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Sample records for measured optical densities

  1. Optical density measurements on the examination of colon cancer tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touati, E.; Ajaal, T.; Hamassi, A.

    2015-01-01

    Automated quantitative image analysis can aid in cancer diagnosis and, in general, mange medical treatments managements and improve routine medical diagnosis. Early diagnosis can make big difference between life and death. Microscopic images from two tissue types forty-four normal and fifty-eight cancers, was evaluated based on their ability to identify abnormalities in colon images. Optical density approach is applied to extract parameters that exhibit cancer behavior on colon tissues images. Using statistical toolbox, a significant result of (p<0.0001) for the mean and the variance of the optical density parameter were detected, and only (p<0.001) for skewness optical density. based on linear discrimination method, the obtained result shows 905 accuracy for both sensitivity and specificity, and with an overall accuracy of 90% (author)

  2. Measurements of the Fe3+ diffusion coefficient in Fricke Xylenol gel using optical density measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonato de Oliveira, Lucas; Sampaio, Francisco Glaildo Almeida; Moreira, Marcos Vasques; Almeida, Adelaide de

    2014-01-01

    In Fricke dosimetry, optical density measurements are performed some time after dosimeter irradiation. Values of the diffusion coefficient of Fe 3+ in Fricke Xylenol gel (FXG) are necessary for determining the spatial distribution of the absorbed dose from measurements of the optical density. Five sets of FXG dosimeters, kept at different constant temperatures, were exposed to collimated 6 MV photons. The optical density profile, proportional to the Fe 3+ concentration, at the boundary between irradiated and non-irradiated parts of each dosimeter was measured periodically over a period of 60 h. By comparing the experimental data with a function that accounts for the unobserved initial concentration profile of Fe 3+ in the FXG, we obtained diffusion coefficients 0.30±0.05, 0.40±0.05, 0.50±0.05, 0.60±0.05 and 0.80±0.05 mm 2 /h for the temperatures 283.0±0.5, 286.0±0.5, 289.0±0.5, 292.0±0.5, and 296.0±0.5 K, respectively. The activation energy of Fe 3+ diffusion in the gel, 0.54±0.06 eV, was determined from the temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficients. - Highlights: • A new analytical method to determine diffusion coefficients of ions in gels is proposed. • The method is applied for measurements of the diffusion coefficients of Fe 3+ ions in a Fricke gel dosimeter. • Activation energy of the Fe 3+ ions in the gel was found to be 0.54 ±0.06 eV

  3. Measurement of the optical density of packable composites: comparison between direct and indirect digital systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziottin Luiz Felipe Rodrigues

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to measure the optical density of four packable composite resins with widths of 1, 2, 3 and 4 mm, by means of Digora® (direct and DentScan DentView® (indirect digital imaging systems, in order to compare both methods. Twenty acrylic plates, with the proposed thicknesses, were used, each one containing a sample of each resin. Each acrylic plate was radiographed three times, under a standardized technique. For the Digora® system, an optical plate was used under each resin sample, and, for the DentScan DentView® system, occlusal films were employed, totalizing 60 exposures for each system. Optical plates and films were scanned and three consecutive optical readouts were carried out, totalizing 1,440 readouts. The results were submitted to statistical analysis and revealed that the average optical density of the four resins always increased as thickness increased. Regarding the comparisons between the composite resins, in both analysis the resin with the greater optical density was SurefilTM followed by ProdigyTM Condensable, AlertTM and Solitaire®. The correlations between the results of Digora® and DentScan DentView® were significant for the different thicknesses and materials. The observed tendency is that as the values obtained with the Digora® system increase, so do the values obtained with DentScan DentView®. While thickness increased, the values of optical density in both Digora® and DentScan DentView® tended to approach each other. The Digora® system presented smaller amplitude between the results obtained in adjacent thicknesses.

  4. Multiple-capillary measurement of RBC speed, flux, and density with optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonghwan; Wu, Weicheng; Lesage, Frederic; Boas, David A

    2013-11-01

    As capillaries exhibit heterogeneous and fluctuating dynamics even during baseline, a technique measuring red blood cell (RBC) speed and flux over many capillaries at the same time is needed. Here, we report that optical coherence tomography can capture individual RBC passage simultaneously over many capillaries located at different depths. Further, we demonstrate the ability to quantify RBC speed, flux, and linear density. This technique will provide a means to monitor microvascular flow dynamics over many capillaries at different depths at the same time.

  5. Electron density measurement in gas discharge plasmas by optical and acoustic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biagioni, A.; Anania, M.P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Giovenale, D. Di; Pirro, G. Di; Ferrario, M.; Pompili, R.; Shpakov, V.; Vaccarezza, C.; Villa, F.; Cianchi, A.; Filippi, F.; Mostacci, A.; Zigler, A.

    2016-01-01

    Plasma density represents a very important parameter for both laser wakefield and plasma wakefield acceleration, which use a gas-filled capillary plasma source. Several techniques can be used to measure the plasma density within a capillary discharge, which are mainly based on optical diagnostic methods, as for example the well-known spectroscopic method using the Stark broadening effect. In this work, we introduce a preliminary study on an alternative way to detect the plasma density, based on the shock waves produced by gas discharge in a capillary. Firstly, the measurements of the acoustic spectral content relative to the laser-induced plasmas by a solid target allowed us to understand the main properties of the acoustic waves produced during this kind of plasma generation; afterwards, we have extended such acoustic technique to the capillary plasma source in order to calibrate it by comparison with the stark broadening method.

  6. Statistical measurement of power spectrum density of large aperture optical component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Jiancheng; Xu Qiao; Chai Liqun

    2010-01-01

    According to the requirement of ICF, a method based on statistical theory has been proposed to measure the power spectrum density (PSD) of large aperture optical components. The method breaks the large-aperture wavefront into small regions, and obtains the PSD of the large-aperture wavefront by weighted averaging of the PSDs of the regions, where the weight factor is each region's area. Simulation and experiment demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. They also show that, the obtained PSDs of the large-aperture wavefront by statistical method and sub-aperture stitching method fit well, when the number of small regions is no less than 8 x 8. The statistical method is not sensitive to translation stage's errors and environment instabilities, thus it is appropriate for PSD measurement during the process of optical fabrication. (authors)

  7. Optical Extinction Measurements of Dust Density in the GMRO Regolith Test Bin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, J.; Mantovani, J.; Mueller, R.; Nugent, M.; Nick, A.; Schuler, J.; Townsend, I.

    2016-01-01

    A regolith simulant test bin was constructed and completed in the Granular Mechanics and Regolith Operations (GMRO) Lab in 2013. This Planetary Regolith Test Bed (PRTB) is a 64 sq m x 1 m deep test bin, is housed in a climate-controlled facility, and contains 120 MT of lunar-regolith simulant, called Black Point-1 or BP-1, from Black Point, AZ. One of the current uses of the test bin is to study the effects of difficult lighting and dust conditions on Telerobotic Perception Systems to better assess and refine regolith operations for asteroid, Mars and polar lunar missions. Low illumination and low angle of incidence lighting pose significant problems to computer vision and human perception. Levitated dust on Asteroids interferes with imaging and degrades depth perception. Dust Storms on Mars pose a significant problem. Due to these factors, the likely performance of telerobotics is poorly understood for future missions. Current space telerobotic systems are only operated in bright lighting and dust-free conditions. This technology development testing will identify: (1) the impact of degraded lighting and environmental dust on computer vision and operator perception, (2) potential methods and procedures for mitigating these impacts, (3) requirements for telerobotic perception systems for asteroid capture, Mars dust storms and lunar regolith ISRU missions. In order to solve some of the Telerobotic Perception system problems, a plume erosion sensor (PES) was developed in the Lunar Regolith Simulant Bin (LRSB), containing 2 MT of JSC-1a lunar simulant. PES is simply a laser and digital camera with a white target. Two modes of operation have been investigated: (1) single laser spot - the brightness of the spot is dependent on the optical extinction due to dust and is thus an indirect measure of particle number density, and (2) side-scatter - the camera images the laser from the side, showing beam entrance into the dust cloud and the boundary between dust and void. Both

  8. Macular pigment optical density spatial distribution measured in a subject with oculocutaneous albinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Christopher M; Bland, Pauline J

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies of macular pigment optical density (MPOD) distribution in individuals with oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) have primarily used objective measurement techniques including fundus reflectometry and autofluorescence. We report here on a subject with OCA and their corresponding MPOD distribution assessed through heterochromatic flicker photometry (HFP). A subject with a history of OCA presented with an ocular history including strabismus surgery of the LE with persistent amblyopia and mild, latent nystagmus. Best corrected visual acuity was 20/25- RE and 20/40- LE. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and fundus photography were also obtained. Evaluation of MPOD spatial distribution up to 8 degrees eccentricity from the fovea was performed using HFP. SD-OCT indicated a persistence of multiple inner retinal layers within the foveal region in the RE and LE including symmetric foveal thickening consistent with foveal hypoplasia. Fundus photography showed mild retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) hypopigmentation and a poorly demarcated macula. OriginPro 9 was used to plot MPOD spatial distribution of the subject and a 33-subject sample. The OCA subject demonstrated a foveal MPOD of 0.10 with undetectable levels at 6 degrees eccentricity. The study sample showed a mean foveal MPOD of 0.34 and mean 6 degree eccentricity values of 0.03. Consistent with previous macular pigment (MP) studies of OCA, overall MPOD is reduced in our subject. Mild phenotypic expression of OCA with high functional visual acuity may represent a Henle fiber layer amenable to additional MP deposition. Further study of MP supplementation in OCA patients is warranted. Copyright © 2014 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. REPRODUCIBILITY OF MACULAR PIGMENT OPTICAL DENSITY MEASUREMENT BY TWO-WAVELENGTH AUTOFLUORESCENCE IN A CLINICAL SETTING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Qi Sheng; Bartsch, Dirk-Uwe G; Espina, Mark; Alam, Mostafa; Camacho, Natalia; Mendoza, Nadia; Freeman, William R

    2016-07-01

    Macular pigment, composed of lutein, zeaxanthin, and meso-zeaxanthin, is postulated to protect against age-related macular degeneration, likely because of filtering blue light and its antioxidant properties. Macular pigment optical density (MPOD) is reported to be associated with macular function evaluated by visual acuity and multifocal electroretinogram. Given the importance of macular pigment, reliable and accurate measurement methods are important. The main purpose of this study is to determine the reproducibility of MPOD measurement by two-wavelength autofluorescence method using scanning laser ophthalmoscopy. Sixty-eight eyes of 39 persons were enrolled in the study, including 11 normal eyes, 16 eyes with wet age-related macular degeneration, 16 eyes with dry age-related macular degeneration, 11 eyes with macular edema due to diabetic mellitus, branch retinal vein occlusion or macular telangiectasia, and 14 eyes with tractional maculopathy, including vitreomacular traction, epiretinal membrane, or macular hole. MPOD was measured with a two-wavelength (488 and 514 nm) autofluorescence method with the Spectralis HRA + OCT after pupil dilation. The measurement was repeated for each eye 10 minutes later. The analysis of variance and Bland-Altman plot were used to assess the reproducibility between the two measurements. The mean MPOD at eccentricities of 1° and 2° was 0.36 ± 0.17 (range: 0.04-0.69) and 0.15 ± 0.08 (range: -0.03 to 0.35) for the first measurement and 0.35 ± 0.17 (range: 0.02-0.68) and 0.15 ± 0.08 (range: -0.01 to 0.33) for the second measurement, respectively. The difference between the 2 measurements was not statistically significant, and the Bland-Altman plot showed 7.4% and 5.9% points outside the 95% limits of agreement, indicating an overall excellent reproducibility. Similarly, there is no significant difference between the first and second measurements of MPOD volume within eccentricities of 1°, 2°, and 6° radius, and the Bland

  10. Reliability of Heterochromatic Flicker Photometry in Measuring Macular Pigment Optical Density among Preadolescent Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasha M. McCorkle

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Macular pigment optical density (MPOD—assessed using customized heterochromatic flicker photometry (cHFP—is related to better cognition and brain lutein among adults. However, the reliability of MPOD assessed by cHFP has not been investigated in children. We assessed inter-session reliability of MPOD using modified cHFP. 7–10-year-olds (n = 66 underwent cHFP over 2 visits using 11 examiners. Reliability was also assessed in a subsample (n = 46 with only 2 examiners. Among all participants, there was no significant difference between the two sessions (p = 0.59—session 1: 0.61 ± 0.28; session 2: 0.62 ± 0.27. There was no significant difference in the MPOD of boys vs. girls (p = 0.56. There was a significant correlation between sessions (Y = 0.52x + 0.31; R2 = 0.29, p ≤ 0.005, with a reliability of 0.70 (Cronbach’s α. Among the subsample with 2 examiners, there was a significant correlation between sessions (Y = 0.54x + 0.31; R2 = 0.32, p < 0.005, with a reliability of 0.72 (Cronbach’s α. In conclusion, there is moderate reliability for modified cHFP to measure MPOD in preadolescents. These findings provide support for future studies aiming to conduct noninvasive assessments of retinal xanthophylls and study their association with cognition during childhood.

  11. Measurement of carbon nanotube microstructure relative density by optical attenuation and observation of size-dependent variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sei Jin; Schmidt, Aaron J; Bedewy, Mostafa; Hart, A John

    2013-07-21

    Engineering the density of carbon nanotube (CNT) forest microstructures is vital to applications such as electrical interconnects, micro-contact probes, and thermal interface materials. For CNT forests on centimeter-scale substrates, weight and volume can be used to calculate density. However, this is not suitable for smaller samples, including individual microstructures, and moreover does not enable mapping of spatial density variations within the forest. We demonstrate that the relative mass density of individual CNT microstructures can be measured by optical attenuation, with spatial resolution equaling the size of the focused spot. For this, a custom optical setup was built to measure the transmission of a focused laser beam through CNT microstructures. The transmittance was correlated with the thickness of the CNT microstructures by Beer-Lambert-Bouguer law to calculate the attenuation coefficient. We reveal that the density of CNT microstructures grown by CVD can depend on their size, and that the overall density of arrays of microstructures is affected significantly by run-to-run process variations. Further, we use the technique to quantify the change in CNT microstructure density due to capillary densification. This is a useful and accessible metrology technique for CNTs in future microfabrication processes, and will enable direct correlation of density to important properties such as stiffness and electrical conductivity.

  12. Assessment of Different Sampling Methods for Measuring and Representing Macular Cone Density Using Flood-Illuminated Adaptive Optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shu; Gale, Michael J; Fay, Jonathan D; Faridi, Ambar; Titus, Hope E; Garg, Anupam K; Michaels, Keith V; Erker, Laura R; Peters, Dawn; Smith, Travis B; Pennesi, Mark E

    2015-09-01

    To describe a standardized flood-illuminated adaptive optics (AO) imaging protocol suitable for the clinical setting and to assess sampling methods for measuring cone density. Cone density was calculated following three measurement protocols: 50 × 50-μm sampling window values every 0.5° along the horizontal and vertical meridians (fixed-interval method), the mean density of expanding 0.5°-wide arcuate areas in the nasal, temporal, superior, and inferior quadrants (arcuate mean method), and the peak cone density of a 50 × 50-μm sampling window within expanding arcuate areas near the meridian (peak density method). Repeated imaging was performed in nine subjects to determine intersession repeatability of cone density. Cone density montages could be created for 67 of the 74 subjects. Image quality was determined to be adequate for automated cone counting for 35 (52%) of the 67 subjects. We found that cone density varied with different sampling methods and regions tested. In the nasal and temporal quadrants, peak density most closely resembled histological data, whereas the arcuate mean and fixed-interval methods tended to underestimate the density compared with histological data. However, in the inferior and superior quadrants, arcuate mean and fixed-interval methods most closely matched histological data, whereas the peak density method overestimated cone density compared with histological data. Intersession repeatability testing showed that repeatability was greatest when sampling by arcuate mean and lowest when sampling by fixed interval. We show that different methods of sampling can significantly affect cone density measurements. Therefore, care must be taken when interpreting cone density results, even in a normal population.

  13. High Speed and High Spatial Density Parameter Measurement Using Fiber Optic Sensing Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Allen R. Jr. (Inventor); Chan, Hon Man (Inventor); Richards, William Lance (Inventor); Piazza, Anthony (Inventor); Hamory, Philip J (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The present invention is an improved fiber optic sensing system (FOSS) having the ability to provide both high spatial resolution and high frequency strain measurements. The inventive hybrid FOSS fiber combines sensors from high acquisition speed and low spatial resolution Wavelength-Division Multiplexing (WDM) systems and from low acquisition speed and high spatial resolution Optical Frequency Domain Reflection (OFDR) systems. Two unique light sources utilizing different wavelengths are coupled with the hybrid FOSS fiber to generate reflected data from both the WDM sensors and OFDR sensors operating on a single fiber optic cable without incurring interference from one another. The two data sets are then de-multiplexed for analysis, optionally with conventionally-available WDM and OFDR system analyzers.

  14. Potential errors in optical density measurements due to scanning side in EBT and EBT2 Gafchromic film dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desroches, Joannie; Bouchard, Hugo; Lacroix, Frédéric

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effect on the measured optical density of scanning on either side of a Gafchromic EBT and EBT2 film using an Epson (Epson Canada Ltd., Toronto, Ontario) 10000XL flat bed scanner. Calibration curves were constructed using EBT2 film scanned in landscape orientation in both reflection and transmission mode on an Epson 10000XL scanner. Calibration curves were also constructed using EBT film. Potential errors due to an optical density difference from scanning the film on either side ("face up" or "face down") were simulated. Scanning the film face up or face down on the scanner bed while keeping the film angular orientation constant affects the measured optical density when scanning in reflection mode. In contrast, no statistically significant effect was seen when scanning in transmission mode. This effect can significantly affect relative and absolute dose measurements. As an application example, the authors demonstrate potential errors of 17.8% by inverting the film scanning side on the gamma index for 3%-3 mm criteria on a head and neck intensity modulated radiotherapy plan, and errors in absolute dose measurements ranging from 10% to 35% between 2 and 5 Gy. Process consistency is the key to obtaining accurate and precise results in Gafchromic film dosimetry. When scanning in reflection mode, care must be taken to place the film consistently on the same side on the scanner bed.

  15. Technical Note: Potential errors in optical density measurements due to scanning side in EBT and EBT2 Gafchromic film dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desroches, Joannie; Bouchard, Hugo; Lacroix, Frederic

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine the effect on the measured optical density of scanning on either side of a Gafchromic EBT and EBT2 film using an Epson (Epson Canada Ltd., Toronto, Ontario) 10000XL flat bed scanner. Methods: Calibration curves were constructed using EBT2 film scanned in landscape orientation in both reflection and transmission mode on an Epson 10000XL scanner. Calibration curves were also constructed using EBT film. Potential errors due to an optical density difference from scanning the film on either side (''face up'' or ''face down'') were simulated. Results: Scanning the film face up or face down on the scanner bed while keeping the film angular orientation constant affects the measured optical density when scanning in reflection mode. In contrast, no statistically significant effect was seen when scanning in transmission mode. This effect can significantly affect relative and absolute dose measurements. As an application example, the authors demonstrate potential errors of 17.8% by inverting the film scanning side on the gamma index for 3%--3 mm criteria on a head and neck intensity modulated radiotherapy plan, and errors in absolute dose measurements ranging from 10% to 35% between 2 and 5 Gy. Conclusions: Process consistency is the key to obtaining accurate and precise results in Gafchromic film dosimetry. When scanning in reflection mode, care must be taken to place the film consistently on the same side on the scanner bed.

  16. Changes in peripapillary blood vessel density in Graves' orbitopathy after orbital decompression surgery as measured by optical coherence tomography angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Kyle T; Bullock, John R; Drumright, Ryan T; Olsen, Matthew J; Penman, Alan D

    2018-03-08

    The purpose is to evaluate the utility of optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography in the evaluation of Graves' orbitopathy (GO) and response to orbital decompression in patients with and without dysthyroid optic neuropathy (DON). This was a single-center, prospective case series in a cohort of 12 patients (24 orbits) with GO and ±DON, (6 orbits) who underwent bilateral orbital decompression. All patients underwent pre- and postoperative OCT angiography of the peripapillary area. Vessel density indices were calculated in a 4.5 mm × 4.5 mm ellipsoid centered on the optic disk using split-spectrum amplitude decorrelation angiography algorithm, producing the vessel density measurements. Mean change in vessel density indices was compared between pre- and postoperative sessions and between patients with and without DON. Patient 1, a 34-year-old male with GO and unilateral DON OD, showed a significant reduction in blood vessel density indices oculus dexter (OD) (DON eye) after decompression while a more modest reduction was found oculus sinister (OS) with the greatest change noted intrapapillary. Patient 2, a 50-year-old male with DON OU, showed worsening neuropathy following decompression OD that was confirmed by angiographic density indices. Patient 3, a 55-year-female with DON, showed a reduction in blood vessel density OD and increased density OS. Patients without DON showed overall less impressive changes in indices as compared to those with DON. Using OCT angiography, response to surgical treatment in GO orbits, more so in orbits with DON, can be demonstrated and quantified using vessel density indices with reproducibility.

  17. The Quantitative Measurements of Vascular Density and Flow Area of Optic Nerve Head Using Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazvand, Fatemeh; Mirshahi, Reza; Fadakar, Kaveh; Faghihi, Houshangh; Sabour, Siamak; Ghassemi, Fariba

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the vascular density (VD) and the flow area on optic nerve head (ONH) and peripapillary area, and the impact of age and sex using optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) in healthy human subjects. Both eyes of each volunteer were scanned by an RTVue XR Avanti; Optovue with OCTA using the split-spectrum amplitude-decorrelation angiography algorithm technique. Masked graders evaluated enface angiodisc OCTA data. The flow area of ONH and the VD were automatically calculated. A total of 79 eyes of patients with a mean age of 37.03±11.27 were examined. The total ONH (papillary and peripapillary) area VD was 56.03%±4.55%. The flow area of the ONH was 1.74±0.10 mm/1.34 mm. The temporal and inferotemporal peripapillary VD was different between male and female patients. Increasing age causes some changes in the flow area of the ONH and the papillary VD from the third to the fourth decade (analysis of variance test; P<0.05). A normal quantitative database of the flow area and VD of the papillary and peripapillary area, obtained by RTVue XR with OCT angiography technique, is presented here.

  18. Measurement of true density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr-Brion, K.G.; Keen, E.F.

    1982-01-01

    System for determining the true density of a fluent mixture such as a liquid slurry, containing entrained gas, such as air comprises a restriction in pipe through which at least a part of the mixture is passed. Density measuring means such as gamma-ray detectors and source measure the apparent density of the mixture before and after its passage through the restriction. Solid-state pressure measuring devices are arranged to measure the pressure in the mixture before and after its passage through the restriction. Calculating means, such as a programmed microprocessor, determine the true density from these measurements using relationships given in the description. (author)

  19. Structural, electronic and optical properties of monoclinic Na2Ti3O7 from density functional theory calculations: A comparison with XRD and optical absorption measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo-Filho, Adailton A.; Silva, Fábio L. R.; Righi, Ariete; da Silva, Mauricélio B.; Silva, Bruno P.; Caetano, Ewerton W. S.; Freire, Valder N.

    2017-06-01

    Powder samples of bulk monoclinic sodium trititanate Na2Ti3O7 were prepared carefully by solid state reaction, and its monoclinic P21/m crystal structure and morphology were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. Moreover, the sodium trititanate main energy band gap was estimated as Eg=3.51±0.01 eV employing UV-Vis spectroscopy, which is smaller than the measured 3.70 eV energy gap published previously by other authors. Aiming to achieve a better understanding of the experimental data, density functional theory (DFT) computations were performed within the local density and generalized gradient approximations (LDA and GGA, respectively) taking into account dispersion effects through the scheme of Tkatchenko and Scheffler (GGA+TS). Optimal lattice parameters, with deviations relative to measurements Δa=-0.06 Å, Δb=0.02 Å, and Δc=-0.09 Å, were obtained at the GGA level, which was then used to simulate the sodium trititanate electronic and optical properties. Indirect band transitions have led to a theoretical gap energy value of about 3.25 eV. Our results, however, differ from pioneer DFT results with respect to the specific Brillouin zone vectors for which the indirect transition with smallest energy value occurs. Effective masses for electrons and holes were also estimated along a set of directions in reciprocal space. Lastly, our calculations revealed a relatively large degree of optical isotropy for the Na2Ti3O7 optical absorption and complex dielectric function.

  20. Measuring and engineering the atomic mass density wave of a Gaussian mass-polariton pulse in optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partanen, Mikko; Tulkki, Jukka

    2018-02-01

    Conventional theories of electromagnetic waves in a medium assume that only the energy of the field propagates inside the medium. Consequently, they neglect the transport of mass density by the medium atoms. We have recently presented foundations of a covariant theory of light propagation in a nondispersive medium by considering a light wave simultaneously with the dynamics of the medium atoms driven by optoelastic forces [Phys. Rev. A 95, 063850 (2017)]. In particular, we have shown that the mass is transferred by an atomic mass density wave (MDW), which gives rise to mass-polariton (MP) quasiparticles, i.e., covariant coupled states of the field and matter having a nonzero rest mass. Another key observation of the mass-polariton theory of light is that, in common semiconductors, most of the momentum of light is transferred by moving atoms, e.g., 92% in the case of silicon. In this work, we generalize the MP theory of light for dispersive media and consider experimental measurement of the mass transferred by the MDW atoms when an intense light pulse propagates in a silicon fiber. In particular, we consider optimal intensity and time dependence of a Gaussian pulse and account for the breakdown threshold irradiance of the material. The optical shock wave property of the MDW, which propagates with the velocity of light instead of the velocity of sound, prompts for engineering of novel device concepts like very high frequency mechanical oscillators not limited by the acoustic cutoff frequency.

  1. L-Asparagine crystals with wide gap semiconductor features: optical absorption measurements and density functional theory computations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanatta, G; Gottfried, C; Silva, A M; Caetano, E W S; Sales, F A M; Freire, V N

    2014-03-28

    Results of optical absorption measurements are presented together with calculated structural, electronic, and optical properties for the anhydrous monoclinic L-asparagine crystal. Density functional theory (DFT) within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) including dispersion effects (TS, Grimme) was employed to perform the calculations. The optical absorption measurements revealed that the anhydrous monoclinic L-asparagine crystal is a wide band gap material with 4.95 eV main gap energy. DFT-GGA+TS simulations, on the other hand, produced structural parameters in very good agreement with X-ray data. The lattice parameter differences Δa, Δb, Δc between theory and experiment were as small as 0.020, 0.051, and 0.022 Å, respectively. The calculated band gap energy is smaller than the experimental data by about 15%, with a 4.23 eV indirect band gap corresponding to Z → Γ and Z → β transitions. Three other indirect band gaps of 4.30 eV, 4.32 eV, and 4.36 eV are assigned to α3 → Γ, α1 → Γ, and α2 → Γ transitions, respectively. Δ-sol computations, on the other hand, predict a main band gap of 5.00 eV, just 50 meV above the experimental value. Electronic wavefunctions mainly originating from O 2p-carboxyl, C 2p-side chain, and C 2p-carboxyl orbitals contribute most significantly to the highest valence and lowest conduction energy bands, respectively. By varying the lattice parameters from their converged equilibrium values, we show that the unit cell is less stiff along the b direction than for the a and c directions. Effective mass calculations suggest that hole transport behavior is more anisotropic than electron transport, but the mass values allow for some charge mobility except along a direction perpendicular to the molecular layers of L-asparagine which form the crystal, so anhydrous monoclinic L-asparagine crystals could behave as wide gap semiconductors. Finally, the calculations point to a high degree of optical

  2. L-asparagine crystals with wide gap semiconductor features: Optical absorption measurements and density functional theory computations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanatta, G.; Gottfried, C. [Departamento de Bioquímica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-003 Porto Alegre-RS (Brazil); Silva, A. M. [Universidade Estadual do Piauí, 64260-000 Piripiri-Pi (Brazil); Caetano, E. W. S., E-mail: ewcaetano@gmail.com [Instituto de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia do Ceará, 60040-531 Fortaleza-CE (Brazil); Sales, F. A. M.; Freire, V. N. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Caixa Postal 6030, 60455-760 Fortaleza-CE (Brazil)

    2014-03-28

    Results of optical absorption measurements are presented together with calculated structural, electronic, and optical properties for the anhydrous monoclinic L-asparagine crystal. Density functional theory (DFT) within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) including dispersion effects (TS, Grimme) was employed to perform the calculations. The optical absorption measurements revealed that the anhydrous monoclinic L-asparagine crystal is a wide band gap material with 4.95 eV main gap energy. DFT-GGA+TS simulations, on the other hand, produced structural parameters in very good agreement with X-ray data. The lattice parameter differences Δa, Δb, Δc between theory and experiment were as small as 0.020, 0.051, and 0.022 Å, respectively. The calculated band gap energy is smaller than the experimental data by about 15%, with a 4.23 eV indirect band gap corresponding to Z → Γ and Z → β transitions. Three other indirect band gaps of 4.30 eV, 4.32 eV, and 4.36 eV are assigned to α3 → Γ, α1 → Γ, and α2 → Γ transitions, respectively. Δ-sol computations, on the other hand, predict a main band gap of 5.00 eV, just 50 meV above the experimental value. Electronic wavefunctions mainly originating from O 2p–carboxyl, C 2p–side chain, and C 2p–carboxyl orbitals contribute most significantly to the highest valence and lowest conduction energy bands, respectively. By varying the lattice parameters from their converged equilibrium values, we show that the unit cell is less stiff along the b direction than for the a and c directions. Effective mass calculations suggest that hole transport behavior is more anisotropic than electron transport, but the mass values allow for some charge mobility except along a direction perpendicular to the molecular layers of L-asparagine which form the crystal, so anhydrous monoclinic L-asparagine crystals could behave as wide gap semiconductors. Finally, the calculations point to a high degree of optical

  3. The Quantitative Measurements of Vascular Density and Flow Areas of Macula Using Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography in Normal Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghassemi, Fariba; Fadakar, Kaveh; Bazvand, Fatemeh; Mirshahi, Reza; Mohebbi, Masoumeh; Sabour, Siamak

    2017-06-01

    The quantification of the density of macular vascular networks and blood flow areas in the foveal and parafoveal area in healthy subjects using optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA). Cross-sectional, prospective study in an institutional setting at the Retina Services of Farabi Eye Hospital. One hundred twelve normal volunteers with no known ocular or systemic disease were included, including patient numbers (one or both eyes), selection procedures, inclusion/exclusion criteria, randomization procedure, and masking. En face angiogram OCTA was performed on a 3 mm × 3 mm region centered on the macula. Automated thresholding and measuring algorithm method for foveal and parafoveal blood flow and vascular density (VD) were used. The density of macular vascular networks and blood flow area in the foveal and parafoveal area were measured. A total of 224 healthy eyes from 112 subjects with a mean age of 36.4 years ± 11.3 years were included. In the foveal region, the VD of the superficial capillary network (sCN) was significantly higher than that of the deep capillary network (dCN) (31.1% ± 5.5% vs. 28.3% ± 7.2%; P < .001), whereas in the parafoveal area, VD was higher in the dCN (62.24% ± 2.8% vs. 56.5% ± 2.5%; P < .001). Flow area in the 1-mm radius circle in the sCN was less than in the dCN. Superficial foveal avascular zone (sFAZ) size was negatively correlated with the VD of the foveal sCN, but in the deep FAZ (dFAZ) was not correlated with VD or blood flow area of the fovea. There was no difference between measured VD and blood flow surface area in both eyes of the subjects. OCTA could be used as a noninvasive, repeatable, layer-free method in quantitative evaluation of VD and blood flow of macular area. The normal quantities of the vascular plexus density and flow will help in better understanding the pathophysiological basis of the vascular disease of retina. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2017;48:478-486.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK

  4. Axial Length Variation Impacts on Superficial Retinal Vessel Density and Foveal Avascular Zone Area Measurements Using Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Danuta M; Gong, Peijun; An, Di; Menghini, Moreno; Hansen, Alex; Mackey, David A; Sampson, David D; Chen, Fred K

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the impact of image magnification correction on superficial retinal vessel density (SRVD) and foveal avascular zone area (FAZA) measurements using optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA). Participants with healthy retinas were recruited for ocular biometry, refraction, and RTVue XR Avanti OCTA imaging with the 3 × 3-mm protocol. The foveal and parafoveal SRVD and FAZA were quantified with custom software before and after correction for magnification error using the Littman and the modified Bennett formulae. Relative changes between corrected and uncorrected SRVD and FAZA were calculated. Forty subjects were enrolled and the median (range) age of the participants was 30 (18-74) years. The mean (range) spherical equivalent refractive error was -1.65 (-8.00 to +4.88) diopters and mean (range) axial length was 24.42 mm (21.27-28.85). Images from 13 eyes were excluded due to poor image quality leaving 67 for analysis. Relative changes in foveal and parafoveal SRVD and FAZA after correction ranged from -20% to +10%, -3% to +2%, and -20% to +51%, respectively. Image size correction in measurements of foveal SRVD and FAZA was greater than 5% in 51% and 74% of eyes, respectively. In contrast, 100% of eyes had less than 5% correction in measurements of parafoveal SRVD. Ocular biometry should be performed with OCTA to correct image magnification error induced by axial length variation. We advise caution when interpreting interocular and interindividual comparisons of SRVD and FAZA derived from OCTA without image size correction.

  5. Reproducibility of Macular Pigment Optical Density Measurement by Two-wave Length Auto-fluorescence in a Clinical Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Qi-Sheng; Bartsch, Dirk-Uwe G.; Espina, Mark; Alam, Mostafa; Camacho, Natalia; Mendoza, Nadia; Freeman, William

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Macular pigment, composed of lutein, zeaxanthin, and meso-zeaxanthin, is postulated to protect against age-related macular degeneration (AMD), likely due to filtering blue light and its antioxidant properties. Macular pigment optical density (MPOD) is reported to be associated with macular function evaluated by visual acuity and multifocal electroretinogram. Given the importance of macular pigment, reliable and accurate measurement methods are important. The main purpose of current study is to determine the reproducibility of MPOD measurement by two-wave length auto-fluorescence method using scanning laser ophthalmoscopy. Methods Sixty eight eyes of 39 persons were enrolled in the study, including 11 normal eyes, 16 eyes with wet AMD, 16 eyes with dry AMD, 11 eyes with macular edema due to diabetic mellitus, branch retinal vein occlusion or macular telangiectasia and 14 eyes with tractional maculopathy including vitreomacular traction, epiretinal membrane or macular hole. MPOD was measured with a two-wavelength (488 and 514 nm) auto-fluorescence method with the Spectralis HRA+OCT after pupil dilation. The measurement was repeated for each eye 10 minutes later. The Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Bland-Altman plot were used to assess the reproducibility between the two measurements. Results The mean MPOD at eccentricities of 1° and 2° was 0.36±0.17 (range: 0.04–0.69) and 0.15±0.08(range: −0.03, 0.35) for the first measurement and 0.35±0.17 (range: 0.02, 0.68) and 0.15±0.08 (range: −0.01, 0.33) for the second measurement respectively. The difference between the two measurements was not statistically significant, and the Bland-Altman plot showed 7.4% and 5.9% points outside the 95% limits of agreement, indicating an overall excellent reproducibility. Similarly, there is no significant difference between the first and second measurements of MPOD volume within eccentricities of 1°, 2° and 6° radius, and the Bland-Altman plot showed 8.8%, 2.9% and

  6. Retrieval of tropospheric NO2 vertical column densities and aerosol optical properties form MAXDOAS measurements in Yangtze River Delta, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Nan; Van. Roozendael, Michel; Ding, Aijun; Zhou, Bin; Hendrick, François; Shen, Yicheng; Wang, Tin; Valks, Pieter

    2014-05-01

    Air pollution is one of the most important environmental problems in developing Asian countries like China. Due to huge consumption of fossil fuels and rapid increase of traffic emissions in the past decades, many regions in China have been experiencing heavy air pollution. The Yangtze River Delta (YRD) region includes the mega-city Shanghai and the well-industrialized and urbanized areas of Zhejiang Province and Jiangsu Province, with over ten large cities, such as Hangzhou, Suzhou and Nanjing. Covering only 2% land area, this region produces over 20% of China's Gross Domestic Product (GDP) which makes it the most densely populated region and one of the most polluted regions in China. For instance, there more than 60% of a year was haze days with poor visibility in Shanghai over the last few years. In the YRD region, knowledge gaps still exist in the understanding of the source and transport of air pollutants because only few measurement studies have been conducted. MAX-DOAS measurements were performed in Shanghai city center and Wujiang (border of Shanghai and Jiangsu Province) from 2010 to 2012 and in Nanjing (capital of Jiangsu Province) from April 2013. A retrieval algorithm, based on an on-line implementation of the radiative transfer code LIDORT and the optimal estimation technique, has been used to provide information on aerosol extinction vertical profiles. The total aerosol optical depths (AODs) calculated from the retrieved profiles were compared to MODIS, AERONET and local PM measurements. The aerosol information was input to LIDORT to calculate NO2 air mass factors. The retrieved tropospheric NO2 vertical column densities (VCDs) were compared to in-situ and satellite NO2 measurements.

  7. Structural, electronic and optical properties of monoclinic Na2Ti3O7 from density functional theory calculations: A comparison with XRD and optical absorption measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araújo-Filho, Adailton A.; Silva, Fábio L.R.; Righi, Ariete; Silva, Mauricélio B. da; Silva, Bruno P.; Caetano, Ewerton W.S.; Freire, Valder N.

    2017-01-01

    Powder samples of bulk monoclinic sodium trititanate Na 2 Ti 3 O 7 were prepared carefully by solid state reaction, and its monoclinic P2 1 /m crystal structure and morphology were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. Moreover, the sodium trititanate main energy band gap was estimated as E g =3.51±0.01 eV employing UV–Vis spectroscopy, which is smaller than the measured 3.70 eV energy gap published previously by other authors. Aiming to achieve a better understanding of the experimental data, density functional theory (DFT) computations were performed within the local density and generalized gradient approximations (LDA and GGA, respectively) taking into account dispersion effects through the scheme of Tkatchenko and Scheffler (GGA+TS). Optimal lattice parameters, with deviations relative to measurements Δa=−0.06 Å, Δb=0.02 Å, and Δc=−0.09 Å, were obtained at the GGA level, which was then used to simulate the sodium trititanate electronic and optical properties. Indirect band transitions have led to a theoretical gap energy value of about 3.25 eV. Our results, however, differ from pioneer DFT results with respect to the specific Brillouin zone vectors for which the indirect transition with smallest energy value occurs. Effective masses for electrons and holes were also estimated along a set of directions in reciprocal space. Lastly, our calculations revealed a relatively large degree of optical isotropy for the Na 2 Ti 3 O 7 optical absorption and complex dielectric function. - Graphical abstract: Monoclinic sodium trititanate Na2Ti3O7 was characterized by experiment and dispersion-corrected DFT calculations. An indirect gap of 3.5 eV is predicted, with heavy electrons and anisotropic holes ruling its conductivity. - Highlights: • Monoclinic Na2Ti3O7 was characterized by experiment (XRD, SEM, UV–Vis spectroscopy). • DFT GGA+TS optimized geometry and optoelectronic properties were

  8. Reliability of a two-wavelength autofluorescence technique by Heidelberg Spectralis to measure macular pigment optical density in Asian subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obana, Akira; Gellermann, Werner; Gohto, Yuko; Seto, Takahiko; Sasano, Hiroyuki; Tanito, Masaki; Okazaki, Shigetoshi

    2018-03-01

    This study evaluates the accuracy of an objective two-wavelength fundus autofluorescence technique for the purpose of measuring the macular pigment optical density (MPOD) in Asian pigmented eyes. Potential differences between MPOD values obtained via autofluorescence technique and subjective heterochromatic photometry (HFP) were examined. Inter-examiner reproducibility between three examiners and test-retest reliability over five time points were also explored. Subjects were 27 healthy Japanese volunteers aged 24 to 58 (mean ± standard deviation, 40.2 ± 9.0) years. An MPOD module of the Spectralis MultiColor instrument configuration (Spectralis-MP) was used for the autofluorescence technique, and a Macular Metrics Densitometer (MM) was used for HFP. The mean MPOD values at 0.25° and 0.5° eccentricities using the Spectralis-MP were 0.51 ± 0.12 and 0.48 ± 0.13, respectively. In comparison, the MM based values were 0.72 ± 0.23 and 0.61 ± 0.25, respectively. High correlations between the Spectralis-MP and MM instrument were found (Pearson's correlation coefficients of 0.73 and 0.87 at 0.25° and 0.5° eccentricities, respectively), but there was a systematic bias: the MPOD values by MM method were significantly higher than those by Spectralis-MP at 0.25° eccentricity. High inter-examiner reproducibility and test-retest reliability were found for MM measurements at 0.5° eccentricity, but not at 0.25°. The Spectralis-MP showed less inter-examiner and test-retest variability than the MM instrument at 0.25° and 0.5° eccentricities. We conclude that the Spectralis-MP, given its high agreement with the HFP method and due to its higher reproducibility and reliability, is well suited for clinical measurements of MPOD levels in Asian pigmented eyes. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Optical absorption measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draggoo, V.G.; Morton, R.G.; Sawicki, R.H.; Bissinger, H.D.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes a non-intrusive method for measuring the temperature rise of optical elements under high laser power optical loading to determine the absorption coefficient. The method comprises irradiating the optical element with a high average power laser beam, viewing the optical element with an infrared camera to determine the temperature across the optical element and calculating the absorption of the optical element from the temperature

  10. Measurement of optical glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolau-Rebigan, S.

    1978-11-01

    The possibilities of measurement of the optical glasses parameters needed in building optical devices especially in lasers devices are presented. In the first chapter the general features of the main optical glasses as well as the modalities of obtaining them are given. Chapter two defines the optical glass parameters, and the third chapter describes the measuring methods of the optical glass parameters. Finally, the conclusions which point out the utilization of this paper are presented. (author)

  11. Density measures and additive property

    OpenAIRE

    Kunisada, Ryoichi

    2015-01-01

    We deal with finitely additive measures defined on all subsets of natural numbers which extend the asymptotic density (density measures). We consider a class of density measures which are constructed from free ultrafilters on natural numbers and study a certain additivity property of such density measures.

  12. Dissolved oxygen concentration profiles in the hyporheic zone through the use of a high density fiber optic measurement network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeder, W. J.; Quick, A. M.; Farrell, T. B.; Benner, S. G.; Feris, K. P.; Tonina, D.

    2013-12-01

    The hyporheic zone (HZ) is a potentially important source of the potent greenhouse gas, nitrous oxide (N2O); stream processes may account for up to 10% of global anthropogenic N2O emissions. However, mechanistic understanding and predictive quantification of this gas flux is hampered by complex temporally and spatially variable interactions between flow dynamics and biogeochemical processes. Reactive inorganic nitrogen (Nr) is typically present at low concentrations in natural stream waters, but many rural and urban streams suffer from an excess of Nr, typically in the form of ammonium (NH4+) and nitrate (NO3-). These reactive species are either assimilated by living biomass or transformed by microbial processes. The two primary microbial transformations of Nr are nitrification (NH4+ to NO3-) and denitrification (NO3- to N2). Denitrification, which occurs almost exclusively in the anoxic zone of the HZ, permanently removes between 30-70% of all Nr entering streams, other mechanisms may retain nitrogen. The mass transport of reactive species (i.e. O2, NO3- and N2O) by hyporheic flow strongly influences reaction rates, residence times, and subsequent N2O flux. By extension, stream flow and channel morphology presumably control, and may be effective predictors of, N2O generation rates. By recreating the stream processes in the University of Idaho flume, we are able to control the bed morphology, fluxes and residence times through the HZ and concentrations of Nr from exogenous (stream water) and endogenous (organic material in the streambed) sources. For the present experiment, the flume was divided into three streams, each with different morphologies (3, 6 and 9cm dunes) and all using the same source water. Stream water for this first experimental phase had no significant loading of Nr. As such, all reaction products were the result of endogenous sources of Nr. To measure dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations we deployed 120 channels of a novel, fiber-optic optode

  13. Precise measurements of spatial density distributions of damages introduced into GaP by MeV-electron beam irradiations based on its optical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, T.; Hashimoto, Y.; Nakanishi, Y.; Wada, T.

    1985-01-01

    GaP crystals were irradiated uniformly on their flat surfaces by 10 MeV-electrons. The 'below-gap' absorption coefficient Δαsub(b)(hν) and the normalized white-light optical density D/d in these samples increased linearly with a dose phi as Δαsub(b)(2.0) = 3.3 x 10 -16 phi and D/d = 1.42 x 10 -16 phi. The free electron density n in the conduction band estimated from the X 1 -> X 3 absorption band decreased with phi, and as the decrease in the free electron density Δn is equivalent to the density of introduced defects N, it could be expressed that N = Δn = Rsub(c)phi where the value of the carrier removal rate Rsub(c) was 5.8 cm -1 for the S-doped sample. These expressions lead to the basic relation that N is proportional to D/d as expressed in N = 4.1 x 10 16 D/d. Two-dimensional distributions of D/d were measured in the samples irradiated by collimated electron beams at 10 and 16 MeV by using a microdensitometer, and they were converted into the two-dimensional distributions of damage density according to the linear relation of N-D/d. Damages gradually spread laterally with increasing depth at first and then shrink. (author)

  14. Measurement of electron density and electron temperature of a cascaded arc plasma using laser Thomson scattering compared to an optical emission spectroscopic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, WANG; Cong, LI; Jielin, SHI; Xingwei, WU; Hongbin, DING

    2017-11-01

    As advanced linear plasma sources, cascaded arc plasma devices have been used to generate steady plasma with high electron density, high particle flux and low electron temperature. To measure electron density and electron temperature of the plasma device accurately, a laser Thomson scattering (LTS) system, which is generally recognized as the most precise plasma diagnostic method, has been established in our lab in Dalian University of Technology. The electron density has been measured successfully in the region of 4.5 × 1019 m-3 to 7.1 × 1020 m-3 and electron temperature in the region of 0.18 eV to 0.58 eV. For comparison, an optical emission spectroscopy (OES) system was established as well. The results showed that the electron excitation temperature (configuration temperature) measured by OES is significantly higher than the electron temperature (kinetic electron temperature) measured by LTS by up to 40% in the given discharge conditions. The results indicate that the cascaded arc plasma is recombining plasma and it is not in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). This leads to significant error using OES when characterizing the electron temperature in a non-LTE plasma.

  15. Raman spectroscopic measurements of CO2 density: Experimental calibration with high-pressure optical cell (HPOC) and fused silica capillary capsule (FSCC) with application to fluid inclusion observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Chou, I-Ming; Hu, W.; Burruss, Robert; Sun, Q.; Song, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful method for the determination of CO2 densities in fluid inclusions, especially for those with small size and/or low fluid density. The relationship between CO2 Fermi diad split (Δ, cm−1) and CO2 density (ρ, g/cm3) has been documented by several previous studies. However, significant discrepancies exist among these studies mainly because of inconsistent calibration procedures and lack of measurements for CO2fluids having densities between 0.21 and 0.75 g/cm3, where liquid and vapor phases coexist near room temperature.In this study, a high-pressure optical cell and fused silica capillary capsules were used to prepare pure CO2 samples with densities between 0.0472 and 1.0060 g/cm3. The measured CO2 Fermi diad splits were calibrated with two well established Raman bands of benzonitrile at 1192.6 and 1598.9 cm−1. The relationship between the CO2 Fermi diad split and density can be represented by: ρ = 47513.64243 − 1374.824414 × Δ + 13.25586152 × Δ2 − 0.04258891551 × Δ3(r2 = 0.99835, σ = 0.0253 g/cm3), and this relationship was tested by synthetic fluid inclusions and natural CO2-rich fluid inclusions. The effects of temperature and the presence of H2O and CH4 on this relationship were also examined.

  16. Measurement of loose powder density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhtar, S.; Ali, A.; Haider, A.; Farooque, M.

    2011-01-01

    Powder metallurgy is a conventional technique for making engineering articles from powders. Main objective is to produce final products with the highest possible uniform density, which depends on the initial loose powder characteristics. Producing, handling, characterizing and compacting materials in loose powder form are part of the manufacturing processes. Density of loose metallic or ceramic powder is an important parameter for die design. Loose powder density is required for calculating the exact mass of powder to fill the die cavity for producing intended green density of the powder compact. To fulfill this requirement of powder metallurgical processing, a loose powder density meter as per ASTM standards is designed and fabricated for measurement of density. The density of free flowing metallic powders can be determined using Hall flow meter funnel and density cup of 25 cm/sup 3/ volume. Density of metal powders like cobalt, manganese, spherical bronze and pure iron is measured and results are obtained with 99.9% accuracy. (author)

  17. High Spectral Density Optical Communication Technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Nakazawa, Masataka; Miyazaki, Tetsuya

    2010-01-01

    The latest hot topics of high-spectral density optical communication systems using digital coherent optical fibre communication technologies are covered by this book. History and meaning of a "renaissance" of the technology, requirements to the Peta-bit/s class "new generation network" are also covered in the first part of this book. The main topics treated are electronic and optical devices, digital signal processing including forward error correction, modulation formats as well as transmission and application systems. The book serves as a reference to researchers and engineers.

  18. Measuring single-cell density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, William H; Bryan, Andrea K; Diez-Silva, Monica; Suresh, Subra; Higgins, John M; Manalis, Scott R

    2011-07-05

    We have used a microfluidic mass sensor to measure the density of single living cells. By weighing each cell in two fluids of different densities, our technique measures the single-cell mass, volume, and density of approximately 500 cells per hour with a density precision of 0.001 g mL(-1). We observe that the intrinsic cell-to-cell variation in density is nearly 100-fold smaller than the mass or volume variation. As a result, we can measure changes in cell density indicative of cellular processes that would be otherwise undetectable by mass or volume measurements. Here, we demonstrate this with four examples: identifying Plasmodium falciparum malaria-infected erythrocytes in a culture, distinguishing transfused blood cells from a patient's own blood, identifying irreversibly sickled cells in a sickle cell patient, and identifying leukemia cells in the early stages of responding to a drug treatment. These demonstrations suggest that the ability to measure single-cell density will provide valuable insights into cell state for a wide range of biological processes.

  19. Role of Echogenic Amniotic Fluid Particles and Optical Density in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was aimed to correlate echogenic amniotic fluid particle size (AFPS) in late third trimester to fetal lung maturity and amniotic fluid optical density (AFOD) at labor. AFPS were measured with specified criteria by real time transabdominal USG (3.5MHz) while Amniotic Fluid Index (AFI) was measured during routine ...

  20. Amorphous silicon rich silicon nitride optical waveguides for high density integrated optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philipp, Hugh T.; Andersen, Karin Nordström; Svendsen, Winnie Edith

    2004-01-01

    Amorphous silicon rich silicon nitride optical waveguides clad in silica are presented as a high-index contrast platform for high density integrated optics. Performance of different cross-sectional geometries have been measured and are presented with regards to bending loss and insertion loss...

  1. Quadrature interferometry for plasma density measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warthen, B.J.; Shlachter, J.S.

    1995-01-01

    A quadrature interferometer has been used routinely in several pulsed power experiments to measure the line-averaged electron density. The optical source is a 30 mW, continuous wave Nd-YAG laser operating at 1,300 nm. The light is coupled directly to an optical fiber and split into reference and scene beams with a fiber splitter. The scene beam is transported to and from the plasma using single mode optical fibers up to 100 m in length. To simplify alignment through the plasma, the authors have used GRIN lenses on both the launch and receive sides of the single pass transmission diagnostic where this is possible. The return beam passes through a half-wave plate which is used to compensate for polarization rotation associated with slow (hour) time scale drift in the single mode fibers. The reference beam is sent through a quarter-wave plate to produce circular polarization; mixing of the reference and scene beams is accomplished using a non-polarizing beam splitter, and the interference signals are focused into additional fibers which relay the light to fast photodiodes. The quadrature optics allow for an unambiguous determination of the slope of the density changes at inflection points. All of the beam processing optics are located on a stable optical table which is remote and protected from the experiment. Final setup of the interferometer is facilitated by looking at the Lissajous figure generated from the two quadrature components. The authors have used this interferometer to diagnose the background density in the Pegasus-II power flow channel, to study the plasma plume generated in foil implosion experiments, to measure the plasma blowoff during implosions, and to understand the plasma formation mechanism in a fusion target plasma system

  2. Optical fuel spray measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillamo, H.

    2011-07-01

    Diesel fuel sprays, including fuel/air mixing and the physics of two-phase jet formation, are discussed in the thesis. The fuel/air mixing strongly affects emissions formation in spray combustion processes where the local combustion conditions dictate the emission formation. This study comprises optical measurements both in pressurized spray test rigs and in a running engine.The studied fuel injection was arranged with a common rail injection system and the injectors were operated with a solenoid-based injection valve. Both marine and heavy-duty diesel engine injectors were used in the study. Optical fuel spray measurements were carried out with a laser-based double-framing camera system. This kind of equipments is usually used for flow field measurements with Particle Image Velocimetry technique (PIV) as well as for backlight imaging. Fundamental fuel spray properties and spray formation were studied in spray test rigs. These measurements involved studies of mixing, atomization, and the flow field. Test rig measurements were used to study the effect of individual injection parameters and component designs. Measurements of the fuel spray flow field, spray penetration, spray tip velocity, spray angle, spray structure, droplet accumulation, and droplet size estimates are shown. Measurement campaign in a running optically accessible large-bore medium-speed engine was also carried out. The results from engine tests were compared with equivalent test rig measurements, as well as computational results, to evaluate the level of understanding of sprays. It was shown that transient spray has an acceleration and a deceleration phase. Successive flow field measurements (PIV) in optically dense diesel spray resulted in local and average velocity data of diesel sprays. Processing fuel spray generates a flow field to surrounding gas and entrainment of surrounding gas into fuel jet was also seen at the sides of the spray. Laser sheet imaging revealed the inner structure of diesel

  3. Method of measuring surface density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregor, J.

    1982-01-01

    A method is described of measuring surface density or thickness, preferably of coating layers, using radiation emitted by a suitable radionuclide, e.g., 241 Am. The radiation impinges on the measured material, e.g., a copper foil and in dependence on its surface density or thickness part of the flux of impinging radiation is reflected and part penetrates through the material. The radiation which has penetrated through the material excites in a replaceable adjustable backing characteristic radiation of an energy close to that of the impinging radiation (within +-30 keV). Part of the flux of the characteristic radiation spreads back to the detector, penetrates through the material in which in dependence on surface density or thickness of the coating layer it is partly absorbed. The flux of the penetrated characteristic radiation impinging on the face of the detector is a function of surface density or thickness. Only that part of the energy is evaluated of the energy spectrum which corresponds to the energy of characteristic radiation. (B.S.)

  4. Structural, electronic and optical properties of monoclinic Na{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 7} from density functional theory calculations: A comparison with XRD and optical absorption measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araújo-Filho, Adailton A. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Caixa Postal 6030, 60455-760 Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Silva, Fábio L.R.; Righi, Ariete [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG 31270-901 (Brazil); Silva, Mauricélio B. da; Silva, Bruno P. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Caixa Postal 6030, 60455-760 Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Caetano, Ewerton W.S., E-mail: ewcaetano@gmail.com [Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia do Ceará, 60040-531 Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Freire, Valder N. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Caixa Postal 6030, 60455-760 Fortaleza, CE (Brazil)

    2017-06-15

    Powder samples of bulk monoclinic sodium trititanate Na{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 7} were prepared carefully by solid state reaction, and its monoclinic P2{sub 1}/m crystal structure and morphology were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. Moreover, the sodium trititanate main energy band gap was estimated as E{sub g}=3.51±0.01 eV employing UV–Vis spectroscopy, which is smaller than the measured 3.70 eV energy gap published previously by other authors. Aiming to achieve a better understanding of the experimental data, density functional theory (DFT) computations were performed within the local density and generalized gradient approximations (LDA and GGA, respectively) taking into account dispersion effects through the scheme of Tkatchenko and Scheffler (GGA+TS). Optimal lattice parameters, with deviations relative to measurements Δa=−0.06 Å, Δb=0.02 Å, and Δc=−0.09 Å, were obtained at the GGA level, which was then used to simulate the sodium trititanate electronic and optical properties. Indirect band transitions have led to a theoretical gap energy value of about 3.25 eV. Our results, however, differ from pioneer DFT results with respect to the specific Brillouin zone vectors for which the indirect transition with smallest energy value occurs. Effective masses for electrons and holes were also estimated along a set of directions in reciprocal space. Lastly, our calculations revealed a relatively large degree of optical isotropy for the Na{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 7} optical absorption and complex dielectric function. - Graphical abstract: Monoclinic sodium trititanate Na2Ti3O7 was characterized by experiment and dispersion-corrected DFT calculations. An indirect gap of 3.5 eV is predicted, with heavy electrons and anisotropic holes ruling its conductivity. - Highlights: • Monoclinic Na2Ti3O7 was characterized by experiment (XRD, SEM, UV–Vis spectroscopy). • DFT GGA+TS optimized geometry and

  5. Laser produced plasma density measurement by Mach-Zehnder interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaziri, A.; Kohanzadeh, Y.; Mosavi, R.K.

