WorldWideScience

Sample records for measured spatial properties

  1. Longterm and spatial variability of Aerosol optical properties measured by sky radiometer in Japan sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, K.

    2016-12-01

    Aerosols and cloud play an important role in the climate change. We started the long-term monitoring of aerosol and cloud optical properties since 1990's by using sky radiometer (POM-01, 02; Prede Co. Ltd., Japan). We provide the information, in this presentation, on the aerosol optical properties with respect to their temporal and spatial variability in Japan site (ex. Sapporo, Toyama, Kasuga and etc). The global distributions of aerosols have been derived from earth observation satellite and have been simulated in numerical models, which assume optical parameters. However, these distributions are difficult to derive because of variability in time and space. Therefore, Aerosol optical properties were investigated using the measurements from ground-based and ship-borne sky radiometer. The sky radiometer is an automatic instrument that takes observations only in daytime under the clear sky conditions. Observation of diffuse solar intensity interval was made every ten or five minutes by once. The aerosol optical properties were computed using the SKYRAD.pack version 4.2. The obtained Aerosol optical properties (Aerosol optical thickness, Ångström exponent, Single scattering albedo, and etc.) and size distribution volume clearly showed spatial and temporal variability in Japan area. In this study, we present the temporal and spatial variability of Aerosol optical properties at several Japan sites, applied to validation of satellite and numerical models. This project is validation satellite of GCOM-C, JAXA. The GCOM-C satellite scheduled to be launched in early 2017.

  2. Algorithm of extraction optics properties from the measurement of spatially resolved diffuse reflectance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunill Rodriguez, Margarita; Delgado Atencio, Jose Alberto; Castro Ramos, Jorge; Vazquez y Montiel, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    There are several methods to obtain the optical parameters of biological tissues from the measurement of spatially resolved diffuse reflectance. One of them is well-known as Video Reflectometry in which a camera CCD is used as detection and recording system of the lateral distribution of diffuse reflectance Rd(r) when an infinitely narrow light beam impinges on the tissue. In this paper, we present an algorithm that we have developed for the calibration and application of an experimental set-up of Video Reflectometry destined to extract the optical properties of models of biological tissues with optical properties similar to the human skin. The results of evaluation of the accuracy of the algorithm for optical parameters extraction is shown for a set of proofs reflectance curves with known values of these parameters. In the generation of these curves the simulation of measurement errors was also considered. The results show that it is possible to extract the optical properties with an accuracy error of less than 1% for all the proofs curves. (Author)

  3. Comparison of spatially and temporally resolved diffuse transillumination measurement systems for extraction of optical properties of scattering media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Rascón, E; Bruce, N C; Garduño-Mejía, J; Carrillo-Torres, R; Hernández-Paredes, J; Álvarez-Ramos, M E

    2017-11-20

    This paper discusses the main differences between two different methods for determining the optical properties of tissue optical phantoms by fitting the spatial and temporal intensity distribution functions to the diffusion approximation theory. The consistency in the values of the optical properties is verified by changing the width of the recipient containing the turbid medium; as the optical properties are an intrinsic value of the scattering medium, independently of the recipient width, the stability in these values for different widths implies a better measurement system for the acquisition of the optical properties. It is shown that the temporal fitting method presents higher stability than the spatial fitting method; this is probably due to the addition of the time of flight parameter into the diffusion theory.

  4. Comparing multiple model-derived aerosol optical properties to spatially collocated ground-based and satellite measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocko, Ilissa B.; Ginoux, Paul A.

    2017-04-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols are a key factor governing Earth's climate and play a central role in human-caused climate change. However, because of aerosols' complex physical, optical, and dynamical properties, aerosols are one of the most uncertain aspects of climate modeling. Fortunately, aerosol measurement networks over the past few decades have led to the establishment of long-term observations for numerous locations worldwide. Further, the availability of datasets from several different measurement techniques (such as ground-based and satellite instruments) can help scientists increasingly improve modeling efforts. This study explores the value of evaluating several model-simulated aerosol properties with data from spatially collocated instruments. We compare aerosol optical depth (AOD; total, scattering, and absorption), single-scattering albedo (SSA), Ångström exponent (α), and extinction vertical profiles in two prominent global climate models (Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, GFDL, CM2.1 and CM3) to seasonal observations from collocated instruments (AErosol RObotic NETwork, AERONET, and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization, CALIOP) at seven polluted and biomass burning regions worldwide. We find that a multi-parameter evaluation provides key insights on model biases, data from collocated instruments can reveal underlying aerosol-governing physics, column properties wash out important vertical distinctions, and improved models does not mean all aspects are improved. We conclude that it is important to make use of all available data (parameters and instruments) when evaluating aerosol properties derived by models.

  5. Spatial Variability of Soil Physical Properties Obtained with Laboratory Methods and Their Relation to Field Electrical Resistivity Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dathe, A.; Nemes, A.; Bloem, E.; Patterson, M.; Gimenez, D.; Angyal, A.; Koestel, J. K.; Jarvis, N.

    2017-12-01

    Soil spatial heterogeneity plays a critical role for describing water and solute transport processes in the unsaturated zone. Although we have a sound understanding of the physical properties underlying this heterogeneity (like macropores causing preferential water flow), their quantification in a spatial context is still a challenge. To improve existing knowledge and modelling approaches we established a field experiment on an agriculturally used silty clay loam (Stagnosol) in SE Norway. Centimeter to decimeter scale heterogeneities were investigated in the field using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) in a quasi-3D and a real 3D approach. More than 100 undisturbed soil samples were taken in the 2x1x1 m3plot investigated with 3D ERT to determine soil water retention, saturated and unsaturated hydraulic conductivities and bulk density in the laboratory. A subset of these samples was scanned at the computer tomography (CT) facility at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences in Uppsala, Sweden, with special emphasis on characterizing macroporosity. Results show that the ERT measurements captured the spatial distribution of bulk densities and reflected soil water contents. However, ERT could not resolve the large variation observed in saturated hydraulic conductivities from the soil samples. Saturated hydraulic conductivity was clearly related to the macroporosity visible in the CT scans obtained from the respective soil cores. Hydraulic conductivities close to saturation mainly changed with depths in the soil profile and therefore with bulk density. In conclusion, to quantify the spatial heterogeneity of saturated hydraulic conductivities scanning methods with a resolution smaller than the size of macropores have to be used. This is feasible only when the information obtained from for example CT scans of soil cores would be upscaled in a meaningful way.

  6. The Atlantic Meridional Transect: Spatially Extensive Calibration and Validation of Optical Properties and Remotely Sensed Measurements of Ocean Colour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, James; Hooker, Stanford

    1997-01-01

    Twice a year, the Royal Research Ship (RRS) James Clark Ross (JCR) steams a meridional transect of the atlantic Ocean between Grimsly (UK) and Stanley (Falkland Islands) with a port call in Montevideo (Uruguay), as part of the annual research activities of the British Antarctic Survey (BAS). In September, the JCR sails from the UK, and the following April it makes the return trip. The ship is operated by the BAS for the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC). The Atlantic Meridional Transect (AMT) Program exploits the passage of the JCR from approximately 50 deg. N to 50 deg. S with a primary objective to investigate physical and biological processes, as well as to measure the mesi-to-basin-scale bio-optical properties of the atlantic Ocean. The calibration and validation of remotely sensed observations of ocean colour is an inherent objective of these studies: first, by relating in situ measurements of water leaving radiance to satellite measurement, and second, by measuring the bio-optically active constituents of the water.

  7. Influence of Landscape Coverage on Measuring Spatial and Length Properties of Rock Fracture Networks: Insights from Numerical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wenzhuo; Lei, Qinghua

    2018-01-01

    Natural fractures are ubiquitous in the Earth's crust and often deeply buried in the subsurface. Due to the difficulty in accessing to their three-dimensional structures, the study of fracture network geometry is usually achieved by sampling two-dimensional (2D) exposures at the Earth's surface through outcrop mapping or aerial photograph techniques. However, the measurement results can be considerably affected by the coverage of forests and other plant species over the exposed fracture patterns. We quantitatively study such effects using numerical simulation. We consider the scenario of nominally isotropic natural fracture systems and represent them using 2D discrete fracture network models governed by fractal and length scaling parameters. The groundcover is modelled as random patches superimposing onto the 2D fracture patterns. The effects of localisation and total coverage of landscape patches are further investigated. The fractal dimension and length exponent of the covered fracture networks are measured and compared with those of the original non-covered patterns. The results show that the measured length exponent increases with the reduced localisation and increased coverage of landscape patches, which is more evident for networks dominated by very large fractures (i.e. small underlying length exponent). However, the landscape coverage seems to have a minor impact on the fractal dimension measurement. The research findings of this paper have important implications for field survey and statistical analysis of geological systems.

  8. Topological Properties of Spatial Coherence Function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji-Rong, Ren; Tao, Zhu; Yi-Shi, Duan

    2008-01-01

    The topological properties of the spatial coherence function are investigated rigorously. The phase singular structures (coherence vortices) of coherence function can be naturally deduced from the topological current, which is an abstract mathematical object studied previously. We find that coherence vortices are characterized by the Hopf index and Brouwer degree in topology. The coherence flux quantization and the linking of the closed coherence vortices are also studied from the topological properties of the spatial coherence function

  9. Psychological Measures of Spatial Abilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurel Ion Clinciu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Spatial abilities are divided into three categories: mental rotation, spatial relation and visualization. Several tests are cited in foreign literature that are frequently used in order to assess these abilities, but for Romanian specialists they are not on hand. The present paper is introducing new assessment tools for static spatial abilities that were successfully used along with already validated instruments. Data on statistical qualities of the new instruments are also discussed.

  10. Investigation of Spatial Distribution Properties of Mid-Infrared ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The spatial distribution properties of quantum cascade lasers with emission wavelengths around 7 µm were measured. In addition, the emission profile on a plane orthogonal to the propagation axis of the beam were measured and the full width at half maximum (FWHM) on the orthogonal and lateral directions calculated.

  11. Spatial, spectral and statistical properties of the electrostatic fluctuations and measurements of the scattering of the beam in a strongly turbulent plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Michael Duane

    The purpose of this investigation is to measure the spatial, spectral and statistical properties of the high (/omega/ ~/ ω pe) and low (/omega/ ~/ ωpi) frequency electrostatic fluctuations in an unmagnetized, statistically stable, beam-driven, strongly turbulent plasma and compare the results to theoretical predictions. In addition the scattering of the electron beam in both angle and energy is measured and compared to theory. This study is motivated by the recent advances in statistical theories of strong Langmuir turbulence and the glaring lack of confirmatory experimental data. With the advent of modern computers and electronics, enormous data sets are now routinely digitize and subjected to sophisticated statistical and spectral analysis. These methods, along with traditional procedures and an innovative technique known as a 'conditional trigger', are used to extract ensemble averages from the turbulent system for comparison with the theoretical models. It is found that the high-frequency fluctuations consist of low-level wave activity /langle W/rangle/ ~/ 10-2 - 103 punctuated by semi-periodic, intense, spiky field events /langle W/rangle/ ~/ 1, where /langle W/rangle is the normalized intensity. The low- level wave activity has a spectral spread Δ k/k/ ~/ /Delta/omega//omega/ ~ 30%, dispersion relation v beam/ ~/ /omega/k, and correlation length lc/ /approx/ 3λES, where λES is the electrostatic wavelength, and shows evidence of low-intensity parametric decay products. The intense field events, on the other hand, show little correlation for l/ >/ λES, have a full-width-at-half-maximum of 1 f/ /n2/ /propto/ β where β ~/ 1.3 for the experiment and is predicted to be β ~/ 1.98 by the model. The scattering of the electron beam in angle for a typical wave intensity level /langle W/rangle/ ~/ 0.04 is Θ ~/ 3o, and in energy is Δ U/ ~/ 25 eV for a 400 eV beam. The scattering of the beam in both angle and energy is found to agree well with theory.

  12. Thermal Properties Measurement Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmack, Jon [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Braase, Lori [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Papesch, Cynthia [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hurley, David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Tonks, Michael [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gofryk, Krzysztof [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Harp, Jason [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Fielding, Randy [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Knight, Collin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Meyer, Mitch [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The Thermal Properties Measurement Report summarizes the research, development, installation, and initial use of significant experimental thermal property characterization capabilities at the INL in FY 2015. These new capabilities were used to characterize a U3Si2 (candidate Accident Tolerant) fuel sample fabricated at the INL. The ability to perform measurements at various length scales is important and provides additional data that is not currently in the literature. However, the real value of the data will be in accomplishing a phenomenological understanding of the thermal conductivity in fuels and the ties to predictive modeling. Thus, the MARMOT advanced modeling and simulation capability was utilized to illustrate how the microstructural data can be modeled and compared with bulk characterization data. A scientific method was established for thermal property measurement capability on irradiated nuclear fuel samples, which will be installed in the Irradiated Material Characterization Laboratory (IMCL).

  13. Correlation of Spatially Filtered Dynamic Speckles in Distance Measurement Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semenov, Dmitry V.; Nippolainen, Ervin; Kamshilin, Alexei A.; Miridonov, Serguei V.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper statistical properties of spatially filtered dynamic speckles are considered. This phenomenon was not sufficiently studied yet while spatial filtering is an important instrument for speckles velocity measurements. In case of spatial filtering speckle velocity information is derived from the modulation frequency of filtered light power which is measured by photodetector. Typical photodetector output is represented by a narrow-band random noise signal which includes non-informative intervals. Therefore more or less precious frequency measurement requires averaging. In its turn averaging implies uncorrelated samples. However, conducting research we found that correlation is typical property not only of dynamic speckle patterns but also of spatially filtered speckles. Using spatial filtering the correlation is observed as a response of measurements provided to the same part of the object surface or in case of simultaneously using several adjacent photodetectors. Found correlations can not be explained using just properties of unfiltered dynamic speckles. As we demonstrate the subject of this paper is important not only from pure theoretical point but also from the point of applied speckle metrology. E.g. using single spatial filter and an array of photodetector can greatly improve accuracy of speckle velocity measurements

  14. SPATIAL MODELLING FOR DESCRIBING SPATIAL VARIABILITY OF SOIL PHYSICAL PROPERTIES IN EASTERN CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Bogunović

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to characterize the field-scale spatial variability and test several interpolation methods to identify the best spatial predictor of penetration resistance (PR, bulk density (BD and gravimetric water content (GWC in the silty loam soil in Eastern Croatia. The measurements were made on a 25 x 25-m grid which created 40 individual grid cells. Soil properties were measured at the center of the grid cell deep 0-10 cm and 10-20 cm. Results demonstrated that PR and GWC displayed strong spatial dependence at 0-10 cm BD, while there was moderate and weak spatial dependence of PR, BD and GWC at depth of 10-20 cm. Semi-variogram analysis suggests that future sampling intervals for investigated parameters can be increased to 35 m in order to reduce research costs. Additionally, interpolation models recorded similar root mean square values with high predictive accuracy. Results suggest that investigated properties do not have uniform interpolation method implying the need for spatial modelling in the evaluation of these soil properties in Eastern Croatia.

  15. Spatially resolved remote measurement of temperature by neutron resonance absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tremsin, A.S., E-mail: ast@ssl.berkeley.edu [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kockelmann, W.; Pooley, D.E. [STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, ISIS Facility, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Feller, W.B. [NOVA Scientific, Inc., 10 Picker Road, Sturbridge, MA 01566 (United States)

    2015-12-11

    Deep penetration of neutrons into most engineering materials enables non-destructive studies of their bulk properties. The existence of sharp resonances in neutron absorption spectra enables isotopically-resolved imaging of elements present in a sample, as demonstrated by previous studies. At the same time the Doppler broadening of resonance peaks provides a method of remote measurement of temperature distributions within the same sample. This technique can be implemented at a pulsed neutron source with a short initial pulse allowing for the measurement of the energy of each registered neutron by the time of flight technique. A neutron counting detector with relatively high timing and spatial resolution is used to demonstrate the possibility to obtain temperature distributions across a 100 µm Ta foil with ~millimeter spatial resolution. Moreover, a neutron transmission measurement over a wide energy range can provide spatially resolved sample information such as temperature, elemental composition and microstructure properties simultaneously.

  16. Spatial Modeling of Geometallurgical Properties: Techniques and a Case Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deutsch, Jared L., E-mail: jdeutsch@ualberta.ca [University of Alberta, School of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (Canada); Palmer, Kevin [Teck Resources Limited (Canada); Deutsch, Clayton V.; Szymanski, Jozef [University of Alberta, School of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (Canada); Etsell, Thomas H. [University of Alberta, Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    High-resolution spatial numerical models of metallurgical properties constrained by geological controls and more extensively by measured grade and geomechanical properties constitute an important part of geometallurgy. Geostatistical and other numerical techniques are adapted and developed to construct these high-resolution models accounting for all available data. Important issues that must be addressed include unequal sampling of the metallurgical properties versus grade assays, measurements at different scale, and complex nonlinear averaging of many metallurgical parameters. This paper establishes techniques to address each of these issues with the required implementation details and also demonstrates geometallurgical mineral deposit characterization for a copper–molybdenum deposit in South America. High-resolution models of grades and comminution indices are constructed, checked, and are rigorously validated. The workflow demonstrated in this case study is applicable to many other deposit types.

  17. Measurement strategy for spatially encoded photonic qubits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solis-Prosser, M. A.; Neves, L.

    2010-01-01

    We propose a measurement strategy which can, probabilistically, reproduce the statistics of any observable for spatially encoded photonic qubits. It comprises the implementation of a two-outcome positive operator-valued measure followed by a detection in a fixed transverse position, making the displacement of the detection system unnecessary, unlike previous methods. This strategy generalizes a scheme recently demonstrated by one of us and co-workers, restricted to measurement of observables with equatorial eigenvectors only. The method presented here can be implemented with the current technology of programmable multipixel liquid-crystal displays. In addition, it can be straightforwardly extended to high-dimensional qudits and may be a valuable tool in optical implementations of quantum information protocols with spatial qubits and qudits.

  18. Spatial Bias in Field-Estimated Unsaturated Hydraulic Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOLT,ROBERT M.; WILSON,JOHN L.; GLASS JR.,ROBERT J.

    2000-12-21

    Hydraulic property measurements often rely on non-linear inversion models whose errors vary between samples. In non-linear physical measurement systems, bias can be directly quantified and removed using calibration standards. In hydrologic systems, field calibration is often infeasible and bias must be quantified indirectly. We use a Monte Carlo error analysis to indirectly quantify spatial bias in the saturated hydraulic conductivity, K{sub s}, and the exponential relative permeability parameter, {alpha}, estimated using a tension infiltrometer. Two types of observation error are considered, along with one inversion-model error resulting from poor contact between the instrument and the medium. Estimates of spatial statistics, including the mean, variance, and variogram-model parameters, show significant bias across a parameter space representative of poorly- to well-sorted silty sand to very coarse sand. When only observation errors are present, spatial statistics for both parameters are best estimated in materials with high hydraulic conductivity, like very coarse sand. When simple contact errors are included, the nature of the bias changes dramatically. Spatial statistics are poorly estimated, even in highly conductive materials. Conditions that permit accurate estimation of the statistics for one of the parameters prevent accurate estimation for the other; accurate regions for the two parameters do not overlap in parameter space. False cross-correlation between estimated parameters is created because estimates of K{sub s} also depend on estimates of {alpha} and both parameters are estimated from the same data.

  19. SpatEntropy: Spatial Entropy Measures in R

    OpenAIRE

    Altieri, Linda; Cocchi, Daniela; Roli, Giulia

    2018-01-01

    This article illustrates how to measure the heterogeneity of spatial data presenting a finite number of categories via computation of spatial entropy. The R package SpatEntropy contains functions for the computation of entropy and spatial entropy measures. The extension to spatial entropy measures is a unique feature of SpatEntropy. In addition to the traditional version of Shannon's entropy, the package includes Batty's spatial entropy, O'Neill's entropy, Li and Reynolds' contagion index, Ka...

  20. Density measures and additive property

    OpenAIRE

    Kunisada, Ryoichi

    2015-01-01

    We deal with finitely additive measures defined on all subsets of natural numbers which extend the asymptotic density (density measures). We consider a class of density measures which are constructed from free ultrafilters on natural numbers and study a certain additivity property of such density measures.

  1. Properties of spatial Cox process models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jesper

    Probabilistic properties of Cox processes of relevance for statistical modelling and inference are studied. Particularly, we study the most important classes of Cox processes, including log Gaussian Cox processes, shot noise Cox processes, and permanent Cox processes. We consider moment properties...... and point process operations such as thinning, displacements, and superpositioning. We also discuss how to simulate specific Cox processes....

  2. Some properties of spatially homogeneous spacetimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coomer, G.C.

    1979-01-01

    This paper discusses two features of the universe which are influenced in a fundamental way by the spacetime geometry of the universe. The first is the growth of density fluctuations in the early stages of the evolution of the universe. The second is the propagation of electromagnetic radiation in the universe. A spatially homogeneous universe is assumed in both discussions. The gravitational instability theory of galaxy formation is investigated for a viscous fluid and for a charged, conducting fluid with a magnetic field added as a perturbation. It is found that the growth rate of density perturbations in both cases is lower than in the perfect fluid case. Spatially homogeneous but nonisotropic spacetimes are investigated next. Two perfect fluid solutions of Einstein's field equations are found which have spacelike hypersurfaces with Bianchi type II geometry. An expression for the spectrum of the cosmic microwave background radiation in a spatially homogeneous but nonisotropic universe is found. The expression is then used to determine the angular distribution of the intensity of the radiation in the simpler of the two solutions. When accepted values of the matter density and decoupling temperature are inserted into this solution, values for the age of the universe and the time of decoupling are obtained which agree reasonably well with the values of the standard model of the universe

  3. SPATIAL SCHEME FOR PROPERTIES DISTRIBUTION IN SCHEME ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    water quality have been developed with a focus groundwater chemical constituents [2]. There have been adequate data .... Faculty of Engineering, f Nigeria, Nsukka, ISSN: ..... important physical property useful in defining groundwater quality.

  4. Structures and properties of spatially distorted porphyrins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golubchikov, Oleg A; Kuvshinova, Elizaveta M; Pukhovskaya, Svetlana G

    2005-01-01

    The published data on the structures and properties of porphyrins with distorted aromatic macrocycles are generalised and analysed. Data on the crystal structures, spectra and kinetics of formation and dissociation of their coordination derivatives are summarised. It is demonstrated that the distortion of the planar structure of the tetrapyrrole core is one of the most efficient means of controlling spectral, physicochemical and coordination properties of these compounds.

  5. Precise measurements of spatial density distributions of damages introduced into GaP by MeV-electron beam irradiations based on its optical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, T.; Hashimoto, Y.; Nakanishi, Y.; Wada, T.

    1985-01-01

    GaP crystals were irradiated uniformly on their flat surfaces by 10 MeV-electrons. The 'below-gap' absorption coefficient Δαsub(b)(hν) and the normalized white-light optical density D/d in these samples increased linearly with a dose phi as Δαsub(b)(2.0) = 3.3 x 10 -16 phi and D/d = 1.42 x 10 -16 phi. The free electron density n in the conduction band estimated from the X 1 -> X 3 absorption band decreased with phi, and as the decrease in the free electron density Δn is equivalent to the density of introduced defects N, it could be expressed that N = Δn = Rsub(c)phi where the value of the carrier removal rate Rsub(c) was 5.8 cm -1 for the S-doped sample. These expressions lead to the basic relation that N is proportional to D/d as expressed in N = 4.1 x 10 16 D/d. Two-dimensional distributions of D/d were measured in the samples irradiated by collimated electron beams at 10 and 16 MeV by using a microdensitometer, and they were converted into the two-dimensional distributions of damage density according to the linear relation of N-D/d. Damages gradually spread laterally with increasing depth at first and then shrink. (author)

  6. Properties of spatial Cox process models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jesper

    2005-01-01

    Particularly, we study the most important classes of Cox processes, including log Gaussian Cox processes, shot noise Cox processes, and permanent Cox processes. We consider moment properties and point process operations such as thinning, displacements, and super positioning. We also discuss how...... to simulate specific Cox processes....

  7. Spatial planning procedures and property prices: The role of expectations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cotteleer, G.; Peerlings, J.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to show if, and to what extent, spatial planning procedures affect residential property prices. To answer this question we used data on residential property prices from an area in the Netherlands called Midden-Delfland. In this area policy plans and decisions on the

  8. Electric Properties Measurement of Lentil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novák Ján

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper contains the results of the electric properties measurement of lentil set. Electric measurements with use of these materials are of fundamental importance in relation to the analysis of quantity of absorbed water and dielectric heating characteristics. The aim of this paper was to perform the measurements of conductivity, dielectric constant and loss tangent on samples of lentil, the electrical properties of which had not been sufficiently measured. Measurements were performed under various moisture contents, and the frequency of electric field ranged from 1 MHz to 16 MHz, using a Q meter with coaxial probe. It was concluded that conductivity, relative permittivity and loss tangent increased with an increase in moisture content, and dielectric constant and loss tangent decreased as the frequency of electric field increased.

  9. Opportunities for using spatial property assessment data in air pollution exposure assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keller C Peter

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many epidemiological studies examining the relationships between adverse health outcomes and exposure to air pollutants use ambient air pollution measurements as a proxy for personal exposure levels. When pollution levels vary at neighbourhood levels, using ambient pollution data from sparsely located fixed monitors may inadequately capture the spatial variation in ambient pollution. A major constraint to moving toward exposure assessments and epidemiological studies of air pollution at a neighbourhood level is the lack of readily available data at appropriate spatial resolutions. Spatial property assessment data are widely available in North America and may provide an opportunity for developing neighbourhood level air pollution exposure assessments. Results This paper provides a detailed description of spatial property assessment data available in the Pacific Northwest of Canada and the United States, and provides examples of potential applications of spatial property assessment data for improving air pollution exposure assessment at the neighbourhood scale, including: (1 creating variables for use in land use regression modelling of neighbourhood levels of ambient air pollution; (2 enhancing wood smoke exposure estimates by mapping fireplace locations; and (3 using data available on individual building characteristics to produce a regional air pollution infiltration model. Conclusion Spatial property assessment data are an extremely detailed data source at a fine spatial resolution, and therefore a source of information that could improve the quality and spatial resolution of current air pollution exposure assessments.

  10. Airborne lidar measurements of aerosol spatial distribution and optical properties over the Atlantic Ocean during a European pollution outbreak of ACE-2[Special issue with manuscripts related to the second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2), 16 June-25 July 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flamant, Cyrille; Pelon, Jaques; Trouillet, Vincent; Bruneau, Didier [CNRS-UPMC-UVSQ, Paris (France). Service d' Aeronomie; Chazette, Patrick; Leon, J.F. [CEA-CNRS, Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Lab. des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environment; Quinn, P.K.; Bates, T.S.; Johnson, James [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Seattle, WA (United States). Pacific Marine Environmental Lab.; Frouin, Robert [Scripps Inst. of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (United States); Livingston, John [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2000-04-01

    Airborne lidar measurements of the aerosol spatial distribution and optical properties associated with an European pollution outbreak which occurred during the Second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) are presented. Size distribution spectra measured over the ocean near Sagres (Portugal), on-board the Research Vessel Vodyanitsky and on-board the Avion de Recherche Atmospherique et Teledetection (ARAT) have been used to parameterize the aerosol vertical distribution. This parameterization, which is essential to the analysis of airborne lidar measurements, has been validated via closure experiments on extinction coefficient profiles and aerosol optical depth (AOD). During the studied event, AOD's retrieved from lidar measurements at 0.73 {mu}m range between 0.055 and 0.10. The parameterized aerosol vertical distribution has been used to shift AOD retrievals from 0.73 to 0.55 {mu}m to enable comparison with other remote sensing instruments. At the latter wavelength, AOD's retrieved from lidar measurements range between 0.08 and 0.14. An agreement better than 20% is obtained between AOD's derived from lidar and sunphotometer measurements made at the same time and place over the ocean near the coast. However, large differences are observed with the AOD estimated from Meteosat imagery in the same area. These differences are thought to be caused by large uncertainties associated with the Meteosat sensitivity for small AOD's or by the presence of thin scattered clouds. Lidar-derived particulate extinction profiles and scattering coefficient profiles measured by a nephelometer mounted on the ARAT, in a different part of the plume, were found in good agreement, which could be an indication that absorption by pollution aerosols is small and/or that soot is present in small amounts in the European pollution plume. Lidar measurements have also been used to differentiate the contribution of different aerosol layers to the total AOD. It is shown that

  11. Towards the Measurement of Spatial Welfare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grevers, Wilbert

    2005-01-01

    This paper develops a framework for assessing the welfare effects of the capitalisation of the value of environmental quality in the price for land, combining elements from environmental and spatial economics on the basis of equilibrium considerations for population games. Its main contribution to

  12. Spatial correlation between weed species densities and soil properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walter, Mette; Christensen, Svend; Simmelsgaard, Svend Erik

    2002-01-01

    The spatial cross-correlation between weed species densities and six soil properties within fields was analysed using cross-semivariograms. The survey was carried out in three successive years in two fields. The most consistent relationship between weed species density (numbers m−2) and soil...... properties was negative cross-correlation between the density of Viola arvensis Murray and clay content. This correlation was found in both fields; however, the range of spatial dependence varied between fields. In one of the fields, the density of Lamium purpureum L. was positively cross......-correlated with the phosphorus content in the soil in all years. The density of Veronica spp. and Poa annua L. was negatively cross-correlated with pH in all three years. Other spatial cross-correlations that were found in this study were inconsistent over time or field site. The densities of some of the weed species were...

  13. Campbell and moment measures for finite sequential spatial processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.N.M. van Lieshout (Marie-Colette)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractWe define moment and Campbell measures for sequential spatial processes, prove a Campbell-Mecke theorem, and relate the results to their counterparts in the theory of point processes. In particular, we show that any finite sequential spatial process model can be derived as the vector

  14. Measurement of turbulent spatial structure and kinetic energy spectrum by exact temporal-to-spatial mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchhave, Preben; Velte, Clara Marika

    2017-01-01

    distortions caused by Taylor’s hypothesis. The method is first confirmed to produce the correct statistics using computer simulations and later applied to measurements in some of the most difficult regions of a round turbulent jet—the non-equilibrium developing region and the outermost parts of the developed......We present a method for converting a time record of turbulent velocity measured at a point in a flow to a spatial velocity record consisting of consecutive convection elements. The spatial record allows computation of dynamic statistical moments such as turbulent kinetic wavenumber spectra...... and spatial structure functions in a way that completely bypasses the need for Taylor’s hypothesis. The spatial statistics agree with the classical counterparts, such as the total kinetic energy spectrum, at least for spatial extents up to the Taylor microscale. The requirements for applying the method...

  15. Three-dimensional spatial imaging in multiphoton ionization rate measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bredy, Richard; Camp, Howard A.; Nguyen, Hai; Awata, Takaaki; Shan Bing; Chang Zhenghu; DePaola, B.D.

    2004-01-01

    An experiment is described in which an apparatus is used to demonstrate the feasibility of measuring multiphoton photoionization rates in the interaction of short pulsed lasers with atoms or molecules. With this methodology, the ionization rate is measured as a function of the spatial position in the beam-waist region of the laser through the direct three-dimensional spatial imaging of the ionization events. Thus, if the spatial dependence of the laser beam intensity were known, a series of experiments could yield the intensity dependence of multiphoton ionization without the assumptions or errors that are generally inherent in the integration over one or more dimensions in the laser focal volume

  16. Implementing spatial segregation measures in R.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Yun Hong

    Full Text Available Reliable and accurate estimation of residential segregation between population groups is important for understanding the extent of social cohesion and integration in our society. Although there have been considerable methodological advances in the measurement of segregation over the last several decades, the recently developed measures have not been widely used in the literature, in part due to their complex calculation. To address this problem, we have implemented several newly proposed segregation indices in R, an open source software environment for statistical computing and graphics, as a package called seg. Although there are already a few standalone applications and add-on packages that provide access to similar methods, our implementation has a number of advantages over the existing tools. First, our implementation is flexible in the sense that it provides detailed control over the calculation process with a wide range of input parameters. Most of the parameters have carefully chosen defaults, which perform acceptably in many situations, so less experienced users can also use the implemented functions without too much difficulty. Second, there is no need to export results to other software programs for further analysis. We provide coercion methods that enable the transformation of our output classes into general R classes, so the user can use thousands of standard and modern statistical techniques, which are already available in R, for the post-processing of the results. Third, our implementation does not require commercial software to operate, so it is accessible to a wider group of people.

  17. Measuring directional urban spatial interaction in China: A migration perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fangzhou; Feng, Zhiming; Li, Peng; You, Zhen

    2017-01-01

    The study of urban spatial interaction is closely linked to that of economic geography, urban planning, regional development, and so on. Currently, this topic is generating a great deal of interest among researchers who are striving to find accurate ways to measure urban spatial interaction. Classical spatial interaction models lack theoretical guidance and require complicated parameter-adjusting processes. The radiation model, however, as proposed by Simini et al. with rigorous formula derivation, can simulate directional urban spatial interaction. We applied the radiation model in China to simulate the directional migration number among 337 nationwide research units, comprising 4 municipalities and 333 prefecture-level cities. We then analyzed the overall situation in Chinese cities, the interaction intensity hierarchy, and the prime urban agglomerations from the perspective of migration. This was done to ascertain China's urban spatial interaction and regional development from 2000 to 2010 to reveal ground realities.

  18. Uncertainty of spatial straightness in 3D measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jinxing; Jiang Xiangqian; Ma Limin; Xu Zhengao; Li Zhu

    2005-01-01

    The least-square method is commonly employed to verify the spatial straightness in actual three-dimensional measurement process, but the uncertainty of the verification result is usually not given by the coordinate measuring machines. According to the basic principle of spatial straightness least-square verification and the uncertainty propagation formula given by ISO/TS 14253-2, a calculation method for the uncertainty of spatial straightness least-square verification is proposed in this paper. By this method, the coefficients of the line equation are regarded as a statistical vector, so that the line equation, the result of the spatial straightness verification and the uncertainty of the result can be obtained after the expected value and covariance matrix of the vector are determined. The method not only assures the integrity of the verification result, but also accords with the requirement of the new generation of GPS standards, which can improve the veracity of verification

  19. Spatial properties of a terahertz beam generated from a two-color air plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pernille Klarskov; Wang, Tianwu; Buron, Jonas Christian Due

    2013-01-01

    We present a spatial characterization of terahertz (THz) beams generated from a two-color air plasma under different conditions by measuring full 3D beam profiles using a commercial THz camera. We compare two THz beam profiles emitted from plasmas generated by 35 fs and 100 fs laser pulses...... that this reduces the beam waist, and that the beam spot shape changes from Lorentzian to Gaussian. Finally, we observe a forward-propagating Gaussian THz beam by spatially filtering away the conical off-axis radiation with a 1 cm aperture......., and show that the spatial properties of the two THz beams do not change significantly. For the THz beam profile generated by the 35 fs pulse, the spatial effect of eliminating the lower frequencies is investigated by implementing two crossed polarizers working as a high-pass filter. We show...

  20. Measurement of turbulent spatial structure and kinetic energy spectrum by exact temporal-to-spatial mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchhave, Preben; Velte, Clara M.

    2017-08-01

    We present a method for converting a time record of turbulent velocity measured at a point in a flow to a spatial velocity record consisting of consecutive convection elements. The spatial record allows computation of dynamic statistical moments such as turbulent kinetic wavenumber spectra and spatial structure functions in a way that completely bypasses the need for Taylor's hypothesis. The spatial statistics agree with the classical counterparts, such as the total kinetic energy spectrum, at least for spatial extents up to the Taylor microscale. The requirements for applying the method are access to the instantaneous velocity magnitude, in addition to the desired flow quantity, and a high temporal resolution in comparison to the relevant time scales of the flow. We map, without distortion and bias, notoriously difficult developing turbulent high intensity flows using three main aspects that distinguish these measurements from previous work in the field: (1) The measurements are conducted using laser Doppler anemometry and are therefore not contaminated by directional ambiguity (in contrast to, e.g., frequently employed hot-wire anemometers); (2) the measurement data are extracted using a correctly and transparently functioning processor and are analysed using methods derived from first principles to provide unbiased estimates of the velocity statistics; (3) the exact mapping proposed herein has been applied to the high turbulence intensity flows investigated to avoid the significant distortions caused by Taylor's hypothesis. The method is first confirmed to produce the correct statistics using computer simulations and later applied to measurements in some of the most difficult regions of a round turbulent jet—the non-equilibrium developing region and the outermost parts of the developed jet. The proposed mapping is successfully validated using corresponding directly measured spatial statistics in the fully developed jet, even in the difficult outer regions of

  1. Measured spatial variability of beach erosion due to aeolian processes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, S.; Verheijen, A.H.; Hoonhout, B.M.; Vos, S.E.; Cohn, Nicholas; Ruggiero, P; Aagaard, T.; Deigaard, R.; Fuhrman, D.

    2017-01-01

    This paper shows the first results of measured spatial variability of beach erosion due to aeolian processes during the recently conducted SEDEX2 field experiment at Long Beach, Washington, U.S.A.. Beach erosion and sedimentation were derived using series of detailed terrestrial LIDAR measurements

  2. Discrete field theories and spatial properties of strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klebanov, I.; Susskind, L.

    1988-10-01

    We use the ground-state wave function in the light-cone gauge to study the spatial properties of fundamental strings. We find that, as the cut-off in the parameter space is removed, the strings are smooth and have a divergent size. Guided by these properties, we consider a large-N lattice gauge theory which has an unstable phase where the size of strings diverges. We show that this phase exactly describes free fundamental strings. The lattice spacing does not have to be taken to zero for this equivalence to hold. Thus, exact rotation and translation invariance is restored in a discrete space. This suggests that the number of fundamental short-distance degrees of freedom in string theory is much smaller than in a conventional field theory. 11 refs., 4 figs

  3. Spatial distribution measured by the modulation transfer function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, P.; Brice, D.K.; Doyle, B.L.

    2003-01-01

    Spatial distributions in ion micro-beam and IBA experimental practice are regularly characterized through the parameters of FWHM and tail area percentage (TF, tail fraction). Linear and stationary transducer theory allows these distributions to be described in the Fourier-dual frequency space, and provides an indirect method to evaluate them through measurement of the modulation transfer function (MTF). We suggest direct measurement of MTF by employing bar pattern grids, similar to those used for calibration of radiological equipment. Assuming spatial distributions of the form exp(-(|αx|) η ), we are able to relate the MTF measurements to the more popular FWHM and TF. This new approach to determine spatial resolution can become a standard for use by the micro-beam community

  4. Spatial filtering velocimeter for vehicle navigation with extended measurement range

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xin; Zhou, Jian; Nie, Xiaoming; Long, Xingwu

    2015-05-01

    The idea of using spatial filtering velocimeter is proposed to provide accurate velocity information for vehicle autonomous navigation system. The presented spatial filtering velocimeter is based on a CMOS linear image sensor. The limited frame rate restricts high speed measurement of the vehicle. To extend measurement range of the velocimeter, a method of frequency shifting is put forward. Theoretical analysis shows that the frequency of output signal can be reduced and the measurement range can be doubled by this method when the shifting direction is set the same with that of image velocity. The approach of fast Fourier transform (FFT) is employed to obtain the power spectra of the spatially filtered signals. Because of limited frequency resolution of FFT, a frequency spectrum correction algorithm, called energy centrobaric correction, is used to improve the frequency resolution. The correction accuracy energy centrobaric correction is analyzed. Experiments are carried out to measure the moving surface of a conveyor belt. The experimental results show that the maximum measurable velocity is about 800deg/s without frequency shifting, 1600deg/s with frequency shifting, when the frame rate of the image is about 8117 Hz. Therefore, the measurement range is doubled by the method of frequency shifting. Furthermore, experiments were carried out to measure the vehicle velocity simultaneously using both the designed SFV and a laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV). The measurement results of the presented SFV are coincident with that of the LDV, but with bigger fluctuation. Therefore, it has the potential of application to vehicular autonomous navigation.

  5. Beam-quality measurements using a spatial light modulator

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schulze, C

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a fast and easy technique for measuring the beam propagation ratio, M2, of laser beams using a spatial light modulator. Our technique is based on digitally simulating the free-space propagation of light, thus eliminating the need...

  6. Subjective relevance of objective measures for spatial impression (A)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Lily M.; Gade, Anders Christian

    2000-01-01

    Several objective measures have been proposed to describe the feeling of spatial impression in concert halls, including Lateral Energy Fraction (LF) and Interaural Cross-Correlation Coefficient (IACC). However, previous studies have shown that LF and IACC values did not highly correlate with each...... other at individual seat positions in real halls [J. S. Bradley, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 96, 3525–3535 (1994)]. To investigate the listener envelopment aspect of spatial impression further, subjective paired-comparison tests have been run using signals which have various values for LF, early IACC (from 5...

  7. The effects of spatial sampling choices on MR temperature measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Nick; Vyas, Urvi; de Bever, Josh; Payne, Allison; Parker, Dennis L

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to quantify the effects that spatial sampling parameters have on the accuracy of magnetic resonance temperature measurements during high intensity focused ultrasound treatments. Spatial resolution and position of the sampling grid were considered using experimental and simulated data for two different types of high intensity focused ultrasound heating trajectories (a single point and a 4-mm circle) with maximum measured temperature and thermal dose volume as the metrics. It is demonstrated that measurement accuracy is related to the curvature of the temperature distribution, where regions with larger spatial second derivatives require higher resolution. The location of the sampling grid relative temperature distribution has a significant effect on the measured values. When imaging at 1.0 × 1.0 × 3.0 mm(3) resolution, the measured values for maximum temperature and volume dosed to 240 cumulative equivalent minutes (CEM) or greater varied by 17% and 33%, respectively, for the single-point heating case, and by 5% and 18%, respectively, for the 4-mm circle heating case. Accurate measurement of the maximum temperature required imaging at 1.0 × 1.0 × 3.0 mm(3) resolution for the single-point heating case and 2.0 × 2.0 × 5.0 mm(3) resolution for the 4-mm circle heating case. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Intelligent estimation of spatially distributed soil physical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwashita, F.; Friedel, M.J.; Ribeiro, G.F.; Fraser, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Spatial analysis of soil samples is often times not possible when measurements are limited in number or clustered. To obviate potential problems, we propose a new approach based on the self-organizing map (SOM) technique. This approach exploits underlying nonlinear relation of the steady-state geomorphic concave-convex nature of hillslopes (from hilltop to bottom of the valley) to spatially limited soil textural data. The topographic features are extracted from Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission elevation data; whereas soil textural (clay, silt, and sand) and hydraulic data were collected in 29 spatially random locations (50 to 75. cm depth). In contrast to traditional principal component analysis, the SOM identifies relations among relief features, such as, slope, horizontal curvature and vertical curvature. Stochastic cross-validation indicates that the SOM is unbiased and provides a way to measure the magnitude of prediction uncertainty for all variables. The SOM cross-component plots of the soil texture reveals higher clay proportions at concave areas with convergent hydrological flux and lower proportions for convex areas with divergent flux. The sand ratio has an opposite pattern with higher values near the ridge and lower values near the valley. Silt has a trend similar to sand, although less pronounced. The relation between soil texture and concave-convex hillslope features reveals that subsurface weathering and transport is an important process that changed from loss-to-gain at the rectilinear hillslope point. These results illustrate that the SOM can be used to capture and predict nonlinear hillslope relations among relief, soil texture, and hydraulic conductivity data. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  9. Measuring lateral saturated soil hydraulic conductivity at different spatial scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Prima, Simone; Marrosu, Roberto; Pirastru, Mario; Niedda, Marcello

    2017-04-01

    Among the soil hydraulic properties, saturated soil hydraulic conductivity, Ks, is particularly important since it controls many hydrological processes. Knowledge of this soil property allows estimation of dynamic indicators of the soil's ability to transmit water down to the root zone. Such dynamic indicators are valuable tools to quantify land degradation and developing 'best management' land use practice (Castellini et al., 2016; Iovino et al., 2016). In hillslopes, lateral saturated soil hydraulic conductivity, Ks,l, is a key factor since it controls subsurface flow. However, Ks,l data collected by point-scale measurements, including infiltrations tests, could be unusable for interpreting field hydrological processes and particularly subsurface flow in hillslopes. Therefore, they are generally not representative of subsurface processes at hillslope-scale due mainly to soil heterogeneities and the unknown total extent and connectivity of macropore network in the porous medium. On the other hand, large scale Ks,l measurements, which allow to average soil heterogeneities, are difficult and costly, thus remain rare. Reliable Ks,l values should be measured on a soil volume similar to the representative elementary volume (REV) in order to incorporate the natural heterogeneity of the soil. However, the REV may be considered site-specific since it is expected to increase for soils with macropores (Brooks et al., 2004). In this study, laboratory and in-situ Ks,l values are compared in order to detect the dependency Ks,l from the spatial scale of investigation. The research was carried out at a hillslope located in the Baratz Lake watershed, in northwest Sardinia, Italy, characterized by degraded vegetation (grassland established after fire or clearing of the maquis). The experimental area is about 60 m long, with an extent of approximately 2000 m2, and a mean slope of 30%. The soil depth is about 35 to 45 cm. The parent material is a very dense grayish, altered

  10. Determination and optimization of spatial samples for distributed measurements.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huo, Xiaoming (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Tran, Hy D.; Shilling, Katherine Meghan; Kim, Heeyong (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA)

    2010-10-01

    There are no accepted standards for determining how many measurements to take during part inspection or where to take them, or for assessing confidence in the evaluation of acceptance based on these measurements. The goal of this work was to develop a standard method for determining the number of measurements, together with the spatial distribution of measurements and the associated risks for false acceptance and false rejection. Two paths have been taken to create a standard method for selecting sampling points. A wavelet-based model has been developed to select measurement points and to determine confidence in the measurement after the points are taken. An adaptive sampling strategy has been studied to determine implementation feasibility on commercial measurement equipment. Results using both real and simulated data are presented for each of the paths.

  11. Measuring solvent barrier properties of paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollström, Roger; Saarinen, Jarkko J; Toivakka, Martti; Räty, Jukka

    2012-01-01

    New methods for measuring barrier properties against solvents, acids and bases on dispersion coated paper were developed and investigated. Usability, reliability and repeatability were compared both between the new methods and with the standardized method for measuring barrier properties against water vapor. Barrier properties could be measured with all methods and the results obtained by the different methods were in correlation with each other. A qualitative method based on a trace color provided an indicative result, whereas further developed methods also took into account the durability. The effective barrier lifetime could be measured by measuring the conductivity through the substrate as a function of time, or by utilizing a glass prism where the change in refractive index caused by penetrated liquid was monitored, also as a function of time. Barrier properties against water and humidity were also measured and were found not to be predictors for barrier properties against either solvents, or acids or bases, which supports the need to develop new methods

  12. Determination of scattering structures from spatial coherence measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarubin, A M

    1996-03-01

    A new method of structure determination and microscopic imaging with short-wavelength radiations (charged particles, X-rays, neutrons), based on measurements of the modulus and the phase of the degree of spatial coherence of the scattered radiation, is developed. The underlying principle of the method--transfer of structural information about the scattering potential via spatial coherence of the secondary (scattering) source of radiation formed by this potential--is expressed by the generalization of the van Cittert-Zernike theorem to wave and particle scattering [A.M. Zarubin, Opt. Commun. 100 (1993) 491; Opt. Commun. 102 (1993) 543]. Shearing interferometric techniques are proposed for implementing the above measurements; the limits of spatial resolution attainable by reconstruction of the absolute square of a 3D scattering potential and its 2D projections from the measurements are analyzed. It is shown theoretically that 3D imaging with atomic resolution can be realized in a "synthetic aperture" electron or ion microscope and that a 3D resolution of about 6 nm can be obtained with a "synthetic aperture" X-ray microscope. A proof-of-principle optical experiment is presented.

  13. Spatial-Temporal Correlation Properties of the 3GPP Spatial Channel Model and the Kronecker MIMO Channel Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Xiang Wang

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The performance of multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO systems is greatly influenced by the spatial-temporal correlation properties of the underlying MIMO channels. This paper investigates the spatial-temporal correlation characteristics of the spatial channel model (SCM in the Third Generation Partnership Project (3GPP and the Kronecker-based stochastic model (KBSM at three levels, namely, the cluster level, link level, and system level. The KBSM has both the spatial separability and spatial-temporal separability at all the three levels. The spatial-temporal separability is observed for the SCM only at the system level, but not at the cluster and link levels. The SCM shows the spatial separability at the link and system levels, but not at the cluster level since its spatial correlation is related to the joint distribution of the angle of arrival (AoA and angle of departure (AoD. The KBSM with the Gaussian-shaped power azimuth spectrum (PAS is found to fit best the 3GPP SCM in terms of the spatial correlations. Despite its simplicity and analytical tractability, the KBSM is restricted to model only the average spatial-temporal behavior of MIMO channels. The SCM provides more insights of the variations of different MIMO channel realizations, but the implementation complexity is relatively high.

  14. Open space preservation, property value, and optimal spatial configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong Jiang; Stephen K. Swallow

    2007-01-01

    The public has increasingly demonstrated a strong support for open space preservation. How to finance the socially efficient level of open space with the optimal spatial structure is of high policy relevance to local governments. In this study, we developed a spatially explicit open space model to help identify the socially optimal amount and optimal spatial...

  15. Spatial properties of odd and even low order harmonics generated in gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, G; Andreev, A; Gautier, J; Giannessi, L; Malka, V; Petralia, A; Sebban, S; Stremoukhov, S; Tissandier, F; Vodungbo, B; Zeitoun, Ph

    2015-01-14

    High harmonic generation in gases is developing rapidly as a soft X-ray femtosecond light-source for applications. This requires control over all the harmonics characteristics and in particular, spatial properties have to be kept very good. In previous literature, measurements have always included several harmonics contrary to applications, especially spectroscopic applications, which usually require a single harmonic. To fill this gap, we present here for the first time a detailed study of completely isolated harmonics. The contribution of the surrounding harmonics has been totally suppressed using interferential filtering which is available for low harmonic orders. In addition, this allows to clearly identify behaviors of standard odd orders from even orders obtained by frequency-mixing of a fundamental laser and of its second harmonic. Comparisons of the spatial intensity profiles, of the spatial coherence and of the wavefront aberration level of 5ω at 160 nm and 6ω at 135 nm have then been performed. We have established that the fundamental laser beam aberrations can cause the appearance of a non-homogenous donut-shape in the 6ω spatial intensity distribution. This undesirable effect can be easily controlled. We finally conclude that the spatial quality of an even harmonic can be as excellent as in standard generation.

  16. Modeling the Impacts of Spatial Heterogeneity in the Castor Watershed on Runoff, Sediment, and Phosphorus Loss Using SWAT: I. Impacts of Spatial Variability of Soil Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boluwade, Alaba; Madramootoo, Chandra

    2013-01-01

    Spatial accuracy of hydrologic modeling inputs influences the output from hydrologic models. A pertinent question is to know the optimal level of soil sampling or how many soil samples are needed for model input, in order to improve model predictions. In this study, measured soil properties were clustered into five different configurations as inputs to the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) simulation of the Castor River watershed (11-km 2 area) in southern Quebec, Canada. SWAT is a process-based model that predicts the impacts of climate and land use management on water yield, sediment, and nutrient fluxes. SWAT requires geographical information system inputs such as the digital elevation model as well as soil and land use maps. Mean values of soil properties are used in soil polygons (soil series); thus, the spatial variability of these properties is neglected. The primary objective of this study was to quantify the impacts of spatial variability of soil properties on the prediction of runoff, sediment, and total phosphorus using SWAT. The spatial clustering of the measured soil properties was undertaken using the regionalized with dynamically constrained agglomerative clustering and partitioning method. Measured soil data were clustered into 5, 10, 15, 20, and 24 heterogeneous regions. Soil data from the Castor watershed which have been used in previous studies was also set up and termed "Reference". Overall, there was no significant difference in runoff simulation across the five configurations including the reference. This may be attributable to SWAT's use of the soil conservation service curve number method in flow simulation. Therefore having high spatial resolution inputs for soil data may not necessarily improve predictions when they are used in hydrologic modeling.

  17. Integration of temporal and spatial properties of dynamic connectivity networks for automatic diagnosis of brain disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Biao; Liu, Mingxia; Shen, Dinggang

    2018-07-01

    Functional connectivity networks (FCNs) using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) have been applied to the analysis and diagnosis of brain disease, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and its prodrome, i.e., mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Different from conventional studies focusing on static descriptions on functional connectivity (FC) between brain regions in rs-fMRI, recent studies have resorted to dynamic connectivity networks (DCNs) to characterize the dynamic changes of FC, since dynamic changes of FC may indicate changes in macroscopic neural activity patterns in cognitive and behavioral aspects. However, most of the existing studies only investigate the temporal properties of DCNs (e.g., temporal variability of FC between specific brain regions), ignoring the important spatial properties of the network (e.g., spatial variability of FC associated with a specific brain region). Also, emerging evidence on FCNs has suggested that, besides temporal variability, there is significant spatial variability of activity foci over time. Hence, integrating both temporal and spatial properties of DCNs can intuitively promote the performance of connectivity-network-based learning methods. In this paper, we first define a new measure to characterize the spatial variability of DCNs, and then propose a novel learning framework to integrate both temporal and spatial variabilities of DCNs for automatic brain disease diagnosis. Specifically, we first construct DCNs from the rs-fMRI time series at successive non-overlapping time windows. Then, we characterize the spatial variability of a specific brain region by computing the correlation of functional sequences (i.e., the changing profile of FC between a pair of brain regions within all time windows) associated with this region. Furthermore, we extract both temporal variabilities and spatial variabilities from DCNs as features, and integrate them for classification by using manifold regularized multi

  18. Measurement properties of outcome measures for vitiligo. A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrijman, Charlotte; Linthorst Homan, May W; Limpens, Jacqueline; van der Veen, Wietze; Wolkerstorfer, Albert; Terwee, Caroline B; Spuls, Phyllis I

    2012-11-01

    OBJECTIVE To summarize and critically appraise the evidence on the measurement properties of clinician-, patient-, and observer-reported outcomes, measuring any construct of interest in patients with all types of vitiligo. DATA SOURCES Electronic databases including PubMed (1948 to July 2011), OVID EMBASE (1980 to July 2011), and CINAHL (EBSCOhost) (1982 to July 2011) were searched. STUDY SELECTION Two authors independently screened all records for eligibility. For inclusion, the study population had to include patients with vitiligo, for which outcome measures were developed or evaluated on their measurement properties. The initial search retrieved 1249 records, of which 14 articles met the inclusion criteria. DATA EXTRACTION Characteristics of the included instruments, study population, and results of the measurement properties were extracted. The Consensus-Based Standards for the Selection of Health Status Measurement Instruments (COSMIN) 4-point checklist, combined with quality criteria for measurement properties, was used to calculate the overall level of evidence per measurement property of each instrument. Independent extraction and assessment was performed by 2 authors. DATA SYNTHESIS Eleven different measurement instruments were identified. Strong evidence was found for a positive internal consistency of the Dermatology Life Quality Index. For other instruments, the evidence of measurement properties was limited or unknown. CONCLUSIONS Recommendations on the use of specific outcome measures for vitiligo should be formulated with caution because current evidence is insufficient owing to a low number of studies with poor methodological quality and unclear clinical relevance. To recommend outcome measures for vitiligo, further research on measurement properties of clinical relevant outcome measures for vitiligo according to COSMIN quality criteria is needed.

  19. High-Throughput Nanoindentation for Statistical and Spatial Property Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintsala, Eric D.; Hangen, Ude; Stauffer, Douglas D.

    2018-04-01

    Standard nanoindentation tests are "high throughput" compared to nearly all other mechanical tests, such as tension or compression. However, the typical rates of tens of tests per hour can be significantly improved. These higher testing rates enable otherwise impractical studies requiring several thousands of indents, such as high-resolution property mapping and detailed statistical studies. However, care must be taken to avoid systematic errors in the measurement, including choosing of the indentation depth/spacing to avoid overlap of plastic zones, pileup, and influence of neighboring microstructural features in the material being tested. Furthermore, since fast loading rates are required, the strain rate sensitivity must also be considered. A review of these effects is given, with the emphasis placed on making complimentary standard nanoindentation measurements to address these issues. Experimental applications of the technique, including mapping of welds, microstructures, and composites with varying length scales, along with studying the effect of surface roughness on nominally homogeneous specimens, will be presented.

  20. Top quark property measurements at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Hawkings, Richard; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of top quark properties performed at the Large Hadron Collider are reviewed, with a particular emphasis on top-pair charge asymmetries, spin correlations and polarization measurements performed by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations. The measurements are generally in good agreement with predictions from next-to-leading-order QCD calculations, and no deviations from Standard Model expectations have been seen.

  1. A method of reconstructing the spatial measurement network by mobile measurement transmitter for shipbuilding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Siyang; Lin, Jiarui; Yang, Linghui; Ren, Yongjie; Guo, Yin

    2017-01-01

    The workshop Measurement Position System (wMPS) is a distributed measurement system which is suitable for the large-scale metrology. However, there are some inevitable measurement problems in the shipbuilding industry, such as the restriction by obstacles and limited measurement range. To deal with these factors, this paper presents a method of reconstructing the spatial measurement network by mobile transmitter. A high-precision coordinate control network with more than six target points is established. The mobile measuring transmitter can be added into the measurement network using this coordinate control network with the spatial resection method. This method reconstructs the measurement network and broadens the measurement scope efficiently. To verify this method, two comparison experiments are designed with the laser tracker as the reference. The results demonstrate that the accuracy of point-to-point length is better than 0.4mm and the accuracy of coordinate measurement is better than 0.6mm. (paper)

  2. Measurement of spatial correlation functions using image processing techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berryman, J.G.

    1985-01-01

    A procedure for using digital image processing techniques to measure the spatial correlation functions of composite heterogeneous materials is presented. Methods for eliminating undesirable biases and warping in digitized photographs are discussed. Fourier transform methods and array processor techniques for calculating the spatial correlation functions are treated. By introducing a minimal set of lattice-commensurate triangles, a method of sorting and storing the values of three-point correlation functions in a compact one-dimensional array is developed. Examples are presented at each stage of the analysis using synthetic photographs of cross sections of a model random material (the penetrable sphere model) for which the analytical form of the spatial correlations functions is known. Although results depend somewhat on magnification and on relative volume fraction, it is found that photographs digitized with 512 x 512 pixels generally have sufficiently good statistics for most practical purposes. To illustrate the use of the correlation functions, bounds on conductivity for the penetrable sphere model are calculated with a general numerical scheme developed for treating the singular three-dimensional integrals which must be evaluated

  3. Tissue oxygenation and haemodynamics measurement with spatially resolved NIRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Scopesi, F.; Serra, G.; Sun, J. W.; Rolfe, P.

    2010-08-01

    We describe the use of Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) for the non-invasive investigation of changes in haemodynamics and oxygenation of human peripheral tissues. The goal was to measure spatial variations of tissue NIRS oxygenation variables, namely deoxy-haemoglobin (HHb), oxy-haemoglobin (HbO2), total haemoglobin (HbT), and thereby to evaluate the responses of the peripheral circulation to imposed physiological challenges. We present a skinfat- muscle heterogeneous tissue model with varying fat thickness up to 15mm and a Monte Carlo simulation of photon transport within this model. The mean partial path length and the mean photon visit depth in the muscle layer were derived for different source-detector spacing. We constructed NIRS instrumentation comprising of light-emitting diodes (LED) as light sources at four wavelengths, 735nm, 760nm, 810nm and 850nm and sensitive photodiodes (PD) as the detectors. Source-detector spacing was varied to perform measurements at different depths within forearm tissue. Changes in chromophore concentration in response to venous and arterial occlusion were calculated using the modified Lambert-Beer Law. Studies in fat and thin volunteers indicated greater sensitivity in the thinner subjects for the tissue oxygenation measurement in the muscle layer. These results were consistent with those found using Monte Carlo simulation. Overall, the results of this investigation demonstrate the usefulness of the NIRS instrument for deriving spatial information from biological tissues.

  4. Vegetation-induced spatial variability of soil redox properties in wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalai, Zoltán; Jakab, Gergely; Kiss, Klaudia; Ringer, Marianna; Balázs, Réka; Zacháry, Dóra; Horváth Szabó, Kata; Perényi, Katalin

    2016-04-01

    Vegetation induced land patches may result spatial pattern of on soil Eh and pH. These spatial pattern are mainly emerged by differences of aeration and exudation of assimilates. Present paper focuses on vertical extent and temporal dynamics of these patterns in wetlands. Two study sites were selected: 1. a plain wetland on calcareous sandy parent material (Ceglédbercel, Danube-Tisza Interfluve, Hungary); 2. headwater wetland with calcareous loamy parent material (Bátaapáti, Hungary). Two vegetation patches were studied in site 1: sedgy (dominated by Carex riparia) and reedy (dominated by Phragmites australis). Three patches were studied in site2: sedgy1 (dominated by C vulpina), sedgy 2 (C. riparia); nettle-horsetail (Urtica dioica and Equisetum arvense). Boundaries between patches were studied separately. Soil redox, pH and temperature studied by automated remote controlled instruments. Three digital sensors (Ponsell) were installed in each locations: 20cm and 40cm sensors represent the solum and 100 cm sensor monitors the subsoil). Groundwater wells were installed near to triplets for soil water sampling. Soil Eh, pH and temperature values were recorded in each 10 minutes. Soil water sampling for iron and DOC were carried out during saturated periods. Spatial pattern of soil Eh is clearly caused by vegetation. We measured significant differences between Eh values of the studied patches in the solum. We did not find this kinds horizontal differences in the subsoil. Boundaries of the patches usually had more reductive soil environment than the core areas. We have found temporal dynamics of the spatial redox pattern. Differences were not so well expressed during wintertime. These spatial patterns had influence on the DOC and iron content of porewater, as well. Highest temporal dynamics of soil redox properties and porewater iron could be found in the boundaries. These observations refer to importance patchiness of vegetation on soil chemical properties in

  5. Superconducting property measuring system by magnetization method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikisawa, K.; Mori, T.; Takasu, N.

    1988-01-01

    Superconducting property measuring system (CMS-370B) for high temperature oxide superconductor has been developed. This system adopts magnetization measurement. The superconducting properties are able to be measured automatically and continuously changing the temperature and external magnetic field. The critical current density as a function of temperature and magnetic field of high temperature superconductor YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-y (YBCO) has been measured. This paper reports how it was confirmed that this system having the high performance and the accuracy gave the significant contribution to the superconducting material development

  6. Tactile acuity charts: a reliable measure of spatial acuity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Bruns

    Full Text Available For assessing tactile spatial resolution it has recently been recommended to use tactile acuity charts which follow the design principles of the Snellen letter charts for visual acuity and involve active touch. However, it is currently unknown whether acuity thresholds obtained with this newly developed psychophysical procedure are in accordance with established measures of tactile acuity that involve passive contact with fixed duration and control of contact force. Here we directly compared tactile acuity thresholds obtained with the acuity charts to traditional two-point and grating orientation thresholds in a group of young healthy adults. For this purpose, two types of charts, using either Braille-like dot patterns or embossed Landolt rings with different orientations, were adapted from previous studies. Measurements with the two types of charts were equivalent, but generally more reliable with the dot pattern chart. A comparison with the two-point and grating orientation task data showed that the test-retest reliability of the acuity chart measurements after one week was superior to that of the passive methods. Individual thresholds obtained with the acuity charts agreed reasonably with the grating orientation threshold, but less so with the two-point threshold that yielded relatively distinct acuity estimates compared to the other methods. This potentially considerable amount of mismatch between different measures of tactile acuity suggests that tactile spatial resolution is a complex entity that should ideally be measured with different methods in parallel. The simple test procedure and high reliability of the acuity charts makes them a promising complement and alternative to the traditional two-point and grating orientation thresholds.

