of a tendon graft, re-vascularization and resorption processes reduce its mechanical performance. Tendon with severely impaired properties may not be suitable for use as a load-bearing graft, e.g. as anterior cruciate ligament replacement. An important factor determining the extent of the reduction of the mechanical performance is the condition of the tendon during irradiation, especially the presence of water. There has not yet been a study of the effects of both irradiation dose and hydration on tendon mechanical properties. This study measured the changes in tensile mechanical properties, including strength and stiffness, following γ irradiation doses of 15 kGy (1.5 MRad) and 25 kGy irradiated tendons was lower compared to fresh tendons, whereas the strength of the frozen irradiated tendons was very similar to that of the fresh. The tangent modulus of both of the freeze-dried irradiated groups were lower than the fresh tendons, as was the 15 kGy frozen group. The modulus of the 25 kGy frozen irradiated group was similar to the fresh. The general pattern of the results indicate that the two freeze-dried tendon groups were more affected than the frozen irradiated, and of the frozen irradiated groups the 25 kGy group was least affected. The results fit well with suggested mechanisms for the action of irradiation upon collagen; that intramolecular crosslinking and scission of the tropocollagen α chains occur when water is present, and α chain scission alone occurs when water is absent. Irradiation of tendons for use as grafts may produce minimal deleterious changes if the irradiation is performed while the tendon is frozen with water present. (Author)

  15. Chemo-mechanical modeling of tumor growth in elastic epithelial tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bratsun, Dmitry A., E-mail: bratsun@pspu.ru [Department of Applied Physics, Perm National Research Polytechnical University, Perm, 614990 (Russian Federation); Zakharov, Andrey P. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, 32000 Israel (Israel); Theoretical Physics Department, Perm State Humanitarian Pedagogical University, Perm, 614990 (Russian Federation); Pismen, Len [Department of Chemical Engineering, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, 32000 Israel (Israel)

    2016-08-02

    We propose a multiscale chemo-mechanical model of the cancer tumor development in the epithelial tissue. The epithelium is represented by an elastic 2D array of polygonal cells with its own gene regulation dynamics. The model allows the simulation of the evolution of multiple cells interacting via the chemical signaling or mechanically induced strain. The algorithm includes the division and intercalation of cells as well as the transformation of normal cells into a cancerous state triggered by a local failure of the spatial synchronization of the cellular rhythms driven by transcription/translation processes. Both deterministic and stochastic descriptions of the system are given for chemical signaling. The transformation of cells means the modification of their respective parameters responsible for chemo-mechanical interactions. The simulations reproduce a distinct behavior of invasive and localized carcinoma. Generally, the model is designed in such a way that it can be readily modified to take account of any newly understood gene regulation processes and feedback mechanisms affecting chemo-mechanical properties of cells.

  16. Chemo-mechanical modeling of tumor growth in elastic epithelial tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratsun, Dmitry A.; Zakharov, Andrey P.; Pismen, Len

    2016-08-01

    We propose a multiscale chemo-mechanical model of the cancer tumor development in the epithelial tissue. The epithelium is represented by an elastic 2D array of polygonal cells with its own gene regulation dynamics. The model allows the simulation of the evolution of multiple cells interacting via the chemical signaling or mechanically induced strain. The algorithm includes the division and intercalation of cells as well as the transformation of normal cells into a cancerous state triggered by a local failure of the spatial synchronization of the cellular rhythms driven by transcription/translation processes. Both deterministic and stochastic descriptions of the system are given for chemical signaling. The transformation of cells means the modification of their respective parameters responsible for chemo-mechanical interactions. The simulations reproduce a distinct behavior of invasive and localized carcinoma. Generally, the model is designed in such a way that it can be readily modified to take account of any newly understood gene regulation processes and feedback mechanisms affecting chemo-mechanical properties of cells.

  17. Collagenous Extracellular Matrix Biomaterials for Tissue Engineering: Lessons from the Common Sea Urchin Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Kheng Lim; Holmes, David F.

    2017-01-01

    Scaffolds for tissue engineering application may be made from a collagenous extracellular matrix (ECM) of connective tissues because the ECM can mimic the functions of the target tissue. The primary sources of collagenous ECM material are calf skin and bone. However, these sources are associated with the risk of having bovine spongiform encephalopathy or transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. Alternative sources for collagenous ECM materials may be derived from livestock, e.g., pigs, and from marine animals, e.g., sea urchins. Collagenous ECM of the sea urchin possesses structural features and mechanical properties that are similar to those of mammalian ones. However, even more intriguing is that some tissues such as the ligamentous catch apparatus can exhibit mutability, namely rapid reversible changes in the tissue mechanical properties. These tissues are known as mutable collagenous tissues (MCTs). The mutability of these tissues has been the subject of on-going investigations, covering the biochemistry, structural biology and mechanical properties of the collagenous components. Recent studies point to a nerve-control system for regulating the ECM macromolecules that are involved in the sliding action of collagen fibrils in the MCT. This review discusses the key attributes of the structure and function of the ECM of the sea urchin ligaments that are related to the fibril-fibril sliding action—the focus is on the respective components within the hierarchical architecture of the tissue. In this context, structure refers to size, shape and separation distance of the ECM components while function is associated with mechanical properties e.g., strength and stiffness. For simplicity, the components that address the different length scale from the largest to the smallest are as follows: collagen fibres, collagen fibrils, interfibrillar matrix and collagen molecules. Application of recent theories of stress transfer and fracture mechanisms in fibre reinforced

  18. Collagenous Extracellular Matrix Biomaterials for Tissue Engineering: Lessons from the Common Sea Urchin Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Kheng Lim; Holmes, David F

    2017-04-25

    Scaffolds for tissue engineering application may be made from a collagenous extracellular matrix (ECM) of connective tissues because the ECM can mimic the functions of the target tissue. The primary sources of collagenous ECM material are calf skin and bone. However, these sources are associated with the risk of having bovine spongiform encephalopathy or transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. Alternative sources for collagenous ECM materials may be derived from livestock, e.g., pigs, and from marine animals, e.g., sea urchins. Collagenous ECM of the sea urchin possesses structural features and mechanical properties that are similar to those of mammalian ones. However, even more intriguing is that some tissues such as the ligamentous catch apparatus can exhibit mutability, namely rapid reversible changes in the tissue mechanical properties. These tissues are known as mutable collagenous tissues (MCTs). The mutability of these tissues has been the subject of on-going investigations, covering the biochemistry, structural biology and mechanical properties of the collagenous components. Recent studies point to a nerve-control system for regulating the ECM macromolecules that are involved in the sliding action of collagen fibrils in the MCT. This review discusses the key attributes of the structure and function of the ECM of the sea urchin ligaments that are related to the fibril-fibril sliding action-the focus is on the respective components within the hierarchical architecture of the tissue. In this context, structure refers to size, shape and separation distance of the ECM components while function is associated with mechanical properties e.g., strength and stiffness. For simplicity, the components that address the different length scale from the largest to the smallest are as follows: collagen fibres, collagen fibrils, interfibrillar matrix and collagen molecules. Application of recent theories of stress transfer and fracture mechanisms in fibre reinforced

  19. Collagenous Extracellular Matrix Biomaterials for Tissue Engineering: Lessons from the Common Sea Urchin Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kheng Lim Goh

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Scaffolds for tissue engineering application may be made from a collagenous extracellular matrix (ECM of connective tissues because the ECM can mimic the functions of the target tissue. The primary sources of collagenous ECM material are calf skin and bone. However, these sources are associated with the risk of having bovine spongiform encephalopathy or transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. Alternative sources for collagenous ECM materials may be derived from livestock, e.g., pigs, and from marine animals, e.g., sea urchins. Collagenous ECM of the sea urchin possesses structural features and mechanical properties that are similar to those of mammalian ones. However, even more intriguing is that some tissues such as the ligamentous catch apparatus can exhibit mutability, namely rapid reversible changes in the tissue mechanical properties. These tissues are known as mutable collagenous tissues (MCTs. The mutability of these tissues has been the subject of on-going investigations, covering the biochemistry, structural biology and mechanical properties of the collagenous components. Recent studies point to a nerve-control system for regulating the ECM macromolecules that are involved in the sliding action of collagen fibrils in the MCT. This review discusses the key attributes of the structure and function of the ECM of the sea urchin ligaments that are related to the fibril-fibril sliding action—the focus is on the respective components within the hierarchical architecture of the tissue. In this context, structure refers to size, shape and separation distance of the ECM components while function is associated with mechanical properties e.g., strength and stiffness. For simplicity, the components that address the different length scale from the largest to the smallest are as follows: collagen fibres, collagen fibrils, interfibrillar matrix and collagen molecules. Application of recent theories of stress transfer and fracture mechanisms in fibre

  20. A toolbox to explore the mechanics of living embryonic tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campàs, Otger

    2016-01-01

    The sculpting of embryonic tissues and organs into their functional morphologies involves the spatial and temporal regulation of mechanics at cell and tissue scales. Decades of in vitro work, complemented by some in vivo studies, have shown the relevance of mechanical cues in the control of cell behaviors that are central to developmental processes, but the lack of methodologies enabling precise, quantitative measurements of mechanical cues in vivo have hindered our understanding of the role of mechanics in embryonic development. Several methodologies are starting to enable quantitative studies of mechanics in vivo and in situ, opening new avenues to explore how mechanics contributes to shaping embryonic tissues and how it affects cell behavior within developing embryos. Here we review the present methodologies to study the role of mechanics in living embryonic tissues, considering their strengths and drawbacks as well as the conditions in which they are most suitable. PMID:27061360

  1. Comparison of osmotic swelling influences on meniscal fibrocartilage and articular cartilage tissue mechanics in compression and shear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, An M; Levenston, Marc E

    2012-01-01

    Although the contribution of the circumferential collagen bundles to the anisotropic tensile stiffness of meniscal tissue has been well described, the implications of interactions between tissue components for other mechanical properties have not been as widely examined. This study compared the effects of the proteoglycan-associated osmotic swelling stress on meniscal fibrocartilage and articular cartilage (AC) mechanics by manipulating the osmotic environment and tissue compressive offset. Cylindrical samples were obtained from the menisci and AC of bovine stifles, equilibrated in phosphate-buffered saline solutions ranging from 0.1× to 10×, and tested in oscillatory torsional shear and unconfined compression. Biochemical analysis indicated that treatments and testing did not substantially alter tissue composition. Mechanical testing revealed tissue-specific responses to both increasing compressive offset and decreasing bath salinity. Most notably, reduced salinity dramatically increased the shear modulus of both axially and circumferentially oriented meniscal tissue explants to a much greater extent than for cartilage samples. Combined with previous studies, these findings suggest that meniscal proteoglycans have a distinct structural role, stabilizing, and stiffening the matrix surrounding the primary circumferential collagen bundles. Copyright © 2011 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  2. Passive mechanical properties of rat abdominal wall muscles suggest an important role of the extracellular connective tissue matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Stephen H M; Carr, John Austin; Ward, Samuel R; Lieber, Richard L

    2012-08-01

    Abdominal wall muscles have a unique morphology suggesting a complex role in generating and transferring force to the spinal column. Studying passive mechanical properties of these muscles may provide insights into their ability to transfer force among structures. Biopsies from rectus abdominis (RA), external oblique (EO), internal oblique (IO), and transverse abdominis (TrA) were harvested from male Sprague-Dawley rats, and single muscle fibers and fiber bundles (4-8 fibers ensheathed in their connective tissue matrix) were isolated and mechanically stretched in a passive state. Slack sarcomere lengths were measured and elastic moduli were calculated from stress-strain data. Titin molecular mass was also measured from single muscle fibers. No significant differences were found among the four abdominal wall muscles in terms of slack sarcomere length or elastic modulus. Interestingly, across all four muscles, slack sarcomere lengths were quite long in individual muscle fibers (>2.4 µm), and demonstrated a significantly longer slack length in comparison to fiber bundles (p resistance to lengthening at long muscle lengths. Titin molecular mass was significantly less in TrA compared to each of the other three muscles (p < 0.0009), but this difference did not correspond to hypothesized differences in stiffness. Copyright © 2012 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  3. Mechanics of Biological Tissues and Biomaterials : Current Trends (editorial)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zadpoor, A.A.

    2015-01-01

    Investigation of the mechanical behavior of biological tissues and biomaterials has been an active area of research for several decades. However, in recent years, the enthusiasm in understanding the mechanical behavior of biological tissues and biomaterials has increased significantly due to the

  4. Compressed collagen constructs with optimized mechanical properties and cell interactions for tissue engineering applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ajalloueian, Fatemeh; Nikogeorgos, Nikolaos; Ajalloueian, Ali

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we are introducing a simple, fast and reliable add-in to the technique of plastic compression (PC) to obtain collagen sheets with decreased fibrillar densities, representing improved cell-interactions and mechanical properties. Collagen hydrogels with different initial concentratio...

  5. Experimental testing and constitutive modeling of the mechanical properties of the swine skin tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łagan, Sylwia D; Liber-Kneć, Aneta

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was an estimation of the possibility of using hyperelastic material models to fit experimental data obtained in the tensile test for the swine skin tissue. The uniaxial tensile tests of samples taken from the abdomen and back of a pig was carried out. The mechanical properties of the skin such as the mean Young's modulus, the mean maximum stress and the mean maximum elongation were calculated. The experimental data have been used to identify the parameters in specific strain-energy functions given in seven constitutive models of hyperelastic materials: neo-Hookean, Mooney-Rivlin, Ogden, Yeoh, Martins, Humphrey and Veronda-Westmann. An analysis of errors in fitting of theoretical and experimental data was done. Comparison of load -displacement curves for the back and abdomen regions of skin taken showed a different scope of both the mean maximum loading forces and the mean maximum elongation. Samples which have been prepared from the abdominal area had lower values of the mean maximum load compared to samples from the spine area. The reverse trend was observed during the analysis of the values of elongation. An analysis of the accuracy of model fitting to the experimental data showed that, the least accurate were the model of neo- -Hookean, model of Mooney-Rivlin for the abdominal region and model of Veronda-Westmann for the spine region. An analysis of seven hyperelastic material models showed good correlations between the experimental and the theoretical data for five models.

  6. Fourier transform infrared imaging microspectroscopy and tissue-level mechanical testing reveal intraspecies variation in mouse bone mineral and matrix composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtland, Hayden-William; Nasser, Philip; Goldstone, Andrew B; Spevak, Lyudmila; Boskey, Adele L; Jepsen, Karl J

    2008-11-01

    Fracture susceptibility is heritable and dependent upon bone morphology and quality. However, studies of bone quality are typically overshadowed by emphasis on bone geometry and bone mineral density. Given that differences in mineral and matrix composition exist in a variety of species, we hypothesized that genetic variation in bone quality and tissue-level mechanical properties would also exist within species. Sixteen-week-old female A/J, C57BL/6J (B6), and C3H/HeJ (C3H) inbred mouse femora were analyzed using Fourier transform infrared imaging and tissue-level mechanical testing for variation in mineral composition, mineral maturity, collagen cross-link ratio, and tissue-level mechanical properties. A/J femora had an increased mineral-to-matrix ratio compared to B6. The C3H mineral-to-matrix ratio was intermediate of A/J and B6. C3H femora had reduced acid phosphate and carbonate levels and an increased collagen cross-link ratio compared to A/J and B6. Modulus values paralleled mineral-to-matrix values, with A/J femora being the most stiff, B6 being the least stiff, and C3H having intermediate stiffness. In addition, work-to-failure varied among the strains, with the highly mineralized and brittle A/J femora performing the least amount of work-to-failure. Inbred mice are therefore able to differentially modulate the composition of their bone mineral and the maturity of their bone matrix in conjunction with tissue-level mechanical properties. These results suggest that specific combinations of bone quality and morphological traits are genetically regulated such that mechanically functional bones can be constructed in different ways.

  7. Modulation of the mechanical properties of ventricular extracellular matrix hydrogels with a carbodiimide crosslinker and investigation of their cellular compatibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyohei Fujita

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogels made from the cardiac extracellular matrix (ECM as two-dimensional (2D or 3D cell-culture substrates have beneficial biochemical effects on the differentiation of stem cells into cardiomyocytes. The mechanical properties of the substrates that match those of the host tissues have been identified as critical biophysical cues for coaxing the tissue-specific differentiation of stem cells. The objectives of the present study are (1 to fabricate hydrogels comprising pure ventricular ECM (vECM, (2 to make the gels possess mechanical properties similar to those of the decellularized ventricular tissue, and (3 to evaluate the cellular compatibility of the hydrogels. In order to achieve these aims, (1 a simplified protocol was developed to produce vECM solution easily and rapidly, (2 N-(3-Dimethylaminopropyl-N’-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride (EDAC was chosen to crosslink the hydrogels made from the vECM solution to enhance their mechanical properties and stabilize the microstructure of the gels, (3 rat embryonic fibroblasts or cardiomyocytes were cultured on these gels to determine the cellular compatibility of the gels. In particular, the nonlinearity and viscoelasticity of the gels were characterized quantitatively using a newly proposed nonlinear Kelvin model. The results showed that EDAC treatment allowed modulation of the mechanical properties of the gels to the same level as those of decellularized ventricular tissue in terms of the equilibrium elasticity and relaxation coefficient. Cell culture confirmed the cellular compatibility of the gels. Furthermore, an empirical relationship between the equilibrium elastic modulus of the gels and the vECM and EDAC concentrations was derived, which is important to tailor the mechanical properties of the gels. Finally, the influence of the mechanical properties of the gels on the behavior of cultured fibroblasts and cardiomyocytes was discussed.

  8. Novel technique for online characterization of cartilaginous tissue properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Tai-Yi; Huang, Chun-Yuh; Yong Gu, Wei

    2011-09-01

    The goal of tissue engineering is to use substitutes to repair and restore organ function. Bioreactors are an indispensable tool for monitoring and controlling the unique environment for engineered constructs to grow. However, in order to determine the biochemical properties of engineered constructs, samples need to be destroyed. In this study, we developed a novel technique to nondestructively online-characterize the water content and fixed charge density of cartilaginous tissues. A new technique was developed to determine the tissue mechano-electrochemical properties nondestructively. Bovine knee articular cartilage and lumbar annulus fibrosus were used in this study to demonstrate that this technique could be used on different types of tissue. The results show that our newly developed method is capable of precisely predicting the water volume fraction (less than 3% disparity) and fixed charge density (less than 16.7% disparity) within cartilaginous tissues. This novel technique will help to design a new generation of bioreactors which are able to actively determine the essential properties of the engineered constructs, as well as regulate the local environment to achieve the optimal conditions for cultivating constructs.

  9. Mechanics of Biological Tissues and Biomaterials: Current Trends

    OpenAIRE

    Amir A. Zadpoor

    2015-01-01

    Investigation of the mechanical behavior of biological tissues and biomaterials has been an active area of research for several decades. However, in recent years, the enthusiasm in understanding the mechanical behavior of biological tissues and biomaterials has increased significantly due to the development of novel biomaterials for new fields of application, along with the emergence of advanced computational techniques. The current Special Issue is a collection of studies that address variou...

  10. A structural model for the flexural mechanics of nonwoven tissue engineering scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelmayr, George C; Sacks, Michael S

    2006-08-01

    The development of methods to predict the strength and stiffness of biomaterials used in tissue engineering is critical for load-bearing applications in which the essential functional requirements are primarily mechanical. We previously quantified changes in the effective stiffness (E) of needled nonwoven polyglycolic acid (PGA) and poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) scaffolds due to tissue formation and scaffold degradation under three-point bending. Toward predicting these changes, we present a structural model for E of a needled nonwoven scaffold in flexure. The model accounted for the number and orientation of fibers within a representative volume element of the scaffold demarcated by the needling process. The spring-like effective stiffness of the curved fibers was calculated using the sinusoidal fiber shapes. Structural and mechanical properties of PGA and PLLA fibers and PGA, PLLA, and 50:50 PGA/PLLA scaffolds were measured and compared with model predictions. To verify the general predictive capability, the predicted dependence of E on fiber diameter was compared with experimental measurements. Needled nonwoven scaffolds were found to exhibit distinct preferred (PD) and cross-preferred (XD) fiber directions, with an E ratio (PD/XD) of approximately 3:1. The good agreement between the predicted and experimental dependence of E on fiber diameter (R2 = 0.987) suggests that the structural model can be used to design scaffolds with E values more similar to native soft tissues. A comparison with previous results for cell-seeded scaffolds (Engelmayr, G. C., Jr., et al., 2005, Biomaterials, 26(2), pp. 175-187) suggests, for the first time, that the primary mechanical effect of collagen deposition is an increase in the number of fiber-fiber bond points yielding effectively stiffer scaffold fibers. This finding indicated that the effects of tissue deposition on needled nonwoven scaffold mechanics do not follow a rule-of-mixtures behavior. These important results underscore

  11. Genipin crosslinker releasing sutures for improving the mechanical/repair strength of damaged connective tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararaj, Sharath; Slusarewicz, Paul; Brown, Matt; Hedman, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    The most common mode of surgical repair of ruptured tendons and ligaments involves the use of sutures for reattachment. However, there is a high incidence of rerupture and repair failure due to pulling out of the suture material from the damaged connective tissue. The main goal of this research was to achieve a localized delivery of crosslinking agent genipin (GP) from rapid-release biodegradable coatings on sutures, for strengthening the repair of ruptured connective tissue. Our hypothesis is that GP released from the suture coating will lead to exogenous crosslinking of native connective tissue resulting in beneficial effects on clinically relevant mechanical parameters such as tear resistance, tissue strength, and energy required to rupture the tissue (toughness). Sutures were successfully coated with a biodegradable polymer layer loaded with the crosslinking agent genipin, without compromising the mechanical properties of the suture. The rapid-release of genipin was achieved under both in vitro and ex vivo conditions. Exogenous crosslinking using these genipin releasing sutures was demonstrated using equine tendons. The tendons treated with genipin releasing sutures showed significant improvement in failure load, energy required for pull-out failure, and stiffness. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 2199-2205, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Influence of Nano-HA Coated Bone Collagen to Acrylic (Polymethylmethacrylate Bone Cement on Mechanical Properties and Bioactivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Li

    Full Text Available This research investigated the mechanical properties and bioactivity of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA bone cement after addition of the nano-hydroxyapatite(HA coated bone collagen (mineralized collagen, MC.The MC in different proportions were added to the PMMA bone cement to detect the compressive strength, compression modulus, coagulation properties and biosafety. The MC-PMMA was embedded into rabbits and co-cultured with MG 63 cells to exam bone tissue compatibility and gene expression of osteogenesis.15.0%(wt impregnated MC-PMMA significantly lowered compressive modulus while little affected compressive strength and solidification. MC-PMMA bone cement was biologically safe and indicated excellent bone tissue compatibility. The bone-cement interface crosslinking was significantly higher in MC-PMMA than control after 6 months implantation in the femur of rabbits. The genes of osteogenesis exhibited significantly higher expression level in MC-PMMA.MC-PMMA presented perfect mechanical properties, good biosafety and excellent biocompatibility with bone tissues, which has profoundly clinical values.

  13. The fracture properties and toughening mechanisms of bone and dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koester, Kurt John

    The mechanical properties of bone and dentin and in particular their fracture properties, are the subject of intense research. The relevance of these properties is increasing as our population ages and fracture incidence impacts the lives of a greater portion of the population. A robust framework is needed to understand the fracture properties of bone and dentin to guide researchers as they attempt to characterize the effects of aging, disease, and pharmaceutical treatments on the properties of these mineralized tissues. In the present work, this framework is provided and applied to human bone, human dentin, and animal bone. In situ electron microscopy was also used to identify the salient toughening mechanisms in bone and dentin. It was found that bone and dentin are extrinsically toughened materials and consequently their fracture properties are best characterized utilizing a crack-growth resistance approach. A description of the different mechanical measurements commonly employed when using small animal models (rats and mice) to evaluate the influence of drug therapies on bone fragility is provided. A study where these properties were measured for a large population of wild-type rats and mice was also conducted. Given my findings, it was determined that for the most complete understanding of small animal bone it was necessary to measure strength and toughness. Strength measurements probe the flaw distribution and toughness measurements to evaluate the resistance to facture in the presence of a single dominant worst-case flaw.

  14. Mechanical stretching for tissue engineering: two-dimensional and three-dimensional constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehl, Brandon D; Park, Jae-Hong; Kwon, Il Keun; Lim, Jung Yul

    2012-08-01

    Mechanical cell stretching may be an attractive strategy for the tissue engineering of mechanically functional tissues. It has been demonstrated that cell growth and differentiation can be guided by cell stretch with minimal help from soluble factors and engineered tissues that are mechanically stretched in bioreactors may have superior organization, functionality, and strength compared with unstretched counterparts. This review explores recent studies on cell stretching in both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) setups focusing on the applications of stretch stimulation as a tool for controlling cell orientation, growth, gene expression, lineage commitment, and differentiation and for achieving successful tissue engineering of mechanically functional tissues, including cardiac, muscle, vasculature, ligament, tendon, bone, and so on. Custom stretching devices and lab-specific mechanical bioreactors are described with a discussion on capabilities and limitations. While stretch mechanotransduction pathways have been examined using 2D stretch, studying such pathways in physiologically relevant 3D environments may be required to understand how cells direct tissue development under stretch. Cell stretch study using 3D milieus may also help to develop tissue-specific stretch regimens optimized with biochemical feedback, which once developed will provide optimal tissue engineering protocols.

  15. Mechanically robust cryogels with injectability and bioprinting supportability for adipose tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Dianjun; Wu, Shaohua; Kuss, Mitchell A; Shi, Wen; Chung, Soonkyu; Deegan, Paul T; Kamenskiy, Alexey; He, Yini; Duan, Bin

    2018-05-26

    Bioengineered adipose tissues have gained increased interest as a promising alternative to autologous tissue flaps and synthetic adipose fillers for soft tissue augmentation and defect reconstruction in clinic. Although many scaffolding materials and biofabrication methods have been investigated for adipose tissue engineering in the last decades, there are still challenges to recapitulate the appropriate adipose tissue microenvironment, maintain volume stability, and induce vascularization to achieve long-term function and integration. In the present research, we fabricated cryogels consisting of methacrylated gelatin, methacrylated hyaluronic acid, and 4arm poly(ethylene glycol) acrylate (PEG-4A) by using cryopolymerization. The cryogels were repeatedly injectable and stretchable, and the addition of PEG-4A improved the robustness and mechanical properties. The cryogels supported human adipose progenitor cell (HWA) and adipose derived mesenchymal stromal cell adhesion, proliferation, and adipogenic differentiation and maturation, regardless of the addition of PEG-4A. The HWA laden cryogels facilitated the co-culture of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and capillary-like network formation, which in return also promoted adipogenesis. We further combined cryogels with 3D bioprinting to generate handleable adipose constructs with clinically relevant size. 3D bioprinting enabled the deposition of multiple bioinks onto the cryogels. The bioprinted flap-like constructs had an integrated structure without delamination and supported vascularization. Adipose tissue engineering is promising for reconstruction of soft tissue defects, and also challenging for restoring and maintaining soft tissue volume and shape, and achieving vascularization and integration. In this study, we fabricated cryogels with mechanical robustness, injectability, and stretchability by using cryopolymerization. The cryogels promoted cell adhesion, proliferation, and adipogenic

  16. Glial Tissue Mechanics and Mechanosensing by Glial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Pogoda

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanical behavior of human brain is critical to interpret the role of physical stimuli in both normal and pathological processes that occur in CNS tissue, such as development, inflammation, neurodegeneration, aging, and most common brain tumors. Despite clear evidence that mechanical cues influence both normal and transformed brain tissue activity as well as normal and transformed brain cell behavior, little is known about the links between mechanical signals and their biochemical and medical consequences. A multi-level approach from whole organ rheology to single cell mechanics is needed to understand the physical aspects of human brain function and its pathologies. This review summarizes the latest achievements in the field.

