WorldWideScience

Sample records for mechanical design considerations

  1. Design considerations for mechanical snubbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severud, L.K.; Summers, G.D.

    1980-03-01

    The use of mechanical snubbers to restrain piping during an earthquake event is becoming more common in design of nuclear power plants. The design considerations and qualification procedures for mechanical snubbers used on the Fast Flux Test Facility will be presented. Design precautions and requirements for both normal operation and seismic operation are necessary. Effects of environmental vibration (nonseismic) induced through the piping by pump shaft imbalance and fluid flow oscillations will be addressed. Also, the snubber dynamic characteristics of interest to design and snubber design application considerations will be discussed

  2. Mechanical considerations and design skills.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvis, Robert L.

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of the report is to provide experienced-based insights into design processes that will benefit designers beginning their employment at Sandia National Laboratories or those assuming new design responsibilities. The main purpose of this document is to provide engineers with the practical aspects of system design. The material discussed here may not be new to some readers, but some of it was to me. Transforming an idea to a design to solve a problem is a skill, and skills are similar to history lessons. We gain these skills from experience, and many of us have not been fortunate enough to grow in an environment that provided the skills that we now need. I was fortunate to grow up on a farm where we had to learn how to maintain and operate several different kinds of engines and machines. If you are like me, my formal experience is partially based upon the two universities from which I graduated, where few practical applications of the technologies were taught. What was taught was mainly theoretical, and few instructors had practical experience to offer the students. I understand this, as students have their hands full just to learn the theoretical. The practical part was mainly left up to 'on the job experience'. However, I believe it is better to learn the practical applications early and apply them quickly 'on the job'. System design engineers need to know several technical things, both in and out of their field of expertise. An engineer is not expected to know everything, but he should know when to ask an expert for assistance. This 'expert' can be in any field, whether it is in analyses, drafting, machining, material properties, testing, etc. The best expert is a person who has practical experience in the area of needed information, and consulting with that individual can be the best and quickest way for one to learn. If the information provided here can improve your design skills and save one design from having a problem

  3. Design considerations for mechanical face seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, L. P.; Greiner, H. F.

    1980-01-01

    Two companion reports deal with design considerations for improving performance of mechanical face seals, one of family of devices used in general area of fluid sealing of rotating shafts. One report deals with basic seal configuration and other with lubrication of seal.

  4. Basic considerations for the mechanical design of heating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, P.

    1997-01-01

    The paper discusses the principal aspects of the mechanical design of the reactor unit for a nuclear district heating plant. It is reasoned that the design must be specifically tailored to the characteristics of the applications, and that the experience gained with the design practice of big nuclear power stations must also be incorporated. Some examples of the design solutions for the SIEMENS NRH-200 are presented for illustration. (author). 7 refs, 10 figs

  5. Basic considerations for the mechanical design of heating reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rau, P [Siemens AG, Unternehmensbereich KWU, Erlangen (Germany)

    1997-09-01

    The paper discusses the principal aspects of the mechanical design of the reactor unit for a nuclear district heating plant. It is reasoned that the design must be specifically tailored to the characteristics of the applications, and that the experience gained with the design practice of big nuclear power stations must also be incorporated. Some examples of the design solutions for the SIEMENS NRH-200 are presented for illustration. (author). 7 refs, 10 figs.

  6. DOE handbook: Design considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-04-01

    The Design Considerations Handbook includes information and suggestions for the design of systems typical to nuclear facilities, information specific to various types of special facilities, and information useful to various design disciplines. The handbook is presented in two parts. Part 1, which addresses design considerations, includes two sections. The first addresses the design of systems typically used in nuclear facilities to control radiation or radioactive materials. Specifically, this part addresses the design of confinement systems and radiation protection and effluent monitoring systems. The second section of Part 1 addresses the design of special facilities (i.e., specific types of nonreactor nuclear facilities). The specific design considerations provided in this section were developed from review of DOE 6430.1A and are supplemented with specific suggestions and considerations from designers with experience designing and operating such facilities. Part 2 of the Design Considerations Handbook describes good practices and design principles that should be considered in specific design disciplines, such as mechanical systems and electrical systems. These good practices are based on specific experiences in the design of nuclear facilities by design engineers with related experience. This part of the Design Considerations Handbook contains five sections, each of which applies to a particular engineering discipline

  7. DOE handbook: Design considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-04-01

    The Design Considerations Handbook includes information and suggestions for the design of systems typical to nuclear facilities, information specific to various types of special facilities, and information useful to various design disciplines. The handbook is presented in two parts. Part 1, which addresses design considerations, includes two sections. The first addresses the design of systems typically used in nuclear facilities to control radiation or radioactive materials. Specifically, this part addresses the design of confinement systems and radiation protection and effluent monitoring systems. The second section of Part 1 addresses the design of special facilities (i.e., specific types of nonreactor nuclear facilities). The specific design considerations provided in this section were developed from review of DOE 6430.1A and are supplemented with specific suggestions and considerations from designers with experience designing and operating such facilities. Part 2 of the Design Considerations Handbook describes good practices and design principles that should be considered in specific design disciplines, such as mechanical systems and electrical systems. These good practices are based on specific experiences in the design of nuclear facilities by design engineers with related experience. This part of the Design Considerations Handbook contains five sections, each of which applies to a particular engineering discipline.

  8. Mechanical design considerations of a standing wave s-band accelerator with on-axis couplers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, S.B.; Funk, L.W.; Schriber, S.O.

    1976-01-01

    The mechanical design of S-band standing wave accelerator structures with on-axis coupling cells includes material selection, cavity design, segment production, rf tuning and brazing procedures. Pre-assembly tuning operations have been minimized by determining segment dimensions and tolerances so that segments can easily be fabricated in a near-finished condition by a commercial machining firm. Final tuning, if necessary, is easily achieved by removal of material from the cavity wall or drift tube nose. Considerations in choosing brazing procedures were vacuum integrity, resistivity of brazing alloy, joint thickness, alignment of the structure assembly and restriction of grain growth. (author)

  9. Mechanism and bias considerations for design of a bi-directional pneumatic artificial muscle actuator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vocke III, Robert D; Wereley, Norman M; Kothera, Curt S

    2014-01-01

    Pneumatic artificial muscles (PAMs), or McKibben actuators, have received considerable attention for robotic manipulators and in aerospace applications due to their similarity to natural muscles. Like natural muscles, PAMs are a purely contractile actuator, so that, in order to produce bi-directional or rotational motion, they must be arranged in an agonist/antagonist pair, which inherently limits the deflection of the system due to the high parasitic stiffness of the antagonistic PAM. This study presents two methods for increasing the performance of an antagonistic PAM system by decreasing the passive parasitic torque, rather than increasing the active torque. The first involves selection of the kinematic mechanism geometry, and the second involves the introduction of bias into the system, both in terms of PAM contraction and passive (antagonistic) PAM pressure. It was found with the proper selection of design parameters, including mechanism geometry, PAM geometry, and bias conditions, that an ideal actuator configuration can be chosen that maximizes deflection for a given arbitrary loading. When comparing a baseline design to an improved design for a simplified case, a nearly 50% increase in maximum deflection was predicted simply by optimizing mechanism geometry and bias contraction. These results were experimentally verified with quasi-static testing that showed a 300% increase in actuator deflection over the baseline design. (paper)

  10. Sodium effects on mechanical performance and consideration in high temperature structural design for advanced reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natesan, K.; Li, Meimei; Chopra, O. K.; Majumdar, S.

    2009-07-01

    Sodium environmental effects are key limiting factors in the high temperature structural design of advanced sodium-cooled reactors. A guideline is needed to incorporate environmental effects in the ASME design rules to improve the performance reliability over long operating times. This paper summarizes the influence of sodium exposure on mechanical performance of selected austenitic stainless and ferritic/martensitic steels. Focus is on Type 316SS and mod.9Cr-1Mo. The sodium effects were evaluated by comparing the mechanical properties data in air and sodium. Carburization and decarburization were found to be the key factors that determine the tensile and creep properties of the steels. A beneficial effect of sodium exposure on fatigue life was observed under fully reversed cyclic loading in both austenitic stainless steels and ferritic/martensitic steels. However, when hold time was applied during cyclic loading, the fatigue life was significantly reduced. Based on the mechanical performance of the steels in sodium, consideration of sodium effects in high temperature structural design of advanced fast reactors is discussed.

  11. Retrievability of high-level nuclear waste from geologic repositories - Regulatory and rock mechanics/design considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanious, N.S.; Nataraja, M.S.; Daemen, J.J.K.

    1987-01-01

    Retrievability of nuclear waste from high-level geologic repositories is one of the performance objectives identified in 10CFR60 (Code of Federal Regulations, 1985). 10CFR60.111 states that the geologic repository operations area shall be designed to preserve the option of waste retrieval. In designing the repository operations area, rock mechanics considerations play a major role especially in evaluating the feasibility of retrieval operations. This paper discusses generic considerations affecting retrievability as they relate to repository design, construction, and operation, with emphasis on regulatory and rock mechanics aspects

  12. Design of a Single Motor Based Leg Structure with the Consideration of Inherent Mechanical Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha Manzoor, Muhammad; Sohail, Umer; Noor-e-Mustafa; Nizami, Muhammad Hamza Asif; Ayaz, Yasar

    2017-07-01

    The fundamental aspect of designing a legged robot is constructing a leg design that is robust and presents a simple control problem. In this paper, we have successfully designed a robotic leg based on a unique four bar mechanism with only one motor per leg. The leg design parameters used in our platform are extracted from design principles used in biological systems, multiple iterations and previous research findings. These principles guide a robotic leg to have minimal mechanical passive impedance, low leg mass and inertia, a suitable foot trajectory utilizing a practical balance between leg kinematics and robot usage, and the resultant inherent mechanical stability. The designed platform also exhibits the key feature of self-locking. Theoretical tools and software iterations were used to derive these practical features and yield an intuitive sense of the required leg design parameters.

  13. Design considerations and challenges for mechanical stretch bioreactors in tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Ying; Ferdous, Zannatul

    2016-05-01

    With the increase in average life expectancy and growing aging population, lack of functional grafts for replacement surgeries has become a severe problem. Engineered tissues are a promising alternative to this problem because they can mimic the physiological function of the native tissues and be cultured on demand. Cyclic stretch is important for developing many engineered tissues such as hearts, heart valves, muscles, and bones. Thus a variety of stretch bioreactors and corresponding scaffolds have been designed and tested to study the underlying mechanism of tissue formation and to optimize the mechanical conditions applied to the engineered tissues. In this review, we look at various designs of stretch bioreactors and common scaffolds and offer insights for future improvements in tissue engineering applications. First, we summarize the requirements and common configuration of stretch bioreactors. Next, we present the features of different actuating and motion transforming systems and their applications. Since most bioreactors must measure detailed distributions of loads and deformations on engineered tissues, techniques with high accuracy, precision, and frequency have been developed. We also cover the key points in designing culture chambers, nutrition exchanging systems, and regimens used for specific tissues. Since scaffolds are essential for providing biophysical microenvironments for residing cells, we discuss materials and technologies used in fabricating scaffolds to mimic anisotropic native tissues, including decellularized tissues, hydrogels, biocompatible polymers, electrospinning, and 3D bioprinting techniques. Finally, we present the potential future directions for improving stretch bioreactors and scaffolds. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:543-553, 2016. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  14. Design considerations in mechanical face seals for improved performance. I - Basic configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, L. P.; Greiner, H. F.

    1977-01-01

    Basic assembly configurations of the mechanical face seal are described and some advantages associated with each are listed. The various forms of seal components (the primary seal, secondary seal, etc.) are illustrated, and functions pointed out. The technique of seal pressure balancing and its application is described; and the concept of the PV factor, its different forms and limitations are discussed. Brief attention is given to seal lubrication since it is covered in detail in a companion paper. Finally, the operating conditions for various applications of low pressure seals (aircraft transmissions) are listed, and the seal failure mode of a particular application is discussed.

  15. Design considerations in mechanical face seals for improved performance. 1: Basic configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, L. P.; Greiner, H. F.

    1977-01-01

    Basic assembly configurations of the mechanical face seal are described and some advantages associated with each are listed. The various forms of seal components are illustrated, and functions pointed out. The technique of seal pressure balancing and its application are described; and the concept of the PV factor, its different forms and limitations are discussed. Brief attention is given to seal lubrication since it is covered in detail in a companion paper. Finally, the operating conditions for various applications of low pressure seals (aircraft transmissions) are listed, and the seal failure mode of a particular application is discussed.

  16. Design considerations in mechanical face seals for improved performance. II - Lubrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, L. P.; Greiner, H. F.

    1977-01-01

    The importance of sealing technology in the U.S. industrial chemical-orientated society in regard to maintenance and environmental contamination is pointed out. It is stated that seal performance (leakage, life) is directly related to seal lubrication, which is a mechanism not well understood. Current thinking in regard to seal lubrication is reviewed, the effect of energy dissipation in the thin lubricating film separating the sealing faces is pointed out, and the results of vaporization due to heating are illustrated. Also, hydrodynamic lubrication is reviewed, and an inherent tendency for the seal to operate with angular misalignment is pointed out. Recent work on hydrostatic effects is summarized and the conditions for seal instability are discussed. Four different modes of seal lubrication are postulated with the mode type being a strong function of speed and pressure.

  17. Mechanical design

    CERN Document Server

    Risitano, Antonino

    2011-01-01

    METHODOLOGICAL STATEMENT OF ENGINEERING DESIGNApproaches to product design and developmentMechanical design and environmental requirementsPROPERTIES OF ENGINEERING MATERIALSMaterials for mechanical designCharacterization of metalsStress conditionsFatigue of materialsOptimum material selection in mechanical designDESIGN OF MECHANICAL COMPONENTS AND SYSTEMSFailure theoriesHertz theoryLubrificationShafts and bearingsSplines and keysSpringsFlexible machine elementsSpur gearsPress and shrink fitsPressure tubesCouplingsClutchesBrakes

  18. Design Considerations | Efficient Windows Collaborative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foundry Foundry New Construction Windows Window Selection Tool Selection Process Design Guidance Installation Replacement Windows Window Selection Tool Assessing Options Selection Process Design Guidance Installation Understanding Windows Benefits Design Considerations Measuring Performance Performance Standards

  19. User interface design considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Simon Engedal; Jakobsen, Arne; Rasmussen, Bjarne D.

    1999-01-01

    and output variables. This feature requires special attention when designing the user interface and a special approach for controlling the user selection of input and output variables are developed. To obtain a consistent system description the different input variables are grouped corresponding......When designing a user interface for a simulation model there are several important issues to consider: Who is the target user group, and which a priori information can be expected. What questions do the users want answers to and what questions are answered using a specific model?When developing...... the user interface of EESCoolTools these issues led to a series of simulation tools each with a specific purpose and a carefully selected set of input and output variables. To allow a more wide range of questions to be answered by the same model, the user can change between different sets of input...

  20. Mechanisms Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Restrepo-Giraldo, John Dairo

    2006-01-01

    Most products and machines involve some kind of controlled movement. From window casements to DVD players, from harbor cranes to the shears to prune your garden, all these machines require mechanisms to move. This course intends to provide the analytical and conceptual tools to design such mechan......Most products and machines involve some kind of controlled movement. From window casements to DVD players, from harbor cranes to the shears to prune your garden, all these machines require mechanisms to move. This course intends to provide the analytical and conceptual tools to design...... using criteria such as size, performance parameters, operation environment, etc. Content: Understanding Mechanisms Design (2 weeks) Definitions, mechanisms representations, kinematic diagrams, the four bar linkage, mobility, applications of mechanisms, types of mechanisms, special mechanisms, the design......: equations for various mechanisms. At the end of this module you will be able to analyze existing mechanisms and to describe their movement. Designing mechanisms (7 weeks) Type synthesis and dimensional synthesis, function generation, path generation, three precision points in multi-loop mechanisms...

  1. Creating Library Interiors: Planning and Design Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Plummer Alston, Jr.; Barton, Phillip K.

    1997-01-01

    Examines design considerations for public library interiors: access; acoustical treatment; assignable and nonassignable space; building interiors: ceilings, clocks, color, control, drinking fountains; exhibit space: slotwall display, floor coverings, floor loading, furniture, lighting, mechanical systems, public address, copying machines,…

  2. LABORATORY DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS FOR SAFETY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Safety Council, Chicago, IL. Campus Safety Association.

    THIS SET OF CONSIDERATIONS HAS BEEN PREPARED TO PROVIDE PERSONS WORKING ON THE DESIGN OF NEW OR REMODELED LABORATORY FACILITIES WITH A SUITABLE REFERENCE GUIDE TO DESIGN SAFETY. THERE IS NO DISTINCTION BETWEEN TYPES OF LABORATORY AND THE EMPHASIS IS ON GIVING GUIDES AND ALTERNATIVES RATHER THAN DETAILED SPECIFICATIONS. AREAS COVERED INCLUDE--(1)…

  3. Design of mechanical joints

    CERN Document Server

    Blake, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    A cornerstone publication that covers the basic principles and practical considerations of design methodology for joints held by rivets, bolts, weld seams, and adhesive materials, Design of Mechanical Joints gives engineers the practical results and formulas they need for the preliminary design of mechanical joints, combining the essential topics of joint mechanics...strength of materials...and fracture control to provide a complete treatment of problems pertinent to the field of mechanical connections.

  4. General B factory design considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zisman, M.S.

    1992-12-01

    We describe the general considerations that go into the design of an asymmetric B factory collider. Justification is given for the typical parameters of such a facility, and the physics and technology challenges that arise from these parameter choices are discussed. Cost and schedule issues for a B factory are discussed briefly. A summary of existing proposals is presented, noting their similarities and differences

  5. Mechanical design implementation and mathematical considerations for ultra precise diamond turning of multiple freeform mirrors on a common substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartung, Johannes; Beier, Matthias; Peschel, Thomas; Gebhardt, Andreas; Risse, Stefan

    2015-09-01

    For optical systems consisting of metal (in general freeform) mirrors there exist several diamond turning fabrication approaches. These are distuingished by the effort in manufacturing and integration of the later system. The more work one puts into the manufacturing stage the less complicated is the alignment and integration afterwards. For example the most degrees of freedom have to be aligned in integration phase if every mirror of the system is fabricated as a single optical component. For a three mirror anastigmat with three freeform mirrors the degrees of freedom sum up to 18. Therefore the mirror fabrication itself is more or less easy, but the integration is very difficult. There are three major parts in the design and manufacturing process chain to be considered for tackling this integration problem. At the first position in the process chain there is the optical design occuring. At this stage a negotiation between manufacturing and design could improve manufacturability because of more possible integration approaches. The second stage is the mechanical design. Here the appropriate manufacturing approach is already chosen, but may be revisited due to incompatiblities with, e.g., stress specifications. The third level is the manufacturing stage. Here are different clamping approaches and fabrication methods possible. The current article will focus on an approach ("snap-together") where two mirrors are fabricated on one substrate and therefore a reduction of the number of degrees of freedom to be aligned are reduced to six. This improves the amount of time needed for the system integration significantly in contrast to a single mirror fabrication.

  6. Reactor design considerations for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, L.A.

    1979-01-01

    The most challenging reactor design consideration is protection of the cavity wall from the various energy forms as released by the pellet and as affected by the reaction-chamber phenomena. These phenomena depend on both the design and the yield of the pellet, as well as on ambient conditions in the chamber at the time of the pellet microexplosion. The effects on pellet energy-release mechanisms of various reaction chamber atmosphere options are summarized

  7. Mechanical Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shook, Richard; /Marquette U. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    The particle beam of the SXR (soft x-ray) beam line in the LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source) has a high intensity in order to penetrate through samples at the atomic level. However, the intensity is so high that many experiments fail because of severe damage. To correct this issue, attenuators are put into the beam line to reduce this intensity to a level suitable for experimentation. Attenuation is defined as 'the gradual loss in intensity of any flux through a medium' by [1]. It is found that Beryllium and Boron Carbide can survive the intensity of the beam. At very thin films, both of these materials work very well as filters for reducing the beam intensity. Using a total of 12 filters, the first 9 being made of Beryllium and the rest made of Boron Carbide, the beam's energy range of photons can be attenuated between 800 eV and 9000 eV. The design of the filters allows attenuation for different beam intensities so that experiments can obtain different intensities from the beam if desired. The step of attenuation varies, but is relative to the thickness of the filter as a power function of 2. A relationship for this is f(n) = x{sub 0}2{sup n} where n is the step of attenuation desired and x{sub 0} is the initial thickness of the material. To allow for this desired variation, a mechanism must be designed within the test chamber. This is visualized using a 3D computer aided design modeling tool known as Solid Edge.

  8. Mechanical Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The particle beam of the SXR (soft x-ray) beam line in the LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source) has a high intensity in order to penetrate through samples at the atomic level. However, the intensity is so high that many experiments fail because of severe damage. To correct this issue, attenuators are put into the beam line to reduce this intensity to a level suitable for experimentation. Attenuation is defined as 'the gradual loss in intensity of any flux through a medium' by (1). It is found that Beryllium and Boron Carbide can survive the intensity of the beam. At very thin films, both of these materials work very well as filters for reducing the beam intensity. Using a total of 12 filters, the first 9 being made of Beryllium and the rest made of Boron Carbide, the beam's energy range of photons can be attenuated between 800 eV and 9000 eV. The design of the filters allows attenuation for different beam intensities so that experiments can obtain different intensities from the beam if desired. The step of attenuation varies, but is relative to the thickness of the filter as a power function of 2. A relationship for this is f(n) = x 0 2 n where n is the step of attenuation desired and x 0 is the initial thickness of the material. To allow for this desired variation, a mechanism must be designed within the test chamber. This is visualized using a 3D computer aided design modeling tool known as Solid Edge.

  9. Mechanical considerations in cw linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    An 80-MHz radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac has been designed, fabricated and operated at 100% duty factor (cw) for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) project at Los Alamos. This paper describes the design features, fabrication techniques, and operational problems of the device. The RFQ is an assembly of heavy steel, copper-plated weldments. It measures about 15 ft (4.5 m) long by 5 ft (1.5 m) in diameter and weighs over 12 t. Major components are two pair of diametrically orthogonal vanes mounted in a core cylinder. The core is assembled into a manifold cylinder that couples rf power into the vane quadrants. The design features discussed include assembly of hollow wall, flood-cooled components; high-conductivity rf seals; removable and adjustable vanes; and tuning devices. Fabrication challenges such as close-tolerance weldments, vane-tip-contour machining and large-component plating requirements are covered

  10. Mechanical design

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    Design concepts for a 1000 mw thermal stationary power plant employing the UF6 fueled gas core breeder reactor are examined. Three design combinations-gaseous UF6 core with a solid matrix blanket, gaseous UF6 core with a liquid blanket, and gaseous UF6 core with a circulating blanket were considered. Results show the gaseous UF6 core with a circulating blanket was best suited to the power plant concept.

  11. Magnet design considerations for Tokamak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purcell, J.R.; Chen, W.; Thomas, R.

    1976-01-01

    Design problems for superconducting ohmic heating and toroidal field coils for large Tokamak fusion reactors are discussed. The necessity for making these coils superconducting is explained, together with the functions of these coils in a Tokamak reactor. Major problem areas include materials related aspects and mechanical design and cryogenic considerations. Projections and comparisons are made based on existing superconducting magnet technology. The mechanical design of large-scale coils, which can contain the severe electromagnetic loading and stress generated in the winding, are emphasized. Additional major tasks include the development of high current conductors for pulsed applications to be used in fabricating the ohmic heating coils. It is important to note, however, that no insurmountable technical barriers are expected in the course of developing superconducting coils for Tokamak fusion reactors. (Auth.)

  12. Design considerations for ITER toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalsi, S.S.; Lousteau, D.C.; Miller, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is a new tokamak design project with joint participation from Europe, Japan, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (U.S.S.R.), and the United States. This paper describes a magnetic and mechanical design methodology for toroidal field (TF) coils that employs Nb 3 Sn superconductor technology. Coil winding is sized by using conductor concepts developed for the U.S. TIBER concept. Manifold concepts are presented for the complete cooling system. Also included are concepts for the coil structural arrangement. The effects of in-plane and out-of-plane loads are included in the design considerations for the windings and case. Concepts are presented for reacting these loads with a minimum amount of additional structural material. Concepts discussed in this paper could be considered for the ITER TF coils

  13. Accident considerations in LMFBR design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, D.E.; Alter, H.; Fauske, H.K.; Hikido, K.; Keaten, R.W.; Stevenson, M.G.; Strawbridge, L.

    1975-12-01

    LMFBR safety design criteria are discussed from the standpoints of accident severity classification and damage criteria, and the following design events are considered: fuel failure propagation, reactivity addition faults, heat transport system events, steam generator faults, sodium spills, fuel handling and storage faults, and external events

  14. Lunar Navigation Architecture Design Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Christopher; Getchius, Joel; Holt, Greg; Moreau, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Constellation Program is aiming to establish a long-term presence on the lunar surface. The Constellation elements (Orion, Altair, Earth Departure Stage, and Ares launch vehicles) will require a lunar navigation architecture for navigation state updates during lunar-class missions. Orion in particular has baselined earth-based ground direct tracking as the primary source for much of its absolute navigation needs. However, due to the uncertainty in the lunar navigation architecture, the Orion program has had to make certain assumptions on the capabilities of such architectures in order to adequately scale the vehicle design trade space. The following paper outlines lunar navigation requirements, the Orion program assumptions, and the impacts of these assumptions to the lunar navigation architecture design. The selection of potential sites was based upon geometric baselines, logistical feasibility, redundancy, and abort support capability. Simulated navigation covariances mapped to entry interface flightpath- angle uncertainties were used to evaluate knowledge errors. A minimum ground station architecture was identified consisting of Goldstone, Madrid, Canberra, Santiago, Hartebeeshoek, Dongora, Hawaii, Guam, and Ascension Island (or the geometric equivalent).

  15. Design considerations for prepress color proof measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spooner, David L.

    1993-06-01

    For our purposes, we needed colorimetric measurements or, better yet, spectral reflectance data. Our survey of commercially available instruments identified one spectrocolorimeter, the Hunter PICS (manufactured by Hunter Associates Laboratory, Inc.), which could be programmed to automatically measure the color (and spectral reflectance) of large numbers of samples on a proof sheet. After an evaluation of this instrument, which included measuring over 10,000 exhibits, it was decided that the unit did not fully meet our needs. This resulted in a decision to integrate another instrument, the Byk-Gardner Color Machine (manufactured by Byk-Gardner, Inc.), with an x-y positioning mechanism. This paper describes the design considerations used in the development of our color measurement system.

  16. Mechanical considerations for MFTF-B plasma-diagnostic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, S.R. Jr.; Wells, C.W.

    1981-01-01

    The reconfiguration of MFTF to a tandem mirror machine with thermal barriers has caused a significant expansion in the physical scope of plasma diagnostics. From a mechanical perspective, it complicates the plasma access, system interfaces, growth and environmental considerations. Conceptual designs characterize the general scope of the design and fabrication which remains to be done

  17. Design Considerations for Developing Biodegradable Magnesium Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brar, Harpreet S.; Keselowsky, Benjamin G.; Sarntinoranont, Malisa; Manuel, Michele V.

    The integration of biodegradable and bioabsorbable magnesium implants into the human body is a complex undertaking that faces major challenges. The complexity arises from the fact that biomaterials must meet both engineering and physiological requirements to ensure the desired properties. Historically, efforts have been focused on the behavior of commercial magnesium alloys in biological environments and their resultant effect on cell-mediated processes. Developing causal relationships between alloy chemistry and micro structure, and its effect on cellular behavior can be a difficult and time intensive process. A systems design approach driven by thermodynamics has the power to provide significant contributions in developing the next generation of magnesium alloy implants with controlled degradability, biocompatibility, and optimized mechanical properties, at reduced time and cost. This approach couples experimental research with theory and mechanistic modeling for the accelerated development of materials. The aim of this article is to enumerate this strategy, design considerations and hurdles for developing new magnesium alloys for use as biodegradable implant materials [1].

  18. Implementing Sustainability Considerations in Packaging Design Curricula

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder-Nijkamp, Maaike; de Koeijer, Bjorn; Torn, Isaäc Anthony Robbert-Jan

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to address the structured implementation of sustainability considerations in packaging design processes by proposing a teaching framework for design students. The framework builds upon a four-year research program which aims to deliver insights regarding the environmental burden

  19. Design Criteria Based on Aesthetic Considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Bente Dahl

    2009-01-01

    Aesthetic criteria for designs are often debated in a very subjective manner which makes it difficult to reach consensus. In order to have a more rational and transparent process, in particular in industrial design, we propose a procedure based on Baumgarten's aesthetic considerations and Thommesen......'s dividing of a form into form elements. The procedure has been tested in student projects....

  20. Implantable intraocular pressure monitoring systems: Design considerations

    KAUST Repository

    Arsalan, Muhammad; Ouda, Mahmoud H.; Marnat, Loic; Shamim, Atif; Salama, Khaled N.

    2013-01-01

    Design considerations and limitations of implantable Intraocular Pressure Monitoring (IOPM) systems are presented in this paper. Detailed comparison with the state of the art is performed to highlight the benefits and challenges of the proposed design. The system-on-chip, presented here, is battery free and harvests energy from incoming RF signals. This low-cost design, in standard CMOS process, does not require any external components or bond wires to function. This paper provides useful insights to the designers of implantable wireless sensors in terms of design choices and associated tradeoffs. © 2013 IEEE.

  1. Implantable intraocular pressure monitoring systems: Design considerations

    KAUST Repository

    Arsalan, Muhammad

    2013-12-01

    Design considerations and limitations of implantable Intraocular Pressure Monitoring (IOPM) systems are presented in this paper. Detailed comparison with the state of the art is performed to highlight the benefits and challenges of the proposed design. The system-on-chip, presented here, is battery free and harvests energy from incoming RF signals. This low-cost design, in standard CMOS process, does not require any external components or bond wires to function. This paper provides useful insights to the designers of implantable wireless sensors in terms of design choices and associated tradeoffs. © 2013 IEEE.

  2. Design considerations for a gas microcontroller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    Some of the design problems that are now being addressed in consideration of a microcontroller for the upcoming GAS payload are discussed. Microcontrollers will be used to run the experiments and to collect and store the data from those experiments. Some of the requirements for a microcontroller are to be small, lightweight, have low power consumption, and high reliability. Some of the solutions that were developed to meet these design requirements are discussed. At present, the experiment is still in the design stage and the final design may change from what is presented here. The search for new integrated circuits which will do all that is needed all in one package continues.

  3. Mechanical design of DNA nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Carlos E.; Su, Hai-Jun; Marras, Alexander E.; Zhou, Lifeng; Johnson, Joshua

    2015-03-01

    Structural DNA nanotechnology is a rapidly emerging field that has demonstrated great potential for applications such as single molecule sensing, drug delivery, and templating molecular components. As the applications of DNA nanotechnology expand, a consideration of their mechanical behavior is becoming essential to understand how these structures will respond to physical interactions. This review considers three major avenues of recent progress in this area: (1) measuring and designing mechanical properties of DNA nanostructures, (2) designing complex nanostructures based on imposed mechanical stresses, and (3) designing and controlling structurally dynamic nanostructures. This work has laid the foundation for mechanically active nanomachines that can generate, transmit, and respond to physical cues in molecular systems.Structural DNA nanotechnology is a rapidly emerging field that has demonstrated great potential for applications such as single molecule sensing, drug delivery, and templating molecular components. As the applications of DNA nanotechnology expand, a consideration of their mechanical behavior is becoming essential to understand how these structures will respond to physical interactions. This review considers three major avenues of recent progress in this area: (1) measuring and designing mechanical properties of DNA nanostructures, (2) designing complex nanostructures based on imposed mechanical stresses, and (3) designing and controlling structurally dynamic nanostructures. This work has laid the foundation for mechanically active nanomachines that can generate, transmit, and respond to physical cues in molecular systems. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr07153k

  4. Safety considerations in the design of PFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaidyanathan, G.; Om Pal Singh; Govindarajan, S.; Chellapandi, P.; Chetal, S.C.; Shankar Singh, R.; Bhoje, S.B.

    1996-01-01

    Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) is a 500 MWe reactor under design in India. The overall safety approach adopted is based on the defence-in-depth principle. Design features have been incorporated to minimize occurrence of unsafe conditions. A plant protection system comprising reliable core monitoring to detect the off-normal condition, a reliable shutdown system to ensure safe shutdown and a passive decay heat removal system are provided. Containment is provided to prevent any release of radioactivity to the environment in case of failure of the protective devices. This paper provides a brief outline of the safety considerations in the design of PFBR. (author). 5 refs, 1 tab

  5. Criticality safety and facility design considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waltz, W.R.

    1991-06-01

    Operations with fissile material introduce the risk of a criticality accident that may be lethal to nearby personnel. In addition, concerns over criticality safety can result in substantial delays and shutdown of facility operations. For these reasons, it is clear that the prevention of a nuclear criticality accident should play a major role in the design of a nuclear facility. The emphasis of this report will be placed on engineering design considerations in the prevention of criticality. The discussion will not include other important aspects, such as the physics of calculating limits nor criticality alarm systems

  6. Salt creep design consideration for underground nuclear waste storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, W.T.; Wu, C.L.; Antonas, N.J.

    1983-01-01

    This paper summarizes the creep consideration in the design of nuclear waste storage facilities in salt, describes the non-linear analysis method for evaluating the design adequacy, and presents computational results for the current storage design. The application of rock mechanics instrumentation to assure the appropriateness of the design is discussed. It also describes the design evolution of such a facility, starting from the conceptual design, through the preliminary design, to the detailed design stage. The empirical design method, laboratory tests and numerical analyses, and the underground in situ tests have been incorporated in the design process to assure the stability of the underground openings, retrievability of waste during the operation phase and encapsulation of waste after decommissioning

  7. Practical design considerations for photovoltaic power station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, T. D.

    Aspects of photovoltaic (PV) technology are discussed along with generic PV design considerations, taking into account the resource sunlight, PV modules and their reliability, questions of PV system design, the support structure subsystem, and a power conditioning unit subsystem. A description is presented of two recent projects which demonstrate the translation of an idea into actual working PV systems. A privately financed project in Denton, Maryland, went on line in early December, 1982, and began providing power to the local utility grid. It represents the first intermediate size, grid-connected, privately financed power station in the U.S. Based on firm quotes, the actual cost of this system is about $13/W peak. The other project, called the PV Breeder, is an energy independent facility which utilizes solar power to make new solar cells. It is also the first large industrial structure completely powered by the sun.

  8. Mechanical design engineering handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Childs, Peter R N

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical Design Engineering Handbook is a straight-talking and forward-thinking reference covering the design, specification, selection, use and integration of machine elements fundamental to a wide range of engineering applications. Develop or refresh your mechanical design skills in the areas of bearings, shafts, gears, seals, belts and chains, clutches and brakes, springs, fasteners, pneumatics and hydraulics, amongst other core mechanical elements, and dip in for principles, data and calculations as needed to inform and evaluate your on-the-job decisions. Covering the full spectrum

  9. Kinematic design considerations for minimally invasive surgical robots: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chin-Hsing; Dai, Jian S; Dasgupta, Prokar

    2012-06-01

    Kinematic design is a predominant phase in the design of robotic manipulators for minimally invasive surgery (MIS). However, an extensive overview of the kinematic design issues for MIS robots is not yet available to both mechanisms and robotics communities. Hundreds of archival reports and articles on robotic systems for MIS are reviewed and studied. In particular, the kinematic design considerations and mechanism development described in the literature for existing robots are focused on. The general kinematic design goals, design requirements, and design preferences for MIS robots are defined. An MIS-specialized mechanism, namely the remote center-of-motion (RCM) mechanism, is revisited and studied. Accordingly, based on the RCM mechanism types, a classification for MIS robots is provided. A comparison between eight different RCM types is given. Finally, several open challenges for the kinematic design of MIS robotic manipulators are discussed. This work provides a detailed survey of the kinematic design of MIS robots, addresses the research opportunity in MIS robots for kinematicians, and clarifies the kinematic point of view to MIS robots as a reference for the medical community. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Probabilistic cellular automata: Some statistical mechanical considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebowitz, J.L.; Maes, C.; Speer, E.R.

    1990-01-01

    Spin systems evolving in continuous or discrete time under the action of stochastic dynamics are used to model phenomena as diverse as the structure of alloys and the functioning of neural networks. While in some cases the dynamics are secondary, designed to produce a specific stationary measure whose properties one is interested in studying, there are other cases in which the only available information is the dynamical rule. Prime examples of the former are computer simulations, via Glauber dynamics, of equilibrium Gibbs measures with a specified interaction potential. Examples of the latter include various types of majority rule dynamics used as models for pattern recognition and for error-tolerant computations. The present note discusses ways in which techniques found useful in equilibrium statistical mechanics can be applied to a particular class of models of the latter types. These are cellular automata with noise: systems in which the spins are updated stochastically at integer times, simultaneously at all sites of some regular lattice. These models were first investigated in detail in the Soviet literature of the late sixties and early seventies. They are now generally referred to as Stochastic or Probabilistic Cellular Automata (PCA), and may be considered to include deterministic automata (CA) as special limits. 16 refs., 3 figs

  11. MOX fuel design and development consideration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamate, K.; Abeta, S.; Suzuki, K.; Doi, S.

    1997-01-01

    Pu thermal utilization in Japan will be realized in several plants in late 1990's, and will be expanded gradually. For this target, adequacy of methods for MOX fuel design, nuclear design, and safety analysis has been evaluated by the committee of competent authorities organized by government in advance of the licensing application. There is no big difference of physical properties and irradiation behaviors between MOX fuel and UO 2 fuel, because Pu content of MOX fuel for Pu thermal utilization is low. The fuel design code for UO 2 fuel will be applied with some modifications, taking into account of characteristic of MOX fuel. For nuclear design, new code system is to be applied to treat the heterogeneity in MOX fuel assembly and the neutron spectrum interaction with UO 2 fuel more accurately. For 1/3 MOX fueled core in three loop plant, it was confirmed that the fuel rod mechanical design could meet the design criteria, with slight reduction of initial back-fitting pressure, and with appropriate fuel loading patterns in the core to match power with UO 2 fuel. With the increase of MOX fuel fraction in the core, control rod worth and boron worth decrease. Compensating the decrease by adding control rod and utilizing enriched B-10 in safety injection system, 100% MOX fueled core could be possible. Up to 1/3 MOX fueled core in three loop plant, no such modifications of the plant is necessary. The fraction of MOX fuel in PWR is designed to less than 1/3 in the present program. In order to improve Pu thermal utilization in future, various R and D program on fuel design and nuclear design are being performed, such as the irradiation program of MOX fuel manufactured through new process to the extent of high burnup. (author). 8 refs, 9 figs, 2 tabs

  12. Design considerations for ITER magnet systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, C.D.; Miller, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is now completing a definition phase as a beginning of a three-year design effort. Preliminary parameters for the superconducting magnet system have been established to guide further and more detailed design work. Radiation tolerance of the superconductors and insulators has been of prime importance, since it sets requirements for the neutron-shield dimension and sensitively influences reactor size. The major levels of mechanical stress in the structure appear in the cases of the inboard legs of the toroidal-field (TF) coils. The cases of the poloidal-field (PF) coils must be made thin or segmented to minimize eddy current heating during inductive plasma operation. As a result, the winding packs of both the TF and PF coils includes significant fractions of steel. The authors present here preliminary ITER magnet systems design parameters taken from trade studies, design, and analyses performed by the Home Teams of the four ITER participants, by the ITER Magnet Design Unit in Garching, and by other participants at workshops organized by the Magnet Design Unit

  13. LBB considerations for a new plant design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swamy, S.A.; Mandava, P.R.; Bhowmick, D.C.; Prager, D.E. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The leak-before-break (LBB) methodology is accepted as a technically justifiable approach for eliminating postulation of Double-Ended Guillotine Breaks (DEGB) in high energy piping systems. This is the result of extensive research, development, and rigorous evaluations by the NRC and the commercial nuclear power industry since the early 1970s. The DEGB postulation is responsible for the many hundreds of pipe whip restraints and jet shields found in commercial nuclear plants. These restraints and jet shields not only cost many millions of dollars, but also cause plant congestion leading to reduced reliability in inservice inspection and increased man-rem exposure. While use of leak-before-break technology saved hundreds of millions of dollars in backfit costs to many operating Westinghouse plants, value-impacts resulting from the application of this technology for future plants are greater on a per plant basis. These benefits will be highlighted in this paper. The LBB technology has been applied extensively to high energy piping systems in operating plants. However, there are differences between the application of LBB technology to an operating plant and to a new plant design. In this paper an approach is proposed which is suitable for application of LBB to a new plant design such as the Westinghouse AP600. The approach is based on generating Bounding Analyses Curves (BAC) for the candidate piping systems. The general methodology and criteria used for developing the BACs are based on modified GDC-4 and Standard Review Plan (SRP) 3.6.3. The BAC allows advance evaluation of the piping system from the LBB standpoint thereby assuring LBB conformance for the piping system. The piping designer can use the results of the BACs to determine acceptability of design loads and make modifications (in terms of piping layout and support configurations) as necessary at the design stage to assure LBB for the, piping systems under consideration.

  14. Optical design considerations for laser fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monsler, M.J.; Maniscalco, J.A.

    1977-09-01

    The plan for the development of commercial inertial confinement fusion (ICF) power plants is discussed, emphasizing the utilization of the unique features of laser fusion to arrive at conceptual designs for reactors and optical systems which minimize the need for advanced materials and techniques requiring expensive test facilities. A conceptual design for a liquid lithium fall reactor is described which successfully deals with the hostile x-ray and neutron environment and promises to last the 30 year plant lifetime. Schemes for protecting the final focusing optics are described which are both compatible with this reactor system and show promise of surviving a full year in order to minimize costly downtime. Damage mechanisms and protection techniques are discussed, and a recommendation is made for a high f-number metal mirror final focusing system

  15. Mechanical Drawing and Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulsky, Marilyn; McEnaney, Walter K.

    A syllabus is provided for a comprehensive foundation course in mechanical drawing and design for grades 9, 10, 11, or 12 that is prerequisite to advanced elective courses. Introductory materials include course objectives, an overview of basic concepts, and guidelines for implementation. Brief discussions of and suggestions for the areas of design…

  16. Mechanical Design of Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    1962-01-01

    In the spring of 1962, engineers from the Engineering Mechanics Division of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory gave a series of lectures on spacecraft design at the Engineering Design seminars conducted at the California Institute of Technology. Several of these lectures were subsequently given at Stanford University as part of the Space Technology seminar series sponsored by the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Presented here are notes taken from these lectures. The lectures were conceived with the intent of providing the audience with a glimpse of the activities of a few mechanical engineers who are involved in designing, building, and testing spacecraft. Engineering courses generally consist of heavily idealized problems in order to allow the more efficient teaching of mathematical technique. Students, therefore, receive a somewhat limited exposure to actual engineering problems, which are typified by more unknowns than equations. For this reason it was considered valuable to demonstrate some of the problems faced by spacecraft designers, the processes used to arrive at solutions, and the interactions between the engineer and the remainder of the organization in which he is constrained to operate. These lecture notes are not so much a compilation of sophisticated techniques of analysis as they are a collection of examples of spacecraft hardware and associated problems. They will be of interest not so much to the experienced spacecraft designer as to those who wonder what part the mechanical engineer plays in an effort such as the exploration of space.

  17. Special Considerations in Neonatal Mechanical Ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalgleish, Stacey; Kostecky, Linda; Charania, Irina

    2016-12-01

    Care of infants supported with mechanical ventilation is complex, time intensive, and requires constant vigilance by an expertly prepared health care team. Current evidence must guide nursing practice regarding ventilated neonates. This article highlights the importance of common language to establish a shared mental model and enhance clear communication among the interprofessional team. Knowledge regarding the underpinnings of an open lung strategy and the interplay between the pathophysiology and individual infant's response to a specific ventilator strategy is most likely to result in a positive clinical outcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Empirical Design Considerations for Industrial Centrifugal Compressors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Xu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD has been extensively used in centrifugal compressor design. CFD provides further optimisation opportunities for the compressor design rather than designing the centrifugal compressor. The experience-based design process still plays an important role for new compressor developments. The wide variety of design subjects represents a very complex design world for centrifugal compressor designers. Therefore, some basic information for centrifugal design is still very important. The impeller is the key part of the centrifugal stage. Designing a highly efficiency impeller with a wide operation range can ensure overall stage design success. This paper provides some empirical information for designing industrial centrifugal compressors with a focus on the impeller. A ported shroud compressor basic design guideline is also discussed for improving the compressor range.

  19. Reliability and mechanical design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaire, Maurice

    1997-01-01

    A lot of results in mechanical design are obtained from a modelisation of physical reality and from a numerical solution which would lead to the evaluation of needs and resources. The goal of the reliability analysis is to evaluate the confidence which it is possible to grant to the chosen design through the calculation of a probability of failure linked to the retained scenario. Two types of analysis are proposed: the sensitivity analysis and the reliability analysis. Approximate methods are applicable to problems related to reliability, availability, maintainability and safety (RAMS)

  20. A Multilevel Consideration of Service Design Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karpen, Ingo; Gemser, Gerda; Calabretta, Giulia

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to advance the current understanding of organisational conditions that facilitate service design. Specifically, the focus is on organisational capabilities, interactive practices and individual abilities as units of analysis across service system levels....... Grounded in design principles, the paper conceptualises and delineates illustrative service design conditions and introduces a respective service design capability-practice-ability (CPA) portfolio. In doing so, an emerging microfoundations perspective in the context of service design is advanced. Design....../methodology/approach: Conceptual paper. Findings: This paper identifies and delineates a CPA that contributes to service design and ultimately customer experiences. The service design CPA consists of six illustrative constellations of service design capabilities, practices and abilities, which operate on different organisational...

  1. Mobile health units. Design and implementation considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, D C; Klinghoffer, I; Fernandez-Wilson, J B; Rosenberg, L

    2000-11-01

    The decision to provide health care services with a mobile van is one which educational and service facilities are increasingly pursuing. The benefits include: The potential to increase the availability of services to underserved populations where access to care is perceived to be one reason for underuse of available services. The opportunity to increase and broaden the educational experiences of students in a training program. The opportunity to develop a sense of social responsibility in the health care provider. The process of deciding to pursue a van purchase is complicated, and administrators may best be served by obtaining experienced consultants to help them fully comprehend the issues involved. After the decision to purchase a mobile unit is made, it is necessary to focus on van requirements and design to meet federal, state, and city codes concerning motor vehicles and health requirements. Some modifications of one's standard practices are needed because of these codes. Being aware of them in advance will allow a smooth project completion. This article provides information about some of the steps required to implement a mobile unit. The approximate time from initial concept to van delivery was 1 year, with one fully dedicated project coordinator working to assure the project's success in such a short time frame. Seeing the gratified personnel and students who serve the children on the "Smiling Faces, Going Places" Mobile Dental Van of the NYUCD (see Figure 2), and knowing the children would otherwise not have received such services, allows the health care professionals involved to feel the development of this van is an exciting mechanism for delivery of health care to individuals who would otherwise go without.

  2. Instructional design considerations promoting engineering design self-efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Andrew M.

    Engineering design activities are frequently included in technology and engineering classrooms. These activities provide an open-ended context for practicing critical thinking, problem solving, creativity, and innovation---collectively part of the 21st Century Skills which are increasingly needed for success in the workplace. Self-efficacy is a perceptual belief that impacts learning and behavior. It has been shown to directly impact each of these 21st Century Skills but its relation to engineering design is only recently being studied. The purpose of this study was to examine how instructional considerations made when implementing engineering design activities might affect student self-efficacy outcomes in a middle school engineering classroom. Student responses to two self-efficacy inventories related to design, the Engineering Design Self-Efficacy Instrument and Creative Thinking Self-Efficacy Inventory, were collected before and after participation in an engineering design curriculum. Students were also answered questions on specific factors of their experience during the curriculum which teachers may exhibit control over: teamwork and feedback. Results were analyzed using Pearson's correlation coefficients, paired and independent t-tests, and structural equation modeling to better understand patterns for self-efficacy beliefs in students. Results suggested that design self-efficacy and creative thinking self-efficacy are significantly correlated, r(1541) = .783, p classroom strategies for increasing self-efficacy and given specific recommendations related to teamwork and feedback to support students. Finally, although there were weaknesses in the study related to the survey administration, future research opportunities are presented which may build from this work.

  3. Design considerations for epithermal pulse reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostensen, R.W.

    1978-01-01

    Simplified design criteria were developed for scoping analyses of epithermal pulse reactors for use in LMFBR safety testing. By using these criteria, materials and designs were investigated to determine performance limits of moderately sized reactor cores. Several designs are suggested for further study. These are a gas-cooled core fueled with a heterogeneous mixture of Fe-UO 2 cermet and BeO-UO 2 ceramic fuels, and a heavy-water-cooled core fueled with an Fe-UO 2 cermet

  4. Consideration of dismantling operations in the design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubourg; Bonin.

    1984-12-01

    This analysis shows that the parameters and the constraints taken into account at the design level to facilitate the exploitation and the maintenance make the dismantling and its preparation easier [fr

  5. Mechatronic Design - Still a Considerable Challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torry-Smith, Jonas; Qamar, Ahsan; Achiche, Sofiane

    2011-01-01

    Development of mechatronic products is traditionally carried out by several design experts from different design domains. Performing development of mechatronic products is thus greatly challenging. In order to tackle this, the critical challenges in mechatronics have to be well understood and well...... supported through applicable methods and tools. This paper aims at identifying the major challenges, by conducting a survey of the most relevant research work in mechatronic design. Solutions proposed in literature are assessed and illustrated through a case study in order to investigate, if the challenges...... can be handled appropriately by the methods, tools, and mindsets suggested by the mechatronic community. Using a real world mechatronics case, the paper identifies the areas where further research is required, by showing a clear connection between the actual problems faced during the design task...

  6. DESIGN CONSIDERATION INVOLVING ACTIVE SEDIMENT CAPS (PRESENTATION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    When contaminated sediments pose unacceptable risks to human health and the environment, management activities such as removal, treatment, or isolation of contaminated sediments may be required. Various capping designs are being considered for isolating contaminated sediment are...

  7. DESIGN CONSIDERATION INVOLVING ACTIVE SEDIMENT CAPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    When contaminated sediments pose unacceptable risks to human health and the environment, management activities such as removal, treatment, or isolation of contaminated sediments may be required. Various capping designs are being considered for isolating contaminated sediment are...

  8. Superconducting generators for wind turbines: design considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijatovic, Nenad; Abrahamsen, Asger Bech; Træholt, Chresten

    2010-01-01

    The harmonic content of high temperature superconductors (HTS) field winding in air-core high temperature superconducting synchronous machine (HTS SM) has been addressed in order to investigate tendency of HTS SM towards mechanical oscillation and additional loss caused by higher flux harmonic...

  9. Game mechanics : advanced game design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adams, Ernest; Dormans, Joris

    2012-01-01

    Game Mechanics is aimed at game design students and industry professionals who want to improve their understanding of how to design, build, and test the mechanics of a game. Game Mechanics will show you how to design, test, and tune the core mechanics of a game—any game, from a huge role-playing

  10. Downlinks for DBS - Design and engineering considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blecker, M.; Martin, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    The subsystem interrelationships and design parameters choice procedures for a DBS downlink design are discussed from a business decisions point of view. The image quality is determined by customer satisfaction, which is translated to a required carrier/noise (C/N) ratio. The C/N ratio defines acceptable levels of signal fading, a subjective value which is modified by the demographics of the service area. Increasing the satellite on-board transmitting power to meet acceptable broadcast reliability places burdens on the start-up capitalization of the business. Larger receiving antennas in rural areas ameliorates some of the power requirements. The dish size, however, affects the labor costs of installation, but must be kept small enough to be used in heavily populated areas. The satellites must be built, as far as is possible, from off-the-shelf components to keep costs down. Design selections for a sample complete system are listed.

  11. Design consideration of solar powered cars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koten, Hasan; Yilmaz, Mustafa; Zafer Gul, M. [Marmara University Mechanical Engineering Department (Turkey)], E-mail: hasan.koten@marmara.edu.tr

    2011-07-01

    With the coming shortage of fossil fuels and the rising concerns over the environment, it is important to develop new technologies that reduce both energy consumption and pollution at the same time. Using solar energy is a good solution which could meet the world's energy needs. The aim of this study is to present the design process in the production of a solar powered car. Designing a solar powered car is a difficult task as there are strict requirements in term of efficiency: the car must have low drag resistance, be light-weight, and have low rolling resistance. In addition this paper presents the use of the solar powered Stirling engine technology rather than a photovoltaic conversion system for vehicle propulsion. This study presented a design process in the construction of a solar powered car and is expected to provide a new topic of research in the transportation field.

  12. HTGR fuel element structural design consideration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alloway, R.; Gorholt, W.; Ho, F.; Vollman, R.; Yu, H.