  7. Tactile acuity charts: a reliable measure of spatial acuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, Patrick; Camargo, Carlos J; Campanella, Humberto; Esteve, Jaume; Dinse, Hubert R; Röder, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    For assessing tactile spatial resolution it has recently been recommended to use tactile acuity charts which follow the design principles of the Snellen letter charts for visual acuity and involve active touch. However, it is currently unknown whether acuity thresholds obtained with this newly developed psychophysical procedure are in accordance with established measures of tactile acuity that involve passive contact with fixed duration and control of contact force. Here we directly compared tactile acuity thresholds obtained with the acuity charts to traditional two-point and grating orientation thresholds in a group of young healthy adults. For this purpose, two types of charts, using either Braille-like dot patterns or embossed Landolt rings with different orientations, were adapted from previous studies. Measurements with the two types of charts were equivalent, but generally more reliable with the dot pattern chart. A comparison with the two-point and grating orientation task data showed that the test-retest reliability of the acuity chart measurements after one week was superior to that of the passive methods. Individual thresholds obtained with the acuity charts agreed reasonably with the grating orientation threshold, but less so with the two-point threshold that yielded relatively distinct acuity estimates compared to the other methods. This potentially considerable amount of mismatch between different measures of tactile acuity suggests that tactile spatial resolution is a complex entity that should ideally be measured with different methods in parallel. The simple test procedure and high reliability of the acuity charts makes them a promising complement and alternative to the traditional two-point and grating orientation thresholds.

  8. On the spatial coordinate measurement of two identical particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchewka, Avi; Granot, Er'el; Schuss, Zeev

    2016-01-01

    Theoretically, the coordinate measurement of two identical particles at a point by two narrowly separated narrow detectors, is interpreted in the limit of shrinking width and separation, as the detection of two particles by a single narrow detector. Ordinarily, the ratio between probabilities of point measurements is independent of the width of the narrow detectors. We show here that not only this is not the case, but that in some scenarios the results depend on the way the dimensions shrink to zero. The ratio between the width and the separation determines the detection result. In particular, it is shown that the bunching parameter of bosons is not a well-defined physical property. Moreover, it may suggests that there is a difficulty in quantum measurement theory in the interpretation of coordinate measurement of two particles. - Highlights: • The coordinate measurement of two identical particles at a point is investigated. • A discrepancy in the realization of coordinate measurement of two bosons or fermions is shown. • The bunching parameter of bosons is not a well-defined physical property. • There is a problem in the interpretation of coordinate measurement of two particles.

  9. On the spatial coordinate measurement of two identical particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchewka, Avi, E-mail: avi.marchewka@gmail.com [8 Galei Tchelet St., Herzliya (Israel); Granot, Er' el, E-mail: erelgranot@gmail.com [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Ariel University, Ariel (Israel); Schuss, Zeev, E-mail: schuss@post.tau.ac.il [Department of Mathematics, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Ramat-Aviv, 69978 (Israel)

    2016-04-29

    Theoretically, the coordinate measurement of two identical particles at a point by two narrowly separated narrow detectors, is interpreted in the limit of shrinking width and separation, as the detection of two particles by a single narrow detector. Ordinarily, the ratio between probabilities of point measurements is independent of the width of the narrow detectors. We show here that not only this is not the case, but that in some scenarios the results depend on the way the dimensions shrink to zero. The ratio between the width and the separation determines the detection result. In particular, it is shown that the bunching parameter of bosons is not a well-defined physical property. Moreover, it may suggests that there is a difficulty in quantum measurement theory in the interpretation of coordinate measurement of two particles. - Highlights: • The coordinate measurement of two identical particles at a point is investigated. • A discrepancy in the realization of coordinate measurement of two bosons or fermions is shown. • The bunching parameter of bosons is not a well-defined physical property. • There is a problem in the interpretation of coordinate measurement of two particles.

  10. Spatially-Scanned Dual Comb Spectroscopy for Atmospheric Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossel, K.; Waxman, E.; Giorgetta, F.; Cermak, M.; Coddington, I.; Hesselius, D.; Ruben, S.; Swann, W.; Rieker, G. B.; Newbury, N.

    2017-12-01

    Measuring trace gas emissions from sources that are spatially complex and temporally variable, such as leaking natural gas infrastructure, is challenging with current measurement systems. Here, we present a new technique that provides the path-integrated concentrations of multiple gas species between a ground station and a retroreflector mounted on a small quadcopter. Such a system could provide the ability to quantify small area emissions sources as well measure vertical mixing within the boundary layer. The system is based on a near-infrared dual frequency-comb spectroscopy system (DCS) covering 1.58-1.7 microns, which enables rapid, accurate measurements of CO2, CH4, H2O, and HDO. The eye-safe laser light is launched from a telescope on a fast azimuth, elevation gimbal to a small quadcopter carrying a lightweight retroreflector as well as a high-precision real-time kinematic GPS receiver (for real-time cm-level path length measurements) and pressure, temperature and humidity sensors. Here, we show the results of test measurements from controlled releases of CH4 as well as from test vertical profiles.

  11. Top quark property measurements in single top

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00386283; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    A review of the recent results on measurements of top quark properties in single top quark processes, performed at the LHC by ATLAS and CMS is presented. The measurements are in good agreement with predictions and no deviations from Standard Model expectations have been observed.

  12. Measurement Properties of Outcome Measures for Vitiligo A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrijman, C.; Homan, M.W.L.; Limpens, J.; Veen, W.; Wolkerstorfer, A.; Terwee, C.B.; Spuls, P.I.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To summarize and critically appraise the evidence on the measurement properties of clinician-, patient-, and observer-reported outcomes, measuring any construct of interest in patients with all types of vitiligo. Data Sources: Electronic databases including PubMed (1948 to July 2011),

  13. Measurement properties of outcome measures for vitiligo. A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrijman, Charlotte; Linthorst Homan, May W.; Limpens, Jacqueline; van der Veen, Wietze; Wolkerstorfer, Albert; Terwee, Caroline B.; Spuls, Phyllis I.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To summarize and critically appraise the evidence on the measurement properties of clinician-, patient-, and observer-reported outcomes, measuring any construct of interest in patients with all types of vitiligo. DATA SOURCES Electronic databases including PubMed (1948 to July 2011), OVID

  14. Spatial Variability of Dielectric Properties in Field Soils

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hendrickx, J

    2001-01-01

    ... since it directly influences the three other properties The variability of these properties may be such that either potential land mine signatures are overshadowed or false alarms result In this paper...

  15. Measurement of radiant properties of ceramic foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoornstra, J.; Turecky, M.; Maatman, D.

    1994-07-01

    An experimental facility is described for the measurement of the normal spectral and total emissivity and transmissivity of semi-transparent materials in the temperature range of 600 C to 1200 C. The set-up was used for the measurement of radiation properties of highly porous ceramic foam which is used in low NO x radiant burners. Emissivity and transmissivity data were measured and are presented for coated and uncoated ceramic foam of different thicknesses. (orig.)

  16. Dynamic Properties of Impulse Measuring Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A.; Lausen, P.

    1971-01-01

    After some basic considerations the dynamic properties of the measuring system are subjected to a general examination based on a number of responses, characteristic of the system. It is demonstrated that an impulse circuit has an internal impedance different from zero, for which reason...... the interaction between the generator and the measuring circuit is of paramount importance to the voltage across the test object. Based on the measured values the determination of the applied voltage is considered....

  17. On the spatial coordinate measurement of two identical particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchewka, Avi; Granot, Er'el; Schuss, Zeev

    2016-04-01

    Theoretically, the coordinate measurement of two identical particles at a point by two narrowly separated narrow detectors, is interpreted in the limit of shrinking width and separation, as the detection of two particles by a single narrow detector. Ordinarily, the ratio between probabilities of point measurements is independent of the width of the narrow detectors. We show here that not only this is not the case, but that in some scenarios the results depend on the way the dimensions shrink to zero. The ratio between the width and the separation determines the detection result. In particular, it is shown that the bunching parameter of bosons is not a well-defined physical property. Moreover, it may suggests that there is a difficulty in quantum measurement theory in the interpretation of coordinate measurement of two particles.

  18. Instruments Measuring Integrated Care: A Systematic Review of Measurement Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, Mary Ann C; Nurjono, Milawaty; Lim, Yee Wei; Dessers, Ezra; Vrijhoef, Hubertus Jm

    2016-12-01

    Policy Points: Investigations on systematic methodologies for measuring integrated care should coincide with the growing interest in this field of research. A systematic review of instruments provides insights into integrated care measurement, including setting the research agenda for validating available instruments and informing the decision to develop new ones. This study is the first systematic review of instruments measuring integrated care with an evidence synthesis of the measurement properties. We found 209 index instruments measuring different constructs related to integrated care; the strength of evidence on the adequacy of the majority of their measurement properties remained largely unassessed. Integrated care is an important strategy for increasing health system performance. Despite its growing significance, detailed evidence on the measurement properties of integrated care instruments remains vague and limited. Our systematic review aims to provide evidence on the state of the art in measuring integrated care. Our comprehensive systematic review framework builds on the Rainbow Model for Integrated Care (RMIC). We searched MEDLINE/PubMed for published articles on the measurement properties of instruments measuring integrated care and identified eligible articles using a standard set of selection criteria. We assessed the methodological quality of every validation study reported using the COSMIN checklist and extracted data on study and instrument characteristics. We also evaluated the measurement properties of each examined instrument per validation study and provided a best evidence synthesis on the adequacy of measurement properties of the index instruments. From the 300 eligible articles, we assessed the methodological quality of 379 validation studies from which we identified 209 index instruments measuring integrated care constructs. The majority of studies reported on instruments measuring constructs related to care integration (33%) and patient

  19. Instruments Measuring Integrated Care: A Systematic Review of Measurement Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    BAUTISTA, MARY ANN C.; NURJONO, MILAWATY; DESSERS, EZRA; VRIJHOEF, HUBERTUS JM

    2016-01-01

    Policy Points: Investigations on systematic methodologies for measuring integrated care should coincide with the growing interest in this field of research.A systematic review of instruments provides insights into integrated care measurement, including setting the research agenda for validating available instruments and informing the decision to develop new ones.This study is the first systematic review of instruments measuring integrated care with an evidence synthesis of the measurement properties.We found 209 index instruments measuring different constructs related to integrated care; the strength of evidence on the adequacy of the majority of their measurement properties remained largely unassessed. Context Integrated care is an important strategy for increasing health system performance. Despite its growing significance, detailed evidence on the measurement properties of integrated care instruments remains vague and limited. Our systematic review aims to provide evidence on the state of the art in measuring integrated care. Methods Our comprehensive systematic review framework builds on the Rainbow Model for Integrated Care (RMIC). We searched MEDLINE/PubMed for published articles on the measurement properties of instruments measuring integrated care and identified eligible articles using a standard set of selection criteria. We assessed the methodological quality of every validation study reported using the COSMIN checklist and extracted data on study and instrument characteristics. We also evaluated the measurement properties of each examined instrument per validation study and provided a best evidence synthesis on the adequacy of measurement properties of the index instruments. Findings From the 300 eligible articles, we assessed the methodological quality of 379 validation studies from which we identified 209 index instruments measuring integrated care constructs. The majority of studies reported on instruments measuring constructs related to care

  20. Dynamic properties of energy affordability measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heindl, Peter; Schuessler, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Measures of affordability and of fuel poverty are applied in practice to assess the affordability of energy services, for example, or of water or housing. The extensive body of literature on affordability measures has little overlap with the existing literature on poverty measurement. A comprehensive assessment of the response of affordability measures as a result of changes in the distribution of income or expenditure (the dynamic properties) is missing. This paper aims to fill this gap by providing a conceptual discussion on the ‘dynamics’ of both energy affordability measures and fuel poverty measures. Several types of measures are examined in a microsimulation framework. Our results indicate that some measures exhibit odd dynamic behavior. This includes measures used in practice, such as the low income/high cost measure and the double median of expenditure share indicator. Odd dynamic behavior causes the risk of drawing false policy recommendations from the measures. Thus, an appropriate response of affordability measures to changes in relevant variables is a prerequisite for defining meaningful measures that inform about affordability or deprivation in certain domains of consumption. - Highlights: • We investigate changes in fuel poverty measures as result from changes in income and expenditure. • More generally, we investigate dynamic behavior of affordability measures using microsimulation. • We propose axioms regarding dynamic behavior of affordability measures. • Some measures which are used in practice show unintuitive dynamic behavior. • Inappropriate dynamic behavior causes a risk of false policy implications.

  1. Measure theory and fine properties of functions

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Lawrence Craig

    2015-01-01

    Measure Theory and Fine Properties of Functions, Revised Edition provides a detailed examination of the central assertions of measure theory in n-dimensional Euclidean space. The book emphasizes the roles of Hausdorff measure and capacity in characterizing the fine properties of sets and functions. Topics covered include a quick review of abstract measure theory, theorems and differentiation in ℝn, Hausdorff measures, area and coarea formulas for Lipschitz mappings and related change-of-variable formulas, and Sobolev functions as well as functions of bounded variation.The text provides complete proofs of many key results omitted from other books, including Besicovitch's covering theorem, Rademacher's theorem (on the differentiability a.e. of Lipschitz functions), area and coarea formulas, the precise structure of Sobolev and BV functions, the precise structure of sets of finite perimeter, and Aleksandrov's theorem (on the twice differentiability a.e. of convex functions).This revised edition includes countl...

  2. Spatial variability of chemical properties of soil under pasture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Ferreira da Silva

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to analyze the spatial variability of soil chemical attributes under pasture, as well as lime and fertilizer recommendations based on the interpretation of soil chemical analysis from two sampling methods: conventional and systematic depths of 0 to 10 and 10 to 20 cm. The study was conducted at IFES-campus Alegre-ES. Data analysis was performed using descriptive statistics and geostatistics. Results indicate that the spatial method enabled the identification of deficit areas and excessive liming and fertilization, which could not be defined by the conventional method.

  3. Perioperative versus postoperative measurement of Taylor Spatial Frame mounting parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sökücü, Sami; Demir, Bilal; Lapçin, Osman; Yavuz, Umut; Kabukçuoğlu, Yavuz S

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the differences, if any, between application parameters for the Taylor Spatial Frame (TSF) system obtained during surgery under fluoroscopy and after surgery from digital radiography. This retrospective study included 17 extremities of 15 patients (8 male, 7 female; mean age: 21.9 years, range: 10 to 55 years) who underwent TSF after deformity and fracture. Application parameters measured by fluoroscopy at the end of surgery after mounting the fixator were compared with parameters obtained from anteroposterior and lateral digital radiographs taken 1 day after surgery. Fixator was applied to the femur in 8 patients, tibia in 6 and radius in 3. Mean time to removal of the frame was 3.5 (range: 3 to 7) months. Mean perioperative anteroposterior, lateral and axial frame offsets of patients were 9.1 (range: 3 to 20) mm, 18.1 (range: 5 to 37) mm and 95.3 (range: 25 to 155) mm, respectively. Mean postoperative anteroposterior, lateral and axial frame offset radiographs were 11.8 (range: 2 to 30) mm, 18 (range: 6 to 47) mm and 109.5 (range: 28 to 195) mm, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups (p>0.05). While measurements taken during operation may lengthen the duration in the operation room, fluoroscopy may provide better images and is easier to perform than digital radiography. On the other hand, there is no difference between measurements taken during perioperative fluoroscopy and postoperative digital radiography.

  4. Experimental measurements of spatial dose distributions in radiosurgery treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avila-Rodriguez, M. A.; Rodriguez-Villafuerte, M.; Diaz-Perches, R.; Perez-Pastenes, M. A.

    2001-01-01

    The measurement of stereotactic radiosurgery dose distributions requires an integrating, high-resolution dosimeter capable of providing a spatial map of absorbed dose. This paper describes the use of a commercial radiochromic dye film (GafChromic MD-55-2) to measure radiosurgery dose distributions with 6 MV X-rays in a head phantom. The response of the MD-55-2 was evaluated by digitizing and analyzing the films with conventional computer systems. Radiosurgery dose distributions were measured using the radiochromic film in a spherical acrylic phantom of 16 cm diameter undergoing a typical SRS treatment as a patient, and were compared with dose distributions provided by the treatment planning system. The comparison lead to mean radial differences of ±0.6 mm, ±0.9 mm, ±1.3 mm, ±1.9 mm, and ±2.8 mm, for the 80, 60, 50, 40, and 30% isodose curves, respectively. It is concluded that the radiochromic film is a convenient and useful tool for radiosurgery treatment planning validation

  5. Analysis of the spatial variability of crop yield and soil properties in small agricultural plots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vieira Sidney Rosa

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess spatial variability of soil properties and crop yield under no tillage as a function of time, in two soil/climate conditions in São Paulo State, Brazil. The two sites measured approximately one hectare each and were cultivated with crop sequences which included corn, soybean, cotton, oats, black oats, wheat, rye, rice and green manure. Soil fertility, soil physical properties and crop yield were measured in a 10-m grid. The soils were a Dusky Red Latossol (Oxisol and a Red Yellow Latossol (Ultisol. Soil sampling was performed in each field every two years after harvesting of the summer crop. Crop yield was measured at the end of each crop cycle, in 2 x 2.5 m sub plots. Data were analysed using semivariogram analysis and kriging interpolation for contour map generation. Yield maps were constructed in order to visually compare the variability of yields, the variability of the yield components and related soil properties. The results show that the factors affecting the variability of crop yield varies from one crop to another. The changes in yield from one year to another suggest that the causes of variability may change with time. The changes with time for the cross semivariogram between phosphorus in leaves and soybean yield is another evidence of this result.

  6. MEASUREMENTS OF THE PROPERTIES OF BERYLLIUM FOIL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ZHAO, Y.; WANG, H.

    2000-01-01

    The electrical conductivity of beryllium at radio frequency (800 MHz) and liquid nitrogen temperature were investigated and measured. This summary addresses a collection of beryllium properties in the literature, an analysis of the anomalous skin effect, the test model, the experimental setup and improvements, MAFIA simulations, the measurement results and data analyses. The final results show that the conductivity of beryllium is not as good as indicated by the handbook, yet very close to copper at liquid nitrogen temperature

  7. Spatial organization and correlation properties quantify structural changes on mesoscale of parenchymatous plant tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valous, N. A.; Delgado, A.; Sun, D.-W., E-mail: dawen.sun@ucd.ie [School of Biosystems Engineering, University College Dublin, National University of Ireland, Belfield, Dublin 4, Dublin (Ireland); Drakakis, K. [Complex and Adaptive Systems Laboratory, University College Dublin, National University of Ireland, Belfield, Dublin 4, Dublin (Ireland)

    2014-02-14

    The study of plant tissue parenchyma's intercellular air spaces contributes to the understanding of anatomy and physiology. This is challenging due to difficulty in making direct measurements of the pore space and the complex mosaic of parenchymatous tissue. The architectural complexity of pore space has shown that single geometrical measurements are not sufficient for characterization. The inhomogeneity of distribution depends not only on the percentage content of phase, but also on how the phase fills the space. The lacunarity morphometric, as multiscale measure, provides information about the distribution of gaps that correspond to degree of spatial organization in parenchyma. Additionally, modern theories have suggested strategies, where the focus has shifted from the study of averages and histograms to the study of patterns in data fluctuations. Detrended fluctuation analysis provides information on the correlation properties of the parenchyma at different spatial scales. The aim is to quantify (with the aid of the aforementioned metrics), the mesostructural changes—that occur from one cycle of freezing and thawing—in the void phase of pome fruit parenchymatous tissue, acquired with X-ray microcomputed tomography. Complex systems methods provide numerical indices and detailed insights regarding the freezing-induced modifications upon the arrangement of cells and voids. These structural changes have the potential to lead to physiological disorders. The work can further stimulate interest for the analysis of internal plant tissue structures coupled with other physico-chemical processes or phenomena.

  8. Spatial organization and correlation properties quantify structural changes on mesoscale of parenchymatous plant tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valous, N. A.; Delgado, A.; Sun, D.-W.; Drakakis, K.

    2014-01-01

    The study of plant tissue parenchyma's intercellular air spaces contributes to the understanding of anatomy and physiology. This is challenging due to difficulty in making direct measurements of the pore space and the complex mosaic of parenchymatous tissue. The architectural complexity of pore space has shown that single geometrical measurements are not sufficient for characterization. The inhomogeneity of distribution depends not only on the percentage content of phase, but also on how the phase fills the space. The lacunarity morphometric, as multiscale measure, provides information about the distribution of gaps that correspond to degree of spatial organization in parenchyma. Additionally, modern theories have suggested strategies, where the focus has shifted from the study of averages and histograms to the study of patterns in data fluctuations. Detrended fluctuation analysis provides information on the correlation properties of the parenchyma at different spatial scales. The aim is to quantify (with the aid of the aforementioned metrics), the mesostructural changes—that occur from one cycle of freezing and thawing—in the void phase of pome fruit parenchymatous tissue, acquired with X-ray microcomputed tomography. Complex systems methods provide numerical indices and detailed insights regarding the freezing-induced modifications upon the arrangement of cells and voids. These structural changes have the potential to lead to physiological disorders. The work can further stimulate interest for the analysis of internal plant tissue structures coupled with other physico-chemical processes or phenomena

  9. Spatial and temporal variations of the callus mechanical properties during bone transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mora-Macias, J.; Reina-Romo, E.; Pajares, A.; Miranda, P.; Dominguez, J.

    2016-07-01

    Nanoindentation allows obtaining the elastic modulus and the hardness of materials point by point. This technique has been used to assess the mechanical propeties of the callus during fracture healing. However, as fas as the authors know, the evaluation of mechanical properties by this technique of the distraction and the docking-site calluses generated during bone transport have not been reported yet. Therefore, the aim of this work is using nanoindentation to assess the spatial and temporal variation of the elastic modulus of the woven bone generated during bone transport. Nanoindentation measurements were carried out using 6 samples from sheep sacrificed at different stages of the bone transport experiments. The results obtained show an important heterogeneity of the elastic modulus of the woven bone without spatial trends. In the case of temporal variation, a clear increase of the mean elastic modulus with time after surgery was observed (from 7±2GPa 35 days after surgery to 14±2GPa 525 days after surgery in the distraction callus and a similar increase in the docking site callus). Comparison with the evolution of the elastic modulus in the woven bone generated during fracture healing shows that mechanical properties increase slower in the case of the woven bone generated during bone transport. (Author)

  10. Latest ATLAS measurements on top quark properties

    CERN Document Server

    Derue, Frederic; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The top quark is unique among the known quarks in that it decays before it has an opportunity to form hadronic bound states. This makes measurements of its properties particularly interesting as one can access directly the properties of a bare quark. The latest measurements of these properties with the ATLAS detector at the LHC are presented using 8 TeV and 13 TeV data, excluding results from single top production. Measurements of top quark spin observables in top-antitop events, each sensitive to a different coefficient of the spin density matrix, are presented and compared to the Standard Model predictions. The helicity of the W boson from the top decays and the production angles of the top quark are further discussed. New results on the measurment of color flow effects in $t{\\bar t}$ events are presented. Limits on the rate of flavour changing neutral currents in the production or decay of the top quark are reported. The cross-section measurement of photons produced in association with top-quark pairs is a...

  11. Measurement system for ultrahigh temperature thermophysical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuyama, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Properties and Simulations Probed with Electromagnetic Containerless Technique (PROSPECT) is a measurement system for ultrahigh temperature thermophysical properties to be able to measure thermophysical properties with high precision by combining AC magnetic field (electromagnetic levitation device) and DC magnetic field (superconducting magnet) to realize the static floating state of metallic melt, in other words, the state of suppressing the surface vibration of droplets, translational motion, and internal convection. The electromagnetic levitation method is a method to obtain a floating force due to the Lorentz force generated by the interaction between high-frequency current flowing in the coil and the induced current generated in a sample, and to heat/melt the sample with the Joule heat generated by its induced current. This paper roughly explains the element technologies of PROSPECT with a focus on the laser modulation calorimetry (laser periodic heating method), normal spectral emissivity measurement method, density measurement, and surface tension measurement method. Furthermore, as the application of PROSPECT to new research deployment, it introduces the observation of phase separation structure in the supercooled solidification structure of Cu-Co alloy. (A.O.)

  12. Instantaneous local wave vector estimation from multi-spacecraft measurements using few spatial points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. D. Carozzi

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a technique to determine instantaneous local properties of waves based on discrete-time sampled, real-valued measurements from 4 or more spatial points. The technique is a generalisation to the spatial domain of the notion of instantaneous frequency used in signal processing. The quantities derived by our technique are closely related to those used in geometrical optics, namely the local wave vector and instantaneous phase velocity. Thus, this experimental technique complements ray-tracing. We provide example applications of the technique to electric field and potential data from the EFW instrument on Cluster. Cluster is the first space mission for which direct determination of the full 3-dimensional local wave vector is possible, as described here.

  13. Spatial and Numerical Predictors of Measurement Performance: The Moderating Effects of Community Income and Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Beth M.; Dearing, Eric; Vasilyeva, Marina; Ganley, Colleen M.; Tine, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Spatial reasoning and numerical predictors of measurement performance were investigated in 4th graders from low-income and affluent communities. Predictors of 2 subtypes of measurement performance (spatial-conceptual and formula based) were assessed while controlling for verbal and spatial working memory. Consistent with prior findings, students…

  14. Spatial structure of soil properties at different scales of Mt. Kilimanjaro, Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühnel, Anna; Huwe, Bernd

    2013-04-01

    Soils of tropical mountain ecosystems provide important ecosystem services like water and carbon storage, water filtration and erosion control. As these ecosystems are threatened by global warming and the conversion of natural to human-modified landscapes, it is important to understand the implications of these changes. Within the DFG Research Unit "Kilimanjaro ecosystems under global change: Linking biodiversity, biotic interactions and biogeochemical ecosystem processes", we study the spatial heterogeneity of soils and the available water capacity for different land use systems. In the savannah zone of Mt. Kilimanjaro, maize fields are compared to natural savannah ecosystems. In the lower montane forest zone, coffee plantations, traditional home gardens, grasslands and natural forests are studied. We characterize the soils with respect to soil hydrology, emphasizing on the spatial variability of soil texture and bulk density at different scales. Furthermore soil organic carbon and nitrogen, cation exchange capacity and the pH-value are measured. Vis/Nir-Spectroscopy is used to detect small scale physical and chemical heterogeneity within soil profiles, as well as to get information of soil properties on a larger scale. We aim to build a spectral database for these soil properties for the Kilimanjaro region in order to get rapid information for geostatistical analysis. Partial least square regression with leave one out cross validation is used for model calibration. Results for silt and clay content, as well as carbon and nitrogen content are promising, with adjusted R² ranging from 0.70 for silt to 0.86 for nitrogen. Furthermore models for other nutrients, cation exchange capacity and available water capacity will be calibrated. We compare heterogeneity within and across the different ecosystems and state that spatial structure characteristics and complexity patterns in soil parameters can be quantitatively related to biodiversity and functional diversity

  15. Measurement of Spatial Ability in an Introductory Graphic Communications Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Walter F., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Published articles on spatial ability can be found in the fields of psychology and graphics education. In the "Engineering Design Graphics Journal" for 1936-1978, six articles concerning visualization (spatial ability) were listed. As published graphics research increased, the journal (1975-1996) listed 28 articles in the visualization…

  16. Measuring spatial patterns in floodplains: A step towards understanding the complexity of floodplain ecosystems: Chapter 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scown, Murray W.; Thoms, Martin C.; DeJager, Nathan R.; Gilvear, David J.; Greenwood, Malcolm T.; Thoms, Martin C.; Wood, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Floodplains can be viewed as complex adaptive systems (Levin, 1998) because they are comprised of many different biophysical components, such as morphological features, soil groups and vegetation communities as well as being sites of key biogeochemical processing (Stanford et al., 2005). Interactions and feedbacks among the biophysical components often result in additional phenomena occuring over a range of scales, often in the absence of any controlling factors (sensu Hallet, 1990). This emergence of new biophysical features and rates of processing can lead to alternative stable states which feed back into floodplain adaptive cycles (cf. Hughes, 1997; Stanford et al., 2005). Interactions between different biophysical components, feedbacks, self emergence and scale are all key properties of complex adaptive systems (Levin, 1998; Phillips, 2003; Murray et al., 2014) and therefore will influence the manner in which we study and view spatial patterns. Measuring the spatial patterns of floodplain biophysical components is a prerequisite to examining and understanding these ecosystems as complex adaptive systems. Elucidating relationships between pattern and process, which are intrinsically linked within floodplains (Ward et al., 2002), is dependent upon an understanding of spatial pattern. This knowledge can help river scientists determine the major drivers, controllers and responses of floodplain structure and function, as well as the consequences of altering those drivers and controllers (Hughes and Cass, 1997; Whited et al., 2007). Interactions and feedbacks between physical, chemical and biological components of floodplain ecosystems create and maintain a structurally diverse and dynamic template (Stanford et al., 2005). This template influences subsequent interactions between components that consequently affect system trajectories within floodplains (sensu Bak et al., 1988). Constructing and evaluating models used to predict floodplain ecosystem responses to

  17. Measurement errors in cirrus cloud microphysical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Larsen

    Full Text Available The limited accuracy of current cloud microphysics sensors used in cirrus cloud studies imposes limitations on the use of the data to examine the cloud's broadband radiative behaviour, an important element of the global energy balance. We review the limitations of the instruments, PMS probes, most widely used for measuring the microphysical structure of cirrus clouds and show the effect of these limitations on descriptions of the cloud radiative properties. The analysis is applied to measurements made as part of the European Cloud and Radiation Experiment (EUCREX to determine mid-latitude cirrus microphysical and radiative properties.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (cloud physics and chemistry · Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics · Radiative processes · Instruments and techniques

  18. Spatial and temporal variability of thermohaline properties in the Bay of Koper (northern Adriatic Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soczka Mandac, Rok; Žagar, Dušan; Faganeli, Jadran

    2013-04-01

    In this study influence of fresh water discharge on the spatial and temporal variability of thermohaline (TH) conditions is explored for the Bay of Koper (Bay). The Bay is subject to different driving agents: wind stress (bora, sirocco), tidal and seiches effect, buoyancy fluxes, general circulation of the Adriatic Sea and discharge of the Rizana and Badaševica rivers. These rivers have torrential characteristics that are hard to forecast in relation to meteorological events (precipitation). Therefore, during episodic events the spatial and temporal variability of TH properties in the Bay is difficult to determine [1]. Measurements of temperature, salinity and turbidity were conducted monthly on 35 sampling points in the period: June 2011 - December 2012. The data were processed and spatial interpolated with an objective analysis method. Furthermore, empirical orthogonal function analysis (EOF) [2] was applied to investigate spatial and temporal TH variations. Strong horizontal and vertical stratification was observed in the beginning of June 2011 due to high fresh water discharge of the Rizana (31 m3/s) and Badaševica (2 m3/s) rivers. The horizontal gradient (ΔT = 6°C) was noticed near the mouth of the Rizana river. Similar pattern was identified for salinity field on the boundary of the front where the gradient was ΔS = 20 PSU. Vertical temperature gradient was ΔT = 4°C while salinity gradient was ΔS = 18 PSU in the subsurface layer at depth of 3 m. Spatial analysis of the first principal component (86% of the total variance) shows uniform temperature distribution in the surface layer (1m) during the studied period. Furthermore, temporal variability of temperature shows seasonal variation with a minimum in February and maximum in August. This confirms that episodic events have a negligible effect on spatial and temporal variation of temperature in the subsurface layer. Further analysis will include application of EOF on the salinity, density and total

  19. Spatial transferring of ecosystem services and property rights allocation of ecological compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Wujun; Xu, Geng; Wang, Xingjie

    2011-09-01

    Ecological compensation is an important means to maintain the sustainability and stability of ecosystem services. The property rights analysis of ecosystem services is indispensable when we implement ecological compensation. In this paper, ecosystem services are evaluated via spatial transferring and property rights analysis. Take the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MA) as an example, we attempt to classify the spatial structure of 31 categories of ecosystem services into four dimensions, i.e., local, regional, national and global ones, and divide the property rights structure into three types, i.e., private property rights, common property rights and state-owned property rights. Through the case study of forestry, farming industry, drainage area, development of mineral resources, nature reserves, functional areas, agricultural land expropriation, and international cooperation on ecological compensation, the feasible ecological compensation mechanism is illustrated under the spatial structure and property rights structure of the concerned ecosystem services. For private property rights, the ecological compensation mode mainly depends on the market mechanism. If the initial common property rights are "hidden," the implementation of ecological compensation mainly relies on the quota market transactions and the state investment under the state-owned property rights, and the fairness of property rights is thereby guaranteed through central administration.

  20. Studies on the drift properties and spatial resolution using a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R&D studies on the performance as well as on the gas properties of the. microMEGAS-based time ... ies present a new challenge to develop the technology and prove the feasibility of achieving a ... micro-mesh structure with 50 µm gap.

  1. Measurement of material mechanical properties in microforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Wang; Xu, Zhenying; Hui, Huang; Zhou, Jianzhong

    2006-02-01

    As the rapid market need of micro-electro-mechanical systems engineering gives it the wide development and application ranging from mobile phones to medical apparatus, the need of metal micro-parts is increasing gradually. Microforming technology challenges the plastic processing technology. The findings have shown that if the grain size of the specimen remains constant, the flow stress changes with the increasing miniaturization, and also the necking elongation and the uniform elongation etc. It is impossible to get the specimen material properties in conventional tensile test machine, especially in the high precision demand. Therefore, one new measurement method for getting the specimen material-mechanical property with high precision is initiated. With this method, coupled with the high speed of Charge Coupled Device (CCD) camera and high precision of Coordinate Measuring Machine (CMM), the elongation and tensile strain in the gauge length are obtained. The elongation, yield stress and other mechanical properties can be calculated from the relationship between the images and CCD camera movement. This measuring method can be extended into other experiments, such as the alignment of the tool and specimen, micro-drawing process.

  2. Laboratory measurements of rock thermal properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bording, Thue Sylvester; Balling, N.; Nielsen, S.B.

    The thermal properties of rocks are key elements in understanding and modelling the temperature field of the subsurface. Thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity can be measured in the laboratory if rock samples can be provided. We have introduced improvements to the divided bar and needle...... probe methods to be able to measure both thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity. The improvements we implement include, for both methods, a combination of fast numerical finite element forward modelling and a Markov Chain Monte Carlo inversion scheme for estimating rock thermal parameters...

  3. Semiconductor nanoparticles with spatial separation of charge carriers: synthesis and optical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasiliev, Roman B; Dirin, Dmitry N; Gaskov, Alexander M

    2011-01-01

    The results of studies on core/shell semiconductor nanoparticles with spatial separation of photoexcited charge carriers are analyzed and generalized. Peculiarities of the electronic properties of semiconductor/semiconductor heterojunctions formed inside such particles are considered. Data on the effect of spatial separation of charge carriers on the optical properties of nanoparticles including spectral shifts of the exciton bands, absorption coefficients and electron–hole pair recombination times are presented. Methods of synthesis of core/shell semiconductor nanoparticles in solutions are discussed. Specific features of the optical properties of anisotropic semiconductor nanoparticles with the semiconductor/semiconductor junctions are noted. The bibliography includes 165 references.

  4. Spatial variability of physical properties of tropical soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichardt, K.; Libardi, P.L.; Queiroz, S.V.; Grohmann, F.

    1976-04-01

    A basic study with objectives of improving the use of soil and water resources under a particular condition and of developing means for controlling the dynamics of soil-water movement are presented. Special emphasis is given to the variability in space of geometric soil properties such as bulk density, particle density and texture in order to make it possible to define representative means which ideed will be usable to describe the movement of water and of salt in the entire field

  5. Measuring plate thickness using spatial local wavenumber filtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, To; Han, Soon Woo; Park, Jin Ho; Lee, Jeong Han; Park, Gyu Hae; Jeon, Jun Young

    2016-01-01

    Corrosion on the surface of a structure can generate cracks or cause walls to thin. This can lead to fracturing, which can eventually lead to fatalities and property loss. In an effort to prevent this, laser imaging technology has been used over the last ten years to detect thin-plate structure, or relatively thin piping. The most common laser imaging was used to develop a new technology for inspecting and imaging a desired area in order to scan various structures for thin-plate structure and thin piping. However, this method builds images by measuring waves reflected from defects, and subsequently has a considerable time delay of a few milliseconds at each scanning point. In addition, the complexity of the system is high, due to additional required components, such as laser-focusing parts. This paper proposes a laser imaging method with an increased scanning speed, based on excitation and the measurement of standing waves in structures. The wavenumber of standing waves changes at sections with a geometrical discontinuity, such as thickness. Therefore, it is possible to detect defects in a structure by generating standing waves with a single frequency and scanning the waves at each point by with the laser scanning system. The proposed technique is demonstrated on a wall-thinned plate with a linear thickness variation

  6. Property-Based Software Engineering Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briand, Lionel C.; Morasca, Sandro; Basili, Victor R.

    1997-01-01

    Little theory exists in the field of software system measurement. Concepts such as complexity, coupling, cohesion or even size are very often subject to interpretation and appear to have inconsistent definitions in the literature. As a consequence, there is little guidance provided to the analyst attempting to define proper measures for specific problems. Many controversies in the literature are simply misunderstandings and stem from the fact that some people talk about different measurement concepts under the same label (complexity is the most common case). There is a need to define unambiguously the most important measurement concepts used in the measurement of software products. One way of doing so is to define precisely what mathematical properties characterize these concepts, regardless of the specific software artifacts to which these concepts are applied. Such a mathematical framework could generate a consensus in the software engineering community and provide a means for better communication among researchers, better guidelines for analysts, and better evaluation methods for commercial static analyzers for practitioners. In this paper, we propose a mathematical framework which is generic, because it is not specific to any particular software artifact and rigorous, because it is based on precise mathematical concepts. We use this framework to propose definitions of several important measurement concepts (size, length, complexity, cohesion, coupling). It does not intend to be complete or fully objective; other frameworks could have been proposed and different choices could have been made. However, we believe that the formalisms and properties we introduce are convenient and intuitive. This framework contributes constructively to a firmer theoretical ground of software measurement.

  7. Measurement of Thermal Radiation Properties of Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, J. C. (Editor)

    1963-01-01

    The overall objectives of the Symposium were to afford (1) an opportunity for workers in the field to describe the equipment and procedures currently in use for measuring thermal radiation properties of solids, (2) an opportunity for constructive criticism of the material presented, and (3) an open forum for discussion of mutual problems. It was also the hope of the sponsors that the published proceedings of the Symposium would serve as a valuable reference on measurement techniques for evaluating thermal radiation properties of solids, partic.ularly for those with limited experience in the field. Because of the strong dependence of emitted flux upon temperature, the program committee thought it advisable to devote the first session to a discussion of the problems of temperature measurement. All of the papers in Session I were presented at the request of and upon topics suggested by the Committee. Because of time and space limitations, it, was impossible to consider all temperature measurement problems that might arise--the objective was rather to call to the attention of the reader some of the problems that might be encountered, and to provide references that might provide solutions.

  8. Controls on the spatial variability of key soil properties: comparing field data with a mechanistic soilscape evolution model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanwalleghem, T.; Román, A.; Giraldez, J. V.

    2016-12-01

    There is a need for better understanding the processes influencing soil formation and the resulting distribution of soil properties. Soil properties can exhibit strong spatial variation, even at the small catchment scale. Especially soil carbon pools in semi-arid, mountainous areas are highly uncertain because bulk density and stoniness are very heterogeneous and rarely measured explicitly. In this study, we explore the spatial variability in key soil properties (soil carbon stocks, stoniness, bulk density and soil depth) as a function of processes shaping the critical zone (weathering, erosion, soil water fluxes and vegetation patterns). We also compare the potential of a geostatistical versus a mechanistic soil formation model (MILESD) for predicting these key soil properties. Soil core samples were collected from 67 locations at 6 depths. Total soil organic carbon stocks were 4.38 kg m-2. Solar radiation proved to be the key variable controlling soil carbon distribution. Stone content was mostly controlled by slope, indicating the importance of erosion. Spatial distribution of bulk density was found to be highly random. Finally, total carbon stocks were predicted using a random forest model whose main covariates were solar radiation and NDVI. The model predicts carbon stocks that are double as high on north versus south-facing slopes. However, validation showed that these covariates only explained 25% of the variation in the dataset. Apparently, present-day landscape and vegetation properties are not sufficient to fully explain variability in the soil carbon stocks in this complex terrain under natural vegetation. This is attributed to a high spatial variability in bulk density and stoniness, key variables controlling carbon stocks. Similar results were obtained with the mechanistic soil formation model MILESD, suggesting that more complex models might be needed to further explore this high spatial variability.

  9. Spatial properties of coaxial superposition of two coherent Gaussian beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Boubaha, B

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available that of the first focal point owing to its larger diameter, and subsequently decreases as K increases. 3. Interferometric Beam Shaping An interesting feature of the CGB is when the param- eter K is reduced, one observes that the number of rings shown in Fig. 1... for K . It is remarkable to notice that the beam shaping properties displayed in Fig. 5 are obtained from the interference of two coherent GBs, which are coaxially superposed by resorting to a two-wave interferom- eter or by generating the modulating...

  10. Measuring Mechanical Properties Of Optical Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Nichols, Ronald L.

    1989-01-01

    Report discusses mechanical tests measuring parameters of strength and fracture mechanics of optical glasses. To obtain required tables of mechanical properties of each glass of interest, both initial-strength and delayed-fracture techniques used. Modulus of rupture measured by well-known four-point bending method. Initial bending strength measured by lesser-known double-ring method, in which disk of glass supported on one face near edge by larger ring and pressed on its other face by smaller concentric ring. Method maximizes stress near center, making it more likely specimen fractures there, and thereby suppresses edge effects. Data from tests used to predict reliabilities and lifetimes of glass optical components of several proposed spaceborne instruments.

  11. Assessing Wildfire Risk in Cultural Heritage Properties Using High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Satellite Imagery and Spatially Explicit Fire Simulations: The Case of Holy Mount Athos, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgos Mallinis

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Fire management implications and the design of conservation strategies on fire prone landscapes within the UNESCO World Heritage Properties require the application of wildfire risk assessment at landscape level. The objective of this study was to analyze the spatial variation of wildfire risk on Holy Mount Athos in Greece. Mt. Athos includes 20 monasteries and other structures that are threatened by increasing frequency of wildfires. Site-specific fuel models were created by measuring in the field several fuel parameters in representative natural fuel complexes, while the spatial extent of the fuel types was determined using a synergy of high-resolution imagery and high temporal information from medium spatial resolution imagery classified through object-based analysis and a machine learning classifier. The Minimum Travel Time (MTT algorithm, as it is embedded in FlamMap software, was applied in order to evaluate Burn Probability (BP, Conditional Flame Length (CFL, Fire Size (FS, and Source-Sink Ratio (SSR. The results revealed low burn probabilities for the monasteries; however, nine out of the 20 monasteries have high fire potential in terms of fire intensity, which means that if an ignition occurs, an intense fire is expected. The outputs of this study may be used for decision-making for short-term predictions of wildfire risk at an operational level, contributing to fire suppression and management of UNESCO World Heritage Properties.

  12. Sediment spatial distribution evaluated by three methods and its relation to some soil properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacchi, O O.S. . [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura-CENA/USP, Laboratorio de Fisica do Solo, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Reichardt, K [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura-CENA/USP, Laboratorio de Fisica do Solo, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Ciencias Exatas, Escola Superior de Agricultura ' Luiz de Queiroz' ESALQ/USP, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Sparovek, G [Departamento de Solos e Nutricao de Plantas, Escola Superior de Agricultura ' Luiz de Queiroz' ESALQ/USP, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2003-02-15

    An investigation of rates and spatial distribution of sediments on an agricultural field cultivated with sugarcane was undertaken using the {sup 137}Cs technique, USLE and WEPP models. The study was carried out on the Ceveiro watershed of the Piracicaba river basin, state of Sao Paulo, Brazil, experiencing severe soil degradation due to soil erosion. The objectives of the study were to compare the spatial distribution of sediments evaluated by the three methods and its relation to some soil properties. Erosion and sedimentation rates and their spatial distribution estimated by the three methods were completely different. Although not able to show sediment deposition, the spatial distribution of erosion rates evaluated by USLE presented the best correlation with other studied soil properties. (author)

  13. Measurement of diffusive properties of intact rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, K B

    1996-12-01

    In the Postclosure Assessment of a Reference System for the Disposal of Canada`s Nuclear Fuel Waste (Goodwin et al. 1994) the disposal vault is assumed to be surrounded by a zone of intact rock, referred to as the `exclusion zone.` A sensitivity analysis of the relative effectiveness of the several engineered and natural barriers that contribute to the safety of the reference disposal system has shown that this zone of intact rock is the most effective of these barriers to the movement of radionuclides through the reference system. Peer review of the geosphere model used in the case study for the EIS (Environmental Impact Statement) of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program has identified the need to quantify the properties of the intact rock surrounding the disposal vault that would control the transport of radionuclides by diffusion. The Postclosure Assessment also identified the need for appropriate values of the free water diffusion coefficient (D{sub o}) for {sup 129}1 and {sup 14}C. The measurement of rock resistivity allows the calculation of the Formation Factor for a rock This review describes the Formation Factor, diffusivity, permeability, and porosity, and how these properties might be measured or inferred for insitu rock under the conditions that apply to the intact rock surrounding a potential disposal vault. The importance of measuring the intrinsic diffusion coefficient (D{sup i}) of diffusing species under solution salinities simulating those of groundwaters is emphasised, and a method of measurement is described that is independent of the diffusing medium, and which would be appropriate for measurements made in chemically complex media such as groundwaters. (author). 95 refs., 4 tabs., 39 figs.

  14. Measurement of diffusive properties of intact rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, K.B.

    1996-12-01

    In the Postclosure Assessment of a Reference System for the Disposal of Canada's Nuclear Fuel Waste (Goodwin et al. 1994) the disposal vault is assumed to be surrounded by a zone of intact rock, referred to as the 'exclusion zone.' A sensitivity analysis of the relative effectiveness of the several engineered and natural barriers that contribute to the safety of the reference disposal system has shown that this zone of intact rock is the most effective of these barriers to the movement of radionuclides through the reference system. Peer review of the geosphere model used in the case study for the EIS (Environmental Impact Statement) of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program has identified the need to quantify the properties of the intact rock surrounding the disposal vault that would control the transport of radionuclides by diffusion. The Postclosure Assessment also identified the need for appropriate values of the free water diffusion coefficient (D o ) for 129 1 and 14 C. The measurement of rock resistivity allows the calculation of the Formation Factor for a rock This review describes the Formation Factor, diffusivity, permeability, and porosity, and how these properties might be measured or inferred for insitu rock under the conditions that apply to the intact rock surrounding a potential disposal vault. The importance of measuring the intrinsic diffusion coefficient (D i ) of diffusing species under solution salinities simulating those of groundwaters is emphasised, and a method of measurement is described that is independent of the diffusing medium, and which would be appropriate for measurements made in chemically complex media such as groundwaters. (author). 95 refs., 4 tabs., 39 figs

  15. Measurements of Top Properties at the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husemann, Ulrich; Yale U.

    2007-01-01

    The large data samples of thousands of top events collected at the Tevatron experiments CDF and D(O) allow for a variety of measurements to analyze the properties of the top quark. Guided by the question ''Is the top quark observed at the Tevatron really the top quark of the standard model,'' we present Tevatron analyses studying the top production mechanism including resonant t(bar t) production, the V -A structure of the t → Wb decay vertex, the charge of the top quark, and single-top production via flavor-changing neutral currents

  16. Generalized index for spatial data sets as a measure of complete spatial randomness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett-Jones, Emily J.; Davies, Kale J.; Binder, Benjamin J.; Landman, Kerry A.

    2012-06-01

    Spatial data sets, generated from a wide range of physical systems can be analyzed by counting the number of objects in a set of bins. Previous work has been limited to equal-sized bins, which are inappropriate for some domains (e.g., circular). We consider a nonequal size bin configuration whereby overlapping or nonoverlapping bins cover the domain. A generalized index, defined in terms of a variance between bin counts, is developed to indicate whether or not a spatial data set, generated from exclusion or nonexclusion processes, is at the complete spatial randomness (CSR) state. Limiting values of the index are determined. Using examples, we investigate trends in the generalized index as a function of density and compare the results with those using equal size bins. The smallest bin size must be much larger than the mean size of the objects. We can determine whether a spatial data set is at the CSR state or not by comparing the values of a generalized index for different bin configurations—the values will be approximately the same if the data is at the CSR state, while the values will differ if the data set is not at the CSR state. In general, the generalized index is lower than the limiting value of the index, since objects do not have access to the entire region due to blocking by other objects. These methods are applied to two applications: (i) spatial data sets generated from a cellular automata model of cell aggregation in the enteric nervous system and (ii) a known plant data distribution.

  17. Measurement of top properties in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Veloso, F; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The top quark may play a special role in the Standard Model of particle physics. It is, for instance, the heaviest fundamental particle known, with a mass close to the electroweak symmetry breaking scale. Millions of top quark pairs will be produced per year at the LHC at nominal luminosity. ATLAS will measure many of the top quark properties with unprecedented precision. The ATLAS sensitivity studies done with Monte Carlo for the measurements of the top quark mass, the top quark charge, rare top quark decays and flavour changing neutral currents, the $t\\bar t$ spin correlations and $W$ boson polarization, the anomalous couplings at the $Wtb$ vertex and $t\\bar t$ resonances are reviewed.

  18. EXPERIMENTAL MEASUREMENT OF NANOFLUIDS THERMAL PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan M. Hussein

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Solid particles dispersed in a liquid with sizes no larger than 100nm, known as nanofluids, are used to enhance Thermophysical properties compared to the base fluid. Preparations of alumina (Al2O3, titania (TiO2 and silica (SiO2 in water have been experimentally conducted in volume concentrations ranging between 1 and 2.5%. Thermal conductivity is measured by the hot wire method and viscosity with viscometer equipment. The results of thermal conductivity and viscosity showed an enhancement (0.5–20% and 0.5–60% respectively compared with the base fluid. The data measured agreed with experimental data of other researchers with deviation of less than 5%. The study showed that alumina has the highest thermal conductivity, followed silica and titania, on the other hand silica has the highest viscosity followed alumina and titania.

  19. Managing the spatial properties and photon correlations in squeezed non-classical twisted light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, R. V.; Tikhonova, O. V.

    2018-05-01

    Spatial photon correlations and mode content of the squeezed vacuum light generated in a system of two separated nonlinear crystals is investigated. The contribution of both the polar and azimuthal modes with non-zero orbital angular momentum is analyzed. The control and engineering of the spatial properties and degree of entanglement of the non-classical squeezed light by changing the distance between crystals and pump parameters is demonstrated. Methods for amplification of certain spatial modes and managing the output mode content and intensity profile of quantum twisted light are suggested.

  20. Characterization of Spatial Variability of Hydrogeologic Properties for Unsaturated Flow in the Fractured Rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Quanlin; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Liu, Hui-Hai; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2002-01-01

    The spatial variability of layer-scale hydrogeologic properties of the unsaturated zone (UZ) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is investigated using inverse modeling. The thick UZ is grouped into five hydrostratigraphic units and further into 35 hydrogeologic layers. For each layer, lateral variability is represented by the variations in calibrated values of layer-scale properties at different individual deep boreholes. In the calibration model, matrix and fracture properties are calibrated for the one-dimensional vertical column at each individual borehole using the ITOUGH2 code. The objective function is the summation of the weighted misfits between the ambient unsaturated flow (represented by measured state variables: water saturation, water potential, and pneumatic pressure) and the simulated one in the one-dimensional flow system. The objective function also includes the weighted misfits between the calibrated properties and their prior information. Layer-scale state variables and prior rock properties are obtained from their core-scale measurements. Because of limited data, the lateral variability of three most sensitive properties (matrix permeability, matrix of the van Genuchten characterization, and fracture permeability) is calibrated, while all other properties are fixed at their calibrated layer-averaged values. Considerable lateral variability of hydrogeologic properties is obtained. For example, the lateral variability of is two to three orders of magnitude and that of and is one order of magnitude. The effect of lateral variability on site-scale flow and transport will be investigated in a future study

  1. Measurements of spatial population synchrony: influence of time series transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Mathieu; Laffaille, Pascal; Ferdy, Jean-Baptiste; Grenouillet, Gaël

    2015-09-01

    Two mechanisms have been proposed to explain spatial population synchrony: dispersal among populations, and the spatial correlation of density-independent factors (the "Moran effect"). To identify which of these two mechanisms is driving spatial population synchrony, time series transformations (TSTs) of abundance data have been used to remove the signature of one mechanism, and highlight the effect of the other. However, several issues with TSTs remain, and to date no consensus has emerged about how population time series should be handled in synchrony studies. Here, by using 3131 time series involving 34 fish species found in French rivers, we computed several metrics commonly used in synchrony studies to determine whether a large-scale climatic factor (temperature) influenced fish population dynamics at the regional scale, and to test the effect of three commonly used TSTs (detrending, prewhitening and a combination of both) on these metrics. We also tested whether the influence of TSTs on time series and population synchrony levels was related to the features of the time series using both empirical and simulated time series. For several species, and regardless of the TST used, we evidenced a Moran effect on freshwater fish populations. However, these results were globally biased downward by TSTs which reduced our ability to detect significant signals. Depending on the species and the features of the time series, we found that TSTs could lead to contradictory results, regardless of the metric considered. Finally, we suggest guidelines on how population time series should be processed in synchrony studies.

  2. Factors Affecting the Clinical Measurement of Visuo-Spatial Neglect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Pizzamiglio

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined a battery of tests to evaluate unilateral spatial neglect; the tests included different tasks involving several modalities of spatial exploration mapping perceptual, motor, attentional and personal or extrapersonal space dimensions. The subjects, 121 right-brain-damaged patients with unilateral neglect, were studied in seven laboratories in four European countries. Relationships among the various tests were examined by correlations, a cluster analysis and by an analysis of individual cases. Different sensitivity was found among various tests for detecting neglect performances. Both the cluster analysis and the single case analysis clearly showed a segregation between personal and extrapersonal neglect. Analysis of the large cluster, including a variety of tests of extra personal neglect, together with the study of single cases, suggests the possibility of differentiating the various manifestations of spatial neglect which can be interpreted on the basis of the descriptions of other individual cases previously reported in the literature. Finally, the present study indicated the relative stability of neglect following the acute phase and its independence from age.

  3. Measuring anisotropic muscle stiffness properties using elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, M A; Geng, G; Qin, E; Sinkus, R; Gandevia, S C; Bilston, L E

    2013-11-01

    Physiological and pathological changes to the anisotropic mechanical properties of skeletal muscle are still largely unknown, with only a few studies quantifying changes in vivo. This study used the noninvasive MR elastography (MRE) technique, in combination with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), to measure shear modulus anisotropy in the human skeletal muscle in the lower leg. Shear modulus measurements parallel and perpendicular to the fibre direction were made in 10 healthy subjects in the medial gastrocnemius, soleus and tibialis anterior muscles. The results showed significant differences in the medial gastrocnemius (μ‖ = 0.86 ± 0.15 kPa; μ⊥ = 0.66 ± 0.19 kPa, P < 0.001), soleus (μ‖ = 0.83 ± 0.22 kPa; μ⊥ = 0.65 ± 0.13 kPa, P < 0.001) and the tibialis anterior (μ‖ = 0.78 ± 0.24 kPa; μ⊥ = 0.66 ± 0.16 kPa, P = 0.03) muscles, where the shear modulus measured in the direction parallel is greater than that measured in the direction perpendicular to the muscle fibres. No significant differences were measured across muscle groups. This study provides the first direct estimates of the anisotropic shear modulus in the triceps surae muscle group, and shows that the technique may be useful for the probing of mechanical anisotropy changes caused by disease, aging and injury. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Airborne Lidar Measurements of Aerosol Optical Properties During SAFARI-2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, M. J.; Hlavka, D. L.; Hart, W. D.; Welton, E. J.; Campbell, J. R.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) operated onboard the NASA ER-2 high altitude aircraft during the SAFARI-2000 field campaign. The CPL provided high spatial resolution measurements of aerosol optical properties at both 1064 nm and 532 nm. We present here results of planetary boundary layer (PBL) aerosol optical depth analysis and profiles of aerosol extinction. Variation of optical depth and extinction are examined as a function of regional location. The wide-scale aerosol mapping obtained by the CPL is a unique data set that will aid in future studies of aerosol transport. Comparisons between the airborne CPL and ground-based MicroPulse Lidar Network (MPL-Net) sites are shown to have good agreement.

  5. SPATIAL CORRELATION BETWEEN PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF SOIL AND WEEDS IN TWO MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valter Roberto Schaffrath

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The spatial correlation between soil properties and weeds is relevant in agronomic and environmental terms. The analysis of this correlation is crucial for the interpretation of its meaning, for influencing factors such as dispersal mechanisms, seed production and survival, and the range of influence of soil management techniques. This study aimed to evaluate the spatial correlation between the physical properties of soil and weeds in no-tillage (NT and conventional tillage (CT systems. The following physical properties of soil and weeds were analyzed: soil bulk density, macroporosity, microporosity, total porosity, aeration capacity of soil matrix, soil water content at field capacity, weed shoot biomass, weed density, Commelina benghalensis density, and Bidens pilosa density. Generally, the ranges of the spatial correlations were higher in NT than in CT. The cross-variograms showed that many variables have a structure of combined spatial variation and can therefore be mapped from one another by co-kriging. This combined variation also allows inferences about the physical and biological meanings of the study variables. Results also showed that soil management systems influence the spatial dependence structure significantly.

  6. Research on spatial-variant property of bistatic ISAR imaging plane of space target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Bao-Feng; Wang Jun-Ling; Gao Mei-Guo

    2015-01-01

    The imaging plane of inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) is the projection plane of the target. When taking an image using the range-Doppler theory, the imaging plane may have a spatial-variant property, which causes the change of scatter’s projection position and results in migration through resolution cells. In this study, we focus on the spatial-variant property of the imaging plane of a three-axis-stabilized space target. The innovative contributions are as follows. 1) The target motion model in orbit is provided based on a two-body model. 2) The instantaneous imaging plane is determined by the method of vector analysis. 3) Three Euler angles are introduced to describe the spatial-variant property of the imaging plane, and the image quality is analyzed. The simulation results confirm the analysis of the spatial-variant property. The research in this study is significant for the selection of the imaging segment, and provides the evidence for the following data processing and compensation algorithm. (paper)

  7. Power properties of invariant tests for spatial autocorrelation in linear regression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martellosio, F.

    2006-01-01

    Many popular tests for residual spatial autocorrelation in the context of the linear regression model belong to the class of invariant tests. This paper derives a number of exact properties of the power function of such tests. In particular, we extend the work of Krämer (2005, Journal of Statistical

  8. Cadmium Accumulation in Small Mammals: Species Traits, Soil Properties, and Spatial Habitat Use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, van den N.W.; Lammertsma, D.R.; Dimmers, W.J.; Boerwinkel, M.C.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the impact of species-specific spatial habitat use, diet preferences, and soil concentrations and properties on the accumulation of cadmium in small mammals was investigated. The results show that for the wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus), a mobile species with a large range in diet

  9. Multivariate and spatial statistical analysis of Callovo-Oxfordian physical properties from lab and borehole logs data: towards a characterization of lateral and vertical spatial trends in the Meuse/Haute-Marne transposition zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, M.H.; Rabaute, A.; Yven, B.; Guillemot, D.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The geological exploration of the Meuse/Haute-Marne area began in 1994. Several boreholes were drilled, and the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite, thought to become a potential storage formation, were cored and logged. 2D and 3D seismic surveys were completed, as well as geological field observations, and an underground research laboratory was created. A 250 km 2 -wide Transposition Zone was delimited, which was subject to further investigations in 2007 and 2008, including another series of coring and logging in four additional boreholes, and a tighter 2D seismic survey. The main objective of this study was to improve the knowledge of the spatial variability of geological and physical properties of the Callovo-Oxfordian formation. The paper focuses on the three following aspects of the study to present and discuss the methods that have been used and the results that have been obtained: - Use of well-log data to identify equivalent homogeneous log-units on the boreholes. - Relating log attributes to physical properties of argillites measured on cores in laboratory. - Study of lateral and vertical spatial trends of selected physical properties across the Transposition Zone (TZ). To identify equivalent homogeneous log-units, a combination of Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fuzzy Cluster Analysis (FCA) was used. PCA was classically performed to reduce the number of variables to retain principal components gathering most of the original dataset variance. PCA was also used to identify isolated groups of correlated variables that could be associated to different properties of the formation. Then, FCA was applied to identify homogeneous log-units on the eight boreholes across the TZ. Well-logs data being much more numerous and better distributed along boreholes than lab data measured on rock samples, relations and correlations were sought between the two types of data to identify log attributes that were likely to provide

  10. Cylinder Symmetric Measures with the Tail Property

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balkema, A.A.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract: A Pareto distribution has the property that any tail of the distribution has the same shape as the original distribution. The exponential distribution and the uniform distribution have the tail property too. The tail property characterizes the univariate generalized Pareto distributions.

  11. The effect of the spatial positioning of items on the reliability of questionnaires measuring affect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leigh Leo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Extant research has shown that the relationship between spatial location and affect may have pervasive effects on evaluation. In particular, experimental findings on embodied cognition indicate that a person is spatially orientated to position what is positive at the top and what is negative at the bottom (vertical spatial orientation, and to a lesser extent, to position what is positive on the left and what is negative on the right (horizontal spatial orientation. It is therefore hypothesised, that when there is congruence between a respondent’s spatial orientation (related to affect and the spatial positioning (layout of a questionnaire, the reliability will be higher than in the case of incongruence. Research purpose: The principal objective of the two studies reported here was to ascertain the extent to which congruence between a respondent’s spatial orientation (related to affect and the layout of the questionnaire (spatial positioning of questionnaire items may impact on the reliability of a questionnaire measuring affect. Motivation for the study: The spatial position of items on a questionnaire measuring affect may indirectly impact on the reliability of the questionnaire. Research approach, design and method: In both studies, a controlled experimental research design was conducted using a sample of university students (n = 1825. Major findings: In both experiments, evidence was found to support the hypothesis that greater congruence between a respondent’s spatial orientation (related to affect and the spatial positioning (layout of a questionnaire leads to higher reliability on a questionnaire measuring affect. Practical implications: These findings may serve to create awareness of the influence of the spatial positioning of items as a confounding variable in questionnaire design. Contribution/value-add: Overall, this research complements previous studies by confirming the metaphorical representation of affect and

  12. Spatial distribution of the chemical properties of the soil and of soybean yield in the field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Gazolla-Neto

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to evaluate the spatial dependence between chemical properties of the soil and yield components in the soybean using precision farming techniques. Samples of the soil and plants were taken from georeferenced points to determine the chemical properties of the soil and the yield components. The results were submitted to Pearson correlation analysis, descriptive statistics and geostatistics. The coefficient of variation showed a wide range of distribution for the chemical attributes of the soil, with the highest indices being found for the levels of available phosphorus (102% and potassium (72.65%. Soil pH and organic matter showed a coefficient of variation of 5.96 and 15.93% respectively. Semivariogram analysis of the yield components (productivity, 1,000-seed weight and number of seeds and the chemical properties of the soil (organic matter, pH, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, magnesium, boron, manganese and zinc fitted the spherical model with moderate spatial dependence, with values ranging from 200 to 700 m. Spatial distribution by means of map interpolation was efficient in evaluating spatial variability, allowing the identification and quantification of regions of low and high productivity in the production area, together with the distribution of soil attributes and their respective levels of availability to the soybean plants.

  13. Detecting abrupt dynamic change based on changes in the fractal properties of spatial images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qunqun; He, Wenping; Gu, Bin; Jiang, Yundi

    2017-10-01

    Many abrupt climate change events often cannot be detected timely by conventional abrupt detection methods until a few years after these events have occurred. The reason for this lag in detection is that abundant and long-term observational data are required for accurate abrupt change detection by these methods, especially for the detection of a regime shift. So, these methods cannot help us understand and forecast the evolution of the climate system in a timely manner. Obviously, spatial images, generated by a coupled spatiotemporal dynamical model, contain more information about a dynamic system than a single time series, and we find that spatial images show the fractal properties. The fractal properties of spatial images can be quantitatively characterized by the Hurst exponent, which can be estimated by two-dimensional detrended fluctuation analysis (TD-DFA). Based on this, TD-DFA is used to detect an abrupt dynamic change of a coupled spatiotemporal model. The results show that the TD-DFA method can effectively detect abrupt parameter changes in the coupled model by monitoring the changing in the fractal properties of spatial images. The present method provides a new way for abrupt dynamic change detection, which can achieve timely and efficient abrupt change detection results.