  17. Advances in Application of Mechanical Stimuli in Bioreactors for Cartilage Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ke; Zhang, Chunqiu; Qiu, Lulu; Gao, Lilan; Zhang, Xizheng

    2017-08-01

    Articular cartilage (AC) is the weight-bearing tissue in diarthroses. It lacks the capacity for self-healing once there are injuries or diseases due to its avascularity. With the development of tissue engineering, repairing cartilage defects through transplantation of engineered cartilage that closely matches properties of native cartilage has become a new option for curing cartilage diseases. The main hurdle for clinical application of engineered cartilage is how to develop functional cartilage constructs for mass production in a credible way. Recently, impressive hyaline cartilage that may have the potential to provide capabilities for treating large cartilage lesions in the future has been produced in laboratories. The key to functional cartilage construction in vitro is to identify appropriate mechanical stimuli. First, they should ensure the function of metabolism because mechanical stimuli play the role of blood vessels in the metabolism of AC, for example, acquiring nutrition and removing wastes. Second, they should mimic the movement of synovial joints and produce phenotypically correct tissues to achieve the adaptive development between the micro- and macrostructure and function. In this article, we divide mechanical stimuli into three types according to forces transmitted by different media in bioreactors, namely forces transmitted through the liquid medium, solid medium, or other media, then we review and summarize the research status of bioreactors for cartilage tissue engineering (CTE), mainly focusing on the effects of diverse mechanical stimuli on engineered cartilage. Based on current researches, there are several motion patterns in knee joints; but compression, tension, shear, fluid shear, or hydrostatic pressure each only partially reflects the mechanical condition in vivo. In this study, we propose that rolling-sliding-compression load consists of various stimuli that will represent better mechanical environment in CTE. In addition, engineers

  18. From cells to tissue: A continuum model of epithelial mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Shuji; Marcq, Philippe; Sugimura, Kaoru

    2017-08-01

    A two-dimensional continuum model of epithelial tissue mechanics was formulated using cellular-level mechanical ingredients and cell morphogenetic processes, including cellular shape changes and cellular rearrangements. This model incorporates stress and deformation tensors, which can be compared with experimental data. Focusing on the interplay between cell shape changes and cell rearrangements, we elucidated dynamical behavior underlying passive relaxation, active contraction-elongation, and tissue shear flow, including a mechanism for contraction-elongation, whereby tissue flows perpendicularly to the axis of cell elongation. This study provides an integrated scheme for the understanding of the orchestration of morphogenetic processes in individual cells to achieve epithelial tissue morphogenesis.

  19. A classification of the mechanisms producing pathological tissue changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grippo, John O; Oh, Daniel S

    2013-05-01

    The objectives are to present a classification of mechanisms which can produce pathological changes in body tissues and fluids, as well as to clarify and define the term biocorrosion, which has had a singular use in engineering. Considering the emerging field of biomedical engineering, it is essential to use precise definitions in the lexicons of engineering, bioengineering and related sciences such as medicine, dentistry and veterinary medicine. The mechanisms of stress, friction and biocorrosion and their pathological effects on tissues are described. Biocorrosion refers to the chemical, biochemical and electrochemical changes by degradation or induced growth of living body tissues and fluids. Various agents which can affect living tissues causing biocorrosion are enumerated which support the necessity and justify the use of this encompassing and more precise definition of biocorrosion. A distinction is made between the mechanisms of corrosion and biocorrosion.

  20. Non-Fourier based thermal-mechanical tissue damage prediction for thermal ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Zhong, Yongmin; Smith, Julian; Gu, Chengfan

    2017-01-02

    Prediction of tissue damage under thermal loads plays important role for thermal ablation planning. A new methodology is presented in this paper by combing non-Fourier bio-heat transfer, constitutive elastic mechanics as well as non-rigid motion of dynamics to predict and analyze thermal distribution, thermal-induced mechanical deformation and thermal-mechanical damage of soft tissues under thermal loads. Simulations and comparison analysis demonstrate that the proposed methodology based on the non-Fourier bio-heat transfer can account for the thermal-induced mechanical behaviors of soft tissues and predict tissue thermal damage more accurately than classical Fourier bio-heat transfer based model.

  1. Mechanical Properties of Human Patellar Tendon at the Hierarchical levels of Tendon and Fibril

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Rene Brüggebusch; Hansen, Philip; Hassenkam, Tue

    2012-01-01

    Tendons are strong hierarchical structures, but how tensile forces are transmitted between different levels remains incompletely understood. Collagen fibrils are thought to be primary determinants of whole tendon properties, and therefore we hypothesized that the whole human patellar tendon and its...... distinct collagen fibrils would display similar mechanical properties. Human patellar tendons (n=5) were mechanically tested in vivo by ultrasonography. Biopsies were obtained from each tendon and individual collagen fibrils were dissected and tested mechanically by atomic force microscopy. The Young...... that of tendon supports that fibrillar rather than interfibrillar properties govern sub-failure tendon response, making the fibrillar level a meaningful target of intervention. The lower modulus found in vitro suggests a possible adverse effect of removing the tissue from its natural environment. In addition...

  2. One-month spaceflight compromises the bone microstructure, tissue-level mechanical properties, osteocyte survival and lacunae volume in mature mice skeletons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbaix, Maude; Gnyubkin, Vasily; Farlay, Delphine; Olivier, Cécile; Ammann, Patrick; Courbon, Guillaume; Laroche, Norbert; Genthial, Rachel; Follet, Hélène; Peyrin, Françoise; Shenkman, Boris; Gauquelin-Koch, Guillemette; Vico, Laurence

    2017-06-01

    The weightless environment during spaceflight induces site-specific bone loss. The 30-day Bion-M1 mission offered a unique opportunity to characterize the skeletal changes after spaceflight and an 8-day recovery period in mature male C57/BL6 mice. In the femur metaphysis, spaceflight decreased the trabecular bone volume (-64% vs. Habitat Control), dramatically increased the bone resorption (+140% vs. Habitat Control) and induced marrow adiposity invasion. At the diaphysis, cortical thinning associated with periosteal resorption was observed. In the Flight animal group, the osteocyte lacunae displayed a reduced volume and a more spherical shape (synchrotron radiation analyses), and empty lacunae were highly increased (+344% vs. Habitat Control). Tissue-level mechanical cortical properties (i.e., hardness and modulus) were locally decreased by spaceflight, whereas the mineral characteristics and collagen maturity were unaffected. In the vertebrae, spaceflight decreased the overall bone volume and altered the modulus in the periphery of the trabecular struts. Despite normalized osteoclastic activity and an increased osteoblast number, bone recovery was not observed 8 days after landing. In conclusion, spaceflight induces osteocyte death, which may trigger bone resorption and result in bone mass and microstructural deterioration. Moreover, osteocyte cell death, lacunae mineralization and fatty marrow, which are hallmarks of ageing, may impede tissue maintenance and repair.

  3. Vascularization of soft tissue engineering constructs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pimentel Carletto, Rodrigo

    with mechanical properties in the range of soft tissues has not been fully achieved. My project focused on the fabrication and the active perfusion of hydrogel constructs with multi-dimensional vasculature and controlled mechanical properties targeting soft tissues. Specifically, the initial part of the research...... nanotechnology-based paradigm for engineering vascularised liver tissue for transplantation”) and the Danish National Research Foundation and Villum Foundation’s Center for Intelligent Drug delivery and sensing Using microcontainers and Nanomechanics (Danish National Research Foundation (DNRF122)....

  4. Assessment of the mechanics of a tissue-engineered rat trachea in an image-processing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Thiago Henrique Gomes da; Pazetti, Rogerio; Aoki, Fabio Gava; Cardoso, Paulo Francisco Guerreiro; Valenga, Marcelo Henrique; Deffune, Elenice; Evaristo, Thaiane; Pêgo-Fernandes, Paulo Manuel; Moriya, Henrique Takachi

    2014-07-01

    Despite the recent success regarding the transplantation of tissue-engineered airways, the mechanical properties of these grafts are not well understood. Mechanical assessment of a tissue-engineered airway graft before implantation may be used in the future as a predictor of function. The aim of this preliminary work was to develop a noninvasive image-processing environment for the assessment of airway mechanics. Decellularized, recellularized and normal tracheas (groups DECEL, RECEL, and CONTROL, respectively) immersed in Krebs-Henseleit solution were ventilated by a small-animal ventilator connected to a Fleisch pneumotachograph and two pressure transducers (differential and gauge). A camera connected to a stereomicroscope captured images of the pulsation of the trachea before instillation of saline solution and after instillation of Krebs-Henseleit solution, followed by instillation with Krebs-Henseleit with methacholine 0.1 M (protocols A, K and KMCh, respectively). The data were post-processed with computer software and statistical comparisons between groups and protocols were performed. There were statistically significant variations in the image measurements of the medial region of the trachea between the groups (two-way analysis of variance [ANOVA], pmechanical assessment of engineered tracheal grafts that will enable evaluation of the viscoelastic properties of neo-tracheas prior to transplantation.

  5. Effects of collagen microstructure and material properties on the deformation of the neural tissues of the lamina cribrosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhees, A P; Jan, N-J; Sigal, I A

    2017-08-01

    It is widely considered that intraocular pressure (IOP)-induced deformation within the neural tissue pores of the lamina cribrosa (LC) contributes to neurodegeneration and glaucoma. Our goal was to study how the LC microstructure and mechanical properties determine the mechanical insult to the neural tissues within the pores of the LC. Polarized light microscopy was used to measure the collagen density and orientation in histology sections of three sheep optic nerve heads (ONH) at both mesoscale (4.4μm) and microscale (0.73μm) resolutions. Mesoscale fiber-aware FE models were first used to calculate ONH deformations at an IOP of 30mmHg. The results were then used as boundary conditions for microscale models of LC regions. Models predicted large insult to the LC neural tissues, with 95th percentile 1st principal strains ranging from 7 to 12%. Pores near the scleral boundary suffered significantly higher stretch compared to pores in more central regions (10.0±1.4% vs. 7.2±0.4%; p=0.014; mean±SD). Variations in material properties altered the minimum, median, and maximum levels of neural tissue insult but largely did not alter the patterns of pore-to-pore variation, suggesting these patterns are determined by the underlying structure and geometry of the LC beams and pores. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first computational model that reproduces the highly heterogeneous neural tissue strain fields observed experimentally. The loss of visual function associated with glaucoma has been attributed to sustained mechanical insult to the neural tissues of the lamina cribrosa due to elevated intraocular pressure. Our study is the first computational model built from specimen-specific tissue microstructure to consider the mechanics of the neural tissues of the lamina separately from the connective tissue. We found that the deformation of the neural tissue was much larger than that predicted by any recent microstructure-aware models of the lamina. These results

  6. Lithium doped calcium phosphate cement maintains physical mechanical properties and promotes osteoblast proliferation and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Wang, Renchong; Li, Baichuan; Liang, Wei; Pan, Haobo; Cui, Xu; Tang, Jingli; Li, Bing

    2017-07-01

    Calcium phosphate cement (CPC) has been widely used in bone tissue repairing due to its physical mechanical properties and biocompatibility. Addition of trace element to CPC has shown promising evidence to improve the physical properties and biological activities of CPC. Lithium (Li) has effect on osteoblast proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we incorporated Li to CPC and examined the physical properties of Li/CPC and its effect on osteoblast proliferation and differentiation. We found that Li doped CPC maintained similar setting time, pore size distribution, compressive strength, composition, and morphology as CPC without Li. Additionally, Li doped CPC improved osteoblast proliferation and differentiation significantly compared to CPC without Li. To our knowledge, our results, for the first time, show that Li doped CPC has beneficial effect on osteoblast in cell culture while keeps the excellent physical-mechanical properties of CPC. This study will lead to potential application of Li doped CPC in bone tissue engineering. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 944-952, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Evaluation of ionizing radiation effects in bone tissue by FTIR spectroscopy and dynamic mechanical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veloso, Marcelo N.; Santin, Stefany P.; Benetti, Carolina; Pereira, Thiago M.; Mattor, Monica B.; Politano, Rodolfo; Zezell, Denise M.

    2013-01-01

    In many medical practices the bone tissue exposure to ionizing radiation is necessary. However, this radiation can interact with bone tissue in a molecular level, causing chemical and mechanical changes related with the dose used. The aim of this study was verify the changes promoted by different doses of ionizing radiation in bone tissue using spectroscopy technique of Attenuate Total Reflectance - Fourier Transforms Infrared (ATR-FTIR) and dynamic mechanical analysis. Samples of bovine bone were irradiated using irradiator of Cobalt-60 with five different doses between 0.01 kGy, 0.1 kGy,1 kGy, 15 kGy and 75 kGy. To study the effects of ionizing irradiation on bone chemical structure the sub-bands of amide I and the crystallinity index were studied. The mechanical changes were evaluated using the elastic modulus and the damping value. To verify if the chemical changes and the bone mechanic characteristics were related, it was made one study about the correlation between the crystallinity index and the elastic modulus, between the sub-bands ratio and the damping value and between the sub-bands ratio and the elastic modulus. It was possible to evaluate the effects of different dose of ionizing radiation in bone tissue. With ATR-FTIR spectroscopy analysis, it was possible observe changes in the organic components and in the hydroxyapatite crystals organization. Changes were also observed in the mechanical properties. A good correlation between the techniques was found, however, it was not possible to establish a linear or exponential dependence between dose and effect. (author)

  8. Estimating patient-specific soft-tissue properties in a TKA knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Joseph A; Kaufman, Michelle K; Hutter, Erin E; Granger, Jeffrey F; Beal, Matthew D; Piazza, Stephen J; Siston, Robert A

    2016-03-01

    Surgical technique is one factor that has been identified as critical to success of total knee arthroplasty. Researchers have shown that computer simulations can aid in determining how decisions in the operating room generally affect post-operative outcomes. However, to use simulations to make clinically relevant predictions about knee forces and motions for a specific total knee patient, patient-specific models are needed. This study introduces a methodology for estimating knee soft-tissue properties of an individual total knee patient. A custom surgical navigation system and stability device were used to measure the force-displacement relationship of the knee. Soft-tissue properties were estimated using a parameter optimization that matched simulated tibiofemoral kinematics with experimental tibiofemoral kinematics. Simulations using optimized ligament properties had an average root mean square error of 3.5° across all tests while simulations using generic ligament properties taken from literature had an average root mean square error of 8.4°. Specimens showed large variability among ligament properties regardless of similarities in prosthetic component alignment and measured knee laxity. These results demonstrate the importance of soft-tissue properties in determining knee stability, and suggest that to make clinically relevant predictions of post-operative knee motions and forces using computer simulations, patient-specific soft-tissue properties are needed. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Colloquium: Mechanical formalisms for tissue dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tlili, Sham; Gay, Cyprien; Graner, François; Marcq, Philippe; Molino, François; Saramito, Pierre

    2015-05-01

    The understanding of morphogenesis in living organisms has been renewed by tremendous progress in experimental techniques that provide access to cell scale, quantitative information both on the shapes of cells within tissues and on the genes being expressed. This information suggests that our understanding of the respective contributions of gene expression and mechanics, and of their crucial entanglement, will soon leap forward. Biomechanics increasingly benefits from models, which assist the design and interpretation of experiments, point out the main ingredients and assumptions, and ultimately lead to predictions. The newly accessible local information thus calls for a reflection on how to select suitable classes of mechanical models. We review both mechanical ingredients suggested by the current knowledge of tissue behaviour, and modelling methods that can help generate a rheological diagram or a constitutive equation. We distinguish cell scale ("intra-cell") and tissue scale ("inter-cell") contributions. We recall the mathematical framework developed for continuum materials and explain how to transform a constitutive equation into a set of partial differential equations amenable to numerical resolution. We show that when plastic behaviour is relevant, the dissipation function formalism appears appropriate to generate constitutive equations; its variational nature facilitates numerical implementation, and we discuss adaptations needed in the case of large deformations. The present article gathers theoretical methods that can readily enhance the significance of the data to be extracted from recent or future high throughput biomechanical experiments.

  10. Modeling the impact of scaffold architecture and mechanical loading on collagen turnover in engineered cardiovascular tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argento, G; de Jonge, N; Söntjens, S H M; Oomens, C W J; Bouten, C V C; Baaijens, F P T

    2015-06-01

    The anisotropic collagen architecture of an engineered cardiovascular tissue has a major impact on its in vivo mechanical performance. This evolving collagen architecture is determined by initial scaffold microstructure and mechanical loading. Here, we developed and validated a theoretical and computational microscale model to quantitatively understand the interplay between scaffold architecture and mechanical loading on collagen synthesis and degradation. Using input from experimental studies, we hypothesize that both the microstructure of the scaffold and the loading conditions influence collagen turnover. The evaluation of the mechanical and topological properties of in vitro engineered constructs reveals that the formation of extracellular matrix layers on top of the scaffold surface influences the mechanical anisotropy on the construct. Results show that the microscale model can successfully capture the collagen arrangement between the fibers of an electrospun scaffold under static and cyclic loading conditions. Contact guidance by the scaffold, and not applied load, dominates the collagen architecture. Therefore, when the collagen grows inside the pores of the scaffold, pronounced scaffold anisotropy guarantees the development of a construct that mimics the mechanical anisotropy of the native cardiovascular tissue.

  11. Nanocomposite scaffolds with tunable mechanical and degradation capabilities: co-delivery of bioactive agents for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattalini, Juan P; Roether, Judith; Hoppe, Alexander; Pishbin, Fatemeh; Haro Durand, Luis; Gorustovich, Alejandro; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Lucangioli, Silvia; Mouriño, Viviana

    2016-10-21

    Novel multifunctional nanocomposite scaffolds made of nanobioactive glass and alginate crosslinked with therapeutic ions such as calcium and copper were developed for delivering therapeutic agents, in a highly controlled and sustainable manner, for bone tissue engineering. Alendronate, a well-known antiresorptive agent, was formulated into microspheres under optimized conditions and effectively loaded within the novel multifunctional scaffolds with a high encapsulation percentage. The size of the cation used for the alginate crosslinking impacted directly on porosity and viscoelastic properties, and thus, on the degradation rate and the release profile of copper, calcium and alendronate. According to this, even though highly porous structures were created with suitable pore sizes for cell ingrowth and vascularization in both cases, copper-crosslinked scaffolds showed higher values of porosity, elastic modulus, degradation rate and the amount of copper and alendronate released, when compared with calcium-crosslinked scaffolds. In addition, in all cases, the scaffolds showed bioactivity and mechanical properties close to the endogenous trabecular bone tissue in terms of viscoelasticity. Furthermore, the scaffolds showed osteogenic and angiogenic properties on bone and endothelial cells, respectively, and the extracts of the biomaterials used promoted the formation of blood vessels in an ex vivo model. These new bioactive nanocomposite scaffolds represent an exciting new class of therapeutic cell delivery carrier with tunable mechanical and degradation properties; potentially useful in the controlled and sustainable delivery of therapeutic agents with active roles in bone formation and angiogenesis, as well as in the support of cell proliferation and osteogenesis for bone tissue engineering.

  12. Resilin-like polypeptide-poly(ethylene gylcol) hybrid hydrogels for mechanically-demanding tissue engineering applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGann, Christopher Leland

    Technological progress in the life sciences and engineering has combined with important insights in the fields of biology and material science to make possible the development of biological substitutes which aim to restore function to damaged tissue. Numerous biomimetic hydrogels have been developed with the purpose of harnessing the regenerative capacity of cells and tissue through the rational deployment of biological signals. Aided by recombinant DNA technology and protein engineering methods, a new class of hydrogel precursor, the biosynthetic protein polymer, has demonstrated great promise towards the development of highly functional tissue engineering materials. In particular, protein polymers based upon resilin, a natural protein elastomer, have demonstrated outstanding mechanical properties that would have great value in soft tissue applications. This dissertation introduces hybrid hydrogels composed of recombinant resilin-like polypeptides (RLPs) cross-linked with multi-arm PEG macromers. Two different chemical strategies were employed to form RLP-PEG hydrogels: one utilized a Michael-type addition reaction between the thiols of cysteine residues present within the RLP and vinyl sulfone moieties functionalized on a multi-arm PEG macromer; the second system cross-links a norbornene-functionalized RLP with a thiol-functionalized multi-arm PEG macromer via a photoinitiated thiol-ene step polymerization. Oscillatory rheology and tensile testing confirmed the formation of elastic, resilient hydrogels in the RLP-PEG system cross-linked via Michael-type addition. These hydrogels supported the encapsulation and culture of both human aortic adventitial fibroblasts and human mesenchymal stem cells. Additionally, these RLP-PEG hydrogels exhibited phase separation behavior during cross-linking that led to the formation of a heterogeneous microstructure. Degradation could be triggered through incubation with matrix metalloproteinase. Photocross-linking was conferred to

  13. Effect of anti-sclerostin therapy and osteogenesis imperfecta on tissue-level properties in growing and adult mice while controlling for tissue age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinder, Benjamin P; Lloyd, William R; Salemi, Joseph D; Marini, Joan C; Caird, Michelle S; Morris, Michael D; Kozloff, Kenneth M

    2016-03-01

    Bone composition and biomechanics at the tissue-level are important contributors to whole bone strength. Sclerostin antibody (Scl-Ab) is a candidate anabolic therapy for the treatment of osteoporosis that increases bone formation, bone mass, and bone strength in animal studies, but its effect on bone quality at the tissue-level has received little attention. Pre-clinical studies of Scl-Ab have recently expanded to include diseases with altered collagen and material properties such as osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of Scl-Ab on bone quality by determining bone material composition and tissue-level mechanical properties in normal wild type (WT) tissue, as well as mice with a typical OI Gly➔Cys mutation (Brtl/+) in type I collagen. Rapidly growing (3-week-old) and adult (6-month-old) WT and Brtl/+ mice were treated for 5weeks with Scl-Ab. Fluorescent guided tissue-level bone composition analysis (Raman spectroscopy) and biomechanical testing (nanoindentation) were performed at multiple tissue ages. Scl-Ab increased mineral to matrix in adult WT and Brtl/+ at tissue ages of 2-4wks. However, no treatment related changes were observed in mineral to matrix levels at mid-cortex, and elastic modulus was not altered by Scl-Ab at any tissue age. Increased mineral-to-matrix was phenotypically observed in adult Brtl/+ OI mice (at tissue ages>3wks) and rapidly growing Brtl/+ (at tissue ages>4wks) mice compared to WT. At identical tissue ages defined by fluorescent labels, adult mice had generally lower mineral to matrix ratios and a greater elastic modulus than rapidly growing mice, demonstrating that bone matrix quality can be influenced by animal age and tissue age alike. In summary, these data suggest that Scl-Ab alters the matrix chemistry of newly formed bone while not affecting the elastic modulus, induces similar changes between Brtl/+ and WT mice, and provides new insight into the interaction between tissue age and

  14. Polyurethane/fluor-hydroxyapatite nanocomposite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Part I: morphological, physical, and mechanical characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asefnejad, Azadeh; Behnamghader, Aliasghar; Khorasani, Mohammad Taghi; Farsadzadeh, Babak

    2011-01-01

    In this study, new nano-fluor-hydroxyapatite (nFHA)/polyurethane composite scaffolds were fabricated for potential use in bone tissue engineering. Polyester urethane samples were synthesized from polycaprolactone, hexamethylene diisocyanate, and 1,4-butanediol as chain extender. Nano fluor-hydroxyapatite (nFHA) was successfully synthesized by sol-gel method. The solid–liquid phase separation and solvent sublimation methods were used for preparation of the porous composites. Mechanical properties, chemical structure, and morphological characteristics of the samples were investigated by compressive test, Fourier transform infrared, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques, respectively. The effect of nFHA powder content on porosity and pore morphology was investigated. SEM images demonstrated that the scaffolds were constituted of interconnected and homogeneously distributed pores. The pore size of the scaffolds was in the range 50–250 μm. The result obtained in this research revealed that the porosity and pore average size decreased and compressive modulus increased with nFHA percentage. Considering morphological, physical, and mechanical properties, the scaffold with a higher ratio of nFHA has suitable potential use in tissue regeneration. PMID:21289986

  15. Tissue Acoustoelectric Effect Modeling From Solid Mechanics Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xizi; Qin, Yexian; Xu, Yanbin; Ingram, Pier; Witte, Russell S; Dong, Feng

    2017-10-01

    The acoustoelectric (AE) effect is a basic physical phenomenon, which underlies the changes made in the conductivity of a medium by the application of focused ultrasound. Recently, based on the AE effect, several biomedical imaging techniques have been widely studied, such as ultrasound-modulated electrical impedance tomography and ultrasound current source density imaging. To further investigate the mechanism of the AE effect in tissue and to provide guidance for such techniques, we have modeled the tissue AE effect using the theory of solid mechanics. Both bulk compression and thermal expansion of tissue are considered and discussed. Computation simulation shows that the muscle AE effect result, conductivity change rate, is 3.26×10 -3 with 4.3-MPa peak pressure, satisfying the theoretical value. Bulk compression plays the main role for muscle AE effect, while thermal expansion makes almost no contribution to it. In addition, the AE signals of porcine muscle are measured at different focal positions. With the same magnitude order and the same change trend, the experiment result confirms that the simulation result is effective. Both simulation and experimental results validate that tissue AE effect modeling using solid mechanics theory is feasible, which is of significance for the further development of related biomedical imaging techniques.

  16. Active Tension Network model reveals an exotic mechanical state realized in epithelial tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, Nicholas; Mani, Madhav; Heemskerk, Idse; Streicha, Sebastian; Shraiman, Boris

    Mechanical interactions play a crucial role in epithelial morphogenesis, yet understanding the complex mechanisms through which stress and deformation affect cell behavior remains an open problem. Here we formulate and analyze the Active Tension Network (ATN) model, which assumes that mechanical balance of cells is dominated by cortical tension and introduces tension dependent active remodeling of the cortex. We find that ATNs exhibit unusual mechanical properties: i) ATN behaves as a fluid at short times, but at long times it supports external tension, like a solid; ii) its mechanical equilibrium state has extensive degeneracy associated with a discrete conformal - ''isogonal'' - deformation of cells. ATN model predicts a constraint on equilibrium cell geometry, which we demonstrate to hold in certain epithelial tissues. We further show that isogonal modes are observed in a fruit fly embryo, accounting for the striking variability of apical area of ventral cells and helping understand the early phase of gastrulation. Living matter realizes new and exotic mechanical states, understanding which helps understand biological phenomena.

  17. Variation in tissue outcome of ovine and human engineered heart valve constructs : relevance for tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geemen, van D.; Driessen - Mol, A.; Grootzwagers, L.G.M.; Soekhradj - Soechit, R.S.; Riem Vis, P.W.; Baaijens, F.P.T.; Bouten, C.V.C.

    AIM: Clinical application of tissue engineered heart valves requires precise control of the tissue culture process to predict tissue composition and mechanical properties prior to implantation, and to understand the variation in tissue outcome. To this end we investigated cellular phenotype and

  18. Mechanics of Biological Tissues and Biomaterials: Current Trends (editorial)

    OpenAIRE

    Zadpoor, A.A.

    2015-01-01

    Investigation of the mechanical behavior of biological tissues and biomaterials has been an active area of research for several decades. However, in recent years, the enthusiasm in understanding the mechanical behavior of biological tissues and biomaterials has increased significantly due to the development of novel biomaterials for new fields of application, along with the emergence of advanced computational techniques. The current Special Issue is a collection of studies that address variou...

  19. Effects of pore design on mechanical properties of nanoporous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, Nicholas; Becton, Matthew; Zhang, Liuyang; Wang, Xianqiao

    2017-01-01

    Nanoporous silicon has been emerging as a powerful building block for next-generation sensors, catalysts, transistors, and tissue scaffolds. The capability to design novel devices with desired mechanical properties is paramount to their reliability and serviceability. In order to bring further resolution to the highly variable mechanical characteristics of nanoporous silicon, here we perform molecular dynamics simulations to study the effects of ligament thickness, relative density, and pore geometry/orientation on the mechanical properties of nanoporous silicon, thereby determining its Young's modulus, ultimate strength, and toughness as well as the scaling laws versus the features of interior ligaments. Results show that pore shape and pattern dictate stress accumulation inside the designed structure, leading to the corresponding failure signature, such as stretching-dominated, bending-dominated, or stochastic failure signatures, in nanoporous silicon. The nanostructure of the material is also seen to drive or mute size effects such as “smaller is stronger” and “smaller is ductile”. This investigation provides useful insight into the behavior of nanoporous silicon and how one might leverage its promising applications. - Graphical abstract: Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to study the effects of ligament thickness, relative density, and pore geometry/orientation on the mechanical properties of nanoporous silicon, thereby determining its Young's modulus, ultimate strength, and toughness as well as the scaling trends versus the features of interior ligaments.