    1976-06-01

    This report describes an optical interferometric method of measuring the refractive index of the laser-produced plasma, giving estimates of its electron density. The plasma is produced by the interaction of a high power pulsed CO 2 laser beam with a solid target in the vacuum. The time varying plasma has a transient electron density. This transient electron density gives rise to a changing plasma refractive index. A Mach-Zehnder ruby laser interferometer is used to measure this refractive index change

  6. Examination of the constancy of the medium optical density of conventional chest radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stieve, F.E.; Rupp, N.; Niederhofer, F.; Gfirtner, H.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the medium optical density of conventional chest radiographs is constant. Materials and Methods: 47 PA chest radiographs were digitized to measure the optical density and its dynamic range of normal and pathologically altered lungs. Results: For constant exposure factors and a correctly positioned region of interest, the medium optical density deviates only minimal despite differences in AP chest diameter, entry dose and dynamic range, and is largely independent of the pathologic pulmonary findings. Conclusion: Digitization of the radiograph enables the determination of the physical parameters used to operate the imaging system, such as medium optical density, image contrast, image latitude and density distribution, in accordance to the guidelines of the German Medical Association. If the region of interest encompasses the clinically relevant region of the lung, the measured value of the optical density corresponds with only minor variation to the average value of the entire lung region. (orig.) [de

  7. Cone photopigment in older subjects: decreased optical density in early age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, Ann E.; Burns, Stephen A.; Weiter, John J.

    2002-01-01

    We measured changes to cone photoreceptors in patients with early age-related macular degeneration. The data of 53 patients were compared with normative data for color matching measurements of long- and middle-wavelength-sensitive cones in the central macula. A four-parameter model quantified cone photopigment optical density and kinetics. Cone photopigment optical density was on average less for the patients than for normal subjects and was uncorrelated with visual acuity. More light was needed to reduce the photopigment density by 50% in the steady state for patients. These results imply that cone photopigment optical density is reduced by factors other than slowed kinetics.

  8. Polarized light and optical measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Clarke, D N; Ter Haar, D

    2013-01-01

    Polarized Light and Optical Measurement is a five-chapter book that begins with a self-consistent conceptual picture of the phenomenon of polarization. Chapter 2 describes a number of interactions of light and matter used in devising optical elements in polarization studies. Specific optical elements are given in Chapter 3. The last two chapters explore the measurement of the state of polarization and the various roles played in optical instrumentation by polarization and polarization-sensitive elements. This book will provide useful information in this field of interest for research workers,

  9. PWFA plasma source - interferometric diagnostics for Li vapor density measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivakumaran, V.; Mohandas, K.K.; Singh, Sneha; Ravi Kumar, A.V.

    2015-01-01

    A prototype (40 cm long) plasma source based on Li heat pipe oven has been developed for the Plasma Wakefield Acceleration (PWFA) experiments at IPR (IPR), Gujarat as a part of the ongoing Accelerator Programme. Li vapor in the oven is produced by heating solid Li in helium buffer gas. A uniform column of Li plasma is generated by UV photo ionization (193 nm) of the Li vapor in the heat pipe oven. In these experiments, an accurate measurement of Li vapor density is important as it has got a direct consequence on the plasma electron density. In the present experiment, the vapor density is measured optically by using Hook method (spectrally resolved white light interferometry). The hook like structure formed near the vicinity of the Li 670.8 nm resonance line was recorded with a white light Mach Zehnder interferometer crossed with an imaging spectrograph to estimate the Li vapor density. The vapor density measurements have been carried out as a function of external oven temperature and the He buffer gas pressure. This technique has the advantage of being insensitive to line broadening and line shape, and its high dynamic range even with optically thick absorption line. Here, we present the line integrated Lithium vapor density measurement using Hook method and also compare the same with other optical diagnostic techniques (White light absorption and UV absorption) for Li vapor density measurements. (author)

  10. Measurement of nucleation site density, bubble departure diameter and frequency in pool boiling of water using high-speed infrared and optical cameras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerardi, Craig; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Hu, Lin-wen; McKrell, Thomas [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)], e-mail: jacopo@mit.edu

    2009-07-01

    A high-speed video and IR thermometry based technique has been used to obtain time and space resolved information on bubble nucleation and boiling heat transfer. This approach provides a fundamental and systematic method for investigating nucleate boiling in a very detailed fashion. Data on bubble departure diameter and frequency, growth and wait times, and nucleation site density are measured with relative ease. The data have been compared to the traditional decades-old and poorly-validated nucleate-boiling models and correlations. The agreement between the data and the models is relatively good. This study also shows that new insights into boiling heat transfer mechanisms can be obtained with the present technique. For example, our data and analysis suggest that a large contribution to bubble growth comes from heat transfer through the superheated liquid layer in addition to micro layer evaporation. (author)

  11. Measurement of nucleation site density, bubble departure diameter and frequency in pool boiling of water using high-speed infrared and optical cameras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerardi, Craig; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Hu, Lin-wen; McKrell, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    A high-speed video and IR thermometry based technique has been used to obtain time and space resolved information on bubble nucleation and boiling heat transfer. This approach provides a fundamental and systematic method for investigating nucleate boiling in a very detailed fashion. Data on bubble departure diameter and frequency, growth and wait times, and nucleation site density are measured with relative ease. The data have been compared to the traditional decades-old and poorly-validated nucleate-boiling models and correlations. The agreement between the data and the models is relatively good. This study also shows that new insights into boiling heat transfer mechanisms can be obtained with the present technique. For example, our data and analysis suggest that a large contribution to bubble growth comes from heat transfer through the superheated liquid layer in addition to micro layer evaporation. (author)

  12. Power Spectral Density Specification and Analysis of Large Optical Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidick, Erkin

    2009-01-01

    The 2-dimensional Power Spectral Density (PSD) can be used to characterize the mid- and the high-spatial frequency components of the surface height errors of an optical surface. We found it necessary to have a complete, easy-to-use approach for specifying and evaluating the PSD characteristics of large optical surfaces, an approach that allows one to specify the surface quality of a large optical surface based on simulated results using a PSD function and to evaluate the measured surface profile data of the same optic in comparison with those predicted by the simulations during the specification-derivation process. This paper provides a complete mathematical description of PSD error, and proposes a new approach in which a 2-dimentional (2D) PSD is converted into a 1-dimentional (1D) one by azimuthally averaging the 2D-PSD. The 1D-PSD calculated this way has the same unit and the same profile as the original PSD function, thus allows one to compare the two with each other directly.

  13. Precision density measuring equipment: Design, selected examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasinski, T.; Patzelt, K.; Dieker, C.; Hansen, H.; Wenzl, H.; Schober, T.

    1987-06-01

    The report deals with solids density measurement using the pyknometer, the hydrostatic balance, or the floating specimen method. The mathematical relations are derived, and error sources are shown. A detailed description is given of a measuring set-up for measuring the density of solids and liquids. An error calculation is presented. After explaining the determination of density of a standard solid body, the report describes the density measurement of monocrystalline germanium, of niobium-tritide, Ni 3 Al, Ge-Si, and gallium arsenide, the determination of space-lattice expansion by hydrogen isotopes, and of the purity of H-D mixtures. (GG) [de

  14. Measure and dimension functions: measurability and densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattila, Pertti; Mauldin, R. Daniel

    1997-01-01

    During the past several years, new types of geometric measure and dimension have been introduced; the packing measure and dimension, see [Su], [Tr] and [TT1]. These notions are playing an increasingly prevalent role in various aspects of dynamics and measure theory. Packing measure is a sort of dual of Hausdorff measure in that it is defined in terms of packings rather than coverings. However, in contrast to Hausdorff measure, the usual definition of packing measure requires two limiting procedures, first the construction of a premeasure and then a second standard limiting process to obtain the measure. This makes packing measure somewhat delicate to deal with. The question arises as to whether there is some simpler method for defining packing measure and dimension. In this paper, we find a basic limitation on this possibility. We do this by determining the descriptive set-theoretic complexity of the packing functions. Whereas the Hausdorff dimension function on the space of compact sets is Borel measurable, the packing dimension function is not. On the other hand, we show that the packing dimension functions are measurable with respect to the [sigma]-algebra generated by the analytic sets. Thus, the usual sorts of measurability properties used in connection with Hausdorff measure, for example measures of sections and projections, remain true for packing measure.

  15. Flux density calibration in diffuse optical tomographic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Samir Kumar; Rajan, Kanhirodan; Vasu, Ram M

    2013-02-01

    The solution of the forward equation that models the transport of light through a highly scattering tissue material in diffuse optical tomography (DOT) using the finite element method gives flux density (Φ) at the nodal points of the mesh. The experimentally measured flux (Umeasured) on the boundary over a finite surface area in a DOT system has to be corrected to account for the system transfer functions (R) of various building blocks of the measurement system. We present two methods to compensate for the perturbations caused by R and estimate true flux density (Φ) from Umeasuredcal. In the first approach, the measurement data with a homogeneous phantom (Umeasuredhomo) is used to calibrate the measurement system. The second scheme estimates the homogeneous phantom measurement using only the measurement from a heterogeneous phantom, thereby eliminating the necessity of a homogeneous phantom. This is done by statistically averaging the data (Umeasuredhetero) and redistributing it to the corresponding detector positions. The experiments carried out on tissue mimicking phantom with single and multiple inhomogeneities, human hand, and a pork tissue phantom demonstrate the robustness of the approach.

  16. Mammography density estimation with automated volumetic breast density measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Su Yeon; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kim, Min Jung; Moon, Hee Jung

    2014-01-01

    To compare automated volumetric breast density measurement (VBDM) with radiologists' evaluations based on the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS), and to identify the factors associated with technical failure of VBDM. In this study, 1129 women aged 19-82 years who underwent mammography from December 2011 to January 2012 were included. Breast density evaluations by radiologists based on BI-RADS and by VBDM (Volpara Version 1.5.1) were compared. The agreement in interpreting breast density between radiologists and VBDM was determined based on four density grades (D1, D2, D3, and D4) and a binary classification of fatty (D1-2) vs. dense (D3-4) breast using kappa statistics. The association between technical failure of VBDM and patient age, total breast volume, fibroglandular tissue volume, history of partial mastectomy, the frequency of mass > 3 cm, and breast density was analyzed. The agreement between breast density evaluations by radiologists and VBDM was fair (k value = 0.26) when the four density grades (D1/D2/D3/D4) were used and moderate (k value = 0.47) for the binary classification (D1-2/D3-4). Twenty-seven women (2.4%) showed failure of VBDM. Small total breast volume, history of partial mastectomy, and high breast density were significantly associated with technical failure of VBDM (p 0.001 to 0.015). There is fair or moderate agreement in breast density evaluation between radiologists and VBDM. Technical failure of VBDM may be related to small total breast volume, a history of partial mastectomy, and high breast density.

  17. Effects of Environmental Factors on the Growth, Optical Density and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . C. vulgaris was cultivated in sterilized natural seawater enriched with F/2-Si medium. Then grow in bucket, tub and photobioreactor (PBR) in outdoor condition. The daily routine work consisted of culture checkups of optical density, biomass ...

  18. Optical sensor for measuring American Lobster vitality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomassetti, Brian R. A.; Vetelino, John F.

    2011-01-01

    The vitality of the American Lobster (Homarus americanus) is correlated to the total hemolymph protein (THP) in lobster hemolymph (blood). The standard technique for determining lobster vitality is to draw blood from a lobster and measure THP with a refractometer. This technique is invasive and endangers the lobster's health since blood must be drawn from the lobster. In the present work an optical sensor is developed to measure a lobster's vitality in vivo. It is comprised of a broadband light source, a monochromator, a fiber optic reflection probe, a spectrometer and a computer. This sensor measures protein concentrations by exciting a lobster with 280 nm and 334 nm wavelength light sources and measuring the corresponding absorbance peaks for THP and the fluorescence peak for hemocyanin (Hc), the majority protein in hemolymph. In this work several lobsters are tested. For each lobster, absorbance and fluorescence peaks are measured using the sensor and compared to protein concentrations measured using a refractometer. It is found that the shell thickness and muscle density, which correspond directly to protein concentration and the molting stage of the lobster have a significant effect on the absorbance and fluorescence measurements. It is also found that within specific molting stages, such as pre-molt and post-molt, protein concentration measured with a refractometer correlates linearly to absorbance and fluorescence measurements with the optical sensor.

  19. Optical Sensor for Measuring American Lobster Vitality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomassetti, Brian R. A.; Vetelino, John F.

    2011-06-01

    The vitality of the American Lobster (Homarus americanus) is correlated to the total hemolymph protein (THP) in lobster hemolymph (blood). The standard technique for determining lobster vitality is to draw blood from a lobster and measure THP with a refractometer. This technique is invasive and endangers the lobster's health since blood must be drawn from the lobster. In the present work an optical sensor is developed to measure a lobster's vitality in vivo. It is comprised of a broadband light source, a monochromator, a fiber optic reflection probe, a spectrometer and a computer. This sensor measures protein concentrations by exciting a lobster with 280 nm and 334 nm wavelength light sources and measuring the corresponding absorbance peaks for THP and the fluorescence peak for hemocyanin (Hc), the majority protein in hemolymph. In this work several lobsters are tested. For each lobster, absorbance and fluorescence peaks are measured using the sensor and compared to protein concentrations measured using a refractometer. It is found that the shell thickness and muscle density, which correspond directly to protein concentration and the molting stage of the lobster have a significant effect on the absorbance and fluorescence measurements. It is also found that within specific molting stages, such as pre-molt and post-molt, protein concentration measured with a refractometer correlates linearly to absorbance and fluorescence measurements with the optical sensor.

  20. Macular pigment optical density is related to serum lutein in retinitis pigmentosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purpose: To determine whether macular pigment optical density (MPOD) is related to the degree of cystoid macular edema (CME) in patients with retinitis pigmentosa. Methods: We measured MPOD with heterochromatic flicker photometry and central foveal retinal thickness with optical coherence tomography...

  1. Electron density and gas density measurements in a millimeter-wave discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaub, S. C., E-mail: sschaub@mit.edu; Hummelt, J. S.; Guss, W. C.; Shapiro, M. A.; Temkin, R. J. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 167 Albany St., Bldg. NW16, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Electron density and neutral gas density have been measured in a non-equilibrium air breakdown plasma using optical emission spectroscopy and two-dimensional laser interferometry, respectively. A plasma was created with a focused high frequency microwave beam in air. Experiments were run with 110 GHz and 124.5 GHz microwaves at powers up to 1.2 MW. Microwave pulses were 3 μs long at 110 GHz and 2.2 μs long at 124.5 GHz. Electron density was measured over a pressure range of 25 to 700 Torr as the input microwave power was varied. Electron density was found to be close to the critical density, where the collisional plasma frequency is equal to the microwave frequency, over the pressure range studied and to vary weakly with input power. Neutral gas density was measured over a pressure range from 150 to 750 Torr at power levels high above the threshold for initiating breakdown. The two-dimensional structure of the neutral gas density was resolved. Intense, localized heating was found to occur hundreds of nanoseconds after visible plasma formed. This heating led to neutral gas density reductions of greater than 80% where peak plasma densities occurred. Spatial structure and temporal dynamics of gas heating at atmospheric pressure were found to agree well with published numerical simulations.

  2. Electron density and gas density measurements in a millimeter-wave discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaub, S. C.; Hummelt, J. S.; Guss, W. C.; Shapiro, M. A.; Temkin, R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Electron density and neutral gas density have been measured in a non-equilibrium air breakdown plasma using optical emission spectroscopy and two-dimensional laser interferometry, respectively. A plasma was created with a focused high frequency microwave beam in air. Experiments were run with 110 GHz and 124.5 GHz microwaves at powers up to 1.2 MW. Microwave pulses were 3 μs long at 110 GHz and 2.2 μs long at 124.5 GHz. Electron density was measured over a pressure range of 25 to 700 Torr as the input microwave power was varied. Electron density was found to be close to the critical density, where the collisional plasma frequency is equal to the microwave frequency, over the pressure range studied and to vary weakly with input power. Neutral gas density was measured over a pressure range from 150 to 750 Torr at power levels high above the threshold for initiating breakdown. The two-dimensional structure of the neutral gas density was resolved. Intense, localized heating was found to occur hundreds of nanoseconds after visible plasma formed. This heating led to neutral gas density reductions of greater than 80% where peak plasma densities occurred. Spatial structure and temporal dynamics of gas heating at atmospheric pressure were found to agree well with published numerical simulations.

  3. Absolute density measurements in the middle atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rapp

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available In the last ten years a total of 25 sounding rockets employing ionization gauges have been launched at high latitudes ( ~ 70° N to measure total atmospheric density and its small scale fluctuations in an altitude range between 70 and 110 km. While the determination of small scale fluctuations is unambiguous, the total density analysis has been complicated in the past by aerodynamical disturbances leading to densities inside the sensor which are enhanced compared to atmospheric values. Here, we present the results of both Monte Carlo simulations and wind tunnel measurements to quantify this aerodynamical effect. The comparison of the resulting ‘ram-factor’ profiles with empirically determined density ratios of ionization gauge measurements and falling sphere measurements provides excellent agreement. This demonstrates both the need, but also the possibility, to correct aerodynamical influences on measurements from sounding rockets. We have determined a total of 20 density profiles of the mesosphere-lower-thermosphere (MLT region. Grouping these profiles according to season, a listing of mean density profiles is included in the paper. A comparison with density profiles taken from the reference atmospheres CIRA86 and MSIS90 results in differences of up to 40%. This reflects that current reference atmospheres are a significant potential error source for the determination of mixing ratios of, for example, trace gas constituents in the MLT region.Key words. Middle atmosphere (composition and chemistry; pressure, density, and temperature; instruments and techniques

  4. Absolute density measurements in the middle atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rapp

    Full Text Available In the last ten years a total of 25 sounding rockets employing ionization gauges have been launched at high latitudes ( ~ 70° N to measure total atmospheric density and its small scale fluctuations in an altitude range between 70 and 110 km. While the determination of small scale fluctuations is unambiguous, the total density analysis has been complicated in the past by aerodynamical disturbances leading to densities inside the sensor which are enhanced compared to atmospheric values. Here, we present the results of both Monte Carlo simulations and wind tunnel measurements to quantify this aerodynamical effect. The comparison of the resulting ‘ram-factor’ profiles with empirically determined density ratios of ionization gauge measurements and falling sphere measurements provides excellent agreement. This demonstrates both the need, but also the possibility, to correct aerodynamical influences on measurements from sounding rockets. We have determined a total of 20 density profiles of the mesosphere-lower-thermosphere (MLT region. Grouping these profiles according to season, a listing of mean density profiles is included in the paper. A comparison with density profiles taken from the reference atmospheres CIRA86 and MSIS90 results in differences of up to 40%. This reflects that current reference atmospheres are a significant potential error source for the determination of mixing ratios of, for example, trace gas constituents in the MLT region.

    Key words. Middle atmosphere (composition and chemistry; pressure, density, and temperature; instruments and techniques

  5. Fast response densitometer for measuring liquid density

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    Densitometer was developed which produces linear voltage proportional to changes in density of flowing liquid hydrogen. Unit has fast response time and good system stability, statistical variation, and thermal equilibrium. System accuracy is 2 percent of total density span. Basic design may be altered to include measurement of other flowing materials.

  6. Device for measuring fission product density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneda, Mitsunori.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the fission product density of xenon or the like and enable measurement of real time of fission product density in a reactor by calculating the disintegration and annihilation of the fission product on the basis of neutron detected output. Constitution: The neutron flux in a reactor is detected by a detector, and applied to first and second density calculators. Second fission product density signal of xenon or the like outputted from first device is again inputted to the device to form an annihilation signal due to disintegration to determine the present density of the second fission product of xenon or the like corresponding to the decrease of the neutron due to the poison of xeron or the like. Similarly, second device determines the first fission product density of iodine or the like. (Sekiya, K.)

  7. Optical measurements on contaminated surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonham, T. E.; Schmitt, R. J.; Linford, R. M. F.

    1975-01-01

    A bidirectional reflectometer system was developed for in situ measurements of the changes in spectral reflectance of surfaces contaminated with films of organic materials. The system permits experiments with films of controlled thickness in an environment that simulates the thermal, radiation, and vacuum conditions of space. The mechanical and optical construction of the reflectometer are discussed in detail, and actual data curves are used to illustrate its operation and performance.

  8. Quantum measurement in quantum optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimble, H.J.

    1993-01-01

    Recent progress in the generation and application of manifestly quantum or nonclassical states of the electromagnetic field is reviewed with emphasis on the research of the Quantum Optics Group at Caltech. In particular, the possibilities for spectroscopy with non-classical light are discussed both in terms of improved quantitative measurement capabilities and for the fundamental alteration of atomic radiative processes. Quantum correlations for spatially extended systems are investigated in a variety of experiments which utilize nondegenerate parametric down conversion. Finally, the prospects for measurement of the position of a free mass with precision beyond the standard quantum limit are briefly considered. (author). 38 refs., 1 fig

  9. Artefacts for optical surface measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Stuart; Beraldin, J.-Angelo; Brownhill, Andrew; MacDonald, Lindsay

    2011-07-01

    Flexible manufacturing technologies are supporting the routine production of components with freeform surfaces in a wide variety of materials and surface finishes. Such surfaces may be exploited for both aesthetic and performance criteria for a wide range of industries, for example automotive, aircraft, small consumer goods and medial components. In order to ensure conformance between manufactured part and digital design it is necessary to understand, validate and promote best practice of the available measurement technologies. Similar, but currently less quantifiable, measurement requirements also exist in heritage, museum and fine art recording where objects can be individually hand crafted to extremely fine levels of detail. Optical 3D measurement systems designed for close range applications are typified by one or more illumination sources projecting a spot, line or structured light pattern onto a surface or surfaces of interest. Reflections from the projected light are detected in one or more imaging devices and measurements made concerning the location, intensity and optionally colour of the image. Coordinates of locations on the surface may be computed either directly from an understanding of the illumination and imaging geometry or indirectly through analysis of the spatial frequencies of the projected pattern. Regardless of sensing configuration some independent means is necessary to ensure that measurement capability will meet the requirements of a given level of object recording and is consistent for variations in surface properties and structure. As technologies mature, guidelines for best practice are emerging, most prominent at the current time being the German VDI/VDE 2634 and ISO/DIS 10360-8 guidelines. This considers state of the art capabilities for independent validation of optical non-contact measurement systems suited to the close range measurement of table top sized manufactured or crafted objects.

  10. Crowd Analysis by Using Optical Flow and Density Based Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santoro, Francesco; Pedro, Sergio; Tan, Zheng-Hua

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present a system to detect and track crowds in a video sequence captured by a camera. In a first step, we compute optical flows by means of pyramidal Lucas-Kanade feature tracking. Afterwards, a density based clustering is used to group similar vectors. In the last step...

  11. Interocular agreement in melanin and macular pigment optical density.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanis, M.J.; Berendschot, T.T.J.M.; van Norren, D.

    2007-01-01

    Macular pigment (MP) and melanin possibly protect the macular area by absorbing blue light and acting as antioxidants. Because little is known about the interocular correlation of melanin, we determined its optical density (MOD) in both eyes of healthy subjects using fundus reflectometry. The

  12. High-Density Near-Field Optical Disc Recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoda, Masataka; Saito, Kimihiro; Ishimoto, Tsutomu; Kondo, Takao; Nakaoki, Ariyoshi; Ide, Naoki; Furuki, Motohiro; Takeda, Minoru; Akiyama, Yuji; Shimouma, Takashi; Yamamoto, Masanobu

    2005-05-01

    We developed a high-density near-field optical recording disc system using a solid immersion lens. The near-field optical pick-up consists of a solid immersion lens with a numerical aperture of 1.84. The laser wavelength for recording is 405 nm. In order to realize the near-field optical recording disc, we used a phase-change recording media and a molded polycarbonate substrate. A clear eye pattern of 112 GB capacity with 160 nm track pitch and 50 nm bit length was observed. The equivalent areal density is 80.6 Gbit/in2. The bottom bit error rate of 3 tracks-write was 4.5× 10-5. The readout power margin and the recording power margin were ± 30.4% and ± 11.2%, respectively.

  13. NASA's Optical Measurement Program 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowardin, H.; Lederer, S.; Stansbery, G.; Seitzer, P.; Buckalew, B.; Abercromby, K.; Barker, E.

    2014-01-01

    The Optical Measurements Group (OMG) within the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office (ODPO) addresses U.S. National Space Policy goals by monitoring and characterizing debris. Since 2001, the OMG has used the Michigan Orbital Debris Survey Telescope (MODEST) at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in Chile for general orbital debris survey. The 0.6-m Schmidt MODEST provides calibrated astronomical data of GEO targets, both catalogued and uncatalogued debris, with excellent image quality. The data are utilized by the ODPO modeling group and are included in the Orbital Debris Engineering Model (ORDEM) v. 3.0. MODEST and the CTIO/SMARTS (Small and Moderate Aperture Research Telescope System) 0.9 m both acquire filter photometric data, as well as synchronously observing targets in selected optical filters. This information provides data used in material composition studies as well as longer orbital arc data on the same target, without time delay or bias from a rotating, tumbling, or spinning target. NASA, in collaboration with the University of Michigan, began using the twin 6.5-m Magellan telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile for deep imaging (Baade) and spectroscopic data (Clay) in 2011. Through the data acquired on Baade, debris have been detected that are 3 magnitudes fainter than detections with MODEST, while the data from Clay provide better resolved information used in material characterization analyses via selected bandpasses. To better characterize and model optical data, the Optical Measurements Center (OMC) at NASA/JSC has been in operation since 2005, resulting in a database of comparison laboratory data. The OMC is designed to emulate illumination conditions in space using equipment and techniques that parallel telescopic observations and source-target-sensor orientations. Lastly, the OMG is building the Meter Class Autonomous Telescope (MCAT) at Ascension Island. The 1.3-m telescope is designed to observe GEO and LEO targets, using a

  14. Fiber optic chemical sensors: The evolution of high- density fiber-optic DNA microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Jane A.

    2001-06-01

    Sensors were developed for multianalyte monitoring, fermentation monitoring, lactate analysis, remote oxygen detection for use in bioremediation monitoring and in a fuel spill clean-up project, heavy metal analysis, and high density DNA microarrays. The major focus of this thesis involved creating and improving high-density DNA gene arrays. Fiber optic sensors are created using fluorescent indicators, polymeric supports, and optical fiber substrates. The fluorescent indicator is entrapped in a polymer layer and attached to the tip of the optical fiber. The tip of the fiber bearing the sensing layer (the distal end) is placed in the sample of interest while the other end of the fiber (the proximal end) is connected to an analysis system. Any length of fiber can be used without compromising the integrity or sensitivity of the system. A fiber optic oxygen sensor was designed incorporating an oxygen sensitive fluorescent dye and a gas permeable polymer attached to an optical fiber. The construction simplicity and ruggedness of the sensor enabled its deployment for in situ chemical oxidation and bioremediation studies. Optical fibers were also used as the substrate to detect biomolecules in solution. To monitor bioprocesses, the production of the analyte of interest must be coupled with a species that is optically measurable. For example, oxygen is consumed in many metabolic functions. The fiber optic oxygen sensor is equipped with an additional sensing layer. Upon contact with a specific biochemical in the sample, a reaction occurs in the additional sensing layer that either consumes or produces oxygen. This dual layer system was used to monitor the presence of lactate, an important metabolite for clinical and bioprocess analysis. In many biological and environmental systems, the generation of one species occurs coincidentally with the generation or consumption of another species. A multianalyte sensor was prepared that can monitor the simultaneous activity of pH, CO2

  15. Optical properties of two-dimensional charge density wave materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, Charles; Karbassi, Sara; Friedemann, Sven; da Como, Enrico

    Titanium diselenide (TiSe2) is a member of the layered transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) materials. It exhibits unusual chiral charge ordering below 190 K after undergoing an initial phase transition to a commensurate (2 x 2 x 2) charge density wave (CDW) at 200 K which is enhanced further in the monolayer. Recently, the first evidence of chirality in a CDW system was discovered in this material by scanning tunneling microscopy and time-resolved reflectivity experiments, where separate left and right handed charge-ordered domains were found to exist within a single sample. We have prepared single crystals of 1T-TiSe2 using iodine vapour transport, and confirmed their quality by x-ray analysis and charge transport measurements. Using a combination of polarised optical spectroscopy techniques in the mid to far infrared (4 to 700 meV photon energy), we have measured an anisotropy relating to the CDW gap. We discuss the results on the basis of chiral domains with different handedness and the nature of the CDW transition.

  16. Apparatus for measurement of tree core density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blincow, D.W.

    1975-01-01

    Apparatus is described for direct measurement of the density of a core sample from a tree. A radiation source and detector with a receptacle for the core therebetween, an integrator unit for the detector output, and an indicating meter driven by the integrator unit are described

  17. Measuring Air Density in the Introductory Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calza, G.; Gratton, L. M.; Lopez-Arias, T.; Oss, S.

    2010-01-01

    The measurement of the mass, or the density, of air can easily be done with very simple materials and offers many interesting phenomena for discussion--buoyancy and its effects being the most obvious but not the only one. Many interesting considerations can be done regarding the behavior of gases, the effect of the external conditions in the…

  18. Acoustic levitation methods for density measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, E. H.; Hsu, C. J.

    1986-01-01

    The capability of ultrasonic levitators operating in air to perform density measurements has been demonstrated. The remote determination of the density of ordinary liquids as well as low density solid metals can be carried out using levitated samples with size on the order of a few millimeters and at a frequency of 20 kHz. Two basic methods may be used. The first one is derived from a previously known technique developed for acoustic levitation in liquid media, and is based on the static equilibrium position of levitated samples in the earth's gravitational field. The second approach relies on the dynamic interaction between a levitated sample and the acoustic field. The first technique appears more accurate (1 percent uncertainty), but the latter method is directly applicable to a near gravity-free environment such as that found in space.

  19. Measurement of the lunar neutron density profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woolum, D.S.; Burnett, D.S.; Furst, M.; Weiss, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    An in situ measurement of the lunar neutron density from 20 to 400 g cm -2 depth below the lunar surface was made by the Apollo 17 Lunar Neutron Probe Experiment (LNPE) using particle tracks produced by the 10 B (n,α) 7 Li reaction. Both the absolute magnitude and the depth profile of the neutron density are in good agreement with theoretical calculations by Lingenfelter, Canfield, and Hampel. However, relatively small deviations between experiment and theory in the effect of Cd absorption on the neutron density and in the relative 149 Sm to 157 Gd capture rates reported previously (Russ et al., 1972) imply that the true lunar 157 Gd capture rate is about one half of that calculated theoretically. (Auth.)

  20. Optically Addressed Nanostructures for High Density Data Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-14

    beam to sub-wavelength resolutions. X. Refereed Journal Publications I. M. D. Stenner , D. J. Gauthier, and M. A. Neifeld, "The speed of information in a...profiles for high-density optical data storage," Optics Communications, Vol.253, pp.56-69, 2005. 5. M. D. Stenner , D. J. Gauthier, and M. A. Neifeld, "Fast...causal information transmission in a medium with a slow group velocity," Physical Review Letters, Vol.94, February 2005. 6. M. D. Stenner , M. A

  1. Modal decomposition for measuring the orbital angular momentum density of light

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schulze, C

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel technique to measure the orbital angular momentum (OAM) density of light. The technique is based on modal decomposition, enabling the complete reconstruction of optical fields, including the reconstruction of the beams Poynting...

  2. Development of theoretical oxygen saturation calibration curve based on optical density ratio and optical simulation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumadi, Nur Anida; Beng, Gan Kok; Ali, Mohd Alauddin Mohd; Zahedi, Edmond; Morsin, Marlia

    2017-09-01

    The implementation of surface-based Monte Carlo simulation technique for oxygen saturation (SaO2) calibration curve estimation is demonstrated in this paper. Generally, the calibration curve is estimated either from the empirical study using animals as the subject of experiment or is derived from mathematical equations. However, the determination of calibration curve using animal is time consuming and requires expertise to conduct the experiment. Alternatively, an optical simulation technique has been used widely in the biomedical optics field due to its capability to exhibit the real tissue behavior. The mathematical relationship between optical density (OD) and optical density ratios (ODR) associated with SaO2 during systole and diastole is used as the basis of obtaining the theoretical calibration curve. The optical properties correspond to systolic and diastolic behaviors were applied to the tissue model to mimic the optical properties of the tissues. Based on the absorbed ray flux at detectors, the OD and ODR were successfully calculated. The simulation results of optical density ratio occurred at every 20 % interval of SaO2 is presented with maximum error of 2.17 % when comparing it with previous numerical simulation technique (MC model). The findings reveal the potential of the proposed method to be used for extended calibration curve study using other wavelength pair.

  3. Density and temperature measurement using CARS spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirth, A.; Vollrath, K.

    1979-01-01

    Coherent Anti Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) a technique derived from nonlinear optics offers two major advantages compared with the spontaneous Raman method: improved scattering efficiency and spatial coherence of the scattered signal. The theory of the coherent mixing in resonant media serves as a quantitative background of the CARS technique. A review of several applications on plasma physics and gasdynamics is given, which permits to consider the CARS spectroscopy as a potential method for nonintrusive measurement of local concentration and temperature in gas flows and reactive media. (Auth.)

  4. Traceability of optical roughness measurements on polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo; Gasparin, Stefania; Carli, Lorenzo

    2008-01-01

    -focus instrument, and a confocal microscope. Using stylus measurements as reference, parameter settings on the optical instruments were optimised and residual noise reduced by low pass filtering. Traceability of optical measurements could be established with expanded measuring uncertainties (k=2) of 4......An experimental investigation on surface roughness measurements on plastics was carried out with the objective of developing a methodology to achieve traceability of optical instruments. A ground steel surface and its replicas were measured using a stylus instrument, an optical auto......% for the auto-focus instrument and 10% for confocal microscope....

  5. Electron density measurement for steady state plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Yasunori; Chiba, Shinichi; Inoue, Akira

    2000-01-01

    Electron density of a large tokamak has been measured successfully by the tangential CO 2 laser polarimeter developed in JT-60U. The tangential Faraday rotation angles of two different wavelength of 9.27 and 10.6 μm provided the electron density independently. Two-color polarimeter concept for elimination of Faraday rotation at vacuum windows is verified for the first time. A system stability for long time operation up to ∼10 hours is confirmed. A fluctuation of a signal baseline is observed with a period of ∼3 hours and an amplitude of 0.4 - 0.7deg. In order to improve the polarimeter, an application of diamond window for reduction of the Faraday rotation at vacuum windows and another two-color polarimeter concept for elimination of mechanical rotation component are proposed. (author)

  6. Capacitive density measurement for supercritical hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funke, Th; Haberstroh, Ch; Szoucsek, K.; Schott, S.; Kunze, K.

    2017-12-01

    A new approach for automotive hydrogen storage systems is the so-called cryo-compressed hydrogen storage (CcH2). It has a potential for increased energy densities and thus bigger hydrogen amounts onboard, which is the main attractiveness for car manufacturers such as BMW. This system has further advantages in terms of safety, refueling and cooling potential. The current filling level measurement by means of pressure and temperature measurement and subsequent density calculation faces challenges especially in terms of precision. A promising alternative is the capacitive gauge. This measuring principle can determine the filling level of the CcH2 tank with significantly smaller tolerances. The measuring principle is based on different dielectric constants of gaseous and liquid hydrogen. These differences are successfully leveraged in liquid hydrogen storage systems (LH2). The present theoretical analysis shows that the dielectric values of CcH2 in the relevant operating range are comparable to LH2, thus achieving similarly good accuracy. The present work discusses embodiments and implementations for such a sensor in the CcH2 tank.

  7. Wavefront measurement using computational adaptive optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South, Fredrick A; Liu, Yuan-Zhi; Bower, Andrew J; Xu, Yang; Carney, P Scott; Boppart, Stephen A

    2018-03-01

    In many optical imaging applications, it is necessary to correct for aberrations to obtain high quality images. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides access to the amplitude and phase of the backscattered optical field for three-dimensional (3D) imaging samples. Computational adaptive optics (CAO) modifies the phase of the OCT data in the spatial frequency domain to correct optical aberrations without using a deformable mirror, as is commonly done in hardware-based adaptive optics (AO). This provides improvement of image quality throughout the 3D volume, enabling imaging across greater depth ranges and in highly aberrated samples. However, the CAO aberration correction has a complicated relation to the imaging pupil and is not a direct measurement of the pupil aberrations. Here we present new methods for recovering the wavefront aberrations directly from the OCT data without the use of hardware adaptive optics. This enables both computational measurement and correction of optical aberrations.

  8. Quantitative measurement of the orbital angular momentum density of light

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudley, Angela L

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available of the azimuthal mode index, n, on LCD1 is equiva- lent to n on LCD2. If the reader wishes to orientate the experimental setup differently, such that the two SLMs have the same orientation (i.e., are not mirror images of each other), the complex conjugate... measurement, is separated into two parts: (1) the generation of the optical field and (2) the mea- surement of the OAM density, which is achieved by performing a modal decomposition of the opti- cal field. A. Symmetric Superposition of Two Bessel Beams...

  9. A novel method to create high density stratification with matching refractive index for optical flow investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krohn, Benedikt; Manera, Annalisa; Petrov, Victor

    2018-04-01

    Turbulent mixing in stratified environments represents a challenging task in experimental turbulence research, especially when large density gradients are desired. When optical measurement techniques like particle image velocimetry (PIV) are applied to stratified liquids, it is common practice to combine two aqueous solutions with different density but equal refractive index, to suppress particle image deflections. While refractive image matching (RIM) has been developed in the late 1970s, the achieved limit of 4% density ratio was not rivalled up to day. In the present work, we report a methodology, based on the behavior of excess properties and their change in a multicomponent system while mixing, that allows RIM for solutions with higher density differences. The methodology is then successfully demonstrated using a ternary combination of water, isopropanol and glycerol, for which RIM in presence of a density ratio of 8.6% has been achieved. Qualitative PIV results of a turbulent buoyant jet with 8.6% density ratio are shown.

  10. Electron density measurements on the plasma focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rueckle, B.

    1976-01-01

    The paper presents a determination of the maximum electron density in a plasma focus, produced with the NESSI experimental setup, by the method of laser beam deflection. For each discharge a time-resolved measurement was performed at four different places. Neutron efficiency as well as the time of the initial X-ray emission was registrated. The principle and the economic aspects of the beam deflection method are presented in detail. The experimental findings and the resulting knowledge of the neutron efficiency are discussed. (GG) [de

  11. Electron density measurements during ion beam transport on Gamble II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, B.V.; Hinshelwood, D.D.; Neri, J.M.; Ottinger, P.F.; Rose, D.V.; Stephanakis, S.J.; Young, F.C.

    1999-01-01

    High-sensitivity laser interferometry was used to measure the electron density created when an intense proton beam (100 kA, 1 MeV, 50 ns) from the Gamble II generator was transported through low-pressure gas as part of a project investigating Self-Pinched Transport (SPT) of intense ion beams. This measurement is non-perturbing and sufficiently quantitative to allow benchmarking of codes (particularly IPROP) used to model beam-gas interaction and ion-beam transport. Very high phase sensitivity is required for this measurement. For example, a 100-kA, 1-MeV, 10-cm-radius proton beam with uniform current density has a line-integrated proton density equal to n b L = 3 x 10 13 cm -2 . An equal electron line-density, n e L = n b L, (expected for transport in vacuum) will be detected as a phase shift of the 1.064 microm laser beam of only 0.05degree, or an optical path change of 1.4 x 10 -4 waves (about the size of a hydrogen atom). The time-history of the line-integrated electron density, measured across a diameter of the transport chamber at 43 cm from the input aperture, starts with the proton arrival time and decays differently depending on the gas pressure. The gas conditions included vacuum (10 -4 Torr air), 30 to 220 mTorr He, and 1 Torr air. The measured densities vary by three orders of magnitude, from 10 13 to 10 16 cm -2 for the range of gas pressures investigated. In vacuum, the measured electron densities indicate only co-moving electrons (n e L approximately n b L). In He, when the gas pressure is sufficient for ionization by beam particles and SPT is observed, n e L increases to about 10 n b L. At even higher pressures where electrons contribute to ionization, even higher electron densities are observed with an ionization fraction of about 2%. The diagnostic technique as used on the SPT experiment will be described and a summary of the results will be given. The measurements are in reasonable agreement with theoretical predictions from the IPROP code

  12. Changes in macular pigment optical density after membrane peeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Mario R; Cennamo, Gilda; Grassi, Piergiacomo; Sparnelli, Federica; Allegrini, Davide; Cennamo, Giovanni

    2018-01-01

    To highlight the differences in macular pigment optical density (MPOD) between eyes with vitreoretinal interface syndrome and healthy control eyes, to assess the changes in MPOD in eyes treated with macular peeling, to investigate the relationships between MPOD changes and measures of retinal sensitivity such as best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and microperimetry. In this cross-sectional comparative study, 30 eyes affected by idiopathic epiretinal membrane (iERM, 15eyes) or full-thickness macular hole (FTMH, 15eyes) were compared with 60 eyes from 30 healthy age-matched patients. MPOD values (mean MPOD, maximum MPOD, MPOD area, and MPOD volume) were measured in a range of 4°-7° of eccentricity around the fovea, using the one-wavelength reflectometry method (Visucam 200, Carl-Zeiss Meditec). Patients affected by iERM and FTMH were treated with vitrectomy and epiretinal membrane-inner limiting membrane (ERM-ILM) peeling, with follow-up examinations performed preoperatively and 6 months postoperatively. The main outcome measures were the differences in MPOD between eyes with vitreoretinal interface syndrome and healthy eyes, changes in MPOD after ERM-ILM peeling, and relationships between MPOD and functional changes. Mean MPOD differed significantly between control eyes and those with iERM (P = .0001) or FTMH (P = .0006). The max MPOD and MPOD area increased, but not significantly. After peeling, the only significant change in MPOD was in MPOD volume (P = .01). In the ERM group, postoperative mean MPOD correlated significantly with best-corrected visual acuity (r = .739, P = .002). MPOD was reduced in patients with iERM or FTMH compared with healthy eyes. We found a significant correlation between the mean postoperative MPOD and postoperative BCVA, hypothesizing that the postoperative increase in mean MPOD could be due to a change in distribution for unfolding and expansion of the fovea after the peeling. MOPD may be considered as a prognostic factor associated

  13. New bioreactor for in situ simultaneous measurement of bioluminescence and cell density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picart, Pascal; Bendriaa, Loubna; Daniel, Philippe; Horry, Habib; Durand, Marie-José; Jouvanneau, Laurent; Thouand, Gérald

    2004-03-01

    This article presents a new device devoted to the simultaneous measurement of bioluminescence and optical density of a bioluminescent bacterial culture. It features an optoelectronic bioreactor with a fully autoclavable module, in which the bioluminescent bacteria are cultivated, a modulated laser diode dedicated to optical density measurement, and a detection head for the acquisition of both bioluminescence and optical density signals. Light is detected through a bifurcated fiber bundle. This setup allows the simultaneous estimation of the bioluminescence and the cell density of the culture medium without any sampling. The bioluminescence is measured through a highly sensitive photomultiplier unit which has been photometrically calibrated to allow light flux measurements. This was achieved by considering the bioluminescence spectrum and the full optical transmission of the device. The instrument makes it possible to measure a very weak light flux of only a few pW. The optical density is determined through the laser diode and a photodiode using numerical synchronous detection which is based on the power spectrum density of the recorded signal. The detection was calibrated to measure optical density up to 2.5. The device was validated using the Vibrio fischeri bacterium which was cultivated under continuous culture conditions. A very good correlation between manual and automatic measurements processed with this instrument has been demonstrated. Furthermore, the optoelectronic bioreactor enables determination of the luminance of the bioluminescent bacteria which is estimated to be 6×10-5 W sr-1 m-2 for optical density=0.3. Experimental results are presented and discussed.

  14. Nonimaging optical designs for maximum-power-density remote irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuermann, D; Gordon, J M; Ries, H

    1998-04-01

    Designs for flexible, high-power-density, remote irradiation systems are presented. Applications include industrial infrared heating such as in semiconductor processing, alternatives to laser light for certain medical procedures, and general remote high-brightness lighting. The high power densities in herent to the small active radiating regions of conventional metal-halide, halogen, xenon, microwave-sulfur, and related lamps can be restored with nonimaging concentrators with little loss of power. These high fluxlevels can then be transported at high transmissivity with light channels such as optical fibers or lightpipes, and reshaped into luminaires that can deliver prescribed angular and spatial flux distributions onto desired targets. Details for nominally two- and three-dimensional systems are developed, along with estimates ofoptical performance.

  15. LHC injection optics measurements at commissioning (2015)

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Tabares Valdivieso, Ana; Coello De Portugal - Martinez Vazquez, Jaime Maria; Garcia-Bonilla, Alba-Carolina; Langner, Andy Sven; Maclean, Ewen Hamish; Malina, Lukas; Mcateer, Meghan Jill; Persson, Tobias Hakan Bjorn; Skowronski, Piotr Krzysztof; Tomas Garcia, Rogelio; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the measurement and correction process followed during the 2015 LHC injection optics commissioning which extended into Machine Developments (MDs). Results have been analyzed and compared to the 2012 measurements.

  16. Correlation and spectral density measurements by LDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeifer, H.J.

    1986-01-01

    The present paper is intended to give a review on the state-of-the art in correlation and spectral density measurements by means of laser Doppler anemometry. As will be shown in detail the most important difference in performing this type of studies is the fact that laser anemometry relies on the presence of particles in the flow serving as flow velocity indicators. This means that, except in heavily seeded flows, the instantaneous velocity can only be sampled at random instants. This calls for new algorithms to calculate estimates of both correlation functions and power spectra. Various possibilities to handle the problem of random sampling have been developed in the past. They are explained from the theoretical point of view and the experimental aspects are detailed as far as they are different from conventional applications of laser anemometry

  17. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography Vessel Density in Healthy, Glaucoma Suspect, and Glaucoma Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarmohammadi, Adeleh; Zangwill, Linda M.; Diniz-Filho, Alberto; Suh, Min Hee; Manalastas, Patricia Isabel; Fatehee, Naeem; Yousefi, Siamak; Belghith, Akram; Saunders, Luke J.; Medeiros, Felipe A.; Huang, David; Weinreb, Robert N.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness and optical coherence tomography angiography (OCT-A) retinal vasculature measurements in healthy, glaucoma suspect, and glaucoma patients. Methods Two hundred sixty-one eyes of 164 healthy, glaucoma suspect, and open-angle glaucoma (OAG) participants from the Diagnostic Innovations in Glaucoma Study with good quality OCT-A images were included. Retinal vasculature information was summarized as a vessel density map and as vessel density (%), which is the proportion of flowing vessel area over the total area evaluated. Two vessel density measurements extracted from the RNFL were analyzed: (1) circumpapillary vessel density (cpVD) measured in a 750-μm-wide elliptical annulus around the disc and (2) whole image vessel density (wiVD) measured over the entire image. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUROC) were used to evaluate diagnostic accuracy. Results Age-adjusted mean vessel density was significantly lower in OAG eyes compared with glaucoma suspects and healthy eyes. (cpVD: 55.1 ± 7%, 60.3 ± 5%, and 64.2 ± 3%, respectively; P glaucoma and healthy eyes, the age-adjusted AUROC was highest for wiVD (0.94), followed by RNFL thickness (0.92) and cpVD (0.83). The AUROCs for differentiating between healthy and glaucoma suspect eyes were highest for wiVD (0.70), followed by cpVD (0.65) and RNFL thickness (0.65). Conclusions Optical coherence tomography angiography vessel density had similar diagnostic accuracy to RNFL thickness measurements for differentiating between healthy and glaucoma eyes. These results suggest that OCT-A measurements reflect damage to tissues relevant to the pathophysiology of OAG. PMID:27409505

  18. Calculation of the local optical density of states in absorbing and gain media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Stefano, O; Fina, N; Savasta, S; Girlanda, R; Pieruccini, M

    2010-01-01

    The local optical density of states plays a key role in a wide range of phenomena. Near to structures displaying optical absorption or gain, the definition of the photonic local density of states needs to be revised. In this case two operative different definitions can be adopted to characterize photonic structures. The first (ρ A (r, ω)) describes the light intensity at a point r when the material system is illuminated isotropically and corresponds to what can be measured by a near-field microscope. The second (ρ B (r, ω)) gives a measure of vacuum fluctuations and coincides with ρ A (r, ω) in systems with real susceptibility. Scattering calculations in the presence of dielectric and metallic nanostructures show that these two definitions can give rather different results, the difference being proportional to the thermal emission power of the photonic structure. We present a detailed derivation of this result and numerical calculations for nanostructures displaying optical gain. In the presence of amplifying media, ρ B (r, ω) displays regions with negative photon densities, thus failing in describing a power signal. In contrast, ρ A (r, ω), positive definite, properly describes the near-field optical properties of these structures.

  19. Optical vibration measurement of mechatronics devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanabe, Shigeo

    1993-09-01

    An optical vibration measuring system which enables to detect both linear and angular displacement of 25 nm and 5 prad was developed. The system is mainly composed of a He-Ne laser, a displacement detecting photo-diode and lenses, and has linear and angular displacement magnification mechanism using two different principles of optical lever. The system was applied to measure vibrational characteristics of magnetic head slider of hard disk drives and to measure stator teeth driving velocities of ultrasonic motor.

  20. Radio-frequency slurry-density measurement for dredging pipelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eeten, M.J.C.

    2011-01-01

    Hydraulic dredgers make use of a density meter to measure the instantaneous density in the slurry transport pipeline, primarily for process control and production calculation. the current ‘golden’ standard for slurry density measurement is the radioactive density meter. It is based on a slurry

  1. Reineke’s stand density index: a quantitative and non-unitless measure of stand density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis L. VanderSchaaf

    2013-01-01

    When used as a measure of relative density, Reineke’s stand density index (SDI) can be made unitless by relating the current SDI to a standard density but when used as a quantitative measure of stand density SDI is not unitless. Reineke’s SDI relates the current stand density to an equivalent number of trees per unit area in a stand with a quadratic mean diameter (Dq)...

  2. A Novel Approach to the Sensing of Liquid Density Using a Plastic Optical Fibre Cantilever Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Atul; Kim, Youngjin; Kim, Taesung

    2009-01-01

    This article reports for the first time the use of a plastic optical fibre (POF) cantilever beam to measure the density of a liquid. The sensor is based on the Archimedes buoyancy principle. The sensor consists of a POF bonded on the surface of a metal beam in the form of a cantilever configuration, and at the free end of the beam a displacer is…

  3. Onboard Optical Navigation Measurement Processing in GEONS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Optical Navigation (OpNav) measurements derived from spacecraft-based images are a powerful data type in the precision orbit determination process.  OpNav...

  4. Optical technologies for measurement and inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mader, D.L.

    1997-01-01

    Ontario Hydro has benefited from specialized optical measurement techniques such as FRILS (fret replica inspection laser system), which permits in-house inspections of pressure tube replicas and has been estimated to save $2M per year. This paper presents a brief overview of (1) FRILS, (2) OPIT (in-reactor Optical Profilometry Inspection Tool), (3) miniature optical probe for steam generator tubes, (4) laser vibrometer used for end-fitting vibration, and (5) computer vision to recognize the ends of fuel bundles and automatically measure their lengths. (author)

  5. Space Density of Optically Selected Type 2 Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Reinabelle; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Strauss, Michael A.; Green, Joshua; Krolik, Julian H.; Shen, Yue; Richards, Gordon T.; Anderson, Scott F.; Schneider, Donald P.

    2008-12-01

    Type 2 quasars are luminous active galactic nuclei whose central regions are obscured by large amounts of gas and dust. In this paper, we present a catalog of type 2 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, selected based on their optical emission lines. The catalog contains 887 objects with redshifts z < 0.83; this is 6 times larger than the previous version and is by far the largest sample of type 2 quasars in the literature. We derive the [O III]5007 luminosity function (LF) for 108.3 L sun < L [O III] < 1010 L sun (corresponding to intrinsic luminosities up to M[2500 Å] ~= -28 mag or bolometric luminosities up to 4 × 1047 erg s-1). This LF provides robust lower limits to the actual space density of obscured quasars due to our selection criteria, the details of the spectroscopic target selection, and other effects. We derive the equivalent LF for the complete sample of type 1 (unobscured) quasars and determine the ratio of type 2 to type 1 quasar number densities. Our data constrain this ratio to be at least ~1.5:1 for 108.3 L sun < L [O III] < 109.5 L sun at z < 0.3, and at least ~1.2:1 for L [O III] ~ 1010 L sun at 0.3 < z < 0.83. Type 2 quasars are at least as abundant as type 1 quasars in the relatively nearby universe (z <~ 0.8) for the highest luminosities.

  6. Quasi-quadrature interferometer for plasma density radial profile measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowenthal, D.D.; Hoffman, A.L.

    1979-01-01

    A cw Mach Zehnder multichannel interferometer has been developed to measure time-dependent fractional fringe shifts with an accuracy of one-fortieth fringe. The design is quasi-quadrature in that known phase shifts, introduced in the reference beam, are time multiplexed with the normal reference beam. This technique requires only one detector per interferometer channel as compared to two detectors for most quadrature designs. The quadrature information makes the sense of density changes unambiguous, it automatically calibrates the instrument during the plasma event, and it makes fringe shift measurements virtually independent of fringe contrast fluctuations caused by plasma refractive and/or absorptive effects. The interferometer optical design is novel in that the electro-optic crystal used to introduce the 90 0 phase shifts is located in the common 2-mm-diam HeNe entrance beam to the interferometer, by exploiting polarization techniques, rather than in the expanded 1--2-cm reference beam itself. This arrangement greatly reduces the size, cost, and high-voltage requirements for the phase modulating crystal

  7. X-ray measurements of water fog density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camp, A.L.

    1982-11-01

    Water-fog densities were measured in a laboratory experiment using x-ray diagnostics. Fog densities were measured, varying the flow rate, nozzle type, nozzle configuration, nozzle height above the x-ray beam, and water surface tension. Suspended water volume fractions between 0.0008 and 0.0074 percent were measured. The fog density increases approximately as the square root of the flow rate; the other parameters had little effect on the density

  8. Lateral diffusion of the topological charge density in stochastic optical fields

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roux, FS

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Stochastic (i.e. random and quasi-random) optical fields may contain distributions of optical vortices that are represented by non-uniform topological charge densities. Numerical simulations are used to investigate the evolution under free...

  9. Optical Depth Estimates and Effective Critical Densities of Dense Gas Tracers in the Inner Parts of Nearby Galaxy Discs

    OpenAIRE

    Jimenez-Donaire, M. J.; Bigiel, F.; Leroy, A. K.; Cormier, D.; Gallagher, M.; Usero, A.; Bolatto, A.; Colombo, D.; Garcia-Burillo, S.; Hughes, A.; Kramer, C.; Krumholz, M. R.; Meier, D. S.; Murphy, E.; Pety, J.

    2016-01-01

    High critical density molecular lines like HCN(1-0) or HCO+(1-0) represent our best tool to study currently star-forming, dense molecular gas at extragalactic distances. The optical depth of these lines is a key ingredient to estimate the effective density required to excite emission. However, constraints on this quantity are even scarcer in the literature than measurements of the high density tracers themselves. Here, we combine new observations of HCN, HCO+ and HNC(1-0) and their optically ...

  10. System for uranium superficial density measurement in U3Si2 MTR fuel plates using radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hey, Martin A.; Gomez Marlasca, Fernando

    2003-01-01

    The paper describes a method for measuring uranium superficial density in high density uranium silicide (U 3 Si 2 ) MTR fuel plates, through the use of industrial radiography, a set of patterns built for this purpose, a transmission optical densitometer, and a quantitative model of analysis and measurement. Our choice for this particular method responds to its high accuracy, low cost and easy implementation according to the standing quality control systems. (author)

  11. Cavity assisted measurements of heat and work in optical lattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis Villa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a method to experimentally measure the internal energy of a system of ultracold atoms trapped in optical lattices by coupling them to the fields of two optical cavities. We show that the tunnelling and self-interaction terms of the one-dimensional Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian can be mapped to the field and photon number of each cavity, respectively. We compare the energy estimated using this method with numerical results obtained using the density matrix renormalisation group algorithm. Our method can be employed for the assessment of power and efficiency of thermal machines whose working substance is a strongly correlated many-body system.

  12. Optical wave microphone measurement during laser ablation of Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitsugi, Fumiaki, E-mail: mitsugi@cs.kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto, 860-8555 (Japan); Ide, Ryota; Ikegami, Tomoaki [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto, 860-8555 (Japan); Nakamiya, Toshiyuki; Sonoda, Yoshito [Graduate School of Industrial Engineering, Tokai University, 9-1-1 Toroku, Kumamoto, 862-8652 (Japan)

    2012-10-30

    Pulsed laser irradiation is used for surface treatment of a solid and ablation for particle formation in gas, liquid or supercritical phase media. When a pulsed laser is used to irradiate a solid, spatial refractive index variations (including photothermal expansion, shockwaves and particles) occur, which vary depending on the energy density of the pulsed laser. We focused on this phenomenon and applied an unique method for detection of refractive index variation using an optical wave microphone based on Fraunhofer diffraction. In this research, we analyzed the waveforms and frequencies of refractive index variations caused by pulsed laser irradiation of silicon in air and measured with an optical wave microphone.