  14. Measurements of thermal properties of rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumada, Toshiaki

    2001-02-01

    The report concerns the measurement of thermal conductivity and specific heat of supplied sedimental rock B and Funyu rock. The method of measurement of these properties was done with the method which was developed at 1997 and improved much in its accuracy by the present author et al. The porosity of sedimental rock B is 0.55, which is deduced from the density of rock (the porosity deduced from the difference between dry and water filled conditions is 0.42) and the shape and size of pores in rock are much different. Its thermal conductivity is 0.238 W/mK in dry and 1.152 W/mK in water filled conditions respectively, while the thermal conductivity of bentonite is 0.238 W/mK in dry and 1.152 W/mK in water saturated conditions. The difference of thermal conductivity between dry and water saturated conditions is little difference in sedimental rock B and bentonite at same porosity. The porosity of Funyu rock is 0.26 and the shape and size of pores in the rock are uniform. Its thermal conductivity is 0.914 W/mK in dry and 1.405 W/mK in water saturated conditions, while the thermal conductivity of bentonite is 0.606 W/mK in dry and 1.591 W/mK in water saturated conditions respectively. The correlation estimating thermal conductivity of rocks was derived based on Fricke correlation by presuming rocks as a suspension. (author)

  15. Measurement of other Higgs boson properties

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00030446; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The recent measurement of Higgs boson properties, cross section, spin-parity and non-standard model coupling (Lepton flavor violation, flavor changing neutral current), in the ATLAS and CMS experiments are reported. The total cross section is $33.0\\pm5.3(stat.)\\pm1.6(sys.)$pb, that is agreement with state-of-art theory predictions. The differential cross sections of several variables are also fair agreement with theory predictions. Various hypothesis tests for spin $1^{\\pm}$ and $2^{\\pm}$ scenarios has been performed. No indication favors spin 1 or 2 models has been observed. CP-mixing scenarios for spin 0 have been investigated. No significant deviation from the Standard Model $0^{+}$ has been observed. We also searched for anomalous couplings, the lepton flavor violating decay in $H\\rightarrow \\mu\\tau$ events and flavor changing neutral current in $t\\rightarrow qH$ events. No significant excess has been observed in LHC Run-I data.

  16. Spatial measurement error and correction by spatial SIMEX in linear regression models when using predicted air pollution exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeeff, Stacey E; Carroll, Raymond J; Coull, Brent

    2016-04-01

    Spatial modeling of air pollution exposures is widespread in air pollution epidemiology research as a way to improve exposure assessment. However, there are key sources of exposure model uncertainty when air pollution is modeled, including estimation error and model misspecification. We examine the use of predicted air pollution levels in linear health effect models under a measurement error framework. For the prediction of air pollution exposures, we consider a universal Kriging framework, which may include land-use regression terms in the mean function and a spatial covariance structure for the residuals. We derive the bias induced by estimation error and by model misspecification in the exposure model, and we find that a misspecified exposure model can induce asymptotic bias in the effect estimate of air pollution on health. We propose a new spatial simulation extrapolation (SIMEX) procedure, and we demonstrate that the procedure has good performance in correcting this asymptotic bias. We illustrate spatial SIMEX in a study of air pollution and birthweight in Massachusetts. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Measuring the self-healing of the spatially inhomogeneous states of polarization of vector Bessel beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Milione, G

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available , using a spatial light modulator in concert with a liquid crystal q-plate. As a proof of principle, their intensities and spatially inhomogeneous states of polarization were experimentally measured using Stokes polarimetry as they propagated through two...

  18. Measurement of the spatial resolution and rate capability of an induction drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roderburg, E.; Broeders, R.; Dahmen, M.; Decker, G.; Kilian, K.; Kurtenbach, A.; Lippert, C.; Oelert, W.; Sehl, G.; Steinkamp, O.; Stratmann, R.; Walsh, S.; Ziolkowski, M.

    1992-01-01

    The limits of spatial resolution of an induction drift chamber (IDC) lead to the concept of an asymmetric IDC with Flash ADC readout. The construction of a chamber is described. The results of two measurements concerning the spatial resolution and the rate capability are reported. (orig.)

  19. Spatial filtering velocimetry of objective speckles for measuring out-of-plane motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Michael Linde; Yura, H. T.; Hanson, Steen Grüner

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes the dynamics of objective laser speckles as the distance between the object and the observation plane continuously changes. With the purpose of applying optical spatial filtering velocimetry to the speckle dynamics, in order to measure out-of-plane motion in real time......, a rotational symmetric spatial filter is designed. The spatial filter converts the speckle dynamics into a photocurrent with a quasi-sinusoidal response to the out-of-plane motion. The spatial filter is here emulated with a CCD camera, and is tested on speckles arising from a real application. The analysis...

  20. Measurement of the spatial coherence of a soft x-ray laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trebes, J.E.; Mrowka, S.; London, R.A.; Barbee, T.W.; Carter, M.R.; MacGowan, B.J.; Matthews, D.L.; Da Silva, L.B.; Stone, G.F.; Feit, M.D.; Nugent, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    The spatial coherence of a neon-like selenium x-ray laser operating at 206 and 210 Angstroems has been measured using a technique based on partially coherent x-ray diffraction. The time integrated spatial coherence of the selenium x-ray laser was determined to be equivalent to that of a quasi-monochromatic spatially incoherent disk source whose diameter is comparable to the line focus of the visible light laser pumping the x-ray laser. The spatial coherence was improved by narrowing the line focus width. 20 refs., 4 figs

  1. Pixel size and pitch measurements of liquid crystal spatial light ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    However, some departure from square pixel shape and pitch may result due to the manufacturing constraints and environmental changes like temperature or mechanical stresses. To our knowledge, we did not come across any detailed studies to accurately measure these variations (if any) in the available literature. We find ...

  2. Zernike phase spatial filter for measuring the aberrations

    OpenAIRE

    Svetlana N. Khonina; Victor V. Kotlyar; Dmitriy V. Kirsh

    2015-01-01

    To measure directly the wavefront aberration coefficients, we propose to use the multi8order diffractive element fitted with the set of Zernike polynomials. Polynomials of lowest degree describe defocusing (ametropy) and astigmatism. Coefficients of highest degree correspond to the spherical aberration of oblique rays that occurs as a consequence of misalignment of the crystalline lens and foveola, as well as deflection at the periphery of the crystalline lens. Mul^order elements allow severa...

  3. Effects of limited spatial resolution on fluctuation measurements (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bravenec, R.V.; Wootton, A.J.

    1995-01-01

    The finite sample volumes of fluctuation diagnostics distort the measurements not only by averaging the gross fluctuation parameters over the sample volumes, but more importantly (except for collective scattering), by attenuating the shorter wavelength components. In this work, the response of various sample volume sizes and orientations to a model fluctuation power spectrum S(k,ω) are examined. The model spectrum is fashioned after observations by far-infrared scattering on TEXT. The sample-volume extent in the direction of propagation of the turbulence is shown to be the most critical---not only does it reduce the measured fluctuation amplitude and increase the correlation length (as does an extent perpendicular to the propagation direction), but it also reduces the measured mean frequency and increases the apparent average phase velocity of the fluctuations. The differing sizes, shapes, and orientations of the sample volumes among fluctuation diagnostics, as well as deliberate variations within a single diagnostic, provide information on the form of the underlying turbulence and can be exploited to refine the model

  4. Effects of limited spatial resolution on fluctuation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bravenec, R.V.; Wootton, A.J.

    1994-01-01

    The finite sample volumes of fluctuation diagnostics distort the measurements not only by averaging the gross fluctuation parameters over the sample volumes, but more importantly (except for collective scattering), by attenuating the shorter wavelength components. In this work the response of various sample volume sizes and orientations to a model fluctuation power spectrum S(k,ω) are examined. The model spectrum is fashioned after observations by far-infrared scattering on TEXT. The sample-volume extent in the direction of propagation of the turbulence is shown to be the most critical - not only does it reduce the measured fluctuation amplitude and correlation length (as does an extent perpendicular to the propagation direction), but also reduces the measured mean frequency and increases the apparent average phase velocity of the fluctuations. The differing sizes, shapes, and orientations of the sample volumes among fluctuation diagnostics, as well as deliberate variations within a single diagnostic, provide information on the form of the underlying turbulence and can be exploited to refine the model

  5. Two New Measures of Fuzzy Divergence and Their Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Om Parkash

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Several measures of directed divergence and their corresponding measures of fuzzy divergence are available in the exiting literature. Two new measures of fuzzy divergence have been developed and their desirable properties have been discussed.

  6. Prediction of spatial soil property information from ancillary sensor data using ordinary linear regression: Model derivations, residual assumptions and model validation tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geospatial measurements of ancillary sensor data, such as bulk soil electrical conductivity or remotely sensed imagery data, are commonly used to characterize spatial variation in soil or crop properties. Geostatistical techniques like kriging with external drift or regression kriging are often use...

  7. Seed drill instrumentation for spatial coulter depth measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard Nielsen, Søren; Munkholm, Lars Juhl; Lamandé, Mathieu

    2017-01-01

    coulter depth varied up to ±5 mm between the blocks. In addition, significant depth variations between the individual coulters were found. The mean depths varied between −14.2 and −25.9 mm for the eleven coulters. The mean shallowest coulter depth (−14.2 mm) was measured for the coulter running...... in the wheel track of the tractor. The power spectral densities (distribution) of the coulter depth oscillation frequencies showed that the majority of oscillations occurred below 0.5 Hz without any natural vibration frequency. The study concluded that the instrumentation concept was functional for on...

  8. Measuring Behavioral Responses to the Property Tax

    OpenAIRE

    John Deskins; William Fox

    2008-01-01

    This paper focuses on excise effects of the property tax system. The excise effects are, of course, only one element in determining the role that property taxes should play as a revenue source and tell us only part of the story on the tax’s ability to generate revenues, the incidence of the tax and other concerns. In addition to direct excise tax effects, such as on land use and city structure, the tax can indirectly affect choices such as between private and public schools. Some of these eff...

  9. Comparison of spatial interpolation techniques to predict soil properties in the colombian piedmont eastern plains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Castro Franco

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Context: Interpolating soil properties at field-scale in the Colombian piedmont eastern plains is challenging due to: the highly and complex variable nature of some processes; the effects of the soil; the land use; and the management. While interpolation techniques are being adapted to include auxiliary information of these effects, the soil data are often difficult to predict using conventional techniques of spatial interpolation. Method: In this paper, we evaluated and compared six spatial interpolation techniques: Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW, Spline, Ordinary Kriging (KO, Universal Kriging (UK, Cokriging (Ckg, and Residual Maximum Likelihood-Empirical Best Linear Unbiased Predictor (REML-EBLUP, from conditioned Latin Hypercube as a sampling strategy. The ancillary information used in Ckg and REML-EBLUP was indexes calculated from a digital elevation model (MDE. The “Random forest” algorithm was used for selecting the most important terrain index for each soil properties. Error metrics were used to validate interpolations against cross validation. Results: The results support the underlying assumption that HCLc captured adequately the full distribution of variables of ancillary information in the Colombian piedmont eastern plains conditions. They also suggest that Ckg and REML-EBLUP perform best in the prediction in most of the evaluated soil properties. Conclusions: Mixed interpolation techniques having auxiliary soil information and terrain indexes, provided a significant improvement in the prediction of soil properties, in comparison with other techniques.

  10. Micromechanical measurement of wood substructure properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David E. Kretschmann; Troy W. Schmidt; Roderic S. Lakes; Steven M. Cramer

    2002-01-01

    The annual rings of softwoods are visually obvious and represent cylindrical layers of primarily cellulosic material that possess significantly different properties. For simplicity, wood construction products are designed assuming a material homogeneity that does not exist. As rapidly grown plantation trees are used for wood products, fewer rings are contained in an...

  11. Spatially dependent properties in a laser additive manufactured Ti–6Al–4V component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palanivel, S.; Dutt, A.K.; Faierson, E.J.; Mishra, R.S.

    2016-01-01

    Automotive and aerospace sectors have provided a strong product pull for advancing powder bed fusion technologies. However, as these technologies mature towards large-scale production, issues of build consistency and surface finish are of concern. In order to study these issues, a Ti–6Al–4V mini impeller was fabricated using laser additive manufacturing. The primary objective of this work was to quantify and correlate the variation in mechanical properties and microstructure across and along different locations in the component. Hardness measured at various build locations revealed a stronger hub (highest value: 428 HV) with lower spatial variations in comparison to the blade (highest value: 415 HV). Additional examinations to assess anisotropy showed an average hardness of 397±11 and 385±8 HV along the blade build (Z) and longitudinal (X) directions respectively. Region and direction specific uniaxial tensile testing of the samples indicated a strong hub bottom with yield strength (YS) of 1193 MPa, ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of 1310 MPa, and a total elongation of 5.5% in the longitudinal direction. Although the low elongation value correlates well with previous studies, strength is significantly higher and is attributed to having a complete martensitic structure induced by the high cooling rates experienced at the build–substrate interface. On the other hand, YS, UTS and total elongation in the blade were recorded as 978 MPa, 1096 MPa and 9.12%, respectively, along the build direction. Microstructure in the blade region consisted of α′ and α+β. When compared to the polished specimen in the blade, its unpolished counterpart yielded at 896 MPa, had UTS of 1018 MPa, and elongation of 6.24%. An understanding of the reduction in performance of the unfinished blade would help in deciding the need for surface finishing operations after fabrication.

  12. Spatially dependent properties in a laser additive manufactured Ti–6Al–4V component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palanivel, S.; Dutt, A.K. [Center for Friction Stir Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Faierson, E.J. [Quad City Manufacturing Laboratory, Western Illinois University, Rock Island, IL 61201 (United States); Mishra, R.S., E-mail: Rajiv.Mishra@unt.edu [Center for Friction Stir Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States)

    2016-01-27

    Automotive and aerospace sectors have provided a strong product pull for advancing powder bed fusion technologies. However, as these technologies mature towards large-scale production, issues of build consistency and surface finish are of concern. In order to study these issues, a Ti–6Al–4V mini impeller was fabricated using laser additive manufacturing. The primary objective of this work was to quantify and correlate the variation in mechanical properties and microstructure across and along different locations in the component. Hardness measured at various build locations revealed a stronger hub (highest value: 428 HV) with lower spatial variations in comparison to the blade (highest value: 415 HV). Additional examinations to assess anisotropy showed an average hardness of 397±11 and 385±8 HV along the blade build (Z) and longitudinal (X) directions respectively. Region and direction specific uniaxial tensile testing of the samples indicated a strong hub bottom with yield strength (YS) of 1193 MPa, ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of 1310 MPa, and a total elongation of 5.5% in the longitudinal direction. Although the low elongation value correlates well with previous studies, strength is significantly higher and is attributed to having a complete martensitic structure induced by the high cooling rates experienced at the build–substrate interface. On the other hand, YS, UTS and total elongation in the blade were recorded as 978 MPa, 1096 MPa and 9.12%, respectively, along the build direction. Microstructure in the blade region consisted of α′ and α+β. When compared to the polished specimen in the blade, its unpolished counterpart yielded at 896 MPa, had UTS of 1018 MPa, and elongation of 6.24%. An understanding of the reduction in performance of the unfinished blade would help in deciding the need for surface finishing operations after fabrication.

  13. CheckDen, a program to compute quantum molecular properties on spatial grids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacios, Luis F; Fernandez, Alberto

    2009-09-01

    CheckDen, a program to compute quantum molecular properties on a variety of spatial grids is presented. The program reads as unique input wavefunction files written by standard quantum packages and calculates the electron density rho(r), promolecule and density difference function, gradient of rho(r), Laplacian of rho(r), information entropy, electrostatic potential, kinetic energy densities G(r) and K(r), electron localization function (ELF), and localized orbital locator (LOL) function. These properties can be calculated on a wide range of one-, two-, and three-dimensional grids that can be processed by widely used graphics programs to render high-resolution images. CheckDen offers also other options as extracting separate atom contributions to the property computed, converting grid output data into CUBE and OpenDX volumetric data formats, and perform arithmetic combinations with grid files in all the recognized formats.

  14. On some topological properties of stable measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Carsten Krabbe

    1996-01-01

    Summary The paper shows that the set of stable probability measures and the set of Rational Beliefs relative to a given stationary measure are closed in the strong topology, but not closed in the topology of weak convergence. However, subsets of the set of stable probability measures which...... are characterized by uniformity of convergence of the empirical distribution are closed in the topology of weak convergence. It is demonstrated that such subsets exist. In particular, there is an increasing sequence of sets of SIDS measures who's union is the set of all SIDS measures generated by a particular...... system and such that each subset consists of stable measures. The uniformity requirement has a natural interpretation in terms of plausibility of Rational Beliefs...

  15. Simulation of spatial and temporal properties of aftershocks by means of the fiber bundle model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monterrubio-Velasco, Marisol; Zúñiga, F. R.; Márquez-Ramírez, Victor Hugo; Figueroa-Soto, Angel

    2017-11-01

    The rupture processes of any heterogeneous material constitute a complex physical problem. Earthquake aftershocks show temporal and spatial behaviors which are consequence of the heterogeneous stress distribution and multiple rupturing following the main shock. This process is difficult to model deterministically due to the number of parameters and physical conditions, which are largely unknown. In order to shed light on the minimum requirements for the generation of aftershock clusters, in this study, we perform a simulation of the main features of such a complex process by means of a fiber bundle (FB) type model. The FB model has been widely used to analyze the fracture process in heterogeneous materials. It is a simple but powerful tool that allows modeling the main characteristics of a medium such as the brittle shallow crust of the earth. In this work, we incorporate spatial properties, such as the Coulomb stress change pattern, which help simulate observed characteristics of aftershock sequences. In particular, we introduce a parameter ( P) that controls the probability of spatial distribution of initial loads. Also, we use a "conservation" parameter ( π), which accounts for the load dissipation of the system, and demonstrate its influence on the simulated spatio-temporal patterns. Based on numerical results, we find that P has to be in the range 0.06 sequences. This means that the system requires a small difference in the spatial distribution of initial stress, and a very particular fraction of load transfer in order to generate realistic aftershocks.

  16. Spatially Resolved Gas Temperature Measurements in an Atmospheric Pressure DC Glow Microdischarge with Raman Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belostotskiy, S.; Wang, Q.; Donnelly, V.; Economou, D.; Sadeghi, N.

    2006-10-01

    Spatially resolved rotational Raman spectroscopy of ground state nitrogen N2(X^1σg^+) was used to measure the gas temperature (Tg) in a nitrogen dc glow microdischarge (gap between electrodes d˜500 μm). An original backscattering, confocal optical system was developed for collecting Raman spectra. Stray laser light and Raleigh scattering were blocked by using a triple grating monochromator and spatial filters, designed specifically for these experiments. The optical system provided a spatial resolution of electrodes, Tg increased linearly with jd, reaching 500 K at 1000 mA/cm^2 jd for a pressure of 720 Torr. Spatially resolved gas temperature measurements will also be presented and discussed in combination with a mathematical model for gas heating in the microplasma. This work is supported by DoE/NSF.

  17. Measurement-Based Spatial Correlation and Capacity of Indoor Distributed MIMO System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Distributed MIMO (D-MIMO system is one of the candidates for future wireless access networks. In this study, the spatial correlation and capacity in indoor D-MIMO system are presented. All results are from the actual channel measurements in typical indoor scenarios, including office and corridor. Based on measured data, spatial correlation coefficients between distributed transmitting antennas are analyzed. Although the literature about D-MIMO system assumes the small scale fading between distributed antennas is independent, we find that spatial correlation may still exist in specific propagation scenario. This correlation can also degrade the performance of D-MIMO system. To mitigate the impact of spatial correlation, one efficient method is to use transmitting antenna selection technique.

  18. Radiochromic film measurement of spatial uniformity for a laser generated x-ray environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, J. H.; Newlander, C. D.; Horton, R.; Fournier, K. B.; Emig, J.; Patterson, R.; Davis, J. F.; Seiler, S.; Jenkins, P. P.

    2012-10-01

    n existing x-ray source application (XRSA) test cassette was modified to hold multiple x-ray filter materials followed by two radiochromic film types (FWT-60 and HD-810 Gafchromic® film) to qualitatively characterize the spectral-spatial uniformity over the XRSA sample field of view. Multiple sets of film were examined and nominal set was determined. These initial, qualitative measurements suggest a low-energy regime (E < 3 keV) spatial anisotropy and spatial isotropy at higher energies (E > 3 keV).

  19. Determination of atmospheric aerosol properties over land using satellite measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kokhanovsky, A.A.; Leeuw, G. de

    2009-01-01

    Mostly, aerosol properties are poorly understood because the aerosol properties are very sparse. The first workshop on the determination of atmospheric aerosol properties over land using satellite measurements is convened in Bremen, Germany. In this workshop, the topics of discussions included a

  20. Probing spatial properties of electronic excitation in water after interaction with temporally shaped femtosecond laser pulses: Experiments and simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkler, Thomas; Sarpe, Cristian; Jelzow, Nikolai [Institute of Physics and CINSaT, University of Kassel, Heinrich-Plett-Str. 40, D-34132 Kassel (Germany); Lillevang, Lasse H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Götte, Nadine; Zielinski, Bastian [Institute of Physics and CINSaT, University of Kassel, Heinrich-Plett-Str. 40, D-34132 Kassel (Germany); Balling, Peter [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Senftleben, Arne [Institute of Physics and CINSaT, University of Kassel, Heinrich-Plett-Str. 40, D-34132 Kassel (Germany); Baumert, Thomas, E-mail: baumert@physik.uni-kassel.de [Institute of Physics and CINSaT, University of Kassel, Heinrich-Plett-Str. 40, D-34132 Kassel (Germany)

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • Temporally asymmetric shaped femtosecond laser pulses lead to excitation over smaller area and larger depth in water. • Transient optical properties are measured radially resolved by spectral interference in an imaging geometry. • Radially resolved spectral interference shows indications of nonlinear propagation effects at high fluences. - Abstract: In this work, laser excitation of water under ambient conditions is investigated by radially resolved common-path spectral interferometry. Water, as a sample system for dielectric materials, is excited by ultrashort bandwidth-limited and temporally asymmetric shaped femtosecond laser pulses, where the latter start with an intense main pulse followed by a decaying pulse sequence, i.e. a temporal Airy pulse. Spectral interference in an imaging geometry allows measurements of the transient optical properties integrated along the propagation through the sample but radially resolved with respect to the transverse beam profile. Since the optical properties reflect the dynamics of the free-electron plasma, such measurements reveal the spatial characteristics of the laser excitation. We conclude that temporally asymmetric shaped laser pulses are a promising tool for high-precision laser material processing, as they reduce the transverse area of excitation, but increase the excitation inside the material along the beam propagation.

  1. Measurement Properties of Instruments for Measuring of Lymphedema: Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidding, Janine T; Viehoff, Peter B; Beurskens, Carien H G; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G; van der Wees, Philip J

    2016-12-01

    Lymphedema is a common complication of cancer treatment, resulting in swelling and subjective symptoms. Reliable and valid measurement of this side effect of medical treatment is important. The purpose of this study was to provide best evidence regarding which measurement instruments are most appropriate in measuring lymphedema in its different stages. The PubMed and Web of Science databases were used, and the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines were followed. Clinical studies on measurement instruments assessing lymphedema were reviewed using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies-2 (QUADAS-2) scoring instrument for quality assessment. Data on reliability, concurrent validity, convergent validity, sensitivity, specificity, applicability, and costs were extracted. Pooled data showed good intrarater intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) (.89) for bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) in the lower extremities and high intrarater and interrater ICCs for water volumetry, tape measurement, and perometry (.98-.99) in the upper extremities. In the upper extremities, the standard error of measurement was 3.6% (σ=0.7%) for water volumetry, 5.6% (σ=2.1%) for perometry, and 6.6% (σ=2.6%) for tape measurement. Sensitivity of tape measurement in the upper extremities, using different cutoff points, varied from 0.73 to 0.90, and specificity values varied from 0.72 to 0.78. No uniform definition of lymphedema was available, and a gold standard as a reference test was lacking. Items concerning risk of bias were study design, patient selection, description of lymphedema, blinding of test outcomes, and number of included participants. Measurement instruments with evidence for good reliability and validity were BIS, water volumetry, tape measurement, and perometry, where BIS can detect alterations in extracellular fluid in stage 1 lymphedema and the other measurement instruments can detect alterations in volume

  2. Measurement Properties of Instruments for Measuring of Lymphedema: Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hidding, J.T.; Viehoff, P.B.; Beurskens, C.H.G.; Laarhoven, H.W. van; Sanden, M.W. van der; Wees, P.J. van der

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lymphedema is a common complication of cancer treatment, resulting in swelling and subjective symptoms. Reliable and valid measurement of this side effect of medical treatment is important. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to provide best evidence regarding which measurement

  3. Measurement of in-plane strain with dual beam spatial phase-shift digital shearography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Xin; Chen, Xu; Li, Junrui; Yang, Lianxiang; Wang, Yonghong

    2015-01-01

    Full-field in-plane strain measurement under dynamic loading by digital shearography remains a big challenge in practice. A phase measurement for in-plane strain information within one time frame has to be achieved to solve this problem. This paper presents a dual beam spatial phase-shift digital shearography system with the capacity to measure phase distribution corresponding to in-plane strain information within a single time frame. Two laser beams with different wavelengths are symmetrically arranged to illuminate the object under test, and two cameras with corresponding filters, which enable simultaneous recording of two shearograms, are utilized for data acquisition. The phase information from the recorded shearograms, which corresponds to the in-plane strain, is evaluated by the spatial phase-shift method. The spatial phase-shift shearography system realizes a measurement of the in-plane strain through the introduction of the spatial phase-shift technique, using one frame after the loading and one frame before loading. This paper presents the theory of the spatial phase-shift digital shearography for in-plane strain measurement and its derivation, experimental results, and the technique’s potential. (paper)

  4. Linear chirped slope profile for spatial calibration in slope measuring deflectometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siewert, F., E-mail: frank.siewert@helmholtz-berlin.de; Zeschke, T. [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Institut für Nanometer Optik und Technologie, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Arnold, T.; Paetzelt, H. [Leibnitz Institut für Oberflächen Modifizierung Leipzig e.V., IOM, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Yashchuk, V. V. [Lawerence Berkeley National Laboratory, Advanced Light Source, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Slope measuring deflectometry is commonly used by the X-ray optics community to measure the long-spatial-wavelength surface figure error of optical components dedicated to guide and focus X-rays under grazing incidence condition at synchrotron and free electron laser beamlines. The best performing instruments of this kind are capable of absolute accuracy on the level of 30-50 nrad. However, the exact bandwidth of the measurements, determined at the higher spatial frequencies by the instrument’s spatial resolution, or more generally by the instrument’s modulation transfer function (MTF) is hard to determine. An MTF calibration method based on application of a test surface with a one-dimensional (1D) chirped height profile of constant amplitude was suggested in the past. In this work, we propose a new approach to designing the test surfaces with a 2D-chirped topography, specially optimized for MTF characterization of slope measuring instruments. The design of the developed MTF test samples based on the proposed linear chirped slope profiles (LCSPs) is free of the major drawback of the 1D chirped height profiles, where in the slope domain, the amplitude strongly increases with the local spatial frequency of the profile. We provide the details of fabrication of the LCSP samples. The results of first application of the developed test samples to measure the spatial resolution of the BESSY-NOM at different experimental arrangements are also presented and discussed.

  5. Measurement methods for several properties of scintillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Fengqun; Ji Changsong

    1998-01-01

    The current paper describes the experimental measurement methods for the relative light output, the relative energy conversion efficiency, the intrinsic amplitude resolution and the detection efficiency of the scintillators and their temperature effects

  6. Spatial variability in alluvium properties at a low-level nuclear waste site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Istok, J.D.; Blout, D.O.; Barker, L.; Johnejack, K.R.; Hammermeister, D.P.

    1994-01-01

    Geological and statistical models for the spatial variability of soil properties are needed to predict field-scale water flow and solute transport but only limited information is currently available on unsaturated soils below the root zone. Spatial variability of selected physical and hydrologic properties was quantified for fine- and coarse-grained alluvial deposits at a low-level nuclear waste disposal site on the Nevada Test Site. Gravimetric water content (w), bulk density (ρ b ), saturated hydraulic conductivity (K a ), and particle-size distribution were determined for vertical and horizontal core specimens and bulk samples collected from 183-m-long horizontal transects in two existing waste disposal trenches located on a single alluvial fan. The transects were approximately aligned parallel and perpendicular to the principal direction of sediment transport. Properties were modeled as either normally or lognormally distributed random variables. Sample coefficients of variation were smallest for ρ b and largest for log(K a ); a weak correlation was identified between log(K a ) and the grain-size parameter d 10 . Particle-size distributions for the fine- and coarse-grained materials were different and significant differences in the natural logarithm of saturated hydraulic conductivity, log(K a ), existed between coarse and fine layers in an excavation aligned with the principal direction of alluvium deposition but not in a perpendicular direction. 37 refs., 7 figs., 11 tabs

  7. Manufacturing of different gel detectors and their calibration for spatial radiation dose measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bero, M.

    2008-05-01

    Three types of gel dosemeter have been made and their most important properties for radiation dosimetry were studied. The comparison between the three categories helps to widen knowledge in each of these detectors and to establish a method for the preparation as well as testing of this radiation sensitive materials. Experiments show the technical application possibility for using these gel detectors to measure the spatial radiation dose distribution in the range of doses given for cancer treatment. The experimental results give some important characteristic for the three gel dosemeter used in comparison to that of the traditional dosimetry systems. It also shows the simplicity of manufacturing the dosemeter from low cost materials and its radiation response to ionizing. The relationships between the dosemeter response and the dose rate as well as the radiation energy were also investigated. Important subjects that have been also taken into consideration are the effects of ambient conditions and storage likelihood of the studied materials. Recommendation was made for the use of these materials in practical applications and for handling as well as their long term storage possibility. (author)

  8. Improved algorithm for estimating optical properties of food and biological materials using spatially-resolved diffuse reflectance

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this research, the inverse algorithm for estimating optical properties of food and biological materials from spatially-resolved diffuse reflectance was optimized in terms of data smoothing, normalization and spatial region of reflectance profile for curve fitting. Monte Carlo simulation was used ...

  9. Interpolation Approaches for Characterizing Spatial Variability of Soil Properties in Tuz Lake Basin of Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorji, Taha; Sertel, Elif; Tanik, Aysegul

    2017-12-01

    Soil management is an essential concern in protecting soil properties, in enhancing appropriate soil quality for plant growth and agricultural productivity, and in preventing soil erosion. Soil scientists and decision makers require accurate and well-distributed spatially continuous soil data across a region for risk assessment and for effectively monitoring and managing soils. Recently, spatial interpolation approaches have been utilized in various disciplines including soil sciences for analysing, predicting and mapping distribution and surface modelling of environmental factors such as soil properties. The study area selected in this research is Tuz Lake Basin in Turkey bearing ecological and economic importance. Fertile soil plays a significant role in agricultural activities, which is one of the main industries having great impact on economy of the region. Loss of trees and bushes due to intense agricultural activities in some parts of the basin lead to soil erosion. Besides, soil salinization due to both human-induced activities and natural factors has exacerbated its condition regarding agricultural land development. This study aims to compare capability of Local Polynomial Interpolation (LPI) and Radial Basis Functions (RBF) as two interpolation methods for mapping spatial pattern of soil properties including organic matter, phosphorus, lime and boron. Both LPI and RBF methods demonstrated promising results for predicting lime, organic matter, phosphorous and boron. Soil samples collected in the field were used for interpolation analysis in which approximately 80% of data was used for interpolation modelling whereas the remaining for validation of the predicted results. Relationship between validation points and their corresponding estimated values in the same location is examined by conducting linear regression analysis. Eight prediction maps generated from two different interpolation methods for soil organic matter, phosphorus, lime and boron parameters

  10. Measurement of spatial dose-rate distribution using a position sensitive detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emoto, T.; Torii, T.; Nozaki, T.; Ando, H.

    1994-01-01

    Recently, the radiation detectors using plastic scintillation fibers (PSF) have been developed to measure the positions exposed to radiation such as neutrons and high energy charged particles. In particular, the time of flight (TOF) method for measuring the difference of time that two directional signals of scintillation light reach both ends of a PSF is a rather simple method for the measurement of the spatial distribution of fast neutron fluence rate. It is possible to use the PSF in nuclear facility working areas because of its flexibility, small diameter and long length. In order to apply TOF method to measure spatial gamma dose rate distribution, the characteristic tests of a detector using PSFs were carried out. First, the resolution of irradiated positions and the counting efficiency were measured with collimated gamma ray. The sensitivity to unit dose rate was also obtained. The measurement of spatial dose rate distribution was also carried out. The sensor is made of ten bundled PSFs, and the experimental setup is described. The experiment and the results are reported. It was found that the PSF detector has the good performance to measure spatial gamma dose rate distribution. (K.I.)

  11. Pressure measurement using thermal properties of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz Pessoa, Jose Dalton; Calbo, Adonai Gimenes

    2004-01-01

    This work presents a design and two methods, one isothermal and one isovolumetric, for pressure measurements based on the compressibility coefficient (κ) and thermal expansibility (α) of the fluid under test. The setup and relevant construction details are described. To demonstrate the applicability of the isovolumetric measurement method, the setup was calibrated with respect to a Bourdon-type manometer; the other isothermic method was analyzed to determine construction details that could realize resolution requirements. The authors determined the effect of ambient temperature on device operation and the time response of the isovolumetric method. The device can be used to estimate the compressibility of a fluid and, in addition, could become an alternative for direct plant cell turgor measurement

  12. Spatial Variability Analysis of Within-Field Winter Wheat Nitrogen and Grain Quality Using Canopy Fluorescence Sensor Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyu Song

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Wheat grain protein content (GPC is a key component when evaluating wheat nutrition. It is also important to determine wheat GPC before harvest for agricultural and food process enterprises in order to optimize the wheat grading process. Wheat GPC across a field is spatially variable due to the inherent variability of soil properties and position in the landscape. The objectives of this field study were: (i to assess the spatial and temporal variability of wheat nitrogen (N attributes related to the grain quality of winter wheat production through canopy fluorescence sensor measurements; and (ii to examine the influence of spatial variability of soil N and moisture across different growth stages on the wheat grain quality. A geostatistical approach was used to analyze data collected from 110 georeferenced locations. In particular, Ordinary Kriging Analysis (OKA was used to produce maps of wheat GPC, GPC yield, and wheat canopy fluorescence parameters, including simple florescence ratio and Nitrogen Balance Indices (NBI. Soil Nitrate-Nitrogen (NO3-N content and soil Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR value in the study field were also interpolated through the OKA method. The fluorescence parameter maps, soil NO3-N and soil TDR maps obtained from the OKA output were compared with the wheat GPC and GPC yield maps in order to assess their relationships. The results of this study indicate that the NBI spatial variability map in the late stage of wheat growth can be used to distinguish areas that produce higher GPC.

  13. Spatially telescoping measurements for improved characterization of groundwater-surface water interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Colin; Ferre, Ty P.A.; Welker, Jeffery M.

    2012-01-01

    The suite of measurement methods available to characterize fluxes between groundwater and surface water is rapidly growing. However, there are few studies that examine approaches to design of field investigations that include multiple methods. We propose that performing field measurements in a spatially telescoping sequence improves measurement flexibility and accounts for nested heterogeneities while still allowing for parsimonious experimental design. We applied this spatially telescoping approach in a study of ground water-surface water (GW-SW) interaction during baseflow conditions along Lucile Creek, located near Wasilla, Alaska. Catchment-scale data, including channel geomorphic indices and hydrogeologic transects, were used to screen areas of potentially significant GW-SW exchange. Specifically, these data indicated increasing groundwater contribution from a deeper regional aquifer along the middle to lower reaches of the stream. This initial assessment was tested using reach-scale estimates of groundwater contribution during baseflow conditions, including differential discharge measurements and the use of chemical tracers analyzed in a three-component mixing model. The reach-scale measurements indicated a large increase in discharge along the middle reaches of the stream accompanied by a shift in chemical composition towards a regional groundwater end member. Finally, point measurements of vertical water fluxes -- obtained using seepage meters as well as temperature-based methods -- were used to evaluate spatial and temporal variability of GW-SW exchange within representative reaches. The spatial variability of upward fluxes, estimated using streambed temperature mapping at the sub-reach scale, was observed to vary in relation to both streambed composition and the magnitude of groundwater contribution from differential discharge measurements. The spatially telescoping approach improved the efficiency of this field investigation. Beginning our assessment

  14. Methods of Evaluating Thermodynamic Properties of Landscape Cover Using Multispectral Reflected Radiation Measurements by the Landsat Satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuriy Puzachenko

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses methods of evaluating thermodynamic properties of landscape cover based on multi-spectral measurements by the Landsat satellites. Authors demonstrate how these methods could be used for studying functionality of landscapes and for spatial interpolation of Flux NET system measurements.

  15. Simultaneous measurements of transport and poroelastic properties of rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanov, Azar K; Prasad, Manika; Batzle, Michael L

    2017-12-01

    A novel laboratory apparatus has been developed for simultaneous measurements of transport and poroelastic rock properties. These transport and poroelastic properties at reservoir pressure and temperature conditions are required inputs for various geoscience applications, such as reservoir simulation, basin modeling, or modeling of pore pressure generation. Traditionally, the transport and poroelastic properties are measured separately using, for example, the oscillating pore pressure method to measure hydraulic transport properties, static strain measurements for elastic properties, and pore volumometry for storage capacity. In addition to time, the separate set of measurements require either aliquot cores or subjecting the same core to multiple pressure tests. We modified the oscillating pore pressure method to build an experimental setup, capable of measuring permeability, storage capacity, and pseudo-bulk modulus of rocks simultaneously. We present here the test method, calibration measurements (capillary tube), and sample measurements (sandstone) of permeability and storage capacity at reservoir conditions. We establish that hydraulically measured storage capacities were overestimated by an order of magnitude when compared to elastically derived ones. Our concurrent measurement of elastic properties during the hydraulic experiment provides an independent constraint on storage capacity.

  16. A novel method of measuring spatial rotation angle using MEMS tilt sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Jian’an; Zhu, Xin; Zhang, Leping; Wu, Hao

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method of measuring spatial rotation angle with a dual-axis micro-electro-mechanical systems tilt sensor. When the sensor is randomly mounted on the surface of the rotating object, there are three unpredictable and unknown mounting position parameters: α , the sensor’s swing angle on the measuring plane; β , the angle between the rotation axis and the horizontal plane; and γ , the angle between the measuring plane and the rotation axis. Thus, the sensor’s spatial rotation model is established to describe the relationship between the measuring axis, rotation axis, and horizontal plane, and the corresponding analytical equations are derived. Furthermore, to eliminate the deviation caused by the uncertain direction of the rotation axis, an extra perpendicularly mounted, single-axis tilt sensor is combined with the dual-axis tilt sensor, forming a three-axis tilt sensor. Then, by measuring the sensors’ three tilts and solving the model’s equations, the object’s spatial rotation angle is obtained. Finally, experimental results show that the developed tilt sensor is capable of measuring spatial rotation angle in the range of  ±180° with an accuracy of 0.2° if the angle between the rotation axis and the horizontal plane is less than 75°. (paper)

  17. Spatial variation of peat soil properties in the oil-producing region of northeastern Sakhalin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipatov, D. N.; Shcheglov, A. I.; Manakhov, D. V.; Zavgorodnyaya, Yu. A.; Rozanova, M. S.; Brekhov, P. T.

    2017-07-01

    Morphology and properties of medium-deep oligotrophic peat, oligotrophic peat gley, pyrogenic oligotrophic peat gley, and peat gley soils on subshrub-cotton grass-sphagnum bogs and in swampy larch forests of northeastern Sakhalin have been studied. Variation in the thickness and reserves of litters in the studied bog and forest biogeocenoses has been analyzed. The profile distribution and spatial variability of moisture, density, ash, and pHKCl in separate groups of peat soils have been described. The content and spatial variability of petroleum hydrocarbons have been considered in relation to the accumulation of natural bitumoids by peat soils and the technogenic pressing in the oil-producing region. Variation of each parameter at different distances (10, 50, and 1000 m) has been estimated using a hierarchical sampling scheme. The spatial conjugation of soil parameters has been studied by factor analysis using the principal components method and Spearman correlation coefficients. Regression equations have been proposed to describe relationships of ash content with soil density and content of petroleum hydrocarbons in peat horizons.

  18. Spatial and Temporal Variations of Aerosol Optical Properties during KORUS-AQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Y.; Ghim, Y. S.; Segal-Rosenhaimer, M.; Redemann, J.

    2017-12-01

    As part of the KORUS-AQ campaign, Aerosol Robotic Networks (AERONET) Cimel sunphotometers were deployed at more than 20 sites over Korea including the Seoul Metropolitan Area (SMA) and rural/background areas. We analyzed hourly mean values of fine and coarse mode aerosol optical depths (AODs), and fine mode fraction (FMF) from spectral deconvolution algorithm retrievals. The AERONET sites over Korea were classified into four groups - those in SMA, southeastern and southwestern parts of Korea, and background sites, which distribute similar results from particulate matter (PM) stations in Korea. Temporal and spatial variations of aerosol optical properties (AOPs) from the four groups were further examined using AODs from the Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR), which can provide denser spatial resolution than AERONET sites and PM stations. AOPs from more than 30 flights over SMA were also investigated to distinguish the characteristics of diurnal variations upwind and downwind of SMA. The spatial and temporal homogeneity and/or heterogeneity of AOPs are discussed in terms of meteorological variables, other pollutants and nearby emission sources.

  19. Spatial estimation of foliar phosphorus in different species of the genus Coffea based on soil properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel de Assis Silva

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Information underlying analyses of coffee fertilization systems should consider both the soil and the nutritional status of plants. This study investigated the spatial relationship between phosphorus (P levels in coffee plant tissues and soil chemical and physical properties. The study was performed using two arabica and one canephora coffee variety. Sampling grids were established in the areas, and the points georeferenced. The assessed properties of the soil were levels of available phosphorus (P-Mehlich, remaining phosphorus (P-rem and particle size, and of the plant tissue, phosphorus levels (foliar P. The data were subjected to descriptive statistical analysis, correlation analysis, cluster analysis, and probability tests. Geostatistical and trend analyses were only performed for pairs of variables with significant linear correlation. The spatial variability for foliar P content was high for the variety Catuai and medium for the other evaluated plants. Unlike P-Mehlich, the variability in P-rem of the soil indicated the nutritional status of this nutrient in the plant.

  20. Direct prediction of spatially and temporally varying physical properties from time-lapse electrical resistance data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Thomas; Oware, Erasmus; Caers, Jef

    2016-09-01

    Time-lapse applications of electrical methods have grown significantly over the last decade. However, the quantitative interpretation of tomograms in terms of physical properties, such as salinity, temperature or saturation, remains difficult. In many applications, geophysical models are transformed into hydrological models, but this transformation suffers from spatially and temporally varying resolution resulting from the regularization used by the deterministic inversion. In this study, we investigate a prediction-focused approach (PFA) to directly estimate subsurface physical properties with electrical resistance data, circumventing the need for classic tomographic inversions. First, we generate a prior set of resistance data and physical property forecast through hydrogeological and geophysical simulations mimicking the field experiment. We reduce the dimension of both the data and the forecast through principal component analysis in order to keep the most informative part of both sets in a reduced dimension space. Then, we apply canonical correlation analysis to explore the relationship between the data and the forecast in their reduced dimension space. If a linear relationship can be established, the posterior distribution of the forecast can be directly sampled using a Gaussian process regression where the field data scores are the conditioning data. In this paper, we demonstrate PFA for various physical property distributions. We also develop a framework to propagate the estimated noise level in the reduced dimension space. We validate the results by a Monte Carlo study on the posterior distribution and demonstrate that PFA yields accurate uncertainty for the cases studied.

  1. Probabilistic evaluation method of stability of ground and slope considering spatial randomness of soil properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtori, Yasuki

    2004-01-01

    In the JEAG4601-1987 (Japan Electric Association Guide for earthquake resistance design), either the conventional deterministic method or probabilistic method is used for evaluating the stability of ground foundations and surrounding slopes in nuclear power plants. The deterministic method, in which the soil properties of 'mean ± coefficient x standard deviation' is adopted for the calculations, is generally used in the design stage to data. On the other hand, the probabilistic method, in which the soil properties assume to have probabilistic distributions, is stated as a future method. The deterministic method facilitates the evaluation, however, it is necessary to clarify the relation with the probabilistic method. In this paper, the relationship between the deterministic and the probabilistic methods are investigated. To do that, a simple model that can take into account the dynamic effect of structures and a simplified method for accounting the spatial randomness are proposed and used for the studies. As the results of studies, it is found that the strength of soil properties is most importation factor for the stability of ground structures and the probability below the safety factor evaluated with the soil properties of mean -1.0 x standard deviation' by the deterministic method is of much lower. (author)

  2. FIM measurement properties and Rasch model details.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, B D; Linacre, J M; Smith, R M; Heinemann, A W; Granger, C V

    1997-12-01

    To summarize, we take issue with the criticisms of Dickson & Köhler for two main reasons: 1. Rasch analysis provides a model from which to approach the analysis of the FIM, an ordinal scale, as an interval scale. The existence of examples of items or individuals which do not fit the model does not disprove the overall efficacy of the model; and 2. the principal components analysis of FIM motor items as presented by Dickson & Köhler tends to undermine rather than support their argument. Their own analyses produce a single major factor explaining between 58.5 and 67.1% of the variance, depending upon the sample, with secondary factors explaining much less variance. Finally, analysis of item response, or latent trait, is a powerful method for understanding the meaning of a measure. However, it presumes that item scores are accurate. Another concern is that Dickson & Köhler do not address the issue of reliability of scoring the FIM items on which they report, a critical point in comparing results. The Uniform Data System for Medical Rehabilitation (UDSMRSM) expends extensive effort in the training of clinicians of subscribing facilities to score items accurately. This is followed up with a credentialing process. Phase 1 involves the testing of individual clinicians who are submitting data to determine if they have achieved mastery over the use of the FIM instrument. Phase 2 involves examining the data for outlying values. When Dickson & Köhler investigate more carefully the application of the Rasch model to their FIM data, they will discover that the results presented in their paper support rather than contradict their application of the Rasch model! This paper is typical of supposed refutations of Rasch model applications. Dickson & Köhler will find that idiosyncrasies in their data and misunderstandings of the Rasch model are the only basis for a claim to have disproven the relevance of the model to FIM data. The Rasch model is a mathematical theorem (like

  3. Spatial filtering velocimetry for real-time out-of-plane displacement measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anders Sig; Yura, H.T.; Jakobsen, Michael Linde

    2016-01-01

    power spectrum of the photocurrent produced by this filter. This main contribution of this paper is a model, which describe the selectivity of the sensor, applied to speckle dynamics generated by an object moving out-of-plane. To motivate our interest in these filters we also present an all optical......We probe the dynamics of objective laser speckles as the axial distance between the object and the observation plane changes. With the purpose of measuring out-of-plane motion in real time, we apply optical spatial filtering velocimetry to the speckle dynamics. To achieve this, a rotationally...... symmetric spatial filter is designed. The spatial filter converts the speckle dynamics into a photocurrent with a quasi-sinusoidal response to the out-of-plane motion. The selectivity of the sensor relates directly to the uncertainty on sensor measurements. The selectivity most be derived from a temporal...

  4. IMAP: Interferometry for Material Property Measurement in MEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, B.D.; Miller, S.L.; de Boer, M.P.

    1999-03-10

    An interferometric technique has been developed for non-destructive, high-confidence, in-situ determination of material properties in MEMS. By using interferometry to measure the full deflection curves of beams pulled toward the substrate under electrostatic loads, the actual behavior of the beams has been modeled. No other method for determining material properties allows such detailed knowledge of device behavior to be gathered. Values for material properties and non-idealities (such as support post compliance) have then been extracted which minimize the error between the measured and modeled deflections. High accuracy and resolution have been demonstrated, allowing the measurements to be used to enhance process control.

  5. Dissociations of spatial congruence effects across response measures: an examination of delta plots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jeff; Roüast, Nora M

    2016-09-01

    Spatial congruence ("Simon") effects on reaction time (RT) and response force (RF) were studied in two experiments requiring speeded choice responses to the color of a stimulus located irrelevantly to the left or right of fixation. In Experiment 1 with unimanual responses, both RT and incorrect-hand RF were sensitive to spatial congruence, and both showed larger Simon effects following a congruent trial than following an incongruent one. RT and incorrect-hand RF were dissociated in distributional (i.e., delta plot) analyses, however. As in previous studies, the Simon effect on RT was largest for the fastest responses and diminished as RT increased (i.e., decreasing delta plot). In contrast, Simon effects on RF did not decrease for slower responses; if anything, they increased slightly. In Experiment 2 participants made bimanual responses, allowing measurement of the spatial congruence effect for each trial. Responses were both faster and more forceful with the spatially congruent hand than with the spatially incongruent one, but neither of these effects decreased for slower responses. Overall, the results demonstrate that at least some motor-level effects of irrelevant spatial location persist for slower responses.

  6. Spatially resolving the dust properties and submillimetre excess in M 33

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relaño, M.; De Looze, I.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Lisenfeld, U.; Dariush, A.; Verley, S.; Braine, J.; Tabatabaei, F.; Kramer, C.; Boquien, M.; Xilouris, M.; Gratier, P.

    2018-05-01

    Context. The relative abundance of the dust grain types in the interstellar medium is directly linked to physical quantities that trace the evolution of galaxies. Because of the poor spatial resolution of the infrared and submillimetre data, we are able to study the dependence of the resolved infrared spectral energy distribution (SED) across regions of the interstellar medium (ISM) with different physical properties in just a few objects. Aims: We aim to study the dust properties of the whole disc of M 33 at spatial scales of 170 pc. This analysis allows us to infer how the relative dust grain abundance changes with the conditions of the ISM, study the existence of a submillimetre excess and look for trends of the gas-to-dust mass ratio (GDR) with other physical properties of the galaxy. Methods: For each pixel in the disc of M 33 we have fitted the infrared SED using a physically motivated dust model that assumes an emissivity index β close to two. We applied a Bayesian statistical method to fit the individual SEDs and derived the best output values from the study of the probability density function of each parameter. We derived the relative amount of the different dust grains in the model, the total dust mass, and the strength of the interstellar radiation field (ISRF) heating the dust at each spatial location. Results: The relative abundance of very small grains tends to increase, and for big grains to decrease, at high values of Hα luminosity. This shows that the dust grains are modified inside the star-forming regions, in agreement with a theoretical framework of dust evolution under different physical conditions. The radial dependence of the GDR is consistent with the shallow metallicity gradient observed in this galaxy. The strength of the ISRF derived in our model correlates with the star formation rate in the galaxy in a pixel by pixel basis. Although this is expected, it is the first time that a correlation between the two quantities has been reported

  7. Corticostriatal Divergent Function in Determining the Temporal and Spatial Properties of Motor Tics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israelashvili, Michal; Bar-Gad, Izhar

    2015-12-16

    Striatal disinhibition leads to the formation of motor tics resembling those expressed during Tourette syndrome and other tic disorders. The spatial properties of these tics are dependent on the location of the focal disinhibition within the striatum; however, the factors affecting the temporal properties of tic expression are still unknown. Here, we used microstimulation within the motor cortex of freely behaving rats before and after striatal disinhibition to explore the factors underlying the timing of individual tics. Cortical activation determined the timing of individual tics via an accumulation process of inputs that was dependent on the frequency and amplitude of the inputs. The resulting tics and their neuronal representation within the striatum were highly stereotypic and independent of the cortical activity properties. The generation of tics was limited by absolute and relative tic refractory periods that were derived from an internal striatal state. Thus, the precise time of the tic expression depends on the interaction between the summation of incoming excitatory inputs to the striatum and the timing of the previous tic. A data-driven computational model of corticostriatal function closely replicated the temporal properties of tic generation and enabled the prediction of tic timing based on incoming cortical activity and tic history. These converging experimental and computational findings suggest a clear functional dichotomy within the corticostriatal network, pointing to disparate temporal (cortical) versus spatial (striatal) encoding. Thus, the abnormal striatal inhibition typical of Tourette syndrome and other tic disorders results in tics due to cortical activation of the abnormal striatal network. The factors underlying the temporal properties of tics expressed in Tourette syndrome and other tic disorders have eluded clinicians and scientists for decades. In this study, we highlight the key role of corticostriatal activity in determining the

  8. Experimental measurements of shock properties of stishovite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furnish, M.D.; Ito, E.

    1996-01-01

    We have synthesized, characterized and performed Hugoniot measurements on monolithic samples of stishovite. Synthesis was accomplished in a multianvil press with pyrophyllite gaskets and carbon heaters. The samples had densities ranging from 3.80 to 4.07Mg/m 3 , corresponding to stishovite volume fractions of 0.7 to 0.87, a range confirmed by NMR analysis. They had no significant impurities except less than 1% carbon. Samples ∼1 mm thick and 3 mm diameter were tested in reverse- and forward-ballistics modes on a two-stage light gas gun, using velocity interferometry diagnostics. Impact velocities ranged from 4.0 to 6.5 km/sec. Hugoniot stresses for the four successful tests ranged from 65 to 225GPa. At higher stresses significant uncertainties arise due to impact tilt/nonplanarity issues. Results are consistent with earlier predictions of the stishovite Hugoniot based on quartz-centered Hugoniot data, static-compression (diamond-anvil cell) data and hydrostatic multianvil cell data. Release behavior appears to be frozen. These results are remarkable in view of the small size of the samples used. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  9. Temporal and spatial assessments of minimum air temperature using satellite surface temperature measurements in Massachusetts, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloog, Itai; Chudnovsky, Alexandra; Koutrakis, Petros; Schwartz, Joel

    2012-08-15

    Although meteorological stations provide accurate air temperature observations, their spatial coverage is limited and thus often insufficient for epidemiological studies. Satellite data expand spatial coverage, enhancing our ability to estimate near surface air temperature (Ta). However, the derivation of Ta from surface temperature (Ts) measured by satellites is far from being straightforward. In this study, we present a novel approach that incorporates land use regression, meteorological variables and spatial smoothing to first calibrate between Ts and Ta on a daily basis and then predict Ta for days when satellite Ts data were not available. We applied mixed regression models with daily random slopes to calibrate Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Ts data with monitored Ta measurements for 2003. Then, we used a generalized additive mixed model with spatial smoothing to estimate Ta in days with missing Ts. Out-of-sample tenfold cross-validation was used to quantify the accuracy of our predictions. Our model performance was excellent for both days with available Ts and days without Ts observations (mean out-of-sample R(2)=0.946 and R(2)=0.941 respectively). Furthermore, based on the high quality predictions we investigated the spatial patterns of Ta within the study domain as they relate to urban vs. non-urban land uses. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Measurement of spatial dose distribution for evaluation operator dose during nero-interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Su Chul; Hong, Dong Hee

    2016-01-01

    The spatial dose distribution was measured with ionization chamber as preliminary study to evaluate operator dose and to study dose reduction during neuro-interventional procedures. The zone of operators was divided into four area (45, 135, 225, and 315 degree).We supposed that operator exist on the four area and indicated location of critical organs(eyes, breast, gonad). The spatial doses were measured depending on distance( 80, 100, 120, and 140 cm) and location of critical organs. The spatial doses of area of 225 degree were 114.5 mR/h (eyes location), 143.1 mR/h (breast location) and 147 mR/h (gonad location) in 80 cm. When changed location of x-ray generator, spatial dose increased in 18.1±10.5%, averagely. We certified spatial dose in the operator locations, Using the results of this study, It is feasible to protect operator from radiation in neuro-interventional procedures

  11. Measurement of spatial dose distribution for evaluation operator dose during nero-interventional procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Su Chul [Division of Medical Radiation Equipment, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Dong Hee [Dept. of Radiology Science, Far East University, Eumseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    The spatial dose distribution was measured with ionization chamber as preliminary study to evaluate operator dose and to study dose reduction during neuro-interventional procedures. The zone of operators was divided into four area (45, 135, 225, and 315 degree).We supposed that operator exist on the four area and indicated location of critical organs(eyes, breast, gonad). The spatial doses were measured depending on distance( 80, 100, 120, and 140 cm) and location of critical organs. The spatial doses of area of 225 degree were 114.5 mR/h (eyes location), 143.1 mR/h (breast location) and 147 mR/h (gonad location) in 80 cm. When changed location of x-ray generator, spatial dose increased in 18.1±10.5%, averagely. We certified spatial dose in the operator locations, Using the results of this study, It is feasible to protect operator from radiation in neuro-interventional procedures.

  12. Quantifying measurement uncertainty and spatial variability in the context of model evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choukulkar, A.; Brewer, A.; Pichugina, Y. L.; Bonin, T.; Banta, R. M.; Sandberg, S.; Weickmann, A. M.; Djalalova, I.; McCaffrey, K.; Bianco, L.; Wilczak, J. M.; Newman, J. F.; Draxl, C.; Lundquist, J. K.; Wharton, S.; Olson, J.; Kenyon, J.; Marquis, M.

    2017-12-01

    In an effort to improve wind forecasts for the wind energy sector, the Department of Energy and the NOAA funded the second Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP2). As part of the WFIP2 field campaign, a large suite of in-situ and remote sensing instrumentation was deployed to the Columbia River Gorge in Oregon and Washington from October 2015 - March 2017. The array of instrumentation deployed included 915-MHz wind profiling radars, sodars, wind- profiling lidars, and scanning lidars. The role of these instruments was to provide wind measurements at high spatial and temporal resolution for model evaluation and improvement of model physics. To properly determine model errors, the uncertainties in instrument-model comparisons need to be quantified accurately. These uncertainties arise from several factors such as measurement uncertainty, spatial variability, and interpolation of model output to instrument locations, to name a few. In this presentation, we will introduce a formalism to quantify measurement uncertainty and spatial variability. The accuracy of this formalism will be tested using existing datasets such as the eXperimental Planetary boundary layer Instrumentation Assessment (XPIA) campaign. Finally, the uncertainties in wind measurement and the spatial variability estimates from the WFIP2 field campaign will be discussed to understand the challenges involved in model evaluation.

  13. Ultrasonic motion analysis system - measurement of temporal and spatial gait parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huitema, RB; Hof, AL; Postema, K

    The duration of stance and swing phase and step and stride length are important parameters in human gait. In this technical note a low-cost ultrasonic motion analysis system is described that is capable of measuring these temporal and spatial parameters while subjects walk on the floor. By using the

  14. Measurement of thermal neutron flux spatial distribution in the IEA-R1 reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Utra Bitelli, U.

    1993-01-01

    This work presents the spatial thermal neutron flux in IEA-R1 reactor obtained by activation foils methods. These measurements were made in 27 fuel elements of the reactor core (165 B configuration). The results are important to compare with theoretical values, power calibration and safety analysis. (author)

  15. Development of spatial heterogeneity in vegetation and soil properties after land abandonment in a semi-arid ecosystem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lesschen, J.P.; Cammeraat, L.H.; Kooijman, A.M.; van Wesemael, B.

    2008-01-01

    To mitigate erosion on abandoned fields in semi-arid ecosystems, it is important to understand how vegetation and soil properties and patterns develop after land abandonment. Our objective was to investigate the development of spatial heterogeneity in vegetation and soil properties after land

  16. A measure of localization properties of one-dimensional single electron lattice systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Longyan; Li, Wenjia; Zhao, Shengmei; Cheng, Weiwen

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel quantity to measure the degree of localization properties of various types of one-dimension single electron states. The quantity includes information about the spatial variation of probability density of quantum states. Numerical results show that it can distinguish localized states from delocalized ones, so it can be used as a fruitful index to monitor the localization–delocalization transition. Comparing with existing measures, such as geometric average density of states, inverse participation ratio, and quantum information entropies, our proposed quantity has some advantages over them. - Highlights: • A novel quantity is proposed to measure the degree of localization. • It includes information about the spatial variation of probability density. • It is a fruitful index to monitor the localization–delocalization transition.

  17. Measurement of inherent optical properties in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Suresh, T.; Desa, E.; Kurian, J.; Mascarenhas, A.A.M.Q.

    Inherent optical properties, absorption and began attenuation were measured in situ using a reflective tube absorption meter at nint wavelength, 412, 440, 488, 510, 555, 630, 650, 676 and 715 nm, in the Arabian Sea during March. Since inherent...

  18. Measurements of the Higgs boson properties with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Tomoto, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    Slide draft for the Crimea 2013 workshop. The subject of the talk will be measurements of the Higgs boson properties, including the spin, mass, signal strength, and couplings of a new boson discovered in 2012 at the ATLAS experiment.

  19. Image properties of list mode likelihood reconstruction for a rectangular positron emission mammography with DOI measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, Jinyi; Klein, Gregory J.; Huesman, Ronald H.

    2000-01-01

    A positron emission mammography scanner is under development at our Laboratory. The tomograph has a rectangular geometry consisting of four banks of detector modules. For each detector, the system can measure the depth of interaction information inside the crystal. The rectangular geometry leads to irregular radial and angular sampling and spatially variant sensitivity that are different from conventional PET systems. Therefore, it is of importance to study the image properties of the reconstructions. We adapted the theoretical analysis that we had developed for conventional PET systems to the list mode likelihood reconstruction for this tomograph. The local impulse response and covariance of the reconstruction can be easily computed using FFT. These theoretical results are also used with computer observer models to compute the signal-to-noise ratio for lesion detection. The analysis reveals the spatially variant resolution and noise properties of the list mode likelihood reconstruction. The theoretical predictions are in good agreement with Monte Carlo results

  20. Highlights of top quark properties measurements at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Barranco Navarro, Laura; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The top quark is the heaviest known fundamental particle. As it is the only quark that decays before it hadronizes, this gives the unique opportunity to probe the properties of bare quarks. This talk focuses on a few recent precision measurements of top quark properties in production and decay by the ATLAS Collaboration. Measurements of the top quark mass and searches for rare top quark decays are also presented.

  1. Highlights of top quark properties measurements at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Barranco Navarro, Laura; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The top quark is the heaviest known fundamental particle. As it is the only quark that decays before it hadronizes, this gives the unique opportunity to probe the properties of bare quarks. This talk will focus on a few recent precision measurements of top quark properties in production and decay by the ATLAS Collaboration. Measurements of the top quark mass and searches for rare top quark decays are also presented.

  2. Measurement of Spatial Coherence of Light Propagating in a Turbulent Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Barcik

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A lot of issues have to be taken into account when designing a reliable free space optical communication link. Among these are e.g.,beam wander, fluctuation of optical intensity and loss of spatial coherence that are caused by atmospheric turbulence. This paper presents experimental measurements of spatial coherence of a laser beam. The experimental setup is based on Young's double pinhole experiment. Fringe patterns under atmospheric turbulence for four different pinhole separations are presented. From these fringe patterns, visibility is determined and the coherence radius is estimated.

  3. Force scanning: a rapid, high-resolution approach for spatial mechanical property mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darling, E M

    2011-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can be used to co-localize mechanical properties and topographical features through property mapping techniques. The most common approach for testing biological materials at the microscale and nanoscale is force mapping, which involves taking individual force curves at discrete sites across a region of interest. The limitations of force mapping include long testing times and low resolution. While newer AFM methodologies, like modulated scanning and torsional oscillation, circumvent this problem, their adoption for biological materials has been limited. This could be due to their need for specialized software algorithms and/or hardware. The objective of this study is to develop a novel force scanning technique using AFM to rapidly capture high-resolution topographical images of soft biological materials while simultaneously quantifying their mechanical properties. Force scanning is a straightforward methodology applicable to a wide range of materials and testing environments, requiring no special modification to standard AFMs. Essentially, if a contact-mode image can be acquired, then force scanning can be used to produce a spatial modulus map. The current study first validates this technique using agarose gels, comparing results to ones achieved by the standard force mapping approach. Biologically relevant demonstrations are then presented for high-resolution modulus mapping of individual cells, cell-cell interfaces, and articular cartilage tissue.