  20. Effect of eccentric training on the plantar flexor muscle-tendon tissue properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahieu, Nele Nathalie; McNair, Peter; Cools, Ann; D'Haen, Caroline; Vandermeulen, Katrien; Witvrouw, Erik

    2008-01-01

    It has been shown that eccentric training can be effective in the rehabilitation of patients with Achilles tendonopathy. The mechanism behind these results is not clear. However, there is evidence that tendons are able to respond to repeated forces by altering their structure and composition, and, thus, their mechanical properties change. In this regard, the objective of the present study was to investigate whether eccentric training affects the mechanical properties of the plantar flexor's muscle-tendon tissue properties. Seventy-four healthy subjects were randomized into two groups: an eccentric training group and a control group. The eccentric training group performed a 6-wk eccentric training program for the calf muscles. Before and after this period, all subjects were evaluated for dorsiflexion range of motion using universal goniometry, passive resistive torque of the plantar flexors, and stiffness of the Achilles tendon. Passive resistive torque was measured during ankle dorsiflexion on an isokinetic dynamometer. Stiffness of the Achilles tendon was assessed using a dynamometer, in combination with ultrasonography. The results of the study reveal that the dorsiflexion range of motion was significantly increased only in the eccentric training group. The eccentric heel drop program also resulted in a significant decrease of the passive resistive torque of the plantar flexors (from 16.423 +/- 0.827 to 12.651 +/- 0.617 N.m). The stiffness of the Achilles tendon did not change significantly as a result of training. These findings provide evidence that an eccentric training program results in changes to some of the mechanical properties of the plantar flexor muscles. These changes were thought to be associated with modifications to structure rather than to stretch tolerance.

  1. Effects of cyclic compression on the mechanical properties and calcification process of immature chick bone tissue in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Eijiro; Nakagaki, Masashi; Ichikawa, Katsuhisa; Nagayama, Kazuaki; Matsumoto, Takeo

    2017-06-01

    Contribution of mechanical loading to tissue growth during both the development and post-natal maturation is of a particular interest, as its understanding would be important to strategies in bone tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The present study has been performed to investigate how immature bone responds to mechanical loading using an ex vivo culture system. A slice of the tibia, with the thickness of 3 mm, was obtained from 0-day-old chick. For the ex vivo culture experiment in conjunction with cyclic compressive loading, we developed a custom-made, bioreactor system where both the load and the deformation applied to the specimen was recorded. Cyclic compression, with an amplitude of 0.3 N corresponding to 1 to 2% compressive strain, was applied to immature bone specimen during a 3-day culture period at an overall loading rate 3-4 cycles/min, in the presence of β-glycerol phosphate and dexamethasone in culture medium. The stress-strain relationship was obtained at the beginning and the end of the culture experiment. In addition, analyses for alkaline phosphate release, cell viability and tissue calcification were also performed. It was exhibited that elastic moduli of bone slices were significantly elevated at the end of the 3-day culture in the presence of cyclic compression, which was a similar phenomenon to significant elevation of the elastic moduli of bone tissue by the maturation from 0-day old to 3-day old. By contrast, no significant changes in the moduli were observed in the absence of cyclic compression or in deactivated, cell-free samples. The increases in the moduli were coincided with the increase in calcified area in the bone samples. It was confirmed that immature bone can respond to compressive loading in vitro and demonstrate the growth of bone matrix, similar to natural, in vivo maturation. The elevation of the elastic moduli was attributable to the increased calcified area and the realignment of collagen fibers parallel to

  2. Effects of cyclic compression on the mechanical properties and calcification process of immature chick bone tissue in culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eijiro Maeda

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Contribution of mechanical loading to tissue growth during both the development and post-natal maturation is of a particular interest, as its understanding would be important to strategies in bone tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The present study has been performed to investigate how immature bone responds to mechanical loading using an ex vivo culture system. A slice of the tibia, with the thickness of 3 mm, was obtained from 0-day-old chick. For the ex vivo culture experiment in conjunction with cyclic compressive loading, we developed a custom-made, bioreactor system where both the load and the deformation applied to the specimen was recorded. Cyclic compression, with an amplitude of 0.3 N corresponding to 1 to 2% compressive strain, was applied to immature bone specimen during a 3-day culture period at an overall loading rate 3–4 cycles/min, in the presence of β-glycerol phosphate and dexamethasone in culture medium. The stress-strain relationship was obtained at the beginning and the end of the culture experiment. In addition, analyses for alkaline phosphate release, cell viability and tissue calcification were also performed. It was exhibited that elastic moduli of bone slices were significantly elevated at the end of the 3-day culture in the presence of cyclic compression, which was a similar phenomenon to significant elevation of the elastic moduli of bone tissue by the maturation from 0-day old to 3-day old. By contrast, no significant changes in the moduli were observed in the absence of cyclic compression or in deactivated, cell-free samples. The increases in the moduli were coincided with the increase in calcified area in the bone samples. It was confirmed that immature bone can respond to compressive loading in vitro and demonstrate the growth of bone matrix, similar to natural, in vivo maturation. The elevation of the elastic moduli was attributable to the increased calcified area and the realignment of collagen

  3. A Comparison in Mechanical Properties of Cermets of Calcium Silicate with Ti-55Ni and Ti-6Al-4V Alloys for Hard Tissues Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azim Ataollahi Oshkour

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the impact of calcium silicate (CS content on composition, compressive mechanical properties, and hardness of CS cermets with Ti-55Ni and Ti-6Al-4V alloys sintered at 1200°C. The powder metallurgy route was exploited to prepare the cermets. New phases of materials of Ni16Ti6Si7, CaTiO3, and Ni31Si12 appeared in cermet of Ti-55Ni with CS and in cermet of Ti-6Al-4V with CS, the new phases Ti5Si3, Ti2O, and CaTiO3, which were emerged during sintering at different CS content (wt%. The minimum shrinkage and density were observed in both groups of cermets for the 50 and 100 wt% CS content, respectively. The cermets with 40 wt% of CS had minimum compressive Young’s modulus. The minimum of compressive strength and strain percentage at maximum load were revealed in cermets with 50 and 40 wt% of CS with Ti-55Ni and Ti-6Al-4V cermets, respectively. The cermets with 80 and 90 wt% of CS showed more plasticity than the pure CS. It concluded that the composition and mechanical properties of sintered cermets of Ti-55Ni and Ti-6Al-4V with CS significantly depend on the CS content in raw cermet materials. Thus, the different mechanical properties of the cermets can be used as potential materials for different hard tissues replacements.

  4. A Comparison in Mechanical Properties of Cermets of Calcium Silicate with Ti-55Ni and Ti-6Al-4V Alloys for Hard Tissues Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramanik, Sumit; Shirazi, Seyed Farid Seyed; Mehrali, Mehdi; Yau, Yat-Huang; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of calcium silicate (CS) content on composition, compressive mechanical properties, and hardness of CS cermets with Ti-55Ni and Ti-6Al-4V alloys sintered at 1200°C. The powder metallurgy route was exploited to prepare the cermets. New phases of materials of Ni16Ti6Si7, CaTiO3, and Ni31Si12 appeared in cermet of Ti-55Ni with CS and in cermet of Ti-6Al-4V with CS, the new phases Ti5Si3, Ti2O, and CaTiO3, which were emerged during sintering at different CS content (wt%). The minimum shrinkage and density were observed in both groups of cermets for the 50 and 100 wt% CS content, respectively. The cermets with 40 wt% of CS had minimum compressive Young's modulus. The minimum of compressive strength and strain percentage at maximum load were revealed in cermets with 50 and 40 wt% of CS with Ti-55Ni and Ti-6Al-4V cermets, respectively. The cermets with 80 and 90 wt% of CS showed more plasticity than the pure CS. It concluded that the composition and mechanical properties of sintered cermets of Ti-55Ni and Ti-6Al-4V with CS significantly depend on the CS content in raw cermet materials. Thus, the different mechanical properties of the cermets can be used as potential materials for different hard tissues replacements. PMID:25538954

  5. Martensite and bainite in steels: transformation mechanism and mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhadeshia, H.K.D.H.

    1997-01-01

    Many essential properties of iron alloys depend on what actually happens when one allotropic form gives way to another, i.e. on the mechanism of phase change. The dependence of the mechanical properties on the atomic mechanism by which bainite and martensite grow is the focus of this paper. The discussion is illustrated in the context of some common engineering design parameters, and with a brief example of the inverse problem in which the mechanism may be a function of the mechanical properties. (orig.)

  6. Structure-function relationships in soft tissue mechanics: Examining how the micro-scale architecture of biochemical constituents effects health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, David Sheldon

    Countless debilitating pathologies exhibit symptoms that result from altered mechanical behavior of soft tissue. Therefore, it is of clinical and economic importance to mechanically evaluate soft tissues and attribute degenerative changes to alterations in structural constituents. The studies presented here focus on the annulus fibrosus and the sclera. Failure in these tissues is common and catastrophic. The annulus fibrosus may fail, resulting in herniation and nerve impingement, or the disc may degenerate over time, resulting in reduced mobility and pain. Similarly, the sclera may degenerate over time with intraocular pressure spurring creep behavior that distends the eye beyond its ideal shape. This causes myopic vision and puts patients at risk of macular degeneration and retinal detachment. These two tissues share a common structural role as the outer wall of a pressure vessel. Also, they are made of strikingly similar constituents, primarily consisting of water, type I collagen, glycosaminoglycans and elastin. The microstructure of these tissues, however, is very different. The annulus fibrosus is representative of an anisotropic tissue. Its well-organized fibril structure was analyzed via polarization modulated second harmonic microscopy in order to characterize fibril architecture. Structurally relevant biochemical constituents were quantified with biochemical assays. Morphologically healthy annulus tended to have a more highly organized microstructure and tended to absorb more strain energy when subject to a tensile load cycle. Given the strong correlation between fibril organization and select mechanical properties, predictive models will likely benefit from a characterization of fibril continuity and orientation coherence. The sclera is representative of an isotropic tissue. Its less-organized fibril structure has evolved to sustain biaxial plane stress. In the sclera, collagen content and associated crosslinks were primary determinants of stiffness

  7. Mechanical Properties of Optimized Diamond Lattice Structure for Bone Scaffolds Fabricated via Selective Laser Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, David Z.; Zhang, Peng; Zhao, Miao; Jafar, Salman

    2018-01-01

    Developments in selective laser melting (SLM) have enabled the fabrication of periodic cellular lattice structures characterized by suitable properties matching the bone tissue well and by fluid permeability from interconnected structures. These multifunctional performances are significantly affected by cell topology and constitutive properties of applied materials. In this respect, a diamond unit cell was designed in particular volume fractions corresponding to the host bone tissue and optimized with a smooth surface at nodes leading to fewer stress concentrations. There were 33 porous titanium samples with different volume fractions, from 1.28 to 18.6%, manufactured using SLM. All of them were performed under compressive load to determine the deformation and failure mechanisms, accompanied by an in-situ approach using digital image correlation (DIC) to reveal stress–strain evolution. The results showed that lattice structures manufactured by SLM exhibited comparable properties to those of trabecular bone, avoiding the effects of stress-shielding and increasing longevity of implants. The curvature of optimized surface can play a role in regulating the relationship between density and mechanical properties. Owing to the release of stress concentration from optimized surface, the failure mechanism of porous titanium has been changed from the pattern of bottom-up collapse by layer (or cell row) to that of the diagonal (45°) shear band, resulting in the significant enhancement of the structural strength. PMID:29510492

  8. Mechanical Properties of Optimized Diamond Lattice Structure for Bone Scaffolds Fabricated via Selective Laser Melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fei; Zhang, David Z; Zhang, Peng; Zhao, Miao; Jafar, Salman

    2018-03-03

    Developments in selective laser melting (SLM) have enabled the fabrication of periodic cellular lattice structures characterized by suitable properties matching the bone tissue well and by fluid permeability from interconnected structures. These multifunctional performances are significantly affected by cell topology and constitutive properties of applied materials. In this respect, a diamond unit cell was designed in particular volume fractions corresponding to the host bone tissue and optimized with a smooth surface at nodes leading to fewer stress concentrations. There were 33 porous titanium samples with different volume fractions, from 1.28 to 18.6%, manufactured using SLM. All of them were performed under compressive load to determine the deformation and failure mechanisms, accompanied by an in-situ approach using digital image correlation (DIC) to reveal stress-strain evolution. The results showed that lattice structures manufactured by SLM exhibited comparable properties to those of trabecular bone, avoiding the effects of stress-shielding and increasing longevity of implants. The curvature of optimized surface can play a role in regulating the relationship between density and mechanical properties. Owing to the release of stress concentration from optimized surface, the failure mechanism of porous titanium has been changed from the pattern of bottom-up collapse by layer (or cell row) to that of the diagonal (45°) shear band, resulting in the significant enhancement of the structural strength.

  9. Three-dimensional optical coherence micro-elastography of skeletal muscle tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Chin, Lixin; Kennedy, Brendan F.; Kennedy, Kelsey M.; Wijesinghe, Philip; Pinniger, Gavin J.; Terrill, Jessica R.; McLaughlin, Robert A.; Sampson, David D.

    2014-01-01

    In many muscle pathologies, impairment of skeletal muscle function is closely linked to changes in the mechanical properties of the muscle constituents. Optical coherence micro-elastography (OCME) uses optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging of tissue under a quasi-static, compressive mechanical load to map variations in tissue mechanical properties on the micro-scale. We present the first study of OCME on skeletal muscle tissue. We show that this technique can resolve features of muscle t...

  10. Quantifying the motion of magnetic particles in excised tissue: Effect of particle properties and applied magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulkarni, Sandip, E-mail: sandip.d.kulkarni@gmail.com [Fischell Department of Bioengineering, University of Maryland at College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Ramaswamy, Bharath; Horton, Emily; Gangapuram, Sruthi [Fischell Department of Bioengineering, University of Maryland at College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Nacev, Alek [Weinberg Medical Physics, LLC (United States); Depireux, Didier [The Institute for Systems Research, University of Maryland at College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Otomagnetics, LLC (United States); Shimoji, Mika [Fischell Department of Bioengineering, University of Maryland at College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Otomagnetics, LLC (United States); Shapiro, Benjamin [Fischell Department of Bioengineering, University of Maryland at College Park, MD 20742 (United States); The Institute for Systems Research, University of Maryland at College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Otomagnetics, LLC (United States)

    2015-11-01

    This article presents a method to investigate how magnetic particle characteristics affect their motion inside tissues under the influence of an applied magnetic field. Particles are placed on top of freshly excised tissue samples, a calibrated magnetic field is applied by a magnet underneath each tissue sample, and we image and quantify particle penetration depth by quantitative metrics to assess how particle sizes, their surface coatings, and tissue resistance affect particle motion. Using this method, we tested available fluorescent particles from Chemicell of four sizes (100 nm, 300 nm, 500 nm, and 1 μm diameter) with four different coatings (starch, chitosan, lipid, and PEG/P) and quantified their motion through freshly excised rat liver, kidney, and brain tissues. In broad terms, we found that the applied magnetic field moved chitosan particles most effectively through all three tissue types (as compared to starch, lipid, and PEG/P coated particles). However, the relationship between particle properties and their resulting motion was found to be complex. Hence, it will likely require substantial further study to elucidate the nuances of transport mechanisms and to select and engineer optimal particle properties to enable the most effective transport through various tissue types under applied magnetic fields.

  11. Poly(amido-amine)-based hydrogels with tailored mechanical properties and degradation rates for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martello, Federico; Tocchio, Alessandro; Tamplenizza, Margherita; Gerges, Irini; Pistis, Valentina; Recenti, Rossella; Bortolin, Monica; Del Fabbro, Massimo; Argentiere, Simona; Milani, Paolo; Lenardi, Cristina

    2014-03-01

    Poly(amido-amine) (PAA) hydrogels containing the 2,2-bisacrylamidoacetic acid-4-amminobutyl guanidine monomeric unit have a known ability to enhance cellular adhesion by interacting with the arginin-glycin-aspartic acid (RGD)-binding αVβ3 integrin, expressed by a wide number of cell types. Scientific interest in this class of materials has traditionally been hampered by their poor mechanical properties and restricted range of degradation rate. Here we present the design of novel biocompatible, RGD-mimic PAA-based hydrogels with wide and tunable degradation rates as well as improved mechanical and biological properties for biomedical applications. This is achieved by radical polymerization of acrylamide-terminated PAA oligomers in both the presence and absence of 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate. The degradation rate is found to be precisely tunable by adjusting the PAA oligomer molecular weight and acrylic co-monomer concentration in the starting reaction mixture. Cell adhesion and proliferation tests on Madin-Darby canine kidney epithelial cells show that PAA-based hydrogels have the capacity to promote cell adhesion up to 200% compared to the control. Mechanical tests show higher compressive strength of acrylic chain containing hydrogels compared to traditional PAA hydrogels. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Cartilage-like mechanical properties of poly (ethylene glycol)-diacrylate hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quynhhoa T; Hwang, Yongsung; Chen, Albert C; Varghese, Shyni; Sah, Robert L

    2012-10-01

    Hydrogels prepared from poly-(ethylene glycol) (PEG) have been used in a variety of studies of cartilage tissue engineering. Such hydrogels may also be useful as a tunable mechanical material for cartilage repair. Previous studies have characterized the chemical and mechanical properties of PEG-based hydrogels, as modulated by precursor molecular weight and concentration. Cartilage mechanical properties vary substantially, with maturation, with depth from the articular surface, in health and disease, and in compression and tension. We hypothesized that PEG hydrogels could mimic a broad range of the compressive and tensile mechanical properties of articular cartilage. The objective of this study was to characterize the mechanical properties of PEG hydrogels over a broad range and with reference to articular cartilage. In particular, we assessed the effects of PEG precursor molecular weight (508 Da, 3.4 kDa, 6 kDa, and 10 kDa) and concentration (10-40%) on swelling property, equilibrium confined compressive modulus (H(A0)), compressive dynamic stiffness, and hydraulic permeability (k(p0)) of PEG hydrogels in static/dynamic confined compression tests, and equilibrium tensile modulus (E(ten)) in tension tests. As molecular weight of PEG decreased and concentration increased, hydrogels exhibited a decrease in swelling ratio (31.5-2.2), an increase in H(A0) (0.01-2.46 MPa) and E(ten) (0.02-3.5 MPa), an increase in dynamic compressive stiffness (0.055-42.9 MPa), and a decrease in k(p0) (1.2 × 10(-15) to 8.5 × 10(-15) m(2)/(Pa s)). The frequency-dependence of dynamic compressive stiffness amplitude and phase, as well as the strain-dependence of permeability, were typical of the time- and strain-dependent mechanical behavior of articular cartilage. H(A0) and E(ten) were positively correlated with the final PEG concentration, accounting for swelling. These results indicate that PEG hydrogels can be prepared to mimic many of the static and dynamic mechanical

  13. Postnatal changes to the mechanical properties of articular cartilage are driven by the evolution of its collagen network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AR Gannon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available While it is well established that the composition and organisation of articular cartilage dramatically change during skeletal maturation, relatively little is known about how this impacts the mechanical properties of the tissue. In this study, digital image correlation was first used to quantify spatial deformation within mechanically compressed skeletally immature (4 and 8 week old and mature (1 and 3 year old porcine articular cartilage. The compressive modulus of the immature tissue was relatively homogeneous, while the stiffness of mature articular cartilage dramatically increased with depth from the articular surface. Other, well documented, biomechanical characteristics of the tissue also emerged with skeletal maturity, such as strain-softening and a depth-dependent Poisson’s ratio. The most significant changes that occurred with age were in the deep zone of the tissue, where an order of magnitude increase in compressive modulus (from 0.97 MPa to 9.4 MPa for low applied strains was observed from 4 weeks postnatal to skeletal maturity. These temporal increases in compressive stiffness occurred despite a decrease in tissue sulphated glycosaminoglycan content, but were accompanied by increases in tissue collagen content. Furthermore, helium ion microscopy revealed dramatic changes in collagen fibril alignment through the depth of the tissue with skeletal maturity, as well as a fivefold increase in fibril diameter with age. Finally, computational modelling was used to demonstrate how both collagen network reorganisation and collagen stiffening play a key role in determining the final compressive mechanical properties of the tissue. Together these findings provide a unique insight into evolving structure-function relations in articular cartilage.

  14. Sensing inhomogeneous mechanical properties of human corneal Descemet's membrane with AFM nano-indentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Mundo, Rosa; Recchia, Giuseppina; Parekh, Mohit; Ruzza, Alessandro; Ferrari, Stefano; Carbone, Giuseppe

    2017-10-01

    The paper describes a highly space-resolved characterization of the surface mechanical properties of the posterior human corneal layer (Descemet's membrane). This has been accomplished with Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) nano-indentation by using a probe with a sharp tip geometry. Results indicate that the contact with this biological tissue in liquid occurs with no (or very low) adhesion. More importantly, under the same operating conditions, a broad distribution of penetration depth can be measured on different x-y positions of the tissue surface, indicating a high inhomogeneity of surface stiffness, not yet clearly reported in the literature. An important contribution to such inhomogeneity should be ascribed to the discontinuous nature of the collagen/proteoglycans fibers matrix tissue, as can be imaged by AFM when the tissue is semi-dry. Using classical contact mechanics calculations adapted to the specific geometry of the tetrahedral tip it has been found that the elastic modulus E of the material in the very proximity of the surface ranges from 0.23 to 2.6 kPa. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Mechanical properties and osteocompatibility of novel biodegradable alanine based polyphosphazenes: Side group effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethuraman, Swaminathan; Nair, Lakshmi S; El-Amin, Saadiq; Nguyen, My-Tien; Singh, Anurima; Krogman, Nick; Greish, Yaser E; Allcock, Harry R; Brown, Paul W; Laurencin, Cato T

    2010-06-01

    The versatility of polymers for tissue regeneration lies in the feasibility to modulate the physical and biological properties by varying the side groups grafted to the polymers. Biodegradable polyphosphazenes are high-molecular-weight polymers with alternating nitrogen and phosphorus atoms in the backbone. This study is the first of its kind to systematically investigate the effect of side group structure on the compressive strength of novel biodegradable polyphosphazene based polymers as potential materials for tissue regeneration. The alanine polyphosphazene based polymers, poly(bis(ethyl alanato) phosphazene) (PNEA), poly((50% ethyl alanato) (50% methyl phenoxy) phosphazene) (PNEA(50)mPh(50)), poly((50% ethyl alanato) (50% phenyl phenoxy) phosphazene) (PNEA(50)PhPh(50)) were investigated to demonstrate their mechanical properties and osteocompatibility. Results of mechanical testing studies demonstrated that the nature and the ratio of the pendent groups attached to the polymer backbone play a significant role in determining the mechanical properties of the resulting polymer. The compressive strength of PNEA(50)PhPh(50) was significantly higher than poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (85:15 PLAGA) (p<0.05). Additional studies evaluated the cellular response and gene expression of primary rat osteoblast cells on PNEA, PNEA(50)mPh(50) and PNEA(50)PhPh(50) films as candidates for bone tissue engineering applications. Results of the in vitro osteocompatibility evaluation demonstrated that cells adhere, proliferate, and maintain their phenotype when seeded directly on the surface of PNEA, PNEA(50)mPh(50), and PNEA(50)PhPh(50). Moreover, cells on the surface of the polymers expressed type I collagen, alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, osteopontin, and bone sialoprotein, which are characteristic genes for osteoblast maturation, differentiation, and mineralization. Copyright 2009 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Ropivacaine alters the mechanical properties of hamstring tendons: In vitro controlled mechanical testing of tendons from living donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollivier, M; Sbihi, J; Sbihi, A; Pithioux, M; Parratte, S; Argenson, J-N

    2017-11-01

    Intraarticular or periarticular injection of ropivacaine (RI) is an element of current knee surgery practices. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of RI on the mechanical properties of hamstring tendons. We hypothesized that RI would have a detrimental effect on the mechanical properties of periarticular soft tissues METHODS: A tensile test to failure was performed on 120 hamstring tendon segments harvested during ACL reconstruction surgery in 120 patients. Two sets of tensile tests were done. The first evaluated the effect of RI itself on the mechanical properties of tendons: 30 samples were soaked for 1hour in a 2% RI solution and compared to 30 samples soaked in a saline solution (control group). The second evaluated the effect of RI concentration on the mechanical properties of hamstring tendons: 30 samples were soaked for 1hour in a 2% RI solution and 30 samples were soaked in a 7.5% RI solution. In the first test, 29 samples from each group were analyzed as two samples (one in each group) failed at the grip interface. The specimens exposed to 2% RI had lower ultimate tensile strength (Δ=4.4MPa, P=0.001), strain energy (Δ=13MPa, P=0.001) and Young's modulus (Δ=1.6MPa, P=0.02) than the specimens in the control group. There was no significant difference in the strain at failure between groups (Δ=5%, P=0.3). In the second test, one specimen from the 7.5% RI group failed during the preloading and was excluded. There was no significant difference in terms of the load at failure and ultimate tensile stress (Δ=0.45MPa, P=0.6) and strain energy (Δ=0.49MPa, P=0.49) between the two groups. There were significant differences in terms of elongation at failure (Δ=28%, P=0.0003) and Young's modulus (Δ=2.6MPa, P=0.005), with the specimens exposed to 7.5% RI undergoing greater deformation and having a lower Young's modulus. While local RI injections are widely performed in clinical practice, the results of this in vitro study point to short

  17. Laser-induced damage in biological tissue: Role of complex and dynamic optical properties of the medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Elharith M.

    Since its invention in the early 1960's, the laser has been used as a tool for surgical, therapeutic, and diagnostic purposes. To achieve maximum effectiveness with the greatest margin of safety it is important to understand the mechanisms of light propagation through tissue and how that light affects living cells. Lasers with novel output characteristics for medical and military applications are too often implemented prior to proper evaluation with respect to tissue optical properties and human safety. Therefore, advances in computational models that describe light propagation and the cellular responses to laser exposure, without the use of animal models, are of considerable interest. Here, a physics-based laser-tissue interaction model was developed to predict the spatial and temporal temperature and pressure rise during laser exposure to biological tissues. Our new model also takes into account the dynamic nature of tissue optical properties and their impact on the induced temperature and pressure profiles. The laser-induced retinal damage is attributed to the formation of microbubbles formed around melanosomes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and the damage mechanism is assumed to be photo-thermal. Selective absorption by melanin creates these bubbles that expand and collapse around melanosomes, destroying cell membranes and killing cells. The Finite Element (FE) approach taken provides suitable ground for modeling localized pigment absorption which leads to a non-uniform temperature distribution within pigmented cells following laser pulse exposure. These hot-spots are sources for localized thermo-elastic stresses which lead to rapid localized expansions that manifest themselves as microbubbles and lead to microcavitations. Model predictions for the interaction of lasers at wavelengths of 193, 694, 532, 590, 1314, 1540, 2000, and 2940 nm with biological tissues were generated and comparisons were made with available experimental data for the retina

  18. Novel mechanically competent polysaccharide scaffolds for bone tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumbar, S G; Toti, U S; Deng, M; James, R; Laurencin, C T; Aravamudhan, A; Harmon, M; Ramos, D M

    2011-01-01

    The success of the scaffold-based bone regeneration approach critically depends on the biomaterial's mechanical and biological properties. Cellulose and its derivatives are inherently associated with exceptional strength and biocompatibility due to their β-glycosidic linkage and extensive hydrogen bonding. This polymer class has a long medical history as a dialysis membrane, wound care system and pharmaceutical excipient. Recently cellulose-based scaffolds have been developed and evaluated for a variety of tissue engineering applications. In general porous polysaccharide scaffolds in spite of many merits lack the necessary mechanical competence needed for load-bearing applications. The present study reports the fabrication and characterization of three-dimensional (3D) porous sintered microsphere scaffolds based on cellulose derivatives using a solvent/non-solvent sintering approach for load-bearing applications. These 3D scaffolds exhibited a compressive modulus and strength in the mid-range of human trabecular bone and underwent degradation resulting in a weight loss of 10–15% after 24 weeks. A typical stress–strain curve for these scaffolds showed an initial elastic region and a less-stiff post-yield region similar to that of native bone. Human osteoblasts cultured on these scaffolds showed progressive growth with time and maintained expression of osteoblast phenotype markers. Further, the elevated expression of alkaline phosphatase and mineralization at early time points as compared to heat-sintered poly(lactic acid–glycolic acid) control scaffolds with identical pore properties affirmed the advantages of polysaccharides and their potential for scaffold-based bone regeneration.