    1987-01-01

    The structural design of the large HTGR prismatic core fuel elements involve the interaction of four engineering disciplines: nuclear physics, thermo-hydraulics, structural and material science. Fuel element stress analysis techniques and the development of structural criteria are discussed in the context of an overview of the entire design process. The core of the proposed 2240 MW(t) HTGR is described as an example where the design process was used. Probabilistic stress analysis techniques coupled with probabilistic risk analysis (PRA) to develop structural criteria to account for uncertainty are described. The PRA provides a means for ensuring that the proposed structural criteria are consistant with plant investment and safety risk goals. The evaluation of cracked fuel elements removed from the Fort St. Vrain reactor in the U.S.A. is discussed in the context of stress analysis uncertainty and structural criteria development. (author)

  13. HTGR fuel element structural design considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alloway, R.; Gorholt, W.; Ho, F.; Vollman, R.; Yu, H.

    1986-09-01

    The structural design of the large HTGR prismatic core fuel elements involve the interaction of four engineering disciplines: nuclear physics, thermo-hydraulics, structural and material science. Fuel element stress analysis techniques and the development of structural criteria are discussed in the context of an overview of the entire design process. The core of the proposed 2240 MW(t) HTGR is described as an example where the design process was used. Probabalistic stress analysis techniques coupled with probabalistic risk analysis (PRA) to develop structural criteria to account for uncertainty are described. The PRA provides a means for ensuring that the proposed structural criteria are consistent with plant investment and safety risk goals. The evaluation of cracked fuel elements removed from the Fort St. Vrain reactor in the USA is discussed in the context of stress analysis uncertainty and structural criteria development

  14. Practical design considerations for nuclear cogeneration installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koupal, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Dual-purpose nuclear plants, cogeneration electricity and steam, offer significant economic benefits over comparable electricity generating stations. The design of such a nuclear facility requires the resolution of unique technical challenges. This paper reports on experience gained in the detailed design of such a dual-purpose facility with the steam supplied to a chemical plant for process heating. The following topics are discussed: Siting, Radioactivity of Export Steam, Optimization for Load Combinations, Steam Supply Reliability, Steam Transportation, Water Chemistry, Cost Allocation. (author)

  15. Design considerations for a suboptimal Kalman filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Difilippo, D. J.

    1995-06-01

    In designing a suboptimal Kalman filter, the designer must decide how to simplify the system error model without causing the filter estimation errors to increase to unacceptable levels. Deletion of certain error states and decoupling of error state dynamics are the two principal model simplifications that are commonly used in suboptimal filter design. For the most part, the decisions as to which error states can be deleted or decoupled are based on the designer's understanding of the physics of the particular system. Consequently, the details of a suboptimal design are usually unique to the specific application. In this paper, the process of designing a suboptimal Kalman filter is illustrated for the case of an airborne transfer-of-alignment (TOA) system used for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) motion compensation. In this application, the filter must continuously transfer the alignment of an onboard Doppler-damped master inertial navigation system (INS) to a strapdown navigator that processes information from a less accurate inertial measurement unit (IMU) mounted on the radar antenna. The IMU is used to measure spurious antenna motion during the SAR imaging interval, so that compensating phase corrections can be computed and applied to the radar returns, thereby presenting image degradation that would otherwise result from such motions. The principles of SAR are described in many references, for instance. The primary function of the TOA Kalman filter in a SAR motion compensation system is to control strapdown navigator attitude errors, and to a less degree, velocity and heading errors. Unlike a classical navigation application, absolute positional accuracy is not important. The motion compensation requirements for SAR imaging are discussed in some detail. This TOA application is particularly appropriate as a vehicle for discussing suboptimal filter design, because the system contains features that can be exploited to allow both deletion and decoupling of error

  16. The LACIE data bases: Design considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westberry, L. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    The implementation of direct access storage devices for LACIE is discussed with emphasis on the storage and retrieval of image data. Topics covered include the definition of the problem, the solution methodology (design decisions), the initial operational structure, and the modifications which were incorporated. Some conclusions and projections of future problems to be solved are also presented.

  17. Section summary: Uncertainty and design considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen Hagen

    2013-01-01

    Well planned sampling designs and robust approaches to estimating uncertainty are critical components of forest monitoring. The importance of uncertainty estimation increases as deforestation and degradation issues become more closely tied to financing incentives for reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the forest sector. Investors like to know risk and risk is tightly...

  18. Some physics considerations for TEPR designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, J.T.; Rome, J.A.; McAlees, D.G.; Attenberger, S.E.

    1975-01-01

    A simplified version of the Oak Ridge Tokamak Transport Code is used to assess the implications of confinement scaling, impurity trapping of neutral beam particles and plasma currents driven by neutral injection. The ORNL, ANL and GAC experimental power reactor reference designs are considered

  19. Service-Learning Instructional Design Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddrell, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the design of "service-learning" experiences to engage college students in the real-world application of course subject matter. Service learning is an educational approach that combines community service, academic coursework, and work-based applied learning. Based on data gathered during a series of recent interviews…

  20. Considerations for Designing Instructional Virtual Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennen, Vanessa Paz; Branch, Robert C.

    Virtual reality is an immersive, interactive medium that manipulates the senses in order provide users with simulated experiences in computer-generated worlds. The visual design of virtual reality is an important issue, but literature has tended to stress the medium's instructional potential rather than setting forth a protocol for designing…

  1. Design principles for precision mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Soemers, Herman

    2011-01-01

    The successful design of mechanisms for products, tools and equipment relies on excellent concepts and properly designed details. Both are covered in this book. Many of the examples presented have been realised in practice and properly evaluated, giving the reader/designer a high level of confidence. Every example comes with the considerations underlying the application and the limitations of the particular idea. This book is based on the work started in the 1960s by W. van der Hoek at Philips in Eindhoven, the Netherlands, and subsequently continued by M.P. Koster, culminating in the Dutch-language book “Constructieprincipes” [Design principles for accurate movement and positioning]. The core of their design approach has been preserved, while theory and examples were updated and the English language was adopted to reach a broad audience within the Netherlands as well as abroad. Herman (H.M.J.R.) Soemers is associated with the University of Twente, Enschede, the Netherlands. He also works as a technolog...

  2. Some Human Factors Considerations for Designing Mixed Reality Interfaces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Milgram, Paul

    2006-01-01

    ...), as well as the case of Augmented Virtuality (AV). In designing human-machine interfaces for mixed reality applications, a number of considerations are discussed which may potentially impact the effectiveness of the design...

  3. Design considerations for tropical forest inventories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Edward McRoberts

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Forests contribute substantially to maintaining the global greenhouse gas balance, primarily because among the five economic sectors identified by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, only the forestry sector has the potential to remove greenhouse gas emissions from the atmosphere. In this context, development of national forest carbon accounting systems, particularly in countries with tropical forests, has emerged as an international priority. Because these systems are often developed as components of or in parallel with national forest inventories, a brief review of statistical issues related to the development of forest ground sampling designs is provided. This overview addresses not only the primary issues of plot configurations and sampling designs, but also to a lesser extent the emerging roles of remote sensing and uncertainty assessment. Basic inventory principles are illustrated for two case studies, the national forest inventory of Brazil with special emphasis on the state of Santa Catarina, and an inventory for Tanzania.

  4. Design considerations for heated wells in gloveboxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frigo, A. A.; Preuss, D. E.

    1999-01-01

    Heated wells in gloveboxes have been used for many years by the Argonne National Laboratory Chemical Technology Division for nuclear-technology, waste-management, chemical-technology, and analytical-chemistry research. These wells allow experiments to be isolated from the main working volume of the glovebox. In addition, wells, when sealed, allow experiments to be conducted under pressurized or vacuum conditions. Until recently, typical maximum operational temperatures were about 500 C. However, more recent research is requiring operational temperatures approaching 900 C. These new requirements pose interesting design challenges that must be resolved. Some problem areas include temperature effects on material properties, maintaining a seal, cooling selected areas, and minimizing stresses. This paper discusses issues related to these design challenges and the ways in which these issues have been resolved

  5. SOME CONSIDERATIONS ON FOREIGN LANGUAGE SYLLABUS DESIGN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norica-Felicia BUCUR

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Studies and articles that focus on describing and classifying foreign language syllabuses are dominated by the product / process dichotomy. Nevertheless, this is not always the case, as there are authors who, apparently, use other criteria to produce their own taxonomy. Thus, this paper attempts to provide a brief chronological outline of the various descriptions found in the syllabus design literature, so that the principles underlying the proposed taxonomies could be identified and critical comparisons could be performed.

  6. Electronic cigarettes: product characterisation and design considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Christopher J; Cheng, James M

    2014-05-01

    To review the available evidence regarding electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) product characterisation and design features in order to understand their potential impact on individual users and on public health. Systematic literature searches in 10 reference databases were conducted through October 2013. A total of 14 articles and documents and 16 patents were included in this analysis. Numerous disposable and reusable e-cigarette product options exist, representing wide variation in product configuration and component functionality. Common e-cigarette components include an aerosol generator, a flow sensor, a battery and a nicotine-containing solution storage area. e-cigarettes currently include many interchangeable parts, enabling users to modify the character of the delivered aerosol and, therefore, the product's 'effectiveness' as a nicotine delivery product. Materials in e-cigarettes may include metals, rubber and ceramics. Some materials may be aerosolised and have adverse health effects. Several studies have described significant performance variability across and within e-cigarette brands. Patent applications include novel product features designed to influence aerosol properties and e-cigarette efficiency at delivering nicotine. Although e-cigarettes share a basic design, engineering variations and user modifications result in differences in nicotine delivery and potential product risks. e-cigarette aerosols may include harmful and potentially harmful constituents. Battery explosions and the risks of exposure to the e-liquid (especially for children) are also concerns. Additional research will enhance the current understanding of basic e-cigarette design and operation, aerosol production and processing, and functionality. A standardised e-cigarette testing regime should be developed to allow product comparisons.

  7. Electronic cigarettes: product characterisation and design considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Christopher J; Cheng, James M

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review the available evidence regarding electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) product characterisation and design features in order to understand their potential impact on individual users and on public health. Methods Systematic literature searches in 10 reference databases were conducted through October 2013. A total of 14 articles and documents and 16 patents were included in this analysis. Results Numerous disposable and reusable e-cigarette product options exist, representing w...

  8. Design considerations for TES and QET sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabrera, B.

    2000-01-01

    We summarize some of the effects that must be taken into account in the design of superconducting Transition Edge Sensors (TES) and Quasiparticle-trap-assisted Electrothermal-feedback Transition-edge-sensors (QET). For the TES these include determining time constants, maintaining voltage bias, avoid electrothermal oscillations, critical current limitations, and saturation. For QET phonon sensors, voltage bias was conceived to allow the simultaneous biasing of parallel TESs with different transition temperatures, and preventing normal-superconducting phase separation

  9. Physics Considerations in the Design of NCSX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neilson, G.H.; Zarnstorff, M.C.; Ku, L.P.; Lazarus, E.A.; Mioduszewski, P.K.; Fenstermacher, M.; Fredrickson, E.; Fu, G.Y.; Grossman, A.; Heitzenroeder, P.J.; Hatcher, R.H.; Hirshman, S.P.; Hudson, S.R.; Johnson, D.W.; Kugel, H.W.; Lyon, J.F.; Majeski, R.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Monticello, D.A.; Nelson, B.E.; Pomphrey, N.; Reiersen, W.T.; Reiman, A.H.; Rutherford, P.H.; Schmidt, J.A.; Spong, D.A.; Strickler, D.J.

    2002-01-01

    Compact stellarators have the potential to make steady-state, disruption-free magnetic fusion systems with beta approximately 5% and relatively low aspect ratio (R/ < 4.5) compared to most drift-optimized stellarators. Magnetic quasi-symmetry can be used to reduce orbit losses. The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) is designed to test compact stellarator physics in a high-beta quasi-axisymmetric configuration and to determine the conditions for high-beta disruption-free operation. It is designed around a reference plasma with low ripple, good magnetic surfaces, and stability to the important ideal instabilities at beta approximately 4%. The device size, available heating power, and pulse lengths provide access to a high-beta target plasma state. The NCSX has magnetic flexibility to explore a wide range of equilibrium conditions and has operational flexibility to achieve a wide range of beta and collisionality values. The design provides space to accommodate plasma-facing components for divertor operation and ports for an extensive array of diagnostics

  10. Advanced Control Considerations for Turbofan Engine Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Joseph W.; Csank, Jeffrey T.; Chicatelli, Amy

    2016-01-01

    This paper covers the application of a model-based engine control (MBEC) methodology featuring a self tuning on-board model for an aircraft turbofan engine simulation. The nonlinear engine model is capable of modeling realistic engine performance, allowing for a verification of the advanced control methodology over a wide range of operating points and life cycle conditions. The on-board model is a piece-wise linear model derived from the nonlinear engine model and updated using an optimal tuner Kalman Filter estimation routine, which enables the on-board model to self-tune to account for engine performance variations. MBEC is used here to show how advanced control architectures can improve efficiency during the design phase of a turbofan engine by reducing conservative operability margins. The operability margins that can be reduced, such as stall margin, can expand the engine design space and offer potential for efficiency improvements. Application of MBEC architecture to a nonlinear engine simulation is shown to reduce the thrust specific fuel consumption by approximately 1% over the baseline design, while maintaining safe operation of the engine across the flight envelope.

  11. Trajectory Design Considerations for Exploration Mission 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawn, Timothy F.; Gutkowski, Jeffrey P.; Batcha, Amelia L.; Williams, Jacob; Pedrotty, Samuel M.

    2018-01-01

    Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1) will be the first mission to send an uncrewed Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) to cislunar space in the fall of 2019. EM-1 was originally conceived as a lunar free-return mission, but was later changed to a Distant Retrograde Orbit (DRO) mission as a precursor to the Asteroid Redirect Mission. To understand the required mission performance (i.e., propellant requirement), a series of trajectory optimization runs was conducted using JSC's Copernicus spacecraft trajectory optimization tool. In order for the runs to be done in a timely manner, it was necessary to employ a parallelization approach on a computing cluster using a new trajectory scan tool written in Python. Details of the scan tool are provided and how it is used to perform the scans and post-process the results. Initially, a scan of daily due east launched EM-1 DRO missions in 2018 was made. Valid mission opportunities are ones that do not exceed the useable propellant available to perform the required burns. The initial scan data showed the propellant and delta-V performance patterns for each launch period. As questions were raised from different subsystems (e.g., power, thermal, communications, flight operations, etc.), the mission parameters or data that were of interest to them were added to the scan output data file. The additional data includes: (1) local launch and landing times in relation to sunrise and sunset, (2) length of eclipse periods during the in-space portion of the mission, (3) Earth line of sight from cislunar space, (4) Deep Space Network field of view looking towards cislunar space, and (5) variation of the downrange distance from Earth entry interface to splashdown. Mission design trades can also be performed based on the information that the additional data shows. For example, if the landing is in darkness, but the recovery operations team desires a landing in daylight, then an analysis is performed to determine how to change the mission design

  12. Design Considerations in Capacitively Coupled Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sang-Heon; Ventzek, Peter; Ranjan, Alok

    2015-11-01

    Microelectronics industry has driven transistor feature size scaling from 10-6 m to 10-9 m during the past 50 years, which is often referred to as Moore's law. It cannot be overstated that today's information technology would not have been so successful without plasma material processing. One of the major plasma sources for the microelectronics fabrication is capacitively coupled plasmas (CCPs). The CCP reactor has been intensively studied and developed for the deposition and etching of different films on the silicon wafer. As the feature size gets to around 10 nm, the requirement for the process uniformity is less than 1-2 nm across the wafer (300 mm). In order to achieve the desired uniformity, the hardware design should be as precise as possible before the fine tuning of process condition is applied to make it even better. In doing this procedure, the computer simulation can save a significant amount of resources such as time and money which are critical in the semiconductor business. In this presentation, we compare plasma properties using a 2-dimensional plasma hydrodynamics model for different kinds of design factors that can affect the plasma uniformity. The parameters studied in this presentation include chamber accessing port, pumping port, focus ring around wafer substrate, and the geometry of electrodes of CCP.

  13. Planning and design considerations in karst terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, J. A.; Greene, R. W.; Ottoson, R. S.; Graham, T. C.

    1988-10-01

    This article discusses the various steps that the authors feel are necessary to the successful progression of an engineered project sited in karst terrain. The procedures require a multidisciplined approach with liaison and cooperation among the various parties to the project. Initially, the prospective owner must have sufficient understanding of the potential engineering problems to incorporate the engineering geologist into the early stages of any planned acquisition. The first step in an investigation should include a review of the available geologic information, aerial photo interpretation, consultation with the State Geological Survey, and a geologic reconnaissance of the prospective site and surrounding area. A go-no-go decision as to purchase can often been made at an early time. Although, in some instances, more study is needed for a particularly intriguing property. The second stage should consider the various planning alternatives that are feasible based upon the limited available information. At this stage planning/purchase decisions can be made as to purchasing options, value of the property, design constraints, and the possible economic penalties that could be associated with the potential site construction. Various planning and construction alternatives should be considered in this phase of the work. The third stage should include a site investigation program of moderate size, consisting of test pits and/or exploratory borings. The borings should be drilled using water as the drilling fluid, with an experienced crew and qualified technical inspection. The authors find the use of geophysical techniques can be extremely misleading unless used in conjunction with exploratory drilling. Successful evaluations using geophysical procedures occur only under ideal conditions. The geotechnical viability of the plan and preliminary design should be investigated in the fourth phase. Additionally, the physical parameters required for the design of structures

  14. Design considerations for parallel graphics libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, Thomas W.

    1994-01-01

    Applications which run on parallel supercomputers are often characterized by massive datasets. Converting these vast collections of numbers to visual form has proven to be a powerful aid to comprehension. For a variety of reasons, it may be desirable to provide this visual feedback at runtime. One way to accomplish this is to exploit the available parallelism to perform graphics operations in place. In order to do this, we need appropriate parallel rendering algorithms and library interfaces. This paper provides a tutorial introduction to some of the issues which arise in designing parallel graphics libraries and their underlying rendering algorithms. The focus is on polygon rendering for distributed memory message-passing systems. We illustrate our discussion with examples from PGL, a parallel graphics library which has been developed on the Intel family of parallel systems.

  15. Cultural considerations when designing entrepreneurial pedagogies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexander, Ian Keith; Hjortsø, Carsten Nico Portefée

    2013-01-01

    principles (teacher dominance/control and reflective learning styles) are at odds with the learner-centred and participative methodologies used in entrepreneurship teaching. Furthermore, cultural variables such as individualism-collectivism, uncertainty avoidance and power distance played a role in a role......We assume that cultural variables influence the effectiveness of entrepreneurship pedagogy and as such there is need for cultural sensitivity in the design and implementation of entrepreneurship teaching progammes. With this in mind, we set out to examine whether the approaches and methods used...... teach entrepreneurship are culturally-based. We systematically searched the extant literature for evidence to verify our assumption. The search was conducted in two phases. In phase one we searched 79 articles to identify the major approaches and methods used in entrepreneurship. Experiential, learner...

  16. Design Considerations for Proposed Fermilab Integrable RCS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldred, Jeffrey [Fermilab; Valishev, Alexander

    2017-03-02

    Integrable optics is an innovation in particle accelerator design that provides strong nonlinear focusing while avoiding parametric resonances. One promising application of integrable optics is to overcome the traditional limits on accelerator intensity imposed by betatron tune-spread and collective instabilities. The efficacy of high-intensity integrable accelerators will be undergo comprehensive testing over the next several years at the Fermilab Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) and the University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER). We propose an integrable Rapid-Cycling Synchrotron (iRCS) as a replacement for the Fermilab Booster to achieve multi-MW beam power for the Fermilab high-energy neutrino program. We provide a overview of the machine parameters and discuss an approach to lattice optimization. Integrable optics requires arcs with integer-pi phase advance followed by drifts with matched beta functions. We provide an example integrable lattice with features of a modern RCS - long dispersion-free drifts, low momentum compaction, superperiodicity, chromaticity correction, separate-function magnets, and bounded beta functions.

  17. Planetary Protection Considerations in EVA System Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppler, Dean B.; Kosmo, Joseph J.

    2011-01-01

    very little expression of these anomalies. hardware from the human-occupied area may limit (although not likely eliminate) external materials in the human habitat. Definition of design-to requirements is critical to understanding technical feasibility and costs. The definition of Planetary Protection needs in relation to EVA mission and system element development cost impacts should be considered and interpreted in terms of Plausible Protection criteria. Since EVA operations will have the most direct physical interaction with the Martian surface, PP needs should be considered in the terms of mitigating hardware and operations impacts and costs.

  18. Digital libraries philosophies, technical design considerations, and example scenarios

    CERN Document Server

    Stern, David

    1999-01-01

    An unparalleled overview of current design considerations for your digital library! Digital Libraries: Philosophies, Technical Design Considerations, and Example Scenarios is a balanced overview of public services, collection development, administration, and systems support, for digital libraries, with advice on adopting the latest technologies that appear on the scene. As a professional in the library and information science field, you will benefit from this special issue that serves as an overview of selected directions, trends, possibilities, limitations, enhancements, design principals, an

  19. Mechanizing Exploratory Game Design

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Adam Marshall

    2012-01-01

    Game design is an art form that deals with inherently interactive artifacts. Game designers craft games (assembled from rule systems and content), but they really seek to manipulate play: the interaction between games and players. When developing new games that are similar to past games, a designer may rely on previous experience with related designs and relatively easy access to players familiar with conventional design choices. When exploratorily venturing into uncharted territory, uncoveri...

  20. Consideration from a PBL perspective designing a virtual workshop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Lillian; Bygholm, Ann

    2006-01-01

    This paper is taking departure in considerations of the pedagogical and learning oriented approaches made in the process from design to evaluation of the virtual workshop; as part of the MVU tutor course. Our focus in this paper is on elaborating and discussing the pedagogical considerations...

  1. Design Considerations for Multi-Channel Picture Communication Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Scheibe, Paul O.

    1983-01-01

    Design of networks intended for communication of digitally-encoded pictures involves considerations different from those used in the design of text or voice communication networks. This paper provides an overview of the elements useful in the design of picture communication networks by relation and contrast with other communication networks. Particular emphasis is given to picture communication systems useful in medical applications.

  2. Conceptual design considerations and neutronics of lithium fall laser fusion target chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, W.R.; Thomson, W.B.

    1978-01-01

    Atomics International and Lawrence Livermore Laboratory are involved in the conceptual design of a laser fusion power plant incorporating the lithium fall target chamber. In this paper we discuss some of the more important design considerations for the target chamber and evaluate its nuclear performance. Sizing and configuration of the fall, hydraulic effects, and mechanical design considerations are addressed. The nuclear aspects examined include tritium breeding, energy deposition, and radiation damage

  3. Conceptual design considerations and neutronics of lithium fall laser target chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, W.R.; Thomson, W.B.

    1978-01-01

    Atomics International and Lawrence Livermore Laboratory are involved in the conceptual design of a laser fusion power plant incorporating the lithium fall target chamber. In this paper we discuss some of the more important design considerations for the target chamber and evaluate its nuclear performance. Sizing and configuration of the fall, hydraulic effects, and mechanical design considerations are addressed. The nuclear aspects examined include tritium breeding, energy deposition, and radiation damage

  4. The Mechanical Design for the LHC Collimators

    CERN Document Server

    Bertarelli, A; Assmann, R W; Chiaveri, Enrico; Kurtyka, T; Mayer, M; Perret, R; Sievers, P

    2004-01-01

    The design of the LHC collimators must comply with the very demanding specifications entailed by the highly energetic beam handled in the LHC: these requirements impose a temperature on the collimating jaws not exceeding 50ºC in steady operations and an unparalleled overall geometrical stability of 25 micro-m on a 1200 mm span. At the same time, the design phase must meet the challenging deadlines required by the general time schedule. To respond to these tough and sometimes conflicting constraints, the chosen design appeals to a mixture of traditional and innovative technologies, largely drawing from LEP collimator experience. The specifications impose a low-Z material for the collimator jaws, directing the design towards such graphite or such novel materials as 3-d Carbon/carbon composites. An accurate mechanical design has allowed to considerably reduce mechanical play and optimize geometrical stability. Finally, all mechanical studies were supported by in-depth thermo-mechanical analysis concerning tempe...

  5. TMX magnets: mechanical design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinkle, R.E.; Harvey, A.R.; Calderon, M.O.; Chargin, A.K.; Chen, F.F.K.; Denhoy, B.S.; Horvath, J.A.; Reed, J.R.; Waugh, A.F.

    1977-01-01

    The Tandem Mirror Experiment (TMX) system, part of the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory magnetic mirror program incorporates in its design various types of coils or magnets. This paper describes the physical construction of each coil within the system as well as the structural design required for their support and installation

  6. Mechanical Design Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Sun Mo

    1969-04-01

    This book contains element of machine and machine design, machine standard, a safety factor, fatigue limit like notch, creep, limits and fits for engineering, design of shaft system machine, shaft coupling and clutch, journal and roller bearing such as needle bearing, flexible roller bearing and miniature ball bearing and sliding bearing. It also deals with brake like band brake, spring such as coil spring, torsion bar spring, ring spring and fly wheel, design of pipe system machine like pipe types, joint pipes, check valve, reductive valve and escape valve.

  7. Mechanical and thermal design of hybrid blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, K.R.

    1978-01-01

    The thermal and mechanical aspects of hybrid reactor blanket design considerations are discussed. This paper is intended as a companion to that of J. D. Lee of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory on the nuclear aspects of hybrid reactor blanket design. The major design characteristics of hybrid reactor blankets are discussed with emphasis on the areas of difference between hybrid reactors and standard fusion or fission reactors. Specific examples are used to illustrate the design tradeoffs and choices that must be made in hybrid reactor design. These examples are drawn from the work on the Mirror Hybrid Reactor

  8. Mechanical design in arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadwick, R E

    1999-12-01

    The most important mechanical property of the artery wall is its non-linear elasticity. Over the last century, this has been well-documented in vessels in many animals, from humans to lobsters. Arteries must be distensible to provide capacitance and pulse-smoothing in the circulation, but they must also be stable to inflation over a range of pressure. These mechanical requirements are met by strain-dependent increases in the elastic modulus of the vascular wall, manifest by a J-shaped stress-strain curve, as typically exhibited by other soft biological tissues. All vertebrates and invertebrates with closed circulatory systems have arteries with this non-linear behaviour, but specific tissue properties vary to give correct function for the physiological pressure range of each species. In all cases, the non-linear elasticity is a product of the parallel arrangement of rubbery and stiff connective tissue elements in the artery wall, and differences in composition and tissue architecture can account for the observed variations in mechanical properties. This phenomenon is most pronounced in large whales, in which very high compliance in the aortic arch and exceptionally low compliance in the descending aorta occur, and is correlated with specific modifications in the arterial structure.

  9. Stability design considerations for mirror support systems in ICF lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tietbohl, G.L.; Sommer, S.C.

    1996-10-01

    Some of the major components of laser systems used for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) are the large aperture mirrors which direct the path of the laser. These mirrors are typically supported by systems which consist of mirror mounts, mirror enclosures, superstructures, and foundations. Stability design considerations for the support systems of large aperture mirrors have been developed based on the experience of designing and evaluating similar systems at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Examples of the systems developed at LLNL include Nova, the Petawatt laser, Beamlet, and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The structural design of support systems of large aperture mirrors has typically been controlled by stability considerations in order for the large laser system to meet its performance requirements for alignment and positioning. This paper will discuss the influence of stability considerations and will provide guidance on the structural design and evaluation of mirror support systems in ICF lasers so that this information can be used on similar systems

  10. Design Considerations. An Interior Architectural Design Approach to Interiors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, William C.

    1971-01-01

    The State University Construction Fund, utilizing the nation's top professional talents, must design by contract, within fixed budgets and strict time schedules, quality architecture for 32 campuses in New York State. (Author)

  11. Design considerations: gas turbines for electric power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, D.M.

    1979-01-01

    The gas turbine represents one of the most sophisticated designs from the standpoint of time dependent deformation behavior. The large size of the equipment, which limits the amount of full scale testing, together with the demanding performance requirements and high level of reliability desired places a high degree of emphasis on the high temperature deformation design process. As an example of the various design considerations used in this equipment, a brief overview of the turbine will be given, highlighting the materials, stress, temperatures, and load history experienced by the major components. Particular attention will then be focused on the vane segment design considerations. This component is not only structurally complicated, but experiences steep temperature gradients imposed by internal cooling and large temperature transients during cyclic duty operation which have to be addressed in the design procedure. Based on this discussion the limitations of the current design procedures will be highlighted and the areas requiring additional research inputs will be discussed

  12. Robust Design of Sounds in Mechanical Mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boegedal Jensen, Annemette; Munch, Natasja; Howard, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    mechanism consisting of a toothed rack and a click arm. First several geometries of the teeth and the click arm’s head were investigated to identify the most robust and repeatable design. It was found that a flat surface in the valleys between the teeth is very beneficial in relation to repeatability...

  13. Shape Synthesis in Mechanical Design

    OpenAIRE

    C. P. Teng; S. Bai; J. Angeles

    2007-01-01

    The shaping of structural elements in the area of mechanical design is a recurrent problem. The mechanical designer, as a rule, chooses what is believed to be the “simplest” shapes, such as the geometric primitives: lines, circles and, occasionally, conics. The use of higher-order curves is usually not even considered, not to speak of other curves than polynomials. However, the simplest geometric shapes are not necessarily the most suitable when the designed element must withstand loads that ...

  14. Mechanical design of machine components

    CERN Document Server

    Ugural, Ansel C

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical Design of Machine Components, Second Edition strikes a balance between theory and application, and prepares students for more advanced study or professional practice. It outlines the basic concepts in the design and analysis of machine elements using traditional methods, based on the principles of mechanics of materials. The text combines the theory needed to gain insight into mechanics with numerical methods in design. It presents real-world engineering applications, and reveals the link between basic mechanics and the specific design of machine components and machines. Divided into three parts, this revised text presents basic background topics, deals with failure prevention in a variety of machine elements and covers applications in design of machine components as well as entire machines. Optional sections treating special and advanced topics are also included.Key Features of the Second Edition:Incorporates material that has been completely updated with new chapters, problems, practical examples...

  15. Analyses for designing objects in mechanical design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Norihiro; Miyamura, Hiroko N.; Kawakami, Yoshiaki; Kawamura, Takuma

    2015-01-01

    Defining factors to induce the damage that can be assumed in the mechanical structures, it is a loaded work to analyze a damage possibility point derived by the assumption phenomenon that can occur is, but it is the important designing process. Taking factors caused by the earthquake as an example, and simulating the phenomenon that can be assumed, the computational result was analyzed with information visualization. A damage possibility point by analyzing the result mathematically. The illustration of analytical results may give points to designers as means for a designer to recognize a damage possibility point from the sensitivity of the designer. (author)

  16. Safety considerations in the design of the fusion engineering device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    Safety considerations play a significant role in the design of a near-term Fusion Engineering Device (FED). For the safety of the general public and the plant workers, the radiation environment caused by the reacting plasma and the potential release of tritium fuel are the dominant considerations. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) regulations and guidelines for radiation protection have been reviewed and are being applied to the device design. Direct radiation protection is provided by the device shield and the reactor building walls. Radiation from the activated device components and the tritium fuel is to be controlled with shielding, contamination control, and ventilation. The potential release of tritium from the plant has influenced the selection of reactor building and plant designs and specifications. The safety of the plant workers is affected primarily by the radiation from the activated device components and from plasma chamber debris. The highly activated device components make it necessary to design many of the maintenance activities in the reactor building for totally remote operation. The hot cell facility has evolved as a totally remote maintenance facility due to the high radiation levels of the device components. Safety considerations have had substantial impacts on the design of FED. Several examples of safety-related design impacts are discussed in the paper. Feasible solutions have been identified for all outstanding safety-related items, and additional optimization of these solutions is anticipated in future design studies

  17. Design consideration on severe accident for future LWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omoto, A.

    1998-01-01

    Utilities' Severe Accident Management strategies, selected based on Individual Plant Examination, are in the process of implementation for each operating plant. Activities for the next generation LWR design are going on by Utilities, NSSS vendors and Research Institutes. The proposed new designs vary from evolutionary design to revolutionary design such as the supercritical LWR. Discussion on the consideration of Severe Accident in the design of next generation LWR is being held to establish the industry's self-regulatory document on containment design and its performance, which ABWR-IER (Improved Evolutionary Reactor) on the part of BWR and Evolutionary APWR and New PWR21 on the part of PWR are expected to comply. Conceptual design study for ABWR-IER will illustrate an example of design approach for the prevention and mitigation of Severe Accident and its impact on capital cost

  18. Parameters and design considerations for tomographic transmission scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pentlow, K.S.; Beattie, J.W.; Laughlin, J.S.

    1976-01-01

    The design of transverse axial transmission scanners for reconstruction tomography involves many interrelated parameters and conflicting requirements. We have investigated some of those parameters and their interactions and, where appropriate, attempted to optimize them. It is convenient to group the considerations under four headings: (1) Geometrical factors (basic configurations, rectilinear and fan geometry, moving detectors or static arrays, spatial response variations and field uniformity, and collimation); (2) Radiation energy and sources (Considerations here include transmission versus sensitivity, detector efficiency, collimator penetration, scattered radiation, patient dose, monochromatic versus polychromatic radiation and X-ray tubes versus radionuclide sources); (3) Detection systems (types of detector, detection modes and the rejection of scatter); and (4) Reconstruction mathematics and quantum noise. As a result of such considerations we have proposed a particular design which should have advantages in certain applications

  19. Spectrum analysis on quality requirements consideration in software design documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiya, Haruhiko; Umemura, Masahiro; Ogata, Shinpei; Kaijiri, Kenji

    2013-12-01

    Software quality requirements defined in the requirements analysis stage should be implemented in the final products, such as source codes and system deployment. To guarantee this meta-requirement, quality requirements should be considered in the intermediate stages, such as the design stage or the architectural definition stage. We propose a novel method for checking whether quality requirements are considered in the design stage. In this method, a technique called "spectrum analysis for quality requirements" is applied not only to requirements specifications but also to design documents. The technique enables us to derive the spectrum of a document, and quality requirements considerations in the document are numerically represented in the spectrum. We can thus objectively identify whether the considerations of quality requirements in a requirements document are adapted to its design document. To validate the method, we applied it to commercial software systems with the help of a supporting tool, and we confirmed that the method worked well.

  20. Mainz/PSI φ-factory design considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streun, A.

    1991-01-01

    Design considerations for a φ-factory with a Luminosity of the order of 10 33 cm -2 s -1 lead to the concept of a multi-bunch round beam double storage ring with superconducting solenoids for micro-beta focusing and beam rotation. Simulations of the beam-beam-interaction indicate, that significantly higher beam-beam-parameters may become possible with round beams. A rough draft design of a round beam φ-factory is presented. (orig.)

  1. Hydraulic design considerations for a multi-tube sodium economizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassberger, J.A.; McConnell, P.M.; Olson, W.H.

    1975-01-01

    Operating experience gained from tests shows that flow distribution effects can severely affect the thermal performance of high effectiveness, low pressure drop sodium heat exchangers. It has been shown that design efforts for such devices must include proper consideration of potential causes of flow maldistribution within the tube bundle. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that fairly simple design features can be capable of eliminating detrimental flow fields in the tube bundle

  2. Lunar Module Electrical Power System Design Considerations and Failure Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interbartolo, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the design and redesign considerations of the Apollo lunar module electrical power system. Included in the work are graphics showing the lunar module power system. It describes the in-flight failures, and the lessons learned from these failures.

  3. Research design considerations for chronic pain prevention clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gewandter, Jennifer S; Dworkin, Robert H; Turk, Dennis C

    2015-01-01

    Although certain risk factors can identify individuals who are most likely to develop chronic pain, few interventions to prevent chronic pain have been identified. To facilitate the identification of preventive interventions, an IMMPACT meeting was convened to discuss research design considerations...

  4. Influence of system considerations on waste form design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, A.A.; Matthews, S.C.; Peterson, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    The design of waste forms is constrained by waste management system considerations imposed during generation, treatment, packaging, transportation, storage, and isolation. In the isolation phase, the waste form provides one of the barriers to release in a multibarrier system that includes the natural geologic and hydrologic barriers as well as other engineered barriers

  5. The Design Consideration for Game-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chaoyun; Lee, Yuan-Zone; Chou, Wen-Shou

    2010-01-01

    The integration of game playing with online education has recently become one of the most discussed issues in the e-learning field for its potentially positive impact on the development of related industries and on the social lives of young people. In this article, the authors propose a set of design considerations to assist game-based learning…

  6. Design considerations for CRBRP heat transport system piping operating at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollono, L.P.; Mello, R.M.

    1979-01-01

    The heat transport system sodium piping for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) within the reactor containment building must withstand high temperatures for long periods of time. Each phase of the mechanical design process of the piping system is influenced by elevated temperature considerations which include material thermal creep effects, ratchetting caused by rapid temperature transients and stress relaxation, and material degradation effects. The structural design philosophy taken to design the CRBRP piping operating in a high temperature environment is described. The resulting design of the heat transport system piping is presented along with a discussion of special features that resulted from the elevated temperature considerations

  7. Scientific, statistical, practical, and regulatory considerations in design space development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debevec, Veronika; Srčič, Stanko; Horvat, Matej

    2018-03-01

    The quality by design (QbD) paradigm guides the pharmaceutical industry towards improved understanding of products and processes, and at the same time facilitates a high degree of manufacturing and regulatory flexibility throughout the establishment of the design space. This review article presents scientific, statistical and regulatory considerations in design space development. All key development milestones, starting with planning, selection of factors, experimental execution, data analysis, model development and assessment, verification, and validation, and ending with design space submission, are presented and discussed. The focus is especially on frequently ignored topics, like management of factors and CQAs that will not be included in experimental design, evaluation of risk of failure on design space edges, or modeling scale-up strategy. Moreover, development of a design space that is independent of manufacturing scale is proposed as the preferred approach.

  8. Mechanical Design Handbook for Elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlow, M.; Zorzi, E.

    1986-01-01

    Mechanical Design Handbook for Elastomers reviews state of art in elastomer-damper technology with particular emphasis on applications of highspeed rotor dampers. Self-contained reference but includes some theoretical discussion to help reader understand how and why dampers used for rotating machines. Handbook presents step-by-step procedure for design of elastomer dampers and detailed examples of actual elastomer damper applications.

  9. Design considerations for energy efficient, resilient, multi-layer networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagertun, Anna Manolova; Hansen, Line Pyndt; Ruepp, Sarah Renée

    2016-01-01

    measures. In this complex problem, considerations such as client traffic granularity, applied grooming policies and multi-layer resiliency add even more complexity. A commercially available network planning tool is used to investigate the interplay between different methods for resilient capacity planning......This work investigates different network design considerations with respect to energy-efficiency, under green-field resilient multi-layer network deployment. The problem of energy efficient, reliable multi-layer network design is known to result in different trade-offs between key performance....... Switching off low-utilized transport links has been investigated via a pro-active re-routing applied during the network planning. Our analysis shows that design factors such as the applied survivability strategy and the applied planning method have higher impact on the key performance indicators compared...

  10. Thermostructural and mechanical aspects of the TFTR plasma limiter design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Condolff, R.; Fixler, S.

    1977-01-01

    This paper presents the preliminary mechanical and thermostructural aspects of the TFTR (TOKAMAK Fusion Test Reactor) plasma limiter design. The evolution of the limiter design is traced through the various stages from conceptual design to the present state. Results of parametric limiter blade studies are presented. Design criteria, requirements, design loads (mechanical and thermal), material considerations, and remote handling problems are described. The design approach used to achieve a satisfactory plasma limiter and blade is discussed

  11. Thermostructural and mechanical aspects of the TFTR plasma limiter design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Condolff, R.; Fixler, S.

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents the preliminary mechanical and thermostructural aspects of the TFTR (TOKAMAK Fusion Test Reactor) plasma limiter design. The evolution of the limiter design is traced through the various stages from conceptual design to the present state. Results of parametric limiter blade studies are presented. Design criteria, requirements, design loads (mechanical and thermal), material considerations, and remote handling problems are described. The design approach used to achieve a satisfactory plasma limiter and blade is discussed

  12. Design Considerations for a Flexible Multigrid Preconditioning Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérémie Gaidamour

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available MueLu is a library within the Trilinos software project [An overview of Trilinos, Technical Report SAND2003-2927, Sandia National Laboratories, 2003] and provides a framework for parallel multigrid preconditioning methods for large sparse linear systems. While providing efficient implementations of modern multigrid methods based on smoothed aggregation and energy minimization concepts, MueLu is designed to be customized and extended. This article gives an overview of design considerations for the MueLu package: user interfaces, internal design, data management, usage of modern software constructs, leveraging Trilinos capabilities, linear algebra operations and advanced application.

  13. Design for Additive Manufacturing: Trends, opportunities, considerations, and constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thompson, Mary Kathryn; Moroni, Giovanni; Vaneker, Tom

    2016-01-01

    The past few decades have seen substantial growth in Additive Manufacturing (AM) technologies. However, this growth has mainly been process-driven. The evolution of engineering design to take advantage of the possibilities afforded by AM and to manage the constraints associated with the technology...... has lagged behind. This paper presents the major opportunities, constraints, and economic considerations for Design for Additive Manufacturing. It explores issues related to design and redesign for direct and indirect AM production. It also highlights key industrial applications, outlines future...

  14. Design for Additive Manufacturing: Trends, opportunities, considerations, and constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thompson, Mary Kathryn; Moroni, Giovanni; Vaneker, Tom

    2016-01-01

    has lagged behind. This paper presents the major opportunities, constraints, and economic considerations for Design for Additive Manufacturing. It explores issues related to design and redesign for direct and indirect AM production. It also highlights key industrial applications, outlines future......The past few decades have seen substantial growth in Additive Manufacturing (AM) technologies. However, this growth has mainly been process-driven. The evolution of engineering design to take advantage of the possibilities afforded by AM and to manage the constraints associated with the technology...

  15. Design Considerations of Permanent Magnet Transverse Flux Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Kaiyuan; Rasmussen, Peter Omand; Ritchie, Ewen

    2011-01-01

    electrical machines. This paper addresses two important design considerations for PMTFM—the influence of permanent magnet leakage flux, which plays an important role in the determination of machine output torque, and the leakage inductance. A new simple method to provide a quick estimation of the armature......Permanent magnet transverse flux machine (PMTFM) is well known for its high torque density and is interested in various direct-drive applications. Due to its complicated 3-D flux components, design and design optimization of a PMTFM is more difficult and time consuming than for radial flux...

  16. Shape Synthesis in Mechanical Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. P. Teng

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The shaping of structural elements in the area of mechanical design is a recurrent problem. The mechanical designer, as a rule, chooses what is believed to be the “simplest” shapes, such as the geometric primitives: lines, circles and, occasionally, conics. The use of higher-order curves is usually not even considered, not to speak of other curves than polynomials. However, the simplest geometric shapes are not necessarily the most suitable when the designed element must withstand loads that can lead to failure-prone stress concentrations. Indeed, as mechanical designers have known for a while, stress concentrations occur, first and foremost, by virtue of either dramatic changes in curvature or extremely high values thereof. As an alternative, we propose here the use of smooth curves that can be simply generated using standard concepts such as non-parametric cubic splines. These curves can be readily used to produce either extruded surfaces or surfaces of revolution. 

  17. Mechanical design of electric motors

    CERN Document Server

    Tong, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Rapid increases in energy consumption and emphasis on environmental protection have posed challenges for the motor industry, as has the design and manufacture of highly efficient, reliable, cost-effective, energy-saving, quiet, precisely controlled, and long-lasting electric motors.Suitable for motor designers, engineers, and manufacturers, as well as maintenance personnel, undergraduate and graduate students, and academic researchers, Mechanical Design of Electric Motors provides in-depth knowledge of state-of-the-art design methods and developments of electric motors. From motor classificati

  18. Design considerations and operational performance of Anaerobic Digester: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzaffar Ahmad Mir

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to the decline in fossil fuel reservoirs, the researchers emphasized more on the production of biogas from organic waste. Producing the renewable energy from biodegradable waste helps to overcome the energy crisis and solid waste management, done by anaerobic digestion. Anaerobic digestion is controlled breakdown of organic matter into methane gas (60%, carbon dioxide (40%, trace components along with digested used as soil conditioner. However there is vast dearth of literature regarding the design considerations. The batch digestion system yields a cost-effective and economically viable means for conversion of the food waste to useful energy. It is therefore recommended that such process can be increasingly employed in order to get and simultaneously protect the environment .This paper aims to draw key analysis and concern about the design considerations, analysis of gas production, substrates and inoculums utilization, uses and impacts of biogas.

  19. Designing Epigenome Editors: Considerations of Biochemical and Locus Specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Dilara; Keung, Albert J

    2018-01-01

    The advent of locus-specific protein recruitment technologies has enabled a new class of studies in chromatin biology. Epigenome editors enable biochemical modifications of chromatin at almost any specific endogenous locus. Their locus specificity unlocks unique information including the functional roles of distinct modifications at specific genomic loci. Given the growing interest in using these tools for biological and translational studies, there are many specific design considerations depending on the scientific question or clinical need. Here we present and discuss important design considerations and challenges regarding the biochemical and locus specificities of epigenome editors. These include how to account for the complex biochemical diversity of chromatin; control for potential interdependency of epigenome editors and their resultant modifications; avoid sequestration effects; quantify the locus specificity of epigenome editors; and improve locus specificity by considering concentration, affinity, avidity, and sequestration effects.

  20. Mechanical design of SERT 2 thruster system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavesky, R. J.; Hurst, E. B.

    1972-01-01

    The mechanical design of the mercury bombardment thruster that was tested on SERT is described. The report shows how the structural, thermal, electrical, material compatibility, and neutral mercury coating considerations affected the design and integration of the subsystems and components. The SERT 2 spacecraft with two thrusters was launched on February 3, 1970. One thruster operated for 3782 hours and the other for 2011 hours. A high voltage short resulting from buildup of loose eroded material was believed to be the cause of failure.

  1. Design of compliant mechanisms with selective compliance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasse, Alexander; Campanile, Lucio Flavio

    2009-01-01

    Conventional mechanisms provide a defined mobility, which expresses the number of degrees of freedom of the mechanism. This allows the system to be driven by a low number of control outputs. This property is virtually retained in the case of compliant mechanisms with lumped compliance, which are obtained by replacing the conventional hinges by solid-state ones. Compliant mechanisms with distributed compliance have, in general, an infinite number of degrees of freedom and therefore cannot guarantee defined kinematics. In this paper the concept of compliant mechanisms with selective compliance is introduced. This special class of compliant mechanisms combines the advantages of distributed compliance with the easy controllability of systems with defined kinematics. The task is accomplished by introducing a new design criterion based on a modal formulation. After this design criterion has been implemented in an optimization formulation for a formal optimization procedure, mechanisms are obtained in which a freely chosen deformation pattern is associated with a low deformation energy while other deformation patterns are considerably stiffer. Besides the description of the modal design criterion and the associated objective function, the sensitivity analysis of the objective function is presented and an application example is shown

  2. Design considerations for incineration of transuranic-contaminated solid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory has established a development program to evaluate alternate production-level (100-200 lb/hr throughput) volume reduction processes for transuranic-contaminated solid waste. The first process selected for installation and study is based on controlled-air incineration. Design considerations leading to selection of feed preparation, incineration, residue removal, and off-gas cleanup components and their respective radioactive containment provisions will be presented

  3. Design Considerations of a Novel Two-Beam Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luginsland, John William

    This thesis reports the design study of a new type of charged particle accelerator called the Twobetron. The accelerator consists of two beams of electrons traveling through a series of pillbox cavities. The power of a high current annular beam excites an electromagnetic mode in the cavities, which, in turn, drives a low current on-axis pencil beam to high energy. We focus on the design considerations that would make use of existing pulsed power systems, for a proof-of-principle experiment. Potential applications of this new device include radiotherapy, materials processing, and high energy accelerators. The first phase of the research involves analytic description of the accelerating process. This reveals the problem of phase slippage. Derbenev's proposed cure of beam radius modulation is analyzed. Further studies include the effect of initial phase and secondary beam loading. Scaling laws to characterize the Twobetron's performance are derived. Computer simulation is performed to produce a self-consistent analysis of the dynamics of the space charge and its interaction with the accelerator structure. Particle -in-cell simulations answer several questions concerning beam stability, cavity modes, and the nature of the structure. Specifically, current modulation on the primary beam is preserved in the simulations. However, these simulations also revealed that mode competition and significant cavity coupling are serious issues that need to be addressed. Also considered is non-axisymmetric instability on the driver beam of the Twobetron, in particular, the beam breakup instability (BBU), which is known to pose a serious threat to linear accelerators in general. We extend the classical analysis of BBU to annular beams. The effect of higher order non-axisymmetric modes is also examined. It is shown that annular beams are more stable than pencil beams to BBU in general. Our analysis also reveals that the rf magnetic field is more important than the rf electric field in

  4. Sample design considerations of indoor air exposure surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, B.G.; Mage, D.T.; Immerman, F.W.

    1988-01-01

    Concern about the potential for indoor air pollution has prompted recent surveys of radon and NO 2 concentrations in homes and personal exposure studies of volatile organics, carbon monoxide and pesticides, to name a few. The statistical problems in designing sample surveys that measure the physical environment are diverse and more complicated than those encountered in traditional surveys of human attitudes and attributes. This paper addresses issues encountered when designing indoor air quality (IAQ) studies. General statistical concepts related to target population definition, frame creation, and sample selection for area household surveys and telephone surveys are presented. The implications of different measurement approaches are discussed, and response rate considerations are described

  5. Design considerations for a large anti s FRC facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, A.L.; Crawford, E.A.; Milroy, R.D.; Slough, J.T.; Steinhauer, L.C.

    1986-01-01

    The number of internal gyroradii between the field null and the separatrix of field-reversed-configurations (FRC), has been identified as a key parameter governing both stability and transport. Present experiments have anti s in the range of 2, while values of about 30 are thought to be necessary in a reactor. It is thus desirable to conduct experiments in some intermediate range. A value of 10 has been chosen as a reasonable goal for a next experiment. In this paper some of the design considerations and cost optimization procedures used to pick a point design for an anti s = 10 facility are discussed

  6. Seismic design considerations for nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soni, R.S.; Kushwaha, H.S.; Venkat Raj, V.

    2001-01-01

    During the last few decades, there have been considerable advances in the field of a seismic design of nuclear structures and components housed inside a Nuclear power Plant (NPP). The seismic design and qualification of theses systems and components are carried out through the use of well proven and established theoretical as well as experimental means. Many of the related research works pertaining to these methods are available in the published literature, codes, guides etc. Contrary to this, there is very little information available with regards to the seismic design aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle facilities. This is probably on account of the little importance attached to these facilities from the point of view of seismic loading. In reality, some of these facilities handle a large inventory of radioactive materials and, therefore, these facilities must survive during a seismic event without giving rise to any sort of undue radiological risk to the plant personnel and the public at large. Presented herein in this paper are the seismic design considerations which are adopted for the design of nuclear fuel cycle facilities in India. (author)

  7. Focusing the Sun: State Considerations for Designing Community Solar Policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, Jeffrey J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Shah, Monisha R [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-01-31

    This report summarizes outcomes from the National Community Solar Partnership State Best Practices working group by identifying key differences in state policies that enable community solar and illustrating how various policy design approaches may impact the market. For the latter question, it is too early to quantify a relationship between policy design and market impacts, because most state programs have not been fully implemented. So, the authors conducted interviews with 19 subject matter experts, including project developers, regulators, and utilities to better understand how various policy design approaches may impact community solar markets. These perspectives, along with those gleaned from the working group and relevant literature were synthesized to identify key considerations for policymakers designing community solar programs. Though state community solar policies vary in numerous ways, the report focuses on the following critical elements: program cap, project size cap, subscriber location requirements, subscriber eligibility requirements, low- and moderate-income stipulations, and subscriber compensation.

  8. Air quality considerations for stormwater green street design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaneyfelt, Kathryn M.; Anderson, Andrew R.; Kumar, Prashant; Hunt, William F.

    2017-01-01

    Green streets are increasingly being used as a stormwater management strategy to mitigate stormwater runoff at its source while providing other environmental and societal benefits, including connecting pedestrians to the street. Simultaneously, human exposure to particulate matter from urban transportation is of major concern worldwide due to the proximity of pedestrians, drivers, and cyclists to the emission sources. Vegetation used for stormwater treatment can help designers limit the exposure of people to air pollutants. This goal can be achieved through the deliberate placement of green streets, along with strategic planting schemes that maximize pollutant dispersion. This communication presents general design considerations for green streets that combine stormwater management and air quality goals. There is currently limited guidance on designing green streets for air quality considerations; this is the first communication to offer suggestions and advice for the design of green stormwater streets in regards to their effects on air quality. Street characteristics including (1) the width to height ratio of the street to the buildings, (2) the type of trees and their location, and (3) any prevailing winds can have an impact on pollutant concentrations within the street and along sidewalks. Vegetation within stormwater control measures has the ability to reduce particulate matter concentrations; however, it must be carefully selected and placed within the green street to promote the dispersion of air flow. - Highlights: • Green streets can be used for both stormwater and air quality management. • Design considerations must be made to minimize human exposure to air pollutants. • Urban vegetation can improve air quality with careful selection and placement.