  4. Spatially resolved density and ionization measurements of shocked foams using x-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, M. J.; Keiter, P. A.; Montgomery, D. S.; Scott, H. A.; Biener, M. M.; Fein, J. R.; Fournier, K. B.; Gamboa, E. J.; Kemp, G. E.; Klein, S. R.; Kuranz, C. C.; LeFevre, H. J.; Manuel, M. J. -E.; Wan, W. C.; Drake, R. P.

    2016-09-28

    We present experiments at the Trident laser facility demonstrating the use of x-ray fluorescence (XRF) to simultaneously measure density, ionization state populations, and electron temperature in shocked foams. An imaging x-ray spectrometer obtained spatially resolved measurements of Ti K-α emission. Density profiles were measured from K-α intensity. Ti ionization state distributions and electron temperatures were inferred by fitting K-α spectra to spectra from CRETIN simulations. This work shows that XRF provides a powerful tool to complement other diagnostics to make equation of state measurements of shocked materials containing a suitable tracer element.

  5. Crossed Optical Fiber Sensor Arrays for High-Spatial-Resolution Sensing: Application to Dissolved Oxygen Concentration Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Veronica Rigo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical fiber sensors using luminescent probes located along an optical fiber in the cladding of this fiber are of great interest for monitoring physical and chemical properties in their environment. The interrogation of a luminophore with a short laser pulse propagating through the fiber core allows for the measurement of the location of these luminophores. To increase the spatial resolution of such a measurements and to measure multiple analytes and properties in a confined space, a crossed optical fiber sensing platform can be employed. Here we describe the application of this platform to measuring the concentration of dissolved oxygen. The sensor is based on luminescence quenching of a ruthenium complex immobilized in a highly crosslinked film and covalently attached to the optical fibers. Both luminescence-intensity and luminescence-lifetime changes of the sensor molecules in response to changes in the concentration of oxygen dissolved in water are reported. For luminescence-intensity measurements, a second adjacent sensor region is employed as reference to account for laser pulse energy fluctuations. Enhanced quenching response in water is demonstrated by the use of organically modified poly(ethylene glycol precursors, which increase the hydrophobicity of the film surface.

  6. Spectral and spatial resolution properties of photon counting X-ray detectors like the Medipix-Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korn, A.

    2007-01-01

    resolutions. The simulations using the augmented ROSI program allow a perfect reproduction of the measurements. The phenomenon of the low frequency drop, known from previous measurements of the Medipix detector's MTF, can be explained with backscattering inside the detector. For the development of the next generation of detectors, Medipix3, it's prospective properties were implemented into the simulations. In comparison to Medipix2, a significant amelioration of the energy resolution may be expected. Beyond this, a method was developed permitting to maintain the high spatial resolution of Medipix2 with Medipix3. (orig.)

  7. Spatial cluster detection for repeatedly measured outcomes while accounting for residential history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Andrea J; Gold, Diane R; Li, Yi

    2009-10-01

    Spatial cluster detection has become an important methodology in quantifying the effect of hazardous exposures. Previous methods have focused on cross-sectional outcomes that are binary or continuous. There are virtually no spatial cluster detection methods proposed for longitudinal outcomes. This paper proposes a new spatial cluster detection method for repeated outcomes using cumulative geographic residuals. A major advantage of this method is its ability to readily incorporate information on study participants relocation, which most cluster detection statistics cannot. Application of these methods will be illustrated by the Home Allergens and Asthma prospective cohort study analyzing the relationship between environmental exposures and repeated measured outcome, occurrence of wheeze in the last 6 months, while taking into account mobile locations.

  8. High Speed and High Spatial Density Parameter Measurement Using Fiber Optic Sensing Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Allen R. Jr. (Inventor); Chan, Hon Man (Inventor); Richards, William Lance (Inventor); Piazza, Anthony (Inventor); Hamory, Philip J (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The present invention is an improved fiber optic sensing system (FOSS) having the ability to provide both high spatial resolution and high frequency strain measurements. The inventive hybrid FOSS fiber combines sensors from high acquisition speed and low spatial resolution Wavelength-Division Multiplexing (WDM) systems and from low acquisition speed and high spatial resolution Optical Frequency Domain Reflection (OFDR) systems. Two unique light sources utilizing different wavelengths are coupled with the hybrid FOSS fiber to generate reflected data from both the WDM sensors and OFDR sensors operating on a single fiber optic cable without incurring interference from one another. The two data sets are then de-multiplexed for analysis, optionally with conventionally-available WDM and OFDR system analyzers.

  9. Expanding Talent Search Procedures by Including Measures of Spatial Ability: CTY's Spatial Test Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpf, Heinrich; Mills, Carol J.; Brody, Linda E.; Baxley, Philip G.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of spatial ability for success in a variety of domains, particularly in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM), is widely acknowledged. Yet, students with high spatial ability are rarely identified, as Talent Searches for academically talented students focus on identifying high mathematical and verbal abilities.…

  10. Measurements of the top-quark properties at CMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafari Abideh

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We present different measurements of the top quark properties in production and decay. The measurements are performed using the LHC proton-proton (pp collisions at 7 TeV and 8 TeV center-of-mass energies collected by the CMS detector during 2011 and 2012 runs, respectively. The study of production properties consists of charge asymmetry, tt¯$tar t$ spin correlation and the vector boson associated production of tt¯$tar t$. The top quark properties in decay are studied via the measurement of the b-quark content, R = ℬ(t → Wb/ℬ(t → Wq, the top quark charge, the FCNC process of t → Zq and the W-helicity fractions. The results of the last measurement are used to set limits on the tWb anomalous couplings. The W-helicity fractions are measured in the electroweakly produced (single- top quarks, too.

  11. Measurement of dielectric and magnetic properties of soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patitz, W.E.; Brock, B.C.; Powell, E.G.

    1995-11-01

    The possibility of subsurface imaging using SAR technology has generated a considerable amount of interest in recent years. One requirement for the successful development of a subsurface imagin system is an understanding of how the soil affects the signal. In response to a need for an electromagnetic characterization of the soil properties, the Radar/Antenna department has developed a measurement system which determines the soils complex electric permittivity and magnetic permeability at UHF frequencies. The one way loss in dB is also calculated using the measured values. There are many reports of measurements of the electric properties of soil in the literature. However, most of these are primarily concerned with measuring only a real dielectric constant. Because some soils have ferromagnetic constituents it is desirable to measure both the electric and magnetic properties of the soil

  12. The experimental method of measurement for spatial distribution of full aperture backscatter light by circular PIN-array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xuefeng; Wang Chuanke; Hu Feng; Kuang Longyu; Wang Zhebin; Li Sanwei; Liu Shengye; Jiang Gang

    2011-01-01

    The spatial distribution of backscatter light is very important for understanding the production of backscatter light. The experimental method of spatial distribution of full aperture backscatter light is based on the circular PIN array composed of concentric orbicular multi-PIN detectors. The image of backscatter light spatial distribution of full aperture SBS is obtained by measuring spatial distribution of full aperture backscatter light using the method in the experiment of laser hohlraum targets interaction at 'Shenguang II'. A preliminary method to measure spatial distribution of full aperture backscatter light is established. (authors)

  13. Simultaneous weak measurement of angular and spatial Goos-Hänchen and Imbert-Fedorov shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Chandravati; Viswanathan, Nirmal K.

    2017-10-01

    We propose and demonstrate the weak measurement scheme to simultaneously measure the amplified angular and spatial contributions to the Goos-Hänchen (GH) and Imbert-Fedorov (IF) shifts, due to transmission through a glass plate. We have studied two cases of post-selection using a polarizer in the first case and a quarter-wave plate (QWP)-polarizer combination in the second case. The two cases are analyzed theoretically using Jones calculus of polarization formalism and the results are verified experimentally. In the first case of post-selection, the projection of the polarizer at +/- {{Δ }} away from the crossed position amplifies the angular GH and IF shifts, while in the second case of post-selection, the projection of QWP at +/- {{Δ }} and polarizer kept fixed measures the polarization ellipticity in the beam and thus amplifies the spatial shift along with the angular shift simultaneously, for {{Δ }}\\ll 1.

  14. Environmental determinants and spatial mismatch of mammal diversity measures in Colombia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Maya, J.F.; Arias-Alzate, A.; Granados-Peña, R.; Mancera-Rodriguez, N.J.; Ceballos, G.

    2016-07-01

    Including complementary diversity measures into ecological and conservation studies should improve our ability to link species assemblages to ecosystems. Recent measures such as phylogenetic and functional diversity have furthered our understanding of assemblage patterns of ecosystems and species, allowing improved inference of ecosystem function and conservation. We evaluated spatial patterns of taxonomic, phylogenetic and functional diversity of mammals in Colombia and identified their main environmental determinants, as well as interrelationships and spatial mismatch between the three measures. We found significant effects of elevation and precipitation on species richness, slope and species richness on phylogenetic diversity, and slope and phylogenetic diversity on functional diversity. We also identified a spatial mismatch of the three measures in some areas of the country: 12% of the country for species richness and 14% for phylogenetic and functional diversity. Our results highlight the importance of including species relationships within environmental drivers with biogeographical and distribution analyses and could facilitate selection of priority areas for conservation, especially when mismatch occurs between measures. (Author)

  15. Environmental determinants and spatial mismatch of mammal diversity measures in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González–Maya, J. F.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Including complementary diversity measures into ecological and conservation studies should improve our ability to link species assemblages to ecosystems. Recent measures such as phylogenetic and functional diversity have furthered our understanding of assemblage patterns of ecosystems and species, allowing improved inference of ecosystem function and conservation. We evaluated spatial patterns of taxonomic, phylogenetic and functional diversity of mammals in Colombia and identified their main environmental determinants, as well as interrelationships and spatial mismatch between the three measures. We found significant effects of elevation and precipitation on species richness, slope and species richness on phylogenetic diversity, and slope and phylogenetic diversity on functional diversity. We also identified a spatial mismatch of the three measures in some areas of the country: 12% of the country for species richness and 14% for phylogenetic and functional diversity. Our results highlight the importance of including species relationships within environmental drivers with biogeographical and distribution analyses and could facilitate selection of priority areas for conservation, especially when mismatch occurs between measures.

  16. 2D Spatial Frequency Considerations in Comparing 1D Power Spectral Density Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takacs, P.Z.; Barber, S.; Church, E.L.; Kaznatcheev, K.; McKinney, W.R.; Yashchuk, V.Y.

    2010-01-01

    The frequency footprint of ID and 2D profiling instruments needs to be carefully considered in comparing ID surface roughness spectrum measurements made by different instruments. Contributions from orthogonal direction frequency components can not be neglected. The use of optical profiling instruments is ubiquitous in the measurement of the roughness of optical surfaces. Their ease-of-use and non-contact measurement method found widespread use in the optics industry for measuring the quality of delicate optical surfaces. Computerized digital data acquisition with these instruments allowed for quick and easy calculation of surface roughness statistics, such as root-mean-square (RMS) roughness. The computing power of the desktop computer allowed for the rapid conversion of spatial domain data into the frequency domain, enabling the application of sophisticated signal processing techniques to be applied to the analysis of surface roughness, the most powerful of which is the power spectral density (PSP) function. Application of the PSD function to surface statistics introduced the concept of 'bandwidth-limited' roughness, where the value of the RMS roughness depends critically upon the spatial frequency response of the instrument. Different instruments with different spatial frequency response characteristics give different answers when measuring the same surface.

  17. Application of spatial time domain reflectometry measurements in heterogeneous, rocky substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, C.; Scheuermann, A.; Arnold, S.; Baumgartl, T.

    2016-10-01

    Measurement of soil moisture across depths using sensors is currently limited to point measurements or remote sensing technologies. Point measurements have limitations on spatial resolution, while the latter, although covering large areas may not represent real-time hydrologic processes, especially near the surface. The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of elongated soil moisture probes—spatial time domain reflectometry (STDR)—and to describe transient soil moisture dynamics of unconsolidated mine waste rock materials. The probes were calibrated under controlled conditions in the glasshouse. Transient soil moisture content was measured using the gravimetric method and STDR. Volumetric soil moisture content derived from weighing was compared with values generated from a numerical model simulating the drying process. A calibration function was generated and applied to STDR field data sets. The use of elongated probes effectively assists in the real-time determination of the spatial distribution of soil moisture. It also allows hydrologic processes to be uncovered in the unsaturated zone, especially for water balance calculations that are commonly based on point measurements. The elongated soil moisture probes can potentially describe transient substrate processes and delineate heterogeneity in terms of the pore size distribution in a seasonally wet but otherwise arid environment.

  18. SDSS IV MaNGA: Dependence of Global and Spatially Resolved SFR–M ∗ Relations on Galaxy Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hsi-An; Lin, Lihwai; Hsieh, Bau-Ching; Sánchez, Sebastián F.; Ibarra-Medel, Héctor; Boquien, Médéric; Lacerna, Ivan; Argudo-Fernández, Maria; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Cano-Díaz, Mariana; Drory, Niv; Gao, Yang; Masters, Karen; Pan, Kaike; Tabor, Martha; Tissera, Patricia; Xiao, Ting

    2018-02-01

    The galaxy integrated Hα star formation rate–stellar mass relation, or SFR(global)–M *(global) relation, is crucial for understanding star formation history and evolution of galaxies. However, many studies have dealt with SFR using unresolved measurements, which makes it difficult to separate out the contamination from other ionizing sources, such as active galactic nuclei and evolved stars. Using the integral field spectroscopic observations from SDSS-IV MaNGA, we spatially disentangle the contribution from different Hα powering sources for ∼1000 galaxies. We find that, when including regions dominated by all ionizing sources in galaxies, the spatially resolved relation between Hα surface density (ΣHα (all)) and stellar mass surface density (Σ*(all)) progressively turns over at the high Σ*(all) end for increasing M *(global) and/or bulge dominance (bulge-to-total light ratio, B/T). This in turn leads to the flattening of the integrated Hα(global)–M *(global) relation in the literature. By contrast, there is no noticeable flattening in both integrated Hα(H II)–M *(H II) and spatially resolved ΣHα (H II)–Σ*(H II) relations when only regions where star formation dominates the ionization are considered. In other words, the flattening can be attributed to the increasing regions powered by non-star-formation sources, which generally have lower ionizing ability than star formation. An analysis of the fractional contribution of non-star-formation sources to total Hα luminosity of a galaxy suggests a decreasing role of star formation as an ionizing source toward high-mass, high-B/T galaxies and bulge regions. This result indicates that the appearance of the galaxy integrated SFR–M * relation critically depends on their global properties (M *(global) and B/T) and relative abundances of various ionizing sources within the galaxies.

  19. A Space-Frequency Data Compression Method for Spatially Dense Laser Doppler Vibrometer Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Roberto de França Arruda

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available When spatially dense mobility shapes are measured with scanning laser Doppler vibrometers, it is often impractical to use phase-separation modal parameter estimation methods due to the excessive number of highly coupled modes and to the prohibitive computational cost of processing huge amounts of data. To deal with this problem, a data compression method using Chebychev polynomial approximation in the frequency domain and two-dimensional discrete Fourier series approximation in the spatial domain, is proposed in this article. The proposed space-frequency regressive approach was implemented and verified using a numerical simulation of a free-free-free-free suspended rectangular aluminum plate. To make the simulation more realistic, the mobility shapes were synthesized by modal superposition using mode shapes obtained experimentally with a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer. A reduced and smoothed model, which takes advantage of the sinusoidal spatial pattern of structural mobility shapes and the polynomial frequency-domain pattern of the mobility shapes, is obtained. From the reduced model, smoothed curves with any desired frequency and spatial resolution can he produced whenever necessary. The procedure can he used either to generate nonmodal models or to compress the measured data prior to modal parameter extraction.

  20. Measurement properties of continuous text reading performance tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brussee, Tamara; van Nispen, Ruth M A; van Rens, Ger H M B

    2014-11-01

    Measurement properties of tests to assess reading acuity or reading performance have not been extensively evaluated. This study aims to provide an overview of the literature on available continuous text reading tests and their measurement properties. A literature search was performed in PubMed, Embase and PsycInfo. Subsequently, information on design and content of reading tests, study design and measurement properties were extracted using consensus-based standards for selection of health measurement instruments. Quality of studies, reading tests and measurement properties were systematically assessed using pre-specified criteria. From 2334 identified articles, 20 relevant articles were found on measurement properties of three reading tests in various languages: IReST, MNread Reading Test and Radner Reading Charts. All three reading tests scored high on content validity. Reproducibility studies (repeated measurements between different testing sessions) of the IReST and MNread of commercially available reading tests in different languages were missing. The IReST scored best on inter-language comparison, the MNread scored well in repeatability studies (repeated measurements under the same conditions) and the Radner showed good reproducibility in studies. Although in daily practice there are other continuous text reading tests available meeting the criteria of this review, measurement properties were described in scientific studies for only three of them. Of the few available studies, the quality and content of study design and methodology used varied. For testing existing reading tests and the development of new ones, for example in other languages, we make several recommendations, including careful description of patient characteristics, use of objective and subjective lighting levels, good control of working distance, documentation of the number of raters and their training, careful documentation of scoring rules and the use of Bland-Altman analyses or similar for

  1. Properties of Risk Measures of Generalized Entropy in Portfolio Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongxi Zhou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper systematically investigates the properties of six kinds of entropy-based risk measures: Information Entropy and Cumulative Residual Entropy in the probability space, Fuzzy Entropy, Credibility Entropy and Sine Entropy in the fuzzy space, and Hybrid Entropy in the hybridized uncertainty of both fuzziness and randomness. We discover that none of the risk measures satisfy all six of the following properties, which various scholars have associated with effective risk measures: Monotonicity, Translation Invariance, Sub-additivity, Positive Homogeneity, Consistency and Convexity. Measures based on Fuzzy Entropy, Credibility Entropy, and Sine Entropy all exhibit the same properties: Sub-additivity, Positive Homogeneity, Consistency, and Convexity. These measures based on Information Entropy and Hybrid Entropy, meanwhile, only exhibit Sub-additivity and Consistency. Cumulative Residual Entropy satisfies just Sub-additivity, Positive Homogeneity, and Convexity. After identifying these properties, we develop seven portfolio models based on different risk measures and made empirical comparisons using samples from both the Shenzhen Stock Exchange of China and the New York Stock Exchange of America. The comparisons show that the Mean Fuzzy Entropy Model performs the best among the seven models with respect to both daily returns and relative cumulative returns. Overall, these results could provide an important reference for both constructing effective risk measures and rationally selecting the appropriate risk measure under different portfolio selection conditions.

  2. Semi-non-intrusive objective intelligibility measure using spatial filtering in hearing aids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Charlotte; Boldt, Jesper Bünsow; Gran, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    -intrusive metrics have not been able to achieve acceptable intelligibility predictions. This paper presents a new semi-non-intrusive intelligibility measure based on an existing intrusive measure, STOI, where an estimate of the clean speech is extracted using spatial filtering in the hearing aid. The results......Reliable non-intrusive online assessment of speech intelligibility can play a key role for the functioning of hearing aids, e.g. as guidance for adjusting the hearing aid settings to the environment. While existing intrusive metrics can provide a precise and reliable measure, the current non...

  3. Measurement of rock properties at elevated pressures and temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pincus, H.J.; Hoskins, E.R.

    1985-01-01

    The papers in this volume were presented at an ASTM symposium held on 20 June 1983 in conjunction with the 24th Annual Rock Mechanics Symposium at Texas A and M University, College Station, TX. The purpose of these papers is to present recent developments in the measurement of rock properties at elevated pressures and temperatures, and to examine and interpret the data produced by such measurement. The need for measuring rock properties at elevated pressures and temperatures has become increasingly important in recent years. Location and design of nuclear waste repositories, development of geothermal energy sites, and design and construction of deep excavations for civil, military, and mining engineering require significantly improved capabilities for measuring rock properties under conditions substantially different from those prevailing in most laboratory and in situ work. The development of high-pressure, high-temperature capabilities is also significant for the analysis of tectonic processes

  4. Characteristics and correlation of various radiation measuring methods in spatial radiation measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoneda, Kazuhiro; Tonouchi, Shigemasa

    1992-01-01

    When the survey of the state of natural radiation distribution was carried out, for the purpose of examining the useful measuring method, the comparison of the γ-ray dose rate calculated from survey meter method, in-situ measuring method and the measuring method by sampling soil was carried out. Between the in-situ measuring method and the survey meter method, the correlation Y=0.986X+5.73, r=0.903, n=18, P<0.01 was obtained, and the high correlation having the inclination of nearly 1 was shown. Between the survey meter method and the measuring method by sampling soil, the correlation Y=1.297X-10.30, r=0.966, n=20 P<0.01 was obtained, and the high correlation was shown, but as for the dose rate contribution, the disparities of 36% in U series, 6% in Th series and 20% in K-40 were observed. For the survey of the state of natural radiation distribution, the method of using in combination the survey meter method and the in-situ measuring method or the measuring method by sampling soil is suitable. (author)

  5. The PyCASSO database: spatially resolved stellar population properties for CALIFA galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Amorim, A. L.; García-Benito, R.; Cid Fernandes, R.; Cortijo-Ferrero, C.; González Delgado, R. M.; Lacerda, E. A. D.; López Fernández, R.; Pérez, E.; Vale Asari, N.

    2017-11-01

    The Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area (CALIFA) survey, a pioneer in integral field spectroscopy legacy projects, has fostered many studies exploring the information encoded on the spatially resolved data on gaseous and stellar features in the optical range of galaxies. We describe a value-added catalogue of stellar population properties for CALIFA galaxies analysed with the spectral synthesis code starlight and processed with the pycasso platform. Our public database (http://pycasso.ufsc.br/, mirror at http://pycasso.iaa.es/) comprises 445 galaxies from the CALIFA Data Release 3 with COMBO data. The catalogue provides maps for the stellar mass surface density, mean stellar ages and metallicities, stellar dust attenuation, star formation rates, and kinematics. Example applications both for individual galaxies and for statistical studies are presented to illustrate the power of this data set. We revisit and update a few of our own results on mass density radial profiles and on the local mass-metallicity relation. We also show how to employ the catalogue for new investigations, and show a pseudo Schmidt-Kennicutt relation entirely made with information extracted from the stellar continuum. Combinations to other databases are also illustrated. Among other results, we find a very good agreement between star formation rate surface densities derived from the stellar continuum and the H α emission. This public catalogue joins the scientific community's effort towards transparency and reproducibility, and will be useful for researchers focusing on (or complementing their studies with) stellar properties of CALIFA galaxies.

  6. The spatial distribution of errors made by rats in Hebb-Williams type mazes in relation to the spatial properties of the blind alleys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, S. de; Bohus, B.

    The various configurations in series of Hebb-Williams type of mazes, which are used to measure problem solving behaviour in rats, differ markedly in structure. The relationship between error behaviour and spatial maze structure in control rats tested in a number of pharmacological experiments is

  7. Maritime Aerosol optical properties measured by ship-borne sky radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, K.

    2017-12-01

    Maritime aerosols play an important role in the earth climate change. We started the measurements of aerosol optical properties since 1994 by using ship-borne sky radiometer (POM-01 MK-II and III; Prede Co. Ltd., Japan) over the ocean. We report the results of an aerosol optical properties over the ocean by using Research Vessel of the ship-borne sky radiometers. Aerosol optical properties observation were made in MR10-02 to MR16-09 onboard the R/V Mirai, JAMSTEC. The sky radiometer measure the direct and diffuse solar radiance with seven interference filters (0.315, 0.4, 0.5, 0.675, 0.87, 0.94, and 1.02 µm). Observation interval was made every five minutes by once, only in daytime under the clear sky conditions. GPS provides the position with longitude and latitude and heading direction of the vessel, and azimuth and elevation angle of the sun. The aerosol optical properties were computed using the SKYRAD.pack version 4.2. The obtained Aerosol optical properties (Aerosol optical thickness, Ångström exponent, Single scattering albedo, and etc.) and size distribution volume clearly showed spatial and temporal variability over the ocean. Aerosol optical thickness found over the near the coast (Asia and Tropical area) was high and variable. The size distribution volume have peaks at small particles at Asian coast and large particles at Tropical coast area. We provide the information, in this presentation, on the aerosol optical properties measurements with temporal and spatial variability in the Maritime Aerosol. This project is validation satellite of GCOM-C/SGLI, JAXA and other. The GCOM-C satellite scheduled to be launched in 2017 JFY.

  8. Electronic property measurements for piezoelectric ceramics. Technical notes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cain, M.; Stewart, M.; Gee, M.

    1998-01-01

    A series of measurement notes are presented, with emphasis placed on the technical nature of the testing methodology, for the determination of key electronic properties for piezoelectric ceramic materials that are used as sensors and actuators. The report is segmented into 'sections' that may be read independently from the rest of the report. The following measurement issues are discussed: Polarisation/Electric field (PE) loop measurements including a discussion of commercial and an in-house constructed system that measures PE loops; Dielectric measurements at low and high stress application, including some thermal and stress dependency modelling of piezo materials properties, developed at NPL; Strain measurement techniques developed at CMMT; Charge measurement techniques suitable for PE loop and other data acquisition; PE loop measurement and software analysis developed at CMMT and Manchester University. The primary objective of this report is to provide a framework on which the remainder of the testing procedures are to be developed for measurements of piezoelectric properties at high stress and stress rate. These procedures will be the subject of a future publication. (author)

  9. Study the effects of varying interference upon the optical properties of turbid samples using NIR spatial light modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaul, Oren; Fanrazi-Kahana, Michal; Meitav, Omri; Pinhasi, Gad A.; Abookasis, David

    2018-03-01

    Optical properties of biological tissues are valuable diagnostic parameters which can provide necessary information regarding tissue state during disease pathogenesis and therapy. However, different sources of interference, such as temperature changes may modify these properties, introducing confounding factors and artifacts to data, consequently skewing their interpretation and misinforming clinical decision-making. In the current study, we apply spatial light modulation, a type of diffuse reflectance hyperspectral imaging technique, to monitor the variation in optical properties of highly scattering turbid media in the presence varying levels of the following sources of interference: scattering concentration, temperature, and pressure. Spatial near-infrared (NIR) light modulation is a wide-field, non-contact emerging optical imaging platform capable of separating the effects of tissue scattering from those of absorption, thereby accurately estimating both parameters. With this technique, periodic NIR illumination patterns at alternately low and high spatial frequencies, at six discrete wavelengths between 690 to 970 nm, were sequentially projected upon the medium while a CCD camera collects the diffusely reflected light. Data analysis based assumptions is then performed off-line to recover the medium's optical properties. We conducted a series of experiments demonstrating the changes in absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of commercially available fresh milk and chicken breast tissue under different interference conditions. In addition, information on the refractive index was study under increased pressure. This work demonstrates the utility of NIR spatial light modulation to detect varying sources of interference upon the optical properties of biological samples.

  10. Frequency Dependence of Measured Massive MIMO Channel Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveras Martínez, Àlex; Carvalho, Elisabeth De; Nielsen, Jesper Ødum

    2016-01-01

    A multi-user massive MIMO measurement campaign is conducted to study the channel propagation characteristics (e.g. user correlation, sum of eigenvalues and condition number), focusing on the stability over frequencies and the impact of the array aperture. We use 3 arrays with 64 antennas (6m linear...... array, 2m linear array and 25cm by 28cm squared 2D array) serving 8 users holding a handset with 2 antennas. The study of the measurements shows that the propagation characteristics of the channel are stable for all the measured frequencies. We also observe that user proximity and user handgrip...... stabilize the studied properties of the channel across the frequencies, and in such case the larger the aperture of the array the more stable the properties. The number of base station antennas improves the propagation characteristics of the channel and stabilizes the properties in the frequency domain....

  11. Top Quark Properties Measurements with the ATLAS Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quijada, J A Murillo

    2016-01-01

    Results on recent measurements of top quark properties with the ATLAS experiment at the European Laboratory, CERN, are shown. The measurements are performed using the full data set recorded during the LHC Run-I. The full data set consists of a collected integrated luminosities ∫Tdt of 4.6 fb -1 recorded at a proton-proton collision energy of √ s = 7 TeV and 20.3 fb -1 collected at 8 TeV. The mentioned top quark properties include: spin correlation, charge asymmetry, W-boson polarization, color flow, top mass and top width in events with a top and anti-top quark pair ( tt ). An introduction to the LHC and the ATLAS detector is included and latest main results from this experiment. The contents include the current world benchmark results for the different properties and plans for future measurements during the ongoing LHC Run-II. (paper)

  12. Measurement properties of asthma-specific quality-of-life measures: protocol for a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apfelbacher, Christian; Paudyal, Priya; Bülbül, Alpaslan; Smith, Helen

    2014-07-24

    Asthma is a frequent chronic inflammatory disease of the airways, and the assessment of health-related quality of life (HrQoL) is important in both research and routine care. Various asthma-specific measures of HrQoL exist but there is uncertainty which measures are best suited for use in research and routine care. Therefore, the aim of the proposed research is a comprehensive systematic assessment of the measurement properties of the existing measures that were developed to measure asthma-specific quality of life. This study is a systematic review of the measurement properties of asthma-specific measures of health-related quality of life. PubMed and Embase will be searched using a selection of relevant search terms. Eligible studies will be primary empirical studies evaluating, describing or comparing measurement properties of asthma-specific HRQL tools. Eligibility assessment and data abstraction will be performed independently by two reviewers. Evidence tables will be generated for study characteristics, instrument characteristics, measurement properties and interpretability. The quality of the measurement properties will be assessed using predefined criteria. Methodological quality of studies will be assessed using the COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments (COSMIN) checklist. A best evidence synthesis will be undertaken if more than one study have investigated a particular measurement property. The proposed systematic review will produce a comprehensive assessment of measurement properties of existing measures of asthma-specific health-related quality of life. We also aim to derive recommendations in order to help researchers and practitioners alike in the choice of instrument. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42014010491.

  13. Reactor for in situ measurements of spatially resolved kinetic data in heterogeneous catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, R.; Korup, O.; Geske, M.; Zavyalova, U.; Oprea, I.; Schlögl, R.

    2010-06-01

    The present work describes a reactor that allows in situ measurements of spatially resolved kinetic data in heterogeneous catalysis. The reactor design allows measurements up to temperatures of 1300 °C and 45 bar pressure, i.e., conditions of industrial relevance. The reactor involves reactants flowing through a solid catalyst bed containing a sampling capillary with a side sampling orifice through which a small fraction of the reacting fluid (gas or liquid) is transferred into an analytical device (e.g., mass spectrometer, gas chromatograph, high pressure liquid chromatograph) for quantitative analysis. The sampling capillary can be moved with μm resolution in or against flow direction to measure species profiles through the catalyst bed. Rotation of the sampling capillary allows averaging over several scan lines. The position of the sampling orifice is such that the capillary channel through the catalyst bed remains always occupied by the capillary preventing flow disturbance and fluid bypassing. The second function of the sampling capillary is to provide a well which can accommodate temperature probes such as a thermocouple or a pyrometer fiber. If a thermocouple is inserted in the sampling capillary and aligned with the sampling orifice fluid temperature profiles can be measured. A pyrometer fiber can be used to measure the temperature profile of the solid catalyst bed. Spatial profile measurements are demonstrated for methane oxidation on Pt and methane oxidative coupling on Li/MgO, both catalysts supported on reticulated α -Al2O3 foam supports.

  14. Spatial variability of carbon dioxide in the urban canopy layer and implications for flux measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, B.; Christen, A.

    2014-12-01

    This contribution reports CO2 mixing ratios measured in the urban canopy layer (UCL) of a residential neighborhood in Vancouver, BC, Canada and discusses the relevance of UCL CO2 temporal and spatial variability to local-scale eddy covariance (EC) fluxes measured above the UCL. Measurements were conducted from a mobile vehicle-mounted platform over a continuous, 26-h period in the longterm turbulent flux source area of an urban EC tower. Daytime mixing ratios were highest along arterial roads and largely a function of proximity to vehicle traffic CO2 sources. At night, there was a distinct negative correlation between potential air temperature and CO2 mixing ratios. The spatial distribution of CO2 was controlled by topography and micro-scale advective processes (i.e. cold-air pooling). Mobile CO2 measurements were then used to calculate CO2 storage changes (FS) in the UCL volume and compared to single-layer FS estimates calculated from the EC system. In total, five variations of FS were calculated. On average, the choice of FS calculation method affected net measured hourly emissions (FC) by 5.2%. Analysis of FS using a four-year dataset measured at the EC tower show FS was 2.8% of hourly FC for this site on average. At this urban EC location, FS was relatively minor compared to FC and calculation of FS using a single-layer method was adequate, though FS still represents a potentially large uncertainty during individual hours.

  15. Spatially resolved quantitative mapping of thermomechanical properties and phase transition temperatures using scanning probe microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V; Nikiforov, Maxim P

    2013-07-09

    An approach for the thermomechanical characterization of phase transitions in polymeric materials (polyethyleneterephthalate) by band excitation acoustic force microscopy is developed. This methodology allows the independent measurement of resonance frequency, Q factor, and oscillation amplitude of a tip-surface contact area as a function of tip temperature, from which the thermal evolution of tip-surface spring constant and mechanical dissipation can be extracted. A heating protocol maintained a constant tip-surface contact area and constant contact force, thereby allowing for reproducible measurements and quantitative extraction of material properties including temperature dependence of indentation-based elastic and loss moduli.

  16. Measurement Properties of the Central Sensitization Inventory: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scerbo, Thomas; Colasurdo, Joseph; Dunn, Sally; Unger, Jacob; Nijs, Jo; Cook, Chad

    2018-04-01

    Central sensitization (CS) is a phenomenon associated with several medical diagnoses, including postcancer pain, low back pain, osteoarthritis, whiplash, and fibromyalgia. CS involves an amplification of neural signaling within the central nervous system that results in pain hypersensitivity. The purpose of this systematic review was to gather published studies of a widely used outcome measure (the Central Sensitization Inventory [CSI]), determine the quality of evidence these publications reported, and examine the measurement properties of the CSI. Four databases were searched for publications from 2011 (when the CSI was developed) to July 2017. The Consensus-Based Standards for the Selection of Health Measurement Instruments (COSMIN) checklist was applied to evaluate methodological quality and risk of bias. In instances when COSMIN did not offer a scoring system for measurement properties, qualitative analyses were performed. Fourteen studies met inclusion criteria. Quality of evidence examined with the COSMIN checklist was determined to be good to excellent for all studies for their respective measurement property reports. Interpretability measures were consistent when publications were analyzed qualitatively, and construct validity was strong when examined alongside other validated measures relating to CS. An assessment of the published measurement studies of the CSI suggest the tool generates reliable and valid data that quantify the severity of several symptoms of CS. © 2017 World Institute of Pain.

  17. Spectral and spatial resolving of photoelectric property of femtosecond laser drilled holes of GaSb(1-x)Bi(x).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, C B; Zha, F X; Song, Y X; Shao, J; Dai, Y; Chen, X R; Ye, J Y; Wang, S M

    2015-07-15

    Femtosecond laser drilled holes of GaSbBi were characterized by the joint measurements of photoconductivity (PC) spectroscopy and laser-beam-induced current (LBIC) mapping. The excitation light in PC was focused down to 60 μm presenting the spectral information of local electronic property of individual holes. A redshift of energy band edge of about 6-8 meV was observed by the PC measurement when the excitation light irradiated on the laser drilled holes. The spatial resolving of photoelectric property was achieved by the LBIC mapping which shows "pseudo-holes" with much larger dimensions than the geometric sizes of the holes. The reduced LBIC current with the pseudo-holes is associated with the redshift effect indicating that the electronic property of the rim areas of the holes is modified by the femtosecond laser drilling.

  18. SPATIAL VARIATIONS OF PAH PROPERTIES IN M17SW REVEALED BY SPITZER /IRS SPECTRAL MAPPING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamagishi, M. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara 252-5210 (Japan); Kaneda, H.; Ishihara, D.; Oyabu, S.; Suzuki, T.; Nishimura, A.; Kohno, M. [Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Onaka, T.; Ohashi, S. [Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Nagayama, T.; Matsuo, M. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Kagoshima University, 1-21-35 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Umemoto, T.; Minamidani, T.; Fujita, S. [Nobeyama Radio Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ), National Institutes of Natural Sciences (NINS), 462-2, Nobeyama, Minamimaki, Minamisaku, Nagano 384-1305 (Japan); Tsuda, Y., E-mail: yamagish@ir.isas.jaxa.jp [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Meisei University, 2-1-1 Hodokubo, Hino, Tokyo 191-0042 (Japan)

    2016-12-20

    We present Spitzer /IRS mid-infrared spectral maps of the Galactic star-forming region M17 as well as IRSF/SIRIUS Br γ and Nobeyama 45 m/FOREST {sup 13}CO ( J = 1–0) maps. The spectra show prominent features due to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at wavelengths of 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, 11.3, 12.0, 12.7, 13.5, and 14.2  μ m. We find that the PAH emission features are bright in the region between the H ii region traced by Br γ and the molecular cloud traced by {sup 13}CO, supporting that the PAH emission originates mostly from photo-dissociation regions. Based on the spatially resolved Spitzer /IRS maps, we examine spatial variations of the PAH properties in detail. As a result, we find that the interband ratio of PAH 7.7  μ m/PAH 11.3  μ m varies locally near M17SW, but rather independently of the distance from the OB stars in M17, suggesting that the degree of PAH ionization is mainly controlled by local conditions rather than the global UV environments determined by the OB stars in M17. We also find that the interband ratios of the PAH 12.0  μ m, 12.7  μ m, 13.5  μ m, and 14.2  μ m features to the PAH 11.3  μ m feature are high near the M17 center, which suggests structural changes of PAHs through processing due to intense UV radiation, producing abundant edgy irregular PAHs near the M17 center.

  19. Polarization Property Measurement of the Long Undulator Radiation Using Cr/C Multilayer Polarization Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niibe, Masahito; Mukai, Mikihito; Shoji, Yoshihiko; Kimura, Hiroaki

    2004-01-01

    A rotating analyzer ellipsometry (RAE) system was developed with Cr/C multilayers that function as polarization elements for photon energy range of 110 - 280 eV. Polarization properties of a planar undulator change axisymmetrically in off-axial manner, and the second harmonic is more remarkable for the change. By using the RAE system, the polarization property of the second harmonic radiation from the NewSUBARU long undulator at the energy of 180 eV was examined. The degree of linear polarization of the on-axis radiation was over 0.996. The spatial distribution of the polarization azimuth was measured and was in fair agreement with the theoretical calculation. A peculiar behavior of the polarization property near the radiation peak of the second harmonic was observed by changing the height of the undulator gap

  20. CO2 laser interferometer for temporally and spatially resolved electron density measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannon, P. J.; Gerber, R. A.; Gerardo, J. B.

    1982-09-01

    A 10.6-μm Mach-Zehnder interferometer has been constructed to make temporally and spatially resolved measurements of electron densities in plasmas. The device uses a pyroelectric vidicon camera and video memory to record and display the two-dimensional fringe pattern and a Pockels cell to limit the pulse width of the 10.6-μm radiation. A temporal resolution of 14 ns has been demonstrated. The relative sensitivity of the device for electron density measurements is 2×1015 cm-2 (the line integral of the line-of-sight length and electron density), which corresponds to 0.1 fringe shift.

  1. CO2 laser interferometer for temporally and spatially resolved electron density measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brannon, P.J.; Gerber, R.A.; Gerardo, J.B.

    1982-01-01

    A 10.6-μm Mach--Zehnder interferometer has been constructed to make temporally and spatially resolved measurements of electron densities in plasmas. The device uses a pyroelectric vidicon camera and video memory to record and display the two-dimensional fringe pattern and a Pockels cell to limit the pulse width of the 10.6-μm radiation. A temporal resolution of 14 ns has been demonstrated. The relative sensitivity of the device for electron density measurements is 2 x 10 15 cm -2 (the line integral of the line-of-sight length and electron density), which corresponds to 0.1 fringe shift

  2. The Spatial Power Motivation Scale: a semi-implicit measure of situational power motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoel, Christiane; Zimmer, Katharina; Stahlberg, Dagmar

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new nonverbal and unobtrusive measure to assess power motive activation, the Spatial Power Motivation Scale (SPMS). The unique features of this instrument are that it is (a) very simple and economical, (b) reliable and valid, and (c) sensitive to situational changes. Study 1 demonstrates the instrument's convergent and discriminant validity with explicit measures. Study 2 demonstrates the instrument's responsiveness to situational power motive salience: anticipating and winning competition versus losing competition and watching television. Studies 3 and 4 demonstrate that thoughts of competition result in higher power motivation specifically for individuals with a high dispositional power motive.

  3. Spatial correlation in matter-wave interference as a measure of decoherence, dephasing, and entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zilin; Beierle, Peter; Batelaan, Herman

    2018-04-01

    The loss of contrast in double-slit electron diffraction due to dephasing and decoherence processes is studied. It is shown that the spatial intensity correlation function of diffraction patterns can be used to distinguish between dephasing and decoherence. This establishes a measure of time reversibility that does not require the determination of coherence terms of the density matrix, while von Neumann entropy, another measure of time reversibility, does require coherence terms. This technique is exciting in view of the need to understand and control the detrimental experimental effect of contrast loss and for fundamental studies on the transition from the classical to the quantum regime.

  4. Spatially resolved measurements of the magnetocaloric effect and the local magnetic field using thermography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Dennis; Bjørk, Rasmus; Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein

    2010-01-01

    The magnetocaloric effect causes a magnetic material to change temperature upon application of a magnetic field. Here, spatially resolved measurements of the adiabatic temperature change are performed on a plate of gadolinium using thermography. The adiabatic temperature change is used to extract...... the corresponding change in the local magnetic field strength. The measured temperature change and local magnetic field strength are compared to results obtained with a numerical model, which takes demagnetization into account and employs experimental data....

  5. Top quark properties and mass measurements with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Moreno Llacer, Maria; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    ID# 104 Top quark properties and mass measurements with the ATLAS detector The top quark is unique among the known quarks in that it decays before it has an opportunity to form hadronic bound states. This makes measurements of its properties particularly interesting as one can access directly the properties of a bare quark. The latest measurements of these properties with the ATLAS detector at the LHC are presented using 8 TeV and 13 TeV data. Measurements of top quark spin observables in top-antitop events, each sensitive to a different coefficient of the spin density matrix, are presented and compared to the Standard Model predictions. The helicity of the W boson from the top decays and the production angles of the top quark are further discussed. Limits on the rate of flavour changing neutral currents in the production or decay of the top quark are reported. The production of top-quark pairs in association with W and Z bosons is also presented. The measurement probes the coupling between the top quark and ...

  6. Experimental study of coherence vortices: Local properties of phase singularities in a spatial coherence function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, W.; Duan, Z.H.; Hanson, Steen Grüner

    2006-01-01

    By controlling the irradiance of an extended quasimonochromatic, spatially incoherent source, an optical field is generated that exhibits spatial coherence with phase singularities, called coherence vortices. A simple optical geometry for direct visualization of coherence vortices is proposed, an...

  7. Measuring floodplain spatial patterns using continuous surface metrics at multiple scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scown, Murray W.; Thoms, Martin C.; DeJager, Nathan R.

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between fluvial processes and floodplain ecosystems occur upon a floodplain surface that is often physically complex. Spatial patterns in floodplain topography have only recently been quantified over multiple scales, and discrepancies exist in how floodplain surfaces are perceived to be spatially organised. We measured spatial patterns in floodplain topography for pool 9 of the Upper Mississippi River, USA, using moving window analyses of eight surface metrics applied to a 1 × 1 m2 DEM over multiple scales. The metrics used were Range, SD, Skewness, Kurtosis, CV, SDCURV,Rugosity, and Vol:Area, and window sizes ranged from 10 to 1000 m in radius. Surface metric values were highly variable across the floodplain and revealed a high degree of spatial organisation in floodplain topography. Moran's I correlograms fit to the landscape of each metric at each window size revealed that patchiness existed at nearly all window sizes, but the strength and scale of patchiness changed within window size, suggesting that multiple scales of patchiness and patch structure exist in the topography of this floodplain. Scale thresholds in the spatial patterns were observed, particularly between the 50 and 100 m window sizes for all surface metrics and between the 500 and 750 m window sizes for most metrics. These threshold scales are ~ 15–20% and 150% of the main channel width (1–2% and 10–15% of the floodplain width), respectively. These thresholds may be related to structuring processes operating across distinct scale ranges. By coupling surface metrics, multi-scale analyses, and correlograms, quantifying floodplain topographic complexity is possible in ways that should assist in clarifying how floodplain ecosystems are structured.

  8. Development of an ICCD-scintillator system for measurement of spatial dose distributions around 'hot particles'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aydarous, A. Sh; Darley, P. J.; Charles, M. W.

    2004-01-01

    An intensified charge coupled device (ICCD)-scintillator system has been investigated for potential use in measuring the spatially non-uniform dose distribution around 'hot particles'. This imaging system is capable of producing real-time measurements considerably quicker than other presently available radiation dosimetry techniques and exhibits good linearity and reproducibility and relatively high spatial resolution (∼17.5 μm). The time required for a dose evaluation is less than a hundredth that required for radiochromic dye film measurements. The non-uniformity of the system has been eliminated by applying pixel-to-pixel correction factors. The measurable dose rate range using a 110 μm thick scintillator extends from ∼2000 down to ∼6 Gy h -1 . The prototype ICCD-scintillator system has been used in evaluation of the skin dose from some high-activity nuclear fuel fragments. The results agree within a few percentage with radiochromic dye film measurements for 1 cm 2 averaging areas. (authors)

  9. Procedural Factors That Affect Psychophysical Measures of Spatial Selectivity in Cochlear Implant Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Cosentino

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Behavioral measures of spatial selectivity in cochlear implants are important both for guiding the programing of individual users’ implants and for the evaluation of different stimulation methods. However, the methods used are subject to a number of confounding factors that can contaminate estimates of spatial selectivity. These factors include off-site listening, charge interactions between masker and probe pulses in interleaved masking paradigms, and confusion effects in forward masking. We review the effects of these confounds and discuss methods for minimizing them. We describe one such method in which the level of a 125-pps masker is adjusted so as to mask a 125-pps probe, and where the masker and probe pulses are temporally interleaved. Five experiments describe the method and evaluate the potential roles of the different potential confounding factors. No evidence was obtained for off-site listening of the type observed in acoustic hearing. The choice of the masking paradigm was shown to alter the measured spatial selectivity. For short gaps between masker and probe pulses, both facilitation and refractory mechanisms had an effect on masking; this finding should inform the choice of stimulation rate in interleaved masking experiments. No evidence for confusion effects in forward masking was revealed. It is concluded that the proposed method avoids many potential confounds but that the choice of method should depend on the research question under investigation.

  10. Modeling of Subsurface Lagrangian Sensor Swarms for Spatially Distributed Current Measurements in High Energy Coastal Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, T. W.; Polagye, B. L.

    2016-02-01

    Coastal ecosystems are characterized by spatially and temporally varying hydrodynamics. In marine renewable energy applications, these variations strongly influence project economics and in oceanographic studies, they impact accuracy of biological transport and pollutant dispersion models. While stationary point or profile measurements are relatively straight forward, spatial representativeness of point measurements can be poor due to strong gradients. Moving platforms, such as AUVs or surface vessels, offer better coverage, but suffer from energetic constraints (AUVs) and resolvable scales (vessels). A system of sub-surface, drifting sensor packages is being developed to provide spatially distributed, synoptic data sets of coastal hydrodynamics with meter-scale resolution over a regional extent of a kilometer. Computational investigation has informed system parameters such as drifter size and shape, necessary position accuracy, number of drifters, and deployment methods. A hydrodynamic domain with complex flow features was created using a computational fluid dynamics code. A simple model of drifter dynamics propagate the drifters through the domain in post-processing. System parameters are evaluated relative to their ability to accurately recreate domain hydrodynamics. Implications of these results for an inexpensive, depth-controlled Lagrangian drifter system is presented.

  11. Measurement properties of performance-based measures to assess physical function in hip and knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dobson, F; Hinman, R S; Hall, M

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To systematically review the measurement properties of performance-based measures to assess physical function in people with hip and/or knee osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: Electronic searches were performed in MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, and PsycINFO up to the end of June 2012. Two...... investigating measurement properties of performance measures, including responsiveness and interpretability in people with hip and/or knee OA, is needed. Consensus on which combination of measures will best assess physical function in people with hip/and or knee OA is urgently required....

  12. Reconstruction of the spatial dependence of dielectric and geometrical properties of adhesively bonded structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackay, C; Hayward, D; Mulholland, A J; McKee, S; Pethrick, R A

    2005-01-01

    An inverse problem motivated by the nondestructive testing of adhesively bonded structures used in the aircraft industry is studied. Using transmission line theory, a model is developed which, when supplied with electrical and geometrical parameters, accurately predicts the reflection coefficient associated with such structures. Particular attention is paid to modelling the connection between the structures and the equipment used to measure the reflection coefficient. The inverse problem is then studied and an optimization approach employed to recover these electrical and geometrical parameters from experimentally obtained data. In particular the approach focuses on the recovery of spatially varying geometrical parameters as this is paramount to the successful reconstruction of electrical parameters. Reconstructions of structure geometry using this method are found to be in close agreement with experimental observations

  13. Liquidus temperature and optical properties measurement by containerless techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Collin D.

    1993-01-01

    Reactive alloy liquidus temperatures measured by conventional, contained techniques are often in error due to reactions with containers and gaseous impurities. This paper describes a new liquidus temperature measurement technique that avoids these problems by employing containerless processing. This technique relies on precise and accurate noncontact temperature measurements (NCTM), which are made possible by spectral emissivity values. The spectral emissivities, epsilon(sub lambda), are measured along with the optical properties (real, n, and imaginary, k, components of the index of refraction) using polarimetric techniques on electromagnetically levitated specimens. Results from work done at Vanderbilt University and Intersonics on the Ti-Al system are presented to demonstrate the above techniques.

  14. Using 137 Cs measurements to investigate the influence of erosion and soil redistribution on soil properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, P; Walling, D E

    2011-05-01

    Information on the interaction between soil erosion and soil properties is an important requirement for sustainable management of the soil resource. The relationship between soil properties and the soil redistribution rate, reflecting both erosion and deposition, is an important indicator of this interaction. This relationship is difficult to investigate using traditional approaches to documenting soil redistribution rates involving erosion plots and predictive models. However, the use of the fallout radionuclide (137)Cs to document medium-term soil redistribution rates offers a means of overcoming many of the limitations associated with traditional approaches. The study reported sought to demonstrate the potential for using (137)Cs measurements to assess the influence of soil erosion and redistribution on soil properties (particle size composition, total C, macronutrients N, P, K and Mg, micronutrients Mn, Mo, Fe, Cu and Zn and other elements, including Ti and As). (137)Cs measurements undertaken on 52 soil cores collected within a 7 ha cultivated field located near Colebrooke in Devon, UK were used to establish the magnitude and spatial pattern of medium-term soil redistribution rates within the field. The soil redistribution rates documented for the individual sampling points within the field ranged from an erosion rate of -12.9 t ha(-1) yr(-1) to a deposition rate of 19.2 t ha(-1) yr(-1). Composite samples of surface soil (0-5 cm) were collected immediately adjacent to each coring point and these samples were analysed for a range of soil properties. Individual soil properties associated with these samples showed significant variability, with CV values generally lying in the range 10-30%. The relationships between the surface soil properties and the soil redistribution rate were analysed. This analysis demonstrated statistically significant relationships between some soil properties (total phosphorus, % clay, Ti and As) and the soil redistribution rate, but for

  15. Using 137Cs measurements to investigate the influence of erosion and soil redistribution on soil properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, P.; Walling, D.E.

    2011-01-01

    Information on the interaction between soil erosion and soil properties is an important requirement for sustainable management of the soil resource. The relationship between soil properties and the soil redistribution rate, reflecting both erosion and deposition, is an important indicator of this interaction. This relationship is difficult to investigate using traditional approaches to documenting soil redistribution rates involving erosion plots and predictive models. However, the use of the fallout radionuclide 137 Cs to document medium-term soil redistribution rates offers a means of overcoming many of the limitations associated with traditional approaches. The study reported sought to demonstrate the potential for using 137 Cs measurements to assess the influence of soil erosion and redistribution on soil properties (particle size composition, total C, macronutrients N, P, K and Mg, micronutrients Mn, Mo, Fe, Cu and Zn and other elements, including Ti and As). 137 Cs measurements undertaken on 52 soil cores collected within a 7 ha cultivated field located near Colebrooke in Devon, UK were used to establish the magnitude and spatial pattern of medium-term soil redistribution rates within the field. The soil redistribution rates documented for the individual sampling points within the field ranged from an erosion rate of -12.9 t ha -1 yr -1 to a deposition rate of 19.2 t ha -1 yr -1 . Composite samples of surface soil (0-5 cm) were collected immediately adjacent to each coring point and these samples were analysed for a range of soil properties. Individual soil properties associated with these samples showed significant variability, with CV values generally lying in the range 10-30%. The relationships between the surface soil properties and the soil redistribution rate were analysed. This analysis demonstrated statistically significant relationships between some soil properties (total phosphorus, % clay, Ti and As) and the soil redistribution rate, but for most

  16. Measurement of the mechanical properties of layered systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blank, E.

    2002-01-01

    Thin films for integrated electronic circuitry, packaging and small structures in micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) as well as protective coatings require mechanical testing to control fabrication processes, guarantee product quality and establish data bases for engineering purposes. They generally escape classical materials testing owing to their small size in at least one dimension and their incorporation into larger structures. The fact that material properties change in the micro- and nanometer range when sample dimensions reach the scale of defect structures, implies that sample and probe size become part of the property evaluation process. Although research into the mechanical behaviour of thin films and small structures now is established, the fundamentals of mechanical testing continue to be identified while there is a growing need for methods allowing to measure intrinsic material properties. This lecture will focus on the mechanics of thin film and small volume structures and review recently developed testing techniques for measuring materials properties, particularly indentation, bulge and bend testing. The effect of specimen and probe geometry on property evaluation will be discussed. The use of Raman spectroscopy for residual stress measurement will be illustrated. (Author)

  17. Some Properties of a Measure of Information Discrepancy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Shun-lan; FANG Wei-wu

    2002-01-01

    Based on a group of axioms, a measure of information discrepancyamong multiple information sources has been introduced in [7,8, 10] and it possesses some peculiar properties compared with other measures of information discrepancy, so it can be used in some areas, where the traditional measures are not valid or not efficient, for example, in the study of DNA sequence comparison, prediction of protein structure class, evidence analysis, questionnaire analysis, and so on. In this paper, using the optimization techniques,we prove that it is a distance function and show that it is also an approximation of x2 function. These two properties will stimulate further applications of the measure to information processing and system analysis.

  18. Measurement of magnetic properties of confined compact toroid plasma (spheromak)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Fu-Kwun.

    1991-01-01

    The theoretical aspect of the spheromak is described in this paper. The MS machine hardware will be explored along with the formation scheme and diagnostic systems. The magnetic pickup probes, their calibration procedures and the data analysis methods will be discussed. Observations from the probe measurements and magnetic properties of the MS spheromak are considered. The axisymmetric Grad-Shafranov equilibrium code calculations are presented and compared with the measurements. Magnetic helicity and its correlation with the experimental observations is described

  19. Petrophysical properties of greensand as predicted from NMR measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hossain, Zakir; Grattoni, Carlos A.; Solymar, Mikael

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a useful tool in reservoir evaluation. The objective of this study is to predict petrophysical properties from NMR T2 distributions. A series of laboratory experiments including core analysis, capillary pressure measurements, NMR T2 measurements...... with macro-pores. Permeability may be predicted from NMR by using Kozeny's equation when surface relaxivity is known. Capillary pressure drainage curves may be predicted from NMR T2 distribution when pore size distribution within a sample is homogeneous....

  20. Top quark properties and mass measurements with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Negrini, Matteo; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Highlights on recent measurements of top quark properties in ATLAS, using pp collision data at \\sqrt{s}= 8 TeV and 13 TeV, are presented. The measurements of the top quark polarization and spin correlation coefficients, the W boson helicity fractions, the structure of the Wtb vertex, the associated production of a t anti-t pair with a vector boson or a photon, and the top quark mass are all in agreement with the Standard Model expectations.

  1. The effect of spatial confinement on the noble-gas HArF molecule: structure and electric properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozłowska, Justyna; Bartkowiak, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The structure and electrical properties of HArF in spatial confinement are analyzed. • Orbital compression leads to decrease of bond lengths in the HArF molecule. • Spatial restriction causes a drop of the molecular (hyper)polarizabilities. • Spatial confinement reduces the electron correlation contribution to μ, α and β. - Abstract: A systematic study on the dipole moment and (hyper)polarizabilities of argon fluorohydride under spatial restriction was performed. Detailed analysis of the confinement induced changes in the structure of HArF is also presented. In order to render the influence of chemical compression on the properties in question a two-dimensional harmonic oscillator potential, mimicking a cylindrical confinement, was applied. Through the comparison of the results obtained for HArF with those of HF the effect of Ar insertion on the above properties was discussed. A hierarchy of ab initio methods including HF, MP2, CCSD and CCSD(T), has been employed to investigate the effect of orbital compression on the electron correlation contribution to the studied electric properties. It was observed that the external confining potential modifies the electronic contributions to the dipole moment and (hyper)polarizabilities of HArF. In particular, the first hyperpolarizability of HArF is remarkably smaller than that of the unconfined HArF molecule

  2. The effect of spatial confinement on the noble-gas HArF molecule: structure and electric properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozłowska, Justyna; Bartkowiak, Wojciech, E-mail: wojciech.bartkowiak@pwr.edu.pl

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • The structure and electrical properties of HArF in spatial confinement are analyzed. • Orbital compression leads to decrease of bond lengths in the HArF molecule. • Spatial restriction causes a drop of the molecular (hyper)polarizabilities. • Spatial confinement reduces the electron correlation contribution to μ, α and β. - Abstract: A systematic study on the dipole moment and (hyper)polarizabilities of argon fluorohydride under spatial restriction was performed. Detailed analysis of the confinement induced changes in the structure of HArF is also presented. In order to render the influence of chemical compression on the properties in question a two-dimensional harmonic oscillator potential, mimicking a cylindrical confinement, was applied. Through the comparison of the results obtained for HArF with those of HF the effect of Ar insertion on the above properties was discussed. A hierarchy of ab initio methods including HF, MP2, CCSD and CCSD(T), has been employed to investigate the effect of orbital compression on the electron correlation contribution to the studied electric properties. It was observed that the external confining potential modifies the electronic contributions to the dipole moment and (hyper)polarizabilities of HArF. In particular, the first hyperpolarizability of HArF is remarkably smaller than that of the unconfined HArF molecule.

  3. Measurement of thermal properties of soil and concrete samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagola, Maria Alberdi; Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Madsen, Søren

    February 2016 and February 2017. The presented work mainly consists of thermal property measurements. They become important as they form the basis for dimensioning a planned ground source heat pump installation based on closed loop vertical ground heat exchangers. This report complements the report......, the measurements of the properties of the concrete are treated. The work is extended in appendixes.......This document aims to present the laboratory work undertaken to analyse the thermal properties of the soil at two test sites in Denmark and the concrete produced by Centrum Pæle A/S, used to produce the pile heat exchangers studied in the present PhD project. The tasks have been carried out between...

  4. In-Vivo Techniques for Measuring Electrical Properties of Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    probe Electromagnetic energy Dielectric properties Monopole antenna In-situ tissues , Antemortem/Pos tmortem studies Renal blood flow 10 ABSTRACT... mice or rats, which were positioned beneath a fixed measurement probe. Several alternative methods involving the use of semi-rigid or flexible coaxial

  5. Measuring Institutions: Indicators of Political and Property Rights in Malawi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedderke, Johannes; Garlick, Julia

    2012-01-01

    This paper constructs a new set of institutional indicators for Malawi. We develop indicators of political rights, of freehold, traditional (communitarian) and intellectual property rights, based on the Malawian legislative framework. In exploring the association between our rights measures and a range of indicators of socio-economic development,…

  6. Monitoring hillslope moisture dynamics with surface ERT for enhancing spatial significance of hydrometric point measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübner, R.; Heller, K.; Günther, T.; Kleber, A.

    2015-01-01

    Besides floodplains, hillslopes are basic units that mainly control water movement and flow pathways within catchments of subdued mountain ranges. The structure of their shallow subsurface affects water balance, e.g. infiltration, retention, and runoff. Nevertheless, there is still a gap in the knowledge of the hydrological dynamics on hillslopes, notably due to the lack of generalization and transferability. This study presents a robust multi-method framework of electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) in addition to hydrometric point measurements, transferring hydrometric data into higher spatial scales to obtain additional patterns of distribution and dynamics of soil moisture on a hillslope. A geoelectrical monitoring in a small catchment in the eastern Ore Mountains was carried out at weekly intervals from May to December 2008 to image seasonal moisture dynamics on the hillslope scale. To link water content and electrical resistivity, the parameters of Archie's law were determined using different core samples. To optimize inversion parameters and methods, the derived spatial and temporal water content distribution was compared to tensiometer data. The results from ERT measurements show a strong correlation with the hydrometric data. The response is congruent to the soil tension data. Water content calculated from the ERT profile shows similar variations as that of water content from soil moisture sensors. Consequently, soil moisture dynamics on the hillslope scale may be determined not only by expensive invasive punctual hydrometric measurements, but also by minimally invasive time-lapse ERT, provided that pedo-/petrophysical relationships are known. Since ERT integrates larger spatial scales, a combination with hydrometric point measurements improves the understanding of the ongoing hydrological processes and better suits identification of heterogeneities.

  7. High spatial sampling global mode structure measurements via multichannel reflectometry in NSTX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crocker, N A; Peebles, W A; Kubota, S; Zhang, J [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California-Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-7099 (United States); Bell, R E; Fredrickson, E D; Gorelenkov, N N; LeBlanc, B P; Menard, J E; Podesta, M [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, PO Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08543-0451 (United States); Sabbagh, S A [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Tritz, K [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Yuh, H [Nova Photonics, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Global modes-including kinks and tearing modes (f <{approx} 50 kHz), toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAE; f {approx} 50-250 kHz) and global and compressional Alfven eigenmodes (GAE and CAE; f >{approx} 400 kHz)-play critical roles in many aspects of plasma performance. Their investigation on NSTX is aided by an array of fixed-frequency quadrature reflectometers used to determine their radial density perturbation structure. The array has been recently upgraded to 16 channels spanning 30-75 GHz (n{sub cutoff} = (1.1-6.9) x 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} in O-mode), improving spatial sampling and access to the core of H-mode plasmas. The upgrade has yielded significant new results that advance the understanding of global modes in NSTX. The GAE and CAE structures have been measured for the first time in the core of an NSTX high-power (6 MW) beam-heated H-mode plasma. The CAE structure is strongly core-localized, which has important implications for electron thermal transport. The TAE structure has been measured with greatly improved spatial sampling, and measurements of the TAE phase, the first in NSTX, show strong radial variation near the midplane, indicating radial propagation caused by non-ideal MHD effects. Finally, the tearing mode structure measurements provide unambiguous evidence of coupling to an external kink.

  8. Experimental research on laser tracking system with galvanometer scanner for measuring spatial coordinates of moving target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia; Hu, Zhaohui; Liu, Yongdong; Liang, Jinwen

    2000-10-01

    The spatial position of industrial object, such as robot end- effector, is an important geometric parameter whose accuracy determines whether robot can perform accurately. Therefore, we have established a laser tracking and coordinate measuring system with galvanometer scanner for high accuracy, large range, non- contact, and spatial dynamic measurement. In this paper, the laser tracking system and its setup are illuminated at first. Then, the formulae for calculating coordinates are deduced, and the calibration method of the initial distance from tracking mirror to target is presented. After that, two preliminary experiments in different distances are described. One is on CMM; the other is with grating ruler as reference. In the former, the maximum measurement error of coordinates is 70micrometers and the maximum error of length is 35micrometers in the 85x100x100mm3 measurement volume, and in the 1m initial distance. In the later, the maximum error of length is 140micrometers in the range of 480mm, and in the 5m initial distance. At the end of the paper, the error sources are analyzed and simulated.