  19. Topographic modelling of haptic properties of tissue products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, B-G; Fall, A; Farbrot, A; Bergström, P; Rosen, S

    2014-01-01

    The way a product or material feels when touched, haptics, has been shown to be a property that plays an important role when consumers determine the quality of products For tissue products in constant touch with the skin, ''softness'' becomes a primary quality parameter. In the present work, the relationship between topography and the feeling of the surface has been investigated for commercial tissues with varying degree of texture from the low textured crepe tissue to the highly textured embossed- and air-dried tissue products. A trained sensory panel at was used to grade perceived haptic ''roughness''. The technique used to characterize the topography was Digital light projection (DLP) technique, By the use of multivariate statistics, strong correlations between perceived roughness and topography were found with predictability of above 90 percent even though highly textured products were included. Characterization was made using areal ISO 25178-2 topography parameters in combination with non-contacting topography measurement. The best prediction ability was obtained when combining haptic properties with the topography parameters auto-correlation length (Sal), peak material volume (Vmp), core roughness depth (Sk) and the maximum height of the surface (Sz)

  20. Differences in the mechanical properties of the developing cerebral cortical proliferative zone between mice and ferrets at both the tissue and single-cell levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arata Nagasaka

    2016-11-01

    actually greater in mice (720 Pa than in ferrets (450 Pa. Adherens junction was ultrastructurally comparable between mice and ferrets. These results show that the horizontally denser packing of neuroepithelial cell processes is a major contributor to the increased tissue-level apical stiffness in ferrets, and suggest that tissue-level mechanical properties may be achieved by balancing cellular densification and the physical properties of single cells.

  1. Longitudinal elastic properties and porosity of cortical bone tissue vary with age in human proximal femur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malo, M K H; Rohrbach, D; Isaksson, H; Töyräs, J; Jurvelin, J S; Tamminen, I S; Kröger, H; Raum, K

    2013-04-01

    Tissue level structural and mechanical properties are important determinants of bone strength. As an individual ages, microstructural changes occur in bone, e.g., trabeculae and cortex become thinner and porosity increases. However, it is not known how the elastic properties of bone change during aging. Bone tissue may lose its elasticity and become more brittle and prone to fractures as it ages. In the present study the age-dependent variation in the spatial distributions of microstructural and microelastic properties of the human femoral neck and shaft were evaluated by using acoustic microscopy. Although these properties may not be directly measured in vivo, there is a major interest to investigate their relationships with the linear elastic measurements obtained by diagnostic ultrasound at the most severe fracture sites, e.g., the femoral neck. However, before the validity of novel in vivo techniques can be established, it is essential to understand the age-dependent variation in tissue elastic properties and porosity at different skeletal sites. A total of 42 transverse cross-sectional bone samples were obtained from the femoral neck (Fn) and proximal femoral shaft (Ps) of 21 men (mean±SD age 47.1±17.8, range 17-82years). Samples were quantitatively imaged using a scanning acoustic microscope (SAM) equipped with a 50MHz ultrasound transducer. Distributions of the elastic coefficient (c33) of cortical (Ct) and trabecular (Tr) tissues and microstructure of cortex (cortical thickness Ct.Th and porosity Ct.Po) were determined. Variations in c33 were observed with respect to tissue type (c33Trc33(Ct.Fn)=35.3GPa>c33(Tr.Ps)=33.8GPa>c33(Tr.Fn)=31.9GPa), and cadaver age (R(2)=0.28-0.46, pbone tissue were observed. These findings may explain in part the increase in susceptibility to suffer low energy fractures during aging and highlight the potential of ultrasound in clinical osteoporosis diagnostics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Thermal behavior and mechanical properties of physically crosslinked PVA/Gelatin hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yurong; Geever, Luke M; Kennedy, James E; Higginbotham, Clement L; Cahill, Paul A; McGuinness, Garrett B

    2010-02-01

    Poly (vinyl alcohol)/Gelatin hydrogels are under active investigation as potential vascular cell culture biomaterials, tissue models and vascular implants. The PVA/Gelatin hydrogels are physically crosslinked by the freeze-thaw technique, which is followed by a coagulation bath treatment. In this study, the thermal behavior of the gels was examined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). Rheological measurement and uniaxial tensile tests revealed key mechanical properties. The role of polymer fraction in relation to these mechanical properties is explored. Gelatin has no significant effect on the thermal behavior of PVA, which indicates that no substantial change occurs in the PVA crystallite due to the presence of gelatin. The glass transition temperature, melting temperature, degree of crystallinity, polymer fraction, storage modulus (G') and ultimate strength of one freeze-thaw cycle (1FT) hydrogels are inferior to those of 3FT hydrogels. With coagulation, both 1FT and 3FT hydrogels shifted to a lower value of T(g), melting temperature and polymer fraction are further increased and the degree of crystallinity is depressed. The mechanical properties of 1FT, but not 3FT, were strengthened with coagulation treatment. This study gives a detailed investigation of the microstructure formation of PVA/Gelatin hydrogel in each stage of physical treatments which helps us to explain the role of physical treatments in tuning their physical properties for biomechanical applications. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Research on terahertz properties of rat brain tissue sections during dehydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Gangqiang; Liang, Jianfeng; Zhao, Hongwei; Zhao, Xianghui; Chang, Chao

    2018-01-01

    Biological tissue sections are always kept in a system purged with dry nitrogen for the measurement of terahertz spectrum. However, the injected nitrogen will cause dehydration of tissue sections, which will affect the accuracy of spectrum measurement. In this paper, terahertz time-domain spectrometer is used to measure the terahertz spectra of rat brain tissue sections during dehydration. The changes of terahertz properties, including terahertz transmittance, refractive index and extinction coefficient during dehydration are also analyzed. The amplitudes of terahertz time-domain spectra increase gradually during the dehydration process. Besides, the terahertz properties show obvious changes during the dehydration process. All the results indicate that the injected dry nitrogen has a significant effect on the terahertz spectra and properties of tissue sections. This study contributes to further research and application of terahertz technology in biomedical field.

  4. Elastic properties of synthetic materials for soft tissue modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansy, H A; Grahe, J R; Sandler, R H

    2008-01-01

    Mechanical models of soft tissue are useful for studying vibro-acoustic phenomena. They may be used for validating mathematical models and for testing new equipment and techniques. The objective of this study was to measure density and visco-elastic properties of synthetic materials that can be used to build such models. Samples of nine different materials were tested under dynamic (0.5 Hz) compressive loading conditions. The modulus of elasticity of the materials was varied, whenever possible, by adding a softener during manufacturing. The modulus was measured over a nine month period to quantify the effect of ageing and softener loss on material properties. Results showed that a wide range of the compression elasticity modulus (10 to 1400 kPa) and phase (3.5 0 -16.7 0 ) between stress and strain were possible. Some materials tended to exude softener over time, resulting in a weight loss and elastic properties change. While the weight loss under normal conditions was minimal in all materials (<3% over nine months), loss under accelerated weight-loss conditions can reach 59%. In the latter case an elasticity modulus increase of up to 500% was measured. Key advantages and limitations of candidate materials were identified and discussed

  5. Tissue characterization using magnetic resonance elastography: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruse, S.A.; Smith, J.A.; Lawrence, A.J.; Dresner, M.A.; Manduca, A.; Greenleaf, J.F.; Ehman, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    The well-documented effectiveness of palpation as a diagnostic technique for detecting cancer and other diseases has provided motivation for developing imaging techniques for non-invasively evaluating the mechanical properties of tissue. A recently described approach for elasticity imaging, using propagating acoustic shear waves and phase-contrast MRI, has been called magnetic resonance elastography (MRE). The purpose of this work was to conduct preliminary studies to define methods for using MRE as a tool for addressing the paucity of quantitative tissue mechanical property data in the literature. Fresh animal liver and kidney tissue specimens were evaluated with MRE at multiple shear wave frequencies. The influence of specimen temperature and orientation on measurements of stiffness was studied in skeletal muscle. The results demonstrated that all of the materials tested (liver, kidney, muscle and tissue-simulating gel) exhibit systematic dependence of shear stiffness on shear rate. These data are consistent with a viscoelastic model of tissue mechanical properties, allowing calculation of two independent tissue properties from multiple-frequency MRE data: shear modulus and shear viscosity. The shear stiffness of tissue can be substantially affected by specimen temperature. The results also demonstrated evidence of shear anisotropy in skeletal muscle but not liver tissue. The measured shear stiffness in skeletal muscle was found to depend on both the direction of propagation and polarization of the shear waves. (author)

  6. Modeling the mechanical properties of liver fibrosis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ying; Chen, Xin; Zhang, Xinyu; Chen, Siping; Shen, Yuanyuan; Song, Liang

    2016-06-14

    The progression of liver fibrosis changes the biomechanical properties of liver tissue. This study characterized and compared different liver fibrosis stages in rats in terms of viscoelasticity. Three viscoelastic models, the Voigt, Maxwell, and Zener models, were applied to experimental data from rheometer tests and then the elasticity and viscosity were estimated for each fibrosis stage. The study found that both elasticity and viscosity are correlated with the various stages of liver fibrosis. The study revealed that the Zener model is the optimal model for describing the mechanical properties of each fibrosis stage, but there is no significant difference between the Zener and Voigt models in their performance on liver fibrosis staging. Therefore the Voigt model can still be effectively used for liver fibrosis grading. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Does nutrition affect bone porosity and mineral tissue distribution in deer antlers? The relationship between histology, mechanical properties and mineral composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landete-Castillejos, T; Currey, J D; Ceacero, F; García, A J; Gallego, L; Gomez, S

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that porosity has an inverse relationship with the mechanical properties of bones. We examined cortical and trabecular porosity of antlers, and mineral composition, thickness and mechanical properties in the cortical wall. Samples belonged to two deer populations: a captive population of an experimental farm having a high quality diet, and a free-ranging population feeding on plants of lower nutritive quality. As shown for minerals and mechanical properties in previous studies by our group, cortical and trabecular porosity increased from the base distally. Cortical porosity was always caused by the presence of incomplete primary osteons. Porosity increased along the length of the antler much more in deer with lower quality diet. Despite cortical porosity being inversely related to mechanical properties and positively with K, Zn and other minerals indicating physiological effort, it was these minerals and not porosity that statistically better explained variability in mechanical properties. Histochemistry showed that the reason for this is that Zn is located around incomplete osteons and also in complete osteons that were still mineralizing, whereas K is located in non-osteonal bone, which constitutes a greater proportion of bone where osteons are incompletely mineralized. This suggests that, K, Zn and other minerals indicate reduction in mechanical performance even with little porosity. If a similar process occurred in internal bones, K, Zn and other minerals in the bone may be an early indicator of decrease in mechanical properties and future osteoporosis. In conclusion, porosity is related to diet and physiological effort in deer. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Biaxial mechanics and inter-lamellar shearing of stem-cell seeded electrospun angle-ply laminates for annulus fibrosus tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Tristan P; Nakasone, Ryan H; Szczesny, Spencer E; Elliott, Dawn M; Mauck, Robert L

    2013-06-01

    The annulus fibrosus (AF) of the intervertebral disk plays a critical role in vertebral load transmission that is heavily dependent on the microscale structure and composition of the tissue. With degeneration, both structure and composition are compromised, resulting in a loss of AF mechanical function. Numerous tissue engineering strategies have addressed the issue of AF degeneration, but few have focused on recapitulation of AF microstructure and function. One approach that allows for generation of engineered AF with appropriate (+/-)30° lamellar microstructure is the use of aligned electrospun scaffolds seeded with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and assembled into angle-ply laminates (APL). Previous work indicates that opposing lamellar orientation is necessary for development of near native uniaxial tensile properties. However, most native AF tensile loads are applied biaxially, as the disk is subjected to multi-axial loads and is constrained by its attachments to the vertebral bodies. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate the biaxial mechanical response of engineered AF bilayers, and to determine the importance of opposing lamellar structure under this loading regime. Opposing bilayers, which replicate native AF structure, showed a significantly higher modulus in both testing directions compared to parallel bilayers, and reached ∼60% of native AF biaxial properties. Associated with this increase in biaxial properties, significantly less shear, and significantly higher stretch in the fiber direction, was observed. These results provide additional insight into native tissue structure-function relationships, as well as new benchmarks for engineering functional AF tissue constructs. Copyright © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  9. Mechanical Properties of 3d Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deividas Mizeras

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the biggest challenges in modern tissue engineering is a creation 3D scaffolds for bone tissue regeneration. Until now, in order to restore bone defects are used various bone substitutes (autologous and allogeneic, however, their usage is limited because is required additional surgery, possible complications, also limited their use is associated with ethical point of view. In this work we aim to determine the mechanical properties of 3D printed PLA objects having various orientation woodpile microarchitectures. In this work we chose three different 3D microarchitectures: woodpile BCC (each layer consists of parallel logs which are rotated 90 deg every next layer, woodpile FCC (every layer is additionally shifted half of the period in respect to the previous parallel log layer and a rotating woodpile 60 deg (each layer is rotated 60 deg in respect to the previous one. Compressive and bending tests were carried out with TIRAtest2300 universal testing machine. We found that 60 deg rotating woodpile geometry had the highest mechanical values which were approximately about 3 times higher than the BCC or FCC microstructures.

  10. Mechanical tension as a driver of connective tissue growth in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Cameron J; Pearcy, Mark J; Epari, Devakara R

    2014-07-01

    We propose the progressive mechanical expansion of cell-derived tissue analogues as a novel, growth-based approach to in vitro tissue engineering. The prevailing approach to producing tissue in vitro is to culture cells in an exogenous "scaffold" that provides a basic structure and mechanical support. This necessarily pre-defines the final size of the implantable material, and specific signals must be provided to stimulate appropriate cell growth, differentiation and matrix formation. In contrast, surgical skin expansion, driven by increments of stretch, produces increasing quantities of tissue without trauma or inflammation. This suggests that connective tissue cells have the innate ability to produce growth in response to elevated tension. We posit that this capacity is maintained in vitro, and that order-of-magnitude growth may be similarly attained in self-assembling cultures of cells and their own extracellular matrix. The hypothesis that growth of connective tissue analogues can be induced by mechanical expansion in vitro may be divided into three components: (1) tension stimulates cell proliferation and extracellular matrix synthesis; (2) the corresponding volume increase will relax the tension imparted by a fixed displacement; (3) the repeated application of static stretch will produce sustained growth and a tissue structure adapted to the tensile loading. Connective tissues exist in a state of residual tension, which is actively maintained by resident cells such as fibroblasts. Studies in vitro and in vivo have demonstrated that cellular survival, reproduction, and matrix synthesis and degradation are regulated by the mechanical environment. Order-of-magnitude increases in both bone and skin volume have been achieved clinically through staged expansion protocols, demonstrating that tension-driven growth can be sustained over prolonged periods. Furthermore, cell-derived tissue analogues have demonstrated mechanically advantageous structural adaptation in

  11. Emulsion templated scaffolds with tunable mechanical properties for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Robert; Sherborne, Colin; Paterson, Thomas; Green, Nicola H; Reilly, Gwendolen C; Claeyssens, Frederik

    2016-02-01

    Polymerised High Internal Phase Emulsions (PolyHIPEs) are manufactured via emulsion templating and exhibit a highly interconnected microporosity. These materials are commonly used as thin membranes for 3D cell culture. This study uses emulsion templating in combination with microstereolithography to fabricate PolyHIPE scaffolds with a tightly controlled and reproducible architecture. This combination of methods produces hierarchical structures, where the microstructural properties can be independently controlled from the scaffold macrostructure. PolyHIPEs were fabricated with varying ratios of two acrylate monomers (2-ethylhexyl acrylate (EHA) and isobornyl acrylate (IBOA)) and varying nominal porosity to tune mechanical properties. Young's modulus, ultimate tensile stress (UTS) and elongation at failure were determined for twenty EHA/IBOA compositions. Moduli ranged from 63.01±9.13 to 0.36±0.04MPa, UTS from 2.03±0.33 to 0.11±0.01MPa and failure strain from 21.86±2.87% to 2.60±0.61%. Selected compositions were fabricated into macro-porous woodpile structures, plasma treated with air or acrylic acid and seeded with human embryonic stem-cell derived mesenchymal progenitor cells (hES-MPs). Confocal and two-photon microscopy confirmed cell proliferation and penetration into the micro- and macro-porous architecture. The scaffolds supported osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal cells and interestingly, the stiffest IBOA-based scaffolds that were plasma treated with acrylic acid promoted osteogenesis more strongly than the other scaffolds. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Tuning mechanical performance of poly(ethylene glycol) and agarose interpenetrating network hydrogels for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennerfeldt, Deena A; Renth, Amanda N; Talata, Zsolt; Gehrke, Stevin H; Detamore, Michael S

    2013-11-01

    Hydrogels are attractive for tissue engineering applications due to their incredible versatility, but they can be limited in cartilage tissue engineering applications due to inadequate mechanical performance. In an effort to address this limitation, our team previously reported the drastic improvement in the mechanical performance of interpenetrating networks (IPNs) of poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEG-DA) and agarose relative to pure PEG-DA and agarose networks. The goal of the current study was specifically to determine the relative importance of PEG-DA concentration, agarose concentration, and PEG-DA molecular weight in controlling mechanical performance, swelling characteristics, and network parameters. IPNs consistently had compressive and shear moduli greater than the additive sum of either single network when compared to pure PEG-DA gels with a similar PEG-DA content. IPNs withstood a maximum stress of up to 4.0 MPa in unconfined compression, with increased PEG-DA molecular weight being the greatest contributing factor to improved failure properties. However, aside from failure properties, PEG-DA concentration was the most influential factor for the large majority of properties. Increasing the agarose and PEG-DA concentrations as well as the PEG-DA molecular weight of agarose/PEG-DA IPNs and pure PEG-DA gels improved moduli and maximum stresses by as much as an order of magnitude or greater compared to pure PEG-DA gels in our previous studies. Although the viability of encapsulated chondrocytes was not significantly affected by IPN formulation, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content was significantly influenced, with a 12-fold increase over a three-week period in gels with a lower PEG-DA concentration. These results suggest that mechanical performance of IPNs may be tuned with partial but not complete independence from biological performance of encapsulated cells. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Microstructure based hygromechanical modelling of deformation of fruit tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abera, M. K.; Wang, Z.; Verboven, P.; Nicolai, B.

    2017-10-01

    Quality parameters such as firmness and susceptibility to mechanical damage are affected by the mechanical properties of fruit tissue. Fruit tissue is composed of turgid cells that keep cell walls under tension, and intercellular gas spaces where cell walls of neighboring cells have separated. How the structure and properties of these complex microstructures are affecting tissue mechanics is difficult to unravel experimentally. In this contribution, a modelling methodology is presented to calculate the deformation of apple fruit tissue affected by differences in structure and properties of cells and cell walls. The model can be used to perform compression experiments in silico using a hygromechanical model that computes the stress development and water loss during tissue deformation, much like in an actual compression test. The advantage of the model is that properties and structure can be changed to test the influence on the mechanical deformation process. The effect of microstructure, turgor pressure, cell membrane permeability, wall thickness and damping) on the compressibility of the tissue was simulated. Increasing the turgor pressure and thickness of the cell walls results in increased compression resistance of apple tissue increases, as do decreasing cell size and porosity. Geometric variability of the microstructure of tissues plays a major role, affecting results more than other model parameters. Different fruit cultivars were compared, and it was demonstrated, that microstructure variations within a cultivar are so large that interpretation of cultivar-specific effects is difficult.

  14. Learning from evolutionary optimisation: what are toughening mechanisms good for in dentine, a nonrepairing bone tissue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaslansky, Paul; Currey, John D; Fleck, Claudia

    2016-09-12

    The main mass of material found in teeth is dentine, a bone-like tissue, riddled with micron-sized tubules and devoid of living cells. It provides support to the outer wear-resistant layer of enamel, and exhibits toughening mechanisms which contribute to crack resistance. And yet unlike most bone tissues, dentine does not remodel and consequently any accumulated damage does not 'self repair'. Because damage containment followed by tissue replacement is a prime reason for the crack-arresting microstructures found in most bones, the occurrence of toughening mechanisms without the biological capability to repair is puzzling. Here we consider the notion that dentine might be overdesigned for strength, because it has to compensate for the lack of cell-mediated healing mechanisms. Based on our own and on literature-reported observations, including quasistatic and fatigue properties, dentine design principles are discussed in light of the functional conditions under which teeth evolved. We conclude that dentine is only slightly overdesigned for everyday cyclic loading because usual mastication stresses may come close to its endurance strength. The in-built toughening mechanisms constitute an evolutionary benefit because they prevent catastrophic failure during rare overload events, which was probably very advantageous in our hunter gatherer ancestor times. From a bio-inspired perspective, understanding the extent of evolutionary overdesign might be useful for optimising biomimetic structures used for load bearing.

  15. Poly (L-lactic acid) porous scaffold-supported alginate hydrogel with improved mechanical properties and biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Jiaqi; Zeng, Shaodong; Gao, Liyang; Groth, Thomas; Li, Zhiwen; Kong, Junchao; Zhao, Mingyan; Li, Lihua

    2016-10-10

    Polymer porous scaffolds and hydrogels have been separately employed and explored for a wide range of applications including cell encapsulation, drug delivery, and tissue engineering. In this study, a three-dimensional poly (L-lactic acid) (PLLA) scaffold with interconnected and homogeneously distributed pores was fabricated to support the alginate hydrogel (Alg). The gels were filled into the porous scaffold, which acted as an analogue of native extracellular matrix (ECM) for entrapment of cells within a support of predefined shape. The mechanical strength of the composite scaffold was characterized by compression testing. The chondrocyte behavior in the scaffold was determined by inverted microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and MTT viability assay. The repair efficiency of such a composite scaffold was further investigated in dog spinal defects by histological evaluation after implantation for 4 weeks. Results showed that the composite scaffold possessed superior mechanical properties and hierarchical porous structure in comparison to pure Alg. Cell culture revealed that the cells presented a specific cartilage status in the composite scaffold in line with higher adherence and proliferation ratio. The histological analyses suggested that the composite scaffold substantially promotes its integration in the host tissue accompanied with a low inflammatory reaction and new tissue formation. The method thus provides a useful pathway for scaffold preparation that can simultaneously achieve suitable mechanical properties and good biocompatibility.

  16. Vascularization of soft tissue engineering constructs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pimentel Carletto, Rodrigo

    nanotechnology-based paradigm for engineering vascularised liver tissue for transplantation”) and the Danish National Research Foundation and Villum Foundation’s Center for Intelligent Drug delivery and sensing Using microcontainers and Nanomechanics (Danish National Research Foundation (DNRF122).......Vascularization is recognized to be the biggest challenge for the fabrication of tissues and finally, organs in vitro. So far, several fabrication techniques have been proposed to create a perfusable vasculature within hydrogels, however, the vascularization and perfusion of hydrogels...... with mechanical properties in the range of soft tissues has not been fully achieved. My project focused on the fabrication and the active perfusion of hydrogel constructs with multi-dimensional vasculature and controlled mechanical properties targeting soft tissues. Specifically, the initial part of the research...

  17. Mechanical properties, biological activity and protein controlled release by poly(vinyl alcohol)-bioglass/chitosan-collagen composite scaffolds: a bone tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pon-On, Weeraphat; Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol; Teerapornpuntakit, Jarinthorn; Thongbunchoo, Jirawan; Krishnamra, Nateetip; Tang, I-Ming

    2014-05-01

    In the present study, composite scaffolds made with different weight ratios (0.5:1, 1:1 and 2:1) of bioactive glass (15Ca:80Si:5P) (BG)/polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) (PVABG) and chitosan (Chi)/collagen (Col) (ChiCol) were prepared by three mechanical freeze-thaw followed by freeze-drying to obtain the porous scaffolds. The mechanical properties and the in vitro biocompatibility of the composite scaffolds to simulated body fluid (SBF) and to rat osteoblast-like UMR-106 cells were investigated. The results from the studies indicated that the porosity and compressive strength were controlled by the weight ratio of PVABG:ChiCol. The highest compressive modulus of the composites made was 214.64 MPa which was for the 1:1 weight ratio PVABG:ChiCol. Mineralization study in SBF showed the formation of apatite crystals on the PVABG:ChiCol surface after 7 days of incubation. In vitro cell availability and proliferation tests confirmed the osteoblast attachment and growth on the PVABG:ChiCol surface. MTT and ALP tests on the 1:1 weight ratio PVABG:ChiCol composite indicated that the UMR-106 cells were viable. Alkaline phosphatase activity was found to increase with increasing culturing time. In addition, we showed the potential of PVABG:ChiCol drug delivery through PBS solution studies. 81.14% of BSA loading had been achieved and controlled release for over four weeks was observed. Our results indicated that the PVABG:ChiCol composites, especially the 1:1 weight ratio composite exhibited significantly improved mechanical, mineral deposition, biological properties and controlled release. This made them potential candidates for bone tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Transverse mechanical properties of cell walls of single living plant cells probed by laser-generated acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadalla, Atef; Dehoux, Thomas; Audoin, Bertrand

    2014-05-01

    Probing the mechanical properties of plant cell wall is crucial to understand tissue dynamics. However, the exact symmetry of the mechanical properties of this anisotropic fiber-reinforced composite remains uncertain. For this reason, biologically relevant measurements of the stiffness coefficients on individual living cells are a challenge. For this purpose, we have developed the single-cell optoacoustic nanoprobe (SCOPE) technique, which uses laser-generated acoustic waves to probe the stiffness, thickness and viscosity of live single-cell subcompartments. This all-optical technique offers a sub-micrometer lateral resolution, nanometer in-depth resolution, and allows the non-contact measurement of the mechanical properties of live turgid tissues without any assumption of mechanical symmetry. SCOPE experiments reveal that single-cell wall transverse stiffness in the direction perpendicular to the epidermis layer of onion cells is close to that of cellulose. This observation demonstrates that cellulose microfibrils are the main load-bearing structure in this direction, and suggests strong bonding of microfibrils by hemicelluloses. Altogether our measurement of the viscosity at high frequencies suggests that the rheology of the wall is dominated by glass-like dynamics. From a comparison with literature, we attribute this behavior to the influence of the pectin matrix. SCOPE's ability to unravel cell rheology and cell anisotropy defines a new class of experiments to enlighten cell nano-mechanics.

  19. Tuning Cell and Tissue Development by Combining Multiple Mechanical Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Ravi; Verdonschot, Nico; Koopman, Bart; Rouwkema, Jeroen

    2017-10-01

    Mechanical signals offer a promising way to control cell and tissue development. It has been established that cells constantly probe their mechanical microenvironment and employ force feedback mechanisms to modify themselves and when possible, their environment, to reach a homeostatic state. Thus, a correct mechanical microenvironment (external forces and mechanical properties and shapes of cellular surroundings) is necessary for the proper functioning of cells. In vitro or in the case of nonbiological implants in vivo, where cells are in an artificial environment, addition of the adequate mechanical signals can, therefore, enable the cells to function normally as in vivo. Hence, a wide variety of approaches have been developed to apply mechanical stimuli (such as substrate stretch, flow-induced shear stress, substrate stiffness, topography, and modulation of attachment area) to cells in vitro. These approaches have not just revealed the effects of the mechanical signals on cells but also provided ways for probing cellular molecules and structures that can provide a mechanistic understanding of the effects. However, they remain lower in complexity compared with the in vivo conditions, where the cellular mechanical microenvironment is the result of a combination of multiple mechanical signals. Therefore, combinations of mechanical stimuli have also been applied to cells in vitro. These studies have had varying focus-developing novel platforms to apply complex combinations of mechanical stimuli, observing the co-operation/competition between stimuli, combining benefits of multiple stimuli toward an application, or uncovering the underlying mechanisms of their action. In general, they provided new insights that could not have been predicted from previous knowledge. We present here a review of several such studies and the insights gained from them, thereby making a case for such studies to be continued and further developed.