  9. IVVS probe mechanical concept design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.rossi@enea.it; Neri, Carlo; De Collibus, Mario Ferri; Mugnaini, Giampiero; Pollastrone, Fabio; Crescenzi, Fabio

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • ENEA designed, developed and tested a laser based In Vessel Viewing System (IVVS). • IVVS mechanical design has been revised from 2011 to 2013 to meet ITER requirements. • Main improvements are piezoceramic actuators and a step focus system. • Successful qualification activities validated the concept design for ITER environment. - Abstract: ENEA has been deeply involved in the design, development and testing of a laser based In Vessel Viewing System (IVVS) required for the inspection of ITER plasma-facing components. The IVVS probe shall be deployed into the vacuum vessel, providing high resolution images and metrology measurements to detect damages and possible erosion. ENEA already designed and manufactured an IVVS probe prototype based on a rad-hard concept and driven by commercial micro-step motors, which demonstrated satisfying viewing and metrology performances at room conditions. The probe sends a laser beam through a reflective rotating prism. By rotating the axes of the prism, the probe can scan all the environment points except those present in a shadow cone and the backscattered light signal is then processed to measure the intensity level (viewing) and the distance from the probe (metrology). During the last years, in order to meet all the ITER environmental conditions, such as high vacuum, gamma radiation lifetime dose up to 5 MGy, cumulative neutron fluence of about 2.3 × 10{sup 17} n/cm{sup 2}, temperature of 120 °C and magnetic field of 8 T, the probe mechanical design was significantly revised introducing a new actuating system based on piezo-ceramic actuators and improved with a new step focus system. The optical and mechanical schemes have been then modified and refined to meet also the geometrical constraints. The paper describes the mechanical concept design solutions adopted in order to fulfill IVVS probe functional performance requirements considering ITER working environment and geometrical constraints.

  10. Air quality considerations for stormwater green street design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaneyfelt, Kathryn M; Anderson, Andrew R; Kumar, Prashant; Hunt, William F

    2017-12-01

    Green streets are increasingly being used as a stormwater management strategy to mitigate stormwater runoff at its source while providing other environmental and societal benefits, including connecting pedestrians to the street. Simultaneously, human exposure to particulate matter from urban transportation is of major concern worldwide due to the proximity of pedestrians, drivers, and cyclists to the emission sources. Vegetation used for stormwater treatment can help designers limit the exposure of people to air pollutants. This goal can be achieved through the deliberate placement of green streets, along with strategic planting schemes that maximize pollutant dispersion. This communication presents general design considerations for green streets that combine stormwater management and air quality goals. There is currently limited guidance on designing green streets for air quality considerations; this is the first communication to offer suggestions and advice for the design of green stormwater streets in regards to their effects on air quality. Street characteristics including (1) the width to height ratio of the street to the buildings, (2) the type of trees and their location, and (3) any prevailing winds can have an impact on pollutant concentrations within the street and along sidewalks. Vegetation within stormwater control measures has the ability to reduce particulate matter concentrations; however, it must be carefully selected and placed within the green street to promote the dispersion of air flow. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Design considerations for the commercial production of wood acrylics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witt, A.E.; Bosco, L.R.

    1978-01-01

    The major application of wood acrylics is for flooring, more specifically in high traffic area. The most important property is its abrasion resistance. As for the decisions in facility design, the following considerations must be made: irradiation or heat-catalyst to polymerize, machine irradiation or isotope irradiation, and wet or dry irradiation. Then, processing considerations are made on wood type, monomer selection, dye selection, fire retardant, dose conditions and crosslinker usage. In ''PermaGrain'' production, for example, the facility has the yearly production capacity of over 4,000,000 kilograms of wood acrylic. The starting wood form is small slats or fingers. After pressure cycle, the impregnant wet wood is lowered into an irradiation pool and the product canister passes around a cobalt 60 source. After irradiation, the product is taken out of the pool and allowed to cool. Then, final sizing and finishing are carried out. (Mori, K.)

  12. STAR PIXEL detector mechanical design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieman, H H; Anderssen, E; Greiner, L; Matis, H S; Ritter, H G; Sun, X; Szelezniak, M [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)], E-mail: hhwieman@lbl.gov

    2009-05-15

    A high resolution pixel detector is being designed for the STAR [1] experiment at RHIC. This device will use MAPS as the detector element and will have a pointing accuracy of {approx}25 microns. We will be reporting on the mechanical design required to support this resolution. The radiation length of the first layer ({approx}0.3% X{sub 0}) and its distance from the interaction point (2.5 cm) determines the resolution. The design makes use of air cooling and thin carbon composite structures to limit the radiation length. The mechanics are being developed to achieve spatial calibrations and stability to 20 microns and to permit rapid detector replacement in event of radiation damage or other potential failures from operation near the beam.

  13. Seismic considerations in the design of atomic power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arya, A.S.; Chandrasekaran, A.R.; Thakkar, S.K.

    1975-01-01

    A seismic design is one of the most important factors for the safety of nuclear power plants constructed in seismic areas. The various considerations in the design of atomic power plant structures and components to achieve high degree (near absolute) of safety during future probable earthquakes is described as follows: (a) determination of design earthquake parameters for SSE and OBE (b) fixing time history accelerograms and acceleration response spectra (c) mathematical modelling of the reactor building considering soil-structure interaction (d) deciding allowable stresses, damping factors and serviceability limits like drift, displacements and crack widths (e) tests for determining stiffness and damping characteristics of components in-situ before commissioning of plant. The main questions that arise under various items requiring further research investigations or development work are pointed out for discussion. (author)

  14. DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS UPON PRODUCT END-OF-LIFE OPTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BARSAN Lucian

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents some considerations about the necessity of evaluating the environmental impact of a product during its entire life. The present situation (economic, social and ecologic imposes solutions to reduce this impact as a result of an analysis performed during all stages of the life cycle. This paper focuses on design solutions with consequences in the last stage, the end-of-life. Reusing products, with, or without remanufacturing and recycling the materials from products that cannot be reused represent some options analysed in this paper. The end-of-life options should be known even from the beginning of the design process and should be included as design objectives or, at least as constrictions. Considering them as human needs would naturally include them in the requirements list.

  15. Design considerations for a servo optical projection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadalsky, Michael; Allen, Daniel; Bien, Joseph

    1987-01-01

    The present servooptical projection system (SOPS) furnishes 'out-the-window' scenery for a pilot-training flight simulator; attention is given to the parametric tradeoffs made in the SOPS' optical design, as well as to its mechanical packaging and the servonetwork performance of the unit as integrated into a research/training helicopter flight simulator. The final SOPS configuration is a function of scan head design, assembly modularity, image deterioration method, and focal lengths and relative apertures.

  16. Some preliminary design considerations for the ANS [Advanced Neutron Source] reactor cold source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, D.L.

    1988-01-01

    Two areas concerned with the design of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) cold source have been investigated by simple one-dimensional calculations. The gain factors computed for a possible liquid nitrogen-15 cold source moderator are considerably below those computed for the much colder liquid deuterium moderator, as is reasonable considering the difference in moderator temperature. Nevertheless, nitrogen-15 does represent a viable option should safety related issues prohibit the use of deuterium as a moderating material. The slab geometry calculations have indicated that reflection of neutrons may be the dominant moderating mechanism and should be a consideration in the design of the cold source. 9 refs., 2 figs

  17. Design and application consideration of high temperature superconducting current leads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    As a potential major source of heat leak and the resultant cryogen boiloff, cryogenic current leads can significantly affect the refrigeration power requirement of cryogenic power equipment. Reduction of the heat leak associated with current leads can therefore contribute to the development and application of this equipment. Recent studies and tests have demonstrated that, due to their superconducting and low thermal conductivity properties, ceramic high temperature superconductor (HTSC) can be employed in current leads to significantly reduce the heat leak. However, realization of this benefit requires special design considerations pertaining to the properties and the fabrication technology of the relatively new ceramic superconductor materials. Since processing and fabrication technology are continuously being developed in the laboratories, data on material properties unrelated to critical states are quite limited. Therefore, design analysis and experiments have to be conducted in tandem to achieve a successful development. Due to the rather unique combination of superconducting and thermal conductivities which are orders of magnitude lower than copper, ceramic superconductors allow expansion of the operating scenarios of current leads. In addition to the conventional vapor-cooled lead type application, low heat leak conduction-cooled type current leads may be practical and are being developed. Furthermore, a current lead with an intermediate heat leak intercept has been successfully demonstrated in a multiple current lead assembly employing HTSC. These design and application considerations of high temperature superconducting current leads are addressed here

  18. Transistor design considerations for low-noise preamplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fair, R.B.

    1976-01-01

    A review is presented of design considerations for GaAs Schottky-barrier FETs and other types of transistors in low-noise amplifiers for capacitive sources which are used in nuclear radiation detectors and high speed fiber-optic communication systems. Ultimate limits on performance are evaluated in terms of the g/sub m//C/sub i/ ratio and the gate leakage current to minimize the noise sources. Si bipolar transistors and the future prospects of GaAs, Si and InAs MISFETs are discussed, and performance is compared to FETs currently being used in low-noise preamplifiers

  19. Practical considerations in the design and operation of superconducting structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwettman, H.A.

    1975-01-01

    During the past few years, considerable experience has been gained in the operation of prototype superconducting accelerators under beam line conditions. As a result of this experience, important aspects of structure design and important questions related to the long term operation of superconducting structures have been brought into sharper focus. For applications where low power loss and high duty factor, or exceptional beam quality and stable operation, are essential properties, and where modest energy gradients can be tolerated, superconducting structures are distinctly superior to conventional room temperature structures. (auth)

  20. Design considerations for high-current superconducting ion linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delayen, J.R.; Bohn, C.L.; Micklich, B.J.; Roche, C.T.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1993-01-01

    Superconducting linacs may be a viable option for high-current applications such as fusion materials irradiation testing, spallation neutron source, transmutation of radioactive waste, tritium production, and energy production. These linacs must run reliably for many years and allow easy routine maintenance. Superconducting cavities operate efficiently with high cw gradients, properties which help to reduce operating and capital costs, respectively. However, cost-effectiveness is not the sole consideration in these applications. For example, beam impingement must be essentially eliminated to prevent unsafe radioactivation of the accelerating structures, and thus large apertures are needed through which to pass the beam. Because of their high efficiency, superconducting cavities can be designed with very large bore apertures, thereby reducing the effect of beam impingement. Key aspects of high-current cw superconducting linac designs are explored in this context

  1. Design consideration of resonance inverters with electro-technological application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinov, Nikolay

    2017-12-01

    This study presents design consideration of resonance inverters with electro-technological application. The presented methodology was achieved as a result of investigations and analyses of different types and working regimes of resonance inverters, made by the author. Are considered schemes of resonant inverters without inverse diodes. The first harmonic method is used in the analysis and design. This method for the case of inverters with electro-technological application gives very good accuracy. This does not require the use of a complex and heavy mathematical apparatus. The proposed methodology is easy to use and is suitable for use in training students in power electronics. Authenticity of achieved results is confirmed by simulating and physical prototypes research work.

  2. Carbon Taxes. A Review of Experience and Policy Design Considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumner, Jenny [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bird, Lori [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Smith, Hillary [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2009-12-01

    State and local governments in the United States are evaluating a wide range of policies to reduce carbon emissions, including, in some instances, carbon taxes, which have existed internationally for nearly 20 years. This report reviews existing carbon tax policies both internationally and in the United States. It also analyzes carbon policy design and effectiveness. Design considerations include which sectors to tax, where to set the tax rate, how to use tax revenues, what the impact will be on consumers, and how to ensure emissions reduction goals are achieved. Emission reductions that are due to carbon taxes can be difficult to measure, though some jurisdictions have quantified reductions in overall emissions and other jurisdictions have examined impacts that are due to programs funded by carbon tax revenues.

  3. Carbon Taxes: A Review of Experience and Policy Design Considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumner, J.; Bird, L.; Smith, H.

    2009-12-01

    State and local governments in the United States are evaluating a wide range of policies to reduce carbon emissions, including, in some instances, carbon taxes, which have existed internationally for nearly 20 years. This report reviews existing carbon tax policies both internationally and in the United States. It also analyzes carbon policy design and effectiveness. Design considerations include which sectors to tax, where to set the tax rate, how to use tax revenues, what the impact will be on consumers, and how to ensure emissions reduction goals are achieved. Emission reductions that are due to carbon taxes can be difficult to measure, though some jurisdictions have quantified reductions in overall emissions and other jurisdictions have examined impacts that are due to programs funded by carbon tax revenues.

  4. Steam generator design considerations for modular HTGR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C.F.; DeFur, D.D.

    1986-01-01

    Studies are in progress to develop a standard High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) plant design that is amenable to serial production and is licensable. Based on the results of trade studies performed in the DOE-funded HTGR program, activities are being focused to emphasize a modular concept based on a 350 MW(t) annular reactor core with prismatic fuel elements. Utilization of a multiplicity of the standard module affords flexibility in power rating for utility electricity generation. The selected modular HTGR concept has the reactor core and heat transport systems housed in separate steel vessels. This paper highlights the steam generator design considerations for the reference plant, and includes a discussion of the major features of the heat exchanger concept and the technology base existing in the U.S

  5. Mechanical design of ORPUS-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwall, R.E.; Gray, W.H.; Long, C.J.

    1977-01-01

    ORPUS-3 is the third in a series of pulsed superconducting solenoids built to test construction techniques applicable to tokamak poloidal field coils. The present coil is designed to be charged to a maximum field of 7 T in 1 sec. Stored energy is approximately 300 kJ. The conductor is a high copper-superconductor ratio mixed matrix material developed for this application. In this paper we present a mechanical design which uses distributed reinforcement to support a self-ventilating braid conductor. Using this design, it has been possible to obtain a high overall current density and a low heat flux in a fully normal zone. In order for the stress to be kept within acceptable limits in the reinforcing material, a programmed winding tension schedule has been calculated. The deflection, stress, and strain of the windings are predicted using the STANSOL-II computer code

  6. Structural design considerations for micromachined solid-oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikar, V. T.; Turner, Kevin T.; Andrew Ie, Tze Yung; Spearing, S. Mark

    Micromachined solid-oxide fuel cells (μSOFCs) are among a class of devices being investigated for portable power generation. Optimization of the performance and reliability of such devices requires robust, scale-dependent, design methodologies. In this first analysis, we consider the structural design of planar, electrolyte-supported, μSOFCs from the viewpoints of electrochemical performance, mechanical stability and reliability, and thermal behavior. The effect of electrolyte thickness on fuel cell performance is evaluated using a simple analytical model. Design diagrams that account explicitly for thermal and intrinsic residual stresses are presented to identify geometries that are resistant to fracture and buckling. Analysis of energy loss due to in-plane heat conduction highlights the importance of efficient thermal isolation in microscale fuel cell design.

  7. Helium compressor aerodynamic design considerations for MHTGR circulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C.F.

    1988-01-01

    Compressor aerodynamic design considerations for both the main and shutdown cooling circulators in the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) plant are addressed in this paper. A major selection topic relates to the impeller type (i.e., axial or radial flow), and the aerothermal studies leading to the selection of optimum parameters are discussed. For the conceptual designs of the main and shutdown cooling circulators, compressor blading geometries were established and helium gas flow paths defined. Both circulators are conservative by industrial standards in terms of aerodynamic and structural loading, and the blade tip speeds are particularly modest. Performance characteristics are presented, and the designs embody margin to ensure that pressure-rise growth potential can be accomodated should the circuit resistance possibly increase as the plant design advances. The axial flow impeller for the main circulator is very similar to the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) helium compressor which performs well. A significant technology base exists for the MHTGR plant circulators, and this is highlighted in the paper. (author). 15 refs, 16 figs, 12 tabs

  8. Mechanical flexible joint design document

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daily, Vic

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the status of the Mechanical Flexible Joint (MFJ) Design Subtask with the intent of halting work on the design. Recommendations for future work is included in the case that the task is to be resumed. The MFJ is designed to eliminate two failure points from the current flex joint configuration, the inner 'tripod configuration' and the outer containment jacket. The MFJ will also be designed to flex 13.5 degrees and have three degrees of freedom. By having three degrees of freedom, the MFJ will allow the Low Pressure Fuel Duct to twist and remove the necessity to angulate the full 11 degrees currently required. The current flex joints are very labor intensive and very costly and a simple alternative is being sought. The MFJ is designed with a greater angular displacement, with three degrees of freedom, to reside in the same overall envelope, to meet weight constraints of the current bellows, to be compatible with cryogenic fuel and oxidizers, and also to be man-rated.

  9. THEORETICAL CONSIDERATIONS REGARDING THE AUTOMATIC FISCAL STABILIZERS OPERATING MECHANISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gondor Mihaela

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the role of Automatic Fiscal Stabilizers (AFS for stabilizing the cyclical fluctuations of macroeconomic output as an alternative to discretionary fiscal policy, admitting its huge potential of being an anti crisis solution. The objectives of the study are the identification of the general features of the concept of automatic fiscal stabilizers and the logical assessment of them from economic perspectives. Based on the literature in the field, this paper points out the disadvantages of fiscal discretionary policy and argue the need of using Automatic Fiscal Stabilizers in order to provide a faster decision making process, shielded from political interference, and reduced uncertainty for households and business environment. The paper conclude about the need of using fiscal policy for smoothing the economic cycle, but in a way which includes among its features transparency, responsibility and clear operating mechanisms. Based on the research results the present paper assumes that pro-cyclicality reduces de effectiveness of the Automatic Fiscal Stabilizer and as a result concludes that it is very important to avoid the pro-cyclicality in fiscal rule design. Moreover, by committing in advance to specific fiscal policy action contingent on economic developments, uncertainty about the fiscal policy framework during a recession should be reduced. Being based on logical analysis and not focused on empirical, contextualized one, the paper presents some features of AFS operating mechanism and also identifies and systematizes the factors which provide its importance and national individuality. Reaching common understanding on the Automatic Fiscal Stabilizer concept as a institutional device for smoothing the gap of the economic cycles across different countries, particularly for the European Union Member States, will facilitate efforts to coordinate fiscal policy responses during a crisis, especially in the context of the fiscal

  10. Hardware Design Considerations for Edge-Accelerated Stereo Correspondence Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos Ttofis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stereo correspondence is a popular algorithm for the extraction of depth information from a pair of rectified 2D images. Hence, it has been used in many computer vision applications that require knowledge about depth. However, stereo correspondence is a computationally intensive algorithm and requires high-end hardware resources in order to achieve real-time processing speed in embedded computer vision systems. This paper presents an overview of the use of edge information as a means to accelerate hardware implementations of stereo correspondence algorithms. The presented approach restricts the stereo correspondence algorithm only to the edges of the input images rather than to all image points, thus resulting in a considerable reduction of the search space. The paper highlights the benefits of the edge-directed approach by applying it to two stereo correspondence algorithms: an SAD-based fixed-support algorithm and a more complex adaptive support weight algorithm. Furthermore, we present design considerations about the implementation of these algorithms on reconfigurable hardware and also discuss issues related to the memory structures needed, the amount of parallelism that can be exploited, the organization of the processing blocks, and so forth. The two architectures (fixed-support based versus adaptive-support weight based are compared in terms of processing speed, disparity map accuracy, and hardware overheads, when both are implemented on a Virtex-5 FPGA platform.

  11. Statistical considerations of graphite strength for assessing design allowable stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, M.; Mogi, H.; Ioka, I.; Arai, T.; Oku, T.

    1987-01-01

    Several aspects of statistics need to be considered to determine design allowable stresses for graphite structures. These include: 1) Statistical variation of graphite material strength. 2) Uncertainty of calculated stress. 3) Reliability (survival probability) required from operational and safety performance of graphite structures. This paper deals with some statistical considerations of structural graphite for assessing design allowable stress. Firstly, probability distribution functions of tensile and compressive strengths are investigated on experimental Very High Temperature candidated graphites. Normal, logarithmic normal and Weibull distribution functions are compared in terms of coefficient of correlation to measured strength data. This leads to the adaptation of normal distribution function. Then, the relation between factor of safety and fracture probability is discussed on the following items: 1) As the graphite strength is more variable than metalic material's strength, the effect of strength variation to the fracture probability is evaluated. 2) Fracture probability depending on survival probability of 99 ∼ 99.9 (%) with confidence level of 90 ∼ 95 (%) is discussed. 3) As the material properties used in the design analysis are usually the mean values of their variation, the additional effect of these variations on the fracture probability is discussed. Finally, the way to assure the minimum ultimate strength with required survival probability with confidence level is discussed in view of statistical treatment of the strength data from varying sample numbers in a material acceptance test. (author)

  12. Preliminary conceptual engineering design considerations for the MX machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulmer, R.H.; Calderon, M.U.; Hibbs, S.M.; Kozman, T.A.

    1975-01-01

    The mirror experiment was designed to develop the technologies necessary to make the transition from the presently small-scale physics experiments (2XIIB and BBII) to large-scale steady-state DT burning systems, such as the Fusion Engineering Research Facility (FERF) and Controlled Thermonuclear Reactors (CTR) based on plasma confinement in open magnetic geometry. The confinement parameters in the design of the present machine include a 20-kG central field with a mirror ratio of 2 to 1 and an overall BL product approximately 5 times greater than that currently available with the 2XIIB compression coils (or a mirror-to-mirror length of 3.4 m). Several types of Yin-Yang minimum parallel B parallel geometries were studied, and a ''displaced'' Yin-Yang was chosen because the center of the machine is easily accessable between the coils and between the magnet lobes. Other important design considerations include the target plasma system, the vacuum system, and the injectors. The target plasma system includes a pellet generating system used to produce a 400-μm deuterium pellet and a two-arm laser system where the laser energy is produced from a 1-kJ, 10-GW CO 2 laser at 100 ns

  13. Design consideration for a diversity of heat sink

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rueckbrodt, Karin; Meischak, Stefan [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The defense in depth approach requires in all cases to prevent and mitigate accidents that could release radioactive materials. To assure the physical design barriers (preserve fuel integrity, reactor coolant pressure boundary integrity, and containment integrity) the decay heat has to be removed. External and internal events have to be taken in consideration for the robustness of all the involved cooling systems. To ensure the cooling function in all conceivable and all unlikely events an analysis for the necessity of a diversified heat sink is essential. The diversified concepts analyses the type of the primary heat sink and use contrary sources for the heat sink, air instead of water, well instead of a river. A complete diversity is realized if also for the heat transfer diversified systems are implemented. The described solutions are mainly applied for BWR plants, but can be partly transferred analogously to PWR plants. (orig.)

  14. Radiotracers for per studies of neurotransmitter binding sites: Design considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilbourn, M.R.

    1991-01-01

    Neurotransmitter binding sites, such as receptors, neuronal uptake systems, and vesicular uptake systems, are important targets for new radiopharmaceutical design. Selection of potential radioligands can be guided by in vitro laboratory data including such characteristics as selectivity and affinity for specific binding sites. However, development of PET radiotracers for use in vivo must include considerations of in vivo pharmacokinetics and metabolism. Introduction of potential radioligands is further narrowed by the demands of the radiochemical synthesis, which must produce radioligands of high chemical and radiochemical purity and of high specific activity. This paper will review examples of previous and current attempts by radiopharmaceutical chemists to meet these demands for new positron emitter-labeled radioligands for PET studies of a wide array of neurotransmitter binding sites

  15. Design considerations for Mars transfer vehicles using nuclear thermal propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, William J.

    1995-01-01

    The design of a Mars Transfer Vehicle (MTV) utilizing nuclear propulsion will require that careful consideration be given to the nuclear radiation environment in which it will operate. The extremely high neutron and gamma fluxes characteristic of nuclear thermal propulsion systems will cause significant heating of the fluid systems in close proximity to the reactor, especially in the lower propellant tanks. Crew radiation doses are also a concern particularly late in a mission when there is less shielding from the propellant tanks. In this study, various vehicle configuration and shielding strategies were examined and the resulting time dependent radiation fields evaluated. A common cluster of three particle bed reactor (PBR) engines were used in all configurations examined. In general, it appears that long, relatively narrow vehicles perform the best from a radiation standpoint, however, good shield optimization will be critical in maintaining a low radiation environment while minimizing the shield weight penalty.

  16. Mechanical design of a RF electron gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodle, M.H.; Batchelor, K.; Sheehan, J.

    1989-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory is building an Accelerator Test Facility at which we plan to study laser acceleration of electrons, inverse free electron lasers and the production of X-rays by non-linear Compton scattering. The facility contains an electron gun, linac, lasers and ancillary systems which will enable the production of 6 ps duration pulses of 50-100 MeV electrons. The electron source is an one and one half cell RF Electron gun which utilizes either a thermionic or photoemissive cathode to produce 5 MeV electrons. This paper discusses how gun mechanical design considerations such as material, vacuum maintenance, surface finish, fabrication methods, cavity tuning, and cathode replacement were reconciled to arrive at the final design. 9 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Mechanical design of a rf electron gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodle, M.H.; Batchelor, K.; Sheehan, J.

    1988-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory is building an Accelerator Test Facility at which we plan to study laser acceleration of electrons inverse free electron lasers and the production of X-rays by non- linear Compton scattering. The facility contains an electron gun, linac, lasers and ancillary systems which will enable the production of 6 ps duration pulses of 50--100 MeV electrons. The electron source is an one and one half cell RF Electron gun which utilizes either a thermionic or photoemissive cathode to produce 5 MeV electrons. This paper discusses how gun mechanical design considerations such as material, vacuum maintenance, surface finish, fabrication methods, cavity tuning, and cathode replacement were reconciled to arrive at the final design. 9 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Considerations in the Design of Future Planetary Laser Altimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D. E.; Neumann, G. A.; Mazarico, E.; Zuber, M. T.; Sun, X.

    2017-12-01

    Planetary laser altimeters have generally been designed to provide high accuracy measurements of the nadir range to an uncooperative surface for deriving the shape of the target body, and sometimes specifically for identifying and characterizing potential landing sites. However, experience has shown that in addition to the range measurement, other valuable observations can be acquired, including surface reflectance and surface roughness, despite not being given high priority in the original altimeter design or even anticipated. After nearly 2 decades of planetary laser altimeter design, the requirements are evolving and additional capabilities are becoming equally important. The target bodies, once the terrestrial planets, are now equally asteroids and moons that in many cases do not permit simple orbital operations due to their small mass, radiation issues, or spacecraft fuel limitations. In addition, for a number of reasons, it has become necessary to perform shape determination from a much greater range, even thousands of kilometers, and thus ranging is becoming as important as nadir altimetry. Reflectance measurements have also proved important for assessing the presence of ice, water or CO2, and laser pulse spreading informed knowledge of surface roughness; all indicating a need for improved instrument capability. Recently, the need to obtain accurate range measurement to laser reflectors on landers or on a planetary surface is presenting new science opportunities but for which current designs are far from optimal. These changes to classic laser altimetry have consequences for many instrument functions and capabilities, including beam divergence, laser power, number of beams and detectors, pixelation, energy measurements, pointing stability, polarization, laser wavelengths, and laser pulse rate dependent range. We will discuss how a new consideration of these trades will help make lidars key instruments to execute innovative science in future planetary

  19. Design considerations for ITER [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor] magnet systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, C.D.; Miller, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is now completing a definition phase as a beginning of a three-year design effort. Preliminary parameters for the superconducting magnet system have been established to guide further and more detailed design work. Radiation tolerance of the superconductors and insulators has been of prime importance, since it sets requirements for the neutron-shield dimension and sensitively influences reactor size. The major levels of mechanical stress in the structure appear in the cases of the inboard legs of the toroidal-field (TF) coils. The cases of the poloidal-field (PF) coils must be made thin or segmented to minimize eddy current heating during inductive plasma operation. As a result, the winding packs of both the TF and PF coils includes significant fractions of steel. The TF winding pack provides support against in-plane separating loads but offers little support against out-of-plane loads, unless shear-bonding of the conductors can be maintained. The removal of heat due to nuclear and ac loads has not been a fundamental limit to design, but certainly has non-negligible economic consequences. We present here preliminary ITER magnetic systems design parameters taken from trade studies, designs, and analyses performed by the Home Teams of the four ITER participants, by the ITER Magnet Design Unit in Garching, and by other participants at workshops organized by the Magnet Design Unit. The work presented here reflects the efforts of many, but the responsibility for the opinions expressed is the authors'. 4 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  20. Structural design considerations for an 8-m space telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, William r., Sr.; Stahl, H. Philip

    2009-08-01

    NASA's upcoming ARES V launch vehicle, with its' immense payload capacities (both volume and mass) has opened the possibilities for a whole new paradigm of space observatories. It becomes practical to consider a monolith mirror of sufficient size to permit significant scientific advantages, both in collection area and smoothness or figure at a reasonable price. The technologies and engineering to manufacture and test 8 meter class monoliths is mature, with nearly a dozen of such mirrors already in operation around the world. This paper will discuss the design requirements to adapt an 8m meniscus mirror into a Space Telescope System, both launch and operational considerations are included. With objects this massive and structurally sensitive, the mirror design must include all stages of the process. Based upon the experiences of the Hubble Space Telescope, testing and verification at both component and integrated system levels are considered vital to mission success. To this end, two different component level test methods for gravity sag (the so call zero- gravity simulation or test mount) are proposed, with one of these methods suitable for the full up system level testing as well.

  1. Entombment Using Cementitious Materials: Design Considerations and International Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, Roger Ray

    2002-08-01

    Cementitious materials have physical and chemical properties that are well suited for the requirements of radioactive waste management. Namely, the materials have low permeability and durability that is consistent with the time frame required for short-lived radionuclides to decay. Furthermore, cementitious materials can provide a long-term chemical environment that substantially reduces the mobility of some long-lived radionuclides of concern for decommissioning (e.g., C-14, Ni-63, Ni-59). Because of these properties, cementitious materials are common in low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities throughout the world and are an attractive option for entombment of nuclear facilities. This paper describes design considerations for cementitious barriers in the context of performance over time frames of a few hundreds of years (directed toward short-lived radionuclides) and time frames of thousands of years (directed towards longer-lived radionuclides). The emphasis is on providing an overview of concepts for entombment that take advantage of the properties of cementitious materials and experience from the design of low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. A few examples of the previous use of cementitious materials for entombment of decommissioned nuclear facilities and proposals for the use in future decommissioning of nuclear reactors in a few countries are also included to provide global perspective.

  2. Entombment Using Cementitious Materials: Design Considerations and International Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, R.R.

    2002-05-15

    Cementitious materials have physical and chemical properties that are well suited for the requirements of radioactive waste management. Namely, the materials have low permeability and durability that is consistent with the time frame required for short-lived radionuclides to decay. Furthermore, cementitious materials can provide a long-term chemical environment that substantially reduces the mobility of some long-lived radionuclides of concern for decommissioning (e.g., C-14, Ni-63, Ni-59). Because of these properties, cementitious materials are common in low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities throughout the world and are an attractive option for entombment of nuclear facilities. This paper describes design considerations for cementitious barriers in the context of performance over time frames of a few hundreds of years (directed toward short-lived radionuclides) and time frames of thousands of years (directed towards longer-lived radionuclides). The emphasis is on providing a n overview of concepts for entombment that take advantage of the properties of cementitious materials and experience from the design of low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. A few examples of the previous use of cementitious materials for entombment of decommissioned nuclear facilities and proposals for the use in future decommissioning of nuclear reactors in a few countries are also included to provide global perspective.

  3. Entombment Using Cementitious Materials: Design Considerations and International Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seitz, R.R.

    2002-01-01

    Cementitious materials have physical and chemical properties that are well suited for the requirements of radioactive waste management. Namely, the materials have low permeability and durability that is consistent with the time frame required for short-lived radionuclides to decay. Furthermore, cementitious materials can provide a long-term chemical environment that substantially reduces the mobility of some long-lived radionuclides of concern for decommissioning (e.g., C-14, Ni-63, Ni-59). Because of these properties, cementitious materials are common in low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities throughout the world and are an attractive option for entombment of nuclear facilities. This paper describes design considerations for cementitious barriers in the context of performance over time frames of a few hundreds of years (directed toward short-lived radionuclides) and time frames of thousands of years (directed towards longer-lived radionuclides). The emphasis is on providing a n overview of concepts for entombment that take advantage of the properties of cementitious materials and experience from the design of low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. A few examples of the previous use of cementitious materials for entombment of decommissioned nuclear facilities and proposals for the use in future decommissioning of nuclear reactors in a few countries are also included to provide global perspective

  4. Design considerations for medical devices in the home environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman-Rivi, Diana; Collins-Mitchell, Janette; Jetley, Raoul

    2010-01-01

    Patient demographics, economic forces, and technological advancements contribute to the rise in home care services. Advanced medical devices and equipment originally designed for use by trained personnel in hospitals and clinics are increasingly migrating into the home. Unlike the clinical setting, the home is an uncontrolled environment with additional hazards. The compatibility of the device with the recipient's knowledge, abilities, lifestyle, and home environment plays a significant role in their therapy and rehabilitation. The advent of new device technologies such as wireless devices and interoperability of systems lends a new and complex perspective for medical device use in the home that must also be addressed. Adequately assessing and matching the patient and their caregiver with the appropriate device technology while considering the suitability of the home environment for device operation and maintenance is a challenge that relies on good human factors principles. There is a need to address these challenges in the growing home care sector In this article, the authors take a look at some important considerations and design issues for medical devices used in the home care environment.

  5. Mechanical engineers' handbook, design, instrumentation, and controls

    CERN Document Server

    Kutz, Myer

    2015-01-01

    Full coverage of electronics, MEMS, and instrumentation andcontrol in mechanical engineering This second volume of Mechanical Engineers' Handbookcovers electronics, MEMS, and instrumentation and control, givingyou accessible and in-depth access to the topics you'll encounterin the discipline: computer-aided design, product design formanufacturing and assembly, design optimization, total qualitymanagement in mechanical system design, reliability in themechanical design process for sustainability, life-cycle design,design for remanufacturing processes, signal processing, dataacquisition and dis

  6. Quasi-experimental designs in practice-based research settings: design and implementation considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Margaret A; Schillinger, Dean; Shiboski, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Although randomized controlled trials are often a gold standard for determining intervention effects, in the area of practice-based research (PBR), there are many situations in which individual randomization is not possible. Alternative approaches to evaluating interventions have received increased attention, particularly those that can retain elements of randomization such that they can be considered "controlled" trials. Methodological design elements and practical implementation considerations for two quasi-experimental design approaches that have considerable promise in PBR settings--the stepped-wedge design, and a variant of this design, a wait-list cross-over design, are presented along with a case study from a recent PBR intervention for patients with diabetes. PBR-relevant design features include: creation of a cohort over time that collects control data but allows all participants (clusters or patients) to receive the intervention; staggered introduction of clusters; multiple data collection points; and one-way cross-over into the intervention arm. Practical considerations include: randomization versus stratification, training run in phases; and extended time period for overall study completion. Several design features of practice based research studies can be adapted to local circumstances yet retain elements to improve methodological rigor. Studies that utilize these methods, such as the stepped-wedge design and the wait-list cross-over design, can increase the evidence base for controlled studies conducted within the complex environment of PBR.

  7. Design control considerations for biologic-device combination products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Dave; Liu, Roger; Anand Subramony, J; Cammack, Jon

    2017-03-01

    Combination products are therapeutic and diagnostic medical products that combine drugs, devices, and/or biological products with one another. Historically, biologics development involved identifying efficacious doses administered to patients intravenously or perhaps by a syringe. Until fairly recently, there has been limited focus on developing an accompanying medical device, such as a prefilled syringe or auto-injector, to enable easy and more efficient delivery. For the last several years, and looking forward, where there may be little to distinguish biologics medicines with relatively similar efficacy profiles, the biotechnology market is beginning to differentiate products by patient-focused, biologic-device based combination products. As innovative as biologic-device combination products are, they can pose considerable development, regulatory, and commercialization challenges due to unique physicochemical properties and special clinical considerations (e.g., dosing volumes, frequency, co-medications, etc.) of the biologic medicine. A biologic-device combination product is a marriage between two partners with "cultural differences," so to speak. There are clear differences in the development, review, and commercialization processes of the biologic and the device. When these two cultures come together in a combination product, developers and reviewers must find ways to address the design controls and risk management processes of both the biologic and device, and knit them into a single entity with supporting product approval documentation. Moreover, digital medicine and connected health trends are pushing the boundaries of combination product development and regulations even further. Despite an admirable cooperation between industry and FDA in recent years, unique product configurations and design features have resulted in review challenges. These challenges have prompted agency reviewers to modernize consultation processes, while at the same time, promoting

  8. System-Level Design Considerations for Carbon Nanotube Electromechanical Resonators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Kauth

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite an evermore complete plethora of complex domain-specific semiempirical models, no succinct recipe for large-scale carbon nanotube electromechanical systems design has been formulated. To combine the benefits of these highly sensitive miniaturized mechanical sensors with the vast functionalities available in electronics, we identify a reduced key parameter set of carbon nanotube properties, nanoelectromechanical system design, and operation that steers the sensor’s performance towards system applications, based on open- and closed-loop topologies. Suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes are reviewed in terms of their electromechanical properties with the objective of evaluating orders of magnitude of the electrical actuation and detection mechanisms. Open-loop time-averaging and 1ω or 2ω mixing methods are completed by a new 4ω actuation and detection technique. A discussion on their extension to closed-loop topologies and system applications concludes the analysis, covering signal-to-noise ratio, and the capability to spectrally isolate the motional information from parasitical feedthrough by contemporary electronic read-out techniques.

  9. Some considerations in the CANFLEX-NU fuel design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, K.S.; Suk, H.C.; Tayal, M.; Alavi, P.; Oldaker, I.E.; Lau, J.H.

    1997-01-01

    The CANDU Flexible-natural uranium (CANFLEX-NU) fuel bundle is being developed as the next logical evolution of CANDU fuel. Several design details of the CANFLEX bundle differ from the current 37-element fuel bundle. For example, the CANFLEX bundle uses buttons that enhance critical heat flux, smaller element diameters, and thinner sheaths. These changes contribute to the many advantages offered by the CANFLEX bundle. Nonetheless, the impact of these modified parameters on fuel failure mechanisms must be examined. For example, smaller diameter may lead to increased potential for flow-induced vibration and fatigue. Similarly, thinner sheaths may potentially lead to increased likelihood of collapse of the sheath into concentrated axial gap in the element due to the coolant pressure. Likewise, thin sheath and altered pellet dimensions may also potentially influence the defect threshold for stress-corrosion cracking during power ramps. The fatigue behaviour of the element may be different from the standard 37-element bundle under the condition of the significant number of power cycles. As part of the design verification of the CANFLEX bundle, the above failure mechanisms were analysed using well-established methods with reasonable support from relevant experiments or operating experience. As the analysis results show, the CANFLEX-NU fuel bundle is expected to exhibit excellent integrity during its lifetime in the reactor. (author)

  10. Robotic Observatory System Design-Specification Considerations for Achieving Long-Term Sustainable Precision Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray, J. D.

    2003-05-01

    The robotic observatory telescope must point precisely on the target object, and then track autonomously to a fraction of the FWHM of the system PSF for durations of ten to twenty minutes or more. It must retain this precision while continuing to function at rates approaching thousands of observations per night for all its years of useful life. These stringent requirements raise new challenges unique to robotic telescope systems design. Critical design considerations are driven by the applicability of the above requirements to all systems of the robotic observatory, including telescope and instrument systems, telescope-dome enclosure systems, combined electrical and electronics systems, environmental (e.g. seeing) control systems and integrated computer control software systems. Traditional telescope design considerations include the effects of differential thermal strain, elastic flexure, plastic flexure and slack or backlash with respect to focal stability, optical alignment and angular pointing and tracking precision. Robotic observatory design must holistically encapsulate these traditional considerations within the overall objective of maximized long-term sustainable precision performance. This overall objective is accomplished through combining appropriate mechanical and dynamical system characteristics with a full-time real-time telescope mount model feedback computer control system. Important design considerations include: identifying and reducing quasi-zero-backlash; increasing size to increase precision; directly encoding axis shaft rotation; pointing and tracking operation via real-time feedback between precision mount model and axis mounted encoders; use of monolithic construction whenever appropriate for sustainable mechanical integrity; accelerating dome motion to eliminate repetitive shock; ducting internal telescope air to outside dome; and the principal design criteria: maximizing elastic repeatability while minimizing slack, plastic deformation

  11. Lunar Module Wiring Design Considerations and Failure Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interbartolo, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the considerations for the design of wiring for the Lunar Module. Included are a review of the choice of conductors and insulations, the wire splicing (i.e., crimping, and soldering), the wire connectors, and the fabrication of the wire harnesses. The problems in fabrication include the wires being the wrong length, the damage due to the sharp edges, the requried use of temproary protective covers and inadequate training. The problems in the wire harness installation include damge from sharp eges, work on adjacent harnesses, connector damage, and breaking wires. Engineering suggestions from the Apollo-era in reference to the conductors that are reviewed include: the use of plated conductors, and the use of alloys for stronger wiring. In refernce to insulation, the suggestions from Apollo era include the use of polymer tape-wrap wire insulation due to the light weight, however, other types of modern insulation might be more cost-effective. In reference to wire splices and terminal boards the suggestions from the Apollo Era include the use of crimp splices as superior to solder splices, joining multiple wire to a common point using modular plug-ins might be more reliable, but are heavier than crimp splicing. For connectors, the lessons from the Apollo era indicate that a rear environmental seal that does not require additional potting is preferred, and pins should be crimped or welded to the incoming wires and be removable from the rear of the connector.

  12. A REVIEW OF MILD COMBUSTION AND OPEN FURNACE DESIGN CONSIDERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Noor

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Combustion is still very important to generate energy. Moderate or Intense Low-oxygen Dilution (MILD combustion is one of the best new technologies for clean and efficient combustion. MILD combustion has been proven to be a promising combustion technology in industrial applications with decreased energy consumption due to the uniformity of its temperature distribution. It is clean compared to traditional combustion due to producing low NOx and CO emissions. This article provides a review and discussion of recent research and developments in MILD. The issue and applications are summarized, with some suggestions presented on the upgrading and application of MILD in the future. Currently MILD combustion has been successfully applied in closed furnaces. The preheating of supply air is no longer required since the recirculation inside the enclosed furnace already self-preheats the supply air and self-dilutes the oxygen in the combustion chamber. The possibility of using open furnace MILD combustion will be reviewed. The design consideration for open furnace with exhaust gas re-circulation (EGR was discussed.

  13. Microgel mechanics in biomaterial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Shalini; Hansen, Caroline E; Lyon, L Andrew

    2014-08-19

    The field of polymeric biomaterials has received much attention in recent years due to its potential for enhancing the biocompatibility of systems and devices applied to drug delivery and tissue engineering. Such applications continually push the definition of biocompatibility from relatively straightforward issues such as cytotoxicity to significantly more complex processes such as reducing foreign body responses or even promoting/recapitulating natural body functions. Hydrogels and their colloidal analogues, microgels, have been and continue to be heavily investigated as viable materials for biological applications because they offer numerous, facile avenues in tailoring chemical and physical properties to approach biologically harmonious integration. Mechanical properties in particular are recently coming into focus as an important manner in which biological responses can be altered. In this Account, we trace how mechanical properties of microgels have moved into the spotlight of research efforts with the realization of their potential impact in biologically integrative systems. We discuss early experiments in our lab and in others focused on synthetic modulation of particle structure at a rudimentary level for fundamental drug delivery studies. These experiments elucidated that microgel mechanics are a consequence of polymer network distribution, which can be controlled by chemical composition or particle architecture. The degree of deformability designed into the microgel allows for a defined response to an imposed external force. We have studied deformation in packed colloidal phases and in translocation events through confined pores; in all circumstances, microgels exhibit impressive deformability in response to their environmental constraints. Microgels further translate their mechanical properties when assembled in films to the properties of the bulk material. In particular, microgel films have been a large focus in our lab as building blocks for self

  14. Quantum mechanics and faster-than-light communication: methodological considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghirardi, G.C.; Weber, T.

    1983-06-01

    A detailed quantum mechanical analysis of a recent proposal of faster than light communication through wave packet reduction is performed. The discussion allows us to focus on some methodological problems about critical investigations in physical theories. (author)

  15. Design considerations for foil windows for PET radioisotope targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughey, B.J.; Shefer, R.E.; Klinkowstein, R.E.; Welch, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a study performed at SRL to develop analytical and computational techniques for optimizing the design of conduction-cooled foil windows for PET targets. Single foil conduction cooled windows have been found to be good target entrance windows for both low energy accelerators and medium energy cyclotrons. Detailed thermal analysis has given an approximate analytical expression for the maximum temperature reached in a foil window under conditions of realistic ion beam bombardment. The effects of 'hot spots' in the beam density profile were investigated. It was shown that a factor of two safety margin in window design should be adequate to compensate for any possible beam hot spots. In addition, the reduction of foil stress by slack mounting was verified by experiments. The properties of conventional and novel foil materials were investigated for use in conduction cooled windows. Novel foil materials include two-component Al/Ti and Al/Havar foil. Results on the testing of candidate foil materials for thermal conductivity and mechanical strength at elevated temperature were presented. Two optimum foil window geometries were analyzed: a high aspect ratio window and a multiply slotted window. The multiply slotted window combines the advantages of a high aspect ratio foil window with a circular beam strike and is a promising window design for both TCA and cyclotron targets. A multiply slotted window for a N 2 gas target for 15 O production was designed using the methodologies discussed above. This prototype target was successfully tested using the TCA beam at SRL. (author) 6 figs., 3 tabs., 10 refs

  16. Considerations for the rational design of a Chlamydia vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Steven; Bulir, David; Kaushic, Charu; Mahony, James

    2017-04-03

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the leading cause of preventable blindness and the most common bacterial sexually transmitted infection. Remarkable progress in vaccine research over the past six decades has led to the advancement of novel C. trachomatis vaccine candidates into clinical trials. However, many questions regarding the role of specific cellular populations and molecular mechanisms in protective immunity against human C. trachomatis genital tract infections remain unanswered. Biomarkers of vaccine induced protective immunity are elusive in humans, while a cautionary message on the translatability of data obtained from current animal models has emanated from vaccine research and development efforts against other important human pathogens. In this commentary, we highlight recent advances in Chlamydia vaccine development and discuss their implications in the context of a rational approach to the design of a human C. trachomatis vaccine.

  17. Understanding Mechanical Design with Respect to Manufacturability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondell, Skyler

    2010-01-01

    At the NASA Prototype Development Laboratory in Kennedy Space Center, Fl, several projects concerning different areas of mechanical design were undertaken in order to better understand the relationship between mechanical design and manufacturabiIity. The assigned projects pertained specifically to the NASA Space Shuttle, Constellation, and Expendable Launch Vehicle programs. During the work term, mechanical design practices relating to manufacturing processes were learned and utilized in order to obtain an understanding of mechanical design with respect to manufacturability.

  18. Design considerations for teleoperation systems operating in gas-tight argon cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungnam Yu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the nuclear industry, mechanical engineers spend a significant portion of their time designing equipment such as manipulators, bogies, mechanical grippers, and so on. Some customized designs can be considered as standard mechanical equipment in this area, although it is not unusual to find that an existing design cannot simply be copied from one project to another. Varied performance requirements can dictate that redesign, often quite extensive redesign, is required. However, if something similar has been done before, engineers could use that as a starting point for the new project. In this regard, this study presents several guidelines inspired by previous design knowledge for similar development cases. Moreover, this study presents more detailed suggestions such as design guidelines for an argon-based hot cell atmosphere and design experience for a large-scale practical hot cell facility. Design considerations and case studies dealt with in this study are dedicated to teleoperation manipulators that are used at a large-scale argon cell facility for pyroprocess integrated inactive demonstration (PRIDE, at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. In particular, for case studies to support the suggested recommendations, a fabricated telemanipulator system for PRIDE is introduced, and several kinds of experimental results associated with it are presented.

  19. Design considerations for community mental health management information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, B H; Sugarman, B

    1978-01-01

    Many community mental health centers are presently faced with the necessity of implementing a management information system. This article offers guidelines for centers dealing with this situation. Whether a center chooses to adapt an existing system or develop one of its own, careful planning prior to the implementation of the system can help ensure that it will meet the needs of the center and operate successfully. The guidelines are organized into the categories of data considerations, people considerations, and system considerations. The first two categories are of general interest, whereas the last category is more technical in nature.

  20. Mechanical considerations in the processing of high Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, R.N.; German, R.M.; Knorr, D.B.; Maccrone, R.K.; Rajan, K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a brief review of deformation processing concepts germane to high-Tc superconductor processing, and illustrates some available techniques with results from recent work. It is noted that YBa2Cu3O(7-x) powder/binder cold extrusion technique is quite sensitive to binder formulation and processing conditions. With appropriate technique, indefinite lengths of YBa2Cu3O(7-x) powder/binder composite can be extruded with sufficient workability to allow coiling and other forming operations. With heat treatment, the resulting prototype wire is electrically continuous and manifests critical current densities of a few hundred A/sq cm. The hot extrusion of YBa2Cu3O(7-x) powder results in a modest, but favorable, development of a texture involving preferential rotation of the c-axis toward the radial direction. Billet designs involving larger powder charge diameters, and thinner container walls, produce the favorable texture. Unfortunately, such billet designs reduce workability. 29 refs

  1. Considerations on Velocities and Accelerations in Higher Pairs Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florina-Carmen Ciornei

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes a method for finding the velocities and accelerations in the pairs from a mechanism with higher pairs in the case when the curvature radii of the curves achieving the higher pair are finite. There are obtained the characteristic equations of the motion in the higher pair for the case that one of the curves has zero curvature radius, condition characteristic to the knife edge follower. The relations are required to justify the difference between the particular cases of knife edge follower and flat face follower. The methodology is exemplified through an actual example.

  2. SPOUTED BED DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS FOR COATED NUCLEAR FUEL PARTICLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, Douglas W.

    2017-07-01

    High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) are fueled with tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated nuclear fuel particles embedded in a carbon-graphite fuel body. TRISO coatings consist of four layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide that are deposited on uranium ceramic fuel kernels (350µm – 500µm diameters) in a concatenated series of batch depositions. Each layer has dedicated functions such that the finished fuel particle has its own integral containment to minimize and control the release of fission products into the fuel body and reactor core. The TRISO coatings are the primary containment structure in the HTGR reactor and must have very high uniformity and integrity. To ensure high quality TRISO coatings, the four layers are deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using high purity precursors and are applied in a concatenated succession of batch operations before the finished product is unloaded from the coating furnace. These depositions take place at temperatures ranging from 1230°C to 1550°C and use three different gas compositions, while the fuel particle diameters double, their density drops from 11.1 g/cm3 to 3.0 g/cm3, and the bed volume increases more than 8-fold. All this is accomplished without the aid of sight ports or internal instrumentation that could cause chemical contamination within the layers or mechanical damage to thin layers in the early stages of each layer deposition. The converging section of the furnace retort was specifically designed to prevent bed stagnation that would lead to unacceptably high defect fractions and facilitate bed circulation to avoid large variability in coating layer dimensions and properties. The gas injection nozzle was designed to protect precursor gases from becoming overheated prior to injection, to induce bed spouting and preclude bed stagnation in the bottom of the retort. Furthermore, the retort and injection nozzle designs minimize buildup of pyrocarbon and silicon carbide on the

  3. Operator interface design considerations for a PACS information management system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, James E.; Nabijee, Kamal H.; Freeman, Rick H.; Prior, Fred W.

    1990-08-01

    As prototype PACS grow into fully digital departmental and hospital-wide systems, effective information storage and retrieval mechanisms become increasingly important. Thus far, designers of PACS workstations have concentrated on image communication and display functionality. The new challenge is to provide appropriate operator interface environments to facilitate information retrieval. The "Marburg Model" 1 provides a detailed analysis of the functions, control flows and data structures used in Radiology. It identifies a set of "actors" who perform information manipulation functions. Drawing on this model and its associated methodology it is possible to identify four modes of use of information systems in Radiology: Clinical Routine, Research, Consultation, and Administration. Each mode has its own specific access requirements and views of information. An operator interface strategy appropriate for each mode will be proposed. Clinical Routine mode is the principal concern of PACS primary diagnosis workstations. In a full PACS implementation, such workstations must provide a simple and consistent navigational aid for the on-line image database, a local work list of cases to be reviewed, and easy access to information from other hospital information systems. A hierarchical method of information access is preferred because it provides the ability to start at high-level entities and iteratively narrow the scope of information from which to select subsequent operations. An implementation using hierarchical, nested software windows which fulfills such requirements shall be examined.

  4. Considerations for designing robotic upper limb rehabilitation devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadas, I.; Vaida, C.; Gherman, B.; Pisla, D.; Carbone, G.

    2017-12-01

    The present study highlights the advantages of robotic systems for post-stroke rehabilitation of the upper limb. The latest demographic studies illustrate a continuous increase of the average life span, which leads to a continuous increase of stroke incidents and patients requiring rehabilitation. Some studies estimate that by 2030 the number of physical therapists will be insufficient for the patients requiring physical rehabilitation, imposing a shift in the current methodologies. A viable option is the implementation of robotic systems that assist the patient in performing rehabilitation exercises, the physical therapist role being to establish the therapeutic program for each patient and monitor their individual progress. Using a set of clinical measurements for the upper limb motions, the analysis of rehabilitation robotic systems provides a comparative study between the motions required by clinicians and the ones that robotic systems perform for different therapeutic exercises. A critical analysis of existing robots is performed using several classifications: mechanical design, assistance type, actuation and power transmission, control systems and human robot interaction (HRI) strategies. This classification will determine a set of pre-requirements for the definition of new concepts and efficient solutions for robotic assisted rehabilitation therapy.