  9. Spatial Practices in Lowliebenhof: The Case of Maphango v Aengus Lifestyle Properties (PTY Ltd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isolde de Villiers

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In Maphango v Aengus Lifestyle Properties (Pty Ltd 2012 5 BCLR 449 (CC the question before the Constitutional Court was when a landlord may legally cancel contracts of lease and evict tenants. In answering this question the court had to consider the constitutional protection against arbitrary evictions in section 26(3 and the provisions of the Rental Housing Act 50 of 1999. The applicants sought a declaratory order that the landlord had terminated their leases unlawfully, because the termination had been intended to double (and in some instances more than double the rent. The applicants argued that this escalation violated contractual and legislative provisions governing the procedure and conditions under which a landlord can increase the amount of a rental. The Constitutional Court found in favour of the tenants and postponed the appeal to allow any of the parties to lodge a complaint at the Gauteng Rental Housing Tribunal. The narrow focus of this note is the manner in which the Constitutional Court in the Maphango case interpreted the concept of "practice" in the Rental Housing Act and how this in turn corresponds to perceptions of urban spaces. The inquiry is informed by the spatial justice turn and relies on the works of Michel de Certeau, Henri Lefebvre and Doreen Massey.

  10. Mineralogy of the clay fraction of alfisols in two slope curvatures: IV - spatial correlation with physical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Arantes Camargo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Although the influence of clay mineralogy on soil physical properties has been widely studied, spatial relationships between these features in Alfisols have rarely been examined. The purpose of this work was to relate the clay minerals and physical properties of an Alfisol of sandstone origin in two slope curvatures. The crystallographic properties such as mean crystallite size (MCS and width at half height (WHH of hematite, goethite, kaolinite and gibbsite; contents of hematite and goethite; aluminium substitution (AS and specific surface area (SSA of hematite and goethite; the goethite/(goethite+hematite and kaolinite/(kaolinite+gibbsite ratios; and the citrate/bicarbonate/dithionite extractable Fe (Fe d were correlated with the soil physical properties through Pearson correlation coefficients and cross-semivariograms. The correlations found between aluminium substitution in goethite and the soil physical properties suggest that the degree of crystallinity of this mineral influences soil properties used as soil quality indicators. Thus, goethite with a high aluminium substitution resulted in large aggregate sizes and a high porosity, and also in a low bulk density and soil penetration resistance. The presence of highly crystalline gibbsite resulted in a high density and micropore content, as well as in smaller aggregates. Interpretation of the cross-semivariogram and classification of landscape compartments in terms of the spatial dependence pattern for the relief-dependent physical and mineralogical properties of the soil proved an effective supplementary method for assessing Pearson correlations between the soil physical and mineralogical properties.

  11. Systems, methods, and software for determining spatially variable distributions of the dielectric properties of a heterogeneous material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrington, Stephen P.

    2018-05-15

    Systems, methods, and software for measuring the spatially variable relative dielectric permittivity of materials along a linear or otherwise configured sensor element, and more specifically the spatial variability of soil moisture in one dimension as inferred from the dielectric profile of the soil matrix surrounding a linear sensor element. Various methods provided herein combine advances in the processing of time domain reflectometry data with innovations in physical sensing apparatuses. These advancements enable high temporal (and thus spatial) resolution of electrical reflectance continuously along an insulated waveguide that is permanently emplaced in contact with adjacent soils. The spatially resolved reflectance is directly related to impedance changes along the waveguide that are dominated by electrical permittivity contrast due to variations in soil moisture. Various methods described herein are thus able to monitor soil moisture in profile with high spatial resolution.

  12. Does the edge effect impact on the measure of spatial accessibility to healthcare providers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei; Kihal, Wahida; Le Meur, Nolwenn; Souris, Marc; Deguen, Séverine

    2017-12-11

    autocorrelation index and local indicators of spatial autocorrelation) are not really impacted. Our research has revealed minor accessibility variation when edge effect has been considered in a French context. No general statement can be set up because intensity of impact varies according to healthcare provider type, territorial organization and methodology used to measure the accessibility to healthcare. Additional researches are required in order to distinguish what findings are specific to a territory and others common to different countries. It constitute a promising direction to determine more precisely healthcare shortage areas and then to fight against social health inequalities.

  13. Top quark mass and properties measurements with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Moreno Llacer, Maria; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The top quark is the heaviest elementary particle and unique among the known quarks since it decays before forming hadronic bound states. This makes measurements of its properties particularly interesting as one can access directly the properties of a bare quark. The latest measurements of these properties with the ATLAS detector are reported using 8 TeV and 13 TeV data of proton-proton collisions from the Large Hadron Collider at CERN laboratory. Measurements of the top quark decay width, top quark spin observables and $W$ boson helicity in events with top quark pairs ($t\\bar{t}$) are presented and compared to the Standard Model predictions. The cross-section measurements of top quark pairs production in association with photons, $Z$ or $W$ bosons is also presented and compared to the most accurate theoretical calculations. These measurements probe the top quark electroweak couplings. Limits on the rate of flavour changing neutral currents in the production or decay of the top quark are also reported. In add...

  14. Top quark properties and mass measurements with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Dado, Tomas; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The top quark is unique among the known quarks in that it decays before it has an opportunity to form hadronic bound states. This makes measurements of its properties particularly interesting as one can access directly the properties of a bare quark. The latest measurements of these properties with the ATLAS detector at the LHC are presented. Measurements of top quark spin observables in top-antitop events, each sensitive to a different coefficient of the spin density matrix, are presented and compared to the Standard Model predictions. The helicity of the W boson from the top decays and the production angles of the top quark are further discussed. Limits on the rate of flavour changing neutral currents in the production or decay of the top quark are reported. The production of top-quark pairs in association with W and Z bosons is also presented. The measurement probes the coupling between the top quark and the Z boson. The cross-section measurement of photons produced in association with top-quark pairs is a...

  15. Sensorineural hearing loss degrades behavioral and physiological measures of human spatial selective auditory attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lengshi; Best, Virginia; Shinn-Cunningham, Barbara G.

    2018-01-01

    Listeners with sensorineural hearing loss often have trouble understanding speech amid other voices. While poor spatial hearing is often implicated, direct evidence is weak; moreover, studies suggest that reduced audibility and degraded spectrotemporal coding may explain such problems. We hypothesized that poor spatial acuity leads to difficulty deploying selective attention, which normally filters out distracting sounds. In listeners with normal hearing, selective attention causes changes in the neural responses evoked by competing sounds, which can be used to quantify the effectiveness of attentional control. Here, we used behavior and electroencephalography to explore whether control of selective auditory attention is degraded in hearing-impaired (HI) listeners. Normal-hearing (NH) and HI listeners identified a simple melody presented simultaneously with two competing melodies, each simulated from different lateral angles. We quantified performance and attentional modulation of cortical responses evoked by these competing streams. Compared with NH listeners, HI listeners had poorer sensitivity to spatial cues, performed more poorly on the selective attention task, and showed less robust attentional modulation of cortical responses. Moreover, across NH and HI individuals, these measures were correlated. While both groups showed cortical suppression of distracting streams, this modulation was weaker in HI listeners, especially when attending to a target at midline, surrounded by competing streams. These findings suggest that hearing loss interferes with the ability to filter out sound sources based on location, contributing to communication difficulties in social situations. These findings also have implications for technologies aiming to use neural signals to guide hearing aid processing. PMID:29555752

  16. Measurement and Monte Carlo modeling of the spatial response of scintillation screens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pistrui-Maximean, S.A. [CNDRI (NDT using Ionizing Radiation) Laboratory, INSA-Lyon, 69621 Villeurbanne (France)], E-mail: spistrui@gmail.com; Letang, J.M. [CNDRI (NDT using Ionizing Radiation) Laboratory, INSA-Lyon, 69621 Villeurbanne (France)], E-mail: jean-michel.letang@insa-lyon.fr; Freud, N. [CNDRI (NDT using Ionizing Radiation) Laboratory, INSA-Lyon, 69621 Villeurbanne (France); Koch, A. [Thales Electron Devices, 38430 Moirans (France); Walenta, A.H. [Detectors and Electronics Department, FB Physik, Siegen University, 57068 Siegen (Germany); Montarou, G. [Corpuscular Physics Laboratory, Blaise Pascal University, 63177 Aubiere (France); Babot, D. [CNDRI (NDT using Ionizing Radiation) Laboratory, INSA-Lyon, 69621 Villeurbanne (France)

    2007-11-01

    In this article, we propose a detailed protocol to carry out measurements of the spatial response of scintillation screens and to assess the agreement with simulated results. The experimental measurements have been carried out using a practical implementation of the slit method. A Monte Carlo simulation model of scintillator screens, implemented with the toolkit Geant4, has been used to study the influence of the acquisition setup parameters and to compare with the experimental results. An algorithm of global stochastic optimization based on a localized random search method has been implemented to adjust the optical parameters (optical scattering and absorption coefficients). The algorithm has been tested for different X-ray tube voltages (40, 70 and 100 kV). A satisfactory convergence between the results simulated with the optimized model and the experimental measurements is obtained.

  17. The spatial filtering method for solid particle velocity measurement based on an electrostatic sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Chuanlong; Tang, Guanghua; Zhou, Bin; Wang, Shimin

    2009-01-01

    The spatial filtering method for particle velocity measurement has the advantages of simplicity of the measurement system and convenience of data processing. In this paper, the relationship between solid particles mean velocity in a pneumatic pipeline and the power spectrum of the output signal of an electrostatic sensor was mathematically modeled. The effects of the length of the sensor, the thickness of the dielectric pipe and its length on the spatial filtering characteristics of the sensor were also investigated using the finite element method. As for the roughness of and the difficult determination of the peak frequency f max of the power spectrum characteristics of the output signal of the sensor, a wavelet analysis based filtering method was applied to smooth the curve, which can accurately determine the peak frequency f max . Finally, experiments were performed on a pilot dense phase pneumatic conveying rig at high pressure to test the performance of the velocity measurement system. The experimental results show that the system repeatability is within ±4% over a gas superficial velocity range of 8.63–18.62 m s −1 for a particle concentration range of 0.067–0.130 m 3 m −3

  18. Measuring streetscape complexity based on the statistics of local contrast and spatial frequency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Cavalcante

    Full Text Available Streetscapes are basic urban elements which play a major role in the livability of a city. The visual complexity of streetscapes is known to influence how people behave in such built spaces. However, how and which characteristics of a visual scene influence our perception of complexity have yet to be fully understood. This study proposes a method to evaluate the complexity perceived in streetscapes based on the statistics of local contrast and spatial frequency. Here, 74 streetscape images from four cities, including daytime and nighttime scenes, were ranked for complexity by 40 participants. Image processing was then used to locally segment contrast and spatial frequency in the streetscapes. The statistics of these characteristics were extracted and later combined to form a single objective measure. The direct use of statistics revealed structural or morphological patterns in streetscapes related to the perception of complexity. Furthermore, in comparison to conventional measures of visual complexity, the proposed objective measure exhibits a higher correlation with the opinion of the participants. Also, the performance of this method is more robust regarding different time scenarios.

  19. Application and Analysis of Measurement Model for Calibrating Spatial Shear Surface in Triaxial Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhihua; Qiu, Hongsheng; Zhang, Xiedong; Zhang, Hang

    2017-12-01

    Discrete element method has great advantages in simulating the contacts, fractures, large displacement and deformation between particles. In order to analyze the spatial distribution of the shear surface in the three-dimensional triaxial test, a measurement model is inserted in the numerical triaxial model which is generated by weighted average assembling method. Due to the non-visibility of internal shear surface in laboratory, it is largely insufficient to judge the trend of internal shear surface only based on the superficial cracks of sheared sample, therefore, the measurement model is introduced. The trend of the internal shear zone is analyzed according to the variations of porosity, coordination number and volumetric strain in each layer. It shows that as a case study on confining stress of 0.8 MPa, the spatial shear surface is calibrated with the results of the rotated particle distribution and the theoretical value with the specific characteristics of the increase of porosity, the decrease of coordination number, and the increase of volumetric strain, which represents the measurement model used in three-dimensional model is applicable.

  20. Impact of the neutron detector choice on Bell and Glasstone spatial correction factor for subcriticality measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamo, Alberto, E-mail: alby@anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Gohar, Y.; Cao, Y.; Zhong, Z. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Kiyavitskaya, H.; Bournos, V.; Fokov, Y.; Routkovskaya, C. [Joint Institute for Power and Nuclear Research-Sosny, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, 99 acad. Krasin str., Minsk 220109 (Belarus)

    2012-03-11

    In subcritical assemblies, the Bell and Glasstone spatial correction factor is used to correct the measured reactivity from different detector positions. In addition to the measuring position, several other parameters affect the correction factor: the detector material, the detector size, and the energy-angle distribution of source neutrons. The effective multiplication factor calculated by computer codes in criticality mode slightly differs from the average value obtained from the measurements in the different experimental channels of the subcritical assembly, which are corrected by the Bell and Glasstone spatial correction factor. Generally, this difference is due to (1) neutron counting errors; (2) geometrical imperfections, which are not simulated in the calculational model, and (3) quantities and distributions of material impurities, which are missing from the material definitions. This work examines these issues and it focuses on the detector choice and the calculation methodologies. The work investigated the YALINA Booster subcritical assembly of Belarus, which has been operated with three different fuel enrichments in the fast zone either: high (90%) and medium (36%), medium (36%), or low (21%) enriched uranium fuel.

  1. Impact of the neutron detector choice on Bell and Glasstone spatial correction factor for subcriticality measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talamo, Alberto; Gohar, Y.; Cao, Y.; Zhong, Z.; Kiyavitskaya, H.; Bournos, V.; Fokov, Y.; Routkovskaya, C.

    2012-01-01

    In subcritical assemblies, the Bell and Glasstone spatial correction factor is used to correct the measured reactivity from different detector positions. In addition to the measuring position, several other parameters affect the correction factor: the detector material, the detector size, and the energy-angle distribution of source neutrons. The effective multiplication factor calculated by computer codes in criticality mode slightly differs from the average value obtained from the measurements in the different experimental channels of the subcritical assembly, which are corrected by the Bell and Glasstone spatial correction factor. Generally, this difference is due to (1) neutron counting errors; (2) geometrical imperfections, which are not simulated in the calculational model, and (3) quantities and distributions of material impurities, which are missing from the material definitions. This work examines these issues and it focuses on the detector choice and the calculation methodologies. The work investigated the YALINA Booster subcritical assembly of Belarus, which has been operated with three different fuel enrichments in the fast zone either: high (90%) and medium (36%), medium (36%), or low (21%) enriched uranium fuel.

  2. Design of an omnidirectional single-point photodetector for large-scale spatial coordinate measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hongbo; Mao, Chensheng; Ren, Yongjie; Zhu, Jigui; Wang, Chao; Yang, Lei

    2017-10-01

    In high precision and large-scale coordinate measurement, one commonly used approach to determine the coordinate of a target point is utilizing the spatial trigonometric relationships between multiple laser transmitter stations and the target point. A light receiving device at the target point is the key element in large-scale coordinate measurement systems. To ensure high-resolution and highly sensitive spatial coordinate measurement, a high-performance and miniaturized omnidirectional single-point photodetector (OSPD) is greatly desired. We report one design of OSPD using an aspheric lens, which achieves an enhanced reception angle of -5 deg to 45 deg in vertical and 360 deg in horizontal. As the heart of our OSPD, the aspheric lens is designed in a geometric model and optimized by LightTools Software, which enables the reflection of a wide-angle incident light beam into the single-point photodiode. The performance of home-made OSPD is characterized with working distances from 1 to 13 m and further analyzed utilizing developed a geometric model. The experimental and analytic results verify that our device is highly suitable for large-scale coordinate metrology. The developed device also holds great potential in various applications such as omnidirectional vision sensor, indoor global positioning system, and optical wireless communication systems.

  3. Spatial Dependence of Physical Attributes and Mechanical Properties of Ultisol in a Sugarcane Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Uilka Elisa; Rolim, Mário Monteiro; de Oliveira, Veronildo Souza; Pedrosa, Elvira Maria Regis; Siqueira, Glécio Machado; Magalhães, Adriana Guedes

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of conventional tillage and application of the monoculture of sugar cane on soil health. Variables like density, moisture, texture, consistency limits, and preconsolidation stress were taken as indicators of soil quality. The measurements were made at a 120 × 120 m field cropped with sugar cane under conventional tillage. The objective of this work was to characterize the soil and to study the spatial dependence of the physical and mechanical attributes. Then, undisturbed soil samples were collected to measure bulk density, moisture content and preconsolidation stress and disturbed soil samples for classification of soil texture, and consistency limits. The soil texture indicated that soil can be characterized as sandy clay soil and a sandy clay loam soil, and the consistency limits indicated that the soil presents an inorganic low plasticity clay. The preconsolidation tests tillage in soil moisture content around 19% should be avoided or should be chosen a management of soil with lighter vehicles in this moisture content, to avoid risk of compaction. Using geostatistical techniques mapping was possible to identify areas of greatest conservation soil and greater disturbance of the ground.

  4. Containerless high temperature property measurements by atomic fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, R. A.; Walker, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) techniques for containerless study of high temperature processes and material properties was studied. Gas jet and electromagnetic levitation and electromagnetic and laser heating techniques are used with LIF in earth-based containerless high temperature experiments. Included are the development of an apparatus and its use in the studies of (1) chemical reactions on Al2O3, molybdenum, tungsten and LaB6 specimens, (2) methods for noncontact specimen temperature measurement, (3) levitation jet properties and (4) radiative lifetime and collisional energy transfer rates for electronically excited atoms.

  5. Measurement of the spatial resolution of wide-pitch silicon strip detectors with large incident angle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, T.; Hazumi, M.; Nagashima, Y.

    1996-01-01

    As a part of R ampersand D for the BELLE experiment at KEK-B, we measured the spatial resolution of silicon strip detectors for particles with incident angles ranging from 0 degrees to 75 degrees. These detectors have strips with pitches of 50, 125 and 250 μm on the ohmic side. We have obtained the incident angle dependence which agreed well with a Monte Carlo simulation. The resolution was found to be 11 μm for normal incidence with a pitch of 50 μm, and 29 μm for incident angle of 75 degrees with a pitch of 250μm

  6. Soil pH Errors Propagation from Measurements to Spatial Predictions - Cost Benefit Analysis and Risk Assessment Implications for Practitioners and Modelers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, P. R.; Libohova, Z.; Seybold, C. A.; Wills, S. A.; Peaslee, S.; Beaudette, D.; Lindbo, D. L.

    2017-12-01

    The measurement errors and spatial prediction uncertainties of soil properties in the modeling community are usually assessed against measured values when available. However, of equal importance is the assessment of errors and uncertainty impacts on cost benefit analysis and risk assessments. Soil pH was selected as one of the most commonly measured soil properties used for liming recommendations. The objective of this study was to assess the error size from different sources and their implications with respect to management decisions. Error sources include measurement methods, laboratory sources, pedotransfer functions, database transections, spatial aggregations, etc. Several databases of measured and predicted soil pH were used for this study including the United States National Cooperative Soil Survey Characterization Database (NCSS-SCDB), the US Soil Survey Geographic (SSURGO) Database. The distribution of errors among different sources from measurement methods to spatial aggregation showed a wide range of values. The greatest RMSE of 0.79 pH units was from spatial aggregation (SSURGO vs Kriging), while the measurement methods had the lowest RMSE of 0.06 pH units. Assuming the order of data acquisition based on the transaction distance i.e. from measurement method to spatial aggregation the RMSE increased from 0.06 to 0.8 pH units suggesting an "error propagation". This has major implications for practitioners and modeling community. Most soil liming rate recommendations are based on 0.1 pH unit increments, while the desired soil pH level increments are based on 0.4 to 0.5 pH units. Thus, even when the measured and desired target soil pH are the same most guidelines recommend 1 ton ha-1 lime, which translates in 111 ha-1 that the farmer has to factor in the cost-benefit analysis. However, this analysis need to be based on uncertainty predictions (0.5-1.0 pH units) rather than measurement errors (0.1 pH units) which would translate in 555-1,111 investment that

  7. Dynamic electrostatic force microscopy technique for the study of electrical properties with improved spatial resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maragliano, C; Heskes, D; Stefancich, M; Chiesa, M; Souier, T

    2013-01-01

    The need to resolve the electrical properties of confined structures (CNTs, quantum dots, nanorods, etc) is becoming increasingly important in the field of electronic and optoelectronic devices. Here we propose an approach based on amplitude modulated electrostatic force microscopy to obtain measurements at small tip–sample distances, where highly nonlinear forces are present. We discuss how this improves the lateral resolution of the technique and allows probing of the electrical and surface properties. The complete force field at different tip biases is employed to derive the local work function difference. Then, by appropriately biasing the tip–sample system, short-range forces are reconstructed. The short-range component is then separated from the generic tip–sample force in order to recover the pure electrostatic contribution. This data can be employed to derive the tip–sample capacitance curve and the sample dielectric constant. After presenting a theoretical model that justifies the need for probing the electrical properties of the sample in the vicinity of the surface, the methodology is presented in detail and verified experimentally. (paper)

  8. Measurement properties of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMS) in Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Andrew; Liles, Clive; Rushton, Alison; Kyte, Derek G

    2014-12-01

    This systematic review investigated the measurement properties of disease-specific patient-reported outcome measures used in Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome. Two independent reviewers conducted a systematic search of key databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINHAL+ and the Cochrane Library from inception to August 2013) to identify relevant studies. A third reviewer mediated in the event of disagreement. Methodological quality was evaluated using the validated COSMIN (Consensus-based Standards for the Selection of Health Measurement Instruments) tool. Data synthesis across studies determined the level of evidence for each patient-reported outcome measure. The search strategy returned 2177 citations. Following the eligibility review phase, seven studies, evaluating twelve different patient-reported outcome measures, met inclusion criteria. A 'moderate' level of evidence supported the structural validity of several measures: the Flandry Questionnaire, Anterior Knee Pain Scale, Functional Index Questionnaire, Eng and Pierrynowski Questionnaire and Visual Analogue Scales for 'usual' and 'worst' pain. In addition, there was a 'Limited' level of evidence supporting the test-retest reliability and validity (cross-cultural, hypothesis testing) of the Persian version of the Anterior Knee Pain Scale. Other measurement properties were evaluated with poor methodological quality, and many properties were not evaluated in any of the included papers. Current disease-specific outcome measures for Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome require further investigation. Future studies should evaluate all important measurement properties, utilising an appropriate framework such as COSMIN to guide study design, to facilitate optimal methodological quality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Spatial and temporal interpolation of satellite-based aerosol optical depth measurements over North America using B-splines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Nicolas; O'Neill, Norman T.; Aube, Martin; Nguyen, Minh-Nghia; Bechamp-Laganiere, Xavier; Besnier, Albert; Corriveau, Louis; Gasse, Geremie; Levert, Etienne; Plante, Danick

    2005-08-01

    Satellite-based measurements of aerosol optical depth (AOD) over land are obtained from an inversion procedure applied to dense dark vegetation pixels of remotely sensed images. The limited number of pixels over which the inversion procedure can be applied leaves many areas with little or no AOD data. Moreover, satellite coverage by sensors such as MODIS yields only daily images of a given region with four sequential overpasses required to straddle mid-latitude North America. Ground based AOD data from AERONET sun photometers are available on a more continuous basis but only at approximately fifty locations throughout North America. The object of this work is to produce a complete and coherent mapping of AOD over North America with a spatial resolution of 0.1 degree and a frequency of three hours by interpolating MODIS satellite-based data together with available AERONET ground based measurements. Before being interpolated, the MODIS AOD data extracted from different passes are synchronized to the mapping time using analyzed wind fields from the Global Multiscale Model (Meteorological Service of Canada). This approach amounts to a trajectory type of simplified atmospheric dynamics correction method. The spatial interpolation is performed using a weighted least squares method applied to bicubic B-spline functions defined on a rectangular grid. The least squares method enables one to weight the data accordingly to the measurement errors while the B-splines properties of local support and C2 continuity offer a good approximation of AOD behaviour viewed as a function of time and space.

  10. Field soil-water properties measured through radiation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-07-01

    This report shows a major effort to make soil physics applicable to the behaviour of the field soils and presents a rich and diverse set of data which are essential for the development of effective soil-water management practices that improve and conserve the quality and quantity of agricultural lands. This piece of research has shown that the neutron moisture meter together with some complementary instruments like tensiometers, can be used not only to measure soil water contents but also be extremely handy to measure soil hydraulic characteristics and soil water flow. It is, however, recognized that hydraulic conductivity is highly sensitive to small changes in soil water content and texture, being extremely variable spatially and temporally

  11. The influence of target properties on nuclear spectroscopy measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dionisio, J.S.; Vieu, C.; Lagrange, J.M.; Pautrat, M.; Vanhorenbeeck, J.; Passoja, A.

    1988-01-01

    A broad review of different kinds of in-beam nuclear spectroscopy measurements particularly influenced by the target properties is outlined. To illustrate such an influence a few typical examples of in-beam electron and gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements, performed at the Orsay MP Tandem accelerator, are reported. In particular several applications of the recoil ion catcher method in the study of short-lived nuclear isomers (with half-lives between ten and few hundred nanoseconds) are briefly described. This method is operated mostly with a pulsed heavy ion beam, bombarding a thin self-supported target but avoiding hitting the catcher foil. Moreover, the time of flight filtering properties of this experimental device is improved by a fast detection of compound nucleus deexcitation (performed with an array of several BaF 2 crystals). This kind of measurement shows clearly the importance of the target qualities as well as the need of good focusing properties and time structure for the accelerated particle beam. Finally, the required characteristics of the targets and recoil stopper foils needed for these measurements (and similar ones performed with the recoil ion shadow method) are analyzed in detail for a few typical experimental arrangements. (author). Abstract only

  12. A method for measuring the inertia properties of rigid bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbi, M.; Mastinu, G.; Previati, G.

    2011-01-01

    A method for the measurement of the inertia properties of rigid bodies is presented. Given a rigid body and its mass, the method allows to measure (identify) the centre of gravity location and the inertia tensor during a single test. The proposed technique is based on the analysis of the free motion of a multi-cable pendulum to which the body under consideration is connected. The motion of the pendulum and the forces acting on the system are recorded and the inertia properties are identified by means of a proper mathematical procedure based on a least square estimation. After the body is positioned on the test rig, the full identification procedure takes less than 10 min. The natural frequencies of the pendulum and the accelerations involved are quite low, making this method suitable for many practical applications. In this paper, the proposed method is described and two test rigs are presented: the first is developed for bodies up to 3500 kg and the second for bodies up to 400 kg. A validation of the measurement method is performed with satisfactory results. The test rig holds a third part quality certificate according to an ISO 9001 standard and could be scaled up to measure the inertia properties of huge bodies, such as trucks, airplanes or even ships.

  13. Top quark properties measurements with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Span\\`o, Francesco; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Precise measurements of the properties of the top quark test the Standard Model (SM) and can be used to constrain new physics models. As it may be significantly enhanced by the presence of new physics, the $t\\overline{t}$ production charge asymmetry is measured inclusively and differentially using the 8 TeV ATLAS dataset using both the lepton+jets and dilepton channels, including a dedicated measurement for highly boosted top quarks. In the SM the top quark is predicted to decay almost exclusively into W boson and a $b$-quark. Measurements of the W-helicity and spin correlations in $t\\overline{t}$ production are presented as well as new measurements of CP asymmetries in $b$-hadron decays using top-quark events.

  14. Top quark properties measurements with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Spano, Francesco; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Precise measurements of the properties of the top quark test the Standard Model (SM) and can be used to constrain new physics models. As it may be significantly enhanced by the presence of new physics, the ttbar production charge asymmetry is measured inclusively and differentially using the 8 TeV ATLAS dataset using both the lepton+jets and dilepton channels, including a dedicated measurement for highly boosted top-quarks. In the SM the top-quark is predicted to decay almost exclusively into a W boson and a b-quark. Measurements of the W-helicity and spin correlations in ttbar production are presented as well as new measurements of CP asymmetries in b-hadron decays using top-quark events.

  15. High temperature measurements of the microwave dielectric properties of ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeraky, T.A.

    1999-06-01

    Equipment has been developed for the measurement of dielectric properties at high temperature from 25 to 1700 deg. C in the microwave frequency range 614.97 to 3620.66 MHz using the cavity perturbation technique, to measure the permittivity of a range of ceramic materials. The complex permittivities of the standard materials, water and methanol, were measured at low temperature and compared with the other published data. A statistical analysis was made for the permittivity measurements of water and methanol using sample holders of different diameter. Also the measurements of these materials were used to compare the simple perturbation equation with its modifications and alternation correction methods for sample shape and the holes at the two endplates of the cavity. The dielectric properties of solid materials were investigated from the permittivity measurements on powder materials, shown in table 4.7, using the dielectric mixture equations. Two kinds of ceramics, oxide and nitrides, were selected for the high temperature dielectric measurements in microwave frequency ranges. Pure zirconia, yttria-stabilised zirconia, and Magnesia-stabilised zirconia are the oxide ceramics while aluminium nitride and silicon nitride are the nitride ceramics. A phase transformation from monoclinic to tetragonal was observed in pure zirconia in terms of the complex permittivity measurements, and the conduction mechanism in three regions of temperature was suggested to be ionic in the first region and a mixture of ionic and electronic in the second. The phase transition disappeared with yttria-stabilised zirconia but it was observed with magnesia-stabilised zirconia. Yttria doped zirconia was fully stabilised while magnesia stabilised was partially stabilised zirconia. The dielectric property measurements of aluminium nitride indicated that there is a transition from AIN to AlON, which suggested that the external layer of the AIN which was exposed to the air, contains alumina. It was

  16. Energetic and Spatial Bonding Properties from Angular Distributions of Ultraviolet Photoelectrons: Application to the GaAs(110) Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadley, C.S.; Fadley, C.S.; Van Hove, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    Angle-resolved ultraviolet photoemission spectra are interpreted by combining the energetics and spatial properties of the contributing states. One-step calculations are in excellent agreement with new azimuthal experimental data for GaAs(110). Strong variations caused by the dispersion of the surface bands permit an accurate mapping of the electronic structure. The delocalization of the valence states is discussed analogous to photoelectron diffraction. The spatial origin of the electrons is determined, and found to be strongly energy dependent, with uv excitation probing the bonding region. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  17. Non-Contact Thermal Properties Measurement with Low-Power Laser and IR Camera System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Troy L.; Hecht, Michael H.

    2011-01-01

    As shown by the Phoenix Mars Lander's Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP), contact measurements of thermal conductivity and diffusivity (using a modified flux-plate or line-source heat-pulse method) are constrained by a number of factors. Robotic resources must be used to place the probe, making them unavailable for other operations for the duration of the measurement. The range of placement is also limited by mobility, particularly in the case of a lander. Placement is also subject to irregularities in contact quality, resulting in non-repeatable heat transfer to the material under test. Most important from a scientific perspective, the varieties of materials which can be measured are limited to unconsolidated or weakly-cohesive regolith materials, rocks, and ices being too hard for nominal insertion strengths. Accurately measuring thermal properties in the laboratory requires significant experimental finesse, involving sample preparation, controlled and repeatable procedures, and, practically, instrumentation much more voluminous than the sample being tested (heater plates, insulation, temperature sensors). Remote measurements (infrared images from orbiting spacecraft) can reveal composite properties like thermal inertia, but suffer both from a large footprint (low spatial resolution) and convolution of the thermal properties of a potentially layered medium. In situ measurement techniques (the Phoenix TECP is the only robotic measurement of thermal properties to date) suffer from problems of placement range, placement quality, occupation of robotic resources, and the ability to only measure materials of low mechanical strength. A spacecraft needs the ability to perform a non-contact thermal properties measurement in situ. Essential components include low power consumption, leveraging of existing or highly-developed flight technologies, and mechanical simplicity. This new in situ method, by virtue of its being non-contact, bypasses all of these

  18. Measuring spatially- and directionally-varying light scattering from biological material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Todd Alan; Bostwick, Kimberly S; Marschner, Steve

    2013-05-20

    Light interacts with an organism's integument on a variety of spatial scales. For example in an iridescent bird: nano-scale structures produce color; the milli-scale structure of barbs and barbules largely determines the directional pattern of reflected light; and through the macro-scale spatial structure of overlapping, curved feathers, these directional effects create the visual texture. Milli-scale and macro-scale effects determine where on the organism's body, and from what viewpoints and under what illumination, the iridescent colors are seen. Thus, the highly directional flash of brilliant color from the iridescent throat of a hummingbird is inadequately explained by its nano-scale structure alone and questions remain. From a given observation point, which milli-scale elements of the feather are oriented to reflect strongly? Do some species produce broader "windows" for observation of iridescence than others? These and similar questions may be asked about any organisms that have evolved a particular surface appearance for signaling, camouflage, or other reasons. In order to study the directional patterns of light scattering from feathers, and their relationship to the bird's milli-scale morphology, we developed a protocol for measuring light scattered from biological materials using many high-resolution photographs taken with varying illumination and viewing directions. Since we measure scattered light as a function of direction, we can observe the characteristic features in the directional distribution of light scattered from that particular feather, and because barbs and barbules are resolved in our images, we can clearly attribute the directional features to these different milli-scale structures. Keeping the specimen intact preserves the gross-scale scattering behavior seen in nature. The method described here presents a generalized protocol for analyzing spatially- and directionally-varying light scattering from complex biological materials at multiple

  19. Study of cloud properties using airborne and satellite measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boscornea, Andreea; Stefan, Sabina; Vajaiac, Sorin Nicolae

    2014-08-01

    The present study investigates cloud microphysics properties using aircraft and satellite measurements. Cloud properties were drawn from data acquired both from in situ measurements with state of the art airborne instrumentation and from satellite products of the MODIS06 System. The used aircraft was ATMOSLAB - Airborne Laboratory for Environmental Atmospheric Research, property of the National Institute for Aerospace Research "Elie Carafoli" (INCAS), Bucharest, Romania, which is specially equipped for this kind of research. The main tool of the airborne laboratory is a Cloud, Aerosol and Precipitation Spectrometer - CAPS (30 bins, 0.51- 50 μm). The data was recorded during two flights during the winter 2013-2014, over a flat region in the south-eastern part of Romania (between Bucharest and Constanta). The analysis of cloud particle size variations and cloud liquid water content provided by CAPS can explain cloud processes, and can also indicate the extent of aerosols effects on clouds. The results, such as cloud coverage and/or cloud types, microphysical parameters of aerosols on the one side and the cloud microphysics parameters obtained from aircraft flights on the other side, was used to illustrate the importance of microphysics cloud properties for including the radiative effects of clouds in the regional climate models.

  20. The measurement of the presampled MTF of a high spatial resolution neutron imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Raymond Lei; Biegalski, Steven R.

    2007-01-01

    A high spatial resolution neutron imaging device was developed at the Mark II TRIGA reactor at University of Texas at Austin. As the modulation transfer function (MTF) is recognized as a well-established parameter for evaluation of imaging system resolution, the aliasing associated with digital sampling adds complexity to its measurement. Aliasing is especially problematic when using a high spatial resolution micro-channel plate (MCP) neutron detector that has a pixel grid size similar to that of a CCD array. To compensate for the aliasing an angulated edge method was used to evaluate the neutron imaging facility, overcoming aliasing by obtaining an oversampled edge spread function (ESF). Baseline correction was applied to the ESF to remove the noticeable trends and the LSF was multiplied by Hann window to obtain a smoothed version of presampled MTF. The computing procedure is confirmed by visual inspection of a testing phantom; in addition, it is confirmed by comparison to the MTF measurement of a scintillation screen with a known MTF curve

  1. A protocol for measuring spatial variables in soft-sediment tide pools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina R. Brenha-Nunes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT We present a protocol for measuring spatial variables in large (>50 m2 soft-sediment tide pool. Secondarily, we present the fish capture efficiency of a sampling protocol that based on such spatial variables to calculate relative abundances. The area of the pool is estimated by summing areas of basic geometric forms; the depth, by taken representative measurements of the depth variability of each pool's sector, previously determined according to its perimeter; and the volume, by considering the pool as a prism. These procedures were a trade-off between the acquisition of reliable estimates and the minimization of both the cost of operating and the time spent in field. The fish sampling protocol is based on two con secutive stages: 1 two people search for fishes under structures (e.g., rocks and litters on the pool and capture them with hand seines; 2 these structures are removed and then a beach-seine is hauled over the whole pool. Our method is cheaper than others and fast to operate considering the time in low tides. The method to sample fish is quite efficient resulting in a capture efficiency of 89%.

  2. Voxel-based measurement sensitivity of spatially resolved near-infrared spectroscopy in layered tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwayama, Masatsugu

    2018-03-01

    We quantitatively investigated the measurement sensitivity of spatially resolved spectroscopy (SRS) across six tissue models: cerebral tissue, a small animal brain, the forehead of a fetus, an adult brain, forearm muscle, and thigh muscle. The optical path length in the voxel of the model was analyzed using Monte Carlo simulations. It was found that the measurement sensitivity can be represented as the product of the change in the absorption coefficient and the difference in optical path length in two states with different source-detector distances. The results clarified the sensitivity ratio between the surface layer and the deep layer at each source-detector distance for each model and identified changes in the deep measurement area when one of the detectors was close to the light source. A comparison was made with the results from continuous-wave spectroscopy. The study also identified measurement challenges that arise when the surface layer is inhomogeneous. Findings on the measurement sensitivity of SRS at each voxel and in each layer can support the correct interpretation of measured values when near-infrared oximetry or functional near-infrared spectroscopy is used to investigate different tissue structures. (2018) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  3. Understanding quantum mechanics by measuring the properties of mesoscopic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, R.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of the electrical transport and magnetic properties of micron-size scale insulators, metals, semi-metals, and semiconductors at low temperatures have uncovered a wealth of unexpected phenomena. The only way to understand these new properties is by invoking many of the postulates of quantum mechanics. The author has confirmed that the electron acts as a long-range phase-coherent wave and conventional classical forces are not as important as scalar and vector potentials in determining the response of the electron as it moves through its environment. This talk will focus on the measurement of the Aharonov-Bohm self-interference effects, nonlocal transport phenomena, and persistent currents in normal metal ring structures that have been observed in these nanostructures

  4. Measure theoretical approach to recurrent properties for quantum dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otobe, Yoshiki; Sasaki, Itaru

    2011-01-01

    Poincaré's recurrence theorem, which states that every Hamiltonian dynamics enclosed in a finite volume returns to its initial position as close as one wishes, is a mathematical basis of statistical mechanics. It is Liouville's theorem that guarantees that the dynamics preserves the volume on the state space. A quantum version of Poincaré's theorem was obtained in the middle of the 20th century without any volume structures of the state space (Hilbert space). One of our aims in this paper is to establish such properties of quantum dynamics from an analog of Liouville's theorem, namely, we will construct a natural probability measure on the Hilbert space from a Hamiltonian defined on the space. Then we will show that the measure is invariant under the corresponding Schrödinger flow. Moreover, we show that the dynamics naturally causes an infinite-dimensional Weyl transformation. It also enables us to discuss the ergodic properties of such dynamics. (paper)

  5. General Relationships between Abiotic Soil Properties and Soil Biota across Spatial Scales and Different Land-Use Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkhofer, Klaus; Schöning, Ingo; Alt, Fabian; Herold, Nadine; Klarner, Bernhard; Maraun, Mark; Marhan, Sven; Oelmann, Yvonne; Wubet, Tesfaye; Yurkov, Andrey; Begerow, Dominik; Berner, Doreen; Buscot, François; Daniel, Rolf; Diekötter, Tim; Ehnes, Roswitha B.; Erdmann, Georgia; Fischer, Christiane; Foesel, Bärbel; Groh, Janine; Gutknecht, Jessica; Kandeler, Ellen; Lang, Christa; Lohaus, Gertrud; Meyer, Annabel; Nacke, Heiko; Näther, Astrid; Overmann, Jörg; Polle, Andrea; Pollierer, Melanie M.; Scheu, Stefan; Schloter, Michael; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef; Schulze, Waltraud; Weinert, Jan; Weisser, Wolfgang W.; Wolters, Volkmar; Schrumpf, Marion

    2012-01-01

    Very few principles have been unraveled that explain the relationship between soil properties and soil biota across large spatial scales and different land-use types. Here, we seek these general relationships using data from 52 differently managed grassland and forest soils in three study regions spanning a latitudinal gradient in Germany. We hypothesize that, after extraction of variation that is explained by location and land-use type, soil properties still explain significant proportions of variation in the abundance and diversity of soil biota. If the relationships between predictors and soil organisms were analyzed individually for each predictor group, soil properties explained the highest amount of variation in soil biota abundance and diversity, followed by land-use type and sampling location. After extraction of variation that originated from location or land-use, abiotic soil properties explained significant amounts of variation in fungal, meso- and macrofauna, but not in yeast or bacterial biomass or diversity. Nitrate or nitrogen concentration and fungal biomass were positively related, but nitrate concentration was negatively related to the abundances of Collembola and mites and to the myriapod species richness across a range of forest and grassland soils. The species richness of earthworms was positively correlated with clay content of soils independent of sample location and land-use type. Our study indicates that after accounting for heterogeneity resulting from large scale differences among sampling locations and land-use types, soil properties still explain significant proportions of variation in fungal and soil fauna abundance or diversity. However, soil biota was also related to processes that act at larger spatial scales and bacteria or soil yeasts only showed weak relationships to soil properties. We therefore argue that more general relationships between soil properties and soil biota can only be derived from future studies that consider

  6. 3D shape measurement of moving object with FFT-based spatial matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qinghua; Ruan, Yuxi; Xi, Jiangtao; Song, Limei; Zhu, Xinjun; Yu, Yanguang; Tong, Jun

    2018-03-01

    This work presents a new technique for 3D shape measurement of moving object in translational motion, which finds applications in online inspection, quality control, etc. A low-complexity 1D fast Fourier transform (FFT)-based spatial matching approach is devised to obtain accurate object displacement estimates, and it is combined with single shot fringe pattern prolometry (FPP) techniques to achieve high measurement performance with multiple captured images through coherent combining. The proposed technique overcomes some limitations of existing ones. Specifically, the placement of marks on object surface and synchronization between projector and camera are not needed, the velocity of the moving object is not required to be constant, and there is no restriction on the movement trajectory. Both simulation and experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed technique.

  7. A systematic review of measurement properties of patient reported outcome measures in psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, Pil; Klokker, Louise; Orbai, Ana Maria

    2018-01-01

    Background: An updated psoriatic arthritis (PsA) core outcome set (COS) for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was endorsed at the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) meeting in 2016. Objectives: To synthesize the evidence on measurement properties of patient reported outcome measures...... (PROMs) for PsA and thereby contribute to development of a PsA core outcome measurement set (COMS) as described by the OMERACT Filter 2.0. Methods: A systematic literature search was performed in EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO on Jan 1, 2017 to identify full-text articles with an aim of assessing...... the measurement properties of PROMs in PsA. Two independent reviewers rated the quality of studies using the COnsensus based standards for the Selection of health Measurement INstruments (COSMIN) checklist, and performed a qualitative evidence synthesis. Results: Fifty-five studies were included in the systematic...

  8. Aerodynamic levitator furnace for measuring thermophysical properties of refractory liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langstaff, D; Gunn, M; Greaves, G N; Marsing, A; Kargl, F

    2013-12-01

    The development of novel contactless aerodynamic laser heated levitation techniques is reported that enable thermophysical properties of refractory liquids to be measured in situ in the solid, liquid, and supercooled liquid state and demonstrated here for alumina. Starting with polished crystalline ruby spheres, we show how, by accurately measuring the changing radius, the known density in the solid state can be reproduced from room temperature to the melting point at 2323 K. Once molten, by coupling the floating liquid drop to acoustic oscillations via the levitating gas, the mechanical resonance and damping of the liquid can be measured precisely with high-speed high-resolution shadow cast imaging. The resonance frequency relates to the surface tension, the decay constant to the viscosity, and the ellipsoidal size and shape of the levitating drop to the density. This unique instrumentation enables these related thermophysical properties to be recorded in situ over the entire liquid and supercooled range of alumina, from the boiling point at 3240 K, until spontaneous crystallization occurs around 1860 K, almost 500 below the melting point. We believe that the utility that this unique instrumentation provides will be applicable to studying these important properties in many other high temperature liquids.

  9. Comparison of Thermal Properties Measured by Different Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundberg, Jan [Geo Innova AB, Linkoeping (Sweden); Kukkonen, Ilmo [Geological Survey of Finland, Helsinki (Finland); Haelldahl, Lars [Hot Disk AB, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2003-04-01

    A strategy for a thermal site descriptive model of bedrock is under development at SKB. In the model different kinds of uncertainties exist. Some of these uncertainties are related to the potential errors in the methods used for determining thermal properties of rock. In two earlier investigations thermal properties of rock samples were analysed according to the TPS method (transient plane source). Thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity were determined using the TPS method. For a comparison, the same samples have been measured at the Geological Survey of Finland (GSF), using different laboratory methods. In this later investigation, the thermal conductivity was determined using the divided-bar method and the specific heat capacity using a calorimetric method. The mean differences between the results of different methods are relatively low but the results of individual samples show large variations. The thermal conductivity measured by the divided bar method gives for most samples slightly higher values, in average about 3%, than the TPS method. The specific heat capacity measured by the calorimetric method gives lower values, in average about 2%, than the TPS method. Consequently, the thermal diffusivity calculated from thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity gives higher values, in average about 6%, than the TPS method. Reasons for the differences are estimated mainly to be dependent on differences between the samples, errors in the temperature dependence of specific heat and in the transformation from volumetric to specific heat. The TPS measurements are performed using two pieces (sub-samples) of rock. Only one of these two sub-samples was measured using the divided bar method and the calorimetric method. Further, sample preparation involved changes in the size of some of the samples. The mean differences between the results of different methods are within the margins of error reported by the measuring laboratories. However, systematic errors in

  10. Comparison of Thermal Properties Measured by Different Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundberg, Jan; Kukkonen, Ilmo; Haelldahl, Lars

    2003-04-01

    A strategy for a thermal site descriptive model of bedrock is under development at SKB. In the model different kinds of uncertainties exist. Some of these uncertainties are related to the potential errors in the methods used for determining thermal properties of rock. In two earlier investigations thermal properties of rock samples were analysed according to the TPS method (transient plane source). Thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity were determined using the TPS method. For a comparison, the same samples have been measured at the Geological Survey of Finland (GSF), using different laboratory methods. In this later investigation, the thermal conductivity was determined using the divided-bar method and the specific heat capacity using a calorimetric method. The mean differences between the results of different methods are relatively low but the results of individual samples show large variations. The thermal conductivity measured by the divided bar method gives for most samples slightly higher values, in average about 3%, than the TPS method. The specific heat capacity measured by the calorimetric method gives lower values, in average about 2%, than the TPS method. Consequently, the thermal diffusivity calculated from thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity gives higher values, in average about 6%, than the TPS method. Reasons for the differences are estimated mainly to be dependent on differences between the samples, errors in the temperature dependence of specific heat and in the transformation from volumetric to specific heat. The TPS measurements are performed using two pieces (sub-samples) of rock. Only one of these two sub-samples was measured using the divided bar method and the calorimetric method. Further, sample preparation involved changes in the size of some of the samples. The mean differences between the results of different methods are within the margins of error reported by the measuring laboratories. However, systematic errors in

  11. Reducing uncertainty of estimated nitrogen load reductions to aquatic systems through spatially targeting agricultural mitigation measures using groundwater nitrogen reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hashemi, Fatemeh; Olesen, Jørgen Eivind; Jabloun, Mohamed

    2018-01-01

    variation across the landscape in natural N-reduction (denitrification) of leached nitrate in the groundwater and surface water systems. A critical basis for including spatial targeting in regulation of N-load in Denmark is the uncertainty associated with the effect of spatially targeting measures, since......The need to further abate agricultural nitrate (N)-loadings to coastal waters in Denmark represents the main driver for development of a new spatially targeted regulation that focus on locating N-mitigation measures in agricultural areas with high N-load. This targeting makes use of the spatial...... the effect will be critically affected by uncertainty in the quantification of the spatial variation in N-reduction. In this study, we used 30 equally plausible N-reduction maps, at 100 m grid and sub-catchment resolutions, for the 85-km2 groundwater dominated Norsminde catchment in Denmark, applying set...

  12. Spatially resolved flux measurements of NOx from London suggest significantly higher emissions than predicted by inventories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Adam R; Lee, James D; Misztal, Pawel K; Metzger, Stefan; Shaw, Marvin D; Lewis, Alastair C; Purvis, Ruth M; Carslaw, David C; Goldstein, Allen H; Hewitt, C Nicholas; Davison, Brian; Beevers, Sean D; Karl, Thomas G

    2016-07-18

    To date, direct validation of city-wide emissions inventories for air pollutants has been difficult or impossible. However, recent technological innovations now allow direct measurement of pollutant fluxes from cities, for comparison with emissions inventories, which are themselves commonly used for prediction of current and future air quality and to help guide abatement strategies. Fluxes of NOx were measured using the eddy-covariance technique from an aircraft flying at low altitude over London. The highest fluxes were observed over central London, with lower fluxes measured in suburban areas. A footprint model was used to estimate the spatial area from which the measured emissions occurred. This allowed comparison of the flux measurements to the UK's National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory (NAEI) for NOx, with scaling factors used to account for the actual time of day, day of week and month of year of the measurement. The comparison suggests significant underestimation of NOx emissions in London by the NAEI, mainly due to its under-representation of real world road traffic emissions. A comparison was also carried out with an enhanced version of the inventory using real world driving emission factors and road measurement data taken from the London Atmospheric Emissions Inventory (LAEI). The measurement to inventory agreement was substantially improved using the enhanced version, showing the importance of fully accounting for road traffic, which is the dominant NOx emission source in London. In central London there was still an underestimation by the inventory of 30-40% compared with flux measurements, suggesting significant improvements are still required in the NOx emissions inventory.

  13. W-Band Transmission MeasurementS and X-Band Dielectric Properties Measurements for a Radome Material Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravey, Robin L.; Tiemsin, Pacita I.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes measurements which were performed on a sample of radome material in the Electromagnetic Properties Measurements Laboratory (EPML). The purpose of the measurements described in this paper was to determine the one-way transmission loss through the flat panel of radome material for a frequency range of 84 to 94 GHz, for varying incidence angles. The panel, which was manufactured by Norton Performance Plastics Corporation, was provided to the EPML by TRW. The size of the panel is 40 in x 36 in x 0.422 in and consists of a foam material with one side coated with a smooth white coating (this side will be referred to as the front side). The dielectric properties of the foam material from the inside of the panel were also determined at X-band (8.2-12.4 GHz). The W-band free space measurements are presented first, followed by the X-band dielectric properties measurements.

  14. Spatial and radiative properties of an open-flame hydrogen plume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schefer, R.W.; Houf, W.G. [Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Bourne, B.; Colton, J. [SRI International, 333 Ravenwood Ave., Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2006-08-15

    Considerable effort is being directed toward updating safety codes and standards in preparation for production, distribution, and retail of hydrogen as a consumer energy source. In the present study, measurements were performed in large-scale, vertical flames to characterize the dimensional and radiative properties of an ignited hydrogen jet. These data are relevant to the safety scenario of a sudden leak in a high-pressure hydrogen containment vessel. Specifically, the data will provide a technological basis for determining hazardous length scales associated with unintended releases at hydrogen storage and distribution centers. Visible and infrared video and ultraviolet flame luminescence imaging were used to evaluate flame length, diameter and structure. Radiometer measurements allowed determination of the radiant heat flux from the flame. The results show that flame length increases with total jet mass flow rate and jet nozzle diameter. When plotted as a function of Froude number, which measures the relative importance of jet momentum and buoyancy, the measured flame lengths for a range of operating conditions collapse onto the same curve. Good comparison with hydrocarbon jet flame lengths is found, demonstrating that the non-dimensional correlations are valid for a variety of fuel types. The radiative heat flux measurements for hydrogen flames show good agreement with non-dimensional correlations and scaling laws developed for a range of fuels and flame conditions. This result verifies that such correlations can be used to predict radiative heat flux from a wide variety of hydrogen flames and establishes a basis for predicting a priori the characteristics of flames resulting from accidental releases. (author)

  15. Minding the gap: Children's difficulty conceptualizing spatial intervals as linear measurement units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Tracy L; Vasilyeva, Marina; Huttenlocher, Janellen; Levine, Susan C

    2015-11-01

    Understanding measurement units is critical to mathematics and science learning, but it is a topic that American students find difficult. In 3 studies, we investigated the challenges underlying this difficulty in kindergarten and second grade by comparing performance on different versions of a linear measurement task. Children measured crayons that were either aligned or shifted relative to the left edge of either a continuous ruler or a row of discrete units. The alignment (aligned, shifted) and the measuring tool (ruler, discrete units) were crossed to form 4 types of problems. Study 1 showed good performance in both grades on both types of aligned problems as well as on the shifted problems with discrete units. In contrast, performance was at chance on the shifted ruler problems. Study 2 showed that performance on shifted discrete unit problems declined when numbers were placed on the units, particularly for kindergarteners, suggesting that on the shifted ruler problems, the presence of numbers may have contributed to children's difficulty. However, Study 3 showed that the difficulty on the shifted ruler problems persisted even when the numbers were removed from the ruler. Taken together, these findings suggest that there are multiple challenges to understanding measurement, but that a key challenge is conceptualizing the ruler as a set of countable spatial interval units. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Field mapping measurements to determine spatial and field dependence of critical current density in YBCO tapes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leclerc, J.; Berger, K.; Douine, B.; Lévêque, J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • A method for characterizing superconducting tapes from field mapping is presented. • A new and efficient field mapping apparatus has been setup. • This method allows the spatial characterization of superconducting tapes. • The critical current density is obtained as a function of the flux density. • This method has been experimentally tested on an YBCO tape. -- Abstract: In this paper a measurement method that allows the determination of the critical current density of superconducting tape from field mapping measurements is presented. This contact-free method allows obtaining characteristics of the superconductor as a function of the position and of the applied flux density. With some modifications, this technique can be used for reel-to-reel measurements. The determination of the critical current density is based on an inverse calculation. This involves calculating the current distribution in the tape from magnetic measurements. An YBaCuO tape has been characterized at 77 K. A defect in this superconductor has been identified. Various tests were carried out to check the efficiency of the method. The inverse calculation was tested theoretically and experimentally. Comparison with a transport current measurement was also performed

  17. Measurement of Mechanical Properties of Cantilever Shaped Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Thundat

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Microcantilevers were first introduced as imaging probes in Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM due to their extremely high sensitivity in measuring surface forces. The versatility of these probes, however, allows the sensing and measurement of a host of mechanical properties of various materials. Sensor parameters such as resonance frequency, quality factor, amplitude of vibration and bending due to a differential stress can all be simultaneously determined for a cantilever. When measuring the mechanical properties of materials, identifying and discerning the most influential parameters responsible for the observed changes in the cantilever response are important. We will, therefore, discuss the effects of various force fields such as those induced by mass loading, residual stress, internal friction of the material, and other changes in the mechanical properties of the microcantilevers. Methods to measure variations in temperature, pressure, or molecular adsorption of water molecules are also discussed. Often these effects occur simultaneously, increasing the number of parameters that need to be concurrently measured to ensure the reliability of the sensors. We therefore systematically investigate the geometric and environmental effects on cantilever measurements including the chemical nature of the underlying interactions. To address the geometric effects we have considered cantilevers with a rectangular or circular cross section. The chemical nature is addressed by using cantilevers fabricated with metals and/or dielectrics. Selective chemical etching, swelling or changes in Young’s modulus of the surface were investigated by means of polymeric and inorganic coatings. Finally to address the effect of the environment in which the cantilever operates, the Knudsen number was determined to characterize the molecule-cantilever collisions. Also bimaterial cantilevers with high thermal sensitivity were used to discern the effect of temperature

  18. The patient satisfaction questionnaire of EUprimecare project: measurement properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimas, Marta; Ayala, Alba; García-Pérez, Sonia; Sarria-Santamera, Antonio; Forjaz, Maria João

    2016-06-01

    The measurement of patient satisfaction is considered an essential outcome indicator to evaluate health care quality. Patient satisfaction is considered a multi-dimensional construct, which would include a variety of domains. Although a large number of studies have proposed scales to measure patient satisfaction, there is a lack of psychometric information on them. This study aims to describe the psychometric properties of the Primary Care Satisfaction Scale (PCSS) of the EUprimecare project. A cross-sectional survey of patient satisfaction with primary care was carried out by telephone interview. Primary care services of Estonia, Finland, Germany, Hungary, Lithuania, Italy and Spain. A total of 3020 adult patients aged 18-65 years old attending primary care services. Classic psychometric properties were analysed and Rasch analysis was used to assess the following measurement properties: fit to the Rasch model; uni-dimensionality; reliability; differential item functioning (DIF) by gender, age, civil status, area of residency and country; local independency; adequacy of response scale; and scale targeting. To achieve good fit to the Rasch model, the original response scales of three items (1, 2 and 6) were rescored and Item 3 (waiting time in the room) was removed. The scale was uni-dimensional and Person Separation Index was 0.79, indicating a good reliability. All items were free from bias. PCSS linear measure displayed satisfactory convergent validity with overall satisfaction with primary care. PCSS, as a reliable and valid scale, could be used to measure patient satisfaction in primary care in Europe. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  19. The surface renewal method for better spatial resolution of evapotranspiration measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvocarev, K.; Fischer, M.; Massey, J. H.; Reba, M. L.; Runkle, B.

    2017-12-01

    Evaluating feasible irrigation strategies when water is scarce requires measurements or estimations of evapotranspiration (ET). Direct observations of ET from agricultural fields are preferred, and micrometeorological methods such as eddy covariance (EC) provide a high quality, continuous time series of ET. However, when replicates of the measurements are needed to compare irrigation strategies, the cost of such experiments is often prohibitive and limits experimental scope. An alternative micrometeorological approach to ET, the surface renewal (SR) method, may be reduced to a thermocouple and a propeller anemometer (Castellvi and Snyder, 2009). In this case, net radiation, soil and sensible heat flux (H) are measured and latent heat flux (an energy equivalent for ET) is estimated as the residual of the surface energy-balance equation. In our experiment, thermocouples (Type E Fine-Wire Thermocouple, FW3) were deployed next to the EC system and combined with mean horizontal wind speed measurements to obtain H using SR method for three weeks. After compensating the temperature signal for non-ideal frequency response in the wavelet half-plane and correcting the sonic anemometer for the flow distortion (Horst et al., 2015), the SR H fluxes compared well to those measured by EC (r2 = 0.9, slope = 0.92). This result encouraged us to install thermocouples over 16 rice fields under different irrigation treatments (continuous cascade flood, continuous multiple inlet rice irrigation, alternate wetting and drying, and furrow irrigation). The EC measurements with net radiometer and soil heat flux plates are deployed at three of these fields to provide a direct comparison. The measurement campaign will finish soon and the data will be processed to evaluate the SR approach for ET estimation. The results will be used to show better spatial resolution of ET measurements to support irrigation decisions in agricultural crops.

  20. Material Property Measurement in Hostile Environments using Laser Acoustics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ken L. Telschow

    2004-01-01

    Acoustic methods are well known and have been used to measure various intrinsic material properties, such as, elastic coefficients, density, crystal axis orientation, microstructural texture, and residual stress. Extrinsic properties, such as, dimensions, motion variables or temperature are also readily determined from acoustic methods. Laser acoustics, employing optical generation and detection of elastic waves, has a unique advantage over other acoustic methods-it is noncontacting, uses the sample surface itself for transduction, requires no couplant or invasive sample surface preparation and can be utilized in any hostile environment allowing optical access to the sample surface. In addition, optical generation and detection probe beams can be focused to the micron scale and/or shaped to alter the transduction process with a degree of control not possible using contact transduction methods. Laser methods are amenable to both continuous wave and pulse-echo measurements and have been used from Hz to 100's of GHz (time scales from sec to psec) and with amplitudes sufficient to fracture materials. This paper shall review recent applications of laser acoustic methods to determining material properties in hostile environments that preclude the use of contacting transduction techniques. Example environments include high temperature (>1000C) sintering and molten metal processing, thin film deposition by plasma techniques, materials moving at high velocity during the fabrication process and nuclear high radiation regions. Recent technological advances in solid-state lasers and telecommunications have greatly aided the development and implementation of laser acoustic methods, particularly at ultra high frequencies. Consequently, laser acoustic material property measurements exhibit high precision and reproducibility today. In addition, optical techniques provide methods of imaging acoustic motion that is both quantitative and rapid. Possible future directions for laser

  1. Neutron spatial distribution measurement with 6Li-contained thermoluminescent sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konnai, A.; Odano, N.; Sawamura, H.; Ozasa, N.; Ishikawa, Y.

    2006-01-01

    We have been developing a thermoluminescent (TL) sheet for photon dosimetry (TL sheet) with thermoluminescent material of LiF:Mg, Cu, P and a co-polymer of ethylene and tetrafluoroethylene. For the purpose of a development of simple method for neutron spatial distribution measurement, TL sheet for neutron detection (NTL sheet) is made by adding 94.7% enriched 6 LiF to TL sheet. TL material in TL sheet is directly excited by ionizing radiation whereas, in the case of neutron detection, TL material in NTL sheet is indirectly excited by neutron capture reaction. That is neutron distribution can be obtained with TL caused by α particle from 6 Li(n, α) 3 H reaction. Responses of NTL sheets to neutrons were examined at the neutron beam irradiation facility for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in JRR-4 research reactor in Japan Atomic Energy Agency. TL and NTL sheets were exposed to striped and roundly distributed neutron fields. Attenuations of neutron flux in air and water were also observed using NTL sheets. TL sheets were also exposed on the same conditions and compared with NTL sheets. TL intensity ratios of NTL sheet to TL sheet were consistent with the calculated value from 6 Li content. Thermal neutron attenuation observed by NTL sheet also corresponded with the result measured by Au wire radioactivation and TLD chips, which were currently used in BNCT at JRR-4. These results were analyzed with by Monte Carlo simulation. The present results indicated that NTL sheet is applicable to measurement of neutron spatial distribution. (author)

  2. Advanced Spatial-Division Multiplexed Measurement Systems Propositions—From Telecommunication to Sensing Applications: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Weng

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The concepts of spatial-division multiplexing (SDM technology were first proposed in the telecommunications industry as an indispensable solution to reduce the cost-per-bit of optical fiber transmission. Recently, such spatial channels and modes have been applied in optical sensing applications where the returned echo is analyzed for the collection of essential environmental information. The key advantages of implementing SDM techniques in optical measurement systems include the multi-parameter discriminative capability and accuracy improvement. In this paper, to help readers without a telecommunication background better understand how the SDM-based sensing systems can be incorporated, the crucial components of SDM techniques, such as laser beam shaping, mode generation and conversion, multimode or multicore elements using special fibers and multiplexers are introduced, along with the recent developments in SDM amplifiers, opto-electronic sources and detection units of sensing systems. The examples of SDM-based sensing systems not only include Brillouin optical time-domain reflectometry or Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (BOTDR/BOTDA using few-mode fibers (FMF and the multicore fiber (MCF based integrated fiber Bragg grating (FBG sensors, but also involve the widely used components with their whole information used in the full multimode constructions, such as the whispering gallery modes for fiber profiling and chemical species measurements, the screw/twisted modes for examining water quality, as well as the optical beam shaping to improve cantilever deflection measurements. Besides, the various applications of SDM sensors, the cost efficiency issue, as well as how these complex mode multiplexing techniques might improve the standard fiber-optic sensor approaches using single-mode fibers (SMF and photonic crystal fibers (PCF have also been summarized. Finally, we conclude with a prospective outlook for the opportunities and challenges of

  3. Spatial Representativeness of Surface-Measured Variations of Downward Solar Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, M.; Folini, D.; Hakuba, M. Z.; Wild, M.