  13. Electron density measurements in the TRIAM-1 tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitarai, O; Nakashima, H; Nakamura, K; Hiraki, N; Toi, K [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1980-02-01

    Electron density measurements in the TRIAM-1 tokamak are carried out by a 140 GHz microwave interferometer. To follow rapid density variations, a high-speed direct-reading type interferometer is constructed. The density of (1 - 20) x 10/sup 13/ cm/sup -3/ is measured.

  14. Electron density measurements in the TRIAM-1 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitarai, Osamu; Nakashima, Hisatoshi; Nakamura, Kazuo; Hiraki, Naoji; Toi, Kazuo

    1980-01-01

    Electron density measurements in the TRIAM-1 tokamak are carried out by a 140 GHz microwave interferometer. To follow rapid density variations, a high-speed direct-reading type interferometer is constructed. The density of (1 - 20) x 10 13 cm -3 is measured. (author)

  15. Method of measuring density of gas in a vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shono, Kosuke.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To accurately measure the density of a gas in a vessel even at a loss-of-coolant accident in a BWR type reactor. Method: When at least one of the pressure or the temperature of gas in a vessel exceeds the usable range of a gas density measuring instrument due to a loss-of-coolant accident, the gas in the vessel is sampled, and the pressure or the temperature of the sampled gas are measured by matching them to the usable conditions of the gas density measuring instrument. Hydrogen gas and oxygen gas densities exceeding the usable range of the gas density measuring instrument are calculated by the following formulae based on the measured values. C'sub(O) = P sub(T).C sub(O)/P sub(T), C'sub(H) = C''sub(H).C'sub(O)/C''sub(O), where C sub(O), P sub(T), C'sub(H) represent the oxygen density, the total pressure and the hydrogen density of the internal pressure gas of the vessel after the respective gas density measuring instruments exceed the usable ranges; C sub(O), P sub(T) represent the oxygen density and the total pressure of the gas in the vessel before the gas density measuring instruments exceeded the usable range, and C''sub(H), C''sub(O) represent the hydrogen density and oxygen density of the respective sampled gases. (Kamimura, M.)

  16. Measurement-induced nonlinearity in linear optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheel, Stefan; Knight, Peter L.; Nemoto, Kae; Munro, William J.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the generation of nonlinear operators with single-photon sources, linear optical elements, and appropriate measurements of auxiliary modes. We provide a framework for the construction of useful single-mode and two-mode quantum gates necessary for all-optical quantum information processing. We focus our attention generally on using minimal physical resources while providing a transparent and algorithmic way of constructing these operators

  17. Stress Measurement by Geometrical Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, R. S.; Rossnagel, S. M.

    1986-01-01

    Fast, simple technique measures stresses in thin films. Sample disk bowed by stress into approximately spherical shape. Reflected image of disk magnified by amount related to curvature and, therefore, stress. Method requires sample substrate, such as cheap microscope cover slide, two mirrors, laser light beam, and screen.

  18. Optical Measurement Technology For Aluminium Extrusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moe, Per Thomas; Willa-Hansen, Arnfinn; Stoeren, Sigurd

    2007-01-01

    Optical measurement techniques such as laser scanning, structured light scanning and photogrammetry can be used for accurate shape control for aluminum extrusion and downstream processes. The paper presents the fundamentals of optical shape measurement. Furthermore, it focuses on how full-field in- and off-line shape measurement during pure-bending of aluminum extrusions has been performed with stripe projection (structured light) using white light. Full field shape measurement is difficult to implement industrially, but is very useful as a laboratory tool. For example, it has been clearly shown how moderate internal air pressure (less than 5 bars) can significantly reduce undesirable cross-sectional shape distortions during pure bending, and how buckling of the compressive flange occurs at an early stage. Finally, a stretch-bending set-up with adaptive shape control using internal gas pressure and optical techniques is presented

  19. A microwave interferometer for density measurement and stabilization in process plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, D.I.C.; Campbell, G.A.; Domier, C.W.

    1988-01-01

    A low-cost heterodyne microwave interferometer system capable of measuring and/or controlling the plasma density over a dynamic range covering two orders of magnitude is demonstrated. The microwave frequency is chosen to match the size and density of plasma to be monitored. Large amplitude, high frequency fluctuations can be quantitatively followed and the longer-time-scale density can be held constant over hours of operation, for example during an inline production process to maintain uniformity and stoichiometry of films. A linear relationship is shown between plasma density and discharge current in a specific plasma device. This simple relationship makes control of the plasma straightforward using the interferometer as a density monitor. Other plasma processes could equally well benefit from such density control capability. By combining the interferometer measurement with diagnostics such as probes or optical spectroscopy, the total density profile and the constituent proportions of the various species in the plasma could be determined

  20. Size-resolved chemical composition, effective density, and optical properties of biomass burning particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Jinghao; Lu, Xiaohui; Li, Ling; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Ci; Chen, Hong; Yang, Xin; Chen, Jianmin

    2017-06-01

    Biomass burning aerosol has an important impact on the global radiative budget. A better understanding of the correlations between the mixing states of biomass burning particles and their optical properties is the goal of a number of current studies. In this work, the effective density, chemical composition, and optical properties of rice straw burning particles in the size range of 50-400 nm were measured using a suite of online methods. We found that the major components of particles produced by burning rice straw included black carbon (BC), organic carbon (OC), and potassium salts, but the mixing states of particles were strongly size dependent. Particles of 50 nm had the smallest effective density (1.16 g cm-3) due to a relatively large proportion of aggregate BC. The average effective densities of 100-400 nm particles ranged from 1.35 to 1.51 g cm-3 with OC and inorganic salts as dominant components. Both density distribution and single-particle mass spectrometry showed more complex mixing states in larger particles. Upon heating, the separation of the effective density distribution modes confirmed the external mixing state of less-volatile BC or soot and potassium salts. The size-resolved optical properties of biomass burning particles were investigated at two wavelengths (λ = 450 and 530 nm). The single-scattering albedo (SSA) showed the lowest value for 50 nm particles (0.741 ± 0.007 and 0.889 ± 0.006) because of the larger proportion of BC content. Brown carbon played an important role for the SSA of 100-400 nm particles. The Ångström absorption exponent (AAE) values for all particles were above 1.6, indicating the significant presence of brown carbon in all sizes. Concurrent measurements in our work provide a basis for discussing the physicochemical properties of biomass burning aerosol and its effects on the global climate and atmospheric environment.

  1. A novel approach to the sensing of liquid density using a plastic optical fibre cantilever beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Atul; Kim, Youngjin; Kim, Taesung

    2009-01-01

    This article reports for the first time the use of a plastic optical fibre (POF) cantilever beam to measure the density of a liquid. The sensor is based on the Archimedes buoyancy principle. The sensor consists of a POF bonded on the surface of a metal beam in the form of a cantilever configuration, and at the free end of the beam a displacer is attached. Due to the apparent loss of the true weight of the displacer there is a deflection in the cantilever beam, which causes macro bending in the POF. The loss of intensity due to macro bending of the POF is a measure of the density of the liquid under test. The variation of weight loss with the density of different liquids showed that the weight loss is proportional to density. This sensor is capable of detecting the weight loss with respect to their densities even for liquids having close values of density like distilled water, tap water, and milk of various brands. The resolution of the sensor is observed to be 1.1 mg cm-3.

  2. Procedure for Uranium-Molybdenum Density Measurements and Porosity Determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakaran, Ramprashad [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Devaraj, Arun [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Joshi, Vineet V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-08-13

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines for preparing uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) specimens, performing density measurements, and computing sample porosity. Typical specimens (solids) will be sheared to small rectangular foils, disks, or pieces of metal. A mass balance, solid density determination kit, and a liquid of known density will be used to determine the density of U-Mo specimens using the Archimedes principle. A standard test weight of known density would be used to verify proper operation of the system. By measuring the density of a U-Mo sample, it is possible to determine its porosity.

  3. Optical scattering measurement and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Stover, John C

    2012-01-01

    Newly included are scatter models for pits and particles as well as the use of wafer scanners to locate and size isolated surface features. New sections cover the multimillion-dollar wafer scanner business, establishing that microroughness is the noise, not the signal, in these systems. Scatter measurements, now routinely used to determine whether small-surface features are pits or particles and inspiring new technology that provides information on particle material, are also discussed. These new capabilities are now supported by a series of international standards, and a new chapter reviews t

  4. Beyond the borders of classical optical measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenberg, H.; Khoury, G.; Fonseca, E.; Bouwmeester, D.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text: The limits of optical measurements are the subject to many recent works. It has been shown how by using non-classical photonic states, spatial resolution can exceed the diffraction limit [1]. The same states also improve interference measurements beyond the shot noise and up to the quantum Heisenberg limit [2]. On the other hand, a few methods have been suggested that improve the optical resolution by exploiting classical optical nonlinearities [3]. First, we will present a scheme that exploits the non-local quantum correlations of a second order entangled state produced by optical parametric down-conversion [4]. The scheme results with a non-classical state that can be used in quantum limited interferometry. It is also simply extendable to states of any photon number. Another method will be presented, where nonlinear measurements are induced by projecting the state of light onto the Fock space [5]. This process simulated optical nonlinearities up to the 7th order. We used those measurements to characterize the output of a standard polarization interferometer. Improved resolution was demonstrated, but a detailed analysis reveals the differences to the previous nonclassical approach

  5. Plant density affects measures of biodiversity effects

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stachová, T.; Fibich, P.; Lepš, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 1 (2013), s. 1-11 ISSN 1752-9921 R&D Projects: GA ČR GD206/08/H044 Grant - others:GA JU(CZ) 138/2010/P Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : biodiversity effects * plant density * constant final yield Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 2.284, year: 2013 http://jpe.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2012/04/27/jpe.rts015.full.pdf+html

  6. Estimating snowpack density from Albedo measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    James L. Smith; Howard G. Halverson

    1979-01-01

    Snow is a major source of water in Western United States. Data on snow depth and average snowpack density are used in mathematical models to predict water supply. In California, about 75 percent of the snow survey sites above 2750-meter elevation now used to collect data are in statutory wilderness areas. There is need for a method of estimating the water content of a...

  7. Dynamic temperature measurements with embedded optical sensors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolan, Daniel H.,; Seagle, Christopher T; Ao, Tommy

    2013-10-01

    This report summarizes LDRD project number 151365, \\Dynamic Temperature Measurements with Embedded Optical Sensors". The purpose of this project was to develop an optical sensor capable of detecting modest temperature states (<1000 K) with nanosecond time resolution, a recurring diagnostic need in dynamic compression experiments at the Sandia Z machine. Gold sensors were selected because the visible re ectance spectrum of gold varies strongly with temperature. A variety of static and dynamic measurements were performed to assess re ectance changes at di erent temperatures and pressures. Using a minimal optical model for gold, a plausible connection between static calibrations and dynamic measurements was found. With re nements to the model and diagnostic upgrades, embedded gold sensors seem capable of detecting minor (<50 K) temperature changes under dynamic compression.

  8. Gamma densitometer for measuring Pu density in fuel tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winn, W.G.

    1982-01-01

    A fuel-gamma-densitometer (FGD) has been developed to examine nondestructively the uniformity of plutonium in aluminum-clad fuel tubes at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). The monitoring technique is γ-ray spectroscopy with a lead-collimated Ge(Li) detector. Plutonium density is correlated with the measured intensity of the 208 keV γ-ray from 237 U (7d) of the 241 Pu (15y) decay chain. The FGD measures the plutonium density within 0.125- or 0.25-inch-diameter areas of the 0.133- to 0.183-inch-thick tube walls. Each measurement yields a density ratio that relates the plutonium density of the measured area to the plutonium density in normal regions of the tube. The technique was used to appraise a series of fuel tubes to be irradated in an SRP reactor. High-density plutonium areas were initially identified by x-ray methods and then examined quantitatively with the FGD. The FGD reliably tested fuel tubes and yielded density ratios over a range of 0.0 to 2.5. FGD measurements examined (1) nonuniform plutonium densities or hot spots, (2) uniform high-density patches, and (3) plutonium density distribution in thin cladding regions. Measurements for tubes with known plutonium density agreed with predictions to within 2%. Attenuation measurements of the 208-keV γ-ray passage through the tube walls agreed to within 2 to 3% of calculated predictions. Collimator leakage measurements agreed with model calculations that predicted less than a 1.5% effect on plutonium density ratios. Finally, FGD measurements correlated well with x-ray transmission and fluoroscopic measurements. The data analysis for density ratios involved a small correction of about 10% for γ-shielding within the fuel tube. For hot spot examinations, limited information for this correction dictated a density ratio uncertainty of 3 to 5%

  9. Technical factors influencing cone packing density estimates in adaptive optics flood illuminated retinal images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Lombardo

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate the influence of various technical factors on the variation of cone packing density estimates in adaptive optics flood illuminated retinal images. METHODS: Adaptive optics images of the photoreceptor mosaic were obtained in fifteen healthy subjects. The cone density and Voronoi diagrams were assessed in sampling windows of 320×320 µm, 160×160 µm and 64×64 µm at 1.5 degree temporal and superior eccentricity from the preferred locus of fixation (PRL. The technical factors that have been analyzed included the sampling window size, the corrected retinal magnification factor (RMFcorr, the conversion from radial to linear distance from the PRL, the displacement between the PRL and foveal center and the manual checking of cone identification algorithm. Bland-Altman analysis was used to assess the agreement between cone density estimated within the different sampling window conditions. RESULTS: The cone density declined with decreasing sampling area and data between areas of different size showed low agreement. A high agreement was found between sampling areas of the same size when comparing density calculated with or without using individual RMFcorr. The agreement between cone density measured at radial and linear distances from the PRL and between data referred to the PRL or the foveal center was moderate. The percentage of Voronoi tiles with hexagonal packing arrangement was comparable between sampling areas of different size. The boundary effect, presence of any retinal vessels, and the manual selection of cones missed by the automated identification algorithm were identified as the factors influencing variation of cone packing arrangements in Voronoi diagrams. CONCLUSIONS: The sampling window size is the main technical factor that influences variation of cone density. Clear identification of each cone in the image and the use of a large buffer zone are necessary to minimize factors influencing variation of Voronoi

  10. Measurements using optic and RF waves

    CERN Document Server

    De Fornel, Frederique

    2013-01-01

    Scientific and technical knowledge for measurements in modern electromagnetism must be vast as our electromagnetic environment covers all frequencies and wavelengths. These measurements must be applied to fields as varied as nanotechnologies, telecommunications, meteorology, geolocalization, radioastronomy, health, biology, etc. In order to cover the multiple facets of the topic, this book sweeps the entire electromagnetic spectrum, from several hertz to terahertz; considers distances ranging from nanometers to light-years in optics; before extending towards the various measurement techniques

  11. Density measurements of small amounts of high-density solids by a floatation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akabori, Mitsuo; Shiba, Koreyuki

    1984-09-01

    A floatation method for determining the density of small amounts of high-density solids is described. The use of a float combined with an appropriate floatation liquid allows us to measure the density of high-density substances in small amounts. Using the sample of 0.1 g in weight, the floatation liquid of 3.0 g cm -3 in density and the float of 1.5 g cm -3 in apparent density, the sample densities of 5, 10 and 20 g cm -3 are determined to an accuracy better than +-0.002, +-0.01 and +-0.05 g cm -3 , respectively that correspond to about +-1 x 10 -5 cm 3 in volume. By means of appropriate degassing treatments, the densities of (Th,U)O 2 pellets of --0.1 g in weight and --9.55 g cm -3 in density were determined with an accuracy better than +-0.05 %. (author)

  12. Measuring method for optical fibre sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammerink, Theodorus S.J.; Fluitman, J.H.J.

    1984-01-01

    A new measuring method for the signal amplitude in intensity modulating fibre optic sensors is described. A reference signal is generated in the time domain. The method is insensitive for the sensitivity fluctuations of the light transmitter and the light receiver. The method is experimentally

  13. High sensitivity optical measurement of skin gloss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ezerskaia, A.; Ras, Arno; Bloemen, Pascal; Pereira, S.F.; Urbach, Paul; Varghese, Babu

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate a low-cost optical method for measuring the gloss properties with improved sensitivity in the low gloss regime, relevant for skin gloss properties. The gloss estimation method is based on, on the one hand, the slope of the intensity gradient in the transition regime between

  14. A method of atmospheric density measurements during Shuttle entry using UV laser Rayleigh scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckenzie, Robert L.

    1987-01-01

    A detailed study is described of the performance capabilities and the hardware requirements for a method in which ambient density is measured along the Space Shuttle flight path using on-board optical instrumentation. The technique relies on Rayleigh scattering of light from a pulsed, ultraviolet, ArF excimer laser operating at a wavelength of 193 nm. The method is shown to be capable of providing direct measurements of ambient density with an uncertainty of less than 1 percent and with a spatial resolution of 1 km, over an altitude range from 50 to 90 km. In addition, extensions of this concept are discussed that allow measurements of the shock wave location and the density profile within the shock layer. Two approaches are identified that appear to be feasible, in which the same laser system is used for the extended measurements as that required for the ambient density measurements.

  15. Tomographic Measurements of Longitudinal Phase Space Density

    CERN Document Server

    Hancock, S; McIntosh, E; Metcalf, M

    1999-01-01

    Tomography : the reconstruction of a two-dimensional image from a series of its one-dimensional projections is now a very broad topic with a wealth of algorithms for the reconstruction of both qualitative and quantitative images. One of the simplest algorithms has been modified to take into account the non-linearity of large-amplitude synchrotron motion in a particle accelerator. This permits the accurate reconstruction of longitudinal phase space density from one-dimensional bunch profile data. The algorithm was developed in Mathematica TM in order to exploit the extensive built-in functions and graphics. Subsequently, it has been recoded in Fortran 90 with the aim of reducing the execution time by at least a factor of one hundred. The choice of Fortran 90 was governed by the desire ultimately to exploit parallel architectures, but sequential compilation and execution have already largely yielded the required gain in speed. The use of the method to produce longitudinal phase space plots, animated sequences o...

  16. Smart density: A more accurate method of measuring rural residential density for health-related research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Peter M; Titus-Ernstoff, Linda; Gibson, Lucinda; Beach, Michael L; Beauregard, Sandy; Dalton, Madeline A

    2010-02-12

    Studies involving the built environment have typically relied on US Census data to measure residential density. However, census geographic units are often unsuited to health-related research, especially in rural areas where development is clustered and discontinuous. We evaluated the accuracy of both standard census methods and alternative GIS-based methods to measure rural density. We compared residential density (units/acre) in 335 Vermont school neighborhoods using conventional census geographic units (tract, block group and block) with two GIS buffer measures: a 1-kilometer (km) circle around the school and a 1-km circle intersected with a 100-meter (m) road-network buffer. The accuracy of each method was validated against the actual residential density for each neighborhood based on the Vermont e911 database, which provides an exact geo-location for all residential structures in the state. Standard census measures underestimate residential density in rural areas. In addition, the degree of error is inconsistent so even the relative rank of neighborhood densities varies across census measures. Census measures explain only 61% to 66% of the variation in actual residential density. In contrast, GIS buffer measures explain approximately 90% of the variation. Combining a 1-km circle with a road-network buffer provides the closest approximation of actual residential density. Residential density based on census units can mask clusters of development in rural areas and distort associations between residential density and health-related behaviors and outcomes. GIS-defined buffers, including a 1-km circle and a road-network buffer, can be used in conjunction with census data to obtain a more accurate measure of residential density.

  17. Smart density: a more accurate method of measuring rural residential density for health-related research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gibson Lucinda

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies involving the built environment have typically relied on US Census data to measure residential density. However, census geographic units are often unsuited to health-related research, especially in rural areas where development is clustered and discontinuous. Objective We evaluated the accuracy of both standard census methods and alternative GIS-based methods to measure rural density. Methods We compared residential density (units/acre in 335 Vermont school neighborhoods using conventional census geographic units (tract, block group and block with two GIS buffer measures: a 1-kilometer (km circle around the school and a 1-km circle intersected with a 100-meter (m road-network buffer. The accuracy of each method was validated against the actual residential density for each neighborhood based on the Vermont e911 database, which provides an exact geo-location for all residential structures in the state. Results Standard census measures underestimate residential density in rural areas. In addition, the degree of error is inconsistent so even the relative rank of neighborhood densities varies across census measures. Census measures explain only 61% to 66% of the variation in actual residential density. In contrast, GIS buffer measures explain approximately 90% of the variation. Combining a 1-km circle with a road-network buffer provides the closest approximation of actual residential density. Conclusion Residential density based on census units can mask clusters of development in rural areas and distort associations between residential density and health-related behaviors and outcomes. GIS-defined buffers, including a 1-km circle and a road-network buffer, can be used in conjunction with census data to obtain a more accurate measure of residential density.

  18. Spatially resolvable optical emission spectrometer for analyzing density uniformity of semiconductor process plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Changhoon; Ryoo, Hoonchul; Lee, Hyungwoo; Hahn, Jae W.; Kim, Se-Yeon; Yi, Hun-Jung

    2010-01-01

    We proposed a spatially resolved optical emission spectrometer (SROES) for analyzing the uniformity of plasma density for semiconductor processes. To enhance the spatial resolution of the SROES, we constructed a SROES system using a series of lenses, apertures, and pinholes. We calculated the spatial resolution of the SROES for the variation of pinhole size, and our calculated results were in good agreement with the measured spatial variation of the constructed SROES. The performance of the SROES was also verified by detecting the correlation between the distribution of a fluorine radical in inductively coupled plasma etch process and the etch rate of a SiO 2 film on a silicon wafer.

  19. Quantum probability measures and tomographic probability densities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amosov, GG; Man'ko, [No Value

    2004-01-01

    Using a simple relation of the Dirac delta-function to generalized the theta-function, the relationship between the tomographic probability approach and the quantum probability measure approach with the description of quantum states is discussed. The quantum state tomogram expressed in terms of the

  20. Fiber-optic voltage measuring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Miaoyuan; Nie, De-Xin; Li, Yan; Peng, Yu; Lin, Qi-Qing; Wang, Jing-Gang

    1993-09-01

    A new fibre optic voltage measuring system has been developed based on the electrooptic effect of bismuth germanium oxide (Bi4Ge3O12)crystal. It uses the LED as the light source. The light beam emitted from the light source is transmitted to the sensor through the optic fibre and the intensity of the output beam is changed by the applied voltage. This optic signal is transmitted to the PIN detector and converted to an electric signal which is processed by the electronic circuit and 8098 single chip microcomputer the output voltage signal obtained is directly proportional to the applied voltage. This paper describes the principle the configuration and the performance parameters of the system. Test results are evaluated and discussed.

  1. A gauge for the measurement of wood density MGD-05

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartak, J.; Machaj, B.; Urbanski, P.; Pienkos, P.

    2006-01-01

    Wood density is an important parameter determining several properties of wood as: wood quality, mechanical resistance, charcoal production, transport cost, etc. Radiometric methods for the measurement of wood density are based on attenuation of 241 Am gamma radiation, or measurement of backscattered 241 Am radiation. In the paper authors describe the newly constructed computerized gauge designed for the non routine measurements. Up to 1000 measuring results can be stored in the gauge memory and the measuring results can be sent to an external laptop for computations of density contours

  2. Alpha radiation gauge for the measurement of gas density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lech, M.

    1977-01-01

    Alpha gauge for the measurement of gas density with thick alfa source, has been developed. The gauge is based on radiation transmission through a space filled with gas and total-count principle. Air density can be measured in the range 1,2 - 1,27 kg m -3 with a maximum standard deviation of 2 x 10 -3 kg m -3 . (author)

  3. Preionization electron density measurement by collecting electric charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giordano, G.; Letardi, T.

    1988-01-01

    A method using electron collection for preionization-electron number density measurements is presented. A cathode-potential drop model is used to describe the measurement principle. There is good agreement between the model and the experimental result

  4. Spectrum of density turbulence measured by microwave reflectometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Xuantong; Cao Janyong; Xu Deming; Zhang Hongying; Yang Qinwei

    1993-01-01

    The principle of measuring lower frequency density turbulence with microwave reflectometer is presented. Preliminary results from the HL-1 tokamak have been obtained and compared with the results measured by means of electrostatic probe

  5. Procedure of non-contacting local mass density and mass density distribution measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menzel, M.; Winkler, K.

    1985-01-01

    The invention has been aimed at a procedure of non-contacting local mass density and/or mass density distribution measurements i.e. without the interfering influence of sensors or probes. It can be applied to installations, apparatuses and pipings of chemical engineering, to tank constructions and transportation on extreme temperature and/or pressure conditions and aggressive media influences respectively. The procedure has utilized an ionizing quantum radiation whereby its unknown weakening and scattering is compensated by a suitable combination of scattering and transmission counter rate measurements in such a way that the local mass densities and the mass density distribution respectively are determinable

  6. Measuring Mechanical Properties Of Optical Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Nichols, Ronald L.

    1989-01-01

    Report discusses mechanical tests measuring parameters of strength and fracture mechanics of optical glasses. To obtain required tables of mechanical properties of each glass of interest, both initial-strength and delayed-fracture techniques used. Modulus of rupture measured by well-known four-point bending method. Initial bending strength measured by lesser-known double-ring method, in which disk of glass supported on one face near edge by larger ring and pressed on its other face by smaller concentric ring. Method maximizes stress near center, making it more likely specimen fractures there, and thereby suppresses edge effects. Data from tests used to predict reliabilities and lifetimes of glass optical components of several proposed spaceborne instruments.

  7. High current density ion beam measurement techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, W.C.; Sawatzky, E.

    1976-01-01

    High ion beam current measurements are difficult due to the presence of the secondary particles and beam neutralization. For long Faraday cages, true current can be obtained only by negative bias on the target and by summing the cage wall and target currents; otherwise, the beam will be greatly distorted. For short Faraday cages, a combination of small magnetic field and the negative target bias results in correct beam current. Either component alone does not give true current

  8. Optical techniques for in-core measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brichard, B.

    2007-01-01

    The in-situ measurement of dimensional changes is a key issue for advanced irradiation programs in Material Test Reactors. It is for example crucial to monitor the changes of the dimensions of nuclear fuel assemblies as well as those of mechanically stressed structural material samples during in-pile irradiations. Different techniques already exist to carry out such measurements but they all come with a number of drawbacks. SCK-CEN and CEA have therefore decided to share the development of a measurement system that was never applied before in the core of a nuclear reactor. It relies on optical dimensional measurements and brings along unprecedented non-intrusiveness combined with high resolution. A clear advantage in using compact optical sensors results in a more efficient occupation of the irradiation volume available for target testings as well as a significant reduction of the gamma-heating associated with the in-pile instrumentation. The objectives of these shared studies are to design, develop, test and qualify an in-pile dimensional measurement system based on optical techniques, with the goal to implement this system in future MTR irradiation experiments. In 2006, we focussed our activities on sensor analysis, selection of the sensor prototypes, procurement and first irradiation experiment

  9. Metastable argon atom density in complex argon/acetylene plasmas determined by means of optical absorption and emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sushkov, Vladimir; Herrendorf, Ann-Pierra; Hippler, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Optical emission and absorption spectroscopy has been utilized to investigate the instability of acetylene-containing dusty plasmas induced by growing nano-particles. The density of Ar(1s 5 ) metastable atoms was derived by two methods: tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy and with the help of the branching ratio method of emitted spectral lines. Results of the two techniques agree well with each other. The density of Ar(1s 3 ) metastable atoms was also measured by means of optical emission spectroscopy. The observed growth instability leads to pronounced temporal variations of the metastable and other excited state densities. An analysis of optical line ratios provides evidence for a depletion of free electrons during the growth cycle but no indication for electron temperature variations. (paper)

  10. Diffuse optical tomography with structured-light patterns to quantify breast density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Jessica; Nouizi, Farouk; Cho, Jaedu; Zheng, Jie; Li, Yifan; Chen, Jeon-hor; Su, Min-Ying; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2016-02-01

    Breast density is an independent risk factor for breast cancer, where women with denser breasts are more likely to develop cancer. By identifying women at higher risk, healthcare providers can suggest screening at a younger age to effectively diagnose and treat breast cancer in its earlier stages. Clinical risk assessment models currently do not incorporate breast density, despite its strong correlation with breast cancer. Current methods to measure breast density rely on mammography and MRI, both of which may be difficult to use as a routine risk assessment tool. We propose to use diffuse optical tomography with structured-light to measure the dense, fibroglandular (FGT) tissue volume, which has a different chromophore signature than the surrounding adipose tissue. To test the ability of this technique, we performed simulations by creating numerical breast phantoms from segmented breast MR images. We looked at two different cases, one with a centralized FGT distribution and one with a dispersed distribution. As expected, the water and lipid volumes segmented at half-maximum were overestimated for the dispersed case. However, it was noticed that the recovered water and lipid concentrations were lower and higher, respectively, than the centralized case. This information may provide insight into the morphological distribution of the FGT and can be a correction in estimating the breast density.

  11. Application of interferometry and Faraday rotation techniques for density measurements on ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snider, R.T.; Carlstrom, T.N.; Ma, C.H.; Peebles, W.A.

    1995-01-01

    There is a need for real time, reliable density measurement for density control, compatible with the restricted access and radiation environment on ITER. Line average density measurements using microwave or laser interferometry techniques have proven to be robust and reliable for density control on contemporary tokamaks. In ITER, the large path length, high density and density gradients, limit the wavelength of a probing beam to shorter then about 50 microm due to refraction effects. In this paper the authors consider the design of short wavelength vibration compensated interferometers and Faraday rotation techniques for density measurements on ITER. These techniques allow operation of the diagnostics without a prohibitively large vibration isolated structure and permits the optics to be mounted directly on the radial port plugs on ITER. A beam path designed for 10.6 microm (CO2 laser) with a tangential path through the plasma allows both an interferometer and a Faraday rotation measurement of the line average density with good density resolution while avoiding refraction problems. Plasma effects on the probing beams and design tradeoffs will be discussed along with radiation and long pulse issues. A proposed layout of the diagnostic for ITER will be present

  12. Recording of radiation-induced optical density changes in doped agarose gels with a CCD camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarte, B.J.; Jardine, P.A.; Van Doorn, T.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: Spatially resolved dose measurement with iron-doped agarose gels is continuing to be investigated for applications in radiotherapy dosimetry. It has previously been proposed to use optical methods, rather than MRI, for dose measurement with such gels and this has been investigated using a spectrophotometer (Appleby A and Leghrouz A, Med Phys, 18:309-312, 1991). We have previously studied the use of a pencil beam laser for such optical density measurement of gels and are currently investigating charge-coupled devices (CCD) camera imaging for the same purpose but with the advantages of higher data acquisition rates and potentially greater spatial resolution. The gels used in these studies were poured, irradiated and optically analysed in Perspex casts providing gel sections 1 cm thick and up to 20 cm x 30 cm in dimension. The gels were also infused with a metal indicator dye (xylenol orange) to render the radiation induced oxidation of the iron in the gel sensitive to optical radiation, specifically in the green spectral region. Data acquisition with the CCD camera involved illumination of the irradiated gel section with a diffuse white light source, with the light from the plane of the gel section focussed to the CCD array with a manual zoom lens. The light was also filtered with a green colour glass filter to maximise the contrast between unirradiated and irradiated gels. The CCD camera (EG and G Reticon MC4013) featured a 1024 x 1024 pixel array and was interfaced to a PC via a frame grabber acquisition board with 8 bit resolution. The performance of the gel dosimeter was appraised in mapping of physical and dynamic wedged 6 MV X-ray fields. The results from the CCD camera detection system were compared with both ionisation chamber data and laser based optical density measurements of the gels. Cross beam profiles were extracted from each measurement system at a particular depth (eg. 2.3 cm for the physical wedge field) for direct comparison. A

  13. Simultaneous measurements of temperature and density in air flows using UV laser spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, D. G.; Mckenzie, R. L.

    1991-01-01

    The simultaneous measurement of temperature and density using laser-induced fluorescence of oxygen in combination with Q-branch Raman scattering of nitrogen and oxygen is demonstrated in a low-speed air flow. The lowest density and temperature measured in the experiment correspond to the freestream values at Mach 5 in the Ames 3.5-Foot Hypersonic Wind Tunnel for stagnation conditions of 100 atm and 1000 K. The experimental results demonstrate the viability of the optical technique for measurements that support the study of compressible turbulence and the validation of numerical codes in supersonic and hypersonic wind tunnel flows.

  14. Strain measurement using multiplexed fiber optic sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Il Bum; Kim, Chi Yeop; Yoon, Dong Jin; Lee, Seung Seok

    2003-01-01

    FBG(Fiber Bragg grating) sensor, which is one of the fiber optic sensors for the application of smart structures, can not only measure one specific point but also multiple points by multiplexing techniques. We have proposed a novel multiplexing technique of FBG sensor by the intensity modulation of light source. This technique is applicable to WDM(Wavelength Division Multiplexing) technique and number of sensors in this system can be increased by using this technique with WDM technique.

  15. Beam profile measurements using nonimaging gamma optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norem, J.; Dawson, J.; Haberichter, W.; Lam, R.; Reed, L.; Yang, X.F.; Spencer, J.

    1995-01-01

    High energy photons produced from bremsstrahlung foils, Compton scattering or beamstrahlung from high energy e + e - collisions can be used to measure beam profiles using nonimaging optics. We describe the method and its limitations (resolution, backgrounds etc.), as well as the apparatus required to implement it. Data from a low energy test run is described as well as other possible applications, such as a 250+250 GeV linear collider and possible experiments with existing beams. (orig.)

  16. High sensitivity optical measurement of skin gloss

    OpenAIRE

    Ezerskaia, Anna; Ras, Arno; Bloemen, Pascal; Pereira, Silvania F.; Urbach, H. Paul; Varghese, Babu

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate a low-cost optical method for measuring the gloss properties with improved sensitivity in the low gloss regime, relevant for skin gloss properties. The gloss estimation method is based on, on the one hand, the slope of the intensity gradient in the transition regime between specular and diffuse reflection and on the other on the sum over the intensities of pixels above threshold, derived from a camera image obtained using unpolarized white light illumination. We demonstrate the...

  17. Interferometer for electron density measurement in exploding wire plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batra, Jigyasa; Jaiswar, Ashutosh; Kaushik, T.C.

    2016-12-01

    Mach-Zehnder Interferometer (MZI) has been developed for measuring electron density profile in pulsed plasmas. MZI is to be used for characterizing exploding wire plasmas for correlating electron density dynamics with x-rays emission. Experiments have been carried out for probing electron density in pulsed plasmas produced in our laboratory like in spark gap and exploding wire plasmas. These are microsecond phenomenon. Changes in electron density have been registered in interferograms with the help of a streak camera for specific time window. Temporal electron density profiles have been calculated by analyzing temporal fringe shifts in interferograms. This report deals with details of MZI developed in our laboratory along with its theory. Basic introductory details have also been provided for exploding wire plasmas to be probed. Some demonstrative results of electron density measurements in pulsed plasmas of spark gap and single exploding wires have been described. (author)

  18. Density functional study of : Electronic and optical properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K C Bhamu

    3Department of Physics, Swami Keshvanand Insitute of Technology, Management and Gramothan, ... Published online 20 June 2017. Abstract. This paper focusses on the electronic and optical properties of scandium-based silver delafossite.

  19. Measurement of Sediment Deposition Rates using an Optical Backscatter Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridd, P.; Day, G.; Thomas, S.; Harradence, J.; Fox, D.; Bunt, J.; Renagi, O.; Jago, C.

    2001-02-01

    An optical method for measuring siltation of sediment has been developed using an optical fibre backscatter (OBS) nephelometer. Sediment settling upon the optical fibre sensor causes an increase in the backscatter reading which can be related to the settled sediment surface density (SSSD) as measured in units of mg cm -2. Calibration and laboratory tests indicate that the resolution of measurements of SSSD is 0·01 mg cm -2and an accuracy of 5% in still water. In moving water it is more difficult to determine the accuracy of the method because other methods with suitable resolution are unavailable. However, indirect methods using measurements of changing suspended sediment concentration in a ring flume, indicate that the OBS method under-predicts deposition. The series of siltation from three field sites are presented. This sensor offers considerable advances over other methods of measuring settling because time series of settling may be taken and thus settling events may be related to other hydrodynamic parameters such as wave climate and currents.

  20. Ultracompact vibrometry measurement with nanometric accuracy using optical feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Ajit; Azcona, Francisco; Royo, Santiago

    2015-05-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of a semiconductor laser with optical feedback (OF) combined with direct current modulation of the laser is demonstrated to suffice for the measurement of subwavelength changes in the position of a vibrating object. So far, classical Optical Feedback Interferometry (OFI) has been used to measure the vibration of an object given its amplitude is greater than half the wavelength of emission, and the resolution of the measurement limited to some tenths of the wavelength after processing. We present here a methodology which takes advantage of the combination of two different phenomena: continuous wave frequency modulation (CWFM), induced by direct modulation of the laser, and non-linear dynamics inside of the laser cavity subject to optical self-injection (OSI). The methodology we propose shows how to detect vibration amplitudes smaller than half the emission wavelength with resolutions way beyond λ/2, extending the typical performance of OFI setups to very small amplitudes. A detailed mathematical model and simulation results are presented to support the proposed methodology, showing its ability to perform such displacement measurements of frequencies in the MHz range, depending upon the modulation frequency. Such approach makes the technique a suitable candidate, among other applications, to economic laser-based ultrasound measurements, with applications in nondestructive testing of materials (thickness, flaws, density, stresses), among others. The results of simulations of the proposed approach confirm the merit of the figures as detection of amplitudes of vibration below λ/2) with resolutions in the nanometer range.

  1. Paramagnetic ionic liquids for measurements of density using magnetic levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bwambok, David K; Thuo, Martin M; Atkinson, Manza B J; Mirica, Katherine A; Shapiro, Nathan D; Whitesides, George M

    2013-09-03

    Paramagnetic ionic liquids (PILs) provide new capabilities to measurements of density using magnetic levitation (MagLev). In a typical measurement, a diamagnetic object of unknown density is placed in a container containing a PIL. The container is placed between two magnets (typically NdFeB, oriented with like poles facing). The density of the diamagnetic object can be determined by measuring its position in the magnetic field along the vertical axis (levitation height, h), either as an absolute value or relative to internal standards of known density. For density measurements by MagLev, PILs have three advantages over solutions of paramagnetic salts in aqueous or organic solutions: (i) negligible vapor pressures; (ii) low melting points; (iii) high thermal stabilities. In addition, the densities, magnetic susceptibilities, glass transition temperatures, thermal decomposition temperatures, viscosities, and hydrophobicities of PILs can be tuned over broad ranges by choosing the cation-anion pair. The low melting points and high thermal stabilities of PILs provide large liquidus windows for density measurements. This paper demonstrates applications and advantages of PILs in density-based analyses using MagLev.

  2. Recent advances in measurements of the nuclear level density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, Bency

    2007-01-01

    A short review of recent advances in measurements of the nuclear level density is given. First results of the inverse level density parameter - angular momentum correlation in a number of nuclei around Z∼50 shell region at an excitation energy around 0.3 MeV/nucleon are presented. Significant variations observed over and above the expected shell corrections are discussed in context of the emerging trends in microscopic calculations of the nuclear level density. (author)

  3. Optical Reflectance Measurements for Commonly Used Reflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janecek, Martin; Moses, William W.

    2008-08-01

    When simulating light collection in scintillators, modeling the angular distribution of optical light reflectance from surfaces is very important. Since light reflectance is poorly understood, either purely specular or purely diffuse reflectance is generally assumed. In this paper we measure the optical reflectance distribution for eleven commonly used reflectors. A 440 nm, output power stabilized, un-polarized laser is shone onto a reflector at a fixed angle of incidence. The reflected light's angular distribution is measured by an array of silicon photodiodes. The photodiodes are movable to cover 2pi of solid angle. The light-induced current is, through a multiplexer, read out with a digital multimeter. A LabVIEW program controls the motion of the laser and the photodiode array, the multiplexer, and the data collection. The laser can be positioned at any angle with a position accuracy of 10 arc minutes. Each photodiode subtends 6.3deg, and the photodiode array can be positioned at any angle with up to 10 arc minute angular resolution. The dynamic range for the current measurements is 10 5:1. The measured light reflectance distribution was measured to be specular for several ESR films as well as for aluminum foil, mostly diffuse for polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) tape and titanium dioxide paint, and neither specular nor diffuse for Lumirrorreg, Melinexreg and Tyvekreg. Instead, a more complicated light distribution was measured for these three materials.

  4. A comprehensive tool for measuring mammographic density changes over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Mikael; Li, Jingmei; Leifland, Karin; Czene, Kamila; Hall, Per

    2018-06-01

    Mammographic density is a marker of breast cancer risk and diagnostics accuracy. Density change over time is a strong proxy for response to endocrine treatment and potentially a stronger predictor of breast cancer incidence. We developed STRATUS to analyse digital and analogue images and enable automated measurements of density changes over time. Raw and processed images from the same mammogram were randomly sampled from 41,353 healthy women. Measurements from raw images (using FDA approved software iCAD) were used as templates for STRATUS to measure density on processed images through machine learning. A similar two-step design was used to train density measures in analogue images. Relative risks of breast cancer were estimated in three unique datasets. An alignment protocol was developed using images from 11,409 women to reduce non-biological variability in density change. The protocol was evaluated in 55,073 women having two regular mammography screens. Differences and variances in densities were compared before and after image alignment. The average relative risk of breast cancer in the three datasets was 1.6 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.3-1.8] per standard deviation of percent mammographic density. The discrimination was AUC 0.62 (CI 0.60-0.64). The type of image did not significantly influence the risk associations. Alignment decreased the non-biological variability in density change and re-estimated the yearly overall percent density decrease from 1.5 to 0.9%, p density measures was not influenced by mammogram type. The alignment protocol reduced the non-biological variability between images over time. STRATUS has the potential to become a useful tool for epidemiological studies and clinical follow-up.

  5. Measurement of average density and relative volumes in a dispersed two-phase fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreepada, Sastry R.; Rippel, Robert R.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus and a method are disclosed for measuring the average density and relative volumes in an essentially transparent, dispersed two-phase fluid. A laser beam with a diameter no greater than 1% of the diameter of the bubbles, droplets, or particles of the dispersed phase is directed onto a diffraction grating. A single-order component of the diffracted beam is directed through the two-phase fluid and its refraction is measured. Preferably, the refracted beam exiting the fluid is incident upon a optical filter with linearly varing optical density and the intensity of the filtered beam is measured. The invention can be combined with other laser-based measurement systems, e.g., laser doppler anemometry.

  6. Density gradients in ceramic pellets measured by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawicka, B.D.; Palmer, B.J.F.

    1986-07-01

    Density gradients are of fundamental importance in ceramic processing and computed tomography (CT) can provide accurate measurements of density profiles in sintered and unsintered ceramic parts. As a demonstration of this potential, the density gradients in an unsintered pellet pressed from an alumina powder were measured by CT scanning. To detect such small density gradients, the CT images must have good density resolution and be free from beam-hardening effects. This was achieved by measuring high-contrast (low-noise) images with the use of an Ir-192 isotopic source. A beam-hardening correction was applied. The resulting images are discussed relative to the transmission of forces through the powder mass during the pelletizing process

  7. Association of age and macular pigment optical density using dual-wavelength autofluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Verônica Castro; Rosen, Richard B; Prata, Tiago Santos; Dorairaj, Syril; Spielberg, Leigh; Maia, Mauricio; Sallum, Juliana M

    2013-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that macular pigment may play a protective role against age-related macular degeneration, but the influence of age on macular pigment density levels remains unclear. This study was designed to investigate the relationship between age and the normal distribution of macular pigment optical density (MPOD) values surrounding the fovea. Consecutive healthy subjects with no evidence of ocular disease were enrolled in this study. After inclusion, MPOD values were measured at specific eccentricities (0.5, 1, and 2 degrees) from the foveal center using a dual-wavelength autofluorescence method employing a modified confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope. Whenever both eyes were eligible, one was randomly selected for analysis. The correlation between age and MPOD values was investigated using regression analysis. Thirty subjects (30 eyes) were included (mean age 48.6 ± 16.4 [range 23-77] years). Significant differences were found between MPOD values measured at 0.5, 1, and 2 degrees from the center of the fovea (0.49 ± 0.12 density units, 0.37 ± 0.11 density units, and 0.13 ± 0.05 density units, respectively, P < 0.05). Significant correlations between age and MPOD values at 0.5 and 1 degree were found (P ≤ 0.02). Values measured at 2 degrees did not correlate significantly with age (P = 0.06). In healthy subjects, MPOD values were highest near the foveal center. These values appeared to increase during adulthood (peak at 45-50 years), followed by a gradual reduction after 60 years of age.

  8. Association of age and macular pigment optical density using dual-wavelength autofluorescence imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima VC

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Verônica Castro Lima,1,2 Richard B Rosen,1,3 Tiago Santos Prata,2 Syril Dorairaj,4 Leigh Spielberg,1 Mauricio Maia,2 Juliana M Sallum21Retina Service, Department of Ophthalmology, The New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY, 2Department of Ophthalmology, Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; 3New York Medical College, New York, NY, 4Department of Ophthalmology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, USABackground: Several lines of evidence suggest that macular pigment may play a protective role against age-related macular degeneration, but the influence of age on macular pigment density levels remains unclear. This study was designed to investigate the relationship between age and the normal distribution of macular pigment optical density (MPOD values surrounding the fovea.Methods: Consecutive healthy subjects with no evidence of ocular disease were enrolled in this study. After inclusion, MPOD values were measured at specific eccentricities (0.5, 1, and 2 degrees from the foveal center using a dual-wavelength autofluorescence method employing a modified confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope. Whenever both eyes were eligible, one was randomly selected for analysis. The correlation between age and MPOD values was investigated using regression analysis.Results: Thirty subjects (30 eyes were included (mean age 48.6 ± 16.4 [range 23–77] years. Significant differences were found between MPOD values measured at 0.5, 1, and 2 degrees from the center of the fovea (0.49 ± 0.12 density units, 0.37 ± 0.11 density units, and 0.13 ± 0.05 density units, respectively, P < 0.05. Significant correlations between age and MPOD values at 0.5 and 1 degree were found (P ≤ 0.02. Values measured at 2 degrees did not correlate significantly with age (P = 0.06.Conclusion: In healthy subjects, MPOD values were highest near the foveal center. These values appeared to increase during adulthood (peak at 45–50 years, followed by a gradual reduction

  9. Optical Measurement of Cable and String Vibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Achkire

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a non contacting measurement technique for the transverse vibration of small cables and strings using an analog position sensing detector. On the one hand, the sensor is used to monitor the cable vibrations of a small scale mock-up of a cable structure in order to validate the nonlinear cable dynamics model. On the other hand, the optical sensor is used to evaluate the performance of an active tendon control algorithm with guaranteed stability properties. It is demonstrated experimentally, that a force feedback control law based on a collocated force sensor measuring the tension in the cable is feasible and provides active damping in the cable.

  10. Summer sudden Na number density enhancements measured with the ALOMAR Weber Na Lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Heinrich

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available We present summer Na-densities and atmospheric temperatures measured 80 to 110 km above the Arctic Lidar Observatory for Middle Atmosphere Research (ALOMAR. The Weber Na Lidar is part of ALOMAR, located at 69° N in Norway, 150 km north of the Arctic Circle. The sun does not set here during the summer months, and measurements require a narrowband Faraday Anomalous Dispersion Optical Filter (FADOF.

    We discuss an observed sudden enhancement in the Na number density around 22:00 UT on 1 to 2 June 2006. We compare this observation with previous summer measurements and find a frequent appearance of Na number density enhancements near local midnight. We describe the time of appearance, the altitude distribution, the duration and the strength of these enhancements and compare them to winter observations. We investigate possible formation mechanisms and, as others before, we find a strong link between these Na number density enhancements and sporadic E layers.

  11. Summer sudden Na number density enhancements measured with the ALOMAR Weber Na Lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Heinrich

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available We present summer Na-densities and atmospheric temperatures measured 80 to 110 km above the Arctic Lidar Observatory for Middle Atmosphere Research (ALOMAR. The Weber Na Lidar is part of ALOMAR, located at 69° N in Norway, 150 km north of the Arctic Circle. The sun does not set here during the summer months, and measurements require a narrowband Faraday Anomalous Dispersion Optical Filter (FADOF. We discuss an observed sudden enhancement in the Na number density around 22:00 UT on 1 to 2 June 2006. We compare this observation with previous summer measurements and find a frequent appearance of Na number density enhancements near local midnight. We describe the time of appearance, the altitude distribution, the duration and the strength of these enhancements and compare them to winter observations. We investigate possible formation mechanisms and, as others before, we find a strong link between these Na number density enhancements and sporadic E layers.

  12. Silicon surface barrier detectors used for liquid hydrogen density measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, D. T.; Milam, J. K.; Winslett, H. B.

    1968-01-01

    Multichannel system employing a radioisotope radiation source, strontium-90, radiation detector, and a silicon surface barrier detector, measures the local density of liquid hydrogen at various levels in a storage tank. The instrument contains electronic equipment for collecting the density information, and a data handling system for processing this information.

  13. Ambient RF energy scavenging: GSM and WLAN power density measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, H.J.; Reniers, A.C.F.; Theeuwes, J.A.C.

    2009-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of ambient RF energy scavenging, a survey of expected power density levels distant from GSM-900 and GSM-1800 base stations has been conducted and power density measurements have been performed in a WLAN environment. It appears that for distances ranging from 25 m to 100 m

  14. Laboratory testing & measurement on optical imaging systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Theron, B

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available on Optical Imaging Systems Bertus Theron 27 April 2013 presented at SIECPC 2013, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Overview of Workshop Part 1. Introduction & Context  Some history of Arabic Optics  Context: Global vs Local optical testing... of Arabic Optics 1 See [4]  Arabic records of study of geometrical optics  Traced to Hellenistic (Greek) optics  Translated to Arabic  9th century  Arabic contribution to geometric optics  Not just translation to Arabic  Innovative research...

  15. A magnetic suspension system for measuring liquid density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz María Centeno González

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Density is a derived quantity of mass and length; it is defined as mass per volume unit and its SI unit is kg/m3. National metrology institutes have been designing and building their own magnetic suspension systems during the last 5 decades for making fluid density measurements; this has allowed them to carry out research into liquids and gases’ physical characteristics. This paper was aimed at designing and developing a magnetic suspension system for a magnetic balance used in determining liquid density to be used in CENAM’s metrology density laboratories.

  16. Density measurements of microsecond-conduction-time POS plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinshelwood, D.; Goodrich, P.J.; Weber, B.V.; Commisso, R.J.; Grossmann, J.M.; Kellogg, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of the electron density in a coaxial microsecond conduction time plasma opening switch during switch operation are described. Current conduction is observed to cause a radial redistribution of the switch plasma. A local reduction in axial line density of more than an order of magnitude occurs by the time opening begins. This reduction, and the scaling of conduction current with plasma density, indicate that current conduction in this experiment is limited by hydrodynamic effects. It is hypothesized that the density reduction allows the switch to open by an erosion mechanism. Initial numerical modeling efforts have reproduced the principal observed results. A model that predicts accurately the conduction current is presented

  17. Optical measurements on iron pnictides containing Eu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neubauer, David; Baumgartner, Andreas; Merz, Johannes; Zapf, Sina; Dressel, Martin [1. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Stuttgart (Germany); Aswartham, Saicharan [University of Kentucky, Lexington (United States); Wurmehl, Sabine [IFW, Dresden (Germany); Jiao, Wen-He; Cao, Guang-Han [Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China)

    2015-07-01

    The interplay of magnetism with superconductivity is a fascinating, highly debated field of research and many questions still remain unsolved. Members of the EuFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} family are a perfectly suited playground for investigations concerning this topic, due to the peculiarity of strong local magnetism of the europium (T{sub N}∼ 20K), which is a unique feature among the 122 iron pnictides. Optical studies of the parent compound have already revealed that the spin density wave formation deviates from the other 122 pnictides. To get more insight into the superconducting properties of the EuFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} family we carried out an optical study on differently doped samples. We compare Eu(Fe{sub 1-x}Ir{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2} where electron doping takes place directly in the conducting iron layer, with EuFe{sub 2}(As{sub 1-x}P{sub x}){sub 2} which corresponds to isovalent substitution at atomic positions out of the Fe-plane. The influence of the Eu is furthermore investigated by placing data we obtained on Ba{sub 0.6}Eu{sub 0.4}(Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2} in juxtaposition to the already highly investigated pure Ba analogue.

  18. Optical properties of Al nanostructures from time dependent density functional theory

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2016-01-01

    The optical properties of Al nanostructures are investigated by means of time dependent density functional theory, considering chains of varying length and ladders/stripes of varying aspect ratio. The absorption spectra show redshifting

  19. Strength measurement of optical fibers by bending

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srubshchik, Leonid S.

    1999-01-01

    A two-point bending technique has been used not only to measure the breaking stress of optical fiber but also to predict its static and dynamic fatigue. The present theory of this test is based on elastica theory of rod. However, within the limits of elastica theory the tensile and shear stresses cannot be determined. In this paper we study dynamic and static problems for optical fiber in the two- point bending test on the base of geometrically exact theory in which rod can suffer flexure, extension, and shear. We obtain the governing partial differential equations taking into account the fact that the lateral motion of the fiber is restrained by the presence of flat parallel plates. We develop the computational methods for solving the initial and equilibrium free-boundary nonlinear planar problems. We derive the formulas for predicting of the tensile strength from strength in the bending and calculate one example.

  20. Rapid density-measurement system with vibrating-tube densimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kayukawa, Yohei; Hasumoto, Masaya; Watanabe, Koichi

    2003-01-01

    Concerning an increasing demand for environmentally friendly refrigerants including hydrocarbons, thermodynamic properties of such new refrigerants, especially densities, are essential information for refrigeration engineering. A rapid density-measurement system with vibrating-tube densimeter was developed in the present study with an aim to supply large numbers of high-quality PVT property data in a short period. The present system needs only a few minutes to obtain a single datum, and requires less than 20 cm 3 sample fluid. PVT properties in the entire fluid-phase, vapor-pressures, saturated-liquid densities for pure fluid are available. Liquid densities, bubble-point pressures and saturated-liquid densities for mixture can be obtained. The measurement range is from 240 to 380 K for temperature and up to 7 MPa for pressure. By employing a new calibration function, density can be precisely obtained even at lower densities. The densimeter is calibrated with pure water and iso-octane which is one of the density-standard fluids, and then measurement uncertainty was evaluated to be 0.1 kg m -3 or 0.024% whichever greater in density, 0.26 kPa or 0.022% whichever greater in pressure and 3 mK for temperature, respectively. The performance of the present measurement system was examined by measuring thermodynamic properties for refrigerant R134a. The experimental results were compared with available equation of state and confirmed to agree with it within ±0.05% for liquid densities while ±0.5% in pressure for the gas phase

  1. Negative vacuum energy densities and the causal diamond measure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salem, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    Arguably a major success of the landscape picture is the prediction of a small, nonzero vacuum energy density. The details of this prediction depend in part on how the diverging spacetime volume of the multiverse is regulated, a question that remains unresolved. One proposal, the causal diamond measure, has demonstrated many phenomenological successes, including predicting a distribution of positive vacuum energy densities in good agreement with observation. In the string landscape, however, the vacuum energy density is expected to take positive and negative values. We find the causal diamond measure gives a poor fit to observation in such a landscape - in particular, 99.6% of observers in galaxies seemingly just like ours measure a vacuum energy density smaller than we do, most of them measuring it to be negative.

  2. Optimum design of a microwave interferometer for plasma density measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindberg, L.; Eriksson, A.

    1980-11-01

    Theoretical and practical problems arising in the application of microwave interferometry to density measurements on transient plasmas are discussed. The conditions for unambiquous measurements in a density range as wide as possible are analyzed. It is shown that the initial zero adjustment of the interferometer bridge recommended in many text books is the worst possible choice of initial condition when the aim is high initial sensitivity at low densities. The analytic expressions needed for unambiquous evaluation of any phase shift from a few degrees to several times π (counting of fringes) are derived. The practical design of the interferometer circuit and its inherent error sources due to reflexions and non-ideal component properties are discussed. The results are applied to an interferometer operating at 80 GHz used on a pulsed plasma experiment. The minimum measurable phase shift is 2deg and the range of linear densities that have been measured is = 1 . 10 16 - 3 . 10 18 m -2

  3. Beam density equalization in a channel with nonlinear optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batygin, Yu.K.; Kushin, V.V.; Nesterov, N.A.; Plotnikov, S.V.

    1993-01-01

    Simulation of beam density equalization in 2.85 m length transport channel covering two quadrupole lenses and two octupole lenses was carried out to obtain irradiation homogeneous field of track membrane materials. 0.3 MeV/nucleon energy and 1/8 electron-charge-mass ratio ion beam was supplied to the system inlet. Equalization of beam density function equal to about 80% was obtained. 4 refs., 1 fig

  4. Automated Volumetric Mammographic Breast Density Measurements May Underestimate Percent Breast Density for High-density Breasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahbar, K.; Gubern Merida, A.; Patrie, J.T.; Harvey, J.A.