  5. Routine Design for Mechanical Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Brinkop, Axel; Laudwein, Norbert; Maasen, Rudiger

    1995-01-01

    COMIX (configuration of mixing machines) is a system that assists members of the EKATO Sales Department in designing a mixing machine that fulfills the requirements of a customer. It is used to help the engineer design the requested machine and prepare an offer that's to be submitted to the customer. comix integrates more traditional software techniques with explicit knowledge representation and constraint propagation. During the process of routine design, some design decisions have to be mad...

  6. A review on mechanical considerations for chronically-implanted neural probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecomte, Aziliz; Descamps, Emeline; Bergaud, Christian

    2018-06-01

    This review intends to present a comprehensive analysis of the mechanical considerations for chronically-implanted neural probes. Failure of neural electrical recordings or stimulation over time has shown to arise from foreign body reaction and device material stability. It seems that devices that match most closely with the mechanical properties of the brain would be more likely to reduce the mechanical stress at the probe/tissue interface, thus improving body acceptance. The use of low Young’s modulus polymers instead of hard substrates is one way to enhance this mechanical mimetism, though compliance can be achieved through a variety of means. The reduction of probe width and thickness in comparison to a designated length, the use of soft hydrogel coatings and the release in device tethering to the skull, can also improve device compliance. Paradoxically, the more compliant the device, the more likely it will fail during the insertion process in the brain. Strategies have multiplied this past decade to offer partial or temporary stiffness to the device to overcome this buckling effect. A detailed description of the probe insertion mechanisms is provided to analyze potential sources of implantation failure and the need for a mechanically-enhancing structure. This leads us to present an overview of the strategies that have been put in place over the last ten years to overcome buckling issues. Particularly, great emphasis is put on bioresorbable polymers and their assessment for neural applications. Finally, a discussion is provided on some of the key features for the design of mechanically-reliable, polymer-based next generation of chronic neuroprosthetic devices.

  7. Problems of structural mechanics in nuclear design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patwardhan, V.M.; Kakodkar, Anil

    1975-01-01

    A very careful and detailed stress analysis of nuclear presure vessels and components is essential for ensuring the safety and integrity of nuclear power plants. The nuclear designer, therefore, relies heavily on structural mechanics for application of the most advanced stress analysis techniques to practical design problems. The paper reviews the inter-relation between structural mechanics and nuclear design and discusses a few of the specific structural mechanics problems faced by the nuclear designers in the Department of Atomic Energy, India. (author)

  8. Radiological safety design considerations for fusion research experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crase, K.W.; Singh, M.S.

    1979-01-01

    A wide variety of fusion research experiments are in the planning or construction stages. Two such experiments, the Nova Laser Fusion Facility and the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF), are currently under construction at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Although the plasma chamber vault for MFTF and the Nova target room will have thick concrete walls and roofs, the radiation safety problems are made complex by the numerous requirements for shield wall penetrations. This paper addresses radiation safety considerations for the MFTF and Nova experiments, and the need for integrated safety considerations and safety technology development during the planning stages of fusion experiments

  9. Speed Controlled Belt Conveyors: Drives and Mechanical Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BEBIC, M. Z.

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents variable speed belt conveyor system where the reference speed is changed in order to achieve improved energy efficiency of operation. The recorded measurements show that belt tension varies within the same limits as under constant speed operation. These results introduce a new insight of the present state of the art in variable speed belt conveyor drives. The system is realized with remote control from the control center on an open pit mine. The structure of the multi-motor drive system of a single conveyor, as well as of the network-based control system distributed among belt conveyor stations and the control center are shown. Speed control of a belt conveyor system is organized to provide better utilization of the available material cross section on the belt and reduced electrical energy consumption of the drive. The experimental results obtained on the system prove that, under existing constraints, the applied algorithm has not introduced additional stress to the belt or mechanical assemblies during acceleration and deceleration processes, while providing higher energy efficiency of operation.

  10. Some considerations referring to mechanisms of iron oxides dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radulescu, M.; Stefanescu, D.; Popa, L.; Mogosan, S.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Under nuclear power plant operational conditions, the carbon steel components in a such nuclear station react with high temperature cooling agent forming several iron oxides and oxyhydroxides. These substances forming some randomly located deposits on the piping walls, can result in some damaging consequences such as: tube constrictions, pitting and intergranular corrosion and finally decreasing of heat transfer and the development of a radiation field around the primary circuit. The decontamination process being in fact a descaling process, involves the chemical dissolution of corrosion deposits in diluted acidic reagents containing usually a complexing carboxylic acid, a reductant and a corrosion inhibitor. A comparative survey of our experimental results with those published in literature on the up-mentioned topics is presented in our paper. To evaluate the removing rates of these superficial films two types of methods were used: gravimetric and potentiodynamic techniques. While the gravimetry supplied us the weight losses data necessary to establish the descaling process kinetics, the potentiodynamic method was used to compare the values of descaling rates obtained from electrochemical data. Correlating our experimental data with those from literature, we adopted two models of mechanisms applicable to our specific conditions. (authors)

  11. Materials for Consideration in Standardized Canister Design Activities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, Charles R.; Ilgen, Anastasia Gennadyevna; Enos, David George; Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie; Hardin, Ernest

    2014-10-01

    This document identifies materials and material mitigation processes that might be used in new designs for standardized canisters for storage, transportation, and disposal of spent nuclear fuel. It also addresses potential corrosion issues with existing dual-purpose canisters (DPCs) that could be addressed in new canister designs. The major potential corrosion risk during storage is stress corrosion cracking of the weld regions on the 304 SS/316 SS canister shell due to deliquescence of chloride salts on the surface. Two approaches are proposed to alleviate this potential risk. First, the existing canister materials (304 and 316 SS) could be used, but the welds mitigated to relieve residual stresses and/or sensitization. Alternatively, more corrosion-resistant steels such as super-austenitic or duplex stainless steels, could be used. Experimental testing is needed to verify that these alternatives would successfully reduce the risk of stress corrosion cracking during fuel storage. For disposal in a geologic repository, the canister will be enclosed in a corrosion-resistant or corrosion-allowance overpack that will provide barrier capability and mechanical strength. The canister shell will no longer have a barrier function and its containment integrity can be ignored. The basket and neutron absorbers within the canister have the important role of limiting the possibility of post-closure criticality. The time period for corrosion is much longer in the post-closure period, and one major unanswered question is whether the basket materials will corrode slowly enough to maintain structural integrity for at least 10,000 years. Whereas there is extensive literature on stainless steels, this evaluation recommends testing of 304 and 316 SS, and more corrosion-resistant steels such as super-austenitic, duplex, and super-duplex stainless steels, at repository-relevant physical and chemical conditions. Both general and localized corrosion testing methods would be used to

  12. Beyond Informed Consent: Ethical Considerations in the Design and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    people will inevitably be offered services that have only been tested ... capacity to make informed decisions about their long-term best ... autonomy of the adolescent and yet balance this with other .... their own. These children make considerable decisions for themselves. .... essence of their engagement as critical community.

  13. Recombination rate plasticity: revealing mechanisms by design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefick, Stephen; Rushton, Chase

    2017-01-01

    For over a century, scientists have known that meiotic recombination rates can vary considerably among individuals, and that environmental conditions can modify recombination rates relative to the background. A variety of external and intrinsic factors such as temperature, age, sex and starvation can elicit ‘plastic’ responses in recombination rate. The influence of recombination rate plasticity on genetic diversity of the next generation has interesting and important implications for how populations evolve. Further, many questions remain regarding the mechanisms and molecular processes that contribute to recombination rate plasticity. Here, we review 100 years of experimental work on recombination rate plasticity conducted in Drosophila melanogaster. We categorize this work into four major classes of experimental designs, which we describe via classic studies in D. melanogaster. Based on these studies, we highlight molecular mechanisms that are supported by experimental results and relate these findings to studies in other systems. We synthesize lessons learned from this model system into experimental guidelines for using recent advances in genotyping technologies, to study recombination rate plasticity in non-model organisms. Specifically, we recommend (1) using fine-scale genome-wide markers, (2) collecting time-course data, (3) including crossover distribution measurements, and (4) using mixed effects models to analyse results. To illustrate this approach, we present an application adhering to these guidelines from empirical work we conducted in Drosophila pseudoobscura. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Evolutionary causes and consequences of recombination rate variation in sexual organisms’. PMID:29109222

  14. Norm-based mechanism design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulling, Nils; Dastani, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    The increasing presence of autonomous (software) systems in open environments in general, and the complex interactions taking place among them in particular, require flexible control and coordination mechanisms to guarantee desirable overall system level properties without limiting the autonomy of

  15. Design considerations for a multiprocessor based data acquisition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tippie, J.W.; Kulaga, J.E.

    1979-01-01

    The rapid advance of digital technology has provided the systems designer with many new design options. Hardware is no longer the controlling expense. Complex operating systems provide the flexibility and development tools needed by software designers, but restrict throughput. Multiprocessor-based systems can be used to ''front-end'' high-throughput applications while maintaining the many advantages offered by multitasking operating systems. The design of a high-throughput data acquisition system for application in low energy nuclear physics is considered

  16. Structural design considerations for a radwaste processing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foelber, S.C.; Sabbe, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    The structural engineer needs to consider several criteria when designing a radioactive-waste processing facility in order to properly balance the requirements of safety and economy. This paper addresses the design criteria and structural design of a vitrification building and the special equipment and supports associated with remote process operations. In addition, approaches to construction, and the role of scale models to aid in engineering design and construction are discussed. 5 figures

  17. Design trade-offs in view of safety considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saji, G.; Kishida, K.; Inoue, T.

    1978-01-01

    In view of resolving conflicting demands of cost, safety, flexibility of operation and design margins, safety design of various plant systems is discussed referring to their weight on construction costs. An influence of hypothetical core disruptive accident (HCDA) and loss of piping integrity (LOPI) on plant design and thus on construction materials is discussed, in optimising future commercial FBR plants. (author)

  18. Space reactor preliminary mechanical design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, K.L.

    1983-01-01

    An analysis was performed on the SABRE reactor space power system to determine the effect of the number and size of heat pipes on the design parameters of the nuclear subsystem. Small numbers of thin walled heat pipes were found to give a lower subsystem mass, but excessive fuel swelling resulted. The SP-100 preliminary design uses 120 heat pipes because of acceptable fuel swelling and a minimum nuclear subsystem mass of 1875 kg. Salient features of the reactor preliminary design are: individual fuel modules, ZrO 2 block core mounts, bolted collar fuel module restraints, and a BeO central plug

  19. Small Satellite Mechanical Design Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Meyers, Stewart

    1993-01-01

    The design approach used and the experience gained in the building of four small satellite payloads is explained. Specific recommendations are made and the lessons learned on the SAMPEX program are detailed.

  20. Design considerations for an x-ray microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howells, M.R.; Hastings, J.B.

    1982-01-01

    The optical design of a fluorescent microprobe covering the x-ray region from 2 to 16 keV is considered for the NSLS x-ray ring. The limit on detectability is from total flux (photons/μm 2 ) and several design choices are considered to match the optical system to the storage ring to maximize throughput. The tradeoffs in image quality and energy resolution of these designs have been considered and within these constraints two firm proposals are presented

  1. Tokamak building-design considerations for a large tokamak device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, R.J.; Thomson, S.L.

    1981-01-01

    Design and construction of a satisfactory tokamak building to support FED appears feasible. Further, a pressure vessel building does not appear necessary to meet the plant safety requirements. Some of the building functions will require safety class systems to assure reliable and safe operation. A rectangular tokamak building has been selected for FED preconceptual design which will be part of the confinement system relying on ventilation and other design features to reduce the consequences and probability of radioactivity release

  2. Thermo-mechanical design aspects of mercury bombardment ion thrusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnelker, D. E.; Kami, S.

    1972-01-01

    The mechanical design criteria are presented as background considerations for solving problems associated with the thermomechanical design of mercury ion bombardment thrusters. Various analytical procedures are used to aid in the development of thruster subassemblies and components in the fields of heat transfer, vibration, and stress analysis. Examples of these techniques which provide computer solutions to predict and control stress levels encountered during launch and operation of thruster systems are discussed. Computer models of specific examples are presented.

  3. 57 Culture Consideration in the Design of Government Housing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arc. Usman A. Jalam

    Although an attempt was made in all the three estates to cater for the value systems of the ... estate developers to consider cultural traits in housing design and development. Key words: ... of human value systems in housing design ... immediate family as well as extended family ... self satisfaction which refer to the physical.

  4. Trajectory Design Considerations for Small Body Touch-and-Go

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Mark; Broschart, Stephen; Bonfiglio, Eugene; Bhaskharan, Shyam; Cangahuala, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Outline: (1) Trajectory Description (2) Design Drivers: (2a) Dynamics (2b) Environment (2c) Spacecraft and Ground and System Capabilities (2d) Mission Objectives (3) Design Choices (4) Historical Precedents (5) Case Studies. What is Touch-and-Go (TAG)? (1) Descent to the surface (2) Brief contact (3) Ascends to a safe distance

  5. Renewable Electricity Standards: Good Practices and Design Considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, Sadie [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Esterly, Sean [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-01-02

    In widespread use globally, renewable electricity standards (RES) are one of the most widely adopted renewable energy policies and a critical regulatory vehicle to accelerate renewable energy deployment. This policy brief provides an introduction to key RES design elements, lessons from country experience, and support resources to enable more detailed and country-specific RES policy design.

  6. Synchronous E-Learning: Reflections and Design Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabak, Filiz; Rampal, Rohit

    2014-01-01

    This paper is a personal reflection on the design, development, and delivery of online synchronous conferencing as a pedagogical tool complementing traditional, face-to-face content delivery and learning. The purpose of the paper is to demonstrate how instructors can combine collaborative and virtual learning principles in course design. In…

  7. Feed-in Tariffs: Good Practices and Design Considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, Sadie [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Esterly, Sean [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-01-02

    In recent years, feed-in tariff (FIT) activity has focused primarily on revisions to current policies, underscoring the need for stable and predictable, yet flexible, policy environments. This policy brief provides a primer on key FIT design elements, lessons from country experience, and support resources to enable more detailed and country-specific FIT policy design.

  8. Design and control considerations for industrial and space manipulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, D. E.; Book, W. J.; Lynch, P. M.

    1974-01-01

    This paper is a progress report summarizing theoretical and practical results concerning integration of design and control aspects of manipulator arms for industrial or space applications. The relationships between task specifications, gross motions, fine motions, actuator type and location, size and strength of structural members, control servos and strategies, and overall design evaluation are briefly discussed, with some technical examples.

  9. Design considerations for the Yucca Mountain project exploratory shaft facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bullock, R.L. Sr.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the regulatory/requirements challenges of this project which exist because this is the first facility of its kind to ever be planned, characterized, designed, and built under the purview of a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Agency. The regulations and requirements that flow down to the Architect/Engineer (A/E) for development of the Exploratory Shaft Facility (ESF) design are voluminous and unique to this project. The subsurface design and construction of the ESF underground facility may eventually become a part of the future repository facility and, if so, will require licensing by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The Fenix and Scisson of Nevada-Yucca Mountain Project (FSN-YMP) group believes that all of the UMP design and construction related activities, with good design/construct control, can be performed to meet all engineering requirements, while following a strict quality assurance program that will also meet regulatory requirements

  10. Geologic, stratigraphic, thermal, and mechanical factors which influence repository design in the bedded salt environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashby, J.P.; Nair, O.; Ortman, D.; Rowe, J.

    1979-12-01

    This report describes the geologic, stratigraphic, thermal, and mechanical considerations applicable to repository design. The topics discussed in the report include: tectonic activity; geologic structure; stratigraphy; rock mechanical properties; and hydrologic properties

  11. Timelines Revisited: A Design Space and Considerations for Expressive Storytelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehmer, Matthew; Lee, Bongshin; Bach, Benjamin; Riche, Nathalie Henry; Munzner, Tamara

    2017-09-01

    There are many ways to visualize event sequences as timelines. In a storytelling context where the intent is to convey multiple narrative points, a richer set of timeline designs may be more appropriate than the narrow range that has been used for exploratory data analysis by the research community. Informed by a survey of 263 timelines, we present a design space for storytelling with timelines that balances expressiveness and effectiveness, identifying 14 design choices characterized by three dimensions: representation, scale, and layout. Twenty combinations of these choices are viable timeline designs that can be matched to different narrative points, while smooth animated transitions between narrative points allow for the presentation of a cohesive story, an important aspect of both interactive storytelling and data videos. We further validate this design space by realizing the full set of viable timeline designs and transitions in a proof-of-concept sandbox implementation that we used to produce seven example timeline stories. Ultimately, this work is intended to inform and inspire the design of future tools for storytelling with timelines.

  12. Consideration of severe accidents in design of advanced WWER reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorov, V.G.; Rogov, M.F.; Podshibyakin, A.K.; Fil, N.S.; Volkov, B.E.; Semishkin, V.P.

    1998-01-01

    Severe accident related requirements formulated in General Regulations for Nuclear Power Plant Safety (OPB-88), in Nuclear Safety Regulations for Nuclear Power Stations' Reactor Plants (PBYa RU AS-89) and in other NPP nuclear and radiation guides of the Russian Gosatomnadzor are analyzed. In accordance with these guides analyses of beyond design basis accidents should be performed in the reactor plant design. Categorization of beyond design basis accidents leading to severe accidents should be made on occurrence probability and severity of consequences. Engineered features and measures intended for severe accident management should be provided in reactor plant design. Requirements for severe accident analyses and for development of measures for severe accident management are determined. Design philosophy and proposed engineered measures for mitigation of severe accidents and decrease of radiation releases are demonstrated using examples of large, WWER-1000 (V-392), and medium size WWER-640 (V-407) reactor plant designs. Mitigation of severe accidents and decrease of radiation releases are supposed to be conducted on basis of consistent realization of the defense in depth concept relating to application of a system of barriers on the path of spreading of ionizing radiation and radioactive materials to the environment and a set of engineered measures protecting these barriers and retaining their effectiveness. Status of fulfilled by OKB Gidropress and other Russian organizations experimental and analytical investigations of severe accident phenomena supporting design decisions and severe accident management procedures is described. Status of the works on retention of core melt inside the WWER-640 reactor vessel is also characterized

  13. Safeguards by design - The early consideration of safeguards concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killeen, T.; Moran, B.; Pujol, E.

    2009-01-01

    Full-text: The IAEA Department of Safeguards is in the process of formalizing its approach to long-range strategic planning. As a result of this activity new endeavours are being identified. One of these endeavours is to develop a concept known as Safeguards by Design. Safeguarding nuclear material and facilities can be made more effective and cost efficient by improving the safeguardability of the system. By taking into account design features that facilitate the implementation of international safeguards early in the design phase, a concept known as safeguards by design, the proliferation resistance of the system can be improved. This improvement process requires an understanding by designers and operators of safeguards and its underlying principles. To advance the safeguards by design approach, the IAEA determined that there is a need to develop written guidance. This guidance would help the major stakeholders - the designers, operators, owners, and regulatory bodies - to better understand how a facility could be designed, built and operated in such a way that effective safeguards could be implemented at reduced cost and with minimal burden to facility operations. By enlisting the cooperation of Member States through the support programme structure, the IAEA is working to first develop a document that describes the basic principles of safeguards, and the fundamental design features and measures that facilitate the implementation of international safeguards. Facility-specific guidance will then be developed utilizing the resources, expertise and experience of the IAEA and its Member States. This paper will review the foundation for the development of this task, describe the progress that has been made and outline the path forward. (author)

  14. On-chip antenna: Practical design and characterization considerations

    KAUST Repository

    Shamim, Atif; Salama, Khaled N.; Sedky, S.; Soliman, E. A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper highlights the challenges of an emergent field, namely, on-chip antenna design. Consistent with the RF System-on-Chip (SoC) concept, co-design strategy for circuits and on-chip antennas is described. A number of design and layout issues, arising from the highly integrated nature of this kind of systems, are discussed. The characterization difficulties related to on-chip antennas radiation properties are also highlighted. Finally, a novel on-wafer test fixture is proposed to measure the gain and radiation pattern of the on-chip antennas in the anechoic chamber.

  15. On-chip antenna: Practical design and characterization considerations

    KAUST Repository

    Shamim, Atif

    2012-07-28

    This paper highlights the challenges of an emergent field, namely, on-chip antenna design. Consistent with the RF System-on-Chip (SoC) concept, co-design strategy for circuits and on-chip antennas is described. A number of design and layout issues, arising from the highly integrated nature of this kind of systems, are discussed. The characterization difficulties related to on-chip antennas radiation properties are also highlighted. Finally, a novel on-wafer test fixture is proposed to measure the gain and radiation pattern of the on-chip antennas in the anechoic chamber.

  16. Engine cycle design considerations for nuclear thermal propulsion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelaccio, D.G.; Scheil, C.M.; Collins, J.T.

    1993-01-01

    A top-level study was performed which addresses nuclear thermal propulsion system engine cycle options and their applicability to support future Space Exploration Initiative manned lunar and Mars missions. Technical and development issues associated with expander, gas generator, and bleed cycle near-term, solid core nuclear thermal propulsion engines are identified and examined. In addition to performance and weight the influence of the engine cycle type on key design selection parameters such as design complexity, reliability, development time, and cost are discussed. Representative engine designs are presented and compared. Their applicability and performance impact on typical near-term lunar and Mars missions are shown

  17. Design Considerations of a Solid State Thermal Energy Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janbozorgi, Mohammad; Houssainy, Sammy; Thacker, Ariana; Ip, Peggy; Ismail, Walid; Kavehpour, Pirouz

    2016-11-01

    With the growing governmental restrictions on carbon emission, renewable energies are becoming more prevalent. A reliable use of a renewable source however requires a built-in storage to overcome the inherent intermittent nature of the available energy. Thermal design of a solid state energy storage has been investigated for optimal performance. The impact of flow regime, laminar vs. turbulent, on the design and sizing of the system is also studied. The implications of low thermal conductivity of the storage material are discussed and a design that maximizes the round trip efficiency is presented. This study was supported by Award No. EPC-14-027 Granted by California Energy Commission (CEC).

  18. Damping considerations in CANDU feeder pipe design and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usmani, S.A.; Saleem, M.A.; So, G.

    1990-01-01

    Recent developments in pipe damping indicate a trend towards more realistic and less conservative values, which result in less rigid and safer pipe designs. The CANDU-PHW (Canada deuterium uranium, pressurized heavy water) reactor feeder pipe designs have applied similar approaches which permit seismic qualifications without overly restraining these compact arrays of pipes to cater for the large creep and thermal anchor movement. This paper reviews the feeder design aspects, especially pertaining to the design provisions, experimental verification and analytical modelling for seismic qualification in the light of recent pipe dynamic developments. Using illustrative examples, comparison of seismic analysis results is provided for the ASME Code Case N-411 dampings, and those traditionally used in the feeder seismic qualification. The results confirm acceptability of the traditional approach which permit simplified analysis to demonstrate seismic qualificationqualification of CANDU feeder pipes

  19. Planning and architectural safety considerations in designing nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konsowa, Ahmed A.

    2009-01-01

    To achieve optimum safety and to avoid possible hazards in nuclear power plants, considering architectural design fundamentals and all operating precautions is mandatory. There are some planning and architectural precautions should be considered to achieve a high quality design and construction of nuclear power plant with optimum safety. This paper highlights predicted hazards like fire, terrorism, aircraft crash attacks, adversaries, intruders, and earthquakes, proposing protective actions against these hazards that vary from preventing danger to evacuating and sheltering people in-place. For instance; using safeguards program to protect against sabotage, theft, and diversion. Also, site and building well design focusing on escape pathways, emergency exits, and evacuation zones, and the safety procedures such as; evacuation exercises and sheltering processes according to different emergency classifications. In addition, this paper mentions some important codes and regulations that control nuclear power plants design, and assessment methods that evaluate probable risks. (author)

  20. Practical considerations for adaptive trial design and implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Pinheiro, José; Kuznetsova, Olga

    2014-01-01

    This edited volume is a definitive text on adaptive clinical trial designs from creation and customization to utilization. As this book covers the full spectrum of topics involved in the adaptive designs arena, it will serve as a valuable reference for researchers working in industry, government and academia. The target audience is anyone involved in the planning and execution of clinical trials, in particular, statisticians, clinicians, pharmacometricians, clinical operation specialists, drug supply managers, and infrastructure providers.  In spite of the increased efficiency of adaptive trials in saving costs and time, ultimately getting drugs to patients sooner, their adoption in clinical development is still relatively low.  One of the chief reasons is the higher complexity of adaptive design trials as compared to traditional trials. Barriers to the use of clinical trials with adaptive features include the concerns about the integrity of study design and conduct, the risk of regulatory non-acceptance, t...

  1. Geothermal FIT Design: International Experience and U.S. Considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rickerson, W.; Gifford, J.; Grace, R.; Cory, K.

    2012-08-01

    Developing power plants is a risky endeavor, whether conventional or renewable generation. Feed-in tariff (FIT) policies can be designed to address some of these risks, and their design can be tailored to geothermal electric plant development. Geothermal projects face risks similar to other generation project development, including finding buyers for power, ensuring adequate transmission capacity, competing to supply electricity and/or renewable energy certificates (RECs), securing reliable revenue streams, navigating the legal issues related to project development, and reacting to changes in existing regulations or incentives. Although FITs have not been created specifically for geothermal in the United States to date, a variety of FIT design options could reduce geothermal power plant development risks and are explored. This analysis focuses on the design of FIT incentive policies for geothermal electric projects and how FITs can be used to reduce risks (excluding drilling unproductive exploratory wells).

  2. Secondary cycle design considerations for reduction of reactor transients frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bevilacqua, L.; Leal, M.R.L.V.

    1980-01-01

    The secondary cycle systems should not be considered of secondary importance to the pressurized water reactor safety. The advanced design and analysis techniques used for components related to nuclear safety are suggested. (E.G.) [pt

  3. Design considerations for economically competitive sodium cooled fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hongbin; Zhao, Haihua; Mousseau, Vincent; Szilard, Ronaldo

    2009-01-01

    The technological viability of sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR) has been established by various experimental and prototype (demonstration) reactors such as EBR-II, FFTF, Phenix, JOYO, BN-600 etc. However, the economic competitiveness of SFR has not been proven yet. The perceived high cost premium of SFRs over LWRs has been the primary impediment to the commercial expansion of SFR technologies. In this paper, cost reduction options are discussed for advanced SFR designs. These include a hybrid loop-pool design to optimize the primary system, multiple reheat and intercooling helium Brayton cycle for the power conversion system and the potential for suppression of intermediate heat transport system. The design options for the fully passive decay heat removal systems are also thoroughly examined. These include direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS), reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system (RVACS) and the newly proposed pool reactor auxiliary cooling system (PRACS) in the context of the hybrid loop-pool design. (author)

  4. Design considerations and sustainability of self-compacting concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Grünewald, Steffen; De Schutter, Geert

    2016-01-01

    Self-compacting concrete (SCC) differs from conventional vibrated concrete (CVC) in the rheological behaviour, which is achieved by adequate mix design. The application and production requirements also pose demands on the mix design and workability. Effective production requires adequate strength control. The use of Portland Cement promotes a rapid early age strength development, but it comes with a relative high impact on the environment since decarbonation and a high energ...

  5. Architect engineer balance-of-plant radiological design considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piccot, A.R.

    1975-01-01

    Methods which are or may be used by Architect Engineers in dealing with the problems of radiological safety in the design of a nuclear power plant are discussed. The bases and basic requirements for a radiation protection program are briefly noted. Requirements in the areas of planning, organization, responsibilities and implementation of radiation protection are discussed. Lists of safety tasks which should be performed during the various design phases are presented

  6. Mechanical design of walking machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikawa, Keisuke; Hirose, Shigeo

    2007-01-15

    The performance of existing actuators, such as electric motors, is very limited, be it power-weight ratio or energy efficiency. In this paper, we discuss the method to design a practical walking machine under this severe constraint with focus on two concepts, the gravitationally decoupled actuation (GDA) and the coupled drive. The GDA decouples the driving system against the gravitational field to suppress generation of negative power and improve energy efficiency. On the other hand, the coupled drive couples the driving system to distribute the output power equally among actuators and maximize the utilization of installed actuator power. First, we depict the GDA and coupled drive in detail. Then, we present actual machines, TITAN-III and VIII, quadruped walking machines designed on the basis of the GDA, and NINJA-I and II, quadruped wall walking machines designed on the basis of the coupled drive. Finally, we discuss walking machines that travel on three-dimensional terrain (3D terrain), which includes the ground, walls and ceiling. Then, we demonstrate with computer simulation that we can selectively leverage GDA and coupled drive by walking posture control.

  7. System design considerations for fast-neutron interrogation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micklich, B.J.; Curry, B.P.; Fink, C.L.; Smith, D.L.; Yule, T.J.

    1993-01-01

    Nonintrusive interrogation techniques that employ fast neutrons are of interest because of their sensitivity to light elements such as carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. The primary requirement of a fast-neutron inspection system is to determine the value of atomic densities, or their ratios, over a volumetric grid superimposed on the object being interrogated. There are a wide variety of fast-neutron techniques that can provide this information. The differences between the various nuclear systems can be considered in light of the trade-offs relative to the performance requirements for each system's components. Given a set of performance criteria, the operational requirements of the proposed nuclear systems may also differ. For instance, resolution standards will drive scanning times and tomographic requirements, both of which vary for the different approaches. We are modelling a number of the fast-neutron interrogation techniques currently under consideration, to include Fast Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy (FNTS), Pulsed Fast Neutron Analysis (PFNA), and its variant, 14-MeV Associated Particle Imaging (API). The goals of this effort are to determine the component requirements for each technique, identify trade-offs that system performance standards impose upon those component requirements, and assess the relative advantages and disadvantages of the different approaches. In determining the component requirements, we will consider how they are driven by system performance standards, such as image resolution, scanning time, and statistical uncertainty. In considering the trade-offs between system components, we concentrate primarily on those which are common to all approaches, for example: source characteristics versus detector array requirements. We will then use the analysis to propose some figures-of-merit that enable performance comparisons between the various fast-neutron systems under consideration. The status of this ongoing effort is presented

  8. Design considerations of modular pump limiters for large tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uckan, T.; Klepper, C.C.; Mioduszewski, P.K.

    1987-11-01

    Long-pulse (>10-s) and high-power (>10-MW) operation of large tokamaks requires multiple limiter modules for particle and heat removal, and the power load must be distributed among a number of modules. Because each added module changes the performance of all the others, a set of design criteria must be defined for the overall limiter system. The relationship between individual modules must also be considered from the standpoint of flux coverage and shadowing effects. This paper addresses these issues and provides design guidelines. Parameters of the individual modules are then determined from the system requirements for particle and power removal. Long-pulse operation of large tokamaks requires that the limiter modules be equipped with active cooling. At the leading edge of a module, the cooling channel determines the thickness of the limiter blade (or head). A model has been developed for estimating the system exhaust efficiency in terms of the parameters of the leading edge (i.e., its thickness and the design heat flux) in terms of given device parameters and the power load that must be removed. The impact on module design of state-of-the-art engineering technology for high heat removal is discussed. The choice of locations for the modules is also investigated, and the effects of shadowing between modules on particle and power removal are examined. The results are applied to the Tore Supra tokamak. Conceptual design parameters of the modular pump limiter system are given. 10 refs., 5 figs

  9. Design considerations for the rotating electrostatic liquid-film radiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bankoff, S.G.; Miksis, M.J.; Kim, H.; Gwinner, R.

    1994-01-01

    A lightweight, fully modular radiator design for heat rejection in space is proposed, which is estimated to weigh less than 2kg per square meter of the effective radiator area. The feature which makes this thin membrane radiator practical is the internal electrostatic field system, which can stop radiator leaks from punctures, sudden accelerations or accidental tears. Preliminary design calculations are presented for a rotating conical radiator, using liquid lithium at an inlet temperature of 800K. Remarkably low weights of less than 1kgkW -1 may be attained, with safety factors of two or more for stopping leaks. This is almost an order of magnitude less than the values for current heat pipe designs. ((orig.))

  10. Magnet Design Considerations for Fusion Nuclear Science Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Y. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Kessel, C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); El-Guebaly, L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States) Fusion Technology Institute; Titus, P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2016-06-01

    The Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) is a nuclear confinement facility that provides a fusion environment with components of the reactor integrated together to bridge the technical gaps of burning plasma and nuclear science between the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the demonstration power plant (DEMO). Compared with ITER, the FNSF is smaller in size but generates much higher magnetic field, i.e., 30 times higher neutron fluence with three orders of magnitude longer plasma operation at higher operating temperatures for structures surrounding the plasma. Input parameters to the magnet design from system code analysis include magnetic field of 7.5 T at the plasma center with a plasma major radius of 4.8 m and a minor radius of 1.2 m and a peak field of 15.5 T on the toroidal field (TF) coils for the FNSF. Both low-temperature superconductors (LTS) and high-temperature superconductors (HTS) are considered for the FNSF magnet design based on the state-of-the-art fusion magnet technology. The higher magnetic field can be achieved by using the high-performance ternary restacked-rod process Nb3Sn strands for TF magnets. The circular cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) design similar to ITER magnets and a high-aspect-ratio rectangular CICC design are evaluated for FNSF magnets, but low-activation-jacket materials may need to be selected. The conductor design concept and TF coil winding pack composition and dimension based on the horizontal maintenance schemes are discussed. Neutron radiation limits for the LTS and HTS superconductors and electrical insulation materials are also reviewed based on the available materials previously tested. The material radiation limits for FNSF magnets are defined as part of the conceptual design studies for FNSF magnets.

  11. ARGOS laser system mechanical design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deysenroth, M.; Honsberg, M.; Gemperlein, H.; Ziegleder, J.; Raab, W.; Rabien, S.; Barl, L.; Gässler, W.; Borelli, J. L.

    2014-07-01

    ARGOS, a multi-star adaptive optics system is designed for the wide-field imager and multi-object spectrograph LUCI on the LBT (Large Binocular Telescope). Based on Rayleigh scattering the laser constellation images 3 artificial stars (at 532 nm) per each of the 2 eyes of the LBT, focused at a height of 12 km (Ground Layer Adaptive Optics). The stars are nominally positioned on a circle 2' in radius, but each star can be moved by up to 0.5' in any direction. For all of these needs are following main subsystems necessary: 1. A laser system with its 3 Lasers (Nd:YAG ~18W each) for delivering strong collimated light as for LGS indispensable. 2. The Launch system to project 3 beams per main mirror as a 40 cm telescope to the sky. 3. The Wave Front Sensor with a dichroic mirror. 4. The dichroic mirror unit to grab and interpret the data. 5. A Calibration Unit to adjust the system independently also during day time. 6. Racks + platforms for the WFS units. 7. Platforms and ladders for a secure access. This paper should mainly demonstrate how the ARGOS Laser System is configured and designed to support all other systems.

  12. Cognitive considerations for helmet-mounted display design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Gregory; Rash, Clarence E.

    2010-04-01

    Helmet-mounted displays (HMDs) are designed as a tool to increase performance. To achieve this, there must be an accurate transfer of information from the HMD to the user. Ideally, an HMD would be designed to accommodate the abilities and limitations of users' cognitive processes. It is not enough for the information (whether visual, auditory, or tactual) to be displayed; the information must be perceived, attended, remembered, and organized in a way that guides appropriate decision-making, judgment, and action. Following a general overview, specific subtopics of cognition, including perception, attention, memory, knowledge, decision-making, and problem solving are explored within the context of HMDs.

  13. Control system design considerations in a modern nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, P.; Raiskums, G.; Harber, J.; Tikku, S.

    2010-01-01

    Applying new technologies is a challenge for instrumentation and control (I and C) designers to ensure that the overall principles of defence-in-depth, the independence of safety functions (credited in the safety case), and modern human factors engineering principles are maintained. This paper describes the Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR-1000) I and C architecture, including the display/control systems and the design approaches employed to ensure that the fundamental premise of independence between safety and process control is not compromised and that the reliability targets for each layer of protection are fulfilled to meet the overall plant safety goals. (author)

  14. INFORMATION DISPLAY: CONSIDERATIONS FOR DESIGNING COMPUTER-BASED DISPLAY SYSTEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'HARA, J.M.; PIRUS, D.; BELTRATCCHI, L.

    2004-01-01

    This paper discussed the presentation of information in computer-based control rooms. Issues associated with the typical displays currently in use are discussed. It is concluded that these displays should be augmented with new displays designed to better meet the information needs of plant personnel and to minimize the need for interface management tasks (the activities personnel have to do to access and organize the information they need). Several approaches to information design are discussed, specifically addressing: (1) monitoring, detection, and situation assessment; (2) routine task performance; and (3) teamwork, crew coordination, collaborative work

  15. Design considerations for a radiation hardened nonvolatile memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    Sub-optimal design practices can reduce the radiation hardness of a circuit even though it is fabricated in a radiation hardened process. This is especially true for a nonvolatile memory, as compared to a standard digital circuit, where high voltages and unusual bias conditions are required. This paper will discuss the design technique's used in the development of a 64K EEPROM (Electrically Erasable Programmable Read Only Memory) to maximize radiation hardness. The circuit radiation test results will be reviewed in order to provide validation of the techniques

  16. A FEW CONSIDERATIONS ABOUT TRADE FAIR STANDS DESIGN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NEIDONI Nadina

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents some aspects related to the design of a trade fair stand, advertising a company specialized in the fabrication of corrugated fibre board packaging. The first section reviews shortly the main features of the industrial design. The second section deals with the structural conception of successful trade shows. Further, the importance of the package in the marketing matters is addressed. In this context corrugated fibreboard, as secondary or tertiary material is essential. In the final section, a comparison between two trade fair stands, representing a corrugated fibreboard company are presented.

  17. Sorbent selection and design considerations for uranium trapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, R.M.; Hobbs, W.E.; Norton, J.L.; Stephenson, M.J.

    1981-07-01

    The efficient removal of UF 6 from effluent streams can be accomplished through the selection of the best solid sorbent and the implementation of good design principles. Pressure losses, sorbent capacity, reaction kinetics, sorbent regeneration/uranium recovery requirements and the effects of other system components are the performance factors which are summarized. The commonly used uranium trapping materials highlighted are sodium fluoride, H-151 alumina, XF-100 alumina, and F-1 alumina. Sorbent selection and trap design have to be made on a case-by-case basis but the theoretical modeling studies and the evaluation of the performance factors presented can be used as a guide for other chemical trap applications

  18. Safety considerations in the design of the Fusion Engineering Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) regulations and guidelines for radiation protection have been reviewed and are being applied to the device design. Direct radiation protection is provided by the device shield and the reactor building walls. Radiation from the activated device components and the tritium fuel is to be controlled with shielding, contamination control, and ventilation. The potential release of tritium from the plant has influenced the selection of reactor building and plant designs and specifications. The safety of the plant workers is affected primarily by the radiation from the activated device components and from plasma chamber debris

  19. Stiffness and damping in mechanical design

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rivin, Eugene I

    1999-01-01

    ... important conceptual issues are stiffness of mechanical structures and their components and damping in mechanical systems sensitive to and/or generating vibrations. Stiffness and strength are the most important criteria for many mechanical designs. However, although there are hundreds of books on various aspects of strength, and strength issues ar...

  20. Some engineering considerations when designing centrifuge enrichment plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, T.T.

    1982-01-01

    A review is given of the three main areas where flexibility is needed in the design of centrifuge enrichment plants. These are: the need to cope with market requirements, the limitations imposed by currently available centrifuges and ever advancing centrifuge technology. Details of BNFL's experience with centrifuge enrichment at Capenhurst are presented. (U.K.)

  1. Additive Manufacturing Design Considerations for Liquid Engine Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitten, Dave; Hissam, Andy; Baker, Kevin; Rice, Darron

    2014-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center's Propulsion Systems Department has gained significant experience in the last year designing, building, and testing liquid engine components using additive manufacturing. The department has developed valve, duct, turbo-machinery, and combustion device components using this technology. Many valuable lessons were learned during this process. These lessons will be the focus of this presentation. We will present criteria for selecting part candidates for additive manufacturing. Some part characteristics are 'tailor made' for this process. Selecting the right parts for the process is the first step to maximizing productivity gains. We will also present specific lessons we learned about feature geometry that can and cannot be produced using additive manufacturing machines. Most liquid engine components were made using a two-step process. The base part was made using additive manufacturing and then traditional machining processes were used to produce the final part. The presentation will describe design accommodations needed to make the base part and lessons we learned about which features could be built directly and which require the final machine process. Tolerance capabilities, surface finish, and material thickness allowances will also be covered. Additive Manufacturing can produce internal passages that cannot be made using traditional approaches. It can also eliminate a significant amount of manpower by reducing part count and leveraging model-based design and analysis techniques. Information will be shared about performance enhancements and design efficiencies we experienced for certain categories of engine parts.

  2. Design considerations for a large aperture high field superconducting dipole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harfoush, F.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Harrison, M.; Kerby, J.; Koepke, K.; Mantsch, P.; Nicol, T.; Riddiford, A.; Theilacker, J.

    1989-03-01

    The final phase of the Fermilab upgrade proposal calls for a new ring of superconducting magnets to be placed in the existing Main Accelerator tunnel. The goal of this design study is to specify a high field dipole (HFD) that is capable of supporting fixed target operation (ramping, resonant extraction) at a field of 6.6T (1.5 Tev) and colliding beam physics at 8.0T (1.8 Tev). The magnetic field quality at high field is set by the large amplitude orbits associated with resonant extraction. The field quality must therefore be at least as good as the existing Tevatron magnets which fulfill these criteria. The high fields and large aperture of this magnet result in large forces on the coil and collar assemblies. Therefore, the cold mass design must be able to sustain these forces while providing sufficient cooling to the coils during 4.2 K fixed target operation, and a minimum heat load during 1.8 K collider operation. The design work is still in progress but a cosine-theta, cold-iron dipole with a 70mm inner diameter coil has been tentatively adopted. This report presents details on the conductor and cable parameters, coil cross-section, projected manufacturing tolerances, iron yoke design, and cold mass assembly. 4 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  3. Good times?! 3 problems and design considerations for playful HCI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    el Ali, A.; Nack, F.; Hardman, L.

    2011-01-01

    Using Location-aware Multimedia Messaging (LMM) systems as a research testbed, this paper presents an analysis of how ‘fun or playfulness’ can be studied and designed for under mobile and ubiquitous environments. These LMM systems allow users to leave geo-tagged multimedia messages behind at any

  4. An Electrostatic Free-Electron Maser for Fusion - Design Considerations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Amersfoort, P. W.; Urbanus, W. H.; Verhoeven, A. G. A.; Verheul, A.; Sterk, A. B.; Vaningen, A. M.; van der Wiel, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    For the next generation of large tokamaks, efficient mm-wave sources at frequencies of up to 300 GHz and unit size of 1 MW cw will be required. The design of a free electron maser for this application, based on a dc electrostatic accelerator, is discussed.

  5. Preliminary design considerations for the stage 1 PEP lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helm, R.H.; Lee, M.J.

    1974-07-01

    A general description of the proposed PEP e + e - storage ring is discussed in the paper. We discuss the lattice and its operating characteristics in more detail, show how the design luminosity operative regions may be met and outline the limits of the operative regions of the beam parameters in several modes of operation. 18 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab

  6. Design considerations for on-line vibration diagnostic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branagan, L.A.; Schjeibel, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    The decisions made in the design of a data system for on-line vibration diagnostic system in power plants define how well the system will meet its intended goals. Direct use of the data for performing troubleshooting or developing operating correlations requires an understanding of the subtle impact of the design decisions incorporated in the data system. A data system includes data acquisition, data storage, and data retrieval. Data acquisition includes the selection of sensors, of vibration measurement modes, and of the time stamping format, and the arrangement of data collection cycles. Data storage requires the evaluation of data compression options and of data segregation. Data retrieval design requires an understanding of the data storage and acquisition techniques. Each of these options and design decisions involves compromises, many of which are discussed in this paper. Actual and synthetic data are presented to illustrate these points. The authors' experience with multiple data collection cycles, with frequent monitoring, and with storage by exception suggests that these techniques can be developed into an effective diagnostic system

  7. Design considerations for a large aperture high field superconducting dipole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harfoush, F.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Harrison, M.; Kerby, J.; Koepke, K.; Mantsch, P.; Nicol, T.; Riddiford, A.; Theilacker, J.

    1989-03-01

    The final phase of the Fermilab upgrade proposal calls for a new ring of superconducting magnets to be placed in the existing Main Accelerator tunnel. The goal of this design study is to specify a high field dipole (HFD) that is capable of supporting fixed target operation (ramping, resonant extraction) at a field of 6.6T (1.5 Tev) and colliding beam physics at 8.0T (1.8 Tev). The magnetic field quality at high field is set by the large amplitude orbits associated with resonant extraction. The field quality must therefore be at least as good as the existing Tevatron magnets which fulfill these criteria. The high fields and large aperture of this magnet result in large forces on the coil and collar assemblies. Therefore, the cold mass design must be able to sustain these forces while providing sufficient cooling to the coils during 4.2 K fixed target operation, and a minimum heat load during 1.8 K collider operation. The design work is still in progress but a cosine-theta, cold-iron dipole with a 70mm inner diameter coil has been tentatively adopted. This report presents details on the conductor and cable parameters, coil cross-section, projected manufacturing tolerances, iron yoke design, and cold mass assembly. 4 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Considerations for the rational design of a Chlamydia vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Steven; Bulir, David; Kaushic, Charu; Mahony, James

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chlamydia trachomatis is the leading cause of preventable blindness and the most common bacterial sexually transmitted infection. Remarkable progress in vaccine research over the past six?decades has led to the advancement of novel C. trachomatis vaccine candidates into clinical trials. However, many questions regarding the role of specific cellular populations and molecular mechanisms in protective immunity against human C. trachomatis genital tract infections remain unanswered. Bio...

  9. The renewable portfolio standard: design considerations and an implementation survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, T.; Jaccard, M.

    2001-01-01

    Renewables have social and environmental benefits compared to conventional electricity sources, but are rarely competitive on a strict financial cost basis. This is because conventional sources are sometimes subsidized, their full pollution costs are ignored, and renewables involve newer, higher-cost technologies whose relative costs will fall with commercialization. Governments use several mechanisms to support renewables, including direct financial support (grants, loans), indirect support (R and D, demonstrations), reform of financial costs of conventional sources (subsidy removal, pollution taxes), and the Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS). The RPS requires a minimum share of electricity from renewable energy sources. Its use is spreading because it maintains an incentive for renewable producers to reduce costs, links the regulated market outcome to an environmental target, and reduces government involvement. Although it is too early to evaluate fully its effectiveness, the survey for this study explored implementation issues in three European countries, nine US states, and Australia, and found the following. The RPS target is usually set to have environmental benefits without causing significant price increases (cost caps are sometimes used). Most jurisdictions limit eligibility to grid-connected, domestic renewables. The RPS is usually applied to producers rather than consumers, and to energy output not capacity. Flexibility mechanisms are desired but a challenge to implement. Administration in the US and Australia is by government with delegation to independent utility regulators, while in Europe it is more the responsibility of government. Everywhere, the RPS is applied alongside other mechanisms of renewables support. (author)

  10. Reliable Thermoelectric Module Design under Opposing Requirements from Structural and Thermoelectric Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karri, Naveen K.; Mo, Changki

    2018-06-01

    Structural reliability of thermoelectric generation (TEG) systems still remains an issue, especially for applications such as large-scale industrial or automobile exhaust heat recovery, in which TEG systems are subject to dynamic loads and thermal cycling. Traditional thermoelectric (TE) system design and optimization techniques, focused on performance alone, could result in designs that may fail during operation as the geometric requirements for optimal performance (especially the power) are often in conflict with the requirements for mechanical reliability. This study focused on reducing the thermomechanical stresses in a TEG system without compromising the optimized system performance. Finite element simulations were carried out to study the effect of TE element (leg) geometry such as leg length and cross-sectional shape under constrained material volume requirements. Results indicated that the element length has a major influence on the element stresses whereas regular cross-sectional shapes have minor influence. The impact of TE element stresses on the mechanical reliability is evaluated using brittle material failure theory based on Weibull analysis. An alternate couple configuration that relies on the industry practice of redundant element design is investigated. Results showed that the alternate configuration considerably reduced the TE element and metallization stresses, thereby enhancing the structural reliability, with little trade-off in the optimized performance. The proposed alternate configuration could serve as a potential design modification for improving the reliability of systems optimized for thermoelectric performance.

  11. Flexible energy-storage devices: design consideration and recent progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianfu; Lu, Xihong; Liu, Bin; Chen, Di; Tong, Yexiang; Shen, Guozhen

    2014-07-23

    Flexible energy-storage devices are attracting increasing attention as they show unique promising advantages, such as flexibility, shape diversity, light weight, and so on; these properties enable applications in portable, flexible, and even wearable electronic devices, including soft electronic products, roll-up displays, and wearable devices. Consequently, considerable effort has been made in recent years to fulfill the requirements of future flexible energy-storage devices, and much progress has been witnessed. This review describes the most recent advances in flexible energy-storage devices, including flexible lithium-ion batteries and flexible supercapacitors. The latest successful examples in flexible lithium-ion batteries and their technological innovations and challenges are reviewed first. This is followed by a detailed overview of the recent progress in flexible supercapacitors based on carbon materials and a number of composites and flexible micro-supercapacitors. Some of the latest achievements regarding interesting integrated energy-storage systems are also reviewed. Further research direction is also proposed to surpass existing technological bottle-necks and realize idealized flexible energy-storage devices. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Nuclear Fuel Design Considerations for the 1990s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stucker, David L.

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear fuel for many of today's operating Ness's was designed based on the expectation of annual fuel cycles, plutonium recycle, low cost uranium commodities, and discharge burnups of about 33 GW D/Mtu. The original PWR Ness designers envisioned equilibrium annual cycles with negative moderator feedback at all times. The annual cycle and low discharge burnup could be easily achieved without the use of burnable absorbers in all but the first fuel cycle using classical out-in core loading techniques. Fuel assembly insert burnable absorbers were developed to maintain negative moderator feedback for first cycles but were not optimized for use in reload cycles due to their perceived limited application. The plutonium recycle assumption has proven to be one with major design implications. Low discharge burnups to maximize the fissile content of the total plutonium generated, relatively low H/U ratios to promote plutonium breeding, spent fuel storage capacity sized by cooling requirements not plant lifetime, and less importance placed upon the use of parasitic materials within the reactor volume are all outcomes of the plutonium recycle design assumption. Historically, the plutonium recycle assumption has proven to be an unfortunate one in that fuel arrays and Ness hardware were designed and compromised to accommodate a fuel cycle alternative that has seen little economic or political success. Utility customers in the 1990s require ever-increasing fuel discharge burnup and hot residence time, continuing thermal margin improvement, efficient burnable absorbers, continued reductions in fuel cycle, operation and maintenance costs, and reductions in worker radiation exposure. In addition, because the costs associated with fuel rod defects are extremely high, both in currency and worker exposure, all of these competitive pressures come with the foremost requirement of defect-free operation. Fuel assembly vendors have responded to these competitive pressures with advanced

  13. Auxiliary bearing design considerations for gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penfield, S.R. Jr.; Rodwell, E.

    2001-01-01

    The need to avoid contamination of the primary system, along with other perceived advantages, has led to the selection of electromagnetic bearings (EMBs) in most ongoing commercial-scale gas cooled reactor (GCR) designs. However, one implication of magnetic bearings is the requirement to provide backup support to mitigate the effects of failures or overload conditions. The demands on these auxiliary or 'catcher' bearings have been substantially escalated by the recent development of direct Brayton cycle GCR concepts. Conversely, there has been only limited directed research in the area of auxiliary bearings, particularly for vertically oriented turbomachines. This paper explores the current state-of-the-art for auxiliary bearings and the implications for current GCR designs. (author)

  14. Radiotherapy facilities: Master planning and concept design considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-08-15

    This publication provides guidelines on how to plan a radiotherapy facility in terms of the strategic master planning process including the legal, technical and infrastructure requirements. It outlines a risk assessment methodology, a typical project work plan and describes the professional expertise required for the implementation of such a project. Generic templates for a block design are suggested, which include possibilities for future expansion. These templates can be overlaid onto the designated site such that the most efficient workflow between the main functional areas can be ensured. A sample checklist is attached to act as a guideline for project management and to indicate the critical stages in the process where technical expert assistance may be needed. The publication is aimed at professionals and administrators involved in infrastructure development, planning and facility management, as well as engineers, building contractors and radiotherapy professionals.

  15. Critical early mission design considerations for lunar data systems architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hei, Donald J., Jr.; Stephens, Elaine

    1992-01-01

    This paper outlines recent early mission design activites for a lunar data systems architecture. Each major functional element is shown to be strikingly similar when viewed in a common reference system. While this similarity probably deviates with lower levels of decomposition, the sub-functions can always be arranged into similar and dissimilar categories. Similar functions can be implemented as objects - implemented once and reused several times like today's advanced integrated circuits. This approach to mission data systems, applied to other NASA programs, may result in substantial agency implementation and maintenance savings. In today's zero-sum-game budgetary environment, this approach could help to enable a lunar exploration program in the next decade. Several early mission studies leading to such an object-oriented data systems design are recommended.