    2017-12-01

    When using time series of ground-based surface solar radiation (SSR) measurements in combination with gridded data, the spatial and temporal representativeness of the point observations must be considered. We use SSR data from surface observations and high-resolution (0.05°) satellite-derived data to infer the spatiotemporal representativeness of observations for monthly and longer time scales in Europe. The correlation analysis shows that the squared correlation coefficients (R2) between SSR times series decrease linearly with increasing distance between the surface observations. For deseasonalized monthly mean time series, R2 ranges from 0.85 for distances up to 25 km between the stations to 0.25 at distances of 500 km. A decorrelation length (i.e., the e-folding distance of R2) on the order of 400 km (with spread of 100-600 km) was found. R2 from correlations between point observations and colocated grid box area means determined from satellite data were found to be 0.80 for a 1° grid. To quantify the error which arises when using a point observation as a surrogate for the area mean SSR of larger surroundings, we calculated a spatial sampling error (SSE) for a 1° grid of 8 (3) W/m2 for monthly (annual) time series. The SSE based on a 1° grid, therefore, is of the same magnitude as the measurement uncertainty. The analysis generally reveals that monthly mean (or longer temporally aggregated) point observations of SSR capture the larger-scale variability well. This finding shows that comparing time series of SSR measurements with gridded data is feasible for those time scales.

  4. Advanced Spatial-Division Multiplexed Measurement Systems Propositions—From Telecommunication to Sensing Applications: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Yi; Ip, Ezra; Pan, Zhongqi; Wang, Ting

    2016-01-01

    The concepts of spatial-division multiplexing (SDM) technology were first proposed in the telecommunications industry as an indispensable solution to reduce the cost-per-bit of optical fiber transmission. Recently, such spatial channels and modes have been applied in optical sensing applications where the returned echo is analyzed for the collection of essential environmental information. The key advantages of implementing SDM techniques in optical measurement systems include the multi-parameter discriminative capability and accuracy improvement. In this paper, to help readers without a telecommunication background better understand how the SDM-based sensing systems can be incorporated, the crucial components of SDM techniques, such as laser beam shaping, mode generation and conversion, multimode or multicore elements using special fibers and multiplexers are introduced, along with the recent developments in SDM amplifiers, opto-electronic sources and detection units of sensing systems. The examples of SDM-based sensing systems not only include Brillouin optical time-domain reflectometry or Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (BOTDR/BOTDA) using few-mode fibers (FMF) and the multicore fiber (MCF) based integrated fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors, but also involve the widely used components with their whole information used in the full multimode constructions, such as the whispering gallery modes for fiber profiling and chemical species measurements, the screw/twisted modes for examining water quality, as well as the optical beam shaping to improve cantilever deflection measurements. Besides, the various applications of SDM sensors, the cost efficiency issue, as well as how these complex mode multiplexing techniques might improve the standard fiber-optic sensor approaches using single-mode fibers (SMF) and photonic crystal fibers (PCF) have also been summarized. Finally, we conclude with a prospective outlook for the opportunities and challenges of SDM

  5. Quantification of Fugitive Methane Emissions with Spatially Correlated Measurements Collected with Novel Plume Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Tracy; Rella, Chris; Crosson, Eric

    2013-04-01

    Quantification of fugitive methane emissions from unconventional natural gas (i.e. shale gas, tight sand gas, etc.) production, processing, and transport is essential for scientists, policy-makers, and the energy industry, because methane has a global warming potential of at least 21 times that of carbon dioxide over a span of 100 years [1]. Therefore, fugitive emissions reduce any environmental benefits to using natural gas instead of traditional fossil fuels [2]. Current measurement techniques involve first locating all the possible leaks and then measuring the emission of each leak. This technique is a painstaking and slow process that cannot be scaled up to the large size of the natural gas industry in which there are at least half a million natural gas wells in the United States alone [3]. An alternative method is to calculate the emission of a plume through dispersion modeling. This method is a scalable approach since all the individual leaks within a natural gas facility can be aggregated into a single plume measurement. However, plume dispersion modeling requires additional knowledge of the distance to the source, atmospheric turbulence, and local topography, and it is a mathematically intensive process. Therefore, there is a need for an instrument capable of simple, rapid, and accurate measurements of fugitive methane emissions on a per well head scale. We will present the "plume camera" instrument, which simultaneously measures methane at different spatial points or pixels. The spatial correlation between methane measurements provides spatial information of the plume, and in addition to the wind measurement collected with a sonic anemometer, the flux can be determined. Unlike the plume dispersion model, this approach does not require knowledge of the distance to the source and atmospheric conditions. Moreover, the instrument can fit inside a standard car such that emission measurements can be performed on a per well head basis. In a controlled experiment

  6. Analysis of absence seizure generation using EEG spatial-temporal regularity measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammone, Nadia; Labate, Domenico; Lay-Ekuakille, Aime; Morabito, Francesco C

    2012-12-01

    Epileptic seizures are thought to be generated and to evolve through an underlying anomaly of synchronization in the activity of groups of neuronal populations. The related dynamic scenario of state transitions is revealed by detecting changes in the dynamical properties of Electroencephalography (EEG) signals. The recruitment procedure ending with the crisis can be explored through a spatial-temporal plot from which to extract suitable descriptors that are able to monitor and quantify the evolving synchronization level from the EEG tracings. In this paper, a spatial-temporal analysis of EEG recordings based on the concept of permutation entropy (PE) is proposed. The performance of PE are tested on a database of 24 patients affected by absence (generalized) seizures. The results achieved are compared to the dynamical behavior of the EEG of 40 healthy subjects. Being PE a feature which is dependent on two parameters, an extensive study of the sensitivity of the performance of PE with respect to the parameters' setting was carried out on scalp EEG. Once the optimal PE configuration was determined, its ability to detect the different brain states was evaluated. According to the results here presented, it seems that the widely accepted model of "jump" transition to absence seizure should be in some cases coupled (or substituted) by a gradual transition model characteristic of self-organizing networks. Indeed, it appears that the transition to the epileptic status is heralded before the preictal state, ever since the interictal stages. As a matter of fact, within the limits of the analyzed database, the frontal-temporal scalp areas appear constantly associated to PE levels higher compared to the remaining electrodes, whereas the parieto-occipital areas appear associated to lower PE values. The EEG of healthy subjects neither shows any similar dynamic behavior nor exhibits any recurrent portrait in PE topography.

  7. Measurement and model on thermal properties of sintered diamond composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moussa, Tala; Garnier, Bertrand; Peerhossaini, Hassan

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Thermal properties of sintered diamond used for grinding is studied. ► Flash method with infrared temperature measurement is used to investigate. ► Thermal conductivity increases with the amount of diamond. ► It is very sensitive to binder conductivity. ► Results agree with models assuming imperfect contact between matrix and particles. - Abstract: A prelude to the thermal management of grinding processes is measurement of the thermal properties of working materials. Indeed, tool materials must be chosen not only for their mechanical properties (abrasion performance, lifetime…) but also for thermal concerns (thermal conductivity) for efficient cooling that avoids excessive temperatures in the tool and workpiece. Sintered diamond is currently used for grinding tools since it yields higher performances and longer lifetimes than conventional materials (mineral or silicon carbide abrasives), but its thermal properties are not yet well known. Here the thermal conductivity, heat capacity and density of sintered diamond are measured as functions of the diamond content in composites and for two types of metallic binders: hard tungsten-based and soft cobalt-based binders. The measurement technique for thermal conductivity is derived from the flash method. After pulse heating, the temperature of the rear of the sample is measured with a noncontact method (infrared camera). A parameter estimation method associated with a three-layer nonstationary thermal model is used to obtain sample thermal conductivity, heat transfer coefficient and absorbed energy. With the hard metallic binder, the thermal conductivity of sintered diamond increased by up to 64% for a diamond content increasing from 0 to 25%. The increase is much less for the soft binder: 35% for diamond volumes up to 25%. In addition, experimental data were found that were far below the value predicted by conventional analytical models for effective thermal conductivity. A possible explanation

  8. Spatially-resolved measurement of optically stimulated luminescence and time-resolved luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailiff, I.K.; Mikhailik, V.B.

    2003-01-01

    Spatially-resolved measurements of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) were performed using a two-dimensional scanning system designed for use with planar samples. The scanning system employs a focused laser beam to stimulate a selected area of the sample, which is moved under the beam by a motorised stage. Exposure of the sample is controlled by an electronic shutter. Mapping of the distribution of OSL using a continuous wave laser source was obtained with sub-millimeter resolution for samples of sliced brick, synthetic single crystal quartz, concrete and dental ceramic. These revealed sporadic emission in the case of brick or concrete and significant spatial variation of emission for quartz and dental ceramic slices. Determinations of absorbed dose were performed for quartz grains within a slice of modern brick. Reconfiguration of the scanner with a pulsed laser source enabled quartz and feldspathic minerals within a ceramic sample to be thinner region. about 6 nm from the extrapolation of themeasuring the time-resolved luminescence spectrum

  9. A new method for measuring coronary artery diameters with CT spatial profile curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimamoto, Ryoichi; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Yamazaki, Tadashi; Tsuji, Taeko; Ohmoto, Yuki; Morita, Toshihiro; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Honye, Junko; Nagai, Ryozo; Akahane, Masaaki; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Coronary artery vascular edge recognition on computed tomography (CT) angiograms is influenced by window parameters. A noninvasive method for vascular edge recognition independent of window setting with use of multi-detector row CT was contrived and its feasibility and accuracy were estimated by intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). Methods: Multi-detector row CT was performed to obtain 29 CT spatial profile curves by setting a line cursor across short-axis coronary angiograms processed by multi-planar reconstruction. IVUS was also performed to determine the reference coronary diameter. IVUS diameter was fitted horizontally between two points on the upward and downward slopes of the profile curves and Hounsfield number was measured at the fitted level to test seven candidate indexes for definition of intravascular coronary diameter. The best index from the curves should show the best agreement with IVUS diameter. Results: Of the seven candidates the agreement was the best (agreement: 16 ± 11%) when the two ratios of Hounsfield number at the level of IVUS diameter over that at the peak on the profile curves were used with water and with fat as the background tissue. These edge definitions were achieved by cutting the horizontal distance by the curves at the level defined by the ratio of 0.41 for water background and 0.57 for fat background. Conclusions: Vascular edge recognition of the coronary artery with CT spatial profile curves was feasible and the contrived method could define the coronary diameter with reasonable agreement

  10. Automated measurement of spatial preference in the open field test with transmitted lighting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikov, Alexander V; Tikhonova, Maria A; Kulikov, Victor A

    2008-05-30

    New modification of the open field was designed to improve automation of the test. The main innovations were: (1) transmitted lighting and (2) estimation of probability to find pixels associated with an animal in the selected region of arena as an objective index of spatial preference. Transmitted (inverted) lighting significantly ameliorated the contrast between an animal and arena and allowed to track white animals with similar efficacy as colored ones. Probability as a measure of preference of selected region was mathematically proved and experimentally verified. A good correlation between probability and classic indices of spatial preference (number of region entries and time spent therein) was shown. The algorithm of calculation of probability to find pixels associated with an animal in the selected region was implemented in the EthoStudio software. Significant interstrain differences in locomotion and the central zone preference (index of anxiety) were shown using the inverted lighting and the EthoStudio software in mice of six inbred strains. The effects of arena shape (circle or square) and a novel object presence in the center of arena on the open field behavior in mice were studied.

  11. Measuring the spatial resolution of an optical system in an undergraduate optics laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Calvin; Donnelly, T. D.

    2017-06-01

    Two methods of quantifying the spatial resolution of a camera are described, performed, and compared, with the objective of designing an imaging-system experiment for students in an undergraduate optics laboratory. With the goal of characterizing the resolution of a typical digital single-lens reflex (DSLR) camera, we motivate, introduce, and show agreement between traditional test-target contrast measurements and the technique of using Fourier analysis to obtain the modulation transfer function (MTF). The advantages and drawbacks of each method are compared. Finally, we explore the rich optical physics at work in the camera system by calculating the MTF as a function of wavelength and f-number. For example, we find that the Canon 40D demonstrates better spatial resolution at short wavelengths, in accordance with scalar diffraction theory, but is not diffraction-limited, being significantly affected by spherical aberration. The experiment and data analysis routines described here can be built and written in an undergraduate optics lab setting.

  12. Computation of the optical properties of turbid media from slope and curvature of spatially resolved reflectance curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jäger, Marion; Foschum, Florian; Kienle, Alwin

    2013-01-01

    The optical properties of turbid media were calculated from the curvature at the radial distance ρ O and the slope at the radial distance ρ* of simulated spatially resolved reflectance curves (ρ O (ρ*) denotes a decrease of the spatially resolved reflectance curve of 0.75 (2.4) orders of magnitude relative to the reflectance value at 1.2 mm). We found correlations between the curvature at ρ O and the reduced scattering coefficient as well as the slope at ρ* and the absorption coefficient. For the determination of the optical properties we used these two correlations. The calculation of the reduced scattering coefficient from the curvature at ρ O is practically independent from the absorption coefficient. Knowing the reduced scattering coefficient within a certain accuracy allows the determination of the absorption coefficient from the slope at ρ*. Additionally, we investigated the performance of an artificial neural network for the determination of the optical properties using the above explained correlations. This means we used the derivatives as input data. Our artificial neural network was capable to learn the mapping between the optical properties and the derivatives. In effect, the results for the determined optical properties improved in comparison to the above explained method. Finally, the procedure was compared to an artificial neural network that was trained without using the derivatives. (note)

  13. Spatial heterogeneity of physicochemical properties explains differences in microbial composition in arid soils from Cuatro Cienegas, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Pajares

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Arid ecosystems are characterized by high spatial heterogeneity, and the variation among vegetation patches is a clear example. Soil biotic and abiotic factors associated with these patches have also been well documented as highly heterogeneous in space. Given the low vegetation cover and little precipitation in arid ecosystems, soil microorganisms are the main drivers of nutrient cycling. Nonetheless, little is known about the spatial distribution of microorganisms and the relationship that their diversity holds with nutrients and other physicochemical gradients in arid soils. In this study, we evaluated the spatial variability of soil microbial diversity and chemical parameters (nutrients and ion content at local scale (meters occurring in a gypsum-based desert soil, to gain knowledge on what soil abiotic factors control the distribution of microbes in arid ecosystems. We analyzed 32 soil samples within a 64 m2 plot and: (a characterized microbial diversity using T-RFLPs of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene, (b determined soil chemical parameters, and (c identified relationships between microbial diversity and chemical properties. Overall, we found a strong correlation between microbial composition heterogeneity and spatial variation of cations (Ca2, K+ and anions (HCO ${}_{3}^{-}$ 3 − , Cl−, SO ${}_{4}^{2-}$ 4 2 − content in this small plot. Our results could be attributable to spatial differences of soil saline content, favoring the patchy emergence of salt and soil microbial communities.

  14. Microwave measurement and modeling of the dielectric properties of vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Bijay Lal

    Some of the important applications of microwaves in the industrial, scientific and medical sectors include processing and treatment of various materials, and determining their physical properties. The dielectric properties of the materials of interest are paramount irrespective of the applications, hence, a wide range of materials covering food products, building materials, ores and fuels, and biological materials have been investigated for their dielectric properties. However, very few studies have been conducted towards the measurement of dielectric properties of green vegetations, including commercially important plant crops such as alfalfa. Because of its high nutritional value, there is a huge demand for this plant and its processed products in national and international markets, and an investigation into the possibility of applying microwaves to improve both the net yield and quality of the crop can be beneficial. Therefore, a dielectric measurement system based upon the probe reflection technique has been set up to measure dielectric properties of green plants over a frequency range from 300 MHz to 18 GHz, moisture contents from 12%, wet basis to 79%, wet basis, and temperatures from -15°C to 30°C. Dielectric properties of chopped alfalfa were measured with this system over frequency range of 300 MHz to 18 GHz, moisture content from 11.5%, wet basis, to 73%, wet basis, and density over the range from 139 kg m-3 to 716 kg m-3 at 23°C. The system accuracy was found to be +/-6% and +/-10% in measuring the dielectric constant and loss factor respectively. Empirical, semi empirical and theoretical models that require only moisture content and operating frequency were determined to represent the dielectric properties of both leaves and stems of alfalfa at 22°C. The empirical models fitted the measured dielectric data extremely well. The root mean square error (RMSE) and the coefficient of determination (r2) for dielectric constant and loss factor of leaves

  15. Non-Contact Surface Roughness Measurement by Implementation of a Spatial Light Modulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Aulbach

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The surface structure, especially the roughness, has a significant influence on numerous parameters, such as friction and wear, and therefore estimates the quality of technical systems. In the last decades, a broad variety of surface roughness measurement methods were developed. A destructive measurement procedure or the lack of feasibility of online monitoring are the crucial drawbacks of most of these methods. This article proposes a new non-contact method for measuring the surface roughness that is straightforward to implement and easy to extend to online monitoring processes. The key element is a liquid-crystal-based spatial light modulator, integrated in an interferometric setup. By varying the imprinted phase of the modulator, a correlation between the imprinted phase and the fringe visibility of an interferogram is measured, and the surface roughness can be derived. This paper presents the theoretical approach of the method and first simulation and experimental results for a set of surface roughnesses. The experimental results are compared with values obtained by an atomic force microscope and a stylus profiler.

  16. Airborne-Measured Spatially-Averaged Temperature and Moisture Turbulent Structure Parameters Over a Heterogeneous Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platis, Andreas; Martinez, Daniel; Bange, Jens

    2014-05-01

    Turbulent structure parameters of temperature and humidity can be derived from scintillometer measurements along horizontal paths of several 100 m to several 10 km. These parameters can be very useful to estimate the vertical turbulent heat fluxes at the surface (applying MOST). However, there are many assumptions required by this method which can be checked using in situ data, e.g. 1) Were CT2 and CQ2 correctly derived from the initial CN2 scintillometer data (structure parameter of density fluctuations or refraction index, respectively)? 2) What is the influence of the surround hetereogeneous surface regarding its footprint and the weighted averaging effect of the scintillometer method 3) Does MOST provide the correct turbulent fluxes from scintillometer data. To check these issues, in situ data from low-level flight measurements are well suited, since research aircraft cover horizontal distances in very short time (Taylor's hypothesis of a frozen turbulence structure can be applyed very likely). From airborne-measured time series the spatial series are calculated and then their structure functions that finally provide the structure parameters. The influence of the heterogeneous surface can be controlled by the definition of certain moving-average window sizes. A very useful instrument for this task are UAVs since they can fly very low and maintain altitude very precisely. However, the data base of such unmanned operations is still quite thin. So in this contribution we want to present turbulence data obtained with the Helipod, a turbulence probe hanging below a manned helicopter. The structure parameters of temperature and moisture, CT2 and CQ2, in the lower convective boundary layer were derived from data measured using the Helipod in 2003. The measurements were carried out during the LITFASS03 campaign over a heterogeneous land surface around the boundary-layer field site of the Lindenberg Meteorological Observatory-Richard-Aßmann-Observatory (MOL) of the

  17. Retrievals of Ice Cloud Microphysical Properties of Deep Convective Systems using Radar Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, J.; Dong, X.; Xi, B.; Wang, J.; Homeyer, C. R.

    2015-12-01

    This study presents innovative algorithms for retrieving ice cloud microphysical properties of Deep Convective Systems (DCSs) using Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) reflectivity and newly derived empirical relationships from aircraft in situ measurements in Wang et al. (2015) during the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E). With composite gridded NEXRAD radar reflectivity, four-dimensional (space-time) ice cloud microphysical properties of DCSs are retrieved, which is not possible from either in situ sampling at a single altitude or from vertical pointing radar measurements. For this study, aircraft in situ measurements provide the best-estimated ice cloud microphysical properties for validating the radar retrievals. Two statistical comparisons between retrieved and aircraft in situ measured ice microphysical properties are conducted from six selected cases during MC3E. For the temporal-averaged method, the averaged ice water content (IWC) and median mass diameter (Dm) from aircraft in situ measurements are 0.50 g m-3 and 1.51 mm, while the retrievals from radar reflectivity have negative biases of 0.12 g m-3 (24%) and 0.02 mm (1.3%) with correlations of 0.71 and 0.48, respectively. For the spatial-averaged method, the IWC retrievals are closer to the aircraft results (0.51 vs. 0.47 g m-3) with a positive bias of 8.5%, whereas the Dm retrievals are larger than the aircraft results (1.65 mm vs. 1.51 mm) with a positive bias of 9.3%. The retrieved IWCs decrease from ~0.6 g m-3 at 5 km to ~0.15 g m-3 at 13 km, and Dm values decrease from ~2 mm to ~0.7 mm at the same levels. In general, the aircraft in situ measured IWC and Dm values at each level are within one standard derivation of retrieved properties. Good agreements between microphysical properties measured from aircraft and retrieved from radar reflectivity measurements indicate the reasonable accuracy of our retrievals.

  18. Characterizing Fracture Property Using Resistivity Measured at Different Frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horne, Roland N. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Li, Kewen [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2014-09-30

    The objective was to develop geophysical approaches to detecting and evaluating the fractures created or existing in EGS and other geothermal reservoirs by measuring the resistivity at different frequencies. This project has been divided into two phases: Phase I (first year): Proof of Concept – develop the resistivity approach and verify the effect of frequency on the resistivity in rocks with artificial or natural fractures over a wide range of frequencies. Phase II: Prototyping Part 1 (second year): measure the resistivity in rocks with fractures of different apertures, different length, and different configurations at different frequencies. Part 2 (third year): develop mathematical models and the resistivity method; infer the fracture properties using the measured resistivity data.

  19. Special Properties of Coherence Scanning Interferometers for large Measurement Volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, W

    2011-01-01

    In contrast to many other optical methods the uncertainty of Coherence Scanning Interferometer (CSI) in vertical direction is independent from the field of view. Therefore CSIs are ideal instruments for measuring 3D-profiles of larger areas (36x28mm 2 , e.g.) with high precision. This is of advantage for the determination of form parameters like flatness, parallelism and steps heights within a short time. In addition, using a telecentric beam path allows measurements of deep lying surfaces (<70mm) and the determination of form parameters with large step-heights. The lateral and spatial resolution, however, are reduced. In this presentation different metrological characteristics together with their potential errors are analyzed for large-scale measuring CSIs. Therefore these instruments are ideal tools in quality control for good/bad selections, e.g. The consequences for the practical use in industry and for standardization are discussed by examples of workpieces of automotive suppliers or from the steel industry.

  20. Identifying spatial clustering properties of the 1997-2003 Liguria (Northern Italy) forest-fire sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telesca, Luciano; Amatulli, Giuseppe; Lasaponara, Rosa; Lovallo, Michele; Santulli, Adriano

    2007-01-01

    The spatial clustering of the forest-fire sequence (1997-2003) of Liguria Region (Northern Italy) has been analysed using the correlation dimension D C , calculated by means of the correlation integral method. Studying the variations of this parameter, we recognize the presence of a strong variability of the spatial clusterization, modulated by seasonal cycles. Furthermore, we found that the larger fires (size >400 ha) mark the cyclic behaviour of the correlation dimension

  1. Mass Properties Measurement in the X-38 Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Wayne L.

    2004-01-01

    This paper details the techniques used in measuring the mass properties for the X-38 family of test vehicles. The X-38 Project was a NASA internal venture in which a series of test vehicles were built in order to develop a Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) for the International Space Station. Three atmospheric test vehicles and one spaceflight vehicle were built to develop the technologies required for a CRV. The three atmospheric test vehicles have undergone flight-testing by a combined team from the NASA Johnson Space Center and the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. The flight-testing was performed at Edward's Air Force Base in California. The X-38 test vehicles are based on the X-24A, which flew in the '60s and '70s. Scaled Composites, Inc. of Mojave, California, built the airframes and the vehicles were outfitted at the NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. Mass properties measurements on the atmospheric test vehicles included weight and balance by the three-point suspension method, four-point suspension method, three load cells on jackstands, and on three in-ground platform scales. Inertia measurements were performed as well in which Ixx, Iyy, Izz, and Ixz were obtained. This paper describes each technique and the relative merits of each. The proposed measurement methods for an X-38 spaceflight test vehicle will also be discussed. This vehicle had different measurement challenges, but integrated vehicle measurements were never conducted. The spaceflight test vehicle was also developed by NASA and was scheduled to fly on the Space Shuttle before the project was cancelled.

  2. Measurements of Thermophysical Properties of Molten Silicon and Geranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhim, Won-Kyu

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this ground base program is to measure thermophysical properties of molten/ undercooled silicon, germanium, and Si-Ge alloys using a high temperature electrostatic levitator and in clearly assessing the need of the microgravity environment to achieve the objective with higher degrees of accuracy. Silicon and germanium are two of the most important semiconductors for industrial applications: silicon is unsurpassed as a microelectronics material, occupying more than 95% of the electronics market. Si-Ge alloy is attracting keen interest for advanced electronic and optoelectronic applications in view of its variable band gap and lattice parameter depending upon its composition. Accurate thermophysical properties of these materials are very much needed in the semiconductor industry for the growth of large high quality crystals.

  3. A method to measure the thermovoltage with a high spatial resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sotthewes, K.; Siekman, M. H.; Zandvliet, H. J. W. [Physics of Interfaces and Nanomaterials, MESA" + Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500AE Enschede (Netherlands)

    2016-04-04

    We have recorded spatial maps of the thermovoltage of a Au(111) surface with a scanning tunneling microscope. The method relies on an approach where we record quasi-simultaneously the normal topography as well as the thermovoltage by switching the feedback and sample bias on and off. This setup can be combined with standard scanning tunneling microscopy and scanning tunneling spectroscopy techniques. The thermovoltage, which arises from a temperature difference between scanning tunneling microscope tip and sample, is very sensitive to small variations of the local electronic density of states in vicinity of the Fermi level. Near step edges we have observed well-defined Friedel oscillations, while for the herringbone reconstruction, small variations of the local work-function are measured. By altering the tip-sample distance, the thermovoltage contrast can be adjusted.

  4. A method to measure the thermovoltage with a high spatial resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sotthewes, K.; Siekman, M. H.; Zandvliet, H. J. W.

    2016-01-01

    We have recorded spatial maps of the thermovoltage of a Au(111) surface with a scanning tunneling microscope. The method relies on an approach where we record quasi-simultaneously the normal topography as well as the thermovoltage by switching the feedback and sample bias on and off. This setup can be combined with standard scanning tunneling microscopy and scanning tunneling spectroscopy techniques. The thermovoltage, which arises from a temperature difference between scanning tunneling microscope tip and sample, is very sensitive to small variations of the local electronic density of states in vicinity of the Fermi level. Near step edges we have observed well-defined Friedel oscillations, while for the herringbone reconstruction, small variations of the local work-function are measured. By altering the tip-sample distance, the thermovoltage contrast can be adjusted.

  5. LERFCM: a computer code for spatial reconstruction of volume emission from chord measurements in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro, A.P.; Pare, V.K.; Dunlap, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    Local Emissivity Reconstruction from Chord Measurements (LERFCM) is a package of computer programs used to determine the two-dimensional spatial distribution of the emission intensity of radiation in a plasma from line integral data, which represents signals from arrays of collimated detectors looking through the plasma along different chords in a plane. The method requires data from only a few detector arrays and assumes that the emission distribution in the plane of observation has a smooth angular dependence that can be represented by a few low-order harmonics. The intended application is a reconstruction of plasma shape and MHD instabilities, using data from arrays of soft x-ray detectors on Impurity Study Experiment Tokamak

  6. Comet 73P Measurements of Solar Wind Interactions, Cometary Ion Pickup, and Spatial Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, J. A.; Lepri, S. T.; Rubin, M.; Combi, M. R.; Zurbuchen, T.

    2015-12-01

    Several fragments of Comet 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 passed near the Earth following a 2006 disintegration episode. Unique measurements regarding the charge state composition and the elemental abundances of both cometary and heliospheric plasma were made during this time by both the ACE/SWICS and Wind/STICS sensors. As the solar wind passed through the neutral cometary coma, it experienced charge exchange that was observed as an increase in the ratio of He+/He++. In addition, particles originating from fragments trailing the major cometary objects were ionized and picked up by the solar wind. The cometary material can be identified by the concentrations of water-group pickup ions having a mass-per-charge ratio of 16-18 amu/e, indicating that these are actively sublimating fragments. Here we present an analysis of cometary composition, spatial distribution, directionality, and heliospheric interactions with a focus on Helium, Carbon (C/O), and water-group ions.

  7. Nonlinear Elastodynamic Behaviour Analysis of High-Speed Spatial Parallel Coordinate Measuring Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiulong Chen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the elastodynamic behaviour of 4- universal joints- prismatic pairs- spherical joints / universal joints- prismatic pairs- universal joints 4-UPS-UPU high-speed spatial PCMMs(parallel coordinate measuring machines, the nonlinear time-varying dynamics model, which comprehensively considers geometric nonlinearity and the rigid-flexible coupling effect, is derived by using Lagrange equations and finite element methods. Based on the Newmark method, the kinematics output response of 4-UPS-UPU PCMMs is illustrated through numerical simulation. The results of the simulation show that the flexibility of the links is demonstrated to have a significant impact on the system dynamics response. This research can provide the important theoretical base of the optimization design and vibration control for 4-UPS-UPU PCMMs.

  8. Characterisation of advanced windows. Determination of thermal properties by measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duer, K.

    2001-04-01

    identified and (to a certain extend) solved. Procedures for performing the measurements in the METSET have been developed. As the measurements are carried out under conditions different from the defined reference conditions a number of corrections of the measured results must be applied. Procedures for these corrections have been developed and demonstrated. Especially the corrections for differences between the solar simulator spectrum and the reference spectrum draw attention and for some special types of speciments these corrections are still object for further development. For less special types the procedures outlined in this report are considered sufficiently accurate. The g-value as function of incidence angle for three different glazings have been measured in the METSET. The glazings had very different optical properties ranging from almost no spectral selectivity to significant spectral selectivity. However all glazings were clear and their g-values could be calculated using detailed calculation models. This enabled a comparison between measured and calculated g-values assuming that the uncertainty in the calculated values is {+-}5%. An error analysis of the g-value measurements showed that the expected uncertainty for the measured g-value is about 4-10% for the investigated samples. The measured g-values were ranging from 0.29 to 0.75 and the difference between measured and calculated values were all within the expected uncertainties (max difference 7%). This gives good reason to increase the confidence in the method used to obtain the measured/corrected g-values and shows that the calorimetric measurements - when properly corrected - give meaningful results. Broadband transmittance values corresponding to solar simulator spectrum and to 'real' solar spectrum are in some cases useful data for the correction of g-values measured indoor in the METSET. This is specially true if the sample cannot be characterised by an optical calculation model (e.g. many

  9. Measurement of clavicular length and shortening after a midshaft clavicular fracture: Spatial digitization versus planar roentgen photogrammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegeman, Sylvia A; de Witte, Pieter Bas; Boonstra, Sjoerd; de Groot, Jurriaan H; Nagels, Jochem; Krijnen, Pieta; Schipper, Inger B

    2016-08-01

    Clavicular shortening after fracture is deemed prognostic for clinical outcome and is therefore generally assessed on radiographs. It is used for clinical decision making regarding operative or non-operative treatment in the first 2weeks after trauma, although the reliability and accuracy of the measurements are unclear. This study aimed to assess the reliability of roentgen photogrammetry (2D) of clavicular length and shortening, and to compare these with 3D-spatial digitization measurements, obtained with an electromagnetic recording system (Flock of Birds). Thirty-two participants with a consolidated non-operatively treated two or multi-fragmented dislocated midshaft clavicular fracture were analysed. Two observers measured clavicular lengths and absolute and proportional clavicular shortening on radiographs taken before and after fracture consolidation. The clavicular lengths were also measured with spatial digitization. Inter-observer agreement on the radiographic measurements was assessed using the Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC). Agreement between the radiographic and spatial digitization measurements was assessed using a Bland-Altman plot. The inter-observer agreement on clavicular length, and absolute and proportional shortening on trauma radiographs was almost perfect (ICC>0.90), but moderate for absolute shortening after consolidation (ICC=0.45). The Bland-Altman plot compared measurements of length on AP panorama radiographs with spatial digitization and showed that planar roentgen photogrammetry resulted in up to 37mm longer and 34mm shorter measurements than spatial digitization. Measurements of clavicular length on radiographs are highly reliable between observers, but may not reflect the actual length and shortening of the clavicle when compared to length measurements with spatial digitization. We recommend to use proportional shortening when measuring clavicular length or shortening on radiographs for clinical decision making. Copyright

  10. Accounting for the measurement error of spectroscopically inferred soil carbon data for improved precision of spatial predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somarathna, P D S N; Minasny, Budiman; Malone, Brendan P; Stockmann, Uta; McBratney, Alex B

    2018-08-01

    Spatial modelling of environmental data commonly only considers spatial variability as the single source of uncertainty. In reality however, the measurement errors should also be accounted for. In recent years, infrared spectroscopy has been shown to offer low cost, yet invaluable information needed for digital soil mapping at meaningful spatial scales for land management. However, spectrally inferred soil carbon data are known to be less accurate compared to laboratory analysed measurements. This study establishes a methodology to filter out the measurement error variability by incorporating the measurement error variance in the spatial covariance structure of the model. The study was carried out in the Lower Hunter Valley, New South Wales, Australia where a combination of laboratory measured, and vis-NIR and MIR inferred topsoil and subsoil soil carbon data are available. We investigated the applicability of residual maximum likelihood (REML) and Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation methods to generate parameters of the Matérn covariance function directly from the data in the presence of measurement error. The results revealed that the measurement error can be effectively filtered-out through the proposed technique. When the measurement error was filtered from the data, the prediction variance almost halved, which ultimately yielded a greater certainty in spatial predictions of soil carbon. Further, the MCMC technique was successfully used to define the posterior distribution of measurement error. This is an important outcome, as the MCMC technique can be used to estimate the measurement error if it is not explicitly quantified. Although this study dealt with soil carbon data, this method is amenable for filtering the measurement error of any kind of continuous spatial environmental data. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Measurements of top-quark properties at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Andreas Werner [Fermilab

    2013-07-30

    Recent measurements of top-quark properties at the Tevatron are presented. CDF uses data corresponding up to 9.0 fb-1 to measure the ratio R of the branching fractions , the branching fraction for top-quarks decaying into τ leptons and the cross section for the production of an additional γ in t production. The results from all these measurements agree well with their respective Standard Model expectation. DØ uses 5.3 fb-1 of data to measure the t cross section as a function of the time. A time dependency would imply Lorentz invariance violation as implemented by the Standard Model extension. No time dependency is observed and DØ sets first limits in the top-quark sector for Lorentz invariance violation. DØ also determines indirectly the top quark width using the results of earlier measurements at DØ. The measured top quark width is in agreement with the SM expectation and does not show any hints for new physics contributions.

  12. Measuring the impact of spatial network layout on community social cohesion: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Crispin H V; Fone, David L; Chiaradia, Alain J F

    2014-04-11

    There is now a substantial body of research suggesting that social cohesion, a collective characteristic measured by the levels of trust, reciprocity and formation of strong social bonds within communities, is an important factor in determining health. Of particular interest is the extent to which factors in the built environment facilitate, or impede, the development of social bonds. Severance is a characteristic of physical environments which is hypothesized to inhibit cohesion. In the current study we test a number of characteristics of spatial networks which could be hypothesized to relate either to severance, or directly to community cohesion. Particular focus is given to our most promising variable for further analysis (Convex Hull Maximum Radius 600 m). In the current study we analysed social cohesion as measured at Enumeration District level, aggregated from a survey of 10,892 individuals aged 18 to 74 years in the Caerphilly Health and Social Needs Cohort Study, 2001. In a data mining process we test 16 network variables on multiple scales. The variable showing the most promise is validated in a test on an independent data set. We then conduct a multivariate regression also including Townsend deprivation scores and urban/rural status as predictor variables for social cohesion. We find convex hull maximum radius at a 600 m scale to have a small but highly significant correlation with social cohesion on both data sets. Deprivation has a stronger effect. Splitting the analysis by tertile of deprivation, we find that the effect of severance as measured by this variable is strongest in the most deprived areas. A range of spatial scales are tested, with the strongest effects being observed at scales that match typical walking distances. We conclude that physical connectivity as measured in this paper has a significant effect on social cohesion, and that our measure is unlikely to proxy either deprivation or the urban/rural status of communities. Possible

  13. Thermodynamic properties of soddyite from solubility and calorimetry measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorman-Lewis, Drew; Mazeina, Lena; Fein, Jeremy B.; Szymanowski, Jennifer E.S.; Burns, Peter C.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2007-01-01

    The release of uranium from geologic nuclear waste repositories under oxidizing conditions can only be modeled if the thermodynamic properties of the secondary uranyl minerals that form in the repository setting are known. Toward this end, we synthesized soddyite ((UO 2 ) 2 (SiO 4 )(H 2 O) 2 ), and performed solubility measurements from both undersaturation and supersaturation. The solubility measurements rigorously constrain the value of the solubility product of synthetic soddyite, and consequently its standard-state Gibbs free energy of formation. The log solubility product (lg K sp ) with its error (1σ) is (6.43 + 0.20/-0.37), and the standard-state Gibbs free energy of formation is (-3652.2 ± 4.2 (2σ)) kJ mol -1 . High-temperature drop solution calorimetry was conducted, yielding a calculated standard-state enthalpy of formation of soddyite of (-4045.4 ± 4.9 (2σ)) kJ . mol -1 . The standard-state Gibbs free energy and enthalpy of formation yield a calculated standard-state entropy of formation of soddyite of (-1318.7 ± 21.7 (2σ)) J . mol -1 . K -1 . The measurements and associated thermodynamic calculations not only describe the T = 298 K stability and solubility of soddyite, but they also can be used in predictions of repository performance through extrapolation of these properties to repository temperatures

  14. Measurements of Lunar Dust Charging Properties by Electron Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Mian M.; Tankosic, Dragana; Craven, Paul D.; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; LeClair, Andre; Spann, James F.; Norwood, Joseph K.

    2009-01-01

    Dust grains in the lunar environment are believed to be electrostatically charged predominantly by photoelectric emissions resulting from solar UV radiation on the dayside, and on the nightside by interaction with electrons in the solar wind plasma. In the high vacuum environment on the lunar surface with virtually no atmosphere, the positive and negative charge states of micron/submicron dust grains lead to some unusual physical and dynamical dust phenomena. Knowledge of the electrostatic charging properties of dust grains in the lunar environment is required for addressing their hazardous effect on the humans and mechanical systems. It is well recognized that the charging properties of individual small micron size dust grains are substantially different from the measurements on bulk materials. In this paper we present the results of measurements on charging of individual Apollo 11 and Apollo 17 dust grains by exposing them to mono-energetic electron beams in the 10-100 eV energy range. The charging/discharging rates of positively and negatively charged particles of approx. 0.1 to 5 micron radii are discussed in terms of the sticking efficiencies and secondary electron yields. The secondary electron emission process is found to be a complex and effective charging/discharging mechanism for incident electron energies as low as 10-25 eV, with a strong dependence on particle size. Implications of the laboratory measurements on the nature of dust grain charging in the lunar environment are discussed.

  15. WE-DE-207B-05: Measuring Spatial Resolution in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis: Update of AAPM Task Group 245

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaduto, DA; Hu, Y-H; Zhao, W [Stony Brook Medicine, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Goodsitt, M; Chan, H-P [University Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Olafsdottir, H [Image Owl, 105 Reykjavik (Iceland); Das, M [University Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Fredenberg, E [Philips Healthcare, Solna (Sweden); Geiser, W [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Goodenough, D [The George Washington University, Washington, DC (United States); Heid, P [ARCADES, Marseille (France); Liu, B [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Mainprize, J [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, North York, ON (Canada); Reiser, I [The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Van Engen, R [LRCB, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Varchena, V [CIRS Inc., Norfolk, VA (United States); Vecchio, S [I.M.S., Pontecchio Marconi (Italy); Glick, S [Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Spatial resolution in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is affected by inherent/binned detector resolution, oblique entry of x-rays, and focal spot size/motion; the limited angular range further limits spatial resolution in the depth-direction. While DBT is being widely adopted clinically, imaging performance metrics and quality control protocols have not been standardized. AAPM Task Group 245 on Tomosynthesis Quality Control has been formed to address this deficiency. Methods: Methods of measuring spatial resolution are evaluated using two prototype quality control phantoms for DBT. Spatial resolution in the detector plane is measured in projection and reconstruction domains using edge-spread function (ESF), point-spread function (PSF) and modulation transfer function (MTF). Spatial resolution in the depth-direction and effective slice thickness are measured in the reconstruction domain using slice sensitivity profile (SSP) and artifact spread function (ASF). An oversampled PSF in the depth-direction is measured using a 50 µm angulated tungsten wire, from which the MTF is computed. Object-dependent PSF is derived and compared with ASF. Sensitivity of these measurements to phantom positioning, imaging conditions and reconstruction algorithms is evaluated. Results are compared from systems of varying acquisition geometry (9–25 projections over 15–60°). Dependence of measurements on feature size is investigated. Results: Measurements of spatial resolution using PSF and LSF are shown to depend on feature size; depth-direction spatial resolution measurements are shown to similarly depend on feature size for ASF, though deconvolution with an object function removes feature size-dependence. A slanted wire may be used to measure oversampled PSFs, from which MTFs may be computed for both in-plane and depth-direction resolution. Conclusion: Spatial resolution measured using PSF is object-independent with sufficiently small object; MTF is object

  16. Measurement of stress strain and vibrational properties of tendons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revel, Gian Marco; Scalise, Alessandro; Scalise, Lorenzo

    2003-08-01

    The authors present a new non-intrusive experimental procedure based on laser techniques for the measurement of mechanical properties of tendons. The procedure is based on the measurement of the first resonance frequency of the tendon by laser Doppler vibrometry during in vitro tensile experiments, with the final aim of establishing a measurement procedure to perform the mechanical characterization of tendons by extracting parameters such as the resonance frequency, also achievable during in vivo investigation. The experimental procedure is reported, taking into account the need to simulate the physiological conditions of the Achilles tendon, and the measurement technique used for the non-invasive determination of tendon cross-sectional area during tensile vibration tests at different load levels is described. The test procedure is based on a tensile machine, which measures longitudinal tendons undergoing controlled load conditions. Cross-sectional area is measured using a new non-contact procedure for the measurement of tendon perimeter (repeatability of 99% and accuracy of 2%). For each loading condition, vibration resonance frequency and damping, cross-sectional area and tensile force are measured, allowing thus a mechanical characterization of the tendon. Tendon stress-strain curves are reported. Stress-strain curves have been correlated to the first vibration resonance frequency and damping of the tendon measured using a single-point laser Doppler vibrometer. Moreover, experimental results have been compared with a theoretical model of a vibrating cord showing discrepancies. In vitro tests are reported, demonstrating the validity of the method for the comparison of different aged rabbit tendons.

  17. Measurement properties of tools measuring mental health knowledge: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yifeng; McGrath, Patrick J; Hayden, Jill; Kutcher, Stan

    2016-08-23

    Mental health literacy has received great attention recently to improve mental health knowledge, decrease stigma and enhance help-seeking behaviors. We conducted a systematic review to critically appraise the qualities of studies evaluating the measurement properties of mental health knowledge tools and the quality of included measurement properties. We searched PubMed, PsycINFO, EMBASE, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library, and ERIC for studies addressing psychometrics of mental health knowledge tools and published in English. We applied the COSMIN checklist to assess the methodological quality of each study as "excellent", "good", "fair", or "indeterminate". We ranked the level of evidence of the overall quality of each measurement property across studies as "strong", "moderate", "limited", "conflicting", or "unknown". We identified 16 mental health knowledge tools in 17 studies, addressing reliability, validity, responsiveness or measurement errors. The methodological quality of included studies ranged from "poor" to "excellent" including 6 studies addressing the content validity, internal consistency or structural validity demonstrating "excellent" quality. We found strong evidence of the content validity or internal consistency of 6 tools; moderate evidence of the internal consistency, the content validity or the reliability of 8 tools; and limited evidence of the reliability, the structural validity, the criterion validity, or the construct validity of 12 tools. Both the methodological qualities of included studies and the overall evidence of measurement properties are mixed. Based on the current evidence, we recommend that researchers consider using tools with measurement properties of strong or moderate evidence that also reached the threshold for positive ratings according to COSMIN checklist.

  18. Probing Anisotropic Surface Properties of Molybdenite by Direct Force Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhenzhen; Liu, Qingxia; Xu, Zhenghe; Zeng, Hongbo

    2015-10-27

    Probing anisotropic surface properties of layer-type mineral is fundamentally important in understanding its surface charge and wettability for a variety of applications. In this study, the surface properties of the face and the edge surfaces of natural molybdenite (MoS2) were investigated by direct surface force measurements using atomic force microscope (AFM). The interaction forces between the AFM tip (Si3N4) and face or edge surface of molybdenite were measured in 10 mM NaCl solutions at various pHs. The force profiles were well-fitted with classical DLVO (Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek) theory to determine the surface potentials of the face and the edge surfaces of molybdenite. The surface potentials of both the face and edge surfaces become more negative with increasing pH. At neutral and alkaline conditions, the edge surface exhibits more negative surface potential than the face surface, which is possibly due to molybdate and hydromolybdate ions on the edge surface. The point of zero charge (PZC) of the edge surface was determined around pH 3 while PZC of the face surface was not observed in the range of pH 3-11. The interaction forces between octadecyltrichlorosilane-treated AFM tip (OTS-tip) and face or edge surface of molybdenite were also measured at various pHs to study the wettability of molybdenite surfaces. An attractive force between the OTS-tip and the face surface was detected. The force profiles were well-fitted by considering DLVO forces and additional hydrophobic force. Our results suggest the hydrophobic feature of the face surface of molybdenite. In contrast, no attractive force between the OTS-tip and the edge surface was detected. This is the first study in directly measuring surface charge and wettability of the pristine face and edge surfaces of molybdenite through surface force measurements.

  19. Measurement of magnetic fluctuations at small spatial scales in the Tokapole II tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haines, E.J.

    1991-08-01

    This thesis is a presentation of the measurements of short-wavelength, high-frequency radial magnetic fluctuations performed on the Tokapole 2 tokamak at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Theories of electron temperature gradient (η e ) driven turbulence predict the existence of increased magnetic fluctuation power at small spatial scales near the collisionless skin depth c/ω pe and over a wide range of frequencies near and below the electron diamagnetic drift frequency ω* ne . Small magnetic probes of sizes down to 1 m m have been constructed and used to resolve short poloidal and radial wavelength magnetic fluctuations. These probes have been used with larger probes to make comparisons of fluctuation spectra measured in various ranges of wavelength and over the range of frequencies from 10 kHz to 6 MHz in Tokapole 2 plasmas. A calculation of the short-wavelength, high-frequency response of an electrostatically shielded model B r probe has been performed to guide the interpretation of the power comparison measurements. Comparisons of magnetic fluctuation spectra at various positions within the plasma, and for discharges with edge safety factor 1, 2, and 3 are presented. The linear and nonlinear theories and numerical simulations of η e turbulence are reviewed and compared, where possible with the experimental parameters and results

  20. The properties of genome conformation and spatial gene interaction and regulation networks of normal and malignant human cell types.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Wang

    Full Text Available The spatial conformation of a genome plays an important role in the long-range regulation of genome-wide gene expression and methylation, but has not been extensively studied due to lack of genome conformation data. The recently developed chromosome conformation capturing techniques such as the Hi-C method empowered by next generation sequencing can generate unbiased, large-scale, high-resolution chromosomal interaction (contact data, providing an unprecedented opportunity to investigate the spatial structure of a genome and its applications in gene regulation, genomics, epigenetics, and cell biology. In this work, we conducted a comprehensive, large-scale computational analysis of this new stream of genome conformation data generated for three different human leukemia cells or cell lines by the Hi-C technique. We developed and applied a set of bioinformatics methods to reliably generate spatial chromosomal contacts from high-throughput sequencing data and to effectively use them to study the properties of the genome structures in one-dimension (1D and two-dimension (2D. Our analysis demonstrates that Hi-C data can be effectively applied to study tissue-specific genome conformation, chromosome-chromosome interaction, chromosomal translocations, and spatial gene-gene interaction and regulation in a three-dimensional genome of primary tumor cells. Particularly, for the first time, we constructed genome-scale spatial gene-gene interaction network, transcription factor binding site (TFBS - TFBS interaction network, and TFBS-gene interaction network from chromosomal contact information. Remarkably, all these networks possess the properties of scale-free modular networks.

  1. Seasonal Bias of Retrieved Ice Cloud Optical Properties Based on MISR and MODIS Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Hioki, S.; Yang, P.; Di Girolamo, L.; Fu, D.

    2017-12-01

    The precise estimation of two important cloud optical and microphysical properties, cloud particle optical thickness and cloud particle effective radius, is fundamental in the study of radiative energy budget and hydrological cycle. In retrieving these two properties, an appropriate selection of ice particle surface roughness is important because it substantially affects the single-scattering properties. At present, using a predetermined ice particle shape without spatial and temporal variations is a common practice in satellite-based retrieval. This approach leads to substantial uncertainties in retrievals. The cloud radiances measured by each of the cameras of the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument are used to estimate spherical albedo values at different scattering angles. By analyzing the directional distribution of estimated spherical albedo values, the degree of ice particle surface roughness is estimated. With an optimal degree of ice particle roughness, cloud optical thickness and effective radius are retrieved based on a bi-spectral shortwave technique in conjunction with two Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) bands centered at 0.86 and 2.13 μm. The seasonal biases of retrieved cloud optical and microphysical properties, caused by the uncertainties in ice particle roughness, are investigated by using one year of MISR-MODIS fused data.

  2. Performance considerations of ultrasonic distance measurement with well defined properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmer, Hannes; Schweinzer, Herbert

    2005-01-01

    Conventional ultrasonic distance measurement systems based on narrow bandwidth ultrasonic bursts and amplitude detection are often used because of their low costs and easy implementation. However, the achievable results strongly depend on the actual environments where the system is implemented: in case of well defined objects that are always located near the measurement direction of the system, in general good results are obtained. If arbitrary objects are expected that are moreover located in arbitrary positions in front of the sensor, strongly object dependent areas where objects are detected with decreasing accuracy towards their borders must be taken into account. In previous works we developed an ultrasonic measurement system that provides accurate distance measurement values within a well defined detection area that is independent of the reflection properties of the objects. This measurement system is based on the One Bit Correlation method that is described in the following. To minimise its implementation efforts, it is necessary to examine the influence of the system parameters as e.g. the correlation length to the results that are expected in case of different signal to noise ratios of the received signal. In the following, these examinations are shown and the obtained results are discussed that allow getting a well conditioned system that makes best use of given system resources

  3. Sensing, Measuring and Modelling the Mechanical Properties of Sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, S. J.; Olugbenga, A.; Ozerkan, N. G.

    2018-02-01

    We present a hybrid framework for simulating the strength and dilation characteristics of sandstone. Where possible, the grain-scale properties of sandstone are evaluated experimentally in detail. Also, using photo-stress analysis, we sense the deviator stress (/strain) distribution at the micro-scale and its components along the orthogonal directions on the surface of a V-notch sandstone sample under mechanical loading. Based on this measurement and applying a grain-scale model, the optical anisotropy index K 0 is inferred at the grain scale. This correlated well with the grain contact stiffness ratio K evaluated using ultrasound sensors independently. Thereafter, in addition to other experimentally characterised structural and grain-scale properties of sandstone, K is fed as an input into the discrete element modelling of fracture strength and dilation of the sandstone samples. Physical bulk-scale experiments are also conducted to evaluate the load-displacement relation, dilation and bulk fracture strength characteristics of sandstone samples under compression and shear. A good level of agreement is obtained between the results of the simulations and experiments. The current generic framework could be applied to understand the internal and bulk mechanical properties of such complex opaque and heterogeneous materials more realistically in future.

  4. Apparent rotation properties of space debris extracted from photometric measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šilha, Jiří; Pittet, Jean-Noël; Hamara, Michal; Schildknecht, Thomas

    2018-02-01

    Knowledge about the rotation properties of space debris objects is essential for the active debris removal missions, accurate re-entry predictions and to investigate the long-term effects of the space environment on the attitude motion change. Different orbital regions and object's physical properties lead to different attitude states and their change over time. Since 2007 the Astronomical Institute of the University of Bern (AIUB) performs photometric measurements of space debris objects. To June 2016 almost 2000 light curves of more than 400 individual objects have been acquired and processed. These objects are situated in all orbital regions, from low Earth orbit (LEO), via global navigation systems orbits and high eccentricity orbit (HEO), to geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). All types of objects were observed including the non-functional spacecraft, rocket bodies, fragmentation debris and uncorrelated objects discovered during dedicated surveys. For data acquisition, we used the 1-meter Zimmerwald Laser and Astrometry Telescope (ZIMLAT) at the Swiss Optical Ground Station and Geodynamics Observatory Zimmerwald, Switzerland. We applied our own method of phase-diagram reconstruction to extract the apparent rotation period from the light curve. Presented is the AIUB's light curve database and the obtained rotation properties of space debris as a function of object type and orbit.

  5. Dosimetry, measurement and properties of radon daughters and thoron daughters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, C.R.

    1982-03-01

    Various properties of radon and thoron daughter products are examined. Dosimeter methods and instrumentation (TLD and personal alpha dosimeters) are investigated as to performance under varying conditions such as humidity and pure or mixed atmospheric conditions. Optimized counting schemes are determined for the daughters of radon and thoron. An optimized counting scheme was experimentally examined under mine conditions. The optimization procedure takes into account the uncertainties associated with concentration, flow rate and radioactive decay. Measurements were made in two uranium mines at Elliot Lake, Ontario of the charged and unattached fractions of radon daughters in the mines. The physicochemical state of 218 Po in air was determined by measurement of rate of neutralization, diffusion coefficient and fraction born charge. Careful control of experimental conditions made it possible to obtain more precise and detailed quantitative data than previously possible

  6. Measurements of interface fracture properties of composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashkenazi, D.; Bank-Sills, L.; Travitzky, N.; Eliasi, R.

    1998-01-01

    In this investigation, interface Fracture properties are measured. To this end, glass/epoxy Brazilian disk specimens are studied. In order to calibrate the specimen, a numerical procedure is used. The finite element method is employed to derive stress intensity factors as a function of loading angle and crack length. By means of the weight friction method together with finite elements, a correction to the stress intensity factors for residual thermal stresses is obtained. These are combined to determine the critical interface energy release rate as a function of phase angle Tom the measured load and crack length at Fracture. A series of tests on a glass/epoxy material pair were carried out. It may be observed from the results that the residual thermal stresses resulting from the material mismatch greatly affect the interface toughness values

  7. International Workshop on Stratospheric Aerosols: Measurements, Properties, and Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueschel, Rudolf F. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Following a mandate by the International Aerosol Climatology Program under the auspices of International Association of Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics International Radiation Commission, 45 scientists from five nations convened to discuss relevant issues associated with the measurement, properties, and effects of stratospheric aerosols. A summary is presented of the discussions on formation and evolution, transport and fate, effects on climate, role in heterogeneous chemistry, and validation of lidar and satellite remote sensing of stratospheric aerosols. Measurements are recommended of the natural (background) and the volcanically enhanced aerosol (sulfuric acid and silica particles), the exhaust of shuttle, civil aviation and supersonic aircraft operations (alumina, soot, and ice particles), and polar stratospheric clouds (ice, condensed nitric and hydrochloric acids).

  8. Measurements of top-quark properties at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Beernaert, Kelly Simone

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of several top-quark properties are presented, obtained from the ATLAS and CMS data collected in 2011 and 2012 at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. The results include measurements of the top pair charge asymmetry, the top quark polarization in pair production and single top production, the W helicity in top decays. Results of spin correlation in topquark pairs are presented and interpreted in terms of the SM predicted values. The results are compared with predictions from the standard model as well as new physics models. The cross section of ttbar events produced in association with a W, Z boson or a photon is also presented.

  9. Comparison of different interpolation methods for spatial distribution of soil organic carbon and some soil properties in the Black Sea backward region of Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göl, Ceyhun; Bulut, Sinan; Bolat, Ferhat

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this research is to compare the spatial variability of soil organic carbon (SOC) in four adjacent land uses including the cultivated area, the grassland area, the plantation area and the natural forest area in the semi - arid region of Black Sea backward region of Turkey. Some of the soil properties, including total nitrogen, SOC, soil organic matter, and bulk density were measured on a grid with a 50 m sampling distance on the top soil (0-15 cm depth). Accordingly, a total of 120 samples were taken from the four adjacent land uses. Data was analyzed using geostatistical methods. The methods used were: Block kriging (BK), co - kriging (CK) with organic matter, total nitrogen and bulk density as auxiliary variables and inverse distance weighting (IDW) methods with the power of 1, 2 and 4. The methods were compared using a performance criteria that included root mean square error (RMSE), mean absolute error (MAE) and the coefficient of correlation (r). The one - way ANOVA test showed that differences between the natural (0.6653 ± 0.2901) - plantation forest (0.7109 ± 0.2729) areas and the grassland (1.3964 ± 0.6828) - cultivated areas (1.5851 ± 0.5541) were statistically significant at 0.05 level (F = 28.462). The best model for describing spatially variation of SOC was CK with the lowest error criteria (RMSE = 0.3342, MAE = 0.2292) and the highest coefficient of correlation (r = 0.84). The spatial structure of SOC could be well described by the spherical model. The nugget effect indicated that SOC was moderately dependent on the study area. The error distributions of the model showed that the improved model was unbiased in predicting the spatial distribution of SOC. This study's results revealed that an explanatory variable linked SOC increased success of spatial interpolation methods. In subsequent studies, this case should be taken into account for reaching more accurate outputs.

  10. Spatial Statistics and Spatio-Temporal Data Covariance Functions and Directional Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Sherman, Michael

    2010-01-01

    In the spatial or space-time context, specifying the correct covariance function is important to obtain efficient predictions and to understand the underlying physical process of interest. There have been several books in recent years in the general area of spatial statistics. This book focuses on covariance and variogram functions, their role in prediction, and the proper choice of these functions in data applications. Presenting recent methods from 2004-2007 alongside more established methodology of assessing the usual assumptions on such functions such as isotropy, separability and symmetry

  11. Measure theoretical approach to recurrent properties for quantum dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otobe, Yoshiki [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Shinshu University, Asahi 3-1-1, Matsumoto 390-8621 (Japan); Sasaki, Itaru, E-mail: otobe@math.shinshu-u.ac.jp, E-mail: isasaki@shinshu-u.ac.jp [Fiber-Nanotech Young Researcher Empowerment Center, Shinshu University, Asahi 3-1-1, Matsumoto 390-8621 (Japan)

    2011-11-18

    Poincare's recurrence theorem, which states that every Hamiltonian dynamics enclosed in a finite volume returns to its initial position as close as one wishes, is a mathematical basis of statistical mechanics. It is Liouville's theorem that guarantees that the dynamics preserves the volume on the state space. A quantum version of Poincare's theorem was obtained in the middle of the 20th century without any volume structures of the state space (Hilbert space). One of our aims in this paper is to establish such properties of quantum dynamics from an analog of Liouville's theorem, namely, we will construct a natural probability measure on the Hilbert space from a Hamiltonian defined on the space. Then we will show that the measure is invariant under the corresponding Schroedinger flow. Moreover, we show that the dynamics naturally causes an infinite-dimensional Weyl transformation. It also enables us to discuss the ergodic properties of such dynamics. (paper)

  12. Status report on severe accident material property measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, M.T.; McUmber, L.; Spencer, B.W.; Aeschlimann, R.W.

    1997-06-01

    Measurements of selected material properties of molten reactor core material (corium) were made. The corium used was a mixture of UO 2 , ZrO 2 and Zr, with oxygen content being a parameter to reflect different stages of zirconium oxidation. The mixtures used were representative of typical in-vessel melt sequences. For most measurements, the UO 2 /ZrO 2 mass ratio was 1.51, representative of VVER/440 melt compositions and melt compositions of most US BWRs. Measurements were made of the solidus/liquidus temperatures of corium compositions using a Differential Thermal Analysis technique. Observation of the solubility of unoxidized Zr in the oxide phase was made by metallographic analysis of solidus/liquidus melt samples. The results of laminar flow corium spreading tests in one dimension were used to estimate the viscosity of corium compositions. Measured solidus and liquidus temperatures for compositions representative of Zr oxidation of 30, 50 and 70% were compared with those obtained form a phase diagram provided by Kurchatov Institute. It was found that experimental measurements agreed well with the phase diagram values at 70% oxidation, but the measured solidus temperatures were higher than those on the phase diagram and the measured liquidus temperatures were lower than those on the phase diagram at 30 and 50% oxidation. From a microstructure examination it was determined that there was no global segregation into distinct metal and oxide phases during the cooldown of a sample in which there was initially 70% Zr oxidation. Therefore it is concluded that Zr metal is soluble in the oxide phase under molten conditions. Viscosity estimates were made for compositions representative of Zr oxidation of 30, 50 and 70% by fitting the results of spreading tests to Huppert's equation. It was found that, at a temperature of 2500 C, the viscosity varied by three orders of magnitude over this range of compositions. 10 refs., 39 figs., 16 tabs

  13. Spatial Distributions of Metal Atoms During Carbon SWNTs Formation: Measurements and Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cau, M.; Dorval, N.; Attal-Tretout, B.; Cochon, J. L.; Loiseau, A.; Farhat, S.; Hinkov, I.; Scott, C. D.

    2004-01-01

    Experiments and modelling have been undertaken to clarify the role of metal catalysts during single-wall carbon nanotube formation. For instance, we wonder whether the metal catalyst is active as an atom, a cluster, a liquid or solid nanoparticle [1]. A reactor has been developed for synthesis by continuous CO2-laser vaporisation of a carbon-nickel-cobalt target in laminar helium flow. The laser induced fluorescence technique [2] is applied for local probing of gaseous Ni, Co and CZ species throughout the hot carbon flow of the target heated up to 3500 K. A rapid depletion of C2 in contrast to the spatial extent of metal atoms is observed in the plume (Fig. 1). This asserts that C2 condenses earlier than Ni and Co atoms.[3, 4]. The depletion is even faster when catalysts are present. It may indicate that an interaction between metal atoms and carbon dimers takes place in the gas as soon as they are expelled from the target surface. Two methods of modelling are used: a spatially I-D calculation developed originally for the arc process [5], and a zero-D time dependent calculation, solving the chemical kinetics along the streamlines [6]. The latter includes Ni cluster formation. The peak of C2 density is calculated close to the target surface where the temperature is the highest. In the hot region, C; is dominant. As the carbon products move away from the target and mix with the ambient helium, they recombine into larger clusters, as demonstrated by the peak of C5 density around 1 mm. The profile of Ni-atom density compares fairly well with the measured one (Fig. 2). The early increase is due to the drop of temperature, and the final decrease beyond 6 mm results from Ni cluster formation at the eutectic temperature (approx.1600 K).

  14. Macular pigment optical density spatial distribution measured in a subject with oculocutaneous albinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Christopher M; Bland, Pauline J

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies of macular pigment optical density (MPOD) distribution in individuals with oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) have primarily used objective measurement techniques including fundus reflectometry and autofluorescence. We report here on a subject with OCA and their corresponding MPOD distribution assessed through heterochromatic flicker photometry (HFP). A subject with a history of OCA presented with an ocular history including strabismus surgery of the LE with persistent amblyopia and mild, latent nystagmus. Best corrected visual acuity was 20/25- RE and 20/40- LE. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and fundus photography were also obtained. Evaluation of MPOD spatial distribution up to 8 degrees eccentricity from the fovea was performed using HFP. SD-OCT indicated a persistence of multiple inner retinal layers within the foveal region in the RE and LE including symmetric foveal thickening consistent with foveal hypoplasia. Fundus photography showed mild retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) hypopigmentation and a poorly demarcated macula. OriginPro 9 was used to plot MPOD spatial distribution of the subject and a 33-subject sample. The OCA subject demonstrated a foveal MPOD of 0.10 with undetectable levels at 6 degrees eccentricity. The study sample showed a mean foveal MPOD of 0.34 and mean 6 degree eccentricity values of 0.03. Consistent with previous macular pigment (MP) studies of OCA, overall MPOD is reduced in our subject. Mild phenotypic expression of OCA with high functional visual acuity may represent a Henle fiber layer amenable to additional MP deposition. Further study of MP supplementation in OCA patients is warranted. Copyright © 2014 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Measurements of spatial distribution of absorbed dose in proton therapy with Gafchromic EBT3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambarini, G.; Regazzoni, V.; Grisotto, S.; Artuso, E.; Giove, D.; Borroni, M.; Carrara, M.; Pignoli, E.; Mirandola, A.; Ciocca, M.