  20. The mechanical properties of infrainguinal vascular bypass grafts: their role in influencing patency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, S; Salacinski, H J; Hamilton, G; Seifalian, A M

    2006-06-01

    When autologous vein is unavailable, prosthetic graft materials, particularly expanded polytetrafluoroethylene are used for peripheral arterial revascularisation. Poor long term patency of prosthetic materials is due to distal anastomotic intimal hyperplasia. Intimal hyperplasia is directly linked to shear stress abnormalities at the vessel wall. Compliance and calibre mismatch between native vessel and graft, as well as anastomotic line stress concentration contribute towards unnatural wall shear stress. High porosity reduces graft compliance by causing fibrovascular infiltration, whereas low porosity discourages the development of an endothelial lining and hence effective antithrombogenicity. Therefore, consideration of mechanical properties is necessary in graft development. Current research into synthetic vascular grafts concentrates on simulating the mechanical properties of native arteries and tissue engineering aims to construct a new biological arterial conduit.

  1. Nanoreinforced Hydrogels for Tissue Engineering: Biomaterials that are Compatible with Load-Bearing and Electroactive Tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehrali, Mehdi; Thakur, Ashish; Pennisi, Christian Pablo

    2017-01-01

    , mechanical, and electrical properties. Here, recent advances in the fabrication and application of nanocomposite hydrogels in tissue engineering applications are described, with specific attention toward skeletal and electroactive tissues, such as cardiac, nerve, bone, cartilage, and skeletal muscle......Given their highly porous nature and excellent water retention, hydrogel-based biomaterials can mimic critical properties of the native cellular environment. However, their potential to emulate the electromechanical milieu of native tissues or conform well with the curved topology of human organs...

  2. Passaged adult chondrocytes can form engineered cartilage with functional mechanical properties: a canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Kenneth W; Lima, Eric G; Bian, Liming; O'Conor, Christopher J; Jayabalan, Prakash S; Stoker, Aaron M; Kuroki, Keiichi; Cook, Cristi R; Ateshian, Gerard A; Cook, James L; Hung, Clark T

    2010-03-01

    It was hypothesized that previously optimized serum-free culture conditions for juvenile bovine chondrocytes could be adapted to generate engineered cartilage with physiologic mechanical properties in a preclinical, adult canine model. Primary or passaged (using growth factors) adult chondrocytes from three adult dogs were encapsulated in agarose, and cultured in serum-free media with transforming growth factor-beta3. After 28 days in culture, engineered cartilage formed by primary chondrocytes exhibited only small increases in glycosaminoglycan content. However, all passaged chondrocytes on day 28 elaborated a cartilage matrix with compressive properties and glycosaminoglycan content in the range of native adult canine cartilage values. A preliminary biocompatibility study utilizing chondral and osteochondral constructs showed no gross or histological signs of rejection, with all implanted constructs showing excellent integration with surrounding cartilage and subchondral bone. This study demonstrates that adult canine chondrocytes can form a mechanically functional, biocompatible engineered cartilage tissue under optimized culture conditions. The encouraging findings of this work highlight the potential for tissue engineering strategies using adult chondrocytes in the clinical treatment of cartilage defects.

  3. Mechanical properties of rock at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Naoto; Abe, Tohru; Wakabayashi, Naruki; Ishida, Tsuyoshi.

    1997-01-01

    The laboratory tests have been performed in order to investigate the effects of temperature up to 300degC and pressure up to 30 MPa on the mechanical properties of three types of rocks, Inada granite, Sanjoume andesite and Oya tuff. The experimental results indicated that the significant differences in temperature dependence of mechanical properties exist between the three rocks, because of the difference of the factors which determine the mechanical properties of the rocks. The effect of temperature on the mechanical properties for the rocks is lower than that of pressure and water content. Temperature dependence of the mechanical properties is reduced by increase in pressure in the range of pressure and temperature investigated in this paper. (author)

  4. Microcomputed tomography and microfinite element modeling for evaluating polymer scaffolds architecture and their mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberich-Bayarri, Angel; Moratal, David; Ivirico, Jorge L Escobar; Rodríguez Hernández, José C; Vallés-Lluch, Ana; Martí-Bonmatí, Luis; Estellés, Jorge Más; Mano, Joao F; Pradas, Manuel Monleón; Ribelles, José L Gómez; Salmerón-Sánchez, Manuel

    2009-10-01

    Detailed knowledge of the porous architecture of synthetic scaffolds for tissue engineering, their mechanical properties, and their interrelationship was obtained in a nondestructive manner. Image analysis of microcomputed tomography (microCT) sections of different scaffolds was done. The three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the scaffold allows one to quantify scaffold porosity, including pore size, pore distribution, and struts' thickness. The porous morphology and porosity as calculated from microCT by image analysis agrees with that obtained experimentally by scanning electron microscopy and physically measured porosity, respectively. Furthermore, the mechanical properties of the scaffold were evaluated by making use of finite element modeling (FEM) in which the compression stress-strain test is simulated on the 3D structure reconstructed from the microCT sections. Elastic modulus as calculated from FEM is in agreement with those obtained from the stress-strain experimental test. The method was applied on qualitatively different porous structures (interconnected channels and spheres) with different chemical compositions (that lead to different elastic modulus of the base material) suitable for tissue regeneration. The elastic properties of the constructs are explained on the basis of the FEM model that supports the main mechanical conclusion of the experimental results: the elastic modulus does not depend on the geometric characteristics of the pore (pore size, interconnection throat size) but only on the total porosity of the scaffold. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Cell–scaffold interaction within engineered tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Haiping; Liu, Yuanyuan, E-mail: Yuanyuan_liu@shu.edu.cn; Jiang, Zhenglong; Chen, Weihua; Yu, Yongzhe; Hu, Qingxi

    2014-05-01

    The structure of a tissue engineering scaffold plays an important role in modulating tissue growth. A novel gelatin–chitosan (Gel–Cs) scaffold with a unique structure produced by three-dimensional printing (3DP) technology combining with vacuum freeze-drying has been developed for tissue-engineering applications. The scaffold composed of overall construction, micro-pore, surface morphology, and effective mechanical property. Such a structure meets the essential design criteria of an ideal engineered scaffold. The favorable cell–matrix interaction supports the active biocompatibility of the structure. The structure is capable of supporting cell attachment and proliferation. Cells seeded into this structure tend to maintain phenotypic shape and secreted large amounts of extracellular matrix (ECM) and the cell growth decreased the mechanical properties of scaffold. This novel biodegradable scaffold has potential applications for tissue engineering based upon its unique structure, which acts to support cell growth. - Highlights: • The scaffold is not only for providing a surface for cell residence but also for determining cell phenotype and retaining structural integrity. • The mechanical property of scaffold can be affected by activities of cell. • The scaffold provides a microenvironment for cell attachment, growth, and migration.

  6. Mechanical modeling and characterization of meniscus tissue using flat punch indentation and inverse finite element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfi, Behzad; Fatouraee, Nasser; Imeni, Milad

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, to characterize the mechanical properties of meniscus by considering its local microstructure, a novel nonlinear poroviscoelastic Finite Element (FE) model has been developed. To obtain the mechanical response of meniscus, indentation experiments were performed on bovine meniscus samples. The ramp-relaxation test scenario with different depths and preloads was designed to capture the mechanical characteristics of the tissue in different regions of the medial and lateral menisci. Thereafter, a FE simulation was performed considering experimental conditions. Constitutive parameters were optimized by solving a FE-based inverse problem using the heuristic Simulated Annealing (SA) optimization algorithm. These parameters were ranged according to previously reported data to improve the optimization procedure. Based on the results, the mechanical properties of meniscus were highly influenced by both superficial and main layers. At low indentation depths, a high percentage relaxation (p < 0.01) with a high relaxation rate (p < 0.05) was obtained, due to the poroelastic and viscoelastic nature of the superficial layer. Increasing both penetration depth and preload level involved the main layer response and caused alterations in hyperelastic and viscoelastic parameters of the tissue, such that for both layers, the shear modulus was increased (p < 0.01) while the rate and percentage of relaxation were decreased (p < 0.01). Results reflect that, shear modulus of the main layer in anterior region is higher than central and posterior sites in medial meniscus. In contrast, in lateral meniscus, posterior side is stiffer than central and anterior sides. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cell-based and biomaterial approaches to connective tissue repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalling, Simone Suzette

    Connective tissue injuries of skin, tendon and ligament, heal by a reparative process in adults, filling the wound site with fibrotic, disorganized scar tissue that poorly reflects normal tissue architecture or function. Conversely, fetal skin and tendon have been shown to heal scarlessly. Complete regeneration is not intrinsically ubiquitous to all fetal tissues; fetal diaphragmatic and gastrointestinal injuries form scars. In vivo studies suggest that the presence of fetal fibroblasts is essential for scarless healing. In the orthopaedic setting, adult anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) heals poorly; however, little is known about the regenerative capacity of fetal ACL or fetal ACL fibroblasts. We characterized in vitro wound healing properties of fetal and adult ACL fibroblasts demonstrating that fetal ACL fibroblasts migrate faster and elaborate greater quantities of type I collagen, suggesting the healing potential of the fetal ACL may not be intrinsically poor. Similar to fetal ACL fibroblasts, fetal dermal fibroblasts also exhibit robust cellular properties. We investigated the age-dependent effects of dermal fibroblasts on tendon-to-bone healing in rat supraspinatus tendon injuries, a reparative injury model. We hypothesized delivery of fetal dermal fibroblasts would increase tissue organization and mechanical properties in comparison to adult dermal fibroblasts. However, at 1 and 8 weeks, the presence of dermal fibroblasts, either adult or fetal, had no significant effect on tissue histology or mechanical properties. There was a decreasing trend in cross-sectional area of repaired tendons treated with fetal dermal fibroblasts in comparison to adult, but this finding was not significant in comparison to controls. Finally, we synthesized a novel polysaccharide, methacrylated methylcellulose (MA-MC), and fabricated hydrogels using a well-established photopolymerization technique. We characterized the physical and mechanical properties of MA-MC hydrogels in

  8. Mechanical properties of electrospun PCL scaffold under in vitro and accelerated degradation conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvdal, Alexandra Liv Vest; Vange, Jakob; Nielsen, Lene Feldskov

    2014-01-01

    Within recent years, researchers have looked into using polycaprolactone (PCL) as a synthetic biodegradable scaffold for tissue engineering purposes. This study investigated the mechanical properties of an electrospun PCL, while being exposed to physiological fluids at 37C (in vitro conditions) w...... in buffer (pH 12). The accelerated study showed a linear decrease in both elastic modulus and yield stress as a function of degradation time....

  9. A comprehensive study on the fabrication and properties of biocomposites of poly(lactic acid)/ceramics for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajbakhsh, Saeid; Hajiali, Faezeh

    2017-01-01

    The fabrication of a suitable scaffold material is one of the major challenges for bone tissue engineering. Poly(lactic acid) (PLA) is one of the most favorable matrix materials in bone tissue engineering owing to its biocompatibility and biodegradability. However, PLA suffers from some shortcomings including low degradation rate, low cell adhesion caused by its hydrophobic property, and inflammatory reactions in vivo due to its degradation product, lactic acid. Therefore, the incorporation of bioactive reinforcements is considered as a powerful method to improve the properties of PLA. This review presents a comprehensive study on recent advances in the synthesis of PLA-based biocomposites containing ceramic reinforcements, including various methods of production and the evaluation of the scaffolds in terms of porosity, mechanical properties, in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility and bioactivity for bone tissue engineering applications. The production routes range from traditional approaches such as the use of porogens to provide porosity in the scaffolds to novel methods such as solid free-form techniques. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Controlled biomineralization of electrospun poly(ε-caprolactone) fibers to enhance their mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jingwei; Zhong, Shaoping; Ma, Bing; Shuler, Franklin D; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2013-03-01

    Electrospun polymeric fibers have been investigated as scaffolding materials for bone tissue engineering. However, their mechanical properties, and in particular stiffness and ultimate tensile strength, cannot match those of natural bones. The objective of the study was to develop novel composite nanofiber scaffolds by attaching minerals to polymeric fibers using an adhesive material - the mussel-inspired protein polydopamine - as a "superglue". Herein, we report for the first time the use of dopamine to regulate mineralization of electrospun poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) fibers to enhance their mechanical properties. We examined the mineralization of the PCL fibers by adjusting the concentration of HCO(3)(-) and dopamine in the mineralized solution, the reaction time and the surface composition of the fibers. We also examined mineralization on the surface of polydopamine-coated PCL fibers. We demonstrated the control of morphology, grain size and thickness of minerals deposited on the surface of electrospun fibers. The obtained mineral coatings render electrospun fibers with much higher stiffness, ultimate tensile strength and toughness, which could be closer to the mechanical properties of natural bone. Such great enhancement of mechanical properties for electrospun fibers through mussel protein-mediated mineralization has not been seen previously. This study could also be extended to the fabrication of other composite materials to better bridge the interfaces between organic and inorganic phases. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Viscoelastic Properties of Dental Pulp Tissue and Ramifications on Biomaterial Development for Pulp Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erisken, Cevat; Kalyon, Dilhan M; Zhou, Jian; Kim, Sahng G; Mao, Jeremy J

    2015-10-01

    A critical step in biomaterial selection effort is the determination of material as well as the biological properties of the target tissue. Previously, the selection of biomaterials and carriers for dental pulp regeneration has been solely based on empirical experience. In this study, first, the linear viscoelastic material functions and compressive properties of miniature pig dental pulp were characterized using small-amplitude oscillatory shear and uniaxial compression at a constant rate. They were then compared with the properties of hydrogels (ie, agarose, alginate, and collagen) that are widely used in tissue regeneration. The comparisons of the linear viscoelastic material functions of the native pulp tissue with those of the 3 hydrogels revealed the gel-like behavior of the pulp tissue over a relatively large range of time scales (ie, over the frequency range of 0.1-100 rps). At the constant gelation agent concentration of 2%, the dynamic properties (ie, storage and loss moduli and the tanδ) of the collagen-based gel approached those of the native tissue. Under uniaxial compression, the peak normal stresses and compressive moduli of the agarose gel were similar to those of the native tissue, whereas alginate and collagen exhibited significantly lower compressive properties. The linear viscoelastic and uniaxial compressive properties of the dental pulp tissue reported here should enable the more appropriate selection of biogels for dental pulp regeneration via the better tailoring of gelation agents and their concentrations to better mimic the dynamic and compressive properties of native pulp tissue. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Tensile Mechanical Properties and Dynamic Collagen Fiber Re-Alignment of the Murine Cervix are Dramatically Altered Throughout Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnum, Carrie E; Fey, Jennifer L; Weiss, Stephanie N; Barila, Guillermo; Brown, Amy G; Connizzo, Brianne K; Shetye, Snehal S; Elovitz, Michal A; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2017-06-01

    The cervix is a unique organ able to dramatically change its shape and function by serving as a physical barrier for the growing fetus and then undergoing dramatic dilation allowing for delivery of a term infant. As a result, the cervix endures changing mechanical forces from the growing fetus. There is an emerging concept that the cervix may change or remodel "early" in many cases of spontaneous preterm birth (sPTB). However, the mechanical role of the cervix in both normal and preterm birth remains unclear. Therefore, the primary objective of this study was to determine the mechanical and structural responses of murine cervical tissue throughout a normal gestational time course. In this study, both tissue structural and material properties were determined via a quasi-static tensile load-to-failure test, while simultaneously obtaining dynamic collagen fiber re-alignment via cross-polarization imaging. This study demonstrated that the majority of the mechanical properties evaluated decreased at midgestation and not just at term, while collagen fiber re-alignment occurred earlier in the loading curve for cervices at term. This suggests that although structural changes in the cervix occur throughout gestation, the differences in material properties function in combination with collagen fiber re-alignment as mechanical precursors to regulate term gestation. This work lays a foundation for investigating cervical biomechanics and the role of the cervix in preterm birth.

  13. Tissue engineered devices for ligament repair, replacement and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    potential, severe damage warrants surgical intervention including complete replacement. Ligaments are longitudinally arranged, complex tissues; the mechanical properties of ligaments are a direct result of their components and the arrangement of these components in the tissue. It is these mechanics that have made ...

  14. Towards Tuning the Mechanical Properties of Three-Dimensional Collagen Scaffolds Using a Coupled Fiber-Matrix Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengmao Lin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Scaffold mechanical properties are essential in regulating the microenvironment of three-dimensional cell culture. A coupled fiber-matrix numerical model was developed in this work for predicting the mechanical response of collagen scaffolds subjected to various levels of non-enzymatic glycation and collagen concentrations. The scaffold was simulated by a Voronoi network embedded in a matrix. The computational model was validated using published experimental data. Results indicate that both non-enzymatic glycation-induced matrix stiffening and fiber network density, as regulated by collagen concentration, influence scaffold behavior. The heterogeneous stress patterns of the scaffold were induced by the interfacial mechanics between the collagen fiber network and the matrix. The knowledge obtained in this work could help to fine-tune the mechanical properties of collagen scaffolds for improved tissue regeneration applications.

  15. A Novel bioreactor with mechanical stimulation for skeletal tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Petrović

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The provision of mechanical stimulation is believed to be necessary for the functional assembly of skeletal tissues, which are normally exposed to a variety of biomechanical signals in vivo. In this paper, we present a development and validation of a novel bioreactor aimed for skeletal tissue engineering that provides dynamic compression and perfusion of cultivated tissues. Dynamic compression can be applied at frequencies up to 67.5 Hz and displacements down to 5 m thus suitable for the simulation of physiological conditions in a native cartilage tissue (0.1-1 Hz, 5-10 % strain. The bioreactor also includes a load sensor that was calibrated so to measure average loads imposed on tissue samples. Regimes of the mechanical stimulation and acquisition of load sensor outputs are directed by an automatic control system using applications developed within the LabView platform. In addition, perfusion of tissue samples at physiological velocities (10–100 m/s provides efficient mass transfer, as well as the possibilities to expose the cells to hydrodynamic shear and simulate the conditions in a native bone tissue. Thus, the novel bioreactor is suited for studies of the effects of different biomechanical signals on in vitro regeneration of skeletal tissues, as well as for the studies of newly formulated biomaterials and cell biomaterial interactions under in vivo-like settings.

  16. Dispensing-based bioprinting of mechanically-functional hybrid scaffolds with vessel-like channels for tissue engineering applications - A brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghieh, Saman; Sarker, Md; Izadifar, Mohammad; Chen, Xiongbiao

    2018-02-01

    Over the past decades, significant progress has been achieved in the field of tissue engineering (TE) to restore/repair damaged tissues or organs and, in this regard, scaffolds made from biomaterials have played a critical role. Notably, recent advances in biomaterials and three-dimensional (3D) printing have enabled the manipulation of two or more biomaterials of distinct, yet complementary, mechanical and/or biological properties to form so-called hybrid scaffolds mimicking native tissues. Among various biomaterials, hydrogels synthesized to incorporate living cells and/or biological molecules have dominated due to their hydrated tissue-like environment. Moreover, dispensing-based bioprinting has evolved to the point that it can now be used to create hybrid scaffolds with complex structures. However, the complexities associated with multi-material bioprinting and synthesis of hydrogels used for hybrid scaffolds pose many challenges for their fabrication. This paper presents a brief review of dispensing-based bioprinting of hybrid scaffolds for TE applications. The focus is on the design and fabrication of hybrid scaffolds, including imaging techniques, potential biomaterials, physical architecture, mechanical properties, cell viability, and the importance of vessel-like channels. The key issues and challenges for dispensing-based bioprinting of hybrid scaffolds are also identified and discussed along with recommendations for future research directions. Addressing these issues will significantly enhance the design and fabrication of hybrid scaffolds to and pave the way for translating them into clinical applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparison of mechanisms involved in image enhancement of Tissue Harmonic Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, Robin O.; Jing, Yuan

    2006-05-01

    Processes that have been suggested as responsible for the improved imaging in Tissue Harmonic Imaging (THI) include: 1) reduced sensitivity to reverberation, 2) reduced sensitivity to aberration, and 3) reduction in the amplitude of diffraction side lobes. A three-dimensional model of the forward propagation of nonlinear sound beams in media with arbitrary spatial properties (a generalized KZK equation) was developed and solved using a time-domain code. The numerical simulations were validated through experiments with tissue mimicking phantoms. The impact of aberration from tissue-like media was determined through simulations using three-dimensional maps of tissue properties derived from datasets available through the Visible Female Project. The experiments and simulations demonstrated that second harmonic imaging suffers less clutter from reverberation and side-lobes but is not immune to aberration effects. The results indicate that side lobe suppression is the most significant reason for the improvement of second harmonic imaging.

  18. Mechanical properties of femoral trabecular bone in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nolte Ingo

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studying mechanical properties of canine trabecular bone is important for a better understanding of fracture mechanics or bone disorders and is also needed for numerical simulation of canine femora. No detailed data about elastic moduli and degrees of anisotropy of canine femoral trabecular bone has been published so far, hence the purpose of this study was to measure the elastic modulus of trabecular bone in canine femoral heads by ultrasound testing and to assess whether assuming isotropy of the cancellous bone in femoral heads in dogs is a valid simplification. Methods From 8 euthanized dogs, both femora were obtained and cubic specimens were cut from the centre of the femoral head which were oriented along the main pressure and tension trajectories. The specimens were tested using a 100 MHz ultrasound transducer in all three orthogonal directions. The directional elastic moduli of trabecular bone tissue and degrees of anisotropy were calculated. Results The elastic modulus along principal bone trajectories was found to be 11.2 GPa ± 0.4, 10.5 ± 2.1 GPa and 10.5 ± 1.8 GPa, respectively. The mean density of the specimens was 1.40 ± 0.09 g/cm3. The degrees of anisotropy revealed a significant inverse relationship with specimen densities. No significant differences were found between the elastic moduli in x, y and z directions, suggesting an effective isotropy of trabecular bone tissue in canine femoral heads. Discussion This study presents detailed data about elastic moduli of trabecular bone tissue obtained from canine femoral heads. Limitations of the study are the relatively small number of animals investigated and the measurement of whole specimen densities instead of trabecular bone densities which might lead to an underestimation of Young's moduli. Publications on elastic moduli of trabecular bone tissue present results that are similar to our data. Conclusion This study provides data about directional elastic

  19. Mapping of Mechanical Strains and Stresses around Quiescent Engineered Three-Dimensional Epithelial Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjorevski, Nikolce; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding how physical signals guide biological processes requires qualitative and quantitative knowledge of the mechanical forces generated and sensed by cells in a physiologically realistic three-dimensional (3D) context. Here, we used computational modeling and engineered epithelial tissues of precise geometry to define the experimental parameters that are required to measure directly the mechanical stress profile of 3D tissues embedded within native type I collagen. We found that to calculate the stresses accurately in these settings, we had to account for mechanical heterogeneities within the matrix, which we visualized and quantified using confocal reflectance and atomic force microscopy. Using this technique, we were able to obtain traction forces at the epithelium-matrix interface, and to resolve and quantify patterns of mechanical stress throughout the surrounding matrix. We discovered that whereas single cells generate tension by contracting and pulling on the matrix, the contraction of multicellular tissues can also push against the matrix, causing emergent compression. Furthermore, tissue geometry defines the spatial distribution of mechanical stress across the epithelium, which communicates mechanically over distances spanning hundreds of micrometers. Spatially resolved mechanical maps can provide insight into the types and magnitudes of physical parameters that are sensed and interpreted by multicellular tissues during normal and pathological processes. PMID:22828342

  20. The materials used in bone tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tereshchenko, V. P., E-mail: tervp@ngs.ru; Kirilova, I. A.; Sadovoy, M. A.; Larionov, P. M. [Novosibirsk Research Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics n.a. Ya.L. Tsivyan, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-17

    Bone tissue engineering looking for an alternative solution to the problem of skeletal injuries. The method is based on the creation of tissue engineered bone tissue equivalent with stem cells, osteogenic factors, and scaffolds - the carriers of these cells. For production of tissue engineered bone equivalent is advisable to create scaffolds similar in composition to natural extracellular matrix of the bone. This will provide optimal conditions for the cells, and produce favorable physico-mechanical properties of the final construction. This review article gives an analysis of the most promising materials for the manufacture of cell scaffolds. Biodegradable synthetic polymers are the basis for the scaffold, but it alone cannot provide adequate physical and mechanical properties of the construction, and favorable conditions for the cells. Addition of natural polymers improves the strength characteristics and bioactivity of constructions. Of the inorganic compounds, to create cell scaffolds the most widely used calcium phosphates, which give the structure adequate stiffness and significantly increase its osteoinductive capacity. Signaling molecules do not affect the physico-mechanical properties of the scaffold, but beneficial effect is on the processes of adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of cells. Biodegradation of the materials will help to fulfill the main task of bone tissue engineering - the ability to replace synthetic construct by natural tissues that will restore the original anatomical integrity of the bone.

  1. Contraction and elongation: Mechanics underlying cell boundary deformations in epithelial tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Yusuke

    2017-06-01

    The cell-cell boundaries of epithelial cells form cellular frameworks at the apical side of tissues. Deformations in these boundaries, for example, boundary contraction and elongation, and the associated forces form the mechanical basis of epithelial tissue morphogenesis. In this review, using data from recent Drosophila studies on cell boundary contraction and elongation, I provide an overview of the mechanism underlying the bi-directional deformations in the epithelial cell boundary, that are sustained by biased accumulations of junctional and apico-medial non-muscle myosin II. Moreover, how the junctional tensions exist on cell boundaries in different boundary dynamics and morphologies are discussed. Finally, some future perspectives on how recent knowledge about single cell boundary-level mechanics will contribute to our understanding of epithelial tissue morphogenesis are discussed. © 2017 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  2. Teletactile System Based on Mechanical Properties Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro M. Sette

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tactile feedback is a major missing feature in minimally invasive procedures; it is an essential means of diagnosis and orientation during surgical procedures. Previous works have presented a remote palpation feedback system based on the coupling between a pressure sensor and a general haptic interface. Here a new approach is presented based on the direct estimation of the tissue mechanical properties and finally their presentation to the operator by means of a haptic interface. The approach presents different technical difficulties and some solutions are proposed: the implementation of a fast Young’s modulus estimation algorithm, the implementation of a real time finite element model, and finally the implementation of a stiffness estimation approach in order to guarantee the system’s stability. The work is concluded with an experimental evaluation of the whole system.