  16. Radiotherapy Facilities: Master Planning and Concept Design Considerations (Russian Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This publication provides guidelines on how to plan a radiotherapy facility in terms of the strategic master planning process including the legal, technical and infrastructure requirements. It outlines a risk assessment methodology and a typical project work plan, and describes the professional expertise required for the implementation of such a project. Generic templates for a block design are suggested, which include possibilities for future expansion. These templates can be overlaid onto the designated site such that the most efficient workflow between the main functional areas can be ensured. A sample checklist is attached to act as a guideline for project management and to indicate the critical stages in the process where technical expert assistance may be needed. The publication is aimed at professionals and administrators involved in infrastructure development, planning and facility management, as well as engineers, building contractors and radiotherapy professionals

  17. Radiotherapy facilities: Master planning and concept design considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    This publication provides guidelines on how to plan a radiotherapy facility in terms of the strategic master planning process including the legal, technical and infrastructure requirements. It outlines a risk assessment methodology, a typical project work plan and describes the professional expertise required for the implementation of such a project. Generic templates for a block design are suggested, which include possibilities for future expansion. These templates can be overlaid onto the designated site such that the most efficient workflow between the main functional areas can be ensured. A sample checklist is attached to act as a guideline for project management and to indicate the critical stages in the process where technical expert assistance may be needed. The publication is aimed at professionals and administrators involved in infrastructure development, planning and facility management, as well as engineers, building contractors and radiotherapy professionals

  18. Technical considerations for flexible piping design in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, S.C.; Chou, C.K.

    1985-01-01

    The overall objective of this research project is to develop a technical basis for flexible piping designs which will improve piping reliability and minimize the use of pipe supports, snubbers, and pipe whip restraints. The current study was conducted to establish the necessary groundwork based on the piping reliability analysis. A confirmatory piping reliability assessment indicated that removing rigid supports and snubbers tends to either improve or affect very little the piping reliability. A couple of changes to be implemented in Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.61 and RG 1.122 aimed at more flexible piping design were investigated. It was concluded that these changes substantially reduce calculated piping responses and allows piping redesigns with significant reduction in number of supports and snubbers without violating ASME code requirements

  19. Safety considerations in next step fusion design and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, D.F.

    1990-01-01

    Recent U.S. and international design studies provide insights into the potential safety and environmental advantages of fusion as well as the development needed to realize this potential. We in the Fusion Safety Program at EG ampersand G Idaho have analyzed the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT), the International Thermonuclear Engineering Reactor (ITER), and the Advanced Reactor Innovative Engineering Study (ARIES). I have reviewed these three designs to determine issues related to meeting the safety and the environmental goals that guide fusion development in the U.S. The paper lists safety and environmental issues that are generic to fusion and approaches to favorably resolve each issue. The technical developments that have the highest potential of contributing to improving the safety and environmental attractiveness of fusion are identified and discussed. These developments are in the areas of low-activation materials, plasma- facing components, and plasma physics relating to off-normal plasma events and tritium burn-up. 8 refs., 7 tabs

  20. Design considerations for large roof-integrated photovoltaic arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ropp, M.E.; Begovic, M.; Rohatgi, A. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States); Long, R. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta (United States). Office of Facilities

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes calculations and modeling used in the design of the photovoltaic (PV) array built on the roof of the Georgia Tech Aquatic Center, the aquatic sports venue for the 1996 Olympic and Paralympic Games. The software package PVFORM (version 3.3) was extensively utilized; because of its importance to this work, it is thoroughly reviewed here. Procedures required to adapt PVFORM to this particular installation are described. The expected behavior and performance of the system, including maximum power output, annual energy output and maximum expected temperature, are then presented, and the use of this information in making informed design decisions is described. Finally, since the orientation of the PV array is not optimal, the effect of the unoptimized array orientation on the system`s performance is quantified. (author)

  1. SNS accumulator ring design and space charge considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weng, W.T.

    1998-08-01

    The goal of the proposed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is to provide a short pulse proton beam of about 0.5 {micro}s with average beam power of 1 MW. To achieve such purpose, a proton storage ring operated at 60 Hz with 1 {times} 10{sup 14} protons per pulse at 1 GeV is required. The Accumulator Ring (AR) receives 1 msec long H{sup {minus}} beam bunches of 28 mA from a 1 GeV linac. Scope and design performance goals of the AR are presented. About 1,200 turns of charge exchange injection is needed to accumulate 1 mA in the ring. After a brief description of the lattice design and machine performance parameters, space charge related issues, such as: tune shifts, stopband corrections, halo generatino and beam collimation etc. is discussed.

  2. SNS ACCUMULATOR RING DESIGN AND SPACE CHARGE CONSIDERATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WENG,W.T.

    1998-05-04

    The goal of the proposed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is to provide a short pulse proton beam of about 0.5{micro}s with average beam power of 1MW. To achieve such purpose, a proton storage ring operated at 60Hz with 1 x 10{sup 14} protons per pulse at 1GeV is required. The Accumulator Ring (AR) receives 1msec long H{sup {minus}} beam bunches of 28mA from a 1GeV linac. Scope and design performance goals of the AR are presented. About 1,200 turns of charge exchange injection is needed to accumulate 1mA in the ring. After a brief description of the lattice design and machine performance parameters, space charge related issues, such as: tune shifts, stopband corrections, halo generation and beam collimation etc. is discussed.

  3. Magnet field design considerations for a high energy superconducting cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botman, J.I.M.; Craddock, M.K.; Kost, C.J.; Richardson, J.R.

    1983-08-01

    This paper reports the pole shape designs for a two stage superconducting isochronous cyclotron combination (CANUCK) to accelerate 100 μA proton beams to 15 GeV. The pole shape of the 15 sectors of the first stage 3.5 GeV proton cyclotron provides isochronism over the full energy range and a constant axial tune over all but the lowest energies. Progress on the pole design of the 42 sector 15 GeV second stage is also reported. The magnetic fields are computed from the current distribution of the superconducting coils and the infinitely thin current sheets simulating the fully saturated poles. A least squares method is used to minimize deviations from isochronism by adjusting the size of various elemental shim coils placed around the main coil. The method to obtain the desired axial tune is described

  4. SNS accumulator ring design and space charge considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weng, W.T.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of the proposed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is to provide a short pulse proton beam of about 0.5micros with average beam power of 1MW. To achieve such purpose, a proton storage ring operated at 60Hz with 1 x 10 14 protons per pulse at 1GeV is required. The Accumulator Ring (AR) receives 1msec long H - beam bunches of 28mA from a 1GeV linac. Scope and design performance goals of the AR are presented. About 1,200 turns of charge exchange injection is needed to accumulate 1mA in the ring. After a brief description of the lattice design and machine performance parameters, space charge related issues, such as: tune shifts, stopband corrections, halo generation and beam collimation etc. is discussed

  5. Material and design considerations of FBGA reliability performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Teck Kheng; Ng, T.C.; Chai, Y.M.

    2004-01-01

    FBGA package reliability is usually assessed through the conventional approaches of die attach and mold compound material optimization. However, with the rapid changes and fast-moving pace of electronic packaging and the introduction of new soldermask and core materials, substrate design has also become a critical factor in determining overall package reliability. The purpose of this paper is to understand the impact design and soldermask material of a rigid substrate on overall package reliability. Three different soldermask patterns with a matrix of different die attach, mold compound, and soldermask materials are assessed using the moisture sensitivity test (MST). Package reliability is also assessed through the use of temperature cycling (T/C) at conditions 'B' and 'C'. For material optimization, three different mold compounds and die attach materials are used. Material adhesion between different die attach materials and soldermask materials are obtained through die shear performed at various temperatures and preset moisture conditions. A study correlating the different packaging material properties and their relative adhesion strengths with overall package reliability in terms of both MST and T/C performance was performed. Soldermask design under the die pads was found to affect package reliability. For example, locating vias at the edge of the die is not desirable because the vias acts as initiation point for delamination and moisture-induced failure. Through die shear testing, soldermask B demonstrated higher adhesion properties compared to soldermask A across several packaging materials and enhanced the overall package reliability in terms of both MST and T/C performance. Both MST JEDEC level 1 and the T/C of 'B' and 'C' at 1000 cycles have been achieved through design and package material optimization

  6. Material and design considerations of FBGA reliability performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Teck Kheng; Ng, T.C.; Chai, Y.M

    2004-09-01

    FBGA package reliability is usually assessed through the conventional approaches of die attach and mold compound material optimization. However, with the rapid changes and fast-moving pace of electronic packaging and the introduction of new soldermask and core materials, substrate design has also become a critical factor in determining overall package reliability. The purpose of this paper is to understand the impact design and soldermask material of a rigid substrate on overall package reliability. Three different soldermask patterns with a matrix of different die attach, mold compound, and soldermask materials are assessed using the moisture sensitivity test (MST). Package reliability is also assessed through the use of temperature cycling (T/C) at conditions 'B' and 'C'. For material optimization, three different mold compounds and die attach materials are used. Material adhesion between different die attach materials and soldermask materials are obtained through die shear performed at various temperatures and preset moisture conditions. A study correlating the different packaging material properties and their relative adhesion strengths with overall package reliability in terms of both MST and T/C performance was performed. Soldermask design under the die pads was found to affect package reliability. For example, locating vias at the edge of the die is not desirable because the vias acts as initiation point for delamination and moisture-induced failure. Through die shear testing, soldermask B demonstrated higher adhesion properties compared to soldermask A across several packaging materials and enhanced the overall package reliability in terms of both MST and T/C performance. Both MST JEDEC level 1 and the T/C of 'B' and 'C' at 1000 cycles have been achieved through design and package material optimization.

  7. Design considerations and expectations of a very large hadron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggiero, A.G.

    1996-01-01

    The ELOISATRON Project is a proton-proton collider at very high energy and very large luminosity. The main goal is to determine the ultimate performance that is possible to achieve with reasonable extrapolation of the present accelerator technology. A complete study and design of the collider requires that several steps of investigations are undertaken. The authors count five of such steps as outlined in the report

  8. Moving ring field-reversed mirror blanket design considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.P.C.; Cheng, E.T.; Creedon, L.; Kessel, C.; Norman, J.; Schultz, K.R.

    1981-01-01

    A blanket design for the Moving Ring Field-Reversed Mirror Reactor (MRFRM) is presented in this paper. The design emphasis is placed on minimizing the induced radioactivities in the first-wall, blanket and shield. To this end, aluminum-alloy was selected as the reference structural material, giving dose rates two weeks after shutdown that are 3 to 4 orders of magnitude lower than comparable steel structures. The aluminum first-wall is water-cooled and thermally insulated from the high temperature SiC-clad Li 2 O tritium breeding zone. A local tritium breeding ratio of 1.05 was obtained for the design. The tritium is extracted from the Li 2 O by the use of a small dry helium purge stream through the SiC tubes. About 1 ppM hydrogen is added to the helium purge stream to enhance the tritium recovery rate. Helium at 28 atmospheres pressure is circulated through the blanket and shield, with an outlet temperature of 850 0 C, which is coupled with an existing small size closed-cycle gas turbine (CCGT) power conversion system. The spatial and temporal variations of the first-wall temperature caused by the translational movement of the plasma rings along the axis of the cylindrical reactor were evaluated. The after-heat cooling problems of the first-wall were also considered

  9. Some considerations about the theory of intelligent design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JUAN E CARREÑO

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The so-called theory of intelligent design (ID has gained a growing reputation in the Anglo-Saxon culture, becoming a subject of public debate. The approaches that constitute the core of this proposal, however, have been poorly characterized and systematized. The three most significant authors of ID are certainly Michael Behe, William Dembski and Stephen Meyer. Beyond the differences that can be distinguished in the work of each of them, the central fact in their arguments is the complexity of living organisms, which according to these authors, escapes any kind of natural explanation. In effect, according to the authors of ID, the irreducible complexity that can be detected in the natural world would allow to infer design in a scientifically valid way, even though many of them prefer to remain silent regarding the identity and attributes of the designer. We think that under this proposal, remains a deep epistemological confusion, since its very structure combines methodologies that are beyond the scope of historical and natural evolutionary theories. We also reject the claim that ID is a legitimate scientific theory, because it does not exhibit the classical characteristics that a scientific kind of knowledge must have.

  10. Results From a Channel Restoration Project: Hydraulic Design Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karle, K.F.; Densmore, R.V.; ,

    2001-01-01

    Techniques for the hydraulic restoration of placer-mined streams and floodplains were developed in Denali National Park and Preserve, Alaska. The two-year study at Glen Creek focused on a design of stream and floodplain geometry using hydraulic capacity and shear stress equations. Slope and sinuosity values were based on regional relationships. Design requirements included a channel capacity for a bankfull discharge and a floodplain capacity for a 1.5- to 100-year discharge. Several bio-engineering techniques using alder and willow, including anchored brush bars, streambank hedge layering, seedlings, and cuttings, were tested to dissipate floodwater energy and encourage sediment deposition until natural revegetation stabilized the new floodplains. Permanently monumented cross-sections installed throughout the project site were surveyed every one to three years. Nine years after the project began, a summer flood caused substantial damage to the channel form, including a change in width/depth ratio, slope, and thalweg location. Many of the alder brush bars were heavily damaged or destroyed, resulting in significant bank erosion. This paper reviews the original hydraulic design process, and describes changes to the channel and floodplain geometry over time, based on nine years of cross-section surveys.

  11. Mechanism design visual and programmable approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, Kevin; Sodhi, Raj S

    2013-01-01

    "… the book provides a lot of MATLAB® and SimMechanics examples. Students could benefit from the experience of solving the complex spatial synthesis problems using computer tools. The mathematics software tools are very efficient to do the displacement analysis, too."-Wen-Tzong Lee, National Pingtung University of Science and Technology, Neipu, Taiwan"The book covers a vast range of mechanism kinematics and design. The algorithm covering the topics presented is useful for mechanism design in class and homework assignments. The book provides an alternative modern tool, as compared to kinematics analysis methods based on Fortran or QuickBasic algorithms, covering all topics for mechanism design."-Thomas G. Chondros, University of Patras, Greece"… well elaborated for students at their first approach to the subject of mechanism design and its computation with MATLAB®."-Marco Ceccarelli, University of Cassino and South Latium, Italy.

  12. Some experimental considerations regarding ion beam simulation of neutron irradiation for mechanical property measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Styris, D.L.; Jones, R.H.; Harling, O.K.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Marshall, R.P.

    1975-01-01

    A preliminary assessment of the requirements for mechanical property data related to CTR materials is given. The status of ion simulation for mechanical property measurements is described. A damage analysis and calculations for light ions are presented along with sample size, heating and cooling, and surface considerations

  13. Safety considerations in the design of an electron beam melter for a fissile metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, T.W.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the EBM in the melting of highly enriched uranium metal is principally to recycle machining swarf but it may also be used for the manufacture of alloys and the recycling of alloy swarf. The current recycling of swarf involves the cleaning and compaction of swarf to pellets, these are then melted in a VIF with losses of > 20% of the metal as dross lift in the crucible. This has to be converted to oxide and then chemically recycled, a very expensive process. Use of the EBM would limit losses to less than 3% and make significant savings and also solve some safety problems. The EBM will be attached to a glove box and fume cupboard and the hazards addressed by the design include: (1) Criticality, (2) Radiation, (3) Release of Radioactive Contamination, (4) Explosion, (5) Fire, (6) Mechanical Handling, (7) Electrical, (8) Other Safety Considerations. These are addressed with details of the considerations including interlocks required to mitigate the hazards. The requirements of Safety documentation and Hazard and Operability studies are outlined together with Quality Assurance demands and training requirements. A number of safety considerations are based on previous accident scenarios in which Dangerous Occurrences took place involving equipment faults and operator errors on high vacuum equipment associated with glove boxes in a radioactive controlled area

  14. Antenna Design Considerations for the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakula, Casey J.; Theofylaktos, Onoufrios

    2015-01-01

    NASA is designing an Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (AEMU)to support future manned missions beyond low-Earth orbit (LEO). A key component of the AEMU is the communications assembly that allows for the wireless transfer of voice, video, and suit telemetry. The Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) currently used on the International Space Station (ISS) contains a radio system with a single omni-directional resonant cavity antenna operating slightly above 400 MHz capable of transmitting and receiving data at a rate of about 125 kbps. Recent wireless communications architectures are calling for the inclusion of commercial wireless standards such as 802.11 that operate in higher frequency bands at much higher data rates. The current AEMU radio design supports a 400 MHz band for low-rate mission-critical data and a high-rate band based on commercial wireless local area network (WLAN) technology to support video, communication with non-extravehicular activity (EVA) assets such as wireless sensors and robotic assistants, and a redundant path for mission-critical EVA data. This paper recommends the replacement of the existing EMU antenna with a new antenna that maintains the performance characteristics of the current antenna but with lower weight and volume footprints. NASA has funded several firms to develop such an antenna over the past few years, and the most promising designs are variations on the basic patch antenna. This antenna technology at UHF is considered by the authors to be mature and ready for infusion into NASA AEMU technology development programs.

  15. Design consideration on the synchrotron ultrahigh vacuum system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujikawa, H.; Chida, K.; Mizobuchi, A.; Miyahara, A.

    1982-01-01

    Ultrahigh vacuum production for the high-energy heavy-ion accelerator poses special problems concerning beam-gas molecule and beam-wall interactions. In this paper, summary of the TARN ultrahigh vacuum system and design criteria of the synchrotron ultrahigh vacuum system are presented. On-beam pressure of 4 x 10 -11 Torr is achieved in the TARN ultrahigh vacuum system, of which experiences through the construction and the operation are described and discussed. With emphasis on the application of newly developed technique in the fabrication of vacuum chamber and ultrahigh vacuum pump for the synchrotron ultrahigh vacuum system. (author)

  16. Design considerations for superconducting magnets as a maglev pad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, H.; Ogiwara, H.

    1974-01-01

    The design and construction of a thin superconducting magnet for a magnetically suspended high-speed train are explained. The superconducting magnet, which is to be used in a null-flux maglev train system, is called a 'wing-type' superconducting magnet because of its geometry. The wing-type superconducting magnet is about 1.5m long and weighs about 500kg, but its heat loss is within 1W, which is very small compared with that of conventional superconducting magnets. (author)

  17. Some design considerations for perpendicular biased ferrite tuners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enchevich, I.B.; Poirier, R.L.

    1994-10-01

    Recently remarkable progress has been achieved in the development of perpendicular biased ferrite tuned rf resonators for fast cycled synchrotrons. Compared with the broadly used parallel biased rf cavities they provide higher resonator quality factor Q. However when designing perpendicular biased cavities, special attention should be paid to the methods to provide eddy current suppression in the resonator walls, the ferrite nonlinearity influence, the generated heat removal, the fast self resonant frequency control. The prospective of a faster additional biasing system are discussed and conclusions are drawn. (author). 8 refs., 6 figs

  18. User Language Considerations in Military Human-Computer Interface Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-06-30

    trial: 4 1 4 Viaje hacia el norte y en la primera calle cruce hacia la derecha. *Salgase del camino y vaya hacia el este a trav6s de los arboles . *En la...primer camino *y entonces atraviese el puente para peatones que va hacia el este. *AI este de los Arboles encuentre el VEHICULO DE TRANSPORTE DE PERSONAL... decision , unless so designated by other documentation. Apporo-ed for public rcleaue; distribution is unlimited. 89 6 3 :CURIT’Y CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE

  19. Project considerations and design of systems for wheeling cogenerated power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tessmer, R.G. Jr.; Boyle, J.R.; Fish, J.H. III; Martin, W.A.

    1994-08-01

    Wheeling electric power, the transmission of electricity not owned by an electric utility over its transmission lines, is a term not generally recognized outside the electric utility industry. Investigation of the term`s origin is intriguing. For centuries, wheel has been used to describe an entire machine, not just individual wheels within a machine. Thus we have waterwheel, spinning wheel, potter`s wheel and, for an automobile, wheels. Wheel as a verb connotes transmission or modification of forces and motion in machinery. With the advent of an understanding of electricity, use of the word wheel was extended to be transmission of electric power as well as mechanical power. Today, use of the term wheeling electric power is restricted to utility transmission of power that it doesn`t own. Cogeneration refers to simultaneous production of electric and thermal power from an energy source. This is more efficient than separate production of electricity and thermal power and, in many instances, less expensive.

  20. Design Considerations, Modeling and Analysis for the Multispectral Thermal Imager

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borel, C.C.; Clodius, W.B.; Cooke, B.J.; Smith, B.W.; Weber, P.G.

    1999-01-01

    The design of remote sensing systems is driven by the need to provide cost-effective, substantive answers to questions posed by our customers. This is especially important for space-based systems, which tend to be expensive, and which generally cannot be changed after they are launched. We report here on the approach we employed in developing the desired attributes of a satellite mission, namely the Multispectral Thermal Imager. After an initial scoping study, we applied a procedure which we call: ''End-to-end modeling and analysis (EEM).'' We began with target attributes, translated to observable signatures and then propagated the signatures through the atmosphere to the sensor location. We modeled the sensor attributes to yield a simulated data stream, which was then analyzed to retrieve information about the original target. The retrieved signature was then compared to the original to obtain a figure of merit: hence the term ''end-to-end modeling and analysis.'' We base the EEM in physics to ensure high fidelity and to permit scaling. As the actual design of the payload evolves, and as real hardware is tested, we can update the EEM to facilitate trade studies, and to judge, for example, whether components that deviate from specifications are acceptable

  1. Control rod repositioning considerations in core design analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, B.C.; Buechel, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    Control rod repositioning is a method for minimizing rod cluster control assembly (RCCA) wear in the upper internals area where the guide cards interface with the rodlets of the RCCAs. A number of utilities have implemented strategies for rod repositioning, which often has no impact on the nuclear analysis for cases where the control rods are never repositioned into the active fuel. Other strategies involve repositioning the control rods several steps into the active fuel. The impact of this type of repositioning on the axial power shape and consequently the total peaking factor F Q T varies, depending on the method in which the repositioning is implemented at the plant. Operating for long periods with all the control and shutdown rods inserted several steps in the active fuel followed by withdrawing them fully from the core results in a shifting of the power distribution toward the top of the core and must be accounted for in the design analysis. On the other hand, an optional plan for control rod repositioning that considers margins available in related design parameters can be devised that minimizes the effects of the repositioning for the reload. This paper summarizes a rod repositioning strategy implemented for a recent reload and some calculated power shape results for this strategy and other scenarios

  2. Methodological Considerations in Designing and Evaluating Animal-Assisted Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Cindy; Chur-Hansen, Anna

    2013-02-27

    This paper presents a discussion of the literature on animal-assisted interventions and describes limitations surrounding current methodological quality. Benefits to human physical, psychological and social health cannot be empirically confirmed due to the methodological limitations of the existing body of research, and comparisons cannot validly be made across different studies. Without a solid research base animal-assisted interventions will not receive recognition and acceptance as a credible alternative health care treatment. The paper draws on the work of four systematic reviews conducted over April-May 2009, with no date restrictions, focusing exclusively on the use of canine-assisted interventions for older people residing in long-term care. The reviews revealed a lack of good quality studies. Although the literature base has grown in volume since its inception, it predominantly consists of anecdotal accounts and reports. Experimental studies undertaken are often flawed in aspects of design, conduct and reporting. There are few qualitative studies available leading to the inability to draw definitive conclusions. It is clear that due to the complexities associated with these interventions not all weaknesses can be eliminated. However, there are basic methodological weaknesses that can be addressed in future studies in the area. Checklists for quantitative and qualitative research designs to guide future research are offered to help address methodological rigour.

  3. Wastes taken into consideration in Cigeo design studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-07-01

    After a description of the context of radioactive waste management in France, this report gives an overview of nuclear installations which are taken into account for the design of Cigeo, the centre for deep geological storage of radioactive materials and wastes coming from nuclear power reactors, fuel cycle plants, CEA installations, and new installations. It proposes an inventory of wastes by distinguishing the different waste primary parcels (high activity waste parcels, medium-activity long-life waste parcels), by giving quantitative information (number and volume of primary parcels) per waste family, and by reviewing wastes which are taken into account in the Cigeo design. It analyses hypotheses which are taken into account, notably the planning of investments in electricity production which have been made in 2009, and the case of low-activity long-life wastes (graphite waste, asphalt parcels and other low-activity long-life wastes). It briefly reports a study related to the direct disposal of spent fuels

  4. Mechanical Design of Superconducting Accelerator Magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toral, F

    2014-01-01

    This paper is about the mechanical design of superconducting accelerator magnets. First, we give a brief review of the basic concepts and terms. In the following sections, we describe the particularities of the mechanical design of different types of superconducting accelerator magnets: solenoids, costheta, superferric, and toroids. Special attention is given to the pre-stress principle, which aims to avoid the appearance of tensile stresses in the superconducting coils. A case study on a compact superconducting cyclotron summarizes the main steps and the guidelines that should be followed for a proper mechanical design. Finally, we present some remarks on the measurement techniques

  5. Mechanical Design of Superconducting Accelerator Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Toral, Fernando

    2014-07-17

    This paper is about the mechanical design of superconducting accelerator magnets. First, we give a brief review of the basic concepts and terms. In the following sections, we describe the particularities of the mechanical design of different types of superconducting accelerator magnets: solenoids, costheta, superferric, and toroids. Special attention is given to the pre-stress principle, which aims to avoid the appearance of tensile stresses in the superconducting coils. A case study on a compact superconducting cyclotron summarizes the main steps and the guidelines that should be followed for a proper mechanical design. Finally, we present some remarks on the measurement techniques.

  6. Mechanical Design of Superconducting Accelerator Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toral, F [Madrid, CIEMAT (Spain)

    2014-07-01

    This paper is about the mechanical design of superconducting accelerator magnets. First, we give a brief review of the basic concepts and terms. In the following sections, we describe the particularities of the mechanical design of different types of superconducting accelerator magnets: solenoids, costheta, superferric, and toroids. Special attention is given to the pre-stress principle, which aims to avoid the appearance of tensile stresses in the superconducting coils. A case study on a compact superconducting cyclotron summarizes the main steps and the guidelines that should be followed for a proper mechanical design. Finally, we present some remarks on the measurement techniques.

  7. Reactor design considerations in mineral sequestration of carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ityokumbul, M.T.; Chander, S.; O'Connor, William K.; Dahlin, David C.; Gerdemann, Stephen J.

    2001-01-01

    One of the promising approaches to lowering the anthropogenic carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere is mineral sequestration. In this approach, the carbon dioxide reacts with alkaline earth containing silicate minerals forming magnesium and/or calcium carbonates. Mineral carbonation is a multiphase reaction process involving gas, liquid and solid phases. The effective design and scale-up of the slurry reactor for mineral carbonation will require careful delineation of the rate determining step and how it changes with the scale of the reactor. The shrinking core model was used to describe the mineral carbonation reaction. Analysis of laboratory data indicates that the transformations of olivine and serpentine are controlled by chemical reaction and diffusion through an ash layer respectively. Rate parameters for olivine and serpentine carbonation are estimated from the laboratory data

  8. Design and implementation considerations of a MSAT packet data network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, Fouad G.; Hearn, Terry; Rohr, Doug; Guibord, Arthur F.

    1993-01-01

    The Mobile Data System, which is intended to provide for packet switched data services is currently under development. The system is based on a star network topology consisting of a centralized Data Hub (DH) serving a large number of mobile terminals. Through the Data Hub, end-to-end connections can be established between terrestrial users on public or private data networks and mobile users. The MDS network will be capable of offering a variety of services some of which are based on the standard X.25 network interface protocol, and others optimized for short messages and broadcast messages. A description of these services and the trade-offs in the DH design are presented.

  9. Polarized wiggler for NSLS x-ray ring design considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, A.; Krinsky, S.; Blum, E.

    1992-03-01

    We examine the properties of an elliptically polarized wiggler that will generate circularly polarized photons with energy spectrum of 3--12 KeV. The vertical wiggler magnetic field is produced by permanent magnets while the horizontal wiggler field is generated by electric coils capable of AC excitation. The radiation parameters of the wiggler are presented, including photon flux, circular and linear polarization and spectrum. These parameters are compared to the synchrotron radiation from a bending magnet. Numerical values are calculated for radiation from the wiggler and bending magnet for the NSLS X-ray ring parameters. A conceptual design for such a wiggler is discussed and several different alternatives are analyzed. We consider AC excitation of the wiggler to produce the time modulation of the elliptic polarization, and also to produce time modulated linearly polarized radiation

  10. Design Considerations for Optimized Lateral Spring Structures for Wearable Electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Aftab M.

    2016-03-07

    The market for wearable electronics has been gaining momentum in the recent years. For completely electronic wearable textiles with integrated sensors, actuators, computing units and communication circuitry, it is important that there is significant stretchability. This stretchability can be obtained by introducing periodic stretchable structures between the electronic circuits. In this work, we derive the equations and constraints governing the stretchability in horseshoe lateral spring structures. We have derived the optimum design and the parameters therein, to help develop the best spring structures for a given stretchability. We have also developed a figure of merit, called area efficiency of stretchability, to compare all twodimensional stretchable systems. Finally, we experimentally verify the validity of our equations by fabricating a metal/polymer bilayer thin film based stretchable horseshoe lateral spring structures. We obtain a stretchability of 1.875 which is comparable to the theoretical maxima of 2.01 for the given parameters.

  11. Design Considerations for Optimized Lateral Spring Structures for Wearable Electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Aftab M.; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    The market for wearable electronics has been gaining momentum in the recent years. For completely electronic wearable textiles with integrated sensors, actuators, computing units and communication circuitry, it is important that there is significant stretchability. This stretchability can be obtained by introducing periodic stretchable structures between the electronic circuits. In this work, we derive the equations and constraints governing the stretchability in horseshoe lateral spring structures. We have derived the optimum design and the parameters therein, to help develop the best spring structures for a given stretchability. We have also developed a figure of merit, called area efficiency of stretchability, to compare all twodimensional stretchable systems. Finally, we experimentally verify the validity of our equations by fabricating a metal/polymer bilayer thin film based stretchable horseshoe lateral spring structures. We obtain a stretchability of 1.875 which is comparable to the theoretical maxima of 2.01 for the given parameters.

  12. Design and criticality considerations for 9977 and 9978 shipping packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, R.; Biswas, D.; Abramczyk, G.

    2009-01-01

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed two new, Type B, state-of-the-art, general purpose, fissile material Shipping Packages, designated as 9977 and 9978, as replacements for the U.S. Dept. of Transportation (DOT) specification 6M container. The packages accommodate plutonium, uranium, and other special nuclear materials in bulk quantities and in many forms with capabilities exceeding those of the 6M. A nuclear criticality safety evaluation demonstrates the safe configurations of the new shipping container for plutonium and uranium metal/oxide loading under various conditions for the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP). The evaluation is in compliance with the performance requirements of 10CFR 71, specifically 10CFR71.55 and 71.59. The criticality safety index (CSI) is 1.0 for most of the contents (Max. Pu Loading -4.4 kg). (authors)

  13. Preliminary design considerations for automatic refueling at N Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quapp, W.J.; Yount, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    The Refueling Enhancement Program is an effort to upgrade and improve the N Reactor refueling operation. Primary goals of this effort are to reduce personnel exposure, reduce effluents to the environment, and, where possible, increase the refueling rate. Recent advances in available commercial robotics systems have prompted a look at automating the Charge/Discharge (C/D) operations. Current efforts will culminate in a conceptual design report (CDR) and accompanying economic and risk analysis in January 1986. Based on the results in that report, DOE will review the viability of the approach as a future capital project. Implementation of automation in existing plants raises questions regarding both the programmatic (how does one implement such an effort) and technical (what equipment is available; how will it be applied) concerns. This paper addresses both aspects

  14. Considerations in designing and using superconductors with high resistivity matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlett, R.J.; Carlson, R.V.; Laquer, H.L.; Migliori, A.

    1976-01-01

    Superconductors are often designed with matrices of much higher residual resistivities than copper for reasons of manufacturing (multifilamentary Nb 3 Sn in CuSn bronze) or loss reduction (mixed matrix NbTi with Cu and CuNi). The high resistivity matrix may complicate or degrade contact resistances at the joints, generate excess heat, reduce the stability of the conductor, and interfere with the observation of flux flow resistivities in the 10 -12 Ω-cm region. The minimization of these effects is discussed, presenting both simple and more refined models for the current transfer length, and it is shown how variations in transfer length (with current), particularly under significant self field conditions, can mimic flux flow resistivity

  15. Design Considerations: Falcon M Dwarf Habitable Exoplanet Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsgrove, Daniel; Novotny, Steven; Della-Rose, Devin J.; Chun, Francis; Tippets, Roger; O'Shea, Patrick; Miller, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The Falcon Telescope Network (FTN) is an assemblage of twelve automated 20-inch telescopes positioned around the globe, controlled from the Cadet Space Operations Center (CSOC) at the US Air Force Academy (USAFA) in Colorado Springs, Colorado. Five of the 12 sites are currently installed, with full operational capability expected by the end of 2016. Though optimized for studying near-earth objects to accomplish its primary mission of Space Situational Awareness (SSA), the Falcon telescopes are in many ways similar to those used by ongoing and planned exoplanet transit surveys targeting individual M dwarf stars (e.g., MEarth, APACHE, SPECULOOS). The network's worldwide geographic distribution provides additional potential advantages. We have performed analytical and empirical studies exploring the viability of employing the FTN for a future survey of nearby late-type M dwarfs tailored to detect transits of 1-2REarth exoplanets in habitable-zone orbits . We present empirical results on photometric precision derived from data collected with multiple Falcon telescopes on a set of nearby (survey design parameters is also described, including an analysis of site-specific weather data, anticipated telescope time allocation and the percentage of nearby M dwarfs with sufficient check stars within the Falcons' 11' x 11' field-of-view required to perform effective differential photometry. The results of this ongoing effort will inform the likelihood of discovering one (or more) habitable-zone exoplanets given current occurrence rate estimates over a nominal five-year campaign, and will dictate specific survey design features in preparation for initiating project execution when the FTN begins full-scale automated operations.

  16. Technicon H*1 Hematology System: Optical Design Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colella, G. M.; Tycko, D. H.; Groner, W.

    1988-06-01

    The Technicon H*1 systemTM is a clinical laboratory flow cytometer which performs a complete hematology profile, providing quantitative information on the various types of cells in a blood sample. A light-scattering method, using a HeNe laser, determines in a single flow channel the red cell count, platelet count, and the distributions of red cell volume, red cell hemoglobin concentration, and platelet volume. To accomplish this the scattered light from each red cell in the sample is measured in real time at two angular intervals. The cell volume and the hemoglobin concentration within the cell are derived from these two measurements. Severe accuracy and precision specifications are placed on the medically important red cell count (RBC) and the mean red cell volume (MCV). From the point of view of optical system design, the dominant factor is the requirement that RBC and MCV have precision and accuracy of the order of 2%. Signal-to-noise and scattering-angle definition requirements dictated the choice of a HeNe laser light source. The optics includes an illumination system for producing a sharply defined, uniformly illuminated scattering region and a detection system which must accurately define the accepted scattering angles. In previous cytometric methods for determining MCV only a single quantity was measured for each cell. Such methods cannot disentangle the independent effects of cell size and hemoglobin concentration on the measurement, thus compromising MCV accuracy. The present double-angle scattering method overcomes this accuracy problem. The H*1 red cell method, the supporting optical design and data demonstrating that the use of this technique eliminates interference between the observed red cell indices are presented.

  17. Design Considerations for the LHC 200 MHz RF System

    CERN Document Server

    Boussard, Daniel; Kindermann, H P; Linnecar, Trevor Paul R; Marque, S; Tückmantel, Joachim

    2000-01-01

    The longitudinal beam transfer from the SPS into the LHC 400 MHz buckets will not be free of losses without a lower frequency capture system and a fast longitudinal damping system in LHC. We present a complete study of a combined system using four identical copper cavities at 200 MHz delivering 3 MV total CW voltage and having still enough bandwidth to achieve fast longitudinal damping. The shape of a cavity was designed according to the accelerating mode performance, its tuning and the higher order mode spectrum with respect to the LHC beam lines and their possible attenuation. The possibility to park the cavities during coast was included. The local heat load and the corresponding cooling water distribution as well as deformations were studied and techniques to build the cavity with all ports at low cost are proposed. The parameters of the RF generators, couplers and detuning are determined. Simulations of the total LHC RF system incorporating real delays, generator bandwidth and the control loops confirm t...

  18. Thermal considerations for overpack designs in drum packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hensel, S.; Gromada, R.J.

    1997-01-01

    The design of the overpacks in drum packages, both in terms of thickness and materials of construction, greatly impact the ability of the package to accommodate heat source contents. The optimum overpack thermal protection needed is that which results in the lowest containment vessel temperature during both Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) and Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT). For heat source packages, the use of very good or high efficiency insulating materials such as fiberboard and polyurethane results in high containment vessel temperatures during both NCT and HAC. Using a more modest or low efficiency insulating material would reduce the NCT and HAC material such as oak (low efficiency) would maintain a containment vessel with a content of 100 watts at a fraction of the temperature reported for very good or high efficiency insulating materials. Four inches of oak can prevent the containment vessel from exceeding 500 degrees F during both NCT and HAC with 100 watts of contents, whereas using a high efficiency material the vessel would exceed 1000 degrees F. 8 figs., 1 tab

  19. Health-economic evaluation in implant trials: design considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, Volker; Pavlidis, Theodoros; Szalay, Gabor; Heiss, Christian; Schnettler, Reinhard

    2009-01-01

    In today's world, demonstration of the safety, efficacy, and quality of a new treatment strategy is no longer sufficient in many countries for market entry and reimbursement in the public healthcare system. This implies that new implants in orthopedic and orthopedic trauma surgery not only must be shown to lead to better medical outcome compared with the standard of care implant, but also must be shown to exhibit "good value" for the money for the public health-care system based on sound economic data from health-economic studies. The purpose of this article is to elucidate a framework for health-economic aspects alongside implant trials, with the assumption that the new implant is more costly but potentially better than the control implant. Cost-effectiveness, cost-utility, and cost-benefit studies are suitable for the assessment of the health-economic value of a new implant. The following criteria should be considered for a health-economic study design in the context with an implant: i) it should state medical benefits of the new implant compared with the control implant; ii) it should precise the type of health economic study; iii) it should define the methodological approach, perspective of the study, and types of costs; iv) if necessary, it should state discount costs and/benefits; and v) a sound sensitivity analysis should be included. Furthermore, close cooperation between researchers, clinicians, and health economists is essential.

  20. Radiological safety design considerations for a laser-fusion facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, M.S.

    1977-01-01

    Detailed neutronics and photonics calculations have been performed for analyzing prompt and residual radiations and required shielding associated with the design of a laser-fusion facility with a nominal yield of 10 19 neutrons per D--T burn pulse. The standard Livermore Monte Carlo codes and nuclear data cross section libraries were used in calculations. The Bateman equation was used to calculate the accumulation and decay of radionuclide chain products. A number of activation sensitivity experiments were conducted and the results were found to be in very good agreement within 10 percent of those calculated. It has been found that neutron yields of 2 x 10 19 per day can be conducted continuously if the reactor chamber is Kevlar-epoxy or silica, the primary shield is 0.60-m of water immediately on the chamber, and the building concrete is 1.80 m thick. These precautions result in dose equivalents below the primary protection limits inside the target room after a few hours of cool-down per each 10 19 pulse, 10 percent of the primary protection limits immediately outside the target room, and 1 percent of the natural background level at the nearest site boundary

  1. Spillover effects in epidemiology: parameters, study designs and methodological considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin-Chung, Jade; Arnold, Benjamin F; Berger, David; Luby, Stephen P; Miguel, Edward; Colford Jr, John M; Hubbard, Alan E

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Many public health interventions provide benefits that extend beyond their direct recipients and impact people in close physical or social proximity who did not directly receive the intervention themselves. A classic example of this phenomenon is the herd protection provided by many vaccines. If these ‘spillover effects’ (i.e. ‘herd effects’) are present in the same direction as the effects on the intended recipients, studies that only estimate direct effects on recipients will likely underestimate the full public health benefits of the intervention. Causal inference assumptions for spillover parameters have been articulated in the vaccine literature, but many studies measuring spillovers of other types of public health interventions have not drawn upon that literature. In conjunction with a systematic review we conducted of spillovers of public health interventions delivered in low- and middle-income countries, we classified the most widely used spillover parameters reported in the empirical literature into a standard notation. General classes of spillover parameters include: cluster-level spillovers; spillovers conditional on treatment or outcome density, distance or the number of treated social network links; and vaccine efficacy parameters related to spillovers. We draw on high quality empirical examples to illustrate each of these parameters. We describe study designs to estimate spillovers and assumptions required to make causal inferences about spillovers. We aim to advance and encourage methods for spillover estimation and reporting by standardizing spillover parameter nomenclature and articulating the causal inference assumptions required to estimate spillovers. PMID:29106568

  2. Smart practice: smart card design considerations in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindley, R A; Pacheco, F

    1995-01-01

    Recent innovations in microelectronics and advances in cryptography are driving the appearance of a new generation of smart cards with wider applications; this has important repercussions for our society in the coming years. Essentially, these breakthroughs include built-in microprocessors capable of generating cryptographic transactions (e.g.,Jelectronic blinded signatures, digital pseudonyms, and digital credentials), developments toward a single electronic card offering multi-access to services such as transport, telecommunications, health, financial, and entertainment (Universal Access Services), and incorporation of personal identification technologies such as voice, eye, or skin pattern recognition. For example, by using electronic representatives or cryptographic blinded signatures, a smart card can be used for multi transactions across different organizations and under different generated pseudonyms. These pseudonyms are capable of recognizing an individual unambiguously, while none of her records can be linked [1]. Moreover, tamper-proof electronic observers would make smart cards a very attractive technology for high-security based applications, such as those in the health care field. New trends in smart card technology offer excellent privacy and confidentiality safeguards. Therefore, smart cards constitute a promising technology for the health sector in Australia and other countries around the world in their pursuit of technology to support the delivery of quality care services. This paper addresses the main issues and the key design criteria which may be of strategic importance to the success of future smart card technology in the health care sector.

  3. Harmonic filter design consideration for a tire-rubber factory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zebardast, A. [Azad Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Abhar Branch]|[Sharif Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mokhtari, H. [Azad Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    Nonlinear loads and arc furnace loads are the main sources of harmonic currents in power distribution systems. Harmonic currents can cause reductions in system efficiency, and shorten the lifespan of transformers and capacitor banks. This paper provided details of a filter designed to attenuate harmonic currents at a tire company in Iran. The tire company was supplied by 3 distribution transformers and an emergency transformer. Main supply was through a 132 kV/20 kV transformer, which was connected to 2 A and B stations. The AC/DC drivers generated harmonics. Harmonic measurements were performed to determine the type and size of the required filters. A summary of site harmonic measurements was provided. A passive filter was placed at a medium voltage location. A sensitivity analysis was then performed in order to assess loading effects on filter performance. The analysis was performed on all possible configurations in the plant, including load change, capacitor bank step change, and transformer energization. Resonance conditions were also examined. Results showed that attention must be paid to the filter component rating in addition to potential resonant conditions. It was concluded that resonant conditions alter when system operating conditions change. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  4. Design considerations and construction of a small animal PET prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzanakos, G.; Nikolaou, M.; Drakoulakos, D.; Karamitros, D.; Kontaxakis, G.; Logaras, E.; Panayiotakis, G.; Pavlopoulos, S.; Skiadas, M.; Spyrou, G.; Thireou, T.; Vamvakas, D.

    2006-01-01

    We are developing a small animal PET scanner consisting of two block detectors, each made of 216 BGO crystals of dimensions 3.75 mmx3.75 mmx20 mm, cylindrically arranged and coupled to a position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (R2486 PSPMT). Our design was based on a very detailed Monte Carlo, that simulates the function of a PET scanner from the system level down to the individual γ-ray detectors. We have made laboratory measurements of the individual detector performance as well as measurements of characteristics of the PSPMTs. The two detector blocks which will form the basic tomographic unit have been assembled. We are developing electronics to individually process (amplify and digitize) anode signals, and use field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) in the position determination and energy measurement of the γ-rays. At present, as an intermediate step, we are using the electronics supplied from Hamamatsu to study various aspects of the system and produce initial images

  5. Phase 1 space fission propulsion system design considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houts, Mike; Van Dyke, Melissa; Godfroy, Tom; Pedersen, Kevin; Martin, James; Dickens, Ricky; Salvail, Pat; Hrbud, Ivana; Carter, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Fission technology can enable rapid, affordable access to any point in the solar system. If fission propulsion systems are to be developed to their full potential; however, near-term customers must be identified and initial fission systems successfully developed, launched, and operated. Studies conducted in fiscal year 2001 (IISTP, 2001) show that fission electric propulsion (FEP) systems operating at 80 kWe or above could enhance or enable numerous robotic outer solar system missions of interest. At these power levels it is possible to develop safe, affordable systems that meet mission performance requirements. In selecting the system design to pursue, seven evaluation criteria were identified: safety, reliability, testability, specific mass, cost, schedule, and programmatic risk. A top-level comparison of three potential concepts was performed: an SP-100 based pumped liquid lithium system, a direct gas cooled system, and a heatpipe cooled system. For power levels up to at least 500 kWt (enabling electric power levels of 125-175 kWe, given 25-35% power conversion efficiency) the heatpipe system has advantages related to several criteria and is competitive with respect to all. Hardware-based research and development has further increased confidence in the heatpipe approach. Successful development and utilization of a 'Phase 1' fission electric propulsion system will enable advanced Phase 2 and Phase 3 systems capable of providing rapid, affordable access to any point in the solar system

  6. Seismic design considerations of nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-10-01

    An Advisory Group Meeting (AGM) on Seismic Technologies of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities was convened in Vienna from 12 to 14 November 1997. The main objective of the meeting was the investigation of the present status of seismic technologies in nuclear fuel cycle facilities in Member States as a starting point for understanding of the most important directions and trends of national initiatives, including research and development, in the area of seismic safety. The AGM gave priority to the establishment of a consistent programme for seismic assessment of nuclear fuel cycle facilities worldwide. A consultants meeting subsequently met in Vienna from 16 to 19 March 1999. At this meeting the necessity of a dedicated programme was further supported and a technical background to the initiative was provided. This publication provides recommendations both for the seismic design of new plants and for re-evaluation projects of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. After a short introduction of the general IAEA approach, some key contributions from Member State participants are presented. Each of them was indexed separately

  7. Mechanical design and protection of superconducting magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Asner, Alfred M

    1978-01-01

    The principles of the mechanical design of superconducting magnets of concentric configuration, with iron low-temperature and room- temperature screening, are outlined. Measures for protection of such magnets against quench forces, are considered. (4 refs).

  8. Emerging Dynamic Design Techniques for Mechanical and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Emerging Dynamic Design Techniques for Mechanical ... through this school to bring about an awareness of the state-of-art of the software and ... those mentioned above, cannot be ensured on the basis of approaches involving numerical.

  9. Design considerations for wastewater treatment by reverse osmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, C R; Wilf, M; Andes, K; Iong, J

    2005-01-01

    Reverse Osmosis is finding increasing use for the treatment of municipal and industrial wastewaters due to the growing demand for high quality water in large urban areas. The growing success of membranes in this application is related to improved process designs and improved membrane products. Key factors which have been determined to result in successful operation of large-scale plants will be discussed. Factors which play a key role in the use of RO membranes include ultra or microfiltration pretreatment, low fouling membranes, flux rate, recovery and control of fouling and scaling. In particular, high flux rates can be used when UF or MF pretreatment is used. These technologies remove most of the suspended particles that would normally cause heavy fouling of lead elements. Typically, fluxes in the range of 17-21 lmh lead to cleaning frequencies in the range of 3-4 months. By combining the use of membrane pretreatment and chloramination of the feed water through chlorine addition, two of the primary sources of RO membrane fouling can be controlled. The use of chloramine has become a proven means to control biofouling in a membrane for wastewater applications. The other significant problems for RO membranes result from organics fouling by dissolved organics and scaling due to saturation of marginally soluble salts. The former can be a significant problem for membranes, due to the strong attraction forces. To some extent, these can be mitigated by making the membrane surface more hydrophilic or changing the charge of the membrane surface. To minimize fouling, many plants are turning to low fouling membranes. Extensive studies have demonstrated that the membrane surface is hydrophilic, neutrally charged over a broad pH range, and more resistant to organic adsorption. Also, an analysis of the potential scaling issues will be reviewed. In particular, calcium phosphate has been found to be one of the key scalants that will limit RO system recovery rate. Calcium

  10. Exercise program design considerations for head and neck cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midgley, Adrian W; Lowe, Derek; Levy, Andrew R; Mepani, Vishal; Rogers, Simon N

    2018-01-01

    The present study aimed to establish exercise preferences, barriers, and perceived benefits among head and neck cancer survivors, as well as their level of interest in participating in an exercise program. Patients treated for primary squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck between 2010 and 2014 were identified from the hospital database and sent a postal questionnaire pack to establish exercise preferences, barriers, perceived benefits, current physical activity levels, and quality of life. A postal reminder was sent to non-responders 4 weeks later. The survey comprised 1021 eligible patients of which 437 (43%) responded [74% male, median (interquartile range) age, 66 (60-73) years]. Of the respondents, 30% said 'Yes' they would be interested in participating in an exercise program and 34% said 'Maybe'. The most common exercise preferences were a frequency of three times per week, moderate-intensity, and 15-29 min per bout. The most popular exercise types were walking (68%), flexibility exercises (35%), water activites/swimming (33%), cycling (31%), and weight machines (19%). Home (55%), outdoors (46%) and health club/gym (33%) were the most common preferred choices for where to regularly exercise. Percieved exercise benefits relating to improved physical attributes were commonly cited, whereas potential social and work-related benefits were less well-acknowledged. The most commonly cited exercise barriers were dry mouth or throat (40%), fatigue (37%), shortness of breath (30%), muscle weakness (28%) difficulty swallowing (25%), and shoulder weakness and pain (24%). The present findings inform the design of exercise programs for head and neck cancer survivors.

  11. Nuclear design considerations for Z-IFE chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, W.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-641, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States)]. E-mail: meier5@llnl.gov; Schmitt, R.C. [Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA 15203 (United States); Abbott, R.P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-641, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Latkowski, J.F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-641, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Reyes, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-641, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States)

    2006-02-15

    Z-pinch driven IFE (Z-IFE) requires the design of a repetitive target insertion system that allows coupling of the pulsed power to the target with adequate standoff, and a chamber that can withstand blast and radiation effects from large yield targets. The present strategy for Z-IFE is to use high yield targets ({approx}2-3 GJ/shot), low repetition rate per chamber ({approx}0.1 Hz), and 10 chambers per power plant. In this study, we propose an alternative power plant configuration that uses very high yield targets (20 GJ/shot) in a single chamber operating at 0.1 Hz. A thick-liquid-wall chamber is proposed to absorb the target emission (X-rays, debris and neutrons) and mitigate the blast effects on the chamber wall. The target is attached to the end of a conical shaped recyclable transmission line (RTL) made from a solid coolant (e.g., frozen flibe), or a material that is easily separable from the coolant (e.g., steel). The RTL/target assembly is inserted through a single opening at the top of the chamber for each shot. This study looks at the RTL material choice from a safety and environmental point of view. Materials were assessed according to waste disposal rating (WDR) and contact dose rate (CDR). Neutronics calculations, using the TART2002 Monte Carlo code from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), were performed for the RTL and Z-IFE chamber, and key results reported here.

  12. Design considerations for a backlight with switchable viewing angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujieda, Ichiro; Takagi, Yoshihiko; Rahadian, Fanny

    2006-08-01

    Small-sized liquid crystal displays are widely used for mobile applications such as cell phones. Electronic control of a viewing angle range is desired in order to maintain privacy for viewing in public as well as to provide wide viewing angles for solitary viewing. Conventionally, a polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC) panel is inserted between a backlight and a liquid crystal panel. The PDLC layer either transmits or scatters the light from the backlight, thus providing an electronic control of viewing angles. However, such a display system is obviously thick and expensive. Here, we propose to place an electronically-controlled, light-deflecting device between an LED and a light-guide of a backlight. For example, a liquid crystal lens is investigated for other applications and its focal length is controlled electronically. A liquid crystal phase grating either transmits or diffracts an incoming light depending on whether or not a periodic phase distribution is formed inside its liquid crystal layer. A bias applied to such a device will control the angular distribution of the light propagating inside a light-guide. Output couplers built in the light-guide extract the propagating light to outside. They can be V-shaped grooves, pyramids, or any other structures that can refract, reflect or diffract light. When any of such interactions occur, the output couplers translate the changes in the propagation angles into the angular distribution of the output light. Hence the viewing-angle characteristic can be switched. The designs of the output couplers and the LC devices are important for such a backlight system.

  13. Design and market considerations for axial flux superconducting electric machine design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainslie, M. D.; George, A.; Shaw, R.; Dawson, L.; Winfield, A.; Steketee, M.; Stockley, S.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, the authors investigate a number of design and market considerations for an axial flux superconducting electric machine design that uses high temperature superconductors. The axial flux machine design is assumed to utilise high temperature superconductors in both wire (stator winding) and bulk (rotor field) forms, to operate over a temperature range of 65-77 K, and to have a power output in the range from 10s of kW up to 1 MW (typical for axial flux machines), with approximately 2-3 T as the peak trapped field in the bulk superconductors. The authors firstly investigate the applicability of this type of machine as a generator in small- and medium-sized wind turbines, including the current and forecasted market and pricing for conventional turbines. Next, a study is also carried out on the machine's applicability as an in-wheel hub motor for electric vehicles. Some recommendations for future applications are made based on the outcome of these two studies. Finally, the cost of YBCO-based superconducting (2G HTS) wire is analysed with respect to competing wire technologies and compared with current conventional material costs and current wire costs for both 1G and 2G HTS are still too great to be economically feasible for such superconducting devices.