    2014-08-01

    A study of the response of EBT3 films has been carried out. Light transmittance images (around 630 nm) were acquired by means of a Ccd camera. The difference of optical density was assumed as dosimeter response. Calibration was performed by means of 60 Co photons, at a radiotherapy facility. A study of the response variation during the time after exposure has been carried out. EBT3 films were exposed, in a solid-water phantom, to proton beams of various energies and the obtained depth-dose profiles were compared with those measured with a ionization chamber. As expected, in the Bragg peak region the values obtained with EBT3 films were lower than those obtained with the ionization chamber. The ratio of such values was evaluated, along dose profiles, for each utilized energy. A method for correcting the data measured with EBT3 has been proposed and tested. The results confirm that the method can be advantageously applied for obtaining spatial distribution of the absorbed dose in proton therapy. (author)

  16. Characterization of the spatial structure of local functional connectivity using multi-distance average correlation measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macia, Didac; Pujol, Jesus; Blanco-Hinojo, Laura; Martínez-Vilavella, Gerard; Martín-Santos, Rocío; Deus, Joan

    2018-04-24

    There is ample evidence from basic research in neuroscience of the importance of local cortico-cortical networks. Millimetric resolution is achievable with current functional MRI (fMRI) scanners and sequences, and consequently a number of "local" activity similarity measures have been defined to describe patterns of segregation and integration at this spatial scale. We have introduced the use of Iso-Distant local Average Correlation (IDAC), easily defined as the average fMRI temporal correlation of a given voxel with other voxels placed at increasingly separated iso-distant intervals, to characterize the curve of local fMRI signal similarities. IDAC curves can be statistically compared using parametric multivariate statistics. Furthermore, by using RGB color-coding to display jointly IDAC values belonging to three different distance lags, IDAC curves can also be displayed as multi-distance IDAC maps. We applied IDAC analysis to a sample of 41 subjects scanned under two different conditions, a resting state and an auditory-visual continuous stimulation. Multi-distance IDAC mapping was able to discriminate between gross anatomo-functional cortical areas and, moreover, was sensitive to modulation between the two brain conditions in areas known to activate and de-activate during audio-visual tasks. Unlike previous fMRI local similarity measures already in use, our approach draws special attention to the continuous smooth pattern of local functional connectivity.

  17. Measurements of spatial distribution of absorbed dose in proton therapy with Gafchromic EBT3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambarini, G.; Regazzoni, V.; Grisotto, S.; Artuso, E.; Giove, D. [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Department of Physics, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Borroni, M.; Carrara, M.; Pignoli, E. [Fondazione IRCCS, Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori di Milano, Medical Physics Unit, via Giacomo Venezian 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Mirandola, A.; Ciocca, M., E-mail: grazia.gambarini@mi.infn.it [Centro Nazionale Adroterapia Oncologica, Medical Physics Unit, Strada Campeggi 53, 27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2014-08-15

    A study of the response of EBT3 films has been carried out. Light transmittance images (around 630 nm) were acquired by means of a Ccd camera. The difference of optical density was assumed as dosimeter response. Calibration was performed by means of {sup 60}Co photons, at a radiotherapy facility. A study of the response variation during the time after exposure has been carried out. EBT3 films were exposed, in a solid-water phantom, to proton beams of various energies and the obtained depth-dose profiles were compared with those measured with a ionization chamber. As expected, in the Bragg peak region the values obtained with EBT3 films were lower than those obtained with the ionization chamber. The ratio of such values was evaluated, along dose profiles, for each utilized energy. A method for correcting the data measured with EBT3 has been proposed and tested. The results confirm that the method can be advantageously applied for obtaining spatial distribution of the absorbed dose in proton therapy. (author)

  18. Measurement of the particle production properties in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Bruni, Alessia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of the particle production properties with the ATLAS detector A correct modelling of the underlying event in proton-proton collisions is important for the proper simulation of kinematic distributions of high-energy collisions. The ATLAS collaboration extended previous studies at 7 TeV with a leading track or jet or Z boson by a new study at 13 TeV, measuring the number and transverse-momentum sum of charged particles as a function of pseudorapidity and azimuthal angle in dependence of the reconstructed leading track. These measurements are sensitive to the underlying-event as well as the onset of hard emissions. The results are compared to predictions of several MC generators. A similar comparison between measurements and MC generator predictions will be shown for the strange meson content in topquark pair events. Studies of particle correlations in high-energy collisions can provide valuable insights into the detailed understanding of the space-time geometry of the hadronization region. The ATLA...

  19. Measurements of the thermal radiative properties of liquid uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Havstad, M.A.; McLean, W. II; Self, S.A.

    1992-07-01

    Measurements of the thermal radiative properties of liquid uranium have been made using an instrument with two optical systems, one for measuring the complex index of refraction by ellipsometry, the other for measuring the normal spectral emissivity by direct comparison to an integral blackbody cavity. The measurements cover the wavelength range 0.4 to 10 μm with sample temperatures between 940 and 1630 K. Two 5keV ion sputter guns and an Auger spectrometer produce and verify, in-situ, atomically pure sample surfaces. Good agreement between the two methods is observed for the normal spectral emissivity, which varies with wavelength in a manner typical of transition metals. The two components of the complex index of refraction, the index of refraction and the extinction coefficient, increase with wavelength, from ∼3 at 0.4 μm to -20 at 9.5 μm. Both components of polarized reflectivity are shown for visible to infrared wavelengths

  20. Reliability and Minimum Detectable Change of Temporal-Spatial, Kinematic, and Dynamic Stability Measures during Perturbed Gait.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A Rábago

    Full Text Available Temporal-spatial, kinematic variability, and dynamic stability measures collected during perturbation-based assessment paradigms are often used to identify dysfunction associated with gait instability. However, it remains unclear which measures are most reliable for detecting and tracking responses to perturbations. This study systematically determined the between-session reliability and minimum detectable change values of temporal-spatial, kinematic variability, and dynamic stability measures during three types of perturbed gait. Twenty young healthy adults completed two identical testing sessions two weeks apart, comprised of an unperturbed and three perturbed (cognitive, physical, and visual walking conditions in a virtual reality environment. Within each session, perturbation responses were compared to unperturbed walking using paired t-tests. Between-session reliability and minimum detectable change values were also calculated for each measure and condition. All temporal-spatial, kinematic variability and dynamic stability measures demonstrated fair to excellent between-session reliability. Minimal detectable change values, normalized to mean values ranged from 1-50%. Step width mean and variability measures demonstrated the greatest response to perturbations with excellent between-session reliability and low minimum detectable change values. Orbital stability measures demonstrated specificity to perturbation direction and sensitivity with excellent between-session reliability and low minimum detectable change values. We observed substantially greater between-session reliability and lower minimum detectable change values for local stability measures than previously described which may be the result of averaging across trials within a session and using velocity versus acceleration data for reconstruction of state spaces. Across all perturbation types, temporal-spatial, orbital and local measures were the most reliable measures with the

  1. Asymptotic properties of the development of conformally flat data near spatial infinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valiente Kroon, Juan Antonio

    2007-01-01

    The analysis of the relation between Bondi-type systems (NP-gauge) and a gauge used in the analysis of the structure of spatial infinity (F-gauge) which was carried out by Friedrich and Kannar (2000 J. Math Phys. 41 2195) is retaken and applied to the development of a suitable class of conformally flat initial data sets with non-vanishing second fundamental form. The calculations presented depend on a certain assumption about the existence and regularity of the solutions to the conformal Einstein field equations close to null and spatial infinity. As a result of the calculations the Newman-Penrose constants of both future and past null infinity are calculated in terms of initial data and are shown to be equal. It is also shown that the asymptotic shear goes to zero as one approaches spatial infinity along the generators of null infinity so that it is possible to select, in a canonical fashion, the Poincare group out of the BMS group. An expansion-again in terms of initial data quantities-of the Bondi mass close to spatial infinity is calculated. This expansion shows that if the existence and regularity assumptions hold, the Bondi mass approaches the ADM mass. A discussion of possible conditions on the initial data which would render a peeling development is presented

  2. Magnetic Measurements as a Useful Tool for the Evaluation of Spatial Variability of the Arable Horizon Thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattakhova, Leysan; Shinkarev, Alexandr; Ryzhikh, Lyudmila; Kosareva, Lina

    2017-04-01

    In normal practice, the thickness of the arable horizon is determined on the basis of field morphological descriptions, allowing the subjectivity of perception and judgment at the crucial role of experience of the researcher. The subject of special interest are independent analytical and technically relatively simple in design approaches to the diagnosis of the lower boundary of the blended plowing the profiles part. Theoretical premises to use spectrophotometry and magnetometry to arable horizon depth diagnose is based on the concept of regular color and magnetic properties vertical differentiation in a profile of virgin soils. This work is devoted to the comparative assessment of the possibility to objectively and reliably diagnose the lower boundary of the arable horizon in gray forest soils by determining the color characteristics and the magnetic susceptibility of their layer-wise samples. It was shown with arable gray forest soil (Cutanic Luvisols (Anthric)) as example that the magnetic susceptibility profile distribution curves can provide more reliable and objective assessment of the arable horizon thickness spatial variability than the profile curves of the color characteristics in the CIELAB coordinates. Therefore, magnetic measurements can be a useful tool for the tillage erosion estimation in the monitoring of soil characteristics in connection with the development of precision agriculture technologies and the organizing of agricultural field plot experiments.

  3. Spatial Cluster Detection for Repeatedly Measured Outcomes while Accounting for Residential History

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, Andrea J.; Gold, Diane R.; Li, Yi

    2009-01-01

    Spatial cluster detection has become an important methodology in quantifying the effect of hazardous exposures. Previous methods have focused on cross-sectional outcomes that are binary or continuous. There are virtually no spatial cluster detection methods proposed for longitudinal outcomes. This paper proposes a new spatial cluster detection method for repeated outcomes using cumulative geographic residuals. A major advantage of this method is its ability to readily incorporate information ...

  4. The Measurement of Aerosol Optical Properties Using Continuous Wave Cavity Ring-Down Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strawa, A. W.; Owano, T.; Castaneda, R.; Baer, D. S.; Paldus, B. A.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Large uncertainties in the effects that aerosols have on climate require improved in-situ measurements of extinction coefficient and single-scattering albedo. This abstract describes the use of continuous wave cavity ring-down (CW-CRD) technology to address this problem. The innovations in this instrument are the use of CW-CRD to measure aerosol extinction coefficient, the simultaneous measurement of scattering coefficient, and small size suitable for a wide range of aircraft applications. Our prototype instrument measures extinction and scattering coefficient at 690 nm and extinction coefficient at 1550 nm. The instrument itself is small (60 x 48 x 15 cm) and relatively insensitive to vibrations. The prototype instrument has been tested in our lab and used in the field. While improvements in performance are needed, the prototype has been shown to make accurate and sensitive measurements of extinction and scattering coefficients. Combining these two parameters, one can obtain the single-scattering albedo and absorption coefficient, both important aerosol properties. The use of two wavelengths also allows us to obtain a quantitative idea of the size of the aerosol through the Angstrom exponent. Minimum sensitivity of the prototype instrument is 1.5 x 10(exp -6)/m (1.5/Mm). Validation of the measurement of extinction coefficient has been accomplished by comparing the measurement of calibration spheres with Mie calculations. This instrument and its successors have potential to help reduce uncertainty currently associated with aerosol optical properties and their spatial and temporal variation. Possible applications include studies of visibility, climate forcing by aerosol, and the validation of aerosol retrieval schemes from satellite data.

  5. High spatial and spectral resolution measurements of Jupiter's auroral regions using Gemini-North-TEXES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, J. A.; Orton, G. S.; Greathouse, T. K.; Lacy, J.; Giles, R.; Fletcher, L. N.; Vogt, M.; Irwin, P. G.

    2017-12-01

    Jupiter exhibits auroral emission at a multitude of wavelengths. Auroral emission at X-ray, ultraviolet and near-infrared wavelengths demonstrate the precipitation of ion and electrons in Jupiter's upper atmosphere, at altitudes exceeding 250 km above the 1-bar level. Enhanced mid-infrared emission of CH4, C2H2, C2H4 and further hydrocarbons is also observed coincident with Jupiter's auroral regions. Retrieval analyses of infrared spectra from IRTF-TEXES (Texas Echelon Cross Echelle Spectrograph on NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility) indicate strong heating at the 1-mbar level and evidence of ion-neutral chemistry, which enriches the abundances of unsaturated hydrocarbons (Sinclair et al., 2017b, doi:10.1002/2017GL073529, Sinclair et al., 2017c (under review)). The extent to which these phenomena in the stratosphere are correlated and coupled physically with the shorter-wavelength auroral emission originating from higher altitudes has been a challenge due to the limited spatial resolution available on the IRTF. Smaller-scale features observed in the near-infrared and ultraviolet emission, such as the main `oval', transient `swirls' and dusk-active regions within the main oval (e.g. Stallard et al., 2014, doi:10.1016/j/Icarus.2015.12.044, Nichols et al., 2017, doi: 10.1002/2017GL073029) are potentially being blurred in the mid-infrared by the diffraction-limited resolution (0.7") of IRTF's 3-metre primary aperture. However, on March 17-19th 2017, we obtained spectral measurements of H2 S(1), CH4, C2H2, C2H4 and C2H6 emission of Jupiter's high latitudes using TEXES on Gemini-North, which has a 8-metre primary aperture. This rare opportunity combines the superior spectral resolving power of TEXES and the high spatial resolution provided by Gemini-North's 8-metre aperture. We will perform a retrieval analyses to determine the 3D distributions of temperature, C2H2, C2H4 and C2H6. The morphology will be compared with near-contemporaneous measurements of H3+ emission from

  6. High spatial resolution measurement of depth-of-interaction of a PET LSO crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, A.; Kalinka, G.; Novak, D.; Sipos, A.; Vegh, J.; Molnar, J.

    2004-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. A new type of experimental technique to investigate the depth-of-interaction (DOI) dependence in small scintillator elements designed for high-resolution animal PET [1] has been introduced at our institute, recently. A lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) crystal (2x2x10 mm 3 ) was irradiated with a highly focused 2 MeV He + beam at the ATOMKI nuclear microprobe laboratory. Pulse height spectra from a photomultiplier (PMT) attached to one end of the LSO crystal were collected in list mode. Sequential scans of 1000x1000 μm 2 areas along the 10 mm long crystal were made to get high lateral resolution images of pulse height spectra at different distances from the window of the PMT. A mean pulse height algorithm was applied to each pixel to generate two dimensional intensity images and the corresponding spectra of 100 μmx1 mm areas. Representative pulse height spectra are shown in Fig. 1 for different distances between the position of irradiation and the PMT. The mean value of the pulse height spectrum describing the position of the full energy peak is a way to measure DOI effects. It is seen that the closer the DOI to the PMT-end of the crystal the higher the energy of the peak. The centre of the detected peak varies about 30 % along the lateral side of the crystal. This effect is due to the increasing number of reflections with associated loss of light when the distance between the DOI position and the light collecting PMT grows. Further these results, no difference in the light intensity was found depending on which position across (perpendicular to the length of) the crystal was irradiated with the microbeam. The obtained results of the overall DOI dependence confirm previous measurements on LSO crystals with similar geometry and wrapping but based on collimated gamma-ray irradiation. Since the present experimental setup allows obtaining data with several orders of magnitude better spatial resolution (from μm up to mm) than with

  7. Psychometric properties of Spanish-language adult dental fear measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heaton Lisa J

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It would be useful to have psychometrically-sound measures of dental fear for Hispanics, who comprise the largest ethnic minority in the United States. We report on the psychometric properties of Spanish-language versions of two common adult measures of dental fear (Modified Dental Anxiety Scale, MDAS; Dental Fear Survey, DFS, as well as a measure of fear of dental injections (Needle Survey, NS. Methods Spanish versions of the measures were administered to 213 adults attending Hispanic cultural festivals, 31 students (who took the questionnaire twice, for test-retest reliability, and 100 patients at a dental clinic. We also administered the questionnaire to 136 English-speaking adults at the Hispanic festivals and 58 English-speaking students at the same college where we recruited the Spanish-speaking students, to compare the performance of the English and Spanish measures in the same populations. Results The internal reliabilities of the Spanish MDAS ranged from 0.80 to 0.85. Values for the DFS ranged from 0.92 to 0.96, and values for the NS ranged from 0.92 to 0.94. The test-retest reliabilities (intra-class correlations for the three measures were 0.69, 0.86, and 0.94 for the MDAS, DFS, and NS, respectively. The three measures showed moderate correlations with one another in all three samples, providing evidence for construct validity. Patients with higher scores on the measures were rated as being more anxious during dental procedures. Similar internal reliabilities and correlations were found in the English-version analyses. The test-retest values were also similar in the English students for the DFS and NS; however, the English test-retest value for the MDAS was better than that found in the Spanish students. Conclusion We found evidence for the internal reliability, construct validity, and criterion validity for the Spanish versions of the three measures, and evidence for the test-retest reliability of the Spanish

  8. Measurements of fast ion spatial dynamics during magnetic activity in the RFP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, J. A.; Anderson, J. K.; Bonofiglo, P.; Kim, J.; McConnell, R.; Magee, R. M.

    2017-10-01

    Fast ions in the RFP are only weakly affected by a stochastic magnetic field and behave nearly classically in concentration too low to excite Alfvenic activity. At high fast ion concentration sourced by H-NBI in 300kA RFP discharges, a substantial drop in core-localized high pitch fast ions is observed during bursts of coupled EPM and IAE (magnetic island-induced Alfven eigenmode) activity (100-200kHz) through neutral particle analysis. Sourcing instead fast deuterium with NBI, the DD fusion products can measure the dynamics of the fast ion density profile. Both a collimated neutron detector and a new 3MeV fusion proton detector loaned by TriAlpha Energy measure the fast ion density profile with 5cm spatial resolution and 100 μs temporal resolution. In D-NBI, the bursting EPM is excited at slightly lower frequency and the IAE activity is nearly absent, likely due to an isotope effect and loss of wave-particle interaction. In these cases, neutral particle analysis shows little change in the core-localized high pitch fast ion content, and the fusion product profile indicates little change in the fast ion density profile, leaving unexplained the mechanism removing EPM drive. We measure a substantial redistribution of the fast ion profile due to strong lower-frequency ( 30kHz) MHD activity that accompanies the current profile relaxation in the RFP. Profile flattening is strongest in low bulk density discharges, which often occur with a total increase in global neutron flux from acceleration of the beam ions. Work supported by US DoE.

  9. Measurement properties of adult quality-of-life measurement instruments for eczema: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinl, D; Prinsen, C A C; Deckert, S; Chalmers, J R; Drucker, A M; Ofenloch, R; Humphreys, R; Sach, T; Chamlin, S L; Schmitt, J; Apfelbacher, C

    2016-03-01

    The Harmonising Outcome Measures for Eczema (HOME) initiative has identified quality of life (QoL) as a core outcome domain to be evaluated in every eczema trial. It is unclear which of the existing QoL instruments is most appropriate for this domain. Thus, the aim of this review was to systematically assess the measurement properties of existing measurement instruments developed and/or validated for the measurement of QoL in adult eczema. We conducted a systematic literature search in PubMed and Embase identifying studies on measurement properties of adult eczema QoL instruments. For all eligible studies, we assessed the adequacy of the measurement properties and the methodological quality with the COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments (COSMIN) checklist. A best evidence synthesis summarizing findings from different studies was the basis to assign four degrees of recommendation (A-D). A total of 15 articles reporting on 17 instruments were included. No instrument fulfilled the criteria for category A. Six instruments were placed in category B, meaning that they have the potential to be recommended depending on the results of further validation studies. Three instruments had poor adequacy in at least one required adequacy criterion and were therefore put in category C. The remaining eight instruments were minimally validated and were thus placed in category D. Currently, no QoL instrument can be recommended for use in adult eczema. The Quality of Life Index for Atopic Dermatitis (QoLIAD) and the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) are recommended for further validation research. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Food environments and dietary intakes among adults: does the type of spatial exposure measurement matter? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bivoltsis, Alexia; Cervigni, Eleanor; Trapp, Gina; Knuiman, Matthew; Hooper, Paula; Ambrosini, Gina Leslie

    2018-06-09

    The relationships between food environments and dietary intake have been assessed via a range of methodologically diverse measures of spatial exposure to food outlets, resulting in a largely inconclusive body of evidence, limiting informed policy intervention. This systematic review aims to evaluate the influence of methodological choice on study outcomes by examining the within-study effect of availability (e.g., counts) versus accessibility (e.g., proximity) spatial exposure measures on associations with diet. (PROSPERO registration: CRD42018085250). PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus and ScienceDirect databases were searched for empirical studies from 1980 to 2017, in the English language, involving adults and reporting on the statistical association between a dietary outcome and spatial exposure measures of both availability and accessibility. Studies were appraised using an eight-point quality criteria with a narrative synthesis of results. A total of 205 associations and 44 relationships (i.e., multiple measures of spatial exposure relating to a particular food outlet type and dietary outcome) were extracted from 14 eligible articles. Comparative measures were dominated by counts (availability) and proximity (accessibility). Few studies compared more complex measures and all counts were derived from place-based measures of exposure. Sixteen of the 44 relationships had a significant effect involving an availability measure whilst only 8 had a significant effect from an accessibility measure. The largest effect sizes in relationships were mostly for availability measures. After stratification by scale, availability measure had the greatest effect size in 139 of the 176 pairwise comparisons. Of the 33% (68/205) of associations that reached significance, 53/68 (78%) were from availability measures. There was no relationship between study quality and reported study outcomes. The limited evidence suggests that availability measures may produce significant and greater

  11. Carex sempervirens tussocks induce spatial heterogeneity in litter decomposition, but not in soil properties, in a subalpine grassland in the Central Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei-Hai Yu; Martin Schutz; Deborah S. Page-Dumroese; Bertil O. Krusi; Jakob Schneller; Otto Wildi; Anita C. Risch

    2011-01-01

    Tussocks of graminoids can induce spatial heterogeneity in soil properties in dry areas with discontinuous vegetation cover, but little is known about the situation in areas with continuous vegetation and no study has tested whether tussocks can induce spatial heterogeneity in litter decomposition. In a subalpine grassland in the Central Alps where vegetation cover is...

  12. Physical Property Control on the Cellular Uptake Pathway and Spatial Distribution of Nanoparticles in Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sungsook; Seo, Eunseok; Kim, Ki Hean; Lee, Sang Joon

    2015-06-01

    Nanoparticles have been developed in broad biomedical research in terms of effective cellular interactions to treat and visualize diseased cells. Considering the charge and polar functional groups of proteins that are embedded in cellular membranes, charged nanoparticles have been strategically developed to enhance electrostatic cellular interactions. In this study, we show that cellular uptake efficiency, pathway, and spatial distribution of gold nanoparticles in a cell are significantly modulated based on the surface condition of gold nanoparticles and human cancer cells that were tuned by controlling the pH of the medium and by introducing an electron beam. Cellular uptake efficiency is increased when electrostatic attraction is induced between the cells and the gold nanoparticles. Cell surface modification changes the cellular uptake pathways of the gold nanoparticles and concentrates the gold nanoparticles at the membrane region. Surface modification of the gold nanoparticles also contributes to deep penetration and homogeneous spatial distributions in a cell.

  13. Environmental Correlation and Spatial Autocorrelation of Soil Properties in Keller Peninsula, Maritime Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Geraldo de Lima Moraes

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The pattern of variation in soil and landform properties in relation to environmental covariates are closely related to soil type distribution. The aim of this study was to apply digital soil mapping techniques to analysis of the pattern of soil property variation in relation to environmental covariates under periglacial conditions at Keller Peninsula, Maritime Antarctica. We considered the hypothesis that covariates normally used for environmental correlation elsewhere can be adequately employed in periglacial areas in Maritime Antarctica. For that purpose, 138 soil samples from 47 soil sites were collected for analysis of soil chemical and physical properties. We tested the correlation between soil properties (clay, potassium, sand, organic carbon, and pH and environmental covariates. The environmental covariates selected were correlated with soil properties according to the terrain attributes of the digital elevation model (DEM. The models evaluated were linear regression, ordinary kriging, and regression kriging. The best performance was obtained using normalized height as a covariate, with an R2 of 0.59 for sand. In contrast, the lowest R2 of 0.15 was obtained for organic carbon, also using the regression kriging method. Overall, results indicate that, despite the predominant periglacial conditions, the environmental covariates normally used for digital terrain mapping of soil properties worldwide can be successfully employed for understanding the main variations in soil properties and soil-forming factors in this region.

  14. Measurement of gas transport properties for chemical vapor infiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starr, T.L.; Hablutzel, N. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Engineering

    1996-12-01

    In the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process for fabricating ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), transport of gas phase reactant into the fiber preform is a critical step. The transport can be driven by pressure or by concentration. This report describes methods for measuring this for CVI preforms and partially infiltrated composites. Results are presented for Nicalon fiber cloth layup preforms and composites, Nextel fiber braid preforms and composites, and a Nicalon fiber 3-D weave composite. The results are consistent with a percolating network model for gas transport in CVI preforms and composites. This model predicts inherent variability in local pore characteristics and transport properties, and therefore, in local densification during processing; this may lead to production of gastight composites.

  15. Direct measurement of nonlinear properties of bipartite quantum states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovino, Fabio Antonio; Castagnoli, Giuseppe; Ekert, Artur; Horodecki, Paweł; Alves, Carolina Moura; Sergienko, Alexander Vladimir

    2005-12-09

    Nonlinear properties of quantum states, such as entropy or entanglement, quantify important physical resources and are frequently used in quantum-information science. They are usually calculated from a full description of a quantum state, even though they depend only on a small number of parameters that specify the state. Here we extract a nonlocal and a nonlinear quantity, namely, the Renyi entropy, from local measurements on two pairs of polarization-entangled photons. We also introduce a "phase marking" technique which allows the selection of uncorrupted outcomes even with nondeterministic sources of entangled photons. We use our experimental data to demonstrate the violation of entropic inequalities. They are examples of nonlinear entanglement witnesses and their power exceeds all linear tests for quantum entanglement based on all possible Bell-Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt inequalities.

  16. Signal Morphing techniques and possible application to Higgs properties measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Ecker, Katharina Maria; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    One way of describing deviations from the Standard Model is via Effective Field Theories or pseudo-observables, where higher order operators modify the couplings and the kinematics of the interaction of the Standard Model particles. Generating Monte Carlo events for every testable set of parameters for such a theory would require computing resources beyond the ones currently available in ATLAS. Up to now, Matrix-Element based reweighting techniques have been often used to model Beyond Standard Model process starting from Standard Model simulated events. In this talk, we review the advantages and the limitations of morphing techniques to construct continuous probability model for signal parameters, interpolating between a finite number of distributions obtained from the simulation chain. The technique will be exemplified by searching for deviations from the Standard Model predictions in Higgs properties measurements.

  17. Measuring the value of air quality: application of the spatial hedonic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung Gyu; Cho, Seong-Hoon; Lambert, Dayton M; Roberts, Roland K

    2010-03-01

    This study applies a hedonic model to assess the economic benefits of air quality improvement following the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendment at the county level in the lower 48 United States. An instrumental variable approach that combines geographically weighted regression and spatial autoregression methods (GWR-SEM) is adopted to simultaneously account for spatial heterogeneity and spatial autocorrelation. SEM mitigates spatial dependency while GWR addresses spatial heterogeneity by allowing response coefficients to vary across observations. Positive amenity values of improved air quality are found in four major clusters: (1) in East Kentucky and most of Georgia around the Southern Appalachian area; (2) in a few counties in Illinois; (3) on the border of Oklahoma and Kansas, on the border of Kansas and Nebraska, and in east Texas; and (4) in a few counties in Montana. Clusters of significant positive amenity values may exist because of a combination of intense air pollution and consumer awareness of diminishing air quality.

  18. Spatial and spectral interpolation of ground-motion intensity measure observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worden, Charles; Thompson, Eric M.; Baker, Jack W.; Bradley, Brendon A.; Luco, Nicolas; Wilson, David

    2018-01-01

    Following a significant earthquake, ground‐motion observations are available for a limited set of locations and intensity measures (IMs). Typically, however, it is desirable to know the ground motions for additional IMs and at locations where observations are unavailable. Various interpolation methods are available, but because IMs or their logarithms are normally distributed, spatially correlated, and correlated with each other at a given location, it is possible to apply the conditional multivariate normal (MVN) distribution to the problem of estimating unobserved IMs. In this article, we review the MVN and its application to general estimation problems, and then apply the MVN to the specific problem of ground‐motion IM interpolation. In particular, we present (1) a formulation of the MVN for the simultaneous interpolation of IMs across space and IM type (most commonly, spectral response at different oscillator periods) and (2) the inclusion of uncertain observation data in the MVN formulation. These techniques, in combination with modern empirical ground‐motion models and correlation functions, provide a flexible framework for estimating a variety of IMs at arbitrary locations.

  19. Spatial-temporal analysis of coherent offshore wind field structures measured by scanning Doppler-lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valldecabres, L.; Friedrichs, W.; von Bremen, L.; Kühn, M.

    2016-09-01

    An analysis of the spatial and temporal power fluctuations of a simplified wind farm model is conducted on four offshore wind fields data sets, two from lidar measurements and two from LES under unstable and neutral atmospheric conditions. The integral length scales of the horizontal wind speed computed in the streamwise and the cross-stream direction revealed the elongation of the structures in the direction of the mean flow. To analyse the effect of the structures on the power output of a wind turbine, the aggregated equivalent power of two wind turbines with different turbine spacing in the streamwise and cross-stream direction is analysed at different time scales under 10 minutes. The fact of considering the summation of the power of two wind turbines smooths out the fluctuations of the power output of a single wind turbine. This effect, which is stronger with increasing spacing between turbines, can be seen in the aggregation of the power of two wind turbines in the streamwise direction. Due to the anti-correlation of the coherent structures in the cross-stream direction, this smoothing effect is stronger when the aggregated power is computed with two wind turbines aligned orthogonally to the mean flow direction.

  20. Health Literacy Measure for Adolescents (HELMA: Development and Psychometric Properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahla Ghanbari

    Full Text Available Health literacy refers to personal competencies for the access to, understanding of, appraisal of and application of health information in order to make sound decisions in everyday life. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate the psychometric properties of an instrument for the measurement of health literacy among adolescents (the Health Literacy Measure for Adolescents-HELMA.This study was made up of two phases, qualitative and quantitative, which were carried out in 2012-2014 in Tehran, Iran. In the qualitative part of the study, in-depth interviews with 67 adolescents aged 15-18 were carried out in 4 high schools to generate the initial item pool for the survey. The content validity of the items was then assessed by an expert panel review (n = 13 and face validity was assessed by interviewing adolescents (n = 16. In the quantitative part of the study, in order to describe the psychometric properties of the scale, validity, reliability (internal consistency and test-retest and factor analysis were assessed.An item pool made up of 104 items was generated at the qualitative stage. After content validity was considered, this decreased to 47 items. In the quantitative stage, 582 adolescents aged 15-18 participated in the study with a mean age of 16.2 years. 51.2% of participants were females. In principal component factor analysis, 8 factors were loaded, which accounted for 53.37% of the variance observed. Reliability has been approved by α = 0.93 and the test-retest of the scale at two-week intervals indicated an appropriate stability for the scale (ICC = 0.93. The final questionnaire was approved with 44 items split into eight sections. The sections were titled: gain access to, reading, understanding, appraise, use, communication, self-efficacy and numeracy.The Health Literacy Measure for Adolescents (HELMA is a valid and reliable tool for the measurement of the health literacy of adolescents aged 15-18 and can be used to evaluate

  1. Measurement of adhesion properties between topcoat paint and metallized/galvanized steel with surface energy measurement equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The objectives of this research project are: (1) Compare the adhesion properties of NEPCOAT-approved topcoat paint over : metallized or galvanized steel. Use surface-energy measuring technique to characterize the wetting properties of the liqui...

  2. Recurrent Property Taxes in Communal Budgets – Identification of Types of Communes and their Spatial Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trojanek Maria

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this paper is to identify differences between Polish communes as regards their revenues from property taxes. To this end, we distinguished and described types of communes with similar configurations of features under analysis (incomes from real property tax, agricultural tax and forest tax. In the research procedure, we applied methods of multidimensional analysis, with particular emphasis on cluster analysis. The research was conducted on the basis of aggregated (to eliminate random fluctuations values of income from properties in the years 2013-2015. On the basis of typological classification, we distinguished six clusters (groups of communes of different quantitative characteristics of budget revenues from property taxes. We identified specific regularities in the distribution of the distinguished commune types.

  3. Fingerprinting ancient gold by measuring Pt with spatially resolved high energy Sy-XRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerra, M.F.; Calligaro, T.; Radtke, M.; Reiche, I.; Riesemeier, H.

    2005-01-01

    Trace elements of ancient gold such as Pt, give fundamental information on the circulation of the metal in the past. In the case of objects from the cultural heritage, the determination of trace elements requires non-destructive point analysis in general. These conditions and the need of good detection limits restrain the number of applicable analytical techniques. After the development of a PIXE set-up with a selective Cu or Zn filter of 75 μm and of a PIXE-XRF set-up using a primary target of As, we tested the possibilities of spatially resolved Sy-XRF to determine Pt in gold alloys. With a Zn filter, PIXE showed a detection limit of 1000 ppm in gold while PIXE-XRF lowers this detection limit down to 80 ppm. This last value being constrained by the resonant Raman effect produced on gold. In order to improve the detection limit of Pt keeping the non-destructiveness and access to point analysis, we developed an analytical protocol for XRF with synchrotron radiation at BESSY II, using the BAMline set-up. The L-lines of Pt were excited by a beam of energy above and below 11.564 keV and measured using a Si(Li) detector with a 50 μm Cu filter. A μ-beam of 100-250 μm 2 was used according to the size of the sample. The determination of the Pt content in the samples was carried out by Monte-Carlo simulation and subtraction of Au and Pt spectra obtained on pure standards. The limit of detection for Pt of 20 ppm was determined by using certified standards. The detection limits of a small set of other characteristic elements of gold were also measured using an incident energy of 33 keV

  4. The measurement and calculation of the X-ray spatial resolution obtained in the analytical electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael, J.R.; Williams, D.B.

    1990-01-01

    The X-ray microanalytical spatial resolution is determined experimentally in various analytical electron microscopes by measuring the degradation of an atomically discrete composition profile across an interphase interface in a thin-foil of Ni-Cr-Fe. The experimental spatial resolutions are then compared with calculated values. The calculated spatial resolutions are obtained by the mathematical convolution of the electron probe size with an assumed beam-broadening distribution and the single-scattering model of beam broadening. The probe size is measured directly from an image of the probe in a TEM/SETEM and indirectly from dark-field signal changes resulting from scanning the probe across the edge of an MgO crystal in a dedicated STEM. This study demonstrates the applicability of the convolution technique to the calculation of the microanalytical spatial resolution obtained in the analytical electron microscope. It is demonstrated that, contrary to popular opinion, the electron probe size has a major impact on the measured spatial resolution in foils < 150 nm thick. (author)

  5. Spatial Variability of Soil-Water Storage in the Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory: Measurement and Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oroza, C.; Bales, R. C.; Zheng, Z.; Glaser, S. D.

    2017-12-01

    Predicting the spatial distribution of soil moisture in mountain environments is confounded by multiple factors, including complex topography, spatial variably of soil texture, sub-surface flow paths, and snow-soil interactions. While remote-sensing tools such as passive-microwave monitoring can measure spatial variability of soil moisture, they only capture near-surface soil layers. Large-scale sensor networks are increasingly providing soil-moisture measurements at high temporal resolution across a broader range of depths than are accessible from remote sensing. It may be possible to combine these in-situ measurements with high-resolution LIDAR topography and canopy cover to estimate the spatial distribution of soil moisture at high spatial resolution at multiple depths. We study the feasibility of this approach using six years (2009-2014) of daily volumetric water content measurements at 10-, 30-, and 60-cm depths from the Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory. A non-parametric, multivariate regression algorithm, Random Forest, was used to predict the spatial distribution of depth-integrated soil-water storage, based on the in-situ measurements and a combination of node attributes (topographic wetness, northness, elevation, soil texture, and location with respect to canopy cover). We observe predictable patterns of predictor accuracy and independent variable ranking during the six-year study period. Predictor accuracy is highest during the snow-cover and early recession periods but declines during the dry period. Soil texture has consistently high feature importance. Other landscape attributes exhibit seasonal trends: northness peaks during the wet-up period, and elevation and topographic-wetness index peak during the recession and dry period, respectively.

  6. Systematic review of measurement properties of questionnaires measuring somatization in primary care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitnikova, Kate; Dijkstra-Kersten, Sandra M A; Mokkink, Lidwine B; Terluin, Berend; van Marwijk, Harm W J; Leone, Stephanie S; van der Horst, Henriëtte E; van der Wouden, Johannes C

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this review is to critically appraise the evidence on measurement properties of self-report questionnaires measuring somatization in adult primary care patients and to provide recommendations about which questionnaires are most useful for this purpose. We assessed the methodological quality of included studies using the COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments (COSMIN) checklist. To draw overall conclusions about the quality of the questionnaires, we conducted an evidence synthesis using predefined criteria for judging the measurement properties. We found 24 articles on 9 questionnaires. Studies on the Patient Health Questionnaire-15 (PHQ-15) and the Four-Dimensional Symptom Questionnaire (4DSQ) somatization subscale prevailed and covered the broadest range of measurement properties. These questionnaires had the best internal consistency, test-retest reliability, structural validity, and construct validity. The PHQ-15 also had good criterion validity, whereas the 4DSQ somatization subscale was validated in several languages. The Bodily Distress Syndrome (BDS) checklist had good internal consistency and structural validity. Some evidence was found for good construct validity and criterion validity of the Physical Symptom Checklist (PSC-51) and good construct validity of the Symptom Check-List (SCL-90-R) somatization subscale. However, these three questionnaires were only studied in a small number of primary care studies. Based on our findings, we recommend the use of either the PHQ-15 or 4DSQ somatization subscale for somatization in primary care. Other questionnaires, such as the BDS checklist, PSC-51 and the SCL-90-R somatization subscale show promising results but have not been studied extensively in primary care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Measurement properties of patient reported outcome measures for spondyloarthritis: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Png, Kelly; Kwan, Yu Heng; Leung, Ying Ying; Phang, Jie Kie; Lau, Jia Qi; Lim, Ka Keat; Chew, Eng Hui; Low, Lian Leng; Tan, Chuen Seng; Thumboo, Julian; Fong, Warren; Østbye, Truls

    2018-03-21

    This systematic review aimed to identify studies investigating measurement properties of patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) for spondyloarthritis (SpA), and to evaluate their methodological quality and level of evidence relating to the measurement properties of PROMs. This systematic review was guided by the preferred reporting items for systematic review and meta-analysis (PRISMA). Articles published before 30 June 2017 were retrieved from PubMed ® , Embase ® , and PsychINFO ® (Ovid). Methodological quality and level of evidence were evaluated according to recommendations from the COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments (COSMIN). We identified 60 unique PROMs from 125 studies in 39 countries. Twenty-one PROMs were validated for two or more SpA subtypes. The literature examined hypothesis testing (82.4%) most frequently followed by reliability (60.0%). A percentage of 77.7% and 42.7% of studies that assessed PROMs for hypothesis testing and reliability, respectively had "fair" or better methodological quality. Among the PROMs identified, 41.7% were studied in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) only and 23.3% were studied in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) only. The more extensively assessed PROMs included the ankylosing spondylitis quality of life (ASQoL) and bath ankylosing spondylitis functional index (BASFI) for ankylosing spondylitis, and the psoriatic arthritis quality of life questionnaire (VITACORA-19) for psoriatic arthritis. This study identified 60 unique PROMs through a systematic review and synthesized evidence of the measurement properties of the PROMs. There is a lack of validation of PROMs for use across SpA subtypes. Future studies may consider validating PROMs for use across different SpA subtypes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Required spatial resolution of hydrological models to evaluate urban flood resilience measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gires, A.; Giangola-Murzyn, A.; Tchiguirinskaia, I.; Schertzer, D.; Lovejoy, S.

    2012-04-01

    During a flood in urban area, several non-linear processes (rainfall, surface runoff, sewer flow, and sub-surface flow) interact. Fully distributed hydrological models are a useful tool to better understand these complex interactions between natural processes and man built environment. Developing an efficient model is a first step to improve the understanding of flood resilience in urban area. Given that the previously mentioned underlying physical phenomenon exhibit different relevant scales, determining the required spatial resolution of such model is tricky but necessary issue. For instance such model should be able to properly represent large scale effects of local scale flood resilience measures such as stop logs. The model should also be as simple as possible without being simplistic. In this paper we test two types of model. First we use an operational semi-distributed model over a 3400 ha peri-urban area located in Seine-Saint-Denis (North-East of Paris). In this model, the area is divided into sub-catchments of average size 17 ha that are considered as homogenous, and only the sewer discharge is modelled. The rainfall data, whose resolution is 1 km is space and 5 min in time, comes from the C-band radar of Trappes, located in the West of Paris, and operated by Météo-France. It was shown that the spatial resolution of both the model and the rainfall field did not enable to fully grasp the small scale rainfall variability. To achieve this, first an ensemble of realistic rainfall fields downscaled to a resolution of 100 m is generated with the help of multifractal space-time cascades whose characteristic exponents are estimated on the available radar data. Second the corresponding ensemble of sewer hydrographs is simulated by inputting each rainfall realization to the model. It appears that the probability distribution of the simulated peak flow exhibits a power-law behaviour. This indicates that there is a great uncertainty associated with small scale

  9. Thermophysical Properties of Molten Silicon Measured by JPL High Temperature Electrostatic Levitator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhim, W. K.; Ohsaka, K.

    1999-01-01

    Five thermophysical properties of molten silicon measured by the High Temperature Electrostatic Levitator (HTESL) at JPL are presented. The properties measured are the density, the constant pressure specific heat capacity, the hemispherical total emissivity, the surface tension and the viscosity.

  10. Psychometric properties of a scale to measure alexithymia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, E B; Arena, J G; Pallmeyer, T P

    1981-01-01

    Four studies were conducted on a sample of 230 undergraduates to determine the psychometric properties of a measure of alexithymia, the Schalling-Sifneos Scale. In the first study it was found that scores on the scale are approximately normally distributed for each sex with 8.2% of males and 1.8% of females in the alexithymia range. In the second study a factor analysis of the scale revealed three distinct factors: (1) 'difficulty in expression of feelings'; (2) 'the importance of feelings especially about people'; (3) 'day-dreaming or introspection'. In the second factor analytic study, scores from several standard psychological tests on the same subjects were introduced with the scale items. Two factors in this analysis were comprised almost entirely of the other test scores: a 'general psychological distress factor' and a 'concerns about physical symptoms factor'. The other two factors were similar to factors 1 and 2 above in terms of items. The Rathus Assertiveness Scale loaded positively on the equivalent of factor 1. In the lst study, it was shown that Schalling-Sifneos Scale score is relatively orthogonal to other psychological tests with the exception of a Psychosomatic Symptom Checklist and thus is measuring something other than depression, anxiety, etc.

  11. On finitely subadditive outer measures and modularity properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Traina

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Let ν be a finite, finitely subadditive outer measure on P(X. Define ρ (E=ν (X−ν (E′ for E⊂X. The measurable sets Sν and Sρ and the set S={E⊂X/ν (E=ρ (E} are investigated in general, and in the presence of regularity or modularity assumptions on ν. This is also done for ν0(E=inf{ν (M/E⊂M∈Sν }. General properties of ν are derived when ν is weakly submodular. Applications and numerous examples are given.

  12. Coordinated learning of grid cell and place cell spatial and temporal properties: multiple scales, attention and oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossberg, Stephen; Pilly, Praveen K

    2014-02-05

    A neural model proposes how entorhinal grid cells and hippocampal place cells may develop as spatial categories in a hierarchy of self-organizing maps (SOMs). The model responds to realistic rat navigational trajectories by learning both grid cells with hexagonal grid firing fields of multiple spatial scales, and place cells with one or more firing fields, that match neurophysiological data about their development in juvenile rats. Both grid and place cells can develop by detecting, learning and remembering the most frequent and energetic co-occurrences of their inputs. The model's parsimonious properties include: similar ring attractor mechanisms process linear and angular path integration inputs that drive map learning; the same SOM mechanisms can learn grid cell and place cell receptive fields; and the learning of the dorsoventral organization of multiple spatial scale modules through medial entorhinal cortex to hippocampus (HC) may use mechanisms homologous to those for temporal learning through lateral entorhinal cortex to HC ('neural relativity'). The model clarifies how top-down HC-to-entorhinal attentional mechanisms may stabilize map learning, simulates how hippocampal inactivation may disrupt grid cells, and explains data about theta, beta and gamma oscillations. The article also compares the three main types of grid cell models in the light of recent data.

  13. Development and testing of an assessment to measure spatial thinking about enhanced greenhouse effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaza, Heather Jean

    Americans, in general, do not behave in environmentally sustainable ways. We drive cars and fly in planes that emit planet-warming carbon. We purchase food in nearly indestructible packaging that is not recycled or repurposed. We do not consider the environmental impact of the "stuff" stuffed into our grocery and department stores, most of which is made of materials that had to be dug out of the ground, leaving rivers and skies full of pollution in its place. Citizens have a responsibility to understand complex global and local environmental problems. A person's ability to think about the way that an environmental problem they are tasked with understanding changes over time and space can better prepare them to make sustainable decisions in the face of this complexity. Spatial thinking serves the learner's ability to understand the impact of environmental actions and should be given a consistent place in environmental education. Teaching practices and pedagogies that focus on spatial thinking are necessary to learners' success. In order to know if these strategies are successful, educators need an assessment tool that targets the spatial thinking skills necessary to understanding environmental problems. This dissertation project used a models and modeling theoretical framework to develop and test an assessment of students' spatial thinking abilities related to the environmental problem of enhanced greenhouse effect. This assessment was developed from a review of existing spatial thinking literature, research on existing assessments of spatial thinking abilities, and existing assessment of enhanced greenhouse effect. In addition, I interviewed and surveyed experts in science, math, and environmental education to elicit their perspectives on the spatial thinking skills necessary for learners to understand enhanced greenhouse effect. All of this information was synthesized into 14 Central Concepts of spatial thinking for enhanced greenhouse effect. The assessment was

  14. Spectral measurements at different spatial scales in potato: relating leaf, plant and canopy nitrogen status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongschaap, Raymond E. E.; Booij, Remmie

    2004-09-01

    Chlorophyll contents in vegetation depend on soil nitrogen availability and on crop nitrogen uptake, which are important management factors in arable farming. Crop nitrogen uptake is important, as nitrogen is needed for chlorophyll formation, which is important for photosynthesis, i.e. the conversion of absorbed radiance into plant biomass. The objective of this study was to estimate leaf and canopy nitrogen contents by near and remote sensing observations and to link observations at leaf, plant and canopy level. A theoretical base is presented for scaling-up leaf optical properties to whole plants and crops, by linking different optical recording techniques at leaf, plant and canopy levels through the integration of vertical nitrogen distribution. Field data come from potato experiments in The Netherlands in 1997 and 1998, comprising two potato varieties: Eersteling and Bintje, receiving similar nitrogen treatments (0, 100, 200 and 300 kg N ha -1) in varying application schemes to create differences in canopy nitrogen status during the growing season. Ten standard destructive field samplings were performed to follow leaf area index and crop dry weight evolution. Samples were analysed for inorganic nitrogen and total nitrogen contents. At sampling dates, spectral measurements were taken both at leaf level and at canopy level. At leaf level, an exponential relation between SPAD-502 readings and leaf organic nitrogen contents with a high correlation factor of 0.91 was found. At canopy level, an exponential relation between canopy organic nitrogen contents and red edge position ( λrep, nm) derived from reflectance measurements was found with a good correlation of 0.82. Spectral measurements (SPAD-502) at leaf level of a few square mm were related to canopy reflectance measurements (CropScan™) of approximately 0.44 m 2. Statistical regression techniques were used to optimise theoretical vertical nitrogen profiles that allowed scaling-up leaf chlorophyll measurements

  15. Aerosol properties over the western Mediterranean basin: temporal and spatial variability

    OpenAIRE

    H. Lyamani; A. Valenzuela; D. Perez-Ramirez; C. Toledano; M. J. Granados-Muñoz; F. J. Olmo; L. Alados-Arboledas

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on the analysis of AERONET aerosol data obtained over Alborán Island (35.95° N, 3.01° W, 15 m a.s.l.) in the western Mediterranean from July 2011 to January 2012. Additional aerosol data from three nearest AERONET stations and the Maritime Aerosol Network (MAN) were also analyzed in order to investigate the aerosol temporal and spatial variations over this scarcely explored region. Aerosol load over Alborán was significantly larger than that reported for o...

  16. Analyzing spatial variability of soil properties in the urban park before and after reconstruction to support decision-making in landscaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romzaikina, Olga; Vasenev, Viacheslav; Khakimova, Rita

    2017-04-01

    On-going urbanization stresses a necessity for structural and aesthetically organized urban landscapes to improve citizen's life quality. Urban soils and vegetation are the main components of urban ecosystems. Urban greenery regulates the climate, controls and air quality and supports biodiversity in urban areas. Soils play a key role in supporting urban greenery. However, soils of urban parks also perform other important environmental functions. Urban soils are influenced by a variety of environmental and anthropogenic factors and, in the result, are highly heterogeneous and dynamic. Reconstructions of green zones and urban parks, usually occurring in cities, alter soil properties. Analyzing spatial variability and dynamics of soil properties is important to support decision-making in landscaping. Therefore, the research aimed to analyze the spatial distribution of the key soil properties (acidity, soil organic carbon (SOC) and nutrient contents) in the urban park before and after reconstruction to support decision-making in selecting ornamental plants for landscaping. The research was conducted in the urban park named after Artyom Borovik in Moscow before (2012) and after (2014) the reconstruction. Urban soil's properties maps for both periods were created by interpolation of the field data. The observed urban soils included recreazems, urbanozems and constuctozems. Before the reconstruction soils were sampled using the uniform design (the net with 100 m side and key plots with 50m size). After the reconstructions the additional samples were collected at locations, where the land cover and functional zones changed in a result of the reconstruction.We sample from the depths 0-30, 30-50 and 50-100 cm. The following soil properties were measured: pH, SOC, K2O and P2O5. The maps of the analyzed properties were developed using open QGIS2.4 software by IDW. The vegetation in the park was examined using the scale of the visual assessment. The results of the visual

  17. PHYSICAL PROPERTY MEASUREMENTS OF LABORATORY PREPARED SALTSTONE GROUT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, E.; Cozzi, A.; Edwards, T.

    2014-05-05

    The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) built two new Saltstone Disposal Units (SDU), SDU 3 and SDU 5, in 2013. The variable frequency drive (VFD) for the grout transfer hose pump tripped due to high current demand by the motor during the initial radioactive saltstone transfer to SDU 5B on 12/5/2013. This was not observed during clean cap processing on July 5, 2013 to SDU 3A, which is a slightly longer distance from the SPF than is SDU 5B. Saltstone Design Authority (SDA) is evaluating the grout pump performance and capabilities to transfer the grout processed in SPF to SDU 3/5. To assist in this evaluation, grout physical properties are required. At this time, there are no rheological data from the actual SPF so the properties of laboratory prepared samples using simulated salt solution or Tank 50 salt solution will be measured. The physical properties of grout prepared in the laboratory with de-ionized water (DI) and salt solutions were obtained at 0.60 and 0.59 water to premix (W/P) ratios, respectively. The yield stress of the DI grout was greater than any salt grout. The plastic viscosity of the DI grout was lower than all of the salt grouts (including salt grout with admixture). When these physical data were used to determine the pressure drop and fluid horsepower for steady state conditions, the salt grouts without admixture addition required a higher pressure drop and higher fluid horsepower to transport. When 0.00076 g Daratard 17/g premix was added, both the pressure drop and fluid horsepower were below that of the DI grout. Higher concentrations of Daratard 17 further reduced the pressure drop and fluid horsepower. The uncertainty in the single point Bingham Plastic parameters is + 4% of the reported values and is the bounding uncertainty. Two different mechanical agitator mixing protocols were followed for the simulant salt grout, one having a total mixing time of three minutes and the other having a time of 10 minutes. The Bingham Plastic parameters

  18. Selectivity and balance of spatial filtering velocimetry of objective speckles for measuring out-of-plane motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Michael Linde; Yura, Hal T.; Hanson, Steen Grüner

    2015-01-01

    We probe the dynamics of objective laser speckles as the axial distance between the object and the observation plane changes. With the purpose of measuring out-of-plane motion in real time, we apply optical spatial filtering velocimetry to the speckle dynamics. To achieve this, a rotationally sym...

  19. Evaluation of the measurement properties of symptom measurement instruments for atopic eczema: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbens, L A A; Prinsen, C A C; Chalmers, J R; Drucker, A M; von Kobyletzki, L B; Limpens, J; Nankervis, H; Svensson, Å; Terwee, C B; Zhang, J; Apfelbacher, C J; Spuls, P I

    2017-01-01

    Symptoms have been identified as a core outcome domain for atopic eczema (AE) trials. Various instruments exist to measure symptoms in AE, but they vary in quality and there is a lack of standardization between clinical trials. Our objective was to systematically evaluate the quality of the evidence on the measurement properties of AE symptom instruments, thereby informing consensus discussions within the Harmonising Outcome Measures for Eczema (HOME) initiative regarding the most appropriate instruments for the core outcome domain symptoms. Using the COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments (COSMIN) checklist and predefined criteria for good measurement properties on identified development and validation studies of AE symptom instruments, a best evidence synthesis was performed to draw an overall conclusion on quality of the instruments and to provide recommendations. Eighteen instruments were identified and evaluated. When the quality and results of the studies were considered, only five of these instruments had sufficient validation data to consider them for the core outcome set for the core outcome domain symptoms. These were the paediatric Itch Severity Scale (ISS), Patient-Oriented Eczema Measure (POEM), Patient-Oriented SCOring Atopic Dermatitis (PO-SCORAD), Self-Administered Eczema Area and Severity Index (SA-EASI) and adapted SA-EASI. ISS (paediatric version), POEM, PO-SCORAD, SA-EASI and adapted SA-EASI are currently the most appropriate instruments and therefore have the potential to be recommended as core symptom instrument in future clinical trials. These findings will be utilized for the development of a core outcome set for AE. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. The impact of ants on mineral soil properties and processes at different spatial scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cammeraat, E.L.H.; Risch, A.C.

    2008-01-01

    Soil dwelling ants are important soil engineers that have a large impact on the soil ecosystem. This is reflected in the alteration of soil properties by ants due to burrowing activities, the accumulation of organic matter and other nutrients in the soil, which, in turn, alters soil physical,

  1. Measurement properties and usability of non-contact scanners for measuring transtibial residual limb volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofman, Rianne; Beekman, Anna M; Emmelot, Cornelis H; Geertzen, Jan H B; Dijkstra, Pieter U

    2018-06-01

    Non-contact scanners may have potential for measurement of residual limb volume. Different non-contact scanners have been introduced during the last decades. Reliability and usability (practicality and user friendliness) should be assessed before introducing these systems in clinical practice. The aim of this study was to analyze the measurement properties and usability of four non-contact scanners (TT Design, Omega Scanner, BioSculptor Bioscanner, and Rodin4D Scanner). Quasi experimental. Nine (geometric and residual limb) models were measured on two occasions, each consisting of two sessions, thus in total 4 sessions. In each session, four observers used the four systems for volume measurement. Mean for each model, repeatability coefficients for each system, variance components, and their two-way interactions of measurement conditions were calculated. User satisfaction was evaluated with the Post-Study System Usability Questionnaire. Systematic differences between the systems were found in volume measurements. Most of the variances were explained by the model (97%), while error variance was 3%. Measurement system and the interaction between system and model explained 44% of the error variance. Repeatability coefficient of the systems ranged from 0.101 (Omega Scanner) to 0.131 L (Rodin4D). Differences in Post-Study System Usability Questionnaire scores between the systems were small and not significant. The systems were reliable in determining residual limb volume. Measurement systems and the interaction between system and residual limb model explained most of the error variances. The differences in repeatability coefficient and usability between the four CAD/CAM systems were small. Clinical relevance If accurate measurements of residual limb volume are required (in case of research), modern non-contact scanners should be taken in consideration nowadays.

  2. Towards the evidence of a purely spatial Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox in images: measurement scheme and first experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaux, F.; Mougin-Sisini, J.; Moreau, P. A.; Lantz, E.

    2012-07-01

    We propose a scheme to evidence the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) paradox for photons produced by spontaneous down conversion, from measurement of purely spatial correlations of photon positions both in the near- and in the far-field. Experimentally, quantum correlations have been measured in the far-field of parametric fluorescence created in a type II BBO crystal. Imaging is performed in the photon counting regime with an electron-multiplying CCD (EMCCD) camera.

  3. Optical Implementation Of The Hopfield Model Using A Spatial Light Modulator Discussion Of Properties And Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torzynski, Marc

    1989-01-01

    In this paper we propose an optical design for implementation of neuronic Hopfield network. We describe the algorithm and its potential possibilities as associative (or content addressable) memory. We then describe the optical set (using a magneto-optic spatial light modulator) and explaning its operating mode: the binary transparency of the SLM does not allow a direct and accurate experimental realisation of the theoretical algorithm. However, there is a particular setup that can implemented it powerfully but with a reduction of the effective number of neurons. The operating speed is then evaluated from the characteristics of the SLM "Sight-Mod" manufactured by SEMETEX corp.: the maximun operating frequency seems limited by the speed of the optical valve.

  4. Spatial variability of nitrogen-15 and its relation to the variability of other soil properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selles, F.; Karamanos, R.E.; Kachanoski, R.G.

    1986-01-01

    The spatial variability of natural 15 N abundance of a cultivated Chernozemic soil and its native prairie counterpart were smaller than that of total N, organic C, and the C/N ratio. Further, the number of samples required to estimate the true mean of total N with a given precision at various probability levels were twofold those required to estimate the true mean of total N with a given precision at various probability levels were twofold those required to determine the mean 15 N abundance of total soil N in the surface horizons may reflect the isotopic composition of the nitrogenous substances entering the soil system or changes in the isotopic composition of soil N due to humification processes, probably induced by variations in topographic and microrelief features of the soil

  5. Scaling precipitation input to spatially distributed hydrological models by measured snow distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Vögeli

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Accurate knowledge on snow distribution in alpine terrain is crucial for various applicationssuch as flood risk assessment, avalanche warning or managing water supply and hydro-power.To simulate the seasonal snow cover development in alpine terrain, the spatially distributed,physics-based model Alpine3D is suitable. The model is typically driven by spatial interpolationsof observations from automatic weather stations (AWS, leading to errors in the spatial distributionof atmospheric forcing. With recent advances in remote sensing techniques, maps of snowdepth can be acquired with high spatial resolution and accuracy. In this work, maps of the snowdepth distribution, calculated from summer and winter digital surface models based on AirborneDigital Sensors (ADS, are used to scale precipitation input data, with the aim to improve theaccuracy of simulation of the spatial distribution of snow with Alpine3D. A simple method toscale and redistribute precipitation is presented and the performance is analysed. The scalingmethod is only applied if it is snowing. For rainfall the precipitation is distributed by interpolation,with a simple air temperature threshold used for the determination of the precipitation phase.It was found that the accuracy of spatial snow distribution could be improved significantly forthe simulated domain. The standard deviation of absolute snow depth error is reduced up toa factor 3.4 to less than 20 cm. The mean absolute error in snow distribution was reducedwhen using representative input sources for the simulation domain. For inter-annual scaling, themodel performance could also be improved, even when using a remote sensing dataset from adifferent winter. In conclusion, using remote sensing data to process precipitation input, complexprocesses such as preferential snow deposition and snow relocation due to wind or avalanches,can be substituted and modelling performance of spatial snow distribution is improved.

  6. The Spatial Properties of Radical Environmental Organizations in the UK: Do or Die!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zack W Almquist

    Full Text Available Radical environmental groups and their members have a wide and varied agenda which often encompasses both local and global issues. In their efforts to call attention to environmental problems, communicate with like-minded groups, and mobilize support for their activities, radical environmental organizations also produce an enormous amount of text, which can be used to estimate the complex communications and task-based networks that underlie these organizations. Moreover, the tactics employed to garnish attention for these groups' agenda can range from peaceful activities such as information dissemination to violent activities such as fire-bombing buildings. To obtain these varied objectives, radical environmental organizations must harness their networks, which have an important spatial component that structures their ability to communicate, coordinate and act on any given agenda item. Here, we analyze a network built from communications and information provided by the semi-annual "Do or Die" (DoD magazine published in the UK over a 10 year period in the late 1990s and early 2000s. We first employ structural topic model methods to discover violent and nonviolent actors within the larger environmental community. Using this designation, we then compare the spatial structure of these groups, finding that violent groups are especially likely to engage in coordination and/or communication if they are sufficiently close, but exhibit a quickly decreasing probability of interaction over even a few kilometers. Further, violent and nonviolent groups each have a higher probability of coordination with their own group than across groups over even short distances. In these respects, we see that violent groups are especially local in their organization and that their geographic reach is likely very limited. This suggests that nonviolent environmental groups seek each other out over both large and short distances for communication and coordination, but violent

  7. The Spatial Properties of Radical Environmental Organizations in the UK: Do or Die!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almquist, Zack W; Bagozzi, Benjamin E

    2016-01-01

    Radical environmental groups and their members have a wide and varied agenda which often encompasses both local and global issues. In their efforts to call attention to environmental problems, communicate with like-minded groups, and mobilize support for their activities, radical environmental organizations also produce an enormous amount of text, which can be used to estimate the complex communications and task-based networks that underlie these organizations. Moreover, the tactics employed to garnish attention for these groups' agenda can range from peaceful activities such as information dissemination to violent activities such as fire-bombing buildings. To obtain these varied objectives, radical environmental organizations must harness their networks, which have an important spatial component that structures their ability to communicate, coordinate and act on any given agenda item. Here, we analyze a network built from communications and information provided by the semi-annual "Do or Die" (DoD) magazine published in the UK over a 10 year period in the late 1990s and early 2000s. We first employ structural topic model methods to discover violent and nonviolent actors within the larger environmental community. Using this designation, we then compare the spatial structure of these groups, finding that violent groups are especially likely to engage in coordination and/or communication if they are sufficiently close, but exhibit a quickly decreasing probability of interaction over even a few kilometers. Further, violent and nonviolent groups each have a higher probability of coordination with their own group than across groups over even short distances. In these respects, we see that violent groups are especially local in their organization and that their geographic reach is likely very limited. This suggests that nonviolent environmental groups seek each other out over both large and short distances for communication and coordination, but violent groups tend to be

  8. Spatial interpolation of hourly rainfall – effect of additional information, variogram inference and storm properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Verworn

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Hydrological modelling of floods relies on precipitation data with a high resolution in space and time. A reliable spatial representation of short time step rainfall is often difficult to achieve due to a low network density. In this study hourly precipitation was spatially interpolated with the multivariate geostatistical method kriging with external drift (KED using additional information from topography, rainfall data from the denser daily networks and weather radar data. Investigations were carried out for several flood events in the time period between 2000 and 2005 caused by different meteorological conditions. The 125 km radius around the radar station Ummendorf in northern Germany covered the overall study region. One objective was to assess the effect of different approaches for estimation of semivariograms on the interpolation performance of short time step rainfall. Another objective was the refined application of the method kriging with external drift. Special attention was not only given to find the most relevant additional information, but also to combine the additional information in the best possible way. A multi-step interpolation procedure was applied to better consider sub-regions without rainfall.