  3. Effect of porosity, tissue density, and mechanical properties on radial sound speed in human cortical bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eneh, C. T. M., E-mail: chibuzor.eneh@uef.fi, E-mail: markus.malo@uef.fi, E-mail: janne.karjalainen@boneindex.fi, E-mail: jukka.liukkonen@gmail.com, E-mail: juha.toyras@uef.fi; Töyräs, J., E-mail: chibuzor.eneh@uef.fi, E-mail: markus.malo@uef.fi, E-mail: janne.karjalainen@boneindex.fi, E-mail: jukka.liukkonen@gmail.com, E-mail: juha.toyras@uef.fi; Jurvelin, J. S., E-mail: jukka.jurvelin@uef.fi [Department of Applied Physics, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 1627, Kuopio FI-70211, Finland and Diagnostic Imaging Center, Kuopio University Hospital, P.O. Box 100, Kuopio FI-70029 (Finland); Malo, M. K. H., E-mail: chibuzor.eneh@uef.fi, E-mail: markus.malo@uef.fi, E-mail: janne.karjalainen@boneindex.fi, E-mail: jukka.liukkonen@gmail.com, E-mail: juha.toyras@uef.fi; Liukkonen, J., E-mail: chibuzor.eneh@uef.fi, E-mail: markus.malo@uef.fi, E-mail: janne.karjalainen@boneindex.fi, E-mail: jukka.liukkonen@gmail.com, E-mail: juha.toyras@uef.fi [Department of Applied Physics, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 1627, Kuopio FI-70211 (Finland); Karjalainen, J. P., E-mail: chibuzor.eneh@uef.fi, E-mail: markus.malo@uef.fi, E-mail: janne.karjalainen@boneindex.fi, E-mail: jukka.liukkonen@gmail.com, E-mail: juha.toyras@uef.fi [Bone Index Finland Ltd., P.O. Box 1188, Kuopio FI-70211 (Finland)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of simultaneous changes in cortical porosity, tissue mineral density, and elastic properties on radial speed of sound (SOS) in cortical bone. The authors applied quantitative pulse-echo (PE) ultrasound techniques that hold much potential especially for screening of osteoporosis at primary healthcare facilities. Currently, most PE measurements of cortical thickness, a well-known indicator of fracture risk, use a predefined estimate for SOS in bone to calculate thickness. Due to variation of cortical bone porosity, the use of a constant SOS value propagates to an unknown error in cortical thickness assessment by PE ultrasound. Methods: The authors conducted 2.25 and 5.00 MHz focused PE ultrasound time of flight measurements on femoral diaphyses of 18 cadavers in vitro. Cortical porosities of the samples were determined using microcomputed tomography and related to SOS in the samples. Additionally, the effect of cortical bone porosity and mechanical properties of the calcified matrix on SOS was investigated using numerical finite difference time domain simulations. Results: Both experimental measurements and simulations demonstrated significant negative correlation between radial SOS and cortical porosity (R{sup 2} ≥ 0.493, p < 0.01 and R{sup 2} ≥ 0.989, p < 0.01, respectively). When a constant SOS was assumed for cortical bone, the error due to variation of cortical bone porosity (4.9%–16.4%) was about 6% in the cortical thickness assessment in vitro. Conclusions: Use of a predefined, constant value for radial SOS in cortical bone, i.e., neglecting the effect of measured variation in cortical porosity, propagated to an error of 6% in cortical thickness. This error can be critical as characteristic cortical thinning of 1.10% ± 1.06% per yr decreases bending strength of the distal radius and results in increased fragility in postmenopausal women. Provided that the cortical porosity can be estimated

  4. Effect of porosity, tissue density, and mechanical properties on radial sound speed in human cortical bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eneh, C. T. M.; Töyräs, J.; Jurvelin, J. S.; Malo, M. K. H.; Liukkonen, J.; Karjalainen, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of simultaneous changes in cortical porosity, tissue mineral density, and elastic properties on radial speed of sound (SOS) in cortical bone. The authors applied quantitative pulse-echo (PE) ultrasound techniques that hold much potential especially for screening of osteoporosis at primary healthcare facilities. Currently, most PE measurements of cortical thickness, a well-known indicator of fracture risk, use a predefined estimate for SOS in bone to calculate thickness. Due to variation of cortical bone porosity, the use of a constant SOS value propagates to an unknown error in cortical thickness assessment by PE ultrasound. Methods: The authors conducted 2.25 and 5.00 MHz focused PE ultrasound time of flight measurements on femoral diaphyses of 18 cadavers in vitro. Cortical porosities of the samples were determined using microcomputed tomography and related to SOS in the samples. Additionally, the effect of cortical bone porosity and mechanical properties of the calcified matrix on SOS was investigated using numerical finite difference time domain simulations. Results: Both experimental measurements and simulations demonstrated significant negative correlation between radial SOS and cortical porosity (R"2 ≥ 0.493, p < 0.01 and R"2 ≥ 0.989, p < 0.01, respectively). When a constant SOS was assumed for cortical bone, the error due to variation of cortical bone porosity (4.9%–16.4%) was about 6% in the cortical thickness assessment in vitro. Conclusions: Use of a predefined, constant value for radial SOS in cortical bone, i.e., neglecting the effect of measured variation in cortical porosity, propagated to an error of 6% in cortical thickness. This error can be critical as characteristic cortical thinning of 1.10% ± 1.06% per yr decreases bending strength of the distal radius and results in increased fragility in postmenopausal women. Provided that the cortical porosity can be estimated in vivo

  5. Real-time observations of mechanical stimulus-induced enhancements of mechanical properties in osteoblast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xu; Liu Xiaoli; Sun Jialun; He Shuojie; Lee, Imshik; Pak, Hyuk Kyu

    2008-01-01

    Osteoblast, playing a key role in the pathophysiology of osteoporosis, is one of the mechanical stress sensitive cells. The effects of mechanical load-induced changes of mechanical properties in osteoblast cells were studied at real-time. Osteoblasts obtained from young Wister rats were exposed to mechanical loads in different frequencies and resting intervals generated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe tip and simultaneously measured the changes of the mechanical properties by AFM. The enhancement of the mechanical properties was observed and quantified by the increment of the apparent Young's modulus, E * . The observed mechanical property depended on the frequency of applied tapping loads. For the resting interval is 50 s, the mechanical load-induced enhancement of E * -values disappears. It seems that the enhanced mechanical property was recover able under no additional mechanical stimulus

  6. Development of mechanically expanded gelatin-AAc-PLLA/PLCL nanofibers for vascular tissue engineering by radiation-based techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jin Oh; Jeong, Sung In; Seo, Da Eun; Park, Jong Seok; Gwon, Hui Jeong; Ahn, Sung Jun; Lim, Youn Mook [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Young Min [Dept. of Bioengineering, Division of Applied Chemical and Bio Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Vascular tissue engineering has been accessed to mimic the natural composition of the blood vessel containing inmate, media, and adventitia layers. We fabricated mechanically expanded PLLA/PLCL nanofibers using electrospinning and UTM. The pore size of the meshes was increased the gelatin immobilized AAc-PLLA/PLCL nanofibers (203.30±49.62 microns) than PLLA/PLCL nanofibers (59.99±8.66 microns) after mechanical expansion. To increase the cell adhesion and proliferation, we introduced carboxyl group, and gelatin was conjugated on them. The properties of the PLLA/PLCL nanofibers were analyzed with SEM, ATR-FTIR, TBO staining, and water contact angle measurement, general cell responses on the PLLA/PLCL nanofibers such as adhesion, proliferation, and infiltration were also investigated using smooth muscle cell (SMC). During the SMC culture, the initial viability of the cells was significantly increased on the gelatin immobilized AAc-PLLA/PLCL nanofibers, and infiltration of the cells was also enhanced on them. Therefore, gelatin immobilized AAc-PLLA/PLCL nanofibers and mechanically expanded meshes may be a good tool for vascular tissue engineering application.

  7. Fabrication and mechanical characterization of a polyvinyl alcohol sponge for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, A; Navidbakhsh, M; Faghihi, S

    2014-05-01

    Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) sponges are widely used for clinical applications, including ophthalmic surgical treatments, wound healing and tissue engineering. There is, however, a lack of sufficient data on the mechanical properties of PVA sponges. In this study, a biomechanical method is used to characterize the elastic modulus, maximum stress and strain as well as the swelling ratio of a fabricated PVA sponge (P-sponge) and it is compared with two commercially available PVA sponges (CENEFOM and EYETEC). The results indicate that the elastic modulus of the P-sponge is 5.32% and 13.45% lower than that of the CENEFOM and EYETEC sponges, while it bears 4.11% more and 10.37% less stress compared to the CENEFOM and EYETEC sponges, respectively. The P-sponge shows a maximum strain of 32% more than the EYETEC sponge as well as a 26.78% higher swelling ratio, which is a significantly higher absorbency compared to the CENEFOM. It is believed that the results of this study would help for a better understanding of the extension, rupture and swelling mechanism of PVA sponges, which could lead to crucial improvement in the design and application of PVA-based materials in ophthalmic and plastic surgeries as well as wound healing and tissue engineering.

  8. THE STRUCTURAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF THE BONE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Karpiński

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The work contains basic information on the anatomy and physiology of bone tissue. Basic concepts related to the structure of bone tissue are presented. General issues related to bone reconstruction processes and biomechanical structural adaptations processes were described. Mechanical parameters of bone tissue were presented.

  9. Nanosized Mesoporous Bioactive Glass/Poly(lactic-co-glycolic Acid Composite-Coated CaSiO3 Scaffolds with Multifunctional Properties for Bone Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengchao Shi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is of great importance to prepare multifunctional scaffolds combining good mechanical strength, bioactivity, and drug delivery ability for bone tissue engineering. In this study, nanosized mesoporous bioglass/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid composite-coated calcium silicate scaffolds, named NMBG-PLGA/CS, were successfully prepared. The morphology and structure of the prepared scaffolds were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The effects of NMBG on the apatite mineralization activity and mechanical strength of the scaffolds and the attachment, proliferation, and alkaline phosphatase activity of MC3T3 cells as well as drug ibuprofen delivery properties were systematically studied. Compared to pure CS scaffolds and PLGA/CS scaffolds, the prepared NMBG-PLGA/CS scaffolds had greatly improved apatite mineralization activity in simulated body fluids, much higher mechanical property, and supported the attachment of MC3T3 cells and enhanced the cell proliferation and ALP activity. Furthermore, the prepared NMBG-PLGA/CS scaffolds could be used for delivering ibuprofen with a sustained release profile. Our study suggests that the prepared NMBG-PLGA/CS scaffolds have improved physicochemical, biological, and drug-delivery property as compared to conventional CS scaffolds, indicating that the multifunctional property of the prepared scaffolds for the potential application of bone tissue engineering.

  10. Improved mechanical properties of hydroxyapatite whisker-reinforced poly(L-lactic acid) scaffold by surface modification of hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Zhou; Feng, Qingling

    2014-02-01

    To improve the mechanical properties of porous hydroxyapatite/poly(L-lactic acid) (HA/PLLA) composites, HA whiskers with high crystallinity and high aspect ratio were synthesized. HA whiskers were modified with γ-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) to improve the interface between HA whiskers and PLLA. The composite scaffold consists of a porous PLLA matrix with HA whiskers distributed homogeneously. The morphology and the distributions of pore sizes of PLLA scaffold was not influenced by introducing HA whiskers, while the mechanical properties were improved. Both the compressive strength and compressive modulus were increased with the weight ratio of APTES-modified HA whiskers up to 30 wt.%, but only up to 15 wt.% for non-modified HA whiskers. With more than 15 wt.% HA whiskers, the mechanical properties of HA/PLLA scaffold were better improved with APTES-modified HA whiskers than non-modified. The HA whisker/PLLA scaffold with high porosity and improved mechanical properties is attractive in the application of tissue engineering. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Mechanized syringe homogenization of human and animal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurien, Biji T; Porter, Andrew C; Patel, Nisha C; Kurono, Sadamu; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Scofield, R Hal

    2004-06-01

    Tissue homogenization is a prerequisite to any fractionation schedule. A plethora of hands-on methods are available to homogenize tissues. Here we report a mechanized method for homogenizing animal and human tissues rapidly and easily. The Bio-Mixer 1200 (manufactured by Innovative Products, Inc., Oklahoma City, OK) utilizes the back-and-forth movement of two motor-driven disposable syringes, connected to each other through a three-way stopcock, to homogenize animal or human tissue. Using this method, we were able to homogenize human or mouse tissues (brain, liver, heart, and salivary glands) in 5 min. From sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis and a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometric enzyme assay for prolidase, we have found that the homogenates obtained were as good or even better than that obtained used a manual glass-on-Teflon (DuPont, Wilmington, DE) homogenization protocol (all-glass tube and Teflon pestle). Use of the Bio-Mixer 1200 to homogenize animal or human tissue precludes the need to stay in the cold room as is the case with the other hands-on homogenization methods available, in addition to freeing up time for other experiments.

  12. Correlation between the dielectric properties and biological activities of human ex vivo hepatic tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Hang; You, Fusheng; Fu, Feng; Dong, Xiuzhen; Shi, Xuetao; He, Yong; Yang, Min; Yan, Qingguo

    2015-01-01

    Dielectric properties are vital biophysical features of biological tissues, and biological activity is an index to ascertain the active state of tissues. This study investigated the potential correlation between the dielectric properties and biological activities of human hepatic tissue with prolonged ex vivo time through correlation and regression analyses. The dielectric properties of 26 cases of normal human hepatic tissue at 10 Hz to 100 MHz were measured from 15 min after isolation to 24 h at 37 °C with 90% humidity. Cell morphologies, including nucleus area (NA) and alteration rate of intercellular area (ICAR), were analyzed as indicators of biological activities. Conductivity, complex resistivity, and NA exhibited opposing changes 1 h after isolation. Relative permittivity and ex vivo time were not closely correlated (p > 0.05). The dielectric properties measured at low frequencies (i.e. <1 MHz) were more sensitive than those measured at high frequencies in reflecting the biological activity of ex vivo tissue. Highly significant correlations were found between conductivity, resistivity and the ex vivo time (p < 0.05) as well as conductivity and the cell morphology (p < 0.05). The findings indicated that establishing the correlation between the dielectric properties and biological activities of human hepatic tissue is of great significance for promoting the role of dielectric properties in biological science, particularly in human biology. (paper)

  13. An examination of the elastic properties of tissue-mimicking phantoms using vibro-acoustography and a muscle motor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccabi, A.; Taylor, Z.; Bajwa, N.; Mallen-St. Clair, J.; St. John, M.; Sung, S.; Grundfest, W.; Saddik, G.

    2016-02-01

    Tissue hardness, often quantified in terms of elasticity, is an important differentiating criterion for pathological identity and is extensively used by surgeons for tumor localization. Delineation of malignant regions from benign regions is typically performed by visual inspection and palpation. Although practical, this method is highly subjective and does not provide quantitative metrics. We have previously reported on Vibro-Acoustography (VA) for tumor delineation. VA is unique in that it uses the specific, non-linear properties of tumor tissue in response to an amplitude modulated ultrasound beam to generate spatially resolved, high contrast maps of tissue. Although the lateral and axial resolutions (sub-millimeter and sub-centimeter, respectively) of VA have been extensively characterized, the relationship between static stiffness assessment (palpation) and dynamic stiffness characterization (VA) has not been explicitly established. Here we perform a correlative exploration of the static and dynamic properties of tissue-mimicking phantoms, specifically elasticity, using VA and a muscle motor system. Muscle motor systems, commonly used to probe the mechanical properties of materials, provide absolute, quantitative point measurements of the elastic modulus, analogous to Young's modulus, of a target. For phantoms of varying percent-by-weight concentrations, parallel VA and muscle motor studies conducted on 18 phantoms reveal a negative correlation (p < - 0.85) between mean signal amplitude levels observed with VA and calculated elastic modulus values from force vs. indentation depth curves. Comparison of these elasticity measurements may provide additional information to improve tissue modeling, system characterization, as well as offer valuable insights for in vivo applications, specifically surgical extirpation of tumors.

  14. ultrasound reflecting the morphological properties in soft tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, Torben; Larsen, Torben; Court-Payen, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) is an image modality providing the examiner with real-time images which reflect the morphological properties in soft tissue. Different types of transducers are used for different kind of exams. US is cheap, fast, and safe. US is widely used in abdominal imaging including obstetrics...

  15. Preparation and properties of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and hydroxylapatite (HA) hydrogels for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, F; Ma, M; Lu, L; Pan, Z; Zhou, W; Cai, J; Luo, S; Zeng, W; Yin, F

    2017-05-20

    A novel bioactive hydrogel for cartilage tissue based on polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and hydroxylapatite (HA) were prepared, the effects of its component contents on the mechanical properties and microstructure of the hydrogel were investigated. The important properties of the scaffold composites, such as density, porosity, compressive modulus and microstructure were studied and analyzed through various measurements and methods. The biodegradability of hydrogel was evaluated by soaking the samples into artificial degradation solution at body temperature (36 - 37 oC) in vitro. Experimental results showed that the PVA/HA hydrogels had a density of 0.572 - 0.683 g/cm3, a porosity of 63.25 - 96.14% and a compressive modulus of 5.62 - 8.24 MP. The HA compound in the hydrogels enhanced the biodegradation significantly and linearly increased the rate of biodegradation by 2.3 - 8.5 %. The compressive modulus of PVA/HA exhibited a linear reduce to 0.86 - 1.53 MP with the time of degradation. The scaffold composites PVA/HA possess a high porosity, decent compressive modulus and good biodegradability. After further optimizing the structure and properties, this composite might be considered as novel hydrogel biomaterials to be applied in the field of cartilage tissue engineering.

  16. Using molecular mechanics to predict bulk material properties of fibronectin fibers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J Bradshaw

    Full Text Available The structural proteins of the extracellular matrix (ECM form fibers with finely tuned mechanical properties matched to the time scales of cell traction forces. Several proteins such as fibronectin (Fn and fibrin undergo molecular conformational changes that extend the proteins and are believed to be a major contributor to the extensibility of bulk fibers. The dynamics of these conformational changes have been thoroughly explored since the advent of single molecule force spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations but remarkably, these data have not been rigorously applied to the understanding of the time dependent mechanics of bulk ECM fibers. Using measurements of protein density within fibers, we have examined the influence of dynamic molecular conformational changes and the intermolecular arrangement of Fn within fibers on the bulk mechanical properties of Fn fibers. Fibers were simulated as molecular strands with architectures that promote either equal or disparate molecular loading under conditions of constant extension rate. Measurements of protein concentration within micron scale fibers using deep ultraviolet transmission microscopy allowed the simulations to be scaled appropriately for comparison to in vitro measurements of fiber mechanics as well as providing estimates of fiber porosity and water content, suggesting Fn fibers are approximately 75% solute. Comparing the properties predicted by single molecule measurements to in vitro measurements of Fn fibers showed that domain unfolding is sufficient to predict the high extensibility and nonlinear stiffness of Fn fibers with surprising accuracy, with disparately loaded fibers providing the best fit to experiment. This work shows the promise of this microstructural modeling approach for understanding Fn fiber properties, which is generally applicable to other ECM fibers, and could be further expanded to tissue scale by incorporating these simulated fibers into three dimensional

  17. Reliability of in vivo measurements of the dielectric properties of anisotropic tissue: a simulative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huo Xuyang; Shi Xuetao; You Fusheng; Fu Feng; Liu Ruigang; Tang Chi; Dong Xiuzhen; Lu Qiang

    2013-01-01

    A simulative study was performed to measure the dielectric properties of anisotropic tissue using several in vivo and in vitro probes. COMSOL Multiphysics was selected to carry out the simulation. Five traditional probes and a newly designed probe were used in this study. One of these probes was an in vitro measurement probe and the other five were in vivo. The simulations were performed in terms of the minimal tissue volume for in vivo measurements, the calibration of a probe constant, the measurement performed on isotropic tissue and the measurement performed on anisotropic tissue. Results showed that the in vitro probe can be used to measure the in-cell dielectric properties of isotropic and anisotropic tissues. When measured with the five in vivo probes, the dielectric properties of isotropic tissue were all measured accurately. For the measurements performed on anisotropic tissue, large errors were observed when the four traditional in vivo probes were used, but only a small error was observed when the new in vivo probe was used. This newly designed five-electrode in vivo probe may indicate the dielectric properties of anisotropic tissue more accurately than these four traditional in vivo probes. (paper)

  18. A nano-sandwich construct built with graphene nanosheets and carbon nanotubes enhances mechanical properties of hydroxyapatite-polyetheretherketone scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Pei; Peng, Shuping; Wu, Ping; Gao, Chengde; Huang, Wei; Deng, Youwen; Xiao, Tao; Shuai, Cijun

    2016-01-01

    A nano-sandwich construct was built by combining two-dimensional graphene nanosheets (GNSs) and one-dimensional carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to improve the mechanical properties of hydroxyapatite-polyetheretherketone (HAP-PEEK) scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. In this nano-sandwich construct, the long tubular CNTs penetrated the interlayers of graphene and prevented their aggregation, increasing the effective contact area between the construct and matrix. The combination of GNSs and CNTs in a weight ratio of 2:8 facilitated the dispersion of each other and provided a synergetic effect in enhancing the mechanical properties. The compressive strength and modulus of the scaffolds were increased by 63.58% and 56.54% at this time compared with those of HAP-PEEK scaffolds, respectively. The carbon-based fillers, pulling out and bridging, were also clearly observed in the matrix. Moreover, the dangling of CNTs and their entangling with GNSs further reinforced the mechanical properties. Furthermore, apatite layer formed on the scaffold surface after immersing in simulated body fluid, and the cells attached and spread well on the surface of the scaffolds and displayed good viability, proliferation, and differentiation. These evidence indicate that the HAP-PEEK scaffolds enhanced by GNSs and CNTs are a promising alternative for bone tissue engineering.

  19. Selected mechanical properties of modified beech wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Holan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This thesis deals with an examination of mechanical properties of ammonia treated beach wood with a trademark Lignamon. For determination mechanical properties were used procedures especially based on ČSN. From the results is noticeable increased density of wood by 22% in comparison with untreated beach wood, which makes considerable increase of the most mechanical wood properties. Considering failure strength was raised by 32% and modulus of elasticity was raised at average about 46%.

  20. Mechanical properties and cell-culture characteristics of a polycaprolactone kagome-structure scaffold fabricated by a precision extruding deposition system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Se-Hwan; Cho, Yong Sang; Hong, Myoung Wha; Lee, Bu-Kyu; Park, Yongdoo; Park, Sang-Hyug; Kim, Young Yul; Cho, Young-Sam

    2017-09-13

    To enhance the mechanical properties of three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds used for bone regeneration in tissue engineering, many researchers have studied their structure and chemistry. In the structural engineering field, the kagome structure has been known to have an excellent relative strength. In this study, to enhance the mechanical properties of a synthetic polymer scaffold used for tissue engineering, we applied the 3D kagome structure to a porous scaffold for bone regeneration. Prior to fabricating the biocompatible-polymer scaffold, the ideal kagome structure, which was manufactured by a 3D printer of the digital light processing type, was compared with a grid-structure, which was used as the control group, using a compressive experiment. A polycaprolactone (PCL) kagome-structure scaffold was successfully fabricated by additive manufacturing using a 3D printer with a precision extruding deposition head. To assess the physical characteristics of the fabricated PCL-kagome-structure scaffold, we analyzed its porosity, pore size, morphological structure, surface roughness, compressive stiffness, and mechanical bending properties. The results showed that, the mechanical properties of proposed kagome-structure scaffold were superior to those of a grid-structure scaffold. Moreover, Sarcoma osteogenic (Saos-2) cells were used to evaluate the characteristics of in vitro cell proliferation. We carried out cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) and DNA contents assays. Consequently, the cell proliferation of the kagome-structure scaffold was increased; this could be because the surface roughness of the kagome-structure scaffold enhances initial cell attachment.

  1. Human tissue optical properties measurements and light propagation modelling

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dam, JS

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Biomedical Optics is the study of the optical properties of living biological material, especially its scattering and absorption characteristics, and their significance to light propagation within the material. Determination of tissue optical...

  2. Microstructures and mechanical properties of aging materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liaw, P.K.; Viswanathan, R.; Murty, K.L.; Simonen, E.P.; Frear, D.

    1993-01-01

    This book contains a collection of papers presented at the symposium on ''Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Aging Materials,'' that was held in Chicago, IL. November 2-5, 1992 in conjunction with the Fall Meeting of The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society (TMS). The subjects of interest in the symposium included: (1) mechanisms of microstructural degradation, (2) effects of microstructural degradation on mechanical behavior, (3) development of life prediction methodology for in-service structural and electronic components, (4) experimental techniques to monitor degradation of microstructures and mechanical properties, and (5) effects of environment on microstructural degradation and mechanical properties. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases

  3. Design of Xylose-Based Semisynthetic Polyurethane Tissue Adhesives with Enhanced Bioactivity Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcioglu, Sevgi; Parlakpinar, Hakan; Vardi, Nigar; Denkbas, Emir Baki; Karaaslan, Merve Goksin; Gulgen, Selam; Taslidere, Elif; Koytepe, Suleyman; Ates, Burhan

    2016-02-01

    Developing biocompatible tissue adhesives with high adhesion properties is a highly desired goal of the tissue engineering due to adverse effects of the sutures. Therefore, our work involves synthesis, characterization, adhesion properties, protein adsorption, in vitro biodegradation, in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility properties of xylose-based semisynthetic polyurethane (NPU-PEG-X) bioadhesives. Xylose-based semisynthetic polyurethanes were developed by the reaction among 4,4'-methylenebis(cyclohexyl isocyanate) (MCI), xylose and polyethylene glycol 200 (PEG). Synthesized polyurethanes (PUs) showed good thermal stability and high adhesion strength. The highest values in adhesion strength were measured as 415.0 ± 48.8 and 94.0 ± 2.8 kPa for aluminum substrate and muscle tissue in 15% xylose containing PUs (NPU-PEG-X-15%), respectively. The biodegradation of NPU-PEG-X-15% was also determined as 19.96 ± 1.04% after 8 weeks of incubation. Relative cell viability of xylose containing PU was above 86%. Moreover, 10% xylose containing NPU-PEG-X (NPU-PEG-X-10%) sample has favorable tissue response, and inflammatory reaction between 1 and 6 weeks implantation period. With high adhesiveness and biocompatibility properties, NPU-PEG-X can be used in the medical field as supporting materials for preventing the fluid leakage after abdominal surgery or wound closure.

  4. Risk-adjusted survival after tissue versus mechanical aortic valve replacement: a 23-year assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaca, Jeffrey G; Clare, Robert M; Rankin, J Scott; Daneshmand, Mani A; Milano, Carmelo A; Hughes, G Chad; Wolfe, Walter G; Glower, Donald D; Smith, Peter K

    2013-11-01

    Detailed analyses of risk-adjusted outcomes after mitral valve surgery have documented significant survival decrements with tissue valves at any age. Several recent studies of prosthetic aortic valve replacement (AVR) also have suggested a poorer performance of tissue valves, although analyses have been limited to small matched series. The study aim was to test the hypothesis that AVR with tissue valves is associated with a lower risk-adjusted survival, as compared to mechanical valves. Between 1986 and 2009, primary isolated AVR, with or without coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), was performed with currently available valve types in 2148 patients (1108 tissue valves, 1040 mechanical). Patients were selected for tissue valves to be used primarily in the elderly. Baseline and operative characteristics were documented prospectively with a consistent variable set over the entire 23-year period. Follow up was obtained with mailed questionnaires, supplemented by National Death Index searches. The average time to death or follow up was seven years, and follow up for survival was 96.2% complete. Risk-adjusted survival characteristics for the two groups were evaluated using a Cox proportional hazards model with stepwise selection of candidate variables. Differences in baseline characteristics between groups were (tissue versus mechanical): median age 73 versus 61 years; non-elective surgery 32% versus 28%; CABG 45% versus 35%; median ejection fraction 55% versus 55%; renal failure 6% versus 1%; diabetes 18% versus 7% (pvalves; however, after risk adjustment for the adverse profiles of tissue valve patients, no significant difference was observed in survival after tissue or mechanical AVR. Thus, the hypothesis did not hold, and risk-adjusted survival was equivalent, of course qualified by the fact that selection bias was evident. With selection criteria that employed tissue AVR more frequently in elderly patients, tissue and mechanical valves achieved similar survival

  5. Emerging bone tissue engineering via Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA)-based scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Janice; You, Mingliang; Li, Jian; Li, Zibiao

    2017-10-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are a class of biodegradable polymers derived from microorganisms. On top of their biodegradability and biocompatibility, different PHA types can contribute to varying mechanical and chemical properties. This has led to increasing attention to the use of PHAs in numerous biomedical applications over the past few decades. Bone tissue engineering refers to the regeneration of new bone through providing mechanical support while inducing cell growth on the PHA scaffolds having a porous structure for tissue regeneration. This review first introduces the various properties PHA scaffold that make them suitable for bone tissue engineering such as biocompatibility, biodegradability, mechanical properties as well as vascularization. The typical fabrication techniques of PHA scaffolds including electrospinning, salt-leaching and solution casting are further discussed, followed by the relatively new technology of using 3D printing in PHA scaffold fabrication. Finally, the recent progress of using different types of PHAs scaffold in bone tissue engineering applications are summarized in intrinsic PHA/blends forms or as composites with other polymeric or inorganic hybrid materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Necromechanics: Death-induced changes in the mechanical properties of human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Pedro A L S; Ferreira, Francisca; Natal Jorge, Renato; Parente, Marco; Santos, Agostinho

    2015-05-01

    After the death phenomenon, the rigor mortis development, characterized by body stiffening, is one of the most evident changes that occur in the body. In this work, the development of rigor mortis was assessed using a skinfold caliper in human cadavers and in live people to measure the deformation in the biceps brachii muscle in response to the force applied by the device. Additionally, to simulate the measurements with the finite element method, a two-dimensional model of an arm section was used. As a result of the experimental procedure, a decrease in deformation with increasing postmortem time was observed, which corresponds to an increase in rigidity. As expected, the deformations for the live subjects were higher. The finite element method analysis showed a correlation between the c1 parameter of the neo-Hookean model in the 4- to 8-h postmortem interval. This was accomplished by adjusting the c1 material parameter in order to simulate the measured experimental displacement. Despite being a preliminary study, the obtained results show that combining the proposed experimental procedure with a numerical technique can be very useful in the study of the postmortem mechanical modifications of human tissues. Moreover, the use of data from living subjects allows us to estimate the time of death paving the way to establish this process as an alternative to the existing techniques. This solution constitutes a portable, non-invasive method of estimating the postmortem interval with direct quantitative measurements using a skinfold caliper. The tools and methods described can be used to investigate the subject and to gain epidemiologic knowledge on rigor mortis phenomenon. © IMechE 2015.