    2017-01-01

    RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to evaluate discrepancy in breast composition measurements obtained from mammograms using two commercially available software methods for systematic trends in overestimation or underestimation compared to magnetic resonance-derived

  5. Precision Electron Density Measurements in the SSX MHD Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suen-Lewis, Emma M.; Barbano, Luke J.; Shrock, Jaron E.; Kaur, Manjit; Schaffner, David A.; Brown, Michael R.

    2017-10-01

    We characterize fluctuations of the line averaged electron density of Taylor states produced by the magnetized coaxial plasma gun of the SSX device using a 632.8 nm HeNe laser interferometer. The analysis method uses the electron density dependence of the refractive index of the plasma to determine the electron density of the Taylor states. Typical magnetic field and density values in the SSX device approach about B ≅ 0.3 T and n = 0 . 4 ×1016 cm-3 . Analysis is improved from previous density measurement methods by developing a post-processing method to remove relative phase error between interferometer outputs and to account for approximately linear phase drift due to low-frequency mechanical vibrations of the interferometer. Precision density measurements coupled with local measurements of the magnetic field will allow us to characterize the wave composition of SSX plasma via density vs. magnetic field correlation analysis, and compare the wave composition of SSX plasma with that of the solar wind. Preliminary results indicate that density and magnetic field appear negatively correlated. Work supported by DOE ARPA-E ALPHA program.

  6. Electron density profile measurements by microwave reflectometry on Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clairet, F.; Paume, M.; Chareau, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    A proposal is presented developing reflectometry diagnostic for electron density profile measurements as routine diagnostic without manual intervention as achieved at JET. Since density fluctuations seriously perturb the reflected signal and the measurement of the group delay, a method is described to overcome the irrelevant results with the help of an adaptive filtering technique. Accurate profiles are estimated for about 70% of the shots. (author) 3 refs.; 6 figs

  7. Espectrofotometria de longo caminho óptico em espectrofotômetro de duplo-feixe convencional: uma alternativa simples para investigações de amostras com densidade óptica muito baixa Long optical path length spectrophotometry in conventional double-beam spectrophotometers: a simple alternative for investigating samples of very low optical density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luiz Galo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the design and tests of a set-up mounted in a conventional double beam spectrophotometer, which allows the determination of optical density of samples confined in a long liquid core waveguide (LCW capillary. Very long optical path length can be achieved with capillary cell, allowing measurements of samples with very low optical densities. The device uses a custom optical concentrator optically coupled to LCW (TEFLON® AF. Optical density measurements, carried out using a LCW of ~ 45 cm, were in accordance with the Beer-Lambert Law. Thus, it was possible to analyze quantitatively samples at concentrations 45 fold lower than that regularly used in spectrophotometric measurements.

  8. High sensitivity optical measurement of skin gloss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezerskaia, Anna; Ras, Arno; Bloemen, Pascal; Pereira, Silvania F; Urbach, H Paul; Varghese, Babu

    2017-09-01

    We demonstrate a low-cost optical method for measuring the gloss properties with improved sensitivity in the low gloss regime, relevant for skin gloss properties. The gloss estimation method is based on, on the one hand, the slope of the intensity gradient in the transition regime between specular and diffuse reflection and on the other on the sum over the intensities of pixels above threshold, derived from a camera image obtained using unpolarized white light illumination. We demonstrate the improved sensitivity of the two proposed methods using Monte Carlo simulations and experiments performed on ISO gloss calibration standards with an optical prototype. The performance and linearity of the method was compared with different professional gloss measurement devices based on the ratio of specular to diffuse intensity. We demonstrate the feasibility for in-vivo skin gloss measurements by quantifying the temporal evolution of skin gloss after application of standard paraffin cream bases on skin. The presented method opens new possibilities in the fields of cosmetology and dermatopharmacology for measuring the skin gloss and resorption kinetics and the pharmacodynamics of various external agents.

  9. Development of a fiber optic pavement subgrade strain measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Craig Emerson

    2000-11-01

    This dissertation describes the development of a fiber optic sensing system to measure strains within the soil subgrade of highway pavements resulting from traffic loads. The motivation to develop such a device include improvements to: (1)all phases of pavement design, (2)theoretical models used to predict pavement performance, and (3)pavement rehabilitation. The design of the sensing system encompasses selecting an appropriate transducer design as well as the development of optimal optical and demodulation systems. The first is spring based, which attempts to match its spring stiffness to that of the soil-data indicate it is not an optimal transducer design. The second transducer implements anchoring plates attached to two telescoping tubes which allows the soil to be compacted to a desired density between the plates to dictate the transducer's behavior. Both transducers include an extrinsic Fabry- Perot cavity to impose the soil strains onto a phase change of the optical signal propagating through the cavity. The optical system includes a low coherence source and allows phase modulation via path length stretching by adding a second interferometer in series with the transducer, resulting in a path matched differential interferometer. A digitally implemented synthetic heterodyne demodulator based on a four step phase stepping algorithm is used to obtain unambiguous soil strain information from the displacement of the Fabry-Perot cavity. The demodulator is calibrated and characterized by illuminating the transducer with a second long coherence source of different wavelength. The transducer using anchoring plates is embedded within cylindrical soil specimens of varying soil types and soil moisture contents. Loads are applied to the specimen and resulting strains are measured using the embedded fiber optic gage and LVDTs attached to the surface of the specimen. This experimental verification is substantiated using a finite element analysis to predict any differences

  10. Mammographic density measurements are not affected by mammography system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damases, Christine N; Brennan, Patrick C; McEntee, Mark F

    2015-01-01

    Mammographic density (MD) is a significant risk factor for breast cancer and has been shown to reduce the sensitivity of mammography screening. Knowledge of a woman's density can be used to predict her risk of developing breast cancer and personalize her imaging pathway. However, measurement of breast density has proven to be troublesome with wide variations in density recorded using radiologists' visual Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS). Several automated methods for assessing breast density have been proposed, each with their own source of measurement error. The use of differing mammographic imaging systems further complicates MD measurement, especially for the same women imaged over time. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether having a mammogram on differing manufacturer's equipment affects a woman's MD measurement. Raw mammographic images were acquired on two mammography imaging systems (General Electric and Hologic) one year apart and processed using VolparaDensity™ to obtain the Volpara Density Grade (VDG) and average volumetric breast density percentage (AvBD%). Visual BIRADS scores were also obtained from 20 expert readers. BIRADS scores for both systems showed strong positive correlation ([Formula: see text]; [Formula: see text]), while the VDG ([Formula: see text]; [Formula: see text]) and AvBD% ([Formula: see text]; [Formula: see text]) showed stronger positive correlations. Substantial agreement was shown between the systems for BIRADS ([Formula: see text]; [Formula: see text]), however, the systems demonstrated an almost perfect agreement for VDG ([Formula: see text]; [Formula: see text]).

  11. Inelastic collisions and density-dependent excitation suppression in a 87Sr optical lattice clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishof, M.; Martin, M. J.; Swallows, M. D.; Benko, C.; Lin, Y.; Quemener, G.; Rey, A. M.; Ye, J.

    2011-01-01

    We observe two-body loss of 3 P 0 87 Sr atoms trapped in a one-dimensional optical lattice. We measure loss rate coefficients for atomic samples between 1 and 6 μK that are prepared either in a single nuclear-spin sublevel or with equal populations in two sublevels. The measured temperature and nuclear-spin preparation dependence of rate coefficients agree well with calculations and reveal that rate coefficients for distinguishable atoms are only slightly enhanced over those of indistinguishable atoms. We further observe a suppression of excitation and losses during interrogation of the 1 S 0 - 3 P 0 transition as density increases and Rabi frequency decreases, which suggests the presence of strong interactions in our dynamically driven many-body system.

  12. Ultrasonic Technique for Density Measurement of Liquids in Extreme Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rymantas Kazys

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available An ultrasonic technique, invariant to temperature changes, for a density measurement of different liquids under in situ extreme conditions is presented. The influence of geometry and material parameters of the measurement system (transducer, waveguide, matching layer on measurement accuracy and reliability is analyzed theoretically along with experimental results. The proposed method is based on measurement of the amplitude of the ultrasonic wave, reflected from the interface of the solid/liquid medium under investigation. In order to enhance sensitivity, the use of a quarter wavelength acoustic matching layer is proposed. Therefore, the sensitivity of the measurement system increases significantly. Density measurements quite often must be performed in extreme conditions at high temperature (up to 220 °C and high pressure. In this case, metal waveguides between piezoelectric transducer and the measured liquid are used in order to protect the conventional transducer from the influence of high temperature and to avoid depolarization. The presented ultrasonic density measurement technique is suitable for density measurement in different materials, including liquids and polymer melts in extreme conditions. A new calibration algorithm was proposed. The metrological evaluation of the measurement method was performed. The expanded measurement uncertainty Uρ = 7.4 × 10−3 g/cm3 (1%.

  13. Ultrasonic Technique for Density Measurement of Liquids in Extreme Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazys, Rymantas; Sliteris, Reimondas; Rekuviene, Regina; Zukauskas, Egidijus; Mazeika, Liudas

    2015-01-01

    An ultrasonic technique, invariant to temperature changes, for a density measurement of different liquids under in situ extreme conditions is presented. The influence of geometry and material parameters of the measurement system (transducer, waveguide, matching layer) on measurement accuracy and reliability is analyzed theoretically along with experimental results. The proposed method is based on measurement of the amplitude of the ultrasonic wave, reflected from the interface of the solid/liquid medium under investigation. In order to enhance sensitivity, the use of a quarter wavelength acoustic matching layer is proposed. Therefore, the sensitivity of the measurement system increases significantly. Density measurements quite often must be performed in extreme conditions at high temperature (up to 220 °C) and high pressure. In this case, metal waveguides between piezoelectric transducer and the measured liquid are used in order to protect the conventional transducer from the influence of high temperature and to avoid depolarization. The presented ultrasonic density measurement technique is suitable for density measurement in different materials, including liquids and polymer melts in extreme conditions. A new calibration algorithm was proposed. The metrological evaluation of the measurement method was performed. The expanded measurement uncertainty Uρ = 7.4 × 10−3 g/cm3 (1%). PMID:26262619

  14. Ultrasonic Technique for Density Measurement of Liquids in Extreme Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazys, Rymantas; Sliteris, Reimondas; Rekuviene, Regina; Zukauskas, Egidijus; Mazeika, Liudas

    2015-08-07

    An ultrasonic technique, invariant to temperature changes, for a density measurement of different liquids under in situ extreme conditions is presented. The influence of geometry and material parameters of the measurement system (transducer, waveguide, matching layer) on measurement accuracy and reliability is analyzed theoretically along with experimental results. The proposed method is based on measurement of the amplitude of the ultrasonic wave, reflected from the interface of the solid/liquid medium under investigation. In order to enhance sensitivity, the use of a quarter wavelength acoustic matching layer is proposed. Therefore, the sensitivity of the measurement system increases significantly. Density measurements quite often must be performed in extreme conditions at high temperature (up to 220 °C) and high pressure. In this case, metal waveguides between piezoelectric transducer and the measured liquid are used in order to protect the conventional transducer from the influence of high temperature and to avoid depolarization. The presented ultrasonic density measurement technique is suitable for density measurement in different materials, including liquids and polymer melts in extreme conditions. A new calibration algorithm was proposed. The metrological evaluation of the measurement method was performed. The expanded measurement uncertainty Uρ = 7.4 × 10(-3) g/cm(3) (1%).

  15. RZP 202 - a modular system for surface density measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severa, L.; Merinsky, J.

    The sensing element is an ionization chamber of the type that has maximum sensitivity to beta radiation of the used radionuclide ( 147 Pm, 85 Kr, 90 Sr- 90 Y) or to gamma radiation of radionuclide 241 Am. Collimation shields were developed for the said sources. Measurement of the ionization currents is made with an electrometer with a vibration capacitor. Invariable configuration is secured by a measuring arm. The modular units are of the CAMAC system design. The surface density meters measure deviations from the rated surface density. The scale for inputting surface density is linear. The configuration, functional continuity of the individual parts and the possibility of variant designs of surface density meters are described and the technical parameters of RZP 202 and its configuration and design are given

  16. Wireless Sensor Node for Surface Seawater Density Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Saletti

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available An electronic meter to measure surface seawater density is presented. It is based on the measurement of the difference in displacements of a surface level probe and a weighted float, which according to Archimedes’ law depends on the density of the water. The displacements are simultaneously measured using a high-accuracy magnetostrictive sensor, to which a custom electronic board provides a wireless connection and power supply so that it can become part of a wireless sensor network. The electronics are designed so that different kinds of wireless networks can be used, by simply changing the wireless module and the relevant firmware of the microcontroller. Lastly, laboratory and at-sea tests are presented and discussed in order to highlight the functionality and the performance of a prototype of the wireless density meter node in a Bluetooth radio network. The experimental results show a good agreement of the values of the calculated density compared to reference hydrometer readings.

  17. Wireless sensor node for surface seawater density measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baronti, Federico; Fantechi, Gabriele; Roncella, Roberto; Saletti, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    An electronic meter to measure surface seawater density is presented. It is based on the measurement of the difference in displacements of a surface level probe and a weighted float, which according to Archimedes' law depends on the density of the water. The displacements are simultaneously measured using a high-accuracy magnetostrictive sensor, to which a custom electronic board provides a wireless connection and power supply so that it can become part of a wireless sensor network. The electronics are designed so that different kinds of wireless networks can be used, by simply changing the wireless module and the relevant firmware of the microcontroller. Lastly, laboratory and at-sea tests are presented and discussed in order to highlight the functionality and the performance of a prototype of the wireless density meter node in a Bluetooth radio network. The experimental results show a good agreement of the values of the calculated density compared to reference hydrometer readings.

  18. Measurement and correction of accelerator optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, F.

    1998-06-01

    This report reviews procedures and techniques for measuring, correcting and controlling various optics parameters of an accelerator, including the betatron tune, beta function, betatron coupling, dispersion, chromaticity, momentum compaction factor, and beam orbit. The techniques described are not only indispensable for the basic set-up of an accelerator, but in addition the same methods can be used to study more esoteric questions as, for instance, dynamic aperture limitations or wakefield effects. The different procedures are illustrated by examples from several accelerators, storage rings, as well as linacs and transport lines

  19. Density of states in an optical speckle potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falco, G. M.; Fedorenko, A. A.; Giacomelli, J.; Modugno, M.

    2010-01-01

    We study the single-particle density of states of a one-dimensional speckle potential, which is correlated and non-Gaussian. We consider both the repulsive and the attractive cases. The system is controlled by a single dimensionless parameter determined by the mass of the particle, the correlation length, and the average intensity of the field. Depending on the value of this parameter, the system exhibits different regimes, characterized by the localization properties of the eigenfunctions. We calculate the corresponding density of states using the statistical properties of the speckle potential. We find good agreement with the results of numerical simulations.

  20. Optical fibers and their applications for radiation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakuta, Tsunemi

    1998-01-01

    As a new method of radiation measurements, several optical methods using optical fiber sensors have been developed. One is the application of 'radio-luminescence' from the optical fiber itself such as plastic scintillating fibers. Other researches are made to develop the 'combined-sensors' by combination of optical fibers and scintillating materials. Using the time domain method of optical fiber sensors, the profile of radiation distribution along the optical fiber can be easily determined. A multi-parameter sensing system for measurement of radiation, temperature, stress, etc, are also expected using these optical fiber sensors. (author)

  1. Measurement and analyses of molten Ni-Co alloy density

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Feng; K. MUKAI; FANG Liang; FU Ya; YANG Ren-hui

    2006-01-01

    With the advent of powerful mathematical modeling techniques for material phenomena, there is renewed interest in reliable data for the density of the Ni-based superalloys. Up to now, there has been few report on the density of molten Ni-Co alloy.In order to obtain more accurate density data for molten Ni-Co alloy, the density of molten Ni-Co alloy was measured with a modified sessile drop method, and the accommodation of different atoms in molten Ni-Co alloy was analyzed. The density of alloy is found to decrease with increasing temperature and Co concentration in the alloy. The molar volume of molten Ni-Co alloy increases with increasing Co concentration. The molar volume of Ni-Co alloy determined shows a positive deviation from the linear molar volume, and the deviation of molar volume from ideal mixing increases with increasing Co concentration over the experimental concentration range.

  2. Advances in measuring ocean salinity with an optical sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menn, M Le; De Bougrenet de la Tocnaye, J L; Grosso, P; Delauney, L; Podeur, C; Brault, P; Guillerme, O

    2011-01-01

    Absolute salinity measurement of seawater has become a key issue in thermodynamic models of the oceans. One of the most direct ways is to measure the seawater refractive index which is related to density and can therefore be related to the absolute salinity. Recent advances in high resolution position sensitive devices enable us to take advantage of small beam deviation measurements using refractometers. This paper assesses the advantages of such technology with respect to the current state-of-the-art technology. In particular, we present the resolution dependence on refractive index variations and derive the limits of such a solution for designing seawater sensors well suited for coastal and deep-sea applications. Particular attention has been paid to investigate the impact of environmental parameters, such as temperature and pressure, on an optical sensor, and ways to mitigate or compensate them have been suggested here. The sensor has been successfully tested in a pressure tank and in open oceans 2000 m deep

  3. Electron and current density measurements on tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lammeren, A.C.A.P. van.

    1991-01-01

    The first part of this thesis describes the Thomson-scattering diagnostic as it was present at the TORTUR tokamak. For the first time with this diagnostic a complete tangential scattering spectrum was recorded during one single laser pulse. From this scattering spectrum the local current density was derived. Small deviations from the expected gaussian scattering spectrum were observed indicating the non-Maxwellian character of the electron-velocity distribution. The second part of this thesis describes the multi-channel interferometer/ polarimeter diagnostic which was constructed, build and operated on the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project (RTP) tokamak. The diagnostic was operated routinely, yielding the development of the density profiles for every discharge. When ECRH (Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating) is switched on the density profile broadens, the central density decreases and the total density increases, the opposite takes place when ECRH is switched off. The influence of MHD (magnetohydrodynamics) activity on the density was clearly observable. In the central region of the plasma it was measured that in hydrogen discharges the so-called sawtooth collapse is preceded by an m=1 instability which grows rapidly. An increase in radius of this m=1 mode of 1.5 cm just before the crash is observed. In hydrogen discharges the sawtooth induced density pulse shows an asymmetry for the high- and low-field side propagation. This asymmetry disappeared for helium discharges. From the location of the maximum density variations during an m=2 mode the position of the q=2 surface is derived. The density profiles are measured during the energy quench phase of a plasma disruption. A fast flattening and broadening of the density profile is observed. (author). 95 refs.; 66 figs.; 7 tabs

  4. Tear film measurement by optical reflectometry technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hui; Wang, Michael R.; Wang, Jianhua; Shen, Meixiao

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Evaluation of tear film is performed by an optical reflectometer system with alignment guided by a galvanometer scanner. The reflectometer system utilizes optical fibers to deliver illumination light to the tear film and collect the film reflectance as a function of wavelength. Film thickness is determined by best fitting the reflectance-wavelength curve. The spectral reflectance acquisition time is 15 ms, fast enough for detecting film thickness changes. Fast beam alignment of 1 s is achieved by the galvanometer scanner. The reflectometer was first used to evaluate artificial tear film on a model eye with and without a contact lens. The film thickness and thinning rate have been successfully quantified with the minimum measured thickness of about 0.3 μm. Tear films in human eyes, with and without a contact lens, have also been evaluated. A high-contrast spectral reflectance signal from the precontact lens tear film is clearly observed, and the thinning dynamics have been easily recorded from 3.69 to 1.31 μm with lipid layer thickness variation in the range of 41 to 67 nm. The accuracy of the measurement is better than ±0.58% of the film thickness at an estimated tear film refractive index error of ±0.001. The fiber-based reflectometer system is compact and easy to handle. PMID:24500519

  5. Nondestructive density measured in powder metallurgy and ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlieper, G.; Arnold, V.; Dirkes, H.

    1989-01-01

    Absorption measurements with gamma radiation have been utilized for the determination of porosities (densities) in materials compacted or sintered from metallic or ceramic powders. The mathematical background for the assessment of this method, and for evaluations of the accuracy of measurement is presented within the reported paper. The equipment for the practical application of density measurements in industry has been developed. Hardware and software of this computerized instrument are designed for a maximum of safety, ease of operation, reliability, flexibility, and efficiency. (orig./RHM) [de

  6. Space potential, temperature, and density profile measurements on RENTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoch, P.M.

    1983-05-01

    Radial profiles of the space potential, electron temperature, and density have been measured on RENTOR with a heavy-ion-beam probe. The potential profile has been compared to predictions from a stochastic magnetic field fluctuation theory, using the measured temperature and density profiles. The comparison shows strong qualitative agreement in that the potential is positive and the order of T/sub e//e. There is some quantitative disagreement in that the measured radial electric fields are somewhat smaller than the theoretical predictions. To facilitate this comparison, a detailed analysis of the possible errors has been completed

  7. Rocket measurements of electron density irregularities during MAC/SINE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulwick, J. C.

    1989-01-01

    Four Super Arcas rockets were launched at the Andoya Rocket Range, Norway, as part of the MAC/SINE campaign to measure electron density irregularities with high spatial resolution in the cold summer polar mesosphere. They were launched as part of two salvos: the turbulent/gravity wave salvo (3 rockets) and the EISCAT/SOUSY radar salvo (one rocket). In both salvos meteorological rockets, measuring temperature and winds, were also launched and the SOUSY radar, located near the launch site, measured mesospheric turbulence. Electron density irregularities and strong gradients were measured by the rocket probes in the region of most intense backscatter observed by the radar. The electron density profiles (8 to 4 on ascent and 4 on descent) show very different characteristics in the peak scattering region and show marked spatial and temporal variability. These data are intercompared and discussed.

  8. Plasma density measurements from the GEOS-1 relaxation sounder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etcheto, J.; Bloch, J.J.

    1978-01-01

    The relaxation sounder uses the characteristics of the propagation of radiowaves to sound the plasma surrounding the spacecraft. It determines, in particular, the plasma frequency, which gives the electron density. Measurements over the whole dayside of the magnetosphere, from the evening to the night sectors, are now available. The behaviour of the plasma resonance depends on local time, the nighttime echoes being generally weaker. Density measurements thus obtained are shown and discussed in the context of what is presently known about the plasma distribution in the magnetosphere. In particular, the density around apogee is studied as a function of magnetic activity. On the dayside, it appears to vary between a few and a few tens of electrons per cubic centimeter. The evolution of the density profile for several consecutive days is studied and interpreted tracing back the drift of the particles. (Auth.)

  9. Density dependence of stopping cross sections measured in liquid ethane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both, G.; Krotz, R.; Lohmer, K.; Neuwirth, W.

    1983-01-01

    Electronic stopping cross sections for 7 Li projectiles (840--175 keV) have been measured with the inverted Doppler-shift attenuation method in liquid ethane (C 2 H 6 ) at two different densities. The density of the target has been varied by changing the temperature, and measurements have been performed at 0.525 g/cm 3 (199 K) and 0.362 g/cm 3 (287 K). At the higher density the stopping cross section is about 2% smaller. This result agrees with a calculation of the stopping cross section of liquid ethane, applying Lindhard's theory in the local-density approximation using a simple model of the liquid. It is also in agreement with various observations of the so-called physical-state effect, which show that the stopping cross section of the same substance is smaller in a condensed phase than in the gaseous one

  10. WSN-Based Space Charge Density Measurement System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dawei; Yuan, Haiwen; Lv, Jianxun; Ju, Yong

    2017-01-01

    It is generally acknowledged that high voltage direct current (HVDC) transmission line endures the drawback of large area, because of which the utilization of cable for space charge density monitoring system is of inconvenience. Compared with the traditional communication network, wireless sensor network (WSN) shows advantages in small volume, high flexibility and strong self-organization, thereby presenting great potential in solving the problem. Additionally, WSN is more suitable for the construction of distributed space charge density monitoring system as it has longer distance and higher mobility. A distributed wireless system is designed for collecting and monitoring the space charge density under HVDC transmission lines, which has been widely applied in both Chinese state grid HVDC test base and power transmission projects. Experimental results of the measuring system demonstrated its adaptability in the complex electromagnetic environment under the transmission lines and the ability in realizing accurate, flexible, and stable demands for the measurement of space charge density.

  11. Noncontacting Optical Measurement And Inspection Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Jeffrey A.; Jackson, Robert L.

    1986-10-01

    Product inspection continues to play a growing role in the improvement of quality and reduction of scrap. Recent emphasis on precision measurements and in-process inspection have been a driving force for the development of noncontacting sensors. Noncontacting sensors can provide long term, unattended use due to the lack of sensor wear. Further, in applications where, sensor contact can damage or geometrically change the part to be measured or inspected, noncontacting sensors are the only technical approach available. MTI is involved in the development and sale of noncontacting sensors and custom inspection systems. This paper will review the recent advances in noncontacting sensor development. Machine vision and fiber optics sensor systems are finding a wide variety of industrial inspection applications. This paper will provide detailed examples of several state-of-the-art applications for these noncontacting sensors.

  12. Optical measurements in rocket engine liquid sprays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feikema, Douglas A.

    1994-01-01

    The performance of liquid propellant rocket engines is dependent upon many elements of the entire system. One of the most fundamental and most critical is the performance of the injector elements. Their characterization is an important part of the development of combustion devices. Optical measurements within these environments have proven to be invaluable tools in quantifying the physical environment of two phase flows. The effort reported herein involves the measurement of drop velocity, drop size, and most importantly mass flux using Phase-Doppler Particle Anemometry within a spray generated by a single swirl injector element operating in atmospheric pressure conditions. The mass flux has been determined and validated by mechanical patternation methods and by profile integration of the mass flux.

  13. Radiometric densimeter for measuring and automatic control of liquid density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wajs, J.

    1982-01-01

    A performance rule of the radiometric densimeter produced by ''POLON ''Works is presented. A simplified analysis of the correction of density indication changes due to liquid temperature variations is described. A method of replacing the measuring pipe carrying the liquid being measured by suitable standards is given. The method is for automatic systems control. (A.S.)

  14. High-density near-field optical disc recording using phase change media and polycarbonate substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoda, Masataka; Saito, Kimihiro; Ishimoto, Tsutomu; Kondo, Takao; Nakaoki, Ariyoshi; Furuki, Motohiro; Takeda, Minoru; Akiyama, Yuji; Shimouma, Takashi; Yamamoto, Masanobu

    2004-09-01

    We developed a high density near field optical recording disc system with a solid immersion lens and two laser sources. In order to realize the near field optical recording, we used a phase change recording media and a molded polycarbonate substrate. The near field optical pick-up consists of a solid immersion lens with numerical aperture of 1.84. The clear eye pattern of 90.2 GB capacity (160nm track pitch and 62 nm per bit) was observed. The jitter using a limit equalizer was 10.0 % without cross-talk. The bit error rate using an adaptive PRML with 8 taps was 3.7e-6 without cross-talk. We confirmed that the near field optical disc system is a promising technology for a next generation high density optical disc system.

  15. SERODS: a new medium for high-density optical data storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Stokes, David L.

    1998-10-01

    A new optical dada storage technology based on the surface- enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect has been developed for high-density optical memory and three-dimensional data storage. With the surface-enhanced Raman optical data storage (SERODS) technology, the molecular interactions between the optical layer molecules and the nanostructured metal substrate are modified by the writing laser, changing their SERS properties to encode information as bits. Since the SERS properties are extremely sensitive to molecular nano- environments, very small 'spectrochemical holes' approaching the diffraction limit can be produced for the writing process. The SERODS device uses a reading laser to induce the SERS emission of molecules on the disk and a photometric detector tuned to the frequency of the RAMAN spectrum to retrieve the stored information. The results illustrate that SERODS is capable of three-dimensional data storage and has the potential to achieve higher storage density than currently available optical data storage systems.

  16. Measurements of electron density profiles using an angular filter refractometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haberberger, D.; Ivancic, S.; Hu, S. X.; Boni, R.; Barczys, M.; Craxton, R. S.; Froula, D. H.

    2014-01-01

    A novel diagnostic technique, angular filter refractometry (AFR), has been developed to characterize high-density, long-scale-length plasmas relevant to high-energy-density physics experiments. AFR measures plasma densities up to 10 21  cm −3 with a 263-nm probe laser and is used to study the plasma expansion from CH foil and spherical targets that are irradiated with ∼9 kJ of ultraviolet (351-nm) laser energy in a 2-ns pulse. The data elucidate the temporal evolution of the plasma profile for the CH planar targets and the dependence of the plasma profile on target radius for CH spheres

  17. Measurements of electron density profiles using an angular filter refractometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haberberger, D., E-mail: dhab@lle.rochester.edu; Ivancic, S.; Hu, S. X.; Boni, R.; Barczys, M.; Craxton, R. S.; Froula, D. H. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14636 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    A novel diagnostic technique, angular filter refractometry (AFR), has been developed to characterize high-density, long-scale-length plasmas relevant to high-energy-density physics experiments. AFR measures plasma densities up to 10{sup 21} cm{sup −3} with a 263-nm probe laser and is used to study the plasma expansion from CH foil and spherical targets that are irradiated with ∼9 kJ of ultraviolet (351-nm) laser energy in a 2-ns pulse. The data elucidate the temporal evolution of the plasma profile for the CH planar targets and the dependence of the plasma profile on target radius for CH spheres.

  18. Space density of optically-selected type 2 quasars

    OpenAIRE

    Reyes, Reinabelle; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Strauss, Michael A.; Green, Joshua; Krolik, Julian H.; Shen, Yue; Richards, Gordon; Anderson, Scott; Schneider, Donald

    2008-01-01

    Type 2 quasars are luminous active galactic nuclei (AGN) whose central regions are obscured by large amounts of gas and dust. In this paper, we present a catalog of type 2 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), selected based on their optical emission lines. The catalog contains 887 objects with redshifts z < 0.83; this is six times larger than the previous version and is by far the largest sample of type 2 quasars in the literature. We derive the [OIII]5008 luminosity function for...

  19. Magneto-optical imaging of transport current densities in superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crabtree, G.W.; Welp, U.; Gunter, D.O.; Zhong, W.; Balachandran, U.; Haldar, P.; Sokolowski, R.S.; Vlasko-Vlasov, V.K.; Nikitenko, V.I.

    1995-01-01

    Direct imaging of the paths of transport currents in superconductors creates many new possibilities for exploring the basic features of vortex pinning mechanisms and for improving the performance of superconducting materials. A technique for imaging the path and magnitude of the transport current density flowing in superconductors is described. Results are given for a 37-filament BSCCO 2223 powder-in-tube wire, showing a highly inhomogeneous current path within the filaments

  20. Correlations between different methods of UO2 pellet density measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Kazuaki

    1977-07-01

    Density of UO 2 pellets was measured by three different methods, i.e., geometrical, water-immersed and meta-xylene immersed and treated statistically, to find out the correlations between UO 2 pellets are of six kinds but with same specifications. The correlations are linear 1 : 1 for pellets of 95% theoretical densities and above, but such do not exist below the level and variated statistically due to interaction between open and close pores. (auth.)

  1. Quantitatively measuring the orbital angular momentum density of light : Presentation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudley, Angela L

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available the orbital angular momentum density of light Angela Dudleya, Christian Schulzeb, Igor Litvina, Michael Duparréb and Andrew Forbes*a,c,d a CSIR National Laser Centre, PO Box 395, Pretoria 0001, South Africa; b Institute of Applied Optics, Friedrich...., “Generation of high-order Bessel beams by use of an axicon,” Opt. Commun. 177(1-6), 297–301 (2000). [3] Sztul, H. I. and Alfano, R. R., “The Poynting vector and angular momentum of Airy beams,” Opt. Express 16(13), 9411–9416 (2008). [4] Allen, L...

  2. Plasma dynamics near critical density inferred from direct measurements of laser hole boring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chao; Tochitsky, Sergei Ya.; Fiuza, Frederico; Pigeon, Jeremy J.; Joshi, Chan

    2016-06-01

    We have used multiframe picosecond optical interferometry to make direct measurements of the hole boring velocity, vHB, of the density cavity pushed forward by a train of C O2 laser pulses in a near critical density helium plasma. As the pulse train intensity rises, the increasing radiation pressure of each pulse pushes the density cavity forward and the plasma electrons are strongly heated. After the peak laser intensity, the plasma pressure exerted by the heated electrons strongly impedes the hole boring process and the vHB falls rapidly as the laser pulse intensity falls at the back of the laser pulse train. A heuristic theory is presented that allows the estimation of the plasma electron temperature from the measurements of the hole boring velocity. The measured values of vHB, and the estimated values of the heated electron temperature as a function of laser intensity are in reasonable agreement with those obtained from two-dimensional numerical simulations.

  3. High-Sensitivity Measurement of Density by Magnetic Levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemiroski, Alex; Kumar, A A; Soh, Siowling; Harburg, Daniel V; Yu, Hai-Dong; Whitesides, George M

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents methods that use Magnetic Levitation (MagLev) to measure very small differences in density of solid diamagnetic objects suspended in a paramagnetic medium. Previous work in this field has shown that, while it is a convenient method, standard MagLev (i.e., where the direction of magnetization and gravitational force are parallel) cannot resolve differences in density mm) because (i) objects close in density prevent each other from reaching an equilibrium height due to hard contact and excluded volume, and (ii) using weaker magnets or reducing the magnetic susceptibility of the medium destabilizes the magnetic trap. The present work investigates the use of weak magnetic gradients parallel to the faces of the magnets as a means of increasing the sensitivity of MagLev without destabilization. Configuring the MagLev device in a rotated state (i.e., where the direction of magnetization and gravitational force are perpendicular) relative to the standard configuration enables simple measurements along the axes with the highest sensitivity to changes in density. Manipulating the distance of separation between the magnets or the lengths of the magnets (along the axis of measurement) enables the sensitivity to be tuned. These modifications enable an improvement in the resolution up to 100-fold over the standard configuration, and measurements with resolution down to 10(-6) g/cm(3). Three examples of characterizing the small differences in density among samples of materials having ostensibly indistinguishable densities-Nylon spheres, PMMA spheres, and drug spheres-demonstrate the applicability of rotated Maglev to measuring the density of small (0.1-1 mm) objects with high sensitivity. This capability will be useful in materials science, separations, and quality control of manufactured objects.

  4. Electronic and optical properties of nanocrystalline WO3 thin films studied by optical spectroscopy and density functional calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, Malin B; Niklasson, Gunnar A; Österlund, Lars; Baldissera, Gustavo; Persson, Clas; Valyukh, Iryna; Arwin, Hans

    2013-01-01

    The optical and electronic properties of nanocrystalline WO 3 thin films prepared by reactive dc magnetron sputtering at different total pressures (P tot ) were studied by optical spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Monoclinic films prepared at low P tot show absorption in the near infrared due to polarons, which is attributed to a strained film structure. Analysis of the optical data yields band-gap energies E g ≈ 3.1 eV, which increase with increasing P tot by 0.1 eV, and correlate with the structural modifications of the films. The electronic structures of triclinic δ-WO 3 , and monoclinic γ- and ε-WO 3 were calculated using the Green function with screened Coulomb interaction (GW approach), and the local density approximation. The δ-WO 3 and γ-WO 3 phases are found to have very similar electronic properties, with weak dispersion of the valence and conduction bands, consistent with a direct band-gap. Analysis of the joint density of states shows that the optical absorption around the band edge is composed of contributions from forbidden transitions (>3 eV) and allowed transitions (>3.8 eV). The calculations show that E g in ε-WO 3 is higher than in the δ-WO 3 and γ-WO 3 phases, which provides an explanation for the P tot dependence of the optical data. (paper)

  5. Electronic and optical properties of nanocrystalline WO3 thin films studied by optical spectroscopy and density functional calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Malin B.; Baldissera, Gustavo; Valyukh, Iryna; Persson, Clas; Arwin, Hans; Niklasson, Gunnar A.; Österlund, Lars

    2013-05-01

    The optical and electronic properties of nanocrystalline WO3 thin films prepared by reactive dc magnetron sputtering at different total pressures (Ptot) were studied by optical spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Monoclinic films prepared at low Ptot show absorption in the near infrared due to polarons, which is attributed to a strained film structure. Analysis of the optical data yields band-gap energies Eg ≈ 3.1 eV, which increase with increasing Ptot by 0.1 eV, and correlate with the structural modifications of the films. The electronic structures of triclinic δ-WO3, and monoclinic γ- and ε-WO3 were calculated using the Green function with screened Coulomb interaction (GW approach), and the local density approximation. The δ-WO3 and γ-WO3 phases are found to have very similar electronic properties, with weak dispersion of the valence and conduction bands, consistent with a direct band-gap. Analysis of the joint density of states shows that the optical absorption around the band edge is composed of contributions from forbidden transitions (>3 eV) and allowed transitions (>3.8 eV). The calculations show that Eg in ε-WO3 is higher than in the δ-WO3 and γ-WO3 phases, which provides an explanation for the Ptot dependence of the optical data.

  6. Workplace aerosol mass concentration measurement using optical particle counters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görner, Peter; Simon, Xavier; Bémer, Denis; Lidén, Göran

    2012-02-01

    Direct-reading aerosol measurement usually uses the optical properties of airborne particles to detect and measure particle concentration. In the case of occupational hygiene, mass concentration measurement is often required. Two aerosol monitoring methods are based on the principle of light scattering: optical particle counting (OPC) and photometry. The former analyses the light scattered by a single particle, the latter by a cloud of particles. Both methods need calibration to transform the quantity of scattered light detected into particle concentration. Photometers are simpler to use and can be directly calibrated to measure mass concentration. However, their response varies not only with aerosol concentration but also with particle size distribution, which frequently contributes to biased measurement. Optical particle counters directly measure the particle number concentration and particle size that allows assessment of the particle mass provided the particles are spherical and of known density. An integrating algorithm is used to calculate the mass concentration of any conventional health-related aerosol fraction. The concentrations calculated thus have been compared with simultaneous measurements by conventional gravimetric sampling to check the possibility of field OPC calibration with real workplace aerosols with a view to further monitoring particle mass concentration. Aerosol concentrations were measured in the food industry using the OPC GRIMM® 1.108 and the CIP 10-Inhalable and CIP 10-Respirable (ARELCO®) aerosol samplers while meat sausages were being brushed and coated with calcium carbonate. Previously, the original OPC inlet had been adapted to sample inhalable aerosol. A mixed aerosol of calcium carbonate and fungi spores was present in the workplace. The OPC particle-size distribution and an estimated average particle density of both aerosol components were used to calculate the mass concentration. The inhalable and respirable aerosol fractions

  7. High densities and optical collisions in a two-colour magneto-optical trap for metastable helium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelemeij, J.C.J.; Tychkov, A.; Jeltes, T.; Hogervorst, W.; Vassen, W.

    2004-01-01

    We have studied a cloud of cold metastable helium (He*) atoms interacting with near-resonant light at 1083 nm and 389 nm. The 1083 nm light allows for efficient loading of a large magneto-optical trap (MOT) and the 389 nm light is subsequently used to increase the density and reduce the temperature

  8. Measurement of temperature, electric conductivity and density of plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilevova, I.; Nefedov, A.; Oberman, F.; Urinson, A.

    1982-01-01

    Three instruments are briefly described developed by the High Temperatures Institute of the USSR Academy of Sciences for the measurement of plasma temperature, electric conductivity and density. The temperature measuring instrument uses as a standard a light source whose temperature may significantly differ from plasma temperature because three light fluxes are compared, namely the flux emitted by the plasma, the flux emitted directly by the standard source, and the flux emitted by the standard source after passage through the plasma. The results of measurement are computer processed. Electric conductivity is measured using a coil placed in a probe which is automatically extended for a time of maximally 0.3 seconds into the plasma stream. The equipment for measuring plasma density consists of a special single-channel monochromator, a temperature gauge, a plasma pressure gauge, and of a computer for processing the results of measurement. (Ha)

  9. Simulation of density measurements in plasma wakefields using photo acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Kasim, Muhammad Firmansyah; Ceurvorst, Luke; Sadler, James; Burrows, Philip N; Trines, Raoul; Holloway, James; Wing, Matthew; Bingham, Robert; Norreys, Peter

    2015-01-01

    One obstacle in plasma accelerator development is the limitation of techniques to diagnose and measure plasma wakefield parameters. In this paper, we present a novel concept for the density measurement of a plasma wakefield using photon acceleration, supported by extensive particle in cell simulations of a laser pulse that copropagates with a wakefield. The technique can provide the perturbed electron density profile in the laser’s reference frame, averaged over the propagation length, to be accurate within 10%. We discuss the limitations that affect the measurement: small frequency changes, photon trapping, laser displacement, stimulated Raman scattering, and laser beam divergence. By considering these processes, one can determine the optimal parameters of the laser pulse and its propagation length. This new technique allows a characterization of the density perturbation within a plasma wakefield accelerator.

  10. Simulation of density measurements in plasma wakefields using photon acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Firmansyah Kasim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available One obstacle in plasma accelerator development is the limitation of techniques to diagnose and measure plasma wakefield parameters. In this paper, we present a novel concept for the density measurement of a plasma wakefield using photon acceleration, supported by extensive particle in cell simulations of a laser pulse that copropagates with a wakefield. The technique can provide the perturbed electron density profile in the laser’s reference frame, averaged over the propagation length, to be accurate within 10%. We discuss the limitations that affect the measurement: small frequency changes, photon trapping, laser displacement, stimulated Raman scattering, and laser beam divergence. By considering these processes, one can determine the optimal parameters of the laser pulse and its propagation length. This new technique allows a characterization of the density perturbation within a plasma wakefield accelerator.

  11. Electron density interferometry measurement in laser-matter interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popovics-Chenais, C.

    1981-05-01

    This work is concerned with the laser-interferometry measurement of the electronic density in the corona and the conduction zone external part. Particularly, it is aimed at showing up density gradients and at their space-time localization. The first chapter recalls the density profile influence on the absorption principal mechanisms and the laser energy transport. In chapter two, the numerical and analytical hydrodynamic models describing the density profile are analysed. The influence on the density profile of the ponderomotive force associated to high oscillating electric fields is studied, together with the limited thermal conduction and suprathermal electron population. The mechanism action, in our measurement conditions, is numerically simulated. Calculations are made with experimental parameters. The measurement interaction conditions, together with the diagnostic method by high resolution laser interferometry are detailed. The results are analysed with the help of numerical simulation which is the experiment modeling. An overview of the mechanisms shown up by interferometric measurements and their correlation with other diagnostics is the conclusion of this work [fr

  12. Measuring gas temperature during spin-exchange optical pumping process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normand, E.; Jiang, C. Y.; Brown, D. R.; Robertson, L.; Crow, L.; Tong, X.

    2016-04-01

    The gas temperature inside a Spin-Exchange Optical Pumping (SEOP) laser-pumping polarized 3He cell has long been a mystery. Different experimental methods were employed to measure this temperature but all were based on either modelling or indirect measurement. To date there has not been any direct experimental measurement of this quantity. Here we present the first direct measurement using neutron transmission to accurately determine the number density of 3He, the temperature is obtained using the ideal gas law. Our result showed a surprisingly high gas temperature of 380°C, compared to the 245°C of the 3He cell wall temperature and 178°C of the optical pumping oven temperature. This experiment result may be used to further investigate the unsolved puzzle of the "X-factor" in the SEOP process which places an upper bound to the 3He polarization that can be achieved. Additional spin relaxation mechanisms might exist due to the high gas temperature, which could explain the origin of the X-factor.

  13. Application of a universal optic data link for radiation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komatsu, T.; Takada, E.

    2002-01-01

    Optic Data Link (ODL) is a device to convert electric and optic signals to each other, which is used for the field of optical communications. We examined the possibility to apply ODLs to radiation measurements. The effect of ODLs on energy and timing resolution has been investigated. From the results, fundamental applicability of ODLs to radiation measurements has been demonstrated. (author)

  14. DAQ system for low density plasma parameters measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Rashmi S.; Gupta, Suryakant B.

    2015-01-01

    In various cases where low density plasmas (number density ranges from 1E4 to 1E6 cm -3 ) exist for example, basic plasma studies or LEO space environment measurement of plasma parameters becomes very critical. Conventional tip (cylindrical) Langmuir probes often result into unstable measurements in such lower density plasma. Due to larger surface area, a spherical Langmuir probe is used to measure such lower plasma densities. Applying a sweep voltage signal to the probe and measuring current values corresponding to these voltages gives V-I characteristics of plasma which can be plotted on a digital storage oscilloscope. This plot is analyzed for calculating various plasma parameters. The aim of this paper is to measure plasma parameters using a spherical Langmuir probe and indigenously developed DAQ system. DAQ system consists of Keithley source-meter and a host system connected by a GPIB interface. An online plasma parameter diagnostic system is developed for measuring plasma properties for non-thermal plasma in vacuum. An algorithm is developed using LabVIEW platform. V-I characteristics of plasma are plotted with respect to different filament current values and different locations of Langmuir probe with reference to plasma source. V-I characteristics is also plotted for forward and reverse voltage sweep generated programmatically from the source meter. (author)

  15. Optical dynamic deformation measurements at translucent materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipp, Katrin; Koukourakis, Nektarios; Kuschmierz, Robert; Leithold, Christoph; Fischer, Andreas; Czarske, Jürgen

    2015-02-15

    Due to their high stiffness-to-weight ratio, glass fiber-reinforced polymers are an attractive material for rotors, e.g., in the aerospace industry. A fundamental understanding of the material behavior requires non-contact, in-situ dynamic deformation measurements. The high surface speeds and particularly the translucence of the material limit the usability of conventional optical measurement techniques. We demonstrate that the laser Doppler distance sensor provides a powerful and reliable tool for monitoring radial expansion at fast rotating translucent materials. We find that backscattering in material volume does not lead to secondary signals as surface scattering results in degradation of the measurement volume inside the translucent medium. This ensures that the acquired signal contains information of the rotor surface only, as long as the sample surface is rough enough. Dynamic deformation measurements of fast-rotating fiber-reinforced polymer composite rotors with surface speeds of more than 300 m/s underline the potential of the laser Doppler sensor.

  16. The local density of optical states of a metasurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunnemann, Per; Koenderink, A. Femius

    2016-02-01

    While metamaterials are often desirable for near-field functions, such as perfect lensing, or cloaking, they are often quantified by their response to plane waves from the far field. Here, we present a theoretical analysis of the local density of states near lattices of discrete magnetic scatterers, i.e., the response to near field excitation by a point source. Based on a pointdipole theory using Ewald summation and an array scanning method, we can swiftly and semi-analytically evaluate the local density of states (LDOS) for magnetoelectric point sources in front of an infinite two-dimensional (2D) lattice composed of arbitrary magnetoelectric dipole scatterers. The method takes into account radiation damping as well as all retarded electrodynamic interactions in a self-consistent manner. We show that a lattice of magnetic scatterers evidences characteristic Drexhage oscillations. However, the oscillations are phase shifted relative to the electrically scattering lattice consistent with the difference expected for reflection off homogeneous magnetic respectively electric mirrors. Furthermore, we identify in which source-surface separation regimes the metasurface may be treated as a homogeneous interface, and in which homogenization fails. A strong frequency and in-plane position dependence of the LDOS close to the lattice reveals coupling to guided modes supported by the lattice.

  17. Outcomes of bone density measurements in coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolland, Mark J; Grey, Andrew; Rowbotham, David S

    2016-01-29

    Some guidelines recommend that patients with newly diagnosed coeliac disease undergo bone density scanning. We assessed the bone density results in a cohort of patients with coeliac disease. We searched bone density reports over two 5-year periods in all patients from Auckland District Health Board (2008-12) and in patients under 65 years from Counties Manukau District Health Board (2009-13) for the term 'coeliac.' Reports for 137 adults listed coeliac disease as an indication for bone densitometry. The average age was 47 years, body mass index (BMI) 25 kg/m(2), and 77% were female. The median time between coeliac disease diagnosis and bone densitometry was 261 days. The average bone density Z-score was slightly lower than expected (Z-score -0.3 to 0.4) at the lumbar spine, total hip and femoral neck, but 88-93% of Z-scores at each site lay within the normal range. Low bone density was strongly related to BMI: the proportions with Z-score 30 kg/m(2) were 28%, 15%, 6% and 0% respectively. Average bone density was normal, suggesting that bone density measurement is not indicated routinely in coeliac disease, but could be considered on a case-by-case basis for individuals with strong risk factors for fracture.

  18. Fiber optic strain measurements using an optically-active polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Leonard J.; Neumeister, Gary C.

    1992-03-01

    A study encompassing the use of an optically-active polymer as the strain-sensing medium in an organic matrix composite was performed. Several compounds were synthesized for use as the inner cladding material for silica fiber-optic cores. These materials include a diacetylene containing polyamide. It is possible to dynamically modify the optical properties of these materials through changes in applied strain or temperature. By doing so the characteristic absorption in the visible is reversibly shifted to a higher energy state. The polymer-coated fiber-optic cores were initially studied in epoxy resin. Additionally, one of the polyamide/diacetylene polymers was studied in a spin-fiber form consisting of 15 micron filaments assembled in multifilament tows. The most promising configuration and materials were then investigated further by embedding in graphite/epoxy composite laminates. In each case the shift in the visible absorption peak was monitored as a function of applied mechanical strain.

  19. Density and water content measurement with two dual detector probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cariou, J.; Menard, J.

    1980-01-01

    The ''Laboratoires des Ponts et Chaussees'' have developed an electronic device for geological prospections. This system includes gamma-gamma and neutron-neutron probes for continuous measurement in borehole down to one hundred meters. It is used, as well to measure the density and the water content in the field of soil mechanic engineering. When the diameter is not constant all along the borehole the two probes have to use a dual detector procedure. When constant, a simple detector procedure is sufficient to obtain density and water content. Two examples show the possibilities of this apparatus, particularly to control the borehole diameter and the soil chemical composition [fr

  20. Methods and apparatus for measuring the density of geological formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeman, B.

    1975-01-01

    A tool for measuring the density of the geological formations traversed by a borehole is described. An apparatus corrects the effects of barite on the count rate of the pulses which are used for the density measurement and have an amplitude higher than a given threshold, by determining the deformations in the amplitude spectrum of these pulses and adjusting this threshold so as to compensate by the variation in the number of pulses taken into account, resulting from the adjustment for the variation in the number of counted pulses resulting from the said deformations

  1. Precision measurements of linear scattering density using muon tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åström, E.; Bonomi, G.; Calliari, I.; Calvini, P.; Checchia, P.; Donzella, A.; Faraci, E.; Forsberg, F.; Gonella, F.; Hu, X.; Klinger, J.; Sundqvist Ökvist, L.; Pagano, D.; Rigoni, A.; Ramous, E.; Urbani, M.; Vanini, S.; Zenoni, A.; Zumerle, G.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that muon tomography can be used to precisely measure the properties of various materials. The materials which have been considered have been extracted from an experimental blast furnace, including carbon (coke) and iron oxides, for which measurements of the linear scattering density relative to the mass density have been performed with an absolute precision of 10%. We report the procedures that are used in order to obtain such precision, and a discussion is presented to address the expected performance of the technique when applied to heavier materials. The results we obtain do not depend on the specific type of material considered and therefore they can be extended to any application.

  2. Agreement of mammographic measures of volumetric breast density to MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff Wang

    Full Text Available Clinical scores of mammographic breast density are highly subjective. Automated technologies for mammography exist to quantify breast density objectively, but the technique that most accurately measures the quantity of breast fibroglandular tissue is not known.To compare the agreement of three automated mammographic techniques for measuring volumetric breast density with a quantitative volumetric MRI-based technique in a screening population.Women were selected from the UCSF Medical Center screening population that had received both a screening MRI and digital mammogram within one year of each other, had Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS assessments of normal or benign finding, and no history of breast cancer or surgery. Agreement was assessed of three mammographic techniques (Single-energy X-ray Absorptiometry [SXA], Quantra, and Volpara with MRI for percent fibroglandular tissue volume, absolute fibroglandular tissue volume, and total breast volume.Among 99 women, the automated mammographic density techniques were correlated with MRI measures with R(2 values ranging from 0.40 (log fibroglandular volume to 0.91 (total breast volume. Substantial agreement measured by kappa statistic was found between all percent fibroglandular tissue measures (0.72 to 0.63, but only moderate agreement for log fibroglandular volumes. The kappa statistics for all percent density measures were highest in the comparisons of the SXA and MRI results. The largest error source between MRI and the mammography techniques was found to be differences in measures of total breast volume.Automated volumetric fibroglandular tissue measures from screening digital mammograms were in substantial agreement with MRI and if associated with breast cancer could be used in clinical practice to enhance risk assessment and prevention.

  3. Agreement of mammographic measures of volumetric breast density to MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jeff; Azziz, Ania; Fan, Bo; Malkov, Serghei; Klifa, Catherine; Newitt, David; Yitta, Silaja; Hylton, Nola; Kerlikowske, Karla; Shepherd, John A

    2013-01-01

    Clinical scores of mammographic breast density are highly subjective. Automated technologies for mammography exist to quantify breast density objectively, but the technique that most accurately measures the quantity of breast fibroglandular tissue is not known. To compare the agreement of three automated mammographic techniques for measuring volumetric breast density with a quantitative volumetric MRI-based technique in a screening population. Women were selected from the UCSF Medical Center screening population that had received both a screening MRI and digital mammogram within one year of each other, had Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) assessments of normal or benign finding, and no history of breast cancer or surgery. Agreement was assessed of three mammographic techniques (Single-energy X-ray Absorptiometry [SXA], Quantra, and Volpara) with MRI for percent fibroglandular tissue volume, absolute fibroglandular tissue volume, and total breast volume. Among 99 women, the automated mammographic density techniques were correlated with MRI measures with R(2) values ranging from 0.40 (log fibroglandular volume) to 0.91 (total breast volume). Substantial agreement measured by kappa statistic was found between all percent fibroglandular tissue measures (0.72 to 0.63), but only moderate agreement for log fibroglandular volumes. The kappa statistics for all percent density measures were highest in the comparisons of the SXA and MRI results. The largest error source between MRI and the mammography techniques was found to be differences in measures of total breast volume. Automated volumetric fibroglandular tissue measures from screening digital mammograms were in substantial agreement with MRI and if associated with breast cancer could be used in clinical practice to enhance risk assessment and prevention.

  4. Lectures on light nonlinear and quantum optics using the density matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Rand, Stephen C.

    2016-01-01

    This book bridges the gap between introductory quantum mechanics and the research front of modern optics and scientific fields that make use of light. While suitable as a reference for the specialist in quantum optics, it also targets non-specialists from other disciplines who need to understand light and its uses in research. It introduces a single analytic tool, the density matrix, to analyze complex optical phenomena encountered in traditional as well as cross-disciplinary research. It moves swiftly in a tight sequence from elementary to sophisticated topics in quantum optics, including optical tweezers, laser cooling, coherent population transfer, optical magnetism, electromagnetically induced transparency, squeezed light, and cavity quantum electrodynamics. A systematic approach starts with the simplest systems—stationary two-level atoms—then introduces atomic motion, adds more energy levels, and moves on to discuss first-, second-, and third-order coherence effects that are the basis for analyzing n...

  5. Reduction of damage initiation density in fused silica optics via UV laser conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, John E.; Maricle, Stephen M.; Brusasco, Raymond M.; Penetrante, Bernardino M.

    2004-03-16

    The present invention provides a method for reducing the density of sites on the surface of fused silica optics that are prone to the initiation of laser-induced damage, resulting in optics which have far fewer catastrophic defects and are better capable of resisting optical deterioration upon exposure for a long period of time to a high-power laser beam having a wavelength of about 360 nm or less. The initiation of laser-induced damage is reduced by conditioning the optic at low fluences below levels that normally lead to catastrophic growth of damage. When the optic is then irradiated at its high fluence design limit, the concentration of catastrophic damage sites that form on the surface of the optic is greatly reduced.