  14. Mechanical Design Optimization Using Advanced Optimization Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, R Venkata

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical design includes an optimization process in which designers always consider objectives such as strength, deflection, weight, wear, corrosion, etc. depending on the requirements. However, design optimization for a complete mechanical assembly leads to a complicated objective function with a large number of design variables. It is a good practice to apply optimization techniques for individual components or intermediate assemblies than a complete assembly. Analytical or numerical methods for calculating the extreme values of a function may perform well in many practical cases, but may fail in more complex design situations. In real design problems, the number of design parameters can be very large and their influence on the value to be optimized (the goal function) can be very complicated, having nonlinear character. In these complex cases, advanced optimization algorithms offer solutions to the problems, because they find a solution near to the global optimum within reasonable time and computational ...

  15. Mechanical design of the Mars Pathfinder mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisen, Howard Jay; Buck, Carl W.; Gillis-Smith, Greg R.; Umland, Jeffrey W.

    1997-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder mission and the Sojourner rover is reported on, with emphasis on the various mission steps and the performance of the technologies involved. The mechanical design of mission hardware was critical to the success of the entry sequence and the landing operations. The various mechanisms employed are considered.

  16. Engineering Trade-off Considerations Regarding Design-for-Security, Design-for-Verification, and Design-for-Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Melanie; Label, Kenneth

    2018-01-01

    The United States government has identified that application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) and field programmable gate array (FPGA) hardware are at risk from a variety of adversary attacks. This finding affects system security and trust. Consequently, processes are being developed for system mitigation and countermeasure application. The scope of this tutorial pertains to potential vulnerabilities and countermeasures within the ASIC/FPGA design cycle. The presentation demonstrates how design practices can affect the risk for the adversary to: change circuitry, steal intellectual property, and listen to data operations. An important portion of the design cycle is assuring the design is working as specified or as expected. This is accomplished by exhaustive testing of the target design. Alternatively, it has been shown that well established schemes for test coverage enhancement (design-for-verification (DFV) and design-for-test (DFT)) can create conduits for adversary accessibility. As a result, it is essential to perform a trade between robust test coverage versus reliable design implementation. The goal of this tutorial is to explain the evolution of design practices; review adversary accessibility points due to DFV and DFT circuitry insertion (back door circuitry); and to describe common engineering trade-off considerations for test versus adversary threats.

  17. Alloy design through mechanical equation of state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, C.Yu.; Ellis, F.V.; Huang, F.H.

    1975-01-01

    The concept of plastic equation of state and the experimental results which are used to support this approach are introduced. It is shown that considerable savings in mechanical testing are possible in using this approach to establish the constitutive relationships for plastic deformation for a material. Advantages in data correlation and data extrapolation are also described. Examples are given to suggest that the constitutive relationships for plastic deformation obtained may be used as a useful basis for correlating the effects of composition and microstructure changes on mechanical properties and therefore serve as a guide for alloy selection. The savings in mechanical testing suggest also that the approach of plastic equation of state may be adopted for evaluating and assessing the mechanical properties of candidate alloys

  18. Advanced tokamak reactors based on the spherical torus (ATR/ST). Preliminary design considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.; Copenhaver, C.; Schnurr, N.M.; Engelhardt, A.G.; Seed, T.J.; Zubrin, R.M.

    1986-06-01

    Preliminary design results relating to an advanced magnetic fusion reactor concept based on the high-beta, low-aspect-ratio, spherical-torus tokamak are summarized. The concept includes resistive (demountable) toroidal-field coils, magnetic-divertor impurity control, oscillating-field current drive, and a flowing liquid-metal breeding blanket. Results of parametric tradeoff studies, plasma engineering modeling, fusion-power-core mechanical design, neutronics analyses, and blanket thermalhydraulics studies are described. The approach, models, and interim results described here provide a basis for a more detailed design. Key issues quantified for the spherical-torus reactor center on the need for an efficient drive for this high-current (approx.40 MA) device as well as the economic desirability to increase the net electrical power from the nominal 500-MWe(net) value adopted for the baseline system. Although a direct extension of present tokamak scaling, the stablity and transport of this high-beta (approx.0.3) plasma is a key unknown that is resoluble only by experiment. The spherical torus generally provides a route to improved tokamak reactors as measured by considerably simplified coil technology in a configuration that allows a realistic magnetic divertor design, both leading to increased mass power density and reduced cost

  19. Algorithmic Mechanism Design of Evolutionary Computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Yan

    2015-01-01

    We consider algorithmic design, enhancement, and improvement of evolutionary computation as a mechanism design problem. All individuals or several groups of individuals can be considered as self-interested agents. The individuals in evolutionary computation can manipulate parameter settings and operations by satisfying their own preferences, which are defined by an evolutionary computation algorithm designer, rather than by following a fixed algorithm rule. Evolutionary computation algorithm designers or self-adaptive methods should construct proper rules and mechanisms for all agents (individuals) to conduct their evolution behaviour correctly in order to definitely achieve the desired and preset objective(s). As a case study, we propose a formal framework on parameter setting, strategy selection, and algorithmic design of evolutionary computation by considering the Nash strategy equilibrium of a mechanism design in the search process. The evaluation results present the efficiency of the framework. This primary principle can be implemented in any evolutionary computation algorithm that needs to consider strategy selection issues in its optimization process. The final objective of our work is to solve evolutionary computation design as an algorithmic mechanism design problem and establish its fundamental aspect by taking this perspective. This paper is the first step towards achieving this objective by implementing a strategy equilibrium solution (such as Nash equilibrium) in evolutionary computation algorithm.

  20. SSC collider dipole magnet end mechanical design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delchamps, S.W.; Bossert, R.C.; Carson, J.; Ewald, K.; Fulton, H.; Kerby, J.; Koska, W.; Strait, J.; Wake, M.; Leung, K.K.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the mechanical design of the ends of Superconducting Super Collider dipole magnets to be constructed and tested at Fermilab. Coil end clamps, end yoke configuration, and end plate design are discussed. Loading of the end plate by axial Lorentz forces is discussed. Relevant data from 40 mm and 50 mm aperture model dipole magnets built and tested at Fermilab are presented. In particular, the apparent influence of end clamp design on the quench behavior of model SSC dipoles is described

  1. Design Considerations and Conceptual Designs for Surface Nuclear Power Systems for the Moon and Mars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blessing, David L.; Kirkland, Joel

    2006-01-01

    A set of design considerations is proposed for nuclear power systems to provide power on the Moon or Mars. Setting the initial requirements is extremely important since they govern the choices that determine the final design. In addition, the choice of reactor and its operating conditions depends on details of the energy conversion and heat rejection systems, which must be studied in tandem. Refractory materials are not suitable for the primary pressure boundary for the reactor due to their susceptibility to chemical attack from particles of regolith on the Moon and Mars or by the carbon dioxide atmosphere on Mars. High nickel superalloys would be acceptable in these environments, but their limited creep strength at elevated temperatures limits reactor outlet temperature to about 1150 K or less. This temperature restriction results in the mass of a gas cooled reactor coupled to a Brayton power conversion system being somewhat lighter than that of a liquid metal-cooled reactors coupled to a Brayton power conversion system. The mass of a liquid metal-cooled reactor coupled to an advanced Stirling power conversion system would be in between that of the gas and liquid metal cooled systems which use Brayton power conversion

  2. Technical considerations for designing low-cost, long-wave infrared objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desroches, Gerard; Dalzell, Kristy; Robitaille, Blaise

    2014-06-01

    With the growth of uncooled infrared imaging in the consumer market, the balance between cost implications and performance criteria in the objective lens must be examined carefully. The increased availability of consumer-grade, long-wave infrared cameras is related to a decrease in military usage but it is also due to the decreasing costs of the cameras themselves. This has also driven up demand for low-cost, long-wave objectives that can resolve smaller pixels while maintaining high performance. Smaller pixels are traditionally associated with high cost objectives because of higher resolution requirements but, with careful consideration of all the requirements and proper selection of materials, costs can be moderated. This paper examines the cost/performance trade-off implications associated with optical and mechanical requirements of long-wave infrared objectives. Optical performance, f-number, field of view, distortion, focus range and thermal range all affect the cost of the objective. Because raw lens material cost is often the most expensive item in the construction, selection of the material as well as the shape of the lens while maintaining acceptable performance and cost targets were explored. As a result of these considerations, a low-cost, lightweight, well-performing objective was successfully designed, manufactured and tested.

  3. Design considerations for ITER [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor] toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalsi, S.S.; Lousteau, D.C.; Miller, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is a new tokamak design project with joint participation from Europe, Japan, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR), and the United States. This paper describes a magnetic and mechanical design methodology for toroidal field (TF) coils that employs Nb/sub 3/Sn superconductor technology. Coil winding is sized by using conductor concepts developed for the US TIBER concept. The nuclear heating generated during operation is removed from the windings by helium flowing through the conductor. The heat in the coil case is removed through a separate cooling circuit operating at approximately 20 K. Manifold concepts are presented for the complete coil cooling system. Also included are concepts for the coil structural arrangement. The effects of in-plane and out-of-plane loads are included in the design considerations for the windings and case. Concepts are presented for reacting these loads with a minimum amount of additional structural material. Concepts discussed in this paper could be considered for the ITER TF coils. 6 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  4. Lunar Module ECS (Environmental Control System) - Design Considerations and Failure Modes. Part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interbartolo, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Design considerations and failure modes for the Lunar Module (LM) Environmental Control System (ECS) are described. An overview of the the oxygen supply and cabin pressurization, atmosphere revitalization, water management and heat transport systems are provided. Design considerations including reliability, flight instrumentation, modularization and the change to the use of batteries instead of fuel cells are discussed. A summary is provided for the LM ECS general testing regime.

  5. Particulate Matter Filtration Design Considerations for Crewed Spacecraft Life Support Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agui, Juan H.; Vijayakumar, R.; Perry, Jay L.

    2016-01-01

    Particulate matter filtration is a key component of crewed spacecraft cabin ventilation and life support system (LSS) architectures. The basic particulate matter filtration functional requirements as they relate to an exploration vehicle LSS architecture are presented. Particulate matter filtration concepts are reviewed and design considerations are discussed. A concept for a particulate matter filtration architecture suitable for exploration missions is presented. The conceptual architecture considers the results from developmental work and incorporates best practice design considerations.

  6. Systems-design and energy-balance considerations for impact fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    Areas of concern and potential problems for impact fusion are qualitatively considered within an overall systems context. A parametric and qualitative description of the general energy balance and systems considerations for an Impact Fusion Reactor (IFR) design is discussed. Reactor systems design considerations for an IFR are presented. An attempt to assess the IFR viability is made based on highly simplified but limiting projectile-target energy balances and thermonuclear burn models

  7. Design considerations for on-site spent-fuel transfer systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.H.; Jones, C.R.

    1989-06-01

    Studies on spent fuel shipping logistics and operation make it clear that the use of large casks, i.e., 100--125 tons, is superior to smaller casks of similar construction. This superiority manifests itself in both transportation and/or shipping economics and safety as well as reduced personnel exposure in the processing of the casks. An on-site system for the transfer of spent fuel from the storage pool to a large shipping or storage cask, as well as the transfer of spent fuel directly from a storage cask to a shipping cask, could bring the large cask benefits to those restricted reactors. Sensing the need to look more closely at this opportunity, EPRI contracted with S. Levy, Incorporated of Campbell, CA to develop a set of design considerations for such transfer systems. Rather then embark on another design study, EPRI decided to first identify the system considerations that must be factored into any design. The format for this effort presents both the Consideration and the Rationale for the consideration. The resulting work identified thirty-six General Considerations and two Special Considerations. The Considerations are in the form of mandatory requirements and desirable but nonmandatory requirements. Additionally, a brief economic study was performed to get a feel for the cost considerations of on-site transfers. The study results suggest a relatively narrow set of scenarios where on-site transfers are economically superior to alternatives. These scenarios generally involve the use of concrete casks as on-site storage devices

  8. Mechanical Cushion Design Influence on Cylinder Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghi, Massimo; Milani, Massimo; Conrad, Finn

    2005-01-01

    The paper deals with the simulation and the experimental verification of the dynamic behaviour of a linear actuator equipped with different configurations of mechanical cushion. A numerical model, developed and tailored to describe the influence of different modulation of the discharged flow....... experimental comparison, involving the piston velocity and the cylinder chambers pressure. After, with the aim of highlighting the effect of mechanical cushions design on a two effect linear actuator dynamic performances, the characteristics modulation of four alternative cushioning systems are determined...

  9. Thermal hydraulics and mechanics core design programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinecke, J.

    1992-10-01

    The report documents the work performed within the Research and Development Task T hermal hydraulics and mechanics core design programs , funded by the German government. It contains the development of new codes, the extension of existing codes, the qualification and verification of codes and the development of a code library. The overall goal of this work was to adapt the system of thermal hydraulics and mechanics codes to the permanently growing requirements of the status of science and technology

  10. HYLIFE-II reactor chamber mechanical design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    House, P.A.

    1992-01-01

    Mechanical design features of the reactor chamber for the HYLIFE-11 inertial confinement fusion power plant are presented. A combination of oscillating and steady, molten salt streams are used for shielding and blast protection. The system is designed for an 8 Hz repetition rate. Beam path clearing, between shots, is accomplished with the oscillating flow. The mechanism for generating the oscillating streams is described. A design configuration of the vessel wall allows adequate cooling and provides extra shielding to reduce thermal stresses to tolerable levels. The bottom portion of the reactor chamber is designed to minimize splash back of the high velocity (20 m/s) salt streams and also recover up to half of the dynamic head

  11. Self-repair networks a mechanism design

    CERN Document Server

    Ishida, Yoshiteru

    2015-01-01

    This book describes the struggle to introduce a mechanism that enables next-generation information systems to maintain themselves. Our generation observed the birth and growth of information systems, and the Internet in particular. Surprisingly information systems are quite different from conventional (energy, material-intensive) artificial systems, and rather resemble biological systems (information-intensive systems). Many artificial systems are designed based on (Newtonian) physics assuming that every element obeys simple and static rules; however, the experience of the Internet suggests a different way of designing where growth cannot be controlled but self-organized with autonomous and selfish agents. This book suggests using game theory, a mechanism design in particular, for designing next-generation information systems which will be self-organized by collective acts with autonomous components. The challenge of mapping a probability to time appears repeatedly in many forms throughout this book. The book...

  12. Mechanical design of a shape memory alloy actuated prosthetic hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Laurentis, Kathryn J; Mavroidis, Constantinos

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the mechanical design for a new five fingered, twenty degree-of-freedom dexterous hand patterned after human anatomy and actuated by Shape Memory Alloy artificial muscles. Two experimental prototypes of a finger, one fabricated by traditional means and another fabricated by rapid prototyping techniques, are described and used to evaluate the design. An important aspect of the Rapid Prototype technique used here is that this multi-articulated hand will be fabricated in one step, without requiring assembly, while maintaining its desired mobility. The use of Shape Memory Alloy actuators combined with the rapid fabrication of the non-assembly type hand, reduce considerably its weight and fabrication time. Therefore, the focus of this paper is the mechanical design of a dexterous hand that combines Rapid Prototype techniques and smart actuators. The type of robotic hand described in this paper can be utilized for applications requiring low weight, compactness, and dexterity such as prosthetic devices, space and planetary exploration.

  13. High mechanical advantage design of six-bar Stephenson mechanism for servo mechanical presses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianguo Hu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article proposed a two-phase design scheme of Stephenson six-bar working mechanisms for servo mechanical presses with high mechanical advantage. In the qualitative design phase, first, a Stephenson six-bar mechanism with a slide was derived from Stephenson six-bar kinematic chains. Second, based on the instant center analysis method, the relationship between mechanical advantage and some special instant centers was founded, and accordingly a primary mechanism configuration with high mechanical advantage was designed qualitatively. Then, a parameterized prototype model was established, and the influences of design parameters toward slide kinematical characteristics were analyzed. In the quantitative design phase, a multi-objective optimization model, aiming at high mechanical advantage and dwelling characteristics, was built, and a case design was done to find optimal dimensions. Finally, simulations based on the software ADAMS were conducted to compare the transmission characteristics of the optimized working mechanism with that of slide-crank mechanism and symmetrical toggle mechanism, and an experimental press was made to validate the design scheme. The simulation and experiment results show that, compared with general working mechanisms, the Stephenson six-bar working mechanism has higher mechanical advantage and better dwelling characteristics, reducing capacities and costs of servo motors effectively.

  14. Design Considerations in Developing a Text Messaging Program Aimed at Smoking Cessation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtrop, Jodi Summers; Bağci Bosi, A Tülay; Emri, Salih

    2012-01-01

    Background Cell phone text messaging is gaining increasing recognition as an important tool that can be harnessed for prevention and intervention programs across a wide variety of health research applications. Despite the growing body of literature reporting positive outcomes, very little is available about the design decisions that scaffold the development of text messaging-based health interventions. What seems to be missing is documentation of the thought process of investigators in the initial stages of protocol and content development. This omission is of particular concern because many researchers seem to view text messaging as the intervention itself instead of simply a delivery mechanism. Certainly, aspects of this technology may increase participant engagement. Like other interventions, however, the content is a central driver of the behavior change. Objective To address this noted gap in the literature, we discuss the protocol decisions and content development for SMS Turkey (or Cebiniz birakin diyor in Turkish), a smoking cessation text messaging program for adult smokers in Turkey. Methods Content was developed in English and translated into Turkish. Efforts were made to ensure that the protocol and content were grounded in evidence-based smoking cessation theory, while also reflective of the cultural aspects of smoking and quitting in Turkey. Results Methodological considerations included whether to provide cell phones and whether to reimburse participants for texting costs; whether to include supplementary intervention resources (eg, personal contact); and whether to utilize unidirectional versus bidirectional messaging. Program design considerations included how messages were tailored to the quitting curve and one’s smoking status after one’s quit date, the number of messages participants received per day, and over what period of time the intervention lasted. Conclusion The content and methods of effective smoking cessation quitline programs were

  15. Mechanical Design Features of PGSFR NSSS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chang-Gyu; Koo, Gyeong-Hoi; Cho, Jae-Hun; Kim, Sung-Kyun

    2016-01-01

    The NSSS(Nuclear Steam Supply System) is composed of PHTS(Primary Heat Transport System), IHTS (Intermediate Heat Transport System), and SGS(Steam Generation System). And, DHRS(Decay Heat Removal System) adopts both the active and passive systems for diversity. The structures including components and piping should be designed to ensure the structural integrity for their design life against mechanical and operational loads. In this study, the mechanical design features for the structures and components that make up PGSFR NSSS are described. The mechanical design features of structures and components for a PGSFR NSSS are described. The structures are being designed to maintain the structural integrity for their design lifetime by considering the high temperature operating condition. The decay heat removal system(DHRS) removes all reactor decay heat in two ways; active type(ADHRS) and passive type(PDHRS). ADHRS consists of DHX, blower, FHX, circulation pump, and expansion tank. But PDHRS consists of DHX, AHX, and expansion tank. FHX is a finned-tube-type sodium-to-air heat exchanger whereas AHX is a helical-type sodium-to-air heat exchanger

  16. Mechanical Design Features of PGSFR NSSS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chang-Gyu; Koo, Gyeong-Hoi; Cho, Jae-Hun; Kim, Sung-Kyun [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The NSSS(Nuclear Steam Supply System) is composed of PHTS(Primary Heat Transport System), IHTS (Intermediate Heat Transport System), and SGS(Steam Generation System). And, DHRS(Decay Heat Removal System) adopts both the active and passive systems for diversity. The structures including components and piping should be designed to ensure the structural integrity for their design life against mechanical and operational loads. In this study, the mechanical design features for the structures and components that make up PGSFR NSSS are described. The mechanical design features of structures and components for a PGSFR NSSS are described. The structures are being designed to maintain the structural integrity for their design lifetime by considering the high temperature operating condition. The decay heat removal system(DHRS) removes all reactor decay heat in two ways; active type(ADHRS) and passive type(PDHRS). ADHRS consists of DHX, blower, FHX, circulation pump, and expansion tank. But PDHRS consists of DHX, AHX, and expansion tank. FHX is a finned-tube-type sodium-to-air heat exchanger whereas AHX is a helical-type sodium-to-air heat exchanger.

  17. SSC collider dipole magnet end mechanical design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delchamps, S.W.; Bossert, R.C.; Carson, J.; Ewald, K.; Fulton, H.; Kerby, J.; Koska, W.; Strait, J.; Wake, S.M.; Leung, K.K.

    1991-05-01

    This paper describes the mechanical design of the ends of Superconducting Super Collider dipole magnets to be constructed and tested at Fermilab. Coil end clamps, end yoke configuration, and end plate design are discussed. Loading of the end plate by axial Lorentz forces is discussed. Relevant data from 40 mm and 50 mm aperture model dipole magnets built and tested at Fermilab are presented. In particular, the apparent influence of end clamp design on the quench behavior of model SSC dipoles is described. 8 refs., 3 figs

  18. PDX, mechanical design update and assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knutson, D.; Cavalluzzo, S.; Davenport, J.; Kaminsky, E.; Perry, E.; Willard, J.

    1977-01-01

    Mechanical design changes and refinements have occurred since the Sixth Symposium on Engineering Problems of Fusion Research. Particular attention is focused on the area of the toroidal field coil lap joint. Preassembly of major components and final assembly and alignment of the toroidal and poloidal field coils is discussed

  19. Design definition of a mechanical capacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelis, T. D.; Schlieban, E. W.; Scott, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    A design study and analyses of a 10 kW-hr, 15 kW mechanical capacitor system was studied. It was determined that magnetically supported wheels constructed of advanced composites have the potential for high energy density and high power density. Structural concepts are analyzed that yield the highest energy density of any structural design yet reported. Particular attention was paid to the problem of 'friction' caused by magnetic and I to the second power R losses in the suspension and motor-generator subsystems, and low design friction levels have been achieved. The potentially long shelf life of this system, and the absence of wearing parts, provide superior performance over conventional flywheels supported with mechanical bearings. Costs and economies of energy storage wheels were reviewed briefly.

  20. A consideration on pipe-wall thinning mechanisms from an aspect of fluid-mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inada, Fumio; Yoneda, Kimitoshi; Morita, Ryo; Fujiwara, Kazutoshi; Furuya, Masahiro

    2008-01-01

    The contribution of the fluid mechanics to the piping wall thinning phenomena was investigated. It was shown that the fluid force to the wall was quite different between flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) and erosion. The turbulent mass transfer, which is one of the primary factors of FAC, was analogous to the turbulent heat transfer. The model that the molecular transport in the viscous sublayer nearby soon of wall was predominant was practicable. In addition, the mass transport was predicted using commercial codes of computational fluid dynamics. Some prediction results of the mass transfer in orifice and the elbow using above techniques were explained. (author)

  1. AHTR Mechanical, Structural, And Neutronic Preconceptual Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varma, Venugopal Koikal [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Peretz, Fred J [ORNL; Bradley, Eric Craig [ORNL; Ilas, Dan [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL; Zaharia, Nathaniel M [ORNL

    2012-10-01

    This report provides an overview of the mechanical, structural, and neutronic aspects of the Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) design concept. The AHTR is a design concept for a large output Fluoride salt cooled High-temperature Reactor (FHR) that is being developed to enable evaluation of the technology hurdles remaining to be overcome prior to FHRs becoming a commercial reactor class. This report documents the incremental AHTR design maturation performed over the past year and is focused on advancing the design concept to a level of a functional, self-consistent system. The AHTR employs plate type coated particle fuel assemblies with rapid, off-line refueling. Neutronic analysis of the core has confirmed the viability of a 6-month 2-batch cycle with 9 weight-percent enriched uranium fuel. Refueling is intended to be performed automatically under visual guidance using dedicated robotic manipulators. The present design intent is for used fuel to be stored inside of containment for at least 6 months and then transferred to local dry wells for intermediate term, on-site storage. The mechanical and structural concept development effort has included an emphasis on transportation and constructability to minimize construction costs and schedule. The design intent is that all components be factory fabricated into rail transportable modules that are assembled into subsystems at an on-site workshop prior to being lifted into position using a heavy-lift crane in an open-top style construction. While detailed accident identification and response sequence analysis has yet to be performed, the design concept incorporates multiple levels of radioactive material containment including fully passive responses to all identified design basis or non-very-low frequency beyond design basis accidents. Key building design elements include: 1) below grade siting to minimize vulnerability to aircraft impact, 2) multiple natural circulation decay heat rejection chimneys, 3) seismic

  2. Geotechnical materials considerations for conceptual repository design in the Palo Duro Basin, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Versluis, W.S.; Balderman, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    The Palo Duro Basin is only one of numerous potential repository locations for placement of a nuclear waste repository. Conceptual designs in the Palo Duro Basin involve considerations of the character and properties of the geologic materials found on several sites throughout the Basin. The first consideration presented includes current basin exploration results and interpretations of engineering properties for the basin geologic sequences. The next consideration presented includes identification of the characteristics of rock taken from the geologic sequence of interest through laboratory and field testing. Values for materials properties of representative samples are obtained for input into modeling of the material response to repository placement. Conceptual designs which respond to these geotechnical considerations are discussed. 4 references, 4 figures, 4 tables

  3. Computational Design of Animated Mechanical Characters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coros, Stelian; Thomaszewski, Bernhard; DRZ Team Team

    2014-03-01

    A factor key to the appeal of modern CG movies and video-games is that the virtual worlds they portray place no bounds on what can be imagined. Rapid manufacturing devices hold the promise of bringing this type of freedom to our own world, by enabling the fabrication of physical objects whose appearance, deformation behaviors and motions can be precisely specified. In order to unleash the full potential of this technology however, computational design methods that create digital content suitable for fabrication need to be developed. In recent work, we presented a computational design system that allows casual users to create animated mechanical characters. Given an articulated character as input, the user designs the animated character by sketching motion curves indicating how they should move. For each motion curve, our framework creates an optimized mechanism that reproduces it as closely as possible. The resulting mechanisms are attached to the character and then connected to each other using gear trains, which are created in a semi-automated fashion. The mechanical assemblies generated with our system can be driven with a single input driver, such as a hand-operated crank or an electric motor, and they can be fabricated using rapid prototyping devices.

  4. Small Sized Drone Fall Recover Mechanism Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    LIU, Tzu-Heng; CHAO, Fang-Lin; LIOU, Jhen-Yuan

    2017-12-01

    Drones uses four motors to rotate clockwise, counter-clockwise, or change in rotational speed to change its status of motion. The problem of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle turnover causes personal loses and harm local environment. Designs of devices that can let falling drones recover are discussed. The models attempt to change the orientation, so that the drone may be able to improve to the point where it can take off again. The design flow included looking for functional elements, using simplify model to estimate primary functional characteristics, and find the appropriate design parameters. For reducing the complexity, we adopted the simple rotate mechanism with rotating arms to change the fuselage angle and reduce the dependence on the extra-components. A rough model was built to verify structure, and then the concept drawing and prototype were constructed. We made the prototype through the integration of mechanical part and the electronic control circuit. The electronic control module that selected is Arduino-mini pro. Through the Bluetooth modules, user can start the rebound mechanism by the motor control signal. Protections frames are added around each propeller to improve the body rotate problem. Limited by current size of Arduino module, motor and rebound mechanism make the main chassis more massive than the commercial product. However, built-in sensor and circuit miniaturization will improve it in future.

  5. Materials compatibility considerations for a fusion-fission hybrid reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVan, J.H.; Tortorelli, P.F.

    1983-01-01

    The Tandem Mirror Hybrid Reactor is a fusion reactor concept that incorporates a fission-suppressed breeding blanket for the production of 233 U to be used in conventional fission power reactors. The present paper reports on compatibility considerations related to the blanket design. These considerations include solid-solid interactions and liquid metal corrosion. Potential problems are discussed relative to the reference blanket operating temperature (490 0 C) and the recycling time of breeding materials (<1 year)

  6. Design considerations for an integrated safeguards system for fuel-reprocessng plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartan, F.O.

    1982-05-01

    This report presents design ideas for safeguards systems in nuclear fuels reprocessing plants. The report summarizes general safeguards requirements and describes a safeguards system concept being developed and tested at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. The report gives some general concepts intended for design consideration and a checklist of specific problems that should be considered. The report is intended as an aid for the safeguards system designer and as a source of useful information

  7. DESIGN QUALITY IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşegül Akdogan Eker

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available There is a close relationship between material chose and quality in mechanical engineering application like there is in all the other engineering applications. If this relation is balanced then engineering success increases. Material chose comes to fore in the design process most of the time. The two most important responsibilities of the design engineer in here is to chose suitable material and to know the production processes about design. The chose of material of a design that will fulfill the needs all through its life has great importance. It is needed to limit the material applicants by choosing the most suitable ones among variable material. Choosing materials that were examined before and whose behavior is well known provides the designer to feel confident. However since using highly successful materials would increase the competitive power of the designs; designers should follow the developments in materials and know the features of new materials. The description of these features can be interpreted within quality. Quality from the point of engineer is the total fulfillment of expectations.Engineer today are faced with very important problems such as fast technological innovations, a dynamic socio-economical environment, global rivalry. One of the life buoys they stick while trying to solve these problems is total method of quality control. Total Quality model which can provide higher competitive power compared to classical management model brings success only when applied with its whole components. "Approach toward prevention" and "measurement and statistics" have an important place among these elements. The first step of the approach toward prevention composes of design quality and Quality Function Deployment (QFD, or in other words The House of Quality method that will provide this. In this paper; considering the quality function deployment, how the chose of material are done in mechanical engineering applications will be explained.

  8. Structural considerations in the design of a repository to store radioactive waste in basalt formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deju, R.A.; Board, M.P.; Gephart, R.E.; Myers, C.W.

    1978-01-01

    The Columbia River Basalt is being studied as a potential site for a spent fuel repository for the United States of America. To accomplish this end, a design study and environmental feasibility studies are being conducted to assess the feasibility of building tunnels at depths of approximately 1,000 meters to store the spent fuel. Of prime consideration is the design of the tunnels in such a way that the overall underground structure can withstand the thermal loading effect resulting from dissipation of heat released from the spent fuel canisters as the radioactive material decays. This paper discusses structural design considerations needed to construct such a repository subject to the loading conditions and safety considerations that must be applied to guaranteeing that the waste emplaced in these tunnels will remain isolated from mankind for long geologic periods of time

  9. AHTR Mechanical, Structural, and Neutronic Preconceptual Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varma, V.K.; Holcomb, D.E.; Peretz, F.J.; Bradley, E.C.; Ilas, D.; Qualls, A.L.; Zaharia, N.M.

    2012-09-15

    This report provides an overview of the mechanical, structural, and neutronic aspects of the Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) design concept. The AHTR is a design concept for a large output Fluoride salt cooled High-temperature Reactor (FHR) that is being developed to enable evaluation of the technology hurdles remaining to be overcome prior to FHRs becoming an option for commercial reactor deployment. This report documents the incremental AHTR design maturation performed over the past year and is focused on advancing the design concept to a level of a functional, self-consistent system. The reactor concept development remains at a preconceptual level of maturity. While the overall appearance of an AHTR design is anticipated to be similar to the current concept, optimized dimensions will differ from those presented here. The AHTR employs plate type coated particle fuel assemblies with rapid, off-line refueling. Neutronic analysis of the core has confirmed the viability of a 6-month two-batch cycle with 9 wt. % enriched uranium fuel. Refueling is intended to be performed automatically under visual guidance using dedicated robotic manipulators. The report includes a preconceptual design of the manipulators, the fuel transfer system, and the used fuel storage system. The present design intent is for used fuel to be stored inside of containment for at least six months and then transferred to local dry wells for intermediate term, on-site storage. The mechanical and structural concept development effort has included an emphasis on transportation and constructability to minimize construction costs and schedule. The design intent is that all components be factory fabricated into rail transportable modules that are assembled into subsystems at an on-site workshop prior to being lifted into position using a heavy-lift crane in an open-top style construction. While detailed accident identification and response sequence analysis has yet to be performed, the design

  10. Mechanical Cushion Design Influence on Cylinder Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghi, Massimo; Milani, Massimo; Conrad, Finn

    2005-01-01

    . experimental comparison, involving the piston velocity and the cylinder chambers pressure. After, with the aim of highlighting the effect of mechanical cushions design on a two effect linear actuator dynamic performances, the characteristics modulation of four alternative cushioning systems are determined......The paper deals with the simulation and the experimental verification of the dynamic behaviour of a linear actuator equipped with different configurations of mechanical cushion. A numerical model, developed and tailored to describe the influence of different modulation of the discharged flow......-rate (and of the correspondent discharging orifice design) on the cushioning characteristics variation is firstly introduced. Then, with respect to the case of the cylindrical cushioning engagement, both the reliability and the limits of the numerical approach are highlighted through a numerical vs...

  11. Premium quality for a mechanical design department

    OpenAIRE

    Rofín Serrà, Guillem

    2009-01-01

    This Thesis has been carried out in a market which is expected to grow rapidly in the next decade. Because of this, actors in the market like Alpha want to strengthen their business position through refining the quality of their products and processes. One of the internal targets of MD, a mechanical design department within Alpha, referred to “premium product quality parameters” although these were not defined. Hence, this Thesis intends to contribute in the definition and understanding that ...

  12. Surface mechanics design by cavitation peening

    OpenAIRE

    Hitoshi Soyama

    2015-01-01

    Although impacts at cavitation bubble collapses cause severe damage in hydraulic machineries, the cavitation impacts can be utilised for surface mechanics design such as introduction of compressive residual stress and/or improvement of fatigue strength. The peening method using the cavitation impacts was called as cavitation peening. In order to reveal the peening intensity of hydrodynamic cavitation and laser cavitation, the arc height of Almen strip and duralumin plate were measured. In the...

  13. Evolution of design considerations in complex craniofacial reconstruction using patient-specific implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peel, Sean; Bhatia, Satyajeet; Eggbeer, Dominic; Morris, Daniel S; Hayhurst, Caroline

    2017-06-01

    Previously published evidence has established major clinical benefits from using computer-aided design, computer-aided manufacturing, and additive manufacturing to produce patient-specific devices. These include cutting guides, drilling guides, positioning guides, and implants. However, custom devices produced using these methods are still not in routine use, particularly by the UK National Health Service. Oft-cited reasons for this slow uptake include the following: a higher up-front cost than conventionally fabricated devices, material-choice uncertainty, and a lack of long-term follow-up due to their relatively recent introduction. This article identifies a further gap in current knowledge - that of design rules, or key specification considerations for complex computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing/additive manufacturing devices. This research begins to address the gap by combining a detailed review of the literature with first-hand experience of interdisciplinary collaboration on five craniofacial patient case studies. In each patient case, bony lesions in the orbito-temporal region were segmented, excised, and reconstructed in the virtual environment. Three cases translated these digital plans into theatre via polymer surgical guides. Four cases utilised additive manufacturing to fabricate titanium implants. One implant was machined from polyether ether ketone. From the literature, articles with relevant abstracts were analysed to extract design considerations. In all, 19 frequently recurring design considerations were extracted from previous publications. Nine new design considerations were extracted from the case studies - on the basis of subjective clinical evaluation. These were synthesised to produce a design considerations framework to assist clinicians with prescribing and design engineers with modelling. Promising avenues for further research are proposed.

  14. Mechanism Design for Incentivizing Social Media Contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vivek K.; Jain, Ramesh; Kankanhalli, Mohan

    Despite recent advancements in user-driven social media platforms, tools for studying user behavior patterns and motivations remain primitive. We highlight the voluntary nature of user contributions and that users can choose when (and when not) to contribute to the common media pool. A Game theoretic framework is proposed to study the dynamics of social media networks where contribution costs are individual but gains are common. We model users as rational selfish agents, and consider domain attributes like voluntary participation, virtual reward structure, network effect, and public-sharing to model the dynamics of this interaction. The created model describes the most appropriate contribution strategy from each user's perspective and also highlights issues like 'free-rider' problem and individual rationality leading to irrational (i.e. sub-optimal) group behavior. We also consider the perspective of the system designer who is interested in finding the best incentive mechanisms to influence the selfish end-users so that the overall system utility is maximized. We propose and compare multiple mechanisms (based on optimal bonus payment, social incentive leveraging, and second price auction) to study how a system designer can exploit the selfishness of its users, to design incentive mechanisms which improve the overall task-completion probability and system performance, while possibly still benefiting the individual users.

  15. Practical Consideration Factors to Design Array Configuration of Direction Finding System for Airborne Signal Intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Hwan Lee

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Airborne signal intelligence (SIGINT systems must be capable of locating radio signal sources. Direction finding (DF to support this capability is an important factor. There are some practical considerations to be taken when designing the array configuration of a DF system for airborne SIGINT systems. This paper summarizes the practical factors when designing the array configuration of the DF system for airborne SIGINT. In particular, it focuses on four areas: antenna consideration factors when installing the DF system for airborne SIGINT from a practical point of view, array configuration methods for airborne communications intelligence and electronic intelligence, and a numerical analysis to select the optimum antenna position for airborne SIGINT.

  16. Process and design considerations for the anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrivastava, S.R.; Bastuk, B. [Larsen Engineers, Rochester, NY (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Full scale experience exists and justifies implementing anaerobic digestion for pretreatment of high strength industrial waste water and side streams. Anaerobic treatment of sludge and manure have demonstrated cost effective, environmentally sound treatment of these wastes. Recent attention has focused on the potential for anaerobically treating high solids municipal solid wastes to assist in meeting state waste reduction goals and provide a new renewable source of energy. This paper focuses on the fundamental facility design and process protocol considerations necessary for a high solids anaerobic digesting facility. The primary design and equipment considerations are being applied to a 5 to 10 ton per day demonstration anaerobic digestion facility in Bergen, New York.

  17. Quantum mechanical design of enzyme active sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiyun; DeChancie, Jason; Gunaydin, Hakan; Chowdry, Arnab B; Clemente, Fernando R; Smith, Adam J T; Handel, T M; Houk, K N

    2008-02-01

    The design of active sites has been carried out using quantum mechanical calculations to predict the rate-determining transition state of a desired reaction in presence of the optimal arrangement of catalytic functional groups (theozyme). Eleven versatile reaction targets were chosen, including hydrolysis, dehydration, isomerization, aldol, and Diels-Alder reactions. For each of the targets, the predicted mechanism and the rate-determining transition state (TS) of the uncatalyzed reaction in water is presented. For the rate-determining TS, a catalytic site was designed using naturalistic catalytic units followed by an estimation of the rate acceleration provided by a reoptimization of the catalytic site. Finally, the geometries of the sites were compared to the X-ray structures of related natural enzymes. Recent advances in computational algorithms and power, coupled with successes in computational protein design, have provided a powerful context for undertaking such an endeavor. We propose that theozymes are excellent candidates to serve as the active site models for design processes.

  18. Mechanical Design of Carbon Ion Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Carbon Ion Optics are expected to provide much longer thruster life due to their resistance to sputter erosion. There are a number of different forms of carbon that have been used for fabricating ion thruster optics. The mechanical behavior of carbon is much different than that of most metals, and poses unique design challenges. In order to minimize mission risk, the behavior of carbon must be well understood, and components designed within material limitations. Thermal expansion of the thruster structure must be compatible with thermal expansion of the carbon ion optics. Specially designed interfaces may be needed so that grid gap and aperture alignment are not adversely affected by dissimilar material properties within the thruster. The assembled thruster must be robust and tolerant of launch vibration. The following paper lists some of the characteristics of various carbon materials. Several past ion optics designs are discussed, identifying strengths and weaknesses. Electrostatics and material science are not emphasized so much as the mechanical behavior and integration of grid electrodes into an ion thruster.

  19. Mechanical components design for PWR - control rod drive mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leme, Francisco Louzano; Mattar Neto, Miguel

    2002-01-01

    The Control Rod Drive Mechanism (CRDM) is usually - a high precision - equipment incorporating mechanical and electrical components designed to move the control rods. The 'control rods' refer to all rods or assemblies that are moved to assess the performance of the reactor. The CRDM here presented is the Nut and Lead Screw type. This type is basically a power screw type magnetically coupled to a slow speed reluctance electric motor that provides a means of axially positioning the movable fuel assemblies in the reactor core for purpose of controlling core reactivity. A helically threaded lead screw assembly, comprising one element of power screw, is attached to a movable fuel assemblies. The CRDM usually has closer and more consistent contact with environment peculiar to the reactor than has only other machinery component. This environment includes not only the radiation field of the reactor, but also the temperature, pressure and chemical properties associated with the material used as the coolant for reactor fuel. Specific and special materials are needed because of the above mentioned application. Due to the importance of the above described CRDM functions, this paper will also consider the nuclear functions and their safety classes as well as the CRDM nuclear design criteria. (author)

  20. Climate Change Professional Development Approaches: Design Considerations, Teacher Enactment, and Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewes, A.; Henderson, J.; Mouza, C.

    2017-12-01

    Climate change is one of the most pressing challenges facing society, and climate change educational models are emerging in response. This study investigates the implementation and enactment of a climate change professional development model for science educators and its impact on student learning. Using an intrinsic case study methodology, we focused analytic attention on how one teacher made specific curricular, pedagogical, and content decisions, and the implications of those decisions for student's conceptual learning.The research presented here reports on the instructional design, pedagogical enactment, and subsequent effects on student learning of a climate change professional development (PD) model in the United States. Using anthropological theories of conceptual travel, we traced salient ideas from the PD through instructional delivery and into the evidence of student reasoning. We sought to address the following research questions: 1) How did a middle school teacher integrate climate change concepts into her science curriculum following PD participation? and 2) How did climate change instruction influence student understanding of key climate change constructs?From observation of the classroom instruction, we determined that the teacher effectively integrated new climate change information into her pre-existing schema. Additionally, through retrospective analysis of the PD, we found the design of the PD foregrounded the causes, mechanisms and likely effects of anthropogenic climate change at the expense of mitigation and adaptation strategies, and this differentially shaped how climate change was taught in the teacher's classroom. Analysis of student reasoning evidence showed that students gained an increased understanding of the enhanced greenhouse effect and the implications of human activity on this enhanced effect at statistically significant levels and with moderate effect sizes. However, students demonstrated a limited, though non-significant gain on

  1. CONSIDERATIONS REGARDING THE DESIGN OF FOOTWEAR WHICH ASSURES THE HEALTH OF THE FOOT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MĂRCUŞ Liviu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The high demands for cheap footwear can only be satisfied by mass fabrication. Costumed footwear would represent a regress, despite the advantages that it brings. This paper regards mainly the demands that mass footwear requires, in order to maintain the health of the foot. The desire to maintain the foot shape and functionality requires certain last forms and fabrication algorithms. We analyze certain aspects referring to: the correct design of the inner sole, insuring the flexibility of the lower part of the footwear by choosing the right type of materials and confection systems, choosing the right height of the heel, setting the adequate shape by increasing the number of different shoe sizes. In order to give a loose space to the adults’ toes, where they are not pressed, but have a complete range of motion, the orthopedists and the last specialists have set several requirements for building the contour of the inner sole. The technique of building a bond between the footwear forepart and the inferior ensemble is dependent to the purpose and partially to the fashion demands of the shoe. The sole shape is influenced by the buyers, as seen by the development of the ex-flex footwear. There must be noted that in this case, the work of the model designer coincides with the exigencies of the specialist in footwear health. With the help of certain functional considerations and of several mechanical calculations, it can be proven that a heel with a height of 3 cm does not necessarily have a negative impact on the foot health. This is why even the orthopedics consider this limit as acceptable. Higher heels must be avoided if we want to maintain a normal function and development of the foot.

  2. Research design considerations for single-dose analgesic clinical trials in acute pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper, Stephen A; Desjardins, Paul J; Turk, Dennis C

    2016-01-01

    This article summarizes the results of a meeting convened by the Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials (IMMPACT) on key considerations and best practices governing the design of acute pain clinical trials. We discuss the role of early phase clinical trials......, including pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) trials, and the value of including both placebo and active standards of comparison in acute pain trials. This article focuses on single-dose and short-duration trials with emphasis on the perioperative and study design factors that influence assay...... sensitivity. Recommendations are presented on assessment measures, study designs, and operational factors. Although most of the methodological advances have come from studies of postoperative pain after dental impaction, bunionectomy, and other surgeries, the design considerations discussed are applicable...

  3. Design considerations for post accident monitoring system of a research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Gwi Sook; Park, Je Yun; Kim, Young Ki

    2012-01-01

    The Post Accident Monitoring System (PAMS) provides primary information for operators to assess the plant conditions and perform their role in bringing the plant to a safe condition during an accident. The PAMS of NPP (Nuclear Power Plant) in KOREA provides the continuous display of the PAM category 1 parameters specified in R.G 1.97, Rev. 03. Recently the PAMS of NPP has been designed according to R.G 1.97, Rev. 04. There is no PAMS at the HANARO in KOREA, but recently RRs (Research Reactors) around the world are going to have PAMS for various multi purposes. We should determine the design considerations for PAMS in a Korean RR based on the design state analysis. Thus, this paper proposes strategies on the design considerations for the PAMS of a Korean RR

  4. Mechanical design of translocating motor proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Wonmuk; Lang, Matthew J

    2009-01-01

    Translocating motors generate force and move along a biofilament track to achieve diverse functions including gene transcription, translation, intracellular cargo transport, protein degradation, and muscle contraction. Advances in single molecule manipulation experiments, structural biology, and computational analysis are making it possible to consider common mechanical design principles of these diverse families of motors. Here, we propose a mechanical parts list that include track, energy conversion machinery, and moving parts. Energy is supplied not just by burning of a fuel molecule, but there are other sources or sinks of free energy, by binding and release of a fuel or products, or similarly between the motor and the track. Dynamic conformational changes of the motor domain can be regarded as controlling the flow of free energy to and from the surrounding heat reservoir. Multiple motor domains are organized in distinct ways to achieve motility under imposed physical constraints. Transcending amino acid sequence and structure, physically and functionally similar mechanical parts may have evolved as nature's design strategy for these molecular engines.

  5. Lansce Wire Scanning Diagnostics Device Mechanical Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio; Batygin, Yuri K.; Gilpatrick, John D.; Gruchalla, Michael E.; Maestas, Alfred J.; Pillai, Chandra; Raybun, Joseph L.; Sattler, F.D.; Sedillo, James Daniel; Smith, Brian G.

    2011-01-01

    The Accelerator Operations and Technology Division at Los Alamos National Laboratory operates a linear particle accelerator which utilizes 110 wire scanning diagnostics devices to gain position and intensity information of the proton beam. In the upcoming LANSCE improvements, 51 of these wire scanners are to be replaced with a new design, up-to-date technology and off-the-shelf components. This document outlines the requirements for the mechanical design of the LANSCE wire scanner and presents the recently developed linac wire scanner prototype. Additionally, this document presents the design modifications that have been implemented into the fabrication and assembly of this first linac wire scanner prototype. Also, this document will present the design for the second, third, and fourth wire scanner prototypes being developed. Prototypes 2 and 3 belong to a different section of the particle accelerator and therefore have slightly different design specifications. Prototype 4 is a modification of a previously used wire scanner in our facility. Lastly, the paper concludes with a plan for future work on the wire scanner development.

  6. Lansce Wire Scanning Diagnostics Device Mechanical Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batygin, Yuri K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gilpatrick, John D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gruchalla, Michael E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Maestas, Alfred J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pillai, Chandra [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Raybun, Joseph L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sattler, F. D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sedillo, James Daniel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Brian G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-01

    The Accelerator Operations & Technology Division at Los Alamos National Laboratory operates a linear particle accelerator which utilizes 110 wire scanning diagnostics devices to gain position and intensity information of the proton beam. In the upcoming LANSCE improvements, 51 of these wire scanners are to be replaced with a new design, up-to-date technology and off-the-shelf components. This document outlines the requirements for the mechanical design of the LANSCE wire scanner and presents the recently developed linac wire scanner prototype. Additionally, this document presents the design modifications that have been implemented into the fabrication and assembly of this first linac wire scanner prototype. Also, this document will present the design for the second, third, and fourth wire scanner prototypes being developed. Prototypes 2 and 3 belong to a different section of the particle accelerator and therefore have slightly different design specifications. Prototype 4 is a modification of a previously used wire scanner in our facility. Lastly, the paper concludes with a plan for future work on the wire scanner development.

  7. Considerations involved in the design of negative-ion-based neutral beam systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, W.S.

    1983-11-01

    We consider the requirements and constraints for negative-ion-based neutral beam injection systems, and show how these are reflected in design considerations. We will attempt to develop a set of guidelines for users and developers to use to see how well (in a qualitative sense, at least) a particular neutral beam system fits a particular proposed need

  8. 77 FR 74195 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Design Considerations for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-D-1161] Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Design Considerations for Devices Intended for Home Use; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The...

  9. Design considerations for RF power amplifiers demonstrated through a GSM/EDGE power amplifier module

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baltus, P.G.M.; Bezooijen, van A.; Huijsing, J.H.; Steyaert, M.; Roermund, van A.H.M.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the design considerations for RF power amplifiers in general, including trends in systems, linearity and efficiency, the PA environment, implementation is sues and technology. As an example a triple-band (900/1800/1900MHz) dual mode (GSMIEdge) power amplifier module is described

  10. Consideration on excitation mechanisms in a high-power two-jet plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaksas, Natalia P.; Gerasimov, Vladimir A.

    2013-01-01

    The study of excitation mechanisms in the region before the jet confluence of a high-power two-jet plasma used for analysis of different powders has been undertaken. Distribution of excited levels of Fe atoms and ions according to the Boltzmann population was found. Measuring Fe atomic and ionic excitation temperatures showed their considerable difference (≈ 2000–2500 K). The effect of argon on line intensities of a wide range of elements was investigated by the experiment with argon covering. A negligible effect of argon covering on line intensities of atoms with ionization energy of 8 eV was revealed. This is likely to be due to Penning ionization by metastable argon followed by ion recombination with an electron and stepwise de-excitations. A more pronounced effect of argon covering was observed for ionic lines of investigated elements with total excitation energy ranging from 11 to 21 eV. Penning ionization followed by electron impact is believed to be a probable mechanism for ion excitation. The contribution of metastable argon to excitation processes results in departure from local thermodynamic equilibrium and different atomic and ionic excitation temperatures. - Highlights: • Excitation mechanisms were investigated in a high-power TJP. • Boltzmann population of excited levels of Fe atoms and ions takes place. • The considerable difference in Fe atomic and ionic excitation temperatures occurs. • Argon covering was used to study the argon effect on line intensities. • Participation of metastable argon in atom ionization was shown

  11. Technical considerations in the design of near surface disposal facilities for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-11-01

    Good design is an important step towards ensuring operational as well as long term safety of low and intermediate level waste (LILW) disposal. The IAEA has produced this report with the objective of outlining the most important technical considerations in the design of near surface disposal facilities and to provide some examples of the design process in different countries. This guidance has been developed in light of experience gained from the design of existing near surface disposal facilities in a range of Member States. In particular the report provide information on design objective, design requirements, and design phases. The report focuses on: near surface disposal facilities accepting solidified LILW; disposal facilities on or just below the ground surface, where the final protective covering is of the order of a few metres thick; and disposal facilities several tens of metres below the ground surface (including rock cavern type facilities)

  12. Some critical considerations on the present epistemological and scientific debate on quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghirardi, G.C.

    1985-09-01

    Some general methodological considerations aimed to guarantee the necessary logical rigor to the present debate on quantum mechanics are presented. In particular some misunderstandings about the implications of the critical analysis put forward by Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen (EPR) which can be found in the literature, are discussed. These misunderstandings are shown to arise from possible underestimates, overestimates and misinterpretations of the EPR argument. It is argued that the difficulties pointed out by EPR are, in a sense that will be defined precisely, unavoidable. A model which tries to solve the difficulties arising from quantum non separability effects when macroscopic systems are involved, is briefly sketched. (author)

  13. Mechanical design for TMX injector system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calderon, M.O.; Chen, F.F.K.; Denhoy, B.S.

    1977-01-01

    The injector system for the Tandem Mirror Experiment (TMX) contains the components required to create and maintain a high-temperature, high-density plasma. These components include a streaming-plasma gun in each of the plug tanks to form the target-plasma, 24 neutral-beam source modules for injecting neutral deuterium atoms to heat and replace losses from the plasma, and a gas box system that applies a streaming cold gas to the plasma to stabilize it. This paper discusses the mechanical design problems and solutions for this injector system

  14. Mechanical design of the SNS MEBT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshatz, D.; DeMello, A.; Doolittle, L.; Luft, P.; Staples, J.; Zachoszcz, A.