  7. The mechanism and properties of bio-photon emission and absorption in protein molecules in living systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xiao-feng

    2012-05-01

    The mechanism and properties of bio-photon emission and absorption in bio-tissues were studied using Pang's theory of bio-energy transport, in which the energy spectra of protein molecules are obtained from the discrete dynamic equation. From the energy spectra, it was determined that the protein molecules could both radiate and absorb bio-photons with wavelengths of energy level transitions of the excitons. These results were consistent with the experimental data; this consisted of infrared absorption data from collagen, bovine serum albumin, the protein-like molecule acetanilide, plasma, and a person's finger, and the laser-Raman spectra of acidity I-type collagen in the lungs of a mouse, and metabolically active Escherichia coli. We further elucidated the mechanism responsible for the non-thermal biological effects produced by the infrared light absorbed by the bio-tissues, using the above results. No temperature rise was observed; instead, the absorbed infrared light promoted the vibrations of amides as well the transport of the bio-energy from one place to other in the protein molecules, which changed their conformations. These experimental results, therefore, not only confirmed the validity of the mechanism of bio-photon emission, and the newly developed theory of bio-energy transport mentioned above, but also explained the mechanism and properties of the non-thermal biological effects produced by the absorption of infrared light by the living systems.

  8. Stem cell homing-based tissue engineering using bioactive materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yinxian; Sun, Binbin; Yi, Chengqing; Mo, Xiumei

    2017-06-01

    Tissue engineering focuses on repairing tissue and restoring tissue functions by employing three elements: scaffolds, cells and biochemical signals. In tissue engineering, bioactive material scaffolds have been used to cure tissue and organ defects with stem cell-based therapies being one of the best documented approaches. In the review, different biomaterials which are used in several methods to fabricate tissue engineering scaffolds were explained and show good properties (biocompatibility, biodegradability, and mechanical properties etc.) for cell migration and infiltration. Stem cell homing is a recruitment process for inducing the migration of the systemically transplanted cells, or host cells, to defect sites. The mechanisms and modes of stem cell homing-based tissue engineering can be divided into two types depending on the source of the stem cells: endogenous and exogenous. Exogenous stem cell-based bioactive scaffolds have the challenge of long-term culturing in vitro and for endogenous stem cells the biochemical signal homing recruitment mechanism is not clear yet. Although the stem cell homing-based bioactive scaffolds are attractive candidates for tissue defect therapies, based on in vitro studies and animal tests, there is still a long way before clinical application.

  9. Input and output for surgical simulation: devices to measure tissue properties in vivo and a haptic interface for laparoscopy simulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottensmeyer, M P; Ben-Ur, E; Salisbury, J K

    2000-01-01

    Current efforts in surgical simulation very often focus on creating realistic graphical feedback, but neglect some or all tactile and force (haptic) feedback that a surgeon would normally receive. Simulations that do include haptic feedback do not typically use real tissue compliance properties, favoring estimates and user feedback to determine realism. When tissue compliance data are used, there are virtually no in vivo property measurements to draw upon. Together with the Center for Innovative Minimally Invasive Therapy at the Massachusetts General Hospital, the Haptics Group is developing tools to introduce more comprehensive haptic feedback in laparoscopy simulators and to provide biological tissue material property data for our software simulation. The platform for providing haptic feedback is a PHANToM Haptic Interface, produced by SensAble Technologies, Inc. Our devices supplement the PHANToM to provide for grasping and optionally, for the roll axis of the tool. Together with feedback from the PHANToM, which provides the pitch, yaw and thrust axes of a typical laparoscopy tool, we can recreate all of the haptic sensations experienced during laparoscopy. The devices integrate real laparoscopy toolhandles and a compliant torso model to complete the set of visual and tactile sensations. Biological tissues are known to exhibit non-linear mechanical properties, and change their properties dramatically when removed from a living organism. To measure the properties in vivo, two devices are being developed. The first is a small displacement, 1-D indenter. It will measure the linear tissue compliance (stiffness and damping) over a wide range of frequencies. These data will be used as inputs to a finite element or other model. The second device will be able to deflect tissues in 3-D over a larger range, so that the non-linearities due to changes in the tissue geometry will be measured. This will allow us to validate the performance of the model on large tissue

  10. A nano-sandwich construct built with graphene nanosheets and carbon nanotubes enhances mechanical properties of hydroxyapatite–polyetheretherketone scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng P

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Pei Feng,1,* Shuping Peng,2,3,* Ping Wu,4 Chengde Gao,1 Wei Huang,1 Youwen Deng,5 Tao Xiao,5 Cijun Shuai1 1State Key Laboratory of High Performance Complex Manufacturing, 2The Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Cancer Invasion of the Chinese Ministry of Education, 3The Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis of the Chinese Ministry of Health and Cancer Research Institute, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, 4College of Chemistry, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, 5Department of Orthopedics, The Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: A nano-sandwich construct was built by combining two-dimensional graphene nanosheets (GNSs and one-dimensional carbon nanotubes (CNTs to improve the mechanical properties of hydroxyapatite–polyetheretherketone (HAP–PEEK scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. In this nano-sandwich construct, the long tubular CNTs penetrated the interlayers of graphene and prevented their aggregation, increasing the effective contact area between the construct and matrix. The combination of GNSs and CNTs in a weight ratio of 2:8 facilitated the dispersion of each other and provided a synergetic effect in enhancing the mechanical properties. The compressive strength and modulus of the scaffolds were increased by 63.58% and 56.54% at this time compared with those of HAP–PEEK scaffolds, respectively. The carbon-based fillers, pulling out and bridging, were also clearly observed in the matrix. Moreover, the dangling of CNTs and their entangling with GNSs further reinforced the mechanical properties. Furthermore, apatite layer formed on the scaffold surface after immersing in simulated body fluid, and the cells attached and spread well on the surface of the scaffolds and displayed good viability, proliferation, and differentiation. These evidence indicate that the HAP–PEEK scaffolds enhanced by GNSs and CNTs are a

  11. Mechanical Properties of Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuhiro Okayasu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available An examination has been made of the mechanical and failure properties of several composite materials, such as a short and a long carbon fiber reinforced plastic (short- and long-CFRP and metal based composite material. The short CFRP materials were used for a recycled CFRP which fabricated by the following process: the CFRP, consisting of epoxy resin with carbon fiber, is injected to a rectangular plate cavity after mixing with acrylonitrile butadiene styrene resin with different weight fractions of CFRP. The fatigue and ultimate tensile strength (UTS increased with increasing CFRP content. These correlations, however, break down, especially for tensile strength, as the CFPR content becomes more than 70%. Influence of sample temperature on the bending strength of the long-CFRP was investigated, and it appears that the strength slightly degreases with increasing the temperature, due to the weakness in the matrix. Broken fiber and pull-out or debonding between the fiber and matrix were related to the main failure of the short- and long-CFRP samples. Mechanical properties of metal based composite materials have been also investigated, where fiber-like high hardness CuAl2 structure is formed in aluminum matrix. Excellent mechanical properties were obtained in this alloy, e.g., the higher strength and the higher ductility, compared tothe same alloy without the fiber-like structure. There are strong anisotropic effects on the mechanical properties due to the fiber-like metal composite in a soft Al based matrix.

  12. Biomaterials for Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Esther J.; Kasper, F. Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G.

    2013-01-01

    Biomaterials serve as an integral component of tissue engineering. They are designed to provide architectural framework reminiscent of native extracellular matrix in order to encourage cell growth and eventual tissue regeneration. Bone and cartilage represent two distinct tissues with varying compositional and mechanical properties. Despite these differences, both meet at the osteochondral interface. This article presents an overview of current biomaterials employed in bone and cartilage applications, discusses some design considerations, and alludes to future prospects within this field of research. PMID:23820768

  13. The effects of glucocorticoid on microarchitecture, collagen, mineral and mechanical properties of sheep femur cortical bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming; Danielsen, Carl C; Overgaard, Søren

    2010-01-01

    The effects of glucocorticoid on microarchitecture, collagen, mineral and mechanical properties of sheep femur cortical bone – Validation of large animal model for tissue engineering and biomaterial research Ming Ding,1* Carl Christian Danielsen,2 Søren Overgaard1 1Orthopaedic Research Laboratory......, Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Odense University Hospital, Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense C, Denmark 2Department of Connective Tissue Biology, Institute of Anatomy, University of Aarhus, Aarhus C, Denmark Osteopenia in sheep has been successfully induced...... by glucocorticoid treatment and the changes in properties of cancellous bone were comparable with those observed in humans after long-term glucocorticoid treatment. However, the influence on cortical bone has not been thoroughly elucidated. This study aimed to investigate the influence of glucocorticoid on sheep...

  14. Enhanced Mechanical Properties in Cellulose Nanocrystal-Poly(oligoethylene glycol methacrylate) Injectable Nanocomposite Hydrogels through Control of Physical and Chemical Cross-Linking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De France, Kevin J; Chan, Katelyn J W; Cranston, Emily D; Hoare, Todd

    2016-02-08

    While injectable hydrogels have several advantages in the context of biomedical use, their generally weak mechanical properties often limit their applications. Herein, we describe in situ-gelling nanocomposite hydrogels based on poly(oligoethylene glycol methacrylate) (POEGMA) and rigid rod-like cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) that can overcome this challenge. By physically incorporating CNCs into hydrazone cross-linked POEGMA hydrogels, macroscopic properties including gelation rate, swelling kinetics, mechanical properties, and hydrogel stability can be readily tailored. Strong adsorption of aldehyde- and hydrazide-modified POEGMA precursor polymers onto the surface of CNCs promotes uniform dispersion of CNCs within the hydrogel, imparts physical cross-links throughout the network, and significantly improves mechanical strength overall, as demonstrated by quartz crystal microbalance gravimetry and rheometry. When POEGMA hydrogels containing mixtures of long and short ethylene oxide side chain precursor polymers were prepared, transmission electron microscopy reveals that phase segregation occurs with CNCs hypothesized to preferentially locate within the stronger adsorbing short side chain polymer domains. Incorporating as little as 5 wt % CNCs results in dramatic enhancements in mechanical properties (up to 35-fold increases in storage modulus) coupled with faster gelation rates, decreased swelling ratios, and increased stability versus hydrolysis. Furthermore, cell viability can be maintained within 3D culture using these hydrogels independent of the CNC content. These properties collectively make POEGMA-CNC nanocomposite hydrogels of potential interest for various biomedical applications including tissue engineering scaffolds for stiffer tissues or platforms for cell growth.

  15. A model of engineering materials inspired by biological tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holeček M.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The perfect ability of living tissues to control and adapt their mechanical properties to varying external conditions may be an inspiration for designing engineering materials. An interesting example is the smooth muscle tissue since this "material" is able to change its global mechanical properties considerably by a subtle mechanism within individual muscle cells. Multi-scale continuum models may be useful in designing essentially simpler engineering materials having similar properties. As an illustration we present the model of an incompressible material whose microscopic structure is formed by flexible, soft but incompressible balls connected mutually by linear springs. This simple model, however, shows a nontrivial nonlinear behavior caused by the incompressibility of balls and is very sensitive on some microscopic parameters. It may elucidate the way by which "small" changes in biopolymer networks within individual muscular cells may control the stiffness of the biological tissue, which outlines a way of designing similar engineering materials. The 'balls and springs' material presents also prestress-induced stiffening and allows elucidating a contribution of extracellular fluids into the tissue’s viscous properties.

  16. Design considerations and challenges for mechanical stretch bioreactors in tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Ying; Ferdous, Zannatul

    2016-05-01

    With the increase in average life expectancy and growing aging population, lack of functional grafts for replacement surgeries has become a severe problem. Engineered tissues are a promising alternative to this problem because they can mimic the physiological function of the native tissues and be cultured on demand. Cyclic stretch is important for developing many engineered tissues such as hearts, heart valves, muscles, and bones. Thus a variety of stretch bioreactors and corresponding scaffolds have been designed and tested to study the underlying mechanism of tissue formation and to optimize the mechanical conditions applied to the engineered tissues. In this review, we look at various designs of stretch bioreactors and common scaffolds and offer insights for future improvements in tissue engineering applications. First, we summarize the requirements and common configuration of stretch bioreactors. Next, we present the features of different actuating and motion transforming systems and their applications. Since most bioreactors must measure detailed distributions of loads and deformations on engineered tissues, techniques with high accuracy, precision, and frequency have been developed. We also cover the key points in designing culture chambers, nutrition exchanging systems, and regimens used for specific tissues. Since scaffolds are essential for providing biophysical microenvironments for residing cells, we discuss materials and technologies used in fabricating scaffolds to mimic anisotropic native tissues, including decellularized tissues, hydrogels, biocompatible polymers, electrospinning, and 3D bioprinting techniques. Finally, we present the potential future directions for improving stretch bioreactors and scaffolds. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:543-553, 2016. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  17. Preparation of gelatin based porous biocomposite for bone tissue engineering and evaluation of gamma irradiation effect on its properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, Md. Minhajul [Department of Applied Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, University of Dhaka, Dhaka 1000 (Bangladesh); Khan, Mubarak A. [Institute of Radiation and Polymer Technology (IRPT), Atomic Energy Research Establishment (AERE), P. O. Box No. 3787, Dhaka 1000 (Bangladesh); Rahman, Mohammed Mizanur, E-mail: mizanur.rahman@du.ac.bd [Department of Applied Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, University of Dhaka, Dhaka 1000 (Bangladesh)

    2015-04-01

    Biodegradable porous hybrid polymer composites were prepared by using gelatin as base polymer matrix, β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) and calcium sulfate (CS) as cementing materials, chitosan as an antimicrobial agent, and glutaraldehyde and polyethylene glycol (PEG) as crosslinkers at different mass ratios. Thereafter, the composites were subjected to γ-radiation sterilization. The structure and properties of these composite scaffolds were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), mechanical properties testing (compressive, bending, tensile and impact), thermogravimetry/differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA), and physical stability test in simulated body fluid (SBF). We found that TCP rich composites showed enhanced mechanical properties among all the crosslinked composites. γ-Radiation sterilization triggered further cross linking in polymer matrix resulting a decrease in pore size of the composites and an increase in pore wall thickness with improved mechanical and thermal properties. The chemically crosslinked composite with 40% TCP followed by γ-radiation sterilization showed the smallest pore size distribution with a mean pore diameter of 159.22 μm, which falls in the range of 100–350 μm — known to be suitable for osteoconduction. Considering its improved mechanical and thermal properties along with osteoconduction ability without cytotoxicity, we propose this biocomposite as a viable candidate for bone tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Composite scaffolds were prepared from biopolymers (gelatin and chitosan). • β-TCP and CS were used as bioactive cementing materials at different ratios. • γ-Sterilization improved the mechanical properties of the biocomposites. • γ-Sterilization reduced the cytotoxicity and induced high antimicrobial properties. • Composite having 40% TCP has the proper pore size distribution for osteoconduction.

  18. Study of anisotropic mechanical properties for aeronautical PMMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Shang

    Full Text Available For the properties of polymer are relative to its structure, the main purpose of the present work is to investigate the mechanical properties of the aeronautical PMMA which has been treated by the directional tensile technology. Isodyne images reveal the stress state in directional PMMA. And then, an anisotropic mechanical model is established. Furthermore, all mechanical parameters are measured by the digital image correlation method. Finally, based on the anisotropic mechanical model and mechanical parameters, the FEM numerical simulation and experimental methods are applied to analyze the fracture mechanical properties along different directions.

  19. Mechanical verification of soft-tissue attachment on bioactive glasses and titanium implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Desheng; Moritz, Niko; Vedel, Erik; Hupa, Leena; Aro, Hannu T

    2008-07-01

    Soft-tissue attachment is a desired feature of many clinical biomaterials. The aim of the current study was to design a suitable experimental method for tensile testing of implant incorporation with soft-tissues. Conical implants were made of three compositions of bioactive glass (SiO(2)-P(2)O(5)-B(2)O(3)-Na(2)O-K(2)O-CaO-MgO) or titanium fiber mesh (porosity 84.7%). The implants were surgically inserted into the dorsal subcutaneous soft-tissue or back muscles in the rat. Soft-tissue attachment was evaluated by pull-out testing using a custom-made jig 8 weeks after implantation. Titanium fiber mesh implants had developed a relatively high pull-out force in subcutaneous tissue (12.33+/-5.29 N, mean+/-SD) and also measurable attachment with muscle tissue (2.46+/-1.33 N). The bioactive glass implants failed to show mechanically relevant soft-tissue bonding. The experimental set-up of mechanical testing seems to be feasible for verification studies of soft-tissue attachment. The inexpensive small animal model is beneficial for large-scale in vivo screening of new biomaterials.

  20. Additively Manufactured Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering and the Prediction of their Mechanical Behavior: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiang-Yu; Fang, Gang; Zhou, Jie

    2017-01-10

    Additive manufacturing (AM), nowadays commonly known as 3D printing, is a revolutionary materials processing technology, particularly suitable for the production of low-volume parts with high shape complexities and often with multiple functions. As such, it holds great promise for the fabrication of patient-specific implants. In recent years, remarkable progress has been made in implementing AM in the bio-fabrication field. This paper presents an overview on the state-of-the-art AM technology for bone tissue engineering (BTE) scaffolds, with a particular focus on the AM scaffolds made of metallic biomaterials. It starts with a brief description of architecture design strategies to meet the biological and mechanical property requirements of scaffolds. Then, it summarizes the working principles, advantages and limitations of each of AM methods suitable for creating porous structures and manufacturing scaffolds from powdered materials. It elaborates on the finite-element (FE) analysis applied to predict the mechanical behavior of AM scaffolds, as well as the effect of the architectural design of porous structure on its mechanical properties. The review ends up with the authors' view on the current challenges and further research directions.

  1. Mechanical Stimulation Protocols of Human Derived Cells in Articular Cartilage Tissue Engineering - A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khozoee, Baktash; Mafi, Pouya; Mafi, Reza; Khan, Wasim S

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical stimulation is a key factor in articular cartilage generation and maintenance. Bioreactor systems have been designed and built in order to deliver specific types of mechanical stimulation. The focus has been twofold, applying a type of preconditioning in order to stimulate cell differentiation, and to simulate in vivo conditions in order to gain further insight into how cells respond to different stimulatory patterns. Due to the complex forces at work within joints, it is difficult to simulate mechanical conditions using a bioreactor. The aim of this review is to gain a deeper understanding of the complexities of mechanical stimulation protocols by comparing those employed in bioreactors in the context of tissue engineering for articular cartilage, and to consider their effects on cultured cells. Allied and Complementary Medicine 1985 to 2016, Ovid MEDLINE[R] 1946 to 2016, and Embase 1974 to 2016 were searched using key terms. Results were subject to inclusion and exclusion criteria, key findings summarised into a table and subsequently discussed. Based on this review it is overwhelmingly clear that mechanical stimulation leads to increased chondrogenic properties in the context of bioreactor articular cartilage tissue engineering using human cells. However, given the variability and lack of controlled factors between research articles, results are difficult to compare, and a standardised method of evaluating stimulation protocols proved challenging. With improved standardisation in mechanical stimulation protocol reporting, bioreactor design and building processes, along with a better understanding of joint behaviours, we hope to perform a meta-analysis on stimulation protocols and methods. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. A constitutive model of soft tissue: From nanoscale collagen to tissue continuum

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Huang

    2009-04-08

    Soft collagenous tissue features many hierarchies of structure, starting from tropocollagen molecules that form fibrils, and proceeding to a bundle of fibrils that form fibers. Here we report the development of an atomistically informed continuum model of collagenous tissue. Results from full atomistic and molecular modeling are linked with a continuum theory of a fiber-reinforced composite, handshaking the fibril scale to the fiber and continuum scale in a hierarchical multi-scale simulation approach. Our model enables us to study the continuum-level response of the tissue as a function of cross-link density, making a link between nanoscale collagen features and material properties at larger tissue scales. The results illustrate a strong dependence of the continuum response as a function of nanoscopic structural features, providing evidence for the notion that the molecular basis for protein materials is important in defining their larger-scale mechanical properties. © 2009 Biomedical Engineering Society.

  3. Effect of in vitro enzymatic degradation on 3D printed poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds: morphological, chemical and mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Joana; Gloria, Antonio; Cometa, Stefania; Coelho, Jorge F J; Domingos, Marco

    2017-07-27

    In recent years, the tissue engineering (TE) field has significantly benefited from advanced techniques such as additive manufacturing (AM), for the design of customized 3D scaffolds with the aim of guided tissue repair. Among the wide range of materials available to biomanufacture 3D scaffolds, poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) clearly arises as the synthetic polymer with the greatest potential, due to its unique properties - namely, biocompatibility, biodegradability, thermal and chemical stability and processability. This study aimed for the first time to investigate the effect of pore geometry on the in vitro enzymatic chain cleavage mechanism of PCL scaffolds manufactured by the AM extrusion process. Methods: Morphological properties of 3D printed PCL scaffolds before and after degradation were evaluated using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and micro-computed tomography (μ-CT). Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) was employed to determine possible variations in the crystallinity of the scaffolds during the degradation period. The molecular weight was assessed using Size Exclusion Chromatography (SEC) while the mechanical properties were investigated under static compression conditions. Morphological results suggested a uniform reduction of filament diameter, while increasing the scaffolds' porosity. DSC analysis revealed and increment in the crystallinity degree while the molecular weight, evaluated through SEC, remained almost constant during the incubation period (25 days). Mechanical analysis highlighted a decrease in the compressive modulus and maximum stress over time, probably related to the significant weight loss of the scaffolds. All of these results suggest that PCL scaffolds undergo enzymatic degradation through a surface erosion mechanism, which leads to significant variations in mechanical, physical and chemical properties, but which has little influence on pore geometry.

  4. Mechanical Properties of Organic Semiconductors for Stretchable, Highly Flexible, and Mechanically Robust Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Samuel E; Savagatrup, Suchol; Printz, Adam D; Rodriquez, Daniel; Lipomi, Darren J

    2017-05-10

    Mechanical deformability underpins many of the advantages of organic semiconductors. The mechanical properties of these materials are, however, diverse, and the molecular characteristics that permit charge transport can render the materials stiff and brittle. This review is a comprehensive description of the molecular and morphological parameters that govern the mechanical properties of organic semiconductors. Particular attention is paid to ways in which mechanical deformability and electronic performance can coexist. The review begins with a discussion of flexible and stretchable devices of all types, and in particular the unique characteristics of organic semiconductors. It then discusses the mechanical properties most relevant to deformable devices. In particular, it describes how low modulus, good adhesion, and absolute extensibility prior to fracture enable robust performance, along with mechanical "imperceptibility" if worn on the skin. A description of techniques of metrology precedes a discussion of the mechanical properties of three classes of organic semiconductors: π-conjugated polymers, small molecules, and composites. The discussion of each class of materials focuses on molecular structure and how this structure (and postdeposition processing) influences the solid-state packing structure and thus the mechanical properties. The review concludes with applications of organic semiconductor devices in which every component is intrinsically stretchable or highly flexible.

  5. Effect of Nanoparticle Incorporation and Surface Coating on Mechanical Properties of Bone Scaffolds: A Brief Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Corona-Gomez

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical properties of a scaffold play an important role in its in vivo performance in bone tissue engineering, due to the fact that implanted scaffolds are typically subjected to stress including compression, tension, torsion, and shearing. Unfortunately, not all the materials used to fabricate scaffolds are strong enough to mimic native bones. Extensive research has been conducted in order to increase scaffold strength and mechanical performance by incorporating nanoparticles and/or coatings. An incredible improvement has been achieved; and some outstanding examples are the usage of nanodiamond, hydroxyapatite, bioactive glass particles, SiO2, MgO, and silver nanoparticles. This review paper aims to present the results, to summarize significant findings, and to give perspective for future work, which could be beneficial to future bone tissue engineering.

  6. Analysis of 3D Printed Diopside Scaffolds Properties for Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting LIU

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Diopside exhibits favorable potential for bone repair on account of the good mechanical performance, bioactivity and biocompatibility. In this paper, diopside scaffolds with high pore interconnectivity were successfully fabricated by laser three-dimensional (3D printing. The microstructure and mechanical performance of the diopside scaffolds were studied. The experimental analysis indicated that diopside particles gradually fused together until a dense structure was built with an energy density increasing in the range between 2.4 and 4.8 J·mm-2. Meanwhile, compressive strength and fracture toughness increased gradually from 5.96 ± 0.88 MPa to 10.87 ± 0.55 MPa. However, mechanical properties decreased due to the appearance of voids when energy density were 5.4 and 6 J·mm-2. Simulated body fluid (SBF tests showed that apatite crystals formed on the diopside scaffolds surface, and the apatite crystals increased with soaking time. Cell culture tests indicated the scaffolds supported the adhesion and growth of MG-63 cells. The study suggested that diopside scaffolds fabricated by laser 3D printing are promising candidates for bone tissue engineering.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.4.9845

  7. Continuum theory of fibrous tissue damage mechanics using bond kinetics: application to cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nims, Robert J; Durney, Krista M; Cigan, Alexander D; Dusséaux, Antoine; Hung, Clark T; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2016-02-06

    This study presents a damage mechanics framework that employs observable state variables to describe damage in isotropic or anisotropic fibrous tissues. In this mixture theory framework, damage is tracked by the mass fraction of bonds that have broken. Anisotropic damage is subsumed in the assumption that multiple bond species may coexist in a material, each having its own damage behaviour. This approach recovers the classical damage mechanics formulation for isotropic materials, but does not appeal to a tensorial damage measure for anisotropic materials. In contrast with the classical approach, the use of observable state variables for damage allows direct comparison of model predictions to experimental damage measures, such as biochemical assays or Raman spectroscopy. Investigations of damage in discrete fibre distributions demonstrate that the resilience to damage increases with the number of fibre bundles; idealizing fibrous tissues using continuous fibre distribution models precludes the modelling of damage. This damage framework was used to test and validate the hypothesis that growth of cartilage constructs can lead to damage of the synthesized collagen matrix due to excessive swelling caused by synthesized glycosaminoglycans. Therefore, alternative strategies must be implemented in tissue engineering studies to prevent collagen damage during the growth process.