  6. Obtaining sub-daily new snow density from automated measurements in high mountain regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfricht, Kay; Hartl, Lea; Koch, Roland; Marty, Christoph; Olefs, Marc

    2018-05-01

    The density of new snow is operationally monitored by meteorological or hydrological services at daily time intervals, or occasionally measured in local field studies. However, meteorological conditions and thus settling of the freshly deposited snow rapidly alter the new snow density until measurement. Physically based snow models and nowcasting applications make use of hourly weather data to determine the water equivalent of the snowfall and snow depth. In previous studies, a number of empirical parameterizations were developed to approximate the new snow density by meteorological parameters. These parameterizations are largely based on new snow measurements derived from local in situ measurements. In this study a data set of automated snow measurements at four stations located in the European Alps is analysed for several winter seasons. Hourly new snow densities are calculated from the height of new snow and the water equivalent of snowfall. Considering the settling of the new snow and the old snowpack, the average hourly new snow density is 68 kg m-3, with a standard deviation of 9 kg m-3. Seven existing parameterizations for estimating new snow densities were tested against these data, and most calculations overestimate the hourly automated measurements. Two of the tested parameterizations were capable of simulating low new snow densities observed at sheltered inner-alpine stations. The observed variability in new snow density from the automated measurements could not be described with satisfactory statistical significance by any of the investigated parameterizations. Applying simple linear regressions between new snow density and wet bulb temperature based on the measurements' data resulted in significant relationships (r2 > 0.5 and p ≤ 0.05) for single periods at individual stations only. Higher new snow density was calculated for the highest elevated and most wind-exposed station location. Whereas snow measurements using ultrasonic devices and snow

  7. Microscopic optical potentials derived from ab initio translationally invariant nonlocal one-body densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennari, Michael; Vorabbi, Matteo; Calci, Angelo; Navrátil, Petr

    2018-03-01

    Background: The nuclear optical potential is a successful tool for the study of nucleon-nucleus elastic scattering and its use has been further extended to inelastic scattering and other nuclear reactions. The nuclear density of the target nucleus is a fundamental ingredient in the construction of the optical potential and thus plays an important role in the description of the scattering process. Purpose: In this paper we derive a microscopic optical potential for intermediate energies using ab initio translationally invariant nonlocal one-body nuclear densities computed within the no-core shell model (NCSM) approach utilizing two- and three-nucleon chiral interactions as the only input. Methods: The optical potential is derived at first order within the spectator expansion of the nonrelativistic multiple scattering theory by adopting the impulse approximation. Nonlocal nuclear densities are derived from the NCSM one-body densities calculated in the second quantization. The translational invariance is generated by exactly removing the spurious center-of-mass (COM) component from the NCSM eigenstates. Results: The ground-state local and nonlocal densities of He 4 ,6 ,8 , 12C, and 16O are calculated and applied to optical potential construction. The differential cross sections and the analyzing powers for the elastic proton scattering off these nuclei are then calculated for different values of the incident proton energy. The impact of nonlocality and the COM removal is discussed. Conclusions: The use of nonlocal densities has a substantial impact on the differential cross sections and improves agreement with experiment in comparison to results generated with the local densities especially for light nuclei. For the halo nuclei 6He and 8He, the results for the differential cross section are in a reasonable agreement with the data although a more sophisticated model for the optical potential is required to properly describe the analyzing powers.

  8. A new fiber optic sensor for inner surface roughness measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaomei; Liu, Shoubin; Hu, Hong

    2009-11-01

    In order to measure inner surface roughness of small holes nondestructively, a new fiber optic sensor is researched and developed. Firstly, a new model for surface roughness measurement is proposed, which is based on intensity-modulated fiber optic sensors and scattering modeling of rough surfaces. Secondly, a fiber optical measurement system is designed and set up. Under the help of new techniques, the fiber optic sensor can be miniaturized. Furthermore, the use of micro prism makes the light turn 90 degree, so the inner side surface roughness of small holes can be measured. Thirdly, the fiber optic sensor is gauged by standard surface roughness specimens, and a series of measurement experiments have been done. The measurement results are compared with those obtained by TR220 Surface Roughness Instrument and Form Talysurf Laser 635, and validity of the developed fiber optic sensor is verified. Finally, precision and influence factors of the fiber optic sensor are analyzed.

  9. Next-generation fabrication technologies for optical pickup devices in high-density optical disk storage systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoe, Shigeru

    1999-05-01

    This paper shows a direction of friction technologies to make aspherical plastic objective lens with higher optical performance for high density optical disk storage systems. Specifically, a low birefringence and low water absorption (less than 0.1%) optical resin, low tool abrasion mold material, high circularity diamond tool which nose circularity is less than 30 nm, and 1 nm axis resolution precision lathe which tool position is stabilized against drift by environmental change are referred. Cut optical surface of a mold sample was constantly attained in less than 5 nmRtm surface roughness. Using these new technologies, aspherical plastic objective lens (NA0.6) for DVD which wave aberration is less than 35 m (lambda) rms was realized.

  10. Density of asphalt paving mixtures: Measurements, variations, and influencing factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solaimanian, M.

    1990-01-01

    The first part describes the results of a research study to determine the effectiveness of the Troxler Model 4640 Thin Lift Nuclear Density Gauge. The densities obtained from cores and the nuclear density gauge from seven construction projects were compared. A linear regression technique was used to investigate how well the core densities could be predicted from nuclear densities. Correlation coefficients were determined to indicate the degree of correlation between the core and nuclear densities. Using a statistical analysis technique, the range of differences between core and nuclear measurements was established for specified confidence levels for each project. Analysis of the data indicated that the accuracy of this gauge is highly material dependent. While acceptable results were obtained with limestone mixtures, the gauge did not perform satisfactorily with mixtures containing siliceous aggregate. The data presented in this paper indicate that the gauge could be used as a quality control tool provided that a calibration is developed for each project. The maximum theoretical specific gravities of asphalt-aggregate paving mixtures obtained from different methods were compared. The study included experimental work and analysis of the resulting data. The agreement between results obtained from the Texas C-14 method and the Rice method were excellent. Results obtained by backcalculating theoretical maximum densities from a single Rice test were also found to be satisfactory. Theoretical approach based on bulk specific gravity of aggregate is not recommended because of yielding significantly low theoretical maximum specific gravities and high relative densities. The last two parts summarize density levels and corresponding variations obtained from fifty-seven construction projects throughout the state of Texas

  11. Urinary density measurement and analysis methods in neonatal unit care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Vera Lúcia Moreira Leitão Cardoso

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to assess urine collection methods through cotton in contact with genitalia and urinary collector to measure urinary density in newborns. This is a quantitative intervention study carried out in a neonatal unit of Fortaleza-CE, Brazil, in 2010. The sample consisted of 61 newborns randomly chosen to compose the study group. Most neonates were full term (31/50.8% males (33/54%. Data on urinary density measurement through the methods of cotton and collector presented statistically significant differences (p<0.05. The analysis of interquartile ranges between subgroups resulted in statistical differences between urinary collector/reagent strip (1005 and cotton/reagent strip (1010, however there was no difference between urinary collector/ refractometer (1008 and cotton/ refractometer. Therefore, further research should be conducted with larger sampling using methods investigated in this study and whenever possible, comparing urine density values to laboratory tests.

  12. A pilot study examining density of suppression measurement in strabismus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piano, Marianne; Newsham, David

    2015-01-01

    Establish whether the Sbisa bar, Bagolini filter (BF) bar, and neutral density filter (NDF) bar, used to measure density of suppression, are equivalent and possess test-retest reliability. Determine whether density of suppression is altered when measurement equipment/testing conditions are changed. Our pilot study had 10 subjects aged ≥18 years with childhood-onset strabismus, no ocular pathologies, and no binocular vision when manifest. Density of suppression upon repeated testing, with clinic lights on/off, and using a full/reduced intensity light source, was investigated. Results were analysed for test-retest reliability, equivalence, and changes with alteration of testing conditions. Test-retest reliability issues were present for the BF bar (median 6 filter change from first to final test, p = 0.021) and NDF bar (median 5 filter change from first to final test, p = 0.002). Density of suppression was unaffected by environmental illumination or fixation light intensity variations. Density of suppression measurements were higher when measured with the NDF bar (e.g. NDF bar = 1.5, medium suppression, vs BF bar = 6.5, light suppression). Test-retest reliability issues may be present for the two filter bars currently still under manufacture. Changes in testing conditions do not significantly affect test results, provided the same filter bar is used consistently for testing. Further studies in children with strabismus having active amblyopia treatment would be of benefit. Despite extensive use of these tests in the UK, this is to our knowledge the first study evaluating filter bar equivalence/reliability.

  13. Fog Density Estimation and Image Defogging Based on Surrogate Modeling for Optical Depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yutong; Sun, Changming; Zhao, Yu; Yang, Li

    2017-05-03

    In order to estimate fog density correctly and to remove fog from foggy images appropriately, a surrogate model for optical depth is presented in this paper. We comprehensively investigate various fog-relevant features and propose a novel feature based on the hue, saturation, and value color space which correlate well with the perception of fog density. We use a surrogate-based method to learn a refined polynomial regression model for optical depth with informative fog-relevant features such as dark-channel, saturation-value, and chroma which are selected on the basis of sensitivity analysis. Based on the obtained accurate surrogate model for optical depth, an effective method for fog density estimation and image defogging is proposed. The effectiveness of our proposed method is verified quantitatively and qualitatively by the experimental results on both synthetic and real-world foggy images.

  14. Electron beam manipulation, injection and acceleration in plasma wakefield accelerators by optically generated plasma density spikes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittig, Georg; Karger, Oliver S.; Knetsch, Alexander [Institute of Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Xi, Yunfeng; Deng, Aihua; Rosenzweig, James B. [Particle Beam Physics Laboratory, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Bruhwiler, David L. [RadiaSoft LLC, Boulder, CO 80304 (United States); RadiaBeam Technologies LLC (United States); Smith, Jonathan [Tech-X UK Ltd, Daresbury, Cheshire WA4 4FS (United Kingdom); Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Jaroszynski, Dino A.; Manahan, Grace G. [Physics Department, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Hidding, Bernhard [Institute of Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Physics Department, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-01

    We discuss considerations regarding a novel and robust scheme for optically triggered electron bunch generation in plasma wakefield accelerators [1]. In this technique, a transversely propagating focused laser pulse ignites a quasi-stationary plasma column before the arrival of the plasma wake. This localized plasma density enhancement or optical “plasma torch” distorts the blowout during the arrival of the electron drive bunch and modifies the electron trajectories, resulting in controlled injection. By changing the gas density, and the laser pulse parameters such as beam waist and intensity, and by moving the focal point of the laser pulse, the shape of the plasma torch, and therefore the generated trailing beam, can be tuned easily. The proposed method is much more flexible and faster in generating gas density transitions when compared to hydrodynamics-based methods, and it accommodates experimentalists needs as it is a purely optical process and straightforward to implement.

  15. Measurement of the orbital angular momentum density of Bessel beams by projection into a Laguerre–Gaussian basis

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schulze, C

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the measurement of the orbital angular momentum (OAM) density of Bessel beams and superpositions thereof by projection into a Laguerre–Gaussian basis. This projection is performed by an all-optical inner product measurement performed...

  16. Quantitative assessment of slit Mura defect in a thin film transistor-liquid crystal display based on chromaticity and optical density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzu, Fu-Ming; Chou, Jung-Hua

    2010-01-01

    An innovative non-contact optical inspection method is developed to quantify slit Mura defects for thin film transistor–liquid crystal displays (TFT-LCDs). From the measurements of both chromaticity and optical densities across the slit Mura, the results indicate that the optical density profile is a concave shape and the chromaticity distribution is a convex shape. A linear relation with a negative slope exists between the chromaticity and optical density. A larger colour difference has a steeper slope, and vice versa. All of the measurements with uncertainties of a 99.7% confidence interval satisfy the requirements of the flat panel display industry. The proposed method can accurately quantify the pattern of blue slit Mura of TFT-LCDs; even the perceptibility is below the just noticeable difference

  17. Coupling two iteratives algorithms for density measurements by computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, L.E.M.C.; Santos, C.A.C.; Borges, J.C.; Frenkel, A.D.B.; Rocha, G.M.

    1986-01-01

    This work develops a study for coupling two iteratives algotithms for density measurements by computerized tomography. Tomographies have been obtained with an automatized prototype, controled by a microcomputer, projected and assembled in the Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory, at COPPE/UFRJ. Results show a good performance of the tomographic system, and demonstrate the validity of the method of calculus adopted. (Author) [pt

  18. Measurements of plasma temperature and electron density in laser

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The temperature and electron density characterizing the plasma are measured by time-resolved spectroscopy of neutral atom and ion line emissions in the time window of 300–2000 ns. An echelle spectrograph coupled with a gated intensified charge coupled detector is used to record the plasma emissions.

  19. Electron density measurement in an evolving plasma. Experimental devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consoli, Terenzio; Dagai, Michel

    1960-01-01

    The experimental devices described here allow the electron density measurements in the 10 16 e/m 3 to 10 20 e/m 3 interval. Reprint of a paper published in Comptes rendus des seances de l'Academie des Sciences, t. 250, p. 1223-1225, sitting of 15 February 1960 [fr

  20. Device for measuring neutron-flux distribution density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozenbljum, N.D.; Mitelman, M.G.; Kononovich, A.A.; Kirsanov, V.S.; Zagadkin, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    An arrangement is described for measuring the distribution of neutron flux density over the height of a nuclear reactor core and which may be used for monitoring energy release or for detecting deviations of neutron flux from an optimal level so that subsequent balance can be achieved. It avoids mutual interference of detectors. Full constructional details are given. (UK)

  1. Improved density measurement by FIR laser interferometer on EAST tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Jie; Jie, Yinxian; Liu, Haiqing; Wei, Xuechao; Wang, Zhengxing; Gao, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • In 2012, the water-cooling Mo wall was installed in EAST. • A schottky barrier diode detector is designed and used on EAST for the first time. • The three-channel far-infrared laser interferometer can measure the electron density. • The improved measurement and latest experiment results are reported. • The signal we get in this experiment campaign is much better than we got in 2010. -- Abstract: A three-channel far-infrared (FIR) hydrogen cyanide (HCN) laser interferometer is in operation since 2010 to measure the line averaged electron density on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST). The HCN laser signal is improved by means of a new schottky barrier diode (SBD) detector. The improved measurement and latest experiment results of the three-channel FIR laser interferometer on EAST tokamak are reported

  2. Improved density measurement by FIR laser interferometer on EAST tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Jie, E-mail: shenjie1988@ipp.ac.cn; Jie, Yinxian; Liu, Haiqing; Wei, Xuechao; Wang, Zhengxing; Gao, Xiang

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • In 2012, the water-cooling Mo wall was installed in EAST. • A schottky barrier diode detector is designed and used on EAST for the first time. • The three-channel far-infrared laser interferometer can measure the electron density. • The improved measurement and latest experiment results are reported. • The signal we get in this experiment campaign is much better than we got in 2010. -- Abstract: A three-channel far-infrared (FIR) hydrogen cyanide (HCN) laser interferometer is in operation since 2010 to measure the line averaged electron density on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST). The HCN laser signal is improved by means of a new schottky barrier diode (SBD) detector. The improved measurement and latest experiment results of the three-channel FIR laser interferometer on EAST tokamak are reported.

  3. Density measurement using gamma radiation - theory and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Springer, E.K.

    1979-01-01

    There are still widespread uncertainties about the use and safety of gamma radiation in industries. This paper describes, by the example of radiometric density measurement, the theory of gamma radiation. The differences and advantages of both types of detectors, the ionization chamber and the scintillation counter, are discussed. The degree of accuracy which can be expected from the radiometric density meter will be defined, and the inter-relationship: source strength - measuring range - measuring length(normally the pipe diameter) in relation to the measuring accuracy required will be explained in detail. The use of radioactive material requires the permission of the Atomic Energy Board. The formalities involved to receive a user's licence and the implementations of safety standards set by the local authorities are discussed in depth [af

  4. Correlations between internal and external ocular factors and macular pigment optical density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudosescu, Ruxandra; Alexandrescu, Cristina Mihaela; Istrate, Sânziana Luminiţa; Vrapciu, Alexandra Diana; Ciuluvică, Radu Constantin; Voinea, Liliana

    2018-01-01

    To assess the relationship between the macular pigment optical density and blue-light issued by computers, glare sensibility, with iris color, age, sex, or refractive errors. 83 patients (166 eyes) were enrolled in a prospective observational study. They were divided into 2 groups: group 1 (study group) - computer using patients (time spent in front of the computer for minimum 8 hours per day, 5 days per week, 2 years) - 43 patients and group 2 (control group) - 40 patients. The following investigations were conducted in all the selected cases: visual acuity, refraction, biomicroscopy, measurement of the MPOD, glare sensitivity, assessment of eye color. 51.81% of the patients were included in group 1, while the rest, 48.19%, were in group 2. Thus, the MPOD had a mean value of (+/ -SD) 0.42+/ -0.13 (t = -1.08, p = 0.28) in group 1, and 0.44+/ -0.16 on the LE. The results showed a MPOD mean value of 0.51+/ - 0.16 in group 2 and 0.51+/ -0 .16. (t = 0.49, p = 0 .62) on the LE. 55.77% of the patients with light colored iris and 56.14% of those with dark iris had a low MPOD. The data from our study failed to illustrate a significant correlation between MPOD and blue-light issued by computers. Furthermore, a statistic significant relationship regarding iris color, refractive errors, glare, and MPOD was not observed. L = lutein, Z = zeaxanthin, MZ = meso-zeaxanthin, AMD = age related macular degeneration, MPOD = macular pigment optical density, MP = macular pigment, HFP = Heterochromatic Flicker Photometry, RE = right eye, LE = left eye.

  5. 2D Spatial Frequency Considerations in Comparing 1D Power Spectral Density Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takacs, P.Z.; Barber, S.; Church, E.L.; Kaznatcheev, K.; McKinney, W.R.; Yashchuk, V.Y.

    2010-01-01

    The frequency footprint of ID and 2D profiling instruments needs to be carefully considered in comparing ID surface roughness spectrum measurements made by different instruments. Contributions from orthogonal direction frequency components can not be neglected. The use of optical profiling instruments is ubiquitous in the measurement of the roughness of optical surfaces. Their ease-of-use and non-contact measurement method found widespread use in the optics industry for measuring the quality of delicate optical surfaces. Computerized digital data acquisition with these instruments allowed for quick and easy calculation of surface roughness statistics, such as root-mean-square (RMS) roughness. The computing power of the desktop computer allowed for the rapid conversion of spatial domain data into the frequency domain, enabling the application of sophisticated signal processing techniques to be applied to the analysis of surface roughness, the most powerful of which is the power spectral density (PSP) function. Application of the PSD function to surface statistics introduced the concept of 'bandwidth-limited' roughness, where the value of the RMS roughness depends critically upon the spatial frequency response of the instrument. Different instruments with different spatial frequency response characteristics give different answers when measuring the same surface.

  6. Mapping the Local Density of Optical States of a Photonic Crystal with Single Quantum Dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Qin; Stobbe, Søren; Lodahl, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We use single self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots as internal probes to map the local density of optical states of photonic crystal membranes. The employed technique separates contributions from nonradiative recombination and spin-flip processes by properly accounting for the role of the exciton...... fine structure. We observe inhibition factors as high as 70 and compare our results to local density of optical states calculations available from the literature, thereby establishing a quantitative understanding of photon emission in photonic crystal membranes. © 2011 American Physical Society....

  7. Measurement of optical activity of honey bee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Gutiérrez, Mauricio; Olivares-Pérez, Arturo; Salgado-Verduzco, Marco Antonio; Ibarra-Torres, Juan Carlos

    2016-03-01

    Optical activity of some substances, such as chiral molecules, often exhibits circular birefringence. Circular birefringence causes rotation of the vibration plane of the plane polarized light as it passes through the substance. In this work we present optical characterization of honey as function of the optical activity when it is placed in a polariscope that consists of a light source and properly arranged polarizing elements.

  8. Aircraft Position Measurement Using Laser Beacon Optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    8217Comparison of Solar Concentrators .’ Solar Energy, Vol. 10, p. 93, 1976. 7. Winston , R., ’Light Collection Within the Framework of Goemetrical Optics ...8217 J. Optical Society of Am., Vol. 60, p. 245, 1970. 8. Welford, W. T., tics of Nonimaging Concentrators . New York, Academic Press, T978. 9. Bracewell...helicopter pilot and the flight engineer on board the YO-3A. This thesis will concentrate on the development of the laser beacon, the detector optics

  9. Grain bulk density measurement based on wireless network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Fangming

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To know the accurate quantity of stored grain, grain density sensors must be used to measure the grain’s bulk density. However, multi-sensors should be inserted into the storage facility, to quickly collect data during the inventory checking of stored grain. In this study, the ZigBee and Wi-Fi coexistence network’s ability to transmit data collected by density sensors was investigated. A system consisting of six sensor nodes, six router nodes, one gateway and one Android Pad was assembled to measure the grain’s bulk density and calculate its quantity. The CC2530 chip with ZigBee technology was considered as the core of the information processing, and wireless nodes detection in sensor, and router nodes. ZigBee worked in difference signal channel with Wi-Fi to avoid interferences and connected with Wi-Fi module by UART serial communications interfaces in gateway. The Android Pad received the measured data through the gateway and processed this data to calculate quantity. The system enabled multi-point and real-time parameter detection inside the grain storage. Results show that the system has characteristics of good expansibility, networking flexibility and convenience.

  10. Soft x-ray camera for internal shape and current density measurements on a noncircular tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonck, R.J.; Jaehnig, K.P.; Powell, E.T.; Reusch, M.; Roney, P.; Simon, M.P.

    1988-05-01

    Soft x-ray measurements of the internal plasma flux surface shaped in principle allow a determination of the plasma current density distribution, and provide a necessary monitor of the degree of internal elongation of tokamak plasmas with a noncircular cross section. A two-dimensional, tangentially viewing, soft x-ray pinhole camera has been fabricated to provide internal shape measurements on the PBX-M tokamak. It consists of a scintillator at the focal plane of a foil-filtered pinhole camera, which is, in turn, fiber optically coupled to an intensified framing video camera (/DELTA/t />=/ 3 msec). Automated data acquisition is performed on a stand-alone image-processing system, and data archiving and retrieval takes place on an optical disk video recorder. The entire diagnostic is controlled via a PDP-11/73 microcomputer. The derivation of the polodial emission distribution from the measured image is done by fitting to model profiles. 10 refs., 4 figs

  11. Electrical, Magnetic, and Optical Measurement Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides tools necessary for electrical, magnetic, and optical characterization of bulk and thin-film materials. This includes the ability to determine the...

  12. Transfer standard for the spectral density of relative intensity noise of optical fiber sources near 1550 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obarski, Gregory E.; Splett, Jolene D.

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a transfer standard for the spectral density of relative intensity noise (RIN) of optical fiber sources near 1550 nm. Amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) from an erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA), when it is optically filtered over a narrow band (<5 nm), yields a stable RIN spectrum that is practically constant to several tens of gigahertz. The RIN is calculated from the power spectral density as measured with a calibrated optical spectrum analyzer. For a typical device it is -110 dB/Hz, with uncertainty ≤0.12 dB/Hz. The invariance of the RIN under attenuation yields a considerable dynamic range with respect to rf noise levels. Results are compared with those from a second method that uses a distributed-feedback laser (DFB) that has a Poisson-limited RIN. Application of each method to the same RIN measurement system yields frequency-dependent calibration functions that, when they are averaged, differ by ≤0.2 dB. [copyright] 2001 Optical Society of America

  13. Transfer standard for the spectral density of relative intensity noise of optical fiber sources near 1550 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obarski, Gregory E.; Splett, Jolene D.

    2001-06-01

    We have developed a transfer standard for the spectral density of relative intensity noise (RIN) of optical fiber sources near 1550 nm. Amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) from an erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA), when it is optically filtered over a narrow band ({lt}5 nm), yields a stable RIN spectrum that is practically constant to several tens of gigahertz. The RIN is calculated from the power spectral density as measured with a calibrated optical spectrum analyzer. For a typical device it is {minus}110 dB/Hz, with uncertainty {le}0.12 dB/Hz. The invariance of the RIN under attenuation yields a considerable dynamic range with respect to rf noise levels. Results are compared with those from a second method that uses a distributed-feedback laser (DFB) that has a Poisson-limited RIN. Application of each method to the same RIN measurement system yields frequency-dependent calibration functions that, when they are averaged, differ by {le}0.2 dB. {copyright} 2001 Optical Society of America

  14. Optical techniques for sensing and measurement in hostile environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillespie, C.H.; Greenwell, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    These proceedings collect papers on optical sensing and measurement in hostile environments. Topic include: nuclear waste storage facility monitoring, monitoring of nuclear and chemical explosions, exhaust gas monitoring, fiber-optic monitoring, temperature and radiation effects on optical fibers, and interferometers

  15. Optical sensor for measuring humidity, strain and temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to an optical sensor (100) adapted to measure at least three physical parameters, said optical sensor comprising a polymer-based optical waveguide structure comprising a first Bragg grating structure (101) being adapted to provide information about a first, a second...

  16. Noninvasive blood pressure measurement scheme based on optical fiber sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianxuan; Yuan, Xueguang; Zhang, Yangan

    2016-10-01

    Optical fiber sensing has many advantages, such as volume small, light quality, low loss, strong in anti-jamming. Since the invention of the optical fiber sensing technology in 1977, optical fiber sensing technology has been applied in the military, national defense, aerospace, industrial, medical and other fields in recent years, and made a great contribution to parameter measurement in the environment under the limited condition .With the rapid development of computer, network system, the intelligent optical fiber sensing technology, the sensor technology, the combination of computer and communication technology , the detection, diagnosis and analysis can be automatically and efficiently completed. In this work, we proposed a noninvasive blood pressure detection and analysis scheme which uses optical fiber sensor. Optical fiber sensing system mainly includes the light source, optical fiber, optical detector, optical modulator, the signal processing module and so on. wavelength optical signals were led into the optical fiber sensor and the signals reflected by the human body surface were detected. By comparing actual testing data with the data got by traditional way to measure the blood pressure we can establish models for predicting the blood pressure and achieve noninvasive blood pressure measurement by using spectrum analysis technology. Blood pressure measurement method based on optical fiber sensing system is faster and more convenient than traditional way, and it can get accurate analysis results in a shorter period of time than before, so it can efficiently reduce the time cost and manpower cost.

  17. Optical Measurement Techniques Innovations for Industry and the Life Sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Peiponen, Kai-Erik; Priezzhev, Alexander V

    2009-01-01

    Devoted to novel optical measurement techniques that are applied both in industry and life sciences, this book contributes a fresh perspective on the development of modern optical sensors. These sensors are often essential in detecting and controlling parameters that are important for both industrial and biomedical applications. The book provides easy access for beginners wishing to gain familiarity with the innovations of modern optics.

  18. Density and volume measurements of reprocessing plant feed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platzer, R.; Carrier, M.; Neuilly, M.; Dedaldechamp, P.

    1985-05-01

    A theoretical study of the phenomenon of gas bubbles formation within a liquid led to an adaptation of the differential pressure bubbling technique for the measurement of liquid levels and densities in tanks. Experiments, carried out on a 800 liters tank with water and uranyl nitrate solutions had the double aim to study the precision attainable on volume and density measurements and to design a method for corrections of influencing factors. In parallel, procedures for transfer of known volumes through the use of siphons and for tank calibration by liquid level measurement are also investigated. The paper presents the first results obtained so far and the conclusions to be drawn for the elaboration of calibration and exploitation procedures suitables for use in reprocessing plants. The demonstration to transfer mass of solution with an accuracy of 0.1% is made [fr

  19. Optical measurements for scientists and engineers a practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    McClelland, Arthur

    2018-01-01

    With this accessible, introductory guide, you will quickly learn how to use and apply optical spectroscopy and optical microscopy techniques. Focusing on day-to-day implementation and offering practical lab tips throughout, it provides step-by-step instructions on how to select the best technique for a particular application, how to set up and customize new optical systems, and how to analyze optical data. You will gain an intuitive understanding of the full range of standard optical techniques, from fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy to super resolution microscopy. Understand how to navigate around an optics lab with clear descriptions of the most common optical components and tools. Including explanations of basic optics and photonics, and easy-to-understand mathematics, this is an invaluable resource for graduate students, instructors, researchers and professionals who use or teach optical measurements in laboratories.

  20. Statistical modeling of optical attenuation measurements in continental fog conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Saeed; Amin, Muhammad; Awan, Muhammad Saleem; Minhas, Abid Ali; Saleem, Jawad; Khan, Rahimdad

    2017-03-01

    Free-space optics is an innovative technology that uses atmosphere as a propagation medium to provide higher data rates. These links are heavily affected by atmospheric channel mainly because of fog and clouds that act to scatter and even block the modulated beam of light from reaching the receiver end, hence imposing severe attenuation. A comprehensive statistical study of the fog effects and deep physical understanding of the fog phenomena are very important for suggesting improvements (reliability and efficiency) in such communication systems. In this regard, 6-months real-time measured fog attenuation data are considered and statistically investigated. A detailed statistical analysis related to each fog event for that period is presented; the best probability density functions are selected on the basis of Akaike information criterion, while the estimates of unknown parameters are computed by maximum likelihood estimation technique. The results show that most fog attenuation events follow normal mixture distribution and some follow the Weibull distribution.

  1. Optical constants from mirror reflectivities measured at synchrotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, R.L.; Davis, J.C.; Burbine, T.H.; Graessle, D.E.; Gullikson, E.M.

    1992-01-01

    Improved mirror reflectivity measurement techniques have been introduced to permit more accurate determinations of optical constants δ and β in the complex index of refraction n = 1 - δ-iβ over the energy range 50 to 5000 eV. When the density has been determined by x-ray or other means, one can calculate the real and imaginary parts f' and f double-prime, of the complex atomic scattering factor f = f o + f ' + if double-prime from δ and β. Preliminary results are given for the Ni LIII edge around 852 eV, and the Au M edge region from 2150 to 3500 eV. Since these are the first experimental evaluations of δ for these element edges, they are compared with appropriate reservations to semi-empirical tabulations. There is much potential for this technique applied to synchrotron sources

  2. Optics Measurements and Correction Challenges for the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Carlier, Felix Simon; Fartoukh, Stephane; Fol, Elena; Gamba, Davide; Garcia-Tabares Valdivieso, Ana; Giovannozzi, Massimo; Hofer, Michael; Langner, Andy Sven; Maclean, Ewen Hamish; Malina, Lukas; Medina Medrano, Luis Eduardo; Persson, Tobias Hakan Bjorn; Skowronski, Piotr Krzysztof; Tomas Garcia, Rogelio; Van Der Veken, Frederik; Wegscheider, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Optics control in the HL-LHC will be challenged by a very small β* of 15 cm in the two main experiments. HL-LHC physics fills will keep a constant luminosity during several hours via β* leveling. This will require the commissioning of a large number of optical configurations, further challenging the efficiency of the optics measurements and correction tools. We report on the achieved level of optics control in the LHC with simulations and extrapolations for the HL-LHC.

  3. Measuring heart rate with optical sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barachi, M. (Mitra)

    2014-01-01

    The problem addressed in this report is to verify the possibility of using an optical sensor in the SaxShirt in order to extract the heart rate. There are specifically three questions that we try to address. 1) How is it possible to extract heart rate (BPM) from the optical sensor? 2) Is it

  4. Spectroscopic measurements of plasma temperatures and electron number density in a uranium hollow cathode discharge lamp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, M.L.; Suri, B.M.; Gupta, G.P.

    2015-01-01

    The HCD (Hollow Cathode Discharge) lamps have been used as a source of free atoms of any metal, controllable by direct current in the lamp. The plasma parameters including neutral species temperature, atomic excitation temperature and electron number density in a see-through type, homemade uranium hollow cathode discharge lamp with neon as a buffer gas have been investigated using optical emission spectroscopic techniques. The neutral species temperature has been measured using the Doppler broadening of a neon atomic spectral line. The atomic excitation temperature has been measured using the Boltzmann plot method utilizing uranium atomic spectral lines. The electron number density has been determined from the Saha-Boltzmann equation utilizing uranium atomic and ionic spectral lines. To the best of our knowledge, all these three plasma parameters are simultaneously measured for the first time in a uranium hollow cathode discharge lamp

  5. Cumulative sum quality control for calibrated breast density measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heine, John J.; Cao Ke; Beam, Craig

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Breast density is a significant breast cancer risk factor. Although various methods are used to estimate breast density, there is no standard measurement for this important factor. The authors are developing a breast density standardization method for use in full field digital mammography (FFDM). The approach calibrates for interpatient acquisition technique differences. The calibration produces a normalized breast density pixel value scale. The method relies on first generating a baseline (BL) calibration dataset, which required extensive phantom imaging. Standardizing prospective mammograms with calibration data generated in the past could introduce unanticipated error in the standardized output if the calibration dataset is no longer valid. Methods: Sample points from the BL calibration dataset were imaged approximately biweekly over an extended timeframe. These serial samples were used to evaluate the BL dataset reproducibility and quantify the serial calibration accuracy. The cumulative sum (Cusum) quality control method was used to evaluate the serial sampling. Results: There is considerable drift in the serial sample points from the BL calibration dataset that is x-ray beam dependent. Systematic deviation from the BL dataset caused significant calibration errors. This system drift was not captured with routine system quality control measures. Cusum analysis indicated that the drift is a sign of system wear and eventual x-ray tube failure. Conclusions: The BL calibration dataset must be monitored and periodically updated, when necessary, to account for sustained system variations to maintain the calibration accuracy.

  6. Cumulative sum quality control for calibrated breast density measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heine, John J.; Cao Ke; Beam, Craig [Cancer Prevention and Control Division, Moffitt Cancer Center, 12902 Magnolia Drive, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States); Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1603 W. Taylor St., Chicago, Illinois 60612 (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: Breast density is a significant breast cancer risk factor. Although various methods are used to estimate breast density, there is no standard measurement for this important factor. The authors are developing a breast density standardization method for use in full field digital mammography (FFDM). The approach calibrates for interpatient acquisition technique differences. The calibration produces a normalized breast density pixel value scale. The method relies on first generating a baseline (BL) calibration dataset, which required extensive phantom imaging. Standardizing prospective mammograms with calibration data generated in the past could introduce unanticipated error in the standardized output if the calibration dataset is no longer valid. Methods: Sample points from the BL calibration dataset were imaged approximately biweekly over an extended timeframe. These serial samples were used to evaluate the BL dataset reproducibility and quantify the serial calibration accuracy. The cumulative sum (Cusum) quality control method was used to evaluate the serial sampling. Results: There is considerable drift in the serial sample points from the BL calibration dataset that is x-ray beam dependent. Systematic deviation from the BL dataset caused significant calibration errors. This system drift was not captured with routine system quality control measures. Cusum analysis indicated that the drift is a sign of system wear and eventual x-ray tube failure. Conclusions: The BL calibration dataset must be monitored and periodically updated, when necessary, to account for sustained system variations to maintain the calibration accuracy.

  7. Effect of Target Density on Microstructural, Electrical, and Optical Properties of Indium Tin Oxide Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guisheng; Zhi, Li; Yang, Huijuan; Xu, Huarui; Yu, Aibing

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, indium tin oxide (ITO) targets with different densities were used to deposit ITO thin films. The thin films were deposited from these targets at room temperature and annealed at 750°C. Microstructural, electrical, and optical properties of the as-prepared films were studied. It was found that the target density had no effect on the properties or deposition rate of radiofrequency (RF)-sputtered ITO thin films, different from the findings for direct current (DC)-sputtered films. Therefore, when using RF sputtering, the target does not require a high density and may be reused.

  8. Modelling of the energy density deposition profiles of ultrashort laser pulses focused in optical media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidal, F; Lavertu, P-L; Bigaouette, N; Moore, F; Brunette, I; Giguere, D; Kieffer, J-C; Olivie, G; Ozaki, T

    2007-01-01

    The propagation of ultrashort laser pulses in dense optical media is investigated theoretically by solving numerically the nonlinear Schroedinger equation. It is shown that the maximum energy density deposition as a function of the pulse energy presents a well-defined threshold that increases with the pulse duration. As a consequence of plasma defocusing, the maximum energy density deposition is generally smaller and the size of the energy deposition zone is generally larger for shorter pulses. Nevertheless, significant values of the energy density deposition can be obtained near threshold, i.e., at lower energy than for longer pulses

  9. Accurate Prediction of Transimpedances and Equivalent Input Noise Current Densities of Tuned Optical Receiver Front Ends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Qing Zhong

    1991-01-01

    Novel analytical expressions have been derived for calculating transimpedances and equivalent input noise current densities of five tuned optical receiver front ends based on PIN diode and MESFETs or HEMTs. Miller's capacitance, which has been omitted in previous studies, has been taken...

  10. Simulation of Space Charge Effects in Electron Optical System Based on the Calculations of Current Density

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zelinka, Jiří; Oral, Martin; Radlička, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 21, S4 (2015), s. 246-251 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : electron optical system * calculations of current density Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.730, year: 2015

  11. Macular pigment optical density in the elderly: findings in a large biracial Midsouth population sample

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iannaccone, Alessandro; Mura, Marco; Gallaher, Kevin T.; Johnson, Elizabeth J.; Todd, William Andrew; Kenyon, Emily; Harris, Tarsha L.; Harris, Tamara; Satterfield, Suzanne; Johnson, Karen C.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: To report the macular pigment optical density (MPOD) findings at 0.5 degrees of eccentricity from the fovea in elderly subjects participating in ARMA, a study of aging and age-related maculopathy (ARM) ancillary to the Health, Aging, and Body Composition (Health ABC) Study. METHODS: MPOD

  12. Pulse compression radar reflectometry for density measurements on fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costley, A; Prentice, R [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Laviron, C [Compagnie Generale des Matieres Nucleaires (COGEMA), 78 - Velizy-Villacoublay (France); Prentice, R [Toulouse-3 Univ., 31 (France). Centre d` Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements

    1994-07-01

    On tokamaks and other toroidal machines, reflectometry is a very rapidly developing technique for density profile measurements, particularly near the edge. Its principle relies on the total reflection of an electromagnetic wave at a cutoff layer, where the critical density is reached and the local refractive index goes to zero. With the new fast frequency synthesizers now available, a method based on pulse compression radar is proposed for plasma reflectometry, overcoming the limitations of the previous reflectometry methods. The measurement can be made on a time-scale which is effectively very short relatively to the plasma fluctuations, and the very high reproducibility and stability of the source allows an absolute calibration of the waveguides to be made, which corrects for the effects of the parasitic reflections. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Plasma density measurement with ring-type cutoff probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, D.W.; You, S.J.; Na, B.K.; Kim, J.H.; Shin, Y.H.; Chang, H.Y.; Oh, W.Y.

    2013-01-01

    We proposed a cutoff probe with a ring-type detection tip enclosing a bar-type radiation tip. A comparative study between a proposed ring-type cutoff (RTC) probe and a conventional bar-type cutoff (BTC) probe showed that the RTC probe solved the problem of the BTC probe, the large measurement uncertainty of the electron density in a capacitively coupled plasma source. This improved characteristics of the RTC probe might have originated from the geometrical structure of the RTC probe concerning the monopole antennae radiation. This proposed cutoff probe can be expected to expand the applicable diagnostic range and to enhance the sensitivity of the cutoff probe. - Highlights: ► A cutoff probe with a ring type detection tip is proposed. ► Comparative experiment and simulation were conducted. ► The proposed probe showed a small uncertainty of measured plasma density. ► Improved characteristics might be originated from the geometrical structure

  14. Influence of macular pigment optical density spatial distribution on intraocular scatter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Christopher M; Bland, Pauline J; Bassi, Carl J

    This study evaluated the summed measures of macular pigment optical density (MPOD) spatial distribution and their effects on intraocular scatter using a commercially available device (C-Quant, Oculus, USA). A customized heterochromatic flicker photometer (cHFP) device was used to measure MPOD spatial distribution across the central 16° using a 1° stimulus. MPOD was calculated as a discrete measure and summed measures across the central 1°, 3.3°, 10° and 16° diameters. Intraocular scatter was determined as a mean of 5 trials in which reliability and repeatability measures were met using the C-Quant. MPOD spatial distribution maps were constructed and the effects of both discrete and summed values on intraocular scatter were examined. Spatial mapping identified mean values for discrete MPOD [0.32 (s.d.=0.08)], MPOD summed across central 1° [0.37 (s.d.=0.11)], MPOD summed across central 3.3° [0.85 (s.d.=0.20)], MPOD summed across central 10° [1.60 (s.d.=0.35)] and MPOD summed across central 16° [1.78 (s.d.=0.39)]. Mean intraocular scatter was 0.83 (s.d.=0.16) log units. While there were consistent trends for an inverse relationship between MPOD and scatter, these relationships were not statistically significant. Correlations between the highest and lowest quartiles of MPOD within the central 1° were near significance. While there was an overall trend of decreased intraocular forward scatter with increased MPOD consistent with selective short wavelength visible light attenuation, neither discrete nor summed values of MPOD significantly influence intraocular scatter as measured by the C-Quant device. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  15. Measurements of H-atom density by a catalytic probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesel, A.; Drenik, A.; Mozetic, M.

    2006-01-01

    One of the important plasma parameters in tokamaks is the density of neutral hydrogen atoms which can be measured by catalytic probes. The method is based on the catalytic recombination of H atoms on the metal surface. In order to prevent a substantial drain of atoms by the probe, it should be made as small as possible. But still this effect can not be neglected. Therefore a study of the influence of a catalytic probe on the H-atom density was performed. The source of neutral H-atoms was inductively coupled RF hydrogen plasma. The gas from the discharge vessel was leaked to an experimental chamber through a narrow tube with the diameter of 5 mm and the length of 6 cm. Charged particles created in the discharge vessel were recombined on the walls of the narrow tube, so that the gas entering the experimental chamber was a mixture of hydrogen atoms and molecules only. The density of H-atoms in the experimental chamber was measured with two nickel catalytic probes. One probe was at fixed position and the other one was made movable. A change in the probe signal of the fixed probe was measured versus the position of the movable probe. The measurements were performed at the pressures between 10 Pa and 200 Pa and at two different RF powers 200 W and 300 W. It was found that the density of neutral hydrogen atoms was reduced for about 20% due to the presence of the probe. This result was independent from the pressure in the experimental chamber. (author)

  16. An ultracold neutron storage bottle for UCN density measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bison, G.; Burri, F.; Daum, M. [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Kirch, K. [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Institute for Particle Physics, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich (Switzerland); Krempel, J. [Institute for Particle Physics, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich (Switzerland); Lauss, B., E-mail: bernhard.lauss@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Meier, M. [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Ries, D., E-mail: dieter.ries@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Institute for Particle Physics, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich (Switzerland); Schmidt-Wellenburg, P.; Zsigmond, G. [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2016-09-11

    We have developed a storage bottle for ultracold neutrons (UCNs) in order to measure the UCN density at the beamports of the Paul Scherrer Institute's (PSI) UCN source. This paper describes the design, construction and commissioning of the robust and mobile storage bottle with a volume comparable to typical storage experiments (32 L) e.g. searching for an electric dipole moment of the neutron.

  17. Glaucoma Diagnostic Ability of the Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography Vessel Density Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jae Keun; Hwang, Young Hoon; Wi, Jae Min; Kim, Mijin; Jung, Jong Jin

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the glaucoma diagnostic abilities of vessel density parameters as determined by optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography in different stages of glaucoma. A total of 113 healthy eyes and 140 glaucomatous eyes were enrolled. Diagnostic abilities of the OCT vessel density parameters in the optic nerve head (ONH), peripapillary, and macular regions were evaluated by calculating the area under the receiver operation characteristic curves (AUCs). AUCs of the peripapillary vessel density parameters and circumpapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness were compared. OCT angiography vessel densities in the ONH, peripapillary, and macular regions in the glaucomatous eyes were significantly lower than those in the healthy eyes (P glaucoma detection. The peripapillary vessel density parameters showed similar AUCs with the corresponding sectoral RNFL thickness (P > 0.05). However, in the early stage of glaucoma, the AUCs of the inferotemporal and temporal peripapillary vessel densities were significantly lower than that of the RNFL thickness (P glaucoma diagnostic ability with circumpapillary RNFL thickness, in the early stage, the vessel density parameters showed limited clinical value.

  18. Simultaneous measurement of group refractive index and thickness of optical samples using optical coherence tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Hsu-Chih; Liu, Yi-Cheng

    2010-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT), based on a Michelson interferometer and utilizing low coherence light as the optical source, is a novel technique for the noninvasive imaging of optical scattering media. A simple OCT scheme based on a 3x3 fiber coupler is presented for the simultaneous measurement of the refractive index and thickness of optical samples. The proposed system enables the refractive index and thickness to be determined without any prior knowledge of the sample parameters and is characterized by a simple and compact configuration, a straightforward measurement procedure, and a low cost. The feasibility of the proposed approach is demonstrated experimentally using BK7 and B270 optical glass samples.

  19. A measurement of perpendicular current density in an aurora

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bering, E.A.; Mozer, F.S.

    1975-01-01

    A Nike Tomahawk sounding rocket was launched into a 400-γ auroral substorm on February 7, 1972, from Esrange, Kiruna, Sweden. The rocket instrumentation included a split Langmuir probe plasma velocity detector and a double-probe electric field detector. Above 140-km altitude the electric field deduced from the ion flow velocity measurement and the electric field measured by the double probe agree to an accuracy within the uncertainties of the two measurements. The difference between the two measurements at altitudes below 140 km provides an in situ measurement of current density and conductivity. Alternatively, if values for the conductivity are assumed, the neutral wind velocity can be deduced. The height-integrated current was 0.11 A/m flowing at an azimuth of 276degree. The neutral winds were strong, exhibited substantial altitude variation in the east-west component, and were predominantly southward

  20. Quantitative optical microscopy: measurement of cellular biophysical features with a standard optical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Kevin G; Baker-Groberg, Sandra M; McCarty, Owen J T

    2014-04-07

    We describe the use of a standard optical microscope to perform quantitative measurements of mass, volume, and density on cellular specimens through a combination of bright field and differential interference contrast imagery. Two primary approaches are presented: noninterferometric quantitative phase microscopy (NIQPM), to perform measurements of total cell mass and subcellular density distribution, and Hilbert transform differential interference contrast microscopy (HTDIC) to determine volume. NIQPM is based on a simplified model of wave propagation, termed the paraxial approximation, with three underlying assumptions: low numerical aperture (NA) illumination, weak scattering, and weak absorption of light by the specimen. Fortunately, unstained cellular specimens satisfy these assumptions and low NA illumination is easily achieved on commercial microscopes. HTDIC is used to obtain volumetric information from through-focus DIC imagery under high NA illumination conditions. High NA illumination enables enhanced sectioning of the specimen along the optical axis. Hilbert transform processing on the DIC image stacks greatly enhances edge detection algorithms for localization of the specimen borders in three dimensions by separating the gray values of the specimen intensity from those of the background. The primary advantages of NIQPM and HTDIC lay in their technological accessibility using "off-the-shelf" microscopes. There are two basic limitations of these methods: slow z-stack acquisition time on commercial scopes currently abrogates the investigation of phenomena faster than 1 frame/minute, and secondly, diffraction effects restrict the utility of NIQPM and HTDIC to objects from 0.2 up to 10 (NIQPM) and 20 (HTDIC) μm in diameter, respectively. Hence, the specimen and its associated time dynamics of interest must meet certain size and temporal constraints to enable the use of these methods. Excitingly, most fixed cellular specimens are readily investigated with

  1. Precision Spectroscopy, Diode Lasers, and Optical Frequency Measurement Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollberg, Leo (Editor); Fox, Richard (Editor); Waltman, Steve (Editor); Robinson, Hugh

    1998-01-01

    This compilation is a selected set of reprints from the Optical Frequency Measurement Group of the Time and Frequency Division of the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and consists of work published between 1987 and 1997. The two main programs represented here are (1) development of tunable diode-laser technology for scientific applications and precision measurements, and (2) research toward the goal of realizing optical-frequency measurements and synthesis. The papers are organized chronologically in five, somewhat arbitrarily chosen categories: Diode Laser Technology, Tunable Laser Systems, Laser Spectroscopy, Optical Synthesis and Extended Wavelength Coverage, and Multi-Photon Interactions and Optical Coherences.

  2. Optical metrology techniques for dimensional stability measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellis, Jonathan David

    2010-01-01

    This thesis work is optical metrology techniques to determine material stability. In addition to displacement interferometry, topics such as periodic nonlinearity, Fabry-Perot interferometry, refractometry, and laser stabilization are covered.

  3. Coordinate Measuring Machine for Characterizing Conformal Optics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jacobs, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    ... Nanotech 150AG Aspharic Grinder and the Nanotecnnologv Systems Nanotech 5OOFG Freeform Generator. The unique and complex nature of these parts prevented them from being characterized with standard optical metrology instrumentation...

  4. Projective measurements in quantum and classical optical systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roux, FS

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available equally well to both classical and quantum optical systems. A projective measurement, in the context of quantum mechanics, is understood to be the process where a projection operator operates on some input state. Often this projection operator is composed...) Projective measurements in quantum and classical optical systems Filippus S. Roux* and Yingwen Zhang CSIR National Laser Centre, P.O. Box 395, Pretoria 0001, South Africa (Received 3 July 2014; published 22 September 2014) Experimental setups for the optical...

  5. Calculation of new snow densities from sub-daily automated snow measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfricht, Kay; Hartl, Lea; Koch, Roland; Marty, Christoph; Lehning, Michael; Olefs, Marc

    2017-04-01

    :10 approximation (i.e. 100 kgm-3), which is mainly based on daily values in the Alps. Variations in new snow density could not be explained in a satisfactory manner using meteorological data measured at the same location. Likewise, some of the tested parametrizations of new snow density, which primarily use air temperature as a proxy, result in median new snow densities close to the ones from automated measurements, but show only a low correlation between calculated and measured new snow densities. The case study on the influence of snow settling on HN resulted on average in an underestimation of HN by 17%, which corresponds to 2-3% of the cumulated HN from the previous 24 hours. Therefore, the mean hourly new snow densities may be overestimated by 14%. The analysis in this study is especially limited with respect to the meteorological influence on the HS measurement using ultra-sonic rangers. Nevertheless, the reasonable mean values encourage calculating new snow densities from standard hydro-meteorological measurements using more precise observation devices such as optical snow depth sensors and more sensitive scales for SWE measurements also on sub-daily time-scales.

  6. Inspection method of optical fiber preforms by x-ray absorption measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, H.; Nakamura, K.; Shibuya, S.; Kuroha, T.

    1980-01-01

    A method for measuring the refractive index distribution of optical fiber preforms has been developed by application of the theory of X-ray radiography. The composition of quartz optical fiber materials is, in most cases, limited to the group of five elements - Ge, P, Si, O and B. Of them, Ge is an essential element to determine the structure of refractive index of an optical fiber and the distribution of its density can be regarded approximately as the distribution of refractive index. On the other hand, the coefficient of low-energy X-ray absorption by the elements depends markedly on their atomic numbers, and Ge has a far larger absorption coefficient than the other four elements. Therefore, analysis of the intensity of X-ray absorbed by optical fiber preforms makes it possible to determine the distribution of Ge density and consequently the distribution of refractive index. (author)

  7. Soil temperature variability in complex terrain measured using fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil temperature (Ts) exerts critical controls on hydrologic and biogeochemical processes but magnitude and nature of Ts variability in a landscape setting are rarely documented. Fiber optic distributed temperature sensing systems (FO-DTS) potentially measure Ts at high density over a large extent. ...

  8. Measurement of compressed breast thickness by optical stereoscopic photogrammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, Albert H; Mawdsley, Gordon E; Yaffe, Martin J

    2009-02-01

    The determination of volumetric breast density (VBD) from mammograms requires accurate knowledge of the thickness of the compressed breast. In attempting to accurately determine VBD from images obtained on conventional mammography systems, the authors found that the thickness reported by a number of mammography systems in the field varied by as much as 15 mm when compressing the same breast or phantom. In order to evaluate the behavior of mammographic compression systems and to be able to predict the thickness at different locations in the breast on patients, they have developed a method for measuring the local thickness of the breast at all points of contact with the compression paddle using optical stereoscopic photogrammetry. On both flat (solid) and compressible phantoms, the measurements were accurate to better than 1 mm with a precision of 0.2 mm. In a pilot study, this method was used to measure thickness on 108 volunteers who were undergoing mammography examination. This measurement tool will allow us to characterize paddle surface deformations, deflections and calibration offsets for mammographic units.

  9. Electron density fluctuation measurements in the TORTUR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remkes, G.J.J.

    1990-01-01

    This thesis deals with measurements of electron-density fluctuations in the TORTUR tokamak. These measurements are carried out by making use of collective scattering of electromagnetic beams. The choice of the wavelength of the probing beam used in collective scattering experiments has important consequences. in this thesis it is argued that the best choice for a wavelength lies in the region 0.1 - 1 mm. Because sources in this region were not disposable a 2 mm collective scattering apparatus has been used as a fair compromise. The scattering theory, somewhat adapted to the specific TORTUR situation, is discussed in Ch. 2. Large scattering angles are admitted in scattering experiments with 2 mm probing beams. This had consequences for the spatial response functions. Special attention has been paid to the wave number resolution. Expressions for the minimum source power have been determined for two detection techniques. The design and implementation of the scattering apparatus has been described in Ch. 3. The available location of the scattering volume and values of the scattering angle have been determined. The effect of beam deflection due to refraction effects is evaluated. The electronic system is introduced. Ch. 4 presents the results of measurements of density fluctuations in the TORTUR tokamak in the frequency range 1 kHz to 100 MHz end the wave number region 400 - 4000 m -1 in different regions of the plasma. Correlation between density and magnetic fluctuations has been found in a number of cases. During the current decay at the termination of several plasma discharges minor disruptions occurred. The fluctuations during these disruptions have been monitored. Measurements have been performed in hydrogen as well as deuterium. A possible dependence of the wave number on the ion gyroradius has been investigated. The isotropy of the fluctuations in the poloidal plane was investigated. A theoretical discussion of the measured results is given in ch. 5. ( H.W.). 63

  10. Toward quantum-limited position measurements using optically levitated microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libbrecht, Kenneth G.; Black, Eric D.

    2004-01-01

    We propose the use of optically levitated microspheres as test masses in experiments aimed at reaching and potentially exceeding the standard quantum limit for position measurements. Optically levitated microspheres have low mass and are essentially free of suspension thermal noise, making them well suited for experimentally testing our understanding of quantum-limited measurements

  11. Toward quantum-limited position measurements using optically levitated microspheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libbrecht, Kenneth G.; Black, Eric D

    2004-01-26

    We propose the use of optically levitated microspheres as test masses in experiments aimed at reaching and potentially exceeding the standard quantum limit for position measurements. Optically levitated microspheres have low mass and are essentially free of suspension thermal noise, making them well suited for experimentally testing our understanding of quantum-limited measurements.

  12. Simplified method for beatlength measurement in optical fibre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, R.; Town, G.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: A simplified technique for measuring beatlength in birefringent optical fibres using magnetic modulation was analysed, and tested experimentally. By avoiding the use of unnecessary optical components and splicing to the fibre under test, the beatlength was measured accurately with good signal-to-noise ratio

  13. Electron density profile measurements from hydrogen line intensity ratio method in Versatile Experimental Spherical Torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, YooSung; Shi, Yue-Jiang, E-mail: yjshi@snu.ac.kr; Yang, Jeong-hun; Kim, SeongCheol; Kim, Young-Gi; Dang, Jeong-Jeung; Yang, Seongmoo; Jo, Jungmin; Chung, Kyoung-Jae [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Soo-Ghee [Division of Energy Systems Research, Ajou University, Suwon 442-749 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Y. S. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Advanced Research in Fusion Reactor Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Electron density profiles of versatile experiment spherical torus plasmas are measured by using a hydrogen line intensity ratio method. A fast-frame visible camera with appropriate bandpass filters is used to detect images of Balmer line intensities. The unique optical system makes it possible to take images of H{sub α} and H{sub β} radiation simultaneously, with only one camera. The frame rate is 1000 fps and the spatial resolution of the system is about 0.5 cm. One-dimensional local emissivity profiles have been obtained from the toroidal line of sight with viewing dumps. An initial result for the electron density profile is presented and is in reasonable agreement with values measured by a triple Langmuir probe.

  14. Design for coordinated measurements of Faraday rotation and line-of-sight electron density using heterodyne techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, A.R.

    1977-07-01

    This report proposes a device which can overcome certain of the compromises of conventional Faraday rotation methods and at the same time measure the optical phase as well as the polarization. This would be useful for unfolding the Faraday rotation signal using the line-of-sight density along exactly the same path. Preliminary design parameters using a CO 2 laser are presented

  15. Predicting Intra-Urban Population Densities in Africa using SAR and Optical Remote Sensing Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linard, C.; Steele, J.; Forget, Y.; Lopez, J.; Shimoni, M.

    2017-12-01

    The population of Africa is predicted to double over the next 40 years, driving profound social, environmental and epidemiological changes within rapidly growing cities. Estimations of within-city variations in population density must be improved in order to take urban heterogeneities into account and better help urban research and decision making, especially for vulnerability and health assessments. Satellite remote sensing offers an effective solution for mapping settlements and monitoring urbanization at different spatial and temporal scales. In Africa, the urban landscape is covered by slums and small houses, where the heterogeneity is high and where the man-made materials are natural. Innovative methods that combine optical and SAR data are therefore necessary for improving settlement mapping and population density predictions. An automatic method was developed to estimate built-up densities using recent and archived optical and SAR data and a multi-temporal database of built-up densities was produced for 48 African cities. Geo-statistical methods were then used to study the relationships between census-derived population densities and satellite-derived built-up attributes. Best predictors were combined in a Random Forest framework in order to predict intra-urban variations in population density in any large African city. Models show significant improvement of our spatial understanding of urbanization and urban population distribution in Africa in comparison to the state of the art.

  16. Interferometric measurements of plasma density in high-β plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinn, W.E.

    1977-01-01

    The coupled-cavity laser interferometer technique is particularly applicable to the measurement of pulsed plasma densities. This technique is based on the fact that if a small fraction of a gas laser's output radiation is reflected into the laser with an external mirror, the intensity of the laser output is modulated. These amplitude or intensity modulations are produced by changes in the laser gain. A rotating corner mirror or an oscillating mirror can be used to produce a continuous feedback modulation of the interferometer which produces a continuous background fringe pattern. The presence of plasma in the outer cavity causes an additional change which results in a phase shift of the regular period of the background fringe pattern. The integral of the plasma density along the line of sight can be evaluated by comparison of the time history of the fringes obtained with and without plasma

  17. Measurements of edge density profile modifications during IBW on TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, G.R.; Bush, C.E.; Wilgen, J.B.