    2001-01-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is presently designing and building the 2.5 MeV front end for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). The front end includes a medium-energy beam transport (MEBT) that carries the 2.5 MeV, 38 mA peak current, H - beam from the radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) to the drift tube linac (DTL) through a series of 14 electromagnetic quadrupoles, four rebuncher cavities, and a fast traveling wave chopping system. The beamline contains numerous diagnostic devices, including stripline beam position and phase monitors (BPM), toroid beam current monitors (BCM), and beam profile monitors. Components are mounted on three rafts that are separately supported and aligned. The large number of beam transport and diagnostic components in the 3.6 meter-long beamline necessitates an unusually compact mechanical design

  15. Mechanical design of a PERMCAT reactor module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tosti, S. [Associazione ENEA Euratom sulla Fusione, C.R. ENEA Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, Frascati, Roma I-00044 (Italy)], E-mail: tosti@frascati.enea.it; Bettinali, L. [Associazione ENEA Euratom sulla Fusione, C.R. ENEA Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, Frascati, Roma I-00044 (Italy); Borgognoni, F. [Tesi Sas, Via Bolzano 28, Rome (Italy); Murdoch, D.K. [EFDA CSU, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching bei Munchen (Germany)

    2007-02-15

    The PERMCAT is a membrane reactor proposed for processing fusion reactor plasma exhaust gas: tritium removal is obtained by isotopic swamping operating in counter-current mode. In this work, a membrane reactor using a permeator tube of length about 500 mm produced via diffusion welding of Pd-Ag thin foils is described. An appropriate mechanical design of the membrane module has been developed in order to avoid any significant compressive and bending stresses on the very long and thin wall permeator tube: two expanded bellows have been applied to the Pd-Ag tube, so that it has been pre-tensioned before operating. The elongation of the metal permeator under hydrogenation has been theoretically estimated and experimentally verified for properly designing the membrane reactor.

  16. Bioinspiration: applying mechanical design to experimental biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flammang, Brooke E; Porter, Marianne E

    2011-07-01

    The production of bioinspired and biomimetic constructs has fostered much collaboration between biologists and engineers, although the extent of biological accuracy employed in the designs produced has not always been a priority. Even the exact definitions of "bioinspired" and "biomimetic" differ among biologists, engineers, and industrial designers, leading to confusion regarding the level of integration and replication of biological principles and physiology. By any name, biologically-inspired mechanical constructs have become an increasingly important research tool in experimental biology, offering the opportunity to focus research by creating model organisms that can be easily manipulated to fill a desired parameter space of structural and functional repertoires. Innovative researchers with both biological and engineering backgrounds have found ways to use bioinspired models to explore the biomechanics of organisms from all kingdoms to answer a variety of different questions. Bringing together these biologists and engineers will hopefully result in an open discourse of techniques and fruitful collaborations for experimental and industrial endeavors.

  17. Mechanism design for refunding emissions payment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagem, Cathrine; Holtsmark, Bjart; Sterner, Thomas

    2012-07-01

    We analyze two mechanism designs for refunding emission payments to polluting firms; Output Based (OB) and Expenditure Based (EB) refunding. In both instruments, emissions fees are returned to the polluting industry, possibly making the policy more easily accepted by policymakers than a standard tax. The crucial difference between OB and EB is that the fees are refunded in proportion to output in the former, but in proportion to the firms' expenditure on abatement equipment in the latter. We show that to achieve a given abatement target, the fee level in the OB design exceeds the standard tax rate, whereas the fee level in the EB design is lower. Furthermore, the use of OB and EB refunding may lead to large differences in the distribution of costs across firms. Both designs do, strictly speaking, imply a cost-ineffective provision of abatement as firms put relatively too much effort into reducing emissions through abatement technology compared with emission reductions through reduced output. However, this may be seen as an advantage by policymakers if they seek to avoid activity reduction in the regulated sector. We provide some numerical illustrations based on abatement cost information from the Norwegian NOx fund.(Author)

  18. Design considerations for studies of the biomechanical environment of the femoropopliteal arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Farzana; Pack, Lindsay K; Brooks, Steven S; Morrison, Tina M

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the available literature regarding the biomechanics of the superficial femoral artery (SFA) and popliteal artery (PA) in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Stents are one of many available therapies used to treat patients with PAD. Because stents are permanent implants, they undergo a variety of deformations as patients go about their daily activities such as walking, sitting in a chair, or climbing stairs. As a part of the marketing application for United States Food and Drug Administration approval, stents need to be evaluated for long-term durability under a variety of loading modes. The information available in the literature provides direction for such evaluation. We performed a literature search of the PubMed database looking for "key vessel" and "mechanics" (all fields) or "deformation" (all fields) or "flexion" (all fields) or "mechanical environment" (all fields) or "tortuosity" (all fields) or "dynamics" (all fields) or "forces" (all fields), where the "key vessel" was "Femoral Artery," "Superficial Femoral Artery," "Popliteal Artery," and "Femoropopliteal." Using a decision tree, we found 12 relevant articles that focused solely on the nonradial cyclic deformations associated with musculoskeletal motion. Despite the many limitations associated with combining these studies, we learned that under walking conditions, the proximal and mid-SFA deforms, on average, by shortening in the axial direction 4.0%, by twisting 2.1°/cm, and by bending 72.1 mm; the distal SFA and proximal PA deform by shortening in the axial direction 13.9%, by twisting 3.5°/cm, and by being pinched such that the aspect ratio of the lumen changes 4.6%. The distal PA deforms by shortening in the axial direction 12.3%, by twisting 3.5°/cm, by bending 22.1 mm, and by being pinched such that the aspect ratio of the lumen changes 12.5%. A review of the current literature reveals heterogeneous study designs that confound interpretation

  19. Mechanical design and optimal control of humanoid robot (TPinokio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teck Chew Wee

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical structure and the control of the locomotion of bipedal humanoid is an important and challenging domain of research in bipedal robots. Accurate models of the kinematics and dynamics of the robot are essential to achieve bipedal locomotion. Toe-foot walking produces a more natural and faster walking speed and it is even possible to perform stretch knee walking. This study presents the mechanical design of a toe-feet bipedal, TPinokio and the implementation of some optimal walking gait generation methods. The optimality in the gait trajectory is achieved by applying augmented model predictive control method and the pole-zero cancellation method, taken into consideration of a trade-off between walking speed and stability. The mechanism of the TPinokio robot is designed in modular form, so that its kinematics can be modelled accurately into a multiple point-mass system, its dynamics is modelled using the single and double mass inverted pendulum model and zero-moment-point concept. The effectiveness of the design and control technique is validated by simulation testing with the robot walking on flat surface and climbing stairs.

  20. Component design considerations for gas turbine HTGR waste-heat power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C.F.; Vrable, D.L.

    1976-01-01

    Component design considerations are described for the ammonia waste-heat power conversion system of a large helium gas-turbine nuclear power plant under development by General Atomic Company. Initial component design work was done for a reference plant with a 3000-MW(t) High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR), and this is discussed. Advanced designs now being evaluated include higher core outlet temperature, higher peak system pressures, improved loop configurations, and twin 4000-MW(t) reactor units. Presented are the design considerations of the major components (turbine, condenser, heat input exchanger, and pump) for a supercritical ammonia Rankine waste heat power plant. The combined cycle (nuclear gas turbine and waste-heated plant) has a projected net plant efficiency of over 50 percent. While specifically directed towards a nuclear closed-cycle helium gas-turbine power plant (GT-HTGR), it is postulated that the bottoming waste-heat cycle component design considerations presented could apply to other low-grade-temperature power conversion systems such as geothermal plants

  1. Cost Considerations and Financing Mechanisms for the Disposal of Low and Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-06-01

    The overall objective of this publication is to provide Member States who are currently planning or preparing new near surface repositories for low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILW), guidance on cost considerations and funding mechanisms for the repositories' entire life cycle. The report focuses on both technical and non-technical factors affecting repository costs. It considers the major cost elements that comprise a cost evaluation for a disposal facility for LILW and identifies those factors which may result in major uncertainties in an overall cost estimate. In particular, the report lists the basic disposal options and summarizes the legal basis and infrastructure requirements for establishing an effective financing system. It further includes the cost estimation methodology, considers the major cost categories and discusses factors to be considered when planning the financing mechanism, and describes relevant financing schemes

  2. A multi-crucible core-catcher concept: Design considerations and basic results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabo, I.

    1995-01-01

    A multi-crucible core-catcher concept to be implemented in new light water reactor containments has recently been proposed. This paper deals with conceptual design considerations and the various ways this type of core-catcher could be designed to meet requirements for reactor application. A systematic functional analysis of the multi-crucible core-catcher concept and the results of the preliminary design calculation are presented. Finally, the adequacy of the multi-crucible core-catcher concept for reactor application is discussed. (orig.)

  3. Agricultural robot designed for seeding mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunitha, K. A., Dr.; Suraj, G. S. G. S.; Sowrya, CH P. N.; Atchyut Sriram, G.; Shreyas, D.; Srinivas, T.

    2017-05-01

    In the field of agriculture, plantation begins with ploughing the land and sowing seeds. The old traditional method plough attached to an OX and tractors needs human involvement to carry the process. The driving force behind this work is to reduce the human interference in the field of agriculture and to make it cost effective. In this work, apart of the land is taken into consideration and the robot introduced localizes the path and can navigate itself without human action. For ploughing, this robot is provided with tentacles attached with saw blades. The sowing mechanism initiates with long toothed gears actuated with motors. The complete body is divided into two parts the tail part acts as a container for seeds. The successor holds on all the electronics used for automating and actuation. The locomotion is provided with wheels covered under conveyor belts. Gears at the back of the robot rotate in equal speed with respect to each other with the saw blades. For each rotation every tooth on gear will take seeds and will drop them on field. Camera at the front end tracks the path for every fixed distance and at the minimum distance it takes the path pre-programmed.

  4. Designs for mechanical circulatory support device studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neaton, James D; Normand, Sharon-Lise; Gelijns, Annetine; Starling, Randall C; Mann, Douglas L; Konstam, Marvin A

    2007-02-01

    There is increased interest in mechanical circulatory support devices (MCSDs), such as implantable left ventricular assist devices (LVADs), as "destination" therapy for patients with advanced heart failure. Because patient availability to evaluate these devices is limited and randomized trials have been slow in enrolling patients, a workshop was convened to consider designs for MCSD development including alternatives to randomized trials. A workshop was jointly planned by the Heart Failure Society of America and the US Food and Drug Administration and was convened in March 2006. One of the panels was asked to review different designs for evaluating new MCSDs. Randomized trials have many advantages over studies with no controls or with nonrandomized concurrent or historical controls. These advantages include the elimination of bias in the assignment of treatments and the balancing, on average, of known and unknown baseline covariates that influence response. These advantages of randomization are particularly important for studies in which the treatments may not differ from one another by a large amount (eg, a head-to-head study of an approved LVAD with a new LVAD). However, researchers have found it difficult to recruit patients to randomized studies because the number of clinical sites that can carry out the studies is not large. Also, there is a reluctance to randomize patients when the control device is considered technologically inferior. Thus ways of improving the design of randomized trials were discussed, and the advantages and disadvantages of alternative designs were considered. The panel concluded that designs should include a randomized component. Randomized designs might be improved by allowing the control device to be chosen before randomization, by first conducting smaller vanguard studies, and by allowing crossovers in trials with optimal medical management controls. With use of data from completed trials, other databases, and registries, alternative

  5. Design Considerations of a Transverse Flux Machine for Direct-Drive Wind Turbine Applications: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Husain, Tausif; Hasan, Iftekhar; Sozer, Yilmaz; Husain, Iqbal; Muljadi, Eduard

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the design considerations of a double-sided transverse flux machine (TFM) for direct-drive wind turbine applications. The TFM has a modular structure with quasi-U stator cores and ring windings. The rotor is constructed with ferrite magnets in a flux-concentrating arrangement to achieve high air gap flux density. The design considerations for this TFM with respect to initial sizing, pole number selection, key design ratios, and pole shaping are presented in this paper. Pole number selection is critical in the design process of a TFM because it affects both the torque density and power factor under fixed magnetic and changing electrical loading. Several key design ratios are introduced to facilitate the design procedure. The effect of pole shaping on back-emf and inductance is also analyzed. These investigations provide guidance toward the required design of a TFM for direct-drive applications. The analyses are carried out using analytical and three-dimensional finite element analysis. A prototype is under construction for experimental verification.

  6. Mechanical design aspects of the HYVAX railgun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, W.E.; Cummings, C.E.

    1984-01-01

    The hypervelocity experiment (HYVAX) railgun is designed to produce projectile velocities greater than 15 km/s in a 13-m-long, round bore gun. The HYVAX gun incorporates a modular design enabling it to operate in either a distributed energy-storage mode or a single-stage mode. The gun is composed of seven 0.3-m-long power input modules and nine 1.2-mlong accelerating modules. The gun is designed for a 100-shot life. To accommodate this, the bore may be enlarged from an initial diameter of 10.8 mm to a final diameter of 12.7 mm. This will allow the bore to be refinished several times during the life of the gun. To minimize mechanical and arc damage to the gun between bore refinishing operations, the gun will incorporate a low pressure helium projectile injector. Projectiles will be injected under vacuum at 350 m/s. The gun will be operated at a peak current and voltage of 600 kA and 6 kV respectively. The gun will undergo three phases of testing. The first phase will be the characterization of the gun's performance using a 3.0-m-long section of the gun comprising two power modules and two accelerating modules

  7. Rumor spreading model with consideration of forgetting mechanism: A case of online blogging LiveJournal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Laijun; Wang, Qin; Cheng, Jingjing; Chen, Yucheng; Wang, Jiajia; Huang, Wei

    2011-07-01

    Rumor is an important form of social interaction, and its spreading has a significant impact on people’s lives. In the age of Web, people are using electronic media more frequently than ever before, and blog has become one of the main online social interactions. Therefore, it is essential to learn the evolution mechanism of rumor spreading on homogeneous network in consideration of the forgetting mechanism of spreaders. Here we study a rumor spreading model on an online social blogging platform called LiveJournal. In comparison with the Susceptible-Infected-Removed (SIR) model, we provide a more detailed and realistic description of rumor spreading process with combination of forgetting mechanism and the SIR model of epidemics. A mathematical model has been presented and numerical solutions of the model were used to analyze the impact factors of rumor spreading, such as the average degree, forgetting rate and stifling rate. Our results show that there exist a threshold of the average degree of LiveJournal and above which the influence of rumor reaches saturation. Forgetting mechanism and stifling rate exert great influence on rumor spreading on online social network. The analysis results can guide people’s behaviors in view of the theoretical and practical aspects.

  8. Research design considerations for chronic pain prevention clinical trials: IMMPACT recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gewandter, Jennifer S; Dworkin, Robert H; Turk, Dennis C; Farrar, John T; Fillingim, Roger B; Gilron, Ian; Markman, John D; Oaklander, Anne Louise; Polydefkis, Michael J; Raja, Srinivasa N; Robinson, James P; Woolf, Clifford J; Ziegler, Dan; Ashburn, Michael A; Burke, Laurie B; Cowan, Penney; George, Steven Z; Goli, Veeraindar; Graff, Ole X; Iyengar, Smriti; Jay, Gary W; Katz, Joel; Kehlet, Henrik; Kitt, Rachel A; Kopecky, Ernest A; Malamut, Richard; McDermott, Michael P; Palmer, Pamela; Rappaport, Bob A; Rauschkolb, Christine; Steigerwald, Ilona; Tobias, Jeffrey; Walco, Gary A

    2015-07-01

    Although certain risk factors can identify individuals who are most likely to develop chronic pain, few interventions to prevent chronic pain have been identified. To facilitate the identification of preventive interventions, an IMMPACT meeting was convened to discuss research design considerations for clinical trials investigating the prevention of chronic pain. We present general design considerations for prevention trials in populations that are at relatively high risk for developing chronic pain. Specific design considerations included subject identification, timing and duration of treatment, outcomes, timing of assessment, and adjusting for risk factors in the analyses. We provide a detailed examination of 4 models of chronic pain prevention (ie, chronic postsurgical pain, postherpetic neuralgia, chronic low back pain, and painful chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy). The issues discussed can, in many instances, be extrapolated to other chronic pain conditions. These examples were selected because they are representative models of primary and secondary prevention, reflect persistent pain resulting from multiple insults (ie, surgery, viral infection, injury, and toxic or noxious element exposure), and are chronically painful conditions that are treated with a range of interventions. Improvements in the design of chronic pain prevention trials could improve assay sensitivity and thus accelerate the identification of efficacious interventions. Such interventions would have the potential to reduce the prevalence of chronic pain in the population. Additionally, standardization of outcomes in prevention clinical trials will facilitate meta-analyses and systematic reviews and improve detection of preventive strategies emerging from clinical trials.

  9. Soil Penetration Rates by Earthworms and Plant Roots- Mechanical and Energetic Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Siul; Schymanski, Stan; Or, Dani

    2016-04-01

    We analyze the implications of different soil burrowing rates by earthworms and growing plant roots using mechanical models that consider soil rheological properties. We estimate the energetic requirements for soil elasto-viscoplastic displacement at different rates for similar burrows and water contents. In the core of the mechanical model is a transient cavity expansion into viscoplastic wet soil that mimic an earthworm or root tip cone-like penetration and subsequent cavity expansion due to pressurized earthworm hydrostatic skeleton or root radial growth. Soil matrix viscoplatic considerations enable separation of the respective energetic requirements for earthworms penetrating at 2 μm/s relative to plant roots growing at 0.2 μm/s . Typical mechanical and viscous parameters are obtained inversely for soils under different fixed water contents utilizing custom miniaturized cone penetrometers at different fixed penetration rates (1 to 1000 μm/s). Experimental results determine critical water contents where soil exhibits pronounced viscoplatic behavior (close to saturation), bellow which the soil strength limits earthworms activity and fracture propagation by expanding plant roots becomes the favorable mechanical mode. The soil mechanical parameters in conjunction with earthworm and plant root physiological pressure limitations (200 kPa and 2000 kPa respectively) enable delineation of the role of soil saturation in regulating biotic penetration rates for different soil types under different moisture contents. Furthermore, this study provides a quantitative framework for estimating rates of energy expenditure for soil penetration, which allowed us to determine maximum earthworm population densities considering soil mechanical properties and the energy stored in soil organic matter.

  10. Designing for Motivation: Design-Considerations for Spaced-Repetition-Based Learning Games on Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimanke, Florian; Mertens, Robert; Vornberger, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Learning games are an ideal vessel for many kinds of learning content. Playful interaction with the subject matter makes the human mind more receptive and thus learning itself more effective. Well designed games also come with an addictive game-play that makes users want to play the game over and over. This is intended in fun games but it can be…

  11. Seismic design ampersand analysis considerations for high level nuclear waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, Q.A.

    1993-01-01

    A high level nuclear waste repository, like the one at Nevada's Yucca Mountain that is being investigated for site suitability, will have some unique seismic design and analysis considerations. These are discussed, and a design philosophy that can rationally account for the unique performance objectives of such facilities is presented. A case is made for the use of DOE's performance goal-based seismic design and evaluation methodology that is based on a hybrid open-quotes deterministicclose quotes and open-quotes probabilisticclose quotes concept. How and to what extent this methodology should be modified to adopt it for a potential site like Yucca Mountain is also outlined. Finally, the issue of designing for seismic fault rupture is discussed briefly, and the desirability of using the proposed seismic design philosophy in fault rupture evaluation is described

  12. Seismic design and analysis considerations for high level nuclear waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, Q.A.

    1993-01-01

    A high level nuclear waste repository, like the one at Nevada's Yucca Mountain that is being investigated for site suitability, will have some unique seismic design and analysis considerations. These are discussed, and a design philosophy that can rationally account for the unique performance objectives of such facilities is presented. A case is made for the use of DOE's performance goal-based seismic design and evaluation methodology that is based on a hybrid ''deterministic'' and ''probabilistic'' concept. How and to what extent this methodology should be modified to adopt it for a potential site like Yucca Mountain is also outlined. Finally, the issue of designing for seismic fault rupture is discussed briefly, and the desirability of using the proposed seismic design philosophy in fault rupture evaluation is described

  13. Nuclear safety and radiation protection consideration in the design of research and development facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akbar, M.R.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear safety is a critically important aspect that must be considered in the design of a nuclear facility in order to ensure the protection of the workers, public and environment. This paper looks at the methodology, approach and incorporation of this aspect, specifically into the design of a research and development facility. The Health, Safety and Environmental Basis of Design is an initial analysis of nuclear safety and radiation protection considerations that is performed during the conceptual design phase and sets the baseline for what the design of the facility must conform to. It consists of general nuclear safety design principles, such as defence in depth and optimisation considerations, and a hazard management strategy. Following the Health, Safety and Environmental Basis of Design, a Preliminary Safety Assessment Report is generated during the basic design phase in conjunction with various analyses in order to assess the impact of hazards on the workers and members of the public. This assessment follows a hazard graded approach where the depth of the analysis will be determined by the impact of the worst case accident scenario in the facility. The assessment also includes a waste management strategy which is an essential aspect to be considered in the design in order to minimize the generation of waste. The safety assessment also demonstrates compliance to dose limits and risk criteria for the workers and members of the public set by the regulatory body and supported by a legal framework. Measures are taken to keep risk as low as reasonably achievable and prevent transgression of the risk and dose limits. However, a balance needs to be maintained between 5 reducing these doses further and the cost of such a reduction, which is known as optimization. It is therefore imperative to have nuclear safety specialists analyse the design in order to protect the worker and member of the public from unwarranted exposure to nuclear radiation. (author)

  14. Design considerations for application of metallic honeycomb as an energy absorber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.H.; Roemer, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    Design for postulated accidents in nuclear power plants often requires mitigation of impact to safety-related structures. Plastically designed, energy absorbing mechanisms are often used in the design of such mitigating structures. Metallic honeycomb is the most efficient, practical, energy-absorbing material currently in use. Recent tests indicate that its use in this application, however, presents some unique design and fabrication problems. The paper presents the results of static and dynamic crush tests concerned with the effect of impact velocity, material properties, cell density, loading configuration, and overall pad geometry. Specific design recommendations are made in each area, and suggestions are provided to improve fabrication techniques and minimize subsequent problems

  15. DESIGN OPTIMIZATION METHOD USED IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SCURTU Iacob Liviu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an optimization study in mechanical engineering. First part of the research describe the structural optimization method used, followed by the presentation of several optimization studies conducted in recent years. The second part of the paper presents the CAD modelling of an agricultural plough component. The beam of the plough is analysed using finite element method. The plough component is meshed in solid elements, and the load case which mimics the working conditions of agricultural equipment of this are created. The model is prepared to find the optimal structural design, after the FEA study of the model is done. The mass reduction of part is the criterion applied for this optimization study. The end of this research presents the final results and the model optimized shape.

  16. Design Features of Modern Mechanical Ventilators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacIntyre, Neil

    2016-12-01

    A positive-pressure breath ideally should provide a V T that is adequate for gas exchange and appropriate muscle unloading while minimizing any risk for injury or discomfort. The latest generation of ventilators uses sophisticated feedback systems to sculpt positive-pressure breaths according to patient effort and respiratory system mechanics. Currently, however, these new control strategies are not totally closed-loop systems. This is because the automatic input variables remain limited, some clinician settings are still required, and the specific features of the perfect breath design still are not entirely clear. Despite these limitations, there are some rationale for many of these newer feedback features. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Transcatheter Mitral Valve Devices - Functional Mechanical Designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliger, Chad

    2014-03-01

    Mitral regurgitation is a complex disorder involving a multitude of components of the mitral apparatus. With the desire for less invasive treatment approaches, transcatheter mitral valve therapies (TMVT) are directed at these components and available at varying stages of development. Therapeutic advancements and the potential to combine technologies may further improve their efficacy and safety. Transcatheter mitral valve replacement, while preserving the mitral apparatus, may emerge as an alternative or even a more suitable treatment option. In addition, early data on transcatheter mitral valve-in-valve and valve-in-ring implantation are encouraging and this approach may be an alternative to reoperation in the high-risk patient. This review details the expanding functional mechanical designs of current active TMVT.

  18. System Topology Optimization - An Approach to System Design of Electro-Hydraulic-Mechanical Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, T. O.; Hansen, M. R.; Conrad, Finn

    2003-01-01

    The current paper presents an approach to system design of combined electro-hydraulic-mechanical systems. The approach is based on the concurrent handling of the topology as well as the design parameters of the mechanical, hydraulic and controller sub- systems, respectively. Based on an initial...... design the procedure attempts to find the optimal topology and the related parameters. The topology considerations comprise the type of hydraulic pump, the employment of knee linkages or not as well as the type of hydraulic actuators. The design variables also include the signals to the proportional...... valve in a number of predefined load cases as well as the hydraulic and mechanical parameters....

  19. Municipal Officials’ Perceived Barriers to Consideration of Physical Activity in Community Design Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goins, Karin Valentine; Schneider, Kristin L.; Brownson, Ross; Carnoske, Cheryl; Evenson, Kelly; Eyler, Amy; Heinrich, Katie; Litt, Jill; Lyn, Rodney; Maddock, Jay; Reed, Hannah; Tompkins, Nancy O’Hara; Lemon, Stephenie C.

    2016-01-01

    Context Built environment-focused interventions and policies are recommended as sustainable approaches for promoting physical activity. Physical activity has not traditionally been considered in land use and transportation decision making. Effective collaboration with non-public health partners requires knowledge of their perceived barriers to consideration of physical activity in decision making. Objective This study aimed to 1) identify barriers to the consideration of physical activity in community design and planning decisions among municipal decision makers and 2) explore differences in these barriers among a wide range of job functions and departments in a geographically diverse sample. Design A web-based survey was conducted among municipal officials in 94 cities and towns with populations of at least 50,000 residents in eight states. Participants 453 municipal officials from public health, planning, transportation/public works, community and economic development, parks and recreation, city management, and municipal legislatures responded to the survey. Main Outcome Measures Five barriers to consideration of physical activity in community design and layout were assessed. Results The most common barriers included lack of political will (23.5%), limited staff (20.4%) and lack of collaboration across municipal departments (16.2%). Fewer participants reported opposition from the business community or residents as barriers. Compared to other professionals, public health department personnel were more likely to report the barriers of limited staff and lack of collaboration across municipal departments. They were also more likely to report lack of political will compared to city managers or mayors and municipal legislators. Conclusions Barriers to increasing consideration of physical activity in decision making about community design and layout are encouragingly low. Implications for public health practice include the need to strategically increase political will

  20. The influence of engineering design considerations on species recruitment and succession on coastal defence structures

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Juliette Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Engineering design considerations of artificial coastal structures were tested to resemble as far as possible the nearest natural equivalent habitat, ecologically valuable rocky shores, as a potential management option. Coastal areas around the world attract urbanisation but these transitional areas between sea and land are inherently vulnerable to risk of flooding and erosion. Thus hard structures are often built in sensitive coastal environments to defend assets such as property and infrast...

  1. ACCESS: Thermal Mechanical Design, Performance, and Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Mary Elizabeth; Morris, M. J.; McCandliss, S. R.; Rauscher, B. J.; Kimble, R. A.; Kruk, J. W.; Wright, E. L.; Bohlin, R.; Kurucz, R. L.; Riess, A. G.; Pelton, R.; Deustua, S. E.; Dixon, W. V.; Sahnow, D. J.; Benford, D. J.; Gardner, J. P.; Feldman, P. D.; Moos, H. W.; Lampton, M.; Perlmutter, S.; Woodgate, B. E.

    2014-01-01

    Systematic errors associated with astrophysical data used to probe fundamental astrophysical questions, such as SNeIa observations used to constrain dark energy theories, are now rivaling and exceeding the statistical errors associated with these measurements. ACCESS: Absolute Color Calibration Experiment for Standard Stars is a series of rocket-borne sub-orbital missions and ground-based experiments designed to enable improvements in the precision of the astrophysical flux scale through the transfer of absolute laboratory detector standards from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to a network of stellar standards with a calibration accuracy of 1% and a spectral resolving power of 500 across the 0.35 - 1.7μm bandpass. Achieving this level of accuracy requires characterization and stability of the instrument and detector including a thermal background that contributes less than 1% to the flux per resolution element in the NIR. We will present the instrument and calibration status with a focus on the thermal mechanical design and associated performance data. The detector control and performance will be presented in a companion poster (Morris, et al). NASA APRA sounding rocket grant NNX08AI65G supports this work.

  2. LANSCE wire scanning diagnostics device mechanical design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio

    2010-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is one of the major experimental science facilities at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The core of LANSCE's work lies in the operation of a powerful linear accelerator, which accelerates protons up to 84% the speed oflight. These protons are used for a variety of purposes, including materials testing, weapons research and isotopes production. To assist in guiding the proton beam, a series of over one hundred wire scanners are used to measure the beam profile at various locations along the half-mile length of the particle accelerator. A wire scanner is an electro-mechanical device that moves a set of wires through a particle beam and measures the secondary emissions from the resulting beam-wire interaction to obtain beam intensity information. When supplemented with data from a position sensor, this information is used to determine the cross-sectional profile of the beam. This measurement allows beam operators to adjust parameters such as acceleration, beam steering, and focus to ensure that the beam reaches its destination as effectively as possible. Some of the current wire scanners are nearly forty years old and are becoming obsolete. The problem with current wire scanners comes in the difficulty of maintenance and reliability. The designs of these wire scanners vary making it difficult to keep spare parts that would work on all designs. Also many of the components are custom built or out-dated technology and are no longer in production.

  3. LANSCE wire scanning diagnostics device mechanical design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is one of the major experimental science facilities at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The core of LANSCE's work lies in the operation of a powerful linear accelerator, which accelerates protons up to 84% the speed oflight. These protons are used for a variety of purposes, including materials testing, weapons research and isotopes production. To assist in guiding the proton beam, a series of over one hundred wire scanners are used to measure the beam profile at various locations along the half-mile length of the particle accelerator. A wire scanner is an electro-mechanical device that moves a set of wires through a particle beam and measures the secondary emissions from the resulting beam-wire interaction to obtain beam intensity information. When supplemented with data from a position sensor, this information is used to determine the cross-sectional profile of the beam. This measurement allows beam operators to adjust parameters such as acceleration, beam steering, and focus to ensure that the beam reaches its destination as effectively as possible. Some of the current wire scanners are nearly forty years old and are becoming obsolete. The problem with current wire scanners comes in the difficulty of maintenance and reliability. The designs of these wire scanners vary making it difficult to keep spare parts that would work on all designs. Also many of the components are custom built or out-dated technology and are no longer in production.

  4. Residential hospice environments: evidence-based architectural and landscape design considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verderber, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The residential hospice care movement is increasingly accepted and supported globally, and yet, unfortunately, the amount of literature on best practices in the planning and design of residential hospice facilities and adjacent outdoor spaces remains relatively small. This paper reports on a compendium of architectural and landscape design considerations that reflect the fundamental dimensions of the residential hospice experience: site and context, arrival spaces, communal and private spaces of the residential milieu, transitional spaces, and nature connectivity. Additionally, key staffing and administrative ramifications of this built-environment compendium are addressed, as are prognostications and challenges for the future.

  5. Design considerations for sealing the shafts of a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortazavi, M.H.S.; Chan, H.T.; Radhakrishna, H.S.

    1985-05-01

    The shafts in an underground disposal system, which constitute potential pathways between the disposal vault and the biosphere, should be effectively sealed if the system is to perform as a hydrodynamic and geochemical barrier for the safe containment of nuclear fuel waste. In the design of the shaft backfill, consideration should be given to ensure that the backfill and the backfill/rock interface remain intact. Design-related problems, including critical pathways for the transport or radionuclides, configuration of shaft backfill and its functional requirements, the state of stress in a backfilled shaft with particular emphasis on the arching and load transfer phenomenon are discussed in this report

  6. Staff technical position on regulatory considerations in the design and construction of the exploratory shaft facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, D.; Peshel, J.; Bunting, J.

    1991-07-01

    The staff of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has prepared this staff technical position for the purpose of compiling and further clarifying previous staff positions on regulatory considerations in the design and construction of the exploratory shaft facility (ESF). (The US Department of Energy (DOE) now refers to the ESF as the ''exploratory studies facility.'' DOE's change in terminology does not affect the positions taken in this guidance.) This document lists the key regulations in 10 CFR Part 60 that should be considered in the design and construction of the ESF and presents the staff position statements and corresponding discussions. 13 refs., 1 fig

  7. Mechanical Design Engineering Enabler Project wheel and wheel drives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutt, Richard E.; Couch, Britt K.; Holley, John L., Jr.; Garris, Eric S.; Staut, Paul V.

    1992-01-01

    Our group was assigned the responsibility of designing the wheel and wheel drive system for a proof-of-concept model of the lunar-based ENABLER. ENABLER is a multi-purpose, six wheeled vehicle designed to lift and transport heavy objects associated with the construction of a lunar base. The resulting design was based on the performance criteria of the ENABLER. The drive system was designed to enable the vehicle to achieve a speed of 7 mph on a level surface, climb a 30 percent grade, and surpass a one meter high object and one meter wide crevice. The wheel assemblies were designed to support the entire weight of the vehicle on two wheels. The wheels were designed to serve as the main component of the vehicle's suspension and will provide suitable traction for lunar-type surfaces. The expected performance of the drive system for the ENABLER was influenced by many mechanical factors. The expected top speed on a level sandy surface is 4 mph instead of the desired 7 mph. This is due to a lack of necessary power at the wheels. The lack of power resulted from dimension considerations that allowed only an eight horsepower engine and also from mechanical inefficiencies of the hydraulic system. However, the vehicle will be able to climb a 30 percent grade, surpass a one meter high object and one meter wide crevice. The wheel assemblies will be able to support the entire weight of the vehicle on two wheels. The wheels will also provide adequate suspension for the vehicle and sufficient traction for lunar-type surfaces.

  8. Preliminary Mechanical Design of FHX for PGSFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, Jinyup; Koo, G. H.; Kim, S. K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    In this paper, more specific data from analysis and mechanical method of approach to design will be addressed. Especially, frame of tube bundle and housing of FHX. Heretofore, it is concept design by mechanical basic knowledge and research of various structures that are activating in realities. Especially, to reduce thermal stress, we have planning to attach insulations inside the housing. In as much as FHX is as important on SFR as the other part, hereafter, we will develop FEM to check feasibility of the FHX's housing design in order to perform static and thermal analysis as well as bucking, seismic and so on. The Forced-draft sodium-to-air Heat Exchanger system (FHX) (employed in the Active Decay Heat Removal System (ADHRS) is a shell-and-tube type counter-current flow heat exchanger with serpentine finned-tube arrangement. Liquid sodium flows over the finned tubes. The unit is placed above the reactor building and has function of dumping the system heat load into the final heat sink, i. e., the atmosphere. Heat is transmitted from the primary hot sodium pool into the ADHRS sodium loop via Decay Heat Exchanger (DHX), and a direct heat exchange occurs between the tube-side sodium and the shell-side air through the FHX sodium tube wall. Cold atmospheric air is introduced into the air inlet duct at the lower part of the unit by using an electrically driven air blower. Air flows across the finned tube bank rising upward direction to make uniform air flow with perfect mixing across the tubes. The finned tube bundle is placed inside a well-insulated casing. The air heated at the tube bank region is collected at the top of the unit and then is discharged through the air stack above the unit. Although a blower supplies atmospheric air into the FHX unit, a tall air stack is also provided to secure natural draft head of natural circulation air flow against a loss power supply. The stack also has rain protecting structures to prevent inflow of rain drops or undesired

  9. Single-case research design in pediatric psychology: considerations regarding data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Lindsey L; Feinstein, Amanda; Masuda, Akihiko; Vowles, Kevin E

    2014-03-01

    Single-case research allows for an examination of behavior and can demonstrate the functional relation between intervention and outcome in pediatric psychology. This review highlights key assumptions, methodological and design considerations, and options for data analysis. Single-case methodology and guidelines are reviewed with an in-depth focus on visual and statistical analyses. Guidelines allow for the careful evaluation of design quality and visual analysis. A number of statistical techniques have been introduced to supplement visual analysis, but to date, there is no consensus on their recommended use in single-case research design. Single-case methodology is invaluable for advancing pediatric psychology science and practice, and guidelines have been introduced to enhance the consistency, validity, and reliability of these studies. Experts generally agree that visual inspection is the optimal method of analysis in single-case design; however, statistical approaches are becoming increasingly evaluated and used to augment data interpretation.

  10. Emplacement and retrieval equipment design considerations for a repository in salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, B.R.; Bahorich, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    The current design concept for the disposal of nuclear high level waste packages in a repository in salt is based on the emplacement of individual packages in vertical boreholes in the underground mine floor. A key requirement is that the waste packages be capable of being retrieved during the last 26 years of the 76-year repository operating period. The unique design considerations relating to the retrieval of waste packages emplaced in bedded salt are presented in this paper. The information is based on the experience developed during the design of vertical emplacement and retrieval equipment in support of the Sandia Defense High Level Waste experiments at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Also included are the impact of retrievability on the design of the equipment, the special salt cutting technology that was developed for this application, and a description of the equipment

  11. Municipal officials' perceived barriers to consideration of physical activity in community design decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goins, Karin Valentine; Schneider, Kristin L; Brownson, Ross; Carnoske, Cheryl; Evenson, Kelly R; Eyler, Amy; Heinrich, Katie; Litt, Jill; Lyn, Rodney; Maddock, Jay; Reed, Hannah; Tompkins, Nancy Oʼhara; Lemon, Stephenie C

    2013-01-01

    Built environment-focused interventions and policies are recommended as sustainable approaches for promoting physical activity. Physical activity has not traditionally been considered in land use and transportation decision making. Effective collaboration with non-public health partners requires knowledge of their perceived barriers to such consideration. This analysis sought to (a) establish prevalence estimates of selected barriers to the consideration of physical activity in community design and layout decisions and (b) describe how barrier reporting by public health officials differs from other municipal officials among a wide range of job functions and departments in a geographically diverse sample. A Web-based survey was conducted among municipal officials in 94 cities and towns with populations of at least 50 000 residents in 8 states. A total of 453 municipal officials from public health, planning, transportation/public works, community and economic development, parks and recreation, city management, and municipal legislatures in 83 cities and towns responded to the survey. Five barriers to consideration of physical activity in community design and layout were assessed. The most common barriers included lack of political will (23.5%), limited staff (20.4%), and lack of collaboration across municipal departments (16.2%). Fewer participants reported opposition from the business community or residents as barriers. Public health department personnel were more likely to report the barriers of limited staff and lack of collaboration across municipal departments than other professionals. They were also more likely to report lack of political will than city managers or mayors and municipal legislators. Barriers to increasing consideration of physical activity in decision making about community design and layout are encouragingly low. Implications for public health practice include the need to strategically increase political will despite public health staffing

  12. Analysis and optimal design of an underactuated finger mechanism for LARM hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shuangji; Ceccarelli, Marco; Carbone, Giuseppe; Zhan, Qiang; Lu, Zhen

    2011-09-01

    This paper aims to present general design considerations and optimality criteria for underactuated mechanisms in finger designs. Design issues related to grasping task of robotic fingers are discussed. Performance characteristics are outlined as referring to several aspects of finger mechanisms. Optimality criteria of the finger performances are formulated after careful analysis. A general design algorithm is summarized and formulated as a suitable multi-objective optimization problem. A numerical case of an underactuated robot finger design for Laboratory of Robotics and Mechatronics (LARM) hand is illustrated with the aim to show the practical feasibility of the proposed concepts and computations.

  13. Design of planar articulated mechanisms using branch and bound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolpe, Mathias; Kawamoto, Atsushi

    2004-01-01

    This paper considers an optimization model and a solution method for the design of two-dimensional mechanical mechanisms. The mechanism design problem is modeled as a nonconvex mixed integer program which allows the optimal topology and geometry of the mechanism to be determined simultaneously...... and that buckling is prevented. The feasible set of the design problem is described by nonlinear differentiable and non-differentiable constraints as well as nonlinear matrix inequalities. To solve the mechanism design problem a branch and bound method based on convex relaxations is developed. To guarantee...... mechanism design problems of realistic size to global optimality....

  14. Statistical methods in the mechanical design of fuel assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radsak, C.; Streit, D.; Muench, C.J. [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The mechanical design of a fuel assembly is still being mainly performed in a de terministic way. This conservative approach is however not suitable to provide a realistic quantification of the design margins with respect to licensing criter ia for more and more demanding operating conditions (power upgrades, burnup increase,..). This quantification can be provided by statistical methods utilizing all available information (e.g. from manufacturing, experience feedback etc.) of the topic under consideration. During optimization e.g. of the holddown system certain objectives in the mechanical design of a fuel assembly (FA) can contradict each other, such as sufficient holddown forces enough to prevent fuel assembly lift-off and reducing the holddown forces to minimize axial loads on the fuel assembly structure to ensure no negative effect on the control rod movement.By u sing a statistical method the fuel assembly design can be optimized much better with respect to these objectives than it would be possible based on a deterministic approach. This leads to a more realistic assessment and safer way of operating fuel assemblies. Statistical models are defined on the one hand by the quanti le that has to be maintained concerning the design limit requirements (e.g. one FA quantile) and on the other hand by the confidence level which has to be met. Using the above example of the holddown force, a feasible quantile can be define d based on the requirement that less than one fuel assembly (quantile > 192/19 3 [%] = 99.5 %) in the core violates the holddown force limit w ith a confidence of 95%. (orig.)

  15. Planar articulated mechanism design by graph theoretical enumeration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawamoto, A; Bendsøe, Martin P.; Sigmund, Ole

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with design of articulated mechanisms using a truss-based ground-structure representation. By applying a graph theoretical enumeration approach we can perform an exhaustive analysis of all possible topologies for a test example for which we seek a symmetric mechanism. This guaran....... This guarantees that one can identify the global optimum solution. The result underlines the importance of mechanism topology and gives insight into the issues specific to articulated mechanism designs compared to compliant mechanism designs....

  16. Design considerations for large detector arrays on submillimeter-wave telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Antony A.

    2000-07-01

    The emerging technology of large (approximately 10,000 pixel) submillimeter-wave bolometer arrays presents a novel optical design problem -- how can such arrays be fed by diffraction- limited telescope optics where the primary mirror is less than 100,000 wavelengths in diameter? Standard Cassegrain designs for radiotelescope optics exhibit focal surface curvature so large that detectors cannot be placed more than 25 beam diameters from the central ray. The problem is worse for Ritchey-Chretien designs, because these minimize coma while increasing field curvature. Classical aberrations, including coma, are usually dominated by diffraction in submillimeter- wave single dish telescopes. The telescope designer must consider (1) diffraction, (2) aberration, (3) curvature of field, (4) cross-polarization, (5) internal reflections, (6) the effect of blockages, (7) means of beam chopping on- and off-source, (8) gravitational and thermal deformations of the primary mirror, (9) the physical mounting of large detector packages, and (10) the effect of gravity and (11) vibration on those detectors. Simultaneous optimization of these considerations in the case of large detector arrays leads to telescopes that differ considerably from standard radiotelescope designs. Offset optics provide flexibility for mounting detectors, while eliminating blockage and internal reflections. Aberrations and cross-polarization can be the same as on-axis designs having the same diameter and focal length. Trade-offs include the complication of primary mirror homology and an increase in overall cost. A dramatic increase in usable field of view can be achieved using shaped optics. Solutions having one to six mirrors will be discussed, including possible six-mirror design for the proposed South Pole 10 m telescope.

  17. Epigenomic mechanisms of early adversity and HPA dysfunction: Considerations for PTSD research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick O McGowan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Childhood adversity can have life-long consequences for the response to stressful events later in life. Abuse or severe neglect are well known risk factors for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD, at least in part via changes in neural systems mediating the endocrine response to stress. Determining the biological signatures of risk for stress-related mental disorders such as PTSD is important for identifying homogenous subgroups and improving treatment options. This review will focus on epigenetic regulation in early life by adversity and parental care – prime mediators of offspring neurodevelopment - in order to address several questions: (1 what have studies of humans and analogous animal models taught us about molecular mechanisms underlying changes in stress-sensitive physiological systems in response to early life trauma? (2 What are the considerations for studies relating early adversity and PTSD risk, going forward? I will summarize studies in animals and humans that address the epigenetic response to early adversity in the brain and in peripheral tissues. In so doing, I will describe work on the Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR and other well-characterized genes within the stress response pathway and then turn to genomic studies to illustrate the use of increasingly powerful high-throughput approaches to the study of epigenomic mechanisms.

  18. Considerations for Applying Design Extension Conditions to Domestic Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Yongho

    2013-01-01

    The concept is designed to include more serious accidents than the existing design basis accidents considering additional failures. Design extension conditions can be derived based on engineering judgments, deterministic analysis or probabilistic analysis of the nuclear power plants. They are used to secure practical response capabilities to prevent or mitigate accidents. They may also require the deployment of additional safety equipment for existing nuclear power plants currently in operation. Though the general requirements of design extension conditions are described under the IAEA standards, no specific guidelines have been presented as required for their actual application to the nuclear power plant design. Furthermore, there is great variation between countries in implementing the requirements of design extension conditions. Therefore, for the actual application, considerable effort should be made among relevant organizations to establish detailed requirements of the design extension conditions. Such activities could constitute a part of the efforts of the nuclear community to meet the general public's expectations concerning the safety of nuclear power plants. The introduction of design extension conditions is expected to be a means of systematically enhancing the safety of nuclear power plants. Yet, there exists great differences in terms of the scope of analysis and the acceptance criteria, as no uniform practices have yet been established in applying the specific requirements for design extension conditions. A careful review is required in terms of the technical basis for setting the requirements, including those pertaining to the scope of analysis and the acceptance criteria. The introduction of these new requirements to Korean nuclear power plants may cause unexpected problems. Therefore, it is desirable for the regulatory agency to systematically assess the impact of design extension conditions and to discuss the arising issues with the stake holder

  19. Surface mechanics design by cavitation peening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Soyama

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Although impacts at cavitation bubble collapses cause severe damage in hydraulic machineries, the cavitation impacts can be utilised for surface mechanics design such as introduction of compressive residual stress and/or improvement of fatigue strength. The peening method using the cavitation impacts was called as cavitation peening. In order to reveal the peening intensity of hydrodynamic cavitation and laser cavitation, the arc height of Almen strip and duralumin plate were measured. In the case of hydrodynamic cavitation, cavitation was generated by injecting a high speed water jet into water with a pressurised chamber and an open chamber, and the cavitating jet in air was also examined. The laser cavitation was produced by a pulse laser, and a high speed observation using a high speed video camera was carried out to clarify laser abrasion and laser cavitation with detecting noise by a hydrophone. It was concluded that the peening intensity by using the cavitating jet in water with the pressurized chamber was most aggressive, and the impact induced by the laser cavitation was larger than that of the laser abrasion at the present condition.

  20. Design Mechanism as Territorial Strategic Capability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianita BLEOJU

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The current exigencies that a territory must faced in order to its’ optimalpositioning in future regional competition requires the ability to design theappropriate mechanism which better valorize the territory capability. Such aconstruct is vital for territorial sustainable development and supposes thecreation of a specific body of knowledge from distinctive local resourceexploitation and unique value creation and allocation. Territorial mechanismdesign is a typical management decision about identification, ownership andcontrol of specific strategic capabilities and their combination in a distinctiveterritorial portfolio. The most difficult responsibility is to allocate the territorialvalue added which is a source of conflict among territorial components. Ourcurrent paper research covers the basics of two complementary territorialpillars-rural and tourism potential and proves the lack of specific designmechanisms which explain the current diminishing value of Galati Brailaregion. The proposed management system, relying upon territorial controlmechanism, will ensure knowledge sharing process via collaborative learning,with the final role of appropriate territorial attractivity signals, reinforcingidentity as key factor of territorial attractability. Our paper is fully documentedon there years of data analyzing from territorial area of interest. This offers usthe necessary empiric contrasting for our proposed solution.

  1. Design of planar articulated mechanisms using branch and bound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolpe, Mathias; Kawamoto, Atsushi

    2005-01-01

    This paper considers an optimization model and a solution method for the design of two-dimensional mechanical mechanisms. The mechanism design problem is modeled as a nonconvex mixed integer program which allows the optimal topology and geometry of the mechanism to be determined simultaneously...

  2. Design considerations in the use of stainless steel for vacuum and cryogenic equipment

    CERN Document Server

    Geyari, C

    1976-01-01

    The properties making austenitic stainless steel a preferred material for the construction of high vacuum equipment are reviewed. Best results are obtained if attention is paid to the improvement of welding properties, particularly with a view to prevent intercrystalline disintegration. A review of mechanical properties, the effect of cold working and cryogenic temperatures on the strength and magnetic characteristics of stainless steel is given. During material selection for very high vacuum, attention must be paid to the porosity problem. A practical example shows the application of these considerations to the choice of materials for the CERN-ISR intersecting storage rings. (19 refs).

  3. Design considerations in the use of stainless steel for vacuum and cryogenic equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geyari, C.

    1976-01-01

    The properties making austenitic stainless steel a preferred material for the construction of high vacuum equipment are reviewed. Best results are obtained if attention is paid to the improvement of welding properties, particularly with a view to preventing intercrystalline disintegration. A review of mechanical properties, the effect of cold working and cryogenic temperatures on the strength and magnetic characteristics of stainless steel is given. During material selection for very high vacuum, attention must be paid to the porosity problem. A practical example shows the application of these considerations to the choice of materials for the CERN-ISR Intersecting Storage Rings. (author)

  4. Design review of the INTOR mechanical configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, T.G.

    1981-01-01

    The INTOR conceptual design has been carried out by design teams working in the home countries with periodic workshop sessions in Vienna to review the ongoing work and to make decisions on the evolving design. The decisions taken at each workshop session were then incorporated into each national design activity, so that the four national design contributions would progressively converge toward a single design with increasingly greater detail. This paper defines the final INTOR configuration that has evolved during the conceptual design phase, defining the major system design alternatives that were considered and the rationale for selecting the final system configuration

  5. Ethical considerations of neuro-oncology trial design in the era of precision medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Saksham; Smith, Timothy R; Broekman, Marike L

    2017-08-01

    The field of oncology is currently undergoing a paradigm shift. Advances in the understanding of tumor biology and in tumor sequencing technology have contributed to the shift towards precision medicine, the therapeutic framework of targeting the individual oncogenic changes each tumor harbors. The success of precision medicine therapies, such as targeted kinase inhibitors and immunotherapies, in other cancers have motivated studies in brain cancers. The high specificity and cost of these therapies also encourage a shift in clinical trial design away from randomized control trials towards smaller, more exclusive early phase clinical trials. While these new trials advance the clinical application of increasingly precise and individualized therapies, their design brings ethical challenges . We review the pertinent ethical considerations for clinical trials of precision medicine in neuro-oncology and discuss methods to protect patients in this new era of trial design.

  6. Zebrafish housing systems: a review of basic operating principles and considerations for design and functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Christian; Mason, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    The strategies for housing zebrafish used in biomedical research have evolved considerably over the past three decades. To keep pace with the rapid expansion and development of the zebrafish model system, the field has generally moved from keeping fish at the level of aquarium hobbyist to that of industrialized, recirculating aquaculture. Numerous commercial system vendors now offer increasingly sophisticated housing systems based on design principles that maximize the number of animals that can be housed in a given space footprint, and they are thus able to support large and diverse research programs. This review is designed to provide managers, lab animal veterinarians, investigators, and other parties responsible for care and use of these animals with a comprehensive overview of the basic operating and design principles of zebrafish housing systems. This information can be used to help plan the construction of new facilities and/or the upgrade and maintenance of existing operations.

  7. Man-machine considerations in nuclear power plant control room design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tennant, D.V.

    1987-01-01

    Although human factors is a subject that has been around for a number of years, this area of design has only recently become known to the power industry. As power plants have grown in size and complexity, the instrumentation required to control and monitor plant processes has increased tremendously. This has been especially true in nuclear power facilities. Although operators are better trained and qualified, very little consideration has been devoted to man-machine interface and the limitations of human operators. This paper explores the historic aspects and design philosophy associated with nuclear plant control rooms. Current problems and solutions are explored along with the components of a control room review. Finally, a survey of future advances in control room design are offered. This paper is concerned with instrumentation, controls, and displays

  8. Behavioral Effects of Upper Respiratory Tract Illnesses: A Consideration of Possible Underlying Cognitive Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew P. Smith

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown that both experimentally induced upper respiratory tract illnesses (URTIs and naturally occurring URTIs influence mood and performance. The present study investigated possible cognitive mechanisms underlying the URTI-performance changes. Those who developed a cold (N = 47 had significantly faster, but less accurate, performance than those who remained healthy (N = 54. Illness had no effect on manipulations designed to influence encoding, response organisation (stimulus-response compatilibility or response preparation. Similarly, there was no evidence that different components of working memory were impaired. Overall, the present research confirms that URTIs can have an effect on performance efficiency. Further research is required to identify the physiological and behavioral mechanisms underlying these effects.

  9. Mechanical properties considerations for use of epoxy insulators and bonded joints in neutral beam ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doll, D.W.; Trester, P.W.; Staley, H.G.