  8. Determination of optical properties, drug concentration, and tissue oxygenation in human pleural tissue before and after Photofrin-mediated photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Yi Hong; Padawer-Curry, Jonah; Finlay, Jarod C.; Kim, Michele M.; Dimofte, Andreea; Cengel, Keith; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2018-02-01

    PDT efficacy depends on the concentration of photosensitizer, oxygen, and light delivery in patient tissues. In this study, we measure the in-vivo distribution of important dosimetric parameters, namely the tissue optical properties (absorption μa (λ) and scattering μs ' (λ) coefficients), photofrin concentration (cphotofrin), blood oxygen saturation (%StO2), and total hemoglobin concentration (THC), before and after PDT. We characterize the inter- and intra-patient heterogeneity of these quantities and explore how these properties change as a result of PDT treatment. The result suggests the need for real-time dosimetry during PDT to optimize the treatment condition depending on the optical and physiological properties.

  9. Development of Biodegradable Poly(citrate)-Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes Hybrid Elastomers with High Mechanical Properties and Osteogenic Differentiation Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yuzhang; Yu, Meng; Chen, Xiaofeng; Ma, Peter X; Lei, Bo

    2016-02-10

    Biodegradable elastomeric biomaterials have attracted much attention in tissue engineering due to their biomimetic viscoelastic behavior and biocompatibility. However, the low mechanical stability at hydrated state, fast biodegradation in vivo, and poor osteogenic activity greatly limited bioelastomers applications in bone tissue regeneration. Herein, we develop a series of poly(octanediol citrate)-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POC-POSS) hybrids with highly tunable elastomeric behavior (hydrated state) and biodegradation and osteoblasts biocompatibility through a facile one-pot thermal polymerization strategy. POC-POSS hybrids show significantly improved stiffness and ductility in either dry or hydrated conditions, as well as good antibiodegradation ability (20-50% weight loss in 3 months). POC-POSS hybrids exhibit significantly enhanced osteogenic differentiation through upregulating alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, calcium deposition, and expression of osteogenic markers (ALPL, BGLAP, and Runx2). The high mechanical stability at hydrated state and enhanced osteogenic activity make POC-POSS hybrid elastomers promising as scaffolds and nanoscale vehicles for bone tissue regeneration and drug delivery. This study may also provide a new strategy (controlling the stiffness under hydrated condition) to design advanced hybrid biomaterials with high mechanical properties under physiological condition for tissue regeneration applications.

  10. Stochastic modelling in design of mechanical properties of nanometals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tengen, T.B.; Wejrzanowski, T.; Iwankiewicz, R.; Kurzydlowski, K.J.

    2010-01-01

    Polycrystalline nanometals are being fabricated through different processing routes and conditions. The consequence is that nanometals having the same mean grain size may have different grain size dispersion and, hence, may have different material properties. This has often led to conflicting reports from both theoretical and experimental findings about the evolutions of the mechanical properties of nanomaterials. The present paper employs stochastic model to study the impact of microstructure evolution during grain growth on the mechanical properties of polycrystalline nanometals. The stochastic model for grain growth and the stochastic model for changes in mechanical properties of nanomaterials are proposed. The model for the mechanical properties developed is tested on aluminium samples.Many salient features of the mechanical properties of the aluminium samples are revealed. The results show that the different mechanisms of grain growth impart different nature of response to the material mechanical properties. The conventional, homologous and anomalous temperature dependences of the yield stress have also been revealed to be due to different nature of interactions of the microstructures during evolution.

  11. Effect of gamma radiation and accelerated aging on the mechanical and thermal behavior of HDPE/HA nano-composites for bone tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alothman, Othman Y; Almajhdi, Fahad N; Fouad, H

    2013-09-24

    The replacement of hard tissues demands biocompatible and sometimes bioactive materials with properties similar to those of bone. Nano-composites made of biocompatible polymers and bioactive inorganic nano particles such as HDPE/HA have attracted attention as permanent bone substitutes due to their excellent mechanical properties and biocompatibility. The HDPE/HA nano-composite is prepared using melt blending at different HA loading ratios. For evaluation of the degradation by radiation, gamma rays of 35 kGy, and 70 kGy were used to irradiate the samples at room temperature in vacuum. The effects of accelerated ageing after gamma irradiation on morphological, mechanical and thermal properties of HDPE/HA nano-composites were measured. In Vitro test results showed that the HDPE and all HDPE/HA nano-composites do not exhibit any cytotoxicity to WISH cell line. The results also indicated that the tensile properties of HDPE/HA nano-composite increased with increasing the HA content except fracture strain decreased. The dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) results showed that the storage and loss moduli increased with increasing the HA ratio and the testing frequency. Finally, it is remarked that all properties of HDPE/HA is dependent on the irradiation dose and accelerated aging. Based on the experimental results, it is found that the addition of 10%, 20% and 30% HA increases the HDPE stiffness by 23%, 44 and 59% respectively. At the same time, the G' increased from 2.25E11 MPa for neat HDPE to 4.7E11 MPa when 30% HA was added to the polymer matrix. Also, significant improvements in these properties have been observed due to irradiation. Finally, the overall properties of HDPE and its nano-composite properties significantly decreased due to aging and should be taken into consideration in the design of bone substitutes. It is attributed that the developed HDPE/HA nano-composites could be a good alternative material for bone tissue regeneration due to their acceptable

  12. In-Vivo Techniques for Measuring Electrical Properties of Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    probe Electromagnetic energy Dielectric properties Monopole antenna In-situ tissues , Antemortem/Pos tmortem studies Renal blood flow 10 ABSTRACT... mice or rats, which were positioned beneath a fixed measurement probe. Several alternative methods involving the use of semi-rigid or flexible coaxial

  13. Microstructure, mechanical properties, bio-corrosion properties and antibacterial properties of Ti-Ag sintered alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mian; Zhang, Erlin; Zhang, Lan

    2016-05-01

    In this research, Ag element was selected as an antibacterial agent to develop an antibacterial Ti-Ag alloy by a powder metallurgy. The microstructure, phase constitution, mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and antibacterial properties of the Ti-Ag sintered alloys have been systematically studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), compressive test, electrochemical measurements and antibacterial test. The effects of the Ag powder size and the Ag content on the antibacterial property and mechanical property as well as the anticorrosion property have been investigated. The microstructure results have shown that Ti-Ag phase, residual pure Ag and Ti were the mainly phases in Ti-Ag(S75) sintered alloy while Ti2Ag was synthesized in Ti-Ag(S10) sintered alloy. The mechanical test indicated that Ti-Ag sintered alloy showed a much higher hardness and the compressive yield strength than cp-Ti but the mechanical properties were slightly reduced with the increase of Ag content. Electrochemical results showed that Ag powder size had a significant effect on the corrosion resistance of Ti-Ag sintered alloy. Ag content increased the corrosion resistance in a dose dependent way under a homogeneous microstructure. Antibacterial tests have demonstrated that antibacterial Ti-Ag alloy was successfully prepared. It was also shown that the Ag powder particle size and the Ag content influenced the antibacterial activity seriously. The reduction in the Ag powder size was benefit to the improvement in the antibacterial property and the Ag content has to be at least 3wt.% in order to obtain a strong and stable antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. The bacterial mechanism was thought to be related to the Ti2Ag and its distribution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Mechanical properties of ordered alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroupa, F.

    1977-06-01

    A survey is given of the metallophysical fundamentals of the mechanical properties of ordered two-phase alloys. Alloys of this type have a superlattice structure in a substitution mixed crystal. Ordering is achieved by slow cooling or by annealing below the critical temperature, during which ordering domains (antiphase domains) are formed. At a high degree of ordering, the dislocations are concentrated to form pairs, so-called super-dislocations. The mechanical properties may be selectively changed by varying different parameters (size of the ordering domains, degree of ordering, energy of the antiphase boundaries) by a special composition and heat treatment.(GSC) [de

  15. Evaluation of the effects of nano-TiO2 on bioactivity and mechanical properties of nano bioglass-P3HB composite scaffold for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiyari, Sanaz Soleymani Eil; Karbasi, Saeed; Monshi, Ahmad; Montazeri, Mahbobeh

    2016-01-01

    To emulate bone structure, porous composite scaffold with suitable mechanical properties should be designed. In this research the effects of nano-titania (nTiO2) on the bioactivity and mechanical properties of nano-bioglass-poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (nBG/P3HB)-composite scaffold were evaluated. First, nBG powder was prepared by melting method of pure raw materials at a temperature of 1400 °C and then the porous ceramic scaffold of nBG/nTiO2 with 30 wt% of nBG containing different weight ratios of nTiO2 (3, 6, and 9 wt% of nTiO2 with grain size of 35-37 nm) was prepared by using polyurethane sponge replication method. Then the scaffolds were coated with P3HB in order to increase the scaffold's mechanical properties. Mechanical strength and modulus of scaffolds were improved by adding nTiO2 to nBG scaffold and adding P3HB to nBG/nTiO2 composite scaffold. The results of the compressive strength and porosity tests showed that the best scaffold is 30 wt% of nBG with 6 wt% of nTiO2 composite scaffold immersed for 30 s in P3HB with 79.5-80 % of porosity in 200-600 μm, with a compressive strength of 0.15 MPa and a compressive modulus of 30 MPa, which is a good candidate for bone tissue engineering. To evaluate the bioactivity of the scaffold, the simulated body fluid (SBF) solution was used. The best scaffold with 30 wt% of nBG, 6 wt% of P3HB and 6 wt% of nTiO2 was immersed in SBF for 4 weeks at an incubation temperature of 37 °C. The bioactivity of the scaffolds was characterized by AAS, SEM, EDXA and XRD. The results of bioactivity showed that bone-like apatite layer formed well at scaffold surface and adding nTiO2 to nBG/P3HB composite scaffold helped increase the bioactivity rate.

  16. Mussel-inspired tough hydrogels with self-repairing and tissue adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zijian; Duan, Lijie; Yang, Yongqi; Hu, Wei; Gao, Guanghui

    2018-01-01

    The mussel-inspired polymeric hydrogels have been attractively explored owing to their self-repairing or adhesive property when the catechol groups of dopamine could chelate metal ions. However, it was a challenge for self-repairing hydrogels owning high mechanical properties. Herein, a synergistic strategy was proposed by combining catechol-Fe3+ complexes and hydrophobic association. The resulting hydrogels exhibited seamless self-repairing behavior, tissue adhesion and high mechanical property. Moreover, the pH-dependent stoichiometry of catechol-Fe3+ and temperature-sensitive hydrophobic association endue hydrogels with pH/thermo responsive characteristics. Subsequently, the self-repairing rate and mechanical property of hydrogels were investigated at different pH and temperature. This bio-inspired strategy would build an avenue for designing and constructing a new generation of self-repairing, tissue-adhesive and tough hydrogel.

  17. Mechanical properties of chemically modified portuguese pinewood

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes, Duarte B; Mai, Carsten; Militz, Holger

    2014-01-01

    To turn wood into a construction material with enhanced properties, many methods of chemical modification have been developed in the last few decades. In this work, mechanical properties of pine wood were chemically modified, compared and evaluated. Maritime pine wood (Pinus pinaster) was modified with four chemical processes: 1,3-dimethylol-4,5- dihydroxyethyleneurea, N-methylol melamine formaldehyde, tetra-alkoxysilane and wax. The following mechanical properties were assessed experiment...

  18. Prediction of mechanical properties for hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets using molecular mechanics model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natsuki, Toshiaki [Shinshu University, Faculty of Textile Science and Technology, Ueda (Japan); Shinshu University, Institute of Carbon Science and Technology, Nagano (Japan); Natsuki, Jun [Shinshu University, Institute of Carbon Science and Technology, Nagano (Japan)

    2017-04-15

    Mechanical behaviors of nanomaterials are not easy to be evaluated in the laboratory because of their extremely small size and difficulty controlling. Thus, a suitable model for the estimation of the mechanical properties for nanomaterials becomes very important. In this study, the elastic properties of boron nitride (BN) nanosheets, including the elastic modulus, the shear modulus, and the Poisson's ratio, are predicted using a molecular mechanics model. The molecular mechanics force filed is established to directly incorporate the Morse potential function into the constitutive model of nanostructures. According to the molecular mechanics model, the chirality effect of hexagonal BN nanosheets on the elastic modulus is investigated through a closed-form solution. The simulated result shows that BN nanosheets exhibit an isotropic elastic property. The present analysis yields a set of very simple formulas and is able to be served as a good approximation on the mechanical properties for the BN nanosheets. (orig.)

  19. Prediction of mechanical properties for hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets using molecular mechanics model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natsuki, Toshiaki; Natsuki, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical behaviors of nanomaterials are not easy to be evaluated in the laboratory because of their extremely small size and difficulty controlling. Thus, a suitable model for the estimation of the mechanical properties for nanomaterials becomes very important. In this study, the elastic properties of boron nitride (BN) nanosheets, including the elastic modulus, the shear modulus, and the Poisson's ratio, are predicted using a molecular mechanics model. The molecular mechanics force filed is established to directly incorporate the Morse potential function into the constitutive model of nanostructures. According to the molecular mechanics model, the chirality effect of hexagonal BN nanosheets on the elastic modulus is investigated through a closed-form solution. The simulated result shows that BN nanosheets exhibit an isotropic elastic property. The present analysis yields a set of very simple formulas and is able to be served as a good approximation on the mechanical properties for the BN nanosheets. (orig.)

  20. Mechanical characterization of the mouse diaphragm with optical coherence elastography reveals fibrosis-related change of direction-dependent muscle tissue stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shang; Loehr, James A.; Larina, Irina V.; Rodney, George G.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2016-03-01

    The diaphragm, composed of skeletal muscle, plays an important role in respiration through its dynamic contraction. Genetic and molecular studies of the biomechanics of mouse diaphragm can provide great insights into an improved understanding and potential treatment of the disorders that lead to diaphragm dysfunction (i.e. muscular dystrophy). However, due to the small tissue size, mechanical assessment of mouse diaphragm tissue under its proper physiological conditions has been challenging. Here, we present the application of noncontact optical coherence elastography (OCE) for quantitative elastic characterization of ex vivo mouse diaphragm. Phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography was combined with a focused air-puff system to capture and measure the elastic wave propagation from tissue surface. Experiments were performed on wildtype and dystrophic mouse diaphragm tissues containing different levels of fibrosis. The OCE measurements of elastic wave propagation were conducted along both the longitudinal and transverse axis of the muscle fibers. Cross-correlation of the temporal displacement profiles from different spatial locations was utilized to obtain the propagation time delay, which was used to calculate the wave group velocity and to further quantify the tissue Young's modulus. Prior to and after OCE assessment, peak tetanic force was measured to monitor viability of the tissue during the elasticity measurements. Our experimental results indicate a positive correlation between fibrosis level and tissue stiffness, suggesting this elastic-wave-based OCE method could be a useful tool to monitor mechanical properties of skeletal muscle under physiological and pathological conditions.

  1. Alginate based scaffolds for bone tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valente, J.F.A.; Valente, T.A.M. [CICS-UBI - Centro de Investigacao em Ciencias da Saude, Faculdade de Ciencias da Saude, Universidade da Beira Interior, Covilha (Portugal); Alves, P.; Ferreira, P. [CIEPQPF, Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Universidade de Coimbra, Polo II, Pinhal de Marrocos, 3030-290 Coimbra (Portugal); Silva, A. [Centro de Ciencia e Tecnologia Aeroespaciais, Universidade da Beira Interior, Covilha (Portugal); Correia, I.J., E-mail: icorreia@ubi.pt [CICS-UBI - Centro de Investigacao em Ciencias da Saude, Faculdade de Ciencias da Saude, Universidade da Beira Interior, Covilha (Portugal)

    2012-12-01

    The design and production of scaffolds for bone tissue regeneration is yet unable to completely reproduce the native bone properties. In the present study new alginate microparticle and microfiber aggregated scaffolds were produced to be applied in this area of regenerative medicine. The scaffolds' mechanical properties were characterized by thermo mechanical assays. Their morphological characteristics were evaluated by isothermal nitrogen adsorption and scanning electron microscopy. The density of both types of scaffolds was determined by helium pycnometry and mercury intrusion porosimetry. Furthermore, scaffolds' cytotoxic profiles were evaluated in vitro by seeding human osteoblast cells in their presence. The results obtained showed that scaffolds have good mechanical and morphological properties compatible with their application as bone substitutes. Moreover, scaffold's biocompatibility was confirmed by the observation of cell adhesion and proliferation after 5 days of being seeded in their presence and by non-radioactive assays. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Design and production of scaffolds for bone tissue regeneration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microparticle and microfiber alginate scaffolds were produced through a particle aggregation technique; Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Scaffolds' mechanically and biologically properties were characterized through in vitro studies;.

  2. Mechanisms of lymphatic regeneration after tissue transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Yan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Lymphedema is the chronic swelling of an extremity that occurs commonly after lymph node resection for cancer treatment. Recent studies have demonstrated that transfer of healthy tissues can be used as a means of bypassing damaged lymphatics and ameliorating lymphedema. The purpose of these studies was to investigate the mechanisms that regulate lymphatic regeneration after tissue transfer.Nude mice (recipients underwent 2-mm tail skin excisions that were either left open or repaired with full-thickness skin grafts harvested from donor transgenic mice that expressed green fluorescent protein in all tissues or from LYVE-1 knockout mice. Lymphatic regeneration, expression of VEGF-C, macrophage infiltration, and potential for skin grafting to bypass damaged lymphatics were assessed.Skin grafts healed rapidly and restored lymphatic flow. Lymphatic regeneration occurred beginning at the peripheral edges of the graft, primarily from ingrowth of new lymphatic vessels originating from the recipient mouse. In addition, donor lymphatic vessels appeared to spontaneously re-anastomose with recipient vessels. Patterns of VEGF-C expression and macrophage infiltration were temporally and spatially associated with lymphatic regeneration. When compared to mice treated with excision only, there was a 4-fold decrease in tail volumes, 2.5-fold increase in lymphatic transport by lymphoscintigraphy, 40% decrease in dermal thickness, and 54% decrease in scar index in skin-grafted animals, indicating that tissue transfer could bypass damaged lymphatics and promote rapid lymphatic regeneration.Our studies suggest that lymphatic regeneration after tissue transfer occurs by ingrowth of lymphatic vessels and spontaneous re-connection of existing lymphatics. This process is temporally and spatially associated with VEGF-C expression and macrophage infiltration. Finally, tissue transfer can be used to bypass damaged lymphatics and promote rapid lymphatic regeneration.

  3. Effects of mechanical loading on human mesenchymal stem cells for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jane Ru; Yong, Kar Wey; Choi, Jean Yu

    2018-03-01

    Today, articular cartilage damage is a major health problem, affecting people of all ages. The existing conventional articular cartilage repair techniques, such as autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI), microfracture, and mosaicplasty, have many shortcomings which negatively affect their clinical outcomes. Therefore, it is essential to develop an alternative and efficient articular repair technique that can address those shortcomings. Cartilage tissue engineering, which aims to create a tissue-engineered cartilage derived from human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), shows great promise for improving articular cartilage defect therapy. However, the use of tissue-engineered cartilage for the clinical therapy of articular cartilage defect still remains challenging. Despite the importance of mechanical loading to create a functional cartilage has been well demonstrated, the specific type of mechanical loading and its optimal loading regime is still under investigation. This review summarizes the most recent advances in the effects of mechanical loading on human MSCs. First, the existing conventional articular repair techniques and their shortcomings are highlighted. The important parameters for the evaluation of the tissue-engineered cartilage, including chondrogenic and hypertrophic differentiation of human MSCs are briefly discussed. The influence of mechanical loading on human MSCs is subsequently reviewed and the possible mechanotransduction signaling is highlighted. The development of non-hypertrophic chondrogenesis in response to the changing mechanical microenvironment will aid in the establishment of a tissue-engineered cartilage for efficient articular cartilage repair. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. A primer of statistical methods for correlating parameters and properties of electrospun poly(l -lactide) scaffolds for tissue engineering-PART 1: Design of experiments

    KAUST Repository

    Seyedmahmoud, Rasoul

    2014-03-20

    Tissue engineering scaffolds produced by electrospinning are of enormous interest, but still lack a true understanding about the fundamental connection between the outstanding functional properties, the architecture, the mechanical properties, and the process parameters. Fragmentary results from several parametric studies only render some partial insights that are hard to compare and generally miss the role of parameters interactions. To bridge this gap, this article (Part-1 of 2) features a case study on poly-l-lactide scaffolds to demonstrate how statistical methods such as design of experiments can quantitatively identify the correlations existing between key scaffold properties and control parameters, in a systematic, consistent, and comprehensive manner disentangling main effects from interactions. The morphological properties (i.e., fiber distribution and porosity) and mechanical properties (Young\\'s modulus) are "charted" as a function of molecular weight (MW) and other electrospinning process parameters (the Xs), considering the single effect as well as interactions between Xs. For the first time, the major role of the MW emerges clearly in controlling all scaffold properties. The correlation between mechanical and morphological properties is also addressed.

  5. Differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells for cartilage tissue engineering: Individual and synergetic effects of three-dimensional environment and mechanical loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panadero, J A; Lanceros-Mendez, S; Ribelles, J L Gomez

    2016-03-01

    Chondrogenesis of dedifferentiated chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells is influenced not only by soluble molecules like growth factors, but also by the cell environment itself. The latter is achieved through both mechanical cues - which act as stimulation factor and influences nutrient transport - and adhesion to extracellular matrix cues - which determine cell shape. Although the effects of soluble molecules and cell environment have been intensively addressed, few observations and conclusions about the interaction between the two have been achieved. In this work, we review the state of the art on the single effects between mechanical and biochemical cues, as well as on the combination of the two. Furthermore, we provide a discussion on the techniques currently used to determine the mechanical properties of materials and tissues generated in vitro, their limitations and the future research needs to properly address the identified problems. The importance of biomechanical cues in chondrogenesis is well known. This paper reviews the existing literature on the effect of mechanical stimulation on chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells in order to regenerate hyaline cartilage. Contradictory results found with respect to the effect of different modes of external loading can be explained by the different properties of the scaffolding system that holds the cells, which determine cell adhesion and morphology and spatial distribution of cells, as well as the stress transmission to the cells. Thus, this review seeks to provide an insight into the interplay between external loading program and scaffold properties during chondrogenic differentiation. The review of the literature reveals an important gap in the knowledge in this field and encourages new experimental studies. The main issue is that in each of the few cases in which the interplay is investigated, just two groups of scaffolds are compared, leaving intermediate adhesion conditions out of study

  6. Effect of Mechanical Alloying Atmospheres and Oxygen Concentration on Mechanical Properties of ODS Ferritic Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, Sanghoon; Choi, Byoungkwon; Han, Changhee; Kim, Kibaik; Kang, Sukhoon; Chun, Youngbum; Kim, Taekyu

    2013-01-01

    Finely dispersed nano-oxide particles with a high number density in the homogeneous grain matrix are essential to achieve superior mechanical properties at high temperatures, and these unique microstructures can be obtained through the mechanical alloying (MA) and hot consolidation process. The microstructure and mechanical property of ODS steel significantly depends on its powder property and the purity after the MA process. These contents should be carefully controlled to improve the mechanical property at elevated temperature. In particular, appropriate the control of oxygen concentration improves the mechanical property of ODS steel at high temperature. An effective method is to control the mechanical alloying atmosphere by high purity inert gas. In the present study, the effects of mechanical alloying atmospheres and oxygen concentration on the mechanical property of ODS steel were investigated. ODS ferritic alloys were fabricated in various atmospheres, and the HIP process was used to investigate the effects of MA atmospheres and oxygen concentration on the microstructure and mechanical property. ODS ferritic alloys milled in an Ar-H 2 mixture, and He is effective to reduce the excess oxygen concentration. The YH 2 addition made an extremely reduced oxygen concentration by the internal oxygen reduction reaction and resulted in a homogeneous microstructure and superior creep strength

  7. A large-scale study of the ultrawideband microwave dielectric properties of normal breast tissue obtained from reduction surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazebnik, Mariya; McCartney, Leah; Popovic, Dijana; Watkins, Cynthia B; Lindstrom, Mary J; Harter, Josephine; Sewall, Sarah; Magliocco, Anthony; Booske, John H; Okoniewski, Michal; Hagness, Susan C

    2007-05-21

    The efficacy of emerging microwave breast cancer detection and treatment techniques will depend, in part, on the dielectric properties of normal breast tissue. However, knowledge of these properties at microwave frequencies has been limited due to gaps and discrepancies in previously reported small-scale studies. To address these issues, we experimentally characterized the wideband microwave-frequency dielectric properties of a large number of normal breast tissue samples obtained from breast reduction surgeries at the University of Wisconsin and University of Calgary hospitals. The dielectric spectroscopy measurements were conducted from 0.5 to 20 GHz using a precision open-ended coaxial probe. The tissue composition within the probe's sensing region was quantified in terms of percentages of adipose, fibroconnective and glandular tissues. We fit a one-pole Cole-Cole model to the complex permittivity data set obtained for each sample and determined median Cole-Cole parameters for three groups of normal breast tissues, categorized by adipose tissue content (0-30%, 31-84% and 85-100%). Our analysis of the dielectric properties data for 354 tissue samples reveals that there is a large variation in the dielectric properties of normal breast tissue due to substantial tissue heterogeneity. We observed no statistically significant difference between the within-patient and between-patient variability in the dielectric properties.

  8. A large-scale study of the ultrawideband microwave dielectric properties of normal breast tissue obtained from reduction surgeries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazebnik, Mariya; McCartney, Leah; Popovic, Dijana; Watkins, Cynthia B; Lindstrom, Mary J; Harter, Josephine; Sewall, Sarah; Magliocco, Anthony; Booske, John H; Okoniewski, Michal; Hagness, Susan C

    2007-01-01

    The efficacy of emerging microwave breast cancer detection and treatment techniques will depend, in part, on the dielectric properties of normal breast tissue. However, knowledge of these properties at microwave frequencies has been limited due to gaps and discrepancies in previously reported small-scale studies. To address these issues, we experimentally characterized the wideband microwave-frequency dielectric properties of a large number of normal breast tissue samples obtained from breast reduction surgeries at University of Wisconsin and University of Calgary hospitals. The dielectric spectroscopy measurements were conducted from 0.5 to 20 GHz using a precision open-ended coaxial probe. The tissue composition within the probe's sensing region was quantified in terms of percentages of adipose, fibroconnective and glandular tissues. We fit a one-pole Cole-Cole model to the complex permittivity data set obtained for each sample and determined median Cole-Cole parameters for three groups of normal breast tissues, categorized by adipose tissue content (0-30%, 31-84% and 85-100%). Our analysis of the dielectric properties data for 354 tissue samples reveals that there is a large variation in the dielectric properties of normal breast tissue due to substantial tissue heterogeneity. We observed no statistically significant difference between the within-patient and between-patient variability in the dielectric properties

  9. Mechanical properties of nuclear waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connelly, A.J.; Hand, R.J.; Bingham, P.A.; Hyatt, N.C.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanical properties of nuclear waste glasses are important as they will determine the degree of cracking that may occur either on cooling or following a handling accident. Recent interest in the vitrification of intermediate level radioactive waste (ILW) as well as high level radioactive waste (HLW) has led to the development of new waste glass compositions that have not previously been characterised. Therefore the mechanical properties, including Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, hardness, indentation fracture toughness and brittleness of a series of glasses designed to safely incorporate wet ILW have been investigated. The results are presented and compared with the equivalent properties of an inactive simulant of the current UK HLW glass and other nuclear waste glasses from the literature. The higher density glasses tend to have slightly lower hardness and indentation fracture toughness values and slightly higher brittleness values, however, it is shown that the variations in mechanical properties between these different glasses are limited, are well within the range of published values for nuclear waste glasses, and that the surveyed data for all radioactive waste glasses fall within relatively narrow range.

  10. Long-term dynamic loading improves the mechanical properties of chondrogenic mesenchymal stem cell-laden hydrogel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AH Huang

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are an attractive cell source for cartilage tissue engineering given their ability to undergo chondrogenesis in 3D cul