    1997-01-01

    Ion Bernstein wave (IBW) antennas are known to have substantial localized effects on the plasma edge. To allow better understanding and measurement of these effects, the TFTR edge reflectometer has been relocated to the new IBW antenna. This move was facilitated by the incorporation of a diagnostic access tube in the IBW antenna identical to the original diagnostic tube in the fast-wave (FW) antenna. This allowed the reflectometer launcher to simply be moved from the old FW antenna to the new IBW antenna. Only a moderate extension of the waveguide transmission line was required to reconnect the reflectometer to the launcher in its new location. Edge density profile modification during IBW experiments has been observed. Results from IBW experiments will be presented and contrasted to the edge density modifications previously observed during FW heating experiments

  18. Physical properties of Martian meteorites: Porosity and density measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulson, Ian M.; Beech, Martin; Nie, Wenshuang

    Martian meteorites are fragments of the Martian crust. These samples represent igneous rocks, much like basalt. As such, many laboratory techniques designed for the study of Earth materials have been applied to these meteorites. Despite numerous studies of Martian meteorites, little data exists on their basic structural characteristics, such as porosity or density, information that is important in interpreting their origin, shock modification, and cosmic ray exposure history. Analysis of these meteorites provides both insight into the various lithologies present as well as the impact history of the planet's surface. We present new data relating to the physical characteristics of twelve Martian meteorites. Porosity was determined via a combination of scanning electron microscope (SEM) imagery/image analysis and helium pycnometry, coupled with a modified Archimedean method for bulk density measurements. Our results show a range in porosity and density values and that porosity tends to increase toward the edge of the sample. Preliminary interpretation of the data demonstrates good agreement between porosity measured at 100× and 300× magnification for the shergottite group, while others exhibit more variability. In comparison with the limited existing data for Martian meteorites we find fairly good agreement, although our porosity values typically lie at the low end of published values. Surprisingly, despite the increased data set, there is little by way of correlation between either porosity or density with parameters such as shock effect or terrestrial residency. Further data collection on additional meteorite samples is required before more definitive statements can be made concerning the validity of these observations.

  19. Simple method for measuring reflectance of optical coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Gui Wang; Yi Sheng Chen

    1995-01-01

    The quality of optical coatings has an important effect on the performance of optical instrument. The last few years, the requirements for super low loss dielectric mirror coatings used in low gain laser systems such as free electron laser and the ring laser etc., have given an impetus to the development of the technology of precise reflectance measurement of optical coatings. A reliable and workable technique is to measure the light intensity decay time of optical resonant cavity. This paper describes a measuring method which is dependent on direct measurement of the light intensity decay time of a resonant cavity comprised of low loss optical components. According to the evolution of a luminous flux stored inside the cavity, this method guarantees not only a quick and precise reflectance measurements of low loss highly reflecting mirror coatings but also transmittance measurements of low loss antireflection coatings and is especially effective with super los loss highly reflecting mirror. From the round-trip path length of the cavity and the speed of light, the light intensity exponential decay time of an optical cavity is easy to obtain and the cavity losses can be deduced. An optical reflectance of low loss highly mirror coatings and antireflection coatings is precisely measured as well. This is highly significant for the discrimination of the coating surface characteristics, the improvement of the performance of optical instrument and the development of high technology

  20. Functional imaging of the human brain using a modular, fibre-less, high-density diffuse optical tomography system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitnis, Danial; Cooper, Robert J; Dempsey, Laura; Powell, Samuel; Quaggia, Simone; Highton, David; Elwell, Clare; Hebden, Jeremy C; Everdell, Nicholas L

    2016-10-01

    We present the first three-dimensional, functional images of the human brain to be obtained using a fibre-less, high-density diffuse optical tomography system. Our technology consists of independent, miniaturized, silicone-encapsulated DOT modules that can be placed directly on the scalp. Four of these modules were arranged to provide up to 128, dual-wavelength measurement channels over a scalp area of approximately 60 × 65 mm 2 . Using a series of motor-cortex stimulation experiments, we demonstrate that this system can obtain high-quality, continuous-wave measurements at source-detector separations ranging from 14 to 55 mm in adults, in the presence of hair. We identify robust haemodynamic response functions in 5 out of 5 subjects, and present diffuse optical tomography images that depict functional haemodynamic responses that are well-localized in all three dimensions at both the individual and group levels. This prototype modular system paves the way for a new generation of wearable, wireless, high-density optical neuroimaging technologies.

  1. The Physical Density of the City—Deconstruction of the Delusive Density Measure with Evidence from Two European Megacities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes Taubenböck

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Density is among the most important descriptive as well as normative measures in urban research. While its basic concept is generally understandable, approaches towards the density measure are manifold, diverse and of multidimensional complexity. This evolves from differing thematic, spatial and calculative specifications. Consequently, applied density measures are often used in a subjective, non-transparent, unspecific and thus non-comparable manner. In this paper, we aim at a systematic deconstruction of the measure density. Varying thematic, spatial and calculative dimensions show significant influence on the measure. With both quantitative and qualitative techniques of evaluation, we assess the particular influences on the measure density. To do so, we reduce our experiment setting to a mere physical perspective; that is, the quantitative measures building density, degree of soil sealing, floor space density and, more specifically, the density of generic structural classes such as open spaces and highest built-up density areas. Using up-to-date geodata derived from remote sensing and volunteered geographic information, we build upon high-quality spatial information products such as 3-D city models. Exemplified for the comparison of two European megacities, namely Paris and London, we reveal and systemize necessary variables to be clearly defined for meaningful conclusions using the density measure.

  2. Sensors for Metering Heat Flux Area Density and Metrological Equipment for the Heat Flux Density Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doronin, D. O.

    2018-04-01

    The demand in measuring and studies of heat conduction of various media is very urgent now. This article considers the problem of heat conduction monitoring and measurement in various media and materials in any industries and branches of science as well as metrological support of the heat flux measurement equipment. The main study objects are both the sensors manufactured and facilities onto which these sensors will be installed: different cladding structures of the buildings, awnings, rocket fairings, boiler units, internal combustion engines. The Company develops and manufactures different types of heat flux sensors: thermocouple, thin-film, heterogeneous gradient as well as metrological equipment for the gauging calibration of the heat flux density measurement. The calibration shall be performed using both referencing method in the unit and by fixed setting of the heat flux in the unit. To manufacture heterogeneous heat flux gradient sensors (HHFGS) the Company developed and designed a number of units: diffusion welding unit, HHFGS cutting unit. Rather good quality HHFGS prototypes were obtained. At this stage the factory tests on the equipment for the heat flux density measurement equipment are planned. A high-sensitivity heat flux sensor was produced, now it is tested at the Construction Physics Research Institute (Moscow). It became possible to create thin-film heat flux sensors with the sensitivity not worse than that of the sensors manufactured by Captec Company (France). The Company has sufficient premises to supply the market with a wide range of sensors, to master new sensor manufacture technologies which will enable their application range.

  3. Remote application of an oscillatory system for density measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortsch, E.M.; Wade, M.A.

    1974-01-01

    An Anton-Paar densimeter was modified for remote use and installed in the Remote Analytical Facility of the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. This instrument determines density by measuring the deviation in resonant frequency of a hollow-glass mechanical oscillator when filled with sample material. The volume of the oscillator is constant and any change in its frequency is due to the sample. The change in frequency is a measure of the mass of the sample. Since there is no need to measure either volume or mass, the remote manipulations are simplified. This unit replaced existing falling-drop equipment with a reduction in cost and improvement of precision. The remote unit is used routinely 24 h a day with a precision of better than +- 5 x 10 -4 g/ml

  4. The effect of BCMO1 gene variants on macular pigment optical density in young healthy Caucasians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary eKyle-Little

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Serum lutein (L and zeaxanthin (Z positively correlate with macular pigment optical density (MPOD, hence the latter is a valuable indirect tool for measuring L and Z content in the macula. L and Z have been attributed antioxidant capacity and protection from certain retinal diseases but their uptake within the eye is thought to depend on genetic, age and environmental factors. In particular gene variants within beta-carotene monooxygenase (BCMO1 are thought to modulate MPOD in the macula.Objectives: To determine the effect of BCMO1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs rs11645428, rs6420424 and rs6464851 on macular pigment optical density (MPOD in a cohort of young healthy participants of Caucasian origin with normal ocular health.Design: In this cohort study, MPOD was assessed in 46 healthy participants (22 male and 24 female with a mean age of 24 ± 4.0 years (range 19-33. The three SNPs, rs11645428, rs6420424, rs6564851 that have established associations with MPOD were determined using MassEXTEND (hME Sequenom assay. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA was performed on groups segregated into homozygous and heterozygous BCMO1 genotypes. Correlations between body mass index (BMI, iris colour, gender, central retinal thickness (CRT, diet and MPOD were investigated.Results: MPOD did not significantly vary with BCMO1 rs11645428 (F2,41 = 0.700, p = 0.503, rs6420424 (F2,41 = 0.210, p = 0.801 nor rs6464851 homozygous or heterozygous genotypes (F2,41 = 0,13, p = 0.88, in this young healthy cohort. The combination of these three SNPs into triple genotypes based on plasma conversion efficiency did not affect MPOD (F2,41 = 0.07, p = 0.9. There was a significant negative correlation with MPOD and central retinal thickness (r = - 0.39, p = 0.01 but no significant correlation between BMI, iris colour, gender and MPOD. Conclusion: Our results indicate that macular pigment deposition within the central retina is not dependent on BCMO1 gene variant

  5. Fiber-Optic Pyrometer with Optically Powered Switch for Temperature Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Carmen; Pérez-Prieto, Sandra; López-Cardona, Juan D; Tapetado, Alberto; Blanco, Enrique; Moreno-López, Jorge; Montero, David S; Lallana, Pedro C

    2018-02-06

    We report the experimental results on a new infrared fiber-optic pyrometer for very localized and high-speed temperature measurements ranging from 170 to 530 °C using low-noise photodetectors and high-gain transimpedance amplifiers with a single gain mode in the whole temperature range. We also report a shutter based on an optical fiber switch which is optically powered to provide a reference signal in an optical fiber pyrometer measuring from 200 to 550 °C. The tests show the potential of remotely powering via optical means a 300 mW power-hungry optical switch at a distance of 100 m, avoiding any electromagnetic interference close to the measuring point.

  6. Fiber-Optic Pyrometer with Optically Powered Switch for Temperature Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Vázquez

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We report the experimental results on a new infrared fiber-optic pyrometer for very localized and high-speed temperature measurements ranging from 170 to 530 °C using low-noise photodetectors and high-gain transimpedance amplifiers with a single gain mode in the whole temperature range. We also report a shutter based on an optical fiber switch which is optically powered to provide a reference signal in an optical fiber pyrometer measuring from 200 to 550 °C. The tests show the potential of remotely powering via optical means a 300 mW power-hungry optical switch at a distance of 100 m, avoiding any electromagnetic interference close to the measuring point.

  7. Evaluation of the Automatic Density Compensation for Pressurizer Level Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Insoo; Min, Seohong; Ahn, Myunghoon

    2014-01-01

    When using two transmitters, it is difficult for the operators to identify the correct level of the pressurizer (PZR) upon failure of one of the two transmitters. For this reason, Korean Utility Requirements Document (KURD) requires that the operators to use three independent level indicators. Two hot calibrated transmitters and one cold calibrated transmitter compose PZR level transmitters in APR1400. In this paper, the deviation between cold calibration and hot calibration is evaluated, and the application of compensated PZR level measurement and uncompen-sated PZR level measurement during the normal operation of APR1400 are introduced. The PZR level signals for APR1400 come in three channels. To satisfy the KURD requirements for PZR level measurement, and at the same time to accomplish correction design and implementation, applicability and differences between hot calibration and cold calibration, compensated level and uncompensated level were evaluated as follows: For proper indication of PZR levels under normal operating condition, two of the three transmitters went through hot calibration and the remaining one transmitter went through cold calibration. This was to allow indicating entire regions of PZR regardless of the plant operation modes. For automatic density compensation per KURD requirements, the algorithm of the density compensated PZR level implemented in the DCS controller and PRV logic is adopted as a signal validation method

  8. VARIABILITY IN FOVEAL AVASCULAR ZONE AND CAPILLARY DENSITY USING OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY ANGIOGRAPHY MACHINES IN HEALTHY EYES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrath, George N; Say, Emil Anthony T; Sioufi, Kareem; Ferenczy, Sandor; Samara, Wasim A; Shields, Carol L

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the variability in foveal avascular zone (FAZ) and capillary density measurements on optical coherence tomography angiography using Optovue RTVue XR Avanti (OA) (Optovue) and Zeiss Cirrus HD-OCT 5000 (ZC) (Carl Zeiss Meditec). In this prospective, comparative case series, parafoveal (3 × 3 mm) optical coherence tomography angiography scans were obtained on healthy volunteers using both the Avanti and Cirrus. The FAZ area and capillary density at the level of both the superficial and deep capillary plexus were measured automatically using the built-in ReVue software (Optovue) with the Avanti as well as manually using ImageJ (National Institutes of Health) with both machines. There were 50 eyes in 25 healthy volunteers included in the analysis. Mean subject age was 33 years and there were 14 women (56%). On optical coherence tomography, mean central macular thickness was significantly greater on OA (259.1 μm) than ZC (257.6 μm, P = 0.0228). On optical coherence tomography angiography, mean superficial and deep plexus FAZ measured 0.2855 mm and 0.3465 mm on Avanti automated (A-A), 0.2739 mm and 0.3637 mm on Avanti manual (A-M), and 0.2657 mm and 0.3993 mm on Cirrus manual (C-M), respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in superficial plexus FAZ measurements between the A-A and A-M (P = 0.4019) or A-A and C-M (P = 0.1336). The A-M measured significantly larger than C-M (P = 0.0396). Deep plexus FAZ measurements were similar on A-A and A-M (P = 0.6299), but both were significantly less compared with C-M (P machine and technique are consistent and reliable between fellow eyes, significant variability exists in FAZ and capillary density measurements among different machines and techniques. Comparison of measurements across machines and techniques should be considered with caution.

  9. Direct measurements of the extraordinary optical\

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Antognozzi, M.; Bermingham, C.R.; Harniman, R.L.; Simpson, Stephen Hugh; Senior, J.; Hayward, I.R.; Hoerber, H.; Dennis, M.R.; Bekshaev, A.Y.; Bliokh, K.Y.; Nori, F.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 8 (2016), s. 731-735 ISSN 1745-2473 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : radiation-pressure * angular-momentum * microscopy Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 22.806, year: 2016

  10. X-ray spectroscopy for high energy-density X pinch density and temperature measurements (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pikuz, S.A.; Shelkovenko, T.A.; Chandler, K.M.; Mitchell, M.D.; Hammer, D.A.; Skobelev, I.Y.; Shlyaptseva, A.S.; Hansen, S.B.

    2004-01-01

    X pinch plasmas produced from fine metal wires can reach near solid densities and temperatures of 1 keV or even more. Plasma conditions change on time scales as short as 5-10 ps as determined using an x-ray streak camera viewing a focusing crystal spectrograph or directly viewing the plasma through multiple filters on a single test. As a result, it is possible to determine plasma conditions from spectra with ∼10 ps time resolution. Experiments and theory are now coming together to give a consistent picture of the dynamics and kinetics of these high energy density plasmas with very high temporal and spatial precision. A set of diagnostic techniques used in experiments for spectrally, temporally, and spatially resolved measurements of X pinch plasmas is described. Results of plasma parameter determination from these measurements are presented. X ray backlighting of one x-pinch by another with ∼30 ps x-ray pulses enables the dynamics and kinetics to be correlated in time

  11. Poloidal polarimeter for current density measurements in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donne, A.J.H.; Graswinckel, M.F.; Cavinato, M.; Giudicotti, L.; Zilli, E.; Gil, C.; Koslowski, H.R.; McCarthy, P.; Nyhan, C.; Prunty, S.; Spillane, M.; Walker, C.

    2004-01-01

    One of the systems envisaged for measuring the current density profile in the ITER is a 118 μm poloidal polarimeter system. The proposed system has two independent views: one fan of chords observes the plasma via an equatorial port and a second fan views down from an upper port. This article will present the status of the on-going work and will address issues as sensitivity and accuracy, refraction, Gaussian beam ray-tracing, alignment, and calibration as well as some specific design details

  12. Applied photometry, radiometry, and measurements of optical losses

    CERN Document Server

    Bukshtab, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Applied Photometry, Radiometry, and Measurements of Optical Losses reviews and analyzes physical concepts of radiation transfer, providing quantitative foundation for the means of measurements of optical losses, which affect propagation and distribution of light waves in various media and in diverse optical systems and components. The comprehensive analysis of advanced methodologies for low-loss detection is outlined in comparison with the classic photometric and radiometric observations, having a broad range of techniques examined and summarized: from interferometric and calorimetric, resonator and polarization, phase-shift and ring-down decay, wavelength and frequency modulation to pulse separation and resonant, acousto-optic and emissive - subsequently compared to direct and balancing methods for studying free-space and polarization optics, fibers and waveguides. The material is focused on applying optical methods and procedures for evaluation of transparent, reflecting, scattering, absorbing, and aggregat...

  13. Remotely operable compact instruments for measuring atmospheric CO2 and CH4 column densities at surface monitoring sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Morino

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Remotely operable compact instruments for measuring atmospheric CO2 and CH4 column densities were developed in two independent systems: one utilizing a grating-based desktop optical spectrum analyzer (OSA with a resolution enough to resolve rotational lines of CO2 and CH4 in the regions of 1565–1585 and 1674–1682 nm, respectively; the other is an application of an optical fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer (FFPI to obtain the CO2 column density. Direct sunlight was collimated via a small telescope installed on a portable sun tracker and then transmitted through an optical fiber into the OSA or the FFPI for optical analysis. The near infrared spectra of the OSA were retrieved by a least squares spectral fitting algorithm. The CO2 and CH4 column densities deduced were in excellent agreement with those measured by a Fourier transform spectrometer with high resolution. The rovibronic lines in the wavelength region of 1570–1575 nm were analyzed by the FFPI. The I0 and I values in the Beer-Lambert law equation to obtain CO2 column density were deduced by modulating temperature of the FFPI, which offered column CO2 with the statistical error less than 0.2% for six hours measurement.

  14. A torque-measuring micromotor provides operator independent measurements marking four different density areas in maxillae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Stefano, Danilo Alessio; Arosio, Paolo; Piattelli, Adriano; Perrotti, Vittoria; Iezzi, Giovanna

    2015-02-01

    Bone density at implant placement site is a key factor to obtain the primary stability of the fixture, which, in turn, is a prognostic factor for osseointegration and long-term success of an implant supported rehabilitation. Recently, an implant motor with a bone density measurement probe has been introduced. The aim of the present study was to test the objectiveness of the bone densities registered by the implant motor regardless of the operator performing them. A total of 3704 bone density measurements, performed by means of the implant motor, were registered by 39 operators at different implant sites during routine activity. Bone density measurements were grouped according to their distribution across the jaws. Specifically, four different areas were distinguished: a pre-antral (between teeth from first right maxillary premolar to first left maxillary premolar) and a sub-antral (more distally) zone in the maxilla, and an interforaminal (between and including teeth from first left mandibular premolar to first right mandibular premolar) and a retroforaminal (more distally) zone in the lower one. A statistical comparison was performed to check the inter-operators variability of the collected data. The device produced consistent and operator-independent bone density values at each tooth position, showing a reliable bone-density measurement. The implant motor demonstrated to be a helpful tool to properly plan implant placement and loading irrespective of the operator using it.

  15. Measuring the radial density distribution of light emission around the track of fast ions in nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibach, T.

    1983-01-01

    For analysing the emission and stopping of ionization electrons (σ-electrons) emitted by fast ions passing through a gas, the radial density distribution of the light emission of the (0,0) transition of two optical bands in nitrogen have been measured. The systems selected for the epxeriments are the 2nd positive system (2.PS) at 337.1 nm primarily excited by low-energy electrons of about 20 eV, and the first negative system (1.NS) at 391.4 nm excited by faster electrons and simultaneous ionization. The equipment developed for the experiments records the light emission with a telescope-type optical arrangement including interference filters, allowing high local resolution and dynamics of the measured range. The measurements have been carried out at pressures between 0.133 and 13.3 mbar, using photons of energies ranging from 270 keV to 2.8 MeV, helium 3 beams of 270 keV/u and 500 keV/u, and neon beams of 270 keV/u. Abel's inversion applied to the distance functions allows calculation of the spatial light emission density which is normalized for a gas density of 1 g/cm 3 . The profiles of the two bands indicate that the σ-electron spectrum gets harder in outward direction. Next to the beam the impact density decreases faster with increasing ion energy than the stopping power (increasing interaction range of the σ-electrons). With photon beams, about half of the whole light emission in the 1. NS, and of the ionization, is induced by primary interactions of the ion beam. This proportion decreases at constant energy per nucleon with increasing atomic number of the ions as compared with the σ-electrons. The primary σ-emission gets harder with higher atomic numbers. (orig./HP) [de

  16. Constraining the CMB optical depth through the dispersion measure of cosmological radio transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fialkov, A.; Loeb, A.

    2016-01-01

    The dispersion measure of extragalactic radio transients can be used to measure the column density of free electrons in the intergalactic medium. The same electrons also scatter the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) photons, affecting precision measurements of cosmological parameters. We explore the connection between the dispersion measure of radio transients existing during the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) and the total optical depth for the CMB showing that the existence of such transients would provide a new sensitive probe of the CMB optical depth. As an example, we consider the population of FRBs. Assuming they exist during the EoR, we show that: (i) such sources can probe the reionization history by measuring the optical depth to sub-percent accuracy, and (ii) they can be detected with high significance by an instrument such as the Square Kilometer Array.

  17. Constraining the CMB optical depth through the dispersion measure of cosmological radio transients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fialkov, A.; Loeb, A., E-mail: anastasia.fialkov@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: aloeb@cfa.harvard.edu [Institute for Teory and Computation, Harvard University, 60 Garden Street, MS-51, Cambridge, MA, 02138 (United States)

    2016-05-01

    The dispersion measure of extragalactic radio transients can be used to measure the column density of free electrons in the intergalactic medium. The same electrons also scatter the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) photons, affecting precision measurements of cosmological parameters. We explore the connection between the dispersion measure of radio transients existing during the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) and the total optical depth for the CMB showing that the existence of such transients would provide a new sensitive probe of the CMB optical depth. As an example, we consider the population of FRBs. Assuming they exist during the EoR, we show that: (i) such sources can probe the reionization history by measuring the optical depth to sub-percent accuracy, and (ii) they can be detected with high significance by an instrument such as the Square Kilometer Array.

  18. Interrelationships between maternal carotenoid status and newborn infant macular pigment optical density and carotenoid status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Bradley S; Chan, Gary; Hoffman, Robert O; Sharifzadeh, Mohsen; Ermakov, Igor V; Gellermann, Werner; Bernstein, Paul S

    2013-08-15

    Deposition of the macular pigment carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin in the human retina occurs early in life. In this study, we examined the interrelationships of maternal carotenoid status and newborn infant macular pigment levels and systemic carotenoid status. As a secondary measure, we also evaluated the effects of intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) on carotenoid status in term newborn infants. We measured mother and infant skin carotenoids using resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS), serum carotenoids by HPLC, and mother breast milk carotenoids by HPLC. We measured infant macular pigment levels using noninvasive blue light reflectometry. We enrolled 30 healthy term infants, their mothers, and 10 IUGR infants and their mothers. A subset of 16 infants was imaged for macular pigment optical density (MPOD). Infant serum zeaxanthin levels correlated with MPOD (r = 0.68, P = 0.007). Mother serum zeaxanthin levels correlated with infant MPOD (r = 0.59, P = 0.032). Infant and mother serum lutein did not correlate with MPOD. Mother-infant correlations were found for total serum carotenoids (r = 0.42, P = 0.020) and skin carotenoids (r = 0.48, P = 0.001). No difference was seen between IUGR infants and controls in total serum or skin carotenoids. Mothers of IUGR infants had lower total serum carotenoids (P = 0.019) and breast milk carotenoids than controls (P = 0.006). Our findings suggest that maternal zeaxanthin status may play a more important role than lutein status in macular pigment deposition in utero. Controlled trials are needed to determine whether maternal zeaxanthin prenatal supplementation can raise infant macular pigment levels and/or improve ocular function.

  19. Macular pigment optical density is positively associated with academic performance among preadolescent children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Sasha M; Khan, Naiman A; Walk, Anne M; Raine, Lauren B; Moulton, Christopher; Cohen, Neal J; Kramer, Arthur F; Hammond, Billy R; Renzi-Hammond, Lisa; Hillman, Charles H

    2017-05-23

    Macular pigment optical density (MPOD) - a non-invasive indicator of retinal xanthophylls and correlate of brain lutein - has been associated with superior cognitive function among adult populations. Given that lutein accumulation in the brain occurs in early life, it is possible that the cognitive implications of greater MPOD may be evident in childhood. Participants aged 8-9 years (n = 56) completed MPOD measurements via heterochromatic flicker photometry. Academic performance was assessed using the Kaufman Test of Academic and Educational Achievement II (KTEA). Habitual dietary intake of L and Z was measured among a subsample of participants (n = 35) using averaged 3-day food records. Stepwise hierarchical regression models were developed to determine the relationship between MPOD and academic achievement tests, following the adjustment of key covariates including sex, aerobic fitness, body composition, and intelligence quotient (IQ). The regression analyses revealed that MPOD improved the model, beyond the covariates, for overall academic achievement (ΔR 2  = 0.10, P mathematics (ΔR 2  = 0.07, P = 0.02), and written language composite standard scores (ΔR 2  = 0.15, P < 0.01). This is the first study to demonstrate that retinal L and Z, measured as MPOD, is positively related to academic achievement in children, even after accounting for the robust effects of IQ and other demographic factors. These findings extend the positive associations observed between MPOD and cognitive abilities to a pediatric population. Trail registration: The Fitness Improves Thinking in Kids 2 (FITKids2) trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01619826.

  20. Optical Absorption in Molecular Crystals from Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-23

    Our approach represents a full solid-state calculation, allowing for polarization ef- fects while still capable of capturing inter-molecular dis...AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2017-0030 Optical absorption in molecular crystals from time-dependent density functional theory Leeor Kronik WEIZMANN INSTITUTE OF...from time-dependent density functional theory 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA9550-15-1-0290 5c.  PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6. AUTHOR(S

  1. Recent measurements of electron density profiles of plasmas in PLADIS I, a plasma disruption simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, J. III; Sharp, G.; Gahl, J.M. Kuznetsov, V.; Rockett, P.; Hunter, J.

    1995-01-01

    Tokamak disruption simulation experiments are being conducted at the University of New Mexico (UNM) using the PLADIS I plasma gun system. PLADIS I is a high power, high energy coaxial plasma gun configured to produce an intense plasma beam. First wall candidate materials are placed in the beam path to determine their response under disruption relevant energy densities. An optically thick vapor shield plasma has been observed to form above the target surface in PLADIS I. Various diagnostics have been used to determine the characteristics of the incident plasma and the vapor shielding plasma. The cross sectional area of the incident plasma beam is a critical characteristic, as it is used in the calculation of the incident plasma energy density. Recently, a HeNe interferometer in the Mach-Zehnder configuration has been constructed and used to probe the electron density of the incident plasma beam and vapor shield plasma. The object beam of the interferometer is scanned across the plasma beam on successive shots, yielding line integrals of beam density on different chords through the plasma. Data from the interferometer is used to determine the electron density profile of the incident plasma beam as a function of beam radius. This data is then used to calculate the effective beam area. Estimates. of beam area, obtained from other diagnostics such as damage targets, calorimeter arrays and off-axis measurements of surface pressure, will be compared with data from the interferometer to obtain a better estimate of the beam cross sectional area

  2. A Fiber-Optic System Generating Pulses of High Spectral Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramov, A. S.; Zolotovskii, I. O.; Korobko, D. A.; Fotiadi, A. A.

    2018-03-01

    A cascade fiber-optic system that generates pulses of high spectral density by using the effect of nonlinear spectral compression is proposed. It is demonstrated that the shape of the pulse envelope substantially influences the degree of compression of its spectrum. In so doing, maximum compression is achieved for parabolic pulses. The cascade system includes an optical fiber exhibiting normal dispersion that decreases along the fiber length, thereby ensuring that the pulse envelope evolves toward a parabolic shape, along with diffraction gratings and a fiber spectral compressor. Based on computer simulation, we determined parameters of cascade elements leading to maximum spectral density of radiation originating from a subpicosecond laser pulse of medium energy.

  3. Density Measurement of Compact Toroid with Mach-Zehnder Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufman-Wollitzer, Lauren; Endrizzi, Doug; Brookhart, Matt; Flanagan, Ken; Forest, Cary

    2016-10-01

    Utilizing a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) built by Tri Alpha Energy, a dense compact toroid (CT) is created and injected at high speed into the Wisconsin Plasma Astrophysics Laboratory (WiPAL) vessel. A modified Mach-Zehnder interferometer from the Line-Tied Reconnection Experiment (LTRX) provides an absolute measurement of electron density. The interferometer is located such that the beam intersects the plasma across the diameter of the MCPG drift region before the CT enters the vessel. This placement ensures that the measurement is taken before the CT expand. Results presented will be used to further analyze characteristics of the CT. Funding provided by DoE, NSF, and WISE Summer Research.

  4. Optical properties of Al nanostructures from time dependent density functional theory

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb

    2016-04-05

    The optical properties of Al nanostructures are investigated by means of time dependent density functional theory, considering chains of varying length and ladders/stripes of varying aspect ratio. The absorption spectra show redshifting for increasing length and aspect ratio. For the chains the absorption is dominated by HOMO → LUMO transitions, whereas ladders and stripes reveal more complex spectra of plasmonic nature above a specific aspect ratio.

  5. Improving the surface metrology accuracy of optical profilers by using multiple measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xudong; Huang, Qiushi; Shen, Zhengxiang; Wang, Zhanshan

    2016-10-01

    The performance of high-resolution optical systems is affected by small angle scattering at the mid-spatial-frequency irregularities of the optical surface. Characterizing these irregularities is, therefore, important. However, surface measurements obtained with optical profilers are influenced by additive white noise, as indicated by the heavy-tail effect observable on their power spectral density (PSD). A multiple-measurement method is used to reduce the effects of white noise by averaging individual measurements. The intensity of white noise is determined using a model based on the theoretical PSD of fractal surface measurements with additive white noise. The intensity of white noise decreases as the number of times of multiple measurements increases. Using multiple measurements also increases the highest observed spatial frequency; this increase is derived and calculated. Additionally, the accuracy obtained using multiple measurements is carefully studied, with the analysis of both the residual reference error after calibration, and the random errors appearing in the range of measured spatial frequencies. The resulting insights on the effects of white noise in optical profiler measurements and the methods to mitigate them may prove invaluable to improve the quality of surface metrology with optical profilers.

  6. Measurements of the initial density distribution of gas puff liners by using Rayleigh scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalinin, Yu G; Shashkov, A Yu [Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    Rayleigh scattering of a laser beam in a gas jet is proposed for the measurements of initial density distribution of gas-puff liners. The scattering method has several advantages when compared with interferometry. In particular, it provides information on the local gas density, it is more sensitive, and the output data can be absolutely calibrated. Theoretical background of the method is briefly discussed in the paper and the optical setup used in real experiments is described. Imaging of the scattering object make it possible to detect detailed profiles of the investigated gas jet, as illustrated by several examples taken from the experiment. In some cases even the gas jet stratification has been observed. (J.U.). 1 tab., 3 figs., 1 ref.

  7. Small Device For Short-Range Antenna Measurements Using Optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yanakiev, Boyan Radkov; Nielsen, Jesper Ødum; Christensen, Morten

    2011-01-01

    This paper gives a practical solution for implementing an antenna radiation pattern measurement device using optical fibers. It is suitable for anechoic chambers as well as short range channel sounding. The device is optimized for small size and provides a cheap and easy way to make optical antenna...

  8. Annual measurements of gain and loss in aboveground carbon density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccini, A.; Walker, W. S.; Carvalho, L.; Farina, M.; Sulla-menashe, D. J.; Houghton, R. A.

    2017-12-01

    Tropical forests hold large stores of carbon, but their net carbon balance is uncertain. Land use and land-cover change (LULCC) are believed to release between 0.81 and 1.14 PgC yr-1, while intact native forests are thought to be a net carbon sink of approximately the same magnitude. Reducing the uncertainty of these estimates is not only fundamental to the advancement of carbon cycle science but is also of increasing relevance to national and international policies designed to reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (e.g., REDD+). Contemporary approaches to estimating the net carbon balance of tropical forests rely on changes in forest area between two periods, typically derived from satellite data, together with information on average biomass density. These approaches tend to capture losses in biomass due to deforestation (i.e., wholesale stand removals) but are limited in their sensitivity to forest degradation (e.g., selective logging or single-tree removals), which can account for additional biomass losses on the order of 47-75% of deforestation. Furthermore, while satellite-based estimates of forest area loss have been used successfully to estimate associated carbon losses, few such analyses have endeavored to determine the rate of carbon sequestration in growing forests. Here we use 12 years (2003-2014) of pantropical satellite data to quantify net annual changes in the aboveground carbon density of woody vegetation (MgC ha-1yr-1), providing direct, measurement-based evidence that the world's tropical forests are a net carbon source of 425.2 ± 92.0 Tg C yr-1. This net release of carbon consists of losses of 861.7 ± 80.2 Tg C yr-1 and gains of -436.5 ± 31.0 Tg C yr-1 . Gains result from forest growth; losses result from reductions in forest area due to deforestation and from reductions in biomass density within standing forests (degradation), with the latter accounting for 68.9% of overall losses. Our findings advance previous research

  9. Comparison of optic area measurement using fundus photography and optical coherence tomography between optic nerve head drusen and control subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Rodríguez, Patricia; Gili, Pablo; Martín-Ríos, María Dolores; Grifol-Clar, Eulalia

    2013-03-01

    To compare optic disc area measurement between optic nerve head drusen (ONHD) and control subjects using fundus photography, time-domain optical coherence tomography (TD-OCT) and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). We also made a comparison between each of the three techniques. We performed our study on 66 eyes (66 patients) with ONHD and 70 healthy control subjects (70 controls) with colour ocular fundus photography at 20º (Zeiss FF 450 IR plus), TD-OCT (Stratus OCT) with the Fast Optic Disc protocol and SD-OCT (Cirrus OCT) with the Optic Disc Cube 200 × 200 protocol for measurement of the optic disc area. The measurements were made by two observers and in each measurement a correction of the image magnification factor was performed. Measurement comparison using the Student's t-test/Mann-Whitney U test, the intraclass correlation coefficient, Pearson/Spearman rank correlation coefficient and the Bland-Altman plot was performed in the statistical analysis. Mean and standard deviation (SD) of the optic disc area in ONHD and in controls was 2.38 (0.54) mm(2) and 2.54 (0.42) mm(2), respectively with fundus photography; 2.01 (0.56) mm(2) and 1.66 (0.37) mm(2), respectively with TD-OCT, and 2.03 (0.49) mm(2) and 1.75 (0.38) mm(2), respectively with SD-OCT. In ONHD and controls, repeatability of optic disc area measurement was excellent with fundus photography and optical coherence tomography (TD-OCT and SD-OCT), but with a low degree of agreement between both techniques. Optic disc area measurement is smaller in ONHD compared to healthy subjects with fundus photography, unlike time-domain and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography in which the reverse is true. Both techniques offer good repeatability, but a low degree of correlation and agreement, which means that optic disc area measurement is not interchangeable or comparable between techniques. Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics © 2013 The College of Optometrists.

  10. Preliminary analysis of the relationship between serum lutein and zeaxanthin levels and macular pigment optical density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujimura S

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Shigeto Fujimura,1,2 Kohei Ueda,1 Yoko Nomura,1 Yasuo Yanagi3,4 1Department of Ophthalmology, University of Tokyo School of Medicine, Tokyo, 2Department of Ophthalmology, Kanazawa University School of Medicine, Ishikawa, Japan; 3Singapore Eye Research Institute, 4Medical Retina Department, Singapore National Eye Centre, Singapore Purpose: To assess the relationship between combined serum lutein and zeaxanthin (L+Z concentration and macular pigment optical density (MPOD, and to investigate the effect of L+Z+docosahexaenoic acid (DHA dietary supplementation on the spatial distribution of MPOD.Methods: Twenty healthy fellow eyes with unilateral wet age-related macular degeneration or chronic central serous chorioretinopathy were included. All participants received a dietary supplement for 6 months that contained 20 mg L, 1 mg Z, and 200 mg DHA. The best-corrected visual acuity and contrast sensitivity (CS were measured at baseline and at 1, 3, and 6 months. Serum L+Z concentrations were measured at baseline and at 3 months. MPOD was calculated at each time point using fundus autofluorescent images.Results: Serum L+Z concentration was correlated with MPOD at 1°–2° eccentricity at baseline (r=0.63, P=0.003 and 3 months (r=0.53, P=0.015. Serum L+Z concentration increased by a factor of 2.3±1.0 (P<0.0001. At 6 months, MPOD was significantly higher compared to the baseline level at 0°–0.25° (P=0.034 and 0.25°–0.5° (P=0.032 eccentricity. CS improved after 3 or 6 months of L+Z+DHA supplementation (P<0.05.Conclusion: Juxtafoveal MPOD was associated with serum L+Z concentration. Foveal MPOD was increased by L+Z+DHA dietary supplementation. Keywords: fundus autofluorescence, supplement, spatial distribution

  11. Optical forces, torques, and force densities calculated at a microscopic level using a self-consistent hydrodynamics method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Kun; Chan, C. T.

    2018-04-01

    The calculation of optical force density distribution inside a material is challenging at the nanoscale, where quantum and nonlocal effects emerge and macroscopic parameters such as permittivity become ill-defined. We demonstrate that the microscopic optical force density of nanoplasmonic systems can be defined and calculated using the microscopic fields generated using a self-consistent hydrodynamics model that includes quantum, nonlocal, and retardation effects. We demonstrate this technique by calculating the microscopic optical force density distributions and the optical binding force induced by external light on nanoplasmonic dimers. This approach works even in the limit when the nanoparticles are close enough to each other so that electron tunneling occurs, a regime in which classical electromagnetic approach fails completely. We discover that an uneven distribution of optical force density can lead to a light-induced spinning torque acting on individual particles. The hydrodynamics method offers us an accurate and efficient approach to study optomechanical behavior for plasmonic systems at the nanoscale.

  12. CT Measured Psoas Density Predicts Outcomes After Enterocutaneous Fistula Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Wilson D.; Evans, David C.; Yoo, Taehwan

    2018-01-01

    Background Low muscle mass and quality are associated with poor surgical outcomes. We evaluated CT measured psoas muscle density as a marker of muscle quality and physiologic reserve, and hypothesized that it would predict outcomes after enterocutaneous fistula repair (ECF). Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients 18 – 90 years old with ECF failing non-operative management requiring elective operative repair at Ohio State University from 2005 – 2016 that received a pre-operative abdomen/pelvis CT with intravenous contrast within 3 months of their operation. Psoas Hounsfield Unit average calculation (HUAC) were measured at the L3 level. 1 year leak rate, 90 day, 1 year, and 3 year mortality, complication risk, length of stay, dependent discharge, and 30 day readmission were compared to HUAC. Results 100 patients met inclusion criteria. Patients were stratified into interquartile (IQR) ranges based on HUAC. The lowest HUAC IQR was our low muscle quality (LMQ) cutoff, and was associated with 1 year leak (OR 3.50, p < 0.01), 1 year (OR 2.95, p < 0.04) and 3 year mortality (OR 3.76, p < 0.01), complication risk (OR 14.61, p < 0.01), and dependent discharge (OR 4.07, p < 0.01) compared to non-LMQ patients. Conclusions Psoas muscle density is a significant predictor of poor outcomes in ECF repair. This readily available measure of physiologic reserve can identify patients with ECF on pre-operative evaluation that have significantly increased risk that may benefit from additional interventions and recovery time to mitigate risk before operative repair. PMID:29505144

  13. Constraining variable density of ice shelves using wide-angle radar measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drews, Reinhard; Brown, Joel; Matsuoka, Kenichi; Witrant, Emmanuel; Philippe, Morgane; Hubbard, Bryn; Pattyn, Frank

    2016-04-01

    The thickness of ice shelves, a basic parameter for mass balance estimates, is typically inferred using hydrostatic equilibrium, for which knowledge of the depth-averaged density is essential. The densification from snow to ice depends on a number of local factors (e.g., temperature and surface mass balance) causing spatial and temporal variations in density-depth profiles. However, direct measurements of firn density are sparse, requiring substantial logistical effort. Here, we infer density from radio-wave propagation speed using ground-based wide-angle radar data sets (10 MHz) collected at five sites on Roi Baudouin Ice Shelf (RBIS), Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica. We reconstruct depth to internal reflectors, local ice thickness, and firn-air content using a novel algorithm that includes traveltime inversion and ray tracing with a prescribed shape of the depth-density relationship. For the particular case of an ice-shelf channel, where ice thickness and surface slope change substantially over a few kilometers, the radar data suggest that firn inside the channel is about 5 % denser than outside the channel. Although this density difference is at the detection limit of the radar, it is consistent with a similar density anomaly reconstructed from optical televiewing, which reveals that the firn inside the channel is 4.7 % denser than that outside the channel. Hydrostatic ice thickness calculations used for determining basal melt rates should account for the denser firn in ice-shelf channels. The radar method presented here is robust and can easily be adapted to different radar frequencies and data-acquisition geometries.

  14. Improvements for Optics Measurement and Corrections software

    CERN Document Server

    Bach, T

    2013-01-01

    This note presents the improvements for the OMC software during a 14 month technical student internship at CERN. The goal of the work was to improve existing software in terms of maintainability, features and performance. Significant improvements in stability, speed and overall development process were reached. The main software, a Java GUI at the LHC CCC, run for months without noteworthy problems. The overall running time of the software chain used for optics corrections was reduced from nearly half an hour to around two minutes. This was the result of analysing and improving several involved programs and algorithms.

  15. The influence of underwater turbulence on optical phase measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redding, Brandon; Davis, Allen; Kirkendall, Clay; Dandridge, Anthony

    2016-05-01

    Emerging underwater optical imaging and sensing applications rely on phase-sensitive detection to provide added functionality and improved sensitivity. However, underwater turbulence introduces spatio-temporal variations in the refractive index of water which can degrade the performance of these systems. Although the influence of turbulence on traditional, non-interferometric imaging has been investigated, its influence on the optical phase remains poorly understood. Nonetheless, a thorough understanding of the spatio-temporal dynamics of the optical phase of light passing through underwater turbulence are crucial to the design of phase-sensitive imaging and sensing systems. To address this concern, we combined underwater imaging with high speed holography to provide a calibrated characterization of the effects of turbulence on the optical phase. By measuring the modulation transfer function of an underwater imaging system, we were able to calibrate varying levels of optical turbulence intensity using the Simple Underwater Imaging Model (SUIM). We then used high speed holography to measure the temporal dynamics of the optical phase of light passing through varying levels of turbulence. Using this method, we measured the variance in the amplitude and phase of the beam, the temporal correlation of the optical phase, and recorded the turbulence induced phase noise as a function of frequency. By bench marking the effects of varying levels of turbulence on the optical phase, this work provides a basis to evaluate the real-world potential of emerging underwater interferometric sensing modalities.

  16. Development of nonintrusive, scatter-independent techniques for measurement of liquid density inside dense sprays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartfield, Roy

    1994-01-01

    A nonintrusive optical technique for measuring the liquid density in sprays used to simulate LOX injector flows is under development. This manuscript is a report on work toward that development which is currently in progress. The technique is a scatter-independent, absorption-based approach which depends on the numerical inversion of a collection of absorption profiles. For the case in which visible radiation passes through liquid-gas interfaces so numerous in sprays, substantial reductions and alterations in the signal result from scattering even in the absence of absorption. To avoid these problems, X-Rays will be used as the absorbed radiation. The experimental process is simulated by integrating the absorption spectrum for a known distribution, adding instrument noise to this 'measurement', creating a projection from the 'measurement', filtering the projection, inverting the projection, and comparing the results with the original prescribed distribution.

  17. Optical-fiber interferometer for velocity measurements with picosecond resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weng Jidong; Tan Hua; Wang Xiang; Ma Yun; Hu Shaolou; Wang Xiaosong

    2006-01-01

    The conventional Doppler laser-interference velocimeters are made up of traditional optical elements such as lenses and mirrors and will generally restrict its applications in multipoint velocity measurements. By transfering the light from multimode optical fiber to single-mode optical fiber and using the currently available conventional telecommunications elements, the authors have constructed a velocimeter called all-fiber displacement interferometer system for any reflector. The unique interferometer system is only made up of fibers or fiber-coupled components. The viability of this technique is demonstrated by measuring the velocity of an interface moving at velocity of 2133 m/s with 50 ps time resolution. In addition, the concept of optical-fiber mode conversion would provide a way to develop various optical-fiber sensors

  18. The impact of mammographic imaging systems on density measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damases, Christine N.; Brennan, Patrick C.; McEntee, Mark F.

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether having a mammogram on differing manufacturer equipment will affect a woman's breast density (BD) measurement. The data set comprised of 40 cases, each containing a combined image of the left craniocaudal (LCC) and left mediolateral oblique (LMLO). These images were obtained from 20 women age between 42-89 years. The images were acquired on two imaging systems (GE and Hologic) one year apart. Volumetric BD was assessed by using Volpara Density Grade (VDG) and average BD% (AvBD%). Twenty American Board of Radiology (ABR) examiners assessed the same images using the BIRADS BD scale 1-4. Statistical comparisons were performed on the means using Mann-Whitney, on correlation using Spearman's rank coefficient of correlation and agreement using Cohen's Kappa. The absolute median BIRADS difference between GE and Hologic was 0.225 (2.00 versus 2.00; pperfect agreement for VDG (κ=0.933; p<0.001).

  19. Axial length and cone density as assessed with adaptive optics in myopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriya Dabir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the variations in cone mosaic in myopia and its correlation with axial length (AL. Subjects and Methods: Twenty-five healthy myopic volunteers underwent assessment of photoreceptors using adaptive optics retinal camera at 2° and 3° from the foveal center in four quadrants superior, inferior, temporal and nasal. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 17 (IBM. Multivariable regression analysis was conducted to study the relation between cone density and AL, quadrant around the fovea and eccentricity from the fovea. Results: The mean cone density was significantly lower as the eccentricity increased from 2° from the fovea to 3° (18,560 ± 5455-16,404 ± 4494/mm 2 respectively. There was also a statistically significant difference between four quadrants around the fovea. The correlation of cone density and spacing with AL showed that there was a significant inverse relation of AL with the cone density. Conclusion: In myopic patients with good visual acuity cone density around the fovea depends on the quadrant, distance from the fovea as well as the AL. The strength of the relation of AL with cone density depends on the quadrant and distance.

  20. Measurement of inherent optical properties in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Suresh, T.; Desa, E.; Kurian, J.; Mascarenhas, A.A.M.Q.

    Inherent optical properties, absorption and began attenuation were measured in situ using a reflective tube absorption meter at nint wavelength, 412, 440, 488, 510, 555, 630, 650, 676 and 715 nm, in the Arabian Sea during March. Since inherent...

  1. Optical System for Atmospheric Particle Measurement, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To measure the broad size range of 0.1 micron to 200 micron, we propose an optical instrument that combines two techniques: Forward scattering light intensity (FSLI)...

  2. Brain function measurement using optical topography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Hideaki; Maki, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Kawaguchi, Hideo

    2003-01-01

    Optical topography is a completely non-invasive method to image the high brain function with the near infrared spectroscopy, does not need the restriction of human behavior for imaging and thereby is applicable even for infants. The principle is based on irradiation of the near infrared laser beam with the optical-fiber onto the head surface and detection with the fiber of the reflection, of which spectroscopy for blood-borne hemoglobin gives the local cerebral homodynamics related with the nerve activity. The infrared laser beam of 1-10 mW is found safe on direct irradiation to the human body. The topography is applicable in the fields of clinical medicine like internal neurology (an actual image of the activated Broca's and Welnicke's areas at writing is presented), neurosurgery, psychiatry and pedriatric neurology, of developmental cognitive neuroscience, of educational science and of communication. ''MIT Technology Reviews'' mentions that this technique is one of 4 recent promising innovative techniques in the world. (N.I.)

  3. Bone mineral density measurement over the shoulder region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doetsch, A M; Faber, J; Lynnerup, N

    2002-01-01

    values decreased with age (P shoulder BMD levels increased significantly with increased body mass index (BMI) (P positive relationship between the increased hip/shoulder BMD differential with BMI supports the conclusion that the shoulder is subject......The purpose of this study was to (1). establish a method for measuring bone mineral density (BMD) over the shoulder region; (2). compare the relationship between shoulder BMD levels with hip BMD and body mass index (BMI); and (3). discuss the relevance of the shoulder scan as an early indicator...... of osteoporosis compared with hip scans, the latter representing a weight-bearing part of the skeleton. We developed a scanning procedure, including a shoulder fixation device, and determined the most appropriate software in order to establish a reference material with the highest possible precision. Duplicate...

  4. Fiber optic pressure sensors in skin-friction measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuomo, F. W.

    1986-01-01

    A fiber optic lever sensing technique that can be used to measure normal pressure as well as shear stresses is discussed. This method uses three unequal fibers combining small size and good sensitivity. Static measurements appear to confirm the theoretical models predicted by geometrical optics and dynamic tests performed at frequencies up to 10 kHz indicate a flat response within this frequency range. These sensors are intended for use in a low speed wind tunnel environment.

  5. A Fast and Robust Method for Measuring Optical Channel Gain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harbo, Anders La-Cour; Stoustrup, Jakob; Villemoes, L.F.

    2000-01-01

    We present a numerically stable and computational simple method for fast and robust measurement of optical channel gain. By transmitting adaptively designed signals through the channel, good accuracy is possible even in severe noise conditions......We present a numerically stable and computational simple method for fast and robust measurement of optical channel gain. By transmitting adaptively designed signals through the channel, good accuracy is possible even in severe noise conditions...

  6. Single-shot optical conductivity measurement of dense aluminum plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churina, I. V.; Cho, B.-I.; Bernstein, A.; Stoker, D. S.; Dalton, A.; Symes, D. R.; Ditmire, T.

    2009-01-01

    The optical conductivity of a dense femtosecond laser-heated aluminum plasma heated to 0.1-1.5 eV was measured using frequency-domain interferometry with chirped pulses, permitting simultaneous observation of optical probe reflectivity and probe pulse phase shift. Coupled with published models of bound-electron contributions to the conductivity, these two independent experimental data yielded a direct measurement of both real and imaginary components of the plasma conductivity.

  7. Photoinduced electro-optics measurements of biosilica transformation to cristobalite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchs, Ido [Department of Chemistry and the Institute of Nanotechnology, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900 (Israel); Aluma, Yaniv; Ilan, Micha [Department of Zoology, George S. Wise Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 6997801 (Israel); Kityk, Iwan [Institute of Electronic Systems, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Czestochowa University, Czestochowa 42-201 (Poland); Mastai, Yitzhak, E-mail: Yitzhak.Mastai@biu.ac.il [Department of Chemistry and the Institute of Nanotechnology, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900 (Israel)

    2015-03-15

    In this paper we studied the photoinduced electro optics effects in the thermal transformation process of biosilica to cristobalite, at a relatively low temperature and ambient pressure. This process was characterized by a variety of standards techniques with emphasis on linear electro optic effect measurements. Overall we demonstrated that photoinduced electro optics measurements are very sensitive to the transformation from amorphous structure of silica in the natural sponge samples to laminar string morphology of cristobalite. With this technique we could probe the change in the samples chirality from achiral bio silica to chiral cristobalite structure. Furthermore it is shown that natural biosilica have photoinduced linear electro optics respond indicating the chiral natural of biosilica. - Graphical abstract: The phase transformation of biosilica from marine sponges to Cristobalite under thermal treatment was investigated using photoinduced electro optics measurements. The figure shows the changes of the electro-optic coefficient of cristobalite and biosilica. - Highlights: • We examine phase transformation of biosilica. • We report transition from amorphous biosilica to crystalline Cristobalite. • Biosilica transformation to Cristobalite at temperature of 850 °C. • Biosilica transformation is studied with photoinduced measurements. • We examine changes in the photoinduced linear electro optics properties.

  8. Photoinduced electro-optics measurements of biosilica transformation to cristobalite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, Ido; Aluma, Yaniv; Ilan, Micha; Kityk, Iwan; Mastai, Yitzhak

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we studied the photoinduced electro optics effects in the thermal transformation process of biosilica to cristobalite, at a relatively low temperature and ambient pressure. This process was characterized by a variety of standards techniques with emphasis on linear electro optic effect measurements. Overall we demonstrated that photoinduced electro optics measurements are very sensitive to the transformation from amorphous structure of silica in the natural sponge samples to laminar string morphology of cristobalite. With this technique we could probe the change in the samples chirality from achiral bio silica to chiral cristobalite structure. Furthermore it is shown that natural biosilica have photoinduced linear electro optics respond indicating the chiral natural of biosilica. - Graphical abstract: The phase transformation of biosilica from marine sponges to Cristobalite under thermal treatment was investigated using photoinduced electro optics measurements. The figure shows the changes of the electro-optic coefficient of cristobalite and biosilica. - Highlights: • We examine phase transformation of biosilica. • We report transition from amorphous biosilica to crystalline Cristobalite. • Biosilica transformation to Cristobalite at temperature of 850 °C. • Biosilica transformation is studied with photoinduced measurements. • We examine changes in the photoinduced linear electro optics properties

  9. Acridine orange as an alternative to optical density to study growth kinetics of Lactobacillus bulgaricus ATCC 7517.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Dolar; Koo, Ok Kyung; Story, Robert S; O'Bryan, Corliss A; Crandall, Philip G; Lee, Sun-Ok; Ricke, Steven C

    2013-01-01

    In this study we assessed the use of acridine orange as an alternative to optical density to quantify the growth of Lactobacillus bulgaricus ATCC 7517. The growth of bacteria in Lactobacillus de Man Rogosa Sharpe (MRS) medium was measured by both acridine orange (AO) and optical density (OD) measurements for 24 h. The relationship between both methods was compared via correlation analysis. The doubling time of bacteria based on the values of OD600 and AO obtained during 24 h growth were also calculated. The result shows strong correlation of cell growth between OD600 and AO during the first 10 hours of growth, but the correlation was less strong when analyzing the data from 0 to 24 hours. Growth rates, generation time and lag time were also similar. This study indicates that AO could be used in place of OD to prepare growth curves of Lactobacillus bulgaricus during the exponential phase of growth, and to compare growth rates, generation times or lag times.

  10. Fiber-optic evanescent-field sensor for attitude measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Chen, Shimeng; Liu, Zigeng; Guang, Jianye; Peng, Wei

    2017-11-01

    We proposed a new approach to attitude measurement by an evanescent field-based optical fiber sensing device and demonstrated a liquid pendulum. The device consisted of three fiber-optic evanescent-filed sensors which were fabricated by tapered single mode fibers and immersed in liquid. Three fiber Bragg gratings were used to measure the changes in evanescent field. And their reflection peaks were monitored in real time as measurement signals. Because every set of reflection responses corresponded to a unique attitude, the attitude of the device could be measured by the three fiber-optic evanescent-filed sensors. After theoretical analysis, computerized simulation and experimental verification, regular responses were obtained using this device for attitude measurement. The measurement ranges of dihedral angle and direction angle were 0°-50° and 0°-360°. The device is based on cost-effective power-referenced scheme. It can be used in electromagnetic or nuclear radiation environment.

  11. Beam profile measurements on the advanced test accelerator using optical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chong, Y.P.; Kalibjian, R.; Cornish, J.P.; Kallman, J.S.; Donnelly, D.