    The impact of different semivariogram types on the interpolation performance was low. While it varied over the events, an averaged semivariogram was sufficient overall. Weather radar data were the most valuable additional information for KED for convective summer events. For interpolation of stratiform winter events using daily rainfall as additional information was sufficient. The application of the multi-step procedure significantly helped to improve the representation of fractional precipitation coverage.

  9. Measuring the Mechanical Properties of Plant Cell Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes Vogler

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The size, shape and stability of a plant depend on the flexibility and integrity of its cell walls, which, at the same time, need to allow cell expansion for growth, while maintaining mechanical stability. Biomechanical studies largely vanished from the focus of plant science with the rapid progress of genetics and molecular biology since the mid-twentieth century. However, the development of more sensitive measurement tools renewed the interest in plant biomechanics in recent years, not only to understand the fundamental concepts of growth and morphogenesis, but also with regard to economically important areas in agriculture, forestry and the paper industry. Recent advances have clearly demonstrated that mechanical forces play a crucial role in cell and organ morphogenesis, which ultimately define plant morphology. In this article, we will briefly review the available methods to determine the mechanical properties of cell walls, such as atomic force microscopy (AFM and microindentation assays, and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. But we will focus on a novel methodological approach, called cellular force microscopy (CFM, and its automated successor, real-time CFM (RT-CFM.

  10. Delayed-matching-to-place Task in a Dry Maze to Measure Spatial Working Memory in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xi; Krukowski, Karen; Jopson, Timothy; Rosi, Susanna

    2017-07-05

    The delayed-matching-to-place (DMP) dry maze test is a variant of DMP water maze (Steele and Morris, 1999; Faizi et al. , 2012) which measures spatial working/episodic-like learning and memory that depends on both hippocampal and cortical functions (Wang and Morris, 2010; Euston et al. , 2012). Using this test we can detect normal aging related spatial working memory decline, as well as trauma induced working memory deficits. Furthermore, we recently reported that fractionated whole brain irradiation does not affect working memory in mice (Feng et al. , 2016). Here we describe the experimental setup and procedures of this behavioral test.

  11. In-situ optical and acoustical measurements of the buoyant cyanobacterium p. Rubescens: spatial and temporal distribution patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilmar Hofmann

    Full Text Available Optical (fluorescence and acoustic in-situ techniques were tested in their ability to measure the spatial and temporal distribution of plankton in freshwater ecosystems with special emphasis on the harmful and buoyant cyanobacterium P. rubescens. Fluorescence was measured with the multi-spectral FluoroProbe (Moldaenke FluoroProbe, MFP and a Seapoint Chlorophyll Fluorometer (SCF. In-situ measurements of the acoustic backscatter strength (ABS were conducted with three different acoustic devices covering multiple acoustic frequencies (614 kHz ADCP, 2 MHz ADP, and 6 MHz ADV. The MFP provides a fast and reliable technique to measure fluorescence at different wavelengths in situ, which allows discriminating between P. rubescens and other phytoplankton species. All three acoustic devices are sensitive to P. rubescens even if other scatterers, e.g., zooplankton or suspended sediment, are present in the water column, because P. rubescens containing gas vesicles has a strong density difference and hence acoustic contrast to the ambient water and other scatterers. After calibration, the combination of optical and acoustical measurements not only allows qualitative and quantitative observation of P. rubescens, but also distinction between P. rubescens, other phytoplankton, and zooplankton. As the measuring devices can sample in situ at high rates they enable assessment of plankton distributions at high temporal (minutes and spatial (decimeters resolution or covering large temporal (seasonal and spatial (basin scale scales.

  12. Spatial resolution properties in 3D fast spin-echo using variable refocusing flip angles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, Masanori; Mizukami, Shinya; Hata, Hirofumi; Sato, Mayumi; Komi, Syotaro; Miyati, Tosiaki; Nozaki, Atsushi

    2011-01-01

    A new 3-dimensional fast spin-echo (3D FSE) method that uses a variable refocusing flip angle technique has recently been applied to imaging. The imaging pulse sequence can inhibit T 2 decay by varying the refocusing flip angle. Use of a long echo train length allows acquisition of 3D T 2 -weighted images with less blurring in a short scan time. The smaller refocusing flip angle in the new 3D FSE method than in the conventional method can reduce the specific absorption rate. However, T 2 decay differs between the new and conventional 3D FSE methods, so the resolution properties of the 2 methods may differ. We investigated the resolution properties of the new 3D FSE method using a variable refocusing flip angle technique. Varying the refocusing flip angle resulted in different resolution properties for the new 3D FSE method compared to the conventional method, a difference particularly noticeable when the imaging parameters were set for obtaining proton density weighted images. (author)

  13. Biophysical network modeling of the dLGN circuit: Effects of cortical feedback on spatial response properties of relay cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Martínez-Cañada

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite half-a-century of research since the seminal work of Hubel and Wiesel, the role of the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN in shaping the visual signals is not properly understood. Placed on route from retina to primary visual cortex in the early visual pathway, a striking feature of the dLGN circuit is that both the relay cells (RCs and interneurons (INs not only receive feedforward input from retinal ganglion cells, but also a prominent feedback from cells in layer 6 of visual cortex. This feedback has been proposed to affect synchronicity and other temporal properties of the RC firing. It has also been seen to affect spatial properties such as the center-surround antagonism of thalamic receptive fields, i.e., the suppression of the response to very large stimuli compared to smaller, more optimal stimuli. Here we explore the spatial effects of cortical feedback on the RC response by means of a a comprehensive network model with biophysically detailed, single-compartment and multicompartment neuron models of RCs, INs and a population of orientation-selective layer 6 simple cells, consisting of pyramidal cells (PY. We have considered two different arrangements of synaptic feedback from the ON and OFF zones in the visual cortex to the dLGN: phase-reversed ('push-pull' and phase-matched ('push-push', as well as different spatial extents of the corticothalamic projection pattern. Our simulation results support that a phase-reversed arrangement provides a more effective way for cortical feedback to provide the increased center-surround antagonism seen in experiments both for flashing spots and, even more prominently, for patch gratings. This implies that ON-center RCs receive direct excitation from OFF-dominated cortical cells and indirect inhibitory feedback from ON-dominated cortical cells. The increased center-surround antagonism in the model is accompanied by spatial focusing, i.e., the maximum RC response occurs for smaller stimuli

  14. Biophysical network modeling of the dLGN circuit: Effects of cortical feedback on spatial response properties of relay cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Cañada, Pablo; Halnes, Geir; Fyhn, Marianne

    2018-01-01

    Despite half-a-century of research since the seminal work of Hubel and Wiesel, the role of the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) in shaping the visual signals is not properly understood. Placed on route from retina to primary visual cortex in the early visual pathway, a striking feature of the dLGN circuit is that both the relay cells (RCs) and interneurons (INs) not only receive feedforward input from retinal ganglion cells, but also a prominent feedback from cells in layer 6 of visual cortex. This feedback has been proposed to affect synchronicity and other temporal properties of the RC firing. It has also been seen to affect spatial properties such as the center-surround antagonism of thalamic receptive fields, i.e., the suppression of the response to very large stimuli compared to smaller, more optimal stimuli. Here we explore the spatial effects of cortical feedback on the RC response by means of a a comprehensive network model with biophysically detailed, single-compartment and multicompartment neuron models of RCs, INs and a population of orientation-selective layer 6 simple cells, consisting of pyramidal cells (PY). We have considered two different arrangements of synaptic feedback from the ON and OFF zones in the visual cortex to the dLGN: phase-reversed (‘push-pull’) and phase-matched (‘push-push’), as well as different spatial extents of the corticothalamic projection pattern. Our simulation results support that a phase-reversed arrangement provides a more effective way for cortical feedback to provide the increased center-surround antagonism seen in experiments both for flashing spots and, even more prominently, for patch gratings. This implies that ON-center RCs receive direct excitation from OFF-dominated cortical cells and indirect inhibitory feedback from ON-dominated cortical cells. The increased center-surround antagonism in the model is accompanied by spatial focusing, i.e., the maximum RC response occurs for smaller stimuli when

  15. Spatial and thickness dependence of coupling interaction of surface states and influence on transport and optical properties of few-layer Bi2Se3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhongjun; Chen, Shi; Sun, Jiuyu; Li, Xingxing; Qiu, Huaili; Yang, Jinlong

    2018-02-01

    Coupling interaction between the bottom and top surface electronic states and the influence on transport and optical properties of Bi2Se3 thin films with 1-8 quintuple layers (QLs) have been investigated by first principles calculations. Obvious spatial and thickness dependences of coupling interaction are found by analyzing hybridization of two surface states. In the thin film with a certain thickness, from the outer to inner atomic layers, the coupling interaction exhibits an increasing trend. On the other hand, as thickness increases, the coupling interaction shows a disproportionate decrease trend. Moreover, the system with 3 QLs exhibits stronger interaction than that with 2 QLs. The presence of coupling interaction would suppress destructive interference of surface states and enhance resistance in various degrees. In view of the inversely proportional relation to transport channel width, the resistance of thin films should show disproportionate thickness dependence. This prediction is qualitatively consistent with the transport measurements at low temperature. Furthermore, the optical properties also exhibit obvious thickness dependence. Especially as the thickness increases, the coupling interaction results in red and blue shifts of the multiple-peak structures in low and high energy regions of imaginary dielectric function, respectively. The red shift trend is in agreement with the recent experimental observation and the blue shift is firstly predicted by the present calculation. The present results give a concrete understanding of transport and optical properties in devices based on Bi2Se3 thin films with few QLs.

  16. Identification and Simulation as Tools for Measurement of Neuromuscular Properties

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kearney, R

    2001-01-01

    Quantitative, objective methods for the evaluation of neuromuscular properties are required for the diagnosis of neuromuscular disorders and the evaluation of the effectiveness of treatment and rehabilitation...

  17. Measuring the Impact of Road Rehabilitation on Spatial Market Efficiency in Maize Markets in Mozambique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cirera, Xavier; Arndt, Channing

    2008-01-01

    to the existing literature in three ways. First, a unique data set, where road rehabilitation episodes between market pairs are identified, is developed. Second, special care is devoted to estimation of transaction costs due to the sensitivity of the PBM model to the quality of transaction costs estimates......This article analyzes the impact of road rehabilitation on the spatial market efficiency of maize markets in Mozambique. We estimate a modified version of the Parity Bounds Model (PBM) that allows us to test the impact of road rehabilitation on spatial efficiency. This article seeks to contribute....... Finally, as opposed to most existing literature that focuses on relatively distant markets, the article focuses on spatially closed markets. We find that maize markets tend to be segmented due to high transport costs. Following road rehabilitation, inefficiency and average absolute price differentials...

  18. Resolving mass flux at high spatial and temporal resolution using GRACE intersatellite measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rowlands, D. D.; Luthcke, S. B.; Klosko, S. M.

    2005-01-01

    resolution. Using 4° × 4° blocks at 10-day intervals, we estimate the mass of surplus or deficit water over a 52° × 60° grid centered on the Amazon basin for July 2003. We demonstrate that the recovered signals are coherent and correlate well with the expected hydrological signal....... the estimation of static monthly parameters. Through an analysis of the GRACE data residuals, we show that the fundamental temporal and spatial resolution of the GRACE data is 10 days and 400 km. We present an approach similar in concept to altimetric methods that recovers submonthly mass flux at a high spatial...

  19. UAV measurements of aerosol properties at the Cyprus institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neitola, Kimmo; Sciare, Jean; Keleshis, Christos; Pikridas, Michael; Argyrides, Marios; Vouterakos, Panagiotis; Antoniou, Panyiota; Apostolou, Apostolos; Savvides, Constantinos; Vrekoussis, Mihalis; Mihalopoulos, Nikos; Biskos, George; Gao, Ru-Shan; Murphy, Daniel; Schrod, Jann; Weber, Daniel; Bingemer, Heinz; Mocnik, Grisa

    2017-04-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) provide a cost-effective and easy-to-use method to document the vertical profiles of aerosol particles and their physical and optical properties, within and above the boundary layer. These observations combined with satellite and ground data together can provide important information and model constrains regarding the impact of aerosols on the air quality and regional climate. Cyprus is a unique place to observe long-range transported pollution and dust originating from different areas (Europe, Africa, Turkey, and Middle East) and perform such aerosol profiling. The USRL team at the Cyprus Institute has recently started weekly routine flights with a newly developed UAV fleet to build a unique dataset of vertical profile observations. Instrumentation on the UAVs includes miniature Scanning Aerosol Sun Photometer (miniSASP, Murphy et al., 2015), Printed Optical Particle Spectrometer (POPS, Gao et al., 2016), Ice nuclei sampler (IN) and Dual Wavelength absorption Prototype (DWP) together with the measured meteorological parameters (P, T and RH). The UAV fleet is still expanding, as well as the instrumentation, and preliminary test flights have led to very promising results. The UAV ascend up to approximately the middle of the boundary layer, defined by LIDAR measurements at Limassol, where the UAV will fly on one altitude for several minutes ensuring stable data collection. After flying on one altitude, the UAV will continue ascending above the boundary layer, where another level flight will take place for data gathering, before descending for safe landing. The miniSASP measures the sun irradiance and sky radiance at four wavelengths (460, 550, 670 and 680nm) by doing continuous almucantar scans every 30 s. The instrument installation compensates for the pitch and roll of the UAV with 4 Hz frequency. For this reason, the flights are designed to maintain level flight conditions, to ensure proper data acquisition, and to obtain data from

  20. Motor properties from persistence: a linear molecular walker lacking spatial and temporal asymmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuckermann, Martin J; Forde, Nancy R; Angstmann, Christopher N; Schmitt, Regina; Linke, Heiner; Blab, Gerhard A; Bromley, Elizabeth HC; Curmi, Paul MG

    2015-01-01

    The stepping direction of linear molecular motors is usually defined by a spatial asymmetry of the motor, its track, or both. Here we present a model for a molecular walker that undergoes biased directional motion along a symmetric track in the presence of a temporally symmetric chemical cycle. Instead of using asymmetry, directionality is achieved by persistence. At small load force the walker can take on average thousands of steps in a given direction until it stochastically reverses direction. We discuss a specific experimental implementation of a synthetic motor based on this design and find, using Langevin and Monte Carlo simulations, that a realistic walker can work against load forces on the order of picoNewtons with an efficiency of ∼18%, comparable to that of kinesin. In principle, the walker can be turned into a permanent motor by externally monitoring the walker’s momentary direction of motion, and using feedback to adjust the direction of a load force. We calculate the thermodynamic cost of using feedback to enhance motor performance in terms of the Shannon entropy, and find that it reduces the efficiency of a realistic motor only marginally. We discuss the implications for natural protein motor performance in the context of the strong performance of this design based only on a thermal ratchet. (paper)

  1. One-dimensional Tamm plasmons: Spatial confinement, propagation, and polarization properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chestnov, I. Yu.; Sedov, E. S.; Kutrovskaya, S. V.; Kucherik, A. O.; Arakelian, S. M.; Kavokin, A. V.

    2017-12-01

    Tamm plasmons are confined optical states at the interface of a metal and a dielectric Bragg mirror. Unlike conventional surface plasmons, Tamm plasmons may be directly excited by an external light source in both TE and TM polarizations. Here we consider the one-dimensional propagation of Tamm plasmons under long and narrow metallic stripes deposited on top of a semiconductor Bragg mirror. The spatial confinement of the field imposed by the stripe and its impact on the structure and energy of Tamm modes are investigated. We show that the Tamm modes are coupled to surface plasmons arising at the stripe edges. These plasmons form an interference pattern close to the bottom surface of the stripe that involves modification of both the energy and loss rate for the Tamm mode. This phenomenon is pronounced only in the case of TE polarization of the Tamm mode. These findings pave the way to application of laterally confined Tamm plasmons in optical integrated circuits as well as to engineering potential traps for both Tamm modes and hybrid modes of Tamm plasmons and exciton polaritons with meV depth.

  2. Technical Note: Measuring contrast- and noise-dependent spatial resolution of an iterative reconstruction method in CT using ensemble averaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Lifeng, E-mail: yu.lifeng@mayo.edu; Vrieze, Thomas J.; Leng, Shuai; Fletcher, Joel G.; McCollough, Cynthia H. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: The spatial resolution of iterative reconstruction (IR) in computed tomography (CT) is contrast- and noise-dependent because of the nonlinear regularization. Due to the severe noise contamination, it is challenging to perform precise spatial-resolution measurements at very low-contrast levels. The purpose of this study was to measure the spatial resolution of a commercially available IR method using ensemble-averaged images acquired from repeated scans. Methods: A low-contrast phantom containing three rods (7, 14, and 21 HU below background) was scanned on a 128-slice CT scanner at three dose levels (CTDI{sub vol} = 16, 8, and 4 mGy). Images were reconstructed using two filtered-backprojection (FBP) kernels (B40 and B20) and a commercial IR method (sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction, SAFIRE, Siemens Healthcare) with two strength settings (I40-3 and I40-5). The same scan was repeated 100 times at each dose level. The modulation transfer function (MTF) was calculated based on the edge profile measured on the ensemble-averaged images. Results: The spatial resolution of the two FBP kernels, B40 and B20, remained relatively constant across contrast and dose levels. However, the spatial resolution of the two IR kernels degraded relative to FBP as contrast or dose level decreased. For a given dose level at 16 mGy, the MTF{sub 50%} value normalized to the B40 kernel decreased from 98.4% at 21 HU to 88.5% at 7 HU for I40-3 and from 97.6% to 82.1% for I40-5. At 21 HU, the relative MTF{sub 50%} value decreased from 98.4% at 16 mGy to 90.7% at 4 mGy for I40-3 and from 97.6% to 85.6% for I40-5. Conclusions: A simple technique using ensemble averaging from repeated CT scans can be used to measure the spatial resolution of IR techniques in CT at very low contrast levels. The evaluated IR method degraded the spatial resolution at low contrast and high noise levels.

  3. Using {sup 137}Cs measurements to investigate the influence of erosion and soil redistribution on soil properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, P. [School of Geography, Beijing Normal University, Beijing (China); Geography, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, Amory Building, Rennes Drive, Exeter, EX4 4RJ, Devon (United Kingdom); Walling, D.E., E-mail: d.e.walling@exeter.ac.u [Geography, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, Amory Building, Rennes Drive, Exeter, EX4 4RJ, Devon (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-15

    Information on the interaction between soil erosion and soil properties is an important requirement for sustainable management of the soil resource. The relationship between soil properties and the soil redistribution rate, reflecting both erosion and deposition, is an important indicator of this interaction. This relationship is difficult to investigate using traditional approaches to documenting soil redistribution rates involving erosion plots and predictive models. However, the use of the fallout radionuclide {sup 137}Cs to document medium-term soil redistribution rates offers a means of overcoming many of the limitations associated with traditional approaches. The study reported sought to demonstrate the potential for using {sup 137}Cs measurements to assess the influence of soil erosion and redistribution on soil properties (particle size composition, total C, macronutrients N, P, K and Mg, micronutrients Mn, Mo, Fe, Cu and Zn and other elements, including Ti and As). {sup 137}Cs measurements undertaken on 52 soil cores collected within a 7 ha cultivated field located near Colebrooke in Devon, UK were used to establish the magnitude and spatial pattern of medium-term soil redistribution rates within the field. The soil redistribution rates documented for the individual sampling points within the field ranged from an erosion rate of -12.9 t ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1} to a deposition rate of 19.2 t ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1}. Composite samples of surface soil (0-5 cm) were collected immediately adjacent to each coring point and these samples were analysed for a range of soil properties. Individual soil properties associated with these samples showed significant variability, with CV values generally lying in the range 10-30%. The relationships between the surface soil properties and the soil redistribution rate were analysed. This analysis demonstrated statistically significant relationships between some soil properties (total phosphorus, % clay, Ti and As) and the soil

  4. Spatial filtring and thermocouple spatial filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Bing; Tong Yunxian

    1989-12-01

    The design and study on thermocouple spatial filter have been conducted for the flow measurement of integrated reactor coolant. The fundamental principle of spatial filtring, mathematical descriptions and analyses of thermocouple spatial filter are given

  5. The measurement of collaboration within healthcare settings: a systematic review of measurement properties of instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Stephen John; Stern, Cindy; Robertson-Malt, Suzanne

    2016-04-01

    There is a growing call by consumers and governments for healthcare to adopt systems and approaches to care to improve patient safety. Collaboration within healthcare settings is an important factor for improving systems of care. By using validated measurement instruments a standardized approach to assessing collaboration is possible, otherwise it is only an assumption that collaboration is occurring in any healthcare setting. The objective of this review was to evaluate and compare measurement properties of instruments that measure collaboration within healthcare settings, specifically those which have been psychometrically tested and validated. Participants could be healthcare professionals, the patient or any non-professional who contributes to a patient's care, for example, family members, chaplains or orderlies. The term participant type means the designation of any one participant; for example 'nurse', 'social worker' or 'administrator'. More than two participant types was mandatory. The focus of this review was the validity of tools used to measure collaboration within healthcare settings. The types of studies considered for inclusion were validation studies, but quantitative study designs such as randomized controlled trials, controlled trials and case studies were also eligible for inclusion. Studies that focused on Interprofessional Education, were published as an abstract only, contained patient self-reporting only or were not about care delivery were excluded. The outcome of interest was validation and interpretability of the instrument being assessed and included content validity, construct validity and reliability. Interpretability is characterized by statistics such as mean and standard deviation which can be translated to a qualitative meaning. The search strategy aimed to find both published and unpublished studies. A three-step search strategy was utilized in this review. The databases searched included PubMed, CINAHL, Embase, Cochrane Central

  6. Patient-specific quantification of image quality: An automated method for measuring spatial resolution in clinical CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, Jeremiah, E-mail: jeremiah.sanders@duke.edu [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Hurwitz, Lynne [Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Samei, Ehsan [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Departments of Physics, Biomedical Engineering, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Purpose: To develop and validate an automated technique for evaluating the spatial resolution characteristics of clinical computed tomography (CT) images. Methods: Twenty one chest and abdominopelvic clinical CT datasets were examined in this study. An algorithm was developed to extract a CT resolution index (RI) analogous to the modulation transfer function from clinical CT images by measuring the edge-spread function (ESF) across the patient’s skin. A polygon mesh of the air-skin boundary was created. The faces of the mesh were then used to measure the ESF across the air-skin interface. The ESF was differentiated to obtain the line-spread function (LSF), and the LSF was Fourier transformed to obtain the RI. The algorithm’s ability to detect the radial dependence of the RI was investigated. RIs measured with the proposed method were compared with a conventional phantom-based method across two reconstruction algorithms (FBP and iterative) using the spatial frequency at 50% RI, f{sub 50}, as the metric for comparison. Three reconstruction kernels were investigated for each reconstruction algorithm. Finally, an observer study was conducted to determine if observers could visually perceive the differences in the measured blurriness of images reconstructed with a given reconstruction method. Results: RI measurements performed with the proposed technique exhibited the expected dependencies on the image reconstruction. The measured f{sub 50} values increased with harder kernels for both FBP and iterative reconstruction. Furthermore, the proposed algorithm was able to detect the radial dependence of the RI. Patient-specific measurements of the RI were comparable to the phantom-based technique, but the patient data exhibited a large spread in the measured f{sub 50}, indicating that some datasets were blurrier than others even when the projection data were reconstructed with the same reconstruction algorithm and kernel. Results from the observer study substantiated this

  7. Investigations on spatial sound design based on measured room impulse responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melchior, F.

    2011-01-01

    Developments in the area of spatial sound reproduction have led to a large variety of established audio systems. Systems based on stereophonic principles are extended and growing from two channels via the ITU-R BS.775 surround setup to larger systems with more channels including elevated

  8. Variability in results from negative binomial models for Lyme disease measured at different spatial scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Phoebe; Waller, Lance

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease has been the subject of many studies due to increasing incidence rates year after year and the severe complications that can arise in later stages of the disease. Negative binomial models have been used to model Lyme disease in the past with some success. However, there has been little focus on the reliability and consistency of these models when they are used to study Lyme disease at multiple spatial scales. This study seeks to explore how sensitive/consistent negative binomial models are when they are used to study Lyme disease at different spatial scales (at the regional and sub-regional levels). The study area includes the thirteen states in the Northeastern United States with the highest Lyme disease incidence during the 2002-2006 period. Lyme disease incidence at county level for the period of 2002-2006 was linked with several previously identified key landscape and climatic variables in a negative binomial regression model for the Northeastern region and two smaller sub-regions (the New England sub-region and the Mid-Atlantic sub-region). This study found that negative binomial models, indeed, were sensitive/inconsistent when used at different spatial scales. We discuss various plausible explanations for such behavior of negative binomial models. Further investigation of the inconsistency and sensitivity of negative binomial models when used at different spatial scales is important for not only future Lyme disease studies and Lyme disease risk assessment/management but any study that requires use of this model type in a spatial context. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Estimation of spatial variability of lignite mine dumping ground soil properties using CPTu results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagińska Irena

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with application of CPTu test results for the probabilistic modeling of dumping grounds. The statistical measures use results from 42 CPT test points located in the lignite mine dumping ground from the region of Central Europe. Both the tip resistance qc as well as local friction fs are tested. Based on the mean values and standard deviations of measured quantities the specific zones in the dumping site profile are distinguished. For three main zones standard deviations of linearly de-trended functions, distributions of normalized de-trended values for qc and fs are examined. Also the vertical scales of fluctuation for both measured quantities are estimated. The obtained result shows that lignite mine dumping site can be successfully described with the Random Field Theory. Additional use of fs values introduces supplementary statistical information.

  10. Microphysical Properties of Frozen Particles Inferred from Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Microwave Imager (GMI) Polarimetric Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jie; Wu, Dongliang

    2017-01-01

    Scattering differences induced by frozen particle microphysical properties are investigated, using the vertically (V) and horizontally (H) polarized radiances from the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Microwave Imager (GMI) 89 and 166GHz channels. It is the first study on global frozen particle microphysical properties that uses the dual-frequency microwave polarimetric signals. From the ice cloud scenes identified by the 183.3 3GHz channel brightness temperature (TB), we find that the scatterings of frozen particles are highly polarized with V-H polarimetric differences (PD) being positive throughout the tropics and the winter hemisphere mid-latitude jet regions, including PDs from the GMI 89 and 166GHz TBs, as well as the PD at 640GHz from the ER-2 Compact Scanning Submillimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (CoSSIR) during the TC4 campaign. Large polarization dominantly occurs mostly near convective outflow region (i.e., anvils or stratiform precipitation), while the polarization signal is small inside deep convective cores as well as at the remote cirrus region. Neglecting the polarimetric signal would result in as large as 30 error in ice water path retrievals. There is a universal bell-curve in the PD TB relationship, where the PD amplitude peaks at 10K for all three channels in the tropics and increases slightly with latitude. Moreover, the 166GHz PD tends to increase in the case where a melting layer is beneath the frozen particles aloft in the atmosphere, while 89GHz PD is less sensitive than 166GHz to the melting layer. This property creates a unique PD feature for the identification of the melting layer and stratiform rain with passive sensors. Horizontally oriented non-spherical frozen particles are thought to produce the observed PD because of different ice scattering properties in the V and H polarizations. On the other hand, changes in the ice microphysical habitats or orientation due to turbulence mixing can also lead to a reduced PD in the deep

  11. Spectral and Spatial UV Sky Radiance Measurements at a Seaside Resort Under Clear Sky and Slightly Overcast Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandmann, Henner; Stick, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Spatial measurements of the diffusely scattered sky radiance at a seaside resort under clear sky and slightly overcast conditions have been used to calculate the sky radiance distribution across the upper hemisphere. The measurements were done in the summer season when solar UV radiation is highest. The selected wavelengths were 307, 350 and 550 nm representing the UVB, UVA and VIS band. Absolute values of radiance differ considerably between the wavelengths. Normalizing the measured values by use of direct solar radiance made the spatial distributions of unequal sky radiance comparable. The results convey a spatial impression of the different distributions of the radiance at the three wavelengths. Relative scattered radiance intensity is one order of magnitude greater in UVB than in VIS, whereas in UVA lies roughly in between. Under slightly overcast conditions scattered radiance is increased at all three wavelengths by about one order of magnitude. These measurements taken at the seaside underline the importance of diffuse scattered radiance. The effect of shading parts of the sky can be estimated from the distribution of sky radiance. This knowledge might be useful for sun seekers and in the treatment of people staying at the seaside for therapeutic purposes. © 2013 The American Society of Photobiology.

  12. Critical electrode size in measurement of d33 coefficient of films via spatial distribution of piezoelectric displacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhihong; Miao Jianmin

    2008-01-01

    Spatial distributions of piezoelectric displacement response across the top electrode have been used in this paper to measure the piezoelectric coefficient d 33 of films based on the converse piezoelectric effect. The technical details and features of a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer have been summarized and discussed for accurately obtaining the spatial displacement distributions. Three definitions, including the apparent, the effective and the constrained piezoelectric coefficient d 33 of films, have been clarified and used to better understand the fundamental phenomenon behind the measured displacement distributions. Finite element analysis reveals that both the apparent and the effective piezoelectric coefficients depend on the electrode radius of test capacitor as well as film thickness. However, there exists a critical electrode size for apparent piezoelectric coefficients and a critical test capacitor aspect ratio for effective piezoelectric coefficient. Beyond their respective critical values, both coefficients converge to the constrained piezoelectric coefficient irrespective of film thickness. The finding of the critical electric size makes it possible to consistently measure the constrained piezoelectric coefficient of films by using the spatial distributions of the piezoelectric displacement response and becomes the fundamental criterion of this measurement method

  13. Statistical spatial properties of speckle patterns generated by multiple laser beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Cain, A.; Sajer, J. M.; Riazuelo, G.

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates hot spot characteristics generated by the superposition of multiple laser beams. First, properties of speckle statistics are studied in the context of only one laser beam by computing the autocorrelation function. The case of multiple laser beams is then considered. In certain conditions, it is shown that speckles have an ellipsoidal shape. Analytical expressions of hot spot radii generated by multiple laser beams are derived and compared to numerical estimates made from the autocorrelation function. They are also compared to numerical simulations performed within the paraxial approximation. Excellent agreement is found for the speckle width as well as for the speckle length. Application to the speckle patterns generated in the Laser MegaJoule configuration in the zone where all the beams overlap is presented. Influence of polarization on the size of the speckles as well as on their abundance is studied.

  14. Measurement properties of performance-based measures to assess physical function in hip and knee osteoarthritis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, F; Hinman, R S; Hall, M; Terwee, C B; Roos, E M; Bennell, K L

    2012-12-01

    To systematically review the measurement properties of performance-based measures to assess physical function in people with hip and/or knee osteoarthritis (OA). Electronic searches were performed in MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, and PsycINFO up to the end of June 2012. Two reviewers independently rated measurement properties using the consensus-based standards for the selection of health status measurement instrument (COSMIN). "Best evidence synthesis" was made using COSMIN outcomes and the quality of findings. Twenty-four out of 1792 publications were eligible for inclusion. Twenty-one performance-based measures were evaluated including 15 single-activity measures and six multi-activity measures. Measurement properties evaluated included internal consistency (three measures), reliability (16 measures), measurement error (14 measures), validity (nine measures), responsiveness (12 measures) and interpretability (three measures). A positive rating was given to only 16% of possible measurement ratings. Evidence for the majority of measurement properties of tests reported in the review has yet to be determined. On balance of the limited evidence, the 40 m self-paced test was the best rated walk test, the 30 s-chair stand test and timed up and go test were the best rated sit to stand tests, and the Stratford battery, Physical Activity Restrictions and Functional Assessment System were the best rated multi-activity measures. Further good quality research investigating measurement properties of performance measures, including responsiveness and interpretability in people with hip and/or knee OA, is needed. Consensus on which combination of measures will best assess physical function in people with hip/and or knee OA is urgently required. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Human tissue optical properties measurements and light propagation modelling

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dam, JS

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Biomedical Optics is the study of the optical properties of living biological material, especially its scattering and absorption characteristics, and their significance to light propagation within the material. Determination of tissue optical...

  16. Studies of Protein Solution Properties Using Osmotic Pressure Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agena, S.; Bogle, David; Pusey, Marc; Agena, S.

    1998-01-01

    Examination of the protein crystallization process involves investigation of the liquid and solid state and a protein's properties in these states. Liquid state studies such as protein self association in solution by light scattering methods or other methods have been used to examine a protein Is properties and therefore its crystallization process and conditions. Likewise can osmotic pressure data be used to examine protein properties and various published osmotic pressure studies were examined by us to correlate osmotic pressure to protein solution properties. The solution behavior of serum albumin, alpha - chymotrypsin, beta - lactoglobulin and ovalbumin was examined over a range of temperatures, pH values and different salt types and concentrations. Using virial expansion and a local composition model the non ideal solution behavior in form of the activity coefficients (thermodynamic) was described for the systems. This protein activity coefficient data was related to a protein's solubility behavior and this process and the results will be presented.

  17. Ground-based SMART-COMMIT Measurements for Studying Aerosol and Cloud Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsay, Si-Chee

    2008-01-01

    From radiometric principles, it is expected that the retrieved properties of extensive aerosols and clouds from reflected/emitted measurements by satellite (and/or aircraft) should be consistent with those retrieved from transmitted/emitted radiance observed at the surface. Although space-borne remote sensing observations cover large spatial domain, they are often plagued by contamination of surface signatures. Thus, ground-based in-situ and remote-sensing measurements, where signals come directly from atmospheric constituents, the sun, and/or the Earth-atmosphere interactions, provide additional information content for comparisons that confirm quantitatively the usefulness of the integrated surface, aircraft, and satellite data sets. The development and deployment of SMARTCOMMIT (Surface-sensing Measurements for Atmospheric Radiative Transfer - Chemical, Optical & Microphysical Measurements of In-situ Troposphere) mobile facilities are aimed for the optimal utilization of collocated ground-based observations as constraints to yield higher fidelity satellite retrievals and to determine any sampling bias due to target conditions. To quantify the energetics of the surface-atmosphere system and the atmospheric processes, SMART-COMMIT instruments fall into three categories: flux radiometer, radiance sensor and in-situ probe. In this paper, we will demonstrate the capability of SMART-COMMIT in recent field campaigns (e.g., CRYSTAL-FACE, UAE 2, BASEASIA, NAMMA) that were designed and executed to study the compelling variability in temporal scale of both anthropogenic and natural aerosols (e.g., biomass-burning smoke, airborne dust) and cirrus clouds. We envision robust approaches in which well-collocated ground-based measurements and space-borne observations will greatly advance our knowledge of extensive aerosols and clouds.

  18. Compilations of measured and calculated physicochemical property values for PCBs, PBDEs, PCDDs and PAHs

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The dataset consists of compilations of measured and calculated physicochemical property values for PCBs, PBDEs, PCDDs and PAHs. The properties included in this...

  19. Measurement of Deterioration of Frying Oil Using Electrical Properties

    OpenAIRE

    羽倉, 義雄; 佐々木, 芳浩; 鈴木, 寛一

    2006-01-01

    In this study, the relationship between the electrical properties of frying oil (relative dielectric constant and conductance) and its deterioration indicators (acid value, amounts of polymerized triacylglycerols and chromaticity) were examined, focusing on the changes in electrical properties that accompany deterioration. The samples of frying oil used in this experiment were collected from fried food processing sites (school, hospital and factory feeding centers) and were collected at closi...

  20. Spatial Distribution Analysis of Soil Properties in Varzaneh Region of Isfahan Using Image Processing Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mahmoodi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Use of remote sensing for soil assessment and monitoring started with the launch of the first Landsat satellite. Since then many other polar orbiting Earth-observation satellites such as the Landsat series, have been launched and their imagery have been used for a wide range of soil mapping. The broad swaths and regular revisit frequencies of these multispectral satellites mean that they can be used to rapidly detect changes in soil properties. Arid and semi-arid lands cover more than 70 percent of Iran and are very prone to desertification. Due to the broadness, remoteness, and harsh condition of these lands, soil studies using ground-based techniques appear to be limited. Remote sensing imagery with its cost and time-effectiveness has been suggested and used as an alternative approach for more than four decades. Flood irrigation is one of the most common techniques in Isfahan province in which 70% of water is lost through evaporation. This system has increased soil salinization and desert-like conditions in the region. For principled decision making on agricultural product management, combating desertification and its consequences and better use of production resources to achieve sustainable development; understanding and knowledge of the origin, amount and area of salinity, the percentage of calcite, gypsum and other mineral of soil in each region is essential. Therefore, this study aimed to map the physical and chemical characteristics of soils in Vazaneh region of Isfahan province, Iran. Materials and Methods : Varzaneh region with 75000 ha located in central Iran and lies between latitudes 3550234 N and 3594309 N and longitudes 626530 E to 658338 E. The climate in the study area is characterized by hot summers and cold winters. The mean daily maximum temperature ranges from 35°C in summer to approximately 17°C in winter and mean daily minimum temperature ranges from 5°C in summer to about -24.5°C in winter. The mean

  1. Measurements of radiative material properties for astrophysical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, James E.

    2010-01-01

    The new generation of z-pinch, laser, and XFEL facilities opens the possibility to produce astrophysically-relevant laboratory plasmas with energy densities beyond what was previously possible. Furthermore, macroscopic plasmas with uniform conditions can now be created, enabling more accurate determination of the material properties. This presentation will provide an overview of our research at the Z facility investigating stellar interior opacities, AGN warm-absorber photoionized plasmas, and white dwarf photospheres. Atomic physics in plasmas heavily influence these topics. Stellar opacities are an essential ingredient of stellar models and they affect what we know about the structure and evolution of stars. Opacity models have become highly sophisticated, but laboratory tests have not been done at the conditions existing inside stars. Our research is presently focused on measuring Fe at conditions relevant to the base of the solar convection zone, where the electron temperature and density are believed to be 190 eV and 9 x 10 22 e/cc, respectively. The second project is aimed at testing atomic kinetics models for photoionized plasmas. Photoionization is an important process in many astrophysical plasmas and the spectral signatures are routinely used to infer astrophysical object's characteristics. However, the spectral synthesis models at the heart of these interpretations have been the subject of very limited experimental tests. Our current research examines photoionization of neon plasma subjected to radiation flux similar to the warm absorber that surrounds active galactic nuclei. The third project is a recent initiative aimed at producing a white dwarf photosphere in the laboratory. Emergent spectra from the photosphere are used to infer the star's effective temperature and surface gravity. The results depend on knowledge of H, He, and C spectral line profiles under conditions where complex physics such as quasi-molecule formation may be important. These

  2. The Temporal and Spatial Variability of the Confined Aquifer Head and Storage Properties in the San Luis Valley, Colorado Inferred From Multiple InSAR Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jingyi; Knight, Rosemary; Zebker, Howard A.

    2017-11-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data from multiple satellite missions were combined to study the temporal and spatial variability of head and storage properties in a confined aquifer system on a decadal time scale. The area of study was a 4,500 km2 agricultural basin in the San Luis Valley (SLV), Colorado. We had available previous analyses of C-band ERS-1/2 data from June 1992 to November 2000, and L-band ALOS PALSAR data from October 2009 to March 2011. We used C-band Envisat data to fill in the time period from November 2006 to July 2010. In processing the Envisat data, we successfully employed a phase interpolation between persistent scatterer pixels to reduce the impact of vegetation decorrelation, which can significantly reduce the quality of C-band InSAR data over agricultural basins. In comparing the results from the L-band ALOS data and C-band Envisat data in a 10 month overlapping time period, we found that the shorter wavelength of C-band InSAR allowed us to preserve small deformation signals that were not detectable using L-band ALOS data. A significant result was the finding that the elastic storage properties of the SLV confined aquifer system remained stable over the 20 year time period and vary slowly in space, allowing us to combine InSAR data acquired from multiple missions to fill the temporal and spatial gaps in well data. The InSAR estimated head levels were validated with well measurements, which indicate little permanent water-storage loss over the study time period in the SLV.

  3. The cost of travel time variability: three measures with properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelson, Leonid; Fosgerau, Mogens

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the relationships between three types of measures of the cost of travel time variability: measures based on scheduling preferences and implicit departure time choice, Bernoulli type measures based on a univariate function of travel time, and mean-dispersion measures. We...

  4. Geostatistical mapping of Cs-137 contamination depth in building structures by integrating ISOCS measurements of different spatial supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boden, S.; Jacques, D. [Institute for Environment, Health and Safety, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK-CEN), Boeretang 200, BE-2400, Mol (Belgium); Rogiers, B. [Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences, KU Leuven - University of Leuven Celestijnenlaan 200e - bus 2410, BE-3001, Leuven (Belgium)

    2013-07-01

    Reliable methods to determine the contamination depth in nuclear building structures are very much needed for minimizing the radioactive waste volume and the decontamination workload. This paper investigates the geostatistical integration of in situ gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements of different spatial supports. A case study is presented from the BR3 decommissioning project, yielding an estimated reduction of waste volume of ∼35%, and recommendations are made for future application of the proposed methodology. (authors)

  5. Using GPS TEC measurements to probe ionospheric spatial spectra at mid-latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, E. H.; Parker, P. A.; Light, M. E.; Carrano, C. S.; Debchoudhury, S.; Haaser, R. A.

    2017-12-01

    The physics of how random ionospheric structure causes signal degradation is well understood as weak forward scattering through an effective diffraction grating created by plasma irregularities in the ionosphere. However, the spatial scale spectrum of those irregularities required for input into scintillation models and models of traveling ionospheric disturbances is poorly characterized, particularly at the kilometer to tens of kilometer scale lengths important for very-high-frequency (VHF) scintillation prediction. Furthermore, the majority of characterization studies have been performed in low-latitude or high-latitude regions where geomagnetic activity dominates the physical processes. At mid-latitudes, tropospheric and geomagnetic phenomena compete in disturbing the ionosphere, and it is not well understood how these multiple sources affect the drivers that influence the spatial spectrum. In this study, we are interested in mid-latitude electron density irregularities on the order of 10s of kilometers that would affect VHF signals. Data from the GPS networks Japan GEONET and the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO, UNAVCO) in the western United States were analyzed for this study. Japan GEONET is a dense network of GPS receivers (station spacing of tens of km), with fairly evenly spaced positions over all of Japan. The PBO, on the other hand, has several pockets of extremely dense coverage (station spacing within a few km), but is less dense on average. We analyze a day with a large solar storm (2015/03/17, St. Patrick's Day Storm) to allow high scintillation potential at mid-latitudes, a day with low geomagnetic activity and low thunderstorm activity (2016/01/31), and a day with low geomagnetic activity and high thunderstorm activity (2015/08/02). We then perform two-dimensional spatial analyses on the TEC data from these two networks on scale lengths of 20 to 200 km to infer the spatial scale spectra.

  6. High and low temperatures have unequal reinforcing properties in Drosophila spatial learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zars, Melissa; Zars, Troy

    2006-07-01

    Small insects regulate their body temperature solely through behavior. Thus, sensing environmental temperature and implementing an appropriate behavioral strategy can be critical for survival. The fly Drosophila melanogaster prefers 24 degrees C, avoiding higher and lower temperatures when tested on a temperature gradient. Furthermore, temperatures above 24 degrees C have negative reinforcing properties. In contrast, we found that flies have a preference in operant learning experiments for a low-temperature-associated position rather than the 24 degrees C alternative in the heat-box. Two additional differences between high- and low-temperature reinforcement, i.e., temperatures above and below 24 degrees C, were found. Temperatures equally above and below 24 degrees C did not reinforce equally and only high temperatures supported increased memory performance with reversal conditioning. Finally, low- and high-temperature reinforced memories are similarly sensitive to two genetic mutations. Together these results indicate the qualitative meaning of temperatures below 24 degrees C depends on the dynamics of the temperatures encountered and that the reinforcing effects of these temperatures depend on at least some common genetic components. Conceptualizing these results using the Wolf-Heisenberg model of operant conditioning, we propose the maximum difference in experienced temperatures determines the magnitude of the reinforcement input to a conditioning circuit.

  7. Relationships Among Peripheral and Central Electrophysiological Measures of Spatial and Spectral Selectivity and Speech Perception in Cochlear Implant Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheperle, Rachel A; Abbas, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    The ability to perceive speech is related to the listener's ability to differentiate among frequencies (i.e., spectral resolution). Cochlear implant (CI) users exhibit variable speech-perception and spectral-resolution abilities, which can be attributed in part to the extent of electrode interactions at the periphery (i.e., spatial selectivity). However, electrophysiological measures of peripheral spatial selectivity have not been found to correlate with speech perception. The purpose of this study was to evaluate auditory processing at the periphery and cortex using both simple and spectrally complex stimuli to better understand the stages of neural processing underlying speech perception. The hypotheses were that (1) by more completely characterizing peripheral excitation patterns than in previous studies, significant correlations with measures of spectral selectivity and speech perception would be observed, (2) adding information about processing at a level central to the auditory nerve would account for additional variability in speech perception, and (3) responses elicited with spectrally complex stimuli would be more strongly correlated with speech perception than responses elicited with spectrally simple stimuli. Eleven adult CI users participated. Three experimental processor programs (MAPs) were created to vary the likelihood of electrode interactions within each participant. For each MAP, a subset of 7 of 22 intracochlear electrodes was activated: adjacent (MAP 1), every other (MAP 2), or every third (MAP 3). Peripheral spatial selectivity was assessed using the electrically evoked compound action potential (ECAP) to obtain channel-interaction functions for all activated electrodes (13 functions total). Central processing was assessed by eliciting the auditory change complex with both spatial (electrode pairs) and spectral (rippled noise) stimulus changes. Speech-perception measures included vowel discrimination and the Bamford-Kowal-Bench Speech

  8. Measurement of seasonal changes and spatial variations in pavement unbound base and subgrade properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Soils often undergo cyclic wetting/drying, but there is very limited research on unsaturated : soils subjected to variations in moisture content. More specifically, field moisture variation : over time in highway unbound bases and subgrade soils is a...

  9. A measurement based analysis of the spatial distribution, temporal variation and chemical composition of particulate matter in Munich and Augsburg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Schäfer

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the studies presented in this paper is to present an analysis of spatial distribution and temporal variation of particulate matter in Munich and Augsburg, Germany, and to identify and discuss the factors determining the aerosol pollution in both areas. Surface-based in-situ and remote sensing measurements of particle mass and particle size distribution have been performed in, around, and above the two cities. Two measurement campaigns were conducted in Munich, one in late spring and one in winter 2003. Another campaign has been on-going in Augsburg since 2004. Spatial and temporal variations are analyzed from this data (PM10, PM2.5, and PM1. There are higher particle mass concentrations at the urban site than at the surrounding rural sites, especially in winter. No significant difference in the major ionic composition of the particles between the urban and the rural site was detected. This is considered to be related to the spatial distribution of secondary inorganic aerosol that is more homogeneous than aerosol resulting from other sources like traffic or urban releases in general. During the measurement campaigns mixing layer heights were determined continuously by remote sensing (SODAR, ceilometer, RASS. Significant dependence of particle size distribution and particle mass concentration on mixing layer height was found. This finding paves the way to new applications of satellite remote sensing products.

  10. Measurement and calculation of spatial and energetic neutron flux in the IEA-R1 reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bittelli, U.D.

    1988-01-01

    This work presents spatial and energetic flux distribution measured in the IEA-R1 reactor core. The thermal neutron flux was measured by gold activation foils (bare and covered with cadmium) in the fuel element number 108 (reaction: 197 Au(n,γ) 198 Au) at 451W overall reactor power. The fast neutron flux was measured by indium activation foils (reaction: 115 In(n,n') 115m In) in the fuel elements number 94 at 4510W overall reactor power. The neutron energy spectrum was adjusted by SAND II code with the data produced by the irradiation of seven activation detectors in the fuel element number 94 at 4510 W overall reactor power. The following reactions were used: 58 Fe(n,γ) 59 Fe, 232 Th(n,γ) 233 Th, 197 Au(n,γ) 198 Au, 59 Co(n,γ) 60 Co, 54 Fe(n,p) 54 Mn, 24 Mg(n,p) 24 Na, 47 Ti(n,p) 47 Sc, 48 Ti(n,p) 48 Sc and 115 In(n,n') 115m In. The experimental results compared to those obtained by CITATION (spatial distribution flux) and HAMMER (energetic distribution flux) code, showed good agreement. The results presented in this work are a good contribution for a better knowledge of spatial and energetic neutron flux distribution in the IEA-R1 reactor core, besides that the experimental procedure is easily applicable to another situations. (autor) [pt

  11. Spatial Variations of Turbulent Properties of Neutral Hydrogen Gas in the Small Magellanic Cloud Using Structure-function Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nestingen-Palm, David; Stanimirović, Snežana; González-Casanova, Diego F.; Babler, Brian [Astronomy Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706-1582 (United States); Jameson, Katherine; Bolatto, Alberto, E-mail: sstanimi@astro.wisc.edu [Astronomy Department and Laboratory for Millimeter-wave Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2017-08-10

    We investigate spatial variations of turbulent properties in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) by using neutral hydrogen (H i) observations. With the goal of testing the importance of stellar feedback on H i turbulence, we define central and outer SMC regions based on the star formation rate (SFR) surface density, as well as the H i integrated intensity. We use the structure function and the velocity channel analysis to calculate the power-law index ( γ ) for both underlying density and velocity fields in these regions. In all cases, our results show essentially no difference in γ between the central and outer regions. This suggests that H i turbulent properties are surprisingly homogeneous across the SMC when probed at a resolution of 30 pc. Contrary to recent suggestions from numerical simulations, we do not find a significant change in γ due to stellar feedback as traced by the SFR surface density. This could be due to the stellar feedback being widespread over the whole of the SMC, but more likely due to a large-scale gravitational driving of turbulence. We show that the lack of difference between central and outer SMC regions cannot be explained by the high optical depth H I.

  12. Astronomy in Denver: Spatial distributions of dust properties via far-IR broadband map with HerPlaNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Kentaro; Ueta, Toshiya; Ladjal, Djazia; Exter, Katrina; Otsuka, Masaaki; HerPlaNS Consortium

    2018-06-01

    We present the results of our analyses on dust properties in all of Galactic planetary nebulae based on 5-band broadband images in the far-IR taken with the Herschel Space Observatory.By fitting surface brightness distributions of dust thermal emission at 70, 160, 250, 350 and 500 microns with a single-temperature modified black body function, we derive spatially resolved maps of the dust emissivity power-law index (beta) and dust temperature (Td), as well as the column density.We find that circumstellar dust grains in PNe occupy a specific region in the beta-Td space, which is distinct from that occupied by dust grains in the Interstellar Matter (ISM) and star forming regions (SFRs). Unlike those in the ISM and SFRs, dust grains in PNe exhibit little variation in beta while a large spread in Td, suggesting rather homogeneous dust properties.This work is part of the Herschel Planetary Nebula Survey Plus (HerPlaNS+) supported by the NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program.

  13. Multiplicity and properties of Kepler planet candidates: High spatial imaging and RV studies*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aceituno J.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Kepler space telescope is discovering thousands of new planet candidates. However, a follow up program is needed in order to reject false candidates and to fully characterize the bona-fide exoplanets. Our main aims are: 1./ Detect and analyze close companions inside the typical Kepler PSF to study if they are the responsible of the dim in the Kepler light curves, 2./ Study the change in the stellar and planetary parameters due to the presence of an unresolved object, 3./ Help to validate those Kepler Objects of Interest that do not present any object inside the Kepler PSF and 4./ Study the multiplicity rate in planet host candidates. Such a large sample of observed planet host candidates allows us to do statistics about the presence of close (visual or bounded companions to the harboring star. We present here Lucky Imaging observations for a total amount of 98 Kepler Objects of Interest. This technique is based on the acquisition of thousands of very short exposure time images. Then, a selection and combination of a small amount of the best quality frames provides a high resolution image with objects having a 0.1 arcsec PSF. We applied this technique to carry out observations in the Sloan i and Sloan z filters of our Kepler candidates. We find blended objects inside the Kepler PSF for a significant percentage of KOIs. On one hand, only 58.2% of the hosts do not present any object within 6 arcsec. On the other hand, we have found 19 companions closer than 3 arcsec in 17 KOIs. According to their magnitudes and i − z color, 8 of them could be physically bounded to the host star. We are also collecting high-spectral resolution spectroscopuy in order to derive the planet properties.

  14. Measurement properties of questionnaires assessing participation in children and adolescents with a disability: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rainey, J.F.M.; van Nispen, R.M.A.; van der Zee, C.H.; van Rens, G.H.M.B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To critically appraise the measurement properties of questionnaires measuring participation in children and adolescents (0–18 years) with a disability. Methods: Bibliographic databases were searched for studies evaluating the measurement properties of self-report or parent-report

  15. Control and measurement of the physical properties in acrylamide based photopolymer materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Ciara E.; Gleeson, Michael R.; O'Neill, Feidhlim T.; Kelly, John V.; Sheridan, John T.

    2005-06-01

    Recent improvements in holographic materials have led to advances in a variety of applications, including data storage and interferometry. To further increase the possibility of commercial applications in these areas it is necessary to have available an inexpensive, self-processing, environmentally stable material that has a good spatial frequency response. One promising type of material is Acrylamide-based photopolymer recording materials. The material can be made self-processing and can be sensitised to different recording wavelengths using different photosensitive dyes. The self-processing capability of this material simplifies the recording and testing processes and enables holographic interferometry to be carried out without the need for complex realignment procedures. Although this material has a lot of advantages over others it has significant disadvantages such as its spatial frequency response range (500-2500 lines/mm). Therefore, it is of ever-increasing importance to resolve uncertainties regarding optical and material properties, i.e. the refractive index and the diffusion constants. Using experimental diffraction efficiency measurements, a value for the refractive index modulation can be obtained. Then carrying out analysis using the Polymerisation Driven Diffusion model (PDD) values for the diffusion coefficients of various materials in the grating layer can be found. Applying the Lorentz-Lorenz relation, refractive index variations within the material can be more fully understood. With the resulting improved understanding it will be possible to improve the characteristics of photopolymer materials by altering the chemical composition, for example by controlling the crosslinker concentration or through the careful use of inhibitor and/or retarders to control the polymer chain growth.

  16. Measuring the optical properties of IceCube drill holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongen Martin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The IceCube Neutrino Observatory consists of 5160 digital optical modules (DOMs in a cubic kilometer of deep ice below the South Pole. The DOMs record the Cherenkov light from charged particles interacting in the ice. A good understanding of the optical properties of the ice is crucial to the quality of the event reconstruction. While the optical properties of the undisturbed ice are well understood, the properties of the refrozen drill holes still pose a challenge. A new data-acquisition and analysis approach using light originating from LEDs within one DOM detected by the photomultiplier of the same DOM will be described. This method allows us to explore the scattering length in the immediate vicinity of the considered DOMs.

  17. The comparison of spatial accessibility measures between non-obstacle and obstacle oriented based on gravity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhi-Gang; Cui, Cai-Hui

    2009-10-01

    Spatial accessibility denotes the ease with which activities may be reached from a given location using a particular transportation system. There are a number of accessibility measures methods and models, such as time of access to city centre, mean travel costs and opportunity accessibility. But these methods or models ignore the existence of obstacles. In fact, there are many kinds of obstacles in the world, such as rivers, railways, etc. The paper reviews the progress of accessibility measures, and introduces the obstacle to the accessibility measures. Meanwhile, through the analysis of A* algorithm, the advantage of A* algorithm that could avoid obstacles is put forward. Based on the above mentioned, the obstacle oriented accessibility measures based on simple gravity model is discussed in details. Finally, a case study is fulfilled by comparison between the obstacle oriented and non-obstacle accessibility measures.

  18. Measuring Higgs CP properties through top quark production at a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    - tion process at a photon linear collider. Observables which can be obtained by circular polarization of colliding photons and polarization measurement through the angular dis- tribution of the top quark decays are useful not only for measuring ...

  19. MMP-sensitive PEG diacrylate hydrogels with spatial variations in matrix properties stimulate directional vascular sprout formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael V Turturro

    Full Text Available The spatial presentation of immobilized extracellular matrix (ECM cues and matrix mechanical properties play an important role in directed and guided cell behavior and neovascularization. The goal of this work was to explore whether gradients of elastic modulus, immobilized matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-sensitivity, and YRGDS cell adhesion ligands are capable of directing 3D vascular sprout formation in tissue engineered scaffolds. PEGDA hydrogels were engineered with mechanical and biofunctional gradients using perfusion-based frontal photopolymerization (PBFP. Bulk photopolymerized hydrogels with uniform mechanical properties, degradation, and immobilized biofunctionality served as controls. Gradient hydrogels exhibited an 80.4% decrease in elastic modulus and a 56.2% decrease in immobilized YRGDS. PBFP hydrogels also demonstrated gradients in hydrogel degradation with degradation times ranging from 10-12 hours in the more crosslinked regions to 4-6 hours in less crosslinked regions. An in vitro model of neovascularization, composed of co-culture aggregates of endothelial and smooth muscle cells, was used to evaluate the effect of these gradients on vascular sprout formation. Aggregate invasion in gradient hydrogels occurred bi-directionally with sprout alignment observed in the direction parallel to the gradient while control hydrogels with homogeneous properties resulted in uniform invasion. In PBFP gradient hydrogels, aggregate sprout length was found to be twice as long in the direction parallel to the gradient as compared to the perpendicular direction after three weeks in culture. This directionality was found to be more prominent in gradient regions of increased stiffness, crosslinked MMP-sensitive peptide presentation, and immobilized YRGDS concentration.

  20. Quantifying the heterogeneity of soil compaction, physical soil properties and soil moisture across multiple spatial scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Victoria; Pattison, Ian; Sander, Graham

    2016-04-01

    England's rural landscape is dominated by pastoral agriculture, with 40% of land cover classified as either improved or semi-natural grassland according to the Land Cover Map 2007. Since the Second World War the intensification of agriculture has resulted in greater levels of soil compaction, associated with higher stocking densities in fields. Locally compaction has led to loss of soil storage and an increased in levels of ponding in fields. At the catchment scale soil compaction has been hypothesised to contribute to increased flood risk. Previous research (Pattison, 2011) on a 40km2 catchment (Dacre Beck, Lake District, UK) has shown that when soil characteristics are homogeneously parameterised in a hydrological model, downstream peak discharges can be 65% higher for a heavy compacted soil than for a lightly compacted soil. However, at the catchment scale there is likely to be a significant amount of variability in compaction levels within and between fields, due to multiple controlling factors. This research focusses in on one specific type of land use (permanent pasture with cattle grazing) and areas of activity within the field (feeding area, field gate, tree shelter, open field area). The aim was to determine if the soil characteristics and soil compaction levels are homogeneous in the four areas of the field. Also, to determine if these levels stayed the same over the course of the year, or if there were differences at the end of the dry (October) and wet (April) periods. Field experiments were conducted in the River Skell catchment, in Yorkshire, UK, which has an area of 120km2. The dynamic cone penetrometer was used to determine the structural properties of the soil, soil samples were collected to assess the bulk density, organic matter content and permeability in the laboratory and the Hydrosense II was used to determine the soil moisture content in the topsoil. Penetration results show that the tree shelter is the most compacted and the open field area

  1. Implications of the spatial dependence of the single-event-upset threshold in SRAMs measured with a pulsed laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchner, S.; Langworthy, J.B.; Stapor, W.J.; Campbell, A.B.; Rivet, S.

    1994-01-01

    Pulsed laser light was used to measure single event upset (SEU) thresholds for a large number of memory cells in both CMOS and bipolar SRAMs. Results showed that small variations in intercell upset threshold could not explain the gradual rise in the curve of cross section versus linear energy transfer (LET). The memory cells exhibited greater intracell variations implying that the charge collection efficiency within a memory cell varies spatially and contributes substantially to the shape of the curve of cross section versus LET. The results also suggest that the pulsed laser can be used for hardness-assurance measurements on devices with sensitive areas larger than the diameter of the laser beam

  2. Measurements of photon and jet production properties with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00237016; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-09-09

    Summary of recent ATLAS measurements of jet and photon production using proton–proton (pp) collisions from the Large Hadron Collider. The charged-particle multiplicity in jets, and jet charge measurements are presented using 8 TeV pp collisions. Differential measurements of jet and photon cross-sections are shown for 7, 8 and 13 TeV pp collisions.

  3. Employee participation in developing performance measures and job performance: on the role of measurement properties and incentives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, B.; Wouters, M.; Wilderom, C.

    2013-01-01

    Involving employees in the development of performance measures often results in better employee job performance. Yet not all prior studies find such a direct effect. This study explains these inconsistent findings. It focuses on the measurement properties of performance measures and using them for

  4. Spatial Relation of Apparent Soil Electrical Conductivity with Crop Yields and Soil Properties at Different Topographic Positions in a Small Agricultural Watershed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurbir Singh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Use of electromagnetic induction (EMI sensors along with geospatial modeling provide a better opportunity for understanding spatial distribution of soil properties and crop yields on a landscape level and to map site-specific management zones. The first objective of this research was to evaluate the relationship of crop yields, soil properties and apparent electrical conductivity (ECa at different topographic positions (shoulder, backslope, and deposition slope. The second objective was to examine whether the correlation of ECa with soil properties and crop yields on a watershed scale can be improved by considering topography in modeling ECa and soil properties compared to a whole field scale with no topographic separation. This study was conducted in two headwater agricultural watersheds in southern Illinois, USA. The experimental design consisted of three basins per watershed and each basin was divided into three topographic positions (shoulder, backslope and deposition using the Slope Position Classification model in ESRI ArcMap. A combine harvester equipped with a GPS-based recording system was used for yield monitoring and mapping from 2012 to 2015. Soil samples were taken at depths from 0–15 cm and 15–30 cm from 54 locations in the two watersheds in fall 2015 and analyzed for physical and chemical properties. The ECa was measured using EMI device, EM38-MK2, which provides four dipole readings ECa-H-0.5, ECa-H-1, ECa-V-0.5, and ECa-V-1. Soybean and corn yields at depositional position were 38% and 62% lower than the shoulder position in 2014 and 2015, respectively. Soil pH, total carbon (TC, total nitrogen (TN, Mehlich-3 Phosphorus (P, Bray-1 P and ECa at depositional positions were significantly higher compared to shoulder positions. Corn and soybeans yields were weakly to moderately (<±0.75 correlated with ECa. At the deposition position at the 0–15 cm depth ECa-H-0.5 was weakly correlated (r < ±0.50 with soil pH and was

  5. Assessment of plasma impedance probe for measuring electron density and collision frequency in a plasma with spatial and temporal gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopkins, Mark A.; King, Lyon B.

    2014-01-01

    Numerical simulations and experimental measurements were combined to determine the ability of a plasma impedance probe (PIP) to measure plasma density and electron collision frequency in a plasma containing spatial gradients as well as time-varying oscillations in the plasma density. A PIP is sensitive to collision frequency through the width of the parallel resonance in the Re[Z]-vs.-frequency characteristic, while also being sensitive to electron density through the zero-crossing of the Im[Z]-vs.-frequency characteristic at parallel resonance. Simulations of the probe characteristic in a linear plasma gradient indicated that the broadening of Re[Z] due to the spatial gradient obscured the broadening due to electron collision frequency, preventing a quantitative measurement of the absolute collision frequency for gradients considered in this study. Simulation results also showed that the PIP is sensitive to relative changes in electron collision frequency in a spatial density gradient, but a second broadening effect due to time-varying oscillations made collision frequency measurements impossible. The time-varying oscillations had the effect of causing multiple zero-crossings in Im[Z] at parallel resonance. Results of experiments and simulations indicated that the lowest-frequency zero-crossing represented the lowest plasma density in the oscillations and the highest-frequency zero-crossing represented the highest plasma density in the oscillations, thus the PIP probe was found to be an effective tool to measure both the average plasma density as well as the maximum and minimum densities due to temporal oscillations

  6. Spatial aliasing and distortion of energy distribution in the wave vector domain under multi-spacecraft measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Narita

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Aliasing is a general problem in the analysis of any measurements that make sampling at discrete points. Sampling in the spatial domain results in a periodic pattern of spectra in the wave vector domain. This effect is called spatial aliasing, and it is of particular importance for multi-spacecraft measurements in space. We first present the theoretical background of aliasing problems in the frequency domain and generalize it to the wave vector domain, and then present model calculations of spatial aliasing. The model calculations are performed for various configurations of the reciprocal vectors and energy spectra or distribution that are placed at differen