    1981-10-01

    In the Doublet III (D-III) neutral beam injectors, cast, rigid-epoxy insulators are joined to the AISI 304 stainless steel corona rings with semi-rigid epoxy adhesive. Selected mechanical properties of these materials were measured between 11 0 C and 65 0 C, well below the material temperature limits, to identify the trends and to confirm adequate mechanical strength for the insulators. Significant creep deformation was measured at 22 0 C. Empirical relationships were developed to predict long term strain over a range of stress and temperature of design interest. Delayed failure was observed in bonded specimens at stress levels well below the ultimate strength. In order to protect the D-III neutral beam ion source epoxy from elevated temperature effects, a chill was installed in the cooling water circuit. Outgassing measurements of the insulator epoxy were made and found to be low and primarily H 2 O

  10. Material Control and Accounting Design Considerations for High-Temperature Gas Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjornard, Trond; Hockert, John

    2011-01-01

    The subject of this report is domestic safeguards and security by design (2SBD) for high-temperature gas reactors, focusing on material control and accountability (MC and A). The motivation for the report is to provide 2SBD support to the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, which was launched by Congress in 2005. This introductory section will provide some background on the NGNP project and an overview of the 2SBD concept. The remaining chapters focus specifically on design aspects of the candidate high-temperature gas reactors (HTGRs) relevant to MC and A, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements, and proposed MC and A approaches for the two major HTGR reactor types: pebble bed and prismatic. Of the prismatic type, two candidates are under consideration: (1) GA's GT-MHR (Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor), and (2) the Modular High-Temperature Reactor (M-HTR), a derivative of Areva's Antares reactor. The future of the pebble-bed modular reactor (PBMR) for NGNP is uncertain, as the PBMR consortium partners (Westinghouse, PBMR (Pty) and The Shaw Group) were unable to agree on the path forward for NGNP during 2010. However, during the technology assessment of the conceptual design phase (Phase 1) of the NGNP project, AREVA provided design information and technology assessment of their pebble bed fueled plant design called the HTR-Module concept. AREVA does not intend to pursue this design for NGNP, preferring instead a modular reactor based on the prismatic Antares concept. Since MC and A relevant design information is available for both pebble concepts, the pebble-bed HTGRs considered in this report are: (1) Westinghouse PBMR; and (2) AREVA HTR-Module. The DOE Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) sponsors the Fuel Cycle Research and Development program (FCR and D), which contains an element specifically focused on the domestic (or state) aspects of SBD. This Material Protection, Control and Accountancy Technology (MPACT) program supports the present

  11. So, you want to design an acute mental health inpatient unit: physical issues for consideration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Dinesh

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore important considerations when planning an acute mental health inpatient unit. Planning a mental health acute inpatient facility should be about more than just building a beautiful, fabulous facility. A novel architectural design, fancy gadgets, safe tapware, new lounge suites, good light and air circulation are all incredibly important and good architects and designers can inform us about new developments in architecture and design that we must incorporate in our design plans. However, to design a facility that is right for tomorrow, it is also important to spend time trying to understand what happens in the facility and how the new facility is going to make things different and better. Planning of a health facility should be about creating an environment that is not only pleasant, comfortable and safe but also one that would enable and facilitate better care. It is important to map processes before rather than after building a facility, so that this process mapping can inform design and we do not keep falling into the trap of building a beautiful new facility but losing the opportunity to make care better.

  12. Transforming the market for residential windows: design considerations for DOE's Efficient Window Collaborative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eto, J.; Arasteh, D.; Selkowitz, S.

    1998-08-01

    Market adoption of recent, commercially available technological advances that improve the energy performance of windows will lead to immediate economic and energy savings benefits to the nation. This paper is a scoping study intended to inform the design of a major DOE initiative to accelerate market adoption of these windows in the residential sector. We describe the structure of the US residential window market and the interests of the various market players. We then briefly review five recent market transformation initiatives. Finally, we summarize our findings in a list of considerations we believe will be important for the DOE's initiative to transform the US residential window market.

  13. Design considerations for the use of laser-plasma accelerators for advanced space radiation studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Königstein, T.; Karger, O.; Pretzler, G.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Hidding, B.; Hidding

    2012-08-01

    We present design considerations for the use of laser-plasma accelerators for mimicking space radiation and testing space-grade electronics. This novel application takes advantage of the inherent ability of laser-plasma accelerators to produce particle beams with exponential energy distribution, which is a characteristic shared with the hazardous relativistic electron flux present in the radiation belts of planets such as Earth, Saturn and Jupiter. Fundamental issues regarding laser-plasma interaction parameters, beam propagation, flux development, and experimental setup are discussed.

  14. Reliability and testing considerations in the design of nuclear reactor filtration systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Nan, A.; Williams, R.P.; Goldsmith, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    The high performance standards set by USAEC-DRL Regulatory Guides for nuclear reactor filtration systems pose difficult problems for on-site leakage tests. These problems are compounded by the crowded conditions inside reactor structures, and by the fact that, until recently, little consideration has been given by system designers to the needs of testing. Techniques for coping with testing problems on existing systems, and suggestions for improving the testability of future systems, are given. Test crew safety considations are discussed, and a pair of easily portable contaminant generators is described. (U.S.)

  15. Mars Relays Satellite Orbit Design Considerations for Global Support of Robotic Surface Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastrup, Rolf; Cesarone, Robert; Cook, Richard; Knocke, Phillip; McOmber, Robert

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses orbit design considerations for Mars relay satellite (MRS)support of globally distributed robotic surface missions. The orbit results reported in this paper are derived from studies of MRS support for two types of Mars robotic surface missions: 1) the mars Environmental Survey (MESUR) mission, which in its current definition would deploy a global network of up to 16 small landers, and 2)a Small Mars Sample Return (SMSR) mission, which included four globally distributed landers, each with a return stage and one or two rovers, and up to four additional sets of lander/rover elements in an extended mission phase.

  16. Consideration of a design optimization method for advanced nuclear power plant thermal-hydraulic components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridluan, Artit; Tokuhiro, Akira; Manic, Milos; Patterson, Michael; Danchus, William

    2009-01-01

    In order to meet the global energy demand and also mitigate climate change, we anticipate a significant resurgence of nuclear power in the next 50 years. Globally, Generation III plants (ABWR) have been built; Gen' III+ plants (EPR, AP1000 others) are anticipated in the near term. The U.S. DOE and Japan are respectively pursuing the NGNP and MSFR. There is renewed interest in closing the fuel cycle and gradually introducing the fast reactor into the LWR-dominated global fleet. In order to meet Generation IV criteria, i.e. thermal efficiency, inherent safety, proliferation resistance and economic competitiveness, plant and energy conversion system engineering design have to increasingly meet strict design criteria with reduced margin for reliable safety and uncertainties. Here, we considered a design optimization approach using an anticipated NGNP thermal system component as a Case Study. A systematic, efficient methodology is needed to reduce time consuming trial-and-error and computationally-intensive analyses. We thus developed a design optimization method linking three elements; that is, benchmarked CFD used as a 'design tool', artificial neural networks (ANN) to accommodate non-linear system behavior and enhancement of the 'design space', and finally, response surface methodology (RSM) to optimize the design solution with targeted constraints. The paper presents the methodology including guiding principles, an integration of CFD into design theory and practice, consideration of system non-linearities (such as fluctuating operating conditions) and systematic enhancement of the design space via application of ANN, and a stochastic optimization approach (RSM) with targeted constraints. Results from a Case Study optimizing the printed circuit heat exchanger for the NGNP energy conversion system will be presented. (author)

  17. Considerations on Fail Safe Design for Design Basis Accident (DBA) vs. Design Extension Condition (DEC): Lesson Learnt from the Fukushima Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Jun Su; Kim, Sungyeop

    2014-01-01

    The fail safety design is referred to as an inherently safe design concept where the failure of an SSC (System, Structure or Component) leads directly to a safe condition. Usually the fail safe design has been devised based on the design basis accident (DBAs), because the nuclear safety has been assured by securing the capability to safely cope with DBAs. Currently regards have been paid to the DEC (Design Extension Condition) as an extended design consideration. Hence additional attention should be paid to the concept of the fail safe design in order to consider the DEC, accordingly. In this study, a case chosen from the Fukushima accident is studied to discuss the issue associated with the fail safe design in terms of DBA and DEC standpoints. For the fail safe design to be based both on the DBA and the DEC, a Mode Changeable Fail Safe Design (MCFSD) is proposed in this study. Additional discussions on what is needed for the MCFSD to be applied in the nuclear safety are addressed as well. One of the lessons learnt from the Fukushima accident should include considerations on the fail-safe design in a changing regulatory framework. Currently the design extension condition (DEC) including severe accidents should be considered during designing and licensing NPPs. Hence concepts on the fail safe design need to be changed to be based on not only the DBA but also the DEC. In this study, a case on a fail-safe design chosen from the Fukushima accident is studied to discuss the issue associated with the fail safe design in terms of DBA and DEC conditions. For the fail safe design to be based both on the DBA and the DEC, a Mode Changeable Fail Safe Design (MCFSD) is proposed in this study. Additional discussions on what is needed for the MCFSD to be applied in the nuclear safety are addressed as well

  18. Treatment of statin compounds by advanced oxidation processes: Kinetic considerations and destruction mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Behnaz; Song, Weihua; Santoke, Hanoz; Cooper, William J.

    2011-03-01

    This study examined the use of advanced oxidation/reduction processes (AO/RPs) for the destruction of cholesterol lowering statin pharmaceuticals. AO/RPs which utilize the oxidizing hydroxyl radical ( rad OH) and reducing aqueous electron (e -aq), to degrade chemical contaminants are alternatives to traditional water treatment methods, and are alternatives as water reuse becomes more generally implemented. Four major statin pharmaceuticals, fluvastatin, lovastatin, pravastatin and simvastatin, were studied, and the absolute bimolecular reaction rate constants with rad OH determined, (6.96±0.16)×10 9, (2.92±0.06)×10 9, (4.16±0.13)×10 9, and (3.13±0.15)×10 9 M -1 s -1, and for e -aq (2.31±0.06)×10 9, (0.45±0.01)×10 9, (1.26±0.01)×10 9, and (0.69±0.02)×10 9 M -1 s -1, respectively. To provide additional information on the radicals formed upon oxidation, transient spectra were measured and the overall reaction efficiency determined. Radical-based destruction mechanisms for destruction of the statins are proposed based on the LC-MS determination of the stable reaction by-products formed using 137Cs γ-irradiation of statin solutions. Knowing the reaction rates, reaction efficiencies and destruction mechanisms of these compounds is essential for the consideration of the use of advanced oxidation/reduction processes for the destruction of statins in aqueous systems.

  19. Treatment of statin compounds by advanced oxidation processes: Kinetic considerations and destruction mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razavi, Behnaz; Song Weihua; Santoke, Hanoz; Cooper, William J.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the use of advanced oxidation/reduction processes (AO/RPs) for the destruction of cholesterol lowering statin pharmaceuticals. AO/RPs which utilize the oxidizing hydroxyl radical ( · OH) and reducing aqueous electron (e - aq ), to degrade chemical contaminants are alternatives to traditional water treatment methods, and are alternatives as water reuse becomes more generally implemented. Four major statin pharmaceuticals, fluvastatin, lovastatin, pravastatin and simvastatin, were studied, and the absolute bimolecular reaction rate constants with · OH determined, (6.96±0.16)x10 9 , (2.92±0.06)x10 9 , (4.16±0.13)x10 9 , and (3.13±0.15)x10 9 M -1 s -1 , and for e - aq (2.31±0.06)x10 9 , (0.45±0.01)x10 9 , (1.26±0.01)x10 9 , and (0.69±0.02)x10 9 M -1 s -1 , respectively. To provide additional information on the radicals formed upon oxidation, transient spectra were measured and the overall reaction efficiency determined. Radical-based destruction mechanisms for destruction of the statins are proposed based on the LC-MS determination of the stable reaction by-products formed using 137 Cs γ-irradiation of statin solutions. Knowing the reaction rates, reaction efficiencies and destruction mechanisms of these compounds is essential for the consideration of the use of advanced oxidation/reduction processes for the destruction of statins in aqueous systems.

  20. Treatment of statin compounds by advanced oxidation processes: Kinetic considerations and destruction mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razavi, Behnaz, E-mail: brazavi@uci.ed [Urban Water Research Center, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-2175 (United States); Song Weihua, E-mail: wsong@uci.ed [Urban Water Research Center, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-2175 (United States); Santoke, Hanoz, E-mail: hsantoke@uci.ed [Urban Water Research Center, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-2175 (United States); Cooper, William J., E-mail: wcooper@uci.ed [Urban Water Research Center, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-2175 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    This study examined the use of advanced oxidation/reduction processes (AO/RPs) for the destruction of cholesterol lowering statin pharmaceuticals. AO/RPs which utilize the oxidizing hydroxyl radical ({sup {center_dot}O}H) and reducing aqueous electron (e{sup -}{sub aq}), to degrade chemical contaminants are alternatives to traditional water treatment methods, and are alternatives as water reuse becomes more generally implemented. Four major statin pharmaceuticals, fluvastatin, lovastatin, pravastatin and simvastatin, were studied, and the absolute bimolecular reaction rate constants with {sup {center_dot}O}H determined, (6.96{+-}0.16)x10{sup 9}, (2.92{+-}0.06)x10{sup 9}, (4.16{+-}0.13)x10{sup 9}, and (3.13{+-}0.15)x10{sup 9} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, and for e{sup -}{sub aq} (2.31{+-}0.06)x10{sup 9}, (0.45{+-}0.01)x10{sup 9}, (1.26{+-}0.01)x10{sup 9}, and (0.69{+-}0.02)x10{sup 9} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. To provide additional information on the radicals formed upon oxidation, transient spectra were measured and the overall reaction efficiency determined. Radical-based destruction mechanisms for destruction of the statins are proposed based on the LC-MS determination of the stable reaction by-products formed using {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-irradiation of statin solutions. Knowing the reaction rates, reaction efficiencies and destruction mechanisms of these compounds is essential for the consideration of the use of advanced oxidation/reduction processes for the destruction of statins in aqueous systems.

  1. Mechanical design in embryos: mechanical signalling, robustness and developmental defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Lance A

    2017-05-19

    Embryos are shaped by the precise application of force against the resistant structures of multicellular tissues. Forces may be generated, guided and resisted by cells, extracellular matrix, interstitial fluids, and how they are organized and bound within the tissue's architecture. In this review, we summarize our current thoughts on the multiple roles of mechanics in direct shaping, mechanical signalling and robustness of development. Genetic programmes of development interact with environmental cues to direct the composition of the early embryo and endow cells with active force production. Biophysical advances now provide experimental tools to measure mechanical resistance and collective forces during morphogenesis and are allowing integration of this field with studies of signalling and patterning during development. We focus this review on concepts that highlight this integration, and how the unique contributions of mechanical cues and gradients might be tested side by side with conventional signalling systems. We conclude with speculation on the integration of large-scale programmes of development, and how mechanical responses may ensure robust development and serve as constraints on programmes of tissue self-assembly.This article is part of the themed issue 'Systems morphodynamics: understanding the development of tissue hardware'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  2. Clinical implementation of x-ray phase-contrast imaging: Theoretical foundations and design considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Xizeng; Liu Hong

    2003-01-01

    Theoretical foundation and design considerations of a clinical feasible x-ray phase contrast imaging technique were presented in this paper. Different from the analysis of imaging phase object with weak absorption in literature, we proposed a new formalism for in-line phase-contrast imaging to analyze the effects of four clinically important factors on the phase contrast. These are the body parts attenuation, the spatial coherence of spherical waves from a finite-size focal spot, and polychromatic x-ray and radiation doses to patients for clinical applications. The theory presented in this paper can be applied widely in diagnostic x-ray imaging procedures. As an example, computer simulations were conducted and optimal design parameters were derived for clinical mammography. The results of phantom experiments were also presented which validated the theoretical analysis and computer simulations

  3. Fluid and structural dynamic design considerations of the HYLIFE nozzle plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitts, J.H.; Ojalvo, I.U.

    1981-02-01

    The basic concept of the High Yield Lithium Injection Fusion Energy (HYLIFE) reaction chamber involves a falling liquid-metal (lithium) jet array that absorbs 90% of the energy released from inertial confinement fusion reactions. The key element of the chamber that produces the jet array is the nozzle plate. This paper describes the design and analysis of a nozzle plate which can withstand the structural loads and permit the fluid jet array to be reestablished for a 1-Hz fusion reaction frequency. The shape of the nozzle plate and jet array is dictated by considerations of fluid dynamics and neutron-shielding. A vertical jet array, rather than a single annulus, is used because this design enhances fluid momentum interchange and dissipation of the kinetic energy that occurs when the jets disassemble. Less net outward-directed momentum results than with a single liquid annular flow configuration, thus producing lower stresses in the structural components

  4. High Voltage Design Considerations for the Electrostatic Septum for the Mu2e Beam Resonant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, Matthew L. [Fermilab; Jensen, C.; Morris, D.; Nagaslaev, V.; Pham, H.; Tinsley, D.

    2018-04-01

    aTwo electrostatic septa (ESS) are being designed for the slow extraction of 8GeV proton beam for the Mu2e experiment at Fermilab. Special attention is given to the high voltage components that affect the performance of the septa. The components under consideration are the high voltage (HV) feedthrough, cathode standoff (CS), and clearing electrode ceramic standoffs (CECS). Previous experience with similar HV systems at Fermilab was used to define the evaluation criteria of the design of the high voltage components. Using electric field simulation software, high E-field intensities on the components and integrated field strength along the surface of the dielectric material were minimized. Here we discuss the limitations found and improvements made based on those studies.

  5. LASL experimental engineered waste burial facility: design considerations and preliminary plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DePoorter, G.L.

    1980-01-01

    The LASL Experimental Engineered Waste Burial Facility is a part of the National Low-Level Waste Management Program on Shallow-Land Burial Technology. It is a test facility where basic information can be obtained on the processes that occur in shallow-land burial operations and where new concepts for shallow-land burial can be tested on an accelerated basis on an appropriate scale. The purpose of this paper is to present some of the factors considered in the design of the facility and to present a preliminary description of the experiments that are initially planned. This will be done by discussing waste management philosophies, the purposes of the facility in the context of the waste management philosophy for the facility, and the design considerations, and by describing the experiments initially planned for inclusion in the facility, and the facility site

  6. One consideration about rational design of the multi tunnels in geological disposal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizutani, Kazuhiko; Hiramoto, Masayuki; Morita, Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    In the geological disposal facility of the high-level radioactive waste, a group of galleries is designed in parallel at the depth of more than 300 m below surface. This is an unprecedented structure in the field of conventional engineering, and it is necessary to take this characteristic into consideration in the design of the galleries. In the geological disposal facility, as well as ensuring the dynamic stability of the gallery during construction and operational periods, it is necessary to dynamic characteristic of rock mass for long-term stability after the closure. In this study, analysis of the 'multi tunnels model' which represents the whole gallery group was performed and the results about load to act on a pillar. (author)

  7. Design considerations for a time-resolved tomographic diagnostic at DARHT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris I. Kaufman, Daniel Frayer, Wendi Dreesen, Douglas Johnson, Alfred Meidinger

    2006-01-01

    An instrument has been developed to acquire time-resolved tomographic data from the electron beam at the DARHT [Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test] facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The instrument contains four optical lines of sight that view a single tilted object. The lens design optically integrates along one optical axis for each line of sight. These images are relayed via fiber optic arrays to streak cameras, and the recorded streaks are used to reconstruct the original two-dimensional data. Installation of this instrument into the facility requires automation of both the optomechanical adjustments and calibration of the instrument in a constrained space. Additional design considerations include compound tilts on the object and image planes

  8. Mechanically and electrically robust metal-mask design for organic CMOS circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintani, Michihiro; Qin, Zhaoxing; Kuribara, Kazunori; Ogasahara, Yasuhiro; Hiromoto, Masayuki; Sato, Takashi

    2018-04-01

    The design of metal masks for fabricating organic CMOS circuits requires the consideration of not only the electrical property of the circuits, but also the mechanical strength of the masks. In this paper, we propose a new design flow for metal masks that realizes coanalysis of the mechanical and electrical properties and enables design exploration considering the trade-off between the two properties. As a case study, we apply a “stitching technique” to the mask design of a ring oscillator and explore the best design. With this technique, mask patterns are divided into separate parts using multiple mask layers to improve the mechanical strength at the cost of high resistance of the vias. By a numerical experiment, the design trade-off of the stitching technique is quantitatively analyzed, and it is demonstrated that the proposed flow is useful for the exploration of the designs of metal masks.

  9. SSTO vs TSTO design considerations—an assessment of the overall performance, design considerations, technologies, costs, and sensitivities of SSTO and TSTO designs using modern technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, Jay P.

    1996-03-01

    It is generally believed by those skilled in launch system design that Single-Stage-To-Orbit (SSTO) designs are more technically challenging, more performance sensitive, and yield larger lift-off weights than do Two-Stage-To-Orbit designs (TSTO's) offering similar payload delivery capability. Without additional insight into the other considerations which drive the development, recurring costs, operability, and reliability of a launch fleet, an analyst may easily conclude that the higher performing, less sensitive TSTO designs, thus yield a better solution to achieving low cost payload delivery. This limited insight could justify an argument to eliminate the X-33 SSTO technology/demonstration development effort, and thus proceed directly to less risky TSTO designs. Insight into real world design considerations of launch vehicles makes the choice of SSTO vs TSTO much less clear. The presentation addresses a more comprehensive evaluation of the general class of SSTO and TSTO concepts. These include pure SSTO's, augmented SSTO's, Siamese Twin, and Pure TSTO designs. The assessment considers vehicle performance and scaling relationships which characterize real vehicle designs. The assessment also addresses technology requirements, operations and supportability, cost implications, and sensitivities. Results of the assessment indicate that the trade space between various SSTO and TSTO design approaches is complex and not yet fully understood. The results of the X-33 technology demonstrators, as well as additional parametric analysis is required to better define the relative performance and costs of the various design approaches. The results also indicate that with modern technologies and today's better understanding of vehicle design considerations, the perception that SSTO's are dramatically heavier and more sensitive than TSTO designs is more of a myth, than reality.

  10. Soft error rate simulation and initial design considerations of neutron intercepting silicon chip (NISC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Cihangir

    -scale technologies. Prevention of SEEs has been studied and applied in the semiconductor industry by including radiation protection precautions in the system architecture or by using corrective algorithms in the system operation. Decreasing 10B content (20%of natural boron) in the natural boron of Borophosphosilicate glass (BPSG) layers that are conventionally used in the fabrication of semiconductor devices was one of the major radiation protection approaches for the system architecture. Neutron interaction in the BPSG layer was the origin of the SEEs because of the 10B (n,alpha) 7Li reaction products. Both of the particles produced have the capability of ionization in the silicon substrate region, whose thickness is comparable to the ranges of these particles. Using the soft error phenomenon in exactly the opposite manner of the semiconductor industry can provide a new neutron detection system based on the SERs in the semiconductor memories. By investigating the soft error mechanisms in the available semiconductor memories and enhancing the soft error occurrences in these devices, one can convert all memory using intelligent systems into portable, power efficient, directiondependent neutron detectors. The Neutron Intercepting Silicon Chip (NISC) project aims to achieve this goal by introducing 10B-enriched BPSG layers to the semiconductor memory architectures. This research addresses the development of a simulation tool, the NISC Soft Error Analysis Tool (NISCSAT), for soft error modeling and analysis in the semiconductor memories to provide basic design considerations for the NISC. NISCSAT performs particle transport and calculates the soft error probabilities, or SER, depending on energy depositions of the particles in a given memory node model of the NISC. Soft error measurements were performed with commercially available, off-the-shelf semiconductor memories and microprocessors to observe soft error variations with the neutron flux and memory supply voltage. Measurement

  11. Considerations for developing seismic design criteria for nuclear waste storage repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, G.N.; Yanev, P.I.; Scholl, R.E.

    1980-04-01

    The function of seismic design criteria is to reduce the potential for hazards that may arise during various stages of the repository life. During the operational phase, the major concern is with the possible effects of earthquakes on surface facilities, underground facilities, and equipment. During the decommissioned phase, the major concern is with the potential effects of earthquakes on the geologic formation, which may result in a reduction in isolation capacity. Existing standards and guides or criteria used for the static and seismic design of licensed nuclear facilities were reviewed and evaluated for their applicability to repository design. This report is directed mainly toward the development of seismic design criteria for the underground structures of repositories. An initial step in the development of seismic design criteria for the underground structures of repositories is the development of performance criteria, or minimum standards of acceptable behavior. A number of possible damage modes are identified for the operating phase of the repository; however, no damage modes are foreseen that would perturb the long-term function of the repository, except for the possibility of increased permeability within the rock mass. Subsequent steps in formulating acceptable seismic design criteria for the underground structures involve the quantification of the design process. The report discusses the necessity of specifying the form of ground motion that would be needed for seismic analysis and the procedures that may be used for making ground motion predictions. Further discussions outline what is needed for analysis, including rock properties, failure criteria, modeling techniques, seismic hardening criteria for the host rock mass, and probabilistic considerations

  12. Geomechanics considerations for through-and near-salt well design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willson, S.M.; Fredrich, Joanne T.

    2005-01-01

    Over the next decade a significant amount of exploration and new field developments will take place in salt provinces around the world - in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico, and offshore Angola, Brazil, and North and West Africa. Salt formations provide both opportunities and challenges to the design and construction of the often complex wells to be drilled in these locations. An overview of the many geomechanical considerations necessary to ensure successful well construction when drilling in through-, sub- and near-salt environments is presented. The structural styles of deformed sediments adjacent to salt, combined with stress perturbations caused by the presence of salt, are used to assess the risk of encountering zones that might cause wellbore instability or lost-circulation problems. Well design examples are provided that show how near- and through-salt uncertainties may be included within a geomechanical well design for required mud weights while drilling. Salt is found in many hydrocarbon basins around the world. Significant deposits exist in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM), offshore West Africa and Brazil, in the Southern North Sea, Egypt, and the Middle East (Figure 1(1)). In deep water offshore North America, the GoM and offshore Nova Scotia (NE Canada) are notable areas of current oil and gas exploration and production. Significant exploration activity is also targeting areas offshore Angola and Brazil. The extent of deepwater exploration in the GoM is illustrated in Figure 2 that shows the steady march into deeper water, together with a focusing of efforts in the Sigsbee Escarpment areas of Green Canyon, Walker Ridge and Atwater Valley. The deepest wells in the GoM are reaching true vertical depths of up to 32,000 feet, with maximum-recorded downhole pressures in excess of 26,000 psi and bottomhole temperatures in excess of 400 F. Such wells may penetrate considerable thicknesses of salt - up to 20,000 feet of salt is not unheard of. With substantial discoveries

  13. Identification of important ''PIUS'' design considerations and accident sequences using qualitative plant assessment techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, J.; Fullwood, R.; Kroeger, P.; Youngblood, R.

    1992-01-01

    The PIUS (Process Inherent Ultimate Safety) reactor is an advanced design nuclear power plant that uses passive safety features and basic physical processes to address safety concerns. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) performed a detailed study of the PIUS design for the NRC using primarily qualitative engineering analysis techniques. Some quantitative methods were also employed. There are three key initial areas of analysis: FMECA, HAZOP, and deterministic analyses, which are described herein. Once these three analysis methods were completed, the important findings from each of the methods were assembled into thePIUS Interim Table (PIT). This table thus contains a first cut sort of the important design considerations and features of the PIUS reactor. The table also identifies some potential initiating events and systems used for mitigating these initiators. The next stage of the analysis was the construction of event trees for each of the identified initiators. The most significant sequences were then determined qualitatively, using, some quantitative input. Finally, overall insights on the PIUS design developed from the PIT and from the event tree analysis were developed and presented

  14. Human engineering considerations in the design of New Virginia Power Radwaste facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bankley, A.V.; Morris, L.L.; Lippard, D.W.

    1988-01-01

    Human engineering principles were considered by Virginia Power in the recent design of new radwaste facilities (NRFs) for both the Surry and North Anna power stations. Virginia Power recognized that the rigorous application of human engineering principles to the NRF design was essential to the ultimate success or failure of the facilities. Success of the NRF should not only be measured in the volume of radwaste processed but also by other factors such as (a) availability and maintainability of preferred equipment, (b) as-low-as-reasonably-achievable considerations, (c) actual release rates versus achievable release rates, and (d) flexibility to deal with varying circumstances. Each of these success criteria would suffer as the result of operator/human inefficiencies or error. Therefore, human engineering should be applied to the maximum practical extent to minimize such inefficiencies or errors. No method is ever going to ensure a perfectly human-engineered facility design. Virginia Power believes, however, that significant strides have been made in efforts to design and construct a successful radwaste processing facility, a facility where operating success rests with the ability of the human operators to perform their jobs in an efficient and reliable fashion

  15. Planning Considerations for a Mars Sample Receiving Facility: Summary and Interpretation of Three Design Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaty, David W.; Allen, Carlton C.; Bass, Deborah S.; Buxbaum, Karen L.; Campbell, James K.; Lindstrom, David J.; Miller, Sylvia L.; Papanastassiou, Dimitri A.

    2009-10-01

    It has been widely understood for many years that an essential component of a Mars Sample Return mission is a Sample Receiving Facility (SRF). The purpose of such a facility would be to take delivery of the flight hardware that lands on Earth, open the spacecraft and extract the sample container and samples, and conduct an agreed-upon test protocol, while ensuring strict containment and contamination control of the samples while in the SRF. Any samples that are found to be non-hazardous (or are rendered non-hazardous by sterilization) would then be transferred to long-term curation. Although the general concept of an SRF is relatively straightforward, there has been considerable discussion about implementation planning. The Mars Exploration Program carried out an analysis of the attributes of an SRF to establish its scope, including minimum size and functionality, budgetary requirements (capital cost, operating costs, cost profile), and development schedule. The approach was to arrange for three independent design studies, each led by an architectural design firm, and compare the results. While there were many design elements in common identified by each study team, there were significant differences in the way human operators were to interact with the systems. In aggregate, the design studies provided insight into the attributes of a future SRF and the complex factors to consider for future programmatic planning.

  16. Design Considerations for Thermally Insulating Structural Sandwich Panels for Hypersonic Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blosser, Max L.

    2016-01-01

    Simplified thermal/structural sizing equations were derived for the in-plane loading of a thermally insulating structural sandwich panel. Equations were developed for the strain in the inner and outer face sheets of a sandwich subjected to uniaxial mechanical loads and differences in face sheet temperatures. Simple equations describing situations with no viable solution were developed. Key design parameters, material properties, and design principles are identified. A numerical example illustrates using the equations for a preliminary feasibility assessment of various material combinations and an initial sizing for minimum mass of a sandwich panel.

  17. Heat exchanger design considerations for high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C.F.; Vrable, D.L.; Van Hagan, T.H.; King, J.H.; Spring, A.H.

    1980-02-01

    Various aspects of the high-temperature heat exchanger conceptual designs for the gas turbine (HTGR-GT) and process heat (HTGR-PH) plants are discussed. Topics include technology background, heat exchanger types, surface geometry, thermal sizing, performance, material selection, mechanical design, fabrication, and the systems-related impact of installation and integration of the units in the prestressed concrete reactor vessel. The impact of future technology developments, such as the utilization of nonmetallic materials and advanced heat exchanger surface geometries and methods of construction, is also discussed

  18. Considerations in the design of a high power medical isotope production reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, Russell M.; Nordyke, William H.; Brown, Roy

    2002-01-01

    For the low enriched aqueous homogeneous reactor to be economic in the production of medical isotopes, such as Mo-99 and Sr-89, the power level should be of the order of 100 kWth. This is double the earlier designs and this paper discusses the design changes which must be considered to meet this goal. The topics considered are: 1. Heat removal from the reactor solution; 2. Recombination of radiolytic gases; 3. Adequate radiation shielding; 4. Stability of reactor power with fluctuating reactivity; 5. Adequate cooling of the reflector; 6. Independent shutdown mechanisms; 7. Required volume of the reactor; 8. Economic implementation. (author)

  19. Basic MR relaxation mechanisms and contrast agent design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De León-Rodríguez, Luis M; Martins, André F; Pinho, Marco C; Rofsky, Neil M; Sherry, A Dean

    2015-09-01

    The diagnostic capabilities of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have undergone continuous and substantial evolution by virtue of hardware and software innovations and the development and implementation of exogenous contrast media. Thirty years since the first MRI contrast agent was approved for clinical use, a reliance on MR contrast media persists, largely to improve image quality with higher contrast resolution and to provide additional functional characterization of normal and abnormal tissues. Further development of MR contrast media is an important component in the quest for continued augmentation of diagnostic capabilities. In this review we detail the many important considerations when pursuing the design and use of MR contrast media. We offer a perspective on the importance of chemical stability, particularly kinetic stability, and how this influences one's thinking about the safety of metal-ligand-based contrast agents. We discuss the mechanisms involved in MR relaxation in the context of probe design strategies. A brief description of currently available contrast agents is accompanied by an in-depth discussion that highlights promising MRI contrast agents in the development of future clinical and research applications. Our intention is to give a diverse audience an improved understanding of the factors involved in developing new types of safe and highly efficient MR contrast agents and, at the same time, provide an appreciation of the insights into physiology and disease that newer types of responsive agents can provide. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Consideration of reinforcement mechanism in the short fiber mixing granular materials by granular element simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Kentaro; Kaneko, Kenji; Hashizume, Yutaka

    2017-06-01

    The short fiber mixing method is well known as one of the method to improve the strength of gran- ular soils in geotechnical engineering. Mechanical properties of the short fiber mixing granular materials are influenced by many factors, such as the mixture ratio of the short fiber, the material of short fiber, the length, and the orientation. In particular, the mixture ratio of the short fibers is very important in mixture design. In the past study, we understood that the strength is reduced by too much short fiber mixing by a series of tri-axial compression experiments. Namely, there is "optimum mixture ratio" in the short fiber mixing granular soils. In this study, to consider the mechanism of occurrence of the optimum mixture ratio, we carried out the numerical experiments by granular element method. As the results, we can understand that the strength decrease when too much grain-fiber contact points exist, because a friction coefficient is smaller than the grain-grain contact points.

  1. Key considerations on nebulization of antimicrobial agents to mechanically ventilated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rello, J; Rouby, J J; Sole-Lleonart, C; Chastre, J; Blot, S; Luyt, C E; Riera, J; Vos, M C; Monsel, A; Dhanani, J; Roberts, J A

    2017-09-01

    Nebulized antibiotics have an established role in patients with cystic fibrosis or bronchiectasis. Their potential benefit to treat respiratory infections in mechanically ventilated patients is receiving increasing interest. In this consensus statement of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, the body of evidence of the therapeutic utility of aerosolized antibiotics in mechanically ventilated patients was reviewed and resulted in the following recommendations: Vibrating-mesh nebulizers should be preferred to jet or ultrasonic nebulizers. To decrease turbulence and limit circuit and tracheobronchial deposition, we recommend: (a) the use of specifically designed respiratory circuits avoiding sharp angles and characterized by smooth inner surfaces, (b) the use of specific ventilator settings during nebulization including use of a volume controlled mode using constant inspiratory flow, tidal volume 8 mL/kg, respiratory frequency 12 to 15 bpm, inspiratory:expiratory ratio 50%, inspiratory pause 20% and positive end-expiratory pressure 5 to 10 cm H 2 O and (c) the administration of a short-acting sedative agent if coordination between the patient and the ventilator is not obtained, to avoid patient's flow triggering and episodes of peak decelerating inspiratory flow. A filter should be inserted on the expiratory limb to protect the ventilator flow device and changed between each nebulization to avoid expiratory flow obstruction. A heat and moisture exchanger and/or conventional heated humidifier should be stopped during the nebulization period to avoid a massive loss of aerosolized particles through trapping and condensation. If these technical requirements are not followed, there is a high risk of treatment failure and adverse events in mechanically ventilated patients receiving nebulized antibiotics for pneumonia. Copyright © 2017 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  2. Riding the Plane Wave: Considerations for In Vivo Study Designs Employing High Frame Rate Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason S. Au

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Advancements in diagnostic ultrasound have allowed for a rapid expansion of the quantity and quality of non-invasive information that clinical researchers can acquire from cardiovascular physiology. The recent emergence of high frame rate ultrasound (HiFRUS is the next step in the quantification of complex blood flow behavior, offering angle-independent, high temporal resolution data in normal physiology and clinical cases. While there are various HiFRUS methods that have been tested and validated in simulations and in complex flow phantoms, there is a need to expand the field into more rigorous in vivo testing for clinical relevance. In this tutorial, we briefly outline the major advances in HiFRUS, and discuss practical considerations of participant preparation, experimental design, and human measurement, while also providing an example of how these frameworks can be immediately applied to in vivo research questions. The considerations put forward in this paper aim to set a realistic framework for research labs which use HiFRUS to commence the collection of human data for basic science, as well as for preliminary clinical research questions.

  3. Some considerations for establishing seismic design criteria for nuclear plant piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, W.P.; Chokshi, N.C.

    1997-01-01

    The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) is providing assistance to the U.S. NRC in developing regulatory positions on the seismic analysis of piping. As part of this effort, ETEC previously performed reviews of the ASME Code, Section III piping seismic design criteria as revised by the 1994 Addenda. These revised criteria were based on evaluations by the ASME Special Task Group on Integrated Piping Criteria (STGIPC) and the Technical Core Group (TCG) of the Advanced Reactor Corporation (ARC) of the earlier joint Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)/NRC Piping ampersand Fitting Dynamic Reliability (PFDR) program. Previous ETEC evaluations reported at the 23rd WRSM of seismic margins associated with the revised criteria are reviewed. These evaluations had concluded, in part, that although margins for the timed PFDR tests appeared acceptable (>2), margins in detuned tests could be unacceptable (<1). This conclusion was based primarily on margin reduction factors (MRFs) developed by the ASME STGIPC and ARC/TCG from realistic analyses of PFDR test 36. This paper reports more recent results including: (1) an approach developed for establishing appropriate seismic margins based on PRA considerations, (2) independent assessments of frequency effects on margins, (3) the development of margins based on failure mode considerations, and (4) the implications of Code Section III rules for Section XI

  4. Designing Online Marketplaces: Trust and Reputation Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Luca, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Online marketplaces have proliferated over the past decade, creating new markets where none existed. By reducing transaction costs, online marketplaces facilitate transactions that otherwise would not have occurred and enable easier entry of small sellers. One central challenge faced by designers of online marketplaces is how to build enough trust to facilitate transactions between strangers. This paper provides an economist’s toolkit for designing online marketplaces, focusing on trust and r...

  5. Consideration of neutral beam prompt loss in the design of a tokamak helicon antenna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pace, D.C.; Van Zeeland, M.A.; Fishler, B.; Murphy, C.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Neutral beam prompt losses place appreciable power on an in-vessel tokamak antenna. • Simulations predict prompt loss power and inform protective tile design. • Experiments confirm the validity of the prompt loss simulations. - Abstract: Neutral beam prompt losses (injected neutrals that ionize such that their first poloidal transit intersects with the wall) can put appreciable power on the outer wall of tokamaks, and this power may damage the wall or other internal components. These prompt losses are simulated including a protruding helicon antenna installation in the DIII-D tokamak and it is determined that 160 kW of power will impact the antenna during the injection of a particular neutral beam. Protective graphite tiles are designed in response to this modeling and the wall shape of the installed antenna is precisely measured to improve the accuracy of these calculations. Initial experiments confirm that the antenna component temperature increases according to the amount of neutral beam energy injected into the plasma. In this case, only injection of beams that are aimed counter to the plasma current produce an appreciable power load on the outer wall, suggesting that the effect is of little concern for tokamaks featuring only co-current neutral beam injection. Incorporating neutral beam prompt loss considerations into the design of this in-vessel component serves to ensure that adequate protection or cooling is provided.

  6. Design and safety consideration in the High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Shinzo; Tanaka, Toshiuki; Sudo, Yukio; Baba, Osamu; Shiozawa, Shusaku; Okubo, Minoru

    1990-01-01

    The budget for construction of the High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) was recently committed by the Government in Japan. The HTTR is a test reactor with thermal output of 30 MW and reactor outlet coolant temperature of 950 deg. C at high temperature test operation. The HTTR plant uses a pin-in-block design core and will be used as an experience leading to high temperature applications. Several major important safety considerations are adopted in the design of the HTTR. These are as follows: 1) A coated particle fuel must not be failed during a normal reactor operation and an anticipated operational occurrence; 2) Two independent and diverse reactor shut-down systems are provided in order to shut down the reactor safely and reliably in any condition; 3) Back-up reactor cooling systems which are safety ones are provided in order to remove residual heat of reactor in any condition; 4) Multiple barriers and countermeasures are provided to contain fission products such as a containment, pressure gradient between the primary and secondary cooling circuit and so on, though coated particle fuels contain fission products with high reliability; 5) The functions of materials used in the primary cooling circuit are separated to be pressure-resisting and heat-resisting in order to resolve material problems and maintain high reliability. The detailed design of the HTTR was completed with extensive accumulation of material data and component tests. (author)

  7. [Design considerations for clinical data management in an integrated remote medical system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautu, E; Bautu, A; Ciorap, R; Pomazan, V M; Petcu, L C

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a proposal for the design of a telemedicine system. The system (called SIMPA) will be used for noninvasive monitoring of some vital parameters of patients with chronic diseases. The telemedicine system contains a fixed unit and some mobile units. The mobile unit contains various sensors used to gather data about vital biosignals, a transceiver and a medical processor. On the fixed unit side, the host transceiver must be compatible with the mobile transceiver. On the server side, an application analyzes and processes the data and further stores it in dedicated databases. The database support for the telemedicine application is ensured by open source technologies and already available communication infrastructures (GSM networks). The requirements for the application were thoroughly analyzed and the Entity-Relationship diagram of the system was designed and translated into relational model. SIMPA will be implemented using only free and open source technologies, which will ensure a low cost and improved extensibility and portability. We presented some design considerations for a low-cost telemedicine system. The system will help optimize medical decisions and will increase the quality of the medical act and lower the cost, to the ultimate benefit of the patient.

  8. Guide to radiological accident considerations for siting and design of DOE nonreactor nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elder, J.; Graf, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    DOE Office of Nuclear Safety has sponsored preparation of a guidance document to aid field offices and contractors in their analyses of consequences of postulated major accidents. The guide addresses the requirements of DOE Orders 5480.1A, Chapter V, and 6430.1, including the general requirement that DOE nuclear facilities be sited, designed, and operated in accordance with standards, codes, and guides consistent with those applied to comparable licensed nuclear facilities. The guide includes both philosophical and technical information in the areas of: siting guidelines doses applied to an offsite reference person; consideration also given to an onsite reference person; physical parameters, models, and assumptions to be applied when calculating doses for comparison to siting criteria; and potential accident consequences other than radiological dose to a reference person which might affect siting and major design features of the facility, such as environmental contamination, population dose, and associated public health effects. Recommendations and/or clarifications are provided where this could be done without adding new requirements. In this regard, the guide is considered a valuable aid to the safety analyst, especially where requirements have been subject to inconsistent interpretation or where analysis methods are in transition, such as use of dose model (ICRP 2 or ICRP 30) or use of probabilistic methods of risk analysis in the siting and design of nuclear facilities

  9. Elements of Design Consideration of Once-Through Cycle, Supercritical-Pressure Light Water Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshiaki Oka; Sei-ichi Koshizuka; Yuki Ishiwatari; Akifumi Yamaji

    2002-01-01

    The paper describes elements of design consideration of supercritical-pressure, light water cooled reactors as well as the status and prospects of the research and development. It summarizes the results of the conceptual design study at the University of Tokyo from 1989. The research and development started in Japan, Europe and USA. The major advantages of the reactors are 1. Compact reactor and turbines due to high specific enthalpy of supercritical water 2.Simple plant system because of the once-through coolant cycle 3.Use of the experience of LWR and fossil-fired power plants. The temperatures of the major components such as reactor pressure vessel, coolant pipes, pumps and turbines are within the experience, in spite of the high outlet coolant temperature. 4.Similarity to LWR safety design and criteria, but no burnout phenomenon 5.Potential cost reduction due to smaller material expenditure and short construction period 6.The smallest reactor not in power rating, but in plant sizes. 7.High-thermal efficiency and low coolant flow rate because of high enthalpy rise. 8.Water cooled reactors potentially free from SCC (stress corrosion cracking) problems. 9.Compatibility of tight-fuel-lattice fast reactor core due to small coolant flow rate, potentially easy shift to fast breeder reactor without changing coolant technology. 10.Potential of producing energy products such as hydrogen and high quality hydro carbons. (authors)

  10. Consideration of neutral beam prompt loss in the design of a tokamak helicon antenna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pace, D.C., E-mail: pacedc@fusion.gat.com; Van Zeeland, M.A.; Fishler, B.; Murphy, C.

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Neutral beam prompt losses place appreciable power on an in-vessel tokamak antenna. • Simulations predict prompt loss power and inform protective tile design. • Experiments confirm the validity of the prompt loss simulations. - Abstract: Neutral beam prompt losses (injected neutrals that ionize such that their first poloidal transit intersects with the wall) can put appreciable power on the outer wall of tokamaks, and this power may damage the wall or other internal components. These prompt losses are simulated including a protruding helicon antenna installation in the DIII-D tokamak and it is determined that 160 kW of power will impact the antenna during the injection of a particular neutral beam. Protective graphite tiles are designed in response to this modeling and the wall shape of the installed antenna is precisely measured to improve the accuracy of these calculations. Initial experiments confirm that the antenna component temperature increases according to the amount of neutral beam energy injected into the plasma. In this case, only injection of beams that are aimed counter to the plasma current produce an appreciable power load on the outer wall, suggesting that the effect is of little concern for tokamaks featuring only co-current neutral beam injection. Incorporating neutral beam prompt loss considerations into the design of this in-vessel component serves to ensure that adequate protection or cooling is provided.

  11. Enviro-geotechnical considerations in waste containment system design and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, H.Y.; Daniels, J.L.; Inyang, H.I.

    1997-01-01

    The effectiveness of waste control facilities hinges on careful evaluation of the overall planning, analysis and design of the entire system prior to construction. At present, most work is focused on the waste controlling system itself, with little attention given to the local environmental factors surrounding the facility sites. Containment materials including geomembranes, geotextiles and clay amended soils have received intense scrutiny. This paper, however, focuses on three relatively important issues relating to the characterization of the surrounding geomedia. Leakage through naturally occurring low-permeability soil layers, shrinkages swelling, cracking and effects of dynamic loads on system components are often responsible for a waste containment breach. In this paper, these mechanisms and their synergistic effects are explained in terms of the particle energy field theory. It is hoped that this additional information may assist the designer to be aware or take precaution to design safer future waste control facilities

  12. Underground disposal of UK heat-generating wastes: repository design considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steadman, J.A.

    1993-12-01

    The report discusses the likely differences in design between a deep repository for disposal of UK heat-generating radioactive wastes and that of the planned Nirex ILW/LLW repository at Sellafield, based on a review of international published information. The main differences arise from the greater heat and radiation outputs of the waste, and in the case of intact PWR spent fuel elements, the greater length and weight of the disposal packages. Published cost estimates for other OECD countries for disposal of heat-generating wastes are considerably lower than that for the UK, partly because in most cases they are for co-disposal with a larger quantity of ILW. (author)

  13. Facts learnt from the Hanshin-Awaji disaster and consideration on design basis earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Heki

    1997-01-01

    This paper will deal with how to establish the concept of the design basis earthquake for critical industrial facilities such as nuclear power plants in consideration of disasters induced by the 1995 Hyogoken-Nanbu Earthquake (Southern Hyogo-prefecture Earthquake-1995), so-called Kobe earthquake. The author once discussed various DBEs at 7 WCEE. At that time, the author assumed that the strongest effective PGA would be 0.7 G, and compared to the values of accelerations to a structure obtained by various codes in Japan and other countries. The maximum PGA observed by an instrument at the Southern Hyogo-pref. Earthquake-1995 exceeded the previous assumption of the author, even though the evaluation results of the previous paper had been pessimistic. According to the experience of Kobe event, the author will point out the necessity of the third earthquake S s adding to S 1 and S 2 , previous DBEs. (author)

  14. Integrated design and evaluation of biomass energy system taking into consideration demand side characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, Hongbo; Zhou, Weisheng; Nakagami, Ken'ichi; Gao, Weijun

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a linear programming model has been developed for the design and evaluation of biomass energy system, while taking into consideration demand side characteristics. The objective function to be minimized is the total annual cost of the energy system for a given customer equipped with a biomass combined cooling, heating and power (CCHP) plant, as well as a backup boiler fueled by city gas. The results obtained from the implementation of the model demonstrate the optimal system capacities that customers could employ given their electrical and thermal demands. As an illustrative example, an investigation addresses the optimal biomass CCHP system for a residential area located in Kitakyushu Science and Research Park, Japan. In addition, sensitivity analyses have been elaborated in order to show how the optimal solutions would vary due to changes of some key parameters including electricity and city gas tariffs, biogas price, electricity buy-back price, as well as carbon tax rate. (author)

  15. Considerations on the design of front-end electronics for silicon calorimetry for the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wintenberg, A.L.; Bauer, M.L.; Britton, C.L.; Kennedy, E.J.; Todd, R.A.; Berridge, S.C.; Bugg, W.M.

    1990-01-01

    Some considerations are described for the design of a silicon-based sampling calorimetry detector for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). The use of silicon as the detection medium allows fast, accurate, and fine-grained energy measurements - but for optimal performance, the front-end electronics must be matched to the detector characteristics and have the speed required by the high SSC interaction rates. The relation between the signal-to-noise rtio of the calorimeter electronics and the charge collection time, the preamplifier power dissipation, detector capacitance and leakage, charge gain, and signal shaping and sampling was studied. The electrostatic transformer connection was analyzed and found to be unusable for a tightly arranged calorimeter because of stray capacitance effects. The method of deconvolutional sampling was developed as a means for pileup correction following synchronous sampling and analog storage

  16. Nuclear heat source component design considerations for HTGR process heat reactor plant concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C.F.; Kapich, D.; King, J.H.; Venkatesh, M.C.

    1982-05-01

    The coupling of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) and a chemical process facility has the potential for long-term synthetic fuel production (i.e., oil, gasoline, aviation fuel, hydrogen, etc) using coal as the carbon source. Studies are in progress to exploit the high-temperature capability of an advanced HTGR variant for nuclear process heat. The process heat plant discussed in this paper has a 1170-MW(t) reactor as the heat source and the concept is based on indirect reforming, i.e., the high-temperature nuclear thermal energy is transported [via an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX)] to the externally located process plant by a secondary helium transport loop. Emphasis is placed on design considerations for the major nuclear heat source (NHS) components, and discussions are presented for the reactor core, prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV), rotating machinery, and heat exchangers

  17. Facts learnt from the Hanshin-Awaji disaster and consideration on design basis earthquake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibata, Heki [Yokohama National Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-03-01

    This paper will deal with how to establish the concept of the design basis earthquake for critical industrial facilities such as nuclear power plants in consideration of disasters induced by the 1995 Hyogoken-Nanbu Earthquake (Southern Hyogo-prefecture Earthquake-1995), so-called Kobe earthquake. The author once discussed various DBEs at 7 WCEE. At that time, the author assumed that the strongest effective PGA would be 0.7 G, and compared to the values of accelerations to a structure obtained by various codes in Japan and other countries. The maximum PGA observed by an instrument at the Southern Hyogo-pref. Earthquake-1995 exceeded the previous assumption of the author, even though the evaluation results of the previous paper had been pessimistic. According to the experience of Kobe event, the author will point out the necessity of the third earthquake S{sub s} adding to S{sub 1} and S{sub 2}, previous DBEs. (author)

  18. Design consideration on hydrogen production demonstration plant of thermochemical IS process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwatsuki, Jin; Noguchi, Hiroki; Terada, Atsuhiko; Kubo, Shinji; Sakaba, Nariaki; Onuki, Kaoru; Hino, Ryutaro

    2009-03-01

    Preliminary design study was carried out on the hydrogen production demonstration plant of thermochemical IS process. In the pilot test, hydrogen production will be examined under prototypical condition using an apparatus made of industrial materials, which is driven by the sensible heat of helium gas heated by an electric heater that simulates the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). Tentative system condition was defined considering the HTTR specification and the experience on the construction and the operation of the mock-up test facility using methane reforming for hydrogen production. The process condition and the system flow diagram were discussed to meet the system condition. Based on the defined process condition, types of the main components were discussed taking the corrosion resistance of the structural materials into consideration. Applicable rules and regulations were also surveyed regarding the plant construction and operation. (author)

  19. On the design of compliant mechanisms using topology optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigmund, Ole

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a method for optimal design of compliant mechanism topologies. The method is based on continuum-type topology optimization techniques and finds the optimal compliant mechanism topology within a given design domain and a given position and direction of input and output forces....... By constraining the allowed displacement at the input port, it is possible to control the maximum stress level in the compliant mechanism. The ability of the design method to find a mechanism with complex output behavior is demonstrated by several examples. Some of the optimal mechanism topologies have been...... manufactured, both in macroscale (hand-size) made in Nylon, and in microscale (

  20. Deformation mechanisms in ferritic/martensitic steels and the impact on mechanical design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghoniem, Nasr M.; Po, Giacomo; Sharafat, Shahram

    2013-01-01

    Structural steels for nuclear applications have undergone rapid development during the past few decades, thanks to a combination of trial-and-error, mechanism-based optimization, and multiscale modeling approaches. Deformation mechanisms are shown to be intimately related to mechanical design via dominant plastic deformation modes. Because mechanical design rules are mostly based on failure modes associated with plastic strain damage accumulation, we present here the fundamental deformation mechanisms for Ferritic/Martensitic (F/M) steels, and delineate their operational range of temperature and stress. The connection between deformation mechanisms, failure modes, and mechanical design is shown through application of design rules. A specific example is given for the alloy F82H utilized in the design of a Test Blanket Module (TBM) in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), where several constitutive equations are developed for design-related mechanical properties