    1986-01-01

    Beam current density profiles of ATA have been measured both spatially and temporally using a number of diagnostics. An extremely important technique involves measuring optical emissions from either a target foil inserted into the beam path or gas atoms and molecules excited by beam electrons. This paper describes the detection of the optical emission. A 2-D gated television camera with a single or dual micro-channel-plate (MCP) detector for high gain provides excellent spatial and temporal resolution. Measurements are routinely made with resolutions of 1 mm and 5 ns respectively. The optical line of sight allows splitting part of the signal to a streak camera or photometer for even higher time resolution

  12. Effect of Clothing on Measurement of Bone Mineral Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Elizabeth A; Feldman, Anna Z; Malabanan, Alan O; Abate, Ejigayehu G; Whittaker, LaTarsha G; Yano-Litwin, Amanda; Dorazio, Jolene; Rosen, Harold N

    2016-01-01

    It is unknown whether allowing patients to have BMD (bone mineral density) studies acquired while wearing radiolucent clothing adlib contributes appreciably to the measurement error seen. To examine this question, a spine phantom was scanned 30 times without any clothing, while draped with a gown, and while draped with heavy winter clothing. The effect on mean BMD and on SD (standard deviation) was assessed. The effect of clothing on mean or SD of the area was not significant. The effect of clothing on mean and SD for BMD was small but significant and was around 1.6% for the mean. However, the effect on BMD precision was much more clinically important. Without clothing the spine phantom had an least significant change of 0.0077 gm/cm(2), while when introducing variability of clothing the least significant change rose as high as 0.0305 gm/cm(2). We conclude that, adding clothing to the spine phantom had a small but statistically significant effect on the mean BMD and on variance of the measurement. It is unlikely that the effect on mean BMD has any clinical significance, but the effect on the reproducibility (precision) of the result is likely clinically significant. Copyright © 2016 The International Society for Clinical Densitometry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. MIMO channel measurements using optical links on small mobile terminals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yanakiev, Boyan; Nielsen, Jesper Ødum; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    2010-01-01

    This paper looks at a novel measurement device for propagation channel measurements using a fiber optic link. Although the idea of using optical links is not new, most of the developments in the area are either too big [5], short range [6] or suitable for anechoic chamber only [7]. The device...... presented here is specifically designed to fit in a very small volume and is optimized for low power consumption (runs on small battery), thus imitating the phone electronics. It can be used for anechoic chamber measurements, however it is designed for long range channel sounding measurements....

  14. A far-infrared Michelson interferometer for tokamak electron density measurements using computer-generated reference fringes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krug, P.A.; Stimson, P.A.; Falconer, I.S.

    1986-01-01

    A simple far-infrared interferometer which uses the 394 μm laser line from optically-pumped formic acid vapour to measure tokamak electron density is described. This interferometer is unusual in requiring only one detector and a single probing beam since reference fringes during the plasma shot are obtained by computer interpolation between the fringes observed immediately before and after the shot. Electron density has been measured with a phase resolution corresponding to + - 1/20 wavelength fringe shift, which is equivalent to a central density resolution of + - 0.1 x 10 19 m -3 for an assumed parabolic density distribution in a plasma of diameter of 0.2 m, and with a time resolution of 0.2 ms. (author)

  15. Electro-Optical Method for polarimetric measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda Diaz, L. J.

    2011-01-01

    When passing a pulsing beam of polarized light of an LED or a semiconductor laser thru an optical system and two photodiodes spatially arranged at 900 to each other and both with their detection faces parallel to the transmission shaft of light, and polarization axis oriented at 450 of the vertices of the edges where the photodiodes join, in the outputs of two operational amplifiers, we have two signals with the same shape in time, i.e. a pulse train with the same phase, but when you turn the polarization plane, change the radiance of the light projected onto the photodiodes, being out of phase signals to the outputs of the amplifiers, where the difference between the fronts of the pulses is proportional to the angle of rotation of the plane of polarization of light. In a digital circuit phase discriminator, a pulse is obtained equal to the time difference between two sides of the rise in the output of two amplifiers. The width of this is directly proportional to the value of rotation the plane of polarization of light, that is, the greater the rotation, the greater the width of this pulse. (Author)

  16. Highly Sensitive Measurement of Liquid Density in Air Using Suspended Microcapillary Resonators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Malvar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We report the use of commercially available glass microcapillaries as micromechanical resonators for real-time monitoring of the mass density of a liquid that flows through the capillary. The vibration of a suspended region of the microcapillary is optically detected by measuring the forward scattering of a laser beam. The resonance frequency of the liquid filled microcapillary is measured for liquid binary mixtures of ethanol in water, glycerol in water and Triton in ethanol. The method achieves a detection limit in an air environment of 50 µg/mL that is only five times higher than that obtained with state-of-the-art suspended microchannel resonators encapsulated in vacuum. The method opens the door to novel advances for miniaturized total analysis systems based on microcapillaries with the add-on of mechanical transduction for sensing the rheological properties of the analyzed fluids without the need for vacuum encapsulation of the resonators.

  17. Stress measurement in thin films by geometrical optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossnagel, S. M.; Gilstrap, P.; Rujkorakarn, R.

    1982-01-01

    A variation of Newton's rings experiment is proposed for measuring film stress. The procedure described, the geometrical optics method, is used to measure radii of curvature for a series of film depositions with Ta, Al, and Mo films. The method has a sensitivity of 1 x 10 to the 9th dyn/sq cm, corresponding to the practical radius limit of about 50 m, and a repeatability usually within five percent. For the purposes of comparison, radii are also measured by Newton's rings method and the Talysurf method; all results are found to be in general agreement. Measurement times are also compared: the geometrical optics method requires only 1/2-1 minute. It is concluded that the geometrical optics method provides an inexpensive, fast, and a reasonably correct technique with which to measure stresses in film.

  18. Measuring optical properties of a blood vessel model using optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitz, David; Hinds, Monica T.; Tran, Noi; Vartanian, Keri; Hanson, Stephen R.; Jacques, Steven L.

    2006-02-01

    In this paper we develop the concept of a tissue-engineered optical phantom that uses engineered tissue as a phantom for calibration and optimization of biomedical optics instrumentation. With this method, the effects of biological processes on measured signals can be studied in a well controlled manner. To demonstrate this concept, we attempted to investigate how the cellular remodeling of a collagen matrix affected the optical properties extracted from optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of the samples. Tissue-engineered optical phantoms of the vascular system were created by seeding smooth muscle cells in a collagen matrix. Four different optical properties were evaluated by fitting the OCT signal to 2 different models: the sample reflectivity ρ and attenuation parameter μ were extracted from the single scattering model, and the scattering coefficient μ s and root-mean-square scattering angle θ rms were extracted from the extended Huygens-Fresnel model. We found that while contraction of the smooth muscle cells was clearly evident macroscopically, on the microscopic scale very few cells were actually embedded in the collagen. Consequently, no significant difference between the cellular and acellular samples in either set of measured optical properties was observed. We believe that further optimization of our tissue-engineering methods is needed in order to make the histology and biochemistry of the cellular samples sufficiently different from the acellular samples on the microscopic level. Once these methods are optimized, we can better verify whether the optical properties of the cellular and acellular collagen samples differ.

  19. Optical measuring system with an interrogator and a polymer-based single-mode fibre optic sensor system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    The present invention relates to an optical measuring system comprising a polymer-based single-mode fibre-optic sensor system (102), an optical interrogator (101), and an optical arrangement (103) interconnecting the optical interrogator (101) and the polymer-based single-mode fibre-optic sensor...... system (102). The invention further relates to an optical interrogator adapted to be connected to a polymer-based single-mode fibre-optic sensor system via an optical arrangement. The interrogator comprises a broadband light source arrangement (104) and a spectrum analysing arrangement which receives...

  20. Optical rotation calculated with time-dependent density functional theory: the OR45 benchmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srebro, Monika; Govind, Niranjan; de Jong, Wibe A; Autschbach, Jochen

    2011-10-13

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) computations are performed for 42 organic molecules and three transition metal complexes, with experimental molar optical rotations ranging from 2 to 2 × 10(4) deg cm(2) dmol(-1). The performances of the global hybrid functionals B3LYP, PBE0, and BHLYP, and of the range-separated functionals CAM-B3LYP and LC-PBE0 (the latter being fully long-range corrected), are investigated. The performance of different basis sets is studied. When compared to liquid-phase experimental data, the range-separated functionals do, on average, not perform better than B3LYP and PBE0. Median relative deviations between calculations and experiment range from 25 to 29%. A basis set recently proposed for optical rotation calculations (LPol-ds) on average does not give improved results compared to aug-cc-pVDZ in TDDFT calculations with B3LYP. Individual cases are discussed in some detail, among them norbornenone for which the LC-PBE0 functional produced an optical rotation that is close to available data from coupled-cluster calculations, but significantly smaller in magnitude than the liquid-phase experimental value. Range-separated functionals and BHLYP perform well for helicenes and helicene derivatives. Metal complexes pose a challenge to first-principles calculations of optical rotation.

  1. Measurement methods to build up the digital optical twin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochnau, Marcel; Holzbrink, Michael; Wang, Wenxin; Holters, Martin; Stollenwerk, Jochen; Loosen, Peter

    2018-02-01

    The realization of the Digital Optical Twin (DOT), which is in short the digital representation of the physical state of an optical system, is particularly useful in the context of an automated assembly process of optical systems. During the assembly process, the physical system status of the optical system is continuously measured and compared with the digital model. In case of deviations between physical state and the digital model, the latter one is adapted to match the physical state. To reach the goal described above, in a first step measurement/characterization technologies concerning their suitability to generate a precise digital twin of an existing optical system have to be identified and evaluated. This paper gives an overview of possible characterization methods and, finally, shows first results of evaluated, compared methods (e.g. spot-radius, MTF, Zernike-polynomials), to create a DOT. The focus initially lies on the unequivocalness of the optimization results as well as on the computational time required for the optimization to reach the characterized system state. Possible sources of error are the measurement accuracy (to characterize the system) , execution time of the measurement, time needed to map the digital to the physical world (optimization step) as well as interface possibilities to integrate the measurement tool into an assembly cell. Moreover, it is to be discussed whether the used measurement methods are suitable for a `seamless' integration into an assembly cell.

  2. Hybrid Optical Unobtrusive Blood Pressure Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangfei Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Blood pressure (BP is critical in diagnosing certain cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension. Some previous studies have proved that BP can be estimated by pulse transit time (PTT calculated by a pair of photoplethysmography (PPG signals at two body sites. Currently, contact PPG (cPPG and imaging PPG (iPPG are two feasible ways to obtain PPG signals. In this study, we proposed a hybrid system (called the ICPPG system employing both methods that can be implemented on a wearable device, facilitating the measurement of BP in an inconspicuous way. The feasibility of the ICPPG system was validated on a dataset with 29 subjects. It has been proved that the ICPPG system is able to estimate PTT values. Moreover, the PTT measured by the new system shows a correlation on average with BP variations for most subjects, which could facilitate a new generation of BP measurement using wearable and mobile devices.

  3. Measurement of Optical Feshbach Resonances in an Ideal Gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blatt, S.; Nicholson, T. L.; Bloom, B. J.; Williams, J. R.; Thomsen, J. W.; Ye, J.; Julienne, P. S.

    2011-01-01

    Using a narrow intercombination line in alkaline earth atoms to mitigate large inelastic losses, we explore the optical Feshbach resonance effect in an ultracold gas of bosonic 88 Sr. A systematic measurement of three resonances allows precise determinations of the optical Feshbach resonance strength and scaling law, in agreement with coupled-channel theory. Resonant enhancement of the complex scattering length leads to thermalization mediated by elastic and inelastic collisions in an otherwise ideal gas. Optical Feshbach resonance could be used to control atomic interactions with high spatial and temporal resolution.

  4. Measurement of optical Feshbach resonances in an ideal gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatt, S; Nicholson, T L; Bloom, B J; Williams, J R; Thomsen, J W; Julienne, P S; Ye, J

    2011-08-12

    Using a narrow intercombination line in alkaline earth atoms to mitigate large inelastic losses, we explore the optical Feshbach resonance effect in an ultracold gas of bosonic (88)Sr. A systematic measurement of three resonances allows precise determinations of the optical Feshbach resonance strength and scaling law, in agreement with coupled-channel theory. Resonant enhancement of the complex scattering length leads to thermalization mediated by elastic and inelastic collisions in an otherwise ideal gas. Optical Feshbach resonance could be used to control atomic interactions with high spatial and temporal resolution.

  5. CO{sub 2} laser diagnostics for measurements of the plasma density profile and plasma density fluctuations on LHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vyacheslavov, L.N. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Tanaka, K.; Kawahata, K. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2001-04-01

    A CO{sub 2} laser based diagnostics complimentary to the existing FIR interferometer is proposed. It combines interferometry for plasma density profile measurement under conditions of large density gradients, and both imaging and scattering techniques for observation of plasma fluctuations. Two-colour interferometer with a slablike probe beam and a single multichannel linear detector array provide observation of plasma density profile and density fluctuations at two locations along the probe beam. Basic characteristics of the diagnostics are considered as well as some effects that include dispersion and are critical for two colour imaging technique. The results of the bench-top experiments with the prototype of the interferometer are presented. (author)

  6. CO2 laser diagnostics for measurements of the plasma density profile and plasma density fluctuations on LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyacheslavov, L.N.; Tanaka, K.; Kawahata, K.

    2001-04-01

    A CO 2 laser based diagnostics complimentary to the existing FIR interferometer is proposed. It combines interferometry for plasma density profile measurement under conditions of large density gradients, and both imaging and scattering techniques for observation of plasma fluctuations. Two-colour interferometer with a slablike probe beam and a single multichannel linear detector array provide observation of plasma density profile and density fluctuations at two locations along the probe beam. Basic characteristics of the diagnostics are considered as well as some effects that include dispersion and are critical for two colour imaging technique. The results of the bench-top experiments with the prototype of the interferometer are presented. (author)

  7. Effect of Current Density on Thermal and Optical Properties of p-Type Porous Silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasra Behzad; Wan Mahmood Mat Yunus; Zainal Abidin Talib; Azmi Zakaria; Afarin Bahrami

    2011-01-01

    The different parameters of the porous silicon (PSi) can be tuned by changing some parameters in preparation process. We have chosen the anodization as formation method, so the related parameters should be changed. In this study the porous silicon (PSi) layers were formed on p-type Si wafer. The samples were anodized electrically in a fixed etching time under some different current densities. The structural and optical properties of porous silicon (PSi) on silicon (Si) substrates were investigated using photoluminescence (PL) and Photoacoustic Spectroscopy (PAS). (author)

  8. Extrinsic fiber-optic Fabry-Perot interferometer sensor for refractive index measurement of optical glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jihuan; Zhao Jiarong; Huang Xuguang; Huang Zhenjian

    2010-01-01

    A simple fiber-optic sensor based on Fabry-Perot interference for refractive index measurement of optical glass is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. A broadband light source is coupled into an extrinsic fiber Fabry-Perot cavity formed by the surfaces of a sensing fiber end and the measured sample. The interference signals from the cavity are reflected back into the same fiber. The refractive index of the sample can be obtained by measuring the contrast of the interference fringes. The experimental data meet with the theoretical values very well. The proposed technique is a new method for glass refractive index measurement with a simple, solid, and compact structure.

  9. Optical measurement of surface roughness in manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodmann, R.

    1984-11-01

    The measuring system described here is based on the light-scattering method, and was developed by Optische Werke G. Rodenstock, Munich. It is especially useful for rapid non-contact monitoring of surface roughness in production-related areas. This paper outlines the differences between this system and the common stylus instrument, including descriptions of some applications in industry.

  10. Optical measurement of microroughness of pigment coatings on rough substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elton, N. J.

    2009-02-01

    The optical determination of rms roughness at the sub-wavelength scale by measurement of specular intensity as a function of wavelength or angle of incidence is well known. The method is normally used for specimens that are macroscopically flat. However, important industrial materials such as coated paper and paint consist of microscopically rough pigment coatings on a macroscopically rough substrate. Numerical modelling is used to assess the applicability and limitations of optical measurement of microroughness for such materials. Experimental results are presented for a range of paints on substrates of various macroroughness. Model and data are in fair agreement and show that the presence of substrate macroroughness always leads to an underestimation of microroughness. Generally, optical measurements of microroughness are only comparable for substrates of similar macroroughness and a limiting value exists above which measurements may not be meaningful.

  11. Optical measurement of microroughness of pigment coatings on rough substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elton, N J

    2009-01-01

    The optical determination of rms roughness at the sub-wavelength scale by measurement of specular intensity as a function of wavelength or angle of incidence is well known. The method is normally used for specimens that are macroscopically flat. However, important industrial materials such as coated paper and paint consist of microscopically rough pigment coatings on a macroscopically rough substrate. Numerical modelling is used to assess the applicability and limitations of optical measurement of microroughness for such materials. Experimental results are presented for a range of paints on substrates of various macroroughness. Model and data are in fair agreement and show that the presence of substrate macroroughness always leads to an underestimation of microroughness. Generally, optical measurements of microroughness are only comparable for substrates of similar macroroughness and a limiting value exists above which measurements may not be meaningful

  12. Optical sensor for heat conduction measurement in biological tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez-Arroyo, A; Sanchez-Perez, C; Aleman-Garcia, N

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a heat flux sensor using an optical fiber system to measure heat conduction in biological tissues. This optoelectronic device is based on the photothermal beam deflection of a laser beam travelling in an acrylic slab this deflection is measured with a fiber optic angle sensor. We measure heat conduction in biological samples with high repeatability and sensitivity enough to detect differences in tissues from three chicken organs. This technique could provide important information of vital organ function as well as the detect modifications due to degenerative diseases or physical damage caused by medications or therapies.

  13. Simultaneous optical and infrared polarization measurements of blazars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brindle, C.; Hough, J.H.; Bailey, J.A.; Axon, D.J.; Hyland, A.R.

    1986-01-01

    Measurements are presented of the polarization and flux of a sample of 28 blazars (21 BL Lacs and 7 OVV quasars) at optical and near-infrared wavelengths, with repeated observations for some objects. For 20 objects, these are the first reported polarization measurements in either the optical or infrared, and for most of them the first simultaneous measurements at these wavelengths. Out of a total of 42 observations a spectral dependence of polarization level and position angle is found, although not necessarily occurring together, on 15 occasions. (author)

  14. Comparison of optical coherence tomography and fundus photography for measuring the optic disc size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Aljoscha S; Krieglstein, Tina R; Chryssafis, Christos; Thiel, Martin; Kampik, Anselm

    2006-01-01

    To assess the agreement and repeatability of optic nerve head (ONH) size measurements by optical coherence tomography (OCT) as compared to conventional planimetry of fundus photographs in normal eyes. For comparison with planimetry the absolute size of the ONH of 25 eyes from 25 normal subjects were measured by both OCT and digital fundus photography (Zeiss FF camera 450). Repeatability of automated Stratus OCT measurements were investigated by repeatedly measuring the optic disc in five normal subjects. Mean disc size was 1763 +/- 186 vertically and 1632 +/- 160 microm horizontally on planimetry. On OCT, values of 1772 +/- 317 microm vertically (p = 0.82) and a significantly smaller horizontal diameter of 1492 +/- 302 microm (p = 0.04) were obtained. The 95% limits of agreement were (-546 microm; +527 microm) for vertical and (-502 microm; +782 microm) for horizontal planimetric compared to OCT measurements. In some cases large discrepancies existed. Repeatability of automatic measurements of the optic disc by OCT was moderately good with intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) of 0.78 horizontally and 0.83 vertically. The coefficient of repeatability indicating instrument precision was 80 microm for horizontal and 168 microm for vertical measurements. OCT can be used to determine optic disc margins in moderate agreement with planimetry in normal subjects. However, in some cases significant disagreement with photographic assessment may occur making manual inspection advisable. Automatic disc detection by OCT is moderately repeatable.

  15. Experiment to measure oxygen opacity at high density and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiter, Paul; Butler, Hannah; Trantham, Matt; Mussack, Katie; Colgan, James; Fontes, Chris; Guzik, Joyce; Kilcrease, David; Perry, Ted; Orban, Chris; Ducret, Jean-Eric; La Pennec, Maelle; Turck-Chieze, Sylvaine; Mancini, Roberto; Heeter, Robert

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, there has been a debate over the abundances of heavy elements (Z >2) in the solar interior. Recent solar atmosphere models [Asplund 2009] find a significantly lower abundance for C, N, and O compared to models used roughly a decade ago. Recent opacity measurements of iron disagree with opacity model predictions [Bailey et al., 2015]. Repeated scrutiny of the experiment and data has not produced a conclusive reason for the discrepancy. New models have been implemented in the ATOMIC opacity code for low-Z elements [Colgan, 2013, Armstrong 2014], however no data currently exists to test the low-Z material models in the regime relevant to the solar convection zone. We present an experimental design using the opacity platform developed at the National Ignition Facility to study the oxygen opacity at densities and temperatures near the solar convection zone conditions. This work is funded by the U.S. DOE, through the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in HEDLP, Grant Number DE-NA0002956, and the NLUF Program, Grant Number DE-NA0002719, and through the LLE, University of Rochester by the NNSA/OICF under No. DE-NA0001944.

  16. Magneto-optical measurements on high-temperature superconductors influenced by AC-fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Che'Rose, Simon

    2007-01-01

    In this work magneto-optical measurements on YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x and MgB 2 thin films were done. For YBCO the influence of AC-pulses on the flux and current density of a thin film with transport current was investigated. For MgB 2 the influence of AC-fields on the homogenous and dendritic flux penetration was researched. (orig.)

  17. Optical fibers and their applications for radiation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakuta, Tsunemi

    1998-01-01

    When optical fibers are used in a strong radiation field, it is necessary to increase the radiation-resistant capacity. Aiming at the improvement of such property, the characteristics of recent optical fibers made from quartz-glass were reviewed and the newly developed techniques for radiation measurement using those fibers were summarized in this report. Since optical fibers became able to use in the levels near the core conditions, their applications have started in various fields of technologies related to radiation. By combining the optical fibers and a small sensor, it became possible to act as 'Key Component' for measuring wide range radioactivity from a trace activity to a strong radiation field in the reactor core. Presently, the fibers are utilized for investigation of the optical mechanisms related in radiation, evaluation of their validities so on. Further, the optical fibers are expected to utilize in a multi-parametric measuring system which allows to concomitantly determine the radiation, temperature, pressure, flow amount etc. as an incore monitor. (M.N.)

  18. Optical fibers and their applications for radiation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakuta, Tsunemi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-07-01

    When optical fibers are used in a strong radiation field, it is necessary to increase the radiation-resistant capacity. Aiming at the improvement of such property, the characteristics of recent optical fibers made from quartz-glass were reviewed and the newly developed techniques for radiation measurement using those fibers were summarized in this report. Since optical fibers became able to use in the levels near the core conditions, their applications have started in various fields of technologies related to radiation. By combining the optical fibers and a small sensor, it became possible to act as `Key Component` for measuring wide range radioactivity from a trace activity to a strong radiation field in the reactor core. Presently, the fibers are utilized for investigation of the optical mechanisms related in radiation, evaluation of their validities so on. Further, the optical fibers are expected to utilize in a multi-parametric measuring system which allows to concomitantly determine the radiation, temperature, pressure, flow amount etc. as an incore monitor. (M.N.)

  19. Distributed strain measurement in perfluorinated polymer optical fibres using optical frequency domain reflectometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liehr, Sascha; Wendt, Mario; Krebber, Katerina

    2010-01-01

    We present the latest advances in distributed strain measurement in perfluorinated polymer optical fibres (POFs) using backscatter techniques. Compared to previously introduced poly(methyl methacrylate) POFs, the measurement length can be extended to more than 500 m at improved spatial resolution of a few centimetres. It is shown that strain in a perfluorinated POF can be measured up to 100%. In parallel to these investigations, the incoherent optical frequency domain reflectometry (OFDR) technique is introduced to detect strained fibre sections and to measure distributed length change along the fibre with sub-millimetre resolution by applying a cross-correlation algorithm to the backscatter signal. The overall superior performance of the OFDR technique compared to the optical time domain reflectometry in terms of accuracy, dynamic range, spatial resolution and measurement speed is presented. The proposed sensor system is a promising technique for use in structural health monitoring applications where the precise detection of high strain is required

  20. A measurement of the turbulence-driven density distribution in a non-star-forming molecular cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginsburg, Adam; Darling, Jeremy [CASA, University of Colorado, 389-UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Federrath, Christoph, E-mail: Adam.G.Ginsburg@gmail.com [Monash Centre for Astrophysics, School of Mathematical Sciences, Monash University, Vic 3800 (Australia)

    2013-12-10

    Molecular clouds are supersonically turbulent. This turbulence governs the initial mass function and the star formation rate. In order to understand the details of star formation, it is therefore essential to understand the properties of turbulence, in particular the probability distribution of density in turbulent clouds. We present H{sub 2}CO volume density measurements of a non-star-forming cloud along the line of sight toward W49A. We use these measurements in conjunction with total mass estimates from {sup 13}CO to infer the shape of the density probability distribution function. This method is complementary to measurements of turbulence via the column density distribution and should be applicable to any molecular cloud with detected CO. We show that turbulence in this cloud is probably compressively driven, with a compressive-to-total Mach number ratio b=M{sub C}/M>0.4. We measure the standard deviation of the density distribution, constraining it to the range 1.5 < σ {sub s} < 1.9, assuming that the density is lognormally distributed. This measurement represents an essential input into star formation laws. The method of averaging over different excitation conditions to produce a model of emission from a turbulent cloud is generally applicable to optically thin line observations.

  1. Spindle vibration and sound field measurement using optical vibrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Tatar, Kourosh

    2008-01-01

    Mechanical systems often produce a considerable amount of vibration and noise. To be able to obtain a complete picture of the dynamic behaviour of these systems, vibration and sound measurements are of significant importance. Optical metrology is well-suited for non-intrusive measurements on complex objects. The development and the use of remote non-contact vibration measurement methods for spindles are described and vibration measurements on thin- walled structures and sound field measuremen...

  2. Optical measurements of lung microvascular filtration coefficient using polysulfone fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaesner, J W; Roselli, R J; Evans, S; Pou, N A; Parker, R E; Tack, G; Parham, M

    1994-01-01

    Lung fluid balance, which is governed by the product of net transvascular pressure difference and lung filtration coefficient, can be altered in pulmonary diseases. A simple measurement of the lung filtration coefficient (Kfc) would be clinically useful and has been examined by several researchers. Current methods of determining Kfc include gravimetric measurement in isolated lungs and lymph node cannulation, neither of which can be extended to human use. Optical measurements of protein concentration changes in venous blood can be combined with pressure measurements to calculate Kfc. Blood, though, contains red corpuscles, which tend to absorb and scatter light, obscuring these optical measurements. In this study, an optical system was developed in which a polysulfone filter cartridge was used to remove red blood cells before the filtrate was passed through a spectrophotometer. Absorbance changes caused by changes in concentration of albumin labeled with Evans Blue were monitored at 620 nm after venous pressure was elevated by about 13 cm H2O. Optical measurements of Kfc averaged 0.401 +/- 0.074 (ml/min cm H2O 100 g DLW) for an isolated canine lung. Optical measurements of Kfc (0.363 +/- 0.120 ml/min cm H2O 100 g DLW) were made for the first time in an intact, closed chest sheep in which pulmonary pressure was altered by inflating a Foley balloon in the left atrium. We conclude that absorbance and scattering artifacts introduced by red blood cells can be eliminated by first filtering the blood through polysulfone fibers. Kfc measurements using the optical method are similar to values obtained by others using gravimetric methods. Finally, we have demonstrated that the technique can be used to estimate Kfc in an intact animal.

  3. Optical sensors for the measurement of electric current and voltage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutgers, W R; Hulshof, H J.M.; Laurensse, I J; van der Wey, A H

    1987-01-01

    Optical sensors for the measurement of electrical current and voltage were developed for application in electric power systems. The current sensor, based on the Faraday effect in a monomode glass fiber, and the voltage sensor, based on the transverse Pockels effect in a crystal, are demonstrated in wide-band (10 MHz) interference-free measurements of pulsed currents and impulse voltages.

  4. Uncertainty budget for optical coordinate measurements of circle diameter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morace, Renate Erica; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2004-01-01

    An uncertainty analysis for circle diameter measurements using a coordinate measuring machine (CMM) equipped with an optical probe is presented in this paper. A mathematical model for data evaluation and uncertainty assessment was formulated in accordance with Guide to the Expression of Uncertain...

  5. Measurement of small dispersion values in optical components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peucheret, Christophe; Liu, Fenghai; Pedersen, Rune Johan Skullerud

    1999-01-01

    It is reported that small dispersion values in optical components can be measured using the RF modulation method originally restricted to large dispersions. Using a constant dispersion offset, arbitrarily small dispersion values can be measured with a resolution as good as 1.2 ps/nm....

  6. Transient particle emission measurement with optical techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez, Vicente; Luján, José M.; Serrano, José R.; Pla, Benjamín

    2008-06-01

    Particulate matter is responsible for some respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. In addition, it is one of the most important pollutants of high-speed direct injection (HSDI) passenger car engines. Current legislation requires particulate dilution tunnels for particulate matter measuring. However for development work, dilution tunnels are expensive and sometimes not useful since they are not able to quantify real-time particulate emissions during transient operation. In this study, the use of a continuous measurement opacimeter and a fast response HFID is proven to be a good alternative to obtain instantaneous particle mass emissions during transient operation (due to particulate matter consisting mainly of soot and SOF). Some methods and correlations available from literature, but developed for steady conditions, are evaluated during transient operation by comparing with mini-tunnel measurements during the entire MVEG-A transient cycle. A new correlation was also derived from this evaluation. Results for soot and SOF (obtained from the new correlation proposed) are compared with soot and SOF captured with particulate filters, which have been separated by means of an SOF extraction method. Finally, as an example of ECU design strategies using these sort of correlations, the EGR valve opening is optimized during transient operation. The optimization is performed while simultaneously taking into account instantaneous fuel consumption, particulate emissions (calculated with the proposed correlation) and other regulated engine pollutants.

  7. Measurement of neoclassically predicted edge current density at ASDEX Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, M. G.; McCarthy, P. J.; Wolfrum, E.; Fischer, R.; Giannone, L.; Burckhart, A.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2012-12-01

    Experimental confirmation of neoclassically predicted edge current density in an ELMy H-mode plasma is presented. Current density analysis using the CLISTE equilibrium code is outlined and the rationale for accuracy of the reconstructions is explained. Sample profiles and time traces from analysis of data at ASDEX Upgrade are presented. A high time resolution is possible due to the use of an ELM-synchronization technique. Additionally, the flux-surface-averaged current density is calculated using a neoclassical approach. Results from these two separate methods are then compared and are found to validate the theoretical formula. Finally, several discharges are compared as part of a fuelling study, showing that the size and width of the edge current density peak at the low-field side can be explained by the electron density and temperature drives and their respective collisionality modifications.

  8. Measurement of neoclassically predicted edge current density at ASDEX Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunne, M.G.; McCarthy, P.J.; Wolfrum, E.; Fischer, R.; Giannone, L.; Burckhart, A.

    2012-01-01

    Experimental confirmation of neoclassically predicted edge current density in an ELMy H-mode plasma is presented. Current density analysis using the CLISTE equilibrium code is outlined and the rationale for accuracy of the reconstructions is explained. Sample profiles and time traces from analysis of data at ASDEX Upgrade are presented. A high time resolution is possible due to the use of an ELM-synchronization technique. Additionally, the flux-surface-averaged current density is calculated using a neoclassical approach. Results from these two separate methods are then compared and are found to validate the theoretical formula. Finally, several discharges are compared as part of a fuelling study, showing that the size and width of the edge current density peak at the low-field side can be explained by the electron density and temperature drives and their respective collisionality modifications. (paper)

  9. The role of adequate reference materials in density measurements in hemodialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, A.; Moutinho, J.; Moura, S.; Oliveira, F.; Filipe, E.

    2015-02-01

    In hemodialysis, oscillation-type density meters are used to measure the density of the acid component of the dialysate solutions used in the treatment of kidney patients. An incorrect density determination of this solution used in hemodialysis treatments can cause several and adverse events to patients. Therefore, despite the Fresenius Medical Care (FME) tight control of the density meters calibration results, this study shows the benefits of mimic the matrix usually measured to produce suitable reference materials for the density meter calibrations.

  10. The role of adequate reference materials in density measurements in hemodialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furtado, A; Moura, S; Filipe, E; Moutinho, J; Oliveira, F

    2015-01-01

    In hemodialysis, oscillation-type density meters are used to measure the density of the acid component of the dialysate solutions used in the treatment of kidney patients. An incorrect density determination of this solution used in hemodialysis treatments can cause several and adverse events to patients. Therefore, despite the Fresenius Medical Care (FME) tight control of the density meters calibration results, this study shows the benefits of mimic the matrix usually measured to produce suitable reference materials for the density meter calibrations

  11. Measuring the spin Chern number in time-reversal-invariant Hofstadter optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Dan-Wei, E-mail: zdanwei@126.com [Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Quantum Engineering and Quantum Materials, SPTE, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Cao, Shuai, E-mail: shuaicao2004@163.com [Department of Applied Physics, College of Electronic Engineering, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642 China (China)

    2016-10-14

    We propose an experimental scheme to directly measure the spin Chern number of the time-reversal-invariant Hofstadter model in optical lattices. We first show that this model can be realized by using ultracold Fermi atoms with two pseudo-spin states encoded by the internal Zeeman states in a square optical lattice and the corresponding topological Bloch bands are characterized by the spin Chern number. We then propose and numerically demonstrate that this topological invariant can be extracted from the shift of the hybrid Wannier center in the optical lattice. By spin-resolved in situ detection of the atomic densities along the transverse direction combined with time-of-flight measurement along another spatial direction, the spin Chern number in this system is directly measured. - Highlights: • The cold-atom optical-lattice scheme for realizing the time-reversal-invariant Hofstadter model is proposed. • The intrinsic spin Chern number related to the hybrid Wannier center in the optical lattice is investigated. • Direct measurement of the spin Chern number in the proposed system is theoretically demonstrated.

  12. Detection of Mild Emphysema by Computed Tomography Density Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikgren, J.; Friman, O.; Borga, M.; Boijsen, M.; Gustavsson, S.; Bake, B.; Tylen, U.; Ekberg-Jansson, A.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the ability of a conventional density mask method to detect mild emphysema by high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT); to analyze factors influencing quantification of mild emphysema; and to validate a new algorithm for detection of mild emphysema. Material and Methods: Fifty-five healthy male smokers and 34 never-smokers, 61-62 years of age, were examined. Emphysema was evaluated visually, by the conventional density mask method, and by a new algorithm compensating for the effects of gravity and artifacts due to motion and the reconstruction algorithm. Effects of the reconstruction algorithm, slice thickness, and various threshold levels on the outcome of the density mask area were evaluated. Results: Forty-nine percent of the smokers had mild emphysema. The density mask area was higher the thinner the slice irrespective of the reconstruction algorithm and threshold level. The sharp algorithm resulted in increased density mask area. The new reconstruction algorithm could discriminate between smokers with and those without mild emphysema, whereas the density mask method could not. The diagnostic ability of the new algorithm was dependent on lung level. At about 90% specificity, sensitivity was 65-100% in the apical levels, but low in the rest of the lung. Conclusion: The conventional density mask method is inadequate for detecting mild emphysema, while the new algorithm improves the diagnostic ability but is nevertheless still imperfect

  13. [Development of a software standardizing optical density with operation settings related to several limitations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Xiao-Ming; Zhang, Zuo-Heng; Wan, Cheng; Zheng, Yu; Xu, Jin-Mei; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Luo, Jian-Ping; Wu, Hai-Wei

    2012-12-01

    To develop a software that can be used to standardize optical density to normalize the procedures and results of standardization in order to effectively solve several problems generated during standardization of in-direct ELISA results. The software was designed based on the I-STOD method with operation settings to solve the problems that one might encounter during the standardization. Matlab GUI was used as a tool for the development. The software was tested with the results of the detection of sera of persons from schistosomiasis japonica endemic areas. I-STOD V1.0 (WINDOWS XP/WIN 7, 0.5 GB) was successfully developed to standardize optical density. A serial of serum samples from schistosomiasis japonica endemic areas were used to examine the operational effects of I-STOD V1.0 software. The results indicated that the software successfully overcame several problems including reliability of standard curve, applicable scope of samples and determination of dilution for samples outside the scope, so that I-STOD was performed more conveniently and the results of standardization were more consistent. I-STOD V1.0 is a professional software based on I-STOD. It can be easily operated and can effectively standardize the testing results of in-direct ELISA.

  14. Hydrostatic pressure effects on the state density and optical transitions in quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galindez-Ramirez, G; Perez-Merchancano, S T; Paredes Gutierrez, H; Gonzalez, J D

    2010-01-01

    Using the effective mass approximation and variational method we have computed the effects of hydrostatic pressure on the absorption and photoluminescence spectra in spherical quantum dot GaAs-(Ga, Al) As, considering a finite confinement potential of this particular work we show the optical transitions in quantum of various sizes in the presence of hydrogenic impurities and hydrostatic pressure effects. Our first result describes the spectrum of optical absorption of 500 A QD for different values of hydrostatic pressure P = 0, 20 and 40 Kbar. The absorption peaks are sensitive to the displacement of the impurity center to the edge of the quantum dot and even more when the hydrostatic pressure changes in both cases showing that to the extent that these two effects are stronger quantum dots respond more efficiently. Also this result can be seen in the study of the photoluminescence spectrum as in the case of acceptor impurities consider them more efficiently capture carriers or electrons that pass from the conduction band to the valence band. Density states with randomly distributed impurity show that the additional peaks in the curves of the density of impurity states appear due to the presence of the additional hydrostatic pressure effects.

  15. Electro optical system to measure strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciammarella, C. A.; Bhat, G.

    With the advent of the so called speckle interferometry, interferograms of objects can be obtained in real time by using a TV camera as the recording medium. The basic idea of this instrument is to couple the photoelectric registration by a TV camera with the subsequent electronic processing, to develop an efficient device for the measurement of deformations. This paper presents a new and improved instrument, which has a very important feature, portability, that can be operated in different modes and is capable of producing interferograms using holography, speckle, and moire methods. The basic features of the instrument are presented and some of the theoretical points at the foundation of operation of the instrument are analyzed. Examples are given of the application to moire, speckle, and holographic interferometry.

  16. Optical propagation analysis in photobioreactor measurements on cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanjul-Vélez, F.; Arce-Diego, J. L.

    2017-12-01

    Biotechnology applications are nowadays increasing in many areas, from agriculture to biochemistry, or even biomedicine. Knowledge on biological processes is becoming essential in order to be able to adequately estimate and control the production of these elements. Cyanobacteria present the capability of producing oxygen and biomass, from CO2 and light irradiation. Therefore, they could be fundamental for human subsistence in adverse environments, as basic needs of breathing and food would be guaranteed. Cyanobacteria cultivation, as other microorganisms, is carried out in photo-bioreactors. The adequate design of photobioreactors greatly influences elements production throughput. This design includes optical illumination and optical measurement of cyanobacteria growth. In this work an analysis of optical measurement of cyanobacteria growth in a photobioreactor is made. As cyanobacteria are inhomogeneous elements, the influence of light scattering is significant. Several types of cyanobacteria are considered, as long as several spatial profiles and irradiances of the incident light. Depending on cyanobacteria optical properties, optical distribution of transmitted light can be estimated. These results allow an appropriate consideration, in the optical design, of the relationship between detected light and cyanobacteria growth. As a consequence, the most adequate conditions of elements production from cyanobacteria could be estimated.

  17. MEASURING PROTOPLANETARY DISK GAS SURFACE DENSITY PROFILES WITH ALMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Jonathan P.; McPartland, Conor, E-mail: jpw@ifa.hawaii.edu [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2016-10-10

    The gas and dust are spatially segregated in protoplanetary disks due to the vertical settling and radial drift of large grains. A fuller accounting of the mass content and distribution in disks therefore requires spectral line observations. We extend the modeling approach presented in Williams and Best to show that gas surface density profiles can be measured from high fidelity {sup 13}CO integrated intensity images. We demonstrate the methodology by fitting ALMA observations of the HD 163296 disk to determine a gas mass, M {sub gas} = 0.048 M {sub ⊙}, and accretion disk characteristic size R {sub c} = 213 au and gradient γ = 0.39. The same parameters match the C{sup 18}O 2–1 image and indicate an abundance ratio [{sup 12}CO]/[C{sup 18}O] of 700 independent of radius. To test how well this methodology can be applied to future line surveys of smaller, lower mass T Tauri disks, we create a large {sup 13}CO 2–1 image library and fit simulated data. For disks with gas masses 3–10 M {sub Jup} at 150 pc, ALMA observations with a resolution of 0.″2–0.″3 and integration times of ∼20 minutes allow reliable estimates of R {sub c} to within about 10 au and γ to within about 0.2. Economic gas imaging surveys are therefore feasible and offer the opportunity to open up a new dimension for studying disk structure and its evolution toward planet formation.

  18. A NEW RECIPE FOR OBTAINING CENTRAL VOLUME DENSITIES OF PRESTELLAR CORES FROM SIZE MEASUREMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tassis, Konstantinos; Yorke, Harold W.

    2011-01-01

    We propose a simple analytical method for estimating the central volume density of prestellar molecular cloud cores from their column density profiles. Prestellar cores feature a flat central part of the column density and volume density profiles of the same size indicating the existence of a uniform-density inner region. The size of this region is set by the thermal pressure force which depends only on the central volume density and temperature of the core, and can provide a direct measurement of the central volume density. Thus, a simple length measurement can immediately yield a central density estimate independent of any dynamical model for the core and without the need for fitting. Using the radius at which the column density is 90% of the central value as an estimate of the size of the flat inner part of the column density profile yields an estimate of the central volume density within a factor of two for well-resolved cores.

  19. Analysis of rocket flight stability based on optical image measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Shuhua; Liu, Junhu; Shen, Si; Wang, Min; Liu, Jun

    2018-02-01

    Based on the abundant optical image measurement data from the optical measurement information, this paper puts forward the method of evaluating the rocket flight stability performance by using the measurement data of the characteristics of the carrier rocket in imaging. On the basis of the method of measuring the characteristics of the carrier rocket, the attitude parameters of the rocket body in the coordinate system are calculated by using the measurements data of multiple high-speed television sets, and then the parameters are transferred to the rocket body attack angle and it is assessed whether the rocket has a good flight stability flying with a small attack angle. The measurement method and the mathematical algorithm steps through the data processing test, where you can intuitively observe the rocket flight stability state, and also can visually identify the guidance system or failure analysis.

  20. Density measurement verification for hot mix asphalt concrete pavement construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) requires a minimum density for the construction of dense-graded hot mix asphalt concrete (HMAC) pavements to ensure the likelihood that the pavement will not experience distresses that reduce the expected se...

  1. Density measurement verification for hot mixed asphalt concrete pavement construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) requires a minimum density for the construction of dense-graded hot mix asphalt concrete (HMAC) pavements to ensure the likelihood that the pavement will not experience distresses that reduce the expected se...

  2. Ship Effect Measurements With Fiber Optic Neutron Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Kenneth L.; Dean, Rashe A.; Akbar, Shahzad; Kouzes, Richard T.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

    2010-01-01

    The main objectives of this research project was to assemble, operate, test and characterize an innovatively designed scintillating fiber optic neutron radiation detector manufactured by Innovative American Technology with possible application to the Department of Homeland Security screening for potential radiological and nuclear threats at US borders (Kouzes 2004). One goal of this project was to make measurements of the neutron ship effect for several materials. The Virginia State University DOE FaST/NSF summer student-faculty team made measurements with the fiber optic radiation detector at PNNL above ground to characterize the ship effect from cosmic neutrons, and underground to characterize the muon contribution.

  3. Optical fibre sensor for the measurement of ozone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Keeffe, S; Dooly, G; Fitzpatrick, C; Lewis, E

    2005-01-01

    The use of optical fibres for the measurement of ozone based on the optical absorption of both UV light at 254nm and visible light at 600nm is investigated and tested. Calculations based on the Beer-Lambert Law are also presented to demonstrate the high resolution of the UV based sensor in determining the concentration of ozone in the range of 0 mg/litre to 1mg/litre and the ability of the visible based sensor to measure high concentrations over a wide range

  4. Measurement of acidity and density of plutonium solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Bowers, D.L.; Kemmerlin, R.P.

    1978-01-01

    The solutions were analyzed for acidity and total Pu concentration at ambient temperature while the density was determined at 25, 35, 45, and 60 0 C. From least squares fitting, it was found that the density could be computed to within 1% of the experimental value using the equation D = 1 + 0.0477[H + ] - 4.25 x 10 -3 [H + ] 2 + 1.477 x 10 -3 [Pu] - (T - 25)/1000

  5. Atmospheric Turbulence Measurements in Support of Adaptive Optics Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-03-01

    microthermal 2 Cn measurements is also included. In the near future we anticipate completion of the in-depth study of the radar Cn2 applications in the form...temperature fluctuations necessary to use (2) are measured using standard microthermal temperature-resistance sensors and very sensitive - 12...panel is optical Cn computed from microthermal 2measurements of CT assuming negligible water vapor contribution. The middle panel depicts the

  6. Software Package for Optics Measurement and Correction in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Aiba, M; Tomas, R; Vanbavinckhove, G

    2010-01-01

    A software package has been developed for the LHC on-line optics measurement and correction. This package includes several different algorithms to measure phase advance, beta functions, dispersion, coupling parameters and even some non-linear terms. A Graphical User Interface provides visualization tools to compare measurements to model predictions, fit analytical formula, localize error sources and compute and send corrections to the hardware.

  7. Determination of bone mineral density of the distal extremity of the radio in Rottweiller, by radiographic optic densitometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, Jefferson Douglas Soares; Sterman, Franklin de Almeida

    2010-01-01

    This study allowed the standardization of the bone mineral density (BMD) of the distal extremity of the radio of 36 dogs adults in Rottweiler breed by radiographic optic densitometry. The limbs of the animals were radiographed with scale of aluminum that served as a reference. The radiographs images were digitalized and analyzed by a computer program for comparison of gray tones between the standard image and the image of the reference scale radiographed with the bone. Afterwards the values of density were expressed in millimeters of aluminum. Also studied the correlations between BMD and the sex, weight and external measures as the length of spine, height of the animal and circumference the distal extremity of the limb in study. The mean values and standard deviations of the bone mineral density of the distal extremity of the radio were: for the metaphyseal region the average of BMD of 7,88±0,89 mmAl, the diaphyseal region 1 the average of BMD of 8,58±0,80 mmAl and for diaphyseal region 2 of BMD of 9,00±0,74 mmAl. (author)

  8. Density functional theory versus quantum Monte Carlo simulations of Fermi gases in the optical-lattice arena★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilati, Sebastiano; Zintchenko, Ilia; Troyer, Matthias; Ancilotto, Francesco

    2018-04-01

    We benchmark the ground state energies and the density profiles of atomic repulsive Fermi gases in optical lattices (OLs) computed via density functional theory (DFT) against the results of diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) simulations. The main focus is on a half-filled one-dimensional OLs, for which the DMC simulations performed within the fixed-node approach provide unbiased results. This allows us to demonstrate that the local spin-density approximation (LSDA) to the exchange-correlation functional of DFT is very accurate in the weak and intermediate interactions regime, and also to underline its limitations close to the strongly-interacting Tonks-Girardeau limit and in very deep OLs. We also consider a three-dimensional OL at quarter filling, showing also in this case the high accuracy of the LSDA in the moderate interaction regime. The one-dimensional data provided in this study may represent a useful benchmark to further develop DFT methods beyond the LSDA and they will hopefully motivate experimental studies to accurately measure the equation of state of Fermi gases in higher-dimensional geometries. Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://https://doi.org/10.1140/epjb/e2018-90021-1.

  9. Experimental study of stratified jet by simultaneous measurements of velocity and density fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Duo; Chen, Jun

    2012-07-01

    Stratified flows with small density difference commonly exist in geophysical and engineering applications, which often involve interaction of turbulence and buoyancy effect. A combined particle image velocimetry (PIV) and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) system is developed to measure the velocity and density fields in a dense jet discharged horizontally into a tank filled with light fluid. The illumination of PIV particles and excitation of PLIF dye are achieved by a dual-head pulsed Nd:YAG laser and two CCD cameras with a set of optical filters. The procedure for matching refractive indexes of two fluids and calibration of the combined system are presented, as well as a quantitative analysis of the measurement uncertainties. The flow structures and mixing dynamics within the central vertical plane are studied by examining the averaged parameters, turbulent kinetic energy budget, and modeling of momentum flux and buoyancy flux. At downstream, profiles of velocity and density display strong asymmetry with respect to its center. This is attributed to the fact that stable stratification reduces mixing and unstable stratification enhances mixing. In stable stratification region, most of turbulence production is consumed by mean-flow convection, whereas in unstable stratification region, turbulence production is nearly balanced by viscous dissipation. Experimental data also indicate that at downstream locations, mixing length model performs better in mixing zone of stable stratification regions, whereas in other regions, eddy viscosity/diffusivity models with static model coefficients represent effectively momentum and buoyancy flux terms. The measured turbulent Prandtl number displays strong spatial variation in the stratified jet.

  10. Development of Optical Fiber Detector for Measurement of Fast Neutron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    YAGI, Takahiro; KAWAGUCHI, Shinichi; MISAWA, Tsuyoshi; PYEON, Cheol Ho; UNESAKI, Hironobu; SHIROYA, Seiji; OKAJIMA, Shigeaki; TANI, Kazuhiro

    2008-01-01

    Measurement of fast neutron flux is important for investigation of characteristic of fast reactors. In order to insert a neutron detector in a narrow space such as a gap of between fuel plates and measure the fast neutrons in real time, a neutron detector with an optical fiber has been developed. This detector consists of an optical fiber whose tip is covered with mixture of neutron converter material and scintillator such as ZnS(Ag). The detector for fast neutrons uses ThO 2 as converter material because 232 Th makes fission reaction with fast neutrons. The place where 232 Th can be used is limited by regulations because 232 Th is nuclear fuel material. The purpose of this research is to develop a new optical fiber detector to measure fast neutrons without 232 Th and to investigate the characteristic of the detector. These detectors were used to measure a D-T neutron generator and fast neutron flux distribution at Fast Critical Assembly. The results showed that the fast neutron flux distribution of the new optical fiber detector with ZnS(Ag) was the same as it of the activation method, and the detector are effective for measurement of fast neutrons. (authors)

  11. Density functional approach to many-body effects in the optical response of atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zangwill, A.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to present a new method for calculating the optical response of finite electronic system which is accurate, computationally simple, and lends itself to a ready physical interpretation of the results. This work is concerned with the so-called many-body effects which render an independent particle calculation inappropriate for comparison with experimental photoabsorption and photoemission cross sections. Polarization effects are included which describe the response of the system to an external probe and self-energy effects, which describe the dynamics and decay of a single particle state. This work, which essentially reintroduces the residual Coulomb interactions among the electrons, is confined to atoms. The method is a time-dependent local density approximation (TDLDA) and represents a natural generalization of the usual local density approximation to the ground state properties of a many electron system. Using standard first-order time-dependent perturbation theory, a self-consistent mean field theory is derived for an effective field which replaces the external field in the dipole matrix elements of the Golden Rule for photoabsorption. This effective field includes a contribution from an induced classical Coulomb field as well as an induced exchange-correlation field. This work successfully demonstrates the applicability of time-dependent generalization of the local density approximation to the practical calculation of the photo-response of atoms. For the rare gases, barium, cerium and copper are obtained cross sections in quantitative agreement with recent experiments

  12. Fast optical measurements and imaging of flow mixing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Sønnik; Fateev, Alexander; Nielsen, Karsten Lindorff

    Project is focused on fast time-resolved infrared measurements of gas temperature and fast IR-imagining of flames in various combustion environments. The infrared spectrometer system was developed in the project for fast infrared spectral measurements on industrial scale using IR-fibre- optics. F...... engine and visualisation of gas flow behaviour in cylinder.......Project is focused on fast time-resolved infrared measurements of gas temperature and fast IR-imagining of flames in various combustion environments. The infrared spectrometer system was developed in the project for fast infrared spectral measurements on industrial scale using IR-fibre- optics....... Fast time-and spectral-resolved measurements in 1.5-5.1 μm spectral range give information about flame characteristics like gas and particle temperatures, eddies and turbulent gas mixing. Time-resolved gas composition in that spectral range (H2O, CH4, CO2, CO) which is one of the key parameters...

  13. Measurement of heat load density profile on acceleration grid in MeV-class negative ion accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiratsuka, Junichi; Hanada, Masaya; Kojima, Atsushi; Umeda, Naotaka; Kashiwagi, Mieko; Miyamoto, Kenji; Yoshida, Masafumi; Nishikiori, Ryo; Ichikawa, Masahiro; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Tobari, Hiroyuki

    2016-02-01

    To understand the physics of the negative ion extraction/acceleration, the heat load density profile on the acceleration grid has been firstly measured in the ITER prototype accelerator where the negative ions are accelerated to 1 MeV with five acceleration stages. In order to clarify the profile, the peripheries around the apertures on the acceleration grid were separated into thermally insulated 34 blocks with thermocouples. The spatial resolution is as low as 3 mm and small enough to measure the tail of the beam profile with a beam diameter of ∼16 mm. It was found that there were two peaks of heat load density around the aperture. These two peaks were also clarified to be caused by the intercepted negative ions and secondary electrons from detailed investigation by changing the beam optics and gas density profile. This is the first experimental result, which is useful to understand the trajectories of these particles.

  14. Measurement of heat load density profile on acceleration grid in MeV-class negative ion accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiratsuka, Junichi, E-mail: hiratsuka.junichi@jaea.go.jp; Hanada, Masaya; Kojima, Atsushi; Umeda, Naotaka; Kashiwagi, Mieko; Yoshida, Masafumi; Nishikiori, Ryo; Ichikawa, Masahiro; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Tobari, Hiroyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukoyama, Naka 311-0193 (Japan); Miyamoto, Kenji [Naruto University of Education, 748 Nakashima, Takashima, Naruto-cho, Naruto-shi, Tokushima 772-8502 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    To understand the physics of the negative ion extraction/acceleration, the heat load density profile on the acceleration grid has been firstly measured in the ITER prototype accelerator where the negative ions are accelerated to 1 MeV with five acceleration stages. In order to clarify the profile, the peripheries around the apertures on the acceleration grid were separated into thermally insulated 34 blocks with thermocouples. The spatial resolution is as low as 3 mm and small enough to measure the tail of the beam profile with a beam diameter of ∼16 mm. It was found that there were two peaks of heat load density around the aperture. These two peaks were also clarified to be caused by the intercepted negative ions and secondary electrons from detailed investigation by changing the beam optics and gas density profile. This is the first experimental result, which is useful to understand the trajectories of these particles.

  15. Fiber Optic Displacement Sensor for Measuring Cholesterol Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moh. Budiyanto

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A simple design of a cholesterol concentration detection is proposed and demonstrated using a fiber optic displacement sensor based on an intensity modulation technique. The proposed sensor uses a bundled plastic optical fiber (POF as a probe in conjunction with a flat mirror as a target. It is obtained that the peak voltage reduces with increasing cholesterol concentration. The sensor is capable of measuring the cholesterol concentration ranging from 0 to 300 ppm in a distilled water with a measured sensitivity of 0.01 mV/ppm, a linearity of more than 99.62 % and a resolution of 3.9188 ppm. The proposed sensor also shows a high degree of stability and good repeatability. The simplicity of design, accuracy, flexible dynamic range, and the low cost of fabrication are favorable attributes of the sensor and beneficial for real- field applications. Fiber optic sensors

  16. MAX-DOAS measurements of NO2 column densities in Vienna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreier, Stefan; Weihs, Philipp; Peters, Enno; Richter, Andreas; Ostendorf, Mareike; Schönhardt, Anja; Burrows, John P.; Schmalwieser, Alois

    2017-04-01

    In the VINDOBONA (VIenna horizontal aNd vertical Distribution OBservations Of Nitrogen dioxide and Aerosols) project, two Multi AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) systems will be set up at two different locations and altitudes in Vienna, Austria. After comparison measurements in Bremen, Germany, and Cabauw, The Netherlands, the first of the two MAX-DOAS instruments was set up at the University of Veterinary Medicine in the northeastern part of Vienna in December 2016. The instrument performs spectral measurements of visible scattered sunlight at defined horizontal and vertical viewing directions. From these measurements, column densities of NO2 and aerosols are derived by applying the DOAS analysis. First preliminary results are presented. The second MAX-DOAS instrument will be set up in April/May 2017 at the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences in the northwestern part of Vienna. Once these two instruments are measuring simultaneously, small campaigns including car DOAS zenith-sky and tower DOAS off-axis measurements are planned. The main emphasis of this project will be on the installation and operation of two MAX-DOAS instruments, the improvement of tropospheric NO2 and aerosol retrieval, and the characterization of the horizontal, vertical, and temporal variations of tropospheric NO2 and aerosols in Vienna, Austria.

  17. The measurement system of birefringence and Verdet constant of optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi; Chen, Li; Guo, Qiang; Pang, Fufei; Wen, Jianxiang; Shang, Yana; Wang, Tingyun

    2013-12-01

    The Faraday magneto-optical effect of optical fiber has many applications in monitoring magnetic field and electric current. When a linearly polarized light propagates in the direction of a magnetic field, the plane of polarization will rotate linearly proportional to the strength of the applied magnetic field, which following the relationship of θF =VBl. θF is the Faraday rotation angle, which is proportional to the magnetic flux density B and the Verdet constant V . However, when the optical fiber contains the effect of linear birefringence, the detection of Faraday rotation angle will depend on the line birefringence. In order to determine the Verdet constant of an optical fiber under a linear birefringence, the fiber birefringence needs to be accurately measured. In this work, a model is applied to analyze the polarization properties of an optical fiber by using the Jones matrix method. A measurement system based on the lock-in amplifier technology is designed to test the Verdet constant and the birefringence of optical fiber. The magnetic field is produced by a solenoid with a DC current. A tunable laser is intensity modulated with a motorized rotating chopper. The actuator supplies a signal as the phase-locked synchronization reference to the signal of the lock-in amplifier. The measurement accuracy is analyzed and the sensitivity of the system is optimized. In this measurement system, the Verdet constant of the SMF-28 fiber was measured to be 0.56±0.02 rad/T·m at 1550nm. This setup is well suitable for measuring the high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) sensitivity for lock-in amplifier at a low magnetic field strength.

  18. Density-based similarity measures for content based search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hush, Don R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Porter, Reid B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ruggiero, Christy E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We consider the query by multiple example problem where the goal is to identify database samples whose content is similar to a coUection of query samples. To assess the similarity we use a relative content density which quantifies the relative concentration of the query distribution to the database distribution. If the database distribution is a mixture of the query distribution and a background distribution then it can be shown that database samples whose relative content density is greater than a particular threshold {rho} are more likely to have been generated by the query distribution than the background distribution. We describe an algorithm for predicting samples with relative content density greater than {rho} that is computationally efficient and possesses strong performance guarantees. We also show empirical results for applications in computer network monitoring and image segmentation.

  19. Observer variability of absolute and relative thrombus density measurements in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, Emilie M. M.; Yoo, Albert J.; Beenen, Ludo F.; Berkhemer, Olvert A.; den Blanken, Mark D.; Wismans, Carrie; Niessen, Wiro J.; Majoie, Charles B.; Marquering, Henk A.; Fransen, Puck S. S.; Beumer, Debbie; van den Berg, Lucie A.; Lingsma, Hester F.; Schonewille, Wouter J.; Vos, Jan Albert; Nederkoorn, Paul J.; Wermer, Marieke J. H.; van Walderveen, Marianne A. A.; Staals, Julie; Hofmeijer, Jeannette; van Oostayen, Jacques A.; Lycklama à Nijeholt, Geert J.; Boiten, Jelis; Brouwer, Patrick A.; Emmer, Bart J.; de Bruijn, Sebastiaan F.; van Dijk, Lukas C.; Kappelle, L. Jaap; Lo, Rob H.; van Dijk, Ewoud J.; de Vries, Joost; de Kort, Paul L. M.; van den Berg, Jan S. P.; A A M van Hasselt, Boudewijn; Aerden, Leo A. M.; Dallinga, René J.; Visser, Marieke C.; Bot, Joseph C. J.; Vroomen, Patrick C.; Eshghi, Omid; Schreuder, Tobien H. C. M. L.; Heijboer, Roel J. J.; Keizer, Koos; Tielbeek, Alexander V.; Hertog, Heleen M. Den; Gerrits, Dick G.; van den Berg-Vos, Renske M.; Karas, Giorgos B.; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Flach, H. Zwenneke; Sprengers, Marieke E. S.; Jenniskens, Sjoerd F. M.; van den Berg, René; Koudstaal, Peter J.; van Zwam, Wim H.; Roos, Yvo B. W. E. M.; van der Lugt, Aad; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J.; Dippel, Diederik W. J.

    2016-01-01

    Thrombus density may be a predictor for acute ischemic stroke treatment success. However, only limited data on observer variability for thrombus density measurements exist. This study assesses the variability and bias of four common thrombus density measurement methods by expert and non-expert

  20. Observer variability of absolute and relative thrombus density measurements in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M.M. Santos (Emilie M.); A.J. Yoo (Albert J.); L.F.M. Beenen (Ludo); O.A. Berkhemer (Olvert); M.D. Den Blanken (Mark D.); C. Wismans (Carrie); W.J. Niessen (Wiro); C.B. Majoie (Charles); H. Marquering (Henk)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Thrombus density may be a predictor for acute ischemic stroke treatment success. However, only limited data on observer variability for thrombus density measurements exist. This study assesses the variability and bias of four common thrombus density measurement methods by

  1. Observer variability of absolute and relative thrombus density measurements in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, E.M.; Yoo, A.J.; Beenen, L.F.; Berkhemer, O.A.; Blanken, M.D. den; Wismans, C.; Niessen, W.J.; Majoie, C.B.; Marquering, H.A.; Dijk, E.J. van; et al.,

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Thrombus density may be a predictor for acute ischemic stroke treatment success. However, only limited data on observer variability for thrombus density measurements exist. This study assesses the variability and bias of four common thrombus density measurement methods by expert and

  2. Density measurements as a means for detection of semiconductor - metal transitions in melts of chalcogenide systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thurn, H.; Ruska, J.

    1976-01-01

    It is reported on density measurements from liquidus temperature up to 900 or 1,000 0 C of a number of Se- or Te-containing liquid alloys. Anomalous density variations with temperature were found in many cases. The density measurements have been performed by a γ-ray absorption method. (orig./HK) [de

  3. Effects of the light beam bending on the interferometric electron density measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Y.; Koyama, K.; Tanimoto, M.; Sugiura, M.

    1980-01-01

    In the measurements of plasma density profile with laser interferometers, the maximum relative errors due to the deflection of laser light caused by steep gradients of the electron density are analytically evaluated. As an example the errors in the measurements of density profile of a plasma focus by using a UV-N 2 laser are estimated. (author)

  4. Quantitative Analysis of Lens Nuclear Density Using Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT with a Liquid Optics Interface: Correlation between OCT Images and LOCS III Grading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Na Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To quantify whole lens and nuclear lens densities using anterior-segment optical coherence tomography (OCT with a liquid optics interface and evaluate their correlation with Lens Opacities Classification System III (LOCS III lens grading and corrected distance visual acuity (BCVA. Methods. OCT images of the whole lens and lens nucleus of eyes with age-related nuclear cataract were analyzed using ImageJ software. The lens grade and nuclear density were represented in pixel intensity units (PIU and correlations between PIU, BCVA, and LOCS III were assessed. Results. Forty-seven eyes were analyzed. The mean whole lens and lens nuclear densities were 26.99 ± 5.23 and 19.43 ± 6.15 PIU, respectively. A positive linear correlation was observed between lens opacities (R2 = 0.187, p<0.01 and nuclear density (R2 = 0.316, p<0.01 obtained from OCT images and LOCS III. Preoperative BCVA and LOCS III were also positively correlated (R2 = 0.454, p<0.01. Conclusions. Whole lens and lens nuclear densities obtained from OCT correlated with LOCS III. Nuclear density showed a higher positive correlation with LOCS III than whole lens density. OCT with a liquid optics interface is a potential quantitative method for lens grading and can aid in monitoring and managing age-related cataracts.

  5. Triangulation-based edge measurement using polyview optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinan; Kästner, Markus; Reithmeier, Eduard

    2018-04-01

    Laser triangulation sensors as non-contact measurement devices are widely used in industry and research for profile measurements and quantitative inspections. Some technical applications e.g. edge measurements usually require a configuration of a single sensor and a translation stage or a configuration of multiple sensors, so that they can measure a large measurement range that is out of the scope of a single sensor. However, the cost of both configurations is high, due to the additional rotational axis or additional sensor. This paper provides a special measurement system for measurement of great curved surfaces based on a single sensor configuration. Utilizing a self-designed polyview optics and calibration process, the proposed measurement system allows an over 180° FOV (field of view) with a precise measurement accuracy as well as an advantage of low cost. The detailed capability of this measurement system based on experimental data is discussed in this paper.

  6. MTF measurement of IR optics in different temperature ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Alexander; Duncker, Hannes; Dumitrescu, Eugen

    2017-10-01

    Infrared (IR) optical systems are at the core of many military, civilian and manufacturing applications and perform mission critical functions. To reliably fulfill the demanding requirements imposed on today's high performance IR optics, highly accurate, reproducible and fast lens testing is of crucial importance. Testing the optical performance within different temperature ranges becomes key in many military applications. Due to highly complex IR-Applications in the fields of aerospace, military and automotive industries, MTF Measurement under realistic environmental conditions become more and more relevant. A Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) test bench with an integrated thermal chamber allows measuring several sample sizes in a temperature range from -40 °C to +120°C. To reach reliable measurement results under these difficult conditions, a specially developed temperature stable design including an insulating vacuum are used. The main function of this instrument is the measurement of the MTF both on- and off-axis at up to +/-70° field angle, as well as measurement of effective focal length, flange focal length and distortion. The vertical configuration of the system guarantees a small overall footprint. By integrating a high-resolution IR camera with focal plane array (FPA) in the detection unit, time consuming measurement procedures such as scanning slit with liquid nitrogen cooled detectors can be avoided. The specified absolute accuracy of +/- 3% MTF is validated using internationally traceable reference optics. Together with a complete and intuitive software solution, this makes the instrument a turn-key device for today's state-of- the-art optical testing.

  7. Tests of a two-color interferometer and polarimeter for ITER density measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Zeeland, M. A.; Carlstrom, T. N.; Finkenthal, D. K.; Boivin, R. L.; Colio, A.; Du, D.; Gattuso, A.; Glass, F.; Muscatello, C. M.; O'Neill, R.; Smiley, M.; Vasquez, J.; Watkins, M.; Brower, D. L.; Chen, J.; Ding, W. X.; Johnson, D.; Mauzey, P.; Perry, M.; Watts, C.; Wood, R.

    2017-12-01

    A full-scale 120 m path length ITER toroidal interferometer and polarimeter (TIP) prototype, including an active feedback alignment system, has been constructed and undergone initial testing at General Atomics. In the TIP prototype, two-color interferometry is carried out at 10.59 μm and 5.22 μm using a CO2 and quantum cascade laser (QCL) respectively while a separate polarimetry measurement of the plasma induced Faraday effect is made at 10.59 μm. The polarimeter system uses co-linear right and left-hand circularly polarized beams upshifted by 40 and 44 MHz acousto-optic cells respectively, to generate the necessary beat signal for heterodyne phase detection, while interferometry measurements are carried out at both 40 MHz and 44 MHz for the CO2 laser and 40 MHz for the QCL. The high-resolution phase information is obtained using an all-digital FPGA based phase demodulation scheme and precision clock source. The TIP prototype is equipped with a piezo tip/tilt stage active feedback alignment system responsible for minimizing noise in the measurement and keeping the TIP diagnostic aligned indefinitely on its 120 m beam path including as the ITER vessel is brought from ambient to operating temperatures. The prototype beam path incorporates translation stages to simulate ITER motion through a bake cycle as well as other sources of motion or misalignment. Even in the presence of significant motion, the TIP prototype is able to meet ITER’s density measurement requirements over 1000 s shot durations with demonstrated phase resolution of 0.06° and 1.5° for the polarimeter and vibration compensated interferometer respectively. TIP vibration compensated interferometer measurements of a plasma have also been made in a pulsed radio frequency device and show a line-integrated density resolution of δ {nL}=3.5× {10}17 m-2.

  8. Comparison of two different methods for the uncertainty estimation of circle diameter measurements using an optical coordinate measuring machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morace, Renata Erica; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2005-01-01

    This paper deals with the uncertainty estimation of measurements performed on optical coordinate measuring machines (CMMs). Two different methods were used to assess the uncertainty of circle diameter measurements using an optical CMM: the sensitivity analysis developing an uncertainty budget...

  9. Quantum optical measurements with undetected photons through vacuum field indistinguishability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun Kyung; Yoon, Tai Hyun; Cho, Minhaeng

    2017-07-26

    Quantum spectroscopy and imaging with undetected idler photons have been demonstrated by measuring one-photon interference between the corresponding entangled signal fields from two spontaneous parametric down conversion (SPDC) crystals. In this Report, we present a new quantum optical measurement scheme utilizing three SPDC crystals in a cascading arrangement; here, neither the detection of the idler photons which interact with materials of interest nor their conjugate signal photons which do not interact with the sample is required. The coherence of signal beams in a single photon W-type path-entangled state is induced and modulated by indistinguishabilities of the idler beams and crucially the quantum vacuum fields. As a result, the optical properties of materials or objects interacting with the idler beam from the first SPDC crystal can be measured by detecting second-order interference between the signal beams generated by the other two SPDC crystals further down the set-up. This gedankenexperiment illustrates the fundamental importance of vacuum fields in generating an optical tripartite entangled state and thus its crucial role in quantum optical measurements.

  10. McDONALD OBSERVATORY ARCHIVE OF OPTICAL LINEAR POLARIZATION MEASUREMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wills, Beverley J.; Wills, D.; Breger, M.

    2011-01-01

    We present 990 previously unpublished optical linear polarization measurements of quasars, active galactic nuclei, and some stars observed for interstellar polarization. The observations, covering the period 1981-2000, were made with McDonald Observatory's 2.1 m Struve reflector and the Breger photopolarimeter.

  11. Optical sensor system for time-resolved quantification of methane densities in CH4-fueled spark ignition engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golibrzuch, Kai; Digulla, Finn-Erik; Bauke, Stephan; Wackerbarth, Hainer; Thiele, Olaf; Berg, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    We present the development and the first application of an optical sensor system that allows single-cycle determination of methane (CH 4 ) concentration inside internal combustion (IC) engines. We use non-dispersive infrared absorption spectroscopy to detect the CH 4 density with a time resolution up to 33 μs at acquisition rates of 30 kHz. The measurement scheme takes advantage of the strong temperature dependence of the absorption band applying two detection channels for CH 4 that detect different spectral regions of the ν 3 anti-symmetric C-H-stretch absorption. The strategy allows the simultaneous determination of fuel concentration as well as gas temperature. We show the proof-of-concept by validation of the measurement strategy in static pressure cell experiments as well as its application to a methane-fueled IC engine using a modified spark plug probe. Our results clearly demonstrate that it is crucial to determine the CH 4 temperature in the probe volume. Due to thermal influences of the sensor probe, the temperature needed to calculate the desired quantities (fuel density, fuel concentration) significantly differs from the gas phase temperature in the rest of the combustion chamber and estimations from standard thermodynamic models, e.g., polytropic compression, will fail.

  12. Perspective: Optical measurement of feature dimensions and shapes by scatterometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diebold, Alain C.; Antonelli, Andy; Keller, Nick

    2018-05-01

    The use of optical scattering to measure feature shape and dimensions, scatterometry, is now routine during semiconductor manufacturing. Scatterometry iteratively improves an optical model structure using simulations that are compared to experimental data from an ellipsometer. These simulations are done using the rigorous coupled wave analysis for solving Maxwell's equations. In this article, we describe the Mueller matrix spectroscopic ellipsometry based scatterometry. Next, the rigorous coupled wave analysis for Maxwell's equations is presented. Following this, several example measurements are described as they apply to specific process steps in the fabrication of gate-all-around (GAA) transistor structures. First, simulations of measurement sensitivity for the inner spacer etch back step of horizontal GAA transistor processing are described. Next, the simulated metrology sensitivity for sacrificial (dummy) amorphous silicon etch back step of vertical GAA transistor processing is discussed. Finally, we present the application of plasmonically active test structures for improving the sensitivity of the measurement of metal linewidths.

  13. An Antenna Measurement System Based on Optical Feeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryohei Hosono

    2013-01-01

    the advantage of the system is demonstrated by measuring an ultra-wideband (UWB antenna both by the optical and electrical feeding systems and comparing with a calculated result. Ripples in radiation pattern due to the electrical feeding are successfully suppressed by the optical feeding. For example, in a radiation measurement on the azimuth plane at 3 GHz, ripple amplitude of 1.0 dB that appeared in the electrical feeding is reduced to 0.3 dB. In addition, a circularly polarized (CP antenna is successfully measured by the proposed system to show that the system is available not only for amplitude but also phase measurements.

  14. Wood fibre density measurement with 238 Pu radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barry, B.J.; Baker, D.B.

    1996-01-01

    The form of the curve of attenuation by wood fibre of the X radiation from 238 Pu has been determined. An exponential function containing a term second order in the areal density of the fibre described the curve accurately. The effect of scatter is negligible, even with an uncollimated radiation beam. (author). 18 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs

  15. Operation of ADITYA Thomson scattering system: measurement of temperature and density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Jinto; Pillai, Vishal; Singh, Neha; Patel, Kiran; Lingeshwari, G.; Hingrajiya, Zalak; Kumar, Ajai

    2015-01-01

    ADITYA Thomson scattering (TS) system is a single point measurement system operated using a 10 J ruby laser and a 1 meter grating spectrometer. Multi-slit optical fibers are arranged at the image plane of the spectrometer so that each fiber slit collects 2 nm band of scattered spectrum. Each slit of the fiber bundle is coupled to high gain Photomultiplier tubes (PMT). Standard white light source is used to calibrate the optical fiber transmission and the laser light itself is used to calibrate the relative gain of the PMT. Rayleigh scattering has been performed for the absolute calibration of the TS system. The temperature of ADITYA plasma has been calculated using the conventional method of estimation (calculated using the slope of logarithmic intensity vs the square of delta lambda). It has been observed that the core temperature of ADITYA Tokamak plasma is in the range of 300 to 600 eV for different plasma shots and the density 2-3 X 10 13 /cc. The time evolution of the plasma discharge has been studied by firing the laser at different times of the discharge assuming the shots are identical. In some of the discharges, the velocity distribution appears to be non Maxwellian. (author)

  16. Measurement of radiation damage on an optical reflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, K.C.; Sahu, S.K.; Huang, H.C.; Ueno, K.; Chang, Y.H.; Wang, C.H.; Hou, W.S.

    1997-01-01

    We measured the radiation damage on an optical white fluorocarbon reflector called Goretex, which is to be used for aerogel threshold counters and crystal calorimeters of the BELLE detector of the KEK B-factory. Reflectance of the Goretex surface was monitored to see any effect of the radiation damage. Maximum equivalent dose was 8.6 Mrad. No radiation damage is observed within measurement errors. (orig.)

  17. Bridge continuous deformation measurement technology based on fiber optic gyro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Weibing; Hu, Wenbin; Liu, Fang; Tang, Jianguang; Li, Sheng; Yang, Yan

    2016-03-01

    Bridge is an important part of modern transportation systems and deformation is a key index for bridge's safety evaluation. To achieve the long span bridge curve measurement rapidly and timely and accurately locate the bridge maximum deformation, the continuous deformation measurement system (CDMS) based on inertial platform is presented and validated in this paper. Firstly, based on various bridge deformation measurement methods, the method of deformation measurement based on the fiber optic gyro (FOG) is introduced. Secondly, the basic measurement principle based on FOG is presented and the continuous curve trajectory is derived by the formula. Then the measurement accuracy is analyzed in theory and the relevant factors are presented to ensure the measurement accuracy. Finally, the deformation measurement experiments are conducted on a bridge across the Yangtze River. Experimental results show that the presented deformation measurement method is feasible, practical, and reliable; the system can accurately and quickly locate the maximum deformation and has extensive and broad application prospects.

  18. Optical character recognition based on nonredundant correlation measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunecker, B; Hauck, R; Lohmann, A W

    1979-08-15

    The essence of character recognition is a comparison between the unknown character and a set of reference patterns. Usually, these reference patterns are all possible characters themselves, the whole alphabet in the case of letter characters. Obviously, N analog measurements are highly redundant, since only K = log(2)N binary decisions are enough to identify one out of N characters. Therefore, we devised K reference patterns accordingly. These patterns, called principal components, are found by digital image processing, but used in an optical analog computer. We will explain the concept of principal components, and we will describe experiments with several optical character recognition systems, based on this concept.

  19. Study of Optical Fiber Sensors for Cryogenic Temperature Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Miguel-Soto, Veronica; Leandro, Daniel; Lopez-Aldaba, Aitor; Beato-López, Juan Jesus; Pérez-Landazábal, José Ignacio; Auguste, Jean-Louis; Jamier, Raphael; Roy, Philippe; Lopez-Amo, Manuel

    2017-11-30

    In this work, the performance of five different fiber optic sensors at cryogenic temperatures has been analyzed. A photonic crystal fiber Fabry-Pérot interferometer, two Sagnac interferometers, a commercial fiber Bragg grating (FBG), and a π-phase shifted fiber Bragg grating interrogated in a random distributed feedback fiber laser have been studied. Their sensitivities and resolutions as sensors for cryogenic temperatures have been compared regarding their advantages and disadvantages. Additionally, the results have been compared with the given by a commercial optical backscatter reflectometer that allowed for distributed temperature measurements of a single mode fiber.

  20. Measurement and modelization of silica opal optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avoine, Amaury; Hong, Phan Ngoc; Frederich, Hugo; Aregahegn, Kifle; Bénalloul, Paul; Coolen, Laurent; Schwob, Catherine; Thu Nga, Pham; Gallas, Bruno; Maître, Agnès

    2014-03-01

    We present the synthesis process and optical characterization of artificial silica opals. The specular reflection spectra are analyzed and compared to band structure calculations and finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations. The silica optical index is a key parameter to correctly describe an opal and is usually not known and treated as a free parameter. Here we propose a method to infer the silica index, as well as the silica spheres diameter, from the reflection spectra and we validate it by comparison with two independent infrared methods for the index and, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements for the spheres diameter.

  1. Measurement and modelization of silica opal optical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avoine, Amaury; Ngoc Hong, Phan; Frederich, Hugo; Aregahegn, Kifle; Bénalloul, Paul; Coolen, Laurent; Schwob, Catherine; Gallas, Bruno; Maître, Agnès; Thu Nga, Pham

    2014-01-01

    We present the synthesis process and optical characterization of artificial silica opals. The specular reflection spectra are analyzed and compared to band structure calculations and finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations. The silica optical index is a key parameter to correctly describe an opal and is usually not known and treated as a free parameter. Here we propose a method to infer the silica index, as well as the silica spheres diameter, from the reflection spectra and we validate it by comparison with two independent infrared methods for the index and, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements for the spheres diameter. (paper)

  2. Study of Optical Fiber Sensors for Cryogenic Temperature Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica De Miguel-Soto

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the performance of five different fiber optic sensors at cryogenic temperatures has been analyzed. A photonic crystal fiber Fabry-Pérot interferometer, two Sagnac interferometers, a commercial fiber Bragg grating (FBG, and a π-phase shifted fiber Bragg grating interrogated in a random distributed feedback fiber laser have been studied. Their sensitivities and resolutions as sensors for cryogenic temperatures have been compared regarding their advantages and disadvantages. Additionally, the results have been compared with the given by a commercial optical backscatter reflectometer that allowed for distributed temperature measurements of a single mode fiber.

  3. Noncontact measurement of high temperature using optical fiber sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, R. O.

    1990-01-01

    The primary goal of this research program was the investigation and application of noncontact temperature measurement techniques using optical techniques and optical fiber methods. In particular, a pyrometer utilizing an infrared optical light pipe and a multiwavelength filtering approach was designed, revised, and tested. This work was motivated by the need to measure the temperatures of small metallic pellets (approximately 3 mm diameter) in free fall at the Microgravity Materials Processing Drop Tube at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. In addition, research under this program investigated the adaptation of holography technology to optical fiber sensors, and also examined the use of rare-earth dopants in optical fibers for use in measuring temperature. The pyrometer development effort involved both theoretical analysis and experimental tests. For the analysis, a mathematical model based on radiative transfer principles was derived. Key parameter values representative of the drop tube system, such as particle size, tube diameter and length, and particle temperature, were used to determine an estimate of the radiant flux that will be incident on the face of an optical fiber or light pipe used to collect radiation from the incandescent falling particle. An extension of this work examined the advantage of inclining or tilting the collecting fiber to increase the time that the falling particle remains in the fiber field-of-view. Those results indicate that increases in total power collected of about 15 percent may be realized by tilting the fiber. In order to determine the suitability of alternative light pipes and optical fibers, and experimental set-up for measuring the transmittance and insertion loss of infrared fibers considered for use in the pyrometer was assembled. A zirconium fluoride optical fiber and several bundles of hollow core fiber of varying diameters were tested. A prototype two-color pyrometer was assembled and tested at Virginia Tech, and then

  4. All Optical Measurement Proposed for the Photovoltaic Hall Effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Takashi; Aoki, Hideo

    2011-01-01

    We propose an all optical way to measure the recently proposed p hotovoltaic Hall effect , i.e., a Hall effect induced by a circularly polarized light in the absence of static magnetic fields. This is done in a pump-probe experiment with the Faraday rotation angle being the probe. The Floquet extended Kubo formula for photo-induced optical response is formulated and the ac-Hall conductivity is calculated. We also point out the possibility of observing the effect in two layered graphene, three-dimensional graphite, and more generally in multi-band systems such as materials described by the dp-model.

  5. Simulation and measurement of optical access network with different types of optical-fiber amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latal, Jan; Vogl, Jan; Koudelka, Petr; Vitasek, Jan; Siska, Petr; Liner, Andrej; Papes, Martin; Vasinek, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    The optical access networks are nowadays swiftly developing in the telecommunications field. These networks can provide higher data transfer rates, and have great potential to the future in terms of transmission possibilities. Many local internet providers responded to these facts and began gradually installing optical access networks into their originally built networks, mostly based on wireless communication. This allowed enlargement of possibilities for end-users in terms of high data rates and also new services such as Triple play, IPTV (Internet Protocol television) etc. However, with this expansion and building-up is also related the potential of reach in case of these networks. Big cities, such as Prague, Brno, Ostrava or Olomouc cannot be simply covered, because of their sizes and also because of their internal regulations given by various organizations in each city. Standard logical and also physical reach of EPON (IEEE 802.3ah - Ethernet Passive Optical Network) optical access network is about 20 km. However, for networks based on Wavelength Division Multiplex the reach can be up to 80 km, if the optical-fiber amplifier is inserted into the network. This article deals with simulation of different types of amplifiers for WDM-PON (Wavelength Division Multiplexing-Passive Optical Network) network in software application Optiwave OptiSystem and than are the values from the application and from real measurement compared.

  6. Electronic and Optical Properties of Sodium Niobate: A Density Functional Theory Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Fritsch

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, much effort has been devoted to replace the most commonly used piezoelectric ceramic lead zirconate titanate Pb[ZrxTi1−x]O3 (PZT with a suitable lead-free alternative for memory or piezoelectric applications. One possible alternative to PZT is sodium niobate as it exhibits electrical and mechanical properties that make it an interesting material for technological applications. The high-temperature simple cubic perovskite structure undergoes a series of structural phase transitions with decreasing temperature. However, particularly the phases at room temperature and below are not yet fully characterised and understood. Here, we perform density functional theory calculations for the possible phases at room temperature and below and report on the structural, electronic, and optical properties of the different phases in comparison to experimental findings.

  7. Electron momentum density measurements by means of positron annihilation and Compton spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, W.; Dlubek, G.; Marx, U.; Bruemmer, O.; Prautzsch, J.

    1982-01-01

    The electron momentum density is measured applying positron annihilation and Compton spectroscopy in order to get information about electron wave functions. Compton spectroscopic measurements of Pd-Ag and Cu-Zn alloy systems are carried out taking into account crystal structure, mixability, and order state. Three-dimensional momentum densities of silicon are determined in order to get better information about its electronic structure. The momentum density and the spin density of ferromagnetic nickel are investigated using angular correlation curves

  8. Parallel changes in structural and functional measures of optic nerve myelination after optic neuritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneke van der Walt

    Full Text Available Visual evoked potential (VEP latency prolongation and optic nerve lesion length after acute optic neuritis (ON corresponds to the degree of demyelination, while subsequent recovery of latency may represent optic nerve remyelination. We aimed to investigate the relationship between multifocal VEP (mfVEP latency and optic nerve lesion length after acute ON.Thirty acute ON patients were studied at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months using mfVEP and at 1 and 12 months with optic nerve MRI. LogMAR and low contrast visual acuity were documented. By one month, the mfVEP amplitude had recovered sufficiently for latency to be measured in 23 (76.7% patients with seven patients having no recordable mfVEP in more than 66% of segments in at least one test. Only data from these 23 patients was analysed further.Both latency and lesion length showed significant recovery during the follow-up period. Lesion length and mfVEP latency were highly correlated at 1 (r = 0.94, p = <0.0001 and 12 months (r = 0.75, p < 0.001. Both measures demonstrated a similar trend of recovery. Speed of latency recovery was faster in the early follow-up period while lesion length shortening remained relatively constant. At 1 month, latency delay was worse by 1.76 ms for additional 1mm of lesion length while at 12 months, 1mm of lesion length accounted for 1.94 ms of latency delay.A strong association between two putative measures of demyelination in early and chronic ON was found. Parallel recovery of both measures could reflect optic nerve remyelination.

  9. Optical Spectroscopy Measurements of Shock Waves Driven by Intense Z-Pinch Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asay, J.; Bernard, M.; Bailey, J.E.; Carlson, A.L.; Chandler, G.A.; Hall, C.A.; Hanson, D.; Johnston, R.; Lake, P.; Lawrence, J.

    1999-01-01

    Z-pinches created using the Z accelerator generate approximately220 TW, 1.7 MJ radiation pulses that heat large (approximately10 cm 3 ) hohlraums to 100-150 eV temperatures for times of order 10 nsec. We are performing experiments exploiting this intense radiation to drive shock waves for equation of state studies. The shock pressures are typically 1-10 Mbar with 10 nsec duration in 6-mm-diameter samples. In this paper we demonstrate the ability to perform optical spectroscopy measurements on shocked samples located in close proximity to the z-pinch. These experiments are particularly well suited to optical spectroscopy measurements because of the relatively large sample size and long duration. The optical emission is collected using fiber optics and recorded with a streaked spectrograph. Other diagnostics include VISAR and active shock breakout measurements of the shocked sample and a suite of diagnostics that characterize the radiation drive. Our near term goal is to use the spectral emission to obtain the temperature of the shocked material. Longer term objectives include the examination of deviations of the spectrum from blackbody, line emission from lower density regions, determination of kinetic processes in molecular systems, evaluation of phase transitions such as the onset of metalization in transparent materials, and characterization of the plasma formed when the shock exits the rear surface. An initial set of data illustrating both the potential and the challenge of these measurements is described

  10. Adaptive phase measurements in linear optical quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ralph, T C; Lund, A P; Wiseman, H M

    2005-01-01

    Photon counting induces an effective non-linear optical phase shift in certain states derived by linear optics from single photons. Although this non-linearity is non-deterministic, it is sufficient in principle to allow scalable linear optics quantum computation (LOQC). The most obvious way to encode a qubit optically is as a superposition of the vacuum and a single photon in one mode-so-called 'single-rail' logic. Until now this approach was thought to be prohibitively expensive (in resources) compared to 'dual-rail' logic where a qubit is stored by a photon across two modes. Here we attack this problem with real-time feedback control, which can realize a quantum-limited phase measurement on a single mode, as has been recently demonstrated experimentally. We show that with this added measurement resource, the resource requirements for single-rail LOQC are not substantially different from those of dual-rail LOQC. In particular, with adaptive phase measurements an arbitrary qubit state α vertical bar 0>+β vertical bar 1> can be prepared deterministically

  11. Diffuse optical tomography using semiautomated coregistered ultrasound measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Atahar; Vavadi, Hamed; Uddin, K. M. Shihab; Zhu, Quing

    2017-12-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) has demonstrated huge potential in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment monitoring. DOT image reconstruction guided by ultrasound (US) improves the diffused light localization and lesion reconstruction accuracy. However, DOT reconstruction depends on tumor geometry provided by coregistered US. Experienced operators can manually measure these lesion parameters; however, training and measurement time are needed. The wide clinical use of this technique depends on its robustness and faster imaging reconstruction capability. This article introduces a semiautomated procedure that automatically extracts lesion information from US images and incorporates it into the optical reconstruction. An adaptive threshold-based image segmentation is used to obtain tumor boundaries. For some US images, posterior shadow can extend to the chest wall and make the detection of deeper lesion boundary difficult. This problem can be solved using a Hough transform. The proposed procedure was validated from data of 20 patients. Optical reconstruction results using the proposed procedure were compared with those reconstructed using extracted tumor information from an experienced user. Mean optical absorption obtained from manual measurement was 0.21±0.06 cm-1 for malignant and 0.12±0.06 cm-1 for benign cases, whereas for the proposed method it was 0.24±0.08 cm-1 and 0.12±0.05 cm-1, respectively.

  12. Liquidus temperature and optical properties measurement by containerless techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Collin D.

    1993-01-01

    Reactive alloy liquidus temperatures measured by conventional, contained techniques are often in error due to reactions with containers and gaseous impurities. This paper describes a new liquidus temperature measurement technique that avoids these problems by employing containerless processing. This technique relies on precise and accurate noncontact temperature measurements (NCTM), which are made possible by spectral emissivity values. The spectral emissivities, epsilon(sub lambda), are measured along with the optical properties (real, n, and imaginary, k, components of the index of refraction) using polarimetric techniques on electromagnetically levitated specimens. Results from work done at Vanderbilt University and Intersonics on the Ti-Al system are presented to demonstrate the above techniques.

  13. IR Optics Measurement with Linear Coupling's Action-Angle Parameterization

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Yun; Pilat, Fulvia Caterina; Satogata, Todd; Trbojevic, Dejan

    2005-01-01

    The interaction region (IP) optics are measured with the two DX/BPMs close to the IPs at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The beta functions at IP are measured with the two eigenmodes' phase advances between the two BPMs. And the beta waists are also determined through the beta functions at the two BPMs. The coupling parameters at the IPs are also given through the linear coupling's action-angle parameterization. All the experimental data are taken during the driving oscillations with the AC dipole. The methods to do these measurements are discussed. And the measurement results during the beta*

  14. Enhancing DNA binding rate using optical trapping of high-density gold nanodisks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, En-Hung; Pan, Ming-Yang; Lee, Ming-Chang; Wei, Pei-Kuen

    2014-01-01

    We present the dynamic study of optical trapping of fluorescent molecules using high-density gold nanodisk arrays. The gold nanodisks were fabricated by electron beam lithography with a diameter of 500 nm and a period of 1 μm. Dark-field illumination showed ∼15 times enhancement of fluorescence near edges of nanodisks. Such enhanced near-field generated an optical trapping force of ∼10 fN under 3.58 × 10 3 W/m 2 illumination intensity as calculated from the Brownian motions of 590 nm polystyrene beads. Kinetic observation of thiolated DNA modified with Cy5 dye showed different binding rates of DNA under different illumination intensity. The binding rate increased from 2.14 × 10 3 s −1 (I = 0.7 × 10 3 W/m 2 ) to 1.15 × 10 5 s −1 (I = 3.58 × 10 3 W/m 2 ). Both enhanced fluorescence and binding rate indicate that gold nanodisks efficiently improve both detection limit and interaction time for microarrays

  15. Densities of carbon foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoner, J.O. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The densities of arc-evaporated carbon target foils have been measured by several methods. The density depends upon the method used to measure it; for the same surface density, values obtained by different measurement techniques may differ by fifty percent or more. The most reliable density measurements are by flotation, yielding a density of 2.01±0.03 g cm -3 , and interferometric step height with the surface density known from auxiliary measurements, yielding a density of 2.61±0.4 g cm -3 . The difference between these density values mayy be due in part to the compressive stresses that carbon films have while still on their substrates, uncertainties in the optical calibration of surface densities of carbon foils, and systematic errors in step-height measurements. Mechanical thickness measurements by micrometer caliper are unreliable due to nonplanarity of these foils. (orig.)

  16. Experimental arrangement to measure dispersion in optical fiber devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armas Rivera, Ivan [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Facultad de Ciencias de la Electronica (Mexico); Beltran Perez, Georgina; Castillo Mixcoatl, Juan; Munoz Aguirre, Severino [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Facultad de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas (Mexico); Zaca Moran, Placido, E-mail: ivan_rr1@hotmail.com [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Fisicoquimica de Materiales ICUAP (Mexico)

    2011-01-01

    Dispersion is a quite important parameter in systems based on optical fiber, especially in pulsed emission lasers, where the temporal width is affected by such parameter. Therefore, it is necessary to consider the dispersion provoked by each component in the cavity. There are various experimental interferometric arrangements to evaluate this parameter. Generally, these systems modify the wavelength to obtain information about the n({lambda}) dependency, which is contained in the interferogram phase. However, this makes the system quite slow and it requires tunable and narrow bandwidth laser sources. In the present work, results obtained from an arrangement based on Mach-Zehnder interferometer where one of the arms is the optical fiber under study, while the reference one is air, are presented. In order to determine the n({lambda}) dependency, a wide spectrum light source was used in the wavelength range of interest. The phase information was evaluated from the interferometric signal measured by an optical spectrum analyzer.

  17. Airborne Lidar Measurements of Aerosol Optical Properties During SAFARI-2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, M. J.; Hlavka, D. L.; Hart, W. D.; Welton, E. J.; Campbell, J. R.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) operated onboard the NASA ER-2 high altitude aircraft during the SAFARI-2000 field campaign. The CPL provided high spatial resolution measurements of aerosol optical properties at both 1064 nm and 532 nm. We present here results of planetary boundary layer (PBL) aerosol optical depth analysis and profiles of aerosol extinction. Variation of optical depth and extinction are examined as a function of regional location. The wide-scale aerosol mapping obtained by the CPL is a unique data set that will aid in future studies of aerosol transport. Comparisons between the airborne CPL and ground-based MicroPulse Lidar Network (MPL-Net) sites are shown to have good agreement.

  18. Experimental arrangement to measure dispersion in optical fiber devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armas Rivera, Ivan; Beltran Perez, Georgina; Castillo Mixcoatl, Juan; Munoz Aguirre, Severino; Zaca Moran, Placido

    2011-01-01

    Dispersion is a quite important parameter in systems based on optical fiber, especially in pulsed emission lasers, where the temporal width is affected by such parameter. Therefore, it is necessary to consider the dispersion provoked by each component in the cavity. There are various experimental interferometric arrangements to evaluate this parameter. Generally, these systems modify the wavelength to obtain information about the n(λ) dependency, which is contained in the interferogram phase. However, this makes the system quite slow and it requires tunable and narrow bandwidth laser sources. In the present work, results obtained from an arrangement based on Mach-Zehnder interferometer where one of the arms is the optical fiber under study, while the reference one is air, are presented. In order to determine the n(λ) dependency, a wide spectrum light source was used in the wavelength range of interest. The phase information was evaluated from the interferometric signal measured by an optical spectrum analyzer.

  19. Optical tweezers force measurements to study parasites chemotaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Thomaz, A. A.; Pozzo, L. Y.; Fontes, A.; Almeida, D. B.; Stahl, C. V.; Santos-Mallet, J. R.; Gomes, S. A. O.; Feder, D.; Ayres, D. C.; Giorgio, S.; Cesar, C. L.

    2009-07-01

    In this work, we propose a methodology to study microorganisms chemotaxis in real time using an Optical Tweezers system. Optical Tweezers allowed real time measurements of the force vectors, strength and direction, of living parasites under chemical or other kinds of gradients. This seems to be the ideal tool to perform observations of taxis response of cells and microorganisms with high sensitivity to capture instantaneous responses to a given stimulus. Forces involved in the movement of unicellular parasites are very small, in the femto-pico-Newton range, about the same order of magnitude of the forces generated in an Optical Tweezers. We applied this methodology to investigate the Leishmania amazonensis (L. amazonensis) and Trypanossoma cruzi (T. cruzi) under distinct situations.

  20. All-optical time-resolved measurement of laser energy modulation in a relativistic electron beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Xiang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We propose and demonstrate an all-optical method to measure laser energy modulation in a relativistic electron beam. In this scheme the time-dependent energy modulation generated from the electron-laser interaction in an undulator is converted into time-dependent density modulation with a chicane, which is measured to infer the laser energy modulation. The method, in principle, is capable of simultaneously providing information on femtosecond time scale and 10^{-5} energy scale not accessible with conventional methods. We anticipate that this method may have wide applications in many laser-based advanced beam manipulation techniques.

  1. A Well-mixed, Polymer-based Microbioreactor with Integrated Optical Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Z.; Szita, Nicolas; Boccazzi, P.

    2005-01-01

    . Optical transmission measurements are used for cell density. The body of the reactor is poly(methylmethacrylate) with a thin layer of poly (dimethylsiloxane) for aeration, oxygen diffuses through this gas-permeable membrane into the microbioreactor to support metabolism of bacterial cells. Mixing...... in the reactor is characterized by observation of mixing of dyes and computational fluid dynamics simulations. The oxygenation is described in terms of measured KLa values for microbioreactor, 20–75/h corresponding to increasing stirring speed 200–800 rpm. Escherichia coli cell growth in the microbioreactor...

  2. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN FOVEAL AVASCULAR ZONE AREA, VESSEL DENSITY, AND CYSTOID CHANGES IN DIABETIC RETINOPATHY, AN OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY ANGIOGRAPHY STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarassoly, Kia; Miraftabi, Arezoo; Soltan Sanjari, Mostafa; Parvaresh, Mohammad Mehdi

    2017-06-29

    To measure the foveal avascular zone (FAZ) areas and vessel densities of patients with diabetic retinopathy and to study their relationship with diabetic cystoid changes and retinal thickness. Prospective case series of 51 eyes of 31 patients with diabetic retinopathy. The eyes were grouped based on the presence or absence of cystoid edema and evaluated using optical coherence tomography angiography. The FAZ areas and vessel density were compared. The FAZ area at the superficial capillary plexus level was equal between the eyes with and without cystoid edema. Vessel density did not differ as well. There was no correlation with retinal thickness. In eyes with cystoid changes, FAZ area changes at the deep capillary plexus level were difficult to interpret. The FAZ area and vessel density at the superficial capillary plexus level are reproducible and independent of the presence of cystoid edema.

  3. Measurement of electron density of the plasma in the Tokamak TCABR, through Thomson scattering diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeronimo, Leonardo Cunha

    2013-01-01

    Over the last few years is remarkable, so increasingly evident the need for a new source of energy for mankind. One promising option is through nuclear fusion, where the plasma produced in the reactor can be converted into electrical energy. Therefore, knowing the characteristics of this plasma is very important to control it and understand it so desirable. One of the diagnostic options is called Thomson scattering . This is considered the most reliable method for the determination of important plasma parameters such as temperature and electron density, and may also help in the study and explanation of various internal mechanisms. The great advantage lies in the tact that they consist of a direct measurement and nonperturbative. But it is a diagnosis whose installation and execution is admittedly complex, limiting it only a few laboratories in the fíeld of fusion for the world. Among the main difficulties, wc can highlight the fact that the scattered signal is very small, thus requiring a large increase of the incident power. Moreover, the external physical conditions can cause mechanical vibrations that eliminate or minimize them as much as possible, is a great challenge, considering the optical micrometrically very sensitive and needs involved in the system. This work describes the entire process of installation and operation of Thomson scattering diagnostic in tokamak TCABR and through this diagnosis, we work on results of electron temperature, to finally be able to calculate the electron density of the plasma. (author)

  4. Thickness gauge for the measurement of the density of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leveque, P.; Gasnier, M.; Hours, R.; Jouquet, G.; Rappeneau, J.; Tanguy, J.C.

    1961-01-01

    A thickness gauge was built, based on absorption of Bremsstrahlung generated in a Be target by a ( 90 Sr + 90 Y) β- source. This allows rapid and precise estimation (95 per cent probable error = 0.7 per cent) of the densities in slabs of graphite having a constant thickness of 25 ± 0.05 mm, the diameter of the beam being about 1 cm. Results obtained in this way are presented. (author) [fr

  5. Dynamic steering beams for efficient force measurement in optical manipulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaocong Yuan; Yuquan Zhang; Rui Cao; Xing Zhao; Jing Bu; Siwei Zhu

    2011-01-01

    @@ An efficient and inexpensive method that uses a glass plate mounted onto a motorized rotating stage as a beam-steering device for the generation of dynamic optical traps is reported.Force analysis reveals that there are drag and trapping forces imposed on the bead in the opposite directions, respectively, in a viscous medium.The trapped bead will be rotated following the beam's motion before it reaches the critical escape velocity when the drag force is equal to the optical trapping force.The equilibrium condition facilitates the experimental measurement of the drag force with potential extensions to the determination of the viscosity of the medium or the refractive index of the bead.The proposed technique can easily be integrated into conventional optical microscopic systems with minimum modifications.%An efficient and inexpensive method that uses a glass plate mounted onto a motorized rotating stage as a beam-steering device for the generation of dynamic optical traps is reported. Force analysis reveals that there are drag and trapping forces imposed on the bead in the opposite directions, respectively, in a viscous medium. The trapped bead will be rotated following the beam's motion before it reaches the critical escape velocity when the drag force is equal to the optical trapping force. The equilibrium condition facilitates the experimental measurement of the drag force with potential extensions to the determination of the viscosity of the medium or the refractive index of the bead. The proposed technique can easily be integrated into conventional optical microscopic systems with minimum modifications.

  6. Water absorption length measurement with the ANTARES optical beacon system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yepes-Ramirez, Harold

    2011-01-01

    ANTARES is a neutrino telescope located in the Mediterranean Sea with the aim of detecting high energy neutrinos of extra-terrestrial origin. It consists of a three dimensional array on 12 detection lines of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) able to detect the Cherenkov light induced by muons produced in the interaction of neutrinos with the surrounding water and seabed. To reach the best angular resolution, good time and positioning calibrations are required. The propagation of Cherenkov photons strongly depends on the optical properties of the sea water, which has an impact on the reconstruction efficiency. The determination of the optical parameters, as the absorption and scattering lengths, is crucial to calculate properly the effective area and the angular resolution of the detector. The ANTARES optical beacon system consists of pulsed and fast, well controlled light sources distributed throughout the detector to carry out in situ the relative time calibration of the detector components. In this contribution we show some results on the sea water optical properties and their stability measured with the optical beacon system.

  7. How to obtain traceability on optical radiation measurements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matamoros García, Carlos H.

    2006-02-01

    Traceability to national standards provides confidence in measurements results, granting a guaranty when carrying out governmental rules and when demonstrating conformity with quality requirements such as ISO 9000 or ISO/IEC 17025 (and the Mexican equivalent standards). The appropriate traceability contributes with confidence of the quality of products or services. This paper presents different ways to obtain traceability in Mexico for the optical radiation measurements, mentioning some applications, and highlighting the necessity of having traceability to the appropriate units of the SI. Additionally it present the national standards maintained by Centro Nacional de Metrologia (CENAM), the national metrology institute in Mexico, that give the technical support to Mexican measurements in this field and the international recognition that the personal of the Optics and Radiometry Division had gained in 10 years of development.

  8. Optical measurement of thermal deformation of multilayer optics under synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revesz, P.; Kazimirov, A.; Bazarov, I.

    2007-01-01

    An in situ optical technique to visualize surface distortions of the first monochromator crystal under synchrotron beam heat loading has been developed and applied to measure surface profiles of multilayer optics under white wiggler beam at the CHESS A2 beamline. Two identical multilayer structures deposited on Si and SiC substrates have been tested. Comparison of the reconstructed 3D heatbump profiles showed the surface distortions of the multilayer on SiC a factor of two smaller than the same multilayer on a Si substrate

  9. Optical measurement of thermal deformation of multilayer optics under synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Revesz, P. [Cornell University, CHESS, Ithaca, NY 14850 (United States)], E-mail: pr20@cornell.edu; Kazimirov, A.; Bazarov, I. [Cornell University, CHESS, Ithaca, NY 14850 (United States)

    2007-11-11

    An in situ optical technique to visualize surface distortions of the first monochromator crystal under synchrotron beam heat loading has been developed and applied to measure surface profiles of multilayer optics under white wiggler beam at the CHESS A2 beamline. Two identical multilayer structures deposited on Si and SiC substrates have been tested. Comparison of the reconstructed 3D heatbump profiles showed the surface distortions of the multilayer on SiC a factor of two smaller than the same multilayer on a Si substrate.

  10. Optically measured microvascular blood flow contrast of malignant breast tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regine Choe

    Full Text Available Microvascular blood flow contrast is an important hemodynamic and metabolic parameter with potential to enhance in vivo breast cancer detection and therapy monitoring. Here we report on non-invasive line-scan measurements of malignant breast tumors with a hand-held optical probe in the remission geometry. The probe employs diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS, a near-infrared optical method that quantifies deep tissue microvascular blood flow. Tumor-to-normal perfusion ratios are derived from thirty-two human subjects. Mean (95% confidence interval tumor-to-normal ratio using surrounding normal tissue was 2.25 (1.92-2.63; tumor-to-normal ratio using normal tissues at the corresponding tumor location in the contralateral breast was 2.27 (1.94-2.66, and using normal tissue in the contralateral breast was 2.27 (1.90-2.70. Thus, the mean tumor-to-normal ratios were significantly different from unity irrespective of the normal tissue chosen, implying that tumors have significantly higher blood flow than normal tissues. Therefore, the study demonstrates existence of breast cancer contrast in blood flow measured by DCS. The new, optically accessible cancer contrast holds potential for cancer detection and therapy monitoring applications, and it is likely to be especially useful when combined with diffuse optical spectroscopy/tomography.

  11. Evaluation of measurement precision errors at different bone density values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, M.; Wong, J.; Bartlett, M.; Lee, N.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The precision error commonly used in serial monitoring of BMD values using Dual Energy X Ray Absorptometry (DEXA) is 0.01-0.015g/cm - for both the L2 L4 lumbar spine and total femur. However, this limit is based on normal individuals with bone densities similar to the population mean. The purpose of this study was to systematically evaluate precision errors over the range of bone density values encountered in clinical practice. In 96 patients a BMD scan of the spine and femur was immediately repeated by the same technologist with the patient taken off the bed and repositioned between scans. Nine technologists participated. Values were obtained for the total femur and spine. Each value was classified as low range (0.75-1.05 g/cm ) and medium range (1.05- 1.35g/cm ) for the spine, low range (0.55 0. 85 g/cm ) and medium range (0.85-1.15 g/cm ) for the total femur. Results show that the precision error was significantly lower in the medium range for total femur results with the medium range value at 0.015 g/cm - and the low range at 0.025 g/cm - (p<0.01). No significant difference was found for the spine results. We also analysed precision errors between three technologists and found a significant difference (p=0.05) occurred between only two technologists and this was seen in the spine data only. We conclude that there is some evidence that the precision error increases at the outer limits of the normal bone density range. Also, the results show that having multiple trained operators does not greatly increase the BMD precision error. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  12. Effect of wetting-layer density of states on the gain and phase recovery dynamics of quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jungho; Yu, Bong-Ahn

    2015-01-01

    We numerically investigate the effect of the wetting-layer (WL) density of states on the gain and phase recovery dynamics of quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers in both electrical and optical pumping schemes by solving 1088 coupled rate equations. The temporal variations of the ultrafast gain and phase recovery responses at the ground state (GS) are calculated as a function of the WL density of states. The ultrafast gain recovery responses do not significantly depend on the WL density of states in the electrical pumping scheme and the three optical pumping schemes such as the optical pumping to the WL, the optical pumping to the excited state ensemble, and the optical pumping to the GS ensemble. The ultrafast phase recovery responses are also not significantly affected by the WL density of states except the optical pumping to the WL, where the phase recovery component caused by the WL becomes slowed down as the WL density of states increases. (paper)

  13. Estimation of macular pigment optical density in the elderly: test-retest variability and effect of optical blur in pseudophakic subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gallaher, Kevin T.; Mura, Marco; Todd, Wm Andrew; Harris, Tarsha L.; Kenyon, Emily; Harris, Tamara; Johnson, Karen C.; Satterfield, Suzanne; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Iannaccone, Alessandro

    2007-01-01

    The reproducibility of macular pigment optical density (MPOD) estimates in the elderly was assessed in 40 subjects (age: 79.1+/-3.5). Test-retest variability was good (Pearson's r coefficient: 0.734), with an average coefficient of variation (CV) of 18.4% and an intraclass correlation coefficient

  14. Measurement of optical coupling between adjacent bi-material microcantilevers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canetta, Carlo; Narayanaswamy, Arvind

    2013-10-01

    Low thermal conductance bi-material microcantilevers are fabricated with a pad area near the free end to accommodate a focused laser spot. A pair of such cantilevers are proposed as a configuration for measuring thermal conductance of a nanostructure suspended between the two. We determine the resolution of such a device by measuring the stray conductance it would detect in the absence of any nanostructure. Stray conductance, primarily due to optical coupling, is measured for cantilevers with varying pad size and found to be as low as 0.05 nW K(-1), with cantilevers with larger pad size yielding the smallest stray conductance.

  15. Ultrasonic Transducer Peak-to-Peak Optical Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Skarvada

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Possible optical setups for measurement of the peak-to-peak value of an ultrasonic transducer are described in this work. The Michelson interferometer with the calibrated nanopositioner in reference path and laser Doppler vibrometer were used for the basic measurement of vibration displacement. Langevin type of ultrasonic transducer is used for the purposes of Electro-Ultrasonic Nonlinear Spectroscopy (EUNS. Parameters of produced mechanical vibration have to been well known for EUNS. Moreover, a monitoring of mechanical vibration frequency shift with a mass load and sample-transducer coupling is important for EUNS measurement.

  16. Inverse anisotropic diffusion from power density measurements in two dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monard, François; Bal, Guillaume

    2012-01-01

    This paper concerns the reconstruction of an anisotropic diffusion tensor γ = (γ ij ) 1⩽i,j⩽2 from knowledge of internal functionals of the form γ∇u i · ∇u j with u i for 1 ⩽ i ⩽ I solutions of the elliptic equation ∇ · γ∇u i = 0 on a two-dimensional bounded domain with appropriate boundary conditions. We show that for I = 4 and appropriately chosen boundary conditions, γ may uniquely and stably be reconstructed from such internal functionals, which appear in coupled-physics inverse problems involving the ultrasound modulation of electrical or optical coefficients. Explicit reconstruction procedures for the diffusion tensor are presented and implemented numerically. (paper)

  17. Optical excitation and electron relaxation dynamics at semiconductor surfaces: a combined approach of density functional and density matrix theory applied to the silicon (001) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buecking, N

    2007-11-05

    In this work a new theoretical formalism is introduced in order to simulate the phononinduced relaxation of a non-equilibrium distribution to equilibrium at a semiconductor surface numerically. The non-equilibrium distribution is effected by an optical excitation. The approach in this thesis is to link two conventional, but approved methods to a new, more global description: while semiconductor surfaces can be investigated accurately by density-functional theory, the dynamical processes in semiconductor heterostructures are successfully described by density matrix theory. In this work, the parameters for density-matrix theory are determined from the results of density-functional calculations. This work is organized in two parts. In Part I, the general fundamentals of the theory are elaborated, covering the fundamentals of canonical quantizations as well as the theory of density-functional and density-matrix theory in 2{sup nd} order Born approximation. While the formalism of density functional theory for structure investigation has been established for a long time and many different codes exist, the requirements for density matrix formalism concerning the geometry and the number of implemented bands exceed the usual possibilities of the existing code in this field. A special attention is therefore attributed to the development of extensions to existing formulations of this theory, where geometrical and fundamental symmetries of the structure and the equations are used. In Part II, the newly developed formalism is applied to a silicon (001)surface in a 2 x 1 reconstruction. As first step, density-functional calculations using the LDA functional are completed, from which the Kohn-Sham-wave functions and eigenvalues are used to calculate interaction matrix elements for the electron-phonon-coupling an the optical excitation. These matrix elements are determined for the optical transitions from valence to conduction bands and for electron-phonon processes inside the

  18. Electro-optic measurement of terahertz pulse energy distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, J.H.; Gallacher, J.G.; Brussaard, G.J.H.; Lemos, N.; Issac, R.; Huang, Z.X.; Dias, J.M.; Jaroszynski, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    An accurate and direct measurement of the energy distribution of a low repetition rate terahertz electromagnetic pulse is challenging because of the lack of sensitive detectors in this spectral range. In this paper, we show how the total energy and energy density distribution of a terahertz

  19. A straightforward method for measuring the range of apparent density of microplastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lingyun; Li, Mengmeng; Deng, Hua; Cai, Li; Cai, Huiwen; Yan, Beizhan; Hu, Jun; Shi, Huahong

    2018-10-15

    Density of microplastics has been regarded as the primary property that affect the distribution and bioavailability of microplastics in the water column. For measuring the density of microplastis, we developed a simple and rapid method based on density gradient solutions. In this study, we tested four solvents to make the density gradient solutions, i.e., ethanol (0.8 g/cm 3 ), ultrapure water (1.0 g/cm 3 ), saturated NaI (1.8 g/cm 3 ) and ZnCl 2 (1.8 g/cm 3 ). Density of microplastics was measured via observing the float or sink status in the density gradient solutions. We found that density gradient solutions made from ZnCl 2 had a larger uncertainty in measuring density than that from NaI, most likely due to a higher surface tension of ZnCl 2 solution. Solutions made from ethanol, ultrapure water, and NaI showed consistent density results with listed densities of commercial products, indicating that these density gradient solutions were suitable for measuring microplastics with a density range of 0.8-1.8 g/cm 3 . Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. MOVPE grown InGaAs quantum dots of high optical quality as seed layer for low-density InP quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, D; Hafenbrak, R; Joens, K D; Schulz, W-M; Eichfelder, M; Rossbach, R; Jetter, M; Michler, P

    2010-01-01

    To achieve a low density of optically active InP-quantum dots we used InGaAs islands embedded in GaAs as a seed layer. First, the structural InGaAs quantum dot properties and the influence of the annealing technique was investigated by atomic force microscope measurements. High-resolution micro-photoluminescence spectra reveal narrow photoluminescence lines, with linewidths down to 11 μeV and fine structure splittings of 25 μeV. Furthermore, using these InGaAs quantum dots as seed layer reduces the InP quantum dot density of optically active quantum dots drastically. InP quantum dot excitonic photoluminescence emission with a linewidth of 140 μeV has been observed.